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Sample records for 111in labeled morab-009

  1. Recognition of Mesothelin by the Therapeutic Antibody MORAb-009

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jichun; Tang, Wai Kwan; Esser, Lothar; Pastan, Ira; Xia, Di

    2012-01-01

    Mesothelin is a tumor differentiation antigen that is highly expressed in many epithelial cancers, with limited expression in normal human tissues. Binding of mesothelin on normal mesothelial cells lining the pleura or peritoneum to the tumor-associated cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) can lead to heterotypic cell adhesion and tumor metastasis within the pleural and peritoneal cavities. This binding can be prevented by MORAb-009, a humanized monoclonal antibody against mesothelin currently under clinical trials. We show here that MORAb-009 recognizes a non-linear epitope that is contained in the first 64-residue fragment of the mesothelin. We further demonstrate that the recognition is independent of glycosylation state of the protein but sensitive to the loss of a disulfide bond linking residues Cys-7 and Cys-31. The crystal structure of the complex between the mesothelin N-terminal fragment and Fab of MORAb-009 at 2.6 Å resolution reveals an epitope encompassing multiple secondary structural elements of the mesothelin, including residues from helix α1, the loops linking helices α1 and α2, and between helices α4 and α5. The mesothelin fragment has a compact, right-handed superhelix structure consisting of five short helices and connecting loops. A residue essential for complex formation has been identified as Phe-22, which projects its side chain into a hydrophobic niche formed on the antibody recognition surface upon antigen-antibody contact. The overlapping binding footprints of both the monoclonal antibody and the cancer antigen CA-125 explains the therapeutic effect and provides a basis for further antibody improvement. PMID:22787150

  2. Development of 111In-labeled porphyrins for SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Shaghayegh; Mirzaei, Mohammad; Rahimi, Mohammad; Jalilian, Amir R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this research was the development of 111In-labeled porphyrins as possible radiopharmaceuticals for the imaging of tumors. Methods: Ligands, 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis (3, 5-dihydroxyphenyl) porphyrin) (TDHPP), 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis (4-hydroxyphenyl) porphyrin (THPP) and 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis (3,4-dimethoxyphenyl) porphyrin) (TDMPP) were labeled with 111InCl3 (produced from proton bombardment of natCd target) in 60 min at 80 ºC. Quality control of labeled compounds was performed via RTLC and HPLC followed by stability studies in final formulation and presence of human serum at 37 ºC for 48 h as well as partition coefficient determination. The biodistribution studies performed using tissue dissection and SPECT imaging up to 24h. Results: The complexes were prepared with more than 99% radiochemical purity (HPLC and RTLC) and high stability to 48 h. Partition coefficients (calculated as log P) for 111In-TDHPP, 111In-THPP and 111In-TDMPP were 0.88, 0.8 and 1.63 respectively. Conclusion: Due to urinary excretion with fast clearance for 111In-TDMPP, this complex is probably a suitable candidate for considering as a possible tumor imaging agent. PMID:27408865

  3. sup 111 In-labeled nonspecific immunoglobulin scanning in the detection of focal infection

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, R.H.; Fischman, A.J.; Callahan, R.J.; Khaw, B.A.; Keech, F.; Ahmad, M.; Wilkinson, R.; Strauss, H.W. )

    1989-10-05

    We performed radionuclide scanning after the intravenous injection of human IgG labeled with indium-111 in 128 patients with suspected focal sites of inflammation. Localization of 111In-labeled IgG correlated with clinical findings in 51 infected patients (21 with abdominal or pelvic infections, 11 with intravascular infections, 7 with pulmonary infections, and 12 with skeletal infections). Infecting organisms included gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, Pneumocystis carinii, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Candida albicans. No focal localization of 111In-labeled IgG was observed in 63 patients without infection. There were five false negative results, and nine results were unusable. Serial scans were carried out in eight patients: continued localization correctly predicted relapse in six, and the absence of localization indicated resolution in two. To determine whether 111In-labeled IgG localization was specific for inflammation, we studied 16 patients with cancer. Focal localization occurred in 13 of these patients (5 with melanomas, 5 with gynecologic cancers, and 1 each with lymphoma, prostate cancer, and malignant fibrous histiocytoma). No localization was seen in patients with renal or colon cancer or metastatic medullary carcinoma of the thyroid. We conclude that 111In-labeled IgG imaging is effective for the detection of focal infection and that serial scans may be useful in assessing therapeutic efficacy. This technique may also be helpful in the evaluation of certain cancers.

  4. Evaluation of [111In]-Labeled Zinc-Dipicolylamine Tracers for SPECT Imaging of Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Douglas R.; Plaunt, Adam J.; Turkyilmaz, Serhan; Smith, Miles; Wang, Yuzhen; Rusckowski, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study prepared three structurally related zinc-dipicolylamine (ZnDPA) tracers with [111In] labels and conducted biodistribution and SPECT/CT imaging studies of a mouse leg infection model. Methods Two monovalent tracers, ZnDPA-[111In]DTPA and ZnDPA-[111In]DOTA, each with a single zinc-dipicolylamine targeting unit, and a divalent tracer, Bis(ZnDPA)-[111In]DTPA,with two zinc-dipicolylamine units were prepared. Organ biodistribution and SPECT/CT imaging studies were performed on living mice with a leg infection created by injection of clinically relevant Gram positive Streptococcus pyogenes. Fluorescent and luminescent Eu3+-labeled versions of these tracers were also prepared and used to measure relative affinity for the exterior membrane surface of bacterial cells and mimics of healthy mammalian cells. Results All three 111In-labeled radiotracers were prepared with radiopurity > 90%. The biodistribution studies showed that the two monovalent tracers were cleared from the body through the liver and kidney, with retained % injected dose for all organs of < 8 % at 20 hours and infected leg T/NT ratio of ≤ 3.0. Clearance of the divalent tracer from the bloodstream was slower and primarily through the liver, with a retained % injected dose for all organs < 37% at 20 hours and T/NT ratio rising to 6.2 after 20 hours. The SPECT/CT imaging indicated the same large difference in tracer pharmacokinetics and higher accumulation of the divalent tracer at the site of infection. Conclusions All three [111In]-ZnDPA tracers selectively targeted the site of a clinically relevant mouse infection model that could not be discerned by visual external inspection of the living animal. The highest target selectivity, observed with a divalent tracer equipped with two zinc-dipicolylamine targeting units, compares quite favorably with the imaging selectivities previously reported for other nuclear tracers that target bacterial cell surfaces. The tracer pharmacokinetics depended

  5. Preoperative clinical radioimmunodetection of pancreatic cancer by 111 In-labeled chimeric monoclonal antibody Nd2.

    PubMed

    Sawada, T; Nishihara, T; Yamamoto, A; Teraoka, H; Yamashita, Y; Okamura, T; Ochi, H; Ho, J J; Kim, Y S; Hirakawa, K

    1999-10-01

    The present study was carried out with the purpose of evaluating the clinical usefulness of radioimmunodetection (RAID) with 111In-labeled murine/human chimeric monoclonal antibody, Nd2 (c-Nd2) in patients with pancreatic cancer. Nineteen patients suspected to have pancreatic cancer were administered intravenously 74 MBq/2 mg 111In-labeled c-Nd2 in 100 ml of saline containing 2% albumin over 30 min. A scintigram was obtained on the 3rd day after infusion by using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. Of the 14 patients finally diagnosed as having pancreatic cancer on the basis of surgical specimens or progress of disease, specific focal uptake at the site of the tumor was detected in 12 (true positive cases), representing a sensitivity of 85.7% (12/14), and liver metastasis was found in one case with metastasis. Of the 5 patients diagnosed with tumor-forming pancreatitis (TFP), 4 patients demonstrated true negative imaging, but one patient whose tumor demonstrated interesting findings in histology and immunostaining, showed false positive imaging. Of patients investigated for human anti-chimeric antibody (HACA) response, none showed HACA response, and no allergic reaction was seen in any of the patients administered c-Nd2. These results suggest that RAID with 11In-labeled c-Nd2 is useful for differential preoperative diagnosis between invasive pancreatic cancer and TFP. PMID:10595748

  6. Kinetics and sites of destruction of /sup 111/In-oxine-labeled platelets in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: a quantitative study

    SciTech Connect

    Heyns, A.D.; Loetter, M.G.; Badenhorst, P.N.; de Kock, F.; Pieters, H.; Herbst, C.; van Reenen, O.R.; Kotze, H.; Minnaar, P.C.

    1982-04-01

    Kinetics and quantification of the sites of destruction of /sup 111/In-oxine-labeled autologous platelets were investigated in eight patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. The mean platelet count was 17 +/- 9 X 10(9)/liter; platelets were separated by differential centrifugation and labeled with 5.6 +/- 2.5 MBq /sup 111/In. Whole body and organ /sup 111/In-platelet distribution was quantitated with a scintillation camera and a computer-assisted imaging system acquisition matrix. Areas of interest were selected with the computer and organ /sup 111/In-radioactivity expressed as a percentage of whole body activity. Mean platelet survival was 49.5 +/- 29.6 hr and the survival curves were exponential. Equilibrium percentage organ /sup 111/In-radioactivity was (normal values in parentheses): spleen 33.7 +/- 8.8 (31.1 +/- 10.2); liver 16.1 +/- 9.5 (13.1 +/- 1.3); thorax 22.8 +/- 3.7 (28.2 +/- 5.6). Percentage organ /sup 111/In-activity at the time when labeled platelets had disappeared from the circulation was: spleen 44.5 +/- 16.4 (40 +/- 16); liver 16.0 +/- 11.5 (32.4 +/- 7.2); thorax 19.7 +/- 6.0 (17.7 +/- 10.3). Thorax activity corresponds to bone marrow radioactivity. Three patterns of platelet sequestration were evident. Three patients had mainly splenic sequestration, two mainly hepatic sequestration, and three diffuse reticuloendothelial system sequestration with a major component of platelets destroyed in the bone marrow. Splenectomy was performed in two patients. The pattern of /sup 111/In-platelet sequestration was not predictive of response of glucocorticoid therapy or indicative of the necessity for splenectomy. Quantitative /sup 111/In-labeled autologous platelet kinetic studies provide a new tool for the investigation of platelet disorders.U

  7. Platelet turnover and kinetics in immune thrombocytopenic purpura: results with autologous 111In-labeled platelets and homologous 51Cr-labeled platelets differ

    SciTech Connect

    Heyns A du, P.; Badenhorst, P.N.; Loetter, M.G.P.; Pieters, H.; Wessels, P.; Kotze, H.F.

    1986-01-01

    Mean platelet survival and turnover were simultaneously determined with autologous 111In-labeled platelets (111In-AP) and homologous 51Cr-labeled platelets (51Cr-HP) in ten patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). In vivo redistribution of the 111In-AP was quantitated with a scintillation camera and computer-assisted image analysis. The patients were divided into two groups: those with splenic platelet sequestration (spleen-liver 111In activity ratio greater than 1.4), and those with diffuse sequestration in the reticuloendothelial system. The latter patients had more severe ITP reflected by pronounced thrombocytopenia, decreased platelet turnover, and prominent early hepatic platelet sequestration. Mean platelet life span estimated with 51Cr-HP was consistently shorter than that of 111In-AP. Platelet turnover determined with 51Cr-HP was thus over-estimated. The difference in results with the two isotope labels was apparently due to greater in vivo elution of 51Cr. Although the limitations of the techniques should be taken into account, these findings indicate that platelet turnover is not always normal or increased in ITP, but is low in severe disease. We suggest that this may be ascribed to damage to megakaryocytes by antiplatelet antibody. The physical characteristics in 111In clearly make this radionuclide superior to 51Cr for the study of platelet kinetics in ITP.

  8. Improved labelling of DTPA- and DOTA-conjugated peptides and antibodies with 111In in HEPES and MES buffer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In single photon emission computed tomography [SPECT], high specific activity of 111In-labelled tracers will allow administration of low amounts of tracer to prevent receptor saturation and/or side effects. To increase the specific activity, we studied the effect of the buffer used during the labelling procedure: NaAc, NH4Ac, HEPES and MES buffer. The effect of the ageing of the 111InCl3 stock and cadmium contamination, the decay product of 111In, was also examined in these buffers. Methods Escalating amounts of 111InCl3 were added to 1 μg of the diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid [DTPA]- and 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid [DOTA]-conjugated compounds (exendin-3, octreotide and anti-carbonic anhydrase IX [CAIX] antibody). Five volumes of 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid [MES], 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid [HEPES], NH4Ac or NaAc (0.1 M, pH 5.5) were added. After 20 min at 20°C (DTPA-conjugated compounds), at 95°C (DOTA-exendin-3 and DOTA-octreotide) or at 45°C (DOTA-anti-CAIX antibody), the labelling efficiency was determined by instant thin layer chromatography. The effect of the ageing of the 111InCl3 stock on the labelling efficiency of DTPA-exendin-3 as well as the effect of increasing concentrations of Cd2+ (the decay product of 111In) were also examined. Results Specific activities obtained for DTPA-octreotide and DOTA-anti-CAIX antibody were five times higher in MES and HEPES buffer. Radiolabelling of DTPA-exendin-3, DOTA-exendin-3 and DTPA-anti-CAIX antibody in MES and HEPES buffer resulted in twofold higher specific activities than that in NaAc and NH4Ac. Labelling of DTPA-exendin-3 decreased with 66% and 73% for NaAc and NH4Ac, respectively, at day 11 after the production date of 111InCl3, while for MES and HEPES, the maximal decrease in the specific activity was 10% and 4% at day 11, respectively. The presence of 1 pM Cd2+ in the labelling mixture of DTPA-exendin-3 in NaAc and NH4Ac

  9. Multimodality Molecular Imaging of [18F]-Fluorinated Carboplatin Derivative Encapsulated in [111In]-Labeled Liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamichhane, Narottam

    -(5-fluoro-pentyl)-2-methyl malonic acid as the labeling agent to coordinate with the cisplatin aqua complex. It was then used to treat various cell lines and compared with cisplatin and carboplatin at different concentrations ranging from 0.001 microM to 100 microM for 72 hrs and 96 hrs. IC50 values calculated from cell viability indicated that 19F-FCP is a more potent drug than Carboplatin. Manual radiosynthesis and characterization of [18F]-FCP was performed using [18F]-2-(5-fluoro-pentyl)-2-methyl malonic acid with coordination with cisplatin aqua complex. Automated radiosynthesis of [18F]-FCP was optimized using the manual synthetic procedures and using them as macros for the radiosynthesizer. [18F]-FCP was evaluated in vivo with detailed biodistribution studies and PET imaging in normal and KB 3-1 and KB 8-5 tumor xenograft bearing nude mice. The biodistribution studies and PET imaging of [18F]-FCP showed major uptake in kidneys which attributes to the renal clearance of radiotracer. In vivo plasma and urine stability demonstrated intact [18F]-FCP. [ 111In]-Labeled Liposomes was synthesized and physiochemical properties were assessed with DLS. [111In]-Labeled Liposome was evaluated in vivo with detailed pharmacokinetic studies and SPECT imaging. The biodistribution and ROI analysis from SPECT imaging showed the spleen and liver uptake of [111In]-Labeled Liposome and subsequent clearance of activity with time. [18F]-FCP encapsulated [111In]-Labeled Liposome was developed and physiochemical properties were characterized with DLS. [18F]-FCP encapsulated [111In]-Labeled Liposome was used for in vivo dual tracer PET and SPECT imaging from the same nanoconstruct in KB 3-1 (sensitive) and COLO 205 (resistant) tumor xenograft bearing nude mice. PET imaging of [18F]-FCP in KB 3-1 (sensitive) and COLO 205 (resistant) tumor xenograft bearing nude mice was performed. Naked [18F]-FCP and [18F]-FCP encapsulated [ 111In]-Labeled Liposome showed different pharmacokinetic profiles. PET

  10. Determining the minimum number of detectable cardiac-transplanted 111In-tropolone-labelled bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells by SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yuan; Kong, Huafu; Stodilka, Rob Z.; Wells, R. Glenn; Zabel, Pamela; Merrifield, Peter A.; Sykes, Jane; Prato, Frank S.

    2005-10-01

    In this work, we determined the minimum number of detectable 111In-tropolone-labelled bone-marrow-derived stem cells from the maximum activity per cell which did not affect viability, proliferation and differentiation, and the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of 111In by SPECT. Canine bone marrow mesenchymal cells were isolated, cultured and expanded. A number of samples, each containing 5 × 106 cells, were labelled with 111In-tropolone from 0.1 to 18 MBq, and cell viability was measured afterwards for each sample for 2 weeks. To determine the MDA, the anthropomorphic torso phantom (DataSpectrum Corporation, Hillsborough, NC) was used. A point source of 202 kBq 111In was placed on the surface of the heart compartment, and the phantom and all compartments were then filled with water. Three 111In SPECT scans (duration: 16, 32 and 64 min; parameters: 128 × 128 matrix with 128 projections over 360°) were acquired every three days until the 111In radioactivity decayed to undetectable quantities. 111In SPECT images were reconstructed using OSEM with and without background, scatter or attenuation corrections. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the reconstructed image was calculated, and MDA was set equal to the 111In activity corresponding to a CNR of 4. The cells had 100% viability when incubated with no more than 0.9 MBq of 111In (80% labelling efficiency), which corresponded to 0.14 Bq per cell. Background correction improved the detection limits for 111In-tropolone-labelled cells. The MDAs for 16, 32 and 64 min scans with background correction were observed to be 1.4 kBq, 700 Bq and 400 Bq, which implies that, in the case where the location of the transplantation is known and fixed, as few as 10 000, 5000 and 2900 cells respectively can be detected.

  11. In situ 111In-doping for achieving biocompatible and non-leachable 111In-labeled Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jianfeng; Jia, Bing; Qiao, Ruirui; Wang, Chao; Jing, Lihong; Wang, Fan; Gao, Mingyuan

    2014-02-28

    The present study reports a new approach for synthesizing (111)In-radiolabeled biocompatible Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Radioactive (111)In is doped in situ into the lattice of Fe3O4 nanoparticles to achieve robust radiolabeling for accurately tracing PEGylated Fe3O4 particles in vivo. PMID:24430864

  12. Hyperthermia enhances localization of sup 111 In-labeled hapten to bifunctional antibody in human colon tumor xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Gridley, D.S.; Ewart, K.L.; Cao, J.D.; Stickney, D.R. )

    1991-03-01

    A unique bifunctional antibody (BFA) delivery system was examined for radiolocalization and distribution following hyperthermia (41.5 degrees C, 45 min) of T380h human colon tumor xenografts. The BFA is an F(ab')2 fragment made by combining two murine monoclonal antibodies with different specificities, one directed against carcinoembryonic antigen (monoclonal antibody CEM 231) and the other (monoclonal antibody CHA 255) against a hapten found on a derivative of 111In-labeled benzyl-EDTA (EOTUBE). This BFA is known as CEM/CHA. The CEM/CHA accumulates in carcinoembryonic antigen-expressing tissue and clears from normal tissues prior to administration of the radiolabeled hapten. T380h tumor chunks were injected s.c. into 31 nude mice. Two weeks later mean tumor volume was 352 mm3 and the animals were assigned to one of four groups: (a) CEM/CHA + hyperthermia + 111In-EOTUBE; (b) CHA 255 F(ab')2 + hyperthermia + 111In-EOTUBE, and (c and d) treated in the same manner as a and b, respectively, but without heat. The CEM/CHA, CHA 255 F(ab')2, and 111In-labeled hapten were injected i.p. at 14 micrograms, 7 micrograms, and 140-200 microCi/mouse, respectively. The hyperthermia was administered 22-24 h after BFA and the radiolabeled hapten was injected 2 h later. Twenty-four h thereafter, the animals were euthanized for testing. A significantly greater percentage of injected radioactivity localized within heated compared to unheated tumors in mice given CEM/CHA and 111In-EOTUBE (7.39%/g tumor and 4.46%/tumor versus 2.72%/g tumor and 1.44%/tumor, respectively). The percentage of kidney activity in mice given CHA 255 F(ab')2 fragments and heat was 57% lower than in the nonheated group when expressed on a per g basis (12.73 and 22.20%, respectively). Microautoradiography showed greater radiolocalization in heated tumors than in nonheated control tumors of comparable size.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of internally labeled monoclonal antibodies as a gold standard: comparison of biodistribution of /sup 75/Se-, /sup 111/In-, and /sup 125/I-labeled monoclonal antibodies in osteogenic sarcoma xenografts in nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, M.; Endo, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Saga, T.; Sakahara, H.; Konishi, J.; Yamamuro, T.; Toyama, S.

    1989-04-01

    In order to know the true biodistribution of anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies, three monoclonal antibodies (OST6, OST7, and OST15) against human osteosarcoma and control antibody were internally labeled with 75Se by incubating (75Se)methionine and hybridoma cells. 75Se-labeled monoclonal antibodies were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using the human osteogenic sarcoma cell line KT005, and the results were compared with those of 125I- and 111In-labeled antibodies. 75Se-, 125I- and 111In-labeled monoclonal antibodies had identical binding activities to KT005 cells, and the immunoreactivity was in the decreasing order of OST6, OST7, and OST15. On the contrary, in vivo tumor uptake (% injected dose/g) of 75Se- and 125I-labeled antibodies assessed using nude mice bearing human osteosarcoma KT005 was in the order of OST7, OST6, and OST15. In the case of 111In, the order was OST6, OST7, and OST15. High liver uptake was similarly seen with 75Se- and 111In-labeled antibodies, whereas 125I-labeled antibodies showed the lowest tumor and liver uptake. These data indicate that tumor targeting of antibody conjugates are not always predictable from cell binding studies due to the difference of blood clearance of labeled antibodies. Furthermore, biodistribution of both 111In- and 125I-labeled antibodies are not identical with internally labeled antibody. Admitting that internally labeled antibody is a ''gold standard'' of biodistribution of monoclonal antibody, high liver uptake of 111In-radiolabeled antibodies may be inherent to antibodies. Little, if any, increase in tumor-to-normal tissue ratios of antibody conjugates will be expected compared to those of 111In-labeled antibodies if stably coupled conjugates are administered i.v.

  14. Evaluation of 111In-labeled Anginex as Potential SPECT Tracer for Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Van Mourik, Tiemen R; Läppchen, Tilman; Rossin, Raffaella; Van Beijnum, Judy R; Macdonald, John R; Mayo, Kevin H; Griffioen, Arjan W; Nicolay, Klaas; Grüll, Holger

    2015-11-01

    Angiogenesis is a prerequisite for solid tumors to grow and metastasize, providing oxygen and nutrients to the tumor site. The protein galectin-1 has been identified to be overexpressed on tumor vasculature and represents an interesting target for anti-angiogenic therapy, as well as in molecular imaging. Therefore, the galectin-1-binding peptide Anginex was modified for radiolabeling using (111)In. In vitro, (111)In-Ax showed significantly more binding to galectin-1-positive EC-RF24 and MDA-MB-231-LITG cells than to galectin-1-negative LS174T cells and association with EC-RF24 cells was reduced in the presence of excess native Anginex. However, ex vivo biodistribution profiles showed little tumor uptake of (111)In-Ax and extensive accumulation in non-target organs. Although this study shows the ease of modification of the therapeutic peptide Anginex and favorable characteristics in vitro, in vivo assessment of the tracer revealed negligible tumor targeting. Hence, the strategy we employed lends little support for successful non-invasive imaging of tumor angiogenesis using this peptide. PMID:26504018

  15. Imaging of carbonic anhydrase IX with an 111In-labeled dual-motif inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xing; Minn, Il; Rowe, Steven P; Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Gorin, Michael A; Brummet, Mary; Lee, Hye Soo; Koo, Soo Min; Sysa-Shah, Polina; Mease, Ronnie C; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Allaf, Mohamad E; Pomper, Martin G

    2015-10-20

    We developed a new scaffold for radionuclide-based imaging and therapy of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) targeting carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX). Compound XYIMSR-01, a DOTA-conjugated, bivalent, low-molecular-weight ligand, has two moieties that target two separate sites on CAIX, imparting high affinity. We synthesized [111In]XYIMSR-01 in 73.8-75.8% (n = 3) yield with specific radioactivities ranging from 118 - 1,021 GBq/μmol (3,200-27,600 Ci/mmol). Single photon emission computed tomography of [111In]XYIMSR-01 in immunocompromised mice bearing CAIX-expressing SK-RC-52 tumors revealed radiotracer uptake in tumor as early as 1 h post-injection. Biodistribution studies demonstrated 26% injected dose per gram of radioactivity within tumor at 1 h. Tumor-to-blood, muscle and kidney ratios were 178.1 ± 145.4, 68.4 ± 29.0 and 1.7 ± 1.2, respectively, at 24 h post-injection. Retention of radioactivity was exclusively observed in tumors by 48 h, the latest time point evaluated. The dual targeting strategy to engage CAIX enabled specific detection of ccRCC in this xenograft model, with pharmacokinetics surpassing those of previously described radionuclide-based probes against CAIX. PMID:26418876

  16. Imaging of carbonic anhydrase IX with an 111In-labeled dual-motif inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven P.; Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Gorin, Michael A.; Brummet, Mary; Lee, Hye Soo; Koo, Soo Min; Sysa-Shah, Polina; Mease, Ronnie C.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Allaf, Mohamad E.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a new scaffold for radionuclide-based imaging and therapy of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) targeting carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX). Compound XYIMSR-01, a DOTA-conjugated, bivalent, low-molecular-weight ligand, has two moieties that target two separate sites on CAIX, imparting high affinity. We synthesized [111In]XYIMSR-01 in 73.8–75.8% (n = 3) yield with specific radioactivities ranging from 118 – 1,021 GBq/μmol (3,200–27,600 Ci/mmol). Single photon emission computed tomography of [111In]XYIMSR-01 in immunocompromised mice bearing CAIX-expressing SK-RC-52 tumors revealed radiotracer uptake in tumor as early as 1 h post-injection. Biodistribution studies demonstrated 26% injected dose per gram of radioactivity within tumor at 1 h. Tumor-to-blood, muscle and kidney ratios were 178.1 ± 145.4, 68.4 ± 29.0 and 1.7 ± 1.2, respectively, at 24 h post-injection. Retention of radioactivity was exclusively observed in tumors by 48 h, the latest time point evaluated. The dual targeting strategy to engage CAIX enabled specific detection of ccRCC in this xenograft model, with pharmacokinetics surpassing those of previously described radionuclide-based probes against CAIX. PMID:26418876

  17. Kit for the preparation of (111)In-labeled pertuzumab injection for imaging response of HER2-positive breast cancer to trastuzumab (Herceptin).

    PubMed

    Lam, Karen; Scollard, Deborah A; Chan, Conrad; Levine, Mark N; Reilly, Raymond M

    2014-10-23

    We previously reported that (111)In-labeled pertuzumab imaged trastuzumab (Herceptin)-mediated changes in HER2 expression preclinically in breast cancer tumors. To advance (111)In-labeled pertuzumab to a Phase I/II clinical trial, a kit was designed for preparing this agent in a form suitable for human administration. Unit-dose kits containing pertuzumab modified with 2-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (BzDTPA) were prepared that labeled to high efficiency (>90%) with (111)In and met specifications for pharmaceutical quality. The kits were stable for 4 months and the final radiopharmaceutical was stable for 24h. Imaging studies demonstrated high and specific uptake in HER2-positive tumors in mice using this clinical kit formulation. PMID:25464190

  18. Simultaneous administration of 111In-human immunoglobulin and 99mTc-HMPAO labelled leucocytes in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Mairal, L; de Lima, P A; Martin-Comin, J; Baliellas, C; Xiol, X; Roca, M; Ricart, Y; Ramos, M

    1995-07-01

    Technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) labelled leucocytes and indium-111 polyclonal immunoglobulin (IgG) were simultaneously injected into a group of 27 patients routinely referred for the investigation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Ten-minute anterior abdomen and tail on detector views were obtained at 30 min, 4 h and 24 h p.i. of both tracers. The diagnosis of IBD was obtained in all cases by endoscopy with biopsy and/or surgery. Images were blindly evaluated by two experienced observers who only knew of the clinical suspicion of IBD. IBD was confirmed in 20 patients (12 with Crohn's disease and eight with ulcerative colitis). Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 100%, 85% and 96% respectively for labelled leucocytes and 70%, 85% and 74% for IgG. Both IgG and leucocyte scans were normal in six out of seven patients in whom a diagnosis of IBD was excluded; the remaining patient, with ischaemic colitis, was falsely positive with both agents. As far as disease extension is concerned, the IgG study localized 27 diseased segments, whereas 49 were seen with the leucocyte study. Eighty-four segments were normal and 25 showed tracer uptake with both agents. Twenty-four were positive only with the leucocyte study and two were positive only with the IgG study. Agreement between the agents was 80.7%. These results confirm that 111In-human polyclonal scintigraphy is less sensitive than 99mTc-HMPAO scintigraphy both for the diagnosis of IBD and in the evaluation of disease extension. Nevertheless, if leucocyte labelling is not available, labelled IgG can be used only for diagnostic purposes. PMID:7498228

  19. Kinetics and distribution of /sup 111/In-labeled platelets in patients with homocystinuria

    SciTech Connect

    Hill-Zobel, R.L.; Pyeritz, R.E.; Scheffel, U.

    1982-09-23

    Homocystinuria is an inborn error of metabolism involving a high incidence of thromboembolism. It sometimes improves with large doses of pyridoxine. We investigated the kinetics and distribution of /sup 111/Indoxine-labeled platelets in 11 normal volunteers and 12 patients with homocystinuria, none of whom had clinical evidence of acute thrombosis at the time of the study. Six of the patients were resistant to pyridoxine and had homocystinemia. There were no statistical differences in mean platelet-survival times between pyridoxine responders and nonresponders or between normal subjects and pyridoxine responders or nonresponders, regardless of whether a linear, exponential, or multiple-hit model was used to analyze the kinetic data. Plasma homocystine levels had no apparent effect on mean platelet-survival time. There was no abnormal accumulation of platelets in any of the patients, and the distribution of platelets in liver and spleen was similar to that in normal subjects. Our results suggest that the kinetics and distribution of platelets in patients with homocystinuria who have no clinical evidence of thromboembolism are normal. Thus, the data do not provide evidence for disordered platelet function or for an ongoing interaction of platelets with vessel walls in this condition.

  20. 111 In-labeled leukocytes in the detection of prosthetic vascular graft infections

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, M.R.; Boyd, C.M.; Read, R.C.; Thompson, B.W.; Barnes, R.W.; Shah, H.R.; Balachandran, S.; Ferris, E.J.

    1986-07-01

    Making a clinical diagnosis of infection in prosthetic vascular grafts is difficult but when undiagnosed, this condition has a high mortality rate. Using Indium-111-labeled white-blood cells, 30 scans were performed in 21 patients suspected of having a prosthetic graft infection. The diagnosis of infected graft was confirmed by surgery in all cases, and lack of infection was established by resolution of symptoms with conservative therapy. Twenty-four hour scans of autologous Indium-111 leukocytes were obtained, and correlative CT studies were done in 11 cases. There were 13 infected grafts at surgery (purulent material present), and scans were positive in all (100% sensitivity); of 17 scans, there were 15 true negatives and two false positives (88% specificity). Using the criteria of gas or fluid around the graft, the sensitivity of CT was only 37% in a small subset of these patients. One-half of the cases in which infection was suspected clinically had no infection and had negative scans. Various types of grafts and graft materials were used, and there was no correlation with presence or absence of infection on the basis of the type of graft. Extragraft infection sites were found in five patients. In conclusion, use of Indium-111 leukocytes has been found to be an accurate and valuable diagnostic method for evaluation of suspected prosthetic vascular graft infection, and to have higher diagnostic accuracy than CT.

  1. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of111In-DTPA-labelled pegylated liposomes in a human tumour xenograft model: implications for novel targeting strategies

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, K J; Rowlinson-Busza, G; Syrigos, K N; Uster, P S; Abra, R M; Stewart, J S W

    2000-01-01

    The biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of111In-DTPA-labelled pegylated liposomes in tumour-bearing nude mice was studied to examine possible applications of pegylated liposome-targeted anti-cancer therapies. Nude mice received an intravenous injection of 100 μl of111In-DTPA-labelled pegylated liposomes, containing 0.37–0.74 MBq of activity. The t 1/2α and t 1/2β of111In-DTPA-labelled pegylated liposomes were 1.1 and 10.3 h, respectively. Tumour uptake was maximal at 24 h at 5.5 ± 3.0% ID g–1. Significant reticuloendothelial system uptake was demonstrated with 19.3 ± 2.8 and 18.8 ± 4.2% ID g–1at 24 h in the liver and spleen, respectively. Other sites of appreciable deposition were the kidney, skin, female reproductive tract and to a lesser extent the gastrointestinal tract. There was no indication of cumulative deposition of pegylated liposomes in the lung, central nervous system, musculoskeletal system, heart or adrenal glands. In contrast, the t 1/2α and t 1/2β of unencapsulated111In-DTPA were 5 min and 1.1 h, respectively, with no evidence of accumulation in tumour or normal tissues. Incubation of111In-DTPA-labelled pegylated liposomes in human serum for up to 10 days confirmed that they are very stable, with only minor leakage of their contents. The potential applications of pegylated liposomes in the arena of targeted therapy of solid cancers are discussed. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10901376

  2. A quantitative method to measure human platelet chemotaxis using /sup 111/In-oxine-labeled gel-filtered platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenhaupt, R.W.; Silberstein, E.B.; Sperling, M.I.; Mayfield, G.

    1982-12-01

    Human blood platelets have been shown to migrate directionally and specifically toward collagen in plasma in vitro. We have developed a new system to monitor this behavior using a linear 7-compartment chamber with /sup 111/In-oxine-labeled gel-filtered platelets. The compartments are separated by various Nuclepore and Millipore filter membranes. Radiolabeled platelets suspended in plasma are placed in the central compartment and the other compartments are filled with platelet-free plasma. When collagen is added to an end compartment, platelets migrate toward that end. The degree of this directed movement or chemotaxis can be measured by counting the radioactivity of the contents of each compartment and then comparing the counts from radiolabeled platelets that have moved to the end that holds the chemotactic inducer with those that have randomly migrated to the opposite end, containing only plasma. This assay system allows quantitative comparisons between the chemotaxis-inducing abilities of different substances and permits the study of soluble materials. Experiments to determine the optimal conditions for the procedure are reported, and the advantages of this new method for the investigation of platelet chemotaxis and the identification of chemotaxins are discussed.

  3. Stability, characterization, and kinetics of /sup 111/In-labeled monoclonal antitumor antibodies in normal animals and nude mouse-human tumor models

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, S.E.; Hagan, P.L.; Garver, P.R.; Koziol, J.A.; Chen, A.W.; Frincke, J.M.; Bartholomew, R.M.; David, G.S.; Adams, T.H.

    1983-11-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against carcinoembryonic antigen were successfully radiolabeled with /sup 111/In, and the radiopharmaceutical was characterized in vitro and in normal and tumor-bearing mice. The /sup 111/In-MoAb proved to be stable in vitro and in vivo under normal conditions, although instability could be induced in vitro with large quantities of iron-free transferrin. Animal distribution studies with /sup 111/In-MoAb demonstrated tumor localization superior to /sup 67/Ga and pharmacokinetics that were highly similar to those of endogenously labeled /sup 75/Se-MoAb. The /sup 111/In-MoAb followed first-order kinetics and fit a two-compartmental model when studied in nude mice bearing human colon tumors known to express carcinoembryonic antigen. Significant quantities of radiolabel appeared in tissues other than tumor, with liver and skin having the highest concentrations. Sufficient tumor/background ratios were formed for scanning purposes. The data indicate that /sup 111/In-MoAb may prove to be effective as a radiopharmaceutical for tumor imaging.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of the monoclonal antibody B72. 3 and its fragments labeled with either /sup 125/I or /sup 111/In

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.A.; Comeau, R.D.; Jones, P.L.; Liberatore, F.A.; Neacy, W.P.; Sands, H.; Gallagher, B.M.

    1987-02-15

    A comparison of the pharmacokinetics of intact B72.3 (a murine monoclonal antibody specific for human breast and colon carcinoma) with F(ab')2 and Fab fragments labeled with /sup 111/In and /sup 125/I was done in athymic mice bearing target (LS174T) and non-target (HCT-15) tumors. IgG B72.3 labeled with either isotype imaged LS174T. Biodistributions of both labels were similar in all organs except liver. F(ab')2 also imaged the LS174T tumor, while Fab bearing either isotype did not. The blood clearance was Fab greater than F(ab')2 greater than immunoglobulin G B72.3 for both isotopes. /sup 111/In-labeled fragments yielded large accumulations in the kidneys which persisted for 2 days. The different patterns of biodistribution for the various forms of B72.3 labeled with the two isotopes suggest that the most desirable combination of fragment and isotope will depend on the intended use.

  5. Isolation and (111)In-Oxine Labeling of Murine NK Cells for Assessment of Cell Trafficking in Orthotopic Lung Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Malviya, Gaurav; Nayak, Tapan; Gerdes, Christian; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Signore, Alberto; de Vries, Erik F J

    2016-04-01

    A noninvasive in vivo imaging method for NK cell trafficking is essential to gain further understanding of the pathogenesis of NK cell mediated immune response to the novel cancer treatment strategies, and to discover the homing sites and physiological distribution of NK cells. Although human NK cells can be labeled for in vivo imaging, little is known about the murine NK cell labeling and its application in animal models. This study describes the isolation and ex vivo radiolabeling of murine NK cells for the evaluation of cell trafficking in an orthotopic model of human lung cancer in mice. Scid-Tg(FCGR3A)Blt transgenic SCID mice were used to isolate NK cells from mouse splenocytes using the CD49b (DX5) MicroBeads positive selection method. The purity and viability of the isolated NK cells were confirmed by FACS analysis. Different labeling buffers and incubation times were evaluated to optimize (111)In-oxine labeling conditions. Functionality of the radiolabeled NK cell was assessed by (51)Cr-release assay. We evaluated physiological distribution of (111)In-oxine labeled murine NK cells in normal SCID mice and biodistribution in irradiated and nonirradiated SCID mice with orthotopic A549 human lung tumor lesions. Imaging findings were confirmed by histology. Results showed that incubation with 0.011 MBq of (111)In-oxine per million murine NK cells in PBS (pH 7.4) for 20 min is the best condition that provides optimum labeling efficiency without affecting cell viability and functionality. Physiological distribution in normal SCID mice demonstrated NK cells homing mainly in the spleen, while (111)In released from NK cells was excreted via kidneys into urine. Biodistribution studies demonstrated a higher lung uptake in orthotopic lung tumor-bearing mice than control mice. In irradiated mice, lung tumor uptake of radiolabeled murine NK cells decreased between 24 h and 72 h postinjection (p.i.), which was accompanied by tumor regression, while in nonirradiated mice

  6. The in vivo behavior of granulocytes labeled with indium-111 in a canine model of pneumococcal pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Lichter, J.P.; Konopka, R.G.; Hartman, M.T.; Moser, K.M.; Spragg, R.G.

    1984-04-01

    Use of (/sup 111/In)granulocytes in the study of pulmonary inflammation requires study of their in vivo behavior. To study the pulmonary deposition of these cells and their ability to migrate from the capillary to the alveolus, we injected (/sup 111/In)granulocytes into dogs 24 h after the induction of a right lower lobe pneumococcal pneumonia. Using external imaging, we found rapid clearance of (/sup 111/In)granulocytes from the uninvolved lung (with a residual radioactivity of 24.5 +/- 4.2% at 4 h). In contrast, 83 +/- 12.4% of the initial radioactivity was present in inflamed lung at 4 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the inflamed lung was more cellular than that from control lung, contained a greater fraction of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (82 +/- 4.1% versus 20 +/- 6.2%), and much greater cell-associated radioactivity (ratio of 423:1, inflamed to control). Autoradiography disclosed that this radioactivity was localized to consolidated alveoli and was not prominently distributed in arterioles or venules or in airways larger than 0.6 mm. We conclude that (/sup 111/In)granulocytes are biologically active in the setting of acute lung inflammation.

  7. Immunoscintigraphic detection of venous thrombosis of the lower extremities by means of human antifibrin monoclonal antibodies labeled with sup 111 In

    SciTech Connect

    Lusiani, L.; Zanco, P.; Visona, A.; Breggion, G.; Pagnan, A.; Ferlin, G. )

    1989-07-01

    A new monoclonal antibody specific for the beta-chain of human fibrin (C22A) and labeled with 111In has been obtained and successfully used in rabbits and dogs for the in vivo detection of venous thrombosis. Studies in humans are currently ongoing. In order to assess the diagnostic value of 111In-antifibrin for the detection of venous thrombosis of the lower extremities, the authors investigated 25 consecutive patients. Ten patients had clinical and instrumental (contrast phlebography and duplex scanning) evidence of acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT), 3 had a long-standing DVT with relapsing episodes of swelling and pain, 5 had superficial venous thrombosis, and the remaining 7 had no signs of thrombosis at all. Twenty patients were being treated with heparin. All patients received 111In-antifibrin at the dose of 74 MBq IV and were scanned with a large field of view gamma camera coupled with a high-energy, parallel-hole collimator at 30 minutes and three, six, and twenty-four hours postinjection. Only the persistence of an abnormal uptake at twenty-four hours confirmed by two observers at visual inspection was considered as positive. A positive result was obtained in 9 of 10 DVT patients (90% sensitivity) and in all SVT patients. The single DVT patient with a negative 111In-antifibrin test had the longest interval between scintigraphy and onset of symptoms (fifty-five days). Thus, the age of thrombi represented a substantial limitation for the test. A false-positive result was obtained in a single SVT patient, in whom also a deep involvement, unconfirmed by phlebography, was suspected (91.6% specificity).

