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Sample records for 119sb a potent auger

  1. Production of the Auger emitter 119Sb for targeted radionuclide therapy using a small PET-cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Thisgaard, H; Jensen, M

    2009-01-01

    The use of Auger electrons in radionuclide therapy of cancer is a promising tool for specific tumor cell killing of micrometastases and small tumors. The radioisotope (119)Sb has recently been identified as a potent Auger-emitter for therapy. We here present a method for producing this isotope using a low-energy cyclotron. With this method, it will be possible to produce clinically relevant amounts of (119)Sb radioactivity with high chemical and radionuclidic purity for cancer therapy.

  2. Hydrogen slush production with a large auger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daney, D. E.; Arp, V. D.; Voth, R. O.

    The design and construction of a 178-mm-diameter auger-type hydrogen slush generator are described. A supercritical helium flow loop, which simulates the performance of a helium refrigerator, cools the generator. The coolant temperature varies down to 5 K and the flow varies about the 1.4 L/s (3 cfm) design point. The computer model of the auger-type generator shows that coolant temperature and auger speed have the greatest influence on slush production rate, although coolant flow rate and auger radial clearance are also important.

  3. Hydrogen slush production with a large auger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daney, D. E.; Arp, V. D.; Voth, R. O.

    1990-01-01

    The design and construction of a 178-mm-diameter auger-type hydrogen slush generator are described. A supercritical helium flow loop, which simulates the performance of a helium refrigerator, cools the generator. The coolant temperature varies down to 5 K and the flow varies about the 1.4 L/s (3 cfm) design point. The computer model of the auger-type generator shows that coolant temperature and auger speed have the greatest influence on slush production rate, although coolant flow rate and auger radial clearance are also important.

  4. Design of a rotary stepped auger for a lunar environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dardet, Eduardo; Hart, Derek; Herod, Chris; Homiller, Stephen; Meeks, Mickey; Platt, Kirsten

    1988-01-01

    A lunar outpost will have need for deep drilling operations for both explorative and practical purposes. As in any drilling operation, the cuttings must be cleared from the hole. The hard vacuum of the lunar environment renders conventional flushing methods of cutting removal unfeasible, and requires a new system of removal. A rotary stepped auger (RSA) is a simple mechanical method of removing dry cuttings from a deep hole, and is ideally suited to the lunar environment. The RSA consists of a helical auger with stepped ramps which allow cuttings to slide up the helix, but will prevent them from sliding back down. The auger is driven in a pulsed manner by applying a periodic function of acceleration to the auger shaft. These pulses will compel the cuttings to slide up the auger's helix while the stepped ramps prevent the cuttings from backsliding while the auger accelerates. A mathematical model of the RSA was developed and experimentally evaluated. The math model produced a good baseline design, but the experimental model required some tuning to account for the approximations made in the math model. This design is suited for lunar drilling because it is mechanically simple, integral to the drill string, requires no fluids, is suited to the dry soil, and has relatively low weight and power requirements.

  5. Some performance tests of a microarea AES. [Auger Electron Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, G.; Poppa, H.

    1978-01-01

    An Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) system which has a submicron analysis capability is described. The system provides secondary electron imaging, as well as micro- and macro-area AES. The resolution of the secondary electron image of an oxidized Al contact pad on a charge-coupled device chip indicates a primary beam size of about 1000 A. For Auger mapping, a useful resolution of about 4000 A is reported

  6. Differential auger spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Strongin, Myron; Varma, Matesh Narayan; Anne, Joshi

    1976-06-22

    Differential Auger spectroscopy method for increasing the sensitivity of micro-Auger spectroanalysis of the surfaces of dilute alloys, by alternately periodically switching an electron beam back and forth between an impurity free reference sample and a test sample containing a trace impurity. The Auger electrons from the samples produce representative Auger spectrum signals which cancel to produce an Auger test sample signal corresponding to the amount of the impurity in the test samples.

  7. Production and dosimetric aspects of the potent Auger emitter {sup 58m}Co for targeted radionuclide therapy of small tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Thisgaard, H.; Elema, D.R.; Jensen, M.

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: Based on theoretical calculations, the Auger emitter {sup 58m}Co has been identified as a potent nuclide for targeted radionuclide therapy of small tumors. During the production of this isotope, the coproduction of the long-lived ground state {sup 58g}Co is unfortunately unavoidable, as is ingrowth of the ground state following the isomeric decay of {sup 58m}Co. The impact of {sup 58g}Co as a {beta}{sup +}- and {gamma}-emitting impurity should be included in the dosimetric analysis. The purpose of this study was to investigate this critical part of dosimetry based on experimentally determined production yields of {sup 58m}Co and {sup 58g}Co using a low-energy cyclotron. Also, the cellular S-values for {sup 58m}Co have been calculated and are presented here for the first time. Methods: {sup 58m}Co was produced via the {sup 58}Fe(p,n){sup 58m}Co nuclear reaction on highly enriched {sup 58}Fe metal. In addition, radiochemical separations of produced radio-cobalt from {sup nat}Fe target material were performed. The theoretical subcellular dosimetry calculations for {sup 58m}Co and {sup 58g}Co were performed using the MIRD formalism, and the impact of the increasing ground state impurity on the tumor-to-normal-tissue dose ratios (TND) per disintegration as a function of time after end of bombardment (EOB) was calculated. Results: 192 {+-} 8 MBq of {sup 58m}Co was produced in the irradiation corresponding to a production yield of 10.7 MBq/{mu}Ah. The activity of {sup 58g}Co was measured to be 0.85% {+-} 0.04% of the produced {sup 58m}Co activity at EOB. The radio-cobalt yields in the rapid separations were measured to be >97% with no detectable iron contaminations in the cobalt fractions. Due to the unavoidable coproduction and ingrowth of the long-lived ground state {sup 58g}Co, the TND and the potency of the {sup 58m}Co decrease with time after EOB. If a future treatment with a {sup 58m}Co labeled compound is not initiated before, e.g., 21 h after EOB, the

  8. Upflow bioreactor having a septum and an auger and drive assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Carl S.; Hansen, Conly L.

    2007-11-06

    An upflow bioreactor includes a vessel having an inlet and an outlet configured for upflow operation. A septum is positioned within the vessel and defines a lower chamber and an upper chamber. The septum includes an aperture that provides fluid communication between the upper chamber and lower chamber. The bioreactor also includes an auger positioned in the aperture of the septum. The vessel includes an opening in the top for receiving the auger. The auger extends from a drive housing, which is position over the opening and provides a seal around the opening. The drive housing is adjustable relative to the vessel. The position of the auger in the aperture can be adjusted by adjusting the drive housing relative to the vessel. The auger adjustment mechanism allows the auger to be accurately positioned within the aperture. The drive housing can also include a fluid to provide an additional seal around the shaft of the auger.

  9. A new technique for Auger analysis of surface species subject to electron-induced desorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.

    1973-01-01

    A method is presented to observe surface species subject to electron-induced desorption by Auger electron spectroscopy. The surface to be examined is moved under the electron beam at constant velocity, establishing a time independent condition and eliminating the time response of the electron spectrometer as a limiting factor. The dependence of the Auger signal on the surface velocity, incident electron current, beam diameter, and desorption cross section are analyzed. The method is illustrated by the Auger analysis of PTFE, in which the fluorine is removed by electron induced desorption.

  10. A faraway quasar in the direction of the highest energy Auger event

    SciTech Connect

    Albuquerque, Ivone F.M.; Chou, Aaron E-mail: achou@fnal.gov

    2010-08-01

    The highest energy cosmic ray event reported by the Auger Observatory has an energy of 148 EeV. It does not correlate with any nearby (z < 0.024) object capable of originating such a high energy event. Intrigued by the fact that the highest energy event ever recorded (by the Fly's Eye collaboration) points to a faraway quasar with very high radio luminosity and large Faraday rotation measurement, we have searched for a similar source for the Auger event. We find that the Auger highest energy event points to a quasar with similar characteristics to the one correlated to the Fly's Eye event. We also find the same kind of correlation for one of the highest energy AGASA events. We conclude that so far these types of quasars are the best source candidates for both Auger and Fly's Eye highest energy events. We discuss a few exotic candidates that could reach us from gigaparsec distances.

  11. Auger electron spectroscopy as a tool for measuring intramolecular charges of adsorbed molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkoev, T. T.

    A way for the determination of the values of intramolecular charges of adsorbed molecules of some binary dielectrics, based on Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), is proposed. These values can be obtained from the coverage dependences of the ratios of intensities of anion KL 23L 23 and KL 1L 1 Auger transitions, which are sensitive to the amount of charge at the 2p-orbitals. As an example, MgO adsorbed on Mo(110) is presented.

  12. Auger electron spectroscopy as a tool for measuring intramolecular charges of adsorbed molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkoev, T. T.

    1993-10-01

    A way for the determination of the values of intramolecular charges of adsorbed molecules of some binary dielectrics, based on Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), is proposed. These values can be obtained from the coverage dependences of the ratios of intensities of anion KL 23L 23 and KL 1L 1 Auger transitions, which are sensitive to the amount of charge at the 2p-orbitals. As an example, MgO adsorbed on Mo(110) is presented.

  13. Outreach activities within Auger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Ramírez, Rebeca; Snow, Gregory

    2009-04-01

    The scale and scope of the physics studied at the Auger Observatory offer significant opportunities for original outreach work. Education, outreach, and public relations of the Auger collaboration are coordinated in a task of its own whose goals are to encourage and support a wide range of efforts that link schools and the public with the Auger scientists and the science of cosmic rays, particle physics, and associated technologies. This report focuses on the impact of the collaboration in Mendoza Province, Argentina, as: the Auger Visitor Center in Malargüe that has hosted over 29,000 visitors since 2001, the Auger Celebration and a collaboration-sponsored science fair held on the Observatory campus in November 2005, the opening of the James Cronin School in Malargüe in November 2006, public lectures, school visits, and courses for science teachers.

  14. Pointable Auger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Machine drills, crushes, and feeds coal - and seeks out extra-hard inclusions. Auger mounted on gimbal, located at its center of gravity for ease of maneuvering. Opposing hydraulic cylinders cooperate to point auger under control of microprocessor. Its diamond teeth break up coal seam, it crushes coal fed to it by mining machine jaws, and its screw action pushes crushed coal into slurry-forming chamber.

  15. QS-21: a potent vaccine adjuvant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    QS-21 is an potent adjuvant derived from the bark of a Chilean tree, Quillaja saponaria. One of the advantages of this adjuvant is that it promotes a balanced humoral and cell-mediaed immune response and can be widely applicable to a variety of vaccines. This adjuvant has used for some veterinary va...

  16. 30 CFR 77.1504 - Auger equipment; operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Auger Mining § 77.1504 Auger equipment; operation. (a) Persons shall be kept clear of the auger train while it is in motion and shall not be permitted to pass under or over an auger train, except where adequate crossing facilities are provided. (b) Persons shall be kept clear of auger sections being...

  17. 30 CFR 77.1504 - Auger equipment; operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Auger Mining § 77.1504 Auger equipment; operation. (a) Persons shall be kept clear of the auger train while it is in motion and shall not be permitted to pass under or over an auger train, except where adequate crossing facilities are provided. (b) Persons shall be kept clear of auger sections being...

  18. 30 CFR 77.1504 - Auger equipment; operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Auger Mining § 77.1504 Auger equipment; operation. (a) Persons shall be kept clear of the auger train while it is in motion and shall not be permitted to pass under or over an auger train, except where adequate crossing facilities are provided. (b) Persons shall be kept clear of auger sections being...

  19. 30 CFR 77.1504 - Auger equipment; operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Auger Mining § 77.1504 Auger equipment; operation. (a) Persons shall be kept clear of the auger train while it is in motion and shall not be permitted to pass under or over an auger train, except where adequate crossing facilities are provided. (b) Persons shall be kept clear of auger sections being...

  20. Characterization of Japanese cedar bio-oil produced using a bench-scale auger pyrolyzer.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yoshiaki; Enomoto, Ryohei; Akazawa, Minami; Kojima, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    A bench-scale auger reactor was designed for use as a laboratory-scale fast pyrolyzer for producing bio-oil from Japanese cedar. An analytical pyrolysis method was performed simultaneously to determine the distribution of pyrolysis products. The pyrolysis temperature was found to have the greatest influence on the bio-oil characteristics; bio-oil yields increased as the pyrolysis temperature increased from 450 to 550 °C. The concentration of levoglucosan in the bio-oil, however, decreased significantly with increasing pyrolysis temperature, while it increased following analytical pyrolysis. The same results were obtained for 4-vinylguaiacol and E-isoeugenol, which were the major secondary products produced in the present study. Compared to the yields of these major products obtained via analytical pyrolysis, the yields from the auger reactor were very low, indicating that the auger reactor process had a longer vapor residence time than the analytical pyrolysis process, resulting in the acceleration of secondary reactions of the pyrolysates. The pH values and densities of the bio-oils produced in the auger reactor were similar to those reported by researchers using woody biomass, despite their lower viscosities. From these results, it was concluded that the pyrolysis temperature and residence time of the pyrolysates played a significant role in determining the characteristics of the cedar bio-oil.

  1. Characterization of Japanese cedar bio-oil produced using a bench-scale auger pyrolyzer.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yoshiaki; Enomoto, Ryohei; Akazawa, Minami; Kojima, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    A bench-scale auger reactor was designed for use as a laboratory-scale fast pyrolyzer for producing bio-oil from Japanese cedar. An analytical pyrolysis method was performed simultaneously to determine the distribution of pyrolysis products. The pyrolysis temperature was found to have the greatest influence on the bio-oil characteristics; bio-oil yields increased as the pyrolysis temperature increased from 450 to 550 °C. The concentration of levoglucosan in the bio-oil, however, decreased significantly with increasing pyrolysis temperature, while it increased following analytical pyrolysis. The same results were obtained for 4-vinylguaiacol and E-isoeugenol, which were the major secondary products produced in the present study. Compared to the yields of these major products obtained via analytical pyrolysis, the yields from the auger reactor were very low, indicating that the auger reactor process had a longer vapor residence time than the analytical pyrolysis process, resulting in the acceleration of secondary reactions of the pyrolysates. The pH values and densities of the bio-oils produced in the auger reactor were similar to those reported by researchers using woody biomass, despite their lower viscosities. From these results, it was concluded that the pyrolysis temperature and residence time of the pyrolysates played a significant role in determining the characteristics of the cedar bio-oil. PMID:27047705

  2. Dmt and opioid peptides: a potent alliance.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Sharon D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Salvadori, Severo; Okada, Yoshio; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of the Dmt (2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosine)-Tic pharmacophore into the design of opioid ligands produced an extraordinary family of potent delta-opioid receptor antagonists and heralded a new phase in opioid research. First reviewed extensively in 1998, the incorporation of Dmt into a diverse group of opioid molecules stimulated the opioid field leading to the development of unique analogues with remarkable properties. This overview will document the crucial role played by this residue in the proliferation of opioid peptides with high receptor affinity (K(i) equal to or less than 1 nM) and potent bioactivity. The discussion will include the metamorphosis between delta-opioid receptor antagonists to delta-agonists based solely on subtle structural changes at the C-terminal region of the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore as well as their behavior in vivo. Dmt may be considered promiscuous due to the acquisition of potent mu-agonism by dermorphin and endomorphin derivatives as well as by a unique class of opioidmimetics containing two Dmt residues separated by alkyl or pyrazinone linkers. Structural studies on the Dmt-Tic compounds were enhanced tremendously by x-ray diffraction data for three potent and biologically diverse Dmt-Tic opioidmimetics that led to the development of pharmacophores for both delta-opioid receptor agonists and antagonists. Molecular modeling studies of other unique Dmt opioid analogues illuminated structural differences between delta- and mu-receptor ligand interactions. The future of these compounds as therapeutic applications for various medical syndromes including the control of cancer-associated pain is only a matter of time and perseverance.

  3. A new technique for Auger analysis of surface species subject to electron-induced desorption.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.

    1973-01-01

    A method is presented to observe surface species subject to electron-induced desorption by Auger electron spectroscopy. The surface to be examined is moved under the electron beam at constant velocity, establishing a time-independent condition and eliminating the time response of the electron spectrometer as a limiting factor. The dependence of the Auger signal on the sample velocity, incident electron current, beam diameter, and desorption cross section is analyzed. It is shown that it is advantageous to analyze the moving sample with a high beam current, in contrast to the usual practice of using a low beam current to minimize desorption from a stationary sample. The method is illustrated by the analysis of a friction transfer film of PTFE, in which the fluorine is removed by electron-induced desorption. The method is relevant to surface studies in the field of lubrication and catalysis.

  4. A Scanning Auger Microprobe analysis of corrosion products associated with sulfate reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sadowski, R.A.; Chen, G.; Clayton, C.R.; Kearns, J.R.; Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.

    1995-03-01

    A Scanning Auger Microprobe analysis was performed on the corrosion products of an austenitic AISI type 304 SS after a potentiostatic polarization of one volt for ten minutes in a modified Postgate`s C media containing sulfate reducing bacteria. The corrosion products were characterized and mapped in local regions where pitting was observed. A critical evaluation of the applicability of this technique for the examination of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) is presented.

  5. Education of the Pierre Auger Observatory: The Cinema as a Tool in Science Education.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, B.; Raschia, C.

    2006-08-01

    The Auger collaboration's broad mission in education, outreach and public relations is coordinated in a separate task. Its goals are to encourage and support a wide range of outreach efforts that link schools and the public with the Auger scientists and the science of cosmic rays, particle physics, astrophysics in general, and associated technologies. This report focuses on recent activities and future initiatives and, especially, on a very recent professional production of two educative videos for children between 6 and 11 years: "Messengers of Space" (18 min), and for general audiences: "An Adventure of the Mind" (20 min). The use of new resources, as 2D- and 3D-animation, to teach and learn in sciences is also discussed.

  6. Experiences with the High Energy Resolution Optics (HERO) update on a physical electronics 690 auger system.

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlhausen, James Anthony; Wallace, William O.; Brumbach, Michael Todd

    2010-10-01

    We will present our experiences with the new High Energy Resolution Optics (HERO) upgrade on a Physical Electronics Auger 690 system. This upgrade allows the single pass cylindrical analyzer in the Auger system to achieve higher energy resolution than in the standard mode. With this upgrade, it should be possible to separate chemical states for certain elements. Also, it should be possible to separate closely spaced peaks from selected elements that have been difficult or impossible to separate without the upgrade. Specifically, we will investigate practical use of this upgrade in the analysis of materials systems where overlapping peaks have historically been an issue, such as Kovar, which consists of the elements Ni, Fe and Co. Strategies for the successful use of the technique as well as its current limitations will be shown.

  7. A universal algorithm for calculating the backscattering factor in Auger-electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, A.; Powell, C. J.

    2007-02-01

    We describe a universal Monte Carlo algorithm that can be used for the efficient calculation of backscattering factors (BFs) for quantitative Auger-electron spectroscopy (AES). This algorithm makes use of the continuous slowing-down approximation and the electron stopping power instead of simulation of individual inelastic-scattering events. This approach is attractive because it can be applied to any material with an empirical formula for the stopping power, available data for differential elastic-scattering cross sections, and an empirical formula for inner-shell ionization cross sections. We report BFs for the Si KL 23L 23, Cu L 3M 45M 45, Ag M 5N 45N 45, and Au M 5N 67N 67 Auger transitions in the corresponding elemental solids. These BFs were calculated for normal incidence of the primary beam, primary energies from near threshold for ionization of the relevant core levels to 20 keV, and Auger-electron emission angles of 10°, 60°, and 80°. We found satisfactory agreement between these BFs and values obtained from a more accurate algorithm in which individual inelastic-scattering events were simulated. Percentage deviations between BFs from the two algorithms were <2% for Au, <5% for Ag, <7% for Cu, and <10% for Si for primary energies likely to be used in practical AES. These deviations arise mainly from our use of stopping powers from the empirical formula rather than more reliable values calculated from experimental optical data.

  8. Application of a new vertical profiling tool (ESASS) for sampling groundwater quality during hollow-stem auger drilling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, P.T.; Flanagan, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    A new tool called ESASS (Enhanced Screen Auger Sampling System) was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The use of ESASS, because of its unique U.S. patent design (U.S. patent no. 7,631,705 B1), allows for the collection of representative, depth-specific groundwater samples (vertical profiling) in a quick and efficient manner using a 0.305-m long screen auger during hollow-stem auger drilling. With ESASS, the water column in the flights above the screen auger is separated from the water in the screen auger by a specially designed removable plug and collar. The tool fits inside an auger of standard inner diameter (82.55 mm). The novel design of the system constituted by the plug, collar, and A-rod allows the plug to be retrieved using conventional drilling A-rods. After retrieval, standard-diameter (50.8 mm) observation wells can be installed within the hollow-stem augers. Testing of ESASS was conducted at one waste-disposal site with tetrachloroethylene (PCE) contamination and at two reference sites with no known waste-disposal history. All three sites have similar geology and are underlain by glacial, stratified-drift deposits. For the applications tested, ESASS proved to be a useful tool in vertical profiling of groundwater quality. At the waste site, PCE concentrations measured with ESASS profiling at several depths were comparable (relative percent difference <25%) to PCE concentrations sampled from wells. Vertical profiling with ESASS at the reference sites illustrated the vertical resolution achievable in the profile system; shallow groundwater quality varied by a factor of five in concentration of some constituents (nitrate and nitrite) over short (0.61 m) distances. Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation ?? 2011, National Ground Water Association. No claim to original US government works.

  9. Application of a new vertical profiling tool (ESASS) for sampling groundwater quality during hollow-stem auger drilling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.; Flanagan, Sarah M.

    2011-01-01

    A new tool called ESASS (Enhanced Screen Auger Sampling System) was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The use of ESASS, because of its unique U.S. patent design (U.S. patent no. 7,631,705 B1), allows for the collection of representative, depth-specific groundwater samples (vertical profiling) in a quick and efficient manner using a 0.305-m long screen auger during hollow-stem auger drilling. With ESASS, the water column in the flights above the screen auger is separated from the water in the screen auger by a specially designed removable plug and collar. The tool fits inside an auger of standard inner diameter (82.55 mm). The novel design of the system constituted by the plug, collar, and A-rod allows the plug to be retrieved using conventional drilling A-rods. After retrieval, standard-diameter (50.8 mm) observation wells can be installed within the hollow-stem augers. Testing of ESASS was conducted at one waste-disposal site with tetrachloroethylene (PCE) contamination and at two reference sites with no known waste-disposal history. All three sites have similar geology and are underlain by glacial, stratified-drift deposits. For the applications tested, ESASS proved to be a useful tool in vertical profiling of groundwater quality. At the waste site, PCE concentrations measured with ESASS profiling at several depths were comparable (relative percent difference <25%) to PCE concentrations sampled from wells. Vertical profiling with ESASS at the reference sites illustrated the vertical resolution achievable in the profile system; shallow groundwater quality varied by a factor of five in concentration of some constituents (nitrate and nitrite) over short (0.61 m) distances.

  10. 30 CFR 77.1503 - Augering equipment; overhead protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Auger Mining § 77.1503 Augering equipment; overhead protection. (a) Auger machines which are exposed to highwall hazards, together with all those parts of any coal elevating conveyors... connecting or disconnecting auger sections under a highwall, at least one person shall be assigned to...

  11. 30 CFR 819.13 - Auger mining: Coal recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Auger mining: Coal recovery. 819.13 Section 819....13 Auger mining: Coal recovery. (a) Auger mining shall be conducted so as to maximize the utilization and conservation of the coal in accordance with § 816.59 of this chapter. (b) Auger mining shall...

  12. 30 CFR 819.13 - Auger mining: Coal recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Auger mining: Coal recovery. 819.13 Section 819....13 Auger mining: Coal recovery. (a) Auger mining shall be conducted so as to maximize the utilization and conservation of the coal in accordance with § 816.59 of this chapter. (b) Auger mining shall...

  13. 30 CFR 819.13 - Auger mining: Coal recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Auger mining: Coal recovery. 819.13 Section 819....13 Auger mining: Coal recovery. (a) Auger mining shall be conducted so as to maximize the utilization and conservation of the coal in accordance with § 816.59 of this chapter. (b) Auger mining shall...

  14. 30 CFR 819.13 - Auger mining: Coal recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auger mining: Coal recovery. 819.13 Section 819....13 Auger mining: Coal recovery. (a) Auger mining shall be conducted so as to maximize the utilization and conservation of the coal in accordance with § 816.59 of this chapter. (b) Auger mining shall...

  15. 30 CFR 819.13 - Auger mining: Coal recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Auger mining: Coal recovery. 819.13 Section 819....13 Auger mining: Coal recovery. (a) Auger mining shall be conducted so as to maximize the utilization and conservation of the coal in accordance with § 816.59 of this chapter. (b) Auger mining shall...

  16. SEARCH FOR A CORRELATION BETWEEN ANTARES NEUTRINOS AND PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY UHECRs ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Ardid, M.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Andre, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Astraatmadja, T.; Beemster, L. J.; Bogazzi, C.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Baret, B.; Bouhou, B.; Basa, S.; Biagi, S.; and others

    2013-09-01

    A multimessenger analysis optimized for a correlation of arrival directions of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) and neutrinos is presented and applied to 2190 neutrino candidate events detected in 2007-2008 by the ANTARES telescope and 69 UHECRs observed by the Pierre Auger Observatory between 2004 January 1 and 2009 December 31. No significant correlation is observed. Assuming an equal neutrino flux (E {sup -2} energy spectrum) from all UHECR directions, a 90% CL upper limit on the neutrino flux of 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} GeV cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} per source is derived.

  17. Search for a Correlation between ANTARES Neutrinos and Pierre Auger Observatory UHECRs Arrival Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Samarai, I. Al; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Beemster, L. J.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Cârloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Core, L.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Curtil, C.; De Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehn, K.; Fermani, P.; Ferri, M.; Ferry, S.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geyer, K.; Giacomelli, G.; Giordano, V.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Hartman, J.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefèvre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Meli, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, N.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payet, K.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Richter, R.; Rivière, C.; Robert, A.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Ruiz-Rivas, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Sapienza, P.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Visser, E.; Wagner, S.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2013-09-01

    A multimessenger analysis optimized for a correlation of arrival directions of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) and neutrinos is presented and applied to 2190 neutrino candidate events detected in 2007-2008 by the ANTARES telescope and 69 UHECRs observed by the Pierre Auger Observatory between 2004 January 1 and 2009 December 31. No significant correlation is observed. Assuming an equal neutrino flux (E -2 energy spectrum) from all UHECR directions, a 90% CL upper limit on the neutrino flux of 5.0 × 10-8 GeV cm-2 s-1 per source is derived.

  18. A new route to nanoscale tomographic chemical analysis: Focused ion beam-induced auger electron spectrosocpy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvaneh, Hamed

    This research project is aimed to study the application of ion-induced Auger electron spectroscopy (IAES) in combination with the characteristics of focused ion beam (FIB) microscopy for performing chemical spectroscopy and further evaluate its potential for 3-dimensional chemical tomography applications. The mechanism for generation of Auger electrons by bombarding ions is very different from its electron induced counterpart. In the conventional electron-induced Auger electron spectroscopy (EAES), an electron beam with energy typically in the range 1-10kV is used to excite inner-shell (core) electrons of the solid. An electron from a higher electron energy state then de-excites to fill the hole and the extra energy is then transferred to either another electron, i.e. the Auger electron, or generation of an X-ray (photon). In both cases the emitting particles have charac-teristic energies and could be used to identify the excited target atoms. In IAES, however, large excitation cross sections can occur by promotion of in-ner shell electrons through crossing of molecular orbitals. Originally such phenomenological excitation processes were first proposed [3] for bi-particle gas phase collision systems to explain the generation of inner shell vacancies in violent collisions. In addition to excitation of incident or target atoms, due to a much heavier mass of ions compared to electrons, there would also be a substantial momentum transfer from the incident to the target atoms. This may cause the excited target atom to recoil from the lattice site or alternatively sputter off the surface with the possibility of de-excitation while the atom is either in motion in the matrix or traveling in vacuum. As a result, one could expect differences between the spectra induced by incident electrons and ions and interpretation of the IAE spectra requires separate consideration of both excitation and decay processes. In the first stage of the project, a state-of-the-art mass

  19. Sifuvirtide, a potent HIV fusion inhibitor peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Rui-Rui; Yang, Liu-Meng; Wang, Yun-Hua; Pang, Wei; Tam, Siu-Cheung; Tien, Po; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2009-05-08

    Enfuvirtide (ENF) is currently the only FDA approved HIV fusion inhibitor in clinical use. Searching for more drugs in this category with higher efficacy and lower toxicity seems to be a logical next step. In line with this objective, a synthetic peptide with 36 amino acid residues, called Sifuvirtide (SFT), was designed based on the crystal structure of gp41. In this study, we show that SFT is a potent anti-HIV agent with relatively low cytotoxicity. SFT was found to inhibit replication of all tested HIV strains. The effective concentrations that inhibited 50% viral replication (EC{sub 50}), as determined in all tested strains, were either comparable or lower than benchmark values derived from well-known anti-HIV drugs like ENF or AZT, while the cytotoxic concentrations causing 50% cell death (CC{sub 50}) were relatively high, rendering it an ideal anti-HIV agent. A GST-pull down assay was performed to confirm that SFT is a fusion inhibitor. Furthermore, the activity of SFT on other targets in the HIV life cycle was also investigated, and all assays showed negative results. To further understand the mechanism of action of HIV peptide inhibitors, resistant variants of HIV-1{sub IIIB} were derived by serial virus passage in the presence of increasing doses of SFT or ENF. The results showed that there was cross-resistance between SFT and ENF. In conclusion, SFT is an ideal anti-HIV agent with high potency and low cytotoxicity, but may exhibit a certain extent of cross-resistance with ENF.

  20. Sifuvirtide, a potent HIV fusion inhibitor peptide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Rui; Yang, Liu-Meng; Wang, Yun-Hua; Pang, Wei; Tam, Siu-Cheung; Tien, Po; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2009-05-01

    Enfuvirtide (ENF) is currently the only FDA approved HIV fusion inhibitor in clinical use. Searching for more drugs in this category with higher efficacy and lower toxicity seems to be a logical next step. In line with this objective, a synthetic peptide with 36 amino acid residues, called Sifuvirtide (SFT), was designed based on the crystal structure of gp41. In this study, we show that SFT is a potent anti-HIV agent with relatively low cytotoxicity. SFT was found to inhibit replication of all tested HIV strains. The effective concentrations that inhibited 50% viral replication (EC(50)), as determined in all tested strains, were either comparable or lower than benchmark values derived from well-known anti-HIV drugs like ENF or AZT, while the cytotoxic concentrations causing 50% cell death (CC(50)) were relatively high, rendering it an ideal anti-HIV agent. A GST-pull down assay was performed to confirm that SFT is a fusion inhibitor. Furthermore, the activity of SFT on other targets in the HIV life cycle was also investigated, and all assays showed negative results. To further understand the mechanism of action of HIV peptide inhibitors, resistant variants of HIV-1(IIIB) were derived by serial virus passage in the presence of increasing doses of SFT or ENF. The results showed that there was cross-resistance between SFT and ENF. In conclusion, SFT is an ideal anti-HIV agent with high potency and low cytotoxicity, but may exhibit a certain extent of cross-resistance with ENF.

  1. Looking for Auger signatures in III-nitride light emitters: A full-band Monte Carlo perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Bertazzi, Francesco Goano, Michele; Zhou, Xiangyu; Calciati, Marco; Ghione, Giovanni; Matsubara, Masahiko; Bellotti, Enrico

    2015-02-09

    Recent experiments of electron emission spectroscopy (EES) on III-nitride light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have shown a correlation between droop onset and hot electron emission at the cesiated surface of the LED p-cap. The observed hot electrons have been interpreted as a direct signature of Auger recombination in the LED active region, as highly energetic Auger-excited electrons would be collected in long-lived satellite valleys of the conduction band so that they would not decay on their journey to the surface across the highly doped p-contact layer. We discuss this interpretation by using a full-band Monte Carlo model based on first-principles electronic structure and lattice dynamics calculations. The results of our analysis suggest that Auger-excited electrons cannot be unambiguously detected in the LED structures used in the EES experiments. Additional experimental and simulative work are necessary to unravel the complex physics of GaN cesiated surfaces.

  2. Dynamics of Lopsided Energy Sharing between a Photoelectron and an Auger Electron in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwano, Kaoru; Nasu, Keiichiro

    1995-09-01

    We study the dynamics of lopsided energy sharing between a photoelectron and an Auger electron in solids. The problem is formulated as an optical response theory, in which the energy distribution spectrum for these two propagating electrons is expressed in terms of T matrices. In order to perform numerical calculations, we use two different models, which are a partial-wave model and a cubic-lattice model. Firstly, we concentrate on the effect given by the change of the atomic valency following the Auger decay. As a result, in the former model we have reproduced the lopsidedness in the peak shifts and distortions of the main peaks. Such lopsidedness is realized even in the latter model in spite of the strong mixing among different partial waves. Furthermore, it should be emphasized that various types of dynamics can occur according to the local electronic structure around the atom of which core electron is excited. In particular, the energy spectrum of the two electrons receive modulations representing the local density of states around the initial atom. This is because the phenomenon is essentially local in the sense that both the electrons must be inside the Coulomb-potential region of the atom for the energy sharing to occur. Next, we study the effect of electron-electron scattering between the two propagating electrons, using a perturbation theory. It is concluded that, when the electron-electron scattering is weak enough, its effect is against the previous one and so reduces the lopsidedness in the energy sharing.

  3. Modified power law behavior in quantum dot blinking: a novel role for biexcitons and auger ionization.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jeffrey J; Nesbitt, David J

    2009-01-01

    Single photon detection methods are used to acquire fluorescence trajectories from single CdSe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots (QDs) and analyze their blinking behavior. Although the "off-time" distributions follow ideal power law behavior at all wavelengths and intensities, significant deviations from power law behavior are observed for the "on-times". Specifically, with improved time resolution, trajectory durations, and photon statistics, we report a near-exponential falloff of on-time probability distributions at long times. Investigation of this falloff behavior as a function of laser wavelength and power demonstrate that these deviations originate from multiexciton dynamics, whose formation probabilities can be very low on a "per laser pulse" basis, but become nearly unity on the time scales of the longest on-times. The near quadratic, power-dependent results indicate the predominant role of biexcitons in the long time on-to-off blinking dynamics, which can be interpreted in terms of an Auger ionization event. In conjunction with Poisson modeling of the photon statistics, the data is consistent with QD ionization efficiencies of order approximately 10(-5) and highlight a novel role for biexcitons and Auger ionization in QD blinking.

  4. Calculations of Auger intensity versus beam position for a sample with layers perpendicular to its surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zommer, L.; Jablonski, A.

    2010-07-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology are a driving force for the improvement of lateral resolution in advanced analytical techniques such as scanning electron microscopy or scanning Auger microscopy (SAM). Special samples with multilayers which are perpendicular to their surface are presently proposed for testing the lateral resolution, as discussed in recent works of Senoner et al (2004 Surf. Interface Anal. 36 1423). The relevant experiment needs a theoretical description based on recent progress in the theory. Monte Carlo simulations of electron trajectories make possible an accurate description of the considered system. We selected exemplary samples, with layers perpendicular to the surface. The layer materials are elemental solids with high, medium and low atomic numbers, i.e. Au|Cu|Au and Au|Si|Au. For these systems calculations of the Auger current versus beam position were performed. We found that, for a system with layers consisting of elements of considerably different atomic numbers, the relation can have an unexpected extreme. This observation can be important in analysis of SAM pictures.

  5. Coal-Sizing Auger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Aft end of auger, like forward, face-piercing end, equipped with hard cutting bits such as diamonds. As auger breaks face, pulls broken coal lumps into jaws and forces them into hardened throat section. There, cutting bits chew up lumps: Clearance between throat and auger shaft sets maximum size for coal particles that pass through. Auger motion pushes coal particles into mixing chamber, where paddles combine them with water.

  6. Operations of and Future Plans for the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Performance and operation of the Surface Detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) Extension of the Pierre Auger Observatory using high-elevation fluorescence telescopes (HEAT); (3) AMIGA - Auger Muons and Infill for the Ground Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (4) Radio detection of Cosmic Rays at the southern Auger Observatory; (5) Hardware Developments for the AMIGA enhancement at the Pierre Auger Observatory; (6) A simulation of the fluorescence detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory using GEANT 4; (7) Education and Public Outreach at the Pierre Auger Observatory; (8) BATATA: A device to characterize the punch-through observed in underground muon detectors and to operate as a prototype for AMIGA; and (9) Progress with the Northern Part of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  7. Vertical-Screw-Auger Conveyer Feeder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis (Inventor); Vollmer, Hubert J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A conical feeder is attached to a vertically conveying screw auger. The feeder is equipped with scoops and rotated from the surface to force-feed regolith the auger. Additional scoops are possible by adding a cylindrical section above the conical funnel section. Such then allows the unit to collect material from swaths larger in diameter than the enclosing casing pipe of the screw auger. A third element includes a flexible screw auger. All three can be used in combination in microgravity and zero atmosphere environments to drill and recover a wide area of subsurface regolith and entrained volatiles through a single access point on the surface.

  8. A Complete Set of Radiative and Auger Rates for K-vacancy States in Fe XVIII-Fe-XXV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmeri, P.; Mendoza, C.; Kallman, T. R.; Bautista, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    A complete set of level energies, wavelengths, A-values, and total and partial Auger rates have been computed for transitions involving the K-vacancy states within the n = 2 complex of Fe XVIII-Fe XXV. Three different standard numerical packages are used for this purpose, namel y AUTOSTRUCTURE, the Breit-Pauli R-matrix suite (BPRM) and HFR, which allow reliable estimates of the physical effects involved and of the accuracy of the resulting data sets. The Breit interaction is taken i nto account because its contributions to the small A-values and partial Auger rates cannot be neglected with increasing electron occupancy. Semiempirical adjustments can also lead to large differences in both the radiative and Auger decay data of strongly mixed levels. Several experimental level energies and wavelengths are questioned, and significant discrepancies are found with previously computed decay rates th at are attributed to numerical problems. The statistical accuracy of the present level energies and wavelengths is ranked at +/-3 eV and +/ -2 mA, respectively, and that for A-values and partial Auger rates greater than lO(exp 13)/s at better than 20%.

  9. A Complete Set of Radiative and Auger Rates for K-vacancy States in Fe XVIII-Fe XXV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmeri, P.; Mendoza, C.; Kallman, T. R.; Bautista, M. A.

    2002-01-01

    A complete set of level energies, wavelengths, A-values, and total and partial Auger rates have been computed for transitions involving the K-vacancy states within the n = 2 complex of Fe XVIII-Fe XXV. Three different standard numerical packages are used for this purpose, namely AUTOSTRUCTURE, the Breit-Pauli R-matrix suite (BPRM) and HFR, which allow reliable estimates of the physical effects involved and of the accuracy of the resulting data sets. It is found that the Breit interaction must be always taken into account as the contributions to the small A-values and partial Auger rates does not decrease with electron occupancy. Semi-empirical adjustments can also lead to large differences in both the radiative and Auger decay data of strongly mixed levels. Several experimental energy levels and wavelengths are questioned, and significant discrepancies are found with previously computed decay rates that are attributed to numerical problems. The statistical accuracy of the present level energies and wavelengths is ranked at plus or minus 3 eV and plus or minus 2 mAngstroms, respectively, whereas that for A-values and partial Auger rates greater than 10(exp 13) per second is estimated at better than 20%.

  10. Comparison of Numerical Analyses with a Static Load Test of a Continuous Flight Auger Pile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoľko, Michal; Stacho, Jakub

    2014-12-01

    The article deals with numerical analyses of a Continuous Flight Auger (CFA) pile. The analyses include a comparison of calculated and measured load-settlement curves as well as a comparison of the load distribution over a pile's length. The numerical analyses were executed using two types of software, i.e., Ansys and Plaxis, which are based on FEM calculations. Both types of software are different from each other in the way they create numerical models, model the interface between the pile and soil, and use constitutive material models. The analyses have been prepared in the form of a parametric study, where the method of modelling the interface and the material models of the soil are compared and analysed. Our analyses show that both types of software permit the modelling of pile foundations. The Plaxis software uses advanced material models as well as the modelling of the impact of groundwater or overconsolidation. The load-settlement curve calculated using Plaxis is equal to the results of a static load test with a more than 95 % degree of accuracy. In comparison, the load-settlement curve calculated using Ansys allows for the obtaining of only an approximate estimate, but the software allows for the common modelling of large structure systems together with a foundation system.

  11. Auger analysis of a fiber/matrix interface in a ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honecy, Frank S.; Pepper, Stephen V.

    1988-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) depth profiling was used to characterize the fiber/matrix interface of an SiC fiber, reaction bonded Si3N4 matrix composite. Depth profiles of the as received double coated fiber revealed concentration oscillations which disappeared after annealing the fiber in the environment used to fabricate the composite. After the composite was fractured, the Auger depth profiles showed that failure occurred in neither the Beta-SiC fiber body nor in the Si3N4 matrix but, concurrently, at the fiber coating/matrix interface and within the fiber coating itself.

  12. Towards a Joint Analysis of Data from the IceCube Neutrino Telescope, the Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christov; Golup, G.; Montaruli, T.; Rameez, M.; Aublin, J.; Caccianiga, L.; Ghia, P. L.; Roulet, E.; Unger, M.; Sagawa, H.; Tinyakov, P.

    A joint point-source analysis to search for correlations between the arrival directions of neutrinos and ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) is being planned by the IceCube, Pierre Auger and Telescope Array Collaborations. A cross-correlation analysis will be performed using ten years of Auger data, six years of Telescope Array data and a signal-rich set of neutrino candidate events detected at IceCube. Also, a likelihood analysis will be applied to the same sample of neutrinos, stacking their arrival directions, and to UHECRs. Finally, another likelihood analysis will be performed on stacked UHECRs and the IceCube 4-year sample of clean, through-going muons that could be associated with charged-current muon neutrino interactions. An outline of the analyses, their sensitivities and discovery potentials is presented here.

  13. 30 CFR 77.1501 - Auger mining; inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Auger mining; inspections. 77.1501 Section 77.1501 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND... Auger Mining § 77.1501 Auger mining; inspections. (a) The face of all highwalls, to a distance of...

  14. 30 CFR 77.1501 - Auger mining; inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Auger mining; inspections. 77.1501 Section 77.1501 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND... Auger Mining § 77.1501 Auger mining; inspections. (a) The face of all highwalls, to a distance of...

  15. 30 CFR 77.1501 - Auger mining; inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Auger mining; inspections. 77.1501 Section 77.1501 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND... Auger Mining § 77.1501 Auger mining; inspections. (a) The face of all highwalls, to a distance of...

  16. 30 CFR 77.1501 - Auger mining; inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auger mining; inspections. 77.1501 Section 77.1501 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND... Auger Mining § 77.1501 Auger mining; inspections. (a) The face of all highwalls, to a distance of...

  17. 30 CFR 77.1501 - Auger mining; inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Auger mining; inspections. 77.1501 Section 77.1501 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND... Auger Mining § 77.1501 Auger mining; inspections. (a) The face of all highwalls, to a distance of...

  18. 30 CFR 819.15 - Auger mining: Hydrologic balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. 819.15... MINING § 819.15 Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. (a) Auger mining shall be planned and conducted to minimize disturbances of the prevailing hydrologic balance in accordance with the requirements of §§...

  19. 30 CFR 819.15 - Auger mining: Hydrologic balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. 819.15... MINING § 819.15 Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. (a) Auger mining shall be planned and conducted to minimize disturbances of the prevailing hydrologic balance in accordance with the requirements of §§...

  20. 30 CFR 819.15 - Auger mining: Hydrologic balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. 819.15... MINING § 819.15 Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. (a) Auger mining shall be planned and conducted to minimize disturbances of the prevailing hydrologic balance in accordance with the requirements of §§...

  1. 30 CFR 819.15 - Auger mining: Hydrologic balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. 819.15... MINING § 819.15 Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. (a) Auger mining shall be planned and conducted to minimize disturbances of the prevailing hydrologic balance in accordance with the requirements of §§...

  2. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  3. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  4. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  5. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  6. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  7. Angle-resolved auger electron spectra for a Ni(110) surface: Calculations with the reduced angular momentum expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, V.; Chassé, A.; Mróz, S.

    1990-05-01

    Results of multiple-scattering cluster calculations are presented for angle-resolved M 2,3VV Auger electron intensities from a clean Ni(110) surface, which are obtained using the reduced angular momentum expansion (RAME). This method goes beyond the popular plane-wave approximation and takes into account both the spherical character and the anisotropy of the electron waves. The positions of the maxima and minima in the calculated polar intensity profiles agree well with the experimentally determined structures.

  8. Evaluation of the effective solid angle of a hemispherical deflector analyser with injection lens for metastable Auger projectile states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benis, E. P.; Doukas, S.; Zouros, T. J. M.; Indelicato, P.; Parente, F.; Martins, C.; Santos, J. P.; Marques, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    The accurate determination of the electron yield of a metastable projectile Auger state necessitates the careful evaluation of the corresponding effective solid angle, i.e. the geometrical solid angle convoluted with the decay time of the metastable state. Recently, we presented (Doukas et. al., 2015) SIMION Monte Carlo type simulations of the effective solid angle for long lived projectile Auger states (lifetime τ ∼10-9-10-5s) recorded by a hemispherical spectrograph with injection lens and position sensitive detector in the direction of the projectile ion. These results are important for the accurate evaluation of the 1 s 2 s 2 p4P/2 P ratio of K-Auger cross sections whose observed non-statistical production by electron capture into He-like ions, recently a field of interesting interpretations, awaits final resolution. Here we expand and systematize our investigation using the same techniques to expose universal behaviors of the effective solid angle covering life times of 1 s 2 s 2 p4P states for all first row ions. Our results are also compared to purely geometrical calculations of the solid angle that omit the lensing effects and serve as a benchmark for a deeper insight into the effect.

  9. A Bayesian analysis of the 69 highest energy cosmic rays detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanin, Alexander; Mortlock, Daniel J.

    2016-08-01

    The origins of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) remain an open question. Several attempts have been made to cross-correlate the arrival directions of the UHECRs with catalogues of potential sources, but no definite conclusion has been reached. We report a Bayesian analysis of the 69 events, from the Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), that aims to determine the fraction of the UHECRs that originate from known AGNs in the Veron-Cety & Verson (VCV) catalogue, as well as AGNs detected with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (Swift-BAT), galaxies from the 2MASS Redshift Survey (2MRS), and an additional volume-limited sample of 17 nearby AGNs. The study makes use of a multilevel Bayesian model of UHECR injection, propagation and detection. We find that for reasonable ranges of prior parameters the Bayes factors disfavour a purely isotropic model. For fiducial values of the model parameters, we report 68 per cent credible intervals for the fraction of source originating UHECRs of 0.09^{+0.05}_{-0.04}, 0.25^{+0.09}_{-0.08}, 0.24^{+0.12}_{-0.10}, and 0.08^{+0.04}_{-0.03} for the VCV, Swift-BAT and 2MRS catalogues, and the sample of 17 AGNs, respectively.

  10. Properties of bio-oil generated by a pyrolysis of forest cedar residuals with the movable Auger-type reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Shun; Miyazato, Akio; Ebitani, Kohki

    2016-02-01

    Our research project has developed the new movable reactor for bio-oil production in 2013 on the basis of Auger-type system. This package would be a great impact due to the concept of local production for local consumption in the hilly and mountainous area in not only Japan but also in the world. Herein, we would like to report the properties of the bio-oil generated by the developing Auger-type movable reactor. The synthesized bio-oil possessed C: 46.2 wt%, H: 6.5 wt%, N: wt%, S: <0.1 wt%, O: 46.8 wt% and H2O: 18.4 wt%, and served a good calorific value of 18.1 MJ/kg. The spectroscopic and mass analyses such as FT-IR, GC-MS, 13C-NMR and FT-ICR MS supported that the bio-oil was composed by the fine mixtures of methoxy phenols and variety of alcohol or carboxylic acid functional groups. Thus, it is suggested that the bio-oil generated by the new movable Auger-type reactor has a significant potential as well as the existing bio-oil reported previously.

  11. Auger spectrum of a water molecule after single and double core ionization.

    PubMed

    Inhester, L; Burmeister, C F; Groenhof, G; Grubmüller, H

    2012-04-14

    The high intensity of free electron lasers opens up the possibility to perform single-shot molecule scattering experiments. However, even for small molecules, radiation damage induced by absorption of high intense x-ray radiation is not yet fully understood. One of the striking effects which occurs under intense x-ray illumination is the creation of double core ionized molecules in considerable quantity. To provide insight into this process, we have studied the dynamics of water molecules in single and double core ionized states by means of electronic transition rate calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. From the MD trajectories, photoionization and Auger transition rates were computed based on electronic continuum wavefunctions obtained by explicit integration of the coupled radial Schrödinger equations. These rates served to solve the master equations for the populations of the relevant electronic states. To account for the nuclear dynamics during the core hole lifetime, the calculated electron emission spectra for different molecular geometries were incoherently accumulated according to the obtained time-dependent populations, thus neglecting possible interference effects between different decay pathways. We find that, in contrast to the single core ionized water molecule, the nuclear dynamics for the double core ionized water molecule during the core hole lifetime leaves a clear fingerprint in the resulting electron emission spectra. The lifetime of the double core ionized water was found to be significantly shorter than half of the single core hole lifetime.

  12. Auger spectrum of a water molecule after single and double core ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Inhester, L.; Burmeister, C. F.; Groenhof, G.; Grubmueller, H.

    2012-04-14

    The high intensity of free electron lasers opens up the possibility to perform single-shot molecule scattering experiments. However, even for small molecules, radiation damage induced by absorption of high intense x-ray radiation is not yet fully understood. One of the striking effects which occurs under intense x-ray illumination is the creation of double core ionized molecules in considerable quantity. To provide insight into this process, we have studied the dynamics of water molecules in single and double core ionized states by means of electronic transition rate calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. From the MD trajectories, photoionization and Auger transition rates were computed based on electronic continuum wavefunctions obtained by explicit integration of the coupled radial Schroedinger equations. These rates served to solve the master equations for the populations of the relevant electronic states. To account for the nuclear dynamics during the core hole lifetime, the calculated electron emission spectra for different molecular geometries were incoherently accumulated according to the obtained time-dependent populations, thus neglecting possible interference effects between different decay pathways. We find that, in contrast to the single core ionized water molecule, the nuclear dynamics for the double core ionized water molecule during the core hole lifetime leaves a clear fingerprint in the resulting electron emission spectra. The lifetime of the double core ionized water was found to be significantly shorter than half of the single core hole lifetime.

  13. InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well light-emitting diodes with a grading InN composition suppressing the Auger recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liu, Wei; Ju, Zhengang; Tan, Swee Tiam; Ji, Yun; Kyaw, Zabu; Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Liancheng; Sun, Xiao Wei E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org; Demir, Hilmi Volkan E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org

    2014-07-21

    In conventional InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs), thin InGaN quantum wells are usually adopted to mitigate the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE), caused due to strong polarization induced electric field, through spatially confining electrons and holes in small recombination volumes. However, this inevitably increases the carrier density in quantum wells, which in turn aggravates the Auger recombination, since the Auger recombination scales with the third power of the carrier density. As a result, the efficiency droop of the Auger recombination severely limits the LED performance. Here, we proposed and showed wide InGaN quantum wells with the InN composition linearly grading along the growth orientation in LED structures suppressing the Auger recombination and the QCSE simultaneously. Theoretically, the physical mechanisms behind the Auger recombination suppression are also revealed. The proposed LED structure has experimentally demonstrated significant improvement in optical output power and efficiency droop, proving to be an effective solution to this important problem of Auger recombination.

  14. Dihydro-resveratrol-A potent dietary polyphenol

    SciTech Connect

    Gakh, Andrei A; Anisimova, Natalia Yu; Kiselevsky, Mikhail V; Sadovnikov, Sergey V; Stankov, Ivan N; Yudin, Mikhail V; Rufanov, Konstantin A; Krasavin, Mikhail Yu; Sosnov, Andrey V

    2010-01-01

    Dihydro-resveratrol (dihydro-R), a prominent polyphenol component of red wine, has a profound proliferative effect on hormone-sensitive tumor cell lines such as breast cancer cell line MCF7. We found a significant increase in MCF7 tumor cells growth rates in the presence of picomolar concentrations of this compound. The proliferative effect of dihydro-R was not observed in cell lines that do not express hormone receptors (MDA-MB-231, BT-474, and -562).

  15. New fluoroquinolones: a class of potent antibiotics.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Marcus Vinícius Nora

    2005-11-01

    The discovery of antibiotics opened a new era in the treatment against several pathogenic microorganisms that can disable or kill humans. The appearance of the fluoroquinolones (based on nalidixic acid, 4-quinolone-3-carboxylates), in the early 1980's, gave a new impetus in the treatment of infectious diseases. Despite these favourable properties, the earlier fluoroquinolones had limited potency against some clinically important organisms, especially Gram-positive pathogens so that the development of resistance to these organisms has become a serious problem. Thus the development of new fluoroquinolones with a better pharmacokinetic profile, potency, broad spectrum of activity, solubility, prolonged serum half-life and oral and parenteral routes of administration has been a major focus on recent research. The increasing interest in this class led me to review the promising new fluoroquinolones in clinical trials.

  16. Social communication: a potent force for change.

    PubMed

    Lone, S

    1983-12-01

    Some of the strongest challenges to established communication structures emerge from the development arena. 1 element of the challenges comes from those working to place communication between deprived communities and those providing them expertise at the center of development planning. Communication specialists maintain that human communication is the pivot on which balances the success or failure of the whole process of development as well as individual programs. Yet, the vast majority of development programs are conceived and executed without a serious communication component. Communication personnel are irritated by the approach of planning first, and communicating only after a failure. As more and more after the fact appeals are heard, it is becoming clearer to planners that communication is more than another hardware component consisting of posters, radio messages, and so on, but a central and decisive factor of any program. The attempt to raise communications to a more appropriate place in the development context has been aided greatly by recent evidence of its impact. Among those who must be classified as successful in fully investigating their target group and understanding how to communicate with them are the commercial manufacturers. Their advertising campaigns have revolutionized consumption habits and lifestyles across the world. An increasing number of voices, recognizing the impact of commercial advertising, are advocating that their techniques be adopted in the promotion of social development. Richard Manoff is one experienced advertising man who has used his commercial skills to promote developmental messages. He maintains that there is no idea that cannot be promoted as are commercial products. Changes in communication strategies will not by themselves eliminate the most fundamental problem facing humanity, i.e., the eradication of poverty, but they can contribute to that goal. A comprehensive communication strategy can help awaken people to

  17. Recoil by Auger electrons: Theory and application

    SciTech Connect

    Demekhin, Ph. V.; Scheit, S.; Cederbaum, L. S.

    2009-10-28

    General equations accounting for the molecular dynamics induced by the recoil of a fast Auger electron are presented. The implications of the degree of localization of the molecular orbitals of diatomic molecules involved in the Auger decay are analyzed. It is shown that the direct and exchange terms of the Auger transition matrix element may give rise to opposite signs and hence to opposite directions of the recoil momenta transferred to the nuclear vibrational motion. Consequently, these terms have a different impact on the recoil-induced nuclear dynamics in the final Auger decay state. The developed theory is applied to study the influence of the recoil on the interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) following the K-LL Auger decay of the Ne dimer. Our calculations illustrate a significant effect of the recoil of nuclei on the computed wave packets propagating on the potential energy curve populated by the Auger decay. The corresponding final states of the Auger process decay further by ICD. We show that the recoil momentum imparted onto the nuclei modifies the computed ICD spectra considerably.

  18. 33 CFR 147.813 - Auger Tension Leg Platform safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Auger Tension Leg Platform safety... SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.813 Auger Tension Leg Platform safety zone. (a) Description. The Auger Tension Leg Platform (Auger TLP) is located at position...

  19. 33 CFR 147.813 - Auger Tension Leg Platform safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auger Tension Leg Platform safety... SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.813 Auger Tension Leg Platform safety zone. (a) Description. The Auger Tension Leg Platform (Auger TLP) is located at position...

  20. 33 CFR 147.813 - Auger Tension Leg Platform safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Auger Tension Leg Platform safety... SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.813 Auger Tension Leg Platform safety zone. (a) Description. The Auger Tension Leg Platform (Auger TLP) is located at position...

  1. 33 CFR 147.813 - Auger Tension Leg Platform safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Auger Tension Leg Platform safety... SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.813 Auger Tension Leg Platform safety zone. (a) Description. The Auger Tension Leg Platform (Auger TLP) is located at position...

  2. 33 CFR 147.813 - Auger Tension Leg Platform safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Auger Tension Leg Platform safety... SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.813 Auger Tension Leg Platform safety zone. (a) Description. The Auger Tension Leg Platform (Auger TLP) is located at position...

  3. Discovery of a highly potent glucocorticoid for asthma treatment

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuanzheng; Shi, Jingjing; Yi, Wei; Ren, Xin; Gao, Xiang; Li, Jianshuang; Wu, Nanyan; Weaver, Kevin; Xie, Qian; Khoo, Sok Kean; Yang, Tao; Huang, Xiaozhu; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are the most effective treatment for asthma. However, their clinical applications are limited by low efficacy in severe asthma and by undesired side effects associated with high dose or prolonged use. The most successful approach to overcome these limitations has been the development of highly potent glucocorticoids that can be delivered to the lungs by inhalation to achieve local efficacy with minimal systemic effects. On the basis of our previous structural studies, we designed and developed a highly potent glucocorticoid, VSGC12, which showed an improved anti-inflammation activity in both cell-based reporter assays and cytokine inhibition experiments, as well as in a gene expression profiling of mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells. In a mouse asthma model, VSGC12 delivered a higher efficacy than fluticasone furoate, a leading clinical compound, in many categories including histology and the number of differentiated immune cells. VSGC12 also showed a higher potency than fluticasone furoate in repressing most asthma symptoms. Finally, VSGC12 showed a better side effect profile than fluticasone furoate at their respective effective doses, including better insulin response and less bone loss in an animal model. The excellent therapeutic and side effect properties of VSGC12 provide a promising perspective for developing this potent glucocorticoid as a new effective drug for asthma. PMID:27066265

  4. Determination of the solid angle and response function of a hemispherical spectrograph with injection lens for Auger electrons emitted from long lived projectile states

    SciTech Connect

    Doukas, S.; Madesis, I.; Dimitriou, A.; Zouros, T. J. M.; Laoutaris, A.; Benis, E. P.

    2015-04-15

    We present SIMION 8.1 Monte Carlo type simulations of the response function and detection solid angle for long lived Auger states (lifetime τ ∼ 10{sup −9} − 10{sup −5} s) recorded by a hemispherical spectrograph with injection lens and position sensitive detector used for high resolution Auger spectroscopy of ion beams. Also included in these simulations for the first time are kinematic effects particular to Auger emission from fast moving projectile ions such as line broadening and solid angle limitations allowing for a more accurate and realistic line shape modeling. Our results are found to be in excellent agreement with measured electron line shapes of both long lived 1s2s2p{sup 4}P and prompt Auger projectile states formed by electron capture in collisions of 25.3 MeV F{sup 7+} with H{sub 2} and 12.0 MeV C{sup 4+} with Ne recorded at 0{sup ∘} to the beam direction. These results are important for the accurate evaluation of the 1s2s2p {sup 4}P/{sup 2}P ratio of K-Auger cross sections whose observed non-statistical production by electron capture into He-like ions, recently a field of interesting interpretations, awaits further resolution.

  5. Auger Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals for Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falzone, Nadia; Cornelissen, Bart; Vallis, Katherine A.

    Radionuclides that emit Auger electrons have been of particular interest as therapeutic agents. This is primarily due to the short range in tissue, controlled linear paths and high linear energy transfer of these particles. Taking into consideration that ionizations are clustered within several cubic nanometers around the point of decay the possibility of incorporating an Auger emitter in close proximity to the cancer cell DNA has immense therapeutic potential thus making nuclear targeted Auger-electron emitters ideal for precise targeting of cancer cells. Furthermore, many Auger-electron emitters also emit γ-radiation, this property makes Auger emitting radionuclides a very attractive option as therapeutic and diagnostic agents in the molecular imaging and management of tumors. The first requirement for the delivery of Auger emitting nuclides is the definition of suitable tumor-selective delivery vehicles to avoid normal tissue toxicity. One of the main challenges of targeted radionuclide therapy remains in matching the physical and chemical characteristics of the radionuclide and targeting moiety with the clinical character of the tumor. Molecules and molecular targets that have been used in the past can be classified according to the carrier molecule used to deliver the Auger-electron-emitting radionuclide. These include (1) antibodies, (2) peptides, (3) small molecules, (4) oligonucleotides and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), (5) proteins, and (6) nanoparticles. The efficacy of targeted radionuclide therapy depends greatly on the ability to increase intranuclear incorporation of the radiopharmaceutical without compromising toxicity. Several strategies to achieve this goal have been proposed in literature. The possibility of transferring tumor therapy based on the emission of Auger electrons from experimental models to patients has vast therapeutic potential, and remains a field of intense research.

  6. Correlation between energy deposition and molecular damage from Auger electrons: A case study of ultra-low energy (5–18 eV) electron interactions with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaee, Mohammad Hunting, Darel J.; Sanche, Léon

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The present study introduces a new method to establish a direct correlation between biologically related physical parameters (i.e., stopping and damaging cross sections, respectively) for an Auger-electron emitting radionuclide decaying within a target molecule (e.g., DNA), so as to evaluate the efficacy of the radionuclide at the molecular level. These parameters can be applied to the dosimetry of Auger electrons and the quantification of their biological effects, which are the main criteria to assess the therapeutic efficacy of Auger-electron emitting radionuclides. Methods: Absorbed dose and stopping cross section for the Auger electrons of 5–18 eV emitted by{sup 125}I within DNA were determined by developing a nanodosimetric model. The molecular damages induced by these Auger electrons were investigated by measuring damaging cross section, including that for the formation of DNA single- and double-strand breaks. Nanoscale films of pure plasmid DNA were prepared via the freeze-drying technique and subsequently irradiated with low-energy electrons at various fluences. The damaging cross sections were determined by employing a molecular survival model to the measured exposure–response curves for induction of DNA strand breaks. Results: For a single decay of{sup 125}I within DNA, the Auger electrons of 5–18 eV deposit the energies of 12.1 and 9.1 eV within a 4.2-nm{sup 3} volume of a hydrated or dry DNA, which results in the absorbed doses of 270 and 210 kGy, respectively. DNA bases have a major contribution to the deposited energies. Ten-electronvolt and high linear energy transfer 100-eV electrons have a similar cross section for the formation of DNA double-strand break, while 100-eV electrons are twice as efficient as 10 eV in the induction of single-strand break. Conclusions: Ultra-low-energy electrons (<18 eV) substantially contribute to the absorbed dose and to the molecular damage from Auger-electron emitting radionuclides; hence, they should

  7. Total synthesis of thapsigargin, a potent SERCA pump inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ball, Matthew; Andrews, Stephen P; Wierschem, Frank; Cleator, Ed; Smith, Martin D; Ley, Steven V

    2007-02-15

    The enantioselective total synthesis of thapsigargin, a potent, selective inhibitor of the Ca2+ pump SERCA, is described. Starting from ketoalcohol 8, key steps involve regioselective introduction of the internal olefin at C4-C5, judicious protecting group choice to allow chelation-controlled reduction at C3, and chemoselective introduction of the angelate ester function at C3-O. A selective esterification approach completes the total synthesis in a total of 42 steps and 0.61% overall yield (88.6% average yield per step). [reaction: see text].

  8. A series of novel, potent, and selective histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Philip; Altamura, Sergio; Chakravarty, Prasun K; Cecchetti, Ottavia; De Francesco, Raffaele; Gallinari, Paola; Ingenito, Raffaele; Meinke, Peter T; Petrocchi, Alessia; Rowley, Michael; Scarpelli, Rita; Serafini, Sergio; Steinkühler, Christian

    2006-12-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors offer a promising strategy for cancer therapy and the first generation HDAC inhibitors are currently in clinical trials. A structurally novel series of HDAC inhibitors based on the natural cyclic tetrapeptide Apicidin is described. Selected screening of the sample collection looking for L-2-amino-8-oxodecanoic acid (L-Aoda) derivatives identified a small acyclic lead molecule 1 with the unusual ketone zinc binding group. SAR studies around this lead resulted in optimization to potent, low molecular weight, selective, non-hydroxamic acid HDAC inhibitors, equipotent to current clinical candidates.

  9. Discovery of a potent and selective GPR120 agonist.

    PubMed

    Shimpukade, Bharat; Hudson, Brian D; Hovgaard, Christine Kiel; Milligan, Graeme; Ulven, Trond

    2012-05-10

    GPR120 is a receptor of unsaturated long-chain fatty acids reported to mediate GLP-1 secretion, insulin sensitization, anti-inflammatory, and anti-obesity effects and is therefore emerging as a new potential target for treatment of type 2 diabetes and metabolic diseases. Further investigation is however hindered by the lack of suitable receptor modulators. Screening of FFA1 ligands provided a lead with moderate activity on GPR120 and moderate selectivity over FFA1. Optimization led to the discovery of the first potent and selective GPR120 agonist.

  10. Specific energy from Auger and conversion electrons of 131I, 188Re-anti-CD20 to a lymphocyte's nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-García, E.; Carrillo-Cazares, T. A.

    2011-01-01

    The typical radionuclides used to label anti-CD20 in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma are 90Y, 131I, and 188Re, with the emission of beta particles, Auger electrons, and conversion electrons for the latter two. The aim of the present work was to calculate the contribution of high linear energy transfer radiation as Auger electrons (AE) and conversion electrons (CE) of 131I and 188Re-anti-CD20 to mean specific energy into the cell nucleus by Monte Carlo simulation (MCS), so as to infer therapeutic effectiveness on a dosimetric basis. MCS was used to quantify the frequency-mean specific energy into the cell nucleus, where the cell was modeled by two concentric spheres, considering two cell models. The results showed that 10% and 33% of the mean-specific energies (z¯) per disintegration imparted to the cell nucleus for both geometries are due to AE and CE; on the other hand, if the hit of AE and CE occurs, the contribution to (z¯) is about 64% and 86% for 131I and 188Re, respectively. According to the amount of specific energy from AE and CE into the cell nucleus by positive event, they can cause catastrophic effects in the nuclear DNA in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with 131I, 188Re-anti-CD20.