  8. Distribution of In-111 in granulocyte and other cellular elements of blood (CEB) in human In-111-labeled mixed white cell (MWC) and platelet preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Dewanjee, M.K.; Chowdhury, S.; Brown, M.L.; Wahner, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    A large number of platelets (PLT), red blood cells (RBC) are present along with granulocyte (GC) in In-111 in CEB was determined by Ficoll-Hypaque gradient (FHG) centrifugation of In-111-MWC and PLT preparation as a quality control procedure. MWC were separated by sedimentation with hydroxyethyl starch; PLT by differential centrifugation. MWC and PLT were labeled with In-111-oxine in saline, ACD-saline or with In-111-tropolone in 0.5 ml of ACD-plasma. 0.3-0.5 ml of labeled cell suspended in plasma was layered on 3 ml FHG of two densities (1.119 and 1.077 gm/ml) and spun in a clear polystyrene tube at 1800 G for 30 min. Four layers (plasma, PLT, GC, and RBC) were separated, and In-111 radioactivity in each fraction was determined with a gamma counter. Simultaneously cell types in MWC and PLT preparations were determined by Coulter counter and differential counting. Most of In-111 in In-MWC is associated with the PLT and RBC, GC/lymphocyte ratio is 6/4. GC has higher extraction efficiency than RBC and PLT. PLT preparation is pure and (96 +- 3)% of In-111 is bound to PLT, (4 +- 3)% to RBC and (0.2 +- 0.1)% to GC; PLT preparation contains PLT (97 +- 3)%, RBC (4 +- 3)% and GC (0.2 +- 0.1)%.

  9. Survival of density subpopulations of rabbit platelets: use of /sup 51/Cr-or /sup 111/In-labeled platelets to measure survival of least dense and most dense platelets concurrently

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, M.L.; Packham, M.A.; Mustard, J.F.

    1983-02-01

    The origin of the density heterogeneity of platelets was studied by measuring the survival of density subpopulations of rabbit platelets separated by discontinuous Stractan density gradient centrifugation. When a total population of /sup 51/Cr-labelled platelets was injected into recipient rabbits, the relative specific radioactivity of the most dense platelets decreased rapidly. In contrast, that of the least dense platelets had not changed 24 hr after injection, and then decreased slowly. To distinguish between the possibilities that most dense platelets are cleared from the circulation more quickly than least dense platelets or that platelets decrease in density as they age in the circulation, the concurrent survival of least dense and most dense platelets, labelled with either /sup 51/Cr or /sup 111/In-labelled total platelet populations, determined concurrently in the same rabbits, are identical, calculated from 1 hr values as 100%. However, the 1-hr recovery of /sup 111/In-labelled platelets was slightly but significantly less than that of /sup 51/Cr-labelled platelets. Therefore, researchers studied the survival of /sup 51/Cr-labelled least dense and /sup 111/In-labelled most dense platelets as well as that of /sup 111/In-labelled least dense and /sup 51/Cr-labelled most dense platelets. Mean 1-hr recovery of least dense platelets, labelled with either isotope (78% +/- 7%, SD) was similar to that of most dense platelets, labelled with either isotope (77% +/- 8%; SD). Mean survival of least dense platelets was 47.3 +/- 18.7 hr (SD), which was significantly less than that of most dense platelets (76.1 +/- 21.6 hr; SD) (p less than 0.0025). These results indicate that platelets decrease in buoyant density as they age in the circulation and that most dense platelets are enriched in young platelets, and least dense in old.

  10. Kinetics of leukocyte sequestration in the lungs of acutely septic primates: A study using sup 111 In-labeled autologous leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hangen, D.H.; Segall, G.M.; Harney, E.W.; Stevens, J.H.; McDougall, I.R.; Raffin, T.A. )

    1990-03-01

    To further clarify the role of leukocytes in the pathogenesis of ARDS, we studied the localization and kinetics of leukocyte migration using 111In-labeled autologous white cell scans ({sup 111}In wbc scans) in four primates made acutely septic with infusions of Escherichia coli. Whole body images were obtained with a gamma camera and were acquired on computer every 15 min beginning immediately after the E. coli infusion. Simultaneous measurements of C5a and peripheral blood leukocyte count were also obtained. Within 5 min of initiating sepsis, three major events occurred: complement activation as measured by the production of C5a, a profound fall in peripheral leukocyte count, and a significant increase in the sequestration of leukocytes in the lungs. The pulmonary sequestration reached a peak at 15 min with a mean of 152% of baseline activity. This sequestration consisted of a population that was predominantly neutrophils. Damage to the pulmonary capillary endothelium was demonstrated by an increase in extravascular lung water. The results support a role for neutrophils and complement as mediators in the pathogenesis of ARDS.

  11. 111In- and 203Pb-Labeled Cyclic RGD Peptide Conjugate as an αvβ3 Integrin-Binding Radiotracer

    PubMed Central

    Nwe, Kido; Kim, Young-Seung; Milenic, Diane E.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2012-01-01

    Methodology for site-specific modification and chelate conjugation of a cyclic RGD (cRGD) peptide for the preparation of a radiotracer molecular imaging agent suitable for detecting αvβ3 integrin is described. The method involves functionalizing the peptide with an aldehyde moiety and conjugation to a 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N′,N″,N‴-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) derivative that possesses an aldehyde reactive aminooxy group. The binding assay of the 111In-labeled peptide conjugate with αvβ3 integrin showed 60% bound when four equivalents of the integrin was added, a reasonable binding affinity for a mono-valent modified RGD peptide. PMID:23162207

  12. Straightforward thiol-mediated protein labelling with DTPA: Synthesis of a highly active 111In-annexin A5-DTPA tracer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Annexin A5 (anxA5) has been found useful for molecular imaging of apoptosis and other biological processes. Methods Here, we report an optimised two-step synthesis of annexin A5-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) (anxA5-DTPA) for positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging with a single purification step. The use of a recombinant annexin A5 (cys-anxA5) with a single thiol group allowed regionally specific coupling, without affecting the binding domain of cys-anxA5. Results The metal complexing capacity of anxA5-DTPA was investigated by labelling with 111In3+ and Eu3+. Binding of modified anxA5-DTPA to apoptotic cells was tested in competition experiments with a fluorescent anxA5 derivative (anxA5-FITC) using flow cytometry and compared with that of wildtype anxA5 or non-binding anxA5-DTPA (M1234-anxA5-DTPA). The binding affinity to apoptotic cells of the anxA5-DTPA conjugate does not differ from that of wildtype anxA5. Conclusions This two-step synthesis of annexin A5-DTPA resulted in biologically active anxA5-DTPA, which can be labelled with radionuclides for use in SPECT and PET imaging. PMID:22541756

  13. Use of galactosylated-streptavidin as a clearing agent with 111In-labeled, biotinylated antibodies to enhance tumor/non-tumor localization ratios.

    PubMed

    Govindan, Serengulam V; Griffiths, Gary L; Michel, Rosana B; Andrews, Philip M; Goldenberg, David M; Mattes, M Jules

    2002-06-01

    Optimal tumor imaging using radiolabeled antibodies (Abs) depends on obtaining the highest possible tumor/non-tumor localization ratios. To increase this ratio, in a mouse xenograft model system, we induced rapid blood clearance of the Ab after extensive penetration of a solid tumor, at 24 hr after Ab injection. By using galactosylated streptavidin (gal-SA) as a clearing agent for biotinylated Abs, and by using an 111In-DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) label, clearance was directed to hepatocytes (as opposed to Kupffer cells), and the radiolabel was excreted by the hepatocytes into bile, thereby reducing accumulation in the liver. In this study, we directly compared this approach with the use of 99mTc-F(ab)2 fragments, using the same Ab to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), with a colon carcinoma xenograft. The gal-SA clearance method produced substantially higher tumor/non-tumor localization ratios for all tissues except the liver, and even for the liver the disadvantage of the gal-SA clearance method was small. We also tested the gal-SA clearance method with a xenograft model of human B-cell lymphoma, using anti-CD22. High tumor/non-tumor ratios were obtained, as previously described with carcinomas of the lung and colon. Therefore, this approach appears to be a generally applicable strategy to obtain relatively high tumor/non-tumor ratios. PMID:12136523

  14. Position for site-specific attachment of a DOTA chelator to synthetic affibody molecules has a different influence on the targeting properties of 68Ga- compared to 111in-labeled conjugates.

    PubMed

    Honarvar, Hadis; Strand, Joanna; Perols, Anna; Orlova, Anna; Selvaraju, Ram Kumar; Eriksson Karlström, Amelie; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Affibody molecules, small (7 kDa) scaffold proteins, are a promising class of probes for radionuclide molecular imaging. Radiolabeling of Affibody molecules with the positron-emitting nuclide 68Ga would permit the use of positron emission tomography (PET), providing better resolution, sensitivity, and quantification accuracy than single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The synthetic anti-HER2 ZHER2:S1 Affibody molecule was conjugated with DOTA at the N-terminus, in the middle of helix 3, or at the C-terminus. The biodistribution of 68Ga- and 111In-labeled Affibody molecules was directly compared in NMRI nu/nu mice bearing SKOV3 xenografts. The position of the chelator strongly influenced the biodistribution of the tracers, and the influence was more pronounced for 68Ga-labeled Affibody molecules than for the 111In-labeled counterparts. The best 68Ga-labeled variant was 68Ga-[DOTA-A1]-ZHER2:S1, which provided a tumor uptake of 13 ± 1 %ID/g and a tumor to blood ratio of 39 ± 12 at 2 hours after injection. 111In-[DOTA-A1]-ZHER2:S1 and 111In-[DOTA-K58]-ZHER2:S1 were equally good at this time point, providing a tumor uptake of 15 to 16 %ID/g and a tumor to blood ratio in the range of 60 to 80. In conclusion, the selection of the best position for a chelator in Affibody molecules can be used for optimization of their imaging properties. This may be important for the development of Affibody-based and other protein-based imaging probes. PMID:25249017

  15. /sup 111/In-labeled platelets: effects of heparin on uptake by venous thrombi and relationship to the activated partial thromboplastin time

    SciTech Connect

    Fedullo, P.F.; Moser, K.M.; Moser, K.S.; Konopka, R.; Hartman, M.T.

    1982-09-01

    The goal of heparin therapy in deep vein thrombosis is to prevent thrombus extension. The relationship between thrombus extension and the results of coagulation tests used to monitor heparin therapy is unclear. To explore this relationship, we studied the effect of several heparin regimens on the accretion of /sup 111/In-labeled platelets on fresh venous thrombi, as detected by gamma imaging, and monitored the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). Six dogs were treated with a 300-U/kg bolus of heparin followed by a 90-U/kg/hour heparin infusion, a dose of heparin sufficient to increase the APTT to levels greater than eight times baseline (APTT ratio); platelet accretion (thrombus imaging) occurred only after the heparin effect was reversed with protamine sulfate. Nineteen dogs were treated with a 150-U/kg bolus of heparin followed by a 4-hour, 45-U/kg/hour heparin infusion; a thrombus was demonstrated only after protamine injection in 12 (mean APTT ratio 1.3 +/- 0.19) and before protamine injection in seven. In thirteen of these 19 dogs, 30 minutes separated the platelet injection from heparin therapy, while in six this duration was less than 30 minutes. In four of these six dogs, thrombi were demonstrated before protamine therapy and at APTT ratios greater than 3.0. Finally, 10 dogs were treated with a 100-U/kg bolus followed by a 3-hour, 50-U/kg/hour heparin infusion, after which the APTT was allowed to return to baseline values spontaneously. In all 10 dogs, a thrombus was demonstrated only after cessation of the heparin infusion, and at a mean APTT ratio of 1.4 +/- 0.15 times baseline. These results suggest that, except with very early platelet injection, platelet accretion by thrombi is consistently inhibited by heparin at APTT ratios greater than 2.5. Platelet accretion by venous thrombi occurs within narrow limits of heparin effect as reflected by the APTT.

  16. Imaging agents for in vivo molecular profiling of disseminated prostate cancer--targeting EGFR receptors in prostate cancer: comparison of cellular processing of [111In]-labeled affibody molecule Z(EGFR:2377) and cetuximab.

    PubMed

    Malmberg, Jennie; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Orlova, Anna

    2011-04-01

    Expression of receptor tyrosine-kinase (RTK) EGFR is low in normal prostate, but increases in prostate cancer. This receptor is significantly up-regulated as tumors progress into higher grade, androgen-insensitive and metastatic lesions. The up-regulated receptors could serve as targets for novel selective anti-cancer drugs, e.g. antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Radionuclide imaging of RTK can facilitate patient stratification and monitoring of anti-RTK therapy of prostate cancer. The goal of the study was to evaluate binding and cellar processing of radiolabeled EGFR-targeting conjugates by prostate cancer cell lines. Receptor expression of EGFR was studied in three prostate cancer cell lines: DU145 (brain metastasis of PC, hormone insensitive), PC3 (bone metastasis of PC) and LNCaP (lymph node metastasis of PC, androgen and estrogen receptor positive). Uptake and internalization of anti-EGFR mAbs (cetuximab) and affibody molecule (Z2377) labeled with indium-111 was investigated. EGFR expression on prostate cancer cell lines was clearly demonstrated. Both labelled conjugates 111In-Z2377 and 111In-cetuximab bound to prostate cancer cells in the receptor mediated model. Expression levels were modest but correlate with degree of hormone independence. Internalization of Affibody molecules was relatively slow in all cell lines. Internalization of mAbs was more rapid. The level of EGFR expression in these cell lines is sufficient for in vivo molecular imaging. Slow internalization indicates possibility of the use of non-residualizing labels for affibody molecules. PMID:21253675

  17. Localization of /sup 111/In- and /sup 125/I-labeled monoclonal antibody in guinea pigs bearing line 10 hepatocarcinoma tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard, M.I.; Hwang, K.M.; Foon, K.A.; Keenan, A.M.; Kessler, R.M.; Frincke, J.M.; Tallam, D.J.; Hanna, M.G. Jr.; Peters, L.; Oldham, R.K.

    1983-09-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody (D3) with demonstrated specificity for the guinea pig line 10 hepatocarcinoma (L10) was radiolabeled with either /sup 125/I or /sup 111/In and used to image dermal tumors in vivo. In one set of experiments, L10 tumors were established middorsally in one group of animals, and the similarly derived, antigenically distinct line 1 tumor was established in another group of animals. In spite of background imaging of liver, kidney, and spleen, L10 tumors were visualized clearly. Incorporation of radiolabel was demonstrated to predominate in the L10 tumor. In a separate set of experiments, L10 and line 1 tumors were established in contralateral thighs in the same animals. L10 tumors were visualized clearly, and tissue uptake of radiolabel was demonstrated to reside predominantly in the L10 tumor.

  18. Osteomyelitis complicating fracture: pitfalls of /sup 111/In leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Pjura, G.A.; Lowry, P.A.; Gobuty, A.H.; Traina, J.F.

    1987-05-01

    /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte imaging has shown greater accuracy and specificity than alternative noninvasive methods in the detection of uncomplicated osteomyelitis. Forty patients with suspected osteomyelitis complicating fractures (with and without surgical intervention) were evaluated with /sup 111/In-labeled leukocytes. All five patients with intense focal uptake, but only one of 13 with no uptake, had active osteomyelitis. However, mild to moderate /sup 111/In leukocyte uptake, observed in 22 cases, indicated the presence of osteomyelitis in only four of these; the other false-positive results were observed in noninfected callus formation, heterotopic bone formation, myositis ossificans, and sickle-cell disease. These results suggest that /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte imaging is useful for the evaluation of suspected osteomyelitis complicating fracture but must be used in conjunction with clinical and radiographic correlation to avoid false-positive results.

  19. Monitoring of cardiac antirejection therapy with /sup 111/In lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lerch, R.A.; Bergmann, S.R.; Carlson, E.M.; Saffitz, J.E.; Sobel, B.E.

    1982-06-01

    To determine whether lymphocytes labeled with /sup 111/In permit noninvasive assessment of antirejection therapy, we performed 40 allogeneic heterotopic cardiac transplants in rats. Antirejection therapy with azathioprine (30 mg/kg) and sodium salicylate (200 mg/kg) prolonged contractile function of the graft from 7.5 +/- 1.5 (s.d.) days in controls to 19.4 +/- 3.7 days in treated animals. Six to seven days after transplantation, autologous lymphocytes labeled with /sup 111/In were injected intravenously in seven untreated and eight treated rats. Scintigraphy and organ counting were performed 24 hr after administration of labeled cells. At sacrifice all grafts in untreated rats exhibited contractile failure, whereas grafts in all treated rats were beating well. Transplants in untreated recipients exhibited marked accumulation of /sup 111/In lymphocytes detectable scintigraphically, with ratios of 7.7 +/- 1.9 for the activity in the transplant over that in the native heart (HT/HO), as obtained by well counting. In contrast, accumulation was not scintigraphically detectable in transplants of treated rats, with HT/HO ratios of 2.6 +/- 1.8 (p less than 0.005). The results suggested that imaging with /sup 111/In-labeled lymphocytes will permit noninvasive assessment of antirejection therapy.

  20. Diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the foot in diabetic patients: Value of 111In-leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Larcos, G.; Brown, M.L.; Sutton, R.T. )

    1991-09-01

    The noninvasive diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the foot in diabetic patients with currently available radiologic and radionuclide imaging techniques is often difficult. Recently, 111In-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy has been proposed as an attractive alternative. Accordingly, the authors retrospectively reviewed 51 111In-labeled leukocyte scans, 49 technetium-99m bone scans, and 49 plain radiographs obtained in 51 adults with diabetes in whom osteomyelitis of the foot was suspected. The sensitivity and specificity of these techniques were evaluated in all patients, as well as in a subgroup of 11 patients with neuroarthropathy. Results with 111In-labeled leukocyte scans were also examined in subsets of patients with soft-tissue ulcers (n = 35) and those receiving antibiotics during investigation (n = 20). Confirmation or exclusion of osteomyelitis was made surgically in 28 patients and clinically in 23. Fourteen patients had osteomyelitis. Bone scans were most sensitive (93%) but least specific (43%); plain radiographs were most specific (83%) but least sensitive (43%). 111In-labeled leukocyte scans were both sensitive (79%) and specific (78%), and remained useful in patients with neuroarthropathy, soft-tissue ulcers, and antibiotic treatment. Poor spatial resolution contributed to the false-negative and false-positive 111In-labeled leukocyte scans, suggesting that this technique should not be interpreted independent of other tests. 111In-labeled leukocyte scans are a valuable diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of pedal osteomyelitis in diabetic patients.

  1. A Monte Carlo approach to small-scale dosimetry of solid tumour microvasculature for nuclear medicine therapies with (223)Ra-, (131)I-, (177)Lu- and (111)In-labelled radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Amato, Ernesto; Leotta, Salvatore; Italiano, Antonio; Baldari, Sergio

    2015-07-01

    The small-scale dosimetry of radionuclides in solid-tumours is directly related to the intra-tumoral distribution of the administered radiopharmaceutical, which is affected by its egress from the vasculature and dispersion within the tumour. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the combined dosimetric effects of radiopharmaceutical distribution and range of the emitted radiation in a model of tumour microvasculature. We developed a computational model of solid-tumour microenvironment around a blood capillary vessel, and we simulated the transport of radiation emitted by (223)Ra, (111)In, (131)I and (177)Lu using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo. For each nuclide, several models of radiopharmaceutical dispersion throughout the capillary vessel were considered. Radial dose profiles around the capillary vessel, the Initial Radioactivity (IR) necessary to deposit 100 Gy of dose at the edge of the viable tumour-cell region, the Endothelial Cell Mean Dose (ECMD) and the Tumour Edge Mean Dose (TEMD), i.e. the mean dose imparted at the 250-μm layer of tissue, were computed. The results for beta and Auger emitters demonstrate that the photon dose is about three to four orders of magnitude lower than that deposited by electrons. For (223)Ra, the beta emissions of its progeny deliver a dose about three orders of magnitude lower than that delivered by the alpha emissions. Such results may help to characterize the dose inhomogeneities in solid tumour therapies with radiopharmaceuticals, taking into account the interplay between drug distribution from vasculature and range of ionizing radiations. PMID:25979209

  2. Use of indium-111 as a red cell label

    SciTech Connect

    AuBuchon, J.P.; Brightman, A.

    1989-02-01

    To select the most promising 111In chelate for use as a second red cell (RBC) label for comparison of the survival of autologous and allogeneic cells, 49 normal RBC samples were studied in vitro after being labeled with 111In-8-hydroxyquinolinol (111In-oxine) prepared by three different methods, 111In-tropolone, and 111In-acetylacetone. Labeling efficiencies reached 99 percent and did not decline when the amount of 111In used was increased from 1.75 to 50 muCi per ml of RBCs. Storage of labeled RBCs in normal AB plasma at 4, 22, and 37 degrees C for up to 48 hours resulted in a similar rate of loss of the label from the RBCs with all labeling methods. These rates were time- and temperature-dependent and were accurate predictions of the rates found in later in vivo experimentation. Fresh RBCs from 11 subjects were labeled with 111In chelated with oxine in the presence of the RBCs or chelated with tropolone just prior to the labeling. RBC mass determinations using these autologous RBCs labeled with 111In accurately reflected the subjects' RBC masses as predicted through standard morphometric formulae. The rate of disappearance of the radionuclide after reinfusion of the autologous RBCs decreased with time. At 24 hours after reinfusion, 89.5 +/- 1.29 percent (mean +/- SEM) of the 111In-tropolone and 87.3 +/- 1.25 percent of the 111In-oxine continued in circulation. 111In is a simple and efficient agent for the labeling of RBCs for blood volume determinations and short-term survivals.

  3. Preclinical evaluation of 111In-DTPA-INCA-X anti-Ku70/Ku80 monoclonal antibody in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Evans-Axelsson, Susan; Vilhelmsson Timmermand, Oskar; Welinder, Charlotte; Borrebaeck, Carl AK; Strand, Sven-Erik; Tran, Thuy A; Jansson, Bo; Bjartell, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to assess the Ku70/Ku80 complex as a potential target for antibody imaging of prostate cancer. We evaluated the in vivo and ex vivo tumor targeting and biodistribution of the 111In-labeled human internalizing antibody, INCA-X (111In-DTPA-INCA-X antibody), in NMRI-nude mice bearing human PC-3, PC-3M-Lu2 or DU145 xenografts. DTPA-conjugated, non-labeled antibody was pre-administered at different time-points followed by a single intravenous injection of 111In-DTPA-INCA-X. At 48, 72 and 96 h post-injection, tissues were harvested, and the antibody distribution was determined by measuring radioactivity. Preclinical SPECT/CT imaging of mice with and without the predose was performed at 48 hours post-injection of labeled DTPA-INCA-X. Biodistribution of the labeled antibody showed enriched activity in tumor, spleen and liver. Animals pre-administered with DTPA-INCA-X showed increased tumor uptake and blood content of 111In-DTPA-INCA-X with reduced splenic and liver uptake. The in vitro and in vivo data presented show that the 111In-labeled INCA-X antibody is internalized into prostate cancer cells and by pre-administering non-labeled DTPA-INCA-X, we were able to significantly reduce the off target binding and increase the 111In-DTPA-INCA-X mAb uptake in PC-3, PC-3M-Lu2 and DU145 xenografts. The results are encouraging and identifying the Ku70/Ku80 antigen as a target is worth further investigation for functional imaging of prostate cancer. PMID:24982817

  4. Radiolabeling of equine platelets in plasma with /sup 111/In-(2-mercaptopyridine-N-oxide) and their in vivo survival

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, C.P.; Kelly, A.B.; Hornof, W.J.; O'Brien, T.R.; Philp, M.S.; Lamb, J.F.

    1987-03-01

    A method is presented for the in vitro isolation and radiolabeling of equine platelets with the isotope indium /sup 111/ (/sup 111/In: half-life = 2.8 days, gamma = 173 keV, 89%; 247 keV, 94%). The technique described involves complexing /sup 111/In with the lipid-soluble chelating agent, 2-mercaptopyridine-N-oxide (merc), in an aqueous medium. /sup 111/In-merc platelet-labeling efficiencies in autologous plasma pretreated with or without ferric citrate reagent were 82 +/- 7% and 24 +/- 12%, respectively. Mean intravascular survivals of /sup 111/In-merc-radiolabeled platelets in 8 healthy horses according to simple linear, exponential, mean, weighted-mean residual sum of squares analysis, and multiple-hit model were 5.5 +/- 0.49, 3.5 +/- 0.53, 4.5 +/- 0.18, 4.3 +/- 0.65, and 3.6 +/- 0.97 days, respectively.

  5. Radioimmunodetection in rhabdo- and leiomyosarcoma with sup 111 In-anti-myosin monoclonal antibody complex

    SciTech Connect

    Planting, A.; Verweij, J.; Cox, P.; Pillay, M.; Stoter, G. )

    1990-02-01

    In patients with rhabdo- and leiomyosarcoma a radioimmunodiagnostic study was performed with {sup 111}In labeled F(ab) fragments of a monoclonal antibody against myosin. Eight patients with rhabdomyosarcoma and 18 patients with leiomyosarcoma were studied. Scanning was performed at 4, 24, and 48 h after administration of 74 MBeq of the antibody complex. A high uptake with a tumor:background ratio of 10:1 was observed in several patients with rhabdomyosarcoma but the results were less accurate in leiomyosarcoma.

  6. Evaluation of the viability of /sup 111/In-abeled DTPA coupled to fibrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Layne, W.W.; Hnatowich, D.J.; Doherty, P.W.; Childs, R.L.; Lanteigne, D.; Ansell, J.

    1982-07-01

    In earlier work, DTPA has been covalently coupled to albumin via the cyclic anhydride of DTPA. Using fibrinogen, we have studied the effect of such coupling on protein viability by both an in vitro and an in vivo assay. Clotting time remained identical to that of the native protein whether the anhydride-to-protein molar ratio was 1:1 or 5:1. In vivo studies were done in dogs, with human fibrinogen labeled with /sup 125/I and /sup 111/In. Throughout 130 hr, blood clearances for the two tracers agreed whether with 1:1 or 5:1 coupling. In a dog model with a thrombogenic catheter, the clot-to-blood ratios for the two radiotracers agreed within experimental error. Finally, 1:1-coupled canine fibrinogen, labeled with /sup 111/In, was administered to dogs with a catheter in a jugular vein, and scintigrams at 24 hr clearly showed clotting along the length of the catheter. We conclude that fibrinogen, coupled to DTPA, retains its viability, behaving like radioiodinated fibrinogen in vivo, and /sup 111/In labeled fibrinogen looks promising as a clinical diagnostic agent.

  7. Immunoscintigraphy with 111In antimyosin Fab.

    PubMed

    Morguet, A J; Munz, D L; Kreuzer, H; Emrich, D

    1990-11-01

    Monoclonal 111In antimyosin Fab is a marker for myocytes which have lost their membrane integrity. Because of the slow blood pool clearance of the radiopharmaceutical, imaging is usually started 24-48 h after intravenous injection of 74 MBq of the tracer. This long postinjection interval restricts its utilization in the primary diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. However, antimyosin may help to differentiate between necrotic and viable myocardium in the subacute stage of incomplete myocardial infarction. Serial endomyocardial biopsy for early detection of transplant rejection after heart transplantation may be partially replaced or supplemented by antimyosin scintigraphy. The compound may facilitate the diagnosis of myocarditis. Other potential indications may be prognostic assessment of dilated cardiomyopathy, monitoring cardiotoxic side-effects of chemotherapeutics, recognition of cardiac contusion as well as diagnosis of rhabdo- and leiomyosarcoma. In specific clinical situations 111In antimyosin Fab immunoscintigraphy may provide valuable diagnostic information. PMID:2277688

  8. Radiolabeled red cell viability. II. /sup 99m/Tc and /sup 111/In for measuring the viability of heterologous red cells in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, C.S.; Myhre, B.A.; Angulo, M.C.; Salk, R.D.; Essex, C.E.; Demianew, S.H.

    1987-09-01

    The authors developed a double in vivo crossmatch method using 2 to 3 ml of potential donor blood labeled with either 400 microCi of /sup 99m/Tc or 30 microCi of /sup 111/In-oxine. Data are presented for 19 crossmatches on nine patients, using one blood specimen labeled with /sup 99m/Tc or two specimens, one labeled with /sup 99m/Tc and the other with /sup 111/In. Normal values are given for standardization purposes. This method appears to have advantages over earlier in vivo crossmatch techniques using 51Cr-labeled RBCs. These advantages include the rapidity with which the in vivo crossmatch may be repeated, the ready availability of /sup 99m/Tc and /sup 111/In-oxine, and the lower radiation absorbed doses with the shorter-lived radionuclides.

  9. 111In-BnDTPA-F3: an Auger electron-emitting radiotherapeutic agent that targets nucleolin

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The F3 peptide (KDEPQRRSARLSAKPAPPKPEPKPKKAPAKK), a fragment of the human high mobility group protein 2, binds nucleolin. Nucleolin is expressed in the nuclei of normal cells but is also expressed on the membrane of some cancer cells. The goal was to investigate the use of 111In-labeled F3 peptide for Auger electron-targeted radiotherapy. Methods F3 was labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) for confocal microscopy and conjugated to p-SCN-benzyl-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (BnDTPA) for labeling with 111In to form 111In-BnDTPA-F3. MDA-MB-231-H2N (231-H2N) human breast cancer cells were exposed to 111In-BnDTPA-F3 and used in cell fractionation, γH2AX immunostaining (a marker of DNA double-strand breaks), and clonogenic assays. In vivo, biodistribution studies of 111In-BnDTPA-F3 were performed in 231-H2N xenograft-bearing mice. In tumor growth delay studies, 111In-BnDTPA-F3 (3 μg, 6 MBq/μg) was administered intravenously to 231-H2N xenograft-bearing mice once weekly for 3 weeks. Results Membrane-binding of FITC-F3 was observed in 231-H2N cells, and there was co-localization of FITC-F3 with nucleolin in the nuclei. After exposure of 231-H2N cells to 111In-BnDTPA-F3 for 2 h, 1.7% of 111In added to the medium was membrane-bound. Of the bound 111In, 15% was internalized, and of this, 37% was localized in the nucleus. Exposure of 231-H2N cells to 111In-BnDTPA-F3 (1 μM, 6 MBq/μg) resulted in a dose-dependent increase in γH2AX foci and in a significant reduction of clonogenic survival compared to untreated cells or cells exposed to unlabeled BnDTPA-F3 (46 ± 4.1%, 100 ± 1.8%, and 132 ± 7.7%, respectively). In vivo, tumor uptake of 111In-BnDTPA-F3 (3 μg, 6 MBq/μg) at 3-h post-injection was 1% of the injected dose per gram (%ID/g), and muscle uptake was 0.5%ID/g. In tumor growth delay studies, tumor growth rate was reduced 19-fold compared to untreated or unlabeled BnDTPA-F3-treated mice (p = 0.023). Conclusion 111In-BnDTPA-F3 is

  10. Correlation between radioactivity and chemotherapeutics of the 111In-VNB-liposome in pharmacokinetics and biodistribution in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-Chuan; Chang, Chih-Hsien; Huang, Chih-Min; Wu, Yu-Tse; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Ho, Chung-Li; Chang, Tsui-Jung; Lee, Te-Wei; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2012-01-01

    Background The combination of a radioisotope with a chemotherapeutic agent in a liposomal carrier (ie, Indium-111-labeled polyethylene glycol pegylated liposomal vinorelbine, [111In-VNB-liposome]) has been reported to show better therapeutic efficiency in tumor growth suppression. Nevertheless, the challenge remains as to whether this therapeutic effect is attributable to the combination of a radioisotope with chemotherapeutics. The goal of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and correlation of Indium-111 radioactivity and vinorelbine concentration in the 111In-VNB-liposome. Methods The VNB-liposome and 111In-VNB-liposome were administered to rats. Blood, liver, and spleen tissue were collected to determine the distribution profile of the 111In-VNB-liposome. A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry system and gamma counter were used to analyze the concentration of vinorelbine and radioactivity of Indium-111. Results High uptake of the 111In-VNB-liposome in the liver and spleen demonstrated the properties of a nanosized drug delivery system. Linear regression showed a good correlation (r = 0.97) between Indium-111 radioactivity and vinorelbine concentration in the plasma of rats administered the 111In-VNB-liposome. Conclusion A significant positive correlation between the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of 111Indium radioactivity and vinorelbine in blood, spleen, and liver was found following administration of the 111In-VNB-liposome. The liposome efficiently encapsulated both vinorelbine and Indium-111, and showed a similar concentration-radioactivity time profile, indicating the correlation between chemotherapy and radiotherapy could be identical in the liposomal formulation. PMID:22359447

  11. Killing of human lung cancer cells using a new ( sup 111 In)bleomycin complex ( sup 111 In)BLMC

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, D.Y.; Hamburger, A.W.; Beach, J.L.; Maruyama, Y. )

    1989-01-01

    The ability of a ({sup 111}In)bleomycin complex (({sup 111}In)BLMC) to kill five cell lines of human lung cancer (small cell lung cancer) was investigated. Cells were exposed to either 0.9% NaCl, ({sup 111}In)Cl3, BLM, ({sup 111}In)BLMC, nonradioactive InCl3, or In-BLMC for 60 minutes, plated in soft agarose, and assessed for colony formation. ({sup 111}In)BLMC (40-200 microCi carried by 15-25 micrograms BLM/ml) was more cytotoxic than BLM (15-25 micrograms BLM/ml) by a factor of 1.6-5.3 for five cell lines. The percent survival of N417 cells was 28.4 for ({sup 111}In)BLMC (40 microCi/15 micrograms BLM/ml) and 54.3 for BLM (15 micrograms/ml); 1.9 for ({sup 111}In)BLMC (200 microCi/25 micrograms BLM/ml), and 10.0 for BLM (25 micrograms/ml). {sup 111}InCl3 (200 microCi/ml) and nonradioactive InCl3 failed to inhibit colony formation. The new ({sup 111}In)BLMC may be useful for therapy of some lung cancer patients.

  12. H4octapa-Trastuzumab: Versatile Acyclic Chelate System for 111In and 177Lu Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Price, Eric W.; Zeglis, Brian M.; Cawthray, Jacqueline F.; Ramogida, Caterina F.; Ramos, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    A bifunctional derivative of the versatile acyclic chelator H4octapa, p-SCNBn- H4octapa, has been synthesized for the first time. The chelator was conjugated to the HER2/neu-targeting antibody trastuzumab and labeled in high radiochemical purity and specific activity with the radioisotopes 111In and 177Lu. The in vivo behavior of the resulting radioimmunoconjugates was investigated in mice bearing ovarian cancer xenografts and compared to analogous radioimmunoconjugates employing the ubiquitous chelator DOTA. The H4octapa-trastuzumab conjugates displayed faster radiolabeling kinetics with more reproducible yields under milder conditions (15 min, RT, ~94–95%) than those based on DOTA-trastuzumab (60 min, 37 °C ~50–88%). Further, antibody integrity was better preserved in the 111In- and 177Lu-octapatrastuzumab constructs, with immunoreactive fractions of 0.99 for each compared to 0.93–0.95 for 111In- and 177Lu-DOTA-trastuzumab. These results translated to improved in vivo biodistribution profiles and SPECT imaging results for 111In- and 177Lu-octapa-trastuzumab compared to 111In- and 177Lu-DOTA-trastuzumab, with increased tumor uptake and higher tumor-to-tissue activity ratios. PMID:23901833

  13. Radioimmunodetection in rhabdo- and leiomyosarcoma with 111In-anti-myosin monoclonal antibody complex.

    PubMed

    Planting, A; Verweij, J; Cox, P; Pillay, M; Stoter, G

    1990-02-01

    In patients with rhabdo- and leiomyosarcoma a radioimmunodiagnostic study was performed with 111In labeled F(ab) fragments of a monoclonal antibody against myosin. Eight patients with rhabdomyosarcoma and 18 patients with leiomyosarcoma were studied. Scanning was performed at 4, 24, and 48 h after administration of 74 MBeq of the antibody complex. A high uptake with a tumor:background ratio of 10:1 was observed in several patients with rhabdomyosarcoma but the results were less accurate in leiomyosarcoma. PMID:2297748

  14. Pediatric leptomeningeal metastasis: 111In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow studies.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, M C

    1994-04-01

    Nine children (five girls and four boys) ranging in age from 1 to 18 years (median age, 12 years) with leptomeningeal metastasis were evaluated for cerebrospinal fluid compartmentalization with cerebrospinal fluid flow studies using ventricular diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid labeled with indium 111 (111In-DTPA). Histologic diagnosis included medulloblastoma (two), primitive neuroectodermal tumor (two), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (two), pineoblastoma (one), ependymoma (one), and anaplastic astrocytoma (one). Sixteen 111In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow studies were performed, of which nine demonstrated normal anterograde cerebrospinal fluid flow of radionuclide, with the following cerebrospinal fluid compartment median times to appearance, with ranges in parentheses: ventricles, 1 minute (0 to 3 minutes); cisterna magna/basal cisterns, 5 minutes (3 to 5 minutes); cervical subarachnoid space, 8 minutes (5 to 10 minutes); thoracic subarachnoid space, 15 minutes (10 to 30 minutes); lumbar subarachnoid space, 35 minutes (20 to 45 minutes); and sylvian cistern, 80 minutes (60 to 90 minutes). Blockage of normal anterograde cerebrospinal fluid flow was seen in seven 111In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow studies in the following cerebrospinal fluid compartments: cervical subarachnoid space (four), lumbar subarachnoid space (two), and cisterna magna/basal cisterns (one). Five 111In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow studies were performed after demonstration of cerebrospinal fluid compartmentalization and treatment with limited-field radiation therapy to involved regions; cerebrospinal fluid flow blocks resolved in three. In conclusion, cerebrospinal fluid compartmentalization, as shown by radionuclide ventriculography, is a common occurrence in pediatric leptomeningeal metastasis (four of nine patients, or 44%) and may be palliated by involved-field radiotherapy. PMID:8006365

  15. In vivo and in vitro uptake of 111In, delivered with the affibody molecule (ZEGFR:955)2, in EGFR expressing tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Nordberg, E; Orlova, A; Friedman, M; Tolmachev, V; Ståhl, S; Nilsson, F Y; Glimelius, B; Carlsson, J

    2008-04-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFR, is overexpressed in many carcinomas. Targeting this receptor with radionuclides is important for imaging and therapy applications in nuclear medicine. We investigated the in vitro and in vivo properties of a new high affinity EGFR binding affibody molecule, (ZEGFR:955)2, when conjugated with CHX-A''-DTPA and labelled with 111In. The binding time patterns and retention studies were performed using cultured squamous carcinoma A431 cells that overexpress EGFR. In the in vivo studies, female BALB/c nu/nu mice carrying tumours from xenografted A431 cells were used. The in vitro studies showed EGFR specific binding, high uptake and good retention of 111In when delivered as [111In](ZEGFR:955)2. The retention after 72 h of incubation was 38.0+/-1.15% of the initial level. The biodistribution study showed a tumour specific 111In uptake of 3.8+/-1.4% of injected dose per gram tumour tissue 4 h post-injection. The tumour to blood ratio was 9.1 and the tumours could easily be visualized with a gamma camera at this time-point. 111In delivered with [111In](ZEGFR:955)2 gave an EGFR specific uptake and the results indicated that the (ZEGFR:955)2 affibody molecule is a candidate for radionuclide-based tumour imaging. Potential therapy applications are discussed. PMID:18357367

  16. Data Evaluation Acquired Talys 1.0 Code to Produce 111In from Various Accelerator-Based Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipoor, Zahra; Gholamzadeh, Zohreh; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Seyyedi, Solaleh; Aref, Morteza

    The Indium-111 physical-decay parameters as a β-emitter radionuclide show some potential for radiodiagnostic and radiotherapeutic purposes. Medical investigators have shown that 111In is an important radionuclide for locating and imaging certain tumors, visualization of the lymphatic system and thousands of labeling reactions have been suggested. The TALYS 1.0 code was used here to calculate excitation functions of 112/114-118Sn+p, 110Cd+3He, 109Ag+3He, 111-114Cd+p, 110/111Cd+d, 109Ag+α to produce 111In using low and medium energy accelerators. Calculations were performed up to 200 MeV. Appropriate target thicknesses have been assumed based on energy loss calculations with the SRIM code. Theoretical integral yields for all the latter reactions were calculated. The TALYS 1.0 code predicts that the production of a few curies of 111In is feasible using a target of isotopically highly enriched 112Cd and a proton energy between 12 and 25 MeV with a production rate as 248.97 MBq·μA-1 · h-1. Minimum impurities shall be produced during the proton irradiation of an enriched 111Cd target yielding a production rate for 111In of 67.52 MBq· μA-1 · h-1.

  17. ( sup 111 In-DTPA-D-Phe sup 1 )-octreotide, a potential radiopharmaceutical for imaging of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors: Synthesis, radiolabeling and in vitro validation

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, W.H.; Albert, R.; Bruns, C.; Breeman, W.A.P.; Hofland, L.J.; Marbach, P.; Pless, J.; Pralet, D.; Stolz, B.; Koper, J.W.; Lamberts, S.W.J.; Visser, T.J.; Krenning, E.P. Sandoz Pharma AG, Basel )

    1991-01-01

    As starting material for a potentially convenient radiopharmaceutical, a diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid (DTPA) conjugated derivative of octreotide (SMS 201-995) was prepared. This peptide, (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide (SDZ 215-811) binds more than 95% of added {sup 111}In in an easy, single-step labeling procedure without necessity of further purification. The specific somatostatin-like biologic effect of these analogues was proven by the inhibition of growth hormone secretion by cultured rat pituitary cells in a dose-dependent fashion by octreotide, (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide and non-radioactive ({sup 115}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide. The binding of ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide to rat brain cortex membranes proved to be displaced similarly by natural somatosatin as well as by octreotide, suggesting specific binding of ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide to somatostatin receptors. The binding of the indium-labeled compound showed a somewhat lower affinity when compared with the iodinated (Tyr{sup 3})-octreotide, but indium-labeled (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide still binds with nanomolar affinity. In conjunction with in vivo studies, these results suggest that ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide is a promising radiopharmaceutical for scintigraphic imaging of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors.

  18. Imaging of inflammatory processes with labeled cells

    SciTech Connect

    Froelich, J.W.; Swanson, D.

    1984-04-01

    Radionuclide techniques for localizing inflammatory processes had relied heavily upon /sup 67/Ga-citrate until McAfee and Thakur described the technique for the radiolabeling of leukocytes with /sup 111/In-oxine. Since their initial description in 1976 there has been continued development of the radiopharmaceutical, as well as clinical efficacy. At present /sup 111/In-labeled leukocytes continue to be handled as an investigational new drug but this has not greatly limited its clinical availability. Indium-/sup 111/ leukocytes are the agent of choice for evaluation of patients with fever of unknown origin, osteomyelitis, and prosthetic graft infections; and preliminary data shows great promise in the area of detecting reoccurrence of inflammatory bowel disease. This article attempts to review currently accepted uses of 111In leukocytes as well as potential areas of application.

  19. /sup 111/In-/sup 109/In mass difference

    SciTech Connect

    Takagui, E.M.; Dietzsch, O.

    1980-04-01

    A measurement of the difference of Q values for the /sup 108/Cd(/sup 3/He,d)/sup 109/In and the /sup 110/Cd(/sup 3/He,d)/sup 111/In reactions shows a significant discrepancy with the value from the 1977 Atomic Mass Tables. We find Q(/sup 110/Cd(/sup 3/He,d)/sup 111/In) -Q(/sup 108/Cd(/sup 3/He,d)/sup 109/In)=806.5 +- 2.6 keV, leading to a new improved mass excess difference for /sup 111/In-/sup 109/In of -1904.5 +- 7.5 keV.

  20. Visualization of a prosthetic vascular graft due to platelet contamination during /sup 111/Indium-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Oates, E.; Ramberg, K.

    1988-09-01

    A prosthetic axillo-femoral bypass graft was visualized during /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy in a patient referred for possible abdominal abscess. The presence of significant cardiac blood-pool activity raised the possibility that this uptake was due to deposition of contaminating labeled platelets rather than labeled leukocytes. An analysis of a small sample of the patient's blood confirmed that the circulating activity was due to labeled platelets. Increased activity along prosthetic vascular grafts in patients undergoing /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy may be due to adherent platelet, and not indicative of infection.

  1. 111In-exendin Uptake in the Pancreas Correlates With the β-Cell Mass and Not With the α-Cell Mass

    PubMed Central

    Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Boerman, Otto; Gotthardt, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Targeting of the GLP-1 receptor with 111In-labeled exendin is an attractive approach to determine the β-cell mass (BCM). Preclinical studies as well as a proof-of-concept study in type 1 diabetic patients and healthy subjects showed a direct correlation between BCM and radiotracer uptake. Despite these promising initial results, the influence of α-cells on the uptake of the radiotracer remains a matter of debate. In this study, we determined the correlation between pancreatic tracer uptake and β- and α-cell mass in a rat model for β-cell loss. The uptake of 111In-exendin (% ID/g) showed a strong positive linear correlation with the BCM (Pearson r = 0.82). The fraction of glucagon-positive cells in the total endocrine mass was increased after alloxan treatment (26% ± 4%, 43% ± 8%, and 69% ± 21% for 0, 45, and 60 mg/kg alloxan, respectively). The uptake of 111In-exendin showed a negative linear correlation with the α-cell fraction (Pearson r = −0.76). These data clearly indicate toward specificity of 111In-exendin for β-cells and that the influence of the α-cells on 111In-exendin uptake is negligible. PMID:25409700

  2. (111)In-exendin uptake in the pancreas correlates with the β-cell mass and not with the α-cell mass.

    PubMed

    Brom, Maarten; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Boerman, Otto; Gotthardt, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Targeting of the GLP-1 receptor with (111)In-labeled exendin is an attractive approach to determine the β-cell mass (BCM). Preclinical studies as well as a proof-of-concept study in type 1 diabetic patients and healthy subjects showed a direct correlation between BCM and radiotracer uptake. Despite these promising initial results, the influence of α-cells on the uptake of the radiotracer remains a matter of debate. In this study, we determined the correlation between pancreatic tracer uptake and β- and α-cell mass in a rat model for β-cell loss. The uptake of (111)In-exendin (% ID/g) showed a strong positive linear correlation with the BCM (Pearson r = 0.82). The fraction of glucagon-positive cells in the total endocrine mass was increased after alloxan treatment (26% ± 4%, 43% ± 8%, and 69% ± 21% for 0, 45, and 60 mg/kg alloxan, respectively). The uptake of (111)In-exendin showed a negative linear correlation with the α-cell fraction (Pearson r = -0.76). These data clearly indicate toward specificity of (111)In-exendin for β-cells and that the influence of the α-cells on (111)In-exendin uptake is negligible. PMID:25409700

  3. An experimental comparison of the K- and L-Auger electron spectra generated in the decays of 140Nd and 111In.

    PubMed

    Yakushev, E A; Kovalík, A; Filosofov, D V; Korolev, N A; Lebedev, N A; Lubashevski, A V; Rösch, F; Novgorodov, A F

    2005-03-01

    The low-energy electron spectra generated in the decay of 140Nd have been measured using a combined electrostatic spectrometer adjusted to the 4, 7, and 35 eV instrumental resolution. In order to estimate the therapeutic potential of low-energy electrons associated with the decay of 140Nd, similar experiments have been performed with 111In. Relative Auger electron intensity ratios per decay are: 111In(K-Auger)/140Nd(K-Auger)=1.47(12), 111In(L-Auger) /140Nd(L-Auger)=1.1(4), and 111In(L-Auger [2.8-7 keV])/140Nd(L-Auger [2.8-7 keV])=0.24(11). The obtained K-Auger group intensity ratios have been compared with results of calculations. The good agreement found for the experimental and estimated values indicates that such information can be also derived using available nuclear and atomic data. The relative intensity of L-Auger electrons emitted within the 2.8-7 keV interval is higher for 140Nd by a factor of about 4 compared to 111In. As the L-Auger emission is dominating relative to that of the K-Auger group, this implicates that any potential endotherapeutic strategy using 140Nd-labelled targeting vectors requires a maximum accumulation of the endoradiotherapeutical close to the cell nucleus or the DNA of the tumour cell. PMID:15607923

  4. Cardiac and vascular imaging with labeled platelets and leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Dewanjee, M.K.

    1984-07-01

    The contribution of platelets in atherosclerosis and thrombosis in animal models and in clinical studies has been quantified with 111In-platelet scintigraphy. New in vitro quantitative techniques have been developed using 111In-labeled platelets to determine the number of adherent platelets on deendothelialized surfaces of damaged vessel walls and synthetic vascular grafts. In vivo imaging techniques are semi-quantitative in nature; in these studies 111In radioactivity on thrombotic vessels or graft surfaces of iliac, femoral, or popliteal arteries is compared with contralateral vessels. Background 111In radioactivity in the circulating blood pool of venous and capillary networks and radioactivity in marrow decreases the sensitivity of these techniques. Subtraction of blood pool radioactivity with 99mTc-labeled autologous red cells and calculation of 111In radioactivity associated with platelet thrombus on vessel walls also have been performed for coronary, carotid, and femoral arteries. Although platelet concentrates are used frequently after open heart surgery (one to six per patient), consumption of platelets in the artificial lung or oxygenator, lysis of platelets during pumping, and suction of blood only recently have been quantified with the use of 111In-labeled platelets. These studies also demonstrated far less trauma to platelets with the use of a membrane rather than a bubble oxygenator. Further reduction in platelet consumption and trauma was observed with the use of prostacyclin, a short-acting drug with significant beneficial effect on platelet thrombus reduction and disaggregation of aggregated platelets. The role of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in inflammation, infection and myocardial infarction, and in vivo evaluation with 111In-leukocyte scintigraphy in animals and humans has been described.

  5. Standardisation and half-life measurements of (111)In.

    PubMed

    Dziel, Tomasz; Listkowska, Anna; Tymiński, Zbigniew

    2016-03-01

    The standardisation of (111)In by 4π(LS)-γ coincidence and anticoincidence counting is presented. Absolute measurements were performed for samples with different concentrations of carrier solution and for different window settings in the gamma channel. The radioactive concentration of the master solution determined on the same reference date was consistent for all measurements performed. The evaluated typical uncertainty was 0.43%. The half-life of (111)In was determined using a time series of measurements performed with an ionisation chamber. A least squares fit of the measured data resulted in a half-life of 2.8067 (34) days consistent with Decay Data Evaluation Project recommended value (0.064% higher than the DDEP value). PMID:26651174

  6. Noninvasive Molecular Imaging of Cell Death in Myocardial Infarction using 111In-GSAO

    PubMed Central

    Tahara, Nobuhiro; Zandbergen, H. Reinier; de Haas, Hans J.; Petrov, Artiom; Pandurangi, Raghu; Yamaki, Takayoshi; Zhou, Jun; Imaizumi, Tsutomu; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.; Dyszlewski, Mary; Scarabelli, Tiziano; Kini, Annapoorna; Reutelingsperger, Chris; Narula, Navneet; Fuster, Valentin; Narula, Jagat

    2014-01-01

    Acute insult to the myocardium is associated with substantial loss of cardiomyocytes during the process of myocardial infarction. In this setting, apoptosis (programmed cell death) and necrosis may operate on a continuum. Because the latter is characterized by the loss of sarcolemmal integrity, we propose that an appropriately labeled tracer directed at a ubiquitously present intracellular moiety would allow non-invasive definition of cardiomyocyte necrosis. A trivalent arsenic peptide, GSAO (4-(N-(S-glutathionylacetyl)amino)phenylarsonous acid), is capable of binding to intracellular dithiol molecules such as HSP90 and filamin-A. Since GSAO is membrane impermeable and dithiol molecules abundantly present intracellularly, we propose that myocardial localization would represent sarcolemmal disruption or necrotic cell death. In rabbit and mouse models of myocardial infarction and post-infarct heart failure, we employed In-111-labelled GSAO for noninvasive radionuclide molecular imaging. 111In-GSAO uptake was observed within the regions of apoptosis seeking agent- 99mTc-Annexin A5 uptake, suggesting the colocalization of apoptotic and necrotic cell death processes. PMID:25351258

  7. Nutrition Labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Lloyd E.

    Nutrition labeling regulations differ in countries around the world. The focus of this chapter is on nutrition labeling regulations in the USA, as specified by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). A major reason for analyzing the chemical components of foods in the USA is nutrition labeling regulations. Nutrition label information is not only legally required in many countries, but also is of increasing importance to consumers as they focus more on health and wellness.

  8. Effect of metabolism on retention of indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody in liver and blood

    SciTech Connect

    Kinuyfa, S.; Jeong, J.M.; Garmestani, K.

    1994-11-01

    The effect of a chelator structure on the metabolic fate of the {sup 111}In-labeled monoclonal antibody (Mab) T101 was investigated in normal Balb/c mice to assess the importance of this chemical parameter in the reduction of the background radioactivity in blood and liver. Mab T101 was conjugated with either 2-(p-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-6-methyl-diethylaminetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) (1B4M), 2-(p-isothiocyanatobenzyl) cyclohexyl-DTPA (CHX-B) or cyclic DTPA dianhydride (cDTPA) and then radiolabeled with {sup 111}In-labeled T101 conjugates and sacrificed in groups of five up to 5 days postinjection for comparative biodistribution studies and analyses of liver, blood and urine samples for radioindium products. The biodistribution of {sup 111}In-1B4M-T101 and {sup 111}In-CHX-B-T101 were similar to each other but significantly different from that of {sup 111}In-cDTPA-T101, particularly in the blood and liver. Size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography indicated that the concentration of the intact {sup 111}In-immunoglobulin (Ig)G in liver decreased with similar rates for the three conjugates. Meanwhile, the concentration of a small DTPA-like metabolite in liver increased to a different peak value (4.6% 1D/g for the cDTPA conjugate and 1.6% lD/g for the 1B4M and CHX-B conjugates) approximately at 24 hr and maintained a steady-state concentration up to 5 days. The thiourea linkage between T101 and the {sup 111}In-labeled chelates and a higher complex stability and higher lipophilicity of {sup 111}In-1B4M and {sup 111}In-CHX-B appear to be responsible for lower liver and higher blood radioactivity for the 1B4M and CHX conjugates. 31 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. [Pharmacokinetic substantiation of the use of 111In-citrate in bone marrow studies].

    PubMed

    Korsunskiĭ, V N; Tarasenko, Iu I; Koval'chuk, N D; Kosheleva, I Iu; Popov, V I

    1986-07-01

    Soviet radiopharmaceutical 111In-citrin has been studied to define its possible application for marrow visualization. 111In-citrin has been shown to accumulate in the red marrow, parenchymal organs and to be excreted from animal organism by urinary system predominately. 111In-citrin has advantages in defining the nuclide concentrations in marrow blood and serum as compared with colloid preparations and 111In-chloride. 111In-citrin is supposed to be an adequate radiopharmaceutical preparation for visualization of the red marrow. PMID:3736386

  10. 16. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT BUILDING 11 (111) IN 1952. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT BUILDING 11 (111) IN 1952. IN 1952, BUILDINGS 11 (111), 12 (121), 21 (221), 22 (122), 23 (123), AND 42 (442) WERE OCCUPIED. BUILDINGS 91 (991) AND 81 (881) WERE OPERATIONAL. BUILDINGS 44 (444) AND 71 (771) WERE UNDER CONSTRUCTION. THE TOTAL COST FOR CONSTRUCTION BY 1952 WAS $2.5 MILLION. BY SEPTEMBER OF 1953, AUSTIN COMPANY HAD COMPLETED 21 BUILDINGS FOR AN APPROXIMATE COST OF $43.3 MILLION (1952). - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  11. Comparative biodistributions of indium-111-labelled macrocycle chimeric B72.3 antibody conjugates in tumour-bearing mice.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, A.; King, D. J.; Farnsworth, A. P.; Rhind, S. K.; Pedley, R. B.; Boden, J.; Boden, R.; Millican, T. A.; Millar, K.; Boyce, B.

    1994-01-01

    A novel 111In ligand (a C-functionalised derivative of 1,4,7-triazacyclononanetriacetic acid), termed 9N3, was covalently attached to chimeric B72.3, labelled with 111In and compared with 111In-labelled chimeric B72.3 diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) cyclic anhydride conjugate (cDTPA) and a C-linked derivative of DTPA (CT-DTPA) in athymic mice bearing human colon carcinoma xenografts. Significant differences in biodistribution were observed between 9N3 and cDTPA conjugates especially in the tumour uptake and blood, liver, femur and colon levels at 24, 48 and 144 h. Significantly higher tumour uptake was observed for 111In-cB72.3-9N3 compared with 111In-cB72.3-cDTPA at all time points. Radiolocalisation (RI) indices increased with time for the 9N3 conjugate but remained constant for the cDTPA conjugate. The biodistribution of 111In-labelled cB72.3-CT-DTPA was similar to that of 111In-labelled cB72.3-9N3 except for elevated kidney levels. A 12N4 macrocycle (a C-functionalised derivative of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecanetetraacetic acid) was also tested for its ability to chelate 111In and its biodistribution examined. Labelled conjugates with this macrocycle were more difficult to prepare in a stable form but gave a very similar biodistribution to the 9N3 macrocycle conjugate. Macrocycle-antibody conjugates of this type offer considerable promise for tumour imaging in patients. PMID:8018538

  12. Radioisotope labeled platelets in medical diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, C.F.; Sostman, H.D.

    1986-08-01

    The myriad of applications of indium-111 labeled platelets (/sup 111/In-P), both in biomedical research and clinical diagnostic imaging, in recent years is an index of the potential of this technology. Because many diseases involve the vascular system, a nontoxic platelet label suitable for imaging has immense potential for diagnosis. Presently confined to research centers, this technique is currently used in three main diagnostic situations: deep vein thrombosis, cardiac thrombi, and organ (renal) transplantation rejection. Future applications will proliferate when difficulties in achieving rapid labeling are overcome, and the period between study initiation and final diagnosis is diminished. This review emphasizes current clinical applications and the potential role of this technology in diagnostic imaging. 52 references.

  13. Preclinical pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, radiation dosimetry and toxicity studies required for regulatory approval of a phase I clinical trial with 111In-CP04 in medullary thyroid carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Maina, Theodosia; Konijnenberg, Mark W.; KolencPeitl, Petra; Garnuszek, Piotr; Nock, Berthold A.; Kaloudi, Aikaterini; Kroselj, Marko; Zaletel, Katja; Maecke, Helmut; Mansi, Rosalba; Erba, Paola; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja; Mikolajczak, Renata; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Introduction From a series of radiolabelled cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin analogues, 111In-CP04 (111In-DOTA-(DGlu)6-Ala-Tyr-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-NH2) was selected for further translation as a diagnostic radiopharmaceutical towards a first-in-man study in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). A freeze-dried kit formulation for multicentre application has been developed. We herein report on biosafety, in vivo stability, biodistribution and dosimetry aspects of 111In-CP04 in animal models, essential for the regulatory approval of the clinical trial. Materials and methods Acute and extended single dose toxicity of CP04 was tested in rodents, while the in vivo stability of 111In-CP04 was assessed by HPLC analysis of mouse blood samples. The biodistribution of 111In-CP04 prepared from a freeze-dried kit was studied in SCID mice bearing double A431-CCK2R(±) xenografts at 1, 4 and 24 h pi. Further 4-h animal groups were either additionally treated with the plasma expander gelofusine or injected with 111In-CP04 prepared by wet-labelling. Pharmacokinetics in healthy mice included the 30 min, 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h time points pi. Dosimetric calculations were based on extrapolation of mice data to humans adopting two scaling models. Results CP04 was well-tolerated by both mice and rats, with an LD50 > 178.5 μg/kg body weight for mice and a NOAEL (no-observed-adverse-effect-level) of 89 μg/kg body weight for rats. After labelling, 111In-CP04 remained >70% intact in peripheral mouse blood at 5 min pi. The uptake of 111In-CP04 prepared from the freeze-dried kit and by wet-labelling were comparable in the A431-CCK2R(+)-xenografts (9.24 ± 1.35%ID/g and 8.49 ± 0.39%ID/g, respectively; P > 0.05). Gelofusine-treated mice exhibited significantly reduced kidneys values (1.69 ± 0.15%ID/g vs. 5.55 ± 0.94%ID/g in controls, P < 0.001). Dosimetry data revealed very comparable effective tumour doses for the two scaling models applied, of 0.045 and 0.044 m

  14. Comparisons of scintigraphy with /sup 111/In leukocytes and /sup 67/Ga in the diagnosis of occult sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Sfakianakis, G.N.; Al-Sheikh, W.; Heal, A.; Rodman, G.; Zeppa, R.; Serafini, A.

    1982-07-01

    In a prospective study involving 32 patients with clinical suspicion of focal infection, the sensitivity and specificity of /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte (In-WBC) scintigraphy were compared with those of /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy performed 24-48 hr later. Of a total of 192 body sites studied, 26 foci of infection were diagnosed by aspiration, cultures, or chest radiographs. Indium-WBC indicated 19 (73%) true-positive (TP) and four (2.5%) false-positive (FP) foci of abnormal accretion; /sup 67/Ga had 21 (81%) TP and 15 (9%) FP. The 7/26 (27%) false-negative (FN) In-WBC scintigrams involved infection foci of more than 2-wk duration; the 5/26 (19%) FN /sup 67/Ga studies were in patients with infections manifested for less than 1 wk. The results of this study are useful in considering the indications of the two tracers.

  15. Murine eosinophils labeled with indium-111 oxine: localization to delayed hypersensitivity reactions against a schistosomal antigen and to lymphokine in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, T.H.; Clanton, J.A.; Runge, V.; English, D.; Colley, D.G.

    1983-04-01

    We have evaluated a method for quantitation of eosinophil migration to stimuli in vivo. Upon transfusion into normal syngeneic mice, 111In-labeled eosinophils had an intravascular half-life of 9.5 hr and distributed predominantly into spleen, bone marrow, and liver. In either Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice or recipients of lymphoid cells from infected mice, intradermal (ear pinna) injection of the schistosomal egg antigenic preparation (SEA) elicited time-dependent accumulation of 111In-labeled eosinophils detectable by either gamma scintillation counting of tissue samples or by nuclear medicine external imaging. Intradermal administration of a lymphokine fraction (containing eosinophil stimulation promoter activity) similarly caused accumulation of 111In-labeled eosinophils. Both reactions depended on the concentration of stimulus (SEA or lymphokine). 111In-labeled neutrophils or macrophages or 125I-albumin did not preferentially accumulate at the reactions examined to the extent found with 111In-labeled eosinophils, indicating that localization of label depends on an active process and is due to eosinophils rather than a contaminating cell type. The method was used to estimate how long eosinotactic lymphokine remained at dermal sites: 60% of initial activity was present 12 hr after injection. The model is discussed with regard to the role of lymphokines in hypersensitivity reactions with eosinophil involvement, such as the granulomatous response to S. mansoni eggs.

  16. Indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy: diagnosis of subperiosteal abscesses complicating osteomyelitis in a child

    SciTech Connect

    Outwater, E.; Oates, E.; Sarno, R.C.

    1988-11-01

    Preoperative /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy demonstrated extensive subperiosteal abscesses complicating acute bilateral tibial osteomyelitis in a child. Plain radiographs showed only marked soft-tissue swelling; three-phase bone scintigraphy depicted both hot and cold areas consistent with acute osteomyelitis.

  17. Life span and tissue distribution of 111indium-labeled blood platelets in hypomagnesemic lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.D.; Miller, J.K.; White, P.K.; Ramsey, N.

    1983-05-01

    Circulating platelets may be activated by exposed triple-helical collagen in atherosclerotic lesions in Mg-deficient ruminants. Autologous platelets, labeled in vitro with 111In and determined to be active, were injected into 5 hypomagnesemic and 3 control lambs fed semipurified diets with 100 or 2,000 mg of Mg/kg of feed for 3 months. During the first 68 hours, 111In concentrations were 11 times higher in packed cells than in plasma. Packed-cell 111In increased 60% during the first 2 hours, probably due to initial tissue sequestration and later release of labeled platelets. Thereafter, platelet half-life span averaged 60 and 63 hours for hypomagnesemic and control lambs. After 68 hours, lambs were injected with native vascular collagen fibrils at 500 micrograms/kg of body weight to initiate reversible platelet aggregation. Within 1 minute, 83% of packed-cell 111In disappeared from circulation. Thirty minutes later, the lambs were euthanatized and necropsied and in the lungs, liver, and spleen, 111In averaged 24%, 19%, and 9%, respectively, of 111In injected 68 hours earlier. Organ deposits were not affected by Mg intake, but 111In in the lungs was somewhat lower in 2 lambs injected with inactivated collagen. Pathologic changes induced by reversible platelet aggregation were compatible with right ventricular failure complicated by pulmonary edema, similar to changes in hypomagnesemic lambs that died spontaneously. Platelets in blood exposed to vascular lesions in hypomagnesemic ruminants could be a major mortality risk factor in grass tetany disease.

  18. Effect of tumor mass and antigenic nature on the biodistribution of labeled monoclonal antibodies in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Y.; Endo, K.; Koizumi, M.; Kawamura, Y.; Saga, T.; Sakahara, H.; Kuroki, M.; Matsuoka, Y.; Konishi, J.

    1989-06-01

    The effect of tumor mass and antigenic nature on the biodistribution of 111In- and 125I-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) was studied using F(ab')2 fragments of three representative anti-tumor MoAbs and SW1116 human colorectal carcinoma grown in nude mice. The 19-9, F33-104 anti-CEA, and 17-1A MoAbs showed specific binding to SW1116 cells. The former two MoAbs recognize circulating CA 19-9 with molecular weights of more than 5,000,000 and CEA of Mr 170,000-180,000, respectively, whereas 17-1A reacts with a nonshedding antigen. Both percentage injected dose per gram tumor and tumor-to-blood ratios were inversely proportional to the tumor mass in nude mice administered 111In- and 125I-labeled 19-9, but liver uptake increased as tumor size increased. Analysis of serum samples and tumor homogenates demonstrated the presence of a high-molecular-weight species, probably due to the antibody binding to CA 19-9. In the case of 111In-labeled anti-CEA MoAb, tumor uptake also decreased and liver uptake increased with tumor size, but this effect was less obvious than that of 19-9. In contrast, tumor and liver uptake of 125I-labeled anti-CEA MoAb, 111In- and 125I-labeled 17-1A and control antibodies were independent of tumor mass. The absolute tumor uptake and tumor-to-blood ratios of all 125I-labeled antibodies were lower than those of the 111In-labeled ones. And the effect of tumor mass was also weaker with 125I-labeled antibodies, probably due to in vivo dehalogenation. These results indicate that the effect of tumor size on the incorporation of labeled MoAb into tumors is dependent on the antigenic nature to be targeted and/or radionuclides used for labeling and that high concentrations of circulating high molecular weight antigens may limit in vivo use of MoAb conjugates.

  19. Development of a new radiolabel (lead-203) and new chelating agents for labeling monoclonal anntibodies for imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Mausner, L.F.; Steplewski, Z.

    1988-01-01

    High liver uptake and slow body clearance presently limit the usefulness of /sup 111/In labeled antibodies for tumor imaging. We have investigated /sup 203/Pb as an alternate and better antibody label. The DTPA and cyclohexyl EDTA (CDTA) conjugates of an anticolon carcinoma antibody, 17-1A were labeled (bicyclic anhydride method) with /sup 203/Pb and /sup 111/In with 60 and 90% labeling yields, respectively. The biodistribution of /sup 203/Pb-17-1A conjugates was compared with the corresponding /sup 111/In-labeled preparations and with /sup 203/Pb-DTPA, /sup 203/Pb-nitrate and nonrelevant antibody controls in normal and human tumor (SW948) xenografted nude mice at 24, and 96 hr. Lead-203-labeled CDTA and DTPA antibody conjugates gave similar in vivo distributions. Even though the lead bound to these chelate-antibody conjugates was more labile in serum and in vivo, compared to indium, it cleared much faster from the liver and the whole body. A new series of chelating agents based on the incorporation of a trans-1,2- diaminocyclohexane moiety into the carbon backbone of polyaminocarboxylates is being synthesized. These are expected to provide stronger complexing ability for lead and produce greater in vivo stability. These ligands are also expected to be superior to EDTA and DTPA for labeling antibodies with other radiometals, including indium. 32 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. Radioimmunoimaging of lung vessels: An approach using indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody to angiotensin-converting enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Danilov, S.M.; Martynov, A.V.; Klibanov, A.L.; Slinkin, M.A.; Sakharov, I.Yu.; Malov, A.G.; Sergienko, V.B.; Vedernikov, A.Yu.; Muzykantov, V.R.; Torchilin, V.P.

    1989-10-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody against human angiotensin-converting enzyme was radiolabeled with {sup 111}In via diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid without substantial loss of antigen-binding capacity. This monoclonal antibody designated 9B9 cross-reacted with rat and monkey angiotensin-converting enzyme. Indium-111-labeled 9B9 selectively accumulated 10-20 times greater in the lung than in blood or other organs following intravenous administration in rats. Kinetics of lung accumulation and blood clearance were studied for {sup 111}In-9B9-antibody and compared to that of {sup 125}I-labeled 9B9 in rat. Highly specific accumulation of {sup 111}In-9B9-antibody in the lung of Macaca Rhesus monkeys after intravenous injection was monitored by gamma-imaging. Images of {sup 111}In-labeled antibody 9B9 biodistribution in monkey lung noticeably differ from the images of biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled albumin microspheres. This difference may provide information concerning the state of the endothelium of lung capillaries, which is different from the blood flow characteristics determined with routine microsphere technique.

  1. Comparison of autologous 111In-leukocytes, 18F-FDG, 11C-methionine, 11C-PK11195 and 68Ga-citrate for diagnostic nuclear imaging in a juvenile porcine haematogenous staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis model

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Ole L; Afzelius, Pia; Bender, Dirk; Schønheyder, Henrik C; Leifsson, Páll S; Nielsen, Karin M; Larsen, Jytte O; Jensen, Svend B; Alstrup, Aage KO

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare 111In-labeled leukocyte single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to PET with tracers that potentially could improve detection of osteomyelitis. We chose 11C-methionine, 11C-PK11195 and 68Ga-citrate and validated their diagnostic utility in a porcine haematogenous osteomyelitis model. Four juvenile 14-15 weeks old female pigs were scanned seven days after intra-arterial inoculation in the right femoral artery with a porcine strain of Staphylococcus aureus using a sequential scan protocol with 18F-FDG, 68Ga-citrate, 11C-methionine, 11C-PK11195, 99mTc-Nanocoll and 111In-labelled autologous leukocytes. This was followed by necropsy of the pigs and gross pathology, histopathology and microbial examination. The pigs developed a total of five osteomyelitis lesions, five lesions characterized as abscesses/cellulitis, arthritis in three joints and five enlarged lymph nodes. None of the tracers accumulated in joints with arthritis. By comparing the 10 infectious lesions, 18F-FDG accumulated in nine, 111In-leukocytes in eight, 11C-methionine in six, 68Ga-citrate in four and 11C-PK11195 accumulated in only one lesion. Overall, 18F-FDG PET was superior to 111In-leukocyte SPECT in marking infectious and proliferative, i.e. hyperplastic, lesions. However, leukocyte SPECT was performed as early scans, approximately 6 h after injection of the leukocytes, to match the requirements of the 18 h long scan protocol. 11C-methionine and possibly 68Ga-citrate may be useful for diagnosis of soft issue lesions. PMID:25973338

  2. Comparison of autologous (111)In-leukocytes, (18)F-FDG, (11)C-methionine, (11)C-PK11195 and (68)Ga-citrate for diagnostic nuclear imaging in a juvenile porcine haematogenous staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis model.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Ole L; Afzelius, Pia; Bender, Dirk; Schønheyder, Henrik C; Leifsson, Páll S; Nielsen, Karin M; Larsen, Jytte O; Jensen, Svend B; Alstrup, Aage Ko

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare (111)In-labeled leukocyte single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to PET with tracers that potentially could improve detection of osteomyelitis. We chose (11)C-methionine, (11)C-PK11195 and (68)Ga-citrate and validated their diagnostic utility in a porcine haematogenous osteomyelitis model. Four juvenile 14-15 weeks old female pigs were scanned seven days after intra-arterial inoculation in the right femoral artery with a porcine strain of Staphylococcus aureus using a sequential scan protocol with (18)F-FDG, (68)Ga-citrate, (11)C-methionine, (11)C-PK11195, (99m)Tc-Nanocoll and (111)In-labelled autologous leukocytes. This was followed by necropsy of the pigs and gross pathology, histopathology and microbial examination. The pigs developed a total of five osteomyelitis lesions, five lesions characterized as abscesses/cellulitis, arthritis in three joints and five enlarged lymph nodes. None of the tracers accumulated in joints with arthritis. By comparing the 10 infectious lesions, (18)F-FDG accumulated in nine, (111)In-leukocytes in eight, (11)C-methionine in six, (68)Ga-citrate in four and (11)C-PK11195 accumulated in only one lesion. Overall, (18)F-FDG PET was superior to (111)In-leukocyte SPECT in marking infectious and proliferative, i.e. hyperplastic, lesions. However, leukocyte SPECT was performed as early scans, approximately 6 h after injection of the leukocytes, to match the requirements of the 18 h long scan protocol. (11)C-methionine and possibly (68)Ga-citrate may be useful for diagnosis of soft issue lesions. PMID:25973338

  3. Diagnosis of arterial prosthetic graft infection by /sup 111/In oxine white blood cell scans

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, P.P.; Miller, D.C.; Jamieson, S.W.; Mitchell, R.S.; Reitz, B.A.; Olcott, C.; Mehigan, J.T.; Silberstein, R.J.; McDougall, I.R.

    1982-08-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis of infected prosthetic arterial grafts is difficult, despite the application of diverse diagnostic modalities. Delay in making the diagnosis is largely responsible for the high amputation and mortality rates associated with this complication. In nine patients with suspected graft infections, /sup 111/In white blood cell scanning was useful and accurate. Graft infection was proved in five cases and ruled out in three. One false-positive scan was due to a sigmoid diverticular abscess overlying the graft. /sup 111/In white blood cell scans may improve the accuracy of diagnosing infected prosthetic grafts, which may result in better limb and patient salvage rates.

  4. Esthesioneuroblastoma (olfactory neuroblastoma) treated with 111In-octreotide and 177Lu-DOTATATE PRRT.

    PubMed

    Makis, William; McCann, Karey; McEwan, Alexander J B

    2015-04-01

    A 51-year-old man with a recurrent metastatic esthesioneuroblastoma (olfactory neuroblastoma) was referred for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). He received 4 treatments of 111In-octreotide over 8 months and 3 treatments of 177Lu-DOTATATE over 4 months, which helped alleviate his symptoms and improved his quality of life; however, the tumor ultimately progressed and he passed away shortly thereafter. PRRT with 111In-octreotide or 177Lu-DOTATATE could play a role in the management of esthesioneuroblastoma. PMID:25674857

  5. Quantitative simultaneous 111In/99mTc SPECT-CT of osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Cervo, Morgan; Gerbaudo, Victor H.; Park, Mi-Ae; Moore, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A well-established approach for diagnostic imaging of osteomyelitis (OM), a bone infection, is simultaneous SPECT-CT of 99mTc sulfur colloid (SC) and 111In white blood cells (WBC). This method provides essentially perfect spatial registration of the tracers within anatomic sites of interest. Currently, diagnosis is based purely on a visual assessment—where relative discordance between 99mTc and 111In uptake in bone, i.e., high 111In and low 99mTc, suggests OM. To achieve more quantitative images, noise, scatter, and crosstalk between radionuclides must be addressed through reconstruction. Here the authors compare their Monte Carlo-based joint OSEM (MC-JOSEM) algorithm, which reconstructs both radionuclides simultaneously, to a more conventional triple-energy window-based reconstruction (TEW-OSEM), and to iterative reconstruction with no compensation for scatter (NC-OSEM). Methods: The authors created numerical phantoms of the foot and torso. Multiple bone-infection sites were modeled using high-count Monte Carlo simulation. Counts per voxel were then scaled to values appropriate for 111In WBC and 99mTc SC imaging. Ten independent noisy projection image sets were generated by drawing random Poisson deviates from these very low-noise images. Data were reconstructed using the two iterative scatter-compensation methods, TEW-OSEM and MC-JOSEM, as well as the uncorrected method (NC-OSEM). Mean counts in volumes of interest (VOIs) were used to evaluate the bias and precision of each method. Data were also acquired using a phantom, approximately the size of an adult ankle, consisting of regions representing infected and normal bone marrow, within a bone-like attenuator and surrounding soft tissue; each compartment contained a mixture of 111In and 99mTc. Low-noise data were acquired during multiple short scans over 29 h on a Siemens Symbia T6 SPECT-CT with medium-energy collimators. Pure 99mTc and 111In projection datasets were derived by fitting the acquired

  6. Semiotic labelled deductive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nossum, R.T.

    1996-12-31

    We review the class of Semiotic Models put forward by Pospelov, as well as the Labelled Deductive Systems developed by Gabbay, and construct an embedding of Semiotic Models into Labelled Deductive Systems.

  7. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  8. Indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy in hemodialysis access-site infection

    SciTech Connect

    Palestro, C.J.; Vega, A.; Kim, C.K.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Goldsmith, S.J. )

    1990-03-01

    Bacterial sepsis, a significant complication of chronic hemodialysis, is generally the result of infection at the vascular access site. We retrospectively reviewed the utility of indium-111-(111In) labeled autologous leukocyte scintigraphy in 26 patients (30 scans) with synthetic vascular grafts, on chronic hemodialysis, in whom hemodialysis access site infection was a diagnostic consideration. Leukocyte scintigraphy correctly identified all fifteen access-site infections; there was one false-positive study, for an overall sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 93%, respectively. Of particular significance is the fact that in nine (60%) of the fifteen access-site infections, physical examination was normal. Our data indicate that 111In-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy is a useful procedure for the diagnosis of hemodialysis access-site infection, and it is especially valuable when physical examination of the access site is normal.

  9. In vivo kinetics of canine leukocytes labeled with technetium-99m HM-PAO and indium-111 tropolonate

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, B.H.; Schauwecker, D.S.; English, D.; Young, K.A.; Wellman, H.N.

    1988-07-01

    Two weeks after the introduction of osteomyelitis in three dogs, autologous leukocytes were dual-labeled with both (/sup 99m/Tc)HM-PAO and (/sup 111/In)tropolonate, and reinjected. Blood sampling and imaging were then performed. Two weeks later, the same dogs received simultaneous injections of singly-labeled (/sup 99m/Tc)WBC and (/sup 111/In)WBC for comparison. For both studies, blood samples were drawn over 6 hr to determine the respective blood clearance half-time (TB) and % recovery (%R0) of cell-bound radioactivity. There were no significant differences in the average TB results of the /sup 99m/Tc and /sup 111/In groups, either within or between the dual- and singly-labeled studies. The %R0 of singly-labeled (/sup 99m/Tc)WBC was about half that of the other groups (p less than 0.01); however, this difference was attributed to the dissimilar radiochemical purity of the (/sup 99m/Tc)HM-PAO reagents. Region of interest analysis of the 6 and 24 hr images revealed no significant differences between either cell label in the relative or absolute in vivo uptake at known sites of osteomyelitis, noninfected surgery, and normal bone marrow.

  10. Preparation and immunoreactivity of high specific activity indium-111-DTPA labeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb) using ultrapure indium-111

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, S.S.; Neumann, R.D.; Gottschalk, A.

    1986-10-01

    The preparation of high-specific activity /sup 111/In-DTPA-MoAb without increasing the number of DTPA molecules per Ab was investigated. Instant thin layer chromatography was used to assay the relationship between labeling efficiencies and specific activities. With ultrapurified /sup 111/In, the specific activity of the radiolabeled MoAb approached the expected theoretic maximum of 100 muCi/microgram. The bioactivity of such high-specific activity preparation showed no degradation as measured by in vitro cell binding assay.

  11. Method for preparing radionuclide-labeled chelating agent-ligand complexes

    DOEpatents

    Meares, Claude F.; Li, Min; DeNardo, Sally J.

    1999-01-01

    Radionuclide-labeled chelating agent-ligand complexes that are useful in medical diagnosis or therapy are prepared by reacting a radionuclide, such as .sup.90 Y or .sup.111 In, with a polyfunctional chelating agent to form a radionuclide chelate that is electrically neutral; purifying the chelate by anion exchange chromatography; and reacting the purified chelate with a targeting molecule, such as a monoclonal antibody, to form the complex.

  12. Rapid migration of /sup 111/indium-labeled granulocytes to sites of infection

    SciTech Connect

    Dutcher, J.P.; Schiffer, C.A.; Johnston, G.S.

    1981-03-05

    Results are reported of studies with homologous, ABO-matched, /sup 111/In-labeled granulocytes given to 14 granulocytopenic patients with specific, known sites of infection. In 13 of these patients, radioactivity was noted at the site of infection after only 30 minutes. Subsequent scans at four hours or 24 hours or both were all positive at the same site. This technique provides a method for rapid diagnosis of occult infection in this patient population.

  13. Uptake of indium-111-labeled platelets and indium-111 oxine by murine kidneys after total-body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbe, S.; Taylor, S.; Maurer, H.; Kullgren, B.

    1996-08-01

    Radiation nephropathy is a well-known late manifestation of renal irradiation in human beings and experimental animals. Its pathogenesis is unclear, but vascular injury may play a role. Endothelial cells have been demonstrated to manifest a variety of abnormalities within hours of exposure to radiation. In the present experiments mice were exposed to lethal doses of whole-body radiation, and the distribution of {sup 111}In-labeled platelets was evaluated during the first week after irradiation. The purpose was to determine if early abnormalities of endothelial cells would be manifested by altered sequestration of platelets in kidneys and other organs. It was found that the indium accumulated in the kidneys of irradiated mice to a greater extent than in nonirradiated mice, but the pattern of accumulation differed from that seen after injection of radiolabeled platelets. Renal hyperemia was not demonstrable with {sup 51}Cr-labeled red cells, renal vascular permeability was not detected with {sup 125}I-labeled albumin, and the pattern of renal uptake of plasma proteins labeled albumin, and the pattern of renal uptake of plasma proteins labeled with {sup 59}Fe {sup 111}In did not coincide with that seen from {sup 111}In administered as labeled platelets or oxine. Renal uptake of {sup 111}In-oxine was not associated with alterations in urinary or fecal excretion or an increase in total-body retention of the radioisotope. The findings are consistent with the notion that renal vascular injury at the time of irradiation results in accumulation of platelets or platelet constituents during the first week after total-body irradiation of mice. 29 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Synthesis of 1-(p-isothiocyanatobenzyl) derivatives of DTPA and EDTA. Antibody labeling and tumor-imaging studies

    SciTech Connect

    Brechbiel, M.W.; Gansow, O.A.; Atcher, R.W.; Schlom, J.; Esteban, J.; Simpson, D.E.; Colcher, D.

    1986-07-30

    To investigate the /sup 111/In labeling of tumor-localizing monoclonal antibodies (MoAb), the chelate 1-(p-isothiocyanatobenzyl)diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (p-SCN-Bz-DPTA) (1) and its EDTA analogue (2) have been synthesized. By the use of a MoAb (B72.3) specific for a high molecular weight antigen (TAG-72) on cells of a colorectal carcinoma grown in nude mice, optimal chemical conditions for MoAb conjugation of those ligands and of the dicyclic and isobutylcarboxy carbonic anhydrides of DTPA and subsequent /sup 111/In labeling were determined. All conjugates were shown by a competitive binding assay to retain their specificity and activity in vitro when less than one ligand is protein coupled both prior to and after /sup 111/In labeling. Chemical methods for purification of the MoAb were systematically investigated by injection of purified immunoprotein into athymic mice bearing LS-174T tumors that express the TAG-72 antigen. Tissue distribution studies revealed that simple addition of EDTA to labeled immunoglobulins was ineffective at complexing indium not linked to protein by chelates. Similarly, gel chromatography (Sephadex G-50) was not sufficient; rather, size exclusion HPLC had to be employed to remove unreacted /sup 111/In and aggregated antibody. To compare the relative utility of the four chelates for /sup 111/In diagnostic radioimmunoimaging, scintigraphic images of tumor-bearing mice were obtained and evaluated along with tissue distributions. Results showed that clear images of these solid tissue tumors free of extraneous radiation could be obtained only by using p-SCN-Bz-DTPA purified by HPLC. Methods developed are now being employed in clinical trials for diagnosis of human colorectal cancer. 71 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  15. Clinical diagnostic application of 111In-DTPA-octreotide scintigraphy in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Vaccarili, M; Lococo, A; Fabiani, F; Staffilano, A

    2000-01-01

    Some years ago it was proved that a good percentage of small cell lung cancers, classified among cancers of the APUD system, produces somatostatin receptors that can be detected in vivo by scintigraphy with 111In-DTPA-octreotide. With the method in the whole body it is possible to identify the principal neoformation and the probable metastases. The authors present a study of 21 patients afflicted with small cell lung cancer diagnosed histologically. The study, carried out between January 1995 and December 1997, compared the radiologic iconography of the CT scan with the scintigraphic map obtained by a planar scintigraphy and in SPECT 1, 4 and 24-hr after iv injection of 110 MBq of 111In-DTPA-octreotide. The comparison was made with reference to the principal neoplasm and probable metastases. A scintigraphic study, a CT of restaging and a follow-up, done after 3 and 6 months of chemotherapy, on 15 patients with cancer that produces somatostatin receptors proved that the neoplasm sometimes regresses and sometimes progresses. In the latter case, it is possible to identify cerebral, mediastinal and hepatic metastases with the administration of 200 microg of octreotide 3 times a day for 7 days before the scintigraphy. In fact, the administration lowers background activity. The authors concluded that scintigraphy with 111In-DTPA-octreotide plays an important part in the study of patients afflicted with small cell lung cancer. Scintigraphy identifies the subgroups of patients who can be cured with somatostatin analogues together with chemotherapy. Scintigraphy presents a good sensibility in the re-staging and in the follow-up of patients who are treated, even though it is difficult to identify subdiaphragmatic metastases where liver, spleen and kidney show an increase in 111In-DTPA-octreotide. PMID:10939603

  16. Indium-111-labeled autologous leukocyte imaging and fecal excretion. Comparison with conventional methods of assessment of inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Leddin, D.J.; Paterson, W.G.; DaCosta, L.R.; Dinda, P.K.; Depew, W.T.; Markotich, J.; McKaigney, J.P.; Groll, A.; Beck, I.T.