  11. The Auger Engineering Radio Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Benjamin

    2012-11-01

    High and ultra-high energy cosmic rays hitting the Earth's atmosphere cause extensive air showers (EAS). In recent years, these cosmic rays have been extensively studied at the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina. The EAS mainly consist of charged particles, especially electrons and positrons, which cause electro-magnetic emission in the MHz range by interaction with the Earth's magnetic field. To measure this radio emission, AERA, the Auger Engineering Radio Array, was deployed in October 2010 and commenced regular data acquisition in April 2011. AERA was designed as an engineering array for technology and methodology development towards future large-scale radio arrays. It will allow studies on the radio emission mechanism and the physics capabilities of the detection technique. AERA's unique site within the surface detector array (SD) of the Pierre Auger Observatory provides the possibility of coincident hybrid and super-hybrid EAS detection especially in overlap with the fluorescence telescopes Coihueco and HEAT. Besides a description of the setup, we present an overview of analyses of commissioning data taken between November 2010 and April 2011. Also, we show the first hybrid and self-triggered events detected with AERA in April 2011.

  12. Tool for Guiding An Auger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, C. J.

    1983-01-01

    Auger and Ram have same pitch, which minimizes damage to workpiece and load carried by auger. Auger firmly fastened onto ram shaft by screw and kept from rotating on shaft by slot machined into end of stem and male driving lug that engages slot. Used to install threaded studs in plastic or rubber where impractical to mold them in.

  13. Potent inhibition of tau fibrillization with a multivalent ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Honson, Nicolette S.; Jensen, Jordan R.; Darby, Michael V.; Kuret, Jeff

    2007-11-09

    Small-molecule inhibitors of tau fibrillization are under investigation as tools for interrogating the tau aggregation pathway and as potential therapeutic agents for Alzheimer's disease. Established inhibitors include thiacarbocyanine dyes, which can inhibit recombinant tau fibrillization in the presence of anionic surfactant aggregation inducers. In an effort to increase inhibitory potency, a cyclic bis-thiacarbocyanine molecule containing two thiacarbocyanine moieties was synthesized and characterized with respect to tau fibrillization inhibitory activity by electron microscopy and ligand aggregation state by absorbance spectroscopy. Results showed that the inhibitory activity of the bis-thiacarbocyanine was qualitatively similar to a monomeric cyanine dye, but was more potent with 50% inhibition achieved at {approx}80 nM concentration. At all concentrations tested in aqueous solution, the bis-thiacarbocyanine collapsed to form a closed clamshell structure. However, the presence of tau protein selectively stabilized the open conformation. These results suggest that the inhibitory activity of bis-thiacarbocyanine results from multivalency, and reveal a route to more potent tau aggregation inhibitors.

  14. Potent inhibition of HIV-1 replication by a Tat mutant.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Luke W; Sivakumaran, Haran; Major, Lee; Suhrbier, Andreas; Harrich, David

    2009-11-10

    Herein we describe a mutant of the two-exon HIV-1 Tat protein, termed Nullbasic, that potently inhibits multiple steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle. Nullbasic was created by replacing the entire arginine-rich basic domain of wild type Tat with glycine/alanine residues. Like similarly mutated one-exon Tat mutants, Nullbasic exhibited transdominant negative effects on Tat-dependent transactivation. However, unlike previously reported mutants, we discovered that Nullbasic also strongly suppressed the expression of unspliced and singly-spliced viral mRNA, an activity likely caused by redistribution and thus functional inhibition of HIV-1 Rev. Furthermore, HIV-1 virion particles produced by cells expressing Nullbasic had severely reduced infectivity, a defect attributable to a reduced ability of the virions to undergo reverse transcription. Combination of these inhibitory effects on transactivation, Rev-dependent mRNA transport and reverse transcription meant that permissive cells constitutively expressing Nullbasic were highly resistant to a spreading infection by HIV-1. Nullbasic and its activities thus provide potential insights into the development of potent antiviral therapeutics that target multiple stages of HIV-1 infection.

  15. AHR-5850: a potent anti-inflammatory compound.

    PubMed

    Sancilio, L F; Reese, D L; Cheung, S; Alphin, R S

    1977-03-01

    AHR-5850 is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory compound possessing antipyretic and analgesic properties. AHR-5850 was 16.4 and 22.8 times more potent than phenylbutazone in suppressing acute (Evans blue-carrageenan pleural effusion) and chronic (adjuvant-induced arthritis) inflammation, respectively. The analgesic activity of AHR 5850 was 43 times that of acetylsalicylic acid in the Randall-Selitto assay, and 156 and 56.3 times more potent than phenylbutazone in the acetylcholine-induced abdominal constriction in mice and in the bradykinin-induced nociceptive response in dogs, respectively. Single-dose studies showed that AHR-5850 produced less gastric irritation than acetylsalicylic acid when applied topically to the exposed gastric mucosa of cats or when administered orally to rats and dogs. Upon subchronic oral administration to rats, the therapeutic ratio of AHR-5850 was twice that of phenylbutazone. This was based on the ratio of its potency relative to phenylbutazone in producing intestinal lesions to its anti-inflammatory potency relative to phenylbutazone in the adjuvant-induced arthritis.

  16. Auger electron spectroscopy study of oxidation of a PdCr alloy used for high-temperature sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Darwin L.; Zeller, Mary V.; Vargas-Aburto, Carlos

    1993-01-01

    A Pd-13 wt. percent Cr solid solution is a promising high-temperature strain gage alloy. In bulk form it has a number of properties that are desirable in a resistance strain gage material, such as a linear electrical resistance versus temperature curve to 1000 C and stable electrical resistance in air at 1000 C. However, unprotected fine wire gages fabricated from this alloy perform well only to 600 C. At higher temperatures severe oxidation degrades their electrical performance. In this work Auger electron spectroscopy was used to study the oxidation chemistry of the alloy wires and ribbons. Results indicate that the oxidation is caused by a complex mechanism that is not yet fully understood. As expected, during oxidation, a layer of chromium oxide is formed. This layer, however, forms beneath a layer of metallic palladium. The results of this study have increased the understanding of the oxidation mechanism of Pd-13 wt. percent Cr.

  17. Auger electron spectroscopy study of initial stages of oxidation in a copper - 19.6-atomic-percent-aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.

    1973-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy was used to examine the initial stages of oxidation of a polycrystalline copper - 19.6 a/o-aluminum alloy. The growth of the 55-eV aluminum oxide peak and the decay of the 59-, 62-, and 937-eV copper peaks were examined as functions of temperature, exposure, and pressure. Pressures ranged from 1x10 to the minus 7th power to 0.0005 torr of O2. Temperatures ranged from room temperature to 700 C. A completely aluminum oxide surface layer was obtained in all cases. Complete disappearance of the underlying 937-eV copper peak was obtained by heating at 700 C in O2 at 0.0005 torr for 1 hr. Temperature studies indicated that thermally activated diffusion was important to the oxidation studies. The initial stages of oxidation followed a logarithmic growth curve.

  18. Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy and optical characterization of a-C-H and BN films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, J. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Warner, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The amorphous dielectrics a-C:H and BN were deposited on III-V semiconductors. Optical band gaps as high as 3 eV were measured for a-C:H generated by C4H10 plasmas; a comparison was made with bad gaps obtained from films prepared by CH4 glow discharges. The ion beam deposited BN films exhibited amorphous behavior with band gaps on the order of 5 eV. Film compositions were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The optical properties were characterized by ellipsometry, UV/VIS absorption, and IR reflection and transmission. Etching rates of a-C:H subjected to O2 dicharges were determined.

  19. Deoxygedunin, a natural product with potent neurotrophic activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung-Wuk; Liu, Xia; Chan, Chi Bun; France, Stefan A; Sayeed, Iqbal; Tang, Wenxue; Lin, Xi; Xiao, Ge; Andero, Raul; Chang, Qiang; Ressler, Kerry J; Ye, Keqiang

    2010-01-01

    Gedunin, a family of natural products from the Indian neem tree, possess a variety of biological activities. Here we report the discovery of deoxygedunin, which activates the mouse TrkB receptor and its downstream signaling cascades. Deoxygedunin is orally available and activates TrkB in mouse brain in a BDNF-independent way. Strikingly, it prevents the degeneration of vestibular ganglion in BDNF -/- pups. Moreover, deoxygedunin robustly protects rat neurons from cell death in a TrkB-dependent manner. Further, administration of deoxygedunin into mice displays potent neuroprotective, anti-depressant and learning enhancement effects, all of which are mediated by the TrkB receptor. Hence, deoxygedunin imitates BDNF's biological activities through activating TrkB, providing a powerful therapeutic tool for treatment of various neurological diseases. PMID:20644624

  20. Allylmagnolol, a novel magnolol derivative as potent antioxidant.

    PubMed

    Li, Chi-Yuan; Wang, Yvonne; Hu, Ming-Kuan

    2003-08-15

    We reported the discovery of potent antioxidants based on magnolol, a naturally occurring biphenolic obtained from the bark of Magnolia officinalis. The allylmagnolols 3a,b were synthesized via O-alkylation of the biphenols followed by Claisen rearrangement. In-vitro using enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) and flow cytometric assays in whole cells revealed that both 3a and 3b displayed promising free radical scavenging effects in PMA- and LPS-stimulated models as compared with magnolol. Further DNA labeling analysis for cytotoxicity indicated that these analogues show no cytotoxic effects for the scavenging of the oxygen-derived free radicals under PMA-stimulated concentrations. The results from 3,3'-bisallylmagnolol (3b) suggested that the naturally occurring constituent was suitable to be a lead compound for the development of potential antioxidants for certain diseases. PMID:12901912

  1. Nanosulfur: A Potent Fungicide Against Food Pathogen, Aspergillus niger

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, Samrat Roy; Goswami, Arunava; Nair, Kishore K.; Kumar, Rajesh; Gopal, Madhuban; Devakumar, C.; Gogoi, Robin; Srivastava, Chitra; Subhramanyam, B. S.

    2010-10-04

    Elemental sulfur (S{sup 0}), man's oldest eco-friendly fungicide for curing fungal infections in plants and animals, is registered in India as a non-systemic and contact fungicide. However due to its high volume requirement, Indian agrochemical industry and farmers could not effectively use this product till date. We hypothesize that intelligent nanoscience applications might increase the visibility of nanosulfur in Indian agriculture as a potent and eco-safe fungicide. Sulfur nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized bottom-up via a liquid synthesis method with average particle size in the range of 50-80 nm and the shapes of the NPs were spherical. A comparative study of elemental and nano-sulfur produced has been tested against facultative fungal food pathogen, Aspergillus niger. Results showed that nanosulfur is more efficacious than its elemental form.

  2. Thermal effects in equilibrium surface segregation in a copper/10-atomic-percent-aluminum alloy using Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.

    1972-01-01

    Equilibrium surface segregation of aluminum in a copper-10-atomic-percent-aluminum single crystal alloy oriented in the /111/ direction was demonstrated by using Auger electron spectroscopy. This crystal was in the solid solution range of composition. Equilibrium surface segregation was verified by observing that the aluminum surface concentration varied reversibly with temperature in the range 550 to 850 K. These results were curve fitted to an expression for equilibrium grain boundary segregation and gave a retrieval energy of 5780 J/mole (1380 cal/mole) and a maximum frozen-in surface coverage three times the bulk layer concentration. Analyses concerning the relative merits of sputtering calibration and the effects of evaporation are also included.

  3. Nicotinamide is a potent inhibitor of proinflammatory cytokines

    PubMed Central

    UNGERSTEDT, J S; BLOMBÄCK, M; SöDERSTRÖM, T

    2003-01-01

    The present study investigates the modulating effects of nicotinamide on the cytokine response to endotoxin. In an in vitro model of endotoxaemia, human whole blood was stimulated for two hours with endotoxin at 1 ng/ml, achieving high levels of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNFα. When coincubating whole blood, endotoxin and the vitamin B3 derivative nicotinamide, all four cytokines measured were inhibited in a dose dependent manner. Inhibition was observed already at a nicotinamide concentration of 2 mmol/l. At a concentration of 40 mmol/l, the IL-1β, IL-6 and TNFα responses were reduced by more than 95% and the IL-8 levels reduced by 85%. Endotoxin stimulation activates poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP), a nuclear DNA repair enzyme. It has been hypothesized that the anti-inflammatory properties of nicotinamide are due to PARP inhibition. In the present study, the endotoxin induced PARP activation was dose dependently decreased with 4–40 mmol/l nicotinamide or 4–100 µmol/l 6(5H) phenanthridinone, a specific PARP inhibitor. 6(5H)phenanthridinone however, failed to inhibit the proinflammatory cytokines. Thus, the mechanism behind the cytokine inhibition in our model seems not to be due to PARP inhibition. In conclusion, the present study could not only confirm previous reports of a down-regulatory effect on TNFα, but demonstrates that nicotinamide is a potent modulator of several proinflammatory cytokines. These findings demonstrate that nicotinamide has a potent immunomodulatory effect in vitro, and may have great potential for treatment of human inflammatory disease. PMID:12519385

  4. El proyecto AUGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etchegoyen, A.

    Hace ya más de 30 años en Volcano Ranch, EE.UU., un extenso chubasco cósmico (ECC) fue detectado con energía en exceso de 1020 eV. Desde entonces, observatorios ubicados en Haverah Park del Reino Unido, Yakutsk de Rusia, AGASA de Japón y Dugway de EE.UU. también han observado ECC con energías mayores que 1020 eV. Poco se sabe de dichos rayos, y en particular cuál es la naturaleza del primario, de dónde provienen, y cómo son acelerados, pero su naturaleza ultrarelativista excluye la mayoría de las respuestas dejando sólo algunas plausibles de ser investigadas experimentalmente. Grupos de científicos de 20 países están trabajando con el fin de construir dos arreglos de detectores gigantes, uno en cada hemisferio a lo largo de 3000 km2 c/u. Dichas dimensiones son necesarias debido al flujo estimado de 1 rayo cósmico/centuria/km2/sr. La sede del Observatorio del Sur es la Argentina. El proyecto fue nombrado Pierre Auger en conmemoración del célebre físico francés que detectó por primera vez chubascos cósmicos en 1938. El proyecto focaliza su interés en rayos cósmicos con energías mayores que 1020 eV.

  5. Auger resonant Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Azuma, Y.; LeBrun, T.; MacDonald, M.; Southworth, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    As noted above, traditional spectroscopy of the electronic structure of the inner shells of atoms, molecules, and solids is limited by the lifetime broadening of the core-excited states. This limitation can also be avoided with the non-radiative analog of X-ray Raman scattering - resonant Auger Raman spectroscopy. We have used this technique to study the K-shell excitation spectrum of argon as the photon energy is continuously scanned across threshold.

  6. Auger processes in the 21st century

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Roger W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The extreme radiotoxicity of Auger electrons and their exquisite capacity to irradiate specific molecular sites has prompted scientists to extensively investigate their radiobiological effects. Their efforts have been punctuated by quadrennial international symposia that have focused on biophysical aspects of Auger processes. The latest meeting, the 6th International Symposium on Physical, Molecular, Cellular, and Medical Aspects of Auger Processes, was held 5–6 July 2007 at Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts, USA. This article provides a review of the research in this field that was published during the years 2004–2007, the period that has elapsed since the previous meeting. Conclusion The field has advanced considerably. A glimpse of the potential of this unique form of ionizing radiation to contribute to future progress in a variety of fields of study is proffered. PMID:19061120

  7. Education and public outreach of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, B.; Snow, G.

    2005-08-01

    The Auger collaboration's broad mission in education, outreach and public relations is coordinated in a separate task. Its goals are to encourage and support a wide range of outreach efforts that link schools and the public with the Auger scientists and the science of cosmic rays, particle physics, and associated technologies. This report focuses on recent activities and future initiatives.

  8. Hemin as a generic and potent protein misfolding inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanqin; Carver, John A.; Ho, Lam H.; Elias, Abigail K.; Musgrave, Ian F.; Pukala, Tara L.

    2014-11-14

    Highlights: • Hemin prevents Aβ42, α-synuclein and RCM-κ-casein forming amyloid fibrils. • Hemin inhibits the β-sheet structure formation of Aβ42. • Hemin reduces the cell toxicity caused by fibrillar Aβ42. • Hemin dissociates partially formed Aβ42 fibrils. • Hemin prevents amorphous aggregation by ADH, catalase and γs-crystallin. - Abstract: Protein misfolding causes serious biological malfunction, resulting in diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and cataract. Molecules which inhibit protein misfolding are a promising avenue to explore as therapeutics for the treatment of these diseases. In the present study, thioflavin T fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy experiments demonstrated that hemin prevents amyloid fibril formation of kappa-casein, amyloid beta peptide and α-synuclein by blocking β-sheet structure assembly which is essential in fibril aggregation. Further, inhibition of fibril formation by hemin significantly reduces the cytotoxicity caused by fibrillar amyloid beta peptide in vitro. Interestingly, hemin degrades partially formed amyloid fibrils and prevents further aggregation to mature fibrils. Light scattering assay results revealed that hemin also prevents protein amorphous aggregation of alcohol dehydrogenase, catalase and γs-crystallin. In summary, hemin is a potent agent which generically stabilises proteins against aggregation, and has potential as a key molecule for the development of therapeutics for protein misfolding diseases.

  9. Polyethyleneimine is a potent mucosal adjuvant for viral glycoprotein antigens.

    PubMed

    Wegmann, Frank; Gartlan, Kate H; Harandi, Ali M; Brinckmann, Sarah A; Coccia, Margherita; Hillson, William R; Kok, Wai Ling; Cole, Suzanne; Ho, Ling-Pei; Lambe, Teresa; Puthia, Manoj; Svanborg, Catharina; Scherer, Erin M; Krashias, George; Williams, Adam; Blattman, Joseph N; Greenberg, Philip D; Flavell, Richard A; Moghaddam, Amin E; Sheppard, Neil C; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2012-09-01

    Protection against mucosally transmitted infections probably requires immunity at the site of pathogen entry, yet there are no mucosal adjuvant formulations licensed for human use. Polyethyleneimine (PEI) represents a family of organic polycations used as nucleic acid transfection reagents in vitro and DNA vaccine delivery vehicles in vivo. Here we show that diverse PEI forms have potent mucosal adjuvant activity for viral subunit glycoprotein antigens. A single intranasal administration of influenza hemagglutinin or herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D with PEI elicited robust antibody-mediated protection from an otherwise lethal infection, and was superior to existing experimental mucosal adjuvants. PEI formed nanoscale complexes with antigen, which were taken up by antigen-presenting cells in vitro and in vivo, promoted dendritic cell trafficking to draining lymph nodes and induced non-proinflammatory cytokine responses. PEI adjuvanticity required release of host double-stranded DNA that triggered Irf3-dependent signaling. PEI therefore merits further investigation as a mucosal adjuvant for human use. PMID:22922673

  10. Acetone Extract from Rhodomyrtus tomentosa: A Potent Natural Antioxidant

    PubMed Central

    Lavanya, Goodla; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan; Towatana, Nongporn Hutadilok

    2012-01-01

    Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Myrtaceae) has been employed in traditional Thai medicine to treat colic diarrhoea, dysentery, abscesses, haemorrhage, and gynaecopathy. In addition, it has been used to formulate skin-whitening, anti-aging and skin beautifying agents. Ethnomedical activities of this plant may be due its antioxidant property. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate both in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities of R. tomentosa leaf extract. In vitro antioxidant activity of the extract was assessed by lipid peroxidation inhibition capacity, ferric reducing antioxidant power, and metal chelating activity. R. tomentosa extract demonstrated its free radical scavenging effects in concentration dependent manner. In vivo antioxidant activity of the extract was conducted in Swiss Albino mice. Levels of thio-barbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), glutathione (GSH), and the activities of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in blood, liver, and kidney were analyzed using microtitre plate photometer. Administration of CCl4 caused significant increase in TBARS and decrease in GSH, SOD, CAT and GPx levels. In contrast, R. tomentosa extract (0.8 g/kg) effectively prevented these alterations and maintained the antioxidant status. The results suggest that R. tomentosa extract can serve as a potent antioxidant. PMID:23125869

  11. Carvacrol as a potent natural acaricide against Dermanyssus gallinae.

    PubMed

    Tabari, Mohaddeseh Abouhosseini; Youssefi, Mohammad Reza; Barimani, Alireza; Araghi, Atefeh

    2015-10-01

    Resistance to conventional synthetic pesticides has been widely reported in Dermanyssus gallinae in poultry production systems. Introducing novel acaricides to poultry industry today is more urgent than ever. Research in this field recently focused on plants and plant-derived compounds as acaricides. In the present study, acaricidal activity of three plant bioactive components, carvacrol, thymol, and farnesol, was assessed against D. gallinae and compared with synthetic pesticide permethrin. Mode of acaricidal action was determined by contact toxicity and fumigant toxicity bioassays. Except farnesol which did not cause any mortality, carvacrol and thymol were found to be toxic to D. gallinae with LD50 values of 1 and 3.15 μg/cm(3), respectively. Permethrin gave the LD50 value of 31.95 μg/cm(3) which was less efficient than carvacrol and thymol. In fumigant toxicity bioassay, mortality rate in carvacrol- and thymol-treated groups in closed method was significantly higher than the open one. On the other hand, permethrin exhibited poor fumigant toxicity as there was no statistically significant difference between mortality rate in open and closed methods. These findings revealed that mechanism of acaricidal activity of carvacrol and thymol but not permethrin was mainly due to fumigant action. Results of the present study suggested that carvacrol and thymol, especially carvacrol, can be developed as a novel potent bioacaricide against D. gallinae.

  12. Carvacrol as a potent natural acaricide against Dermanyssus gallinae.

    PubMed

    Tabari, Mohaddeseh Abouhosseini; Youssefi, Mohammad Reza; Barimani, Alireza; Araghi, Atefeh

    2015-10-01

    Resistance to conventional synthetic pesticides has been widely reported in Dermanyssus gallinae in poultry production systems. Introducing novel acaricides to poultry industry today is more urgent than ever. Research in this field recently focused on plants and plant-derived compounds as acaricides. In the present study, acaricidal activity of three plant bioactive components, carvacrol, thymol, and farnesol, was assessed against D. gallinae and compared with synthetic pesticide permethrin. Mode of acaricidal action was determined by contact toxicity and fumigant toxicity bioassays. Except farnesol which did not cause any mortality, carvacrol and thymol were found to be toxic to D. gallinae with LD50 values of 1 and 3.15 μg/cm(3), respectively. Permethrin gave the LD50 value of 31.95 μg/cm(3) which was less efficient than carvacrol and thymol. In fumigant toxicity bioassay, mortality rate in carvacrol- and thymol-treated groups in closed method was significantly higher than the open one. On the other hand, permethrin exhibited poor fumigant toxicity as there was no statistically significant difference between mortality rate in open and closed methods. These findings revealed that mechanism of acaricidal activity of carvacrol and thymol but not permethrin was mainly due to fumigant action. Results of the present study suggested that carvacrol and thymol, especially carvacrol, can be developed as a novel potent bioacaricide against D. gallinae. PMID:26143865

  13. Latest results from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhenry-Yvon, Isabelle

    2016-07-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory has been designed to investigate the origin and nature of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) with energies from 1017 to 1020 eV. In this paper we will review some of the most recent results obtained from data of the Pierre Auger Observatory, namely the spectrum of cosmic rays, the anisotropies in arrival directions and the studies related to mass composition and to the number of muons measured at the ground. We will also discuss the implication of these results for assembling a consistent description of the composition, origin and propagation of cosmic rays.

  14. Esperamicins, a class of potent antitumor antibiotics: mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Long, B H; Golik, J; Forenza, S; Ward, B; Rehfuss, R; Dabrowiak, J C; Catino, J J; Musial, S T; Brookshire, K W; Doyle, T W

    1989-01-01

    The esperamicins represent a class of antitumor antibiotics characterized by an unusual chemical core structure and extremely potent cytotoxicity. The mechanism by which these drugs produce cytotoxicity was investigated and found to be related to the formation of single- and double-strand DNA breaks. Using five structurally related analogs, we defined a structure-activity relationship for cytotoxicity in various eukaryotic and DNA-repair-deficient prokaryotic cell lines, for DNA breakage in a human colon carcinoma cell line, and for DNA breakage in vitro in pBR322 DNA. Mild reducing agents such as dithiothreitol greatly increased the DNA breakage potency of these analogs in vitro. Results suggest that the pendant aromatic chromophore of esperamicin A1 may contribute to the uptake of the drug into cells but may also hinder double-strand DNA break formation. Little DNA breakage specificity was observed for the drug in a 139-base-pair fragment of pBR322 DNA. Evidence supports a previously proposed mechanism whereby esperamicins may produce the observed DNA breaks through reduction of the methyl trisulfide group to a thiolate anion followed by a Michael addition of the anion across the alpha,beta-unsaturated ketone. This addition may result in the saturation of the bridgehead double bond, thus allowing the two triple bonds to approach each other, causing cyclization of the diyn-ene to form a phenylene diradical. It is likely that this diradical is the active form of the drug responsible for single- and double-strand DNA breakage produced by this class of antitumor agents.

  15. Development of a miniature double-pass cylindrical mirror electron energy analyzer (DPCMA), and its application to Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy (APECS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Eiichi; Seo, Junya; Nambu, Akira; Mase, Kazuhiko

    2007-09-01

    We have developed a miniature double-pass cylindrical mirror electron energy analyzer (DPCMA) with an outer diameter of 26 mm. The DPCMA consists of a shield for the electric field, inner and outer cylinders, two pinholes with a diameter of 2.0 mm, and an electron multiplier. By assembling the DPCMA in a coaxially symmetric mirror electron energy analyzer (ASMA) coaxially and confocally we developed an analyzer for Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy (APECS). The performance was estimated by measuring the Si-LVV-Auger Si-1s-photoelectron coincidence spectra of clean Si(1 1 1). The electron-energy resolution of the DPCMA was estimated to be E/Δ E = 20. This value is better than that of the miniature single-pass CMA ( E/Δ E = 12) that was used in the previous APECS analyzer.

  16. Oxidized mucus proteinase inhibitor: a fairly potent neutrophil elastase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Boudier, C; Bieth, J G

    1994-01-01

    N-chlorosuccinimide oxidizes one of the methionine residues of mucus proteinase inhibitor with a second-order rate constant of 1.5 M-1.s-1. Cyanogen bromide cleavage and NH2-terminal sequencing show that the modified residue is methionine-73, the P'1 component of the inhibitor's active centre. Oxidation of the inhibitor decreases its neutrophil elastase inhibitory capacity but does not fully abolish it. The kinetic parameters describing the elastase-oxidized inhibitor interaction are: association rate constant kass. = 2.6 x 10(5) M-1.s-1, dissociation rate constant kdiss. = 2.9 x 10(-3) s-1 and equilibrium dissociation constant Ki = 1.1 x 10(-8) M. Comparison with the native inhibitor indicates that oxidation decreases kass. by a factor of 18.8 and increases kdiss. by a factor of 6.4, and therefore leads to a 120-fold increase in Ki. Yet, the oxidized inhibitor may still act as a potent elastase inhibitor in the upper respiratory tract where its concentration is 500-fold higher than Ki, i.e. where the elastase inhibition is pseudo-irreversible. Experiments in vitro with fibrous human lung elastin, the most important natural substrate of elastase, support this view: 1.35 microM elastase is fully inhibited by 5-6 microM oxidized inhibitor whether the enzyme-inhibitor complex is formed in the presence or absence of elastin and whether elastase is pre-adsorbed on elastin or not. PMID:7945266

  17. Toluidine blue O is a potent inhibitor of human cholinesterases.

    PubMed

    Biberoglu, Kevser; Tek, Melike Yuksel; Ghasemi, Seyhan Turk; Tacal, Ozden

    2016-08-15

    In this study, the inhibitory effects of three phenothiazines [toluidine blue O (TBO), thionine (TH) and methylene violet (MV)] were tested on human plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and their inhibitory mechanisms were studied in detail. MV acted as a linear mixed type inhibitor of human BChE with Ki = 0.66 ± 0.06 μM and α = 13.6 ± 3.5. TBO and TH caused nonlinear inhibition of human BChE, compatible to double occupancy. Ki values estimated by nonlinear regression analysis for TBO and TH were 0.008 ± 0.003 μM and 2.1 ± 0.42 μM, respectively. The inhibitory potential of TBO was also tested on human erythrocyte AChE. TBO acted as a linear mixed type inhibitor of human AChE with Ki = 0.041 ± 0.005 μM and α = 1.6 ± 0.007. Using four site-directed BChE mutants, the role of peripheral anionic site residues of human BChE was also investigated in the binding of TBO to BChE. The peripheral anionic site mutants of BChE caused 16-69-fold increase in Ki value of TBO, compared to recombinant wild-type, suggesting that peripheral anionic site residues are involved in the binding of TBO to human BChE. In conclusion, TBO which is a potent inhibitor of human cholinesterases, may be a potential drug candidate for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27296777

  18. A measurement of the muon number in showers using inclined events detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, G.

    2013-06-01

    The average muon content of measured showers with zenith angles between 62∘ and 80∘ detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory is obtained as a function of shower energy using a reconstruction method specifically designed for inclined showers and the hybrid character of the detector. The reconstruction of inclined showers relies on a comparison between the measured signals at ground and reference patterns at ground level from which an overall normalization factor is obtained. Since inclined showers are dominated by muons this factor gives the relative muon size. It can be calibrated using a subsample of showers simultaneously recorded with the fluorescence detector (FD) and the surface detector (SD) which provides an independent calorimetric measurement of the energy. The muon size obtained for each shower becomes a measurement of the relative number of muons with respect to the reference distributions. The precision of the measurement is assessed using simulated events which are reconstructed using exactly the same procedure. We compare the relative number of muons versus energy as obtained to simulations. Proton simulations with QGSJETII show a factor of 2.13 ± 0.04(stat) ± 0.11(sys) at 1019eV without significant variations in the energy range explored between 4 × 1018eV to 7 × 1019eV. We find that none of the current shower models, neither for proton nor for iron primaries, are able to predict as many muons as are observed.

  19. Dosimetry at the sub-cellular scale of Auger-electron emitter 99mTc in a mouse single thyroid follicle.

    PubMed

    Taborda, A; Benabdallah, N; Desbrée, A

    2016-02-01

    The Auger-electrons emitted by (99m)Tc have been recently associated with the induction of thyroid stunning in in vivo experiments in mice, making the dosimetry at the sub-cellular level of (99m)Tc a pertinent and pressing subject. The S-values for (99m)Tc were calculated using MCNP6, which was first validated for studies at the sub-cellular scale and for low energies electrons. The calculation was then performed for (99m)Tc within different cellular compartments in a single mouse thyroid follicle model, considering the radiative and non-radiative transitions of the (99m)Tc radiation spectrum. It was shown that the contribution of the (99m)Tc Auger and low energy electrons to the absorbed dose to the follicular cells' nucleus is important, being at least of the same order of magnitude compared to the emitted photons' contribution and cannot be neglected. The results suggest that Auger-electrons emitted by (99m)Tc play a significant role in the occurrence of the thyroid stunning effect in mice.

  20. A review on cylindrospermopsin: The global occurrence, detection, toxicity and degradation of a potent cyanotoxin

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Cylindrospermopsin is now recognized as a potent cyanobacterial toxin found in water bodies worldwide. The ever-increasing and global occurrence of massive and prolonged blooms of cylindrospermopsin-producing cyanobacteria in freshwater poses a potential threat to both ...

  1. Hydroxychavicol: a potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor obtained from the leaves of betel, Piper betle.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kazuya; Nakao, Kikuyo; Hirata, Noriko; Namba, Kensuke; Nomi, Takao; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Moriyama, Kenzo; Shintani, Takahiro; Iinuma, Munekazu; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2009-07-01

    The screening of Piperaceous plants for xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity revealed that the extract of the leaves of Piper betle possesses potent activity. Activity-guided purification led us to obtain hydroxychavicol as an active principle. Hydroxychavicol is a more potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor than allopurinol, which is clinically used for the treatment of hyperuricemia.

  2. A potent bidirectional promoter from the monocot cereal Eleusine coracana.

    PubMed

    Sen, Saswati; Dutta, Samir Kr

    2016-09-01

    Ragi bifunctional α-amylase-trypsin inhibitor (RBI) of Eleusine coracana (L.) Gaertn. (finger millet) simultaneously inhibits α-amylase and trypsin. In continuation of previous work on the cloning, expression and characterization of RBI, a bidirectional promoter from finger millet was explored on the basis of experimental observations. Two trypsin inhibitors were identified while purifying RBI from a trypsin-Sepharose column eluent. Using an FPLC gel filtration column, these three inhibitors were purified to homogeneity and subjected to MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS/MS analysis and N-terminal sequencing. Both ragi trypsin inhibitors (RTIs) showed the same N-terminal sequence and considerable sequence similarity to RBI, indicating the presence of a multigene protease inhibitor family in finger millet. To gain insight into the evolution of these genes, the upstream region of RBI was explored by Genome Walking. Interestingly, on sequencing, a genome walking product of ∼1 Kb showed presence of an N-terminal RBI specific primer sequence twice but in opposite directions and leaving an intervening region of ∼0.9 Kb. The intervening region was presumed to represent an E. coracana bidirectional promoter (EcBDP), intuitively having a divergent RBI-RTI gene pair at two sides. For assaying the bidirectionality of promoter activity, a dual reporter GUS-GFP vector construct was made for plant expression containing the reporter genes at two ends of EcBDP, which was used to transform Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA 4404. Transient plant transformation by recombinant Agrobacterium cells was carried out in onion scale epidermal cells and finger millet seedling leaves. Simultaneous expression of GUS and GFP under EcBDP established it as a potent natural bidirectional promoter from monocot origin, thereby potentially having vast application in cereal gene manipulations. In addition, inducibility of the EcBDP by either abscisic acid or cold treatment, as determined by transient

  3. Targeted radiotherapy using Auger electron emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donoghue, J. A.; Wheldon, T. E.

    1996-10-01

    Auger-emitting radionuclides have potential for the therapy of cancer due to their high level of cytotoxicity and short-range biological effectiveness. Biological effects are critically dependent on the sub-cellular (and sub-nuclear) localization of Auger emitters. Mathematical modelling studies suggest that there are theoretical advantages in the use of radionuclides with short half-lives (such as ) in preference to those (such as ) with long half-lives. In addition, heterogeneity of radionuclide uptake is predicted to be a serious limitation on the ultimate therapeutic effect of targeted Auger therapy. Possible methods of targeting include the use of analogues of DNA precursors such as iodo-deoxyuridine and molecules which bind DNA such as steroid hormones or growth factors. A longer term possibility may be the use of molecules such as oligonucleotides which can discriminate at the level of DNA sequence. It seems likely that the optimal clinical role of targeted Auger therapy will be as one component of a multi-modality therapeutic strategy for the treatment of selected malignant diseases.

  4. Auger Spectroscopy of Hydrogenated Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, I. L.; Asnin, V. M.; Petukhov, A. G.; Foygel, M.

    1997-01-01

    An energy shift and a change of the line shape of the carbon core-valence-valence Auger spectra are observed for diamond surfaces after their exposure to an electron beam, or annealing at temperatures higher then 950 C. The effect is studied for both natural diamond crystals and chemical-vapor-deposited diamond films. A theoretical model is proposed for Auger spectra of hydrogenated diamond surfaces. The observed changes of the carbon Auger line shape are shown to be related to the redistribution of the valence-band local density of states caused by the hydrogen desorption from the surface. One-electron calculation of Auger spectra of diamond surfaces with various hydrogen coverages are presented. They are based on self-consistent wave functions and matrix elements calculated in the framework of the local-density approximation and the self-consistent linear muffin-tin orbital method with static core-hole effects taken into account. The major features of experimental spectra are explained.

  5. Echistatin is a potent inhibitor of bone resorption in culture.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Sardana, M K; Grasser, W A; Garsky, V M; Murray, J M; Gould, R J

    1990-10-01

    The venom protein, s-echistatin, originally derived from the saw-scaled viper Echis carinatus, was found to be a potent inhibitor of bone resorption by isolated osteoclasts. This Arg24-Gly25-Asp26-(RGD)-containing protein inhibited the excavation of bone slices by rat osteoclasts (IC50 = 0.1 nM). It also inhibited the release of [3H]proline from labeled bone particles by chicken osteoclasts (IC50 = 100 nM). By comparison, the tetrapeptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) inhibited resorption by rat or chicken osteoclasts with an IC50 of 0.1 mM while ala24-echistatin was inactive. Video microscopy showed that rat osteoclast attachment to substrate was more sensitive to s-echistatin than was the attachment of mononuclear cells or chicken osteoclasts. The difference in sensitivity of rat and chicken osteoclasts to s-echistatin may be due to differences between receptors on rat and chicken osteoclasts for s-echistatin. Antibody localization of echistatin on these cells showed much greater echistatin binding to rat osteoclasts than to chicken osteoclasts. Laser scanning confocal microscopy after immunohistochemical staining showed that s-echistatin binds to osteoclasts, that s-echistatin receptors are most abundant at the osteoclast/glass interface, and that s-echistatin colocalizes with vinculin. Confocal interference reflection microscopy of osteoclasts incubated with s-echistatin, demonstrated colocalization of s-echistatin with the outer edges of clusters of grey contacts at the tips of some lamellipodia. Identification of the echistatin receptor as an integrin was confirmed by colocalization of echistatin fluorescence with staining for an alpha-like subunit. Attachment of bone particles labeled with [3H]proline to chicken osteoclasts confirmed that the mechanism of action of echistatin was to inhibit osteoclast binding to bone presumably by disrupting adhesion structures. These data demonstrate that osteoclasts bind to bone via an RGD-sequence as an obligatory step in bone

  6. Soil chip convey of lunar subsurface auger drill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Deming; Tang, Dewei; Hou, Xuyan; Jiang, Shengyuan; Deng, Zongquan

    2016-05-01

    Celestial body subsurface drilling and sampling is a key aspect of near-earth exploration projects. In these sample return missions, the auger drill system is universally used due to the environment and detector load limits. The common failure that the auger faces is chip chocking, which can raise the torque and cause the drill to stick. This paper builds auger drill models describing chip flow in the auger groove to balance geometric parameters, functional capability, and reliability. The features of chip flow are summarized and verified by a series of discrete element method simulations. In contrast to previous auger design, a convey capability factor is defined to indicate the auger's chip removal capacity, and the role of pitch angle and other parameters is assessed through motion analysis of the lunar soil flow process. The theory is verified by testing the drill penetrating speed limit, which combines drill geometry and motion parameters. This work provides a new method for design and optimization of low speed auger drill systems and research on particle flow with small scale mechanical constraints.

  7. The Pierre Auger Observatory progress and first results

    SciTech Connect

    Mantsch, Paul M.

    2005-08-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory was designed for a high statistics, full sky study of cosmic rays at the highest energies. Energy, direction and composition measurements are intended to illuminate the mysteries of the most energetic particles in nature. The Auger Observatory utilizes a surface array together with air fluorescence telescopes which together provide a powerful instrument for air shower reconstruction. The southern part of the Auger Observatory, now under construction in the Province of Mendoza, Argentina, is well over half finished. Active detectors have been recording events for one and a half years. Preliminary results based on this first data set are presented.

  8. Studies of Cosmic Ray Composition and Air Shower Structure with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Measurement of the average depth of shower maximum and its fluctuations with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) Study of the nuclear mass composition of UHECR with the surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Comparison of data from the Pierre Auger Observatory with predictions from air shower simulations: testing models of hadronic interactions; (4) A Monte Carlo exploration of methods to determine the UHECR composition with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (5) The delay of the start-time measured with the Pierre Auger Observatory for inclined showers and a comparison of its variance with models; (6) UHE neutrino signatures in the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory; and (7) The electromagnetic component of inclined air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  9. Interleukin-8: A potent promoter of angiogenesis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    SHI, JUN; WEI, PIN-KANG

    2016-01-01

    <0.001 and P<0.001, respectively). IL-8 at concentrations of 0.2, 0.5, 0.8 and 1.0 ng/ml significantly upregulated the mRNA levels of VEGFR-2 (P=0.003, P=0.005, P<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively). In conclusion, IL-8 may be a potent promoter of angiogenesis in gastric cancer. PMID:26893688

  10. A search for anisotropy in the arrival directions of ultra high energy cosmic rays recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu, P.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of cosmic ray arrival directions made with the Pierre Auger Observatory have previously provided evidence of anisotropy at the 99% CL using the correlation of ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with objects drawn from the Veron-Cetty Veron catalog. In this paper we report on the use of three catalog independent methods to search for anisotropy. The 2pt-L, 2pt+ and 3pt methods, each giving a different measure of self-clustering in arrival directions, were tested on mock cosmic ray data sets to study the impacts of sample size and magnetic smearing on their results, accounting for both angular and energy resolutions. If the sources of UHECRs follow the same large scale structure as ordinary galaxies in the local Universe and if UHECRs are deflected no more than a few degrees, a study of mock maps suggests that these three methods can efficiently respond to the resulting anisotropy with a P-value = 1.0% or smaller with data sets as few as 100 events. Using data taken from January 1, 2004 to July 31, 2010 we examined the 20, 30, ..., 110 highest energy events with a corresponding minimum energy threshold of about 51 EeV. The minimum P-values found were 13.5% using the 2pt-L method, 1.0% using the 2pt+ method and 1.1% using the 3pt method for the highest 100 energy events. In view of the multiple (correlated) scans performed on the data set, these catalog-independent methods do not yield strong evidence of anisotropy in the highest energy cosmic rays.

  11. A search for anisotropy in the arrival directions of ultra high energy cosmic rays recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antici'c, T.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badescu, A. M.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bäuml, J.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Bohácová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chirinos Diaz, J.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; del Peral, L.; del Río, M.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Fajardo Tapia, I.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gascon, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Guzman, A.; Hague, J. D.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lauer, R.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meurer, C.; Mi'canovi'c, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Silva Lopez, H. H.; Sima, O.; 'Smiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşcău, O.; Tavera Ruiz, C. G.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2012-04-01

    Observations of cosmic ray arrival directions made with the Pierre Auger Observatory have previously provided evidence of anisotropy at the 99% CL using the correlation of ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with objects drawn from the Véron-Cetty Véron catalog. In this paper we report on the use of three catalog independent methods to search for anisotropy. The 2pt-L, 2pt+ and 3pt methods, each giving a different measure of self-clustering in arrival directions, were tested on mock cosmic ray data sets to study the impacts of sample size and magnetic smearing on their results, accounting for both angular and energy resolutions. If the sources of UHECRs follow the same large scale structure as ordinary galaxies in the local Universe and if UHECRs are deflected no more than a few degrees, a study of mock maps suggests that these three methods can efficiently respond to the resulting anisotropy with a P-value = 1.0% or smaller with data sets as few as 100 events. Using data taken from January 1, 2004 to July 31, 2010 we examined the 20,30,...,110 highest energy events with a corresponding minimum energy threshold of about 49.3 EeV. The minimum P-values found were 13.5% using the 2pt-L method, 1.0% using the 2pt+ method and 1.1% using the 3pt method for the highest 100 energy events. In view of the multiple (correlated) scans performed on the data set, these catalog-independent methods do not yield strong evidence of anisotropy in the highest energy cosmic rays.

  12. Thienorphine is a potent long-acting partial opioid agonist: a comparative study with buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gang; Yue, Yong-Juan; Cui, Meng-Xun; Gong, Ze-Hui

    2006-07-01

    A strategy in the development of new treatment for opioid addiction is to find partial opioid agonists with properties of long duration of action and high oral bioavailability. In a search for such compounds, thienorphine, a novel analog of buprenorphine, was synthesized. Here, we reported that, like buprenorphine, thienorphine bound potently and nonselectively to mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid receptors stably expressed in CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cells and behaved as a partial agonist at mu-opioid receptor. However, some differences were observed between the pharmacological profiles of thienorphine and buprenorphine. In vitro, thienorphine was more potent than buprenorphine in inhibiting [3H]diprenorphine and stimulating guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate binding to rat mu-opioid receptor stably expressed in CHO cells. In vivo, thienorphine exhibited a less potent but more efficacious antinociceptive effect with an ED50 value of 0.25 mg/kg s.c. and more potent antimorphine effect with an ED50 value of 0.64 mg/kg intragastric, compared with buprenorphine. Additionally, the bioavailability of thienorphine was greatly higher than that of buprenorphine after oral administration. Moreover, compared with buprenorphine, thienorphine showed a similar long-lasting antinociceptive effect but a much longer antagonism of morphine-induced lethality (more than 15 days). These results indicate that thienorphine is a potent, long-acting partial opioid agonist with high oral bioavailability and may have possible application in treating addiction. PMID:16569757

  13. Suprofen, a potent antagonist of sodium urate crystal-induced arthritis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Niemegeers, C J; Janssen, P A

    1975-10-01

    A standardized sodium urate-induced arthritis test in dogs is described in detail. A microcrystalline suspension of 20 mg/ml in 0.9% NaCl was injected into one of the stifle joints in a volume of 0.5 ml and motor impairment of the dogs was scored every 30 min over a period of 8 h. A direct quantitative comparison was made of the anti-arthritic activity of acetyl-salicylic acid, phenylbutazone, indometacin and alpha-methyl-4-(2-thienylcarbonyl)benzeneacetic acid (suprofen). All compounds were given by oral gavage immediately after the sodium urate injection. Among the compounds studied suprofen was the most potent antagonist of sodium urate-induced arthritis in dogs. Comparing the ED50 values suprofen was about 4 times as potent as indometacin, 9 times as potent as phenylbutazone and 60 times as potent as acetyl-salicylic acid. PMID:1243031

  14. Total synthesis of a potent hybrid of the anticancer natural products dictyostatin and discodermolide.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Ian; Naylor, Guy J; Wright, Amy E

    2008-10-14

    A potent dictyostatin-discodermolide hybrid was designed and synthesised; it showed enhanced cell growth inhibitory activity relative to discodermolide in four human cancer cell lines including the Taxol-resistant NCI/ADR-Res cell line.

  15. Atomic Auger Doppler effects upon emission of fast photoelectrons.

    PubMed

    Simon, Marc; Püttner, Ralph; Marchenko, Tatiana; Guillemin, Renaud; Kushawaha, Rajesh K; Journel, Loïc; Goldsztejn, Gildas; Piancastelli, Maria Novella; Ablett, James M; Rueff, Jean-Pascal; Céolin, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Studies of photoemission processes induced by hard X-rays including production of energetic electrons have become feasible due to recent substantial improvement of instrumentation. Novel dynamical phenomena have become possible to investigate in this new regime. Here we show a significant change in Auger emission following 1s photoionization of neon, which we attribute to the recoil of the Ne ion induced by the emission of a fast photoelectron. Because of the preferential motion of the ionized Ne atoms along two opposite directions, an Auger Doppler shift is revealed, which manifests itself as a gradual broadening and doubling of the Auger spectral features. This Auger Doppler effect should be a general phenomenon in high-energy photoemission of both isolated atoms and molecules, which will have to be taken into account in studies of other recoil effects such as vibrational or rotational recoil in molecules, and may also have consequences in measurements in solids. PMID:24906107

  16. Auger decay of 3p-ionized krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Jonauskas, V.; Kucas, S.; Karazija, R.

    2011-11-15

    A theoretical study of Auger cascades during the decay of 3p{sub 1/2} and 3p{sub 3/2} vacancies in krypton has been performed by level-by-level calculations using a wide configuration interaction basis. Auger spectra for all steps of the cascades are presented and are compared with the existing experimental data. Good agreement of our results with the branching ratios of ions measured by a coincidence technique is obtained.

  17. Potent anti-prostate cancer agents derived from a novel androgen receptor down-regulating agent.

    PubMed

    Purushottamachar, Puranik; Khandelwal, Aakanksha; Vasaitis, Tadas S; Bruno, Robert D; Gediya, Lalji K; Njar, Vincent C O

    2008-04-01

    The search for novel androgen receptor (AR) down-regulating agents by catalyst HipHop pharmacophore modeling led to the discovery of some lead molecules. Unexpectedly, the effect of these leads on human prostate cancer LNCaP cell viability did not correlate with the ability of the compounds to cause down-regulation of AR protein expression. Through rational synthetic optimization of the lead compound (BTB01434), we have discovered a series of novel substituted diaryl molecules as potent anti-prostate cancer agents. Some compounds (1-6) were shown to be extremely potent inhibitors of LNCaP cell viability with GI(50) values in the nanomolar range (1.45-83 nM). The most potent compound (4-methylphenyl)[(4-methylphenyl)sulfonyl]amine (5) with a GI(50) value of 1.45 nM is 27,000 times more potent than our lead compound BTB01434 (GI(50)=39.8 microM). In addition, some of the compounds exhibited modest anti-androgenic activities and one was also a potent inhibitor (GI(50)=850 nM) of PC-3 (AR-null) cell growth. A clear structure-activity relationship (SAR) has been established for activity against LNCaP cells, where potent molecules possess two substituted/unsubstituted aromatic rings connected through a sulfonamide linker. These novel compounds are strong candidates for development for the treatment of hormone-sensitive and importantly hormone-refractory prostate cancers in humans. PMID:18316193

  18. Potent anti-prostate cancer agents derived from a novel androgen receptor down-regulating agent.

    PubMed

    Purushottamachar, Puranik; Khandelwal, Aakanksha; Vasaitis, Tadas S; Bruno, Robert D; Gediya, Lalji K; Njar, Vincent C O

    2008-04-01

    The search for novel androgen receptor (AR) down-regulating agents by catalyst HipHop pharmacophore modeling led to the discovery of some lead molecules. Unexpectedly, the effect of these leads on human prostate cancer LNCaP cell viability did not correlate with the ability of the compounds to cause down-regulation of AR protein expression. Through rational synthetic optimization of the lead compound (BTB01434), we have discovered a series of novel substituted diaryl molecules as potent anti-prostate cancer agents. Some compounds (1-6) were shown to be extremely potent inhibitors of LNCaP cell viability with GI(50) values in the nanomolar range (1.45-83 nM). The most potent compound (4-methylphenyl)[(4-methylphenyl)sulfonyl]amine (5) with a GI(50) value of 1.45 nM is 27,000 times more potent than our lead compound BTB01434 (GI(50)=39.8 microM). In addition, some of the compounds exhibited modest anti-androgenic activities and one was also a potent inhibitor (GI(50)=850 nM) of PC-3 (AR-null) cell growth. A clear structure-activity relationship (SAR) has been established for activity against LNCaP cells, where potent molecules possess two substituted/unsubstituted aromatic rings connected through a sulfonamide linker. These novel compounds are strong candidates for development for the treatment of hormone-sensitive and importantly hormone-refractory prostate cancers in humans.

  19. The Surface Detector System of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Allekotte, I.; Barbosa, A.F.; Bauleo, P.; Bonifazi, C.; Civit, B.; Escobar, C.O.; Garcia, B.; Guedes, G.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Harton, J.L.; Healy, M.; /Cuyo U. /Buenos Aires, CONICET /Natl. Tech. U., San Rafael /Campinas State U. /UEFS, Feira de Santana /Bahia U. /BUAP, Puebla /Santiago de Compostela U. /Fermilab /UCLA /Colorado State U.

    2007-11-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is designed to study cosmic rays with energies greater than 10{sup 19} eV. Two sites are envisaged for the observatory, one in each hemisphere, for complete sky coverage. The southern site of the Auger Observatory, now approaching completion in Mendoza, Argentina, features an array of 1600 water-Cherenkov surface detector stations covering 3000 km{sup 2}, together with 24 fluorescence telescopes to record the air shower cascades produced by these particles. The two complementary detector techniques together with the large collecting area form a powerful instrument for these studies. Although construction is not yet complete, the Auger Observatory has been taking data stably since January 2004 and the first physics results are being published. In this paper we describe the design features and technical characteristics of the surface detector stations of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  20. PDLA a potential new potent topical analgesic: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Joel S

    2014-01-01

    Polymer D-lactic acid (PDLA) is a hydrogel that has been shown to sequester L-lactate (lactate). This reaction is rapid, spontaneous, and non-enzymatic. Lactate has been shown to have many functions within the nervous system including its use as a secondary fuel to sustain neural activity and as a neuromodulator. In the central nervous system, lactate is produced in glial cells and shuttled to neurons to be used mostly as a fuel. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)1 is the predominant LDH isoform within neurons and unlike LDH5, it preferentially converts lactate to pyruvate which can be used to produce adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Considering that lactate is intimately involved in the sustenance of neural activity, PDLA was applied to an open wound and its effects were examined. The results showed that the application of PDLA induced topical analgesia. This may be the first report to demonstrate that sequestering lactate, a source of energy required to sustain the firing of action potentials in neurons, may produce analgesia. PMID:25368530

  1. The Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory, located on a vast, high plain in western Argentina, is the world's largest cosmic ray observatory. The objectives of the Observatory are to probe the origin and characteristics of cosmic rays above 1017 eV and to study the interactions of these, the most energetic particles observed in nature. The Auger design features an array of 1660 water Cherenkov particle detector stations spread over 3000 km2 overlooked by 24 air fluorescence telescopes. In addition, three high elevation fluorescence telescopes overlook a 23.5 km2, 61-detector infilled array with 750 m spacing. The Observatory has been in successful operation since completion in 2008 and has recorded data from an exposure exceeding 40,000 km2 sr yr. This paper describes the design and performance of the detectors, related subsystems and infrastructure that make up the Observatory.

  2. Evaluation of the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore: conversion of a potent delta-opioid receptor antagonist into a potent delta agonist and ligands with mixed properties.

    PubMed

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Guerrini, Remo; Salvadori, Severo; Bianchi, Clementina; Rizzi, Daniela; Bryant, Sharon D; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2002-01-31

    Analogues of the 2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosine (Dmt)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (Tic) pharmacophore were prepared to test the hypothesis that a "spacer" and a third aromatic center in opioid peptides are required to convert a delta-antagonist into ligands with delta-agonist or with mixed delta-antagonist/mu-agonist properties. Potent delta-agonists and bifunctional compounds with high delta- and mu-opioid receptor affinities were obtained by varying the spacer length [none, NH-CH(2), NH-CH(2)-CH(2), Gly-NH-CH(2)] and C-terminal aromatic nucleus [1H-benzimidazole-2-yl, phenyl (Ph) and benzyl groups]. C-terminal modification primarily affected mu-opioid receptor affinities, which increased maximally 1700-fold relative to the prototype delta-antagonist H-Dmt-Tic-NH(2) and differentially modified bioactivity. In the absence of a spacer (1), the analogue exhibited dual delta-agonism (pEC(50), 7.28) and delta-antagonism (pA(2), 7.90). H-Dmt-Tic-NH-CH(2)-1H-benzimidazole-2-yl (Bid) (2) became a highly potent delta-agonist (pEC(50), 9.90), slightly greater than deltorphin C (pEC(50), 9.56), with mu-agonism (pE(50), 7.57), while H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-CH(2)-Bid (4) retained potent delta-antagonism (pA(2), 9.0) but with an order of magnitude less mu-agonism. Similarly, H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-Ph (5) had nearly equivalent high delta-agonism (pEC(50), 8.52) and mu-agonism (pEC(50), 8.59), while H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-CH(2)-Ph (6) whose spacer was longer by a single methylene group exhibited potent delta-antagonism (pA(2), 9.25) and very high mu-agonism (pEC(50), 8.57). These data confirm that the distance between the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore and a third aromatic nucleus is an important criterion in converting Dmt-Tic from a highly potent delta-antagonist into a potent delta-agonist or into ligands with mixed delta- and mu-opioid properties.

  3. Pharmacologic Characterization in the Rat of a Potent Analgesic Lacking Respiratory Depression, IBNtxA

    PubMed Central

    Grinnell, Steven G.; Majumdar, Susruta; Narayan, Ankita; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Ansonoff, Michael; Pintar, John E.

    2014-01-01

    IBNtxA (3′-iodobenzoyl-6β-naltrexamide) is a potent analgesic in mice lacking many traditional opioid side effects. In mice, it displays no respiratory depression, does not produce physical dependence with chronic administration, and shows no cross-tolerance to morphine. It has limited effects on gastrointestinal transit and shows no reward behavior. Biochemical studies indicate its actions are mediated through a set of μ-opioid receptor clone MOR-1 splice variants associated with exon 11 that lack exon 1 and contain only six transmembrane domains. Like the mouse and human, rats express exon 11–associated splice variants that also contain only six transmembrane domains, raising the question of whether IBNtxA would have a similar pharmacologic profile in rats. When given systemically, IBNtxA is a potent analgesic in rats, with an ED50 value of 0.89 mg/kg s.c., approximately 4-fold more potent than morphine. It shows no analgesic cross-tolerance in morphine-pelleted rats. IBNtxA displays no respiratory depression as measured by blood oxygen saturation. In contrast, oximetry shows that an equianalgesic dose of morphine lowers blood oxygen saturation values by 30%. IBNtxA binding is present in a number of brain regions, with the thalamus standing out with very high levels and the cerebellum with low levels. As in mice, IBNtxA is a potent analgesic in rats with a favorable pharmacologic profile and reduced side effects. PMID:24970924

  4. Recent results from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Gascón, Alberto; Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2014-07-23

    The Pierre Auger Observatory has been designed to investigate the origin and nature of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) using a hybrid detection technique. In this contribution we present some of the most recent results of the observatory, namely the upper-end of the spectrum of cosmic rays, state-of-the-art analyses on mass composition, the measurements of the proton-air cross-section, and the number of muons at ground.

  5. Auger Tension Leg Platform cathodic protection system

    SciTech Connect

    Goolsby, A.D.; Smith, J.D.

    1996-04-01

    Corrosion control design for the exterior submerged and buried steel surfaces of the 2,850 ft (869 m) water depth Auger Tension Leg Platform structure is described. Each major type of structural component has its own combination of coating and cathodic protection (CP) systems designed for a 35-year lifetime. Results of early in-service CP surveys of the tendons and guidebases are presented, showing the successful achievement of CP against seawater corrosion.

  6. Orientation dependence of oxygen adsorption on a cylindrical GaAs sample. I. Auger measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranke, W.; Xing, Y. R.; Shen, G. D.

    1982-08-01

    The orientation dependence of oxygen adsorption has been investigated by AES on the surface of a cylindrically shaped GaAs single crystal with [111¯0] being its axis. It thus exposes the main low index orientations (001), (111)Ga, (110), and (111¯)As, as well as all their vicinal surfaces and intermediate orientations on its surface. It is shown that it is possible to prepare all these orientations simultaneously and with reasonable quality by ion bombardment and annealing (IBA). The orientation dependence of the amount of adsorbed oxygen in the range (001)(111)Ga(110)(111¯)As can be understood in terms of different sticking coefficients on the different types of terrace site and of enhanced adsorption on edge-adjacent sites. These edge-adjacent sites show saturation at about 4 × 10 5 L. Starting from (110) towards (111)Ga, at first, steps one atomic layer high are found, changing to a height of two layers when approaching (331). This behaviour can be understood in terms of the known relaxation on (110). A deep minimum in the amount of adsorbed oxygen between (111¯)As and (001¯) is interpreted to be due to an As stabilized low sticking coefficient phase between (112¯) and (113¯). Early saturation (at˜10 5 L) on (001) and (111¯)As is consistent with the fact that these surfaces usually do not reach their room temperature equilibrium phase upon preparation by IBA. Sudden and accidental oxygen induced composition changes towards As-richer substrate compositions further confirm this.

  7. Adhesion of metals to a clean iron surface studied with LEED and Auger emission spectroscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the results of adhesion experiments conducted with various metals contacting a clean iron surface. The metals included gold, silver, nickel, platinum, lead, tantalum, aluminum, and cobalt. Some of the metals were examined with oxygen present on their surface as well as in the clean state. The results indicate that, with the various metals contacting iron, the cohesively weaker will adhere and transfer to the cohesively stronger. The chemical activity of the metal also influenced the adhesive forces measured. With oxygen present on the metal surface, the adhesive forces measured could be correlated with the binding energy of the metal to oxygen.

  8. Low-energy pumping of a 108.9-nm xenon Auger laser.

    PubMed

    Yin, G Y; Barty, C P; King, D A; Walker, D J; Harris, S E; Young, J F

    1987-05-01

    We report extensive measurements of gain in the Xe III system initially observed by Kapteyn et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 57, 2939 (1986)]. The dependence of this gain on pressure, pumping-pulse length, and pump energy is presented. By optimizing these parameters we have achieved a gain of exp(3.2) by using only 0.56 J of 1064-nm energy on target, representing an efficiency improvement of nearly 100. Total gains as high as exp(6.6) have been measured when using higher energies. Our data indicate that effective laser-produced plasmas can be created with applied power densities as low as 5 x 10(10) W cm(-2).

  9. Distributed Computing for the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudoba, J.

    2015-12-01

    Pierre Auger Observatory operates the largest system of detectors for ultra-high energy cosmic ray measurements. Comparison of theoretical models of interactions with recorded data requires thousands of computing cores for Monte Carlo simulations. Since 2007 distributed resources connected via EGI grid are successfully used. The first and the second versions of production system based on bash scripts and MySQL database were able to submit jobs to all reliable sites supporting Virtual Organization auger. For many years VO auger belongs to top ten of EGI users based on the total used computing time. Migration of the production system to DIRAC interware started in 2014. Pilot jobs improve efficiency of computing jobs and eliminate problems with small and less reliable sites used for the bulk production. The new system has also possibility to use available resources in clouds. Dirac File Catalog replaced LFC for new files, which are organized in datasets defined via metadata. CVMFS is used for software distribution since 2014. In the presentation we give a comparison of the old and the new production system and report the experience on migrating to the new system.

  10. Binary collision model for neon Auger spectra from neon ion bombardment of the aluminum surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepper, Stephen V.

    1986-04-01

    A model is developed to account for the angle-resolved Auger spectra from neon ion bombardment of the aluminum surface recently obtained by Pepper and Aron. The neon is assumed to be excited in a single asymmetric neon-aluminum collision and scattered back into the vacuum where it emits an Auger electron. The velocity of the Auger electron acquires a Doppler shift by virtue of the emission from a moving source. The dependence of the Auger peak shape and energy on the incident ion energy, angle of incidence and on the angle of Auger electron emission with respect to the surface is presented. Satisfactory agreement with the angle resolved experimental observations is obtained. The dependence of the angle-integrated Auger yield on the incident ion energy and angle of incidence is also obtained and shown to be in satisfactory agreement with available experimental evidence.

  11. Binary collision model for neon Auger spectra from neon ion bombardment of the aluminum surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.

    1986-01-01

    A model is developed to account for the angle-resolved Auger spectra from neon ion bombardment of the aluminum surface recently obtained by Pepper and Aron. The neon is assumed to be excited in a single asymmetric neon-aluminum-collision and scattered back into the vacuum where it emits an Auger electron. The velocity of the Auger electron acquires a Doppler shift by virtue of the emission from a moving source. The dependence of the Auger peak shape and energy on the incident ion energy, angle of incidence and on the angle of Auger electron emission with respect to the surface is presented. Satisfactory agreement with the angle resolved experimental observations is obtained. The dependence of the angle-integrated Auger yield on the incident ion energy and angle of incidence is also obtained and shown to be in satisfactory agreement with available experimental evidence.

  12. A beginning investigation into the possible role of cosmic rays in the initiation of lightning discharges at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. C.; Dywer, J. R.; Huangs, A.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.; Edens, H.; Niemitz, L.; Rautenberg, J.

    2012-08-01

    The means by which lightning is initiated inside storms is not yet understood and remains a primary unsolved problem in advancing our understanding of lightning. Due to the inconsistency between the estimated required and measured field strengths in thunderclouds, an increasing amount of research has focused on energetic electron/particle runaway processes as the basic initiating mechanism. An important class of these ideas and models is that the seed energetic electrons for runaway processes are provided by energetic cosmic rays. However, as yet there is little experimental or observational evidence to support or refute this idea. Consequently, we are beginning with a Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) in conjunction with the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina. The goal is to determine if discharges are initiated when high energy cosmic ray air showers pass through electrified storms. The planned instrumentation will combine the Pierre Auger Observatory with the LMA. The later will include stations placed to span the observatory to accurately measure the arrival times of impulsive VHF radiation events. These data will provide detailed 3 -dimensional pictures of individual lightning discharges inside storms, The approach of the proposed study is to identify air showers that pass through electrified storms and to look for temporal and spatial correlations with lightning in the storms, paying particular attention to the initial stages of the lightning. The study will be conducted for at least several years to assess fully the possible effects of cosmic rays in initiating lightning.

  13. Normal Auger spectra of iodine in gas phase alkali iodide molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhengfa; Caló, Antonio; Kukk, Edwin; Aksela, Helena; Aksela, Seppo

    2005-06-01

    Molecular normal Auger electron spectra following the iodine 4d ionization in gas-phase alkali iodides were investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The Auger electron spectra for LiI, NaI and KI were recorded using electron impact, and for RbI by using photo-excitation. These Auger spectra were analyzed in detail and compared to the referenced normal Auger spectra of HI [L. Karlsson, S. Svensson, P. Baltzer, M. Carlsson-Göthe, M.P. Keane, A. Naves de Brito, N. Correia, B. Wannberg, J. Phys. B 22 (1989) 3001]. An energy shift toward higher kinetic energy and a narrowing in linewidth are observed in the Auger spectra series revealing the effect of the changing environment from covalently bonded HI to ionic alkali iodide compounds. The experimental results are also compared with the theoretical ab initio calculations and with the Auger spectra of I -, computed with the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) method.

  14. Potent complement C3a receptor agonists derived from oxazole amino acids: Structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranee; Reed, Anthony N; Chu, Peifei; Scully, Conor C G; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Suen, Jacky Y; Durek, Thomas; Reid, Robert C; Fairlie, David P

    2015-12-01

    Potent ligands for the human complement C3a receptor (C3aR) were developed from the almost inactive tripeptide Leu-Ala-Arg corresponding to the three C-terminal residues of the endogenous peptide agonist C3a. The analogous Leu-Ser-Arg was modified by condensing the serine side chain with the leucine carbonyl with elimination of water to form leucine-oxazole-arginine. Subsequent elaboration with a variety of N-terminal amide capping groups produced agonists as potent as human C3a itself in stimulating Ca(2+) release from human macrophages. Structure-activity relationships are discussed.

  15. L-shell Auger and Coster-Kronig spectra from relativistic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, M. H.; Crasemann, B.; Aoyagi, M.; Mark, H.

    1979-01-01

    The intensities of L-shell Auger and Coster-Kronig transitions in heavy atoms have been calculated relativistically. A detailed comparison is made with measured Auger spectra of Pt and U. The pertinent transition energies were computed from relativistic wave functions with inclusion of the Breit interaction, self-energy, a vacuum-polarization correction, and complete atomic relaxation. Multiplet splitting is found to distribute Auger electrons from certain transitions among several lines. The analysis leads to reassignment of a number of lines in the measured spectra. Lines originally identified as L2-L3Ni in the U spectrum are shown to arise from M4,5 Auger transitions instead.

  16. An insight into the grain auger injury problem in Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Athanasiov, A; Gupta, M L; Fragar, L J

    2006-02-01

    Grain auger-related injuries were studied by examining the injury data obtained from the Queensland worker's compensation database. Close to 60% of 52 claimants were male employees in the 20 to 34 age group. Fingers, hands, and arms were affected in 65% of all cases, and the auger flighting was involved in 60% of claims. The severity of auger-related injuries is reflected in the high average cost of claims and number of working days lost, which were more than double the all-industries values. Injuries involving the auger flighting are three times more costly (in time and money) than the all-industries values. More claims were made during winter and towards the end of summer, with the majority of injuries occurring in the animal industries. Most incidents occurred in the early or middle periods of a working shift. In addition, two focus group meetings were held to gain a broader perspective of the grain auger injury picture in Queensland, Australia. Focus group participants suggested that the operator's state of mind and attitude to safety are important, while the auger's age, type, and shielding were cited as important risk factors. They suggested that older augers are less likely to be adequately shielded, and mobile augers are most likely to be involved in injury events. The information gained from this study is being used to develop strategies to help farmers minimize injuries associated with the use of grain augers.

  17. Adenosine Analog NITD008 Is a Potent Inhibitor of Zika Virus

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Na-Na; Li, Chun-Feng; Tian, Min; Hao, Jia-Nan; Xie, Xu-Ping; Shi, Pei-Yong; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreaks have raised global concerns due to its unexpected clinical manifestations. Antiviral development is of high priority in response to the ZIKV emergency. In this study, we report that an adenosine analog NITD008 has potent in vitro and in vivo antiviral activity against ZIKV. The compound can effectively inhibit the historical and contemporary ZIKV strains in cultures as well as significantly reduce viremia and prevent mortality in A129 mice. Our results have demonstrated that NITD008 is potent inhibitor of ZIKV and can be used as reference inhibitor for future ZIKV antiviral drug screen and discovery. PMID:27747251

  18. The marine cyanobacterial metabolite gallinamide A is a potent and selective inhibitor of human cathepsin L.

    PubMed

    Miller, Bailey; Friedman, Aaron J; Choi, Hyukjae; Hogan, James; McCammon, J Andrew; Hook, Vivian; Gerwick, William H

    2014-01-24

    A number of marine natural products are potent inhibitors of proteases, an important drug target class in human diseases. Hence, marine cyanobacterial extracts were assessed for inhibitory activity to human cathepsin L. Herein, we have shown that gallinamide A potently and selectively inhibits the human cysteine protease cathepsin L. With 30 min of preincubation, gallinamide A displayed an IC50 of 5.0 nM, and kinetic analysis demonstrated an inhibition constant of ki = 9000 ± 260 M(-1) s(-1). Preincubation-dilution and activity-probe experiments revealed an irreversible mode of inhibition, and comparative IC50 values display a 28- to 320-fold greater selectivity toward cathepsin L than closely related human cysteine cathepsin V or B. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were used to determine the pose of gallinamide in the active site of cathepsin L. These data resulted in the identification of a pose characterized by high stability, a consistent hydrogen bond network, and the reactive Michael acceptor enamide of gallinamide A positioned near the active site cysteine of the protease, leading to a proposed mechanism of covalent inhibition. These data reveal and characterize the novel activity of gallinamide A as a potent inhibitor of human cathepsin L.

  19. The Marine Cyanobacterial Metabolite Gallinamide A is a Potent and Selective Inhibitor of Human Cathepsin L

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Bailey; Friedman, Aaron J; Choi, Hyukjae; Hogan, James; McCammon, J. Andrew; Hook, Vivian; Gerwick, William H.

    2014-01-01

    A number of marine natural products are potent inhibitors of proteases, an important drug target class in human diseases. Hence, marine cyanobacterial extracts were assessed for inhibitory activity to human cathepsin L. Herein, we have shown that gallinamide A potently and selectively inhibits the human cysteine protease, cathepsin L. With 30 min of preincubation, gallinamide A displayed an IC50 of 5.0 nM, and kinetic analysis demonstrated an inhibition constant of ki = 9000 ± 260 M−1 s−1. Preincubation-dilution and activity-probe experiments revealed an irreversible mode of inhibition, and comparative IC50 values display a 28- to 320- fold greater selectivity toward cathepsin L than closely related human cysteine cathepsins V or B. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were used to determine the pose of gallinamide in the active site of cathepsin L. These data resulted in the identification of a pose characterized by high stability, a consistent hydrogen bond network, and the reactive Michael acceptor enamide of gallinamide A positioned near the active site cysteine of the protease, leading to a proposed mechanism of covalent inhibition. These data reveal and characterize the novel activity of gallinamide A as a potent inhibitor of human cathepsin L. PMID:24364476

  20. A Highly Arginolytic Streptococcus Species That Potently Antagonizes Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xuelian; Palmer, Sara R.; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Richards, Vincent P.; Williams, Matthew L.; Nascimento, Marcelle M.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of certain oral biofilm bacteria to moderate pH through arginine metabolism by the arginine deiminase system (ADS) is a deterrent to the development of dental caries. Here, we characterize a novel Streptococcus strain, designated strain A12, isolated from supragingival dental plaque of a caries-free individual. A12 not only expressed the ADS pathway at high levels under a variety of conditions but also effectively inhibited growth and two intercellular signaling pathways of the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. A12 produced copious amounts of H2O2 via the pyruvate oxidase enzyme that were sufficient to arrest the growth of S. mutans. A12 also produced a protease similar to challisin (Sgc) of Streptococcus gordonii that was able to block the competence-stimulating peptide (CSP)–ComDE signaling system, which is essential for bacteriocin production by S. mutans. Wild-type A12, but not an sgc mutant derivative, could protect the sensitive indicator strain Streptococcus sanguinis SK150 from killing by the bacteriocins of S. mutans. A12, but not S. gordonii, could also block the XIP (comX-inducing peptide) signaling pathway, which is the proximal regulator of genetic competence in S. mutans, but Sgc was not required for this activity. The complete genome sequence of A12 was determined, and phylogenomic analyses compared A12 to streptococcal reference genomes. A12 was most similar to Streptococcus australis and Streptococcus parasanguinis but sufficiently different that it may represent a new species. A12-like organisms may play crucial roles in the promotion of stable, health-associated oral biofilm communities by moderating plaque pH and interfering with the growth and virulence of caries pathogens. PMID:26826230

  1. Multiple cell upset cross-section modeling: A possible interpretation for the role of the ion energy-loss straggling and Auger recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebrev, G. I.; Zemtsov, K. S.

    2016-08-01

    We found that the energy deposition fluctuations in the sensitive volumes may cause the multiple cell upset (MCU) multiplicity scatter in the nanoscale (with feature sizes less than 100 nm) memories. A microdosimetric model of the MCU cross-section dependence on LET is proposed. It was shown that ideally a staircase-shaped cross-section vs LET curve spreads due to the energy-loss straggling impact into a quasi-linear dependence with a slope depending on the memory cell area, the cell critical energy and efficiency of charge collection. This paper also presents a new model of the Auger recombination as a limiting process of the electron-hole charge yield, especially at the high-LET ion impact. A modified form of the MCU cross-section vs LET data interpolation is proposed, discussed and validated.

  2. Discovery of a Potent, Dual Serotonin and Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the described research effort was to identify a novel serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) with improved norepinephrine transporter activity and acceptable metabolic stability and exhibiting minimal drug–drug interaction. We describe herein the discovery of a series of 3-substituted pyrrolidines, exemplified by compound 1. Compound 1 is a selective SNRI in vitro and in vivo, has favorable ADME properties, and retains inhibitory activity in the formalin model of pain behavior. Compound 1 thus represents a potential new probe to explore utility of SNRIs in central nervous system disorders, including chronic pain conditions. PMID:24900709

  3. A potent effect of observational learning on chimpanzee tool construction

    PubMed Central

    Price, Elizabeth E.; Lambeth, Susan P.; Schapiro, Steve J.; Whiten, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Although tool use occurs in diverse species, its complexity may mark an important distinction between humans and other animals. Chimpanzee tool use has many similarities to that seen in humans, yet evidence of the cumulatively complex and constructive technologies common in human populations remains absent in free-ranging chimpanzees. Here we provide the first evidence that chimpanzees have a latent capacity to socially learn to construct a composite tool. Fifty chimpanzees were assigned to one of five demonstration conditions that varied in the amount and type of information available in video footage of a conspecific. Chimpanzees exposed to complete footage of a chimpanzee combining the two components to retrieve a reward learned to combine the tools significantly more than those exposed to more restricted information. In a follow-up test, chimpanzees that constructed tools after watching the complete demonstration tended to do so even when the reward was within reach of the unmodified components, whereas those that spontaneously solved the task (without seeing the modification process) combined only when necessary. Social learning, therefore, had a powerful effect in instilling a marked persistence in the use of a complex technique at the cost of efficiency, inhibiting insightful tool use. PMID:19570785

  4. Nitric oxide as a potent fumigant for postharvest pest control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a great demand for safe and effective alternative fumigants to replace methyl bromide and other toxic fumigants for pest control. Nitric oxide, a common signal molecule in biological systems, was found to be effective and safe to control insects under ultralow oxygen conditions. Fumigatio...

  5. A Potent Multi-functional Neuroprotective Derivative of Tetramethylpyrazine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-Yun; Xu, Da-Ping; Tan, Guo-Lian; Cai, Wei; Zhang, Gao-Xiao; Cui, Wei; Wang, Jin-Zhao; Long, Cheng; Sun, Ye-Wei; Yu, Pei; Tsim, Karl Wahkeung; Zhang, Zai-Jun; Han, Yi-Fan; Wang, Yu-Qiang

    2015-08-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are one of the leading causes of death among the elderly. Therapeutic approaches with a single target have proven unsuccessful in treating these diseases. Structural combination of multi-functional compounds may lead to a molecule with multiple properties. In this study, we designed and synthesized T-006, a novel analog derived from two multi-functional neuroprotective chemicals, tetramethylpyrazine and J147. The methoxyphenyl group of J147 was replaced by tetramethylpyrazine. Bioactivity evaluation showed that T-006 at very low concentrations had multi-functional neuroprotective effects including rescuing iodoacetic acid-induced neuronal loss, preventing oxidative stress-induced neurotoxicity and reducing glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in vitro. Most importantly, T-006 significantly ameliorated memory impairments in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. These multiple functions of a single molecule suggest that T-006 is a promising novel neuroprotective agent for treating various neurodegenerative disorders, including and in particular Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25982925

  6. Nobiletin: a citrus flavonoid displaying potent physiological activity.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Shuji; Atsumi, Haruka; Iwao, Yasunori; Kan, Toshiyuki; Itai, Shigeru

    2016-02-01

    Nobiletin [systematic name: 2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-5,6,7,8-tetramethoxy-4H-chromen-4-one; C21H22O8] is a flavonoid found in citrus peels, and has been reported to show a wide range of physiological properties, including anti-inflammatory, anticancer and antidementia activities. We have solved the crystal structure of nobiletin, which revealed that the chromene and arene rings of its flavone moiety, as well as the two methoxy groups bound to its arene ring, were coplanar. In contrast, the C atoms of the four methoxy groups bound to the chromene ring are out of the plane, making the molecule conformationally chiral. A comparison of the crystal structures of nobiletin revealed that it could adopt a variety of different conformations through rotation of the covalent bond between the chromene and arene rings, and the orientations of methoxy groups bound to the chromene ring.

  7. Synthesis of a Potent Vinblastine: Rationally Designed Added Benign Complexity.

    PubMed

    Allemann, Oliver; Brutsch, Manuela; Lukesh, John C; Brody, Daniel M; Boger, Dale L

    2016-07-13

    Many natural products, including vinblastine, have not been easily subjected to simplifications in their structures by synthetic means or modifications by late-stage semisynthetic derivatization in ways that enhance their biological potency. Herein, we detail a synthetic vinblastine that incorporates added benign complexity (ABC), which improves activity 10-fold, and is now accessible as a result of advances in the total synthesis of the natural product. The compound incorporates designed added molecular complexity but no new functional groups and maintains all existing structural and conformational features of the natural product. It constitutes a member of an analogue class presently inaccessible by semisynthetic derivatization of the natural product, by its late-stage functionalization, or by biosynthetic means. Rather, it was accessed by synthetic means, using an appropriately modified powerful penultimate single-step vindoline-catharanthine coupling strategy that proceeds with a higher diastereoselectivity than found for the natural product itself. PMID:27356080

  8. Methoxetamine--a novel recreational drug with potent hallucinogenic properties.

    PubMed

    Zawilska, Jolanta B

    2014-11-01

    Methoxetamine is one of the constantly growing group of novel psychoactive substances that has emerged in recent years. The compound belongs to the arylcyclohexylamine class, which is used for its recreational and psychedelic effects. Methoxetamine is a structural analogue of ketamine, with a much longer duration of action and intensity of effects, and has been extensively advertised as its 'legal' and 'bladder friendly' alternative. This review surveys the current state of knowledge regarding the metabolism, pharmacology, prevalence and pattern of methoxetamine use, and analytical methods of its detection. Consumption of methoxetamine bears a significant health risk and may even lead to fatal intoxication. A significant amount of research is still needed in order to fully quantify the short- and long-term effects of methoxetamine and its interaction with other drugs of abuse.

  9. A Potent Phytotoxic Substance in Aglaia odorata Lour.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Suzuki, Masahiko; Noguchi, Kazutaka; Ohno, Osamu; Suenaga, Kiyotake; Laosinwattana, Chamroon

    2016-05-01

    Aglaia odorata Lour. (Meliaceae) was found to have very strong allelopathic activity and a bioherbicide PORGANIC(™) was developed from its leaf extracts. However, the phytotoxic substances causing the strong allelopathic activity of the plants have not yet been determined. Therefore, we investigated allelopathic properties and phytotoxic substances in A. odorata. Aqueous EtOH extracts of A. odorata leaves inhibited root and shoot growth of garden cress (Lepidum sativum), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), alfalfa (Medicago sativa), timothy (Phleum pratense), ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum), and Echinochloa crus-galli with the extract concentration-dependent manner. The extracts were then purified and a major phytotoxic substance with allelopathic activity was isolated and identified by spectral data as rocaglaol. Rocaglaol inhibited the growth of garden cress and E. crus-galli at concentrations > 0.3 and 0.03 μm, respectively. The concentrations required for 50% inhibition ranged from 0.09 to 2.5 μm. The inhibitory activity of rocaglaol on the weed species, E. crus-galli, was much greater than that of abscisic acid. These results suggest that rocaglaol may be a major contributor to the allelopathic effect of A. odorata and bioherbicide PORGANIC(™) . PMID:27088639

  10. Optimization of a series of potent and selective ketone histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pescatore, Giovanna; Kinzel, Olaf; Attenni, Barbara; Cecchetti, Ottavia; Fiore, Fabrizio; Fonsi, Massimiliano; Rowley, Michael; Schultz-Fademrecht, Carsten; Serafini, Sergio; Steinkühler, Christian; Jones, Philip

    2008-10-15

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors offer a promising strategy for cancer therapy and the first generation HDAC inhibitors are currently in the clinic. Herein we describe the optimization of a series of ketone small molecule HDAC inhibitors leading to potent and selective class I HDAC inhibitors with good dog PK.

  11. Teratogenicity studies of a new potent tetanus vaccine in rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Sethi, N; Srivastava, R K; Singh, R K

    1991-09-01

    Glaxo Laboratories, Bombay, have prepared a potent tetanus vaccine of 250 Lf as a substitute of the previous 5 Lf tetanus vaccine. The safety evaluation of the vaccine has been reported, but the teratogenic potential was not studied. In the experiment reported herein we have studied the teratogenic action of the vaccine in the progeny of rabbits. No congenital anomalies were observed.

  12. [Bryophytes, a potent source of drugs for tomorrow's medicine?].

    PubMed

    Krzaczkowski, Lucie; Wright, Michel; Gairin, Jean Edouard

    2008-11-01

    Although secondary plant metabolites provided numerous leads for the development of a wide array of therapeutic drugs, the discovery of new drugs with novel structures has declined in the past few years. Indeed higher plants have a similar evolutionary history and so produce similar metabolites. Search for novel sources of new therapeutic compounds within unexplored parts of biodiversity is thus an attractive challenge. Bryophytes, a group of small terrestrial plants remain relatively untouched in the drug discovery process whereas some have been used as medicinal plants. Studies of their secondary metabolites are recent but reveal original compounds, some of which not synthesized by higher plants. However investigations often meet difficulties during harvest or isolation of active compounds. In consequence, small quantities of substances obtained may be the main reason for the lack of biological tests. Strategies to overcome those troubles may exist and then lead to innovative medicinal applications.

  13. Glucagon-like peptide 1: a potent glycogenic hormone.

    PubMed

    Valverde, I; Morales, M; Clemente, F; López-Delgado, M I; Delgado, E; Perea, A; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L

    1994-08-01

    GLP-1(7-36)amide is an insulinotropic peptide derived from the intestinal post-translational proglucagon process, the release of which is increased mainly after a carbohydrate meal; also, its anti-diabetogenic effect in normal and diabetic states has been reported. In this study, GLP-1(7-36)amide stimulates the formation of glycogen from glucose in isolated rat hepatocytes, such a glycogenic effect being achieved with physiological concentrations of the peptide. The GLP-1(7-36)amide-induced glycogenesis is abolished by glucagon, and it is accompanied by stimulation of the glycogen synthase alpha activity and by a decrease in the basal and glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP content. These findings could explain, at least in part, the GLP-1(7-36)amide insulin-independent plasma glucose lowering effect.

  14. Calixtyrosol: a Novel Calixarene Based Potent Radical Scavenger

    PubMed Central

    Nasuhi Pur, Fazel; Akbari Dilmaghani, Karim

    2015-01-01

    The oxidative stress causes many diseases in human, therefore antioxidants have a special position in the medicinal chemistry. Tyrosol is an important antioxidant with a plenty of biological properties. There are many strategies such as clustering single drug units in order to develop new drugs. The cluster effect can increase drug effects relative to single drug unit. Calixtyrosol is the novel cluster of tyrosol that shows a more effective antioxidant activity than single tyrosol. In fact, tyrosol can be considered as 1/4 of the cluster. Four hydroxyethyl moieties have been grafted at the upper rim of the calix[4]arene in all-syn orientation, giving novel agent in the field of antioxidant agents. Free radical scavenging tests were determined by the 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical in methanol for four antioxidants: calixtyrosol, tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol and 3, 5-di-tert-buty l-4-hydroxytoluene to compare their antioxidant activity. Free radical scavenging test showed that calixtyrosol has enhanced antioxidant activity in comparison to the corresponding single tyrosol unit (> 5 fold), it has even more active than the other test antioxidants (2 fold). Presumably, it is attributed to tethering and arraying of four impacted tyrosol units, which make a synergistic effect in interactions with radicals for creating effective radical scavenging activity. This method is in debt of synergistic effect, tethering and arraying of single units in the cluster structure. PMID:26664385

  15. Nesfatin-1 as a New Potent Regulator in Reproductive System

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinhee; Yang, Hyunwon

    2012-01-01

    Nesfatin-1 is a recently discovered anorexigenic peptide which is distributed in several brain areas implicated in the feeding and metabolic regulation. Recently, it has been reported that nesfatin-1 is expressed not only in brain, but also in peripheral organs such as digestive organs, adipose tissues, heart, and reproductive organs. Nesfatin-1 is markedly expressed in the pancreas, stomach and duodenum. Eventually, the nesfatin-1 expression in the digestive organs may be regulated by nutritional status, which suggests a regulatory role of peripheral nesfatin-1 in energy homeostasis. Nesfatin-1 is also detected in the adipose tissues of humans and rodents, indicating that nesfatin-1 expression in the fat may regulate food intake independently, rather than relying on leptin. In addition, nesfatin-1 is expressed in the heart as a cardiac peptide. It suggests that nesfatin-1 may regulate cardiac function and encourage clinical potential in the presence of nutrition-dependent physio-pathologic cardiovascular diseases. Currently, only a few studies demonstrate that nesfatin-1 is expressed in the reproductive system. However, it is not clear yet what function of nesfatin-1 is in the reproductive organs. Here, we summarize the expression of nesfatin-1 and its roles in brain and peripheral organs and discuss the possible roles of nesfatin-1 expressed in reproductive organs, including testis, epididymis, ovary, and uterus. We come to the conclusion that nesfatin-1 as a local regulator in male and female reproductive organs may regulate the steroidogenesis in the testis and ovary and the physiological activity in epididymis and uterus. PMID:25949098

  16. The Electronic Structure of Metals Studied by Auger Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowles, Paul Stephen

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. In recent years there has been much study of Auger processes that involve one or more valence electrons. In particular, the degree to which the Auger lineshape reflects the local density of states (DOS) has proved to be of considerable interest and it is often assumed that the Auger profile may be simply obtained by a weighting of the angular components of the local DOS. By using the embedding technique to carry out first principles, self-consistent calculations of the KLV Auger profiles of simple metals, it is possible to investigate the relationship between the Auger profile and the local DOS. Additionally, it is shown that useful approximations can be made which allow the spatial region probed by the Auger process in Mg to be determined. The alloying of Mg with other simple metals causes the Mg KLV spectra to become distorted. The Mg KLV spectra of a LiMg alloy are presented which show considerable modification from the pure metal. Using the embedding technique, these spectra are simulated and the presence of a virtual bound state is predicted around a core-ionized Mg site. High resolution spectra of the KL_ {2,3}-L_{2,3} L_{2,3}V Auger satellite transitions of Mg and Al, which lie to high kinetic energy of the KL_{2,3}V Auger transition, are shown and an attempt made to simulate the profiles of these satellites. This is achieved by determining the intensity and shape of each component by the use of atomic transition rate calculations and lineshapes obtained using the embedding technique. The satellite profile of Al may be explained in this way, however, one feature remains unexplained in the spectrum of Mg. The N_{6,7}O _{4,5}O_ {4,5} and N_{7} O_{4,5}O _{4,5} Auger profiles of Au are presented and the N_{6}O _{4,5}O_ {4,5} profile found by subtraction. By the removal of a background it will be possible to compare these transitions with theoretical calculations. The requirements for subtracting a

  17. Capsaicin: a potent inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Arabaci, Betul; Gulcin, Ilhami; Alwasel, Saleh

    2014-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) is a zinc containing metalloenzyme that catalyzes the rapid and reversible conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) into a proton (H+) and bicarbonate (HCO3-) ion. On the other hand, capsaicin is the main component in hot chili peppers and is used extensively used in spices, food additives and drugs; it is responsible for their spicy flavor and pungent taste. There are sixteen known CA isoforms in humans. Human CA isoenzymes I, and II (hCA I and hCA II) are ubiquitous cytosolic isoforms. In this study, the inhibition properties of capsaicin against the slow cytosolic isoform hCA I, and the ubiquitous and dominant rapid cytosolic isozymes hCA II were studied. Both CA isozymes were inhibited by capsaicin in the micromolar range. This naturally bioactive compound has a Ki of 696.15 µM against hCA I, and of 208.37 µM against hCA II. PMID:25014536

  18. Polyethyleneimine is a potent systemic adjuvant for glycoprotein antigens.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Neil C; Brinckmann, Sarah A; Gartlan, Kate H; Puthia, Manoj; Svanborg, Catharina; Krashias, George; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C; Flavell, Richard A; Sattentau, Quentin J; Wegmann, Frank

    2014-10-01

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI) is an organic polycation used extensively as a gene and DNA vaccine delivery reagent. Although the DNA targeting activity of PEI is well documented, its immune activating activity is not. We recently reported that PEI has robust mucosal adjuvanticity when administered intranasally with glycoprotein antigens. Here, we show that PEI has strong immune activating activity after systemic delivery. PEI administered subcutaneously with viral glycoprotein (HIV-1 gp140) enhanced antigen-specific serum IgG production in the context of mixed Th1/Th2-type immunity. PEI elicited higher titers of both antigen binding and neutralizing antibodies than alum in mice and rabbits and induced an increased proportion of antibodies reactive with native antigen. In an intraperitoneal model, PEI recruited neutrophils followed by monocytes to the site of administration and enhanced antigen uptake by antigen-presenting cells. The Th bias was modulated by PEI activation of the Nlrp3 inflammasome; however its global adjuvanticity was unchanged in Nlrp3-deficient mice. When coformulated with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides, PEI adjuvant potency was synergistically increased and biased toward a Th1-type immune profile. Taken together, these data support the use of PEI as a versatile systemic adjuvant platform with particular utility for induction of secondary structure-reactive antibodies against glycoprotein antigens. PMID:24844701

  19. Capsaicin: a potent inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Arabaci, Betul; Gulcin, Ilhami; Alwasel, Saleh

    2014-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) is a zinc containing metalloenzyme that catalyzes the rapid and reversible conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) into a proton (H+) and bicarbonate (HCO3-) ion. On the other hand, capsaicin is the main component in hot chili peppers and is used extensively used in spices, food additives and drugs; it is responsible for their spicy flavor and pungent taste. There are sixteen known CA isoforms in humans. Human CA isoenzymes I, and II (hCA I and hCA II) are ubiquitous cytosolic isoforms. In this study, the inhibition properties of capsaicin against the slow cytosolic isoform hCA I, and the ubiquitous and dominant rapid cytosolic isozymes hCA II were studied. Both CA isozymes were inhibited by capsaicin in the micromolar range. This naturally bioactive compound has a Ki of 696.15 µM against hCA I, and of 208.37 µM against hCA II.

  20. Antidiabetic Indian plants: a good source of potent amylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Menakshi; Zinjarde, Smita S; Bhargava, Shobha Y; Kumar, Ameeta Ravi; Joshi, Bimba N

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes is known as a multifactorial disease. The treatment of diabetes (Type II) is complicated due to the inherent patho-physiological factors related to this disease. One of the complications of diabetes is post-prandial hyperglycemia (PPHG). Glucosidase inhibitors, particularly α-amylase inhibitors are a class of compounds that helps in managing PPHG. Six ethno-botanically known plants having antidiabetic property namely, Azadirachta indica Adr. Juss.; Murraya koenigii (L.) Sprengel; Ocimum tenuflorum (L.) (syn: Sanctum); Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels (syn: Eugenia jambolana); Linum usitatissimum (L.) and Bougainvillea spectabilis were tested for their ability to inhibit glucosidase activity. The chloroform, methanol and aqueous extracts were prepared sequentially from either leaves or seeds of these plants. It was observed that the chloroform extract of O. tenuflorum; B. spectabilis; M. koenigii and S. cumini have significant α-amylase inhibitory property. Plants extracts were further tested against murine pancreatic, liver and small intestinal crude enzyme preparations for glucosidase inhibitory activity. The three extracts of O. tenuflorum and chloroform extract of M. koenigi showed good inhibition of murine pancreatic and intestinal glucosidases as compared with acarbose, a known glucosidase inhibitor. PMID:18955350

  1. A new antibiotic with potent activity targets MscL.

    PubMed

    Iscla, Irene; Wray, Robin; Blount, Paul; Larkins-Ford, Jonah; Conery, Annie L; Ausubel, Frederick M; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela; Huang, Johnny X; Blaskovich, Mark A; Cooper, Matthew A; Obregon-Henao, Andres; Orme, Ian; Tjandra, Edwin S; Stroeher, Uwe H; Brown, Melissa H; Macardle, Cindy; van Holst, Nick; Ling Tong, Chee; Slattery, Ashley D; Gibson, Christopher T; Raston, Colin L; Boulos, Ramiz A

    2015-07-01

    The growing problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a major threat to human health. Paradoxically, new antibiotic discovery is declining, with most of the recently approved antibiotics corresponding to new uses for old antibiotics or structurally similar derivatives of known antibiotics. We used an in silico approach to design a new class of nontoxic antimicrobials for the bacteria-specific mechanosensitive ion channel of large conductance, MscL. One antimicrobial of this class, compound 10, is effective against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with no cytotoxicity in human cell lines at the therapeutic concentrations. As predicted from in silico modeling, we show that the mechanism of action of compound 10 is at least partly dependent on interactions with MscL. Moreover we show that compound 10 cured a methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection in the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Our work shows that compound 10, and other drugs that target MscL, are potentially important therapeutics against antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections.

  2. A new antibiotic with potent activity targets MscL

    PubMed Central

    Iscla, Irene; Wray, Robin; Blount, Paul; Larkins-Ford, Jonah; Conery, Annie L; Ausubel, Frederick M; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela; Huang, Johnny X; Blaskovich, Mark A; Cooper, Matthew A; Obregon-Henao, Andres; Orme, Ian; Tjandra, Edwin S; Stroeher, Uwe H; Brown, Melissa H; Macardle, Cindy; van Holst, Nick; Ling Tong, Chee; Slattery, Ashley D; Gibson, Christopher T; Raston, Colin L; Boulos, Ramiz A

    2015-01-01

    The growing problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a major threat to human health. Paradoxically, new antibiotic discovery is declining, with most of the recently approved antibiotics corresponding to new uses for old antibiotics or structurally similar derivatives of known antibiotics. We used an in silico approach to design a new class of nontoxic antimicrobials for the bacteria-specific mechanosensitive ion channel of large conductance, MscL. One antimicrobial of this class, compound 10, is effective against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with no cytotoxicity in human cell lines at the therapeutic concentrations. As predicted from in silico modeling, we show that the mechanism of action of compound 10 is at least partly dependent on interactions with MscL. Moreover we show that compound 10 cured a methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection in the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Our work shows that compound 10, and other drugs that target MscL, are potentially important therapeutics against antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. PMID:25649856

  3. Quinobene, a new potent anti-HIV agent.

    PubMed

    Gruszecka-Kowalik, E; Haugwitz, R D; Zalkow, L H

    1992-09-30

    A simple synthesis of the sulfonated azo dye Quinobene (3) and its derivatives, as well as the results of their evaluation in anti-HIV screening have been described. Thus, reacting the diazonium salt of 4,4'-diaminostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid with 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid yielded the readily isolable title compound. The lithium and tetramethylammonium salts of Quinobene and its complexes with Cu(II), Zn(II), Mg(II) were also prepared. In vitro tests showed considerable activity of these compounds against HIV-1.

  4. Silver-Lactoferrin Nanocomplexes as a Potent Antimicrobial Agent.

    PubMed

    Pomastowski, Paweł; Sprynskyy, Myroslav; Žuvela, Petar; Rafińska, Katarzyna; Milanowski, Maciej; Liu, J Jay; Yi, Myunggi; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2016-06-29

    The process of silver immobilization onto and/or into bovine lactoferrin (LTF), the physicochemical properties of bovine lactoferrin and obtained silver-lactoferrin complexes, as well as antibacterial activity of silver-lactoferrin complexes were investigated in this work. Kinetic study of the silver immobilization into lactoferrin was carried out using batch sorption techniques. Spectrometric (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS, ICP-MS), spectroscopic (FTIR, SERS), electron microscopic (TEM) and electrophoretic (I-DE) techniques, as well as zeta potential measurements, were applied for characterization of LTF and binding nature of silver in Ag-LTF complexes. On the basis of the results of the kinetics study, it was established that the silver binding to LTF is a heterogeneous process involving two main stages: (i) internal diffusion and sorption onto external surface of lactoferrin globules; and (ii) internal diffusion and binding into lactoferrin globule structure. Spectroscopic techniques combined with TEM analysis confirmed the binding process. Molecular dynamics (MD) analysis was carried out in order to simulate the mechanism of the binding process, and locate potential binding sites, as well as complement the experimental findings. Quantum mechanics (QM) simulations were performed utilizing density functional theory (DFT) in order to support the reduction mechanism of silver ions to elemental silver. Antimicrobial activity of synthesized lactoferrin complexes against selected clinical bacteria was confirmed using flow cytometry and antibiograms.

  5. Antitumor agents, 110. Bryophyllin B, a novel potent cytotoxic bufadienolide from Bryophyllum pinnatum.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, T; Haruna, M; Yan, X Z; Chang, J J; Lee, K H

    1989-01-01

    Bryophyllin B [1], a potent cytotoxic bufadienolide, has been isolated from Bryophyllum pinnatum and its structure confirmed by the use of 2D-nmr techniques and difference nOe method. Transformation of bryotoxin C [2] to 1 with acid is also discussed. PMID:2607348

  6. Education and Outreach for the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, G.

    The scale and scope of the physics studied at the Auger Observatory offer significant opportunities for original outreach work. Education, outreach and public relations of the Auger collaboration are coordinated in a separate task whose goals are to encourage and support a wide range of education and outreach efforts that link schools and the public with the Auger scientists and the science of cosmic rays, particle physics, and associated technologies. The presentation will focus on the impact of the collaboration in Mendoza Province, Argentina, as: the Auger Visitor Center in Malargüe that has hosted over 25,000 visitors since 2001, the Auger Celebration and a collaboration-sponsored science fair held on the Observatory campus in November 2005, the opening of the James Cronin School in Malargüe in November 2006, public lectures, school visits, and courses for science teachers. As the collaboration prepares its northern hemisphere site proposal, plans for an enhanced outreach program are being developed in parallel and will be described.

  7. LY341495 is a nanomolar potent and selective antagonist of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Kingston, A E; Ornstein, P L; Wright, R A; Johnson, B G; Mayne, N G; Burnett, J P; Belagaje, R; Wu, S; Schoepp, D D

    1998-01-01

    The in vitro pharmacology of a structurally novel compound, LY341495, was investigated at human recombinant metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor subtypes expressed in non-neuronal (RGT, rat glutamate transporter) cells. LY341495 was a nanomolar potent antagonist of 1S,3R-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (ACPD)-induced inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation at mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors (respective IC50S of 0.021 and 0.014 microM). At group I mGlu receptor expressing cells, LY341495 was micromolar potent in antagonizing quisqualate-induced phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis, with IC50 values of 7.8 and 8.2 microM for mGlu1a and mGlu5a receptors, respectively. Among the human group III mGlu receptors, the most potent inhibition of L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4) responses was seen for LY341495 at mGlu8, with an IC50 of 0.17 microM. LY341495 was less potent at mGlu7 (IC50 = 0.99 microM) and least potent at mGlu4 (IC50 = 22 microM). Binding studies in rat brain membranes also demonstrated nanomolar potent group II mGlu receptor affinity for LY341495, with no appreciable displacement of ionotropic glutamate receptor ligand binding. Thus, LY341495 has a unique range of selectivity across the mGlu receptor subtypes with a potency order of mGlu3 > or = mGlu2 > mGlu8 > mGlu7 > mGlu1a = mGlu5a > mGlu4. In particular, LY341495 is the most potent antagonist yet reported at mGlu2, 3 and 8 receptors. Thus, it represents a novel pharmacological agent for elucidating the function of mGlu receptors in experimental systems. PMID:9680254

  8. Radiolabeling and in vitro evaluation of 67Ga-NOTA-modular nanotransporter – A potential Auger electron emitting EGFR-targeted radiotherapeutic

    PubMed Central

    Koumarianou, Eftychia; Slastnikova, Tatiana A.; Pruszynski, Marek; Rosenkranz, Andrey A.; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Sobolev, Alexander S.; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Modular nanotransporters (MNTs) are vehicles designed to transport drugs from the cell surface via receptor-mediated endocytosis and endosomal escape to nucleus. Hence their conjugation to Auger electron emitters, can cause severe cell killing, by nuclear localization. Herein we evaluate the use of MNT as a platform for targeted radiotherapy with 67Ga. Methods EGF was the targeting ligand on the MNT, and NOTA was selected for its radiolabeling with 67Ga. In the radiolabeling study we dealt with the precipitation of MNT (pI 5.7) at the labeling pH (4.5–5.5) of 67Ga. Cellular and nuclei uptake of 67Ga-NOTA-MNT by the A431 cell line was determined. Its specific cytotoxicity was compared to that of 67Ga-EDTA, 67Ga-NOTA-BSA and 67Ga-NOTA-hEGF, in A431 and U87MGWTT, cell lines, by clonogenic assay. Dosimetry studies were also performed. Results 67Ga-NOTA-MNT was produced with 90% yield and specific activity of 25.6 mCi/mg. The in vitro kinetics revealed an increased uptake over 24 h. 55% of the internalized radioactivity was detected in the nuclei at 1 h. The cytotoxicity of 67Ga-NOTA-MNT on A431 cell line was 17 and 385-fold higher when compared to non-specific 67Ga-NOTA-BSA and 67Ga-EDTA. While its cytotoxic potency was 13 and 72 – fold higher when compared to 67Ga-NOTA-hEGF in the A431 and the U87MGWTT cell lines, respectively, validating its nuclear localization. The absorbed dose, for 63% cell killing, was 9 Gy, confirms the high specific index of 67Ga. Conclusion These results demonstrate the feasibility of using MNT as a platform for single cell kill targeted radiotherapy by Auger electron emitters. PMID:24776093

  9. The Pierre Auger Project: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantsch, Paul M.

    2003-02-01

    The Southern Hemisphere site of the Pierre Auger Observatory is now under construction in Argentina by a collaboration of 50 institutions in 16 countries. The objective of the Auger Project is to make a high statistics measurement of cosmic rays above 1019 eV. The observatory will record extensive air showers induced by these cosmic rays incident on the atmosphere. The measurement will include energy, direction and composition of the primary particles. The engineering phase is now complete and full construction has begun. The search for the source of the highest energy cosmic rays is one of the most interesting problems in astrophysics. Following the discovery of the cosmic microwave background, Greisen and, independently, Zatsepin and Kuzmin realized hat this background radiation would make space opaque to cosmic rays of very high energy. Nevertheless over the past 30 years several tens of events were recorded with energies above the Greisen, Zatsepin, Kuzmin (GZK) cutoff (about 5×1019 eV) including a number above 1020 eV. These events present a conundrum. Because of the GZK cut off these super high-energy events must come from nearby, less than about 50 Mpc. In addition the cosmic acceleration mechanism for achieving these energies is very difficult to conceive. Yet, even though particles of these energies are only slightly deflected by galactic and extragalactic magnetic fields, none clearly points back to a source sufficiently violent to a be a candidate source. The Auger Observatory finished its engineering development phase at the end of 2001. The "Engineering Array" consists of 40 surface particle detector stations and two prototype air fluorescence telescopes. The Observatory, when complete, will have a 1600 detector surface array covering 3000 km**2 overlooked by 24 fluorescence telescopes. The Engineering Array has demonstrated that all of the detector systems perform as well or better than expected. Recently the Observatory has recorded a number of

  10. Auger recombination in scintillator materials from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, Andrew; Kioupakis, Emmanouil; Åberg, Daniel; Schleife, André

    2015-03-01

    Scintillators convert high energy radiation into lower energy photons which are easier to detect and analyze. One of the uses of these devices is identifying radioactive materials being transported across national borders. However, scintillating materials have a non-proportional light yield in response to incident radiation, which makes this task difficult. One possible cause of the non-proportional light yield is non-radiative Auger recombination. Auger recombination can occur in two ways - direct and phonon-assisted. We have studied both types of Auger recombination from first principles in the common scintillating material sodium iodide. Our results indicate that the phonon-assisted process, assisted primarily by short-range optical phonons, dominates the direct process. The corresponding Auger coefficients are 5 . 6 +/- 0 . 3 ×10-32cm6s-1 for the phonon-assisted process versus 1 . 17 +/- 0 . 01 ×10-33cm6s-1 for the direct process. At higher electronic temperatures the direct Auger recombination rate increases but remains lower than the phonon-assisted rate. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation CAREER award through Grant No. DMR-1254314 and NA-22. Computational Resources provide by LLNL and DOE NERSC Facility.

  11. Photoion Auger-electron coincidence measurements near threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, J.C.; Biedermann, C.; Keller, N.; Liljeby, L.; Short, R.T.; Sellin, I.A. . Dept. of Physics Oak Ridge National Lab., TN ); Lindle, D.W. , Gaithersburg, MD )

    1990-01-01

    The vacancy cascade which fills an atomic inner-shell hole is a complex process which can proceed by a variety of paths, often resulting in a broad distribution of photoion charge states. We have measured simplified argon photoion charge distributions by requiring a coincidence with a K-LL or K-LM Auger electron, following K excitation with synchrotron radiation, as a function of photon energy, and report here in detail the argon charge distributions coincident with K-L{sub 1}L{sub 23} Auger electrons. The distributions exhibit a much more pronounced photon-energy dependence than do the more complicated non-coincident spectra. Resonant excitation of the K electron to np levels, shakeoff of these np electrons by subsequent decay processes, double-Auger decay, and recapture of the K photoelectron through postcollision interaction occur with significant probability. 17 refs.

  12. Absolute calibration of the Auger fluorescence detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauleo, P.; Brack, J.; Garrard, L.; Harton, J.; Knapik, R.; Meyhandan, R.; Rovero, A.C.; Tamashiro, A.; Warner, D.

    2005-07-01

    Absolute calibration of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors uses a light source at the telescope aperture. The technique accounts for the combined effects of all detector components in a single measurement. The calibrated 2.5 m diameter light source fills the aperture, providing uniform illumination to each pixel. The known flux from the light source and the response of the acquisition system give the required calibration for each pixel. In the lab, light source uniformity is studied using CCD images and the intensity is measured relative to NIST-calibrated photodiodes. Overall uncertainties are presently 12%, and are dominated by systematics.

  13. A Search for Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos in Highly Inclined Events at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE PAGES

    Abreu, P

    2011-12-30

    The Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is sensitive to neutrinos of all flavors above 0.1 EeV. These interact through charged and neutral currents in the atmosphere giving rise to extensive air showers. When interacting deeply in the atmosphere at nearly horizontal incidence, neutrinos can be distinguished from regular hadronic cosmic rays by the broad time structure of their shower signals in the water-Cherenkov detectors. In this paper we present for the first time an analysis based on down-going neutrinos. We describe the search procedure, the possible sources of background, the method to compute the exposure and the associatedmore » systematic uncertainties. No candidate neutrinos have been found in data collected from 1 January 2004 to 31 May 2010. Assuming an E-2 differential energy spectrum the limit on the single-flavor neutrino is E2dN/dE < 1.74 x 10-7 GeV cm-2s-1sr-1 at 90% C.L. in the energy range 1 x 1017eV < E < 1 x 1020 eV.« less

  14. A Search for Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos in Highly Inclined Events at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu, P

    2011-12-30

    The Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is sensitive to neutrinos of all flavors above 0.1 EeV. These interact through charged and neutral currents in the atmosphere giving rise to extensive air showers. When interacting deeply in the atmosphere at nearly horizontal incidence, neutrinos can be distinguished from regular hadronic cosmic rays by the broad time structure of their shower signals in the water-Cherenkov detectors. In this paper we present for the first time an analysis based on down-going neutrinos. We describe the search procedure, the possible sources of background, the method to compute the exposure and the associated systematic uncertainties. No candidate neutrinos have been found in data collected from 1 January 2004 to 31 May 2010. Assuming an E-2 differential energy spectrum the limit on the single-flavor neutrino is E2dN/dE < 1.74 x 10-7 GeV cm-2s-1sr-1 at 90% C.L. in the energy range 1 x 1017eV < E < 1 x 1020 eV.

  15. Auger recombination in sodium-iodide scintillators from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    McAllister, Andrew; Åberg, Daniel; Schleife, André; Kioupakis, Emmanouil

    2015-04-06

    Scintillator radiation detectors suffer from low energy resolution that has been attributed to non-linear light yield response to the energy of the incident gamma rays. Auger recombination is a key non-radiative recombination channel that scales with the third power of the excitation density and may play a role in the non-proportionality problem of scintillators. In this work, we study direct and phonon-assisted Auger recombination in NaI using first-principles calculations. Our results show that phonon-assisted Auger recombination, mediated primarily by short-range phonon scattering, dominates at room temperature. We discuss our findings in light of the much larger values obtained by numerical fits to z-scan experiments.

  16. Multielectron spectroscopy: Auger decays of the krypton 3d hole

    SciTech Connect

    Palaudoux, J.; Lablanquie, P.; Penent, F.; Andric, L.; Ito, K.; Shigemasa, E.; Eland, J. H. D.; Jonauskas, V.; Kucas, S.; Karazija, R.

    2010-10-15

    The emission of one or two Auger electrons, following Kr 3d inner-shell ionization by synchrotron light, has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. All electrons emitted in the process are detected in coincidence and analyzed in energy thanks to a magnetic-bottle electron time-of-flight spectrometer. In addition, noncoincident high-resolution electron spectra have been measured to characterize the cascade double-Auger paths more fully. Combination of the two experimental approaches and of our calculations allows a full determination of the decay pathways and branching ratios in the case of Kr 3d single- and double-Auger decays. The Kr{sup 3+} threshold is found at 74.197{+-}0.020 eV.

  17. Discovery of LAS101057: A Potent, Selective, and Orally Efficacious A2B Adenosine Receptor Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The structure−activity relationships for a series of pyrazine-based A2B adenosine receptor antagonists are described. From this work, LAS101057 (17), a potent, selective, and orally efficacious A2B receptor antagonist, was identified as a clinical development candidate. LAS101057 inhibits agonist-induced IL-6 production in human fibroblasts and is active in an ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized mouse model after oral administration, reducing airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, Th2 cytokine production, and OVA-specific IgE levels. PMID:24900298

  18. Reviewing recent results from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrigkeit, C.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory addresses the most fundamental questions about the nature and origin of the highest-energy cosmic rays. The results obtained by the Auger Observatory have already led to a number of major breakthroughs in the field contributing to the advance of our understanding of these extremely energetic particles. The spectrum and the arrival direction distribution are key observables to search for sources or source regions of ultra-high energy cosmic rays, and to understand the transition from Galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays. We present the latest results on the energy spectrum, and on the studies of anisotropies performed on the ten-year dataset of arrival directions of cosmic rays at large and small angular scales. We also address the plans and motivations for the future upgrade of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  19. Resonant Auger studies of metallic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Coulthard, I.; Antel, W. J., Jr.; Frigo, S. P.; Freeland, J. W.; Moore, J.; Calaway, W. S.; Pellin, M. J.; Mendelsohn, M.; Sham, T. K.; Naftel, S. J.; Stampfl, A. P. J.

    1999-10-21

    Results of resonant Auger spectroscopy experiments are presented for Cu, Co, and oxidized Al. Sub-lifetime narrowing of Auger spectra and generation of sub-lifetime narrowed absorption spectra constructed from Auger yield measurements, were observed. Resonant Auger yields are used to identify three valence states of oxidized Al. Partial absorption yield spectra were derived giving detailed electronic information and thickness information for the various chemical states of the bulk metal, the passivating aluminum oxide layer, and the metal-oxide interface region. In addition, the total absorption yield spectrum for the oxidized Al sample was constructed from the partial yield data, supporting the consistency of the authors method.

  20. Drilling power consumption and soil conveying volume performances of lunar sampling auger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Tang, Dewei; Deng, Zongquan; Jiang, Shengyuan; Quan, Qiquan

    2015-05-01

    The sampling auger used in lunar sampling and return mission is to transmit power and convey soil, and its performance is the key factor of the whole mission. However, there is currently a lack of the optimization research on soil conveying volume and power consumption models in auger structure design. To provide the drilled object, the simulation lunar soil, whose physical and mechanical property is the same as the real soil, is made by reducing soil void ratio. The models are formulated to analyze the influence of auger structure parameters on power consumption and soil conveying volume. To obtain the optimized structure parameters of auger, the multi-objective optimization functions of the maximum soil conveying volume and minimum power consumption are developed. To verify the correctness of the models, the performances of different augers drilling simulation soil are tested. The test results demonstrate that the power consumption of optimized auger is the lowest both in theory and test, and the experimental results of soil conveying volume are in agreement with theoretical analysis. Consequently, a new method for designing a lunar sampling auger is proposed which includes the models of soil conveying volume and transportation power consumption, the optimization of structure parameters and the comparison tests. This method provides a reference for sampling auger designing of the Chinese Lunar Sample Mission.

  1. Development of a multifunctional surface analysis system based on a nanometer scale scanning electron beam: Combination of ultrahigh vacuum-scanning electron microscopy, scanning reflection electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Heiji; Ichikawa, Masakazu

    1996-12-01

    We have developed a multifunctional surface analysis system based on a scanning electron beam for nanofabrication and characterization of surface reactions for fabrication processes. The system performs scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning reflection electron microscopy (SREM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Nanometer scale resolution is obtained for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV)-SEM while the mechanical pumping instruments are operated. Single atomic steps on Si(111) surfaces are observed through SREM. Surface sensitive AES measurement is achieved with SREM geometry; this has a great advantage for investigating atomic step related surface reactions. High spatial resolution AES analysis is also achieved by using a nanometer scale probe beam. Auger electron signals from a hundred Ag atoms on a Si(111) surface are successfully detected with high sensitivity.

  2. The Central laser facility at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Arqueros, F.; Bellido, J.; Covault, C.; D'Urso, D.; Di Giulio, C.; Facal, P.; Fick, B.; Guarino, F.; Malek, M.; Matthews, J.A.J.; Matthews, J.; Meyhandan, R.; Monasor, M.; Mostafa, M.; Petrinca, P.; Roberts, M.; Sommers, P.; Travnicek, P.; Valore, L.; Verzi, V.; Wiencke, Lawrence; /Utah U.

    2005-07-01

    The Central Laser Facility is located near the middle of the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina. It features a UV laser and optics that direct a beam of calibrated pulsed light into the sky. Light scattered from this beam produces tracks in the Auger optical detectors which normally record nitrogen fluorescence tracks from cosmic ray air showers. The Central Laser Facility provides a ''test beam'' to investigate properties of the atmosphere and the fluorescence detectors. The laser can send light via optical fiber simultaneously to the nearest surface detector tank for hybrid timing analyses. We describe the facility and show some examples of its many uses.

  3. Discovery and characterization of a potent and selective EP4 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Schiffler, Matthew A; Chandrasekhar, Srinivasan; Fisher, Matthew J; Harvey, Anita; Kuklish, Steven L; Wang, Xu-Shan; Warshawsky, Alan M; York, Jeremy S; Yu, Xiao-Peng

    2015-08-15

    EP4 is a prostaglandin E2 receptor that is a target for potential anti-nociceptive therapy. Described herein is a class of amphoteric EP4 antagonists which reverses PGE2-induced suppression of TNFα production in human whole blood. From this class, a potent and highly bioavailable compound (6) has been selected for potential clinical studies. EP4 binding and functional data, selectivity, and pharmacokinetic properties of this compound are included.

  4. Optimisation of a novel series of potent and orally bioavailable azanaphthyridine SYK inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Garton, Neil S; Barker, Michael D; Davis, Rob P; Douault, Clement; Hooper-Greenhill, Edward; Jones, Emma; Lewis, Huw D; Liddle, John; Lugo, Dave; McCleary, Scott; Preston, Alex G S; Ramirez-Molina, Cesar; Neu, Margarete; Shipley, Tracy J; Somers, Don O; Watson, Robert J; Wilson, David M

    2016-10-01

    The optimisation of the azanaphthyridine series of Spleen Tyrosine Kinase inhibitors is described. The medicinal chemistry strategy was focused on optimising the human whole blood activity whilst achieving a sufficient margin over hERG activity. A good pharmacokinetic profile was achieved by modification of the pKa. Morpholine compound 32 is a potent SYK inhibitor showing moderate selectivity, good oral bioavailability and good efficacy in the rat Arthus model but demonstrated a genotoxic potential in the Ames assay. PMID:27578246

  5. Studies of liquid metal surfaces using Auger spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, S.; Fine, J.

    1982-01-01

    The surface composition of liquid gallium-tin alloys is studied in an Auger electron spectrometer as a function of bulk composition and temperature. The sessile drop samples are cleaned by argon ion bombardment sputtering of the liquid. This technique produces surfaces that are entirely free of impurities within the sensitivity of the spectrometer and remain so for many days. Tin is found to be strongly adsorbed at the liquid-vacuum interface. Surface concentrations based on Auger measurements are found to be in reasonably good agreement with values calculated from surface tension measurements interpreted in terms of a monolayer depth distribution model for the adsorbed tin.

  6. Vacuolin-1 potently and reversibly inhibits autophagosome-lysosome fusion by activating RAB5A

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yingying; Dong, Shichen; Hao, Baixia; Li, Chang; Zhu, Kaiyuan; Guo, Wenjing; Wang, Qian; Cheung, King-Ho; Wong, Connie WM; Wu, Wu-Tian; Markus, Huss; Yue, Jianbo

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic lysosomal degradation process essential for cellular homeostasis and cell survival. Dysfunctional autophagy has been associated with a wide range of human diseases, e.g., cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. A large number of small molecules that modulate autophagy have been widely used to dissect this process and some of them, e.g., chloroquine (CQ), might be ultimately applied to treat a variety of autophagy-associated human diseases. Here we found that vacuolin-1 potently and reversibly inhibited the fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes in mammalian cells, thereby inducing the accumulation of autophagosomes. Interestingly, vacuolin-1 was less toxic but at least 10-fold more potent in inhibiting autophagy compared with CQ. Vacuolin-1 treatment also blocked the fusion between endosomes and lysosomes, resulting in a defect in general endosomal-lysosomal degradation. Treatment of cells with vacuolin-1 alkalinized lysosomal pH and decreased lysosomal Ca2+ content. Besides marginally inhibiting vacuolar ATPase activity, vacuolin-1 treatment markedly activated RAB5A GTPase activity. Expression of a dominant negative mutant of RAB5A or RAB5A knockdown significantly inhibited vacuolin-1-induced autophagosome-lysosome fusion blockage, whereas expression of a constitutive active form of RAB5A suppressed autophagosome-lysosome fusion. These data suggest that vacuolin-1 activates RAB5A to block autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Vacuolin-1 and its analogs present a novel class of drug that can potently and reversibly modulate autophagy. PMID:25483964

  7. "Appearance potent"? A content analysis of UK gay and straight men's magazines.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Glen S; Fawkner, Helen; Slater, Amy; Tiggemann, Marika

    2014-09-01

    With little actual appraisal, a more 'appearance potent' (i.e., a reverence for appearance ideals) subculture has been used to explain gay men's greater body dissatisfaction in comparison to straight men's. This study sought to assess the respective appearance potency of each subculture by a content analysis of 32 issues of the most read gay (Attitude, Gay Times) and straight men's magazines (Men's Health, FHM) in the UK. Images of men and women were coded for their physical characteristics, objectification and nudity, as were the number of appearance adverts and articles. The gay men's magazines featured more images of men that were appearance ideal, nude and sexualized than the straight men's magazines. The converse was true for the images of women and appearance adverts. Although more research is needed to understand the effect of this content on the viewer, the findings are consistent with a more appearance potent gay male subculture. PMID:25129685

  8. "Appearance potent"? A content analysis of UK gay and straight men's magazines.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Glen S; Fawkner, Helen; Slater, Amy; Tiggemann, Marika

    2014-09-01

    With little actual appraisal, a more 'appearance potent' (i.e., a reverence for appearance ideals) subculture has been used to explain gay men's greater body dissatisfaction in comparison to straight men's. This study sought to assess the respective appearance potency of each subculture by a content analysis of 32 issues of the most read gay (Attitude, Gay Times) and straight men's magazines (Men's Health, FHM) in the UK. Images of men and women were coded for their physical characteristics, objectification and nudity, as were the number of appearance adverts and articles. The gay men's magazines featured more images of men that were appearance ideal, nude and sexualized than the straight men's magazines. The converse was true for the images of women and appearance adverts. Although more research is needed to understand the effect of this content on the viewer, the findings are consistent with a more appearance potent gay male subculture.

  9. Angular Correlation between Photoelectrons and Auger Electrons from K-Shell Ionization of Neon

    SciTech Connect

    Landers, A. L.; Robicheaux, F.; Bhandary, A.; Jahnke, T.; Schoeffler, M.; Titze, J.; Akoury, D.; Doerner, R.; Osipov, T.; Lee, S. Y.; Adaniya, H.; Hertlein, M.; Weber, Th.; Prior, M. H.; Belkacem, A.; Ranitovic, P.; Bocharova, I.; Cocke, C. L.

    2009-06-05

    We have used cold target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy to study the continuum correlation between the photoelectron of core-photoionized neon and the subsequent Auger electron. We observe a strong angular correlation between the two electrons. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations agree quite well with the photoelectron energy distribution that is shifted due to the potential change associated with Auger decay. However, a striking discrepancy results in the distribution of the relative angle between Auger and photoelectron. The classical model predicts a shift in photoelectron flux away from the Auger emission direction, and the data strikingly reveal that the flux is lost rather than diverted, indicating that the two-step interpretation of photoionization followed by Auger emission is insufficient to fully describe the core-photoionization process.

  10. Identification of a potent Xenopus mesoderm-inducing factor as a homologue of activin A.

    PubMed

    Smith, J C; Price, B M; Van Nimmen, K; Huylebroeck, D

    1990-06-21

    The first inductive interaction in amphibian development is mesoderm induction, when a signal from the vegetal hemisphere of the blastula induces mesoderm from overlying equatorial cells. Recently, several 'mesoderm-inducing factors' (MIFs) have been discovered. These cause isolated Xenopus animal caps to form mesodermal cell types such as muscle, instead of their normal fate of epidermis. The MIFs fall into two classes. One comprises members of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family, and the other members of the transforming growth factor type beta (TGF-beta) family. Of the latter group, the most potent is XTC-MIF, a protein produced by Xenopus XTC cells. Here we show that XTC-MIF is the homologue of mammalian activin A. Activins modulate the release of follicle-stimulating hormone from cultured anterior pituitary cells and cause the differentiation of two erythroleukaemia cell lines. Our results indicate that these molecules may also act in early development during formation of the mesoderm.

  11. Discovery of a Potent and Orally Efficacious TGR5 Receptor Agonist.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sameer; Patil, Amit; Aware, Umesh; Deshmukh, Prashant; Darji, Brijesh; Sasane, Santosh; Sairam, Kalapatapu V V M; Priyadarsiny, Priyanka; Giri, Poonam; Patel, Harilal; Giri, Suresh; Jain, Mukul; Desai, Ranjit C

    2016-01-14

    TGR5 is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), activation of which promotes secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and modulates insulin secretion. The 2-thio-imidazole derivative 6g was identified as a novel, potent, and selective TGR5 agonist (hTGR5 EC50 = 57 pM, mTGR5 = 62 pM) with a favorable pharmacokinetic profile. The compound 6g was found to have potent glucose lowering effects in vivo during an oral glucose tolerance test in DIO C57 mice with ED50 of 7.9 mg/kg and ED90 of 29.2 mg/kg. PMID:26819665

  12. YM-50001: a novel, potent and selective dopamine D4 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, K; Tada, S; Matsumoto, M; Ohmori, J; Maeno, K; Yamaguchi, T

    1996-11-01

    We investigated some in vitro pharmacological properties of a novel human dopamine D2-like receptor antagonist, YM-50001 [(R)-5-chloro-4-cyclopropylacarbonylamino-2-methoxy-N-[1-(3-methox ybenzyl)- 3-pyrrolidinyl]benzamide monooxalate]. Receptor binding studies revealed that YM-50001 had a potent affinity for human D4 receptors (Ki = 5.62 nM). YM-50001 displayed weak or negligible affinity for other neurotransmitter receptors including human D2 and D3 receptors. YM-50001 shifted the dopamine response curve on each human D2-like receptor subtype-mediated low-Km GTPase activity to the right. YM-50001 also exhibited good D4 selectivity with respect to D2-like receptor antagonism in the functional assay. These results indicate that YM-50001 is a novel, potent and selective D4 receptor antagonist.

  13. A Novel Potent Oral Series of VEGFR2 Inhibitors Abrogate Tumor Growth by Inhibiting Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bold, Guido; Schnell, Christian; Furet, Pascal; McSheehy, Paul; Brüggen, Josef; Mestan, Jürgen; Manley, Paul W; Drückes, Peter; Burglin, Marion; Dürler, Ursula; Loretan, Jacqueline; Reuter, Robert; Wartmann, Markus; Theuer, Andreas; Bauer-Probst, Beatrice; Martiny-Baron, Georg; Allegrini, Peter; Goepfert, Arnaud; Wood, Jeanette; Littlewood-Evans, Amanda

    2016-01-14

    This paper describes the identification of 6-(pyrimidin-4-yloxy)-naphthalene-1-carboxamides as a new class of potent and selective human vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In biochemical and cellular assays, the compounds exhibit single-digit nanomolar potency toward VEGFR2. Compounds of this series show good exposure in rodents when dosed orally. They potently inhibit VEGF-driven angiogenesis in a chamber model and rodent tumor models at daily doses of less than 3 mg/kg by targeting the tumor vasculature as demonstrated by ELISA for TIE-2 in lysates or by immunohistochemical analysis. This novel series of compounds shows a potential for the treatment of solid tumors and other diseases where angiogenesis plays an important role. PMID:26629594

  14. Development of a novel tricyclic class of potent and selective FIXa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dongfang; Andre, Patrick; Bateman, Thomas J; Berger, Richard; Chen, Yi-Heng; Desai, Kunal; Dewnani, Sunita; Ellsworth, Kenneth; Feng, Daming; Geissler, Wayne M; Guo, Liangqin; Hruza, Alan; Jian, Tianying; Li, Hong; Metzger, Joe; Parker, Dann L; Reichert, Paul; Sherer, Edward C; Smith, Cameron J; Sonatore, Lisa M; Tschirret-Guth, Richard; Wu, Jane; Xu, Jiayi; Zhang, Ting; Campeau, Louis-Charles; Orr, Robert; Poirier, Marc; McCabe-Dunn, Jamie; Araki, Kazuto; Nishimura, Teruyuki; Sakurada, Isao; Hirabayashi, Tomokazu; Wood, Harold B

    2015-11-15

    Using structure based drug design, a novel class of potent coagulation factor IXa (FIXa) inhibitors was designed and synthesized. High selectivity over FXa inhibition was achieved. Selected compounds were evaluated in rat IV/PO pharmacokinetic (PK) studies and demonstrated desirable oral PK profiles. Finally, the pharmacodynamics (PD) of this class of molecules were evaluated in thrombin generation assay (TGA) in Corn Trypsin Inhibitor (CTI) citrated human plasma and demonstrated characteristics of a FIXa inhibitor. PMID:26318999

  15. Development of a novel class of potent and selective FIXa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Andre, Patrick; Bateman, Thomas J; Chen, Yi-Heng; Desai, Kunal; Ellsworth, Kenneth; Geissler, Wayne M; Guo, Liangqin; Hruza, Alan; Jian, Tianying; Meng, Dongfang; Parker, Dann L; Qian, Xiaoxia; Reichert, Paul; Sherer, Edward C; Shu, Min; Smith, Cameron J; Sonatore, Lisa M; Tschirret-Guth, Richard; Nolting, Andrew F; Orr, Robert; Campeau, Louis-Charles; Araki, Kazuto; Nishimura, Teruyuki; Sakurada, Isao; Wood, Harold B

    2015-11-01

    Using structure based drug design (SBDD), a novel class of potent coagulation Factor IXa (FIXa) inhibitors was designed and synthesized. High selectivity over FXa inhibition was achieved. Selected compounds demonstrated oral bioavailability in rat IV/PO pharmacokinetic (PK) studies. Finally, the pharmacodynamics (PD) of this class of molecules was evaluated in Thrombin Generation Assay (TGA) in Corn Trypsin Inhibitor (CTI) citrated human plasma and demonstrated characteristics of a FIXa inhibitor. PMID:25978966

  16. Auger analysis of films formed on metals in sliding contact with halogenated polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.

    1974-01-01

    The use of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) to search for transferred polymer must contend with the fact that there has been no published work on Auger analysis of polymers. Since this is a new area for AES, the Auger spectra of polymers and of halogenated polymers in particular is discussed. It is shown that the Auger spectra of halogenated polymers have certain characteristics that permit an assessment of whether a polymeric transfer film has been established by sliding contact. The discussion is general and the concepts should be useful in considering the Auger analysis of any polymer. The polymers chosen for this study are the halogenated polymers polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and polychlorotrifluorethylene (PCTFE).

  17. Discovery of a series of cyclohexylethylamine-containing protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors exhibiting potent cellular activity.

    PubMed

    Henry, K J; Wasicak, J; Tasker, A S; Cohen, J; Ewing, P; Mitten, M; Larsen, J J; Kalvin, D M; Swenson, R; Ng, S C; Saeed, B; Cherian, S; Sham, H; Rosenberg, S H

    1999-11-18

    Synthesis of a library of secondary benzylic amines based on the Sebti-Hamilton type peptidomimetic farnesyltransferase (FTase) inhibitor FTI-276 (1) led to the identification of 6 as a potent enzyme inhibitor (IC(50) of 8 nM) which lacked the problematic thiol residue which had been a common theme in many of the more important FTase inhibitors reported to date. It has previously been disclosed that addition of o-tolyl substitution to FTase inhibitors of the general description 2 had a salutary effect on both FTase inhibition and inhibition of Ras prenylation in whole cells. Combination of these two observations led us to synthesize 7, a potent FTase inhibitor which displayed an IC(50) of 0.16 nM for in vitro inhibition of FTase and an EC(50) of 190 nM for inhibition of whole cell Ras prenylation. Modification of 7 by classical medicinal chemistry led to the discovery of a series of potent FTase inhibitors, culminating in the identification of 25 which exhibited an IC(50) of 0.20 nM and an EC(50) of 4.4 nM. In vivo tests in a nude mouse xenograft model of human pancreatic cancer (MiaPaCa cells) showed that oral dosing of 25 gave rise to impressive attenuation of the growth of this aggressive tumor cell line.

  18. Folate-conjugated nanoparticles as a potent therapeutic approach in targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Behdokht; Mohammadnia-Afrouzi, Mousa; Bakhshaei, Peyman; Yazdani, Yaghoub; Ghalamfarsa, Ghasem; Yousefi, Mehdi; Sadreddini, Sanam; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    The selective and efficient drug delivery to tumor cells can remarkably improve different cancer therapeutic approaches. There are several nanoparticles (NPs) which can act as a potent drug carrier for cancer therapy. However, the specific drug delivery to cancer cells is an important issue which should be considered before designing new NPs for in vivo application. It has been shown that cancer cells over-express folate receptor (FR) in order to improve their growth. As normal cells express a significantly lower levels of FR compared to tumor cells, it seems that folate molecules can be used as potent targeting moieties in different nanocarrier-based therapeutic approaches. Moreover, there is evidence which implies folate-conjugated NPs can selectively deliver anti-tumor drugs into cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we will discuss about the efficiency of different folate-conjugated NPs in cancer therapy.