    1987-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the role of /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte imaging and fecal excretion in the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. We compared these tests to various indices of disease activity in Crohn's disease, to Truelove's grading in ulcerative colitis, and to endoscopy, x-ray, and pathology in both diseases. Eleven controls, 16 patients with Crohn's disease, 13 with ulcerative colitis, and 3 with other types of acute bowel inflammation were studied (positive controls). Indium scanning was performed at 1, 4, and 24 hr. Fourteen of 16 patients with active Crohn's disease had positive scans but in only five was localization accurate. One patient had inactive ulcerative colitis, and the scan was negative. Of 12 patients with active ulcerative colitis, 10 had positive scans but disease localization was accurate in only four. Disease extent was correctly defined in 1 of the 3 Positive Controls. There was no significant difference in the accuracy of scanning at 1, 4, or 24 hr. /sup 111/In fecal excretion was significantly higher in patients with inflammatory bowel disease than in controls, and there was correlation between /sup 111/In fecal excretion and most of the indices of disease activity in Crohn's disease. In ulcerative colitis, /sup 111/In fecal excretion did not correlate with Truelove's grading but reflected colonoscopic assessment of severity. In conclusion, /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte scanning lacks sensitivity with respect to disease extent, but fecal excretion of /sup 111/In correlates well with disease severity as determined by other methods.

  17. Bar Code Labels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    American Bar Codes, Inc. developed special bar code labels for inventory control of space shuttle parts and other space system components. ABC labels are made in a company-developed anodizing aluminum process and consecutively marketed with bar code symbology and human readable numbers. They offer extreme abrasion resistance and indefinite resistance to ultraviolet radiation, capable of withstanding 700 degree temperatures without deterioration and up to 1400 degrees with special designs. They offer high resistance to salt spray, cleaning fluids and mild acids. ABC is now producing these bar code labels commercially or industrial customers who also need labels to resist harsh environments.

  18. sup 111 Indium-labeled neutrophil migration into the lungs of bleomycin-treated rabbits assessed noninvasively by external scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Haslett, C.; Shen, A.S.; Feldsien, D.C.; Allen, D.; Henson, P.M.; Cherniack, R.M. )

    1989-09-01

    Factors controlling neutrophil migration into the lung are poorly understood, but their identification is important for our understanding of the pathogenesis of inflammatory lung diseases. Pulmonary inflammation is difficult to quantify, and neutrophils in tissues and BAL may not accurately represent cell migration. In this study, intravenously delivered pulses of rabbit neutrophils labeled with Indium-111 (111In-neutrophils) were used to monitor neutrophil migration into the lungs. Radioactivity quantified in the lung region of interest (ROI) of external gamma camera scintigrams recorded 24 h after intravenous 111In-neutrophil injection accurately reflected the actual neutrophil-associated lung tissue radioactivity. ROI radioactivity at 24 h also correlated closely with the percent of 111In-neutrophils that had migrated into lavageable air spaces, and this parameter therefore provided an index of total lung 111In-neutrophil migration. Using 24-h ROI radioactivity and percent of injected 111In-neutrophils recovered in BAL at 24 h as indices of neutrophil migration into the lung, it was found that intratracheal saline caused only a transient neutrophil migration, whereas 10 U/kg intratracheal bleomycin induced migration that persisted for as long as 3 wk. 111In-neutrophil migration into the lung, assessed by external scintigraphy, correlated with total neutrophils quantified in histologic sections (r = 0.71, p = 0.006). The data suggest that this approach will be valuable in investigating mechanisms controlling neutrophil migration in lung inflammation, and that 111In-neutrophil scintigraphy may provide a noninvasive index of total lung neutrophil load that might be useful in staging inflammation in patchy diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  19. In vitro and in vivo comparison of human Escherichia coli heat-stable peptide analogues incorporating the 111In-DOTA group and distinct linker moieties.

    PubMed

    Giblin, Michael F; Gali, Hariprasad; Sieckman, Gary L; Owen, Nellie K; Hoffman, Timothy J; Forte, Leonard R; Volkert, Wynn A

    2004-01-01

    Three human Escherichia coli heat-stable peptide (STh) analogues, each containing a DOTA chelating group, were synthesized by SPPS and oxidative refolding and compared in in vitro and in vivo systems. One analogue, DOTA-F19-STh(1-19), contains an N-terminal DOTA group attached via an amide bond linkage to an STh moiety which is essentially wild-type except for a Tyr to Phe alteration at position 19 of the molecule. A second analogue, DOTA-R1,4,F19-STh(1-19), differs from the first in that asparagine residues in positions 1 and 4 have been altered to arginine residues in order to examine the effect of positively charged groups in the linker domain. A third analogue, DOTA-11AUN-F19-STh(1-19), differs from the first in that it incorporates an 11-aminoundecanoic acid spacer group between the DOTA group and the first asparagine residue. In vitro competitive binding assays utilizing T-84 human colon cancer cells demonstrated that significant alterations to the N-terminal region of the STh molecule were well tolerated and did not significantly affect binding affinity of STh for the guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C) receptor. Internalization and efflux studies of the indium-labeled species demonstrated that inclusion of positive charge in the linker moiety inhibits internalization of the compound within tumor cells. The characteristics of the three analogues were compared in an in vivo model utilizing T-84 human colon cancer cell xenografts in SCID mice. Clearance of all analogues was rapid, primarily via renal excretion into the urine, with >89% ID excreted into the urine at 1 h pi for all analogues. The 111In-DOTA-R1,4,F19-STh(1-19) and 111In-DOTA-11AUN-F19-STh(1-19) analogues both had longer residence times in the blood than did the 111In-DOTA-F19-STh(1-19) analogue, probably accounting for increased %ID/g values for tumors and nontarget tissues at 1 h pi. At 4 h pi, significant differences between analogues were only seen with respect to metabolic routes of excretion

  20. Loss of 5-hydroxytryptamine from mammalian circulating labelled platelets

    PubMed Central

    Osim, E. E.; Wyllie, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    1. Platelets were obtained from three species of animal: rats, rabbits and dogs. They were labelled with 111In oxine to tag individual platelets and with 14C-labelled 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Doubly labelled platelets from rabbits and dogs were returned to their donors; in the case of rats the platelets were injected intravenously into other, identical rats. At time intervals from 2 to 64 hr, blood samples were drawn and platelets were collected. 111In and 14C were separately counted. In some experiments animals received the 5-HT precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) I.P. (for rats and rabbits) or subcutaneously (for dogs) in a dose of 20 mg/kg daily to accelerate synthesis of 5-HT. 2. 111In disappeared in approximately an exponential fashion in all experiments and the rate of disappearance was not affected by treatment with 5-HTP. The half-life for 111In in four control rats was 18·7 hr and in five rats treated with 5-HTP was 17·8 hr. In rabbits the half-life was 20·4 hr for eight control and 21·2 hr for seven treated with 5-HTP. In the dogs the half-life was 21·0 hr for control and 27·7 hr for experiments with 5-HTP. In control rats, the 14C behaved like the 111In. However, in control rabbits the half-life for 14C was 38·0 hr which is significantly longer than for 111In (P < 0·005). 14C also disappeared more slowly than the 111In in the dogs. 3. In all species treatment with 5-HTP accelerated the disappearance of the 14C approximately three-fold. This was not a reserpine-like effect because the platelets contained more, not less 5-HT than usual. 4. In an attempt to discover the fate of 5-HT disappearing from circulating platelets, experiments were made in which platelets from one rat were doubly labelled, and were then injected into two other rats from the identical strain; one of the recipients received daily I.P. injections of 20 mg/kg of 5-HTP. The other rat in each pair acted as a control. 5. Results from twelve control rats showed that the 14C

  1. Use of Local {sup 111}In-Capromab Pendetide Scan Results to Predict Outcome After Salvage Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, Bridget F. Mouraviev, Vladimir; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Mayes, Janice; Chen, Stephanie H.; Wong, Terence Z.; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Sun, Leon; Moul, Judd; Polascik, Thomas J.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: The {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan (ProstaScint; Cytogen Corp., Princeton NJ) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration to evaluate increasing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels after radical prostatectomy. This study evaluated the role of prostate bed {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan findings to predict response to salvage radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Forty patients who had PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy and a {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan immediately before salvage prostate bed RT (median, 66 Gy) were identified from the Duke Prostate Center database. Patients with distant uptake of capromab pendetide or long-term androgen deprivation therapy were excluded. Median follow-up after salvage RT was 2.7 years. Patient demographic, clinical, and pathologic characteristics; PSA values; and {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan results were retrospectively analyzed. A PSA failure after salvage RT was defined as PSA level greater than 0.2 ng/ml. Data were combined with other published results in a secondary pooled analysis of 106 patients. Results: {sup 111}In-Capromab pendetide findings included 20 patients with negative scan results and 20 with locally positive scan results. Two-year progression-free survival rates were 60% for patients with a negative scan result and 74% for those with a locally positive scan result (p = 0.49). Combined analysis did not show a difference in outcome based on local {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan result. Conclusion: For patients without distant signal detected by using {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan, patients with locally positive scan findings did not have statistically different progression-free survival than those with a negative scan result, suggesting that salvage RT may be successful in patients with either a locally positive or negative {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan result.

  2. Internal radiotherapy and dosimetric study for 111In/ 177Lu-pegylated liposomes conjugates in tumor-bearing mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsin-Ell; Yu, Hung-Man; Lu, Yi-Ching; Heish, Ning-Ning; Tseng, Yun-Long; Huang, Kuang-Liang; Chuang, Kuo-Tang; Chen, Chin-Hsiung; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Lin, Wuu-Jyh; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Ting, Gann; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline; Deng, Win-Ping

    2006-12-01

    In vivo characterization and dosimetric analysis has been performed to evaluate the potential of pegylated liposomes as carriers of radionuclides in tumor internal radiotherapy. MethodsThe DTPA/PEG-liposomes were synthesized with a medium size of 110 nm, conjugated with 111In/ 177Lu-(oxine) 3 to afford 111In/ 177Lu-liposome. The stability of 111In/ 177Lu-liposome in serum was investigated. The biodistribution, scintigraphic imaging and pharmacokinetics of 111In/ 177Lu-liposomes after intravenous(i.v.) injection into C-26 tumor-bearing BALB/cByJ mice were studied. Radiation dose was estimated by MIRD-III program. ResultsThe incorporation efficiency of 111In/ 177Lu into liposomes was 95%. After incubation at 37 °C for 72 h in serum, more than 83% of radioactivity was still retained in the intact 111In/ 177Lu-liposomes. The biodistribution of 111In-liposomes showed that the radioactivity in the blood decreased from 23.14±8.16%ID/g at 1 h to 0.02±0.00%ID/g at 72 h post-injection (p.i.), while reaching its maximum accumulation in tumors at 48 h p.i., with half-life in blood of 10.2 h. The results were supported by that of 177Lu-liposomes. Scintigraphic imaging with 111In-liposomes showed unambiguous tumor images at 48 h p.i. Dose estimation showed that the absorbed dose in tumor from 177Lu-liposomes was 5.74×10 -5 Gy/MBq. ConclusionsThis study provides an in vivo characterization and dosimetric evaluation for the use of liposome systems as carriers in targeted radionuclide therapy. The results suggest that adequate tumor targeting as well as dose delivered to tumors could be achieved by the use of radionuclide targeted liposomes.

  3. Labeling and Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Mike S.; Robertson, Craig T.; Gray-Ray, Phyllis; Ray, Melvin C.

    2003-01-01

    Index comprised of six contrasting descriptive adjectives was used to measure incarcerated youths' perceived negative labeling from the perspective of parents, teachers, and peers. Results provided partial support for hypothesis that juveniles who choose a greater number of negative labels will report more frequent delinquent involvement. Labeling…

  4. Iliac artery mural thrombus formation. Effect of antiplatelet therapy on 111In-platelet deposition in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, S.R.; Paxton, L.D.; Harker, L.A.

    1986-09-01

    To measure the rate, extent, and time course of arterial mural thrombus formation in vivo and to assess the effects of antiplatelet therapy in that setting, we have studied autologous /sup 111/In-platelet deposition induced by experimental iliac artery aneurysms in baboons. Scintillation camera imaging analyses were performed at 1, 24, 48, and 72 hours after implantation of the device. Correction for tissue attenuation was determined by using a small, comparably located /sup 111/In source implanted at the time of surgery. In five animals, /sup 111/In-platelet activity accumulated progressively after device implantation, reaching a maximum after the third day. Repeat image analysis carried out 2 weeks after the surgical procedure also showed progressive accumulation of /sup 111/In-platelets over 3 days but at markedly reduced amounts as compared with the initial study. In five additional animals, treatment with a combination of aspirin and dipyridamole begun 1 hour after surgical implantation reduced /sup 111/In-platelet deposition to negligible levels by the third day. Although platelet survival time was shortened and platelet turnover was reciprocally increased in all operated animals, platelet survival and turnover were not affected by antiplatelet therapy. We conclude that, in contrast to platelet survival and turnover measurements, /sup 111/In-platelet imaging is a reliable and sensitive method for localizing and quantifying focal arterial thrombi and for assessing the effects of antiplatelet therapy.

  5. Label fusion strategy selection.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, Nicolas; Duchesne, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Label fusion is used in medical image segmentation to combine several different labels of the same entity into a single discrete label, potentially more accurate, with respect to the exact, sought segmentation, than the best input element. Using simulated data, we compared three existing label fusion techniques-STAPLE, Voting, and Shape-Based Averaging (SBA)-and observed that none could be considered superior depending on the dissimilarity between the input elements. We thus developed an empirical, hybrid technique called SVS, which selects the most appropriate technique to apply based on this dissimilarity. We evaluated the label fusion strategies on two- and three-dimensional simulated data and showed that SVS is superior to any of the three existing methods examined. On real data, we used SVS to perform fusions of 10 segmentations of the hippocampus and amygdala in 78 subjects from the ICBM dataset. SVS selected SBA in almost all cases, which was the most appropriate method overall. PMID:22518113

  6. OR Specimen Labeling.

    PubMed

    Zervakis Brent, Mary Ann

    2016-02-01

    Mislabeled surgical specimens jeopardize patient safety and quality care. The purpose of this project was to determine whether labeling surgical specimens with two patient identifiers would result in an 80% reduction in specimen labeling errors within six months and a 100% reduction in errors within 12 months. Our failure mode effects analysis found that the lack of two patient identifiers per label was the most unsafe step in our specimen handling process. We piloted and implemented a new process in the OR using the Plan-Do-Check-Act conceptual framework. The audit process included collecting data and making direct observations to determine the sustainability of the process change; however, the leadership team halted the direct observation audit after four months. The total number of surgical specimen labeling errors was reduced by only 60% within six months and 62% within 12 months; therefore, the goal of the project was not met. However, OR specimen labeling errors were reduced. PMID:26849982

  7. Nanovehicles based Bioassay Labels

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong; Lin, Ying-Ying; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-04-01

    In this article, we review recent advances of our group in nanoparticle labels based bioassay. Apoferritin and silica nanoparticles have been used as nanovehicles to load large amount of markers for highly sensitive bioassay. Markers loaded apoferritin, apoferritin-templated metallic phosphate nanoparticles, and poly [guanine] coated silica nanoparticles have been prepared, characterized and used as labels for highly sensitive bioassay of protein and DNA. Dissociation and reconstitution characteristics at different pH as well as the special cavity structure of apoferritin nanovehicle provides a simple and convenient route to prepare versatile nanoparticle labels and avoid the complicated and tedious synthesis process of conventional nanoparticle labels. The optical and electrochemical characteristics of the prepared nanoparticle labels are easily controlled by loading different optical or electrochemical markers. Additionally, the use of apoferritin nanovehicle as template for synthesis of metallic phosphate nanoparticle labels offers fast route to prepare uniform-size metallic nanoparticle labels for electrochemical bioassay and avoids the traditional harsh dissolution conditions to dissolve metallic nanoparticle tags (that is, the strong-acid dissolution of quantum dots and gold nanoparticles) during the stripping analysis step. Silica nanoparticle has also been used as nanovehicle to carry thousands of poly [guanine] tracers, which was used to enhance the oxidation current of Ru(bpy)32+, resulting in enhanced sensitivity of electrochemical immunoassay. The new nanovehicle-based labels have been used for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of DNA and protein biomarkers, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a). The high sensitivity and selectivity make these labels a useful addition to the armory of nanoparticle-based bioassay. The new nanovehicles based labels hold great promise for multiplex protein and DNA detection and for enhancing the sensitivity

  8. How to Read Drug Labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... and alternative medicine Healthy Aging How to read drug labels Printer-friendly version How to Read Drug ... read drug labels How to read a prescription drug label View a text version of this picture. ...

  9. Nutrition Facts: Reading the Label

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Go4Life Get Free Stuff Be a Partner Nutrition Facts: Reading the Label Reading labels can help ... of information on their labels or packaging about nutrition and food safety. Product dates . You might see ...

  10. Noise labeling in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araujo, Marco A. N.; Massarani, Paulo M.; de Azevedo, Jose A. J.; Gerges, Samir N. Y.

    2002-11-01

    The Brazilian Silence Program, created in 1990 by the Brazilian Ministry of Environment, advocates the production and use of equipment with lower noise level. The subcommittee of Noise Labeling of the Brazilian Committee of Certification is composed of INMETRO acoustic specialists to organize and implement the Brazilian Labeling Program. This subcommittee elaborated the label form and test procedure. The noise-labeling program will first concentrate on the following household devices, both manufactured in Brazil or imported from abroad; mixers, blenders, hairdryers, refrigerators, and vacuum cleaners. The label should contain the sound-power level in dBA. INMETRO or other credited laboratories are responsible for the measurements. The ISO 4871, 3740 (1 to 5), ISO 8960, and IEC 704 (1 to 4) and also the equivalent Brazilian standards are used for the measurements, such as ABNT NBR 13910-1. The main objective of the label is to inform the consumer about the emitted noise level. The label offers the noise parameter to be used by the consumer when comparing devices, considering price, performance, and now also noise. No restriction for noise level was established.

  11. Indium-111-labeled leukocyte scan in detection of synthetic vascular graft infection: The effect of antibiotic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, C.J.; Hicklin, O.A.; Payan, J.M.; Gordon, L. )

    1991-01-01

    To determine the sensitivity and specificity of the indium-111-({sup 111}In) labeled leukocyte scan for prosthetic vascular graft infection in patients treated with antibiotic therapy, a retrospective study was performed. Of 41 consecutive {sup 111}In-labeled leukocyte scans performed to evaluate possible vascular graft infection, 23 scans were performed in patients treated with antibiotics. The average duration of antibiotic therapy was 21 days. Twelve positive and 11 negative scans for graft infection were found. By surgical and autopsy correlation of all positive cases, and clinical correlation (of all negative cases), there were 10 true-positive, 11 true-negative, 2 false-positive, and no false-negative scans for graft infections, for an overall sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 85%.

  12. Cause and significance of cold bone defects on indium-111-labeled leukocyte imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, F.L.; Thorne, D.A.

    1987-05-01

    Although photon deficient defects on bone scan have received a great deal of interest, such defects in bones on Indium-111 (/sup 111/In) leukocyte imaging have not been as well recognized. We therefore undertook a retrospective review to determine the frequency and significance of such cold defects on /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte imaging. Three hundred thirty-two scans on 290 patients were reviewed and 40 cases of decreased activity involving bone were found, for an incidence of 12%. The causes of the defects were: fracture (eight), nontraumatic avascular necrosis (eight), solid tumor (six), prostheses and other orthopedic hardware (four), advanced age (four), radiation (three), leukemia (two), osteomyelitis (two), myelofibrosis (one), postlaminectomy (one), and idiopathic (one). To determine the frequency of cold defects in osteomyelitis, all 15 cases of osteomyelitis in this series were reviewed and 12 showed increased activity, two were cold, and one was normoactive. Thus, 14% of cases of osteomyelitis presented as cold defects. We conclude that cold bone defects do occur on /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte scans and that the causes of such defects are similar to those reported for bone and bone marrow scanning.

  13. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H.D.

    1983-07-15

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label.

  14. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H. Duane

    1985-01-01

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label.

  15. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H.D.

    1985-11-12

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label. 5 figs.

  16. Influence of chelator and near-infrared dye labeling on biocharacteristics of dual-labeled trastuzumab-based imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Aldrich, Melissa B; Yang, Zhi; Zhou, Nina; Xie, Qing; Liu, Chen; Sevick-Muraca, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of fluorescent dye labeling on the targeting capabilities of 111In- (DTPA)n-trastuzumab-(IRDye 800)m. Methods Trastuzumab-based conjugates were synthesized and conjugated with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) at molar ratios of 1, 2, 3 and 5 and with a fluorescent dye (IRDye 800CW) at molar ratios of 1, 3 and 5. Immunoreactivity and internalization were assessed on SKBR-3 cells, overexpressing human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. The stability in human serum and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was evaluated. The biodistribution of dual-labeled conjugates was compared with that of 111In-(DTPA)2-trastuzumab in a SKBR-3 xenograft model to evaluate the effect of dye-to-protein ratio. Results All trastuzumab-based conjugates exhibited a high level of chemical and optical purity. Flow cytometry results showed that increasing dye-to-protein ratios were associated with decreased immunoreactivity. Stability studies revealed that the conjugate was stable in PBS, while in human serum, increased degradation and protein precipitation were observed with increasing dye-to-protein ratios. At 4 h, the percentages of internalization of dual-labeled conjugates normalized by dye-to-protein ratio (m) were 24.88%±2.10%, 19.99%±0.59%, and 17.47%±1.26% for "m" equal to 1, 3, and 5, respectively. A biodistribution study revealed a progressive decrease in tumor uptake with an increase in the dye-to-protein ratios. The liver, spleen and kidney showed a marked uptake with increased dye-to-protein ratios, particularly in the latter. Conclusions With non-specific-site conjugation of the fluorescent dye with a protein based on imaging agent, the increase in dye-to-protein ratios negatively impacted the immunoreactivity and stability, indicating a reduced tumor uptake. PMID:27478322

  17. Use of indium-111-labeled cells in measurement of cellular dynamics of experimental cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Oluwole, S.; Wang, T.; Fawwaz, R.; Satake, K.; Nowygrod, R.; Reemtsma, K.; Hardy, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    This study evaluates the kinetics and utility of infused indium-111-labeled cells in detecting rejection in ACI to Lewis rat heart allografts. Syngeneic leukocytes, lymph node lymphocytes, and platelets were isolated and labeled with indium-111 (/sup 111/In) oxine, respectively, and were infused i.v. into Lewis rats carrying beating ACI or syngeneic hearts from post-transplant days 0 to 6. Recipients were imaged serially at 24 hr after infusion of labeled cells followed by excision of both native and transplanted hearts for direct isotope count. Labeled leukocytes accumulative progressively in the allograft with the scan becoming positive by post-transplant day 4. The ratio of allograft to native heart isotope counts rose from 1.25 on day 1 to 10.07 (P less than 0.0001) on day 7. The Lewis recipients infused with labeled lymphocytes showed a positive scan on days 6 and 7 whereas the allograft to native heart isotope count ratio rose from 0.97 on day 1 to 5.33 (P less than 0.001) on day 7. Recipients infused with /sup 111/In-labeled platelets showed a positive scan on days 5 to 7 and the allograft to native heart isotope count ratio rose sharply from 2.56 on day 4 to 16.98 (P less than 0.005) on day 7. Syngeneic heart grafts failed to demonstrate significant accumulation of any of the labeled cell population. These studies confirm the importance of nonlymphocytic cells in cellular rejection, evaluate the kinetics of graft invasion by the various cell types, and suggest that the techniques used afford a method for a safe and an early detection of allograft rejection.

  18. Synthesis, DTPA coupling and radio labeling of cationic aminodextran

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, G.; McAfee, J.G.; Schneider, R.F.; Zapf-Longo, C.; Palladino, E.; Lyons, B.J.; Roskopf, M.

    1984-01-01

    In glomerular diseases, the normal anionic charge of the basement membrane is lost at an early stage. Glomerular damage in rats has been detected more readily with cationic dextrans than with inulin. Hence, the authors attempted to demonstrate this phenomenon in vivo in rats with labeled cationic dextran. Aminated Dextran (AMDEX) was prepared by treating Dextran(mol. wt approx. = 15k) with sodium methoxide followed by a bromethylamine HBr in DMSO resulting in 10-25 aminogroups per mole. DTPA cyclic dianhydride was coupled to AMDEX using a weight ratio of 1:10 in 0.2 - 1.0 ml 0.42 M Hepes buffer at pH 7.4. Free DTPA was removed by gel filtration (Sephadex P6DG) or by using Centricon-10 (AMICON) centrifugal microconcentrators. AMDEX coupled with DTPA was labeled with Indium-111 in 0.25 M acetate buffer. Labeling yields were >90% by gel chromatography and electrophoresis (pH8.2 Barbitol buffer). AMEXDTPA was labeled also by ligand exchange with Tc-99m-Sn-citrate at neutral pH with a labeling yield of 30%. On electrophoresis, all the labeled samples retained their cationic character. The distribution of purified In-111 AMDEX, was compared with simultaneously IV injected Tc-99m DTPA in rats. The 2 hour urinary excretion, and renal clearance (calculated from the biexponential plasma clearance) were slower (70 to 80%) than those of DTPA, due to the larger molecular size of AMDEX. By 1 hr., 5% of the administered activity was retained in each kidney, probably due to adherence to anionic binding sites.

  19. Clinical Utility of Indium 111–Labeled White Blood Cell Scintigraphy for Evaluation of Suspected Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Sarah S.; Cox, Gary M.; Stout, Jason E.

    2014-01-01

    Background  We sought to characterize the clinical utility of indium 111 (111In)–labeled white blood cell (WBC) scans by indication, to identify patient populations who might benefit most from this imaging modality. Methods  Medical records for all patients who underwent 111In-labeled WBC scans at our tertiary referral center from 2005 to 2011 were reviewed. Scan indication, results, and final diagnosis were assessed independently by 2 infectious disease physicians. Reviewers also categorized the clinical utility of each scan as helpful vs not helpful with diagnosis and/or management according to prespecified criteria. Cases for which clinical utility could not be determined were excluded from the utility assessment. Results  One hundred thirty-seven scans were included in this analysis; clinical utility could be determined in 132 (96%) cases. The annual number of scans decreased throughout the study period, from 26 in 2005 to 13 in 2011. Forty-one (30%) scans were positive, and 85 (62%) patients were ultimately determined to have an infection. Of the evaluable scans, 63 (48%) scans were deemed clinically useful. Clinical utility varied by scan indication: 111In-labeled WBC scans were more helpful for indications of osteomyelitis (35/50, 70% useful) or vascular access infection (10/15, 67% useful), and less helpful for evaluation of fever of unknown origin (12/35, 34% useful). Conclusions  111In-labeled WBC scans were useful for patient care less than half of the time at our center. Targeted ordering of these scans for indications in which they have greater utility, such as suspected osteomyelitis and vascular access infections, may optimize test utilization. PMID:25734155

  20. Noninvasive detection of coronary thrombi with /sup 111/In platelets: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, S.R.; Lerch, R.A.; Mathias, C.J.; Sobel, B.E.; Welch, M.J.

    1983-02-01

    The need for rapid, definitive identification of coronary thrombosis has been intensified by the advent of thrombolytic therapy and by interest in the role of thrombosis in the etiology of coronary artery disease. To determine whether platelet thrombi can be detected noninvasively with /sup 111/In platelets, a method was developed in which /sup 99m/Tc-tagged red blood cells were used to correct for activity within the blood attributable to platelets circulating but not associated with thrombus. In 18 dogs coronary thrombi were induced closed-chest with a copper coil introduced into the coronary artery. /sup 111/In platelets and /sup 99m/Tc RBCs were administered either before or 1 hr after induction of thrombus, and serial scintigrams obtained. Coronary thrombus was identified readily in the processed scintigrams. In six dogs, thrombolysis was achieved with intracoronary streptokinase. In each case serial scintigraphy demonstrated resolution of the clot. The dual radiotracer technique should permit serial noninvasive delineation of the temporal relationship between platelet deposition and coronary heart disease in patients, and should facilitate the evaluation of interventions designed to prevent platelet aggregation or to lyse existing thrombi.

  1. 111In platelet imaging of left ventricular thrombi. Predictive value for systemic emboli

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, J.R.; Ritchie, J.L. )

    1990-04-01

    To determine whether a positive indium 111 platelet image for a left ventricular thrombus, which indicates ongoing thrombogenic activity, predicts an increased risk of systemic embolization, we compared the embolic rate in 34 patients with positive {sup 111}In platelet images with that in 69 patients with negative images during a mean follow-up of 38 +/- 31 (+/- SD) months after platelet imaging. The positive and negative image groups were similar with respect to age (59 +/- 11 vs. 62 +/- 10 years), prevalence of previous infarction (94% vs. 78%, p less than 0.05), time from last infarction (28 +/- 51 vs. 33 +/- 47 months), ejection fraction (29 +/- 14 vs. 33 +/- 14), long-term or paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (15% vs. 26%), warfarin therapy during follow-up (26% vs. 20%), platelet-inhibitory therapy during follow-up (50% vs. 33%), injected {sup 111}In dose (330 +/- 92 vs. 344 +/- 118 microCi), and latest imaging time (greater than or equal to 48 hours in all patients). During follow-up, embolic events occurred in 21% (seven of 34) of patients with positive platelet images for left ventricular thrombi as compared with 3% (two of 69) of patients with negative images (p = 0.002). By actuarial methods, at 42 months after platelet imaging, only 86% of patients with positive images were embolus free as compared with 98% of patients with negative images (p less than 0.01).

  2. Like your labels?

    PubMed

    Field, Michele

    2010-01-01

    The descriptive “conventions” used on food labels are always evolving. Today, however, the changes are so complicated (partly driven by legislation requiring disclosures about environmental impacts, health issues, and geographical provenance) that these labels more often baffle buyers than enlighten them. In a light-handed manner, the article points to how sometimes reading label language can be like deciphering runes—and how if we are familiar with the technical terms, we can find a literal meaning, but still not see the implications. The article could be ten times longer because food labels vary according to cultures—but all food-exporting cultures now take advantage of our short attention-span when faced with these texts. The question is whether less is more—and if so, in this contest for our attention, what “contestant” is voted off. PMID:21539053

  3. Indium-based and iodine-based labeling of HPMA copolymer-epirubicin conjugates: Impact of structure on the in vivo fate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Libin; Zhang, Rui; Yang, Jiyuan; Wang, Jiawei; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2016-08-10

    Recently, we developed 2nd generation backbone degradable N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer-drug conjugates which contain enzymatically cleavable sequences (GFLG) in both polymeric backbone and side-chains. This design allows using polymeric carriers with molecular weights above renal threshold without impairing their biocompatibility, thereby leading to significant improvement in therapeutic efficacy. For example, 2nd generation HPMA copolymer-epirubicin (EPI) conjugates (2P-EPI) demonstrated complete tumor regression in the treatment of mice bearing ovarian carcinoma. To obtain a better understanding of the in vivo fate of this system, we developed a dual-labeling strategy to simultaneously investigate the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of the polymer carrier and drug EPI. First, we synthesized two different types of dual-radiolabeled conjugates, including 1) (111)In-2P-EPI-(125)I (polymeric carrier 2P was radiolabeled with (111)In and drug EPI with (125)I), and 2) (125)I-2P-EPI-(111)In (polymeric carrier 2P was radiolabeled with (125)I and drug EPI with (111)In). Then, we compared the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of these two dual-labeled conjugates in female nude mice bearing A2780 human ovarian carcinoma. There was no significant difference in the blood circulation between polymeric carrier and payload; the carriers ((111)In-2P and (125)I-2P) showed similar retention of radioactivity in both tumor and major organs except kidney. However, compared to (111)In-labeled payload EPI, (125)I-labeled EPI showed lower radioactivity in normal organs and tumor at 48h and 144h after intravenous administration of conjugates. This may be due to different drug release rates resulting from steric hindrance to the formation of enzyme-substrate complex as indicated by cleavage experiments with lysosomal enzymes (Tritosomes). A slower release rate of EPI(DTPA)(111)In than EPI(Tyr)(125)I was observed. It may be also due to in vivo catabolism and

  4. In Vivo Biodistribution, PET Imaging, and Tumor Accumulation of 86Y- and 111In-Antimindin/RG-1, Engineered Antibody Fragments in LNCaP Tumor–Bearing Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Douglas W.; Heitner, Tara; Alicke, Bruno; Light, David R.; McLean, Kirk; Satozawa, Noboru; Parry, Gordon; Yoo, Jeongsoo; Lewis, Jason S.; Parry, Renate

    2016-01-01

    To optimize in vivo tissue uptake kinetics and clearance of engineered monoclonal antibody (mAb) fragments for radiotherapeutic and radiodiagnostic applications, we compared the biodistribution and tumor localization of four 111In- and 86Y-labeled antibody formats, derived from a single antimindin/RG-1 mAb, in a prostate tumor model. The IgG, diabody, single-chain variable domain (scFv), and novel miniantibody formats, composed of the human IgE-CH4 and a modified IgG1 hinge linked to scFv domains, were compared. Methods Antibodies were first derivatized with the bifunctional chelator CHX-A″-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid and then bound to the radiometal to create radiolabeled immunoconjugates. Human LNCaP xenografts were grown in nude mice, and 111In- or 86Y-labeled antibodies were administered intravenously. Tissues were harvested at different times, and the level of antibody deposition was determined by measuring radioactivity. Whole-body small-animal PET of mice receiving 86Y-labeled antibodies was performed at 6 time points and colocalized with simultaneous micro-CT imaging. Results The biodistributions of 111In and 86Y antibodies were quite similar. The blood, tumor, kidney, and liver tissues contained varying levels of radioactivity. The antibody accumulation in the tumor correlated with molecular size. The IgG steadily increased with time to 24.1 percentage injected dose per gram (%ID/g) at 48 h. The miniantibody accumulated at a similar rate to reach a lower level (14.2 %ID/g) at 48 h but with a higher tumor-to-blood ratio than the IgG. Tumor accumulation of the diabody peaked at 3 h, reaching a much lower level (3.7 %ID/g). A combination of rapid clearance and lower relative affinity of the scFv precluded deposition in the tumor. Small-animal PET results correlated well with the biodistribution results, with similar tumor localization patterns. Conclusion The larger antibody formats (IgG and miniantibody) gave higher tumor uptake levels than did the

  5. Off-Label Drug Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Off-label Drug Use What is off-label drug use? In the United States new drugs are ... unapproved use of a drug. Is off-label drug use legal? The off-label use of FDA- ...

  6. Clinical parameters related to optimal tumor localization of indium-111-labeled mouse antimelanoma monoclonal antibody ZME-018

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.L.; Rosenblum, M.G.; Lamki, L.; Glenn, H.J.; Krizan, Z.; Hersh, E.M.; Plager, C.E.; Bartholomew, R.M.; Unger, M.W.; Carlo, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Radioimmunolocalization of an /sup 111/In-labeled mouse antimelanoma monoclonal antibody (MoAb), ZME-018, was examined in 21 patients with metastatic malignant melanoma. Each patient received a single. i.v. infusion of MoAb at concentrations ranging from 1 mg to 20 mg, coupled to 5 mCi /sup 111/In by the chelating agent DPTA. No toxicity was observed in any patient. Total-body and regions of interest scans performed at 4, 24, and 72 hr following MoAb administration revealed uptake in 63 out of 105 previously diagnosed metastases for an overall sensitivity of 60%. Uptake was consistently observed in liver/spleen, and less frequently in bowel, testes, axillae and bone. Sensitivity of detection increased significantly at doses of MoAb above 2.5 mg, with 74% of lesions imaging at 20 mg/5 mCi compared with 29% at 2.5 mg/5 mCi (p less than 0.005). A significant correlation was observed between tumor uptake of /sup 111/In-MoAb conjugate and increasing tumor size. Soft-tissue lesions such as skin and lymph node metastases were imaged to a greater extent (76%) than visceral metastases (19%). In five of six patients, biopsies obtained from 3 days to 14 days after MoAb administration showed antibody present on tumor cells as demonstrated by flow cytometry and/or radioimmunoassay. Human anti-murine immunoglobulin responses were observed in seven of 17 patients studied. Mean plasma clearance of ZME-018 was prolonged with a T1/2 of 24.7 hr and increased slightly with increasing MoAb dose. Urinary excretion of /sup 111/In averaged 12.4% of the injected dose over 48 hours. Radioimmunolocalization of melanoma with /sup 111/In-labeled ZME-018 appears feasible. The sensitivity of the technique was related to dose, tumor size, and disease site.

  7. Improved activity estimation with MC-JOSEM versus TEW-JOSEM in 111In SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Fakhri, Georges El; Moore, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    We have previously developed a fast Monte Carlo (MC)-based joint ordered-subset expectation maximization (JOSEM) iterative reconstruction algorithm, MC-JOSEM. A phantom study was performed to compare quantitative imaging performance of MC-JOSEM with that of a triple-energy-window approach (TEW) in which estimated scatter was also included additively within JOSEM, TEW-JOSEM. We acquired high-count projections of a 5.5 cm3 sphere of 111In at different locations in the water-filled torso phantom; high-count projections were then obtained with 111In only in the liver or only in the soft-tissue background compartment, so that we could generate synthetic projections for spheres surrounded by various activity distributions. MC scatter estimates used by MC-JOSEM were computed once after five iterations of TEW-JOSEM. Images of different combinations of liver∕background and sphere∕background activity concentration ratios were reconstructed by both TEW-JOSEM and MC-JOSEM for 40 iterations. For activity estimation in the sphere, MC-JOSEM always produced better relative bias and relative standard deviation than TEW-JOSEM for each sphere location, iteration number, and activity combination. The average relative bias of activity estimates in the sphere for MC-JOSEM after 40 iterations was −6.9%, versus −15.8% for TEW-JOSEM, while the average relative standard deviation of the sphere activity estimates was 16.1% for MC-JOSEM, versus 27.4% for TEW-JOSEM. Additionally, the average relative bias of activity concentration estimates in the liver and the background for MC-JOSEM after 40 iterations was −3.9%, versus −12.2% for TEW-JOSEM, while the average relative standard deviation of these estimates was 2.5% for MC-JOSEM, versus 3.4% for TEW-JOSEM. MC-JOSEM is a promising approach for quantitative activity estimation in 111In SPECT. PMID:18561679

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities in patients with neoplastic meningitis. An evaluation using /sup 111/In-DTPA ventriculography

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, S.A.; Trump, D.L.; Chen, D.C.; Thompson, G.; Camargo, E.E.

    1982-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics were evaluated by /sup 111/In-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (/sup 111/In-DTPA) ventriculography in 27 patients with neoplastic meningitis. Nineteen patients (70 percent) had evidence of cerebrospinal fluid flow disturbances. These occurred as ventricular outlet obstructions, abnormalities of flow in the spinal canal, or flow distrubances over the cortical convexities. Tumor histology, physical examination, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, myelograms, and computerized axial tomographic scans were not sufficient to predict cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns. These data indicate that cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities are common in patients with neoplastic meningitis and that /sup 111/In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow imaging is useful in characterizing these abnormalities. This technique provides insight into the distribution of intraventricularly administered chemotherapy and may provide explanations for treatment failure and drug-induced neurotoxicity in patients with neoplastic meningitis.