  19. Identification of a potent microbial lipid antigen for diverse Natural Killer T cells1

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Benjamin J.; Tatituri, Raju V. V.; Almeida, Catarina F.; Le Nours, Jérôme; Bhowruth, Veemal; Johnson, Darryl; Uldrich, Adam P.; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Brigl, Manfred; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Godfrey, Dale I.; Brenner, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells are a well-characterized CD1d-restricted T cell subset. The availability of potent antigens and tetramers for iNKT cells has allowed this population to be extensively studied and has revealed their central roles in infection, autoimmunity, and tumor immunity. In contrast, diverse Natural Killer T (dNKT) cells are poorly understood because the lipid antigens they recognize are largely unknown. We sought to identify dNKT cell lipid antigen(s) by interrogating a panel of dNKT mouse cell hybridomas with lipid extracts from the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. We identified Listeria phosphatidylglycerol (PG) as a microbial antigen that was significantly more potent than a previously characterized dNKT cell antigen, mammalian PG. Further, while mammalian PG loaded CD1d tetramers did not stain dNKT cells, the Listeria-derived PG loaded tetramers did. The structure of Listeria PG was distinct from mammalian PG since it contained shorter, fully-saturated anteiso fatty acid lipid tails. CD1d binding lipid displacement studies revealed that the microbial PG antigen binds significantly better to CD1d than counterparts with the same headgroup. These data reveal a highly-potent microbial lipid antigen for a subset of dNKT cells and provide an explanation for its increased antigen potency compared to the mammalian counterpart. PMID:26254340

  20. A multifunctional drug combination shows highly potent therapeutic efficacy against human cancer xenografts in athymic mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiu-Jun; Zheng, Yan-Bo; Li, Yi; Wu, Shu-Ying; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays a crucial role during tumor development. Integrated combination of drugs that target tumor microenvironment is a promising approach to anticancer therapy. Here, we report a multifunctional combination of low-cytotoxic drugs composed of dipyridamole, bestatin and dexamethasone (DBDx) which mainly acts on the tumor microenvironment shows highly potent antitumor efficacy in vivo. In mouse hepatoma H22 model, the triple drug combination showed synergistic and highly potent antitumor efficacy. The combination indices of various combinations of the triple drugs were between 0.2 and 0.5. DBDx inhibited the growth of a panel of human tumor xenografts and showed no obvious systemic toxicity. At tolerated doses, DBDx suppressed the growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma BEL-7402, HepG2, and lung adenocarcinoma A549 xenografts by 94.5%, 93.7% and 96.9%, respectively. Clonogenic assay demonstrated that DBDx showed weak cytotoxicity. Western blot showed that Flk1 and Nos3 were down-regulated in the DBDx-treated group. Proteomic analysis showed that DBDx mainly affected the metabolic process and immune system process; in addition, the angiogenesis and VEGF signaling pathway were also affected. Conclusively, DBDx, a multifunctional drug combination of three low-cytotoxic drugs, shows synergistic and highly potent antitumor efficacy evidently mediated by the modulation of tumor microenvironment. Based on its low-cytotoxic attributes and its broad-spectrum antitumor therapeutic efficacy, this multifunctional combination might be useful in the treatment of cancers, especially those refractory to conventional chemotherapeutics.

  1. A Potent and Highly Efficacious Bcl-2/Bcl-xL Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    McEachern, Donna; Yang, Chao-Yie; Meagher, Jennifer; Stuckey, Jeanne; Wang, Shaomeng

    2013-01-01

    Our previously reported Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor, 4, effectively inhibited tumor growth but failed to achieve complete regression in vivo. We have now performed extensive modifications on its pyrrole core structure, which has culminated in the discovery of 32 (BM-1074). Compound 32 binds to Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL proteins with Ki values of < 1 nM and inhibits cancer cell growth with IC50 values of 1-2 nM in four small-cell lung cancer cell lines sensitive to potent and specific Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitors. Compound 32 is capable of achieving rapid, complete and durable tumor regression in vivo at a well-tolerated dose-schedule. Compound 32 is the most potent and efficacious Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor reported to date. PMID:23448298

  2. SAR-Based Optimization of a 4-Quinoline Carboxylic Acid Analogue with Potent Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    It is established that drugs targeting viral proteins are at risk of generating resistant strains. However, drugs targeting host factors can potentially avoid this problem. Herein, we report structure–activity relationship studies leading to the discovery of a very potent lead compound 6-fluoro-2-(5-isopropyl-2-methyl-4-phenoxyphenyl)quinoline-4-carboxylic acid (C44) that inhibits human dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) with an IC50 of 1 nM and viral replication of VSV and WSN-Influenza with an EC50 of 2 nM and 41 nM. We also solved the X-ray structure of human DHODH bound to C44, providing structural insight into the potent inhibition of biaryl ether analogues of brequinar. PMID:23930152

  3. Auger`s lateral mooring system: Key learnings

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, C.J.

    1996-12-31

    Installation of the Auger TLP was completed in February 1994 with first production in April 1994. The lateral mooring system (LMS) was critical to the successful mating of the hull and deck and installation of the tendons. The LMS is currently used to position the TLP over the wells during drilling operations and to assist the tendons in holding station during storm events. This paper describes the most significant lessons learned during design, fabrication, installation and operation of the LMS. The results presented in this paper will be useful to mooring system designers, component manufacturers, installation contractors and other operators pursuing floating system options for development of deepwater fields. Specific results to be addressed include design criteria, component selection, corrosion protection systems, component manufacture, anchor performance, locked coil failures, buoy pin procedures and offshore operations. The most significant aspect of this paper will be to provide the industry with the key learnings from the Auger LMS so that deepwater mooring systems may be further improved for future applications.

  4. Synthesis of organic nitrates of luteolin as a novel class of potent aldose reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi-Qin; Cheng, Ning; Zheng, Xiao-Wei; Peng, Sheng-Ming; Zou, Xiao-Qing

    2013-07-15

    Aldose reductase (AR) plays an important role in the design of drugs that prevent and treat diabetic complications. Aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs) have received significant attentions as potent therapeutic drugs. Based on combination principles, three series of luteolin derivatives were synthesised and evaluated for their AR inhibitory activity and nitric oxide (NO)-releasing capacity in vitro. Eighteen compounds were found to be potent ARIs with IC50 values ranging from (0.099±0.008) μM to (2.833±0.102) μM. O(7)-Nitrooxyethyl-O(3'),O(4')-ethylidene luteolin (La1) showed the most potent AR inhibitory activity [IC50=(0.099±0.008) μM]. All organic nitrate derivatives released low concentrations of NO in the presence of l-cysteine. Structure-activity relationship studies suggested that introduction of an NO donor, protection of the catechol structure, and the ether chain of a 2-carbon spacer as a coupling chain on the luteolin scaffold all help increase the AR inhibitory activity of the resulting compound. This class of NO-donor luteolin derivatives as efficient ARIs offer a new concept for the development and design of new drug for preventive and therapeutic drugs for diabetic complications.

  5. SC-46275: a potent and highly selective agonist at the EP3 receptor.

    PubMed

    Savage, M A; Moummi, C; Karabatsos, P J; Lanthorn, T H

    1993-12-01

    The agonist properties of SC-46275 have been investigated in EP receptor subtype-specific smooth muscle assays. In the isolated guinea pig vas deferens (GPVD), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), via the EP3 receptor, potently inhibited electrically induced contractions with an EC50 of 5.4 +/- 1.1 nM. Sulprostone and misoprostol were both potent relaxers of the GPVD yielding EC50s of 1.6 +/- 0.4 nM and 4.3 +/- 0.9 nM, respectively, while butaprost (10,000 nM) was inactive. SC-46275 was by far the most potent agonist in the GPVD exhibiting an EC50 of 0.04 +/- 0.02 nM. PGE2, via the EP1 receptor, stimulates contractions in the longitudinal muscle layer of the guinea pig ileum (GPIL) with an EC50 of 74.4 +/- 10.6 nM. SC-46275 was extremely weak in this preparation, generating only 33% of the maximal PGE2 effect at 30,000 nM. The circular muscle layer of guinea pig ileum (GPIC) is responsive to inhibition of electrically stimulated contractions by PGE2 (EC50 = 179.6 +/- 20.8 nM) via the EP2 receptor. SC-46275 (up to 10,000 nM) was completely inactive in this preparation. We conclude from these findings that SC-46275 is a very potent and highly selective EP3 receptor agonist. SC-46275 should prove to be an extremely valuable tool in probing the physiological significance of EP3 receptors. The high potency of SC-46275 at the EP3 receptor may account for its antisecretory and cytoprotective actions, while its lack of activity at the EP1 or EP2 sites may explain its very weak diarrheagenic potential.

  6. Performance of the fluorescence detectors of the pierre auger observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Bellido, Jose A.; /Adelaide U.

    2005-08-01

    Fluorescence detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory have been operating in a stable manner since January 2004. After a brief review of the physical characteristics of the detectors, the associated atmospheric monitoring, the calibration infrastructure and the detector aperture, we will describe the steps required for the reconstruction of fluorescence event data, with emphasis on the shower profile parameters and primary energy.

  7. Suppression of auger recombination in ""giant"" core/shell nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia Santamaria, Florencio; Vela, Javier; Schaller, Richard D; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A; Klimov, Victor I; Chen, Yongfen

    2009-01-01

    Many potential applications of semiconductor nanocrystals are hindered by nonradiative Auger recombination wherein the electron-hole (exciton) recombination energy is transferred to a third charge carrier. This process severely limits the lifetime and bandwidth of optical gain, leads to large nonradiative losses in light emitting diodes and photovoltaic cells, and is believed to be responsible for intermittency ('blinking') of emission from single nanocrystals. The development of nanostructures in which Auger recombination is suppressed has been a longstanding goal in colloidal nanocrystal research. Here, we demonstrate that such suppression is possible using so-called 'giant' nanocrystals that consist of a small CdSe core and a thick CdS shell. These nanostructures exhibit a very long biexciton lifetime ({approx}10 ns) that is likely dominated by radiative decay instead of non-radiative Auger recombination. As a result of suppressed Auger recombination, even high-order multiexcitons exhibit high emission efficiencies, which allows us to demonstrate optical amplification with an extraordinarily large bandwidth (>500 me V) and record low excitation thresholds.

  8. Ultrafast X-ray Auger probing of photoexcited molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    McFarland, B K; Farrell, J P; Miyabe, S; Tarantelli, F; Aguilar, A; Berrah, N; Bostedt, C; Bozek, J D; Bucksbaum, P H; Castagna, J C; Coffee, R N; Cryan, J P; Fang, L; Feifel, R; Gaffney, K J; Glownia, J M; Martinez, T J; Mucke, M; Murphy, B; Natan, A; Osipov, T; Petrović, V S; Schorb, S; Schultz, Th; Spector, L S; Swiggers, M; Tenney, I; Wang, S; White, J L; White, W; Gühr, M

    2014-01-01

    Molecules can efficiently and selectively convert light energy into other degrees of freedom. Disentangling the underlying ultrafast motion of electrons and nuclei of the photoexcited molecule presents a challenge to current spectroscopic approaches. Here we explore the photoexcited dynamics of molecules by an interaction with an ultrafast X-ray pulse creating a highly localized core hole that decays via Auger emission. We discover that the Auger spectrum as a function of photoexcitation--X-ray-probe delay contains valuable information about the nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom from an element-specific point of view. For the nucleobase thymine, the oxygen Auger spectrum shifts towards high kinetic energies, resulting from a particular C-O bond stretch in the ππ* photoexcited state. A subsequent shift of the Auger spectrum towards lower kinetic energies displays the electronic relaxation of the initial photoexcited state within 200 fs. Ab-initio simulations reinforce our interpretation and indicate an electronic decay to the nπ* state.

  9. Yucasin is a potent inhibitor of YUCCA, a key enzyme in auxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takeshi; Hayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Suzuki, Hiromi; Gyohda, Atsuko; Takaoka, Chihiro; Sakaguchi, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Sachiko; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Tatsuya; Kato, Jun-Ichi; Kamiya, Yuji; Koshiba, Tomokazu

    2014-02-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), an auxin plant hormone, is biosynthesized from tryptophan. The indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPyA) pathway, involving the tryptophan aminotransferase TAA1 and YUCCA (YUC) enzymes, was recently found to be a major IAA biosynthetic pathway in Arabidopsis. TAA1 catalyzes the conversion of tryptophan to IPyA, and YUC produces IAA from IPyA. Using a chemical biology approach with maize coleoptiles, we identified 5-(4-chlorophenyl)-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol (yucasin) as a potent inhibitor of IAA biosynthesis in YUC-expressing coleoptile tips. Enzymatic analysis of recombinant AtYUC1-His suggested that yucasin strongly inhibited YUC1-His activity against the substrate IPyA in a competitive manner. Phenotypic analysis of Arabidopsis YUC1 over-expression lines (35S::YUC1) demonstrated that yucasin acts in IAA biosynthesis catalyzed by YUC. In addition, 35S::YUC1 seedlings showed resistance to yucasin in terms of root growth. A loss-of-function mutant of TAA1, sav3-2, was hypersensitive to yucasin in terms of root growth and hypocotyl elongation of etiolated seedlings. Yucasin combined with the TAA1 inhibitor l-kynurenine acted additively in Arabidopsis seedlings, producing a phenotype similar to yucasin-treated sav3-2 seedlings, indicating the importance of IAA biosynthesis via the IPyA pathway in root growth and leaf vascular development. The present study showed that yucasin is a potent inhibitor of YUC enzymes that offers an effective tool for analyzing the contribution of IAA biosynthesis via the IPyA pathway to plant development and physiological processes. PMID:24299123

  10. Nanodosimetry of Auger electrons: A case study from the decay of 125I and 0-18-eV electron stopping cross sections of cytosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, M.; Bazin, M.; Sanche, L.

    2013-03-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals emitting Auger electrons are often injected into patients undergoing cancer treatment with targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT). In this type of radiotherapy, the radiation source is radial and most of the emitted primary particles are low-energy electrons (LEEs) having kinetic energies distributed mostly from zero to a few hundred electron volts with very short ranges in biological media. These LEEs generate a high density of energy deposits and clustered damage, thus offering a relative biological effectiveness comparable to that of alpha particles. In this paper, we present a simple model and corresponding measurements to assess the energy deposited near the site of the radiopharmaceuticals in TRT. As an example, a calculation is performed for the decay of a single 125I radionuclide surrounded by a 1-nm-radius spherical shell of cytosine molecules using the energy spectrum of LEEs emitted by 125I along with their stopping cross sections between 0 and 18 eV. The dose absorbed by the cytosine shell, which occupies a volume of 4 nm3, is extremely high. It amounts to 79 kGy per decay of which 3%, 39%, and 58% is attributed to vibrational excitations, electronic excitations, and ionization processes, respectively.

  11. Nanodosimetry of Auger electrons: A case study from the decay of (125)I and 0-18-eV electron stopping cross sections of cytosine.

    PubMed

    Michaud, M; Bazin, M; Sanche, L

    2013-03-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals emitting Auger electrons are often injected into patients undergoing cancer treatment with targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT). In this type of radiotherapy, the radiation source is radial and most of the emitted primary particles are low-energy electrons (LEEs) having kinetic energies distributed mostly from zero to a few hundred electron volts with very short ranges in biological media. These LEEs generate a high density of energy deposits and clustered damage, thus offering a relative biological effectiveness comparable to that of alpha particles. In this paper, we present a simple model and corresponding measurements to assess the energy deposited near the site of the radiopharmaceuticals in TRT. As an example, a calculation is performed for the decay of a single (125)I radionuclide surrounded by a 1-nm-radius spherical shell of cytosine molecules using the energy spectrum of LEEs emitted by (125)I along with their stopping cross sections between 0 and 18 eV. The dose absorbed by the cytosine shell, which occupies a volume of 4 nm(3), is extremely high. It amounts to 79 kGy per decay of which 3%, 39%, and 58% is attributed to vibrational excitations, electronic excitations, and ionization processes, respectively.

  12. Observation of suppressed Auger mechanism in type-I quantum well structures with delocalized electron-hole wavefunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hassani Nia, Iman; Fathipour, Vala; Mohseni, Hooman

    2015-08-15

    We report the first observation of non-threshold Auger mechanism for a quantum well structure with Type-I band alignment. Excitation-dependent photoluminescence measurements were used to extract the Auger recombination coefficients from 77 K up to room temperature. The results verify the role of interface mediated momentum exchange as well as suppression of Auger recombination for delocalized electron-hole wavefunctions.

  13. Pyrazolo-Pyrimidines: A Novel Heterocyclic Scaffold for Potent and Selective p38alpha Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Das,J.; Moquin, R.; Pitt, S.; Zhang, R.; Shen, D.; McIntyre, K.; Gillooly, K.; Doweyko, A.; Sack, J.; et al

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis and structure-activity relationships (SAR) of p38a MAP kinase inhibitors based on a pyrazolo-pyrimidine scaffold are described. These studies led to the identification of compound 2x as a potent and selective inhibitor of p38a MAP kinase with excellent cellular potency toward the inhibition of TNFa production. Compound 2x was highly efficacious in vivo in inhibiting TNFa production in an acute murine model of TNFa production. X-ray co-crystallography of a pyrazolo-pyrimidine analog 2b bound to unphosphorylated p38a is also disclosed.

  14. X-ray excited Auger transitions of Pu compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Art J. Grant, William K.; Stanford, Jeff A.; Siekhaus, Wigbert J.; Allen, Patrick G.; McLean, William

    2015-05-15

    X-ray excited Pu core–valence–valence and core–core–valence Auger line-shapes were used in combination with the Pu 4f photoelectron peaks to characterize differences in the oxidation state and local electronic structure for Pu compounds. The evolution of the Pu 4f core-level chemical shift as a function of sputtering depth profiling and hydrogen exposure at ambient temperature was quantified. The combination of the core–valence–valence Auger peak energies with the associated chemical shift of the Pu 4f photoelectron line defines the Auger parameter and results in a reliable method for definitively determining oxidation states independent of binding energy calibration. Results show that PuO{sub 2}, Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3}, PuH{sub 2.7}, and Pu have definitive Auger line-shapes. These data were used to produce a chemical state (Wagner) plot for select plutonium oxides. This Wagner plot allowed us to distinguish between the trivalent hydride and the trivalent oxide, which cannot be differentiated by the Pu 4f binding energy alone.

  15. Analysis of switchgrass-derived bio-oil and associated aqueous phase generated in a semi-pilot scale auger pyrolyzer

    DOE PAGES

    Ren, Shoujie; Ye, X. Philip; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Kim, Pyoungchung; Labbé, Ncole

    2016-03-30

    To efficiently utilize water-soluble compounds in bio-oil and evaluate the potential effects of these compounds on processes such as microbial electrolysis, our study investigated the physico-chemical properties of bio-oil and the associated aqueous phase generated from switchgrass using a semi-pilot scale auger pyrolyzer. Combining separation and detection strategies with organic solvent extraction, an array of analytical instruments and methods were used to identify and quantify the chemical constituents. Separation of an aqueous phase from crude bio-oil was achieved by adding water (water: crude bio-oil at 4:1 in weight), which resulted in a partition of 61 wt.% of the organic compoundsmore » into a bio-oil aqueous phase (BOAP). GC/MS analysis for BOAP identified over 40 compounds of which 16 were quantified. Acetic acid, propionic acid, and levoglucosan are the major components in BOAP. In addition, a significant portion of chemicals that have the potential to be upgraded to hydrocarbon fuels were extracted to BOAP (77 wt.% of the alcohols, 61 wt.% of the furans, and 52 wt.% of the phenolic compounds in crude bio-oil). Valorization of the BOAP may require conversion methods capable of accommodating a very broad substrate specificity. Ultimately, a better separation strategy is needed to selectively remove the acidic and polar components from crude bio-oil to improve economic feasibility of biorefinery operations.« less

  16. Highly Specific and Broadly Potent Inhibitors of Mammalian Secreted Phospholipases A2

    PubMed Central

    Oslund, Rob C.; Cermak, Nathan; Gelb, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    We report a series of inhibitors of secreted phospholipases A2 (sPLA2s) based on substituted indoles, 6,7-benzoindoles, and indolizines derived from LY315920, a well-known indole-based sPLA2 inhibitor. Using the human group X sPLA2 crystal structure, we prepared a highly potent and selective indole-based inhibitor of this enzyme. Also, we report human and mouse group IIA and IIE specific inhibitors and a substituted 6,7-benzoindole that inhibits nearly all human and mouse sPLA2s in the low nanomolar range. PMID:18605714

  17. Temperature effects on Li4Ti5O12 electrode/electrolyte interfaces at the first cycle: A X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Scanning Auger Microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gieu, J.-B.; Courrèges, C.; El Ouatani, L.; Tessier, C.; Martinez, H.

    2016-06-01

    Li4Ti5O12-based negative electrodes for Lithium-ion batteries are of interest because of the high reversibility of Li+ insertion/extraction. In this study, the surface of cycled electrodes is analysed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Scanning Auger Microscopy (SAM) to investigate the effects of cycling temperature (room temperature, 60 °C and 85 °C) upon the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation, which plays a major role in batteries electrochemical performances. Half-cells, with a vinylene carbonate containing electrolyte, are galvanostatically cycled at different steps of the first cycle: the mid-plateau during the first discharge, the end of the first discharge at 1.2 V and the end of the first charge at 2.0 V. XPS analysis evidences that higher temperatures promote the formation of a thicker SEI, which can explain the increase of the irreversible capacity with temperature. SAM mappings (allowing high spatial resolution ∼10-100 nm) evidence that this SEI homogeneously covers the electrode surface, regardless of the cycling temperature. During charge, the SEI is partially dissolved at room temperature, more slightly at 60 °C whereas at 85 °C, no clear evidence of layer thinning is observed. The SEI chemical composition is also investigated and reveals a majority of organic species and an increasing proportion of LiF with the temperature.

  18. Results of a self-triggered prototype system for radio-detection of extensive air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, P.; Acounis, S.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anti&cbreve; i'c, T.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenir, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Baughman, B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buroker, L.; Burton, R. E.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Charrier, D.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chirinos Diaz, J.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, J.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fox, B.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garçon, T.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Messina, S.; Meurer, C.; Meyhandan, R.; Mi'canovi'c, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F.; Schulz, J.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Silva Lopez, H. H.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stassi, P.; Stephan, M.; Straub, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyj, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano Garcia, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2012-11-01

    We describe the experimental setup and the results of RAuger, a small radio-antenna array, consisting of three fully autonomous and self-triggered radio-detection stations, installed close to the center of the Surface Detector (SD) of the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina. The setup has been designed for the detection of the electric field strength of air showers initiated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays, without using an auxiliary trigger from another detection system. Installed in December 2006, RAuger was terminated in May 2010 after 65 registered coincidences with the SD. The sky map in local angular coordinates (i.e., zenith and azimuth angles) of these events reveals a strong azimuthal asymmetry which is in agreement with a mechanism dominated by a geomagnetic emission process. The correlation between the electric field and the energy of the primary cosmic ray is presented for the first time, in an energy range covering two orders of magnitude between 0.1 EeV and 10 EeV. It is demonstrated that this setup is relatively more sensitive to inclined showers, with respect to the SD. In addition to these results, which underline the potential of the radio-detection technique, important information about the general behavior of self-triggering radio-detection systems has been obtained. In particular, we will discuss radio self-triggering under varying local electric-field conditions.

  19. Influence of the "surface effect" on the segregation parameters of S in Fe(100): A multi-scale modelling and Auger Electron Spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, P. E.; Terblans, J. J.; Swart, H. C.

    2015-12-01

    The article takes a new look at the process of atomic segregation by considering the influence of surface relaxation on the segregation parameters; the activation energy (Q), segregation energy (ΔG), interaction parameter (Ω) and the pre-exponential factor (D0). Computational modelling, namely Density Functional Theory (DFT) and the Modified Darken Model (MDM) in conjunction with Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) was utilized to study the variation of the segregation parameters for S in the surface region of Fe(100). Results indicate a variation in each of the segregation parameters as a function of the atomic layer under consideration. Values of the segregation parameters varied more dramatically as the surface layer is approached, with atomic layer 2 having the largest deviations in comparison to the bulk values. This atomic layer had the highest Q value and formed the rate limiting step for the segregation of S towards the Fe(100) surface. It was found that the segregation process is influenced by two sets of segregation parameters, those of the surface region formed by atomic layer 2, and those in the bulk material. This article is the first to conduct a full scale investigation on the influence of surface relaxation on segregation and labelled it the "surface effect".

  20. MONNA, a Potent and Selective Blocker for Transmembrane Protein with Unknown Function 16/Anoctamin-1

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Soo-Jin; Hwang, Seok Jin; Jung, Jonghoon; Yu, Kuai; Kim, Jeongyeon; Choi, Jung Yoon; Hartzell, H. Criss

    2013-01-01

    Transmembrane protein with unknown function 16/anoctamin-1 (ANO1) is a protein widely expressed in mammalian tissues, and it has the properties of the classic calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC). This protein has been implicated in numerous major physiological functions. However, the lack of effective and selective blockers has hindered a detailed study of the physiological functions of this channel. In this study, we have developed a potent and selective blocker for endogenous ANO1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes (xANO1) using a drug screening method we previously established (Oh et al., 2008). We have synthesized a number of anthranilic acid derivatives and have determined the correlation between biological activity and the nature and position of substituents in these derived compounds. A structure-activity relationship revealed novel chemical classes of xANO1 blockers. The derivatives contain a −NO2 group on position 5 of a naphthyl group-substituted anthranilic acid, and they fully blocked xANO1 chloride currents with an IC50 < 10 μM. The most potent blocker, N-((4-methoxy)-2-naphthyl)-5-nitroanthranilic acid (MONNA), had an IC50 of 0.08 μM for xANO1. Selectivity tests revealed that other chloride channels such as bestrophin-1, chloride channel protein 2, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator were not appreciably blocked by 10∼30 μM MONNA. The potent and selective blockers for ANO1 identified here should permit pharmacological dissection of ANO1/CaCC function and serve as potential candidates for drug therapy of related diseases such as hypertension, cystic fibrosis, bronchitis, asthma, and hyperalgesia. PMID:23997117

  1. Analysis of passivated A-286 stainless steel surfaces for mass spectrometer inlet systems by Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Ajo, Henry; Blankenship, Donnie; Clark, Elliot

    2014-07-25

    In this study, various commercially available surface treatments are being explored for use on stainless steel components in mass spectrometer inlet systems. Type A-286 stainless steel coupons, approximately 12.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick, were passivated with one of five different surface treatments; an untreated coupon served as a control. The surface and near-surface microstructure and chemistry of the coupons were investigated using sputter depth profiling using Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All the surface treatments studied appeared to change the surface morphology dramatically, as evidenced by lack of tool marks onmore » the treated samples in SEM images. In terms of the passivation treatment, Vendors A-D appeared to have oxide layers that were very similar in thickness to each other (0.7–0.9 nm thick), as well as to the untreated samples (the untreated sample oxide layers appeared to be somewhat larger). Vendor E’s silicon coating appears to be on the order of 200 nm thick.« less

  2. Analysis of passivated A-286 stainless steel surfaces for mass spectrometer inlet systems by Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ajo, Henry; Blankenship, Donnie; Clark, Elliot

    2014-07-25

    In this study, various commercially available surface treatments are being explored for use on stainless steel components in mass spectrometer inlet systems. Type A-286 stainless steel coupons, approximately 12.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick, were passivated with one of five different surface treatments; an untreated coupon served as a control. The surface and near-surface microstructure and chemistry of the coupons were investigated using sputter depth profiling using Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All the surface treatments studied appeared to change the surface morphology dramatically, as evidenced by lack of tool marks on the treated samples in SEM images. In terms of the passivation treatment, Vendors A-D appeared to have oxide layers that were very similar in thickness to each other (0.7–0.9 nm thick), as well as to the untreated samples (the untreated sample oxide layers appeared to be somewhat larger). Vendor E’s silicon coating appears to be on the order of 200 nm thick.

  3. Stereoselective synthesis of protectin D1: A potent anti-inflammatory and proresolving lipid mediator

    PubMed Central

    Aursnes, M.; Tungen, J. E.; Vik, A.; Dalli, J.; Hansen, T. V.

    2014-01-01

    A convergent stereoselective synthesis of the potent anti-inflammatory, proresolving and neuroprotective lipid mediator protectin D1 (2) has been achieved in 15% yield over eight steps. The key features were a stereocontrolled Evans-aldol reaction with Nagao’s chiral auxiliary and a highly selective Lindlar reduction of internal alkyne 23, allowing the sensitive conjugated E,E,Z-triene to be introduced late in the preparation of 2. The UV and LC/MS-MS data of synthetic protectin D1 (2) matched those obtained from endogenously produced material PMID:24253202

  4. Ecteinascidins. A review of the chemistry, biology and clinical utility of potent tetrahydroisoquinoline antitumor antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Le, V H; Inai, M; Williams, R M; Kan, T

    2015-02-01

    The ecteinascidin family comprises a number of biologically active compounds, containing two to three tetrahydroisoquinoline subunits. Although isolated from marine tunicates, these compounds share a common pentacyclic core with several antimicrobial compounds found in terrestrial bacteria. Among the tetrahydroisoquinoline natural products, ecteinascidin 743 (Et-743) stands out as the most potent antitumor antibiotics that it is recently approved for treatment of a number of soft tissue sarcomas. In this article, we will review the backgrounds, the mechanism of action, the biosynthesis, and the synthetic studies of Et-743. Also, the development of Et-743 as an antitumor drug is discussed.

  5. Identification of an N-oxide pyridine GW4064 analog as a potent FXR agonist.

    PubMed

    Feng, Song; Yang, Minmin; Zhang, Zhenshan; Wang, Zhanguo; Hong, Di; Richter, Hans; Benson, Gregory Martin; Bleicher, Konrad; Grether, Uwe; Martin, Rainer E; Plancher, Jean-Marc; Kuhn, Bernd; Rudolph, Markus Georg; Chen, Li

    2009-05-01

    According to the docking studies and the analysis of a co-crystal structure of GW4064 with FXR, a series of 3-aryl heterocyclic isoxazole analogs were designed and synthesized. N-Oxide pyridine analog (7b) was identified as a promising FXR agonist with potent binding affinity and good efficacy, supporting our hypothesis that through an additional hydrogen bond interaction between the pyridine substituent of isoxazole analogs and Tyr373 and Ser336 of FXR, binding affinity and functional activity could be improved.

  6. Ecteinascidins. A Review of the Chemistry, Biology and Clinical Utility of Potent Tetrahydroisoquinoline Antitumor Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Le, V. H.; Inai, M.; Williams, R. M.; Kan, T.

    2016-01-01

    The Ecteinascidin family comprises a number of biologically active compounds, containing two to three tetrahydroisoquinoline subunits. Although isolated from marine tunicates, these compounds share a common pentacyclic core with several antimicrobial compounds found in terrestrial bacteria. Among the tetrahydroisoquinoline natural products, Ecteinascidin 743 (Et-743) stands out as the most potent antitumor antibiotics that it is recently approved for treatment of a number of soft tissue sarcomas. In this article, we will review the backgrounds, the mechanism of action, the biosynthesis, and the synthetic studies of Et-743. Also, the development of Et-743 as an antitumor drug is discussed. PMID:25273374

  7. Discovery of a Novel Series of Thienopyrimidine as Highly Potent and Selective PI3K Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway provides a promising new approach for cancer therapy. Through a rational design, a novel series of thienopyrimidine was discovered as highly potent and selective PI3K inhibitors. These thienopyrimidine derivatives were demonstrated to bear nanomolar PI3Kα inhibitory potency with over 100-fold selectivity against mTOR kinase. The lead compounds 6g and 6k showed good developability profiles in cell-based proliferation and ADME assays. In this communication, their design, synthesis, structure–activity relationship, selectivity, and some developability properties are described. PMID:25893045

  8. Discovery of PF-5190457, a Potent, Selective, and Orally Bioavailable Ghrelin Receptor Inverse Agonist Clinical Candidate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The identification of potent, highly selective orally bioavailable ghrelin receptor inverse agonists from a spiro-azetidino-piperidine series is described. Examples from this series have promising in vivo pharmacokinetics and increase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in human whole and dispersed islets. A physicochemistry-based strategy to increase lipophilic efficiency for ghrelin receptor potency and retain low clearance and satisfactory permeability while reducing off-target pharmacology led to the discovery of 16h. Compound 16h has a superior balance of ghrelin receptor pharmacology and off-target selectivity. On the basis of its promising pharmacological and safety profile, 16h was advanced to human clinical trials. PMID:24900864

  9. Discovery of a Selective Inhibitor of Oncogenic B-Raf Kinase With Potent Antimelanoma Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, J.; Lee, J.T.; Wang, W.; Zhang, J.; Cho, H.; Mamo, S.; Bremer, R.; Gillette, S.; Kong, J.; Haass, N.K.; Sproesser, K.; Li, L.; Smalley, K.S.M.; Fong, D.; Zhu, Y.-L.; Marimuthu, A.; Nguyen, H.; Lam, B.; Liu, J.; Cheung, I.; Rice, J.

    2009-05-26

    BRAF{sup V600E} is the most frequent oncogenic protein kinase mutation known. Furthermore, inhibitors targeting 'active' protein kinases have demonstrated significant utility in the therapeutic repertoire against cancer. Therefore, we pursued the development of specific kinase inhibitors targeting B-Raf, and the V600E allele in particular. By using a structure-guided discovery approach, a potent and selective inhibitor of active B-Raf has been discovered. PLX4720, a 7-azaindole derivative that inhibits B-Raf{sup V600E} with an IC{sub 50} of 13 nM, defines a class of kinase inhibitor with marked selectivity in both biochemical and cellular assays. PLX4720 preferentially inhibits the active B-Raf{sup V600E} kinase compared with a broad spectrum of other kinases, and potent cytotoxic effects are also exclusive to cells bearing the V600E allele. Consistent with the high degree of selectivity, ERK phosphorylation is potently inhibited by PLX4720 in B-Raf{sup V600E}-bearing tumor cell lines but not in cells lacking oncogenic B-Raf. In melanoma models, PLX4720 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis exclusively in B-Raf{sup V600E}-positive cells. In B-Raf{sup V600E}-dependent tumor xenograft models, orally dosed PLX4720 causes significant tumor growth delays, including tumor regressions, without evidence of toxicity. The work described here represents the entire discovery process, from initial identification through structural and biological studies in animal models to a promising therapeutic for testing in cancer patients bearing B-Raf{sup V600E}-driven tumors.

  10. Multiple-Auger electron ejection after inner-shell ionization and excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Viefhaus, Jens

    2003-01-24

    Results on the Auger decay of core-ionized and core-exited Ar atoms above the Ar 2p threshold and at the Ar 2p3/2 {yields}3d resonance leading to double and triple ionization states are presented. Using a multiple time-of-flight analyzer arrangement for electron-electron coincidences, we directly observe for the first time a double Auger continuum following core electron ionization. Our results show clear evidence for continuously distributed Auger electron intensity over a 160 eV range of kinetic energies. This double Auger decay represents roughly 10 % of the normal single Auger channels. In the case of the resonant Auger decay we also observe a two-electron continuum of the same order of magnitude as in the non-resonant case which can be explained due to the existence of excited states of the doubly charged ion in the vicinity or just above the triple ionization threshold. In the latter case these states can further decay via emission of a low kinetic energy electron, which makes it possible to study the electron emission characteristics of the triple electron process. Both double- and triple-electron emission Auger processes will make it possible to study electron correlations undisturbed by the symmetry properties of the photoabsorption process.

  11. Pulmonary aerosol actions of LY188695 (KB2413), a new potent H1-receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Silbaugh, S A; Stengel, P W; Rinkema, L E

    1987-06-01

    The new potent H1 receptor antagonist, LY188695 (KB2413), was delivered to guinea pigs as a pulmonary aerosol and its ability to inhibit histamine-induced airway obstruction examined. Aerosol LY188695 was more effective than inhaled chlorpheniramine or clemastine in reducing the pulmonary gas trapping produced by histamine challenge. Lung antihistamine effects occurred within minutes of a brief, low concentration aerosol exposure and persisted for at least 1 hour. LY188695 aerosol treatment did not produce significant inhibition of methacholine-induced gas trapping. Although systemic antihistamine effects occurred 50 minutes after LY188695 inhalation, aerosol administration produced an enhanced local (i.e., lung) action compared to intravenous delivery.

  12. 30 CFR 77.1500 - Auger mining; planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auger mining; planning. 77.1500 Section 77.1500... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Auger Mining § 77.1500 Auger mining; planning. Auger mining shall be planned and conducted by the operator to...

  13. 30 CFR 77.1500 - Auger mining; planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Auger mining; planning. 77.1500 Section 77.1500... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Auger Mining § 77.1500 Auger mining; planning. Auger mining shall be planned and conducted by the operator to...

  14. 30 CFR 77.1500 - Auger mining; planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Auger mining; planning. 77.1500 Section 77.1500... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Auger Mining § 77.1500 Auger mining; planning. Auger mining shall be planned and conducted by the operator to...

  15. 30 CFR 77.1500 - Auger mining; planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Auger mining; planning. 77.1500 Section 77.1500... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Auger Mining § 77.1500 Auger mining; planning. Auger mining shall be planned and conducted by the operator to...

  16. 30 CFR 77.1500 - Auger mining; planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Auger mining; planning. 77.1500 Section 77.1500... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Auger Mining § 77.1500 Auger mining; planning. Auger mining shall be planned and conducted by the operator to...

  17. Effect of Auger Recombination on Lasing in Heterostructured Quantum Dots with Engineered Core/Shell Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Shin; Bae, Wan Ki; Baker, Thomas; Lim, Jaehoon; Klimov, Victor I

    2015-11-11

    Nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) are attractive materials for applications as laser media because of their bright, size-tunable emission and the flexibility afforded by colloidal synthesis. Nonradiative Auger recombination, however, hampers optical amplification in QDs by rapidly depleting the population of gain-active multiexciton states. In order to elucidate the role of Auger recombination in QD lasing and isolate its influence from other factors that might affect optical gain, we study two types of CdSe/CdS core/shell QDs with the same core radii and the same total sizes but different properties of the core/shell interface ("sharp" vs "smooth"). These samples exhibit distinctly different biexciton Auger lifetimes but are otherwise virtually identical. The suppression of Auger recombination in the sample with a smooth (alloyed) interface results in a notable improvement in the optical gain performance manifested in the reduction of the threshold for amplified spontaneous emission and the ability to produce dual-color lasing involving both the band-edge (1S) and the higher-energy (1P) electronic states. We develop a model, which explicitly accounts for the multiexciton nature of optical gain in QDs, and use it to analyze the competition between stimulated emission from multiexcitons and their decay via Auger recombination. These studies re-emphasize the importance of Auger recombination control for the realization of real-life QD-based lasing technologies and offer practical strategies for suppression of Auger recombination via "interface engineering" in core/shell structures. PMID:26397312

  18. Ratioed scatter diagrams - An erotetic method for phase identification on complex surfaces using scanning Auger microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browning, R.

    1984-01-01

    By ratioing multiple Auger intensities and plotting a two-dimensional occupational scatter diagram while digitally scanning across an area, the number and elemental association of surface phases can be determined. This can prove a useful tool in scanning Auger microscopic analysis of complex materials. The technique is illustrated by results from an anomalous region on the reaction zone of a SiC/Ti-6Al-4V metal matrix composite material. The anomalous region is shown to be a single phase associated with sulphur and phosphorus impurities. Imaging of a selected phase from the ratioed scatter diagram is possible and may be a useful technique for presenting multiple scanning Auger images.

  19. A Potent and Orally Efficacious, Hydroxyethylamine-Based Inhibitor of β-Secretase

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    β-Secretase inhibitors are potentially disease-modifying treatments for Alzheimer's disease. Previous efforts in our laboratory have resulted in hydroxyethylamine-derived inhibitors such as 1 with low nanomolar potency against β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme (BACE). When dosed intravenously, compound 1 was also shown to significantly reduce Aβ40 levels in plasma, brain, and cerebral spinal fluid. Herein, we report further optimizations that led to the discovery of inhibitor 16 as a novel, potent, and orally efficacious BACE inhibitor. PMID:24900403

  20. An improved synthesis of m-hydroxymexiletine, a potent mexiletine metabolite.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Alessia; Carocci, Alessia; Lentini, Giovanni; Defrenza, Ivana; Cavalluzzi, Maria Maddalena; Franchini, Carlo

    2012-06-01

    m-Hydroxymexiletine (MHM), a minor metabolite of the class IB anti-arrhythmic drug mexiletine, is about two fold more potent than the parent compound on human cardiac voltage-gated sodium channels (hNav1.5), and equipotent to mexiletine on human skeletal-muscle voltage-gated sodium channels (hNav1.4). Herein, an alternative and simplified synthesis of this promising compound has been accomplished. This route, as well as being more efficient, has the advantage, over the first, to avoid the use of oxidizing agents, such as the meta-chloroperoxybenzoic acid. PMID:22849704

  1. Structure-based design of a potent artificial transactivation domain based on p53.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Chantal; Del Gatto, Annarita; Arseneault, Geneviève; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; De Simone, Mariarosaria; Morse, Thomas; de Paola, Ivan; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Legault, Pascale; Pedone, Carlo; Zaccaro, Laura; Omichinski, James G

    2012-01-25

    Malfunctions in transcriptional regulation are associated with a number of critical human diseases. As a result, there is considerable interest in designing artificial transcription activators (ATAs) that specifically control genes linked to human diseases. Like native transcriptional activator proteins, an ATA must minimally contain a DNA-binding domain (DBD) and a transactivation domain (TAD) and, although there are several reliable methods for designing artificial DBDs, designing artificial TADs has proven difficult. In this manuscript, we present a structure-based strategy for designing short peptides containing natural amino acids that function as artificial TADs. Using a segment of the TAD of p53 as the scaffolding, modifications are introduced to increase the helical propensity of the peptides. The most active artificial TAD, termed E-Cap-(LL), is a 13-mer peptide that contains four key residues from p53, an N-capping motif and a dileucine hydrophobic bridge. In vitro analysis demonstrates that E-Cap-(LL) interacts with several known p53 target proteins, while in vivo studies in a yeast model system show that it is a 20-fold more potent transcriptional activator than the native p53-13 peptide. These results demonstrate that structure-based design represents a promising approach for developing artificial TADs that can be combined with artificial DBDs to create potent and specific ATAs. PMID:22191432

  2. An experimental comparison of the K- and L-Auger electron spectra generated in the decays of 140Nd and 111In.

    PubMed

    Yakushev, E A; Kovalík, A; Filosofov, D V; Korolev, N A; Lebedev, N A; Lubashevski, A V; Rösch, F; Novgorodov, A F

    2005-03-01

    The low-energy electron spectra generated in the decay of 140Nd have been measured using a combined electrostatic spectrometer adjusted to the 4, 7, and 35 eV instrumental resolution. In order to estimate the therapeutic potential of low-energy electrons associated with the decay of 140Nd, similar experiments have been performed with 111In. Relative Auger electron intensity ratios per decay are: 111In(K-Auger)/140Nd(K-Auger)=1.47(12), 111In(L-Auger) /140Nd(L-Auger)=1.1(4), and 111In(L-Auger [2.8-7 keV])/140Nd(L-Auger [2.8-7 keV])=0.24(11). The obtained K-Auger group intensity ratios have been compared with results of calculations. The good agreement found for the experimental and estimated values indicates that such information can be also derived using available nuclear and atomic data. The relative intensity of L-Auger electrons emitted within the 2.8-7 keV interval is higher for 140Nd by a factor of about 4 compared to 111In. As the L-Auger emission is dominating relative to that of the K-Auger group, this implicates that any potential endotherapeutic strategy using 140Nd-labelled targeting vectors requires a maximum accumulation of the endoradiotherapeutical close to the cell nucleus or the DNA of the tumour cell. PMID:15607923

  3. Basis Tetrapeptides as Potent Intracellular Inhibitors of type A Botulinum Neurotoxin Protease Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, M.; Swaminathan, S.; Oyler, G.; Ahmed, S. A.

    2011-01-21

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most potent of all toxins that cause flaccid muscle paralysis leading to death. They are also potential biothreat agents. A systematic investigation of various short peptide inhibitors of the BoNT protease domain with a 17-residue peptide substrate led to arginine-arginine-glycine-cysteine having a basic tetrapeptide structure as the most potent inhibitor. When assayed in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT), the inhibitory effect was drastically reduced. Replacing the terminal cysteine with one hydrophobic residue eliminated the DTT effect but with two hydrophobic residues made the pentapeptide a poor inhibitor. Replacing the first arginine with cysteine or adding an additional cysteine at the N terminus did not improve inhibition. When assessed using mouse brain lysates, the tetrapeptides also inhibited BoNT/A cleavage of the endogenous SNAP-25. The peptides penetrated the neuronal cell lines, N2A and BE(2)-M17, without adversely affecting metabolic functions as measured by ATP production and P-38 phosphorylation. Biological activity of the peptides persisted within cultured chick motor neurons and rat and mouse cerebellar neurons for more than 40 h and inhibited BoNT/A protease action inside the neurons in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Our results define a tetrapeptide as the smallest peptide inhibitor in the backdrop of a large substrate protein of 200+ amino acids having multiple interaction regions with its cognate enzyme. The inhibitors should also be valuable candidates for drug development.

  4. Development and Characterization of a Potent Free Fatty Acid Receptor 1 (FFA1) Fluorescent Tracer.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Elisabeth; Hudson, Brian D; Hansen, Anders Højgaard; Milligan, Graeme; Ulven, Trond

    2016-05-26

    The free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1/GPR40) is a potential target for treatment of type 2 diabetes. Although several potent agonists have been described, there remains a strong need for suitable tracers to interrogate ligand binding to this receptor. We address this by exploring fluorophore-tethering to known potent FFA1 agonists. This led to the development of 4, a high affinity FFA1 tracer with favorable and polarity-dependent fluorescent properties. A close to ideal overlap between the emission spectrum of the NanoLuciferase receptor tag and the excitation spectrum of 4 enabled the establishment of a homogeneous BRET-based binding assay suitable for both detailed kinetic studies and high throughput competition binding studies. Using 4 as a tracer demonstrated that the compound acts fully competitively with selected synthetic agonists but not with lauric acid and allowed for the characterization of binding affinities of a diverse selection of known FFA1 agonists, indicating that 4 will be a valuable tool for future studies at FFA1. PMID:27074625

  5. Particle Physics with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierog, T.

    2014-06-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is the world largest extensive air shower detector. Based on two detection techniques, namely fluorescence telescopes for the observation of the longitudinal development and water Cherenkov detectors for particles at ground, this experiment can be used not only as a cosmic ray observatory, but also to study the basic properties of hadronic interactions leading the development of air showers initiated by these primary cosmic rays. We will show that by using careful data selection it is possible to extract the proton-air inelastic cross-section at energies much higher than that accessible at man-made accelerators. Taking advantage of both detection techniques we will demonstrate that it is also possible to test hadronic interaction models using correlations between different air shower observables, like shower maximum and muons at ground, to reduce the uncertainty due to the unknown beam of cosmic rays.

  6. Extracellularly Extruded Syntaxin-4 Is a Potent Cornification Regulator of Epidermal Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kadono, Nanako; Hagiwara, Natsumi; Tagawa, Takashi; Maekubo, Kenji; Hirai, Yohei

    2015-01-01

    In the skin epidermis, keratinocytes undergo anchorage-dependent cornification, which gives rise to stratified multilayers, each with a distinct differentiation feature. The active formation of the cornified cell envelope (CCE), an important element in the skin barrier, occurs in keratinocytes of the upper epidermal layers and impacts their terminal differentiation. In the present study, we identified the extracellularly extruded syntaxin-4 as a potent differentiation regulator of epidermal keratinocytes. We found that differentiation stimuli led to the acceleration of syntaxin-4 exposure at the keratinocyte cell surface and that the artificial control of extracellular syntaxin-4, either by the forced expression of several syntaxin-4 mutants with structural alterations at the putative functional core site (AIEPQK), or by using antagonistic circular peptides containing this core sequence, dramatically influenced the CCE formation, with spatial misexpression of TGase1 and involucrin. We also found that the topical application of a peptide that exerted the most prominent antagonistic activity for syntaxin-4, named ST4n1, evidently prevented the formation of the hyperplastic and hyperkeratotic epidermis generated by physical irritation in HR-1 mice skin. Collectively, these results demonstrate that extracellularly extruded syntaxin-4 is a potent regulator of CCE differentiation, and that ST4n1 has potential as a clinically applicable reagent for keratotic skin lesions. PMID:25611434

  7. A highly potent human antibody neutralizes dengue virus serotype 3 by binding across three surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Fibriansah, Guntur; Tan, Joanne L; Smith, Scott A; de Alwis, Ruklanthi; Ng, Thiam-Seng; Kostyuchenko, Victor A; Jadi, Ramesh S; Kukkaro, Petra; de Silva, Aravinda M; Crowe, James E; Lok, Shee-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infects ~400 million people annually. There is no licensed vaccine or therapeutic drug. Only a small fraction of the total DENV-specific antibodies in a naturally occurring dengue infection consists of highly neutralizing antibodies. Here we show that the DENV-specific human monoclonal antibody 5J7 is exceptionally potent, neutralizing 50% of virus at nanogram-range antibody concentration. The 9 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy structure of the Fab 5J7-DENV complex shows that a single Fab molecule binds across three envelope proteins and engages three functionally important domains, each from a different envelope protein. These domains are critical for receptor binding and fusion to the endosomal membrane. The ability to bind to multiple domains allows the antibody to fully coat the virus surface with only 60 copies of Fab, that is, half the amount compared with other potent antibodies. Our study reveals a highly efficient and unusual mechanism of molecular recognition by an antibody. PMID:25698059

  8. Inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation by prenylated flavones: artelastin as a potent inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, F; Cordeiro-da-Silva, A; Araújo, N; Cidade, H; Kijjoa, A; Nascimento, M S J

    2003-09-19

    Eight natural prenylated flavones, previously isolated from Artocarpus elasticus, were evaluated for their effect on the mitogenic response of human lymphocytes to PHA. They all exhibited a dose-dependent suppression effect. An interesting relationship was observed between their antiproliferative activity and their chemical structure. Indeed, the most potent flavones possessed a 3,3-dymethylallyl group (prenyl) at C-8, such as artelastin, which exhibited the highest antiproliferative activity. Studies of the mechanism underlying its effect revealed that artelastin had an irreversible inhibitory effect on the PHA-induced lymphocyte proliferation and could affect the course of the ongoing mitogenic response either at the initial induction phase or at the late phase of proliferation. This prenylated flavone was also shown to be a potent inhibitor of both T- and B-lymphocyte mitogen induced proliferation although B-mitogenic response was the more sensitive one. Artelastin did not affect either the basal levels of the early marker of activation CD69 on non-stimulated splenocytes or its expression on ConA- or LPS-stimulated splenocytes. However, it decreased the production of IFN-gamma, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-10 in ConA-stimulated splenocytes. Furthermore, artelastin had no effect on apoptosis of splenocytes.

  9. Auger recombination of dark excitons in WS2 and WSe2 monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danovich, Mark; Zólyomi, Viktor; Fal’ko, Vladimir I.; Aleiner, Igor L.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a novel phonon assisted Auger process unique to the electronic band structure of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), which dominates the radiative recombination of ground state excitons in tungsten based TMDCs. Using experimental and density functional theory computed values for the exciton energies, spin–orbit splittings, optical matrix element, and the Auger matrix elements, we find that the Auger process begins to dominate at carrier densities as low as {10}9-10 {{cm}}-2, thus providing a plausible explanation for the low quantum efficiencies reported for these materials.

  10. Identifying clouds over the Pierre Auger Observatory using infrared satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Baughman, B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buroker, L.; Burton, R. E.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chirinos, J.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fox, B. D.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Peķala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, J.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Straub, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano Garcia, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2013-12-01

    We describe a new method of identifying night-time clouds over the Pierre Auger Observatory using infrared data from the Imager instruments on the GOES-12 and GOES-13 satellites. We compare cloud identifications resulting from our method to those obtained by the Central Laser Facility of the Auger Observatory. Using our new method we can now develop cloud probability maps for the 3000 km2 of the Pierre Auger Observatory twice per hour with a spatial resolution of ˜2.4 km by ˜5.5 km. Our method could also be applied to monitor cloud cover for other ground-based observatories and for space-based observatories.

  11. Auger electron intensity variations in oxygen-exposed large grain polycrystalline silver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, W. S.; Outlaw, R. A.; Hoflund, G. B.; Davidson, M. R.

    1989-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopic studies of the grains in oxygen-charged polycrystal-line silver show significant intensity variations as a function of crystallographic orientation. These intensity variations were observed by studies of the Auger images and line scans of the different grains (randomly selected) for each silver transition energy. The results can be attributed to the diffraction of the ejected Auger electrons and interpreted by corresponding changes in the electron mean-free path for inelastic scattering and by oxygen atom accumulation in the subsurface. The subsurface (second layer) octahedral sites increased in size because of surface relaxation and serve as a stable reservoir for the dissolved oxygen.

  12. Auger recombination of dark excitons in WS2 and WSe2 monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danovich, Mark; Zólyomi, Viktor; Fal'ko, Vladimir I.; Aleiner, Igor L.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a novel phonon assisted Auger process unique to the electronic band structure of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), which dominates the radiative recombination of ground state excitons in tungsten based TMDCs. Using experimental and density functional theory computed values for the exciton energies, spin-orbit splittings, optical matrix element, and the Auger matrix elements, we find that the Auger process begins to dominate at carrier densities as low as {10}9-10 {{cm}}-2, thus providing a plausible explanation for the low quantum efficiencies reported for these materials.

  13. Identifying clouds over the Pierre Auger Observatory using infrared satellite data

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu, Pedro; et al.,

    2013-12-01

    We describe a new method of identifying night-time clouds over the Pierre Auger Observatory using infrared data from the Imager instruments on the GOES-12 and GOES-13 satellites. We compare cloud identifications resulting from our method to those obtained by the Central Laser Facility of the Auger Observatory. Using our new method we can now develop cloud probability maps for the 3000 km^2 of the Pierre Auger Observatory twice per hour with a spatial resolution of ~2.4 km by ~5.5 km. Our method could also be applied to monitor cloud cover for other ground-based observatories and for space-based observatories.

  14. Pentobra: A potent antibiotic with multiple layers of selective antimicrobial mechanisms against Propionibacterium acnes

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Nathan W.; Agak, George W.; Deshayes, Stephanie; Yu, Yang; Blacker, Alyssa; Champer, Jackson; Xian, Wujing; Kasko, Andrea M.; Kim, Jenny; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2015-01-01

    Although antibiotics are a common treatment for acne, the difficulties inherent to effective antimicrobial penetration in sebum and selective antimicrobial action in skin are compounded by increasing resistance of Propionibacterium acnes clinical isolates. To address these problems, we engineered Pentobra, a peptide-aminoglycoside molecule which has multiple mechanisms of antibacterial action, and investigated whether it can be a potential candidate for the treatment of acne. Pentobra combines the potent ribosomal activity of aminoglycosides with the bacteria-selective membrane-permeabilizing abilities of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Pentobra demonstrated potent and selective killing of P. acnes, but not against human skin cells in vitro. In direct comparison, Pentobra demonstrated bactericidal activity and drastically outperformed free tobramycin (by 5–7 logs) against multiple P. acnes clinical strains. Moreover, EM studies showed that Pentobra had robust membrane activity, as treatment with Pentobra killed P. acnes cells and caused leakage of intracellular contents. Pentobra may also have potential anti-inflammatory effects as demonstrated by suppression of some P. acnes-induced chemokines. Importantly, the killing activity was maintained in sebaceous environments as Pentobra was bactericidal against clinical isolates in comedones extracts isolated from human donors. Our work demonstrates that equipping aminoglycosides with selective membrane activity is a viable approach for developing antibiotics against P. acnes that are effective in cutaneous environments. PMID:25668237

  15. Human pituitary tissue secretes a potent growth factor for chondrocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kasper, S; Friesen, H G

    1986-01-01

    We report the secretion from human pituitary tumor fragments in organ culture of a potent mitogen for chondrocyte proliferation. Primary human pituitary cell and organ cultures were established from pituitary fragments obtained from patients with acromegaly, prolactinomas, and nonfunctional adenomas. The conditioned culture medium contained a mitogenic factor(s) that stimulated rabbit fetal chondrocyte proliferation, causing up to an 8-fold increase in cell number when added to Ham's F-10 medium in the presence of 10% fetal bovine serum. Blood leaking into the surgical field after the adenomectomy is known to contain very high concentrations of pituitary hormones. Serum samples, obtained from this venous "ooze" collected at the site of pituitary surgery, also were found to contain chondrocyte growth-promoting activity. Some venous serum samples stimulated chondrocyte proliferation in a dose-dependent manner down to a 1:10 dilution of 1 microliter serum, indicating that the material being secreted was very potent indeed. Gel filtration on Sephadex G-100 and analytical gel isoelectric focusing of culture media or serum samples from the pituitary fossa demonstrated that the growth factor secreted from the pituitary tumor fragments as well as from the venous serum is similar, if not identical, to chondrocyte growth factor (mol wt, 43,000; pI 7.6-7.9) purified from human pituitaries collected at autopsy. These results suggest that the chondrocyte growth-promoting factor(s) may not only be secreted by pituitary tumor fragments but by normal human pituitary tissue as well.

  16. Promoter Activation by CII, a Potent Transcriptional Activator from Bacteriophage 186*

    PubMed Central

    Murchland, Iain; Ahlgren-Berg, Alexandra; Priest, David G.; Dodd, Ian B.; Shearwin, Keith E.

    2014-01-01

    The lysogeny promoting protein CII from bacteriophage 186 is a potent transcriptional activator, capable of mediating at least a 400-fold increase in transcription over basal activity. Despite being functionally similar to its counterpart in phage λ, it shows no homology at the level of protein sequence and does not belong to any known family of transcriptional activators. It also has the unusual property of binding DNA half-sites that are separated by 20 base pairs, center to center. Here we investigate the structural and functional properties of CII using a combination of genetics, in vitro assays, and mutational analysis. We find that 186 CII possesses two functional domains, with an independent activation epitope in each. 186 CII owes its potent activity to activation mechanisms that are dependent on both the σ70 and α C-terminal domain (αCTD) components of RNA polymerase, contacting different functional domains. We also present evidence that like λ CII, 186 CII is proteolytically degraded in vivo, but unlike λ CII, 186 CII proteolysis results in a specific, transcriptionally inactive, degradation product with altered self-association properties. PMID:25294872

  17. JB-9322, a new selective histamine H2-receptor antagonist with potent gastric mucosal protective properties.

    PubMed

    Palacios, B; Montero, M J; Sevilla, M A; Román, L S

    1995-05-01

    1. JB-9322 is a selective histamine H2-receptor antagonist with gastric antisecretory activity and mucosal protective properties. 2. The affinity of JB-9322 for the guinea-pig atria histamine H2-receptor was approximately 2 times greater than that of ranitidine. 3. In vivo, the ID50 value for the inhibition of gastric acid secretion in pylorus-ligated rats was 5.28 mg kg-1 intraperitoneally. JB-9322 also dose-dependently inhibited gastric juice volume and pepsin secretion. In gastric lumen-perfused rats, intravenous injection of JB-9322 dose-dependently reduced histamine-, pentagastrin- and carbachol-stimulated gastric acid secretion. 4. JB-9322 showed antiulcer activity against aspirin and indomethacin-induced gastric lesions and was more potent than ranitidine. 5. JB-9322 effectively inhibited macroscopic gastric haemorrhagic lesions induced by ethanol. Intraperitoneal injection was effective in preventing the lesions as well as oral treatment. The oral ID50 value for these lesions was 1.33 mg kg-1. By contrast, ranitidine (50 mg kg-1) failed to reduce these lesions. In addition, the protective effect of JB-9322 was independent of prostaglandin synthesis. 6. These results indicate that JB-9322 is a new antiulcer drug that exerts a potent cytoprotective effect in addition to its gastric antisecretory activity.

  18. JB-9322, a new selective histamine H2-receptor antagonist with potent gastric mucosal protective properties.

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, B.; Montero, M. J.; Sevilla, M. A.; Román, L. S.

    1995-01-01

    1. JB-9322 is a selective histamine H2-receptor antagonist with gastric antisecretory activity and mucosal protective properties. 2. The affinity of JB-9322 for the guinea-pig atria histamine H2-receptor was approximately 2 times greater than that of ranitidine. 3. In vivo, the ID50 value for the inhibition of gastric acid secretion in pylorus-ligated rats was 5.28 mg kg-1 intraperitoneally. JB-9322 also dose-dependently inhibited gastric juice volume and pepsin secretion. In gastric lumen-perfused rats, intravenous injection of JB-9322 dose-dependently reduced histamine-, pentagastrin- and carbachol-stimulated gastric acid secretion. 4. JB-9322 showed antiulcer activity against aspirin and indomethacin-induced gastric lesions and was more potent than ranitidine. 5. JB-9322 effectively inhibited macroscopic gastric haemorrhagic lesions induced by ethanol. Intraperitoneal injection was effective in preventing the lesions as well as oral treatment. The oral ID50 value for these lesions was 1.33 mg kg-1. By contrast, ranitidine (50 mg kg-1) failed to reduce these lesions. In addition, the protective effect of JB-9322 was independent of prostaglandin synthesis. 6. These results indicate that JB-9322 is a new antiulcer drug that exerts a potent cytoprotective effect in addition to its gastric antisecretory activity. PMID:7647984

  19. A novel peptide with potent and broad-spectrum antiviral activities against multiple respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hanjun; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Ke; Chu, Hin; Liu, Dabin; Poon, Vincent Kwok-Man; Chan, Chris Chung-Sing; Leung, Ho-Chuen; Fai, Ng; Lin, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Anna Jin-Xia; Jin, Dong-Yan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    A safe, potent and broad-spectrum antiviral is urgently needed to combat emerging respiratory viruses. In light of the broad antiviral activity of β-defensins, we tested the antiviral activity of 11 peptides derived from mouse β-defensin-4 and found that a short peptide, P9, exhibited potent and broad-spectrum antiviral effects against multiple respiratory viruses in vitro and in vivo, including influenza A virus H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H7N7, H7N9, SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The antiviral activity of P9 was attributed to its high-affinity binding to viral glycoproteins, as well as the abundance of basic amino acids in its composition. After binding viral particles through viral surface glycoproteins, P9 entered into cells together with the viruses via endocytosis and prevented endosomal acidification, which blocked membrane fusion and subsequent viral RNA release. This study has paved the avenue for developing new prophylactic and therapeutic agents with broad-spectrum antiviral activities. PMID:26911565

  20. A novel peptide with potent and broad-spectrum antiviral activities against multiple respiratory viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hanjun; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Ke; Chu, Hin; Liu, Dabin; Poon, Vincent Kwok-Man; Chan, Chris Chung-Sing; Leung, Ho-Chuen; Fai, Ng; Lin, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Anna Jin-Xia; Jin, Dong-Yan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    A safe, potent and broad-spectrum antiviral is urgently needed to combat emerging respiratory viruses. In light of the broad antiviral activity of β-defensins, we tested the antiviral activity of 11 peptides derived from mouse β-defensin-4 and found that a short peptide, P9, exhibited potent and broad-spectrum antiviral effects against multiple respiratory viruses in vitro and in vivo, including influenza A virus H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H7N7, H7N9, SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The antiviral activity of P9 was attributed to its high-affinity binding to viral glycoproteins, as well as the abundance of basic amino acids in its composition. After binding viral particles through viral surface glycoproteins, P9 entered into cells together with the viruses via endocytosis and prevented endosomal acidification, which blocked membrane fusion and subsequent viral RNA release. This study has paved the avenue for developing new prophylactic and therapeutic agents with broad-spectrum antiviral activities. PMID:26911565

  1. Design of New and Potent Diethyl Thiobarbiturates as Urease Inhibitors: A Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wadood, Abdul; Riaz, Muhammad; Mulk, Amir ul; Khan, Momin; Haleem, Sobia Ahsan; Shams, Sulaiman; Gul, Sahib; Ahmed, Ayaz; Qasim, Muhammad; Ali, Farman; Ul-Haq, Zaheer

    2014-01-01

    Urease is an important enzyme both in agriculture and medicine research. Strategies based on urease inhibition is critically considered as the first line treatment of infections caused by urease producing bacteria. Since, urease possess agro-chemical and medicinal importance, thus, it is necessary to search for the novel compounds capable of inhibiting this enzyme. Several computational methods were employed to design novel and potent urease inhibitors in this work. First docking simulations of known compounds consists of a set of arylidine barbiturates (termed as reference) were performed on the Bacillus pasteurii (BP) urease. Subsequently, two fold strategies were used to design new compounds against urease. Stage 1 comprised of the energy minimization of enzyme-ligand complexes of reference compounds and the accurate prediction of the molecular mechanics generalized born (MMGB) interaction energies. In the second stage, new urease inhibitors were then designed by the substitution of different groups consecutively in the aryl ring of the thiobarbiturates and N, N-diethyl thiobarbiturates of the reference ligands.. The enzyme-ligand complexes with lowest interaction energies or energies close to the calculated interaction energies of the reference molecules, were selected for the consequent chemical manipulation. This was followed by the substitution of different groups on the 2 and 5 positions of the aryl ring. As a result, several new and potent diethyl thiobarbiturates were predicted as urease inhibitors. This approach reflects a logical progression for early stage drug discovery that can be exploited to successfully identify potential drug candidates. PMID:24966538

  2. Design of new and potent diethyl thiobarbiturates as urease inhibitors: a computational approach.

    PubMed

    Wadood, Abdul; Riaz, Muhammad; Mulk, Amir Ul; Khan, Momin; Haleem, Sobia Ahsan; Shams, Sulaiman; Gul, Sahib; Ahmed, Ayaz; Qasim, Muhammad; Ali, Farman; Ul-Haq, Zaheer

    2014-01-01

    Urease is an important enzyme both in agriculture and medicine research. Strategies based on urease inhibition is critically considered as the first line treatment of infections caused by urease producing bacteria. Since, urease possess agro-chemical and medicinal importance, thus, it is necessary to search for the novel compounds capable of inhibiting this enzyme. Several computational methods were employed to design novel and potent urease inhibitors in this work. First docking simulations of known compounds consists of a set of arylidine barbiturates (termed as reference) were performed on the Bacillus pasteurii (BP) urease. Subsequently, two fold strategies were used to design new compounds against urease. Stage 1 comprised of the energy minimization of enzyme-ligand complexes of reference compounds and the accurate prediction of the molecular mechanics generalized born (MMGB) interaction energies. In the second stage, new urease inhibitors were then designed by the substitution of different groups consecutively in the aryl ring of the thiobarbiturates and N, N-diethyl thiobarbiturates of the reference ligands.. The enzyme-ligand complexes with lowest interaction energies or energies close to the calculated interaction energies of the reference molecules, were selected for the consequent chemical manipulation. This was followed by the substitution of different groups on the 2 and 5 positions of the aryl ring. As a result, several new and potent diethyl thiobarbiturates were predicted as urease inhibitors. This approach reflects a logical progression for early stage drug discovery that can be exploited to successfully identify potential drug candidates. PMID:24966538

  3. 45-Day deliverable for Tank 241-BX-105 Auger samples, risers 2 and 6

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, K.E.