  9. Unsuspected pneumonia detected by increased lung uptake on 111In-ibritumomab tiuxetan scan.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Misun; Joyce, Judith M; Klein, Herbert; Hou, Jing-Zhou

    2012-10-01

    99Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin) is a CD20-targeted radioimmunotherapy for the treatment of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma approved by the FDA in 2002. The acquisition of an 111In ibritumomab tiuxetan scan (bioscan) to confirm normal biodistribution before treatment with 99Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan was initially required in the United States until November 2011. This is the first documented example of abnormal biodistribution due to unsuspected pneumonia detected by increased lung uptake on the bioscan. The pneumonia was treated and resolved before 99Y Zevalin, avoiding potential harm and indicating that a screening chest x-ray may be appropriate when a bioscan is not performed. PMID:22955077

  10. Spectral Label Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Wachinger, Christian; Golland, Polina

    2012-01-01

    We present a new segmentation approach that combines the strengths of label fusion and spectral clustering. The result is an atlas-based segmentation method guided by contour and texture cues in the test image. This offers advantages for datasets with high variability, making the segmentation less prone to registration errors. We achieve the integration by letting the weights of the graph Laplacian depend on image data, as well as atlas-based label priors. The extracted contours are converted to regions, arranged in a hierarchy depending on the strength of the separating boundary. Finally, we construct the segmentation by a region-wise, instead of voxel-wise, voting, increasing the robustness. Our experiments on cardiac MRI show a clear improvement over majority voting and intensity-weighted label fusion. PMID:23286157

  11. Spin labeling EPR.

    PubMed

    Klare, Johann P; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy has emerged as an efficient tool to elucidate the structure and conformational dynamics of biomolecules under native-like conditions. This article summarizes the basics as well as recent progress of site-directed spin labeling. Continuous wave EPR spectra analyses and pulse EPR techniques are reviewed with special emphasis on applications to the sensory rhodopsin-transducer complex mediating the photophobic response of the halophilic archaeum Natronomonas pharaonis and the photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26. PMID:19728138

  12. 111-Indium labelled autologous leucocytes in diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wandall, J.H.; Edeling, C.J.; Jensen, J.T.; Lund, J.O.; Bonnevie, O.; Haxholdt, H.; Jensen, H.C.; Matzen, P.; Myschetsky, P.S.; Nielsen, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    111-Indium labelled leucocytes have been used to visualize inflammatory lesions in ulcerative colitis (CU) and in Crohn's disease (CD). The aim of this study was to compare findings by scintigraphy, radiology and endoscopy. Material: Twelve patients with CU and 15 patients with CD were studied. All patients were non-febrile. Two patients received prednisolone 5 mg/daily, 8 sulphasalazine. Methods: Autologous leucocytes were labelled with 111-In-Oxine and given i.v. Scintigrams were obtained 3 and 24 hrs. p.i. Double contrast x-ray studies were done of the colon and small intestine after 2 and 14 days respectively. Colonscopy with biopsy was done after 4 days. Results: Active lesions were found in 24 and 27 patients. Scintigrams 24 hrs.p.i. did not give and additional information compared with scintigrams 3 hrs.p.i. Intraluminal activity masked the location and extension of lesions after 24 hrs. Excretion in the stool was 2.4-25.8% of administered activity. Compared with scintigraphy a corresponding extension and location was found by colonscopy. In 4 patients x-ray of the colon was normal but scintigraphy and colonscopy showed active inflammation. Conclusion: Scintigraphy after injection of 111-In labelled leucocytes is a atraumatic method for visualization of inflammatory lesions in UC and CD. Furthermore, it appears to be more sensitive than conventional x-ray studies.

  13. 90Y-Labeled Anti-ROBO1 Monoclonal Antibody Exhibits Antitumor Activity against Small Cell Lung Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Kentaro; Koyama, Keitaro; Suga, Kosuke; Ikemura, Masako; Saito, Yasutaka; Hino, Akihiro; Iwanari, Hiroko; Kusano-Arai, Osamu; Mitsui, Kenichi; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Fukayama, Masashi; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Hamakubo, Takao; Momose, Toshimitsu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction ROBO1 is a membrane protein that contributes to tumor metastasis and angiogenesis. We previously reported that 90Y-labeled anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody (90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG) showed an antitumor effect against ROBO1-positive tumors. In this study, we performed a biodistribution study and radioimmunotherapy (RIT) against ROBO1-positive small cell lung cancer (SCLC) models. Methods For the biodistribution study, 111In-labeled anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody (111In-anti-ROBO1 IgG) was injected into ROBO1-positive SCLC xenograft mice via the tail vein. To evaluate antitumor effects, an RIT study was performed, and SCLC xenograft mice were treated with 90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG. Tumor volume and body weight were periodically measured throughout the experiments. The tumors and organs of mice were then collected, and a pathological analysis was carried out. Results As a result of the biodistribution study, we observed tumor uptake of 111In-anti-ROBO1 IgG. The liver, kidney, spleen, and lung showed comparably high accumulation of 111In-labeled anti-ROBO1. In the RIT study, 90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG significantly reduced tumor volume compared with baseline. Pathological analyses of tumors revealed coagulation necrosis and fatal degeneration of tumor cells, significant reduction in the number of Ki-67-positive cells, and an increase in the number of apoptotic cells. A transient reduction of hematopoietic cells was observed in the spleen, sternum, and femur. Conclusions These results suggest that RIT with 90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG is a promising treatment for ROBO1-positive SCLC. PMID:26017283

  14. Immunospecific saturable clearance mechanisms for indium-111-labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibody 96. 5 in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.L.; Lamki, L.M.; Shanken, L.J.; Blake, M.E.; Plager, C.E.; Benjamin, R.S.; Schweighardt, S.; Unger, M.W.; Rosenblum, M.G.

    1988-08-01

    Liver uptake of 111In-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) remains a significant problem in radioimaging studies to date. To determine if the observed liver uptake of an 111In-labeled anti-melanoma antibody 96.5 (111In-96.5) was dependent on the presence of hepatic antigen or on recognition of circulating murine antibody, escalating doses of an unlabeled nonimmunoreactive MoAb (NIR-MoAb) were administered to 18 patients with metastatic malignant melanoma either 1 or 24 h prior to an infusion of 1 mg of 111In-96.5. The number of metastases imaged, pharmacokinetics, and the ratio of radioactivity (expressed as average counts/pixel) in liver (L), spleen (S), bone (B), and kidney (K) compared to blood pool (heart = H) were examined. Results were prospectively compared with data from six patients who received immunoreactive unlabeled 96.5 prior to 111In-96.5. Increasing dose or changes in the preinfusion time of NIR-MoAb had no significant effect on the biodistribution of 111In-96.5. In contrast, patients who received unlabeled, immunoreactive 96.5 prior to 111In-96.5 infusion demonstrated a significant drop (P less than 0.001) in the liver/heart ratio of radioactivity (2.81 +/- 0.35 (SEM)) compared to patients receiving the identical dose of NIR-MoAb (10.35 +/- 1.33). Significant decreases in spleen/heart and bone/heart ratios were also observed. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that the volume of distribution (Vd) and the plasma t1/2 both decreased when 96.5 was administered compared to NIR-MoAb. In addition, a 4-fold increase in concentration X time was obtained after 96.5 antibody was administered compared to NIR-MoAb. More metastases were imaged in patients receiving preinfusions of 96.5 (23 of 28) than in patients receiving NIR-MoAb (10 of 18; P less than 0.05).

  15. H2CHXdedpa and H4CHXoctapa-chiral acyclic chelating ligands for (67/68)Ga and (111)In radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Ramogida, Caterina F; Cawthray, Jacqueline F; Boros, Eszter; Ferreira, Cara L; Patrick, Brian O; Adam, Michael J; Orvig, Chris

    2015-02-16

    The chiral acyclic ligands H2CHXdedpa (N4O2), H2CHXdedpa-bb (N4O2), and H4CHXoctapa (N4O4) (CHX = cyclohexyl/cyclohexane, H2dedpa = 1,2-[[6-carboxy-pyridin-2-yl]-methylamino]ethane, bb = N,N'-dibenzylated, H4octapa = N,N'-bis(6-carboxy-2-pyridylmethyl)-ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid) were synthesized, complexed with Ga(III) and/or In(III), and evaluated for their potential as chelating agents in radiopharmaceutical applications. The ligands were compared to the previously studied hexadentate H2dedpa and octadentate H4octapa ligands to determine the effect adding a chiral 1R,2R-trans-cyclohexane to replace the ethylenediamine backbone would have on metal complex stability and radiolabeling kinetics. It was found that [Ga(CHXdedpa)](+) showed very similar properties to those of [Ga(dedpa)](+), with only one isomer in solution observed by NMR spectroscopy, and minimal structural changes in the solid-state X-ray structure. Like [Ga(dedpa)](+), [Ga(CHXdedpa)](+) exhibited exceptionally high thermodynamic stability constants (log KML = 28.11(8)), and the chelate retained the ability to label (67)Ga quantitatively in 10 min at room temperature at ligand concentrations of 1 × 10(-5) M. In vitro kinetic inertness assays demonstrated the [(67)Ga(CHXdedpa)](+) complex to be more stable than [(67)Ga(dedpa)](+) in a human serum competition, with 90.5% and 77.8% of (67)Ga remaining chelate-bound after 2 h, respectively. Preliminary coordination studies of H4CHXoctapa with In(III) demonstrated [In(CHXoctapa)](-) to have an equivalently high thermodynamically stable constant as [In(octapa)](-), with log KML values of 27.16(9) and 26.76(14), respectively. The [(111)In(CHXoctapa)](-) complex showed exceptionally high in vitro kinetic inertness over 120 h in human serum, comparing well with previously reported [(111)In(octapa)](-) values, and an improved stability compared to the current industry "gold standards" 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA

  16. Labeling the Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasner, William

    The report describes research on the effects of labeling children from minority groups as retarded and includes a review of a system of multiculturalistic pluralistic assessment (SOMPA), an instrument for evaluating the abilities and potentialities of children based on different aspects of performance. Listed among findings of the Riverside study,…

  17. A Deceiving Label?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    The author reports on the growing debate among educators on whether the umbrella Asian Pacific Islander label conceals disparities among Asian American students or provides political power in numbers. Nationally, experts say that support services aimed at not only Southeast Asians, but all Asian Pacific Islander students, remain scarce in higher…

  18. Localization of neuroendocrine tumours with [111In] DTPA-octreotide scintigraphy (Octreoscan): a comparative study with CT and MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Shi, W; Johnston, C F; Buchanan, K D; Ferguson, W R; Laird, J D; Crothers, J G; McIlrath, E M

    1998-04-01

    A wide variety of neuroendocrine tumours express somatostatin receptors, and can be visualized by radiolabelled somatostatin analogue scintigraphy. To investigate the value of [111In]-octreotide scintigraphy (Octreoscan), 48 patients (37 with proven carcinoid, pancreatic endocrine and medullary carcinoma of thyroid tumours, 11 with neuroendocrine syndromes multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN-I) and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) were examined with 111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide. Scintigrams were obtained at 24 and 48 h, and the results were compared with CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-five of 48 patients had positive [111In]-octreotide scintigraphy (23/25 (92%) carcinoids, 8/9 (89%) PETs, 4/11 (36%) MEN-I & ZES). Of the 42 lesions located by conventional imaging techniques, 37 (88%) were also identified by Octreoscan. Unexpected lesions (40 sites), not detected by CT or MR imaging were found in 24/48 (50%) patients. [111In]-octreotide scintigraphy has a higher sensitivity for tumour detection, and is superior to MR imaging and CT scanning in the identification of previously unsuspected extraliver and lymph node metastases. It may also be helpful for the localization of clinically suspected tumours in patients with MEN-I and ZES. PMID:9666953

  19. Technetium-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody with preserved immunoreactivity and high in vivo stability

    SciTech Connect

    Arano, Y.; Yokoyama, A.; Furukawa, T.; Horiuchi, K.; Yahata, T.; Saji, H.; Sakahara, H.; Nakashima, T.; Koizumi, M.; Endo, K.

    1987-06-01

    Recent availability of monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) and their radiolabeling through the use of the bifunctional chelating agents (BCA) have become an alternative procedure for in vivo radioimmunodetection. Using a newly synthesized BCA, a p-carboxyethylphenylglyoxal-di(N-methylthiosemicarbazone) (CE-DTS), the coupling and technetium-99m (/sup 99m/Tc) labeling of monoclonal IgG against hCG were carried out. In the system presented, factors affecting stability and immunoreactivity were examined. Immunoreactivity of the original IgG (56C) was preserved by conjugating one CE-DTS molecule per molecule of IgG (56C) using the phosphorylazide method, however, /sup 99m/Tc labeling pH affected the immunoreactivity and limited the /sup 99m/Tc labeling reaction between pH 4.5 and 6.2. A screening of labeling conditions, such as pH, reaction time, and reducing agent system were then carried out. Technetium-99m-labeled IgG (56C), (/sup 99m/Tc)CE-DTS-IgG (56C), showed good stability upon incubation with mice sera and comparable mice biodistribution to that of indium-111 (/sup 111/In) DTPA-IgG (56C). Thus, these results indicate the excellent potential of CE-DTS as a BCA for labeling MoAb with /sup 99m/Tc.

  20. Early diagnosis of acute postoperative renal transplant rejection by indium-111-labeled platelet scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Tisdale, P.L.; Collier, B.D.; Kauffman, H.M.; Adams, M.B.; Isitman, A.T.; Hellman, R.S.; Hoffmann, R.G.; Rao, S.A.; Joestgen, T.; Krohn, L.

    1986-08-01

    A prospective evaluation of /sup 111/In-labeled platelet scintigraphy (IPS) for the early diagnosis of acute postoperative renal transplant rejection (TR) was undertaken. The results of IPS were compared with in vitro biochemical tests, the clinical finding of graft tenderness, and combined (/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA and (/sup 131/I)orthoiodohippurate scintigraphy. With a sensitivity of 0.93 and a specificity of 0.95, IPS provided otherwise unavailable diagnostic information. Furthermore, postoperative IPS was a good predictor of long-term allograft survival.

  1. Therapeutic efficacy evaluation of 111in-VNB-liposome on human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wan-Chi; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Tseng, Yun-Long; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Chang, Ya-Fang; Lu, Yi-Ching; Ting, Gann; Whang-Peng, Jaqueline; Wang, Shyh-Jen

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the liposome encaged with vinorelbine (VNB) and 111In-oxine on human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29) using HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts. HT-29 cells stably transfected with plasmid vectors containing luciferase gene ( luc) were transplanted subcutaneously into the male NOD/SCID mice. Biodistribution of the drug was performed when tumor size reached 500-600 mm 3. The uptakes of 111In-VNB-liposome in tumor and normal tissues/organs at various time points postinjection were assayed. Multimodalities, including gamma scintigraphy, bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and whole-body autoradiography (WBAR), were applied for evaluating the therapeutic efficacy when tumor size was about 100 mm 3. The tumor/blood ratios of 111In-VNB-liposome were 0.044, 0.058, 2.690, 20.628 and 24.327, respectively, at 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h postinjection. Gamma scinitigraphy showed that the tumor/muscle ratios were 2.04, 2.25 and 4.39, respectively, at 0, 5 and 10 mg/kg VNB. BLI showed that significant tumor control was achieved in the group of 10 mg/kg VNB ( 111In-VNB-liposome). WBAR also confirmed this result. In this study, we have demonstrated a non-invasive imaging technique with a luciferase reporter gene and BLI for evaluation of tumor treatment efficacy in vivo. The SCID mice bearing HT-29/ luc xenografts treated with 111In-VNB-liposome were shown with tumor reduction by this technique.

  2. Labeling lake water with tritium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederick, B.J.

    1963-01-01

    A method of packaging tritiated water in a manner that facilitates safe handling in environmental labeling operations, and procedures followed in labeling a large body of water with a small volume of tritiated water are described. ?? 1963.

  3. 99m tc labeled liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, W.T.; Klipper, R.W.; Timmons, J.H.; Rudolph, A.S.

    1992-10-27

    This patent describes a method of preparing stable gamma-emitting radionuclide-labeled alkyleneamine oxime, the incubating being for a period of time sufficient to form labeled liposome-encapsulated protein.

  4. Decode the Sodium Label Lingo

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Preschooler For Gradeschooler For Teen Decode the Sodium Label Lingo Published January 24, 2013 Print Email Reading food labels can help you slash sodium. Here's how to decipher them. "Sodium free" or " ...

  5. Optical reflectance studies of highly specular anisotropic nanoporous (111) InP membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, J. A.; Lewis, R. A.; Sirbu, L.; Enachi, M.; Tiginyanu, I. M.; Skuratov, V. A.

    2015-04-01

    High-precision optical angular reflectance measurements are reported for a specular anisotropic nanoporous (111) InP membrane prepared by doping-assisted wet-electrochemical etching. The membrane surface morphology was investigated using scanning electron microscope imaging and revealed a quasi-uniform and self-organized nanoporous network consisting of semiconductor ‘islands’ in the sub-wavelength regime. The optical response of the nanoporous InP surface was studied at 405 nm (740 THz; UV), 633 nm (474 THz; VIS) and 1064 nm (282 THz; NIR), and exhibited a retention of basic macro-dielectric properties. Refractive index determinations demonstrate an optical anisotropy for the membrane which is strongly dependent on the wavelength of incident light, and exhibits an interesting inversion (positive anisotropy to negative) between 405 and 633 nm. The inversion of optical anisotropy is attributed to a strongly reduced ‘metallic’ behaviour in the membrane when subject to above-bandgap illumination. For the simplest case of sub-bandgap incident irradiation, the optical properties of the nanoporous InP sample are analysed in terms of an effective refractive index neff and compared to effective media approximations.

  6. Learning with imperfectly labeled patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chittineni, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of learning in pattern recognition using imperfectly labeled patterns is considered. The performance of the Bayes and nearest neighbor classifiers with imperfect labels is discussed using a probabilistic model for the mislabeling of the training patterns. Schemes for training the classifier using both parametric and non parametric techniques are presented. Methods for the correction of imperfect labels were developed. To gain an understanding of the learning process, expressions are derived for success probability as a function of training time for a one dimensional increment error correction classifier with imperfect labels. Feature selection with imperfectly labeled patterns is described.

  7. 16 CFR 460.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ....12 Labels. If you are a manufacturer, you must label all packages of your insulation. The labels must...) If installation instructions are included on the label or with the package, add this statement:...

  8. 16 CFR 460.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....12 Labels. If you are a manufacturer, you must label all packages of your insulation. The labels must...) If installation instructions are included on the label or with the package, add this statement:...

  9. 16 CFR 460.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....12 Labels. If you are a manufacturer, you must label all packages of your insulation. The labels must...) If installation instructions are included on the label or with the package, add this statement:...

  10. 16 CFR 460.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ....12 Labels. If you are a manufacturer, you must label all packages of your insulation. The labels must...) If installation instructions are included on the label or with the package, add this statement:...

  11. 16 CFR 460.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....12 Labels. If you are a manufacturer, you must label all packages of your insulation. The labels must...) If installation instructions are included on the label or with the package, add this statement:...

  12. Uptake of indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody ZME-018 as a function of tumor size in a patient with melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Macey, D.J.; Denardo, S.J.; Denardo, G.L.; Goodnight, J.K.; Unger, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    The accumulation of an Indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb), ZME-018, in melanoma tumors in a patient was determined by sequential, quantitative gamma camera imaging. The amount and concentration of In-111 in each tumor changed in a characteristic pattern with time, reaching a peak at day 3 followed by a steady clearance. The concentration of In-111 in the tumor and the ratios of tumor to whole-body or blood decreased as the size of the tumor increased. These results were interpreted to indicate that the fraction of active, perfused tumor decreased as the melanoma lesions increased in size. The maximum number of MoAb molecules bound per melanoma cell was calculated to be abut 35,000. The implications of these observations for radioimmunoimaging and therapy are significant.

  13. Sensitivity of scintigraphy with /sup 111/In-lymphocytes for detection of cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, S.B.; Eisen, H.J.; Sobel, B.E.; Bergmann, S.R.; Bolman, R.M. 3d.

    1988-12-01

    We recently demonstrated the feasibility of noninvasive detection of cardiac allograft rejection after administration of indium-111-labeled lymphocytes. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of the technique, as well as its value for delineating the severity of rejection, we studied 16 dogs with heterotopic thoracic cardiac allografts. Five animals were evaluated while exposed to immunosuppressive agents. Animals were scanned sequentially after administration of 100-400 microCi of indium-111-labeled autologous lymphocytes. Myocardial lymphocyte infiltration was expressed as the indium excess (IE), defined as the ratio of indium activity of the transplant or native heart compared with that in blood. Scintigraphic results were compared with characteristics of simultaneously obtained endomyocardial biopsies. Among 17 biopsy documented episodes of rejection, 16 were detected scintigraphically. Among 18 biopsies with no evidence of rejection, scintigraphy was uniformly negative. Thus, the sensitivity and specificity of scintigraphy were 94 and 100%, respectively. Biopsies graded as showing no rejection were associated with an IE of 0.3 +/- 0.5 (+/- SD); those graded as mild, 2.8 +/- 1.7; those as moderate, 10.7 +/- 7.2; and those graded as indicative of severe rejection, 14.2 +/- 4.5. Thus, scintigraphy with indium-111-labeled lymphocytes sensitively and specifically detects cardiac allograft rejection and delineates the intensity of the rejection process. It should be useful clinically for assessing potential allograft rejection noninvasively.

  14. Evaluation of maleimide derivative of DOTA for site-specific labeling of recombinant affibody molecules.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, Sara; Orlova, Anna; Rosik, Daniel; Sandström, Mattias; Sjöberg, Anna; Baastrup, Barbro; Widmark, Olof; Fant, Gunilla; Feldwisch, Joachim; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Affibody molecules are a new class of small (7 kDa) scaffold affinity proteins, which demonstrate promising properties as agents for in vivo radionuclide targeting. The Affibody scaffold is cysteine-free and therefore independent of disulfide bonds. Thus, a single thiol group can be engineered into the protein by introduction of one cysteine. Coupling of thiol-reactive bifunctional chelators can enable site-specific labeling of recombinantly produced Affibody molecules. In this study, the use of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-tris-acetic acid-10-maleimidoethylacetamide (MMA-DOTA) for 111 In-labeling of anti-HER2 Affibody molecules His 6-Z HER2:342-Cys and Z HER2:2395-Cys has been evaluated. The introduction of a cysteine residue did not affect the affinity of the proteins, which was 29 pM for His 6-Z HER2:342-Cys and 27 pM for Z HER2:2395-Cys, comparable with 22 pM for the parental Z HER2:342. MMA-DOTA was conjugated to DTT-reduced Affibody molecules with a coupling efficiency of 93% using a 1:1 molar ratio of chelator to protein. The conjugates were labeled with 111 In to a specific radioactivity of up to 7 GBq/mmol, with preserved binding for the target HER2. In vivo, the non-His-tagged variant 111 In-[MMA-DOTA-Cys61]-Z HER2:2395-Cys demonstrated appreciably lower liver uptake than its His-tag-containing counterpart. In mice bearing HER2-expressing LS174T xenografts, 111 In-[MMA-DOTA-Cys61]-Z HER2:2395-Cys showed specific and rapid tumor localization, and rapid clearance from blood and nonspecific compartments, leading to a tumor-to-blood-ratio of 18 +/- 8 already 1 h p.i. Four hours p.i., the tumor-to-blood ratio was 138 +/- 8. Xenografts were clearly visualized already 1 h p.i. PMID:18163536

  15. 9 CFR 412.1 - Label approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... Jan. 6, 2014) § 412.1 Label approval. (a) No final label may be used on any product unless the label... for a corporation may submit only one label application for a product produced in other establishments...) The proposed label would not misrepresent the product; (ii) The use of the label would not present...

  16. Activation of 112Cd by deuteron induced reactions up to 50 MeV: An alternative for 111In production?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Adam Rebeles, R.; Van den Winkel, P.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.

    2014-11-01

    In stacked foil irradiations with an incident 50 MeV deuteron beam on highly enriched 112Cd targets, the excitation functions for 109,110g,111In and 111,110g,106Ag were determined, relative to the monitor reactions natAl(d,x)22,24Na. The results were compared to the scarce literature values on enriched Cd isotopes. Through combination of reaction cross section data on all stable Cd isotopes listed in the on-line library TENDL-2013 (calculated with the TALYS 1.4 theoretical code) a comparison with our earlier study on natCd is made. The possible production of 111In through 112Cd(d,3n), as an alternative to 112Cd(p,2n), is discussed.

  17. Assessment of effective absorbed dose of (111)In-DTPA-Buserelin in human on the basis of biodistribution rat data.

    PubMed

    Lahooti, Afsaneh; Shanehsazzadeh, Saeed; Jalilian, Amir Reza; Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the effective absorbed dose to human organs was estimated, following intra vascular administration of (111)In-DTPA-Buserelin using biodistribution data from rats. Rats were sacrificed at exact time intervals of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 24 h post injections. The Medical Internal Radiation Dose formulation was applied to extrapolate from rats to humans and to project the absorbed radiation dose for various human organs. From rat data, it was estimated that a 185-MBq injection of (111)In-DTPA-Buserelin into the human might result in an estimated absorbed dose of 24.27 mGy to the total body and the highest effective absorbed dose was in kidneys, 28.39 mSv. The promising results of this study emphasises the importance of absorbed doses in humans estimated from data on rats. PMID:22874898

  18. Formation of medical radioisotopes 111In, 117 m Sn, 124Sb, and 177Lu in photonuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danagulyan, A. S.; Hovhannisyan, G. H.; Bakhshiyan, T. M.; Avagyan, R. H.; Avetisyan, A. E.; Kerobyan, I. A.; Dallakyan, R. K.

    2015-06-01

    The possibility of the photonuclear production of radioisotopes 111In, 117 m Sn, 124Sb, and 177Lu is discussed. Reaction yields were measured by the gamma-activation method. The enriched tin isotopes 112, 118Sn and Te and HfO2 of natural isotopic composition were used as targets. The targets were irradiated at the linear electron accelerator of Alikhanian National Science Laboratory (Yerevan) at the energy of 40 MeV. The experimental results obtained in this way reveal that the yield and purity of radioisotopes 111In and 117 mSn are acceptable for their production via photonuclear reactions. Reactions proceeding on targets from Te and HfO2 of natural isotopic composition and leading to the formation of 124Sb and 177Lu have small yields and are hardly appropriate for the photoproduction of these radioisotopes even in the case of enriched targets.

  19. Supplementing National Menu Labeling

    PubMed Central

    White, Lexi C.

    2012-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration’s forthcoming national menu labeling regulations are designed to help curb the national obesity epidemic by requiring calorie counts on restaurants’ menus. However, posted calories can be easily ignored or misunderstood by consumers and fail to accurately describe the healthiness of foods. We propose supplemental models that include nutritional information (e.g., fat, salt, sugar) or specific guidance (e.g., “heart-healthy” graphics). The goal is to empower restaurant patrons with better data to make healthier choices, and ultimately to reduce obesity prevalence. PMID:23078494

  20. Supplementing national menu labeling.

    PubMed

    Hodge, James G; White, Lexi C

    2012-12-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration's forthcoming national menu labeling regulations are designed to help curb the national obesity epidemic by requiring calorie counts on restaurants' menus. However, posted calories can be easily ignored or misunderstood by consumers and fail to accurately describe the healthiness of foods. We propose supplemental models that include nutritional information (e.g., fat, salt, sugar) or specific guidance (e.g., "heart-healthy" graphics). The goal is to empower restaurant patrons with better data to make healthier choices, and ultimately to reduce obesity prevalence. PMID:23078494

  1. Noninvasive detection of rejection of transplanted hearts with indium-111-labeled lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Eisen, H.J.; Eisenberg, S.B.; Saffitz, J.E.; Bolman, R.M. 3d.; Sobel, B.E.; Bergmann, S.R.

    1987-04-01

    To determine whether cardiac transplant rejection can be detected noninvasively with indium-111 (/sup 111/In)-labeled lymphocytes, we studied 11 dogs with thoracic heterotopic cardiac transplants without immunosuppression and five dogs with transplants treated with cyclosporine (10 mg/kg/day) and prednisone (1 mg/kg/day). All were evaluated sequentially with gamma scintigraphy after administration of 150 to 350 muCi of autologous /sup 111/In-lymphocytes. Technetium-99m-labeled red blood cells (1 to 3 mCi) were used for correction of radioactivity in the blood pool attributable to circulating labeled lymphocytes. Lymphocyte infiltration was quantified as the ratio of indium in the myocardium of the transplant or native heart compared with that in blood (indium excess, IE). Results were correlated with mechanical and electrical activity of allografts and with histologic findings in sequential biopsy specimens. In untreated dogs (n = 11), IE was 15.5 +/- 7.0 (SD) in transplanted hearts undergoing rejection and 0.4 +/- 1.1 in native hearts on the day before animals were killed. In dogs treated with cyclosporine and prednisone (n = 5), IE was minimal in allografts during the course of immunosuppression (0.8 +/- 0.4) and increased to 22.9 +/- 11.1 after immunosuppression was stopped. Scintigraphic criteria of rejection (IE greater than 2 SD above that in native hearts) correlated with results of biopsies indicative of rejection and appeared before electrophysiologic or mechanical manifestations of dysfunction. Thus infiltration of labeled lymphocytes in allografts, indicative of rejection, is detectable noninvasively by gamma scintigraphy and provides a sensitive approach potentially applicable to clinical monitoring for early detection of rejection and guidance for titration of immunosuppressive measures.

  2. Splenic dynamics of indium-111 labeled platelets in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    SciTech Connect

    Syrjaelae, M.T.Sa.; Savolainen, S.; Nieminen, U.; Gripenberg, J.; Liewendahl, K.; Ikkala, E. )

    1989-09-01

    Splenic dynamics of {sup 111}In-labeled platelets and platelet-associated IgG in 33 patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) were studied. Two half-lives were calculated for the biexponential splenic time-activity curve after i.v. injection of {sup 111}In-labeled platelets. There was no difference in the mean half-life of the rapid component of the splenic curve (ST1) when patients with negative or slightly positive platelet suspension immunofluorescence test (PSIFT) were compared to those with strongly positive PSIFT (3.0 {plus minus} 0.7 min vs. 3.6 {plus minus} 0.4, p greater than 0.05). Mean half-life of the slow component of the splenic curve (ST2) was found to be longer in patients with a strongly positive than a negative or weakly positive PSIFT (26 {plus minus} 5 min vs. 13.2 {plus minus} 1.0 min, p less than 0.01). It seems that determination of the two components of the splenic time-activity curve provides a useful method for studying platelet kinetics in ITP.

  3. Label and Label-Free Detection Techniques for Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Syahir, Amir; Usui, Kenji; Tomizaki, Kin-ya; Kajikawa, Kotaro; Mihara, Hisakazu

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology has gone through numerous innovative developments in recent decades. In this review, we focus on the development of protein detection methods embedded in the technology. Early microarrays utilized useful chromophores and versatile biochemical techniques dominated by high-throughput illumination. Recently, the realization of label-free techniques has been greatly advanced by the combination of knowledge in material sciences, computational design and nanofabrication. These rapidly advancing techniques aim to provide data without the intervention of label molecules. Here, we present a brief overview of this remarkable innovation from the perspectives of label and label-free techniques in transducing nano-biological events.

  4. Label scrambling during CID of covalently labeled peptide ions.

    PubMed

    Borotto, Nicholas B; Degraan-Weber, Nicholas; Zhou, Yuping; Vachet, Richard W

    2014-10-01

    Covalent labeling along with mass spectrometry is finding more use as a means of studying the higher order structure of proteins and protein complexes. Diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) is an increasingly used reagent for these labeling experiments because it is capable of modifying multiple residues at the same time. Pinpointing DEPC-labeled sites on proteins is typically needed to obtain more resolved structural information, and tandem mass spectrometry after protein proteolysis is often used for this purpose. In this work, we demonstrate that in certain instances, scrambling of the DEPC label from one residue to another can occur during collision-induced dissociation (CID) of labeled peptide ions, resulting in ambiguity in label site identity. From a preliminary study of over 30 labeled peptides, we find that scrambling occurs in about 25% of the peptides and most commonly occurs when histidine residues are labeled. Moreover, this scrambling appears to occur more readily under non-mobile proton conditions, meaning that low charge-state peptide ions are more prone to this reaction. For all peptides, we find that scrambling does not occur during electron transfer dissociation, which suggests that this dissociation technique is a safe alternative to CID for correct label site identification. PMID:25056863

  5. Co-Labeling for Multi-View Weakly Labeled Learning.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinxing; Li, Wen; Xu, Dong; Tsang, Ivor W

    2016-06-01

    It is often expensive and time consuming to collect labeled training samples in many real-world applications. To reduce human effort on annotating training samples, many machine learning techniques (e.g., semi-supervised learning (SSL), multi-instance learning (MIL), etc.) have been studied to exploit weakly labeled training samples. Meanwhile, when the training data is represented with multiple types of features, many multi-view learning methods have shown that classifiers trained on different views can help each other to better utilize the unlabeled training samples for the SSL task. In this paper, we study a new learning problem called multi-view weakly labeled learning, in which we aim to develop a unified approach to learn robust classifiers by effectively utilizing different types of weakly labeled multi-view data from a broad range of tasks including SSL, MIL and relative outlier detection (ROD). We propose an effective approach called co-labeling to solve the multi-view weakly labeled learning problem. Specifically, we model the learning problem on each view as a weakly labeled learning problem, which aims to learn an optimal classifier from a set of pseudo-label vectors generated by using the classifiers trained from other views. Unlike traditional co-training approaches using a single pseudo-label vector for training each classifier, our co-labeling approach explores different strategies to utilize the predictions from different views, biases and iterations for generating the pseudo-label vectors, making our approach more robust for real-world applications. Moreover, to further improve the weakly labeled learning on each view, we also exploit the inherent group structure in the pseudo-label vectors generated from different strategies, which leads to a new multi-layer multiple kernel learning problem. Promising results for text-based image retrieval on the NUS-WIDE dataset as well as news classification and text categorization on several real-world multi

  6. 76 FR 75809 - Prior Label Approval System: Generic Label Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... limited types of labels (e.g., labels for raw, single ingredient meat and poultry products) (48 FR 11410... poultry products will take effect January 1, 2012 (75 FR 82148, Dec. 29, 2010). These mandatory features... Agency. On March 25, 1992, FSIS published an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) (57 FR...

  7. Laser labeling, a safe technology to label produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laser labeling of fruits and vegetables is an alternative means to label produce. Low energy CO2 laser beams etch the surface showing the contrasting underlying layer. These etched surfaces can promote water loss and potentially allow for entry of decay organisms. The long-term effects of laser labe...

  8. Laser labeling, a safe technology to label produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Labeling of the produce has gained marked attention in recent years. Laser labeling technology involves the etching of required information on the surface using a low energy CO2 laser beam. The etching forms alphanumerical characters by pinhole dot matrix depressions. These openings can lead to wat...

  9. 78 FR 66826 - Prior Label Approval System: Generic Label Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... the Agency (76 FR 75809). FSIS also proposed to combine the regulations that provide for the approval... preamble (76 FR 75814), FSIS wrote: . . . statements on labels that are defined in FSIS's regulations or... ``Product Labeling: Definition of the Term ``Natural'' and related materials (71 FR 70503, Dec. 5, 2006)...

  10. Labeled Cocaine Analogs

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shi, Bing Zhi; Keil, Robert N.

    1999-03-30

    Novel methods for positron emission tomography or single photon emission spectroscopy using tracer compounds having the structure: ##STR1## where X in .beta. configuration is phenyl, naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-iodophenyl; 2,3 or 4-(trimethylsilyl)phenyl; 3,4,5 or 6-iodonaphthyl; 3,4,5 or 6-(trimethylsilyl)naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-(trialkylstannyl)phenyl; or 3,4,5 or 6-(trialkylstannyl)napthyl Y in .beta. configuration is 2-fluoroethoxy, 3-fluoropropoxy, 4-fluorobutoxy, 2-fluorocyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-fluorocyclobutoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, R 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, 1',3'-difluoroisopropoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R,S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, or 1',1'-di(fluoromethyl)isobutoxy, The compounds bind dopamine transporter protein and can be labeled with .sup.18 F or .sup.123 I for imaging.

  11. 111In-cetuximab as a diagnostic agent by accessible epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor targeting in human metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ying-Hsia; Peng, Cheng-Liang; Lee, Shin-Yu; Chiang, Ping-Fang; Yao, Cheng-Jung; Lin, Wuu-Jyh; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Shieh, Ming-Jium

    2015-06-30

    Colorectal adenocarcinoma is a common cause death cancer in the whole world. The aim of this study is to define the 111In-cetuximab as a diagnosis tracer of human colorectal adenocarcinoma. In this research, cell uptake, nano-SPECT/CT scintigraphy, autoradiography, biodistribution and immunohitochemical staining of EGF receptor were included. HCT-116 and HT-29 cell expressed a relatively high and moderate level of EGF receptor, respectively. The nano-SPECT/CT image of 111In-cetuximab showed tumor radiation uptake of subcutaneous HCT-116 xenograft tumor was higher than SW-620. Autoradiography image also showed that tumor of HCT-116 had high 111In-cetuximab uptake. Mice that bearing CT-26 in situ xenograft colorectal tumors showed similar high uptake in vivo and ex vivo through nano-SPECT/CT imaging at 72 hours. Metastatic HCT-116/Luc tumors demonstrated the highest uptake at 72 hours after the injection of 111In-cetuximab. Relatively, results of 111In-DTPA showed that metabolism through urinary system, especially in the kidney. The quantitative analysis of biodistribution showed count value of metastatic HCT-116/Luc tumors that treated with 111In-cetuximab had a significant difference (P < 0.05) compared with that treated with 111In-DTPA after injection 72 hours. Result of immunohistologic staining of EGF receptor also showed high EGF receptor expression and uptake in metastatic colorectal tumors. In summary, we suggested that 111In-cetuximab will be a potential tool for detecting EGF receptor expression in human metastatic colorectal carcinoma. PMID:26062654

  12. Nutrition Marketing on Food Labels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colby, Sarah E.; Johnson, LuAnn; Scheett, Angela; Hoverson, Bonita

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This research sought to determine how often nutrition marketing is used on labels of foods that are high in saturated fat, sodium, and/or sugar. Design and Setting: All items packaged with food labels (N = 56,900) in all 6 grocery stores in Grand Forks, ND were surveyed. Main Outcome Measure(s): Marketing strategy, nutrient label…

  13. Meat and Poultry Labeling Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Food Standards and Labels: The Facts Labeling and Marketing Information [ Top of Page ] OVEN PREPARED: Product is fully cooked and ready to eat. [ Top of Page ] YOUNG TURKEY: Turkeys of either sex that are less than 8 months of age according to present regulations. [ Top of Page ] Last ...

  14. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium...

  15. 21 CFR 201.70 - Calcium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium labeling. 201.70 Section 201.70 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.70 Calcium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the calcium content...

  16. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  17. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  18. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  19. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  20. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  1. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... contains sodium bicarbonate, sodium phosphate, or sodium biphosphate as an active ingredient for oral... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling...

  2. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... contains sodium bicarbonate, sodium phosphate, or sodium biphosphate as an active ingredient for oral... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling...

  3. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... contains sodium bicarbonate, sodium phosphate, or sodium biphosphate as an active ingredient for oral... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling...

  4. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... contains sodium bicarbonate, sodium phosphate, or sodium biphosphate as an active ingredient for oral... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling...

  5. Scintigraphic detection of bone and joint infections with indium-111-labeled nonspecific polyclonal human immunoglobulin G

    SciTech Connect

    Oyen, W.J.; Claessens, R.A.; van Horn, J.R.; van der Meer, J.W.; Corstens, F.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The utility of indium-111-({sup 111}In) labeled immunoglobulin G (IgG) to detect infection of bone and adjacent tissues was investigated. Proof of infection was obtained by cultures taken at surgery. All 32 patients showed focally increased uptake on the technetium-99m- (99mTc) methylene diphosphonate (MDP) skeletal scintigraphies. Labeled immunoglobulin correctly identified presence, location, extent and soft-tissue involvement of the suspected inflammatory site. In these patients, focally increasing accumulation was noted over 48 hr. Discrimination between infection and sterile inflammatory lesions was not possible. Two fractures, 6-mo-old, and an aseptic loosening of a total-hip prosthesis were not visualized. Side effects after the immunoglobulin administration were not observed. Radiolabeled immunoglobulin is a new and safe radiopharmaceutical for the investigation of infectious bone and joint disease. The sensitivity of this agent appears at least as high as that of labeled leukocytes. However, labeled immunoglobulin can easily be prepared in every nuclear medicine department.

  6. Repeatability of Radiotracer Uptake in Normal Abdominal Organs with 111In-Pentetreotide Quantitative SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven P.; Vicente, Esther; Anizan, Nadège; Wang, Hao; Leal, Jeffrey P.; Lodge, Martin A.; Frey, Eric C.; Wahl, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    With an increasing emphasis on quantitation of SPECT imaging and its use in dosimetry to guide therapies, it is desirable to understand the repeatability in normal-organ SPECT uptake values (SPECT-UVs). We investigated the variability of normal abdominal organ uptake in repeated 111In-pentetreotide SPECT studies. Methods Nine patients with multiple 111In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT studies for clinical purposes were evaluated. Volumes of interest were drawn for the abdominal organs and applied to SPECT-UVs. The variability of those values was assessed. Results The average SPECT-UV for the liver (1.7 ± 0.6) was much lower than for the kidneys (right, 8.0 ± 2.4; left, 7.5 ± 1.7). Interpatient and intrapatient variability was similar (intraclass correlation coefficients, 0.40–0.59) for all organs. The average coefficients of variation for each organ for each patient were obtained and averaged across all patients (0.26 for liver, 0.22 for right kidney, and 0.20 for left kidney). The coefficients of variation for the organs across all scans were 0.33 (liver), 0.30 (right kidney), and 0.22 (left kidney). Conclusion Variability across all patients and all scans for the liver was higher than reported with 18F-FDG PET, though left kidney variability was similar to PET liver variability and left kidney uptake may be able to serve as an internal metric for determining the quantifiability of an 111In-pentetreotide SPECT study. PMID:25977467

  7. Synthesis Of Labeled Metabolites

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Atcher, Robert

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, for example, isotopically enriched mustard gas metabolites including: [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1-[[2-(methylsulfinyl)ethyl]sulfonyl]-2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylsulfinyl)]; and, 2,2'-sulfinylbis([1,2-.sup.13 C.sub.2 ]ethanol of the general formula ##STR1## where Q.sup.1 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone (--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), at least one C* is .sup.13 C, X is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen and deuterium, and Z is selected from the group consisting of hydroxide (--OH), and --Q.sup.2 --R where Q.sup.2 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone(--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), and R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1 to C.sub.4 lower alkyl, and amino acid moieties, with the proviso that when Z is a hydroxide and Q.sup.1 is a sulfide, then at least one X is deuterium.

  8. Labeled Cocaine Analogs

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shi, Bing Zhi; Keil, Robert N.

    1999-01-26

    Novel compounds having the structure: ##STR1## where X in .beta. configuration is phenyl, naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-iodophenyl; 2,3 or 4-(trimethylsilyl)phenyl; 3,4,5 or 6-iodonaphthyl; 3,4,5 or 6-(trimethylsilyl)naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-(trialkylstannyl)phenyl; or 3,4,5 or 6-(trialkylstannyl)naphthyl Y in .beta. configuration is Y.sub.1 or Y.sub.2, where Y.sub.1 is 2-fluoroethoxy, 3-fluoropropoxy, 4-fluorobutoxy, 2-fluorocyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-fluorocyclobutoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, R 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, 1',3'-difluoroisopropoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R,S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, or 1',1'-di(fluoromethyl)isobutoxy, and Y.sub.2 is 2-methanesulfonyloxy ethoxy, 3-methanesulfonyloxy propoxy, 4-methanesulfonyloxy butoxy, 2-methanesulfonyloxy cyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-methanesulfonyloxy cyclobutoxy, 1'methanesulfonyloxy isopropoxy, 1'-fluoro, 3'-methanesulfonyloxy isopropoxy, 1'-methanesulfonyloxy, 3'-fluoro isopropoxy, 1'-methanesulfonyloxy isobutoxy, or 4'-methanesulfonyloxy isobutoxy bind dopamine transporter protein and can be labeled with .sup.18 F or .sup.123 I for imaging.