    1994-11-16

    Two auger samples from single-shell tank 241-BX-105 (BX-105) were extruded, broken down, and analyzed for DSC, TGA, and total alpha as prescribed. Analytical results were tracked and reported using the laboratory information management system known as LabCore. This is the final report for the fiscal year 1995 BX-105 auger sample characterization effort. Included are copies of the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) scans as requested. Also included is a copy of any immediate notification documentation, chain of custody forms, the hot cell work plan, extruded segment [auger] description sheets, and total alpha data.

  4. Generation of pure spin currents via Auger recombination in quantum wells with Rashba splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasiev, A. N. Greshnov, A. A. Greshnov, A. A.

    2015-10-15

    We propose a nonoptical mechanism for generating spin current via Auger recombination in semiconductor quantum wells (QWs) with spin–orbit splitting associated with structural QW asymmetry. It is shown that Auger recombination in narrow-bandgap semiconductors makes it possible to produce spin currents that exceed those that are obtained in the case of intraband as well as interband optical excitation. Analysis shows that the interference term in the expression for the Auger-recombination rate is responsible for the generation of spin currents.

  5. Producing liquid-solid mixtures (slushes) of oxygen or hydrogen using an auger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, R. O.

    An auger rotating inside a brass tube refrigerated with liquid helium was used to produce liquid-solid (slush) mixtures of hydrogen and of oxygen. The auger produced small particles from the cryogens so that the resulting slush mixture could be transferred and stored. The auger could produce slush continuously in an appropriate system; it could produce slush at pressures higher than the triple point pressure of the cryogen, and the energy required to produce the slush was less than the energy required to produce slush using the freeze-thaw process.

  6. Natural fatty acid synthase inhibitors as potent therapeutic agents for cancers: A review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-Sui; Lei, Jie-Ping; Wei, Guo-Qing; Chen, Hui; Ma, Chao-Ying; Jiang, He-Zhong

    2016-09-01

    Context Fatty acid synthase (FAS) is the only mammalian enzyme to catalyse the synthesis of fatty acid. The expression level of FAS is related to cancer progression, aggressiveness and metastasis. In recent years, research on natural FAS inhibitors with significant bioactivities and low side effects has increasingly become a new trend. Herein, we present recent research progress on natural fatty acid synthase inhibitors as potent therapeutic agents. Objective This paper is a mini overview of the typical natural FAS inhibitors and their possible mechanism of action in the past 10 years (2004-2014). Method The information was collected and compiled through major databases including Web of Science, PubMed, and CNKI. Results Many natural products induce cancer cells apoptosis by inhibiting FAS expression, with fewer side effects than synthetic inhibitors. Conclusion Natural FAS inhibitors are widely distributed in plants (especially in herbs and foods). Some natural products (mainly phenolics) possessing potent biological activities and stable structures are available as lead compounds to synthesise promising FAS inhibitors.

  7. Neuroprotective Effects of the Triterpenoid, CDDO Methyl Amide, a Potent Inducer of Nrf2-Mediated Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lichuan; Calingasan, Noel Y.; Thomas, Bobby; Chaturvedi, Rajnish K.; Kiaei, Mahmoud; Wille, Elizabeth J.; Liby, Karen T.; Williams, Charlotte; Royce, Darlene; Risingsong, Renee; Musiek, Eric S.; Morrow, Jason D.; Sporn, Michael; Beal, M. Flint

    2009-01-01

    The NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway regulates phase 2 detoxification genes, including a variety of antioxidative enzymes. We tested neuroprotective effects of the synthetic triterpenoid CDDO-MA, a potent activator of the Nrf2/ARE signaling. CDDO-MA treatment of neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells resulted in Nrf2 upregulation and translocation from cytosol to nucleus and subsequent activation of ARE pathway genes. CDDO-MA blocked t-butylhydroperoxide-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by activation of ARE genes only in wild type, but not Nrf2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Oral administration of CDDO-MA resulted in significant protection against MPTP-induced nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration, pathological alpha-synuclein accumulation and oxidative damage in mice. Additionally, CDDO-MA treatment in rats produced significant rescue against striatal lesions caused by the neurotoxin 3-NP, and associated increases in the oxidative damage markers malondialdehyde, F2-Isoprostanes, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine, 3-nitrotyrosine, and impaired glutathione homeostasis. Our results indicate that the CDDO-MA renders its neuroprotective effects through its potent activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, and suggest that triterpenoids may be beneficial for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease. PMID:19484125

  8. Synthesis and characterization of phosphocitric acid, a potent inhibitor of hydroxylapatite crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Tew, W P; Mahle, C; Benavides, J; Howard, J E; Lehninger, A L

    1980-04-29

    Human urine and extracts of rat liver mitochondria contain apparently identical agents capable of inhibiting the precipitation or crystallization of calcium phosphate. Its general properties, as well as 1H NMR and mass spectra, have suggested that the agent is phosphocitric acid. This paper reports the synthesis of phosphocitric acid via the phosphorylation of triethyl citrate with o-phenylene phosphochloridate, hydrogenolysis of the product to yield triethyl phosphocitrate, hydrolytic removal of the blocking ethyl groups and also chromatographic purification. An enzymatic assay of phosphocitrate is described. Synthetic phosphocitrate was found to be an exceedingly potent inhibitor of the growth of hydroxylapatite seed crystals in a medium supersaturated with respect to Ca2+ and phosphate. Comparative assays showed phosphocitrate to be much more potent than the most active precipitation-crystallization inhibitors previously reported, which include pyrophosphate and ATP. 14C-Labeled phosphocitrate was bound very tightly to hydroxylapatite crystals. Such binding appeared to be essential for its inhibitory activity on crystal growth. Citrate added before but not after, phosphocitrate greatly enhanced the inhibitory potency of the latter. This enhancement effect was not given by other tricarboxylic acids. The monoethyl ester of phosphocitrate had no inhibitory effect on hydroxylapatite crystal growth.

  9. Environmental and health risk analysis of nitrogen trifluoride (NF(3)), a toxic and potent greenhouse gas.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Tien

    2008-11-30

    This article aimed at the introduction of nitrogen trifluoride (NF(3)) and its decomposition products into its hazards to the environment and health because this perfluorocompound is a toxic and potent greenhouse gas not blanketed into the Kyoto Protocol. This paper also predicted the global NF(3) emissions from the electronics industry on the basis of the methodologies recommended by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and further discussed its atmospheric implications according to the estimation of environmental fate for NF(3). It showed that the vaporization of NF(3) from the water bodies to the atmosphere is very high according to its predicted value (ca. 6.0 x 10(5)MPa) of Henry's law constant (K(H)). Furthermore, NF(3) emitted from the electronics industry around the world in 2006 was estimated to be between 3.6 and 56 metric tonnes and it will be on increasing trend in the near future. Although the accumulative amount of NF(3) in the atmosphere currently should be very negligible based on the predicted ratio (the order of 10(-6) to 10(-7)) of equivalent CO(2) emission from NF(3) to total equivalent CO(2) emissions from potent greenhouse gases, it is necessary to adopt the available abatement and also monitor the concentration of NF(3) in the workplaces for reducing the overall environmental and health impacts of various semiconductor processes.

  10. Environmental and health risk analysis of nitrogen trifluoride (NF(3)), a toxic and potent greenhouse gas.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Tien

    2008-11-30

    This article aimed at the introduction of nitrogen trifluoride (NF(3)) and its decomposition products into its hazards to the environment and health because this perfluorocompound is a toxic and potent greenhouse gas not blanketed into the Kyoto Protocol. This paper also predicted the global NF(3) emissions from the electronics industry on the basis of the methodologies recommended by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and further discussed its atmospheric implications according to the estimation of environmental fate for NF(3). It showed that the vaporization of NF(3) from the water bodies to the atmosphere is very high according to its predicted value (ca. 6.0 x 10(5)MPa) of Henry's law constant (K(H)). Furthermore, NF(3) emitted from the electronics industry around the world in 2006 was estimated to be between 3.6 and 56 metric tonnes and it will be on increasing trend in the near future. Although the accumulative amount of NF(3) in the atmosphere currently should be very negligible based on the predicted ratio (the order of 10(-6) to 10(-7)) of equivalent CO(2) emission from NF(3) to total equivalent CO(2) emissions from potent greenhouse gases, it is necessary to adopt the available abatement and also monitor the concentration of NF(3) in the workplaces for reducing the overall environmental and health impacts of various semiconductor processes. PMID:18378075

  11. Identification and characterization of the biosynthetic gene cluster of polyoxypeptin A, a potent apoptosis inducer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polyoxypeptin A was isolated from a culture broth of Streptomyces sp. MK498-98 F14, which has a potent apoptosis-inducing activity towards human pancreatic carcinoma AsPC-1 cells. Structurally, polyoxypeptin A is composed of a C15 acyl side chain and a nineteen-membered cyclodepsipeptide core that consists of six unusual nonproteinogenic amino acid residues (N-hydroxyvaline, 3-hydroxy-3-methylproline, 5-hydroxypiperazic acid, N-hydroxyalanine, piperazic acid, and 3-hydroxyleucine) at high oxidation states. Results A gene cluster containing 37 open reading frames (ORFs) has been sequenced and analyzed for the biosynthesis of polyoxypeptin A. We constructed 12 specific gene inactivation mutants, most of which abolished the production of polyoxypeptin A and only ΔplyM mutant accumulated a dehydroxylated analogue polyoxypeptin B. Based on bioinformatics analysis and genetic data, we proposed the biosynthetic pathway of polyoxypeptin A and biosynthetic models of six unusual amino acid building blocks and a PKS extender unit. Conclusions The identified gene cluster and proposed pathway for the biosynthesis of polyoxypeptin A will pave a way to understand the biosynthetic mechanism of the azinothricin family natural products and provide opportunities to apply combinatorial biosynthesis strategy to create more useful compounds. PMID:24506891

  12. Discovery of Potent and Highly Selective A2B Adenosine Receptor Antagonist Chemotypes.

    PubMed

    El Maatougui, Abdelaziz; Azuaje, Jhonny; González-Gómez, Manuel; Miguez, Gabriel; Crespo, Abel; Carbajales, Carlos; Escalante, Luz; García-Mera, Xerardo; Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo; Sotelo, Eddy

    2016-03-10

    Three novel families of A2B adenosine receptor antagonists were identified in the context of the structural exploration of the 3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-one chemotype. The most appealing series contain imidazole, 1,2,4-triazole, or benzimidazole rings fused to the 2,3-positions of the parent diazinone core. The optimization process enabled identification of a highly potent (3.49 nM) A2B ligand that exhibits complete selectivity toward A1, A2A, and A3 receptors. The results of functional cAMP experiments confirmed the antagonistic behavior of representative ligands. The main SAR trends identified within the series were substantiated by a molecular modeling study based on a receptor-driven docking model constructed on the basis of the crystal structure of the human A2A receptor.

  13. Total synthesis of periploside A, a unique pregnane hexasaccharide with potent immunosuppressive effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaheng; Zhou, Yu; Zuo, Jianping; Yu, Biao

    2015-01-01

    Periploside A is a pregnane hexasaccharide identified from the Chinese medicinal plant Periploca sepium, which features a unique seven-membered formyl acetal bridged orthoester (FABO) motif and potent immunosuppressive activities. Here, we show the synthesis of this molecule in a total of 76 steps with the longest linear sequence of 29 steps and 9.2% overall yield. The FABO motif is constructed via a combination of Sinaÿ’s and Crich’s protocol for the formation of orthoester and acetal glycosides, respectively. The 2-deoxy-β-glycosidic linkages are assembled stereoselectively with judicious choice of the glycosylation methods. The epimer at the spiro-quaternary carbon in the FABO motif has also been elaborated in a stereo-controlled manner. This epimer, as well as the synthetic analogues bearing the FABO motif, retain largely the inhibitory activities of periploside A against the proliferation of T-lymphocyte, indicating the importance of the chemical connection of the FABO motif to their immunosuppressive activity. PMID:25600477

  14. N,N'-Dithiobisphthalimide, a disulfide aromatic compound, is a potent spermicide agent in humans.

    PubMed

    Florez, Martha; Díaz, Emilce S; Brito, Iván; González, Jorge; Morales, Patricio

    2011-12-01

    Several studies have shown that users of vaginal preparations containing nonoxynol-9 (N-9) are at a high risk for sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV. Therefore, there is a great interest in identifying compounds that can specifically inhibit sperm without damaging the vaginal lining, possess a powerful spermicide activity, and can be used in contraceptive vaginal preparations to replace N-9. In this work, we studied the spermostatic and/or spermicidal activity of five non-detergent, disulfide compounds on human sperm, HeLa cells, and Lactobacillus acidophilus. The motility and viability of human sperm in semen and culture medium was evaluated after treatment with different concentrations of the disulfide compounds (2.5 - 100 µM). In addition, we evaluated the cytotoxic effect on HeLa cells and L. acidophilus. We identified compound 101, N,N'-dithiobisphthalimide (No. CAS 7764-30-9), as the most effective molecule. It has a half maximal effective concentration (EC(50)) of 8 µM and a minimum effective concentration (defined as the concentration that immobilizes 100 percent of the sperm in 20 sec) of 24 µM. At these concentrations, compound 101 does not affect the viability of the sperm, HeLa cells, or L. acidophilus. Our results indicate that dithiobisphthalimide has a potent spermostatic, irreversible effect with no toxic effects on HeLa cells and L. acidophilus. PMID:21942567

  15. Dense fibrillar collagen is a potent inducer of invadopodia via a specific signaling network

    PubMed Central

    Swatkoski, Stephen; Matsumoto, Kazue; Campbell, Catherine B.; Petrie, Ryan J.; Dimitriadis, Emilios K.; Li, Xin; Mueller, Susette C.; Bugge, Thomas H.; Gucek, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Cell interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) can regulate multiple cellular activities and the matrix itself in dynamic, bidirectional processes. One such process is local proteolytic modification of the ECM. Invadopodia of tumor cells are actin-rich proteolytic protrusions that locally degrade matrix molecules and mediate invasion. We report that a novel high-density fibrillar collagen (HDFC) matrix is a potent inducer of invadopodia, both in carcinoma cell lines and in primary human fibroblasts. In carcinoma cells, HDFC matrix induced formation of invadopodia via a specific integrin signaling pathway that did not require growth factors or even altered gene and protein expression. In contrast, phosphoproteomics identified major changes in a complex phosphosignaling network with kindlin2 serine phosphorylation as a key regulatory element. This kindlin2-dependent signal transduction network was required for efficient induction of invadopodia on dense fibrillar collagen and for local degradation of collagen. This novel phosphosignaling mechanism regulates cell surface invadopodia via kindlin2 for local proteolytic remodeling of the ECM. PMID:25646088

  16. Chinese herb derived-Rocaglamide A is a potent inhibitor of pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baochun; Li, Yixiong; Tan, Fengbo; Xiao, Zhanxiang

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer ranks No.1 in mortality rate worldwide. This study aims to identify the novel anti-pancreatic cancer drugs. Human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines were purchased from ATCC. CPE-based screening assay was used to examine the cell viability. Patient derived tumor xenografts in SCID mice was established. The Caspase-3 and 7 activities were measured using the Caspase Glo 3/7 Assay kit. Soft agar colony formation assay was used to evaluate the colony formation. Wound healing assay was employed to determine the cell migration. We screened a Chinese herbal product library and found three “hits” that kill cancer cells at nanomolar to micromolar concentrations. One of these compounds, rocaglamide, was found to be potent inhibitors of a wide spectrum of pancreatic cancer cell lines. Furthermore, Rocaglamide reduced the tumor size in a patient-derived pancreatic cancer xenograft mouse model without noticeable toxicity in vivo. Rocaglamide also inhibits pancreatic cancer cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, these data support that Rocaglamide may be a promising anti-pancreatic cancer drug. PMID:27158390

  17. Chloroatranol, an extremely potent allergen hidden in perfumes: a dose-response elicitation study.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Svedman, Cecilia; Bruze, Magnus; Bernard, Guillaume; Giménez-Arnau, Elena; Rastogi, Suresh Chandra; Lepoittevin, Jean-Pierre; Menné, Torkil

    2003-10-01

    Oak moss absolute is a long-known, popular natural extract widely used in perfumes. It is reported as the cause of allergic reactions in a significant number of those with perfume allergy. Oak moss absolute has been the target of recent research to identify its allergenic components. Recently, chloroatranol, a hitherto unknown fragrance allergen, was identified in oak moss absolute. The objective was to assess the clinical importance of chloroatranol as a fragrance allergen by characterizing its elicitation profile. 13 patients previously showing a positive patch test to oak moss absolute and chloroatranol were included, together with a control group of 10 patients without sensitization to either of the 2 materials. A serial dilution patch test was performed on the upper back with concentrations ranging from 200 to 0.0063 p.p.m. of chloroatranol in ethanol. Simultaneously, the participant performed an open test simulating the use of perfumes on the volar aspect of the forearms in a randomized and double-blinded design. A solution with 5 p.p.m. chloroatranol was used for 14 days, and, in case of no reaction, the applications were continued for another 14 days with a solution containing 25 p.p.m. All test subjects (13/13) developed an allergic reaction at the site of application of the solution containing chloroatranol. Among them, 12/13 (92%) gave a positive reaction to the 5 p.p.m. solution and 1 to 25 p.p.m. None of the controls reacted (P < 0.001). The use test was terminated at median day 4. The dose eliciting a reaction in 50% of the test subjects at patch testing was 0.2 p.p.m. In conclusion, the hidden exposure to a potent allergen widely used in perfumes has caused a highly sensitized cohort of individuals. Judged from the elicitation profile, chloroatranol is the most potent allergen present in consumer products today.

  18. High-speed helicopter rotor noise - Shock waves as a potent source of sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Lee, Yung-Jang; Tadghighi, H.; Holz, R.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the problem of high speed rotor noise prediction. In particular, we propose that from the point of view of the acoustic analogy, shocks around rotating blades are sources of sound. We show that, although for a wing at uniform steady rectilinear motion with shocks the volume quadrupole and shock sources cancel in the far field to the order of 1/r, this cannot happen for rotating blades. In this case, some cancellation between volume quadrupoles and shock sources occurs, yet the remaining shock noise contribution is still potent. A formula for shock noise prediction is presented based on mapping the deformable shock surface to a time independent region. The resulting equation is similar to Formulation 1A of Langley. Shock noise prediction for a hovering model rotor for which experimental noise data exist is presented. The comparison of measured and predicted acoustic data shows good agreement.

  19. Discovery of a Potent Class I Protein Arginine Methyltransferase Fragment Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ferreira de Freitas, Renato; Eram, Mohammad S; Szewczyk, Magdalena M; Steuber, Holger; Smil, David; Wu, Hong; Li, Fengling; Senisterra, Guillermo; Dong, Aiping; Brown, Peter J; Hitchcock, Marion; Moosmayer, Dieter; Stegmann, Christian M; Egner, Ursula; Arrowsmith, Cheryl; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Vedadi, Masoud; Schapira, Matthieu

    2016-02-11

    Protein methyltransferases (PMTs) are a promising target class in oncology and other disease areas. They are composed of SET domain methyltransferases and structurally unrelated Rossman-fold enzymes that include protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). In the absence of a well-defined medicinal chemistry tool-kit focused on PMTs, most current inhibitors were identified by screening large and diverse libraries of leadlike molecules. So far, no successful fragment-based approach was reported against this target class. Here, by deconstructing potent PRMT inhibitors, we find that chemical moieties occupying the substrate arginine-binding site can act as efficient fragment inhibitors. Screening a fragment library against PRMT6 produced numerous hits, including a 300 nM inhibitor (ligand efficiency of 0.56) that decreased global histone 3 arginine 2 methylation in cells, and can serve as a warhead for the development of PRMT chemical probes.

  20. Is matching ruthenium with dithiocarbamato ligands a potent chemotherapeutic weapon in oncology?

    PubMed

    Nardon, Chiara; Brustolin, Leonardo; Fregona, Dolores

    2016-02-01

    In the last years, several metal-based compounds have been designed and biologically investigated worldwide in order to obtain chemotherapeutics with a better toxicological profile and comparable or higher antiblastic activity than the clinically-established platinum-based drugs. In this context, researchers have addressed their attention to alternative nonplatinum derivatives able to maximize the anticancer activity of the new drugs and to minimize the side effects. Among them, a number of ruthenium complexes have been developed, including the compounds NAMI-A and KP1019, now in clinical trials. Here, we report the results collected so far for a particular class of ruthenium complexes - the ruthenium(II/III)-dithiocarbamates - which proved more potent than cisplatin in vitro, even at nanomolar concentrations, against a wide panel of human tumor cell lines. PMID:26807601

  1. Lead Optimization of Spiropyrazolopyridones: A New and Potent Class of Dengue Virus Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Spiropyrazolopyridone 1 was identified, as a novel dengue virus (DENV) inhibitor, from a DENV serotype 2 (DENV-2) high-throughput phenotypic screen. As a general trend within this chemical class, chiral resolution of the racemate revealed that R enantiomer was significantly more potent than the S. Cell-based lead optimization of the spiropyrazolopyridones focusing on improving the physicochemical properties is described. As a result, an optimal compound 14a, with balanced in vitro potency and pharmacokinetic profile, achieved about 1.9 log viremia reduction at 3 × 50 mg/kg (bid) or 3 × 100 mg/kg (QD) oral doses in the dengue in vivo mouse efficacy model. PMID:25878766

  2. Furafylline is a potent and selective inhibitor of cytochrome P450IA2 in man.

    PubMed Central

    Sesardic, D; Boobis, A R; Murray, B P; Murray, S; Segura, J; de la Torre, R; Davies, D S

    1990-01-01

    1. Furafylline (1,8-dimethyl-3-(2'-furfuryl)methylxanthine) is a methylxanthine derivative that was introduced as a long-acting replacement for theophylline in the treatment of asthma. Administration of furafylline was associated with an elevation in plasma levels of caffeine, due to inhibition of caffeine oxidation, a reaction catalysed by one or more hydrocarbon-inducible isoenzymes of P450. We have now investigated the selectivity of inhibition of human monooxygenase activities by furafylline. 2. Furafylline was a potent, non-competitive inhibitor of high affinity phenacetin O-deethylase activity of microsomal fractions of human liver, a reaction catalysed by P450IA2, with an IC50 value of 0.07 microM. 3. Furafylline had either very little or no effect on human monooxygenase activities catalysed by other isoenzymes of P450, including P450IID1, P450IIC, P450IIA. Of particular interest, furafylline did not inhibit P450IA1, assessed from aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity of placental samples from women who smoked cigarettes. 4. It is concluded that furafylline is a highly selective inhibitor of P450IA2 in man. 5. Furafylline was a potent inhibitor of the N3-demethylation of caffeine and of a component of the N1- and N7-demethylation. This confirms earlier suggestions that caffeine is a selective substrate of a hydrocarbon-inducible isoenzyme of P450 in man, and identifies this as P450IA2. Thus, caffeine N3-demethylation should provide a good measure of the activity of P450IA in vivo in man. 6. Although furafylline selectively inhibited P450IA2, relative to P450IA1, in the rat, this was at 1000-times the concentration required to inhibit the human isoenzyme, suggesting a major difference in the active site geometry between the human and the rat orthologues of P50IA2. PMID:2378786

  3. Development of highly potent and selective dynorphin A analogues as new medicines.

    PubMed

    Lung, F-D T; Chen, C-H; Liu, J-H

    2005-11-01

    Dynorphin A (Dyn A), a 17 amino acid peptide H-Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu-Arg-Arg-Ile-Arg-Pro-Lys-Leu-Lys-Trp-Asp-Asn-Gln-OH, is a potent opioid peptide which interacts preferentially with kappa-opioid receptors. Research in the development of selective and potent opioid peptide ligands for the kappa-receptor is important in mediating analgesia. Several cyclic disulphide bridge-containing peptide analogues of Dyn A, which were conformationally constrained in the putative message or address segment of the opioid ligand, were designed, synthesized and assayed. To further investigate the conformational and topographical requirements for the residues in positions 5 and 11 of these analogues, a systematic series of Dyn A(1-11)-NH2 cyclic analogues incorporating the sulphydryl-containing amino acids L- and D-Cys and L- and D-Pen in positions 5 and 11 were synthesized and assayed. Cyclic lactam peptide analogues were also synthesized and assayed. Several of these cyclic analogues, retained the same affinity and selectivity (vs. the mu- and delta-receptors) as the parent Dyn A(1-11)-NH2 peptide in the guinea-pig brain (GPB), but exhibited a much lower activity in the guinea-pig ileum (GPI), thus leading to centrally vs. peripherally selective peptides. Studies of the structure-activity relationship of Dyn A peptide provide new insights into the importance of each amino acid residue (and their configurations) in Dyn A analogues for high potency and good selectivity at kappa-opioid receptors. We report herein the progress towards the development of Dyn A peptide ligands, which can act as agonists or antagonists at cell surface receptors that modulate cell function and animal behaviour using various approaches to rational peptide ligand-based drug design.

  4. Building a better dynasore: the dyngo compounds potently inhibit dynamin and endocytosis.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, Adam; Daniel, James A; Hadzic, Gordana; Chau, Ngoc; Clayton, Emma L; Mariana, Anna; Whiting, Ainslie; Gorgani, Nick N; Lloyd, Jonathan; Quan, Annie; Moshkanbaryans, Lia; Krishnan, Sai; Perera, Swetha; Chircop, Megan; von Kleist, Lisa; McGeachie, Andrew B; Howes, Mark T; Parton, Robert G; Campbell, Michael; Sakoff, Jennette A; Wang, Xuefeng; Sun, Jian-Yuan; Robertson, Mark J; Deane, Fiona M; Nguyen, Tam H; Meunier, Frederic A; Cousin, Michael A; Robinson, Phillip J

    2013-12-01

    Dynamin GTPase activity increases when it oligomerizes either into helices in the presence of lipid templates or into rings in the presence of SH3 domain proteins. Dynasore is a dynamin inhibitor of moderate potency (IC₅₀ ~ 15 μM in vitro). We show that dynasore binds stoichiometrically to detergents used for in vitro drug screening, drastically reducing its potency (IC₅₀ = 479 μM) and research tool utility. We synthesized a focused set of dihydroxyl and trihydroxyl dynasore analogs called the Dyngo™ compounds, five of which had improved potency, reduced detergent binding and reduced cytotoxicity, conferred by changes in the position and/or number of hydroxyl substituents. The Dyngo compound 4a was the most potent compound, exhibiting a 37-fold improvement in potency over dynasore for liposome-stimulated helical dynamin activity. In contrast, while dynasore about equally inhibited dynamin assembled in its helical or ring states, 4a and 6a exhibited >36-fold reduced activity against rings, suggesting that they can discriminate between helical or ring oligomerization states. 4a and 6a inhibited dynamin-dependent endocytosis of transferrin in multiple cell types (IC₅₀ of 5.7 and 5.8 μM, respectively), at least sixfold more potently than dynasore, but had no effect on dynamin-independent endocytosis of cholera toxin. 4a also reduced synaptic vesicle endocytosis and activity-dependent bulk endocytosis in cultured neurons and synaptosomes. Overall, 4a and 6a are improved and versatile helical dynamin and endocytosis inhibitors in terms of potency, non-specific binding and cytotoxicity. The data further suggest that the ring oligomerization state of dynamin is not required for clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

  5. In silico reconstruction of the viral evolutionary lineage yields a potent gene therapy vector

    PubMed Central

    Zinn, Eric; Pacouret, Simon; Khaychuk, Vadim; Turunen, Heikki T.; Carvalho, Livia S.; Andres-Mateos, Eva; Shah, Samiksha; Shelke, Rajani; Maurer, Anna C.; Plovie, Eva; Xiao, Ru; Vandenberghe, Luk H.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) have emerged as a gene delivery platform with demonstrated safety and efficacy in a handful of clinical trials for monogenic disorders. However, limitations of the current generation vectors often prevent broader application of AAV gene therapy. Efforts to engineer AAV have been hampered by a limited understanding of the structure-function relationship of the complex multimeric icosahedral architecture of the particle. To develop additional reagents pertinent to further our insight into AAV, we inferred evolutionary intermediates of the viral capsid using ancestral sequence reconstruction. In silico derived sequences were synthesized de novo and characterized for biological properties relevant to clinical applications. This effort led to the generation of 9 functional putative ancestral AAVs and the identification of Anc80, the predicted ancestor of the widely studied AAV serotypes 1, 2, 8 and 9 as a highly potent in vivo gene therapy vector for targeting liver, muscle, and retina. PMID:26235624

  6. A novel bispecific antibody, S-Fab, induces potent cancer cell killing.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; He, Ping; Zhou, Changhua; Jing, Li; Dong, Bin; Chen, Siqi; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Yawei; Miao, Ji; Wang, Zhong; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies that engage immune cells to kill cancer cells have been actively studied in cancer immunotherapy. In this study, we present a novel bispecific format, S-Fab, fabricated by linking a single-domain anti-carcinoembryonic antigen VHH to a conventional anti-CD3 Fab. In contrast to most bispecific antibodies, the S-Fab bispecific antibody can be efficiently expressed and purified from bacteria. The purified S-Fab is stable in serum and is able to recruit T cells to drive potent cancer cell killing. In xenograft models, the S-Fab antibody suppresses tumor growth in the presence of human immune cells. Our study suggested that the bispecific S-Fab format can be applied to a wide range of immunotherapies.

  7. (R)-2-Phenylpyrrolidine Substituted Imidazopyridazines: A New Class of Potent and Selective Pan-TRK Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Deregulated kinase activities of tropomyosin receptor kinase (TRK) family members have been shown to be associated with tumorigenesis and poor prognosis in a variety of cancer types. In particular, several chromosomal rearrangements involving TRKA have been reported in colorectal, papillary thyroid, glioblastoma, melanoma, and lung tissue that are believed to be the key oncogenic driver in these tumors. By screening the Novartis compound collection, a novel imidazopyridazine TRK inhibitor was identified that served as a launching point for drug optimization. Structure guided drug design led to the identification of (R)-2-phenylpyrrolidine substituted imidazopyridazines as a series of potent, selective, orally bioavailable pan-TRK inhibitors achieving tumor regression in rats bearing KM12 xenografts. From this work the (R)-2-phenylpyrrolidine has emerged as an ideal moiety to incorporate in bicyclic TRK inhibitors by virtue of its shape complementarity to the hydrophobic pocket of TRKs. PMID:26005534

  8. Structural evolution of glycan recognition by a family of potent HIV antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Garces, Fernando; Sok, Devin; Kong, Leopold; McBride, Ryan; Kim, Helen J.; Saye-Francisco, Karen F.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Hua, Yuanzi; Cupo, Albert; Moore, John P.; Paulson, James C.; Ward, Andrew B.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The HIV envelope glycoprotein (Env) is densely covered with self-glycans that should help shield it from recognition by the human immune system. Here we examine how a particularly potent family of broadly neutralizing antibodies (Abs) has evolved common and distinct structural features to counter the glycan shield and interact with both glycan and protein components of HIV Env. The inferred germline antibody already harbors potential binding pockets for a glycan and a short protein segment. Affinity maturation then leads to divergent evolutionary branches that either focus on a single glycan and protein segment (e.g. Ab PGT124) or engage multiple glycans (e.g. Abs PGT121-123). Furthermore, other surrounding glycans are avoided by selecting an appropriate initial antibody shape that prevents steric hindrance. Such molecular recognition lessons are important for engineering proteins that can recognize or accommodate glycans. PMID:25259921

  9. Sangivamycin, a nucleoside analogue, is a potent inhibitor of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Loomis, C R; Bell, R M

    1988-02-01

    Protein kinase C functions prominently in cell regulation via its pleiotropic role in signal transduction processes. Certain oncogene products resemble elements involved in transmembrane signaling, elevate cellular sn-1,2-diacylglycerol second messenger levels, and activate protein kinase C. Sangivamycin was unique among the nucleoside compounds tested in its ability to potently inhibit protein kinase C activity. Inhibition was competitive with respect to ATP for both protein kinase C and the catalytic fragment of protein kinase C prepared by trypsin digestion. Sangivamycin was a noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to histone and lipid cofactors (phosphatidylserine and diacylglycerol). Sangivamycin inhibited native protein kinase C and the catalytic fragment identically, with apparent Ki values of 11 and 15 microM, respectively. Sangivamycin was an effective an inhibitor of protein kinase C as H-7, an isoquinolinsulfonamide. Sangivamycin did not inhibit [3H]phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate binding to protein kinase C. Sangivamycin did not exert its action through the lipid binding/regulatory domain; inhibition was not affected by the presence of lipid or detergent. Unlike H-7, sangivamycin selectively inhibited protein kinase C compared to cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The discovery that protein kinase C is inhibited by sangivamycin and other antitumor agents suggests that protein kinase C may be a target for rational design of antitumor compounds. PMID:3338987

  10. Discovery and Characterization of a Potent and Selective Inhibitor of Aedes aegypti Inward Rectifier Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Raphemot, Rene; Rouhier, Matthew F.; Swale, Daniel R.; Days, Emily; Weaver, C. David; Lovell, Kimberly M.; Konkel, Leah C.; Engers, Darren W.; Bollinger, Sean F.; Hopkins, Corey; Piermarini, Peter M.; Denton, Jerod S.

    2014-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases such as dengue fever and malaria, which are transmitted by infected female mosquitoes, affect nearly half of the world's population. The emergence of insecticide-resistant mosquito populations is reducing the effectiveness of conventional insecticides and threatening current vector control strategies, which has created an urgent need to identify new molecular targets against which novel classes of insecticides can be developed. We previously demonstrated that small molecule inhibitors of mammalian Kir channels represent promising chemicals for new mosquitocide development. In this study, high-throughput screening of approximately 30,000 chemically diverse small-molecules was employed to discover potent and selective inhibitors of Aedes aegypti Kir1 (AeKir1) channels heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells. Of 283 confirmed screening ‘hits’, the small-molecule inhibitor VU625 was selected for lead optimization and in vivo studies based on its potency and selectivity toward AeKir1, and tractability for medicinal chemistry. In patch clamp electrophysiology experiments of HEK293 cells, VU625 inhibits AeKir1 with an IC50 value of 96.8 nM, making VU625 the most potent inhibitor of AeKir1 described to date. Furthermore, electrophysiology experiments in Xenopus oocytes revealed that VU625 is a weak inhibitor of AeKir2B. Surprisingly, injection of VU625 failed to elicit significant effects on mosquito behavior, urine excretion, or survival. However, when co-injected with probenecid, VU625 inhibited the excretory capacity of mosquitoes and was toxic, suggesting that the compound is a substrate of organic anion and/or ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. The dose-toxicity relationship of VU625 (when co-injected with probenecid) is biphasic, which is consistent with the molecule inhibiting both AeKir1 and AeKir2B with different potencies. This study demonstrates proof-of-concept that potent and highly selective inhibitors of mosquito Kir channels

  11. Discovery and characterization of a potent and selective inhibitor of Aedes aegypti inward rectifier potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Raphemot, Rene; Rouhier, Matthew F; Swale, Daniel R; Days, Emily; Weaver, C David; Lovell, Kimberly M; Konkel, Leah C; Engers, Darren W; Bollinger, Sean R; Bollinger, Sean F; Hopkins, Corey; Piermarini, Peter M; Denton, Jerod S

    2014-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases such as dengue fever and malaria, which are transmitted by infected female mosquitoes, affect nearly half of the world's population. The emergence of insecticide-resistant mosquito populations is reducing the effectiveness of conventional insecticides and threatening current vector control strategies, which has created an urgent need to identify new molecular targets against which novel classes of insecticides can be developed. We previously demonstrated that small molecule inhibitors of mammalian Kir channels represent promising chemicals for new mosquitocide development. In this study, high-throughput screening of approximately 30,000 chemically diverse small-molecules was employed to discover potent and selective inhibitors of Aedes aegypti Kir1 (AeKir1) channels heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells. Of 283 confirmed screening 'hits', the small-molecule inhibitor VU625 was selected for lead optimization and in vivo studies based on its potency and selectivity toward AeKir1, and tractability for medicinal chemistry. In patch clamp electrophysiology experiments of HEK293 cells, VU625 inhibits AeKir1 with an IC50 value of 96.8 nM, making VU625 the most potent inhibitor of AeKir1 described to date. Furthermore, electrophysiology experiments in Xenopus oocytes revealed that VU625 is a weak inhibitor of AeKir2B. Surprisingly, injection of VU625 failed to elicit significant effects on mosquito behavior, urine excretion, or survival. However, when co-injected with probenecid, VU625 inhibited the excretory capacity of mosquitoes and was toxic, suggesting that the compound is a substrate of organic anion and/or ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. The dose-toxicity relationship of VU625 (when co-injected with probenecid) is biphasic, which is consistent with the molecule inhibiting both AeKir1 and AeKir2B with different potencies. This study demonstrates proof-of-concept that potent and highly selective inhibitors of mosquito Kir channels can

  12. Potent selective monoamine oxidase B inhibition by maackiain, a pterocarpan from the roots of Sophora flavescens.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Woo; Ryu, Hyung Won; Kang, Myung-Gyun; Park, Daeui; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Kim, Hoon

    2016-10-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) catalyzes the oxidation of monoamines and its two isoforms, MAO-A and MAO-B, break down neurotransmitter amines. Of the compounds isolated from the roots of Sophora flavescens, (-)-maackiain (4), a pterocarpan, was found to potently and selectively inhibit human MAO-B, with an IC50 of 0.68μM, and to have a selectivity index of 126.2 for MAO-B. As compared with other herbal natural products, the IC50 value of 4 for MAO-B is one of the lowest reported to date. Genistein (1) highly, effectively and non-selectively inhibited MAO-A and MAO-B with IC50 values of 3.9μM and 4.1μM, respectively. (-)-4-Hydroxy-3-methoxy-8,9-methylenedioxypterocarpan (2) effectively and non-selectively inhibited MAO-A and MAO-B with IC50 values of 20.3μM and 10.3μM, respectively. In addition, compound 4 reversibly and competitively inhibited MAO-B with a Ki value of 0.054μM. Molecular docking simulation revealed that the binding affinity of 4 for MAO-B (-26.6kcal/mol) was greater than its affinity for MAO-A (-8.3kcal/mol), which was in-line with our inhibitory activity findings. Furthermore, Cys172 of MAO-B was found to be a key residue for hydrogen bonding with compound 4. The findings of this study suggest compound 4 be viewed as a new potent, selective, and reversible MAO-B inhibitor, and that compounds 1 and 2 be considered useful lead compounds for the developments of nonselective and reversible MAO inhibitors for the treatment of disorders like Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer disease, and depression.

  13. Potent selective monoamine oxidase B inhibition by maackiain, a pterocarpan from the roots of Sophora flavescens.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Woo; Ryu, Hyung Won; Kang, Myung-Gyun; Park, Daeui; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Kim, Hoon

    2016-10-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) catalyzes the oxidation of monoamines and its two isoforms, MAO-A and MAO-B, break down neurotransmitter amines. Of the compounds isolated from the roots of Sophora flavescens, (-)-maackiain (4), a pterocarpan, was found to potently and selectively inhibit human MAO-B, with an IC50 of 0.68μM, and to have a selectivity index of 126.2 for MAO-B. As compared with other herbal natural products, the IC50 value of 4 for MAO-B is one of the lowest reported to date. Genistein (1) highly, effectively and non-selectively inhibited MAO-A and MAO-B with IC50 values of 3.9μM and 4.1μM, respectively. (-)-4-Hydroxy-3-methoxy-8,9-methylenedioxypterocarpan (2) effectively and non-selectively inhibited MAO-A and MAO-B with IC50 values of 20.3μM and 10.3μM, respectively. In addition, compound 4 reversibly and competitively inhibited MAO-B with a Ki value of 0.054μM. Molecular docking simulation revealed that the binding affinity of 4 for MAO-B (-26.6kcal/mol) was greater than its affinity for MAO-A (-8.3kcal/mol), which was in-line with our inhibitory activity findings. Furthermore, Cys172 of MAO-B was found to be a key residue for hydrogen bonding with compound 4. The findings of this study suggest compound 4 be viewed as a new potent, selective, and reversible MAO-B inhibitor, and that compounds 1 and 2 be considered useful lead compounds for the developments of nonselective and reversible MAO inhibitors for the treatment of disorders like Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer disease, and depression. PMID:27575476

  14. Discovery and Characterization of a Potent Interleukin-6 Binding Peptide with Neutralizing Activity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ranganath, Sheila; Bhandari, Ashok; Avitahl-Curtis, Nicole; McMahon, Jaimee; Wachtel, Derek; Zhang, Jenny; Leitheiser, Christopher; Bernier, Sylvie G.; Liu, Guang; Tran, Tran T.; Celino, Herodion; Tobin, Jenny; Jung, Joon; Zhao, Hong; Glen, Katie E.; Graul, Chris; Griffin, Aliesha; Schairer, Wayne C.; Higgins, Carolyn; Reza, Tammi L.; Mowe, Eva; Rivers, Sam; Scott, Sonya; Monreal, Alex; Shea, Courtney; Bourne, Greg; Coons, Casey; Smith, Adaline; Tang, Kim; Mandyam, Ramya A.; Masferrer, Jaime; Liu, David; Patel, Dinesh V.; Fretzen, Angelika; Murphy, Craig A.; Milne, G. Todd; Smythe, Mark L.; Carlson, Kenneth E.

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important member of the cytokine superfamily, exerting pleiotropic actions on many physiological processes. Over-production of IL-6 is a hallmark of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases such as Castleman’s Disease (CD) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Antagonism of the interleukin IL-6/IL-6 receptor (IL-6R)/gp130 signaling complex continues to show promise as a therapeutic target. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against components of this complex have been approved as therapeutics for both CD and RA. To potentially provide an additional modality to antagonize IL-6 induced pathophysiology, a peptide-based antagonist approach was undertaken. Using a combination of molecular design, phage-display, and medicinal chemistry, disulfide-rich peptides (DRPs) directed against IL-6 were developed with low nanomolar potency in inhibiting IL-6-induced pSTAT3 in U937 monocytic cells. Targeted PEGylation of IL-6 binding peptides resulted in molecules that retained their potency against IL-6 and had a prolongation of their pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles in rodents and monkeys. One such peptide, PN-2921, contained a 40 kDa polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety and inhibited IL-6-induced pSTAT3 in U937 cells with sub-nM potency and possessed 23, 36, and 59 h PK half-life values in mice, rats, and cynomolgus monkeys, respectively. Parenteral administration of PN-2921 to mice and cynomolgus monkeys potently inhibited IL-6-induced biomarker responses, with significant reductions in the acute inflammatory phase proteins, serum amyloid A (SAA) and C-reactive protein (CRP). This potent, PEGylated IL-6 binding peptide offers a new approach to antagonize IL-6-induced signaling and associated pathophysiology. PMID:26555695

  15. Discovery and Characterization of a Potent Interleukin-6 Binding Peptide with Neutralizing Activity In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ranganath, Sheila; Bhandari, Ashok; Avitahl-Curtis, Nicole; McMahon, Jaimee; Wachtel, Derek; Zhang, Jenny; Leitheiser, Christopher; Bernier, Sylvie G; Liu, Guang; Tran, Tran T; Celino, Herodion; Tobin, Jenny; Jung, Joon; Zhao, Hong; Glen, Katie E; Graul, Chris; Griffin, Aliesha; Schairer, Wayne C; Higgins, Carolyn; Reza, Tammi L; Mowe, Eva; Rivers, Sam; Scott, Sonya; Monreal, Alex; Shea, Courtney; Bourne, Greg; Coons, Casey; Smith, Adaline; Tang, Kim; Mandyam, Ramya A; Masferrer, Jaime; Liu, David; Patel, Dinesh V; Fretzen, Angelika; Murphy, Craig A; Milne, G Todd; Smythe, Mark L; Carlson, Kenneth E

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important member of the cytokine superfamily, exerting pleiotropic actions on many physiological processes. Over-production of IL-6 is a hallmark of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases such as Castleman's Disease (CD) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Antagonism of the interleukin IL-6/IL-6 receptor (IL-6R)/gp130 signaling complex continues to show promise as a therapeutic target. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against components of this complex have been approved as therapeutics for both CD and RA. To potentially provide an additional modality to antagonize IL-6 induced pathophysiology, a peptide-based antagonist approach was undertaken. Using a combination of molecular design, phage-display, and medicinal chemistry, disulfide-rich peptides (DRPs) directed against IL-6 were developed with low nanomolar potency in inhibiting IL-6-induced pSTAT3 in U937 monocytic cells. Targeted PEGylation of IL-6 binding peptides resulted in molecules that retained their potency against IL-6 and had a prolongation of their pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles in rodents and monkeys. One such peptide, PN-2921, contained a 40 kDa polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety and inhibited IL-6-induced pSTAT3 in U937 cells with sub-nM potency and possessed 23, 36, and 59 h PK half-life values in mice, rats, and cynomolgus monkeys, respectively. Parenteral administration of PN-2921 to mice and cynomolgus monkeys potently inhibited IL-6-induced biomarker responses, with significant reductions in the acute inflammatory phase proteins, serum amyloid A (SAA) and C-reactive protein (CRP). This potent, PEGylated IL-6 binding peptide offers a new approach to antagonize IL-6-induced signaling and associated pathophysiology. PMID:26555695

  16. Potent and selective inhibitors of class A β-lactamase: 7-prenyloxy coumarins.

    PubMed

    Safdari, Hadi; Neshani, Alireza; Sadeghian, Ali; Ebrahimi, Masoomeh; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Sadeghian, Hamid

    2014-05-01

    Class A and D β-lactamases are the main causes of resistance against β-lactam antibiotics, especially the penam group, in Staphylococcus aureus. On the basis of the potentiator property of ethanolic extracts of Ferula szowitsiana root on penicillin, MIC values observed for resistant S. aureus, the main naturally occurring compounds in these extracts, auraptene, umbelliprenin and galbanic acid, were evaluated for β-lactamase inhibitory activity. Amongst them auraptene showed the most potent inhibitory activity (IC50=21±1.5 μM) toward class A β-lactamase, whereas no inhibition was observed for class D β-lactamase. To obtain the structure activity relationship of the mentioned compounds and rationalize the enzyme inhibitory results, docking analysis was performed for both groups of β-lactamases. Docking analysis showed that the compounds have 100-500-fold lower bonding affinity toward the class D β-lactamase than toward the class A enzyme.

  17. The phosphonomethyl analogue of 3-phosphoglycerate is a potent competitive inhibitor of phosphoglycerate mutases.

    PubMed Central

    McAleese, S M; Fothergill-Gilmore, L A; Dixon, H B

    1985-01-01

    The phosphonomethyl analogue of 3-phosphoglycerate (2-hydroxy-4-phosphonobutanoate) is a potent competitive inhibitor of cofactor-dependent phosphoglycerate mutase from yeast and of cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase from wheat germ. For the yeast enzyme Ki is 1.3 mM (Km for substrate is 0.71 mM); for the wheatgerm enzyme Ki is 18 mM (Km for substrate is 0.86 mM). This analogue should be a useful tool for n.m.r. spectroscopic studies on the mechanism of action of the two mutases. The arsonomethyl analogue of 3-phosphoglycerate (4-arsono-2-hydroxybutanoate) was a relatively poor inhibitor. PMID:2996505

  18. Isolation of potent neutralizing antibodies from a survivor of the 2014 Ebola virus outbreak.

    PubMed

    Bornholdt, Zachary A; Turner, Hannah L; Murin, Charles D; Li, Wen; Sok, Devin; Souders, Colby A; Piper, Ashley E; Goff, Arthur; Shamblin, Joshua D; Wollen, Suzanne E; Sprague, Thomas R; Fusco, Marnie L; Pommert, Kathleen B J; Cavacini, Lisa A; Smith, Heidi L; Klempner, Mark; Reimann, Keith A; Krauland, Eric; Gerngross, Tillman U; Wittrup, Karl D; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Burton, Dennis R; Glass, Pamela J; Ward, Andrew B; Walker, Laura M

    2016-03-01

    Antibodies targeting the Ebola virus surface glycoprotein (EBOV GP) are implicated in protection against lethal disease, but the characteristics of the human antibody response to EBOV GP remain poorly understood. We isolated and characterized 349 GP-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) from the peripheral B cells of a convalescent donor who survived the 2014 EBOV Zaire outbreak. Remarkably, 77% of the mAbs neutralize live EBOV, and several mAbs exhibit unprecedented potency. Structures of selected mAbs in complex with GP reveal a site of vulnerability located in the GP stalk region proximal to the viral membrane. Neutralizing antibodies targeting this site show potent therapeutic efficacy against lethal EBOV challenge in mice. The results provide a framework for the design of new EBOV vaccine candidates and immunotherapies.

  19. Isolation of potent neutralizing antibodies from a survivor of the 2014 Ebola virus outbreak.

    PubMed

    Bornholdt, Zachary A; Turner, Hannah L; Murin, Charles D; Li, Wen; Sok, Devin; Souders, Colby A; Piper, Ashley E; Goff, Arthur; Shamblin, Joshua D; Wollen, Suzanne E; Sprague, Thomas R; Fusco, Marnie L; Pommert, Kathleen B J; Cavacini, Lisa A; Smith, Heidi L; Klempner, Mark; Reimann, Keith A; Krauland, Eric; Gerngross, Tillman U; Wittrup, Karl D; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Burton, Dennis R; Glass, Pamela J; Ward, Andrew B; Walker, Laura M

    2016-03-01

    Antibodies targeting the Ebola virus surface glycoprotein (EBOV GP) are implicated in protection against lethal disease, but the characteristics of the human antibody response to EBOV GP remain poorly understood. We isolated and characterized 349 GP-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) from the peripheral B cells of a convalescent donor who survived the 2014 EBOV Zaire outbreak. Remarkably, 77% of the mAbs neutralize live EBOV, and several mAbs exhibit unprecedented potency. Structures of selected mAbs in complex with GP reveal a site of vulnerability located in the GP stalk region proximal to the viral membrane. Neutralizing antibodies targeting this site show potent therapeutic efficacy against lethal EBOV challenge in mice. The results provide a framework for the design of new EBOV vaccine candidates and immunotherapies. PMID:26912366

  20. Synthesis and receptor profiling of Stemona alkaloid analogues reveal a potent class of sigma ligands

    PubMed Central

    Frankowski, Kevin J.; Setola, Vincent; Evans, Jon M.; Neuenswander, Ben; Roth, Bryan L.; Aubé, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Reported biological activities of Stemona natural products, such as antitussive activity, inspired the development of synthetic methods to access several alkaloids within this family and in so doing develop a general route to the core skeleta shared by the class of natural products. The chemistry was subsequently adapted to afford a series of analogue sets bearing simplified, diverse Stemona-inspired skeleta. Over 100 of these analogues were subjected to general G protein-coupled receptor profiling along with the known antitussive compound, neostenine; this led to the identification of hit compounds targeting several receptor types. The particularly rich hit subset for sigma receptors was expanded with two focused library sets, which resulted in the discovery of a fully synthetic, potent chemotype of sigma ligands. This collaborative effort combined the development of synthetic methods with extensive, flexible screening resources and exemplifies the role of natural products in bioactivity mining. PMID:21368188

  1. Isolation of potent neutralizing antibodies from a survivor of the 2014 Ebola virus outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Turner, Hannah L.; Murin, Charles D.; Li, Wen; Sok, Devin; Souders, Colby A.; Piper, Ashley E.; Goff, Arthur; Shamblin, Joshua D.; Wollen, Suzanne E.; Sprague, Thomas R.; Fusco, Marnie L.; Pommert, Kathleen B.J.; Cavacini, Lisa A.; Smith, Heidi L.; Klempner, Mark; Reimann, Keith A.; Krauland, Eric; Gerngross, Tillman U.; Wittrup, Dane K.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Burton, Dennis R.; Glass, Pamela J.; Ward, Andrew B.; Walker, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies targeting the Ebola virus surface glycoprotein (EBOV GP) are implicated in protection against lethal disease, but the characteristics of the human antibody response to EBOV GP remain poorly understood. Here we isolated and characterized 349 GP-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) from the peripheral B cells of a convalescent donor who survived the 2014 EBOV Zaire outbreak. Remarkably, 77% of the mAbs neutralize live EBOV and several mAbs exhibit unprecedented potency. Structures of selected mAbs in complex with GP reveal a site of vulnerability located in the GP stalk region proximal to the viral membrane. Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) targeting this site show potent therapeutic efficacy against lethal EBOV challenge in mice. The results provide a framework for the design of new EBOV vaccine candidates and immunotherapies. PMID:26912366

  2. Repositioning tolcapone as a potent inhibitor of transthyretin amyloidogenesis and associated cellular toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sant'Anna, Ricardo; Gallego, Pablo; Robinson, Lei Z.; Pereira-Henriques, Alda; Ferreira, Nelson; Pinheiro, Francisca; Esperante, Sebastian; Pallares, Irantzu; Huertas, Oscar; Rosário Almeida, Maria; Reixach, Natàlia; Insa, Raul; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Reverter, David; Reig, Núria; Ventura, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is a plasma homotetrameric protein implicated in fatal systemic amyloidoses. TTR tetramer dissociation precedes pathological TTR aggregation. Native state stabilizers are promising drugs to treat TTR amyloidoses. Here we repurpose tolcapone, an FDA-approved molecule for Parkinson's disease, as a potent TTR aggregation inhibitor. Tolcapone binds specifically to TTR in human plasma, stabilizes the native tetramer in vivo in mice and humans and inhibits TTR cytotoxicity. Crystal structures of tolcapone bound to wild-type TTR and to the V122I cardiomyopathy-associated variant show that it docks better into the TTR T4 pocket than tafamidis, so far the only drug on the market to treat TTR amyloidoses. These data indicate that tolcapone, already in clinical trials for familial amyloid polyneuropathy, is a strong candidate for therapeutic intervention in these diseases, including those affecting the central nervous system, for which no small-molecule therapy exists. PMID:26902880

  3. Syndecan-Fc Hybrid Molecule as a Potent In Vitro Microbicidal Anti-HIV-1 Agent▿

    PubMed Central

    Bobardt, Michael D.; Chatterji, Udayan; Schaffer, Lana; de Witte, Lot; Gallay, Philippe A.

    2010-01-01

    In the absence of a vaccine, there is an urgent need for the development of safe and effective topical microbicides to prevent the sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In this study, we proposed to develop a novel class of microbicides using syndecan as the antiviral agent. Specifically, we generated a soluble syndecan-Fc hybrid molecule by fusing the ectodomain of syndecan-1 to the Fc domain of a human IgG. We then tested the syndecan-Fc hybrid molecule for various in vitro microbicidal anti-HIV-1 properties. Remarkably, the syndecan-Fc hybrid molecule possesses multiple attractive microbicidal properties: (i) it blocks HIV-1 infection of primary targets including T cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DC); (ii) it exhibits a broad range of antiviral activity against primary HIV-1 isolates, multidrug resistant HIV-1 isolates, HIV-2, and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV); (iii) it prevents transmigration of HIV-1 through human primary genital epithelial cells; (iv) it prevents HIV-1 transfer from dendritic cells to CD4+ T cells; (v) it is potent when added 2 h prior to addition of HIV-1 to target cells; (vi) it is potent at a low pH; (vii) it blocks HIV-1 infectivity when diluted in genital fluids; and (viii) it prevents herpes simplex virus infection. The heparan sulfate chains of the syndecan-Fc hybrid molecule are absolutely required for HIV-1 neutralization. Several lines of evidence suggest that the highly conserved Arg298 in the V3 region of gp120 serves as the locus for the syndecan-Fc hybrid molecule neutralization. In conclusion, this study suggests that the syndecan-Fc hybrid molecule represents the prototype of a new generation of microbicidal agents that may have promise for HIV-1 prevention. PMID:20439611

  4. A crystallographic fragment screen identifies cinnamic acid derivatives as starting points for potent Pim-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Michèle N; Fanghänel, Jörg; Schäfer, Martina; Badock, Volker; Briem, Hans; Boemer, Ulf; Nguyen, Duy; Husemann, Manfred; Hillig, Roman C

    2011-03-01

    A crystallographic fragment screen was carried out to identify starting points for the development of inhibitors of protein kinase Pim-1, a potential target for tumour therapy. All fragment hits identified via soaking in this study turned out to bind to the unusually hydrophobic pocket at the hinge region. The most potent fragments, two cinnamic acid derivatives (with a best IC(50) of 130 µM), additionally form a well defined hydrogen bond. The balance between hydrophobic and polar interactions makes these molecules good starting points for further optimization. Pim-2 inhibitors from a recently reported high-throughput screening campaign also feature a cinnamic acid moiety. Two of these Pim-2 inhibitors were synthesized, their potencies against Pim-1 were determined and their cocrystal structures were elucidated in order to determine to what degree the binding modes identified by fragment screening are conserved in optimized inhibitors. The structures show that the cinnamic acid moieties indeed adopt the same binding mode. Fragment screening thus correctly identified binding modes which are maintained when fragments are grown into larger and higher affinity inhibitors. The high-throughput screening-derived compound (E)-3-{3-[6-(4-aminocyclohexylamino)-pyrazin-2-yl]phenyl}acrylic acid (compound 1) is the most potent inhibitor of the cinnamic acid series for which the three-dimensional binding mode is known (IC(50) = 17 nM, K(d) = 28 nM). The structure reveals the molecular basis for the large gain in potency between the initial fragment hit and this optimized inhibitor.

  5. A Potent Gelatinase Inhibitor with Anti-Tumor-Invasive Activity and its Metabolic Disposition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mijoon; Celenza, Giuseppe; Boggess, Bill; Blase, Jennifer; Shi, Qicun; Toth, Marta; Bernardo, M. Margarida; Wolter, William R.; Suckow, Mark A.; Hesek, Dusan; Noll, Bruce C.; Fridman, Rafael; Mobashery, Shahriar; Chang, Mayland

    2009-01-01

    Metastatic tumors lead to more than 90% fatality. Despite the importance of invasiveness of tumors to poor disease outcome, no anti-invasive compounds have been commercialized. We describe herein the synthesis and evaluation of 4-(4-(thiiranylmethylsulfonyl)phenoxy)-phenyl methane-sulfonate (compound 2) as a potent and selective inhibitor of gelatinases (matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9), two enzymes implicated in invasiveness of tumors. It was demonstrated that compound 2 significantly attenuated the invasiveness of human fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080). The metabolism of compound 2 involved hydroxylation at the a-methylene, which generates sulfinic acid, thiirane ring-opening, followed by methylation and oxidation, and cysteine conjugation of both the thiirane and phenyl rings. PMID:19207421

  6. Sphingomyelinase D in sicariid spider venom is a potent insecticidal toxin.

    PubMed

    Zobel-Thropp, Pamela A; Kerins, Alec E; Binford, Greta J

    2012-09-01

    Spider venoms have evolved over hundreds of millions of years with a primary role of immobilizing prey. Sphingomyelinase D (SMase D) and homologs in the SicTox gene family are the most abundantly expressed toxic protein in venoms of Loxosceles and Sicarius spiders (Sicariidae). While SMase D is well known to cause dermonecrotic lesions in mammals, little work has investigated the bioactivity of this enzyme in its presumed natural role of immobilizing insect prey. We expressed and purified recombinant SMase D from Loxosceles arizonica (Laz-SMase D) and compared its enzymatic and insecticidal activity to that of crude venom. SMase D enzymatic activities of purified protein and crude venom from the same species were indistinguishable. In addition, SMase D and crude venom have comparable and high potency in immobilization assays on crickets. These data indicate that SMase D is a potent insecticidal toxin, the role for which it presumably evolved.

  7. Potent agonists of a hematopoietic stem cell cytokine receptor, c-Mpl.

    PubMed

    Tarasova, Anna; Haylock, David N; Meagher, Laurence; Be, Cheang Ly; White, Jacinta; Nilsson, Susan K; Andrade, Jessica; Cartledge, Kellie; Winkler, David A

    2013-05-01

    Several growth factors feature prominently in the control of hematopoiesis. Thrombopoietin, a class I hematopoietic cytokine, plays critical roles in regulating hematopoietic stem cell numbers and also stimulates the production and differentiation of megakaryocytes, the bone marrow cells that ultimately produce platelets. Thrombopoietin interacts with the c-Mpl cell-surface receptor. Recently, several peptide and small-molecule agonists and antagonists of c-Mpl have been reported. We conducted a bioinformatics and molecular modeling study aimed at understanding the agonist activities of peptides that bind to c-Mpl, and developed new potent peptide agonists with low nanomolar activity. These agonists also show very high activity in human CD34(+) primary cell cultures, and doubled the mean blood platelet counts when injected into mice.

  8. Highly sensitive luciferase reporter assay using a potent destabilization sequence of calpain 3.

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Mayu; Murotomi, Kazutoshi; Abe, Hiroko; Yamazaki, Tomomi; Nishii, Shigeaki; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Noguchi, Takako; Niwa, Kazuki; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Nakajima, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-20

    Reporter assays that use luciferases are widely employed for monitoring cellular events associated with gene expression in vitro and in vivo. To improve the response of the luciferase reporter to acute changes of gene expression, a destabilization sequence is frequently used to reduce the stability of luciferase protein in the cells, which results in an increase of sensitivity of the luciferase reporter assay. In this study, we identified a potent destabilization sequence (referred to as the C9 fragment) consisting of 42 amino acid residues from human calpain 3 (CAPN3). Whereas the half-life of Emerald Luc (ELuc) from the Brazilian click beetle Pyrearinus termitilluminans was reduced by fusing PEST (t1/2=9.8 to 2.8h), the half-life of C9-fused ELuc was significantly shorter (t1/2=1.0h) than that of PEST-fused ELuc when measurements were conducted at 37°C. In addition, firefly luciferase (luc2) was also markedly destabilized by the C9 fragment compared with the humanized PEST sequence. These results indicate that the C9 fragment from CAPN3 is a much more potent destabilization sequence than the PEST sequence. Furthermore, real-time bioluminescence recording of the activation kinetics of nuclear factor-κB after transient treatment with tumor necrosis factor α revealed that the response of C9-fused ELuc is significantly greater than that of PEST-fused ELuc, demonstrating that the use of the C9 fragment realizes a luciferase reporter assay that has faster response speed compared with that provided by the PEST sequence. PMID:25528501

  9. Binding ability of impromidine, a potent H2 agonist of histamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anouar, A.; Lhadi, E.; Decock, P.; Kozlowskyinst4, H.

    1999-09-01

    Impromidine (fig.1) is a potent and selective histamine H2 receptor agonist and its structure comprises a strongly basic guanidine group containing two different imidazole-containing side chains. The present work deals with the study of coordination equilibria between impromidine and Cu(II) and Ni(II) in aqueous solution at 25 circC. Potentiometric, UV-Visible and EPR studies on Cu(II) complexes with impromidine have shown that this anti-ulcerogenic drug is a very potent chelating agent. This drug is found to be a very effective ligand for Ni(II) ions also. The effective coordination of impromidine to metal ions may have significant biological implications. L'impromidine est un agoniste H2 de l'histamine, sa structure possède un groupement guanidinique de forte basicité et dont l'environne ment des deux groupements imidazoliques est différent. Le présent travail consiste en l'étude de la coordination de l'impromidine avec le Cu(II) et le Ni(II) en milieu aqueux à 25 circC. La potentiométrie, LíUV-Visible et la RPE montrent que le cuivre se coordine très fortement avec l'impromidine. Nous avons trouvé que ce médicament se coordine aussi fortement avec le nickel(II). La coordination de l'impromidine avec les métaux pourrait avoir des applications importantes en médecine.

  10. Polyethyleneimine is a potent mucosal adjuvant for glycoproteins with innate and adaptive immune activating properties

    PubMed Central

    Wegmann, Frank; Gartlan, Kate H; Harandi, Ali M; Brinckmann, Sarah A; Coccia, Margherita; Hillson, William R; Kok, Wai Ling; Cole, Suzanne; Ho, Ling-Pei; Lambe, Teresa; Puthia, Manoj; Svanborg, Catharina; Scherer, Erin M; Krashias, George; Williams, Adam; Blattman, Joseph N; Greenberg, Philip D; Flavell, Richard A; Moghaddam, Amin E; Sheppard, Neil C; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2012-01-01

    There are no mucosal adjuvant formulations licensed for human use, despite protection against many mucosally-transmitted infections probably requiring immunity at the site of pathogen entry1. Polyethyleneimines (PEI) are organic polycations used as nucleic acid transfection reagents in vitro, and gene and DNA vaccine delivery vehicles in vivo2, 3. Here we show that PEI has unexpected and unusually potent mucosal adjuvant activity in conjunction with viral subunit glycoprotein antigens. Single intranasal administration of influenza HA or HSV-2 gD with PEI elicited robust protection from otherwise lethal infection, and was superior to existing experimental mucosal adjuvants. PEI formed nanoscale complexes with antigen that were taken up by antigen presenting cells in vitro and in vivo, promoted DC trafficking to draining lymph nodes and induced non-proinflammatory cytokine responses. PEI adjuvanticity required release of host dsDNA that triggered Irf-3-dependent signaling. PEI therefore merits further investigation as a mucosal adjuvant for human use. PMID:22922673

  11. Relativistic Radiative and Auger Rates for Fe XXIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, M. A.; Mendoza, C.; Kallman, T. R.; Palmeri, P.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As part of a project to compute improved atomic data for the spectral modeling of iron K lines, we report extensive calculations and comparisons of radiative and Auger rates for transitions involving the K-vacancy states in Fe XXIV. By making use of several computational codes, a detailed study is carried out of orbital representation, configuration interaction, relativistic corrections, cancellation effects, and fine tuning. It is shown that a formal treatment of the Breit interaction is essential to render the important magnetic correlations that take part in the decay pathways of this ion. As a result, the accuracy of the present A-values is firmly ranked at better than 10% while that of the Auger rates at only 15%.