  9. 27 CFR 19.517 - Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... labels under an exemption from label approval. 19.517 Section 19.517 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... PLANTS Liquor Bottle, Label, and Closure Requirements Labeling Requirements § 19.517 Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval. If a proprietor bottles spirits for domestic...

  10. 27 CFR 19.517 - Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... labels under an exemption from label approval. 19.517 Section 19.517 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... PLANTS Liquor Bottle, Label, and Closure Requirements Labeling Requirements § 19.517 Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval. If a proprietor bottles spirits for domestic...

  11. 27 CFR 19.517 - Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... labels under an exemption from label approval. 19.517 Section 19.517 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... PLANTS Liquor Bottle, Label, and Closure Requirements Labeling Requirements § 19.517 Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval. If a proprietor bottles spirits for domestic...

  12. 27 CFR 19.517 - Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... labels under an exemption from label approval. 19.517 Section 19.517 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... PLANTS Liquor Bottle, Label, and Closure Requirements Labeling Requirements § 19.517 Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval. If a proprietor bottles spirits for domestic...

  13. Selective chemical labeling of proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wu, Yao-Wen

    2016-06-28

    Over the years, there have been remarkable efforts in the development of selective protein labeling strategies. In this review, we deliver a comprehensive overview of the currently available bioorthogonal and chemoselective reactions. The ability to introduce bioorthogonal handles to proteins is essential to carry out bioorthogonal reactions for protein labeling in living systems. We therefore summarize the techniques that allow for site-specific "installation" of bioorthogonal handles into proteins. We also highlight the biological applications that have been achieved by selective chemical labeling of proteins. PMID:26940577

  14. Imaging with indium111-labeled anticarcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody ZCE-025 of recurrent colorectal or carcinoembryonic antigen-producing cancer in patients with rising serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels and occult metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, Y.Z.; Lamki, L.M.; Shanken, J.; Jessup, J.M.; Charnsangavej, C.; Ajani, J.A.; Levin, B.; Merchant, B.; Halverson, C.; Murray, J.L. )

    1990-07-01

    We tested whether nuclear imaging with indium111 (111In)-labeled murine monoclonal (MoAb) anticarcinoembryonic antigen (anti-CEA) ZCE-025 antibody could detect recurrent disease in patients with a rising serum CEA level but negative findings for computed tomographic (CT) scans of the abdomen and pelvis, chest radiograph, and colonoscopy or barium enema. Twenty patients with a history of completely resected CEA-producing adenocarcinoma and a rising serum CEA level were given an intravenous infusion of 2 mg of 111In-labeled ZCE-025 mixed with 38 mg of unlabeled ZCE-025. Planar and single-photon emission CT (SPECT) scans were acquired at 72 and 144 hours, and in 19 of the 20 patients these were positive. Of those 19, 13 underwent exploratory surgery, and cancer was found in 10, and two had a diagnostic biopsy, which confirmed cancer. Three patients who had negative laparotomies and all four patients who did not undergo surgery or biopsy were followed radiologically. In all seven, cancer was subsequently detected at the sites suggested by the ZCE-025 scan. Thus, tumor was confirmed in all 19 patients with positive scans. Five of 13 patients who were explored benefited from the study and the exploratory laparotomy, as disease was entirely resected in four or was subjected to definitive radiation therapy to the pelvis in the fifth. In two additional patients who were not explored, MoAb imaging resulted in definitive therapy to regionally confined recurrent disease. 111In-labeled anti-CEA MoAb ZCE-025 scanning in patients with rising CEA successfully imaged metastatic colorectal cancer that eluded detection by other methods and affected the care given to some. These results suggest an important role for 111In-labeled ZCE-025 scanning among patients with rising CEA and otherwise occult metastatic cancer.

  15. Comparison of /sup 111/In platelet scintigraphy and two-dimensional echocardiography in the diagnosis of left ventricular thrombi

    SciTech Connect

    Ezekowitz, M.D.; Wilson, D.A.; Smith, E.O.; Burow, R.D.; Harrison, L.H. Jr.; Parker, D.E.; Elkins, R.C.; Peyton, M.; Taylor, F.B.

    1982-06-24

    In a study comparing /sup 111/In platelet scintigraphy and two-dimensional echocardiography as methods of identifying left ventricular thrombi, the results obtained with both techniques were verified at surgery or autopsy in 53 patients--34 with left ventricular aneurysms, and 19 with mitral-valve disease. Left ventricular thrombi were found at surgery or autopsy in 14 of the patients with aneurysms and in none of those with mitral-valve disease. Thirteen of 53 echocardiograms (25 per cent) were technically inadequate and excluded from the analysis. In the group with aneurysms, the sensitivity of scintigraphy in detecting thrombi was 71 per cent, and that of echocardiography was 77 per cent. The specificity of scintigraphy was 100 per cent, and that of echocardiography was 93 per cent. We conclude that /sup 111/In platelet scintigraphy and two-dimensional echocardiography have useful and complementary roles in the detection of left ventricular thrombi. Both these noninvasive techniques can be used to monitor therapy.

  16. Influence of electron capture after-effects on the stability of 111In( 111Cd)-complexes with organic ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpinkova, L. G.; Carbonari, A. W.; Nikitin, S. M.; Mestnik-Filho, J.

    2002-06-01

    The TDPAC technique was applied to verify a hypothesis about the influence of electron capture after-effects on the integrity of radiometal complexes with organic ligands in aqueous solutions. The neutral aqueous solutions of DTPA-complexes with two parent isotopes, 111In(EC) 111Cd and 111mCd, were used for direct comparison of dynamic interaction parameters. Data for the parent 111In-DTPA complexes revealed three fractions with essentially different relaxation constants, including an "unperturbed" fraction, which, according to the hypothesis, is due to small fragments of the initial complexes disintegrated as a result of Auger-process and the following Coulomb fragmentation. Only one fraction with a relaxation constant of 3(1)×10 6 s-1 was observed for the 111mCd-DTPA solution confirming the proposal about the influence of electron capture after-effects. Measurements with the frozen solutions allowed determining the electric field gradient (EFG) at Cd-sites in complexes with DTPA, V zz=6.7(2)×10 21 V/m2 with an asymmetry parameter η=0.75(5).

  17. (153)Sm(3+) and (111)In(3+) DTPA derivatives with high hepatic specificity: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Prata, M I M; Santos, A C; Neves, M; Geraldes, C F G C; de Lima, J J P

    2002-07-25

    Two DTPA derivatives, a mono-amide derivative containing an iodinated synthon, DTPA-IOPsp (L(1)) and the ligand DTPA(BOM)(3) (BOM=benzyloxymethyl) (L(2)), radiolabelled with (153)Sm(3+) and (111)In(3+), were studied as potential hepatospecific gamma scintigraphic agents. In vivo studies with Wistar rats show that the main excretory pathway for all the chelates studied is the hepatobiliary system. The complexes of L(2) show even greater hepatobiliary specificity than L(1), perhaps as a consequence of longer blood circulation times due to their strong affinity towards HSA. The (153)Sm(3+) chelates are also more hepatospecific than the corresponding (111)In(3+) chelates. The La(3+) and In(3+) chelates of L(1) and L(2) show some structural and dynamic differences in aqueous solution, as studied by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. While only two nona-coordinated isomers were observed for the La(3+) complexes with both ligands, its number is much larger in the In(3+) complexes, with both octa- and hepta-coordinated species (with unbound side arms), as well as structural isomers for each coordination number. PMID:12121790

  18. How to read food labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 serving. You should also pay attention to trans fats on any food label. These fats raise "bad" ... foods and desserts. Many fast food restaurants use trans fats for frying. If a food has these fats, ...

  19. Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Report Error T he Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD) is a joint project of the National ... participants in the latest survey in the DSLD database (NHANES): The search options: Quick Search, Browse Dietary ...

  20. Food Labels Tell the Story!

    MedlinePlus

    ... Environment Kids Health Topics Environment & Health Healthy Living Pollution Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Science – How It Works The ... Pay close attention to serving sizes. Products labeled "light" or "lite" must have 1/3 fewer calories ...

  1. LabeledIn: cataloging labeled indications for human drugs.

    PubMed

    Khare, Ritu; Li, Jiao; Lu, Zhiyong

    2014-12-01

    Drug-disease treatment relationships, i.e., which drug(s) are indicated to treat which disease(s), are among the most frequently sought information in PubMed®. Such information is useful for feeding the Google Knowledge Graph, designing computational methods to predict novel drug indications, and validating clinical information in EMRs. Given the importance and utility of this information, there have been several efforts to create repositories of drugs and their indications. However, existing resources are incomplete. Furthermore, they neither label indications in a structured way nor differentiate them by drug-specific properties such as dosage form, and thus do not support computer processing or semantic interoperability. More recently, several studies have proposed automatic methods to extract structured indications from drug descriptions; however, their performance is limited by natural language challenges in disease named entity recognition and indication selection. In response, we report LabeledIn: a human-reviewed, machine-readable and source-linked catalog of labeled indications for human drugs. More specifically, we describe our semi-automatic approach to derive LabeledIn from drug descriptions through human annotations with aids from automatic methods. As the data source, we use the drug labels (or package inserts) submitted to the FDA by drug manufacturers and made available in DailyMed. Our machine-assisted human annotation workflow comprises: (i) a grouping method to remove redundancy and identify representative drug labels to be used for human annotation, (ii) an automatic method to recognize and normalize mentions of diseases in drug labels as candidate indications, and (iii) a two-round annotation workflow for human experts to judge the pre-computed candidates and deliver the final gold standard. In this study, we focused on 250 highly accessed drugs in PubMed Health, a newly developed public web resource for consumers and clinicians on prevention

  2. Multi-focus cluster labeling.

    PubMed

    Eikvil, Line; Jenssen, Tor-Kristian; Holden, Marit

    2015-06-01

    Document collections resulting from searches in the biomedical literature, for instance, in PubMed, are often so large that some organization of the returned information is necessary. Clustering is an efficient tool for organizing search results. To help the user to decide how to continue the search for relevant documents, the content of each cluster can be characterized by a set of representative keywords or cluster labels. As different users may have different interests, it can be desirable with solutions that make it possible to produce labels from a selection of different topical categories. We therefore introduce the concept of multi-focus cluster labeling to give users the possibility to get an overview of the contents through labels from multiple viewpoints. The concept for multi-focus cluster labeling has been established and has been demonstrated on three different document collections. We illustrate that multi-focus visualizations can give an overview of clusters along axes that general labels are not able to convey. The approach is generic and should be applicable to any biomedical (or other) domain with any selection of foci where appropriate focus vocabularies can be established. A user evaluation also indicates that such a multi-focus concept is useful. PMID:25869415

  3. Imaging, Biodistribution, and Dosimetry of Radionuclide-Labeled PD-L1 Antibody in an Immunocompetent Mouse Model of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Josefsson, Anders; Nedrow, Jessie R; Park, Sunju; Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Rittenbach, Andrew; Jammes, Fabien; Tsui, Benjamin; Sgouros, George

    2016-01-15

    The programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) participates in an immune checkpoint system involved in preventing autoimmunity. PD-L1 is expressed on tumor cells, tumor-associated macrophages, and other cells in the tumor microenvironment. Anti-PD-L1 antibodies are active against a variety of cancers, and combined anti-PD-L1 therapy with external beam radiotherapy has been shown to increase therapeutic efficacy. PD-L1 expression status is an important indicator of prognosis and therapy responsiveness, but methods to precisely capture the dynamics of PD-L1 expression in the tumor microenvironment are still limited. In this study, we developed a murine anti-PD-L1 antibody conjugated to the radionuclide Indium-111 ((111)In) for imaging and biodistribution studies in an immune-intact mouse model of breast cancer. The distribution of (111)In-DTPA-anti-PD-L1 in tumors as well as the spleen, liver, thymus, heart, and lungs peaked 72 hours after injection. Coinjection of labeled and 100-fold unlabeled antibody significantly reduced spleen uptake at 24 hours, indicating that an excess of unlabeled antibody effectively blocked PD-L1 sites in the spleen, thus shifting the concentration of (111)In-DTPA-anti-PD-L1 into the blood stream and potentially increasing tumor uptake. Clearance of (111)In-DTPA-anti-PD-L1 from all organs occurred at 144 hours. Moreover, dosimetry calculations revealed that radionuclide-labeled anti-PD-L1 antibody yielded tolerable projected marrow doses, further supporting its use for radiopharmaceutical therapy. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the feasibility of using anti-PD-L1 antibody for radionuclide imaging and radioimmunotherapy and highlight a new opportunity to optimize and monitor the efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibition therapy. PMID:26554829

  4. 49 CFR 172.426 - OXIDIZER label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.426 OXIDIZER label. (a) Except for size and color, the OXIDIZER label must be as follows: EC02MR91.027 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background color on the OXIDIZER label must be yellow....

  5. 49 CFR 172.426 - OXIDIZER label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.426 OXIDIZER label. (a) Except for size and color, the OXIDIZER label must be as follows: EC02MR91.027 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background color on the OXIDIZER label must be yellow....

  6. 49 CFR 172.426 - OXIDIZER label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.426 OXIDIZER label. (a) Except for size and color, the OXIDIZER label must be as follows: EC02MR91.027 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background color on the OXIDIZER label must be yellow....

  7. 49 CFR 172.426 - OXIDIZER label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.426 OXIDIZER label. (a) Except for size and color, the OXIDIZER label must be as follows: EC02MR91.027 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background color on the OXIDIZER label must be yellow....

  8. 21 CFR 610.61 - Package label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.61 Package label. The following items shall appear on the label affixed to each package containing a product: (a) The proper name of the product; (b... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Package label. 610.61 Section 610.61 Food...

  9. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  10. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  11. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  12. 21 CFR 610.61 - Package label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.61 Package label. The following items shall appear on the label affixed to each package containing a product: (a) The proper name of the product; (b... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Package label. 610.61 Section 610.61 Food...

  13. 21 CFR 610.61 - Package label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.61 Package label. The following items shall appear on the label affixed to each package containing a product: (a) The proper name of the product; (b) The... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Package label. 610.61 Section 610.61 Food and...

  14. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  15. 21 CFR 610.61 - Package label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.61 Package label. The following items shall appear on the label affixed to each package containing a product: (a) The proper name of the product; (b... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Package label. 610.61 Section 610.61 Food...

  16. 21 CFR 610.61 - Package label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.61 Package label. The following items shall appear on the label affixed to each package containing a product: (a) The proper name of the product; (b... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Package label. 610.61 Section 610.61 Food...

  17. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  18. 40 CFR 1033.135 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... THAT IT IS REMANUFACTURED, EXCEPT AS ALLOWED BY 40 CFR 1033.750.” (3) Label diesel-fueled locomotives... that contrasts with the background of the label. (iii) The label must include all the following... same engine part. (ii) The label must be lettered in the English language using a color that...

  19. 40 CFR 156.10 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Labeling requirements. 156.10 Section 156.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS LABELING REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES AND DEVICES General Provisions § 156.10 Labeling requirements. (a) General—(1) Contents of the label. Every...

  20. 30 CFR 74.15 - Approval labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approval labels. 74.15 Section 74.15 Mineral... DUST SAMPLING DEVICES General Requirements for All Devices § 74.15 Approval labels. (a) Certificate of... reproductions of approval labels and a sketch or description of the position of the labels on each...

  1. 16 CFR 306.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Labels. 306.12 Section 306.12 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS AUTOMOTIVE FUEL RATINGS, CERTIFICATION AND POSTING Label Specifications § 306.12 Labels. All labels must meet the following specifications: (a) Layout—(1) For gasoline...

  2. 16 CFR 306.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Labels. 306.12 Section 306.12 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS AUTOMOTIVE FUEL RATINGS, CERTIFICATION AND POSTING Label Specifications § 306.12 Labels. All labels must meet the following specifications: (a) Layout—(1) For gasoline...

  3. In vivo Tumor Grading of Prostate Cancer using Quantitative 111In-Capromab Pendetide SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Youngho; Aparici, Carina Mari; Cooperberg, Matthew R.; Konety, Badrinath R.; Hawkins, Randall A.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed an in vivo antibody uptake quantification method using 111In-capromab pendetide single photon emission computed tomography combined with computed tomography (SPECT/CT) technology. Our goal is to evaluate this noninvasive antibody quantification method for potential prostate tumor grading. Methods Our phantom experiments focused on the robustness of an advanced iterative reconstruction algorithm that involves corrections for photon attenuation, scatter, and geometric blurring caused by radionuclide collimators. The conversion factors between image values and tracer concentrations (in Bq/ml) were calculated from uniform phantom filled with aqueous solution of 111InCl3 using the same acquisition protocol and reconstruction parameters as for patient studies. In addition, the spatial resolution of the reconstructed images was measured from a point source phantom. The measured spatial resolution was modeled into a point spread function (PSF), and the PSF was implemented in a deconvolution-based partial volume error (PVE) correction algorithm. The recovery capability to correctly estimate true tracer concentration values was tested using prostate-like and bladder-like lesion phantoms fitted in the modified NEMA/IEC body phantom. Patients with biopsy-proven prostate cancer (n=10) who underwent prostatectomy were prospectively enrolled in the preoperative SPECT/CT studies at the San Francisco VA Medical Center. The CT portion of SPECT/CT was used for CT-based attenuation map generation as well as an anatomical localization tool for clinical interpretation. Pathologic Gleason grades were compared with in vivo “antibody uptake value” (AUV) normalized by injected dose, effective half-life, and injection-scan time difference. AUVs were calculated in each lobe of prostate gland with cylindrical volumes of interest (VOIs) having dimensions of 1.5 cm both in diameter and height. Results Reconstructed SPECT images further corrected by the deconvolution

  4. Investigation of the endogenous chemoattractants involved in 111In-eosinophil accumulation in passive cutaneous anaphylactic reactions in the guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Weg, V B; Watson, M L; Faccioli, L H; Williams, T J

    1994-01-01

    1. Eosinophil accumulation and plasma extravasation are features of type I allergic responses. In an attempt to characterize the mediators of these responses, we have examined the local accumulation of 111In-eosinophils and leakage of 125I-human serum albumin (125I-HSA) during passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) reactions and in response to defined inflammatory mediators in the guinea-pig. Animals were passively sensitized by intradermal injection of anti-bovine gamma globulin antibody (50 microliters, 1/50 dilution). After 20-24 h, animals were injected intravenously with 111In-eosinophils and 125I-HSA for the measurement of cell accumulation and plasma leakage, respectively. 2. When injected into sensitized sites, antigen caused a dose-related increase in the accumulation of 111In-eosinophils and plasma leakage in guinea-pig skin. Time course experiments over 24 h revealed that the maximal rate of 111In-eosinophil accumulation occurred over the first 90 min, with little accumulation at later time points. Plasma leakage was completed within the first 30 min after challenge. Responses to the mast cell degranulator, compound 48/80, exhibited very similar responses to the PCA reaction. 3. Co-injection of antigen with the PAF antagonist, WEB 2086 (10(-7) mol/site) or the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, PF 5901 (10(-7) mol/site) did not significantly alter the accumulation of 111In-eosinophils or plasma leakage, whereas these drug doses abolished responses to exogenous PAF (10(-9) mol/site) and arachidonic acid (AA, 3 x 10(-8) mol/site), respectively. The H1 receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (2.5 x 10(-8) mol/site) did not reduce antigen-induced 111In-eosinophil accumulation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7812629

  5. Nutrition Labeling Using a Computer Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Lloyd E.

    The 1990 Nutrition Labeling and Education Act mandated nutritional labeling of most foods. As a result, a large portion of food analysis is performed for nutritional labeling purposes. A food labeling guide and links to the complete nutritional labeling regulations are available online at http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/˜dms/flg-toc.html. However, interpretation of these regulations and the appropriate usage of rounding rules, available nutrient content claims, reference amounts, and serving size can be difficult.

  6. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  7. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  8. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  9. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  10. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  11. /sup 111/In-platelet and /sup 125/I-fibrinogen deposition in the lungs in experimental acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Goulbourne, I.A.; Watson, H.; Davies, G.C.

    1987-12-01

    An experimental model of acute pancreatitis in rats has been used to study intrapulmonary /sup 125/I-fibrinogen and /sup 111/In-platelet deposition. Pancreatitis caused a significant increase in wet lung weight compared to normal, and this could be abolished by heparin or aspirin pretreatment. /sup 125/I-fibrinogen was deposited in the lungs of animals to a significantly greater degree than in controls (P less than 0.01). /sup 125/I-fibrinogen deposition was reduced to control levels by pretreatment with aspirin or heparin (P less than 0.05). The uptake of radiolabeled platelets was greater in pancreatitis than in controls (P less than 0.001). Pancreatitis appears to be responsible for platelet entrapment in the lungs. Platelet uptake was reduced by heparin treatment but unaffected by aspirin therapy.

  12. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  13. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  14. Label-free drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ye

    2014-01-01

    Current drug discovery is dominated by label-dependent molecular approaches, which screen drugs in the context of a predefined and target-based hypothesis in vitro. Given that target-based discovery has not transformed the industry, phenotypic screen that identifies drugs based on a specific phenotype of cells, tissues, or animals has gained renewed interest. However, owing to the intrinsic complexity in drug–target interactions, there is often a significant gap between the phenotype screened and the ultimate molecular mechanism of action sought. This paper presents a label-free strategy for early drug discovery. This strategy combines label-free cell phenotypic profiling with computational approaches, and holds promise to bridge the gap by offering a kinetic and holistic representation of the functional consequences of drugs in disease relevant cells that is amenable to mechanistic deconvolution. PMID:24723889

  15. Metrics for Labeled Markov Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desharnais, Josee; Jagadeesan, Radha; Gupta, Vineet; Panangaden, Prakash

    1999-01-01

    Partial Labeled Markov Chains are simultaneously generalizations of process algebra and of traditional Markov chains. They provide a foundation for interacting discrete probabilistic systems, the interaction being synchronization on labels as in process algebra. Existing notions of process equivalence are too sensitive to the exact probabilities of various transitions. This paper addresses contextual reasoning principles for reasoning about more robust notions of "approximate" equivalence between concurrent interacting probabilistic systems. The present results indicate that:We develop a family of metrics between partial labeled Markov chains to formalize the notion of distance between processes. We show that processes at distance zero are bisimilar. We describe a decision procedure to compute the distance between two processes. We show that reasoning about approximate equivalence can be done compositionally by showing that process combinators do not increase distance. We introduce an asymptotic metric to capture asymptotic properties of Markov chains; and show that parallel composition does not increase asymptotic distance.

  16. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  17. Relation of platelet density to platelet age: survival of low- and high-density 111indium-labeled platelets in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, B.; McFadden, P.R.; Hanson, S.R.; Harker, L.A.

    1986-08-01

    The relationship between platelet density and platelet age has been studied using continuous linear Percoll density gradients and 111In-labeling of autologous platelets in baboons. To investigate changes in platelet density during senescence in the circulation, baboons were infused with 111In-labeled autologous platelets, and blood was collected at one hour postinfusion and twice daily thereafter for six days. Platelets were isolated from these samples in high yield (greater than 95%) and separated in continuous linear Percoll density gradients following density equilibrium centrifugation. Although at one hour postinfusion the density distribution of radiolabeled platelets coincided closely with the distribution of the total platelet population, a detectable symmetrical shift toward higher densities was observed after five days. The relative specific radioactivity (RSR) of high-density platelets (1.064 to 1.067 g/mL) decreased at a slower rate than that of the total platelet population (platelets of all densities), whereas the RSR of low-density platelets (1.053 to 1.056 g/mL) showed a more immediate and rapid decrease. These results give rise to one of two interpretations: (1) low-density platelets have a shorter survival time than more dense platelets and are therefore cleared from the circulation at a faster rate, or (2) platelets of all densities increase in density upon aging in the circulation. To determine the explanation for changing RSR of different density fractions we studied the in vivo disappearance characteristics of low- and high-density 111In-labeled platelets. There were no significant differences between the mean survival times of low-density platelets (5.0 +/- 0.49 days, +/- 1 SD, n = 6), high-density platelets (4.9 +/- 0.56 days, n = 6), or control platelets representing platelets of all densities (4.9 +/- 0.38 days, n = 6).

  18. The Labelling Approach to Deviance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rains, Prudence M.; Kitsuse, John L.; Duster, Troy; Freidson, Eliot

    2003-01-01

    This reprint of one chapter from the 1975 text, "Issues in the Classification of Children" by Nicholas Hobbs and others, addresses the theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues involved in the "labeling" approach to the sociology of deviance. It examines the social process of classification, the use of classification in social agencies,…

  19. Revisiting Labels: "Hearing" or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoades, Ellen A.

    2010-01-01

    This position paper briefly presents evidence-based findings pertaining to the language of labels for people with hearing loss that relate to stigma, expectation levels, stereotypes, and self-fulfilling prophecies. These constructs are important for auditory-based practitioners, administrators, policymakers, students, families, and persons with…

  20. Labeling: A Dilemma or Solution?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perusin, Adriano

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the pros and cons of labeling within the classroom, including the effects on self-concept and peer relationships. Argues that integration can be successful, if implemented by an effective and prepared instructor and that activities which are accommodating may allow integration to be successful. (Author/CR)

  1. When Diagnostic Labels Mask Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foltz, Robert; Dang, Sidney; Daniels, Brian; Doyle, Hillary; McFee, Scott; Quisenberry, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of research shows that many seriously troubled children and adolescents are reacting to adverse life experiences. Yet traditional diagnostic labels are based on checklists of surface symptoms. Distracted by disruptive behavior, the common response is to medicate, punish, or exclude rather than respond to needs of youth who have…

  2. Nutrition Marketing on Food Labels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrition marketing may influence purchasing behavior and thereby be a factor in the obesity epidemic. Very little peer-reviewed research has been published which investigates the relationship between nutrition marketing on food labels and consumer behavior. The purpose of this paper was to give an ...

  3. Psychological effectiveness of carbon labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, Geoffrey

    2012-04-01

    Despite the decision by supermarket-giant Tesco to delay its plan to add carbon-footprint information onto all of its 70,000 products, carbon labelling, if carefully designed, could yet change consumer behaviour. However, it requires a new type of thinking about consumers and much additional work.

  4. [Study of distribution of 169Yb, 69Ga and 111In in tumor tissues by macroautoradiography; comparison between viable and necrotic tumor tissues].

    PubMed

    Ando, A; Doishita, K; Sanada, S; Ando, I; Hiraki, T

    1977-01-01

    The localization of 169Yb, 67Ga and 111In in tumor tissues was determined macroautoradiographically. 169Yb-citrate and 111In-citrate were injected intravenously to the rats subcutaneously transplanted Yoshida sarcoma and were injected intraperitoneally to the mice subcutaneously transplanted Ehrlich tumor. These animals were sacrificed 3, 24 and 48 hours after injection. These tumor tissues were frozen in n-hexane (-70 degrees C) cooled with dry ice-acetone. After this, these frozen tumor tissues were cut into serial thin sections (10 micron) in the cryostat (-20 degrees C). One of the slice of these sections was then placed on X-ray film and this film was developed after exposure of several days. On the other hand, next slice of these sections were then stained using the hematoxylin and eosin. From the observations of these autoradiogram and H-E stained slice, the following results were obtained. Concentration of 169Yb, 67Ga and 111In was predominant in viable tumor tissue rather than in necrotic tumor tissue, regardless of time after the administration. 67Ga and 111In were distributed uniformly in viable tumor tissue, but deposition of 169Yb was observed more avidly in viabl tumor tissue neighboring to necrotic tumor. PMID:577017

  5. Safety and biodistribution of 111In-amatuximab in patients with mesothelin expressing cancers using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography-Computed Tomography (SPECT-CT) imaging

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Stephen; Mena, Esther; Kurdziel, Karen; Maltzman, Julia; Wallin, Bruce; Hoffman, Kimberly; Pastan, Ira; Paik, Chang Hum; Choyke, Peter; Hassan, Raffit

    2015-01-01

    Amatuximab is a chimeric high-affinity monoclonal IgG1/k antibody targeting mesothelin that is being developed for treatment of mesothelin-expressing cancers. Considering the ongoing clinical development of amatuximab in these cancers, our objective was to characterize the biodistribution, and dosimetry of 111Indium (111In) radiolabelled amatuximab in mesothelin-expressing cancers. Between October 2011 and February 2013, six patients including four with malignant mesothelioma and two with pancreatic adenocarcinoma underwent Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography-Computed Tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging following administration of 111In amatuximab. SPECT/CT images were obtained at 2–4 hours, 24–48 hours and 96–168 hours after radiotracer injection. In all patients, tumor to background ratios (TBR) consistently met or exceeded an uptake of 1.2 (range 1.2–62.0) which is considered the minimum TBR that can be visualized. TBRs were higher in tumors of patients with mesothelioma than pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 111In-amatuximab uptake was noted in both primary tumors and metastatic sites. The radiotracer dose was generally well-tolerated and demonstrated physiologic uptake in the heart, liver, kidneys and spleen. This is the first study to show tumor localization of an anti-mesothelin antibody in humans. Our results show that 111In-amatuximab was well tolerated with a favorable dosimetry profile. It localizes to mesothelin expressing cancers with a higher uptake in mesothelioma than pancreatic cancer. PMID:25756664

  6. The labeling debate in the United States.

    PubMed

    Marchant, Gary E; Cardineau, Guy A

    2013-01-01

    The mandatory labeling of genetically modified (GM) food has become the predominant policy issue concerning biotechnology in the United States. The controversy over GM labeling is being debated at several different levels and branches of government. At the federal level, the Food and Drug Administration, which has primary jurisdiction over food safety and labeling, has steadfastly refused to require labeling of GM foods since 1992 based on its conclusion that GM foods as a category present no unique or higher risks than other foods. Proposed legislation has been repeatedly introduced in the US. Congress over the years to mandate GM labeling, but has made very little progress. With federal labeling requirements apparently stalled, the main activity has switched to the state level, where numerous individual states are considering mandatory GM labeling, either through legislation or proposition. The debate over GM labeling, at both the federal and state levels, has focused on five issues: (1) public opinion; (2) the legality of labeling requirements; (3) the risks and benefits of GM foods; (4) the costs and burdens of GM labeling; and (5) consumer choice. While the pro-labeling forces argue that all of these factors weigh in favor of mandatory GM labeling, a more careful evaluation of the evidence finds that all five factors weigh decisively against mandatory GM labeling requirements. PMID:23982076

  7. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  8. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  9. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  10. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  11. 7 CFR 65.400 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... origin declarations can either be in the form of a placard, sign, label, sticker, band, twist tie, pin... declaration of the country of origin (e.g., placard, sign, label, sticker, band, twist tie, pin tag, or...

  12. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  13. 27 CFR 19.704 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... containers bear an approved label pursuant to 27 CFR Part 5 and subpart S of this part and the sample is... spirits to be withdrawn under the provisions of § 19.701, the proprietor shall affix a label showing...

  14. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  15. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  16. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  17. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  18. 40 CFR 1033.135 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... THAT IT IS REMANUFACTURED, EXCEPT AS ALLOWED BY 40 CFR 1033.750.” (3) Label diesel-fueled locomotives... locomotives certified for use with both LSD and ULSD. (c) Engine labels. (1) For engines not...

  19. 40 CFR 1033.135 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... THAT IT IS REMANUFACTURED, EXCEPT AS ALLOWED BY 40 CFR 1033.750.” (3) Label diesel-fueled locomotives... locomotives certified for use with both LSD and ULSD. (c) Engine labels. (1) For engines not...

  20. 40 CFR 1033.135 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... THAT IT IS REMANUFACTURED, EXCEPT AS ALLOWED BY 40 CFR 1033.750.” (3) Label diesel-fueled locomotives... locomotives certified for use with both LSD and ULSD. (c) Engine labels. (1) For engines not...

  1. Ivabradine: A Review of Labeled and Off-Label Uses.

    PubMed

    Oliphant, Carrie S; Owens, Ryan E; Bolorunduro, Oluwaseyi B; Jha, Sunil K

    2016-10-01

    Ivabradine is a unique medication recently approved in the USA for the treatment of select heart failure patients. It was first approved for use in several countries around the world over a decade ago as an anti-anginal agent, with subsequent approval for use in heart failure patients. Since ivabradine has selective activity blocking the I f currents in the sinus node, it can reduce heart rate without appreciable effects on blood pressure. Given this heart-rate-specific effect, it has been investigated in many off-label indications as an alternative to traditional heart-rate-reducing medications such as beta blockers and calcium channel blockers. We conducted searches of PubMed and Google Scholar for ivabradine, heart failure, HFrEF, HFpEF, angina, coronary artery disease, inappropriate sinus tachycardia, postural orthostatic hypotension, coronary computed tomography angiography and atrial fibrillation. We reviewed and included studies, case reports, and case series published between 1980 and June 2016 if they provided information relevant to the practicing clinician. In many cases, larger clinical trials are needed to solidify the benefit of ivabradine, although studies indicate benefit in most therapeutic areas explored to date. The purpose of this paper is to review the current labeled and off-label uses of ivabradine, with a focus on clinical trial data. PMID:27405864

  2. 99mTc: Labeling Chemistry and Labeled Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberto, R.; Abram, U.

    This chapter reviews the radiopharmaceutical chemistry of technetium related to the synthesis of perfusion agents and to the labeling of receptor-binding biomolecules. To understand the limitations of technetium chemistry imposed by future application of the complexes in nuclear medicine, an introductory section analyzes the compulsory requirements to be considered when facing the incentive of introducing a novel radiopharmaceutical into the market. Requirements from chemistry, routine application, and market are discussed. In a subsequent section, commercially available 99mTc-based radiopharmaceuticals are treated. It covers the complexes in use for imaging the most important target organs such as heart, brain, or kidney. The commercially available radiopharmaceuticals fulfill the requirements outlined earlier and are discussed with this background. In a following section, the properties and perspectives of the different generations of radiopharmaceuticals are described in a general way, covering characteristics for perfusion agents and for receptor-specific molecules. Technetium chemistry for the synthesis of perfusion agents and the different labeling approaches for target-specific biomolecules are summarized. The review comprises a general introduction to the common approaches currently in use, employing the N x S4-x , [3+1] and 2-hydrazino-nicotinicacid (HYNIC) method as well as more recent strategies such as the carbonyl and the TcN approach. Direct labeling without the need of a bifunctional chelator is briefly reviewed as well. More particularly, recent developments in the labeling of concrete targeting molecules, the second generation of radiopharmaceuticals, is then discussed and prominent examples with antibodies/peptides, neuroreceptor targeting small molecules, myocardial imaging agents, vitamins, thymidine, and complexes relevant to multidrug resistance are given. In addition, a new approach toward peptide drug development is described. The section

  3. 21 CFR 660.28 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... panel. Blood grouping reagent Color of label paper Anti-A Blue. Anti-B Yellow. Slide and rapid tube test... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.28 Labeling. In... label—(1) Color coding. The final container label of all Blood Grouping Reagents shall be...

  4. 21 CFR 660.28 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... panel. Blood grouping reagent Color of label paper Anti-A Blue. Anti-B Yellow. Slide and rapid tube test... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.28 Labeling. In... label—(1) Color coding. The final container label of all Blood Grouping Reagents shall be...

  5. 21 CFR 660.28 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... panel. Blood grouping reagent Color of label paper Anti-A Blue. Anti-B Yellow. Slide and rapid tube test... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.28 Labeling. In... label—(1) Color coding. The final container label of all Blood Grouping Reagents shall be...

  6. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator...

  7. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator...

  8. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator...

  9. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator...

  10. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator...

  11. Learning Words from Labeling and Directive Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callanan, Maureen A.; Akhtar, Nameera; Sussman, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Despite the common intuition that labeling may be the best way to teach a new word to a child, systematic testing is needed of the prediction that children learn words better from labeling utterances than from directive utterances. Two experiments compared toddlers' label learning in the context of hearing words used in directive versus labeling…

  12. China`s environmental labeling program

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Xia, Q.

    1999-09-01

    China`s environmental labeling program was created because the government wanted to improve environmental management, and some Chinese enterprises expected that labeling would help eliminate non-tariff barriers for their exports and allow them to expand their domestic market shares. The labeling program, which is managed by the Chinese government, is a voluntary third-party certification system based on labeling procedures developed in Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development countries. Thus far, China`s labeling program has increased consumer awareness of labeled products and encouraged some enterprises to adopt cleaner technologies in products that have close relationships with consumers` health. However, the effectiveness of the program is very limited because only a small number of product categories are included in the program, consumers` purchasing behavior in China has been influenced by environmental labels for only several types of products, and relatively few enterprises participate in this program. The following measures would improve the effectiveness of the labeling program: enhancing public awareness of environmental labeling and environmental protection, increasing the number of product categories involved in environmental labeling, displaying more information on labels, and integrating the labeling program into China`s efforts to promote cleaner production and to encourage compliance with ISO 14000 standards.

  13. 21 CFR 660.55 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling. 660.55 Section 660.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Anti-Human Globulin § 660.55 Labeling. In addition to the applicable labeling requirements...

  14. 27 CFR 18.55 - Label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... TREASURY ALCOHOL PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.55 Label. Each container of concentrate will have affixed thereto, before transfer, a label identifying the product and... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Label. 18.55 Section...

  15. 47 CFR 15.19 - Labelling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...), and the resulting product is not separately tested: ER09DE03.001 (2) Label text and information should... label on these products shall be permanently affixed to the product and shall be readily visible to the... label shall be located in a conspicuous location on the device and shall contain the...

  16. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a full label: (1) The proper name of the product; (2) The name, address, and license number of manufacturer; (3... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food...

  17. 47 CFR 15.19 - Labelling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...), and the resulting product is not separately tested: ER09DE03.001 (2) Label text and information should... label on these products shall be permanently affixed to the product and shall be readily visible to the... label shall be located in a conspicuous location on the device and shall contain the...

  18. 47 CFR 15.19 - Labelling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...), and the resulting product is not separately tested: ER09DE03.001 (2) Label text and information should... label on these products shall be permanently affixed to the product and shall be readily visible to the... label shall be located in a conspicuous location on the device and shall contain the...

  19. 27 CFR 19.604 - Caution label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Caution label. 19.604... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Containers and Marks Marks § 19.604 Caution label... denaturer may be printed on such label, but no other extraneous matter will be permitted thereon without...

  20. 47 CFR 15.19 - Labelling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...), and the resulting product is not separately tested: ER09DE03.001 (2) Label text and information should... label on these products shall be permanently affixed to the product and shall be readily visible to the... label shall be located in a conspicuous location on the device and shall contain the...

  1. 40 CFR 763.171 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cannot be removed without defacing or destroying them. Product labels shall appear as in paragraph (d)(2... packaging, the label must be attached to the innermost layer adjacent to the product. If the innermost layer... product's innermost layer of product wrapping or packaging, or a label must be attached to the next...

  2. 40 CFR 211.105 - Label format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Label format. 211.105 Section 211.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.105 Label format. (a) Unless specified otherwise in other...

  3. 27 CFR 18.55 - Label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... TREASURY ALCOHOL PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.55 Label. Each container of concentrate will have affixed thereto, before transfer, a label identifying the product and... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Label. 18.55 Section...

  4. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a full label: (1) The proper name of the product; (2) The name, address, and license number of manufacturer; (3... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food...

  5. 21 CFR 606.121 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Container label. 606.121 Section 606.121 Food and... CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR BLOOD AND BLOOD COMPONENTS Finished Product Control § 606.121 Container label. (a) The container label requirements are designed to facilitate the use of a...

  6. 27 CFR 18.55 - Label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... TREASURY LIQUORS PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.55 Label. Each container of concentrate will have affixed thereto, before transfer, a label identifying the product and... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Label. 18.55 Section...

  7. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a full label: (1) The proper name of the product; (2) The name, address, and license number of manufacturer; (3... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food...

  8. 9 CFR 116.3 - Label records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... Each label shall be identified as to: (1) Name and product code number as it appears on the product... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Label records. 116.3 Section 116.3..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS RECORDS AND REPORTS § 116.3 Label...

  9. 40 CFR 211.105 - Label format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Label format. 211.105 Section 211.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.105 Label format. (a) Unless specified otherwise in other...

  10. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a full label: (1) The proper name of the product; (2) The name, address, and license number of manufacturer; (3... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food...

  11. 47 CFR 15.19 - Labelling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...), and the resulting product is not separately tested: ER09DE03.001 (2) Label text and information should... label on these products shall be permanently affixed to the product and shall be readily visible to the... label shall be located in a conspicuous location on the device and shall contain the...

  12. 40 CFR 211.105 - Label format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Label format. 211.105 Section 211.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.105 Label format. (a) Unless specified otherwise in other...

  13. 9 CFR 116.3 - Label records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... Each label shall be identified as to: (1) Name and product code number as it appears on the product... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Label records. 116.3 Section 116.3..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS RECORDS AND REPORTS § 116.3 Label...

  14. 9 CFR 116.3 - Label records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... Each label shall be identified as to: (1) Name and product code number as it appears on the product... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Label records. 116.3 Section 116.3..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS RECORDS AND REPORTS § 116.3 Label...

  15. 27 CFR 18.55 - Label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... TREASURY LIQUORS PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.55 Label. Each container of concentrate will have affixed thereto, before transfer, a label identifying the product and... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Label. 18.55 Section...

  16. 40 CFR 211.105 - Label format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Label format. 211.105 Section 211.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.105 Label format. (a) Unless specified otherwise in other...

  17. 27 CFR 18.55 - Label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY LIQUORS PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.55 Label. Each container of concentrate will have affixed thereto, before transfer, a label identifying the product and... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Label. 18.55 Section...

  18. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a full label: (1) The proper name of the product; (2) The name, address, and license number of manufacturer; (3... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food...

  19. 9 CFR 116.3 - Label records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... Each label shall be identified as to: (1) Name and product code number as it appears on the product... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Label records. 116.3 Section 116.3..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS RECORDS AND REPORTS § 116.3 Label...