  12. Search for ultra high energy primary photons at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colalillo, Roberta

    2016-07-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory, located in Argentina, provides an unprecedented integrated aperture in the search for primary photons with energy above 1017 eV over a large portion of the southern sky. Such photons can be detected in principle via the air showers they initiate at such energies, using the complement of Auger Observatory detectors. We discuss the results obtained in diffuse and directional searches for primary photons in the EeV energy range.

  13. Pseudopyronine B: A Potent Antimicrobial and Anticancer Molecule Isolated from a Pseudomonas mosselii.

    PubMed

    Nishanth Kumar, S; Aravind, S R; Jacob, Jubi; Gopinath, Geethu; Lankalapalli, Ravi S; Sreelekha, T T; Dileep Kumar, B S

    2016-01-01

    In continuation of our search for new bioactive compounds from soil microbes, a fluorescent Pseudomonas strain isolated from paddy field soil of Kuttanad, Kerala, India was screened for the production of bioactive secondary metabolites. This strain was identified as Pseudomonas mosselii through 16S rDNA gene sequencing followed by BLAST analysis and the bioactive metabolites produced were purified by column chromatography (silica gel) and a pure bioactive secondary metabolite was isolated. This bioactive compound was identified as Pseudopyronine B by NMR and HR-ESI-MS. Pseudopyronine B recorded significant antimicrobial activity especially against Gram-positive bacteria and agriculturally important fungi. MTT assay was used for finding cell proliferation inhibition, and Pseudopyronine B recorded significant antitumor activity against non-small cell lung cancer cell (A549), and mouse melanoma cell (B16F10). The preliminary MTT assay results revealed that Pseudopyronine B recorded both dose- and time-dependent inhibition of the growth of test cancer cell lines. Pseudopyronine B induced apoptotic cell death in cancer cells as evidenced by Acridine orange/ethidium bromide and Hoechst staining, and this was further confirmed by flow cytometry analysis using Annexin V. Cell cycle analysis also supports apoptosis by inducing G2/M accumulation in both A549 and B16F10 cells. Pseudopyronine B treated cells recorded significant up-regulation of caspase 3 activity. Moreover, this compound recorded immunomodulatory activity by enhancing the proliferation of lymphocytes. The production of Pseudopyronine B by P. mosselii and its anticancer activity in A549 and B16F10 cell lines is reported here for the first time. The present study has a substantial influence on the information of Pseudopyronine B from P. mosselii as potential sources of novel drug molecule for the pharmaceutical companies, especially as potent antimicrobial and anticancer agent. PMID:27617005

  14. Pseudopyronine B: A Potent Antimicrobial and Anticancer Molecule Isolated from a Pseudomonas mosselii

    PubMed Central

    Nishanth Kumar, S.; Aravind, S. R.; Jacob, Jubi; Gopinath, Geethu; Lankalapalli, Ravi S.; Sreelekha, T.T.; Dileep Kumar, B.S.

    2016-01-01

    In continuation of our search for new bioactive compounds from soil microbes, a fluorescent Pseudomonas strain isolated from paddy field soil of Kuttanad, Kerala, India was screened for the production of bioactive secondary metabolites. This strain was identified as Pseudomonas mosselii through 16S rDNA gene sequencing followed by BLAST analysis and the bioactive metabolites produced were purified by column chromatography (silica gel) and a pure bioactive secondary metabolite was isolated. This bioactive compound was identified as Pseudopyronine B by NMR and HR-ESI-MS. Pseudopyronine B recorded significant antimicrobial activity especially against Gram-positive bacteria and agriculturally important fungi. MTT assay was used for finding cell proliferation inhibition, and Pseudopyronine B recorded significant antitumor activity against non-small cell lung cancer cell (A549), and mouse melanoma cell (B16F10). The preliminary MTT assay results revealed that Pseudopyronine B recorded both dose- and time-dependent inhibition of the growth of test cancer cell lines. Pseudopyronine B induced apoptotic cell death in cancer cells as evidenced by Acridine orange/ethidium bromide and Hoechst staining, and this was further confirmed by flow cytometry analysis using Annexin V. Cell cycle analysis also supports apoptosis by inducing G2/M accumulation in both A549 and B16F10 cells. Pseudopyronine B treated cells recorded significant up-regulation of caspase 3 activity. Moreover, this compound recorded immunomodulatory activity by enhancing the proliferation of lymphocytes. The production of Pseudopyronine B by P. mosselii and its anticancer activity in A549 and B16F10 cell lines is reported here for the first time. The present study has a substantial influence on the information of Pseudopyronine B from P. mosselii as potential sources of novel drug molecule for the pharmaceutical companies, especially as potent antimicrobial and anticancer agent. PMID:27617005

  15. Pseudopyronine B: A Potent Antimicrobial and Anticancer Molecule Isolated from a Pseudomonas mosselii

    PubMed Central

    Nishanth Kumar, S.; Aravind, S. R.; Jacob, Jubi; Gopinath, Geethu; Lankalapalli, Ravi S.; Sreelekha, T.T.; Dileep Kumar, B.S.

    2016-01-01

    In continuation of our search for new bioactive compounds from soil microbes, a fluorescent Pseudomonas strain isolated from paddy field soil of Kuttanad, Kerala, India was screened for the production of bioactive secondary metabolites. This strain was identified as Pseudomonas mosselii through 16S rDNA gene sequencing followed by BLAST analysis and the bioactive metabolites produced were purified by column chromatography (silica gel) and a pure bioactive secondary metabolite was isolated. This bioactive compound was identified as Pseudopyronine B by NMR and HR-ESI-MS. Pseudopyronine B recorded significant antimicrobial activity especially against Gram-positive bacteria and agriculturally important fungi. MTT assay was used for finding cell proliferation inhibition, and Pseudopyronine B recorded significant antitumor activity against non-small cell lung cancer cell (A549), and mouse melanoma cell (B16F10). The preliminary MTT assay results revealed that Pseudopyronine B recorded both dose- and time-dependent inhibition of the growth of test cancer cell lines. Pseudopyronine B induced apoptotic cell death in cancer cells as evidenced by Acridine orange/ethidium bromide and Hoechst staining, and this was further confirmed by flow cytometry analysis using Annexin V. Cell cycle analysis also supports apoptosis by inducing G2/M accumulation in both A549 and B16F10 cells. Pseudopyronine B treated cells recorded significant up-regulation of caspase 3 activity. Moreover, this compound recorded immunomodulatory activity by enhancing the proliferation of lymphocytes. The production of Pseudopyronine B by P. mosselii and its anticancer activity in A549 and B16F10 cell lines is reported here for the first time. The present study has a substantial influence on the information of Pseudopyronine B from P. mosselii as potential sources of novel drug molecule for the pharmaceutical companies, especially as potent antimicrobial and anticancer agent.

  16. Auger recombination in long-wave infrared InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattices

    DOE PAGES

    Olson, B. V.; Grein, C. H.; Kim, J. K.; Kadlec, E. A.; Klem, J. F.; Hawkins, S. D.; Shaner, E. A.

    2015-12-29

    The Auger lifetime is a critical intrinsic parameter for infrared photodetectors as it determines the longest potential minority carrier lifetime and consequently the fundamental limitations to their performance. Here, Auger recombination is characterized in a long-wave infrared InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattice. Auger coefficients as small as 7.1×10–26 cm6/s are experimentally measured using carrier lifetime data at temperatures in the range of 20 K–80 K. The data are compared to Auger-1 coefficients predicted using a 14-band K•p electronic structure model and to coefficients calculated for HgCdTe of the same bandgap. In conclusion, the experimental superlattice Auger coefficients are found to be anmore » order-of-magnitude smaller than HgCdTe.« less

  17. Auger recombination in long-wave infrared InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, B. V.; Grein, C. H.; Kim, J. K.; Kadlec, E. A.; Klem, J. F.; Hawkins, S. D.; Shaner, E. A.

    2015-12-29

    The Auger lifetime is a critical intrinsic parameter for infrared photodetectors as it determines the longest potential minority carrier lifetime and consequently the fundamental limitations to their performance. Here, Auger recombination is characterized in a long-wave infrared InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattice. Auger coefficients as small as 7.1×10–26 cm6/s are experimentally measured using carrier lifetime data at temperatures in the range of 20 K–80 K. The data are compared to Auger-1 coefficients predicted using a 14-band K•p electronic structure model and to coefficients calculated for HgCdTe of the same bandgap. In conclusion, the experimental superlattice Auger coefficients are found to be an order-of-magnitude smaller than HgCdTe.

  18. Computationally-Guided Optimization of a Docking Hit to Yield Catechol Diethers as Potent Anti-HIV Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bollini, Mariela; Domaoal, Robert A.; Thakur, Vinay V.; Gallardo-Macias, Ricardo; Spasov, Krasimir A.; Anderson, Karen S.; Jorgensen, William L.

    2011-01-01

    A 5-μM docking hit has been optimized to an extraordinarily potent (55 pM) non-nucleoside inhibitor of HIV reverse transcriptase. Use of free energy perturbation (FEP) calculations to predict relative free energies of binding aided the optimizations by identifying optimal substitution patterns for phenyl rings and a linker. The most potent resultant catechol diethers feature terminal uracil and cyanovinylphenyl groups. A halogen bond with Pro95 likely contributes to the extreme potency of compound 42. In addition, several examples are provided illustrating failures of attempted grafting of a substructure from a very active compound onto a seemingly related scaffold to improve its activity. PMID:22081993

  19. Discovery of imidazo[1,5-a]pyridines and -pyrimidines as potent and selective RORc inverse agonists.

    PubMed

    Fauber, Benjamin P; Gobbi, Alberto; Robarge, Kirk; Zhou, Aihe; Barnard, Adrian; Cao, Jianhua; Deng, Yuzhong; Eidenschenk, Céline; Everett, Christine; Ganguli, Arunima; Hawkins, Julie; Johnson, Adam R; La, Hank; Norman, Maxine; Salmon, Gary; Summerhill, Susan; Ouyang, Wenjun; Tang, Wei; Wong, Harvey

    2015-08-01

    The nuclear receptor (NR) retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor gamma (RORγ, RORc, or NR1F3) is a promising target for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. RORc is a critical regulator in the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-17. We discovered a series of potent and selective imidazo[1,5-a]pyridine and -pyrimidine RORc inverse agonists. The most potent compounds displayed >300-fold selectivity for RORc over the other ROR family members, PPARγ, and NRs in our cellular selectivity panel. The favorable potency, selectivity, and physiochemical properties of GNE-0946 (9) and GNE-6468 (28), in addition to their potent suppression of IL-17 production in human primary cells, support their use as chemical biology tools to further explore the role of RORc in human biology. PMID:26048793

  20. Some strategies for quantitative scanning Auger electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browning, R.; Peacock, D. C.; Prutton, M.

    1985-01-01

    The general applicability of power law forms of the background in electron spectra is pointed out and exploited for background removal from under Auger peaks. This form of B(E) is found to be extremely sensitive to instrumental alignment and to fault-free construction - an observation which can be used to set up analyser configurations in an accurate way. Also, differences between N(E) and B(E) can be used to derive a spectrometer transmission function T(E). The questions of information density in an energy-analysing spatially-resolving instrument are addressed after reliable instrumental characterization has been established. Strategies involving ratio histograms, showing the population distribution of the ratio of a pair of Auger peak heights, composition scatter diagrams and windowed imaging are discussed and illustrated.

  1. Potent Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    It seems hard to believe that Dolly the cloned sheep was born 10 years ago, kindling furious arguments over the prospects and ethics of cloning a human. Today, the controversy over cloning is entwined, often confused, with concerns over the use of human embryonic stem cells. Most people are unclear what cloning is, and they know even less when it…

  2. A lectin isolated from bananas is a potent inhibitor of HIV replication.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Michael D; Winter, Harry C; Goldstein, Irwin J; Markovitz, David M

    2010-03-19

    BanLec is a jacalin-related lectin isolated from the fruit of bananas, Musa acuminata. This lectin binds to high mannose carbohydrate structures, including those found on viruses containing glycosylated envelope proteins such as human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Therefore, we hypothesized that BanLec might inhibit HIV-1 through binding of the glycosylated HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120. We determined that BanLec inhibits primary and laboratory-adapted HIV-1 isolates of different tropisms and subtypes. BanLec possesses potent anti-HIV activity, with IC(50) values in the low nanomolar to picomolar range. The mechanism for BanLec-mediated antiviral activity was investigated by determining if this lectin can directly bind the HIV-1 envelope protein and block entry of the virus into the cell. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay confirmed direct binding of BanLec to gp120 and indicated that BanLec can recognize the high mannose structures that are recognized by the monoclonal antibody 2G12. Furthermore, BanLec is able to block HIV-1 cellular entry as indicated by temperature-sensitive viral entry studies and by the decreased levels of the strong-stop product of early reverse transcription seen in the presence of BanLec. Thus, our data indicate that BanLec inhibits HIV-1 infection by binding to the glycosylated viral envelope and blocking cellular entry. The relative anti-HIV activity of BanLec compared favorably to other anti-HIV lectins, such as snowdrop lectin and Griffithsin, and to T-20 and maraviroc, two anti-HIV drugs currently in clinical use. Based on these results, BanLec is a potential component for an anti-viral microbicide that could be used to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV-1.

  3. Study of the Auger line shape of polyethylene and diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayan, M.; Pepper, S. V.

    1984-01-01

    The KVV Auger electron line shapes of carbon in polyethylene and diamond have been studied. The spectra were obtained in derivative form by electron beam excitation. They were treated by background subtraction, integration and deconvolution to produce the intrinsic Auger line shape. Electron energy loss spectra provided the response function in the deconvolution procedure. The line shape from polyethylene is compared with spectra from linear alkanes and with a previous spectrum of Kelber et al. Both spectra are compared with the self-convolution of their full valence band densities of states and of their p-projected densities. The experimental spectra could not be understood in terms of existing theories. This is so even when correlation effects are qualitatively taken into account account to the theories of Cini and Sawatzky and Lenselink.

  4. Detailed analysis of shake structures in the KLL Auger spectrum of H2S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Püttner, R.; Céolin, D.; Guillemin, R.; Kushawaha, R. K.; Marchenko, T.; Journel, L.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Simon, M.

    2016-04-01

    Shake processes of different origin are identified in the KLL Auger spectrum of H2S with unprecedented detail. The KLL Auger spectrum is presented together with the S 1 s-1 photoelectron spectrum including the S 1 s-1V-1n λ and S 1 s-12 p-1n λ shake-up satellites with V-1 and n λ indicating a hole in the valence shell and an unoccupied molecular orbital, respectively. By using different photon energies between 2476 and 4150 eV to record the KLL Auger spectra two different shake-up processes responsible for the satellite lines are identified. The first process is a shake-up during the Auger decay of the S 1 s-1 core hole and can be described by S 1 s-1→2 p-2V-1n λ . The second process is the Auger decay of the shake-up satellite in the ionization process leading to S 1 s-1V-1n λ →2 p-2V-1n λ transitions. By combining the results of photoelectron and Auger spectra the involved V-1n λ levels are assigned.

  5. Muons in Air Showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unger, M.

    We present measurements of muons in air showers at ultra-high energies with the Pierre Auger Observatory. The number of muons at the ground in air showers detected at large zenith angles is determined as a function of energy and the results are compared to air shower simulations. Furthermore, using data collected at zenith angles smaller than 60°, rescaling factors are derived that quantify the deficit of muon production in air shower simulations.

  6. Evaluation of the Transport, In Vitro Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics of Salvinorin A, a Potent Hallucinogen

    PubMed Central

    Teksin, Zeynep S.; Lee, Insong J.; Nemieboka, Noble N.; Othman, Ahmed A.; Upreti, Vijay V.; Hassan, Hazem E.; Syed, Shariq S.; Prisinzano, Thomas E.; Eddington, Natalie D.

    2009-01-01

    Salvinorin A is an unregulated potent hallucinogen isolated from the leaves of Salvia divinorum. It is the only known non-nitrogenous kappa-opioid selective agonist and rivals synthetic lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in potency. This objective of this study was to characterize the in vitro transport, in vitro metabolism, and pharmacokinetic properties of Salvinorin A. The transport characteristics of Salvinorin A were assessed using MDCK-MDR1 cell monolayers. The P-glycoprotein (P-gp) affinity status was assessed by the P-gp ATPase assay. In vitro metabolism studies were performed with various specific human CYP450 isoforms and UGT2B7 to assess the metabolic characteristics of Salvinorin A. Cohorts (n=3) of male Sprague Dawley rats were used to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and brain distribution of Salvinorin A (10 mg/kg, intraperitonal (i.p.) over a 240 min period. A validated UV-HPLC and LC/MS/MS method was used to quantify the hallucinogen concentrations obtained from the in vitro and in vivo studies, respectively. Salvinorin A displayed a high secretory transport in the MDCK-MDR1 cells (4.07±1.34 × 10-5 cm/s). Salvinorin A also stimulated the P-gp ATPase activity in a concentration (5-10 μm) dependent manner, suggesting that it may be a substrate of P-gp. A significant decrease in Salvinorin A concentration ranging from 14.7±0.80 % to 31.1±1.20 % was observed after incubation with CYP2D6, CYP1A1, CYP2C18, and CYP2E1, respectively. A significant decrease was also observed after incubation with UGT2B7. These results suggest that Salvinorin A may be a substrate of UGT2B7, CYP2D6, CYP1A1, CYP2E1 and CYP2C18. The in vivo pharmacokinetic study showed a relatively fast elimination with a half-life (t1/2) of 75 min and a clearance (Cl/F) of 26 L/h/kg. The distribution was extensive (Vd of 47.1 L/kg), however the brain to plasma ratio was 0.050. Accordingly, the brain half life was relatively short, 36 min. Salvinorin A is rapidly eliminated after i.p. dosing

  7. 3,5-Bis(3-alkylaminomethyl-4-hydroxybenzylidene)-4-piperidones: A Novel Class of Potent Tumor-Selective Cytotoxins.

    PubMed

    Karki, Subhas S; Das, Umashankar; Umemura, Naoki; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Shoko; Kawase, Masami; Balzarini, Jan; De Clercq, Erik; Dimmock, Stephen G; Dimmock, Jonathan R

    2016-01-28

    Novel 4-piperidone derivatives 2a-f are disclosed as potent cytotoxins. Many of these compounds are more potent than the reference drug melphalan. The compounds in series 2, 4-7 display selective toxicities toward various neoplasms compared to some normal cells. 2a is one of the promising lead molecules that display >11-fold higher growth inhibiting potency than 5-fluorouracil against human colon cancer cells. 2a induces apoptosis, DNA fragmentation, and cleavage of poly ADP-ribose polymerase. PMID:26727215

  8. Resonant Auger decay driving intermolecular Coulombic decay in molecular dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinter, F.; Schöffler, M. S.; Kim, H.-K.; Sturm, F. P.; Cole, K.; Neumann, N.; Vredenborg, A.; Williams, J.; Bocharova, I.; Guillemin, R.; Simon, M.; Belkacem, A.; Landers, A. L.; Weber, Th.; Schmidt-Böcking, H.; Dörner, R.; Jahnke, T.

    2014-01-01

    In 1997, it was predicted that an electronically excited atom or molecule placed in a loosely bound chemical system (such as a hydrogen-bonded or van-der-Waals-bonded cluster) could efficiently decay by transferring its excess energy to a neighbouring species that would then emit a low-energy electron. This intermolecular Coulombic decay (ICD) process has since been shown to be a common phenomenon, raising questions about its role in DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation, in which low-energy electrons are known to play an important part. It was recently suggested that ICD can be triggered efficiently and site-selectively by resonantly core-exciting a target atom, which then transforms through Auger decay into an ionic species with sufficiently high excitation energy to permit ICD to occur. Here we show experimentally that resonant Auger decay can indeed trigger ICD in dimers of both molecular nitrogen and carbon monoxide. By using ion and electron momentum spectroscopy to measure simultaneously the charged species created in the resonant-Auger-driven ICD cascade, we find that ICD occurs in less time than the 20femtoseconds it would take for individual molecules to undergo dissociation. Our experimental confirmation of this process and its efficiency may trigger renewed efforts to develop resonant X-ray excitation schemes for more localized and targeted cancer radiation therapy.

  9. Shell oil's auger TLP/ROV: Challenging, innovative

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, D. )

    1994-04-01

    Shell Oil Co. (Houston) is taking a bold step into the deep-water frontier with development of the $1.2 billion [open quotes]Auger[close quotes] project. After almost four years of construction. Shell Offshore has installed the Auger tension leg platform (TLP) on Garden Banks Block 426, located in the Gulf of Mexico 214 miles southwest of New Orleans in 2,860 feet of water-a depth that surpasses the previous Gulf record by more than 1,000 feet. The Auger TLP, designed and engineered by Shell, is a floating structure held in place by vertical tendons that eliminate significant vertical movement while allowing limited horizontal movement. The TLP will be the first in the Gulf of Mexico to support both a drilling rig and complete production facilities, reaching a peak projected daily production of 46,000 barrels of oil and 125 million cubic feet of gas in the year 2001. Underwater support for this deep-water project will be accomplished by use of one of the most advanced remotely operated vehicle systems ever deployed. In addition to the routine drilling tasks that present a navigation challenge for the system, the ROV is the primary and backup system for production riser connector (PRC) installation and removal operations. This task, coupled with the environmental conditions, significantly increases the total horsepower requirements of the ROV and the complexicity of the deployment system design.

  10. Ne, Ar, Fe, and Cu Auger-electron production at National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.H.; Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Guardala, N.A.; Price, J.L.; Stumborg, M.F.; Glass, G.A.

    1992-09-26

    Energetic K and L Auger electrons produced by focussed, filtered, broad-band synchrotron radiation have been measured at the x-ray ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The x-ray beam was used to study inner-shell photoionization of Ne and Ar gas and Fe and Cu solid film targets. The Auger electrons were analyzed by means of a semi-hemispherical electrostatic electron spectrometer at the energy resolution of {approximately} 3 %. The electrons were detected at both 90{degree} and 0{degree} with respect to the photon beam direction. Broad distributions of the inner-shell photoelectrons were also observed, reflecting the incoming photon flux distribution. The Fe and Cu K Auger electron spectra were found to be very similar to the Ar K Auger electron spectra. This was expected, since deep inner-shell Auger processes are not affected by the outer valence electrons. Above 3 keV in electron energy, there have been few previous Auger electron measurements. 2 figs., 13 refs.

  11. Ne, Ar, Fe, and Cu Auger-electron production at National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.H.; Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W. ); Guardala, N.A.; Price, J.L.; Stumborg, M.F. . White Oak Lab.); Glass, G.A. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-09-26

    Energetic K and L Auger electrons produced by focussed, filtered, broad-band synchrotron radiation have been measured at the x-ray ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The x-ray beam was used to study inner-shell photoionization of Ne and Ar gas and Fe and Cu solid film targets. The Auger electrons were analyzed by means of a semi-hemispherical electrostatic electron spectrometer at the energy resolution of [approximately] 3 %. The electrons were detected at both 90[degree] and 0[degree] with respect to the photon beam direction. Broad distributions of the inner-shell photoelectrons were also observed, reflecting the incoming photon flux distribution. The Fe and Cu K Auger electron spectra were found to be very similar to the Ar K Auger electron spectra. This was expected, since deep inner-shell Auger processes are not affected by the outer valence electrons. Above 3 keV in electron energy, there have been few previous Auger electron measurements. 2 figs., 13 refs.

  12. Ramsey interferometry for resonant Auger decay through core-excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Souvik; Nakajima, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically investigate the electron dynamics in Ne atoms involving core-excited states through the Ramsey scheme with a pair of time-delayed x-ray pulses. Irradiation of Ne atoms by the ˜1 femtosecond x-ray pulse simultaneously populates two core-excited states, and an identical but time-delayed x-ray pulse probes the dynamics of the core-excited electron wave packet which is subject to the resonant Auger decay. The energy-integrated total Auger electron yield and energy-resolved Auger electron spectra in the time domain show periodic structures due to the temporal evolution of the wave packet, from which we can obtain the counterpart in the frequency domain through the Fourier transformation. The Auger electron energy spectra in the time as well as frequency domains show the interference patterns between the two Auger electron wave packets released into the continuum from the superposition of two core-excited states at different times. These spectra are important to clarify the individual contribution of the different Auger decay channels upon core excitation by the x-ray pulse.

  13. Carbon Auger line shape study of nitroaromatic explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W. Jr.; Peebles, H.C.; Rye, R.R.; Houston, J.E.; Binkley, J.S.

    1984-05-01

    The C(KVV) Auger line shapes of a series of nitroaromatic explosives have been compared to condensed benzene. Energy shifts of the pi levels in TNB (1,3,5-trinitrobenzene) and TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) and charge redistribution caused by the resonance electron withdrawing effect of the nitro groups lead to changes in the Auger line shape of transitions involving these levels compared to those of benzene. In MATB (1-amino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene), DATB (1,3-diamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene), and TATB (1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene), the amino groups form resonant structures with the aromatic ring and donate charge density into the ring pi levels. This more than compensates for the charge density withdrawn by the nitro groups. As a result, an amino-carbon pi level is populated which leads to dramatic changes in the energy and intensity of the leading edge of the C(KVV) line shape for these compounds. Hole-hole correlation in the final state causes only small changes in line shape. The relative explosive shock initiation sensitivity of TNB and TNT, where the intermolecular bonding is weak, correlates with the observed Auger line shape changes and reflects the relative ring stability of these aromatic molecules. However, the addition of amino groups in MATB, DATB, and TATB decreases the ring bonding, as reflected in the Auger spectra, in favor of intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bond formation and the initiation sensitivity no longer correlates with ring bonding strength.

  14. Otilonium: a potent blocker of neuronal nicotinic ACh receptors in bovine chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gandía, L.; Villarroya, M.; Lara, B.; Olmos, V.; Gilabert, J. A.; López, M. G.; Martínez-Sierra, R.; Borges, R.; García, A. G.

    1996-01-01

    1. Otilonium, a clinically useful spasmolytic, behaves as a potent blocker of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) as well as a mild wide-spectrum Ca2+ channel blocker in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. 2. 45Ca2+ uptake into chromaffin cells stimulated with high K+ (70 mM, 1 min) was blocked by otilonium with an IC50 of 7.6 microM. The drug inhibited the 45Ca2+ uptake stimulated by the nicotinic AChR agonist, dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) with a 79 fold higher potency (IC50 = 0.096 microM). 3. Whole-cell Ba2+ currents (IBa) through Ca2+ channels of voltage-clamped chromaffin cells were blocked by otilonium with an IC50 of 6.4 microM, very close to that of K(+)-evoked 45Ca2+ uptake. Blockade developed in 10-20 s, almost as a single step and was rapidly and almost fully reversible. 4. Whole-cell nicotinic AChR-mediated currents (250 ms pulses of 100 microM DMPP) applied at 30 s intervals were blocked by otilonium in a concentration-dependent manner, showing an IC50 of 0.36 microM. Blockade was induced in a step-wise manner. Wash out of otilonium allowed a slow recovery of the current, also in discrete steps. 5. In experiments with recordings in the same cells of whole-cell IDMPP, Na+ currents (INa) and Ca2+ currents (ICa), 1 microM otilonium blocked 87% IDMPP, 7% INa and 13% ICa. 6. Otilonium inhibited the K(+)-evoked catecholamine secretory response of superfused bovine chromaffin cells with an IC50 of 10 microM, very close to the IC50 for blockade of K(+)-induced 45Ca2+ uptake and IBa. 7. Otilonium inhibited the secretory responses induced by 10 s pulses of 50 microM DMPP with an IC50 of 7.4 nM. Hexamethonium blocked the DMPP-evoked responses with an IC50 of 29.8 microM, 4,000 fold higher than that of otilonium. 8. In conclusion, otilonium is a potent blocker of nicotinic AChR-mediated responses. The drugs also blocked various subtypes of neuronal voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels at a considerably lower potency. Na+ channels were unaffected by

  15. Characterization of the Mode of Action of a Potent Dengue Virus Capsid Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Scaturro, Pietro; Trist, Iuni Margaret Laura; Paul, David; Kumar, Anil; Acosta, Eliana G.; Byrd, Chelsea M.; Jordan, Robert; Brancale, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue viruses (DV) represent a significant global health burden, with up to 400 million infections every year and around 500,000 infected individuals developing life-threatening disease. In spite of attempts to develop vaccine candidates and antiviral drugs, there is a lack of approved therapeutics for the treatment of DV infection. We have previously reported the identification of ST-148, a small-molecule inhibitor exhibiting broad and potent antiviral activity against DV in vitro and in vivo (C. M. Byrd et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 57:15–25, 2013, doi:10 .1128/AAC.01429-12). In the present study, we investigated the mode of action of this promising compound by using a combination of biochemical, virological, and imaging-based techniques. We confirmed that ST-148 targets the capsid protein and obtained evidence of bimodal antiviral activity affecting both assembly/release and entry of infectious DV particles. Importantly, by using a robust bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assay, we observed an ST-148-dependent increase of capsid self-interaction. These results were corroborated by molecular modeling studies that also revealed a plausible model for compound binding to capsid protein and inhibition by a distinct resistance mutation. These results suggest that ST-148-enhanced capsid protein self-interaction perturbs assembly and disassembly of DV nucleocapsids, probably by inducing structural rigidity. Thus, as previously reported for other enveloped viruses, stabilization of capsid protein structure is an attractive therapeutic concept that also is applicable to flaviviruses. IMPORTANCE Dengue viruses are arthropod-borne viruses representing a significant global health burden. They infect up to 400 million people and are endemic to subtropical and tropical areas of the world. Currently, there are neither vaccines nor approved therapeutics for the prophylaxis or treatment of DV infections, respectively. This study reports the

  16. Novel phospholipase A2 inhibitors from python serum are potent peptide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Samy, Ramar Perumal; Thwin, Maung Maung; Stiles, Brad G; Satyanarayana-Jois, Seetharama; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Zayed, M E; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Sikka, Sakshi; Kumar, Alan Prem; Sethi, Gautam; Lim, Lina Hsiu Kim

    2015-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) play a vital role in defense against resistant bacteria. In this study, eight different AMPs synthesized from Python reticulatus serum protein were tested for bactericidal activity against various Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia pseudomallei (KHW and TES strains), and Proteus vulgaris) using a disc-diffusion method (20 μg/disc). Among the tested peptides, phospholipase A2 inhibitory peptide (PIP)-18[59-76], β-Asp65-PIP[59-67], D-Ala66-PNT.II, and D60,65E-PIP[59-67] displayed the most potent bactericidal activity against all tested pathogens in a dose-dependent manner (100-6.8 μg/ml), with a remarkable activity noted against S. aureus at 6.8 μg/ml dose within 6 h of incubation. Determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) by a micro-broth dilution method at 100-3.125 μg/ml revealed that PIP-18[59-76], β-Asp65-PIP[59-67] and D-Ala66-PNT.II peptides exerted a potent inhibitory effect against S. aureus and B. pseudomallei (KHW) (MICs 3.125 μg/ml), while a much less inhibitory potency (MICs 12.5 μg/ml) was noted for β-Asp65-PIP[59-67] and D-Ala66-PNT.II peptides against B. pseudomallei (TES). Higher doses of peptides had no effect on the other two strains (i.e., Klebsiella pneumoniae and Streptococcus pneumoniae). Overall, PIP-18[59-76] possessed higher antimicrobial activity than that of chloramphenicol (CHL), ceftazidime (CF) and streptomycin (ST) (30 μg/disc). When the two most active peptides, PIP-18[59-76] and β-Asp65-PIP[59-67], were applied topically at a 150 mg/kg dose for testing wound healing activity in a mouse model of S. aureus infection, the former accelerates faster wound healing than the latter peptide at 14 days post-treatment. The western blot data suggest that the topical application of peptides (PIP-18[59-67] and β-Asp65-PIP[59-67]) modulates NF-kB mediated wound repair in mice with relatively little haemolytic (100-1.56 μg/ml) and cytotoxic (1000

  17. Resonant Auger Effect at High X-Ray Intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Rohringer, N; Santra, R

    2008-03-27

    The resonant Auger effect of atomic neon exposed to high-intensity x-ray radiation in resonance with the 1s {yields} 3p transition is discussed. High intensity here means that the x-ray peak intensity is sufficient ({approx} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) to induce Rabi oscillations between the neon ground state and the 1s{sup -1}3p ({sup 1}P) state within the relaxation lifetime of the inner-shell vacancy. For the numerical analysis presented, an effective two-level model, including a description of the resonant Auger decay process, is employed. Both coherent and chaotic x-ray pulses are treated. The latter are used to simulate radiation from x-ray free-electron lasers based on the principle of self-amplified spontaneous emission. Observing x-ray-driven atomic population dynamics in the time domain is challenging for chaotic pulse ensembles. A more practical option for experiments using x-ray free-electron lasers is to measure the line profiles in the kinetic energy distribution of the resonant Auger electron. This provides information on both atomic population dynamics and x-ray pulse properties.

  18. Discovery of a potent class I selective ketone histone deacetylase inhibitor with antitumor activity in vivo and optimized pharmacokinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Kinzel, Olaf; Llauger-Bufi, Laura; Pescatore, Giovanna; Rowley, Michael; Schultz-Fademrecht, Carsten; Monteagudo, Edith; Fonsi, Massimiliano; Gonzalez Paz, Odalys; Fiore, Fabrizio; Steinkühler, Christian; Jones, Philip

    2009-06-11

    The optimization of a potent, class I selective ketone HDAC inhibitor is shown. It possesses optimized pharmacokinetic properties in preclinical species, has a clean off-target profile, and is negative in a microbial mutagenicity (Ames) test. In a mouse xenograft model it shows efficacy comparable to that of vorinostat at a 10-fold reduced dose.

  19. Duboscic acid: a potent α-glucosidase inhibitor with an unprecedented triterpenoidal carbon skeleton from Duboscia macrocarpa.

    PubMed

    Wafo, Pascal; Kamdem, Ramsay S T; Ali, Zulfiqar; Anjum, Shazia; Khan, Shamsun Nahar; Begum, Afshan; Krohn, Karsten; Abegaz, Berhanu M; Ngadjui, Bonaventure T; Choudhary, Muhammad Iqbal

    2010-12-17

    Duboscic acid (1), a triterpenoid with a unique carbon backbone, was isolated from Duboscia macrocarpa Bocq. It is the first member of a new class of triterpenoids, for which the name "dubosane" is proposed. Duboscic acid has a potent α-glucosidase inhibition, and its structure was unambiguously deduced by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study.

  20. Kappa opioid mediation of cannabinoid effects of the potent hallucinogen, salvinorin A, in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Walentiny, D. Matthew; Vann, Robert E.; Warner, Jonathan A.; King, Lindsey S.; Seltzman, Herbert H.; Navarro, Hernán A.; Twine, Charles E.; Thomas, Brian F.; Gilliam, Anne F.; Gilmour, Brian P.; Carroll, F. Ivy

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Salvinorin A, the primary psychoactive derivative of the hallucinogenic herb Salvia divinorum, is a potent and highly selective kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) agonist. Several recent studies, however, have suggested endocannabinoid system mediation of some of its effects. Objectives This study represents a systematic examination of this hypothesis. Methods Salvinorin A was isolated from S. divinorum and was evaluated in a battery of in vitro and in vivo procedures designed to detect cannabinoid activity, including CB1 receptor radioligand and [35S]GTPγS binding, calcium flux assay, in vivo cannabinoid screening tests, and drug discrimination. Results Salvinorin A did not bind to nor activate CB1 receptors. In vivo salvinorin A produced pronounced hypolocomotion and antinociception (and to a lesser extent, hypothermia). These effects were blocked by the selective KOR antagonist, JDTic, but not by the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant. Interestingly, however, rimonabant attenuated KOR activation stimulated by U69,593 in a [35S]GTPγS assay. Salvinorin A did not substitute for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in mice trained to discriminate THC. Conclusions These findings suggest that similarities in the pharmacological effects of salvinorin A and those of cannabinoids are mediated by its activation of KOR rather than by any direct action of salvinorin A on the endocannabinoid system. Further, the results suggest that rimonabant reversal of salvinorin A effects in previous studies may be explained in part by rimonabant attenuation of KOR activation. PMID:20354680

  1. A Novel, Potent, Small Molecule AKT Inhibitor Exhibits Efficacy against Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dinavahi, Saketh S.; Prasanna, Rajagopalan; Dharmarajan, Sriram; Perumal, Yogeeswari; Viswanadha, Srikant

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Anomalies of Akt regulation, including overexpression in lung cancer, impart resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiation, thereby implicating this kinase as a therapeutic intervention point. A novel scaffold of Akt inhibitors was developed through virtual screening of chemical databases available at Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani, Hyderabad, based on docking studies using Maestro. A benzothienopyrimidine derivative (BIA-6) was identified as a potential lead molecule that inhibited Akt1 enzyme activity with an IC50 of 256 nM. Materials and Methods BIA-6 was tested for in vitro Akt1 inhibition using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer kit. Anti-proliferative activity was tested in NCI-H460, A549, NCI-H1975, and NCI-H2170 cell lines. The effect of the compound on p-Akt (S473) was estimated. Results BIA-6 allosterically caused a dose dependent reduction of growth of cell lines with a half maximal growth inhibition (GI50) range of 0.49 μM to 6.6 μM. Cell cycle analysis indicated that BIA-6 caused a G1 phase arrest at < 100 nM but led to apoptosis at higher doses. BIA-6 also exhibited synergism with standard chemotherapeutic agents. Conclusion BIA-6 is a novel, allosteric Akt inhibitor with potent anti-cancer activity in lung cancer cell lines, that effectively blocks the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt pathway with a high margin selectivity towards normal cells. PMID:25687876

  2. Towards the Development of a Potent and Selective Organoruthenium Mammalian Sterile 20 Kinase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Ruchi; Maksimoska, Jasna; Pagano, Nicholas; Wong, Eric Y.; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Diamond, Scott L.; Meggers, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian sterile 20 (MST1) kinase, a member of the sterile 20 (Ste-20) family of proteins, is a proapoptotic cytosolic kinase that plays an important role in the cellular response to oxidative stress. In this study, we report on the development of a potent and selective MST1 kinase inhibitor based on a ruthenium half-sandwich scaffold. We show that the enantiopure organoruthenium inhibitor, 9E1, has an IC50 value of 45 nM for MST1 and a greater than 25-fold inhibitor selectivity over the related Ste-20 kinases, p21 activated kinase 1 (PAK1), and p21 activated kinase 4 (PAK4) and an almost 10-fold selectivity over the related Thousand and one amino acids kinase 2 (TAO2). Compound 9E1 also displays a promising selectivity profile against unrelated protein kinases, however, the proto-oncogene serine/threonine protein kinase PIM1 (PIM-1) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3β) are inhibited with IC50 values in the low nanomolar range. We also show that 9E1 can inhibit MST1 function in cells. A cocrystal structure of a related compound with PIM-1 and a homology model with MST1 reveals the binding mode of this scaffold to MST1 and provides a starting point for the development of improved MST1 kinase inhibitors for possible therapeutic application. PMID:19226137

  3. Discovery of a potent, selective, and orally bioavailable pyridinyl-pyrimidine phthalazine aurora kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Cee, Victor J; Schenkel, Laurie B; Hodous, Brian L; Deak, Holly L; Nguyen, Hanh N; Olivieri, Philip R; Romero, Karina; Bak, Annette; Be, Xuhai; Bellon, Steve; Bush, Tammy L; Cheng, Alan C; Chung, Grace; Coats, Steve; Eden, Patrick M; Hanestad, Kelly; Gallant, Paul L; Gu, Yan; Huang, Xin; Kendall, Richard L; Lin, Min-Hwa Jasmine; Morrison, Michael J; Patel, Vinod F; Radinsky, Robert; Rose, Paul E; Ross, Sandra; Sun, Ji-Rong; Tang, Jin; Zhao, Huilin; Payton, Marc; Geuns-Meyer, Stephanie D

    2010-09-01

    The discovery of aurora kinases as essential regulators of cell division has led to intense interest in identifying small molecule aurora kinase inhibitors for the potential treatment of cancer. A high-throughput screening effort identified pyridinyl-pyrimidine 6a as a moderately potent dual inhibitor of aurora kinases -A and -B. Optimization of this hit resulted in an anthranilamide lead (6j) that possessed improved enzyme and cellular activity and exhibited a high level of kinase selectivity. However, this anthranilamide and subsequent analogues suffered from a lack of oral bioavailability. Converting the internally hydrogen-bonded six-membered pseudo-ring of the anthranilamide to a phthalazine (8a-b) led to a dramatic improvement in oral bioavailability (38-61%F) while maintaining the potency and selectivity characteristics of the anthranilamide series. In a COLO 205 tumor pharmacodynamic assay measuring phosphorylation of the aurora-B substrate histone H3 at serine 10 (p-histone H3), oral administration of 8b at 50 mg/kg demonstrated significant reduction in tumor p-histone H3 for at least 6 h.

  4. Ethynylflavones, Highly Potent, and Selective Inhibitors of Cytochrome P450 1A1

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The flavone backbone is a well-known pharmacophore present in a number of substrates and inhibitors of various P450 enzymes. In order to find highly potent and novel P450 family I enzyme inhibitors, an acetylene group was incorporated into six different positions of flavone. The introduction of an acetylene group at certain locations of the flavone backbone lead to time-dependent inhibitors of P450 1A1. 3′-Ethynylflavone, 4′-ethynylflavone, 6-ethynylflavone, and 7-ethynylflavone (KI values of 0.035–0.056 μM) show strong time-dependent inhibition of P450 1A1, while 5-ethynylflavone (KI value of 0.51 μM) is a moderate time-dependent inhibitor of this enzyme. Meanwhile, 4′-ethynylflavone and 6-ethynylflavone are highly selective inhibitors toward this enzyme. Especially, 6-ethynylflavone possesses a Ki value of 0.035 μM for P450 1A1 177- and 15-fold lower than those for P450s 1A2 and 1B1, respectively. The docking postures observed in the computational simulations show that the orientation of the acetylene group determines its capability to react with P450s 1A1 and 1A2. Meanwhile, conformational analysis indicates that the shape of an inhibitor determines its inhibitory selectivity toward these enzymes. PMID:25033111

  5. Discovery of Pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine TTK Inhibitors: CFI-402257 is a Potent, Selective, Bioavailable Anticancer Agent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Laufer, Radoslaw; Patel, Narendra Kumar; Ng, Grace; Sampson, Peter B; Li, Sze-Wan; Lang, Yunhui; Feher, Miklos; Brokx, Richard; Beletskaya, Irina; Hodgson, Richard; Plotnikova, Olga; Awrey, Donald E; Qiu, Wei; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y; Mason, Jacqueline M; Wei, Xin; Lin, Dan Chi-Chia; Che, Yi; Kiarash, Reza; Fletcher, Graham C; Mak, Tak W; Bray, Mark R; Pauls, Henry W

    2016-07-14

    This work describes a scaffold hopping exercise that begins with known imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazines, briefly explores pyrazolo[1,5-a][1,3,5]triazines, and ultimately yields pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines as a novel class of potent TTK inhibitors. An X-ray structure of a representative compound is consistent with 1(1)/2 type inhibition and provides structural insight to aid subsequent optimization of in vitro activity and physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. Incorporation of polar moieties in the hydrophobic and solvent accessible regions modulates physicochemical properties while maintaining potency. Compounds with enhanced oral exposure were identified for xenograft studies. The work culminates in the identification of a potent (TTK K i = 0.1 nM), highly selective, orally bioavailable anticancer agent (CFI-402257) for IND enabling studies.

  6. Discovery of Pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine TTK Inhibitors: CFI-402257 is a Potent, Selective, Bioavailable Anticancer Agent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Laufer, Radoslaw; Patel, Narendra Kumar; Ng, Grace; Sampson, Peter B; Li, Sze-Wan; Lang, Yunhui; Feher, Miklos; Brokx, Richard; Beletskaya, Irina; Hodgson, Richard; Plotnikova, Olga; Awrey, Donald E; Qiu, Wei; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y; Mason, Jacqueline M; Wei, Xin; Lin, Dan Chi-Chia; Che, Yi; Kiarash, Reza; Fletcher, Graham C; Mak, Tak W; Bray, Mark R; Pauls, Henry W

    2016-07-14

    This work describes a scaffold hopping exercise that begins with known imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazines, briefly explores pyrazolo[1,5-a][1,3,5]triazines, and ultimately yields pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines as a novel class of potent TTK inhibitors. An X-ray structure of a representative compound is consistent with 1(1)/2 type inhibition and provides structural insight to aid subsequent optimization of in vitro activity and physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. Incorporation of polar moieties in the hydrophobic and solvent accessible regions modulates physicochemical properties while maintaining potency. Compounds with enhanced oral exposure were identified for xenograft studies. The work culminates in the identification of a potent (TTK K i = 0.1 nM), highly selective, orally bioavailable anticancer agent (CFI-402257) for IND enabling studies. PMID:27437075

  7. The novel flavone tetramethoxyluteolin is a potent inhibitor of human mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Zuyi; Patel, Arti B.; Panagiotidou, Smaro; Theoharides, Theoharis C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mast cells (MCs) are hemopoietic cells that mature in tissues and are involved in allergy, immunity and inflammation by secreting multiple mediators. The natural flavone luteolin (lut) has anti-inflammatory actions and inhibits human MCs. Objective To investigate the ability of lut, and its novel structural analog 3’,4’,5,7-tetramethoxyluteolin (methlut), to inhibit human MCs mediator expression and release in vitro and in vivo. Methods Human LAD2 cells and primary human umbilical cord-blood derived cultured MC (hCBMCs) were stimulated by substance P (SP) or IgE/anti-IgE with or without pre-incubation with lut, methlut or cromolyn (1–100 μM) for 2 or 24 hr following which a mediator secretion was measured. The effect of the compound on MC intracellular calcium levels and NF-κB activation was also investigated. Pretreatment with methlut was also studied in mice passively sensitized with dinotrophenol-human serum albumin (DNP-HSA) and challenged intradermally. Results Methlut is a more potent inhibitor than lut or cromolyn for beta-hexosaminidase (β-hex) and histamine secretion from LAD2 cells stimulated by either SP or IgE/anti-IgE, but only methlut and lut significantly inhibit preformed tumor necrosis factor (TNF) secretion. Methlut is also a more potent inhibitor than lut of de novo synthesized TNF from LAD2, and of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) from hCBMCs. The mechanism of action from methlut may be due to its ability to inhibit intracellular calcium increase, as well as NF-κB induction at both the transcriptional and translational levels in LAD2 cells stimulated by SP without affecting cell viability. Treatment (ip) with methlut significantly decreases skin vascular permeability of Evans blue in mice passively sensitized to DNP-HAS and challenged intradermaly. Conclusion Methlut is a promising MC inhibitor for the treatment of allergic and inflammatory conditions. PMID:25498791

  8. Human Galectin-9 Is a Potent Mediator of HIV Transcription and Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Chavez, Leonard; Tandon, Ravi; Chew, Glen M.; Deng, Xutao; Danesh, Ali; Keating, Sheila; Lanteri, Marion; Samuels, Michael L.; Hoh, Rebecca; Sacha, Jonah B.; Norris, Philip J.; Niki, Toshiro; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Hirashima, Mitsuomi; Deeks, Steven G.; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C.; Pillai, Satish K.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying host immune determinants governing HIV transcription, latency and infectivity in vivo is critical to developing an HIV cure. Based on our recent finding that the host factor p21 regulates HIV transcription during antiretroviral therapy (ART), and published data demonstrating that the human carbohydrate-binding immunomodulatory protein galectin-9 regulates p21, we hypothesized that galectin-9 modulates HIV transcription. We report that the administration of a recombinant, stable form of galectin-9 (rGal-9) potently reverses HIV latency in vitro in the J-Lat HIV latency model. Furthermore, rGal-9 reverses HIV latency ex vivo in primary CD4+ T cells from HIV-infected, ART-suppressed individuals (p = 0.002), more potently than vorinostat (p = 0.02). rGal-9 co-administration with the latency reversal agent "JQ1", a bromodomain inhibitor, exhibits synergistic activity (p<0.05). rGal-9 signals through N-linked oligosaccharides and O-linked hexasaccharides on the T cell surface, modulating the gene expression levels of key transcription initiation, promoter proximal-pausing, and chromatin remodeling factors that regulate HIV latency. Beyond latent viral reactivation, rGal-9 induces robust expression of the host antiviral deaminase APOBEC3G in vitro and ex vivo (FDR<0.006) and significantly reduces infectivity of progeny virus, decreasing the probability that the HIV reservoir will be replenished when latency is reversed therapeutically. Lastly, endogenous levels of soluble galectin-9 in the plasma of 72 HIV-infected ART-suppressed individuals were associated with levels of HIV RNA in CD4+ T cells (p<0.02) and with the quantity and binding avidity of circulating anti-HIV antibodies (p<0.009), suggesting a role of galectin-9 in regulating HIV transcription and viral production in vivo during therapy. Our data suggest that galectin-9 and the host glycosylation machinery should be explored as foundations for novel HIV cure strategies. PMID:27253379

  9. Human Galectin-9 Is a Potent Mediator of HIV Transcription and Reactivation.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Chavez, Leonard; Tandon, Ravi; Chew, Glen M; Deng, Xutao; Danesh, Ali; Keating, Sheila; Lanteri, Marion; Samuels, Michael L; Hoh, Rebecca; Sacha, Jonah B; Norris, Philip J; Niki, Toshiro; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Hirashima, Mitsuomi; Deeks, Steven G; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Pillai, Satish K

    2016-06-01

    Identifying host immune determinants governing HIV transcription, latency and infectivity in vivo is critical to developing an HIV cure. Based on our recent finding that the host factor p21 regulates HIV transcription during antiretroviral therapy (ART), and published data demonstrating that the human carbohydrate-binding immunomodulatory protein galectin-9 regulates p21, we hypothesized that galectin-9 modulates HIV transcription. We report that the administration of a recombinant, stable form of galectin-9 (rGal-9) potently reverses HIV latency in vitro in the J-Lat HIV latency model. Furthermore, rGal-9 reverses HIV latency ex vivo in primary CD4+ T cells from HIV-infected, ART-suppressed individuals (p = 0.002), more potently than vorinostat (p = 0.02). rGal-9 co-administration with the latency reversal agent "JQ1", a bromodomain inhibitor, exhibits synergistic activity (p<0.05). rGal-9 signals through N-linked oligosaccharides and O-linked hexasaccharides on the T cell surface, modulating the gene expression levels of key transcription initiation, promoter proximal-pausing, and chromatin remodeling factors that regulate HIV latency. Beyond latent viral reactivation, rGal-9 induces robust expression of the host antiviral deaminase APOBEC3G in vitro and ex vivo (FDR<0.006) and significantly reduces infectivity of progeny virus, decreasing the probability that the HIV reservoir will be replenished when latency is reversed therapeutically. Lastly, endogenous levels of soluble galectin-9 in the plasma of 72 HIV-infected ART-suppressed individuals were associated with levels of HIV RNA in CD4+ T cells (p<0.02) and with the quantity and binding avidity of circulating anti-HIV antibodies (p<0.009), suggesting a role of galectin-9 in regulating HIV transcription and viral production in vivo during therapy. Our data suggest that galectin-9 and the host glycosylation machinery should be explored as foundations for novel HIV cure strategies. PMID:27253379

  10. Fellutamide B is a Potent Inhibitor of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, G.; Li, D; Chidawanyika, T; Nathan, C; Li, H

    2010-01-01

    Via high-throughput screening of a natural compound library, we have identified a lipopeptide aldehyde, fellutamide B (1), as the most potent inhibitor of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) proteasome tested to date. Kinetic studies reveal that 1 inhibits both Mtb and human proteasomes in a time-dependent manner under steady-state condition. Remarkably, 1 inhibits the Mtb proteasome in a single-step binding mechanism with K{sub i} = 6.8 nM, whereas it inhibits the human proteasome {beta}5 active site following a two-step mechanism with K{sub i} = 11.5 nM and K*{sub i} = 0.93 nM. Co-crystallization of 1 bound to the Mtb proteasome revealed a structural basis for the tight binding of 1 to the active sites of the Mtb proteasome. The hemiacetal group of 1 in the Mtb proteasome takes the (R)-configuration, whereas in the yeast proteasome it takes the (S)-configuration, indicating that the pre-chiral CHO group of 1 binds to the active site Thr1 in a different orientation. Re-examination of the structure of the yeast proteasome in complex with 1 showed significant conformational changes at the substrate-binding cleft along the active site. These structural differences are consistent with the different kinetic mechanisms of 1 against Mtb and human proteasomes.

  11. Discovery of potent and selective sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) inhibitors using a fragment-based approach.

    PubMed

    Cui, Huaqing; Kamal, Zeeshan; Ai, Teng; Xu, Yanli; More, Swati S; Wilson, Daniel J; Chen, Liqiang

    2014-10-23

    Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) is one of the sirtuins, a family of NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases that act on a variety of histone and non-histone substrates. Accumulating biological functions and potential therapeutic applications have drawn interest in the discovery and development of SIRT2 inhibitors. Herein we report our discovery of novel SIRT2 inhibitors using a fragment-based approach. Inspired by the purported close binding proximity of suramin and nicotinamide, we prepared two sets of fragments, namely, the naphthylamide sulfonic acids and the naphthalene-benzamides and -nicotinamides. Biochemical evaluation of these two series provided structure-activity relationship (SAR) information, which led to the design of (5-benzamidonaphthalen-1/2-yloxy)nicotinamide derivatives. Among these inhibitors, one compound exhibited high anti-SIRT2 activity (48 nM) and excellent selectivity for SIRT2 over SIRT1 and SIRT3. In vitro, it also increased the acetylation level of α-tubulin, a well-established SIRT2 substrate, in both concentration- and time-dependent manners. Further kinetic studies revealed that this compound behaves as a competitive inhibitor against the peptide substrate and most likely as a noncompetitive inhibitor against NAD(+). Taken together, these results indicate that we have discovered a potent and selective SIRT2 inhibitor whose novel structure merits further exploration.

  12. The EDLL motif: a potent plant transcriptional activation domain from AP2/ERF transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Shiv B; Belachew, Alemu; Ma, Siu Fong; Young, Melinda; Ade, Jules; Shen, Yu; Marion, Colleen M; Holtan, Hans E; Bailey, Adina; Stone, Jeffrey K; Edwards, Leslie; Wallace, Andreah D; Canales, Roger D; Adam, Luc; Ratcliffe, Oliver J; Repetti, Peter P

    2012-06-01

    In plants, the ERF/EREBP family of transcriptional regulators plays a key role in adaptation to various biotic and abiotic stresses. These proteins contain a conserved AP2 DNA-binding domain and several uncharacterized motifs. Here, we describe a short motif, termed 'EDLL', that is present in AtERF98/TDR1 and other clade members from the same AP2 sub-family. We show that the EDLL motif, which has a unique arrangement of acidic amino acids and hydrophobic leucines, functions as a strong activation domain. The motif is transferable to other proteins, and is active at both proximal and distal positions of target promoters. As such, the EDLL motif is able to partly overcome the repression conferred by the AtHB2 transcription factor, which contains an ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif. We further examined the activation potential of EDLL by analysis of the regulation of flowering time by NF-Y (nuclear factor Y) proteins. Genetic evidence indicates that NF-Y protein complexes potentiate the action of CONSTANS in regulation of flowering in Arabidopsis; we show that the transcriptional activation function of CONSTANS can be substituted by direct fusion of the EDLL activation motif to NF-YB subunits. The EDLL motif represents a potent plant activation domain that can be used as a tool to confer transcriptional activation potential to heterologous DNA-binding proteins.

  13. Tetanus toxin fragment C fused to flagellin makes a potent mucosal vaccine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recombinant subunit vaccines provide safe and targeted protection against microbial infections. However, the protective efficacy of recombinant subunit vaccines tends to be less potent than the whole cell vaccines, especially when they are administered through mucosal routes. We have reported that a bacterial flagellin has strong mucosal adjuvant activity to induce protective immune responses. In this study, we tested whether FlaB could be used as a fusion partner of subunit vaccine for tetanus. Materials and Methods We constructed fusion proteins consisted with tetanus toxin fragment C (TTFC), the nontoxic C-terminal portion of tetanus toxin, and a Toll-like receptor 5 agonist from Vibrio vulnificus (FlaB). Mice were intranasally administered with fusion protein and protective immune responses of the vaccinated mice were analyzed. Results FlaB-TTFC recombinant protein induced strong tetanus-specific antibody responses in both systemic and mucosal compartments and prolonged the survival of mice after challenge with a supra-lethal dose of tetanus toxin. Conclusion This study establishes FlaB as a successful fusion partner for recombinant subunit tetanus vaccine applicable through mucosal route, and it further endorses our previous observations that FlaB could be a stable adjuvant partner for mucosal vaccines. PMID:25649002

  14. A potent antibrowning agent from pine needles of Cedrus deodara: 2R,3R-dihydromyricetin.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xue; Wu, Yan-Ping; Qiu, Jing-Hong; Zhong, Kai; Gao, Hong

    2014-09-01

    This article focuses on finding the novel antibrowning agents from the pine needles of Cedrus deodara and studying its antibrowning effect. By bioassay guide of tyrosinase inhibitory activity, the main active compound was isolated and purified from 50% methanol extract of pine needles of C. deodara through macroporous resin Diaion HP-20 column chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. Based on mass and nuclear magnetic resonance data, the active compound was identified as 2R,3R-dihydromyricetin, which showed the potent monophenolase and diphenolase inhibitory activities. Moreover, 2R,3R-dihydromyricetin exhibited a strong ABTS radical scavenging activity with a dose-dependent manner. The antibrowning efficacy of 2R,3R-dihydromyricetin was evaluated by monitoring the changes of L*, a*, and b* values and total color difference (△E) on fresh-cut apple slices. It was found that 2R,3R-dihydromyricetin was effective in inhibiting the browning of apple slices treated with a concentration as low as 0.05% at 25 °C for 24 h. Its antibrowning effect was significantly better than ascorbic acid (0.5%) alone. Furthermore, 2R,3R-dihydromyricetin showed a good synergistic antibrowning effect with ascorbic acid. This is the first report that 2R,3R-dihydromyricetin from pine needles of C. deodara may be used as a potential antibrowning agent in protecting against food browning. PMID:25163933

  15. Insulin-like growth factor I/somatomedin C: a potent inducer of oligodendrocyte development

    SciTech Connect

    McMorris, F.A.; Smith, T.M.; DeSalvo, S.; Furlanetto, R.W.

    1986-02-01

    Cell cultures established from cerebrum of 1-day-old rats were used to investigate hormonal regulation of the development of oligodendrocytes, which synthesize myelin in the central nervous system. The number of oligodendrocytes that developed was preferentially increased by insulin, or by insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), also known as somatomedin C. High concentrations of insulin were required for substantial induction of oligodendrocyte development, whereas only 3.3 ng of IGF-I per ml was needed for a 2-fold increase in oligodendrocyte numbers. At an IGF-I concentration of 100 ng/ml, oligodendrocyte numbers were increased 6-fold in cultures grown in the presence of 10% fetal bovine serum, or up to 60-fold in cultures maintained in serum-free medium. IGF-I produced less than a 2-fold increase in the number of nonoligodendroglial cells in the same cultures. Type I IGF receptors were identified on oligodendrocytes and on a putative oligodendrocyte precursor cell population identified by using mouse monoclonal antibody A2B5. Radioligand binding assays were done. These results indicate that IGF-I is a potent inducer of oligodendrocyte development and suggest a possible mechanism based on IGF deficiency for the hypomyelination that results from early postnatal malnutrition.

  16. Latrepirdine is a potent activator of AMP-activated protein kinase and reduces neuronal excitability

    PubMed Central

    Weisová, P; Alvarez, S P; Kilbride, S M; Anilkumar, U; Baumann, B; Jordán, J; Bernas, T; Huber, H J; Düssmann, H; Prehn, J H M

    2013-01-01

    Latrepirdine/Dimebon is a small-molecule compound with attributed neurocognitive-enhancing activities, which has recently been tested in clinical trials for the treatment of Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease. Latrepirdine has been suggested to be a neuroprotective agent that increases mitochondrial function, however the molecular mechanisms underlying these activities have remained elusive. We here demonstrate that latrepirdine, at (sub)nanomolar concentrations (0.1 nM), activates the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Treatment of primary neurons with latrepirdine increased intracellular ATP levels and glucose transporter 3 translocation to the plasma membrane. Latrepirdine also increased mitochondrial uptake of the voltage-sensitive probe TMRM. Gene silencing of AMPKα or its upstream kinases, LKB1 and CaMKKβ, inhibited this effect. However, studies using the plasma membrane potential indicator DisBAC2(3) demonstrated that the effects of latrepirdine on TMRM uptake were largely mediated by plasma membrane hyperpolarization, precluding a purely ‘mitochondrial' mechanism of action. In line with a stabilizing effect of latrepirdine on plasma membrane potential, pretreatment with latrepirdine reduced spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations as well as glutamate-induced Ca2+ increases in primary neurons, and protected neurons against glutamate toxicity. In conclusion, our experiments demonstrate that latrepirdine is a potent activator of AMPK, and suggest that one of the main pharmacological activities of latrepirdine is a reduction in neuronal excitability. PMID:24150226

  17. A potent antibrowning agent from pine needles of Cedrus deodara: 2R,3R-dihydromyricetin.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xue; Wu, Yan-Ping; Qiu, Jing-Hong; Zhong, Kai; Gao, Hong

    2014-09-01

    This article focuses on finding the novel antibrowning agents from the pine needles of Cedrus deodara and studying its antibrowning effect. By bioassay guide of tyrosinase inhibitory activity, the main active compound was isolated and purified from 50% methanol extract of pine needles of C. deodara through macroporous resin Diaion HP-20 column chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. Based on mass and nuclear magnetic resonance data, the active compound was identified as 2R,3R-dihydromyricetin, which showed the potent monophenolase and diphenolase inhibitory activities. Moreover, 2R,3R-dihydromyricetin exhibited a strong ABTS radical scavenging activity with a dose-dependent manner. The antibrowning efficacy of 2R,3R-dihydromyricetin was evaluated by monitoring the changes of L*, a*, and b* values and total color difference (△E) on fresh-cut apple slices. It was found that 2R,3R-dihydromyricetin was effective in inhibiting the browning of apple slices treated with a concentration as low as 0.05% at 25 °C for 24 h. Its antibrowning effect was significantly better than ascorbic acid (0.5%) alone. Furthermore, 2R,3R-dihydromyricetin showed a good synergistic antibrowning effect with ascorbic acid. This is the first report that 2R,3R-dihydromyricetin from pine needles of C. deodara may be used as a potential antibrowning agent in protecting against food browning.

  18. Potent dengue virus neutralization by a therapeutic antibody with low monovalent affinity requires bivalent engagement.

    PubMed

    Edeling, Melissa A; Austin, S Kyle; Shrestha, Bimmi; Dowd, Kimberly A; Mukherjee, Swati; Nelson, Christopher A; Johnson, Syd; Mabila, Manu N; Christian, Elizabeth A; Rucker, Joseph; Pierson, Theodore C; Diamond, Michael S; Fremont, Daved H

    2014-04-01

    We recently described our most potently neutralizing monoclonal antibody, E106, which protected against lethal Dengue virus type 1 (DENV-1) infection in mice. To further understand its functional properties, we determined the crystal structure of E106 Fab in complex with domain III (DIII) of DENV-1 envelope (E) protein to 2.45 Å resolution. Analysis of the complex revealed a small antibody-antigen interface with the epitope on DIII composed of nine residues along the lateral ridge and A-strand regions. Despite strong virus neutralizing activity of E106 IgG at picomolar concentrations, E106 Fab exhibited a ∼20,000-fold decrease in virus neutralization and bound isolated DIII, E, or viral particles with only a micromolar monovalent affinity. In comparison, E106 IgG bound DENV-1 virions with nanomolar avidity. The E106 epitope appears readily accessible on virions, as neutralization was largely temperature-independent. Collectively, our data suggest that E106 neutralizes DENV-1 infection through bivalent engagement of adjacent DIII subunits on a single virion. The isolation of anti-flavivirus antibodies that require bivalent binding to inhibit infection efficiently may be a rare event due to the unique icosahedral arrangement of envelope proteins on the virion surface. PMID:24743696

  19. Meridianin derivatives as potent Dyrk1A inhibitors and neuroprotective agents.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rammohan R; Sharma, Sadhana; Joshi, Prashant; Wani, Abubakar; Vishwakarma, Ram A; Kumar, Ajay; Bharate, Sandip B

    2015-08-01

    Meridianins are a group of marine-derived indole alkaloids which are reported to possess kinase inhibitory activities. In the present Letter, we report synthesis of N1-substituted and C-ring modified meridianin derivatives and their evaluation as Dyrk1A inhibitors and neuroprotective agents. Among the library of 52 compounds screened, morpholinoyl linked derivative 26b and 2-nitro-4-trifluoromethyl phenyl sulfonyl derivative 29v displayed potent inhibition of Dyrk1A with IC50 values of 0.5 and 0.53 μM, respectively. The derivative 26b also inhibited Dyrk2 and Dyrk3 with IC50 values of 1.4 and 2.2 μM, respectively showing 2.2 and 4.4 fold selectivity for Dyrk1A with respect to Dyrk2 and Dyrk3. The compound 26b was not cytotoxic to human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells (IC50>100 μM) and it displayed significant neuroprotection against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in these cells at 10 μM. Molecular modelling studies of compound 26b led to identification of key interactions in the binding site of Dyrk1A and the possible reasons for observed Dyrk1A selectivity over Dyrk2. PMID:26048785

  20. Potent bivalent inhibition of human tryptase-beta by a synthetic inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Selwood, Trevor; Elrod, Kyle C; Schechter, Norman M

    2003-12-01

    Human tryptase-beta (HTbeta) is a unique serine protease exhibiting a frame-like tetramer structure with four active sites directed toward a central pore. Potent inhibition of HTbeta has been attained using CRA-2059. This compound has two phenylguanidinium head groups connected via a linker capable of spanning between two active sites. The properties of the CRA-2059:HTbeta interaction were defined in this study. Tight-binding reversible inhibition was observed with an inhibition constant (Ki) of 620 pM, an association rate constant of 7x10(7) M(-1) s(-1) and a relatively slow dissociation rate constant of 0.04 s(-1). Bivalent inhibition was demonstrated by displacement of p-aminobenzamidine from the primary specificity pocket with a stoichiometry, [CRA-2059]0/[HTbeta]0, of 0.5. The potency of the bivalent interaction was illustrated by CRA-2059 inhibition of HTbeta, 24% or 53% inhibited by pre-incubation with an irreversible inhibitor. Two interactions were observed consistent with mono- and bi-valent binding; the Ki value for bivalent inhibition was at least 10(4)-fold lower than that for monovalent inhibition. Comparison of the affinities of CRA-2059 and phenylguanidine for HTbeta finds an approximate doubling of the free energy change upon bivalent binding. This doubling suggests that the linker portion minimally hinders the binding of CRA-2059 to HTbeta. The potency of CRA-2059 is thus attributable to effective bivalent binding. PMID:14719803

  1. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship of pyripyropene A derivatives as potent and selective acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2) inhibitors: part 1.