  20. 40 CFR 763.171 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... cannot be removed without defacing or destroying them. Product labels shall appear as in paragraph (d)(2... packaging, the label must be attached to the innermost layer adjacent to the product. If the innermost layer... product's innermost layer of product wrapping or packaging, or a label must be attached to the next...

  1. 40 CFR 211.105 - Label format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Label format. 211.105 Section 211.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.105 Label format. (a) Unless specified otherwise in other...

  2. 21 CFR 820.120 - Device labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Device labeling. 820.120 Section 820.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Labeling and Packaging Control § 820.120 Device labeling. Each...

  3. 21 CFR 820.120 - Device labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Device labeling. 820.120 Section 820.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Labeling and Packaging Control § 820.120 Device labeling. Each...

  4. 21 CFR 1271.250 - Labeling controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling controls. 1271.250 Section 1271.250 Food..., AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Current Good Tissue Practice § 1271.250 Labeling controls. (a) General. You must establish and maintain procedures to control the labeling of HCT/Ps. You must...

  5. 21 CFR 1271.250 - Labeling controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling controls. 1271.250 Section 1271.250 Food..., AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Current Good Tissue Practice § 1271.250 Labeling controls. (a) General. You must establish and maintain procedures to control the labeling of HCT/Ps. You must...

  6. 21 CFR 660.35 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... matrix. (g) The package label or package insert shall state the blood group antigens that have been... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.35 Labeling. In... container label of Group O cells shall state: “FOR USE IN DETECTION OF UNEXPECTED ANTIBODIES” or “FOR USE...

  7. 40 CFR 600.301 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Labeling § 600.301 Labeling... each dealer shall maintain or cause to be maintained on each automobile: (1) A general fuel economy... vehicle for which a specific label is requested which has a combined FTP/HFET-based fuel economy value,...

  8. 21 CFR 820.120 - Device labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Device labeling. 820.120 Section 820.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Labeling and Packaging Control § 820.120 Device labeling. Each...

  9. 10 CFR 431.31 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling requirements. 431.31 Section 431.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Electric Motors Labeling § 431.31 Labeling requirements. (a) Electric motor nameplate—(1)...

  10. 10 CFR 431.31 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Labeling requirements. 431.31 Section 431.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Electric Motors Labeling § 431.31 Labeling requirements. (a) Electric motor nameplate—(1)...

  11. 10 CFR 431.31 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Labeling requirements. 431.31 Section 431.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Electric Motors Labeling § 431.31 Labeling requirements. (a) Electric motor nameplate—(1)...

  12. 10 CFR 431.31 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Labeling requirements. 431.31 Section 431.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Electric Motors Labeling § 431.31 Labeling requirements. (a) Electric motor nameplate—(1)...

  13. 10 CFR 431.31 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Labeling requirements. 431.31 Section 431.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Electric Motors Labeling § 431.31 Labeling requirements. (a) Electric motor nameplate—(1)...

  14. 21 CFR 1271.250 - Labeling controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling controls. 1271.250 Section 1271.250 Food..., AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Current Good Tissue Practice § 1271.250 Labeling controls. (a) General. You must establish and maintain procedures to control the labeling of HCT/Ps. You must...

  15. 21 CFR 1271.250 - Labeling controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labeling controls. 1271.250 Section 1271.250 Food..., AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Current Good Tissue Practice § 1271.250 Labeling controls. (a) General. You must establish and maintain procedures to control the labeling of HCT/Ps. You must...

  16. 21 CFR 820.120 - Device labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Device labeling. 820.120 Section 820.120 Food and... QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Labeling and Packaging Control § 820.120 Device labeling. Each manufacturer..., handling instructions, and any additional processing instructions. The release, including the date...

  17. 21 CFR 820.120 - Device labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Device labeling. 820.120 Section 820.120 Food and... QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Labeling and Packaging Control § 820.120 Device labeling. Each manufacturer..., handling instructions, and any additional processing instructions. The release, including the date...

  18. 30 CFR 47.43 - Label alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Label alternatives. 47.43 Section 47.43 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.43 Label alternatives. The operator...

  19. 30 CFR 47.43 - Label alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Label alternatives. 47.43 Section 47.43 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.43 Label alternatives. The operator...

  20. 30 CFR 47.43 - Label alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Label alternatives. 47.43 Section 47.43 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.43 Label alternatives. The operator...

  1. 30 CFR 47.43 - Label alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Label alternatives. 47.43 Section 47.43 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.43 Label alternatives. The operator...

  2. 30 CFR 47.43 - Label alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Label alternatives. 47.43 Section 47.43 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.43 Label alternatives. The operator...

  3. 21 CFR 660.35 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.35 Labeling. In... or end of the label, oustide of the main panel. (2) If washing the cells is required by the manufacturer, the container label shall include appropriate instructions; if the cells should not be...

  4. 21 CFR 660.35 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.35 Labeling. In... or end of the label, oustide of the main panel. (2) If washing the cells is required by the manufacturer, the container label shall include appropriate instructions; if the cells should not be...

  5. 21 CFR 660.35 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.35 Labeling. In... or end of the label, oustide of the main panel. (2) If washing the cells is required by the manufacturer, the container label shall include appropriate instructions; if the cells should not be...

  6. 21 CFR 225.80 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Packaging and Labeling § 225.80 Labeling. (a... adhered to, will assure that the article is safe and effective for its intended purposes. (b)(1) Labels... medicated feed and includes adequate information for the safe and effective use of the medicated feed....

  7. Fluorine-18 labeling of proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbourn, M.R.; Dence, C.S.; Welch, M.J.; Mathias, C.J.

    1987-04-01

    Two fluorine-18-labeled reagents, methyl 3-(/sup 18/F)fluoro-5-nitrobenzimidate and 4-(/sup 18/F)fluorophenacyl bromide, have been prepared for covalent attachment of fluorine-18 to proteins. Both reagents can be prepared in moderate yields (30-50%, EOB) in synthesis times of 50-70 min. Reaction of these reagents with proteins (human serum albumin, human fibrinogen, and human immunoglobulin A) is pH independent, protein concentration dependent, and takes 5-60 min at mild pH (8.0) and temperature (25-37 degrees C), in yields up to 95% (corrected). The /sup 18/F-labeled proteins are purified by size exclusion chromatography.

  8. Automated labeling in document images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongwoo; Le, Daniel X.; Thoma, George R.

    2000-12-01

    The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is developing an automated system to produce bibliographic records for its MEDLINER database. This system, named Medical Article Record System (MARS), employs document image analysis and understanding techniques and optical character recognition (OCR). This paper describes a key module in MARS called the Automated Labeling (AL) module, which labels all zones of interest (title, author, affiliation, and abstract) automatically. The AL algorithm is based on 120 rules that are derived from an analysis of journal page layouts and features extracted from OCR output. Experiments carried out on more than 11,000 articles in over 1,000 biomedical journals show the accuracy of this rule-based algorithm to exceed 96%.

  9. Isotope Labeling in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Arpana; Saxena, Krishna; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Isotope labeling of proteins represents an important and often required tool for the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the structure and dynamics of proteins. Mammalian expression systems have conventionally been considered to be too weak and inefficient for protein expression. However, recent advances have significantly improved the expression levels of these systems. Here, we provide an overview of some of the recent developments in expression strategies for mammalian expression systems in view of NMR investigations. PMID:22167668

  10. Nonstoichiometric zinc oxide and indium-doped zinc oxide: Electrical conductivity and {sup 111}In-TDPAC studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, R.; Sleight, A.W.; Platzer, R.; Gardner, J.A.

    1996-02-15

    Indium-doped zinc oxide powders have been prepared which show room-temperature electrical conductivities as high as 30 {Omega}{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}1}. The indium doping apparently occurs as Zn{sub 1-x}In{sub x}O,Zn{sub 1-y}In{sub y}O{sub 1+y/2}, or a combination of these. Optimum conductivity occurs for Zn{sub 1-x}In{sub x}O where the maximum value of x obtained was about 0.5 at%. The degrees of sample reduction were determined by iodimetric titration. Time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) spectroscopy on indium doped zinc oxide is consistent with indium substituting at normal zinc sites in the ZnO lattice. TDPAC studies on zinc oxide annealed under zinc vapors show a second environment for the {sup 111}In probe. In this case, there is an unusually high temperature dependence of the electric field gradient which may be caused by a nearby zinc interstitial. An important conclusion of this work is that zinc interstitials are not ionized and do not therefore contribute significantly to the increased conductivity of reduced zinc oxide.

  11. [Clinical trial of 111In-antimyosin antibody imaging: (3) Comparison with 99mTc-pyrophosphate imaging].

    PubMed

    Tamaki, N; Yamada, T; Matsumori, A; Fujita, T; Ohtani, H; Watanabe, Y; Yonekura, Y; Endo, K; Konishi, J; Kawai, C

    1989-09-01

    Clinical value of 111In-antimyosin monoclonal antibody F ab (AM) was compared with 99mTc-pyrophosphate (PYP) in 13 patients with myocardial infarction and 3 patients with myocarditis. Following PYP injection, PYP imaging was performed 3 hours later. Immediately after PYP imaging, AM was administrated and AM images were obtained 48 hours later. Abnormal accumulation in the infarcted myocardium was observed in 11 patients (85%) on AM images but only in 3 patients (23%) on PYP images. All patients within 8 days after the onset of infarction showed abnormal uptake on both images. Of 5 patients with 1 to 2 weeks after the onset of infarction, abnormal uptake was observed in all of them on AM images but only in one of them on PYP imaging. Furthermore, of 6 patients with more than 2 weeks after the onset, AM imaging showed abnormal uptake in 4 (67%) but PYP imaging did not show abnormal uptake in any of them. Similarly. Of 3 patients with myocarditis, diffuse uptake in the myocardium ws observed in 2 of them on AM images but none of them showed abnormal uptake on PYP images. We conclude that AM imaging is a useful means for identifying not only acute stages but also subacute stages of myocardial necrosis where PYP imaging did not show any abnormality. PMID:2554037

  12. Location and activity of ulcerative and Crohn's colitis by /sup 111/In leukocyte scan. A prospective comparison study

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, D.T.; Gray, G.M.; Gregory, P.B.; Anderson, M.; Goodwin, D.A.; McDougall, I.R.

    1983-02-01

    A prospective blinded study comparing the /sup 111/In leukocyte scan to barium enema, colonoscopy, or surgery or a combination of these, was carried out in 15 patients (10 with active ulcerative colitis and 5 with active Crohn's colitis). Correlation of disease location to colonic regions between indium scan and other diagnostic studies was excellent in 11 instances, good in 2, and poor in 3. In 2 of the 3 studies where major disagreement occurred, the comparative barium enema was performed greater than 2 mo after the indium scan. Disease activity, estimated by the intensity of radionuclide uptake, was compared to clinical disease activity assessed by the Crohn's Disease Activity Index for both forms of colitis. The relative degree of inflammation estimated by the indium scan correlated well with the independent clinical assessment (correlation coefficient . 0.81). The indium 111 leukocyte scan appears to be an accurate, noninvasive method for assessing the extent and the severity of the inflammation in patients with acute ulcerative or Crohn's colitis.

  13. Human biodistribution of [111In]diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-(DTPA)-D-[Phe1]-octreotide and peroperative detection of endocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Ohrvall, U; Westlin, J E; Nilsson, S; Wilander, E; Juhlin, C; Rastad, J; Akerström, G

    1995-12-01

    Requisites for preoperative and intraoperative tumor localization with [111In]diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-D-[Phe1]-octreotide scanning were explored in 23 patients with endocrine tumors (15 carcinoids, 4 insulinomas, and single cases of gastrinoma, medullary thyroid carcinoma, aldosteronoma, and paraganglioma). The patients were subjected to Octreoscan single photon emission computed tomographic examination prior to surgery and well counter investigation of nuclide uptake in tumors and normal tissues sampled at surgery. Somatostatin receptor-positive tumors demonstrated efficient nuclide accumulation with mean tumor:blood radioactivity ratios of 180-370 (for carcinoids and insulinoma), compared with tissue:blood ratios of 302 for spleen, 42 for liver, and < 10-15 in other normal tissues (pancreas, small intestine, and mesenteric fat). Inefficient preoperative visualization of lesions was related to inconspicuous size, as for primary intestinal carcinoids, tiny liver metastases, and a single small insulinoma. High background activity, pronounced tumor fibrosis, and meager accumulation of tracer also interfered with visualization. Tumor deposits in organs with low background activity (such as carcinoid mesenteric metastases and endocrine pancreatic tumors) were generally most readily detected. Intraoperative investigations with hand-held gamma detector probes were disturbed by obvious high background activity. These investigations revealed two preoperatively unrecognized primary intestinal carcinoids, which, however, were both palpable during surgery. These studies, therefore, had little impact on the surgical strategy. PMID:7493348

  14. High resolution electrochemical STM : new structural results for underpotentially deposited Cu on Au(111) in acid sulfate solution.

    SciTech Connect

    Sieradzki, Karl; Vasiljevic, Natasa; Viyannalage, L.K.T.; Dimitrov, Nikolay

    2007-09-01

    Adsorption of sulfate assists Cu monolayer underpotential deposition (upd) on Au(111) in a unique way, rendering two distinct structural stages: (i) formation of a low-density Cu phase at coverage of 2/3 ML known as the ({radical}3 x {radical}3) R30{sup o} or honeycomb phase; (ii) formation of a complete monolayer, i.e., Cu-(1 x 1) phase pseudomorphic with respect to underlying Au(111) substrate. In this paper we present new structural in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) results for this system. We show and discuss the STM imaging of the copper honeycomb superstructure probed underneath the co-adsorbed ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{sup o} sulfate adlayer in the low-density phase. High resolution imaging during the phase transition from the low to high density copper phase unambiguously shows the existence of an ordered sulfate structure p(2 x 2) on the pseudomorphic Cu-(1 x 1) layer. The new structure is seen during the co-existence of two copper phases as well as upon completion of the Cu-(1 x 1) monolayer. While supported by earlier chronocoulometric measurements in the same system, the new structural results raise questions that need to be addressed in a future work.

  15. 78 FR 24211 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Safety Considerations for Container Labels and Carton Labeling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... closure design (December 13, 2012, 77 FR 74196), and the third guidance will focus on minimizing risks... Container Labels and Carton Labeling Design To Minimize Medication Errors; Availability AGENCY: Food and... Labels and Carton Labeling Design to Minimize Medication Errors.'' The draft guidance focuses on...

  16. 40 CFR 168.65 - Pesticide export label and labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... policy. (3) No statements which appear on any of the product labels or labeling add new uses or claims or... paragraph (b) of this section which are not met by the immediate product labels. Supplemental labeling will... CFR 180.910, 180.920, 180.930, and 180.950, and the dye must not be a List 1 inert. (List 1 inerts...

  17. 40 CFR 168.65 - Pesticide export label and labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... policy. (3) No statements which appear on any of the product labels or labeling add new uses or claims or... paragraph (b) of this section which are not met by the immediate product labels. Supplemental labeling will... CFR 180.910, 180.920, 180.930, and 180.950, and the dye must not be a List 1 inert. (List 1 inerts...

  18. 27 CFR 19.642 - Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... meaning given, and be stated in the manner provided in 27 CFR part 5. (Sec. 201, Pub. L. 85-859, 72 Stat... labels under an exemption from label approval. 19.642 Section 19.642 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... PLANTS Liquor Bottle and Label Requirements Bottle Label Requirements § 19.642 Statements required...

  19. Stigma of a label: educational expectations for high school students labeled with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Shifrer, Dara

    2013-01-01

    Poorer outcomes for youth labeled with learning disabilities (LDs) are often attributed to the student's own deficiencies or cumulative disadvantage; but the more troubling possibility is that special education placement limits rather than expands these students' opportunities. Labeling theory partially attributes the poorer outcomes of labeled persons to stigma related to labels. This study uses data on approximately 11,740 adolescents and their schools from the Education Longitudinal Survey of 2002 to determine if stigma influences teachers' and parents' educational expectations for students labeled with LDs and labeled adolescents' expectations for themselves. Supporting the predictions of labeling theory, teachers and parents are more likely to perceive disabilities in, and hold lower educational expectations for labeled adolescents than for similarly achieving and behaving adolescents not labeled with disabilities. The negative effect of being labeled with LDs on adolescents' educational expectations is partially mechanized through parents' and particularly teachers' lower expectations. PMID:24311756

  20. Use of Symbols in Labeling. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-06-15

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) is issuing this final rule revising its medical device and certain biological product labeling regulations to explicitly allow for the optional inclusion of graphical representations of information, or symbols, in labeling (including labels) without adjacent explanatory text (referred to in this document as "stand-alone symbols") if certain requirements are met. The final rule also specifies that the use of symbols, accompanied by adjacent explanatory text continues to be permitted. FDA is also revising its prescription device labeling regulations to allow the use of the symbol statement "Rx only" or "[rx] only" in the labeling for prescription devices. PMID:27311137

  1. (R)-NODAGA-PSMA: A Versatile Precursor for Radiometal Labeling and Nuclear Imaging of PSMA-Positive Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gourni, Eleni; Canovas, Coline; Goncalves, Victor; Denat, Franck; Meyer, Philipp T.; Maecke, Helmut R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The present study aims at developing and evaluating an urea-based prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) inhibitor suitable for labeling with 111In for SPECT and intraoperative applications as well as 68Ga and 64Cu for PET imaging. Methods The PSMA-based inhibitor-lysine-urea-glutamate-coupled to the spacer Phe-Phe-D-Lys(suberoyl) and functionalized with the enantiomerically pure prochelator (R)-1-(1-carboxy-3-carbotertbutoxypropyl)-4,7-carbotartbutoxymethyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane ((R)-NODAGA(tBu)3), to obtain (R)-NODAGA-Phe-Phe-D-Lys(suberoyl)-Lys-urea-Glu (CC34). CC34 was labeled with 111In, 68Ga and 64Cu. The radioconjugates were further evaluated in vitro and in vivo in LNCaP xenografts by biodistribution and PET studies. Biodistribution studies were also performed with 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA (HBED-CC: N,N′-bis[2-hydroxy-5-(carboxyethyl)benzyl]ethylenediamine-N,N′-diacetic acid) and 111In-PSMA-617 for comparison. Results 68Ga-CC34, 64Cu-CC34, and 111In-CC34 were prepared in radiochemical purity >95%. 68/natGa-CC34, 64/natCu-CC34, 111/natIn-CC34, 68/natGa-HBED-CC-PSMA, and 111/natIn-PSMA-617 exhibited high affinity for the LNCaP cells, with Kd values of 19.3±2.5 nM, 27.5±2.7 nM, 5.5±0.9 nM, 2.9±0.6 nM and 5.4±0.8 nM, respectively. They revealed comparable internalization profiles with approximately 75% of the total cell associated activity internalized after 3 h of incubation. 68Ga-CC34 showed very high stability after its administration in mice. Tumor uptake of 68Ga-CC34 (14.5±2.9% IA/g) in LNCaP xenografts at 1 h p.i. was comparable to 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA (15.8±1.4% IA/g) (P = 0.67). The tumor-to-normal tissue ratios at 1 and 2 h p.i of 68Ga-CC34 were also comparable to 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA (P>0.05). Tumor uptake of 111In-CC34 (28.5±2.6% IA/g) at 1 h p.i. was lower than 111In-PSMA-617 (52.1±6.5% IA/g) (P = 0.02). The acquisition of PET-images with 64Cu-CC34 at later time points showed wash-out from the kidneys, while tumor uptake still remained

  2. Dengue virus growth, purification, and fluorescent labeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Summer; Chan, Kuan Rong; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2014-01-01

    The early events of the dengue virus life cycle involve virus binding, internalization, trafficking, and fusion. Fluorescently labeled viruses can be used to visualize these early processes. As dengue virus has 180 identical copies of the envelope protein attached to the membrane surface and is surrounded by a lipid membrane, amine-reactive (Alexa Fluor) or lipophilic (DiD) dyes can be used for virus labeling. These dyes are highly photostable and are ideal for studies involving cellular uptake and endosomal transport. To improve virus labeling efficiency and minimize the nonspecific labeling of nonviral proteins, virus concentration and purification precede fluorescent labeling of dengue viruses. Besides using these viruses for single-particle tracking, DiD-labeled viruses can also be used to distinguish serotype-specific from cross-neutralizing antibodies. Here the details of virus concentration, purification, virus labeling, applications, and hints of troubleshooting are described. PMID:24696327

  3. Evaluation of in vivo labelled dendritic cell migration in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ridolfi, Ruggero; Riccobon, Angela; Galassi, Riccardo; Giorgetti, Gianluigi; Petrini, Massimiliano; Fiammenghi, Laura; Stefanelli, Monica; Ridolfi, Laura; Moretti, Andrea; Migliori, Giuseppe; Fiorentini, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    Background Dendritic Cell (DC) vaccination is a very promising therapeutic strategy in cancer patients. The immunizing ability of DC is critically influenced by their migration activity to lymphatic tissues, where they have the task of priming naïve T-cells. In the present study in vivo DC migration was investigated within the context of a clinical trial of antitumor vaccination. In particular, we compared the migration activity of mature Dendritic Cells (mDC) with that of immature Dendritic Cells (iDC) and also assessed intradermal versus subcutaneous administration. Methods DC were labelled with 99mTc-HMPAO or 111In-Oxine, and the presence of labelled DC in regional lymph nodes was evaluated at pre-set times up to a maximum of 72 h after inoculation. Determinations were carried out in 8 patients (7 melanoma and 1 renal cell carcinoma). Results It was verified that intradermal administration resulted in about a threefold higher migration to lymph nodes than subcutaneous administration, while mDC showed, on average, a six-to eightfold higher migration than iDC. The first DC were detected in lymph nodes 20–60 min after inoculation and the maximum concentration was reached after 48–72 h. Conclusions These data obtained in vivo provide preliminary basic information on DC with respect to their antitumor immunization activity. Further research is needed to optimize the therapeutic potential of vaccination with DC. PMID:15285807

  4. Label free redox capacitive biosensing.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Flávio C Bedatty; Góes, Márcio S; Davis, Jason J; Bueno, Paulo R

    2013-12-15

    A surface confined redox group contributes to an interfacial charging (quantifiable by redox capacitance) that can be sensitively probed by impedance derived capacitance spectroscopy. In generating mixed molecular films comprising such redox groups, together with specific recognition elements (here antibodies), this charging signal is able to sensitively transduce the recognition and binding of specific analytes. This novel transduction method, exemplified here with C-reactive protein, an important biomarker of cardiac status and general trauma, is equally applicable to any suitably prepared interfacial combination of redox reporter and receptor. The assays are label free, ultrasensitive, highly specific and accompanied by a good linear range. PMID:23896524

  5. Tritium labeling of detonation nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Girard, Hugues A; El-Kharbachi, Abdelouahab; Garcia-Argote, Sébastien; Petit, Tristan; Bergonzo, Philippe; Rousseau, Bernard; Arnault, Jean-Charles

    2014-03-18

    For the first time, the radioactive labeling of detonation nanodiamonds was efficiently achieved using a tritium microwave plasma. According to our measurements, the total radioactivity reaches 9120 ± 120 μCi mg(-1), with 93% of (3)H atoms tightly bonded to the surface and up to 7% embedded into the diamond core. Such (3)H doping will ensure highly stable radiolabeled nanodiamonds, on which surface functionalization is still allowed. This breakthrough opens the way to biodistribution and pharmacokinetics studies of nanodiamonds, while this approach can be scalable to easily treat bulk quantities of nanodiamonds at low cost. PMID:24492594

  6. Hemoglobin Labeled by Radioactive Lysine

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L.; DeLaVergne, L.; Miller, L. L.; Whipple, G. H.

    1949-12-08

    This paper reports on the utilization of tagged epsilon carbon of DL-lysine by a dog both anemic and hypoproteinemic due to repeated bleeding plus a diet low in protein. The experiment extended over period of 234 days, a time sufficient to indicate an erythrocyte life span of at least 115 days based upon the rate of replacement of labeled red cell proteins. The proteins of broken down red cells seem not to be used with any great preference for the synthesis of new hemoglobin.

  7. Social determinants of diagnostic labels in depression.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Susan; Armstrong, David

    2006-01-01

    The role of diagnostic labels in medicine is usually that of labelling an illness as a means of communication. Control over labelling processes in medicine is ordinarily imposed via medical schools, textbooks, education or by diagnostic manuals. Diagnostic labels often change following new discoveries in underlying pathology such as 'consumption' being relabelled as 'TB' or 'cancer'. Sub-types of broad diagnostic labels also often emerge from such discoveries e.g. 'lung cancer' or 'throat cancer'. In mental health, underlying pathology is the subject of ongoing debate spanning ideas including the brain as a faulty organ, faulty genetics and environmental problems. With controversy over pathology comes controversy over labels and the idea that labels may be used not just for communication, but as devices of social and professional control, arising out of a social process. This study explores the codification of the diagnostic label 'depression' which emerged in the twentieth-century and has proliferated with numerous sub-types over the last 40 years. The aim is to examine its social determinants and context. Medline is used as a data source for professional label usage. A range of depression sub-type labels in professional use was identified. This exercise revealed many official and 'unofficial' terms in professional use. Citation rate plots by year were then generated for these depression sub-type labels. The rise and fall of different labels are examined in relation to social determinants and context, including publication of diagnostic manuals DSM and ICD, power shifts in psychiatry, the discovery of psychiatric drugs and the shift from inpatient to community care. Exploring the changing use of official and unofficial labels over time in this way provides a novel historical perspective on the concept of depression in the late twentieth-century. PMID:16009477

  8. Comparison of normal tissue pharmacokinetics with {sup 111}In/{sup 9}Y monoclonal antibody m170 for breast and prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, Joerg; O'Donnell, Robert T.; Richman, Carol M. . E-mail: sjdenardo@ucdavis.edu

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Radioactivity deposition in normal tissues limits the dose deliverable by radiopharmaceuticals (RP) in radioimmunotherapy (RIT). This study investigated the absorbed radiation dose in normal tissues for prostate cancer patients in comparison to breast cancer patients for 2 RPs using the monoclonal antibody (MAb) m170. Methods and Materials: {sup 111}In-DOTA-glycylglycylglycyl-L-p-isothiocyanatophenylalanine amide (GGGF)-m170 and {sup 111}In-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) 2-iminothiolane (2IT)-m170, representing the same MAb and chelate with and without a cleavable linkage, were studied in 13 breast cancer and 26 prostate cancer patients. Dosimetry for {sup 9}Y was calculated using {sup 111}In MAb pharmacokinetics from the initial imaging study for each patient, using reference man- and patient-specific masses. Results: The reference man-specific radiation doses (cGy/MBq) were not significantly different for the breast and the prostate cancer patients for both RPs in all but one tissue-RP combination (liver, DOTA-2IT). The patient-specific doses had differences between the groups most of which can be related to weight differences. Conclusions: Similar normal tissue doses were calculated for two groups of patients having different cancers and genders. This similarity combined with continued careful analysis of the imaging data might allow the use of higher starting doses in early phase RIT studies.

  9. Radiolabeled red cell viability. I. Comparison of /sup 51/Cr, /sup 99m/Tc, and /sup 111/In for measuring the viability of autologous stored red cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, C.S.; Myhre, B.A.; Angulo, M.C.; Salk, R.D.; Essex, C.E.; Demianew, S.H.

    1987-09-01

    The simultaneous determination of autologous /sup 99m/Tc red cell (RBC) and /sup 51/Cr RBC viability at 24 hours was measured in 19 normal volunteers whose RBCs had been stored in additive media (Nutracel) for 42 or 49 days. The ratio of the /sup 51/Cr:/sup 99m/Tc value was 1.23. In this experiment we also calculated /sup 51/Cr RBC viability by both the single-isotope method (extrapolation) and the double-isotope method (using /sup 125/I human serum albumin for an independent plasma volume) in the same volunteers. The corresponding viability values were not significantly different. The simultaneous determination of autologous /sup 111/In-oxine RBC and /sup 51/Cr RBC viability at 24 hours was measured in 19 other normal volunteers whose RBCs had been stored in citrate-phosphate-dextrose-adenine (CPDA-1) for 1 or 15 days. The ratio of the /sup 51/Cr:/sup 111/In value was 1.1. Use of these 24-hour viability ratios as conversion factors permits direct comparison of /sup 99m/Tc or /sup 111/In RBC viability with a /sup 51/Cr standard, and therefore expands the application of these newer RBC radiolabels.

  10. Intraoperative detection of somatostatin-receptor-positive neuroendocrine tumours using indium-111-labelled DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide.

    PubMed Central

    Wangberg, B.; Forssell-Aronsson, E.; Tisell, L. E.; Nilsson, O.; Fjalling, M.; Ahlman, H.

    1996-01-01

    After injection of 111In-labelled DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide, intraoperative tumour localisation was performed using a scintillation detector in 23 patients with neuroendocrine tumours. Count rates from suspect tumour lesions and adjacent normal tissue were expressed as a ratio before (Rin situ) and after (Rex vivo) excision. 111In activity concentration ratios of tumour tissue to blood (T/B) were determined in a gamma counter. In patients with midgut carcinoids, (all scintigraphy positive), false Rin situ recordings were found in 4/29 macroscopically identified tumours. T/B ratios were all high (27-650). In patients with medullary thyroid carcinomas (eight out of ten scintigraphy positive), misleading Rin situ results were found in 4/37 macroscopically identified tumours. T/B ratios were lower (3-39) than those seen in midgut carcinoids. Two out of four patients with endocrine pancreatic tumours had positive scintigraphy, reliable intraoperative measurements and very high T/B ratios (910-1500). One patient with a gastric carcinoid had correct measurements in situ and ex vivo with high T/B ratios (71-210). In situ measurements added little information to preoperative scintigraphy and surgical findings using the present detection system. Rex vivo measurements were more reliable. The very high T/B ratios seen in midgut carcinoids and some endocrine pancreatic tumours would be favourable for future radiation therapy via somatostatin receptors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8611378

  11. Label-free molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junqi; Li, Qi; Fu, Rongxin; Wang, Tongzhou; Wang, Ruliang; Huang, Guoliang

    2014-03-01

    Optical microscopy technology has achieved great improvements in the 20th century. The detection limit has reached about twenty nanometers (with near-field optics, STED, PALM and STORM). But in the application areas such as life science, medical science, clinical treatment and especially in vivo dynamic measurement, mutual restrictions still exist between numeric aperture/magnification and working distance, fluorescent dependent, and between resolution and frame rate/field size, etc. This paper explores a hyperspectral scanning super-resolution label free molecules imaging method based on the white light interferometry. The vertical detection resolution was approximate to 1 nm which is the thickness of a single molecular layer and dynamic measuring range of thickness reaches to 10 μm. The spectrum-shifting algorithm is developed for robust restructure of images when the pixels are overlapped. Micro-biochip with protein binding and DNA amplification could be detected by using this spectral scanning super-resolution molecules imaging in label free. This method has several advantages as following: Firstly, the decoding and detecting steps are combined into one step. It makes tests faster and easier. Secondly, we used thickness-coded, minimized chips instead of a large microarray chip to carry the probes. This accelerates the interaction of the biomolecules. Thirdly, since only one kind of probes are attached to our thickness-coded, minimized chip, users can only pick out the probes they are interested in for a test without wasting unnecessary probes and chips.

  12. Label-free photoacoustic nanoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Winkler, Amy M.; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lidai; Chen, Yun; Dorn, Gerald W.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Super-resolution microscopy techniques—capable of overcoming the diffraction limit of light—have opened new opportunities to explore subcellular structures and dynamics not resolvable in conventional far-field microscopy. However, relying on staining with exogenous fluorescent markers, these techniques can sometimes introduce undesired artifacts to the image, mainly due to large tagging agent sizes and insufficient or variable labeling densities. By contrast, the use of endogenous pigments allows imaging of the intrinsic structures of biological samples with unaltered molecular constituents. Here, we report label-free photoacoustic (PA) nanoscopy, which is exquisitely sensitive to optical absorption, with an 88 nm resolution. At each scanning position, multiple PA signals are successively excited with increasing laser pulse energy. Because of optical saturation or nonlinear thermal expansion, the PA amplitude depends on the nonlinear incident optical fluence. The high-order dependence, quantified by polynomial fitting, provides super-resolution imaging with optical sectioning. PA nanoscopy is capable of super-resolution imaging of either fluorescent or nonfluorescent molecules. PMID:25104412

  13. Chemical kin label in seabirds.

    PubMed

    Célérier, Aurélie; Bon, Cécile; Malapert, Aurore; Palmas, Pauline; Bonadonna, Francesco

    2011-12-23

    Chemical signals yield critical socio-ecological information in many animals, such as species, identity, social status or sex, but have been poorly investigated in birds. Recent results showed that chemical signals are used to recognize their nest and partner by some petrel seabirds whose olfactory anatomy is well developed and which possess a life-history propitious to olfactory-mediated behaviours. Here, we investigate whether blue petrels (Halobaena caerulea) produce some chemical labels potentially involved in kin recognition and inbreeding avoidance. To overcome methodological constraints of chemical analysis and field behavioural experiments, we used an indirect behavioural approach, based on mice olfactory abilities in discriminating odours. We showed that mice (i) can detect odour differences between individual petrels, (ii) perceive a high odour similarity between a chick and its parents, and (iii) perceive this similarity only before fledging but not during the nestling developmental stage. Our results confirm the existence of an individual olfactory signature in blue petrels and show for the first time, to our knowledge, that birds may exhibit an olfactory kin label, which may have strong implications for inbreeding avoidance. PMID:21525047

  14. Inulin determination for food labeling.

    PubMed

    Zuleta, A; Sambucetti, M E

    2001-10-01

    Inulin and oligofructose exhibit valuable nutritional and functional attributes, so they are used as supplements as soluble fiber or as macronutrient substitutes. As classic analytical methods for dietary fiber measurement are not effective, several specific methods have been proposed. These methods measure total fructans and are based on one or more enzymatic sample treatments and determination of released sugars. To determine inulin for labeling purposes, we developed an easy and rapid anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method following water extraction of inulin. HPLC conditions included an Aminex HPX- 87C column (Bio-Rad), deionized water at 85 degrees C as the mobile phase and a refractive index detector. The tested foods included tailor-made food products containing known amounts of inulin and commercial products (cookies, milk, ice creams, cheese, and cereal bars). The average recovery was 97%, and the coefficient of variation ranged from 1.1 to 5% in the food matrixes. The obtained results showed that this method provides an easier, faster and cheaper alternative than previous techniques for determining inulin with enough accuracy and precision for routine labeling purposes by direct determination of inulin by HPLC with refractive index detection. PMID:11599989

  15. Label transfer by measuring compactness.

    PubMed

    Varga, Robert; Nedevschi, Sergiu

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a new automatic image annotation algorithm. First, we introduce a new similarity measure between images: compactness. This uses low level visual descriptors for determining the similarity between two images. Compactness shows how close test image features lie to training image feature cluster centers. The measure provides the core for a k-nearest neighbor type image annotation method. Afterward, a formalism for defining different transfer techniques is devised and several label transfer techniques are provided. The method as whole is evaluated on four image annotation benchmarks. The results on these sets validate the accuracy of the approach, which outperforms many state-of-the-art annotation methods. The method presented here requires a simple training process, efficiently combines different feature types and performs better than complex learning algorithms, even in this incipient form. The main contributions of this paper are the usage of compactness as a similarity measure that enables efficient low level feature comparison and an annotation algorithm based on label transfer. PMID:23955754

  16. 16 CFR 309.17 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... is centered. The band at the top of the label contains the name of the fuel. This band should measure 1″ (2.54 cm) deep. Spacing of the fuel name is 1/4″ (.64 cm) from the top of the label and 3/16.... “Helvetica black” type is used throughout. All type is centered. The band at the top of the label...

  17. 75 FR 81943 - Appliance Labeling Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ...The Commission proposes changing the effective date for its new light bulb labeling requirements (published on July 19, 2010, 75 FR 41696) to January 1, 2012, to provide manufacturers with additional time to incorporate the new label on their packaging. The Commission also proposes not requiring the new label for incandescent bulbs (e.g., 75 watt bulbs) that, as of 2013, will not meet federal......

  18. A programmed labeling approach to image interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pore, M. D.; Abotteen, R. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    Manual labeling techniques require the analyst-interpreter to use not only production film converter products but also agricultural and meteorological data and spectral aids in an integrated, judgmental fashion. To control an anticipated high variance in these techniques, a semiautomatic labeling technology was developed. The product of this technology is label identification from statistical tabulation (LIST) which operates from a discriminant basis and has the ability to measure the reliability of the label and to introduce an arbitrary bias. The development of LIST and its properties are described. Numerical results of an application are included and the evaluation of LIST is discussed.

  19. Simultaneous segmentation and statistical label fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asman, Andrew J.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2012-02-01

    Labeling or segmentation of structures of interest in medical imaging plays an essential role in both clinical and scientific understanding. Two of the common techniques to obtain these labels are through either fully automated segmentation or through multi-atlas based segmentation and label fusion. Fully automated techniques often result in highly accurate segmentations but lack the robustness to be viable in many cases. On the other hand, label fusion techniques are often extremely robust, but lack the accuracy of automated algorithms for specific classes of problems. Herein, we propose to perform simultaneous automated segmentation and statistical label fusion through the reformulation of a generative model to include a linkage structure that explicitly estimates the complex global relationships between labels and intensities. These relationships are inferred from the atlas labels and intensities and applied to the target using a non-parametric approach. The novelty of this approach lies in the combination of previously exclusive techniques and attempts to combine the accuracy benefits of automated segmentation with the robustness of a multi-atlas based approach. The accuracy benefits of this simultaneous approach are assessed using a multi-label multi-atlas whole-brain segmentation experiment and the segmentation of the highly variable thyroid on computed tomography images. The results demonstrate that this technique has major benefits for certain types of problems and has the potential to provide a paradigm shift in which the lines between statistical label fusion and automated segmentation are dramatically blurred.

  20. 16 CFR Appendix L to Part 305 - Sample Labels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Register citations affecting appendix L, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the... Part 305—Sample Labels ER29AU07.122 PROTOTYPE LABEL 1 ER29AU07.123 PROTOTYPE LABEL 2 ER29AU07.124 PROTOTYPE LABEL 3 ER29AU07.125 PROTOTYPE LABEL 4 ER29AU07.126 SAMPLE LABEL 1 ER29AU07.127 SAMPLE LABEL...

  1. Systematic Comparison of Label-Free, Metabolic Labeling, and Isobaric Chemical Labeling for Quantitative Proteomics on LTQ Orbitrap Velos

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhou; Adams, Rachel M; Chourey, Karuna; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Pan, Chongle

    2012-01-01

    A variety of quantitative proteomics methods have been developed, including label-free, metabolic labeling, and isobaric chemical labeling using iTRAQ or TMT. Here, these methods were compared in terms of the depth of proteome coverage, quantification accuracy, precision, and reproducibility using a high-performance hybrid mass spectrometer, LTQ Orbitrap Velos. Our results show that (1) the spectral counting method provides the deepest proteome coverage for identification, but its quantification performance is worse than labeling-based approaches, especially the quantification reproducibility; (2) metabolic labeling and isobaric chemical labeling are capable of accurate, precise, and reproducible quantification and provide deep proteome coverage for quantification. Isobaric chemical labeling surpasses metabolic labeling in terms of quantification precision and reproducibility; (3) iTRAQ and TMT perform similarly in all aspects compared in the current study using a CID-HCD dual scan configuration. Based on the unique advantages of each method, we provide guidance for selection of the appropriate method for a quantitative proteomics study.

  2. F-18 labeled 3-fluorodiazepam

    SciTech Connect

    Luxen, A.; Barrio, J.R.; Bida, G.T.; Satyamurthy, N.; Phelps, M.E.

    1985-05-01

    3-Fluorodiazepam is a new and potent antianxiety agent with prolonged action. The authors found that molecular fluorine (0.5% in Ne) reacts cleanly with diazepam in freon or chloroform at room temperature to produce 3-fluorodiazepam in good yields. Successful syntheses have employed 2:1 to 5:1 molar ratios diazepam: fluorine to minimize the formation of byproducts. (/sup 18/F) 3-Fluorodiazepam, a potential candidate for PET studies, (specific activity 3-5 Ci/mmol) has been synthesized from /sup 18/F-F/sub 2/ using the same procedure, followed by column chromatographic purification (Silicagel, dichloromethane: ethyl acetate, 5:1) with a radiochemical yield of 12-20% (50% maximum) and a chemical and radiochemical purity >99% as judged by reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography analysis (Ultrasyl octyl column, 10 ..mu.. m, 4.6 x 250 mm i.d., 60% MeOH 40% water; flow rate, 1.0 ml/min; retention time for (/sup 18/F) fluorodiazepam, 11.4 min; for diazepam, 13.5 min; radioactivity and ultraviolet detectors). Lower radiochemical yields (5-7%), and significant formation of by-products were observed when (/sup 18/F)acetylhypofluorite, prepared in the gasphase, was used as the reagent. Readily accessible routes to /sup 18/F-labeled benzodiazepines of higher specific activity were also investigated. Approaches to the synthesis of high specific activity (>200 Ci/mmol) (/sup 18/F)3-fluorodiazepam involve nucleophilic displacement at carbon-3 (e.g. from 3-chlorodiazepam) with (/sup 18/F)fluoride ion. The results presented here demonstrate the synthetic accessibility of /sup 18/F-labeled benzodiazepines for application in neurotransmitter ligand studies with PET.

  3. Labeled nucleotide phosphate (NP) probes

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2009-02-03

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  4. The reappropriation of stigmatizing labels: the reciprocal relationship between power and self-labeling.