    PubMed

    Ohtawa, Masaki; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Ohte, Satoshi; Matsuda, Daisuke; Ohshiro, Taichi; Rudel, Lawrence L; Omura, Satoshi; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Nagamitsu, Tohru

    2013-03-01

    In an effort to develop potent and selective inhibitors toward ACAT2, structure-activity relationship studies were carried out using derivatives based on pyripyropene A (PPPA, 1). We have successfully developed novel PPPA derivatives with a 7-O-substituted benzoyl substituent that significantly exhibit more potent ACAT2 inhibitory activity and higher ACAT2 isozyme selectivity than 1. PMID:23369538

  2. 30 CFR 819.17 - Auger mining: Subsidence protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Auger mining: Subsidence protection. 819.17 Section 819.17 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.17 Auger mining: Subsidence protection. Auger mining shall be conducted in accordance...

  3. 30 CFR 819.17 - Auger mining: Subsidence protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auger mining: Subsidence protection. 819.17 Section 819.17 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.17 Auger mining: Subsidence protection. Auger mining shall be conducted in accordance...

  4. 30 CFR 819.17 - Auger mining: Subsidence protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Auger mining: Subsidence protection. 819.17 Section 819.17 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.17 Auger mining: Subsidence protection. Auger mining shall be conducted in accordance...

  5. 30 CFR 819.17 - Auger mining: Subsidence protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Auger mining: Subsidence protection. 819.17 Section 819.17 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.17 Auger mining: Subsidence protection. Auger mining shall be conducted in accordance...

  6. 30 CFR 819.17 - Auger mining: Subsidence protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Auger mining: Subsidence protection. 819.17 Section 819.17 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.17 Auger mining: Subsidence protection. Auger mining shall be conducted in accordance...

  7. 30 CFR 56.7005 - Augers and drill stems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Augers and drill stems. 56.7005 Section 56.7005... SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7005 Augers and drill stems. Drill crews and others shall stay clear of augers...

  8. 30 CFR 56.7005 - Augers and drill stems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Augers and drill stems. 56.7005 Section 56.7005... SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7005 Augers and drill stems. Drill crews and others shall stay clear of augers...

  9. 30 CFR 56.7005 - Augers and drill stems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Augers and drill stems. 56.7005 Section 56.7005... SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7005 Augers and drill stems. Drill crews and others shall stay clear of augers...

  10. 30 CFR 56.7005 - Augers and drill stems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Augers and drill stems. 56.7005 Section 56.7005... SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7005 Augers and drill stems. Drill crews and others shall stay clear of augers...

  11. 30 CFR 56.7005 - Augers and drill stems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Augers and drill stems. 56.7005 Section 56.7005... SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7005 Augers and drill stems. Drill crews and others shall stay clear of augers...

  12. Berberine is a potent agonist of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huarong; Li, Changqing; Yang, Junqing; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    Although berberine has hypolipidemic effects with a high affinity to nuclear proteins, the underlying molecular mechanism for this effect remains unclear. Here, we determine whether berberine is an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha), with a lipid-lowering effect. The cell-based reporter gene analysis showed that berberine selectively activates PPARalpha (EC50 =0.58 mM, Emax =102.4). The radioligand binding assay shows that berberine binds directly to the ligand-binding domain of PPARalpha (Ki=0.73 mM) with similar affinity to fenofibrate. The mRNA and protein levels of CPT-Ialpha gene from HepG2 cells and hyperlipidemic rat liver are remarkably up-regulated by berberine, and this effect can be blocked by MK886, a non-competitive antagonist of PPARalpha. A comparison assay in which berberine and fenofibrate were used to treat hyperlipidaemic rats for three months shows that these drugs produce similar lipid-lowering effects, except that berberine increases high-density lipoprotein cholesterol more effectively than fenofibrate. These findings provide the first evidence that berberine is a potent agonist of PPARalpha and seems to be superior to fenofibrate for treating hyperlipidemia. PMID:27100490

  13. Flunarizine is a highly potent inhibitor of cardiac hERG potassium current.

    PubMed

    Trepakova, Elena S; Dech, Spencer J; Salata, Joseph J

    2006-02-01

    Flunarizine has been widely used for the management of a variety of disorders such as peripheral vascular diseases, migraine, and epilepsy. The majority of its beneficial effects have been attributed to its ability to inhibit voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in the low micromolar range, albeit non-selectively, as flunarizine has been shown to inhibit a variety of ion channels. We examined the effects of flunarizine on potassium currents through cardiac channels encoded by the human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) stably expressed in CHO cells. In this study, we have characterized the effect of flunarizine on biophysical properties of hERG potassium currents with standard whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques. Notably, flunarizine is a highly potent inhibitor of hERG current with an IC50 value of 5.7 nM. The effect of flunarizine on hERG potassium current is concentration and time dependent, and displays voltage dependence over the voltage range between -40 and 0 mV. At concentrations near or above the IC50, flunarizine causes a negative shift in the voltage dependence of hERG current activation and accelerates tail current deactivation. Flunarizine preferentially blocks the activated state of the channel and displays weak frequency dependence of inhibition. Flunarizine also inhibits KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel current with an IC50 of 0.76 microM. PMID:16495758

  14. Emergence of a Potent Multidrug Efflux Pump Variant That Enhances Campylobacter Resistance to Multiple Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hong; Shen, Zhangqi; Wang, Yang; Deng, Fengru; Liu, Dejun; Naren, Gaowa; Dai, Lei; Su, Chih-Chia; Wang, Bing; Wang, Shaolin; Wu, Congming; Yu, Edward W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial antibiotic efflux pumps are key players in antibiotic resistance. Although their role in conferring multidrug resistance is well documented, the emergence of “super” efflux pump variants that enhance bacterial resistance to multiple drugs has not been reported. Here, we describe the emergence of a resistance-enhancing variant (named RE-CmeABC) of the predominant efflux pump CmeABC in Campylobacter, a major zoonotic pathogen whose resistance to antibiotics is considered a serious antibiotic resistance threat in the United States. Compared to the previously characterized CmeABC transporters, RE-CmeABC is much more potent in conferring Campylobacter resistance to antibiotics, which was shown by increased MICs and reduced intracellular accumulation of antibiotics. Structural modeling suggests that sequence variations in the drug-binding pocket of CmeB possibly contribute to the enhanced efflux function. Additionally, RE-CmeABC expands the mutant selection window of ciprofloxacin, enhances the emergence of antibiotic-resistant mutants, and confers exceedingly high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones, an important class of antibiotics for clinical therapy of campylobacteriosis. Furthermore, RE-CmeABC is horizontally transferable, shifts antibiotic MIC distribution among clinical isolates, and is increasingly prevalent in Campylobacter jejuni isolates, suggesting that it confers a fitness advantage under antimicrobial selection. These findings reveal a new mechanism for enhanced multidrug resistance and an effective strategy utilized by bacteria for adaptation to selection from multiple antibiotics. PMID:27651364

  15. Novel merosesquiterpene exerts a potent antitumor activity against breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Esther; Álvarez, Pablo Juan; Melguizo, Consolación; Prados, José; Álvarez-Manzaneda, Enrique; Chahboun, Rachid; Messouri, Ibtissam; Vázquez-Vázquez, María Isabel; Aránega, Antonia; Rodríguez-Serrano, Fernando

    2014-05-22

    This article describes the antitumor properties of a new family of merosesquiterpenes, which were synthesized by Diels-Alder cycloaddition of the labdane diene trans-communic acid, highly abundant in Cupressus sempervirens, or its methyl ester, with the appropriate dienophile. These compounds demonstrated potent cytotoxic activity in vitro against human breast, colon, and lung tumor cells. We highlight the elevated activity (IC50: 0.35 ± 0.10 μM) and specificity (TI: 9) of compound 13 against the MCF-7 line, which corresponds to the most prevalent breast cancer cell subtype, luminal A. It was found that compound 13 exerts its anti-tumor action by inducing oxidative stress, arresting the cell cycle in stages G0-G1, and activating apoptosis, which are all associated with low cyclin D1 regulation, pRb hypophosphorylation, increased expression of p27 and p53, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) fractioning. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a phenomenon associated with metastasis promotion and a worsened prognosis also appeared to be inhibited by compound 13. In addition, it markedly reduced tumor development in immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice with allografts of E0771 mouse breast tumor cells (luminal A subtype). According to these findings, this new family of compounds, especially compound 13, may be highly useful in the treatment of human breast cancer.

  16. Hepatocyte growth factor is a potent angiogenic factor which stimulates endothelial cell motility and growth

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF, also known as Scatter Factor) is a powerful mitogen or motility factor in different cells, acting through the tyrosine kinase receptor encoded by the MET protooncogene. Endothelial cells express the MET gene and expose at the cell surface the mature protein (p190MET) made of a 50 kD (alpha) subunit disulfide linked to a 145-kD (beta) subunit. HGF binding to endothelial cells identifies two sites with different affinities. The higher affinity binding site (Kd = 0.35 nM) corresponds to the p190MET receptor. Sub- nanomolar concentrations of HGF, but not of a recombinant inactive precursor, stimulate the receptor kinase activity, cell proliferation and motility. HGF induces repairs of a wound in endothelial cell monolayer. HGF stimulates the scatter of endothelial cells grown on three-dimensional collagen gels, inducing an elongated phenotype. In the rabbit cornea, highly purified HGF promotes neovascularization at sub-nanomolar concentrations. HGF lacks activities related to hemostasis-thrombosis, inflammation and endothelial cells accessory functions. These data show that HGF is an in vivo potent angiogenic factor and in vitro induces endothelial cells to proliferate and migrate. PMID:1383237

  17. Dietary (-)-epicatechin as a potent inhibitor of βγ-secretase amyloid precursor protein processing.

    PubMed

    Cox, Carla J; Choudhry, Fahd; Peacey, Eleanor; Perkinton, Michael S; Richardson, Jill C; Howlett, David R; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F; Francis, Paul T; Williams, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids, a group of dietary polyphenols have been shown to possess cognitive health benefits. Epidemiologic evidence suggests that they could play a role in risk reduction in dementia. Amyloid precursor protein processing and the subsequent generation of amyloid beta (Aβ) are central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, as soluble, oligomeric Aβ is thought to be the toxic species driving disease progression. We undertook an in vitro screen to identify flavonoids with bioactivity at βγ-mediated amyloid precursor protein processing, which lead to identification of a number of flavonoids bioactive at 100 nM. Because of known bioavailability, we investigated the catechin family further and identified epigallocatechin and (-)-epicatechin as potent (nanomolar) inhibitors of amyloidogenic processing. Supporting this finding, we have shown reduced Aβ pathology and Aβ levels following short term, a 21-day oral delivery of (-)-epicatechin in 7-month-old TASTPM mice. Further, in vitro mechanistic studies suggest this is likely because of indirect BACE1 inhibition. Taken together, our results suggest that orally delivered (-)-epicatechin may be a potential prophylactic for Alzheimer's disease.

  18. The 2′-Trifluoromethyl Analogue of Indomethacin Is a Potent and Selective COX-2 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Indomethacin is a potent, time-dependent, nonselective inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase enzymes (COX-1 and COX-2). Deletion of the 2′-methyl group of indomethacin produces a weak, reversible COX inhibitor, leading us to explore functionality at that position. Here, we report that substitution of the 2′-methyl group of indomethacin with trifluoromethyl produces CF3–indomethacin, a tight-binding inhibitor with kinetic properties similar to those of indomethacin and unexpected COX-2 selectivity (IC50 mCOX-2 = 267 nM; IC50 oCOX-1 > 100 μM). Studies with site-directed mutants reveal that COX-2 selectivity results from insertion of the CF3 group into a small hydrophobic pocket formed by Ala-527, Val-349, Ser-530, and Leu-531 and projection of the methoxy group toward a side pocket bordered by Val-523. CF3–indomethacin inhibited COX-2 activity in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells and exhibited in vivo anti-inflammatory activity in the carrageenan-induced rat paw edema model with similar potency to that of indomethacin. PMID:23687559

  19. Glycosylated enfuvirtide: a long-lasting glycopeptide with potent anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuihong; Chang, Xuesong; Wang, Yan; Gao, George F; Shao, Yiming; Ma, Liying; Li, Xuebing

    2015-02-12

    Many peptide-based therapeutics have short circulatory half-lives. We report here that the pharmacokinetics of an anti-HIV peptide drug enfuvirtide (ENF) can be dramatically improved by a chemical glycosylation approach. A set of glycosylated ENFs with varying glycosylation sites and glycan structures were synthesized. Among these, a sialic acid-introduced peptide (SL-ENF) demonstrated a 15-fold extended half-life in rats relative to ENF (T1/2: 23.1 vs 1.5 h), and its antiviral potency was comparable to that of ENF (EC50: 2 vs 3 nM). SL-ENF bound to a functional fragment of the HIV fusogenic protein gp41 and formed complexes with high affinity and α-helicity, revealing the mechanism behind its potent antiviral activity. Because it is widely accepted in biology that glycosylation protects proteins from denaturation and proteases, our approach may be useful for the development of novel protein and peptide drugs with enhanced pharmaceutical properties.

  20. Autocrine selection of a GLP-1R G-protein biased agonist with potent antidiabetic effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongkai; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Zhu, Jiang; Nieto, Ainhoa; Cistrone, Philip A.; Xie, Jia; He, LinLing; Yea, Kyungmoo; Jones, Teresa; Turn, Rachel; Di Stefano, Peter S.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Dawson, Philip E.; McDonald, Patricia H.; Lerner, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have emerged as treatment options for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). GLP-1R signals through G-protein-dependent, and G-protein-independent pathways by engaging the scaffold protein β-arrestin; preferential signalling of ligands through one or the other of these branches is known as ‘ligand bias'. Here we report the discovery of the potent and selective GLP-1R G-protein-biased agonist, P5. We identified P5 in a high-throughput autocrine-based screening of large combinatorial peptide libraries, and show that P5 promotes G-protein signalling comparable to GLP-1 and Exendin-4, but exhibited a significantly reduced β-arrestin response. Preclinical studies using different mouse models of T2DM demonstrate that P5 is a weak insulin secretagogue. Nevertheless, chronic treatment of diabetic mice with P5 increased adipogenesis, reduced adipose tissue inflammation as well as hepatic steatosis and was more effective at correcting hyperglycaemia and lowering haemoglobin A1c levels than Exendin-4, suggesting that GLP-1R G-protein-biased agonists may provide a novel therapeutic approach to T2DM. PMID:26621478

  1. Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid is a potent activator of endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Doukas, J.; Cutler, A. H.; Mordes, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) is a synthetic double-stranded polyribonucleotide that elicits immune responses analogous to those observed during viral infection. It is also known to modulate the expression of certain autoimmune disorders including diabetes mellitus in the BB rat and NOD mouse. The mechanism underlying these immunomodulatory effects is not known, but it could involve activation of vascular endothelium. We now report that parenteral poly I:C induces rat pancreatic endothelium to hyperexpress intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (CD54). This is accompanied by a perivascular recruitment of mononuclear cells to the exocrine pancreas. Corollary in vitro studies demonstrated that poly I:C is a potent activator of both rat and human endothelial cells in culture. It upregulates endothelial expression of several leukocyte adhesion molecules, stimulates the release of interleukin-6 and interleukin-8, and antagonizes interferon-gamma induction of major histocompatibility complex class II expression. We conclude that poly I:C activates endothelial cells to express surface molecules and cytokines in a pattern classically associated with leukocyte recruitment. These effects may in part contribute to the immunomodulatory effects of poly I:C in animal models of autoimmunity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7518192

  2. Nigericin is a potent inhibitor of the early stage of vaccinia virus replication.

    PubMed

    Myskiw, Chad; Piper, Jessica; Huzarewich, Rhiannon; Booth, Tim F; Cao, Jingxin; He, Runtao

    2010-12-01

    Poxviruses remain a significant public health concern due to their potential use as bioterrorist agents and the spread of animal borne poxviruses, such as monkeypox virus, to humans. Thus, the identification of small molecule inhibitors of poxvirus replication is warranted. Vaccinia virus is the prototypic member of the Orthopoxvirus genus, which also includes variola and monkeypox virus. In this study, we demonstrate that the carboxylic ionophore nigericin is a potent inhibitor of vaccinia virus replication in several human cell lines. In HeLa cells, we found that the 50% inhibitory concentration of nigericin against vaccinia virus was 7.9 nM, with a selectivity index of 1038. We present data demonstrating that nigericin targets vaccinia virus replication at a post-entry stage. While nigericin moderately inhibits both early vaccinia gene transcription and translation, viral DNA replication and intermediate and late gene expression are severely compromised in the presence of nigericin. Our results demonstrate that nigericin has the potential to be further developed into an effective antiviral to treat poxvirus infections. PMID:20951746

  3. Demethoxycurcumin Is A Potent Inhibitor of P-Type ATPases from Diverse Kingdoms of Life.

    PubMed

    Dao, Trong Tuan; Sehgal, Pankaj; Tung, Truong Thanh; Møller, Jesper Vuust; Nielsen, John; Palmgren, Michael; Christensen, Søren Brøgger; Fuglsang, Anja Thoe

    2016-01-01

    P-type ATPases catalyze the active transport of cations and phospholipids across biological membranes. Members of this large family are involved in a range of fundamental cellular processes. To date, a substantial number of P-type ATPase inhibitors have been characterized, some of which are used as drugs. In this work a library of natural compounds was screened and we first identified curcuminoids as plasma membrane H+-ATPases inhibitors in plant and fungal cells. We also found that some of the commercial curcumins contain several curcuminoids. Three of these were purified and, among the curcuminoids, demethoxycurcumin was the most potent inhibitor of all tested P-type ATPases from fungal (Pma1p; H+-ATPase), plant (AHA2; H+-ATPase) and animal (SERCA; Ca2+-ATPase) cells. All three curcuminoids acted as non-competitive antagonist to ATP and hence may bind to a highly conserved allosteric site of these pumps. Future research on biological effects of commercial preparations of curcumin should consider the heterogeneity of the material. PMID:27644036

  4. 3-Chloro,4-methoxyfendiline is a potent GABA(B) receptor potentiator in rat neocortical slices.

    PubMed

    Ong, Jennifer; Parker, David A S; Marino, Victor; Kerr, David I B; Puspawati, Ni Made; Prager, Rolf H

    2005-01-10

    Using grease-gap recording from rat neocortical slices, the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen elicited reversible and concentration-dependent hyperpolarizing responses (EC50=18+/-2.3 microM). The hyperpolarizations were antagonised by the GABA(B) receptor antagonist Sch 50911 [(+)-(S)-5,5-dimethylmorpholinyl-2-acetic acid). (+)-N-1-(3-chloro-4-methoxyphenyl)ethyl-3,3-diphenylpropylamine (3-chloro,4-methoxyfendiline; 3-Cl,4-MeO-fendiline) reversibly potentiated baclofen-induced hyperpolarizing responses, which were reduced by Sch 50911, producing leftward shifts of the baclofen concentration-response curves, with a marked increase in the maximal hyperpolarization (EC50=2+/-0.5 microM). In slices preincubated with either [3H]GABA or [3H]glutamic acid, 3-Cl,4-MeO-fendiline (1 microM) potentiated the inhibitory effect of baclofen (2 microM) on the electrically evoked release of [3H]GABA and had a similar effect on the release of [3H]glutamic acid at a concentration of 0.5 microM, without affecting the basal release. These effects were blocked by Sch 50911 (10 microM). Our findings suggest that 3-Cl,4-MeO-fendiline is a potent potentiator of pre- and postsynaptic GABA(B) receptor-mediated functions.

  5. The root extract of the medicinal plant Pelargonium sidoides is a potent HIV-1 attachment inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Helfer, Markus; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Schneider, Martha; Rebensburg, Stephanie; Forcisi, Sara; Müller, Constanze; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Schindler, Michael; Brack-Werner, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Global HIV-1 treatment would benefit greatly from safe herbal medicines with scientifically validated novel anti-HIV-1 activities. The root extract from the medicinal plant Pelargonium sidoides (PS) is licensed in Germany as the herbal medicine EPs®7630, with numerous clinical trials supporting its safety in humans. Here we provide evidence from multiple cell culture experiments that PS extract displays potent anti-HIV-1 activity. We show that PS extract protects peripheral blood mononuclear cells and macrophages from infection with various X4 and R5 tropic HIV-1 strains, including clinical isolates. Functional studies revealed that the extract from PS has a novel mode-of-action. It interferes directly with viral infectivity and blocks the attachment of HIV-1 particles to target cells, protecting them from virus entry. Analysis of the chemical footprint of anti-HIV activity indicates that HIV-1 inhibition is mediated by multiple polyphenolic compounds with low cytotoxicity and can be separated from other extract components with higher cytotoxicity. Based on our data and its excellent safety profile, we propose that PS extract represents a lead candidate for the development of a scientifically validated herbal medicine for anti-HIV-1 therapy with a mode-of-action different from and complementary to current single-molecule drugs.

  6. Highly fluorescent peptide nanoribbon impregnated with Sn-porphyrin as a potent DNA sensor.

    PubMed

    Parayil, Sreenivasan Koliyat; Lee, Jooran; Yoon, Minjoong

    2013-05-01

    Highly fluorescent and thermo-stable peptide nanoribbons (PNRs) were fabricated by solvothermal self-assembly of a single peptide (D,D-diphenyl alanine peptides) with Sn-porphyrin (trans-dihydroxo[5,10,15,20-tetrakis(p-tolyl)porphyrinato] Sn(IV) (SnTTP(OH)2)). The structural characterization of the as-prepared nanoribbons was performed by transmitting electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, indicating that the lipophilic Sn-porphyrins are impregnated into the porous surface formed in the process of nanoribbon formation through intermolecular hydrogen bonding of the peptide main chains. Consequently the Sn-porphyrin-impregnated peptide nanoribbons (Sn-porphyrin-PNRs) exhibited typical UV-visible absorption spectrum of the monomer porphyrin with a red shifted Q-band, and their fluorescence quantum yield was observed to be enhanced compared to that of free Sn-porphyrin. Interestingly the fluorescence intensity and lifetimes of Sn-porphyrin-PNRs were selectively affected upon interaction with nucleotide base sequences of DNA while those of free Sn-porphyrins were not affected by binding with any of the DNA studied, indicating that DNA-induced changes in the fluorescence properties of Sn-porphyrin-PNRs are due to interaction between DNA and the PNR scaffold. These results imply that Sn-porphyrin-PNR will be useful as a potent fluorescent protein analogue and as a biocompatible DNA sensor.

  7. Toward potent antibiofilm degradable medical devices: a generic method for the antibacterial surface modification of polylactide.

    PubMed

    El Habnouni, Sarah; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Darcos, Vincent; Porsio, Barbara; Garric, Xavier; Coudane, Jean; Nottelet, Benjamin

    2013-08-01

    The effects of biomaterials on their environment must be carefully modulated in most biomedical applications. Among other approaches, this modulation can be obtained through the modification of the biomaterial surface. This paper proposes a simple and versatile strategy to produce non-leaching antibacterial polylactide (PLA) surfaces without any degradation of the polyester chains. The method is based on a one-pot procedure that provides a "clickable" PLA surface via anionic activation which is then functionalized with an antibacterial quaternized poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (QPDMAEMA) by covalent immobilization on the surface. The anti-adherence and antibiofilm activities of modified PLA surfaces are assessed for different QPDMAEMA molecular weights and different quaternization agents. Antibacterial PLA surfaces are shown to be very active against Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains, with adherence reduction factors superior to 99.999% and a marked reduction in biofilm on the most potent surfaces. In addition to this substantial antibacterial activity, the proposed PLA surfaces are also cytocompatible, as demonstrated through the proliferation of L929 fibroblasts.

  8. A plant-produced antigen elicits potent immune responses against West Nile virus in mice.

    PubMed

    He, Junyun; Peng, Li; Lai, Huafang; Hurtado, Jonathan; Stahnke, Jake; Chen, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    We described the rapid production of the domain III (DIII) of the envelope (E) protein in plants as a vaccine candidate for West Nile Virus (WNV). Using various combinations of vector modules of a deconstructed viral vector expression system, DIII was produced in three subcellular compartments in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana by transient expression. DIII expressed at much higher levels when targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) than that targeted to the chloroplast or the cytosol, with accumulation level up to 73  μ g DIII per gram of leaf fresh weight within 4 days after infiltration. Plant ER-derived DIII was soluble and readily purified to > 95% homogeneity without the time-consuming process of denaturing and refolding. Further analysis revealed that plant-produced DIII was processed properly and demonstrated specific binding to an anti-DIII monoclonal antibody that recognizes a conformational epitope. Furthermore, subcutaneous immunization of mice with 5 and 25  μ g of purified DIII elicited a potent systemic response. This study provided the proof of principle for rapidly producing immunogenic vaccine candidates against WNV in plants with low cost and scalability. PMID:24804264

  9. The root extract of the medicinal plant Pelargonium sidoides is a potent HIV-1 attachment inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Helfer, Markus; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Schneider, Martha; Rebensburg, Stephanie; Forcisi, Sara; Müller, Constanze; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Schindler, Michael; Brack-Werner, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Global HIV-1 treatment would benefit greatly from safe herbal medicines with scientifically validated novel anti-HIV-1 activities. The root extract from the medicinal plant Pelargonium sidoides (PS) is licensed in Germany as the herbal medicine EPs®7630, with numerous clinical trials supporting its safety in humans. Here we provide evidence from multiple cell culture experiments that PS extract displays potent anti-HIV-1 activity. We show that PS extract protects peripheral blood mononuclear cells and macrophages from infection with various X4 and R5 tropic HIV-1 strains, including clinical isolates. Functional studies revealed that the extract from PS has a novel mode-of-action. It interferes directly with viral infectivity and blocks the attachment of HIV-1 particles to target cells, protecting them from virus entry. Analysis of the chemical footprint of anti-HIV activity indicates that HIV-1 inhibition is mediated by multiple polyphenolic compounds with low cytotoxicity and can be separated from other extract components with higher cytotoxicity. Based on our data and its excellent safety profile, we propose that PS extract represents a lead candidate for the development of a scientifically validated herbal medicine for anti-HIV-1 therapy with a mode-of-action different from and complementary to current single-molecule drugs. PMID:24489923

  10. Endocrinization of FGF1 produces a neomorphic and potent insulin sensitizer

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jae Myoung; Jonker, Johan W.; Ahmadian, Maryam; Goetz, Regina; Lackey, Denise; Osborn, Olivia; Huang, Zifeng; Liu, Weilin; Yoshihara, Eiji; van Dijk, Theo; Havinga, Rick; Fan, Weiwei; Yin, Yun-Qiang; Yu, Ruth T.; Liddle, Christopher; Atkins, Annette R.; Olefsky, Jerrold M.; Mohammadi, Moosa; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    FGF1 is an autocrine/paracrine regulator whose binding to heparan sulfate proteoglycans effectively precludes its circulation 1,2. Though known as a mitogenic factor, FGF1 knockout mice develop insulin resistance when stressed by a high fat diet, suggesting a potential role in nutrient homeostasis 3,4. Here we show that parenteral delivery of a single dose of recombinant FGF1 (rFGF1) results in potent, insulin-dependent glucose lowering in diabetic mice that is dose-dependent, but does not lead to hypoglycemia. Chronic pharmacological rFGF1 treatment increases insulin-dependent glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and suppresses hepatic glucose production to achieve whole-body insulin sensitization. The sustained glucose lowering and insulin sensitization attributed to rFGF1 are not accompanied by the side effects of weight gain, liver steatosis and bone loss associated with current insulin sensitizing therapies. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the glucose lowering activity of FGF1 can be dissociated from its mitogenic activity and is mediated predominantly via FGF receptor 1 (FGFR1) signaling. In summary, we have uncovered an unexpected, neomorphic insulin sensitizing action for exogenous non-mitogenic human FGF1 with therapeutic potential for treatment of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25043058

  11. A potent and selective inhibitor for the UBLCP1 proteasome phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    He, Yantao; Guo, Xing; Yu, Zhi-Hong; Wu, Li; Gunawan, Andrea M.; Zhang, Yan; Dixon, Jack E.; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitin-like domain-containing C-terminal domain phosphatase 1 (UBLCP1) has been implicated as a negative regulator of the proteasome, a key mediator in the ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation. Small molecule inhibitors that block UBLCP1 activity would be valuable as research tools and potential therapeutics for human diseases caused by the cellular accumulation of misfold/damaged proteins. We report a salicylic acid fragment-based library approach aimed at targeting both the phosphatase active site and its adjacent binding pocket for enhanced affinity and selectivity. Screening of the focused libraries led to the identification of the first potent and selective UBLCP1 inhibitor 13. Compound 13 exhibits an IC50 of 1.0 μM for UBLCP1 and greater than 5-fold selectivity against a large panel of protein phosphatases from several distinct families. Importantly, the inhibitor possesses efficacious cellular activity and is capable of inhibiting UBLCP1 function in cells, which in turn up-regulates nuclear proteasome activity. These studies set the groundwork for further developing compound 13 into chemical probes or potential therapeutic agents targeting the UBLCP1 phosphatase. PMID:25907364

  12. Demethoxycurcumin Is A Potent Inhibitor of P-Type ATPases from Diverse Kingdoms of Life

    PubMed Central

    Dao, Trong Tuan; Sehgal, Pankaj; Tung, Truong Thanh; Møller, Jesper Vuust; Nielsen, John; Palmgren, Michael; Christensen, Søren Brøgger

    2016-01-01

    P-type ATPases catalyze the active transport of cations and phospholipids across biological membranes. Members of this large family are involved in a range of fundamental cellular processes. To date, a substantial number of P-type ATPase inhibitors have been characterized, some of which are used as drugs. In this work a library of natural compounds was screened and we first identified curcuminoids as plasma membrane H+-ATPases inhibitors in plant and fungal cells. We also found that some of the commercial curcumins contain several curcuminoids. Three of these were purified and, among the curcuminoids, demethoxycurcumin was the most potent inhibitor of all tested P-type ATPases from fungal (Pma1p; H+-ATPase), plant (AHA2; H+-ATPase) and animal (SERCA; Ca2+-ATPase) cells. All three curcuminoids acted as non-competitive antagonist to ATP and hence may bind to a highly conserved allosteric site of these pumps. Future research on biological effects of commercial preparations of curcumin should consider the heterogeneity of the material. PMID:27644036

  13. The Root Extract of the Medicinal Plant Pelargonium sidoides Is a Potent HIV-1 Attachment Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Helfer, Markus; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Schneider, Martha; Rebensburg, Stephanie; Forcisi, Sara; Müller, Constanze; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Schindler, Michael; Brack-Werner, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Global HIV-1 treatment would benefit greatly from safe herbal medicines with scientifically validated novel anti-HIV-1 activities. The root extract from the medicinal plant Pelargonium sidoides (PS) is licensed in Germany as the herbal medicine EPs®7630, with numerous clinical trials supporting its safety in humans. Here we provide evidence from multiple cell culture experiments that PS extract displays potent anti-HIV-1 activity. We show that PS extract protects peripheral blood mononuclear cells and macrophages from infection with various X4 and R5 tropic HIV-1 strains, including clinical isolates. Functional studies revealed that the extract from PS has a novel mode-of-action. It interferes directly with viral infectivity and blocks the attachment of HIV-1 particles to target cells, protecting them from virus entry. Analysis of the chemical footprint of anti-HIV activity indicates that HIV-1 inhibition is mediated by multiple polyphenolic compounds with low cytotoxicity and can be separated from other extract components with higher cytotoxicity. Based on our data and its excellent safety profile, we propose that PS extract represents a lead candidate for the development of a scientifically validated herbal medicine for anti-HIV-1 therapy with a mode-of-action different from and complementary to current single-molecule drugs. PMID:24489923

  14. Norpiperidine imidazoazepines as a new class of potent, selective, and nonsedative H1 antihistamines.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Frans; Leenaerts, Jos; Diels, Gaston; De Boeck, Benoît; Megens, Anton; Langlois, Xavier; van Rossem, Koen; Beetens, Johan; Borgers, Marcel

    2005-03-24

    Clinical doses of available H(1) antihistamines are limited mainly by sedative side effects. However, higher doses are often required to obtain optimal therapeutic activity, especially in dermatology. We report the synthesis of three norpiperidine imidazoazepines representative of a new class of selective and nonsedating H(1) antihistamines. The compounds were at least as potent as cetirizine and loratadine as measured by H(1) receptor binding affinity, by protection against compound 48/80- and histamine-induced lethality in rats and guinea pigs, respectively, and by skin reaction tests in rats, guinea pigs, and dogs. The compounds, in particular 3a, were less prone than the reference compounds to penetrate the brain and to occupy central H(1) receptors, suggesting absence of sedative side effects. In vitro and in vivo cardiovascular safety tests showed that 3a had no intrinsic potential to prolong ventricular repolarization or induce cardiac arrhythmias. Compound 3a has been selected for further clinical development, mainly for application in dermatology.

  15. Discovery of a novel, potent and orally active series of gamma-lactams as selective NK1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Paliwal, Sunil; Reichard, Gregory A; Shah, Sapna; Wrobleski, Michelle Laci; Wang, Cheng; Stengone, Carmine; Tsui, Hon-Chung; Xiao, Dong; Duffy, Ruth A; Lachowicz, Jean E; Nomeir, Amin A; Varty, Geoffrey B; Shih, Neng-Yang

    2008-07-15

    Strategic replacement of the nitrogen of the lead compound 1 in the original cyclic urea series with a carbon resulted in the discovery of a novel, potent and orally more efficacious gamma-lactam series of selective NK(1) antagonists. Optimization of the lactam series culminated in the identification of compounds with high binding affinity and excellent oral CNS activity.

  16. 18β-Glycyrrhetinic Acid Derivatives Possessing a Trihydroxylated A Ring Are Potent Gram-Positive Antibacterial Agents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Rong; Hao, Xiao-Jiang; Li, Qi-Ji; Wang, Dao-Ping; Zhang, Jian-Xin; Luo, Heng; Yang, Xiao-Sheng

    2016-04-22

    The oleanane-type triterpene 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (1) was modified chemically through the introduction of a trihydroxylated A ring and an ester moiety at C-20 to enhance its antibacterial activity. Compounds 22, 23, 25, 28, 29, 31, and 32 showed more potent inhibitory activity against Streptomyces scabies than the positive control, streptomycin. Additionally, the inhibitory activity of the most potent compound, 29, against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was greater than that of the positive controls. The antibacterial mode of action of the active derivatives involved the regulation of the expression of genes associated with peptidoglycans, the respiratory metabolism, and the inherent virulence factors found in bacteria, as determined through a quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR assay.

  17. A novel p38 MAPK docking groove-targeted compound is a potent inhibitor of inflammatory hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Willemen, Hanneke L.D.M.; Campos, Pedro M.; Lucas, Elisa; Morreale, Antonio; Gil-Redondo, Rubén; Agut, Juan; González, Florenci V.; Ramos, Paula; Heijnen, Cobi; Mayor, Federico; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Murga, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis The mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 is an important mediator of inflammation and of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. We recently described that docking-groove dependent interactions are important for p38 MAPK-mediated signal transduction. Thus, virtual screening was performed to identify putative docking groove-targeted p38 MAPK inhibitors. Several compounds of the benzooxadiazol family were identified with low micromolar inhibitory activity both in a p38 MAPK activity assay, and in THP-1 human monocytes acting as inhibitors of LPS-induced TNFα secretion. Positions 2 and 5 in the phenyl ring are essential for the described inhibitory activity with a chloride in position 5 and a methyl-group in position 2 yielding the best results with an IC50 of 1.8 μM (FGA-19 compound). Notably, FGA-19 exerted a potent and long-lasting analgesic effect in vivo when tested in a mouse model of inflammatory hyperalgesia. A single intrathecal injection of FGA-19 completely resolved hyperalgesia, being ten times as potent and displaying longer lasting effects than the established p38 MAPK inhibitor SB239063. FGA-19 also reversed persistent pain in a model of post-inflammatory hyperalgesia (in LysM-GRK2+/− mice). These potent in vivo effects put forward p38 MAPK docking-site targeted inhibitors as a potential novel strategy for the treatment of inflammatory pain. PMID:24517375

  18. Benzothiazinethione is a potent preclinical candidate for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chao; Peng, Cuiting; Shi, Yaojie; You, Xinyu; Ran, Kai; Xiong, Lu; Ye, Ting-hong; Zhang, Lidan; Wang, Ningyu; Zhu, Yongxia; Liu, Kun; Zuo, Weiqiong; Yu, Luoting; Wei, Yuquan

    2016-01-01

    New chemotherapeutic compounds are needed to combat multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which remains a serious public-health challenge. Decaprenylphosphoryl-β-D-ribose 2′-epimerase (DprE1 enzyme) has been characterized as an attractive therapeutic target to address this urgent demand. Herein, we have identified a new class of DprE1 inhibitors benzothiazinethiones as antitubercular agents. Benzothiazinethione analogue SKLB-TB1001 exhibited excellent activity against Mtb in the Microplate Alamar blue assay and intracellular model, meanwhile SKLB-TB1001 was also highly potent against multi-drug resistant extensively and drug resistant clinical isolates. Importantly, no antagonism interaction was found with any two-drug combinations tested in the present study and the combination of SKLB-TB1001 with rifampicin (RMP) was proved to be synergistic. Furthermore, benzothiazinethione showed superb in vivo antitubercular efficacy in an acute Mtb infection mouse model, significantly better than that of BTZ043. These data combined with the bioavailability and safety profiles of benzothiazinethione indicates SKLB-TB1001 is a promising preclinical candidate for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:27405961

  19. Allergen challenge during halothane compared to isoflurane anesthesia induces a more potent peripheral lung response.

    PubMed

    Borges, Marcos C; Marchica, Cinzia L; Narayanan, Venkatesan; Ludwig, Mara S

    2013-10-01

    Allergen instillation in anaesthetized vs. awake animals results in increased distribution of allergen in the lung. Halothane is a more potent bronchodilator of the small airways than isoflurane. As small airways contribute to asthma pathogenesis, we questioned whether intranasal challenge under halothane vs. isoflurane anesthesia would lead to an increase in allergen deposition in the lung periphery and, consequently, an enhanced allergic response. C57Bl/6 mice were sensitized twice and repeatedly challenged with ovalbumin (OA) under halothane or isoflurane anesthesia. After OA-challenge, in vivo lung function was measured and BAL performed. Peribronchial and peripheral inflammation, cytokine mRNA production and collagen deposition were assessed. Airway hyperresponsiveness, BAL eosinophilia, peripheral lung inflammation, IL-5 mRNA production and collagen deposition were significantly increased in halothane OA-challenged compared to isoflurane OA-challenged mice. Airway challenge induced a higher level of airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation and remodeling under halothane than isoflurane anesthesia in a murine model of asthma. These differences may be due to increased allergen deposition in the small airways. PMID:23876740

  20. Discovery of a Potent Dihydrooxadiazole Series of Non-ATP-Competitive MK2 (MAPKAPK2) Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jun; Dhondi, Pawan; Huang, Xianhai; Aslanian, Robert; Fossetta, James; Tian, Fang; Lundell, Daniel; Palani, Anandan

    2012-02-01

    Inhibition of MK2 has been shown to offer advantages over that of p38 MAPK in the development of cures for inflammatory diseases such as arthritis. P38 MAPK knockout in mice was lethal, whereas MK2-null mice demonstrated strong inhibition of disease progression in collagen-induced arthritis and appeared normal and viable. However, it is challenging to develop ATP-competitive MK2 inhibitors due to high ATP binding affinity to the kinase. Non-ATP-competitive MK2 inhibitors interact and bind to the kinase in a mode independent of ATP concentration, which could provide better selectivity and cellular potency. Therefore, it is desirable to identify non-ATP-competitive MK2 inhibitors. Through structure optimization of lead compound 1, a novel series of dihydrooxadiazoles was discovered. Additional structure-activity relationship (SAR) study of this series led to the identification of compound 38 as a non-ATP-competitive MK2 inhibitor with potent enzymatic activity and good cellular potency. The SAR, synthesis, and biological data of dihydrooxadiazole series are discussed.

  1. A potent anti-complementary acylated sterol glucoside from Orostachys japonicus.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Na Young; Min, Byung Sun; Lee, Hyeong Kyu; Park, Jong Cheol; Choi, Jae Sue

    2005-08-01

    In order to isolate substances that inhibit the hemolytic activity of human serum against erythrocytes, we have evaluated whole plants of the Orostachys japonicus species with regard to its anti-complement activity, and have identified its active principles following activity-guided isolation. A methanol extract of the O. japonicus, as well as its n-hexane soluble fraction, exhibited significant anti-complement activity on the complement system, which was expressed as total hemolytic activity. A bioassay-guided chromatographic separation of the constituents resulted in the isolation of three known compounds 1-3 from the active n-hexane fraction. The structure of these compounds were analyzed, and they were identified as hydroxyhopanone (1), beta-sitosteryl-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-6'-O-palmitate (2), and beta-sitosteryl-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (3), respectively. Of these compounds, compound 2 exhibited potent anti-complement activity (IC50= 1.0 +/- 0.1 microM) on the classical pathway of the complement, as compared to tiliroside (IC50= 76.5 +/- 1.1 microM), which was used as a positive control. However, compounds 1 and 3 exhibited no activity in this system.

  2. Oral Mucosal Progenitor Cells Are Potently Immunosuppressive in a Dose-Independent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Lindsay C.; Lönnies, Helena; Locke, Matthew; Sundberg, Berit; Rosendahl, Kerstin; Götherström, Cecilia; Le Blanc, Katarina

    2012-01-01

    Oral mucosal lamina propria progenitor cells (OMLP-PCs) are a novel, clonally derived PC population of neural crest origin with the potential to differentiate down both mesenchymal and neuronal cell lineages. In this study we aimed to determine the immunological properties of OMLP-PCs and to establish whether they would be suitable candidates for allogeneic tissue engineering and in the treatment of immune-related diseases. OMLP-PCs demonstrated no inherent immunogenicity with insignificant expression of costimulatory molecules (CD40, CD80, CD86, CD154, and CD178) or human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II. OMLP-PCs required 7 days of stimulation with interferon-γ (IFN-γ) to induce cell surface expression of HLA II. Mixed lymphocyte cultures and mitogen stimulation demonstrated the potent immunosuppressive capability of OMLP-PCs in a contact-independent manner. Complete inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation was seen at doses as low as 0.001% OMLP-PCs to responder lymphocytes, while annexin V staining confirmed that this immunosuppressive effect was not due to the induction of lymphocyte apoptosis. These data demonstrate, for the first time, that OMLP-PC immunomodulation, unlike that for mesenchymal stem cells, occurs via a dose- and HLA II–independent mechanism by the release of immunosuppressive soluble factors and suggests these cells may have wide ranging potential in future immune-related therapies. PMID:21988324

  3. New-to-nature sophorose analog: a potent inducer for gene expression in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tom Tao; Wages, John M

    2016-04-01

    Controlled hydrolysis of lactonic sophorolipids from Starmerella bombicola yields a previously undescribed sophorose analog that potently induces cellulase in Trichoderma reesei Rut-C30. Acid treatment of natural sophorolipids results in a mixture of monoacetylated, deacetylated, and diacetylated sophorolipids in acidic and lactonic forms. Isolation of the active components of the mixture, followed by structure determination by MS and NMR, reveals a new chemical entity, in which the lactone ring has been opened at the C-1' rather than at the C-4″ position of the sophorose moiety. This sophorose ester is resistant to degradation by the host and is at least 28 times more powerful an inducer than sophorose in shake-flask culture. Even at low concentrations (0.05 mM), the chemically modified sophorolipid effectively induces cellulase. With further improvements, this highly enabling technology can potentially reduce the cost of enzymes produced in T. reesei and can facilitate the rapid deployment of enzyme plants to support the nascent cellulosic biofuels and biochemicals industries. PMID:26920480

  4. Na⁺-K⁺-ATPase, a potent neuroprotective modulator against Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Nan; Sun, Yong-Jun; Pan, Shuo; Li, Jun-Xia; Qu, Yin-E; Li, Yao; Wang, Yong-Li; Gao, Zi-Bin

    2013-02-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder clinically characterized by progressive cognitive and memory dysfunction, which is the most common form of dementia. Although the pathogenesis of neuronal injury in AD is not clear, recent evidences suggest that Na⁺-K⁺-ATPase plays an important role in AD, and may be a potent neuroprotective modulator against AD. This review aims to provide readers with an in-depth understanding of Na⁺-K⁺-ATPase in AD through these modulations of some factors that are as follows, which leads to the change of learning and memory in the process of AD. 1. The deficiency in Na⁺, K⁺-ATPase α1, α2 and α3 isoform genes induced learning and memory deficits, and α isoform was evidently changed in AD, revealing that Na⁺, K⁺-ATPase α isoform genes may play an important role in AD. 2. Some factors, such as β-amyloid, cholinergic and oxidative stress, can modulate learning and memory in AD through the mondulation of Na⁺-K⁺-ATPase activity. 3. Some substances, such as Zn, s-Ethyl cysteine, s-propyl cysteine, citicoline, rivastigmine, Vit E, memantine, tea polyphenol, curcumin, caffeine, Alpinia galanga (L.) fractions, and Bacopa monnieri could play a role in improving memory performance and exert protective effects against AD by increasing expression or activity of Na⁺, K⁺-ATPase.

  5. GM1 binding-deficient exotoxin is a potent noninflammatory broad spectrum intradermal immunoadjuvant.

    PubMed

    Zoeteweij, J Paul; Epperson, Diane E; Porter, Jackie D; Zhang, Chen X; Frolova, Olga Y; Constantinides, Anita P; Fuhrmann, Steven R; El-Amine, Moustapha; Tian, Jing-Hui; Ellingsworth, Larry R; Glenn, Gregory M

    2006-07-15

    Intradermal (i.d.) immunization is a promising route of vaccine administration. Suitable i.d. adjuvants are important to increase vaccine efficacy in poorly responding populations such as the elderly or for dose-sparing strategies in the face of vaccine shortages. Bacterial exotoxins, such as Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT), exert strong immunostimulatory effects through binding to monosialoganglioside (GM1) cell surface receptors; however, injection is hampered by local inflammation. We demonstrate that the injection of LT formulations deficient in GM1 binding by mutation (LT(G33D)) or in vitro ligand coupling does not cause localized edema and inflammation in mice, yet these formulations retain potent adjuvant activity by enhancing functional Ab and cellular immune responses to coadministered Ags. Complete protection against in vivo lethal tetanus toxin challenge and the induction of Ag-specific CTL responses capable of killing target cells in vivo indicated in vivo efficacy of the induced immune responses. LT(G33D) proved superior to standard alum adjuvant regarding the magnitude and breadth of the induced immune responses. Immunizations in complex ganglioside knockout mice revealed a GM1-independent pathway of LT adjuvanticity. Immunostimulation by i.d. LT(G33D) is explained by its ability to induce migration of activated APCs to the proximal draining lymph nodes. LT(G33D) is a promising candidate adjuvant for human trials of parenteral vaccines in general and for current i.d. vaccine development in particular.

  6. New-to-nature sophorose analog: a potent inducer for gene expression in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tom Tao; Wages, John M

    2016-04-01

    Controlled hydrolysis of lactonic sophorolipids from Starmerella bombicola yields a previously undescribed sophorose analog that potently induces cellulase in Trichoderma reesei Rut-C30. Acid treatment of natural sophorolipids results in a mixture of monoacetylated, deacetylated, and diacetylated sophorolipids in acidic and lactonic forms. Isolation of the active components of the mixture, followed by structure determination by MS and NMR, reveals a new chemical entity, in which the lactone ring has been opened at the C-1' rather than at the C-4″ position of the sophorose moiety. This sophorose ester is resistant to degradation by the host and is at least 28 times more powerful an inducer than sophorose in shake-flask culture. Even at low concentrations (0.05 mM), the chemically modified sophorolipid effectively induces cellulase. With further improvements, this highly enabling technology can potentially reduce the cost of enzymes produced in T. reesei and can facilitate the rapid deployment of enzyme plants to support the nascent cellulosic biofuels and biochemicals industries.

  7. A highly potent and selective Vps34 inhibitor alters vesicle trafficking and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ronan, Baptiste; Flamand, Odile; Vescovi, Lionel; Dureuil, Christine; Durand, Laurence; Fassy, Florence; Bachelot, Marie-France; Lamberton, Annabelle; Mathieu, Magali; Bertrand, Thomas; Marquette, Jean-Pierre; El-Ahmad, Youssef; Filoche-Romme, Bruno; Schio, Laurent; Garcia-Echeverria, Carlos; Goulaouic, Hélène; Pasquier, Benoit

    2014-12-01

    Vps34 is a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) class III isoform that has attracted major attention over the recent years because of its role in autophagy. Herein we describe the biological characterization of SAR405, which is a low-molecular-mass kinase inhibitor of Vps34 (KD 1.5 nM). This compound has an exquisite protein and lipid kinase selectivity profile that is explained by its unique binding mode and molecular interactions within the ATP binding cleft of human Vps34. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first potent and specific Vps34 inhibitor described so far. Our results demonstrate that inhibition of Vps34 kinase activity by SAR405 affects both late endosome-lysosome compartments and prevents autophagy. Moreover, we show that the concomitant inhibition of Vps34 and mTOR, with SAR405 and the US Food and Drug Administration-approved mTOR inhibitor everolimus, results in synergistic antiproliferative activity in renal tumor cell lines, indicating a potential clinical application in cancer.

  8. On the importance of radiative and Auger losses in GaN-based quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hader, Jorg

    2010-03-01

    Non-radiative carrier losses due to Auger recombinations have been suggested as a possible reason for the efficiency droop in GaN-based laser diodes [1]. This hypothesis is based on the observation that measured efficiencies can be reproduced using the classical power law for the density dependence of the loss current, J=AN+BN^2+CN^3, with an Auger constant C 10-31-10-30,m^6/s. Auger losses can only be deduced indirectly from the overall loss if all other loss processes are know. Thus, it is not clear whether they are indeed responsible for the droop or whether it is an alternative loss process with a similar density dependence, like, maybe, density activated defect recombination. To investigate this we use fully microscopic many-body models to calculate absorption/gain as well as carrier losses due to radiative and Auger recombinations. These models have been shown to give excellent quantitative agreement with the experiment for materials ranging from the mid-IR to less than one micron [2]. These models have shown that the classically assumed density and temperature dependencies for the loss processes are generally far from reality, especially at densities relevant for laser operation [2]. In particular, in this regime the density dependence of Auger losses usually becomes less than cubic. This makes the use of the simple power laws rather questionable. Using the microscopic analysis we find for a typical InGaN/GaN system that carrier losses are dominated by radiative recombinations for all relevant densities [3]. At densities at which the onset of droop has been observed the Auger losses contribute only about 0.1%. Fits to the microscopically calculated losses yield for radiative losses B=3.5x10-12cm^2/s in agreement with traditional estimates. However, for Auger losses one finds C=3.5x10-34cm^6/s which is far too small to reproduce the experiment. Thus, we do not think that the direct Auger processes investigated here are responsible for the droop. Preliminary

  9. IFNλ is a potent anti-influenza therapeutic without the inflammatory side effects of IFNα treatment.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Sophia; McCabe, Teresa M; Crotta, Stefania; Gad, Hans Henrik; Hessel, Edith M; Beinke, Soren; Hartmann, Rune; Wack, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV)-induced severe disease is characterized by infected lung epithelia, robust inflammatory responses and acute lung injury. Since type I interferon (IFNαβ) and type III interferon (IFNλ) are potent antiviral cytokines with immunomodulatory potential, we assessed their efficacy as IAV treatments. IFNλ treatment of IAV-infected Mx1-positive mice lowered viral load and protected from disease. IFNα treatment also restricted IAV replication but exacerbated disease. IFNα treatment increased pulmonary proinflammatory cytokine secretion, innate cell recruitment and epithelial cell death, unlike IFNλ-treatment. IFNλ lacked the direct stimulatory activity of IFNα on immune cells. In epithelia, both IFNs induced antiviral genes but no inflammatory cytokines. Similarly, human airway epithelia responded to both IFNα and IFNλ by induction of antiviral genes but not of cytokines, while hPBMCs responded only to IFNα. The restriction of both IFNλ responsiveness and productive IAV replication to pulmonary epithelia allows IFNλ to limit IAV spread through antiviral gene induction in relevant cells without overstimulating the immune system and driving immunopathology. We propose IFNλ as a non-inflammatory and hence superior treatment option for human IAV infection. PMID:27520969

  10. Crystal Structure of HIV-1 Primary Receptor CD4 i Complex with a Potent Antiviral Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M.M.; Hong, X.; Seaman, M.S.; Rits-Vollock, S.p Kao, C.Y.; Ho, D.D.; Chen, B.

    2010-06-18

    Ibalizumab is a humanized, anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody. It potently blocks HIV-1 infection and targets an epitope in the second domain of CD4 without interfering with immune functions mediated by interaction of CD4 with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. We report here the crystal structure of ibalizumab Fab fragment in complex with the first two domains (D1-D2) of CD4 at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution. Ibalizumab grips CD4 primarily by the BC-loop (residues 121125) of D2, sitting on the opposite side of gp120 and MHC-II binding sites. No major conformational change in CD4 accompanies binding to ibalizumab. Both monovalent and bivalent forms of ibalizumab effectively block viral infection, suggesting that it does not need to crosslink CD4 to exert antiviral activity. While gp120-induced structural rearrangements in CD4 are probably minimal, CD4 structural rigidity is dispensable for ibalizumab inhibition. These results could guide CD4-based immunogen design and lead to a better understanding of HIV-1 entry.

  11. Synthesis of giant globular multivalent glycofullerenes as potent inhibitors in a model of Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Antonio; Sigwalt, David; Illescas, Beatriz M; Luczkowiak, Joanna; Rodríguez-Pérez, Laura; Nierengarten, Iwona; Holler, Michel; Remy, Jean-Serge; Buffet, Kevin; Vincent, Stéphane P; Rojo, Javier; Delgado, Rafael; Nierengarten, Jean-François; Martín, Nazario

    2016-01-01

    The use of multivalent carbohydrate compounds to block cell-surface lectin receptors is a promising strategy to inhibit the entry of pathogens into cells and could lead to the discovery of novel antiviral agents. One of the main problems with this approach, however, is that it is difficult to make compounds of an adequate size and multivalency to mimic natural systems such as viruses. Hexakis adducts of [60]fullerene are useful building blocks in this regard because they maintain a globular shape at the same time as allowing control over the size and multivalency. Here we report water-soluble tridecafullerenes decorated with 120 peripheral carbohydrate subunits, so-called 'superballs', that can be synthesized efficiently from hexakis adducts of [60]fullerene in one step by using copper-catalysed azide–alkyne cycloaddition click chemistry. Infection assays show that these superballs are potent inhibitors of cell infection by an artificial Ebola virus with half-maximum inhibitory concentrations in the subnanomolar range.

  12. Synthesis of giant globular multivalent glycofullerenes as potent inhibitors in a model of Ebola virus infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Antonio; Sigwalt, David; Illescas, Beatriz M.; Luczkowiak, Joanna; Rodríguez-Pérez, Laura; Nierengarten, Iwona; Holler, Michel; Remy, Jean-Serge; Buffet, Kevin; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Rojo, Javier; Delgado, Rafael; Nierengarten, Jean-François; Martín, Nazario

    2016-01-01

    The use of multivalent carbohydrate compounds to block cell-surface lectin receptors is a promising strategy to inhibit the entry of pathogens into cells and could lead to the discovery of novel antiviral agents. One of the main problems with this approach, however, is that it is difficult to make compounds of an adequate size and multivalency to mimic natural systems such as viruses. Hexakis adducts of [60]fullerene are useful building blocks in this regard because they maintain a globular shape at the same time as allowing control over the size and multivalency. Here we report water-soluble tridecafullerenes decorated with 120 peripheral carbohydrate subunits, so-called ‘superballs’, that can be synthesized efficiently from hexakis adducts of [60]fullerene in one step by using copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition click chemistry. Infection assays show that these superballs are potent inhibitors of cell infection by an artificial Ebola virus with half-maximum inhibitory concentrations in the subnanomolar range.

  13. λ-Carrageenan P32 Is a Potent Inhibitor of Rabies Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhaochen; Tian, Dayong; Zhou, Ming; Xiao, Wenjie; Zhang, Yachun; Li, Mingming; Sui, Baokun; Wang, Wei; Guan, Huashi; Chen, Huanchun; Fu, Zhen F.; Zhao, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Rabies, caused by rabies virus (RABV), is an acute, fatal encephalitic disease that affects many warm-blooded mammals. Currently, post-exposure prophylaxis regimens are effective for most rabies cases, but once the clinical signs of the disease appear, current treatment options become ineffective. Carrageenan has been reported as a potent inhibitor of many viruses. In this study, the λ-carrageenan (λ-CG) P32 was investigated for its potential role in inhibiting RABV infection. Our results show that P32 specifically inhibits the replication of several RABV strains but not vesicular stomatitis virus in multiple cell lines and shows low cytotoxicity. P32 mainly abrogated viral replication during the early stage of the post-adsorption period. Further studies demonstrated that P32 could affect not only viral internalization but also viral uncoating by blocking cell fusion mediated by RABV glycoprotein. Moreover, P32 can fully inhibit RABV infection in vitro during the post-adsorption period, whereas heparin and heparan sulfate, which possess similar structures to P32, showed significant but not complete inhibition of RABV infectivity. Collectively, our results indicate that λ-CG P32 is a promising agent that can inhibit RABV infection mainly by inhibiting viral internalization and glycoprotein-mediated cell fusion and can be used for the development of novel anti-RABV drugs. PMID:26465753

  14. Synthesis of conolidine, a potent non-opioid analgesic for tonic and persistent pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarselli, Michael A.; Raehal, Kirsten M.; Brasher, Alex K.; Streicher, John M.; Groer, Chad E.; Cameron, Michael D.; Bohn, Laura M.; Micalizio, Glenn C.

    2011-06-01

    Management of chronic pain continues to represent an area of great unmet biomedical need. Although opioid analgesics are typically embraced as the mainstay of pharmaceutical interventions in this area, they suffer from substantial liabilities that include addiction and tolerance, as well as depression of breathing, nausea and chronic constipation. Because of their suboptimal therapeutic profile, the search for non-opioid analgesics to replace these well-established therapeutics is an important pursuit. Conolidine is a rare C5-nor stemmadenine natural product recently isolated from the stem bark of Tabernaemontana divaricata (a tropical flowering plant used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic and Thai medicine). Although structurally related alkaloids have been described as opioid analgesics, no therapeutically relevant properties of conolidine have previously been reported. Here, we describe the first de novo synthetic pathway to this exceptionally rare C5-nor stemmadenine natural product, the first asymmetric synthesis of any member of this natural product class, and the discovery that (±)-, (+)- and (-)-conolidine are potent and efficacious non-opioid analgesics in an in vivo model of tonic and persistent pain.

  15. 3-Amido-3-aryl-piperidines: A Novel Class of Potent, Selective, and Orally Active GlyT1 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pinard, Emmanuel; Alberati, Daniela; Alvarez-Sanchez, Ruben; Brom, Virginie; Burner, Serge; Fischer, Holger; Hauser, Nicole; Kolczewski, Sabine; Lengyel, Judith; Mory, Roland; Saladin, Christian; Schulz-Gasch, Tanja; Stalder, Henri

    2014-04-10

    3-Amido-3-aryl-piperidines were discovered as a novel structural class of GlyT1 inhibitors. The structure-activity relationship, which was developed, led to the identification of highly potent compounds exhibiting excellent selectivity against the GlyT2 isoform, drug-like properties, and in vivo activity after oral administration.

  16. 3-Amido-3-aryl-piperidines: A Novel Class of Potent, Selective, and Orally Active GlyT1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    3-Amido-3-aryl-piperidines were discovered as a novel structural class of GlyT1 inhibitors. The structure–activity relationship, which was developed, led to the identification of highly potent compounds exhibiting excellent selectivity against the GlyT2 isoform, drug-like properties, and in vivo activity after oral administration. PMID:24900853

  17. Cobicistat (GS-9350): A Potent and Selective Inhibitor of Human CYP3A as a Novel Pharmacoenhancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Cobicistat (3, GS-9350) is a newly discovered, potent, and selective inhibitor of human cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) enzymes. In contrast to ritonavir, 3 is devoid of anti-HIV activity and is thus more suitable for use in boosting anti-HIV drugs without risking selection of potential drug-resistant HIV variants. Compound 3 shows reduced liability for drug interactions and may have potential improvements in tolerability over ritonavir. In addition, 3 has high aqueous solubility and can be readily coformulated with other agents. PMID:24900196

  18. Simultaneous inhibition of multiple oncogenic miRNAs by a multi-potent microRNA sponge.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaeyun; Yeom, Chanjoo; Choi, Yeon-Sook; Kim, Sinae; Lee, EunJi; Park, Min Ji; Kang, Sang Wook; Kim, Sung Bae; Chang, Suhwan

    2015-08-21

    The roles of oncogenic miRNAs are widely recognized in many cancers. Inhibition of single miRNA using antagomiR can efficiently knock-down a specific miRNA. However, the effect is transient and often results in subtle phenotype, as there are other miRNAs contribute to tumorigenesis. Here we report a multi-potent miRNA sponge inhibiting multiple miRNAs simultaneously. As a model system, we targeted miR-21, miR-155 and miR-221/222, known as oncogenic miRNAs in multiple tumors including breast and pancreatic cancers. To achieve efficient knockdown, we generated perfect and bulged-matched miRNA binding sites (MBS) and introduced multiple copies of MBS, ranging from one to five, in the multi-potent miRNA sponge. Luciferase reporter assay showed the multi-potent miRNA sponge efficiently inhibited 4 miRNAs in breast and pancreatic cancer cells. Furthermore, a stable and inducible version of the multi-potent miRNA sponge cell line showed the miRNA sponge efficiently reduces the level of 4 target miRNAs and increase target protein level of these oncogenic miRNAs. Finally, we showed the miRNA sponge sensitize cells to cancer drug and attenuate cell migratory activity. Altogether, our study demonstrates the multi-potent miRNA sponge is a useful tool to examine the functional impact of simultaneous inhibition of multiple miRNAs and proposes a therapeutic potential.

  19. Simultaneous inhibition of multiple oncogenic miRNAs by a multi-potent microRNA sponge

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaeyun; Yeom, Chanjoo; Choi, Yeon-Sook; Kim, Sinae; Lee, EunJi; Park, Min Ji; Kang, Sang Wook; Kim, Sung Bae; Chang, Suhwan

    2015-01-01

    The roles of oncogenic miRNAs are widely recognized in many cancers. Inhibition of single miRNA using antagomiR can efficiently knock-down a specific miRNA. However, the effect is transient and often results in subtle phenotype, as there are other miRNAs contribute to tumorigenesis. Here we report a multi-potent miRNA sponge inhibiting multiple miRNAs simultaneously. As a model system, we targeted miR-21, miR-155 and miR-221/222, known as oncogenic miRNAs in multiple tumors including breast and pancreatic cancers. To achieve efficient knockdown, we generated perfect and bulged-matched miRNA binding sites (MBS) and introduced multiple copies of MBS, ranging from one to five, in the multi-potent miRNA sponge. Luciferase reporter assay showed the multi-potent miRNA sponge efficiently inhibited 4 miRNAs in breast and pancreatic cancer cells. Furthermore, a stable and inducible version of the multi-potent miRNA sponge cell line showed the miRNA sponge efficiently reduces the level of 4 target miRNAs and increase target protein level of these oncogenic miRNAs. Finally, we showed the miRNA sponge sensitize cells to cancer drug and attenuate cell migratory activity. Altogether, our study demonstrates the multi-potent miRNA sponge is a useful tool to examine the functional impact of simultaneous inhibition of multiple miRNAs and proposes a therapeutic potential. PMID:26284487

  20. The Spn4 gene of Drosophila encodes a potent furin-directed secretory pathway serpin

    PubMed Central

    Richer, Martin J.; Keays, Clairessa A.; Waterhouse, Jennifer; Minhas, Jessey; Hashimoto, Carl; Jean, François

    2004-01-01

    Proprotein convertases (PCs) are an important class of host-cell serine endoproteases implicated in many physiological and pathological processes. Owing to their expanding roles in the proteolytic events required for generating infectious microbial pathogens and for tumor growth and invasiveness, there is increasing interest in identifying endogenous PC inhibitors. Here we report the identification of Spn4A, a previously uncharacterized secretory pathway serine protease inhibitor (serpin) from Drosophila melanogaster that contains a consensus furin cleavage site, -ArgP4-Arg-Lys-ArgP1↓-, in its reactive site loop (RSL). Our biochemical and kinetics analysis revealed that recombinant Spn4A inhibits human furin (Ki, 13 pM; kass, 3.2 × 107 M–1·s–1) and Drosophila PC2 (Ki, 3.5 nM; kass, 9.2 × 104 M–1·s–1) by a slow-binding mechanism characteristic of serpin molecules and forms a kinetically trapped SDS-stable complex with each enzyme. For both PCs, the stoichiometry of inhibition by Spn4A is nearly 1, which is characteristic of known physiological serpin–protease interactions. Mass analysis of furin–Spn4A reaction products identified the actual reactive site center of Spn4A to be -ArgP4-Arg-Lys-ArgP1↓-. Moreover, we demonstrate that Spn4A's highly effective PC inhibition properties are critically dependent on the unusual length of its RSL, which is composed of 18 aa instead of the typical 17-residue RSL found in most other inhibitory serpins. The identification of Spn4A, the most potent and effective natural serpin of PCs identified to date, suggests that Spn4A could be a prototype of endogenous serpins involved in the precise regulation of PC-dependent proteolytic cleavage events in the secretory pathway of eukaryotic cells. PMID:15247425

  1. Collybolide is a novel biased agonist of κ-opioid receptors with potent antipruritic activity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Achla; Gomes, Ivone; Bobeck, Erin N; Fakira, Amanda K; Massaro, Nicholas P; Sharma, Indrajeet; Cavé, Adrien; Hamm, Heidi E; Parello, Joseph; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2016-05-24

    Among the opioid receptors, the κ-opioid receptor (κOR) has been gaining considerable attention as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of complex CNS disorders including depression, visceral pain, and cocaine addiction. With an interest in discovering novel ligands targeting κOR, we searched natural products for unusual scaffolds and identified collybolide (Colly), a nonnitrogenous sesquiterpene from the mushroom Collybia maculata. This compound has a furyl-δ-lactone core similar to that of Salvinorin A (Sal A), another natural product from the plant Salvia divinorum Characterization of the molecular pharmacological properties reveals that Colly, like Sal A, is a highly potent and selective κOR agonist. However, the two compounds differ in certain signaling and behavioral properties. Colly exhibits 10- to 50-fold higher potency in activating the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway compared with Sal A. Taken with the fact that the two compounds are equipotent for inhibiting adenylyl cyclase activity, these results suggest that Colly behaves as a biased agonist of κOR. Behavioral studies also support the biased agonistic activity of Colly in that it exhibits ∼10-fold higher potency in blocking non-histamine-mediated itch compared with Sal A, and this difference is not seen in pain attenuation by these two compounds. These results represent a rare example of functional selectivity by two natural products that act on the same receptor. The biased agonistic activity, along with an easily modifiable structure compared with Sal A, makes Colly an ideal candidate for the development of novel therapeutics targeting κOR with reduced side effects. PMID:27162327

  2. Auger Recombination in Self-Assembled Quantum Dots: Quenching and Broadening of the Charged Exciton Transition.

    PubMed

    Kurzmann, Annika; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D; Lorke, Axel; Geller, Martin

    2016-05-11

    In quantum dots (QDs), the Auger recombination is a nonradiative process in which the electron-hole recombination energy is transferred to an additional carrier. It has been studied mostly in colloidal QDs, where the Auger recombination time is in the picosecond range and efficiently quenches the light emission. In self-assembled QDs, on the other hand, the influence of Auger recombination on the optical properties is in general neglected, assuming that it is masked by other processes such as spin and charge fluctuations. Here, we use time-resolved resonance fluorescence to analyze the Auger recombination and its influence on the optical properties of a single self-assembled QD. From excitation-power-dependent measurements, we find a long Auger recombination time of about 500 ns and a quenching of the trion transition by about 80%. Furthermore, we observe a broadening of the trion transition line width by up to a factor of 2. With a model based on rate equations, we are able to identify the interplay between tunneling and Auger rate as the underlying mechanism for the reduced intensity and the broadening of the line width. This demonstrates that self-assembled QDs can serve as an ideal model system to study how the charge recapture process, given by the band-structure surrounding the confined carriers, influences the Auger process. Our findings are not only relevant for improving the emission properties of colloidal QD-based emitters and dyes, which have recently entered the consumer market, but also of interest for more visionary applications, such as quantum information technologies, based on self-assembled quantum dots.