    PubMed

    Galinsky, Adam D; Wang, Cynthia S; Whitson, Jennifer A; Anicich, Eric M; Hugenberg, Kurt; Bodenhausen, Galen V

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical model of reappropriation--taking possession of a slur previously used exclusively by dominant groups to reinforce another group's lesser status. Ten experiments tested this model and established a reciprocal relationship between power and self-labeling with a derogatory group term. We first investigated precursors to self-labeling: Group, but not individual, power increased participants' willingness to label themselves with a derogatory term for their group. We then examined the consequences of such self-labeling for both the self and observers. Self-labelers felt more powerful after self-labeling, and observers perceived them and their group as more powerful. Finally, these labels were evaluated less negatively after self-labeling, and this attenuation of stigma was mediated by perceived power. These effects occurred only for derogatory terms (e.g., queer, bitch), and not for descriptive (e.g., woman) or majority-group (e.g., straight) labels. These results suggest that self-labeling with a derogatory label can weaken the label's stigmatizing force. PMID:23955354

  5. To Label or Not to Label: The Special Education Question for African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Moniqueka E.; Richards, Heraldo

    2012-01-01

    Over the years, the benefits of categorically identifying and labeling students with disabilities have been debated on many grounds, particularly when it comes to labeling African-American children who many argue are over-labeled or disproportionately represented in selected categories such as learning disabilities. In this article, the authors…

  6. 9 CFR 112.2 - Final container label, carton label, and enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... product and the number of doses in each final container shall be stated on each carton label for all... product is recommended specifically for animals, and not for humans. (e) When label requirements of a... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Final container label, carton...

  7. 9 CFR 112.2 - Final container label, carton label, and enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... product and the number of doses in each final container shall be stated on each carton label for all... product is recommended specifically for animals, and not for humans. (e) When label requirements of a... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Final container label, carton...

  8. 9 CFR 112.2 - Final container label, carton label, and enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... product and the number of doses in each final container shall be stated on each carton label for all... product is recommended specifically for animals, and not for humans. (e) When label requirements of a... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Final container label, carton...

  9. 9 CFR 112.2 - Final container label, carton label, and enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... product and the number of doses in each final container shall be stated on each carton label for all... product is recommended specifically for animals, and not for humans. (e) When label requirements of a... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Final container label, carton...

  10. 40 CFR 60.536 - Permanent label, temporary label, and owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Performance for New Residential Wood Heaters § 60.536 Permanent label, temporary label, and owner's manual. (a... section. (2) Except for wood heaters subject to § 60.530 (e), (f), or (g), the permanent label shall... material expected to last the lifetime of the wood heater, (iv) Present required information in a manner...

  11. 40 CFR 60.536 - Permanent label, temporary label, and owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Performance for New Residential Wood Heaters § 60.536 Permanent label, temporary label, and owner's manual. (a... section. (2) Except for wood heaters subject to § 60.530 (e), (f), or (g), the permanent label shall... material expected to last the lifetime of the wood heater, (iv) Present required information in a manner...

  12. Portion Size Labeling and Intended Soft Drink Consumption: The Impact of Labeling Format and Size Portfolio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeer, Willemijn M.; Steenhuis, Ingrid H. M.; Leeuwis, Franca H.; Bos, Arjan E. R.; de Boer, Michiel; Seidell, Jacob C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess what portion size labeling "format" is most promising in helping consumers selecting appropriate soft drink sizes, and whether labeling impact depends on the size portfolio. Methods: An experimental study was conducted in fast-food restaurants in which 2 labeling formats (ie, reference portion size and small/medium/large…

  13. 9 CFR 112.2 - Final container label, carton label, and enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final container label, carton label, and enclosure. 112.2 Section 112.2 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PACKAGING AND LABELING § 112.2 Final...

  14. 21 CFR 640.70 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.70 Labeling. Link to an amendment published... information shall appear on the label affixed to each container of Source Plasma: (1) The proper name of the... shall follow the proper name in the same size and type of print as the proper name. If the Source...

  15. 21 CFR 211.125 - Labeling issuance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling issuance. 211.125 Section 211.125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Packaging and Labeling...

  16. 21 CFR 201.313 - Estradiol labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Pharmacopeia under the designation “Alpha Estradiol.” The substance should no longer be referred to in drug labeling as “Alpha Estradiol.” The Food and Drug Administration would not object to label references to the... referred to the presence of “Estradiol (formerly known as Alpha Estradiol).”...

  17. 21 CFR 201.313 - Estradiol labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Pharmacopeia under the designation “Alpha Estradiol.” The substance should no longer be referred to in drug labeling as “Alpha Estradiol.” The Food and Drug Administration would not object to label references to the... referred to the presence of “Estradiol (formerly known as Alpha Estradiol).”...

  18. 21 CFR 201.313 - Estradiol labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Pharmacopeia under the designation “Alpha Estradiol.” The substance should no longer be referred to in drug labeling as “Alpha Estradiol.” The Food and Drug Administration would not object to label references to the... referred to the presence of “Estradiol (formerly known as Alpha Estradiol).”...

  19. 21 CFR 201.313 - Estradiol labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Pharmacopeia under the designation “Alpha Estradiol.” The substance should no longer be referred to in drug labeling as “Alpha Estradiol.” The Food and Drug Administration would not object to label references to the... referred to the presence of “Estradiol (formerly known as Alpha Estradiol).”...

  20. 21 CFR 201.313 - Estradiol labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Pharmacopeia under the designation “Alpha Estradiol.” The substance should no longer be referred to in drug labeling as “Alpha Estradiol.” The Food and Drug Administration would not object to label references to the... referred to the presence of “Estradiol (formerly known as Alpha Estradiol).”...

  1. 21 CFR 660.28 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Labeling. 660.28 Section 660.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL... panel. Blood grouping reagent Color of label paper Anti-A Blue. Anti-B Yellow. Slide and rapid tube...

  2. 40 CFR 94.212 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Labeling. 94.212 Section 94.212 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Certification Provisions § 94.212 Labeling. (a) General requirements. (1) Each new engine...

  3. 10 CFR 20.1904 - Labeling containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling containers. 20.1904 Section 20.1904 Energy....1904 Labeling containers. (a) The licensee shall ensure that each container of licensed material bears... handling or using the containers, or working in the vicinity of the containers, to take precautions...

  4. 40 CFR 600.301 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Labeling requirements. 600.301 Section 600.301 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Labeling § 600.301...

  5. 40 CFR 600.301 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Labeling requirements. 600.301 Section 600.301 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Labeling § 600.301...

  6. 30 CFR 74.15 - Approval labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval labels. 74.15 Section 74.15 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH COAL MINE DUST SAMPLING DEVICES General Requirements for All Devices § 74.15 Approval labels. (a) Certificate...

  7. 40 CFR 94.212 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Labeling. 94.212 Section 94.212 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Certification Provisions § 94.212 Labeling. (a) General requirements. (1) Each new engine...

  8. The anatomy of a laser label

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laser labeling of fruits and vegetables is an efficient alternative to adhesive tags. The advantages of this system are numerous. In general the label consists of alphanumerical characters formed by laser generated pinhole depressions that penetrate the produce’s surface creating visible markings. H...

  9. 40 CFR 204.55-4 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT Portable Air Compressors § 204.55-4 Labeling. (a)(1) The manufacturer of any compressor subject to the standards prescribed in § 204.52 shall, at the time of manufacture... information hereinafter provided, to all such compressors to be distributed in commerce. (2) The label...

  10. Linguistic Labels: Conceptual Markers or Object Features?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloutsky, Vladimir M.; Fisher, Anna V.

    2012-01-01

    Linguistic labels affect inductive generalization; however, the mechanism underlying these effects remains unclear. According to one similarity-based model, SINC (similarity, induction, naming, and categorization), early in development labels are features of objects contributing to the overall similarity of compared entities, with early induction…

  11. 49 CFR 172.407 - Label specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... appendix A to this part; or (B) For labels printed on packaging surfaces, specified in table 3 in appendix... line outer border to meet the requirements of § 172.406(d) of this subpart. (c) Size. (1) Each diamond (square-on-point) label prescribed in this subpart must be at least 100 mm (3.9 inches) on each side...

  12. 42 CFR 84.257 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Labeling requirements. (a) A warning shall be placed on the label of each gas mask, chemical-cartridge... performance of any gas mask, chemical-cartridge respirator, or powered air-purifying respirator approved under... this subpart shall be specified as follows: Chemical-cartridge respirator 1 hour. Gas mask 4...

  13. 42 CFR 84.257 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Labeling requirements. (a) A warning shall be placed on the label of each gas mask, chemical-cartridge... performance of any gas mask, chemical-cartridge respirator, or powered air-purifying respirator approved under... this subpart shall be specified as follows: Chemical-cartridge respirator 1 hour. Gas mask 4...

  14. 42 CFR 84.257 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Labeling requirements. (a) A warning shall be placed on the label of each gas mask, chemical-cartridge... performance of any gas mask, chemical-cartridge respirator, or powered air-purifying respirator approved under... this subpart shall be specified as follows: Chemical-cartridge respirator 1 hour. Gas mask 4...

  15. 19 CFR 12.18 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labels. 12.18 Section 12.18 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Viruses, Serums, and Toxins for Treatment of Domestic Animals § 12.18 Labels. Each separate container of such virus, serum,...

  16. 16 CFR 1500.128 - Label comment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Label comment. 1500.128 Section 1500.128 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.128 Label comment....

  17. 16 CFR 1500.128 - Label comment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Label comment. 1500.128 Section 1500.128 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.128 Label comment....

  18. 16 CFR 1500.128 - Label comment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Label comment. 1500.128 Section 1500.128 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.128 Label comment....

  19. 9 CFR 112.3 - Diluent labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... labels. Each final container of diluent, other than a liquid biological product, packaged with desiccated biological products shall bear a label that includes the following: (a) The name—Sterile Diluent. (b) True name of the biological product with which the diluent is packaged, except that when the firm...

  20. 9 CFR 112.3 - Diluent labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... labels. Each final container of diluent, other than a liquid biological product, packaged with desiccated biological products shall bear a label that includes the following: (a) The name—Sterile Diluent. (b) True name of the biological product with which the diluent is packaged, except that when the firm...

  1. 9 CFR 112.3 - Diluent labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... labels. Each final container of diluent, other than a liquid biological product, packaged with desiccated biological products shall bear a label that includes the following: (a) The name—Sterile Diluent. (b) True name of the biological product with which the diluent is packaged, except that when the firm...

  2. 16 CFR 1500.128 - Label comment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Label comment. 1500.128 Section 1500.128 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.128 Label comment....

  3. 9 CFR 112.3 - Diluent labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... labels. Each final container of diluent, other than a liquid biological product, packaged with desiccated biological products shall bear a label that includes the following: (a) The name—Sterile Diluent. (b) True name of the biological product with which the diluent is packaged, except that when the firm...

  4. 16 CFR 1500.128 - Label comment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Label comment. 1500.128 Section 1500.128 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.128 Label comment....

  5. 9 CFR 112.3 - Diluent labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... labels. Each final container of diluent, other than a liquid biological product, packaged with desiccated biological products shall bear a label that includes the following: (a) The name—Sterile Diluent. (b) True name of the biological product with which the diluent is packaged, except that when the firm...

  6. 76 FR 13550 - Fur Products Labeling Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ...In December 2010, Congress passed the Truth in Fur Labeling Act (TFLA), which amends the Fur Products Labeling Act (Fur Act) by: (1) Eliminating the Commission's discretion to exempt fur products of relatively small quantity or value from disclosure requirements; and (2) providing that the Fur Act will not apply to certain fur products obtained through trapping or hunting and sold in face to......

  7. 21 CFR 660.28 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... single package, only one package insert per package is required. (d) Names of antibodies. Blood group... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.28 Labeling. In... label—(1) Color coding. The final container label of all Blood Grouping Reagents shall be...

  8. 46 CFR 147.30 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Labeling. 147.30 Section 147.30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES HAZARDOUS SHIPS' STORES General Provisions § 147.30 Labeling. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, all immediate receptacles, containers, or packages containing...

  9. 46 CFR 147.30 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Labeling. 147.30 Section 147.30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES HAZARDOUS SHIPS' STORES General Provisions § 147.30 Labeling. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, all immediate receptacles, containers, or packages containing...

  10. 21 CFR 701.11 - Identity labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC LABELING Package Form § 701.11 Identity labeling. (a) The principal display panel of a cosmetic in...) Such statement of identity shall be in terms of: (1) The common or usual name of the cosmetic; or...

  11. 21 CFR 701.11 - Identity labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC LABELING Package Form § 701.11 Identity labeling. (a) The principal display panel of a cosmetic in...) Such statement of identity shall be in terms of: (1) The common or usual name of the cosmetic; or...

  12. 21 CFR 701.11 - Identity labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC LABELING Package Form § 701.11 Identity labeling. (a) The principal display panel of a cosmetic in...) Such statement of identity shall be in terms of: (1) The common or usual name of the cosmetic; or...

  13. 21 CFR 701.11 - Identity labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC LABELING Package Form § 701.11 Identity labeling. (a) The principal display panel of a cosmetic in...) Such statement of identity shall be in terms of: (1) The common or usual name of the cosmetic; or...

  14. 21 CFR 701.11 - Identity labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC LABELING Package Form § 701.11 Identity labeling. (a) The principal display panel of a cosmetic in...) Such statement of identity shall be in terms of: (1) The common or usual name of the cosmetic; or...

  15. Influence of Food Labels on Adolescent Diet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misra, Ranjita

    2002-01-01

    Provides information on food nutrition labels and discusses the benefits of adolescents' using them to plan healthy diets. Suggests that teachers and educators should encourage appropriate label reading education for adolescents to promote healthy eating practices. Provides definitions of nutrient content claims. (SG)

  16. 16 CFR 309.17 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... contents of the label that you wish to use, and the reasons that you want to use it. (3) Electric vehicle... electric vehicle fuel dispensing systems. All type should be set in upper case (all caps) “Helvetica Black... alternative vehicle fuel (other than electricity) labels with disclosure of principal component only....

  17. 16 CFR 309.17 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... contents of the label that you wish to use, and the reasons that you want to use it. (3) Electric vehicle... electric vehicle fuel dispensing systems. All type should be set in upper case (all caps) “Helvetica Black... alternative vehicle fuel (other than electricity) labels with disclosure of principal component only....

  18. 16 CFR 309.17 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... contents of the label that you wish to use, and the reasons that you want to use it. (3) Electric vehicle... electric vehicle fuel dispensing systems. All type should be set in upper case (all caps) “Helvetica Black... alternative vehicle fuel (other than electricity) labels with disclosure of principal component only....

  19. 16 CFR 309.17 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... contents of the label that you wish to use, and the reasons that you want to use it. (3) Electric vehicle... electric vehicle fuel dispensing systems. All type should be set in upper case (all caps) “Helvetica Black... alternative vehicle fuel (other than electricity) labels with disclosure of principal component only....

  20. 40 CFR 94.212 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Labeling. 94.212 Section 94.212 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Certification Provisions § 94.212 Labeling. (a) General requirements. (1) Each new engine...

  1. 21 CFR 341.90 - Professional labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Professional labeling. 341.90 Section 341.90 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE COLD, COUGH, ALLERGY, BRONCHODILATOR, AND ANTIASTHMATIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Labeling § 341.90...

  2. 9 CFR 317.4 - Labeling approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling approval. 317.4 Section 317.4 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION LABELING, MARKING DEVICES,...

  3. 40 CFR 262.31 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Pre-Transport Requirements § 262.31 Labeling. Before transporting or offering hazardous waste for transportation off-site, a generator must label each package in accordance with the applicable Department of Transportation regulations on hazardous materials under 49...

  4. 40 CFR 262.31 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Pre-Transport Requirements § 262.31 Labeling. Before transporting or offering hazardous waste for transportation off-site, a generator must label each package in accordance with the applicable Department of Transportation regulations on hazardous materials under 49...

  5. 40 CFR 262.31 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Pre-Transport Requirements § 262.31 Labeling. Before transporting or offering hazardous waste for transportation off-site, a generator must label each package in accordance with the applicable Department of Transportation regulations on hazardous materials under 49...

  6. 40 CFR 262.31 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Pre-Transport Requirements § 262.31 Labeling. Before transporting or offering hazardous waste for transportation off-site, a generator must label each package in accordance with the applicable Department of Transportation regulations on hazardous materials under 49...

  7. 40 CFR 262.31 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Pre-Transport Requirements § 262.31 Labeling. Before transporting or offering hazardous waste for transportation off-site, a generator must label each package in accordance with the applicable Department of Transportation regulations on hazardous materials under 49...

  8. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... this section). (e) The term very low sodium may be used in the labeling of OTC drug products intended.... (f) The term low sodium may be used in the labeling of OTC drug products intended for oral ingestion... the term sodium. (h) The terms sodium free, very low sodium, and low sodium shall be in print size...

  9. 9 CFR 116.3 - Label records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Label records. 116.3 Section 116.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS RECORDS AND REPORTS § 116.3 Label records. (a) Each licensee and permittee...

  10. 21 CFR 211.125 - Labeling issuance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling issuance. 211.125 Section 211.125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Packaging and Labeling...

  11. 21 CFR 211.125 - Labeling issuance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labeling issuance. 211.125 Section 211.125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Packaging and Labeling...

  12. 21 CFR 211.125 - Labeling issuance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling issuance. 211.125 Section 211.125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Packaging and Labeling...

  13. 21 CFR 211.125 - Labeling issuance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling issuance. 211.125 Section 211.125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Packaging and Labeling...

  14. 16 CFR 306.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... proper layout. “Helvetica Black” or equivalent type is used throughout except for the octane rating number on octane labels, which is in Franklin gothic type. All type is centered. Spacing of the label is... set in 10 point Helvetica Bold, all capitals, with letterspace set at 101/2 points. The octane...

  15. 21 CFR 895.25 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling. 895.25 Section 895.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES BANNED DEVICES General Provisions § 895.25 Labeling. (a) If the Commissioner determines that the substantial deception or unreasonable and substantial...

  16. 16 CFR 1505.3 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Labeling. 1505.3 Section 1505.3 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRICALLY OPERATED TOYS OR OTHER ELECTRICALLY OPERATED ARTICLES INTENDED FOR USE BY CHILDREN Regulations § 1505.3 Labeling. (a)...

  17. 78 FR 18272 - Energy Labeling Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... INFORMATION: The Commission is reopening the comment period for its January 9, 2013 (78 FR 1779) Notice of... CFR Part 305 Energy Labeling Rule AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission (``FTC'' or ``Commission''). ACTION... in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section below. Write ``Energy Label Ranges, Matter No. R611004''...

  18. 76 FR 79063 - Appliance Labeling Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... separate Federal Register Notices involving: (1) Light bulbs (75 FR 41696 (July 19, 2010)), and (2..., 2010 (75 FR 41696), adopting amendments to the Appliance Labeling Rule, 16 CFR part 305 (``Rule'') related to light bulb labeling. This document makes technical corrections to the final rule....

  19. Recent developments in blood cell labeling research

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Straub, R.F.; Meinken, G.E.

    1988-09-07

    A number of recent developments in research on blood cell labeling techniques are presented. The discussion relates to three specific areas: (1) a new in vitro method for red blood cell labeling with /sup 99m/Tc; (2) a method for labeling leukocytes and platelets with /sup 99m/Tc; and (3) the use of monoclonal antibody technique for platelet labeling. The advantages and the pitfalls of these techniques are examined in the light of available mechanistic information. Problems that remain to be resolved are reviewed. An assessment is made of the progress as well as prospects in blood cell labeling methodology including that using the monoclonal antibody approach. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Probabilistic cluster labeling of imagery data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chittineni, C. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The problem of obtaining the probabilities of class labels for the clusters using spectral and spatial information from a given set of labeled patterns and their neighbors is considered. A relationship is developed between class and clusters conditional densities in terms of probabilities of class labels for the clusters. Expressions are presented for updating the a posteriori probabilities of the classes of a pixel using information from its local neighborhood. Fixed-point iteration schemes are developed for obtaining the optimal probabilities of class labels for the clusters. These schemes utilize spatial information and also the probabilities of label imperfections. Experimental results from the processing of remotely sensed multispectral scanner imagery data are presented.

  1. Simplified labeling process for medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingchen; Huang, Junzhou; Huang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Shaoting; Metaxas, Dimitris N

    2012-01-01

    Image segmentation plays a crucial role in many medical imaging applications by automatically locating the regions of interest. Typically supervised learning based segmentation methods require a large set of accurately labeled training data. However, thel labeling process is tedious, time consuming and sometimes not necessary. We propose a robust logistic regression algorithm to handle label outliers such that doctors do not need to waste time on precisely labeling images for training set. To validate its effectiveness and efficiency, we conduct carefully designed experiments on cervigram image segmentation while there exist label outliers. Experimental results show that the proposed robust logistic regression algorithms achieve superior performance compared to previous methods, which validates the benefits of the proposed algorithms. PMID:23286072

  2. Linguistic Labels: Conceptual Markers or Object Features?

    PubMed Central

    Sloutsky, Vladimir M.; Fisher, Anna V.

    2011-01-01

    Linguistic labels affect inductive generalization; however, the mechanism underlying these effects remains unclear. According to one similarity-based model (SINC: Similarity-Induction-Naming-Categorization), early in development labels are features of objects contributing to the overall similarity of compared entities, with early induction being similarity-based. If this is the case, then not only identical, but also phonologically similar labels may contribute to the overall similarity, and therefore to induction. These predictions were tested in a series of experiments with 5-year-olds and adults. In Experiments 1-5, participants performed a label extension task, whereas in Experiment 6 they performed a feature induction task. Results indicate that phonological similarity contributes to early induction, and support the notion that for young children labels are features of objects. PMID:21903223

  3. 21 CFR 101.36 - Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements. 101.36... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING Specific Nutrition Labeling Requirements and Guidelines § 101.36 Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements. (a) The label of a dietary supplement that...

  4. 21 CFR 101.36 - Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements. 101.36... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING Specific Nutrition Labeling Requirements and Guidelines § 101.36 Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements. (a) The label of a dietary supplement that...

  5. 21 CFR 101.36 - Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements. 101.36... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING Specific Nutrition Labeling Requirements and Guidelines § 101.36 Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements. (a) The label of a dietary supplement that...

  6. 21 CFR 101.36 - Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements. 101.36... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING Specific Nutrition Labeling Requirements and Guidelines § 101.36 Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements. (a) The label of a dietary supplement that...

  7. 21 CFR 101.36 - Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements. 101.36... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING Specific Nutrition Labeling Requirements and Guidelines § 101.36 Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements. (a) The label of a dietary supplement that...

  8. 16 CFR 300.11 - Improper methods of labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Improper methods of labeling. 300.11 Section 300.11 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE WOOL PRODUCTS LABELING ACT OF 1939 Labeling § 300.11 Improper methods of labeling. The stamp, tag, label, or other...

  9. 21 CFR 201.25 - Bar code label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... drug product from the bar code label requirements set forth in this section. The exemption request must... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bar code label requirements. 201.25 Section 201.25...: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.25 Bar code label requirements. (a) Who is subject...

  10. 27 CFR 16.21 - Mandatory label information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mandatory label... Statement Requirements for Alcoholic Beverages § 16.21 Mandatory label information. There shall be stated on the brand label or separate front label, or on a back or side label, separate and apart from all...

  11. 27 CFR 16.21 - Mandatory label information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mandatory label... Statement Requirements for Alcoholic Beverages § 16.21 Mandatory label information. There shall be stated on the brand label or separate front label, or on a back or side label, separate and apart from all...

  12. 27 CFR 16.21 - Mandatory label information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mandatory label... Statement Requirements for Alcoholic Beverages § 16.21 Mandatory label information. There shall be stated on the brand label or separate front label, or on a back or side label, separate and apart from all...

  13. 40 CFR 211.204-3 - Label location and type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.204-3 Label location and type. (a) The manufacturer labeling the product for ultimate sale or use selects the type of label and must locate it as... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Label location and type....

  14. 40 CFR 211.204-3 - Label location and type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.204-3 Label location and type. (a) The manufacturer labeling the product for ultimate sale or use selects the type of label and must locate it as... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Label location and type....

  15. 27 CFR 16.21 - Mandatory label information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mandatory label... Statement Requirements for Alcoholic Beverages § 16.21 Mandatory label information. There shall be stated on the brand label or separate front label, or on a back or side label, separate and apart from all...

  16. 40 CFR 211.204-3 - Label location and type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.204-3 Label location and type. (a) The manufacturer labeling the product for ultimate sale or use selects the type of label and must locate it as... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Label location and type....

  17. 27 CFR 16.21 - Mandatory label information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mandatory label... Statement Requirements for Alcoholic Beverages § 16.21 Mandatory label information. There shall be stated on the brand label or separate front label, or on a back or side label, separate and apart from all...

  18. 40 CFR 211.204-3 - Label location and type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.204-3 Label location and type. (a) The manufacturer labeling the product for ultimate sale or use selects the type of label and must locate it as... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Label location and type....

  19. 21 CFR 201.25 - Bar code label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... drug product from the bar code label requirements set forth in this section. The exemption request must... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bar code label requirements. 201.25 Section 201.25...: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.25 Bar code label requirements. (a) Who is subject...

  20. 40 CFR 211.204-3 - Label location and type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.204-3 Label location and type. (a) The manufacturer labeling the product for ultimate sale or use selects the type of label and must locate it as... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Label location and type....

  1. 21 CFR 201.25 - Bar code label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... drug product from the bar code label requirements set forth in this section. The exemption request must... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bar code label requirements. 201.25 Section 201.25...: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.25 Bar code label requirements. (a) Who is subject...

  2. 21 CFR 201.25 - Bar code label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... drug product from the bar code label requirements set forth in this section. The exemption request must... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bar code label requirements. 201.25 Section 201.25...: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.25 Bar code label requirements. (a) Who is subject...

  3. 21 CFR 500.51 - Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding. 500.51... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS GENERAL Animal Drug Labeling Requirements § 500.51 Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding. (a) Among the representations on the label or labeling of an...

  4. 21 CFR 500.51 - Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding. 500.51... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS GENERAL Animal Drug Labeling Requirements § 500.51 Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding. (a) Among the representations on the label or labeling of an...

  5. 21 CFR 500.51 - Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding. 500.51... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS GENERAL Animal Drug Labeling Requirements § 500.51 Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding. (a) Among the representations on the label or labeling of an...

  6. 21 CFR 500.51 - Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding. 500.51... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS GENERAL Animal Drug Labeling Requirements § 500.51 Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding. (a) Among the representations on the label or labeling of an...

  7. 21 CFR 500.51 - Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding. 500.51... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS GENERAL Animal Drug Labeling Requirements § 500.51 Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding. (a) Among the representations on the label or labeling of an...

  8. 16 CFR 300.11 - Improper methods of labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Improper methods of labeling. 300.11 Section 300.11 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE WOOL PRODUCTS LABELING ACT OF 1939 Labeling § 300.11 Improper methods of labeling. The stamp, tag, label, or other...

  9. Decomposition Optimization for Minimizing Label Overflow in Prime Number Graph Labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehoon; Park, Seog

    Recently, a graph labeling technique based on prime numbers has been suggested for reducing the costly transitive closure computations in RDF query languages. The suggested prime number graph labeling provides the benefit of fast query processing by a simple divisibility test of labels. However, it has an inherent problem that originates with the nature of prime numbers. Since each prime number must be used exclusively, labels can become significantly large. Therefore, in this paper, we introduce a novel optimization technique to effectively reduce the problem of label overflow. The suggested idea is based on graph decomposition. When label overflow occurs, the full graph is divided into several sub-graphs, and nodes in each sub-graph are separately labeled. Through experiments, we also analyze the effectiveness of the graph decomposition optimization, which is evaluated by the number of divisions.

  10. Label distribution after injection of labelled tachykinins into the rat lateral cerebroventricle

    SciTech Connect

    Saija, A.; Polidori, C.; Massi, M.; Perfumi, M.; De Caro, G.; Costa, G.

    1989-04-01

    The present study investigated the label distribution in several brain regions, as well as in the peripheral circulation, following injection of labelled tachykinins ((/sup 3/H)-substance P, (/sup 3/H)-eledoisin or (/sup 125/I)-neurokinin A) into the lateral cerebroventricle of the rat. A widespread label distribution, extending as far as to the brainstem, was detected. Hypothalamus, striatum and hippocampus were the most labelled regions by the 3 labels; however the patterns of distribution of the 3 labelled tachykinins showed marked differences. Distribution in the brain was rapid, reaching a maximum usually within 2 min after injection and declining slightly afterwards. Large amounts of label (1/6-1/15 of the total amount injected) were detected in serum even at 2 min after injection and increased thereafter, reaching a maximum at 10-15 min.

  11. Imaging of bronchial carcinoid tumors associated to Cushing syndrome with 111In-Octreoscan scintigraphy and immunoscintigraphy with anti-chromogranin monoclonal antibodies. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Carretta, A; Chiesa, G; Magnani, P; Songini, C; Melloni, G; Zannini, P; Grossi, A

    1997-04-01

    Bronchial carcinoid tumors are neuroendocrine neoplasms capable of expressing somatostatin receptors and of secreting neuromediators such as ACTH and chromogranins. Radiologic appearance is usually non-specific and has to be distinguished from benign pulmonary nodules and other malignant diseases. Standard radiological techniques have limited accuracy in the evaluation of such lesions. Radioisotopic imaging techniques may increase the specificity of diagnostic assessment. The role of immunoscintigraphy with anti-chromogranin A and B monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) and of 111In-Octreoscan scintigraphy is evaluated in two cases of bronchial carcinoid tumors associated to Cushing syndrome. PMID:9201136

  12. Improved tumor localization with increasing dose of indium-111-labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody ZCE-025 in metastatic colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, Y.Z.; Lamki, L.M.; Haynie, T.P.; Unger, M.W.; Rosenblum, M.G.; Shirkhoda, A.; Murray, J.L.

    1988-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) react with human colorectal cancer cells, and when labeled with a gamma-emitting radioisotope, may help to localize known and occult metastatic disease. We tested ZCE-025, a high-affinity immune gamma globulin1 (IgG1) MoAb anti-CEA that does not react with normal granulocyte glycoproteins in a phase I/II trial to determine the reagent's toxicity and its maximum efficacy in detecting metastatic colorectal cancer. Increasing doses of unlabeled ZCE-025 were mixed with 1 mg of Indium-111 (111In)-radiolabeled MoAb and administered intravenously (IV) to 34 patients who had metastatic colorectal cancer. Planar nuclear or single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) scans were performed 48 to 72 and 120 to 144 hours later. Total dose of MoAb and scanning sensitivity (number of imaged lesions/number of known lesions) were correlated up to 80 mg. At doses of 2.5 to 20 mg, a mean of 22% of the lesions were imaged; at 40 mg, 77% were imaged (P less than .01). Liver metastases were detected as areas of increased activity (hot) at the 40 mg dose but showed decreased MoAb uptake at lower doses. At the 40 mg dose normal liver parenchymal uptake of the labeled MoAb was lower with respect to blood pool compared with the other doses. At 80 mg, however, sensitivity of detection declined to 21%. One milligram of 111In-labeled ZCE-025 antibody coinfused with 39 mg of unlabeled antibody appeared optimal for detecting metastatic colorectal cancer, particularly in the liver. Although the exact mechanism(s) for this dose effect is currently unknown, a partial blocking effect of unlabeled antibody with a change in MoAb biodistribution may be occurring.

  13. 7 CFR 201.8 - Contents of the label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.8 Contents of the label. The label shall contain the...

  14. 49 CFR 172.416 - POISON GAS label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... POISON GAS label and the symbol must be white. The background of the upper diamond must be black and the... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.416 POISON GAS label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON GAS...

  15. 49 CFR 172.416 - POISON GAS label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... POISON GAS label and the symbol must be white. The background of the upper diamond must be black and the... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.416 POISON GAS label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON GAS...

  16. 16 CFR 300.10 - Disclosure of information on labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... label or labels attached to the product, including the care label required by 16 CFR part 423, provided...-required information or representations placed on the product shall not minimize, detract from, or...

  17. 16 CFR 300.10 - Disclosure of information on labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... label or labels attached to the product, including the care label required by 16 CFR part 423, provided...-required information or representations placed on the product shall not minimize, detract from, or...

  18. 16 CFR 300.10 - Disclosure of information on labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... label or labels attached to the product, including the care label required by 16 CFR part 423, provided...-required information or representations placed on the product shall not minimize, detract from, or...

  19. 16 CFR 300.10 - Disclosure of information on labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... label or labels attached to the product, including the care label required by 16 CFR part 423, provided...-required information or representations placed on the product shall not minimize, detract from, or...

  20. 16 CFR 300.10 - Disclosure of information on labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... label or labels attached to the product, including the care label required by 16 CFR part 423, provided...-required information or representations placed on the product shall not minimize, detract from, or...

  1. Current Over-the-Counter Medicine Label: Take a Look

    MedlinePlus

    ... version - 342KB) Always Read the Label Reading the product label is the most important part of taking care ... for special "flags" or "banners" on the front product label alerting you to such changes. If you read ...

  2. 7 CFR 201.8 - Contents of the label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.8 Contents of the label. The label shall contain the...

  3. "Why Mama and Papa?" The Development of Social Labels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Lewis, Michael

    1979-01-01

    Examined social labels first used for parents, differentiation of parents and others on the basis of labeling behavior, and overgeneralization of social labels in 71 infants ranging in age from 9 to 24 months. (JMB)

  4. 21 CFR 1230.13 - Labeling of “poison”.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FEDERAL CAUSTIC POISON ACT Labeling § 1230.13 Labeling of “poison”. The following are styles of...-point size are required on a label in stating the word “poison” they must not be smaller than...

  5. 21 CFR 1230.13 - Labeling of “poison”.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... FEDERAL CAUSTIC POISON ACT Labeling § 1230.13 Labeling of “poison”. The following are styles of...-point size are required on a label in stating the word “poison” they must not be smaller than...

  6. 21 CFR 1230.13 - Labeling of “poison”.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FEDERAL CAUSTIC POISON ACT Labeling § 1230.13 Labeling of “poison”. The following are styles of...-point size are required on a label in stating the word “poison” they must not be smaller than...

  7. 21 CFR 1230.13 - Labeling of “poison”.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... FEDERAL CAUSTIC POISON ACT Labeling § 1230.13 Labeling of “poison”. The following are styles of...-point size are required on a label in stating the word “poison” they must not be smaller than...

  8. 21 CFR 1230.13 - Labeling of “poison”.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... FEDERAL CAUSTIC POISON ACT Labeling § 1230.13 Labeling of “poison”. The following are styles of...-point size are required on a label in stating the word “poison” they must not be smaller than...

  9. 7 CFR 201.8 - Contents of the label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.8 Contents of the label. The label shall contain the...

  10. 7 CFR 201.8 - Contents of the label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.8 Contents of the label. The label shall contain the...

  11. 7 CFR 201.8 - Contents of the label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.8 Contents of the label. The label shall contain the...

  12. Unsupervised Identification of Isotope-Labeled Peptides.

    PubMed

    Goldford, Joshua E; Libourel, Igor G L

    2016-06-01

    In vivo isotopic labeling coupled with high-resolution proteomics is used to investigate primary metabolism in techniques such as stable isotope probing (protein-SIP) and peptide-based metabolic flux analysis (PMFA). Isotopic enrichment of carbon substrates and intracellular metabolism determine the distribution of isotopes within amino acids. The resulting amino acid mass distributions (AMDs) are convoluted into peptide mass distributions (PMDs) during protein synthesis. With no a priori knowledge on metabolic fluxes, the PMDs are therefore unknown. This complicates labeled peptide identification because prior knowledge on PMDs is used in all available peptide identification software. An automated framework for the identification and quantification of PMDs for nonuniformly labeled samples is therefore lacking. To unlock the potential of peptide labeling experiments for high-throughput flux analysis and other complex labeling experiments, an unsupervised peptide identification and quantification method was developed that uses discrete deconvolution of mass distributions of identified peptides to inform on the mass distributions of otherwise unidentifiable peptides. Uniformly (13)C-labeled Escherichia coli protein was used to test the developed feature reconstruction and deconvolution algorithms. The peptide identification was validated by comparing MS(2)-identified peptides to peptides identified from PMDs using unlabeled E. coli protein. Nonuniformly labeled Glycine max protein was used to demonstrate the technology on a representative sample suitable for flux analysis. Overall, automatic peptide identification and quantification were comparable or superior to manual extraction, enabling proteomics-based technology for high-throughput flux analysis studies. PMID:27145348

  13. Synthesis of carbon-13-labeled tetradecanoic acids.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, J T; Patel, K M; Morrisett, J D

    1983-07-01

    The synthesis of tetradecanoic acid enriched with 13C at carbons 1, 3, or 6 is described. The label at the carbonyl carbon was introduced by treating 1-bromotridecane with K13CN (90% enriched) to form the 13C-labeled nitrile, which upon hydrolysis yielded the desired acid. The [3-13C]tetradecanoic acid was synthesized by alkylation of diethyl sodio-malonate with [1-13C]1-bromododecane; the acid was obtained upon saponification and decarboxylation. The label at the 6 position was introduced by coupling the appropriately labeled alkylcadmium chloride with the half acid chloride methyl ester of the appropriate dioic acid, giving the corresponding oxo fatty acid ester. Formation of the tosylhydrazone of the oxo-ester followed by reduction with sodium cyanoborohydride gave the labeled methyl tetradecanoate which, upon hydrolysis, yielded the desired tetradecanoic acid. All tetradecanoic acids were identical to unlabeled analogs as evaluated by gas-liquid chromatography and infrared or NMR spectroscopy. These labeled fatty acids were used subsequently to prepare the correspondingly labeled diacyl phosphatidylcholines. PMID:6631228

  14. Classification with Noisy Labels by Importance Reweighting.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongliang; Tao, Dacheng

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we study a classification problem in which sample labels are randomly corrupted. In this scenario, there is an unobservable sample with noise-free labels. However, before being observed, the true labels are independently flipped with a probability ρ ∈ [0,0.5), and the random label noise can be class-conditional. Here, we address two fundamental problems raised by this scenario. The first is how to best use the abundant surrogate loss functions designed for the traditional classification problem when there is label noise. We prove that any surrogate loss function can be used for classification with noisy labels by using importance reweighting, with consistency assurance that the label noise does not ultimately hinder the search for the optimal classifier of the noise-free sample. The other is the open problem of how to obtain the noise rate ρ. We show that the rate is upper bounded by the conditional probability P(∧Y|X) of the noisy sample. Consequently, the rate can be estimated, because the upper bound can be easily reached in classification problems. Experimental results on synthetic and real datasets confirm the efficiency of our methods. PMID:27046490

  15. A test of different menu labeling presentations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peggy J; Roberto, Christina A; Liu, Linda J; Brownell, Kelly D

    2012-12-01

    Chain restaurants will soon need to disclose calorie information on menus, but research on the impact of calorie labels on food choices is mixed. This study tested whether calorie information presented in different formats influenced calories ordered and perceived restaurant healthfulness. Participants in an online survey were randomly assigned to a menu with either (1) no calorie labels (No Calories); (2) calorie labels (Calories); (3) calorie labels ordered from low to high calories (Rank-Ordered Calories); or (4) calorie labels ordered from low to high calories that also had red/green circles indicating higher and lower calorie choices (Colored Calories). Participants ordered items for dinner, estimated calories ordered, and rated restaurant healthfulness. Participants in the Rank-Ordered Calories condition and those in the Colored Calories condition ordered fewer calories than the No Calories group. There was no significant difference in calories ordered between the Calories and No Calories groups. Participants in each calorie label condition were significantly more accurate in estimating calories ordered compared to the No Calories group. Those in the Colored Calories group perceived the restaurant as healthier. The results suggest that presenting calorie information in the modified Rank-Ordered or Colored Calories formats may increase menu labeling effectiveness. PMID:22918176

  16. Robust statistical fusion of image labels.

    PubMed

    Landman, Bennett A; Asman, Andrew J; Scoggins, Andrew G; Bogovic, John A; Xing, Fangxu; Prince, Jerry L

    2012-02-01

    Image labeling and parcellation (i.e., assigning structure to a collection of voxels) are critical tasks for the assessment of volumetric and morphometric features in medical imaging data. The process of image labeling is inherently error prone as images are corrupted by noise and artifacts. Even expert interpretations are subject to subjectivity and the precision of the individual raters. Hence, all labels must be considered imperfect with some degree of inherent variability. One may seek multiple independent assessments to both reduce this variability and quantify the degree of uncertainty. Existing techniques have exploited maximum a posteriori statistics to combine data from multiple raters and simultaneously estimate rater reliabilities. Although quite successful, wide-scale application has been hampered by unstable estimation with practical datasets, for example, with label sets with small or thin objects to be labeled or with partial or limited datasets. As well, these approaches have required each rater to generate a complete dataset, which is often impossible given both human foibles and the typical turnover rate of raters in a research or clinical environment. Herein, we propose a robust approach to improve estimation performance with small anatomical structures, allow for missing data, account for repeated label sets, and utilize training/catch trial data. With this approach, numerous raters can label small, overlapping portions of a large dataset, and rater heterogeneity can be robustly controlled while simultaneously estimating a single, reliable label set and characterizing uncertainty. The proposed approach enables many individuals to collaborate in the construction of large datasets for labeling tasks (e.g., human parallel processing) and reduces the otherwise detrimental impact of rater unavailability. PMID:22010145

  17. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  18. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  19. Function Labeling for Unparsed Chinese Text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Caixia; Ren, Fuji; Wang, Xiaojie; Zhong, Yixin

    This paper presents a work of function labeling for unparsed Chinese text. Unlike other attempts that utilize the full parse trees, we propose an effective way to recognize function labels directly based on lexical information, which is easily scalable for languages that lack sufficient parsing resources. Furthermore, we investigate a general method to iteratively simplify a sentence, thus transferring complicated sentence into structurally simple pieces. By means of a sequence learning model with hidden Markov support vector machine, we achieve the best F-measure of 87.40 on the text from Penn Chinese Treebank resources - a statistically significant improvement over the existing Chinese function labeling systems.

  20. Nanomaterial Labels in Electrochemical Immunosensors and Immunoassays

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-12-15

    This article reviews recent advances in nanomaterial labels in electrochemical immunosensors and immunoassays. Various nanomaterial labels are discussed, including colloidal gold/silver, semiconductor nanoparticles, and markers loaded nanocarriers (carbon nanotubes, apoferritin, silica nanoparticles, and liposome beads). The enormous signal enhancement associated with the use of nanomaterial labels and with the formation of nanomaterial–antibody-antigen assemblies provides the basis for ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of disease-related protein biomarkers, biothreat agents, or infectious agents. In general, all endeavors cited here are geared to achieve one or more of the following goals: signal amplification by several orders of magnitude, lower detection limits, and detecting multiple targets.