  3. A NOVEL MULTI-MODAL DRUG REPURPOSING APPROACH FOR IDENTIFICATION OF POTENT ACK1 INHIBITORSǂ

    PubMed Central

    Phatak, Sharangdhar S.; Zhang, Shuxing

    2013-01-01

    Exploiting drug polypharmacology to identify novel modes of actions for drug repurposing has gained significant attentions in the current era of weak drug pipelines. From a serendipitous to systematic or rational ways, a variety of unimodal computational approaches have been developed but the complexity of the problem clearly needs multi-modal approaches for better solutions. In this study, we propose an integrative computational framework based on classical structure-based drug design and chemical-genomic similarity methods, combined with molecular graph theories for this task. Briefly, a pharmacophore modeling method was employed to guide the selection of docked poses resulting from our high-throughput virtual screening. We then evaluated if complementary results (hits missed by docking) can be obtained by using a novel chemo-genomic similarity approach based on chemical/sequence information. Finally, we developed a bipartite-graph based on the extensive data curation of DrugBank, PDB, and UniProt. This drug-target bipartite graph was used to assess similarity of different inhibitors based on their connections to other compounds and targets. The approaches were applied to the repurposing of existing drugs against ACK1, a novel cancer target significantly overexpressed in breast and prostate cancers during their progression. Upon screening of ~1,447 marketed drugs, a final set of 10 hits were selected for experimental testing. Among them, four drugs were identified as potent ACK1 inhibitors. Especially the inhibition of ACK1 by Dasatinib was as strong as IC50=1nM. We anticipate that our novel, integrative strategy can be easily extended to other biological targets with a more comprehensive coverage of known bio-chemical space for repurposing studies. PMID:23424109

  4. Amisulpride is a potent 5-HT7 antagonist: relevance for antidepressant actions in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Atheir I.; Hedlund, Peter B.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Tran, Thuy B.; Meltzer, Herbert Y.; Roth, Bryan L.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Amisulpride is approved for clinical use in treating schizophrenia in a number of European countries and also for treating dysthymia, a mild form of depression, in Italy. Amisulpride has also been demonstrated to be an antidepressant for patients with major depression in many clinical trials. In part because of the selective D2/D3 receptor antagonist properties of amisulpride, it has long been widely assumed that dopaminergic modulation is the proximal event responsible for mediating its antidepressant and antipsychotic properties. Objectives The purpose of these studies was to determine if amisulpride’s antidepressant actions are mediated by off-target interactions with other receptors. Materials and Methods We performed experiments that: (1) examined the pharmacological profile of amisulpride at a large number of CNS molecular targets and (2) after finding high potency antagonist affinity for human 5-HT7a serotonin receptors, characterized the actions of amisulpride as an antidepressant in wild-type and 5-HT7 receptor knock-out mice. Results We discovered that amisulpride was a potent competitive antagonist at 5-HT7a receptors and that interactions with no other molecular target investigated here could explain its antidepressant actions in vivo. Significantly, and in contrast to their wildtype littermates, 5-HT7 receptor knockout mice did not respond to amisulpride in a widely used rodent model of depression, the tail suspension test. Conclusions These results indicate that 5-HT7a receptor antagonism, and not D2/D3 receptor antagonism, likely underlies the antidepressant actions of amisulpride. PMID:19337725

  5. Identification of a potent synthetic FXR agonist with an unexpected mode of binding and activation

    SciTech Connect

    Soisson, Stephen M.; Parthasarathy, Gopalakrishnan; Adams, Alan D.; Sahoo, Soumya; Sitlani, Ayesha; Sparrow, Carl; Cui, Jisong; Becker, Joseph W.

    2008-07-08

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor family, plays important roles in the regulation of bile acid and cholesterol homeostasis, glucose metabolism, and insulin sensitivity. There is intense interest in understanding the mechanisms of FXR regulation and in developing pharmaceutically suitable synthetic FXR ligands that might be used to treat metabolic syndrome. We report here the identification of a potent FXR agonist (MFA-1) and the elucidation of the structure of this ligand in ternary complex with the human receptor and a coactivator peptide fragment using x-ray crystallography at 1.9-{angstrom} resolution. The steroid ring system of MFA-1 binds with its D ring-facing helix 12 (AF-2) in a manner reminiscent of hormone binding to classical steroid hormone receptors and the reverse of the pose adopted by naturally occurring bile acids when bound to FXR. This binding mode appears to be driven by the presence of a carboxylate on MFA-1 that is situated to make a salt-bridge interaction with an arginine residue in the FXR-binding pocket that is normally used to neutralize bound bile acids. Receptor activation by MFA-1 differs from that by bile acids in that it relies on direct interactions between the ligand and residues in helices 11 and 12 and only indirectly involves a protonated histidine that is part of the activation trigger. The structure of the FXR:MFA-1 complex differs significantly from that of the complex with a structurally distinct agonist, fexaramine, highlighting the inherent plasticity of the receptor.

  6. Characterization of GSK′963: a structurally distinct, potent and selective inhibitor of RIP1 kinase

    PubMed Central

    Berger, SB; Harris, P; Nagilla, R; Kasparcova, V; Hoffman, S; Swift, B; Dare, L; Schaeffer, M; Capriotti, C; Ouellette, M; King, BW; Wisnoski, D; Cox, J; Reilly, M; Marquis, RW; Bertin, J; Gough, PJ

    2015-01-01

    Necroptosis and signaling regulated by RIP1 kinase activity is emerging as a key driver of inflammation in a variety of disease settings. A significant amount has been learned about how RIP1 regulates necrotic cell death through the use of the RIP1 kinase inhibitor Necrostatin-1 (Nec-1). Nec-1 has been a transformational tool for exploring the function of RIP1 kinase activity; however, its utility is somewhat limited by moderate potency, off-target activity against indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), and poor pharmacokinetic properties. These limitations of Nec-1 have driven an effort to identify next-generation tools to study RIP1 function, and have led to the identification of 7-Cl-O-Nec-1 (Nec-1s), which has improved pharmacokinetic properties and lacks IDO inhibitory activity. Here we describe the characterization of GSK′963, a chiral small-molecule inhibitor of RIP1 kinase that is chemically distinct from both Nec-1 and Nec-1s. GSK′963 is significantly more potent than Nec-1 in both biochemical and cellular assays, inhibiting RIP1-dependent cell death with an IC50 of between 1 and 4 nM in human and murine cells. GSK′963 is >10 000-fold selective for RIP1 over 339 other kinases, lacks measurable activity against IDO and has an inactive enantiomer, GSK′962, which can be used to confirm on-target effects. The increased in vitro potency of GSK′963 also translates in vivo, where GSK′963 provides much greater protection from hypothermia at matched doses to Nec-1, in a model of TNF-induced sterile shock. Together, we believe GSK′963 represents a next-generation tool for examining the function of RIP1 in vitro and in vivo, and should help to clarify our current understanding of the role of RIP1 in contributing to disease pathogenesis. PMID:27551444

  7. TrxR1 as a Potent Regulator of the Nrf2-Keap1 Response System

    PubMed Central

    Cebula, Marcus; Schmidt, Edward E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: All cells must maintain a balance between oxidants and reductants, while allowing for fluctuations in redox states triggered by signaling, altered metabolic flow, or extracellular stimuli. Furthermore, they must be able to rapidly sense and react to various challenges that would disrupt the redox homeostasis. Recent Advances: Many studies have identified Keap1 as a key sensor for oxidative or electrophilic stress, with modification of Keap1 by oxidation or electrophiles triggering Nrf2-mediated transcriptional induction of enzymes supporting reductive and detoxification pathways. However, additional mechanisms for Nrf2 regulation are likely to exist upstream of, or in parallel with, Keap1. Critical Issues: Here, we propose that the mammalian selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) is a potent regulator of Nrf2. A high chemical reactivity of TrxR1 and its vital role for the thioredoxin (Trx) system distinguishes TrxR1 as a prime target for electrophilic challenges. Chemical modification of the selenocysteine (Sec) in TrxR1 by electrophiles leads to rapid inhibition of thioredoxin disulfide reductase activity, often combined with induction of NADPH oxidase activity of the derivatized enzyme, thereby affecting many downstream redox pathways. The notion of TrxR1 as a regulator of Nrf2 is supported by many publications on effects in human cells of selenium deficiency, oxidative stress or electrophile exposure, as well as the phenotypes of genetic mouse models. Future Directions: Investigation of the role of TrxR1 as a regulator of Nrf2 activation will facilitate further studies of redox control in diverse cells and tissues of mammals, and possibly also in animals of other classes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 823–853. PMID:26058897

  8. Visna virus Tat protein: a potent transcription factor with both activator and suppressor domains.

    PubMed Central

    Carruth, L M; Hardwick, J M; Morse, B A; Clements, J E

    1994-01-01

    Visna virus is a pathogenic lentivirus of sheep tat is distantly related to the primate lentiviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1. The visna virus genome encodes a small regulatory protein, Tat, which is necessary for efficient viral replication and enhanced viral transcription. To investigate the mechanism of action of the visna Tat protein and to localize the protein domain(s) responsible for transcriptional activation, chimeric proteins containing visna virus Tat sequences fused to the DNA binding domain of the yeast transactivation factor GAL4 (residues 1 to 147) were made. The GAL4-Tat fusion proteins were transfected into cells and tested for the ability to activate the adenovirus E1b promoter via upstream GAL4 DNA binding sites. Full-length GAL4-Tat fusion proteins were weak transactivators in this system, giving only a two- to fourfold increase in transcription in several cell types, including HeLa and sheep choroid plexus cells. In contrast, fusion of the N-terminal region of the Tat protein to GAL4 revealed a potent activation domain. Amino acids 13 to 38 appeared to be the most critical for activation. No other region of the protein showed any activation in the GAL4 system. This N-terminal region of the visna virus Tat protein has a large number of acidic and hydrophobic residues, suggesting that Tat has an acidic activation domain common to many transcriptional transactivators. Mutations in hydrophobic and bulky aromatic residues dramatically reduced the activity of the chimeric protein. Competition experiments suggest that mechanism of the visna virus Tat activation domain may closely resemble that of the herpesvirus activator VP16 and human immunodeficiency virus Tat, a related lentivirus activator, since both significantly reduce the level of visna virus Tat activation. Finally, a domain between residues 39 and 53 was identified in the Tat protein that, in the GAL4 system, negatively regulates activation by Tat. Images PMID:8083955

  9. CTEP: a novel, potent, long-acting, and orally bioavailable metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Lothar; Jaeschke, Georg; Michalon, Aubin; Vieira, Eric; Honer, Michael; Spooren, Will; Porter, Richard; Hartung, Thomas; Kolczewski, Sabine; Büttelmann, Bernd; Flament, Christophe; Diener, Catherine; Fischer, Christophe; Gatti, Silvia; Prinssen, Eric P; Parrott, Neil; Hoffmann, Gerhard; Wettstein, Joseph G

    2011-11-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) is a glutamate-activated class C G protein-coupled receptor widely expressed in the central nervous system and clinically investigated as a drug target for a range of indications, including depression, Parkinson's disease, and fragile X syndrome. Here, we present the novel potent, selective, and orally bioavailable mGlu5 negative allosteric modulator with inverse agonist properties 2-chloro-4-((2,5-dimethyl-1-(4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenyl)-1H-imidazol-4-yl)ethynyl)pyridine (CTEP). CTEP binds mGlu5 with low nanomolar affinity and shows >1000-fold selectivity when tested against 103 targets, including all known mGlu receptors. CTEP penetrates the brain with a brain/plasma ratio of 2.6 and displaces the tracer [(3)H]3-(6-methyl-pyridin-2-ylethynyl)-cyclohex-2-enone-O-methyl-oxime (ABP688) in vivo in mice from brain regions expressing mGlu5 with an average ED(50) equivalent to a drug concentration of 77.5 ng/g in brain tissue. This novel mGlu5 inhibitor is active in the stress-induced hyperthermia procedure in mice and the Vogel conflict drinking test in rats with minimal effective doses of 0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg, respectively, reflecting a 30- to 100-fold higher in vivo potency compared with 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP) and fenobam. CTEP is the first reported mGlu5 inhibitor with both long half-life of approximately 18 h and high oral bioavailability allowing chronic treatment with continuous receptor blockade with one dose every 48 h in adult and newborn animals. By enabling long-term treatment through a wide age range, CTEP allows the exploration of the full therapeutic potential of mGlu5 inhibitors for indications requiring chronic receptor inhibition. PMID:21849627

  10. A novel RET inhibitor with potent efficacy against medullary thyroid cancer in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Abbas K.; Mukerji, Ridhwi; Shah, Anuj; Timmermann, Barbara N.; Cohen, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Most medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTC) recur or progress despite optimal surgical resection. Current targeted-therapies show promise but lack durable efficacy and tolerability. The purpose of this study was to build upon previous in vitro work and evaluate Withaferin A (WA), a novel RET inhibitor, in a metastatic murine model of MTC. Methods 5 million DRO-81-1 human MTC-cells injected in the left posterior neck of Nu/Nu mice uniformly generated metastases to the liver, spleen, and/or lungs. Treatment with WA (8mg/kg/day i.p.×21 days) was started for tumors >100 mm3. Endpoints were survival, tumor>1500 mm3, decreased bodyweight, or body score (all measured thrice weekly). Results All controls (saline; n=5) died or deteriorated from metastatic disease by 7 weeks post injection. All treated animals were alive,(WA; n=5), having tumor regression and growth-delay without toxicity or weight-loss at 6 wks post treatment; p<0.01. Tumor cells treated with WA demonstrated inhibition of total and phospho-RET levels by Western-Blot analysis in a dose-dependent manner (almost complete inhibition with 5uM WA treatment) as well as potent inhibition of phospho-ERK and phospho-AKT levels. Conclusions Withaferin A is a novel natural-product RET-inhibitor with efficacy in a metastatic murine model of MTC. Further long-term efficacy/toxicity studies are warranted to evaluate this compound for clinical translation. PMID:21134556

  11. 3-Aminopropanal, formed during cerebral ischaemia, is a potent lysosomotropic neurotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Yuan, Xi-Ming; Ivanova, Svetlana; Tracey, Kevin J; Eaton, John W; Brunk, Ulf T

    2003-01-01

    Cytotoxic polyamine-derived amino aldehydes, formed during cerebral ischaemia, damage adjacent tissue (the so-called 'penumbra') not subject to the initial ischaemic insult. One such product is 3-aminopropanal (3-AP), a potent cytotoxin that accumulates in ischaemic brain, although the precise mechanisms responsible for its formation are still unclear. More relevant to the present investigations, the mechanisms by which such a small aldehydic compound might be cytotoxic are also not known, but we hypothesized that 3-AP, having the structure of a weak lysosomotropic base, might concentrate within lysosomes, making these organelles a probable focus of initial toxicity. Indeed, 3-AP leads to lysosomal rupture of D384 glioma cells, a process which clearly precedes caspase activation and apoptotic cell death. Immunohistochemistry reveals that 3-AP concentrates in the lysosomal compartment and prevention of this accumulation by the lysosomotropic base ammonia, NH(3), protects against 3-AP cytotoxicity by increasing lysosomal pH. A thiol compound, N-(2-mercaptopropionyl)glycine, reacts with and neutralizes 3-AP and significantly inhibits cytoxocity. Both amino and aldehyde functions of 3-AP are necessary for toxicity: the amino group confers lysosomotropism and the aldehyde is important for additional, presently unknown, reactions. We conclude that 3-AP exerts its toxic effects by accumulating intralysosomally, causing rupture of these organelles and releasing lysosomal enzymes which initiate caspase activation and apoptosis (or necrosis if the lysosomal rupture is extensive). These results may have implications for the development of new therapeutics designed to lessen secondary damage arising from focal cerebral ischaemia. PMID:12513695

  12. Genome-wide association study identifies a potent locus associated with human opioid sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, D; Fukuda, K; Kasai, S; Hasegawa, J; Aoki, Y; Nishi, A; Saita, N; Koukita, Y; Nagashima, M; Katoh, R; Satoh, Y; Tagami, M; Higuchi, S; Ujike, H; Ozaki, N; Inada, T; Iwata, N; Sora, I; Iyo, M; Kondo, N; Won, M-J; Naruse, N; Uehara-Aoyama, K; Itokawa, M; Koga, M; Arinami, T; Kaneko, Y; Hayashida, M; Ikeda, K

    2014-01-01

    Opioids, such as morphine and fentanyl, are widely used as effective analgesics for the treatment of acute and chronic pain. In addition, the opioid system has a key role in the rewarding effects of morphine, ethanol, cocaine and various other drugs. Although opioid sensitivity is well known to vary widely among individual subjects, several candidate genetic polymorphisms reported so far are not sufficient for fully understanding the wide range of interindividual differences in human opioid sensitivity. By conducting a multistage genome-wide association study (GWAS) in healthy subjects, we found that genetic polymorphisms within a linkage disequilibrium block that spans 2q33.3–2q34 were strongly associated with the requirements for postoperative opioid analgesics after painful cosmetic surgery. The C allele of the best candidate single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs2952768, was associated with more analgesic requirements, and consistent results were obtained in patients who underwent abdominal surgery. In addition, carriers of the C allele in this SNP exhibited less vulnerability to severe drug dependence in patients with methamphetamine dependence, alcohol dependence, and eating disorders and a lower ‘Reward Dependence' score on a personality questionnaire in healthy subjects. Furthermore, the C/C genotype of this SNP was significantly associated with the elevated expression of a neighboring gene, CREB1. These results show that SNPs in this locus are the most potent genetic factors associated with human opioid sensitivity known to date, affecting both the efficacy of opioid analgesics and liability to severe substance dependence. Our findings provide valuable information for the personalized treatment of pain and drug dependence. PMID:23183491

  13. Frequent Overexpression of Aurora Kinase A in Upper Gastrointestinal Adenocarcinomas Correlates With Potent Antiapoptotic Functions

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Altaf A.; Zaika, Alexander; Piazuelo, Maria B.; Correa, Pelayo; Koyama, Tatsuki; Belkhiri, Abbes; Washington, Kay; Castells, Antoni; Pera, Manuel; El-Rifai, Wael

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Upper gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas are a common cause of cancer-related deaths. In this study, the authors investigated the prevalence and biological significance of Aurora Kinase A (AURKA) overexpression in upper gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas. METHODS Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemical staining on tumor tissue microarrays (TMA) were used to study the expression of AURKA in upper gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas. To investigate the biological and signaling impact of AURKA, the authors used multiple in vitro assays that included 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase–mediated nick-end labeling), cytochrome C release, flow cytometry, luciferase reporter, and Western blot analysis. RESULTS Frequent overexpression of AURKA transcript in upper gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas was detected compared with normal samples (47%; P = .001). The immunohistochemical analysis of 130 tumors demonstrated moderate-to-strong immunostaining of AURKA in >50% of upper gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas. By using camptothecin as a drug-induced apoptosis in vitro model, the authors demonstrated that the expression of AURKA provided protection against apoptosis to gastrointestinal cancer cells (AGS and RKO) (P =.006) and RIE-1 primary intestinal epithelial cells (P =.001). The AURKA overexpression mediated an increase in phosphorylation of AKTSer473 with an increase in HDM2 level. The shRNA-knockdown of AKT in AURKA-overexpressing cells reversed this effect and showed a significant increase in the p53 protein level, indicating a possible nexus of AURKA/AKT/p53. Indeed, overexpression of AURKA led to a remarkable reduction in the transcription activity of p53, with subsequent reductions in transcript and protein levels of its downstream proapoptotic transcription targets (p21, BAX, NOXA, and PUMA). CONCLUSIONS Study results indicated that AURKA provides

  14. Free cholesterol is a potent regulator of lipid transfer protein function

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R.E.

    1988-09-05

    This study investigates the effect of altered lipoprotein free cholesterol (FC) content on the transfer of cholesteryl ester (CE) and triglyceride (TG) from very low- (VLDL), low- (LDL), and high-(HDL) density lipoproteins by the plasma-derived lipid transfer protein (LTP). The FC content of VLDL and HDL was selectively altered by incubating these lipoproteins with FC/phospholipid dispersions of varying composition. FC-modified lipoproteins were then equilibrated with (3H) TG, (14C)CE-labeled lipoproteins of another class to facilitate the subsequent modification of the radiolabeled donor lipoproteins. LTP was added and the extent of radiolabeled TG and CE transfer determined after 1 h. With either LDL or VLDL as lipid donor, an increase in the FC content of these lipoproteins caused a concentration-dependent inhibition (up to 50%) of CE transfer from these particles, without any significant effect on TG transfer. In contrast, with HDL as donor, increasing the HDL FC content had little effect on CE transfer from HDL, but markedly stimulated (up to 2.5-fold) the transfer of TG. This differential effect of FC on the unidirectional transfer of radiolabeled lipids from VLDL and HDL led to marked effects on LTP-facilitated net mass transfer of lipids. During long-term incubation of a constant amount of LTP with FC-modified VLDL and HDL, the extent of net mass transfer was linearly related to lipoprotein FC content; a 4-fold increase in FC content resulted in a 3-fold stimulation of the CE mass transferred to VLDL, which was coupled to an equimolar, reciprocal transfer of TG mass to HDL. Since lipid transfer between lipoproteins is integral to the process of reverse cholesterol transport, we conclude that lipoprotein FC levels are a potent, positive regulator of the pathways involved in sterol clearance. FC may modulate lipid transfer by altering the availability of CE and TG to LTP at the lipoprotein surface.

  15. High-Content Screening in Zebrafish Embryos Identifies Butafenacil as a Potent Inducer of Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Leet, Jessica K.; Lindberg, Casey D.; Bassett, Luke A.; Isales, Gregory M.; Yozzo, Krystle L.; Raftery, Tara D.; Volz, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Using transgenic zebrafish (fli1:egfp) that stably express enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) within vascular endothelial cells, we recently developed and optimized a 384-well high-content screening (HCS) assay that enables us to screen and identify chemicals affecting cardiovascular development and function at non-teratogenic concentrations. Within this assay, automated image acquisition procedures and custom image analysis protocols are used to quantify body length, heart rate, circulation, pericardial area, and intersegmental vessel area within individual live embryos exposed from 5 to 72 hours post-fertilization. After ranking developmental toxicity data generated from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) zebrafish teratogenesis assay, we screened 26 of the most acutely toxic chemicals within EPA's ToxCast Phase-I library in concentration-response format (0.05–50 µM) using this HCS assay. Based on this screen, we identified butafenacil as a potent inducer of anemia, as exposure from 0.39 to 3.125 µM butafenacil completely abolished arterial circulation in the absence of effects on all other endpoints evaluated. Butafenacil is an herbicide that inhibits protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO) – an enzyme necessary for heme production in vertebrates. Using o-dianisidine staining, we then revealed that severe butafenacil-induced anemia in zebrafish was due to a complete loss of hemoglobin following exposure during early development. Therefore, six additional PPO inhibitors within the ToxCast Phase-I library were screened to determine whether anemia represents a common adverse outcome for these herbicides. Embryonic exposure to only one of these PPO inhibitors – flumioxazin – resulted in a similar phenotype as butafenacil, albeit not as severe as butafenacil. Overall, this study highlights the potential utility of this assay for (1) screening chemicals for cardiovascular toxicity and (2) prioritizing chemicals for future hypothesis

  16. Targeting Aquaporin Function: Potent Inhibition of Aquaglyceroporin-3 by a Gold-Based Compound

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Ana Paula; Marrone, Alessandro; Ciancetta, Antonella; Galán Cobo, Ana; Echevarría, Miriam; Moura, Teresa F.; Re, Nazzareno; Casini, Angela; Soveral, Graça

    2012-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are membrane channels that conduct water and small solutes such as glycerol and are involved in many physiological functions. Aquaporin-based modulator drugs are predicted to be of broad potential utility in the treatment of several diseases. Until today few AQP inhibitors have been described as suitable candidates for clinical development. Here we report on the potent inhibition of AQP3 channels by gold(III) complexes screened on human red blood cells (hRBC) and AQP3-transfected PC12 cells by a stopped-flow method. Among the various metal compounds tested, Auphen is the most active on AQP3 (IC50 = 0.8±0.08 µM in hRBC). Interestingly, the compound poorly affects the water permeability of AQP1. The mechanism of gold inhibition is related to the ability of Au(III) to interact with sulphydryls groups of proteins such as the thiolates of cysteine residues. Additional DFT and modeling studies on possible gold compound/AQP adducts provide a tentative description of the system at a molecular level. The mapping of the periplasmic surface of an homology model of human AQP3 evidenced the thiol group of Cys40 as a likely candidate for binding to gold(III) complexes. Moreover, the investigation of non-covalent binding of Au complexes by docking approaches revealed their preferential binding to AQP3 with respect to AQP1. The high selectivity and low concentration dependent inhibitory effect of Auphen (in the nanomolar range) together with its high water solubility makes the compound a suitable drug lead for future in vivo studies. These results may present novel metal-based scaffolds for AQP drug development. PMID:22624030

  17. Melatonin as a Potent and Inducible Endogenous Antioxidant: Synthesis and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien C; Esteban-Zubero, Eduardo; Zhou, Zhou; Reiter, Russel J

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin is a tryptophan-derived molecule with pleiotropic activities. It is present in almost all or all organisms. Its synthetic pathway depends on the species in which it is measured. For example, the tryptophan to melatonin pathway differs in plants and animals. It is speculated that the melatonin synthetic machinery in eukaryotes was inherited from bacteria as a result of endosymbiosis. However, melatonin's synthetic mechanisms in microorganisms are currently unknown. Melatonin metabolism is highly complex with these enzymatic processes having evolved from cytochrome C. In addition to its enzymatic degradation, melatonin is metabolized via pseudoenzymatic and free radical interactive processes. The metabolic products of these processes overlap and it is often difficult to determine which process is dominant. However, under oxidative stress, the free radical interactive pathway may be featured over the others. Because of the complexity of the melatonin degradative processes, it is expected that additional novel melatonin metabolites will be identified in future investigations. The original and primary function of melatonin in early life forms such as in unicellular organisms was as a free radical scavenger and antioxidant. During evolution, melatonin was selected as a signaling molecule to transduce the environmental photoperiodic information into an endocrine message in multicellular organisms and for other purposes as well. As an antioxidant, melatonin exhibits several unique features which differ from the classic antioxidants. These include its cascade reaction with free radicals and its capacity to be induced under moderate oxidative stress. These features make melatonin a potent endogenously-occurring antioxidant that protects organisms from catastrophic oxidative stress. PMID:26501252

  18. Triapine and a more potent dimethyl derivative induce endoplasmic reticulum stress in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Trondl, Robert; Flocke, Lea S; Kowol, Christian R; Heffeter, Petra; Jungwirth, Ute; Mair, Georg E; Steinborn, Ralf; Enyedy, Éva A; Jakupec, Michael A; Berger, Walter; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2014-03-01

    Triapine (3-AP; 3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone), a ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, has been extensively evaluated in clinical trials in the last decade. This study addresses the role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the anticancer activity of 3-AP and the derivative N(4),N(4)-dimethyl-triapine (3-AP-Me), differing from 3-AP only by dimethylation of the terminal nitrogen. Treatment of colon cancer cells with 3-AP or 3-AP-Me activated all three ER stress pathways (PERK, IRE1a, ATF6) by phosphorylation of eIF2α and upregulation of gene expression of activating transcription factors ATF4 and ATF6. In particular, 3-AP-Me led to an upregulation of the alternatively spliced mRNA variant XBP1 (16-fold). Moreover, 3-AP and 3-AP-Me activated the cellular stress kinases c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases, and inhibition of JNK activity antagonized the cytotoxic effect of both compounds. Subsequent to induction of the unfolded protein response, a significant upregulation of proapoptotic proteins was detected, including the transcription factor CHOP and Bim, an essential factor for ER stress-related apoptosis. In correlation with the higher degree of ER stress after 3-AP-Me treatment, also a more potent depolarization of mitochondrial membranes was found. These data suggest that 3-AP and 3-AP-Me induce apoptosis via ER stress. This was further corroborated by showing that inhibition of protein biosynthesis with cycloheximide prior to 3-AP and 3-AP-Me treatment leads to a significant reduction of the antiproliferative properties of both compounds. Taken together, this study demonstrates that induction of ER stress contributes to the mode of action of 3-AP and that terminal dimethylation leads to an even more pronounced manifestation of this effect.

  19. Ipsen 5i is a Novel Potent Pharmacoperone for Intracellularly Retained Melanocortin-4 Receptor Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ya-Xiong; Huang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Inactivating mutations of the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) cause early-onset severe obesity in humans. Comprehensive functional studies show that most of the inactivating mutants of the MC4R are retained intracellularly. In the present study, we investigated whether a small molecule inverse agonist of the MC4R, Ipsen 5i, could act as a pharmacoperone and correct the cell surface expression and function of intracellularly retained mutant MC4Rs using multiple cell lines, including HEK293 and two neuronal cell lines. We showed that Ipsen 5i rescued the cell surface expression of all 11 intracellularly retained mutant MC4Rs studied herein in at least one cell line. Ipsen 5i functionally rescued seven mutants in all cell lines used. One mutant (Y157S) was functionally rescued in HEK293 cells but not in the two neuronal cell lines. Ipsen 5i increased cell surface expression of three mutants (S58C, G98R, and F261S) but did not affect signaling. Ipsen 5i had no effect on mutant MC4Rs with other defects (Δ88-92, D90N, I102S) or no defect (N274S). It also did not affect trafficking of a misrouted MC3R mutant (I335S). Cell impermeable peptide ligands of the MC4R or cell permeable small molecule ligand of δ opioid receptor could not rescue misrouted mutant MC4R. In summary, we demonstrated that Ipsen 5i was a novel potent pharmacoperone of the MC4R, correcting trafficking and signaling of a significant portion (73%) of intracellularly retained mutants. Additional studies are needed to demonstrate its in vivo efficacy. PMID:25136332

  20. Melatonin as a Potent and Inducible Endogenous Antioxidant: Synthesis and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien C; Esteban-Zubero, Eduardo; Zhou, Zhou; Reiter, Russel J

    2015-10-16

    Melatonin is a tryptophan-derived molecule with pleiotropic activities. It is present in almost all or all organisms. Its synthetic pathway depends on the species in which it is measured. For example, the tryptophan to melatonin pathway differs in plants and animals. It is speculated that the melatonin synthetic machinery in eukaryotes was inherited from bacteria as a result of endosymbiosis. However, melatonin's synthetic mechanisms in microorganisms are currently unknown. Melatonin metabolism is highly complex with these enzymatic processes having evolved from cytochrome C. In addition to its enzymatic degradation, melatonin is metabolized via pseudoenzymatic and free radical interactive processes. The metabolic products of these processes overlap and it is often difficult to determine which process is dominant. However, under oxidative stress, the free radical interactive pathway may be featured over the others. Because of the complexity of the melatonin degradative processes, it is expected that additional novel melatonin metabolites will be identified in future investigations. The original and primary function of melatonin in early life forms such as in unicellular organisms was as a free radical scavenger and antioxidant. During evolution, melatonin was selected as a signaling molecule to transduce the environmental photoperiodic information into an endocrine message in multicellular organisms and for other purposes as well. As an antioxidant, melatonin exhibits several unique features which differ from the classic antioxidants. These include its cascade reaction with free radicals and its capacity to be induced under moderate oxidative stress. These features make melatonin a potent endogenously-occurring antioxidant that protects organisms from catastrophic oxidative stress.

  1. Deoxyarbutin Possesses a Potent Skin-Lightening Capacity with No Discernible Cytotoxicity against Melanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhi-Feng; Jiang, Shan; Xu, Shi-Zheng; Lei, Tie-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Safe and effective ingredients capable of removing undesired hyperpigmentation from facial skin are urgently needed for both pharmaceutical and cosmetic purposes. Deoxyarbutin (4-[(tetrahydro-2H-pyran-2-yl) oxy] phenol, D-Arb) is a glucoside derivative of hydroquinone. Here, we investigated the toxicity and efficacy of D-Arb at the sub-cellular level (directly on melanosomes) and skin pigmentation using in vivo and in vitro models to compare with its parent compound hydroquinone (1,4-benzenediol, HQ). At first, we examined the ultrastructural changes of melanosomes in hyperpigmented guinea pig skin induced by 308-nm monochromatic excimer lightand/or treated with HQ and D-Arb using transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that prominent changes in the melanosomal membrane, such as bulb-like structure and even complete rupture of the outer membranes, were found in the skin after topical application of 5% HQ for 10 days. These changes were barely observed in the skin treated with D-Arb. To further clarify whether membrane toxicity of HQ was a direct result of the compound treatment, we also examinedultrastructural changes of individual melanosomes purified from MNT1 human melanoma cells. Similar observations were obtained from the naked melanosome model in vitro. Finally, we determined the effects of melanosomal fractions exposed to HQ or D-Arb on hydroxyl radical generation in the Fenton reaction utilizing an electron spin resonance assay. D-Arb-treated melanosomesexhibit a moderate hydroxyl radical-scavenging activity, whereas HQ-treated melanosomessignificantly generate more hydroxyl free radicals. This study suggests that D-Arb possesses a potent ability in skin lightening and antioxidation with less melanosome cytotoxicity. PMID:27776184

  2. Molecular mechanism of viral resistance to a potent non-nucleoside inhibitor unveiled by molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Asthana, Shailendra; Shukla, Saumya; Ruggerone, Paolo; Vargiu, Attilio V

    2014-11-11

    Recently, we reported on a potent benzimidazole derivative (227G) that inhibits the growth of the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in cell-based and enzyme assays at nanomolar concentrations. The target of 227G is the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), and the I261M mutation located in motif I of the RdRp finger domain was found to induce drug resistance. Here we propose a molecular mechanism for the retained functionality of the enzyme in the presence of the inhibitor, on the basis of a thorough computational study of the apo and holo forms of the BVDV RdRp either in the wild type (wt) or in the form carrying the I261M mutation. Our study shows that although the mutation affects to some extent the structure of the apoenzyme, the functional dynamics of the protein appear to be largely maintained, which is consistent with the retained functionality of this natural mutant. Despite the binding site of 227G not collapsing or undergoing drastic structural changes upon introduction of the I261M substitution, these alterations reflect crucially on the binding mode of 227G, which is significantly different from that found in wt RdRp. In particular, while in the wt system the four loops lining the template entrance site embrace 227G and close the template passageway, in the I261M variant the template entrance is only marginally occluded, allowing in principle the translocation of the template to the interior of the enzyme. In addition, the mutated enzyme in the presence of 227G retains several characteristics of the wt apoprotein. Our work provides an original molecular picture of a resistance mechanism that is consistent with published experimental data.

  3. 7-Nitro-4-(phenylthio)benzofurazan is a potent generator of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Patridge, Eric V; Eriksson, Emma S E; Penketh, Philip G; Baumann, Raymond P; Zhu, Rui; Shyam, Krishnamurthy; Eriksson, Leif A; Sartorelli, Alan C

    2012-10-01

    Here, we report on 7-nitro-4-(phenylthio)benzofurazan (NBF-SPh), the most potent derivative among a set of patented anticancer 7-nitrobenzofurazans (NBFs), which have been suggested to function by perturbing protein-protein interactions. We demonstrate that NBF-SPh participates in toxic redox-cycling, rapidly generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the presence of molecular oxygen, and this is the first report to detail ROS production for any of the anticancer NBFs. Oxygraph studies showed that NBF-SPh consumes molecular oxygen at a substantial rate, rivaling even plumbagin, menadione, and juglone. Biochemical and enzymatic assays identified superoxide and hydrogen peroxide as products of its redox-cycling activity, and the rapid rate of ROS production appears to be sufficient to account for some of the toxicity of NBF-SPh (LC(50) = 12.1 μM), possibly explaining why tumor cells exhibit a sharp threshold for tolerating the compound. In cell cultures, lipid peroxidation was enhanced after treatment with NBF-SPh, as measured by 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, indicating a significant accumulation of ROS. Thioglycerol rescued cell death and increased survival by 15-fold to 20-fold, but pyruvate and uric acid were ineffective protectants. We also observed that the redox-cycling activity of NBF-SPh became exhausted after an average of approximately 19 cycles per NBF-SPh molecule. Electrochemical and computational analyses suggest that partial reduction of NBF-SPh enhances electrophilicity, which appears to encourage scavenging activity and contribute to electrophilic toxicity.

  4. Endogenous brain erythropoietin is a potent sex-specific respiratory stimulant in adult and newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Ballot, Orlane; Joseph, Vincent; Soliz, Jorge

    2015-06-01

    We tested the hypothesis that endogenous brain Epo is a respiratory stimulant. Adult (3 mo) and newborn (10 days) male and female mice received an intracisternal (cisterna magna) injection of soluble Epo receptor (sEpoR; competes with EpoR to bind Epo; 50 μg/ml) or vehicle (0.1% BSA in PBS). Twenty-four hours after injection, we used whole body plethysmography to record minute ventilation (V̇e) tidal volume (VT), respiratory frequency (fR), O2 consumption (V̇o2), and CO2 production (V̇co2) under normoxia and progressive exposure to hypoxia (12-10-6% O2; 10 min each). In adult male and female mice sEpoR decreased normoxic V̇e (-25%), due to a decrease of VT in males and fR in females. Moreover, sEpoR injection decreased the ventilatory response to 12% O2, assessed as V̇e/V̇o2 or V̇e/V̇co2, in male but not in female mice. In newborn male and female mice sEpoR decreased V̇e (-37% in males, -59% in females) and VT (-38% in males, -47% in females) in normoxia and fR in females. During hypoxia, sEpoR decreased V̇e/V̇o2 and V̇e/V̇co2 in mice of both sexes. Upon extreme hypoxia (6% O2), the newborn mice treated with sEpoR showed respiratory depression, signs of asphyxia (gasping) and a high mortality rate in males and females. We concluded that endogenous brain Epo is a potent respiratory stimulant under normoxia and hypoxia in adult and newborn mice. Because sex-specific effects are different in newborn male and female, sex steroids secreted at different ages mice appear to modulate the effects of Epo on respiratory regulation in normoxia and in response to hypoxia. PMID:25792712

  5. U-90152, a potent inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    PubMed Central

    Dueweke, T J; Poppe, S M; Romero, D L; Swaney, S M; So, A G; Downey, K M; Althaus, I W; Reusser, F; Busso, M; Resnick, L

    1993-01-01

    Bisheteroarylpiperazines are potent inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT). We describe a novel bisheteroarylpiperazine, U-90152 [1-(5-methanesulfonamido-1H-indol-2-yl-carbonyl)-4-[3-(1-methyl eth yl-amino)pyridinyl]piperazine], which inhibited recombinant HIV-1 RT at a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.26 microM (compared with IC50s of > 440 microM for DNA polymerases alpha and delta). U-90152 blocked the replication in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 25 primary HIV-1 isolates, including variants that were highly resistant to 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT) or 2',3'-dideoxyinosine, with a mean 50% effective dose of 0.066 +/- 0.137 microM. U-90152 had low cellular cytotoxicity, causing less than 8% reduction in peripheral blood lymphocyte viability at 100 microM. In experiments assessing inhibition of the spread of HIV-1IIIB in cell cultures, U-90152 was much more effective than AZT. When approximately 500 HIV-1IIIB-infected MT-4 cells were mixed 1:1,000 with uninfected cells, 3 microM AZT delayed the evidence of rapid viral growth for 7 days. In contrast, 3 microM U-90152 totally prevented the spread of HIV-1, and death and/or dilution of the original inoculum of infected cells prevented renewed viral growth after U-90152 was removed at day 24. The combination of U-90152 and AZT, each at 0.5 microM, also totally prevented viral spread. Finally, although the RT amino acid substitutions K103N (lysine 103 to asparagine) and Y181C (tyrosine 181 to cysteine), which confer cross-resistance to several nonnucleoside inhibitors, also decrease the potency of U-90152, this drug retains significant activity against these mutant RTs in vitro (IC50s, approximately 8 microgramM). PMID:7685995

  6. Discovery and pharmacological characterization of a novel potent inhibitor of diacylglycerol-sensitive TRPC cation channels

    PubMed Central

    Maier, T; Follmann, M; Hessler, G; Kleemann, H-W; Hachtel, S; Fuchs, B; Weissmann, N; Linz, W; Schmidt, T; Löhn, M; Schroeter, K; Wang, L; Rütten, H; Strübing, C

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The cation channel transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) 6 has been associated with several pathologies including focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, pulmonary hypertension and ischaemia reperfusion-induced lung oedema. We set out to discover novel inhibitors of TRPC6 channels and investigate the therapeutic potential of these agents. Experimental Approach A library of potential TRPC channel inhibitors was designed and synthesized. Activity of the compounds was assessed by measuring intracellular Ca2+ levels. The lead compound SAR7334 was further characterized by whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. The effects of SAR7334 on acute hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) and systemic BP were investigated. Key Results SAR7334 inhibited TRPC6, TRPC3 and TRPC7-mediated Ca2+ influx into cells with IC50s of 9.5, 282 and 226 nM, whereas TRPC4 and TRPC5-mediated Ca2+ entry was not affected. Patch-clamp experiments confirmed that the compound blocked TRPC6 currents with an IC50 of 7.9 nM. Furthermore, SAR7334 suppressed TRPC6-dependent acute HPV in isolated perfused lungs from mice. Pharmacokinetic studies of SAR7334 demonstrated that the compound was suitable for chronic oral administration. In an initial short-term study, SAR7334 did not change mean arterial pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Conclusions and Implications Our results confirm the role of TRPC6 channels in hypoxic pulmonary vasoregulation and indicate that these channels are unlikely to play a major role in BP regulation in SHR. SAR7334 is a novel, highly potent and bioavailable inhibitor of TRPC6 channels that opens new opportunities for the investigation of TRPC channel function in vivo. PMID:25847402

  7. Eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits glucose-induced membrane cholesterol crystalline domain formation through a potent antioxidant mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mason, R Preston; Jacob, Robert F

    2015-02-01

    Lipid oxidation leads to endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and foam cell formation during atherogenesis. Glucose also contributes to lipid oxidation and promotes pathologic changes in membrane structural organization, including the development of cholesterol crystalline domains. In this study, we tested the comparative effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an omega-3 fatty acid indicated for the treatment of very high triglyceride (TG) levels, and other TG-lowering agents (fenofibrate, niacin, and gemfibrozil) on lipid oxidation in human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) as well as membrane lipid vesicles prepared in the presence of glucose (200 mg/dL). We also examined the antioxidant effects of EPA in combination with atorvastatin o-hydroxy (active) metabolite (ATM). Glucose-induced changes in membrane structural organization were measured using small angle x-ray scattering approaches and correlated with changes in lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH) levels. EPA was found to inhibit LDL oxidation in a dose-dependent manner (1.0-10.0 µM) and was distinguished from the other TG-lowering agents, which had no significant effect as compared to vehicle treatment alone. Similar effects were observed in membrane lipid vesicles exposed to hyperglycemic conditions. The antioxidant activity of EPA, as observed in glucose-treated vesicles, was significantly enhanced in combination with ATM. Glucose treatment produced highly-ordered, membrane-restricted, cholesterol crystalline domains, which correlated with increased LOOH levels. Of the agents tested in this study, only EPA inhibited glucose-induced cholesterol domain formation. These data demonstrate that EPA, at pharmacologic levels, inhibits hyperglycemia-induced changes in membrane lipid structural organization through a potent antioxidant mechanism associated with its distinct, physicochemical interactions with the membrane bilayer. PMID:25449996

  8. Phenyl Esters Are Potent Inhibitors of Caseinolytic Protease P and Reveal a Stereogenic Switch for Deoligomerization.

    PubMed

    Hackl, Mathias W; Lakemeyer, Markus; Dahmen, Maria; Glaser, Manuel; Pahl, Axel; Lorenz-Baath, Katrin; Menzel, Thomas; Sievers, Sonja; Böttcher, Thomas; Antes, Iris; Waldmann, Herbert; Sieber, Stephan A

    2015-07-01

    Caseinolytic protease P (ClpP) represents a central bacterial degradation machinery that is involved in cell homeostasis and pathogenicity. The functional role of ClpP has been studied by genetic knockouts and through the use of beta-lactones, which remain the only specific inhibitors of ClpP discovered to date. Beta-lactones have served as chemical tools to manipulate ClpP in several organisms; however, their potency, selectivity and stability is limited. Despite detailed structural insights into the composition and conformational flexibility of the ClpP active site, no rational efforts to design specific non-beta-lactone inhibitors have been reported to date. In this work, an unbiased screen of more than 137 000 compounds was used to identify five phenyl ester compounds as highly potent ClpP inhibitors that were selective for bacterial, but not human ClpP. The potency of phenyl esters largely exceeded that of beta-lactones in ClpP peptidase and protease inhibition assays and displayed unique target selectivity in living S. aureus cells. Analytical studies revealed that while phenyl esters are cleaved like native peptide substrates, they remain covalently trapped as acyl-enzyme intermediates in the active site. The synthesis of 36 derivatives and subsequent structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies provided insights into conserved structural elements that are important for inhibition potency and acylation reactivity. Moreover, the stereochemistry of a methyl-substituent at the alpha position to the ester, resembling amino acid side chains in peptide substrates, impacted ClpP complex stability, causing either dissociation into heptamers or retention of the tetradecameric state. Mechanistic insights into this intriguing stereo switch and the phenyl ester binding mode were obtained by molecular docking experiments.

  9. Potent inhibition of human neutrophil activations by bractelactone, a novel chalcone from Fissistigma bracteolatum

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yang-Chang; Sureshbabu, Munisamy; Fang, Yao-Ching; Wu, Yi-Hsiu; Lan, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Fang-Rong; Chang, Ya-Wen; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2013-02-01

    Fissistigma bracteolatum is widely used in traditional medicine to treat inflammatory diseases. However, its active components and mechanisms of action remain unclear. In this study, (3Z)-6,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-3-(phenylmethylidene)-5-(3-phenylpropanoyl) -1-benzofuran-2(3H) (bractelactone), a novel chalcone from F. bracteolatum, showed potent inhibitory effects against superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup ·−}) production, elastase release, and CD11b expression in formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP)-induced human neutrophils. However, bractelactone showed only weak inhibition of phorbol myristate acetate-caused O{sub 2}{sup ·−} production. The peak cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) was unaltered by bractelactone in FMLP-induced neutrophils, but the decay time of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was significantly shortened. In a calcium-free solution, changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} caused by the addition of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} were inhibited by bractelactone in FMLP-activated cells. In addition, bractelactone did not alter the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, JNK, or AKT or the concentration of cAMP. These results suggest that bractelactone selectively inhibits store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). In agreement with this concept, bractelactone suppressed sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} changes in thapsigargin-activated neutrophils. Furthermore, bractelactone did not alter FMLP-induced formation of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of bractelactone, an active ingredient of F. bracteolatum, in human neutrophils are through the selective inhibition of SOCE. Highlights: ► Bractelactone isolated from Fissistigma bracteolatum. ► Bractelactone inhibited FMLP-induced human neutrophil activations. ► Bractelactone had no effect on IP3 formation. ► Bractelactone did not alter MAPKs, AKT, and cAMP pathways. ► Bractelactone inhibited store-operated calcium entry.

  10. Doppler effect in fluorine K-Auger line produced in electron-induced core ionization of SF6.

    PubMed

    Mondal, S; Singh, R K; Shanker, R

    2006-01-21

    An experimental evidence is reported on the observation of the Doppler effect in fluorine K-Auger line emitted from a core-ionized SF6 molecule under an impact of 16 keV electrons. The emitting source of the Auger line is found to acquire a kinetic energy of 4.7+/-0.3 keV. We propose that such large energy is released from the Coulomb repulsion taking place between F+ and SF5+ fragment ions under influence of an intense focusing field of the incident electrons. In the presence of the Coulomb field of these ions, the Auger line obtains a polarization P = 76%+/-7%.

  11. Receptor-DNA binding to target auger electrons for cancer therapy. Final report, August 1, 1993--January 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    DeSombre, E.R.

    1997-05-01

    The goal of this program was to investigate the principle of receptor-DNA binding as a means to target Auger electron radiation for cancer therapy, and thereby to evaluate the potential of non-covalent, high-affinity, Auger electron-emitting ligands binding to a DNA associated molecule, or DNA itself, for cancer therapy. These studies were intended to assess the ability of Auger-emitting estrogens to kill estrogen receptor-positive tumor cells, determine the mean lethal dose, and determine whether they could be effective in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Universal size dependence of auger constants in direct- and indirect-gap semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Robel, Istvan; Schaller, Richard D; Klimov, Victor I; Gresback, Ryan; Kortshagen, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) spatial confinement of electronic wave functions in semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) results in a significant enhancement of multi-electron phenomena including non radiative Auger recombination. In this process, a conduction-band electron recombines with a valence-band hole by transferring the recombination energy to a third carrier. Significant interest in Auger recombination in NCs has been stimulated by recent studies ofNC lasing, and generation-III photovoltaics enabled by carrier multiplication because in both of these prospective applications Auger recombination represents a dominant carrier-loss mechanism. Here, we perform a side-by-side comparison of Auger recombination rates in NCs of several different compositions including Ge, PbSe, InAs, and CdSe. We observe that the only factor, which has a significant effect on the measured recombination rates, is the size of the NCs but not the details of the material's electronic structure. Most surprisingly, comparable rates are measured for nanocrystals of directand indirect-gap semiconductor NCs despite a dramatic four-to-five orders of magnitude difference in respective bulk-semiconductor Auger constants. This unusual observation can be explained by confinement-induced relaxation of momentum conservation, which smears out the difference between direct- and indirect-gap materials.

  13. Studies on the mutagenic mechanisms of the potent environmental carcinogen, benzo[a]pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, H.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental chemicals that cause cancer have previously been shown to become chemically linked to the genetic substance, DNA, to give DNA adducts. These adducts appear foreign to the cell and mutations occur when the DNA is being duplicated during cell replication. Mutations in proto-oncogenes can change a normal cell into a cancerous cell. Benzo[a]pyrene is one example of a potent mutagen/carcinogen found ubiquitously in the environment: For example, in the soot from internal combustion engines and power plants, in cigarette smoke, and on charred meat. Benzo[a]pyrene is an indirect-acting mutagen/carcinogen, which must be metabolized inside the body to its ultimate mutagen/carcinogen, the corresponding (+)-anti-diol epoxide ((+)-anti-B[a]PDE) which forms many adducts in DNA. By using a newly developed forward mutation assay (ES87/pUB3) mutations induced by (+)-anti-B[a]PDE were isolated and characterized. SOS induction was shown to enhance frameshift and base pairing mutagenesis; G:C->T:A mutations were preferentially enhanced (approximately twelve-fold). Nearest neighbor analysis was performed assuming a guanine (underlined) was being mutated; SOS enhanced (+)-anti-B[a]PDE base pairing mutagenesis in 5[prime]-(A/T)G-3[prime] sequences more than in 5[prime]-G(A/T)-3[prime] sequences, and in 5[prime]-G(C/G)-3[prime] sequences more than in 5[prime]-G(A/T)-3[prime] sequences. Sequence content affected mutagenesis quantitatively where hot-spots for (+)-anti-B[a]PDE was heated prior to transformation into ES87 cells, an approximately two-fold decrease in mutation frequency was observed. In general, heating did not affect mutagenic specificity. Models are proposed to explain these results. Freeze/thawing pUB3 adducted with (+)-anti-B[a]PDE, also caused both an approximately two-fold decrease in mutation frequency and changes similar to those caused by heating.

  14. 45-Day safety screening for Tank 241-B-102 auger samples, riser 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, K.E.

    1994-12-01

    This is the 45-Day report for the fiscal year 1994 Tank 241-B-102 auger sampling characterization effort. Only one of the two planned auger samples was received by the 222-S Laboratory, however it was decided to begin the 45-day clock and issue a report based on receipt of the first auger sample. Included are copies of the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) scans as requested. Also included is a copy of any immediate notification documentation, chain of custody forms, the hot cell work plan, extruded segment [auger] description sheets, and total alpha data. The TGA percent moisture results are below the safety criteria limit of 17% in a subsample taken approximately five minutes after extrusion and a second subsample taken from the lower half of the auger. Verbal and written notifications were made as prescribed. The DSC analysis of all subsamples indicates the presence of fraction exotherms, however the results are a factor of two or more below the notification limit of 523 Joules/gram (J/g). Total alpha results are all below the detection limit. In some cases, the tank characterization plan (TCP) accuracy and precision criteria are not met. If a re-run was not performed when a TCP quality control limit was not met, then reasons for not performing the re-run are provided.

  15. Cutting assembly including expanding wall segments of auger

    DOEpatents

    Treuhaft, Martin B.; Oser, Michael S.

    1983-01-01

    A mining auger comprises a cutting head carried at one end of a tubular shaft and a plurality of wall segments which in a first position thereof are disposed side by side around said shaft and in a second position thereof are disposed oblique to said shaft. A vane projects outwardly from each wall segment. When the wall segments are in their first position, the vanes together form a substantially continuous helical wall. A cutter is mounted on the peripheral edge of each of the vanes. When the wall segments are in their second position, the cutters on the vanes are disposed radially outward from the perimeter of the cutting head.

  16. Summary of Auger-Related Entanglement Incidents Occurring Inside Agricultural Confined Spaces.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y H; Field, W E

    2016-04-01

    Entanglements in energized equipment, including augers found in agricultural workplaces, have historically been a significant cause of traumatic injury. Incidents involving augers located inside agricultural confined spaces (primarily grain storage structures and forage silos), although relatively rare events, are a widely recognized problem due to the relative severity of the resulting injuries and the complexities of victim extrication. However, this problem is neither well documented nor elucidated in the research literature, other than anecdotal observations relating to medical treatment of auger-related injuries and citations for non-compliance with federal and state workplace safety regulations. A review of nearly 1,650 cases documented in the Purdue Agricultural Confined Spaces Incident Database from 1964 to 2013 identified 167 incidents involving entanglement in an energized auger that occurred while the victim was working inside an agricultural confined space. These incidents primarily included in-floor unloading augers, sweep augers, stirring augers, and auger components found on silo unloaders. Cases involving portable tube augers used to handle grain outside grain storage structures were not included. Based on analysis of the data, approximately 98% of known victims were male, with the 21-45 age group reporting the largest number of incidents. Nearly one-third (32.3%) of incidents were fatal, and lower limb amputation was the most frequently reported injury type. (It is believed that non-fatal incidents are grossly under-reported in the data set due to a lack of comprehensive reporting requirements, especially for most farms, feedlots, and seed processing operations, which are generally exempt from compliance with OSHA machine guarding, confined-space, and grain-handling standards.) The type of auger identified most frequently as the agent of injury was the exposed in-floor auger (48), which frequently resulted in amputation of one or more lower limbs

  17. Selective detection of angular-momentum-polarized Auger electrons by atomic stereography.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Fumihiko; Fujita, Masayoshi; Ohta, Takuya; Maejima, Naoyuki; Matsui, Hirosuke; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    When a core level is excited by circularly polarized light, the angular momentum of light is transferred to the emitted photoelectron, which can be confirmed by the parallax shift of the forward focusing peak (FFP) direction in a stereograph of atomic arrangement. No angular momentum has been believed to be transferred to normal Auger electrons resulting from the decay process filling core hole after photoelectron ejection. We succeeded in detecting a non-negligible circular dichroism contrast in a normal Auger electron diffraction from a nonmagnetic Cu(001) surface far off from the absorption threshold. Moreover, we detected angular-momentum-polarized Cu L(3)M(4,5)M(4,5) Auger electrons at the L(3) absorption threshold, where the excited core electron is trapped at the conduction band. From the kinetic energy dependence of the Auger electron FFP parallax shift, we found that the angular momentum is transferred to the Auger electron most effectively in the case of the (1)S(0) two-hole creation.

  18. Selective Detection of Angular-Momentum-Polarized Auger Electrons by Atomic Stereography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Fumihiko; Fujita, Masayoshi; Ohta, Takuya; Maejima, Naoyuki; Matsui, Hirosuke; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    When a core level is excited by circularly polarized light, the angular momentum of light is transferred to the emitted photoelectron, which can be confirmed by the parallax shift of the forward focusing peak (FFP) direction in a stereograph of atomic arrangement. No angular momentum has been believed to be transferred to normal Auger electrons resulting from the decay process filling core hole after photoelectron ejection. We succeeded in detecting a non-negligible circular dichroism contrast in a normal Auger electron diffraction from a nonmagnetic Cu(001) surface far off from the absorption threshold. Moreover, we detected angular-momentum-polarized Cu L3M4 ,5M4 ,5 Auger electrons at the L3 absorption threshold, where the excited core electron is trapped at the conduction band. From the kinetic energy dependence of the Auger electron FFP parallax shift, we found that the angular momentum is transferred to the Auger electron most effectively in the case of the 1S0 two-hole creation.

  19. A proposal of potent inhibitor for cancer metastasis blocking the pocket of urokinase receptor: ab initio molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasumi, Tomoyo; Araki, Kohta; Mizushima, Tatsuroh; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2013-04-01

    Recent biochemical experiments have elucidated that a variety of proteases play important roles in cancer invasion and metastasis. In particular, binding of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) to uPA receptor (uPAR) existing on the surface of a cancer cell is considered to be a trigger for cancer invasions. Therefore, the blocking of the binding is expected to inhibit cancer invasion. In previous experiments, several peptides of amino acids were proposed as a potent inhibitor for blocking the binding. In the present study, we obtained stable structures of the solvated complexes with uPAR and the peptides and investigated the specific interactions between uPAR and the peptides by ab initio molecular simulations. Base on these results, we clarified which peptide can bind more strongly to uPAR and proposed a novel potent peptide which can inhibit the uPAR-uPA binding efficiently.

  20. Biochemical and pharmacological profile of a potent and selective nonpeptide antagonist of the neurotensin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Gully, D; Canton, M; Boigegrain, R; Jeanjean, F; Molimard, J C; Poncelet, M; Gueudet, C; Heaulme, M; Leyris, R; Brouard, A

    1993-01-01

    We describe the characteristics of SR 48692, a selective, nonpeptide antagonist of the neurotensin receptor. In vitro, this compound competitively inhibits 125I-labeled neurotensin binding to the high-affinity binding site present in brain tissue from various species with IC50 values of 0.99 +/- 0.14 nM (guinea pig), 4.0 +/- 0.4 nM (rat mesencephalic cells), 7.6 +/- 0.6 nM (COS-7 cells transfected with the cloned high-affinity rat brain receptor), 13.7 +/- 0.3 nM (newborn mouse brain), 17.8 +/- 0.9 nM (newborn human brain), 8.7 +/- 0.7 nM (adult human brain), and 30.3 +/- 1.5 nM (HT-29 cells). It also displaces 125I-labeled neurotensin from the low-affinity levocabastine-sensitive binding sites but at higher concentrations (34.8 +/- 8.3 nM for adult mouse brain and 82.0 +/- 7.4 nM for adult rat brain). In guinea pig striatal slices, SR 48692 blocks K(+)-evoked release of [3H]dopamine stimulated by neurotensin with a potency (IC50 = 0.46 +/- 0.02 nM) that correlates with its binding affinity. In a cell line derived from a human colon carcinoma (HT-29), SR 48692 competitively antagonizes neurotensin-induced intracellular Ca2+ mobilization with a pA2 (-log Kapp) values of 8.13 +/- 0.03, which is consistent with results obtained in binding studies. Moreover, SR 48692 is devoid of any intrinsic agonist activity. This compound is also active in vivo, since it reverses at low dose (80 micrograms/kg) the turning behavior induced by intrastriatal injection of neurotensin in mice with similar potency whatever the route of administration (i.p. or orally) and with a long duration of action (6 hr). Thus, being a potent and selective neurotensin receptor antagonist, SR 48692 may be considered as a powerful tool for investigating the role of neurotensin in physiological and pathological processes. Images PMID:8380498

  1. Mouse model of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma validates FIG-ROS as a potent fusion oncogene and therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Saborowski, Anna; Saborowski, Michael; Davare, Monika A; Druker, Brian J; Klimstra, David S; Lowe, Scott W

    2013-11-26

    Cholangiocarcinoma is the second most common primary liver cancer and responds poorly to existing therapies. Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) likely originates from the biliary tree and develops within the hepatic parenchyma. We have generated a flexible orthotopic allograft mouse model of ICC that incorporates common genetic alterations identified in human ICC and histologically resembles the human disease. We examined the utility of this model to validate driver alterations in ICC and tested their suitability as therapeutic targets. Specifically, we showed that the fused-in-glioblastoma-c-ros-oncogene1 (FIG-ROS1(S); FIG-ROS) fusion gene dramatically accelerates ICC development and that its inactivation in established tumors has a potent antitumor effect. Our studies establish a versatile model of ICC that will be a useful preclinical tool and validate ROS1 fusions as potent oncoproteins and therapeutic targets in ICC and potentially other tumor types.

  2. Azimuth-dependent Auger neutralization of He{sup +} on Ag(111) and (110) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, Diego; Monreal, R. C.; Blanco, J. M.; Esaulov, V. A.

    2007-04-15

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the role played by s and d electrons in Auger neutralization processes of He{sup +} at Ag(111) and Ag(110) surfaces. We calculate crystal-lattice-site Auger neutralization rates as a function of the perpendicular distance between ions and surfaces. We find that the rate is very insensitive to the lateral position for large values of the perpendicular distance because the contribution of the delocalized s electrons dominates in this case. In contrast, the contribution of d electrons dominates at short perpendicular distances and the strong spatial localization of these electrons causes a similar strong dependence of the Auger rate with lateral position. We perform molecular dynamic simulations of scattered ion trajectories, which, used together with the Auger neutralization rates, allow us to obtain the theoretical ion fraction that we compare with our measurements. This parameter-free theory is able to reproduce the magnitude of the ion survival probability and its dependence with the azimuthal angle of incidence for both surfaces of Ag, thus showing the important role played by localized electrons in Auger neutralization of He.

  3. Education and Public Outreach of the Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Gregory

    2012-03-01

    The scale and scope of the physics studied at the Auger Observatory offer significant opportunities for original outreach work. Education, outreach and public relations of the Auger collaboration are coordinated in a separate task whose goals are to encourage and support a wide range of education and outreach efforts that link schools and the public with the Auger scientists and the science of cosmic rays, particle physics, and associated technologies. The presentation will focus on the impact of the collaboration in Mendoza Province, Argentina, as: the Auger Visitor Center in Malarg"ue that has hosted over 60,000 visitors since 2001 and a third collaboration-sponsored science fair held on the Observatory campus in November 2010. The Rural Schools Program, which is run by Observatory staff and which brings cosmic-ray science and infrastructure improvements to remote schools, will be highlighted. Numerous online resources, video documentaries, and animations of extensive air showers have been created for wide public release. Increasingly, collaborators draw on these resources to develop Auger related displays and outreach events at their institutions and in public settings to disseminate the science and successes of the Observatory worldwide.

  4. Discovery of AZD3147: a potent, selective dual inhibitor of mTORC1 and mTORC2.

    PubMed

    Pike, Kurt G; Morris, Jeff; Ruston, Linette; Pass, Sarah L; Greenwood, Ryan; Williams, Emma J; Demeritt, Julie; Culshaw, Janet D; Gill, Kristy; Pass, Martin; Finlay, M Raymond V; Good, Catherine J; Roberts, Craig A; Currie, Gordon S; Blades, Kevin; Eden, Jonathan M; Pearson, Stuart E

    2015-03-12

    High throughput screening followed by a lead generation campaign uncovered a novel series of urea containing morpholinopyrimidine compounds which act as potent and selective dual inhibitors of mTORC1 and mTORC2. We describe the continued compound optimization campaign for this series, in particular focused on identifying compounds with improved cellular potency, improved aqueous solubility, and good stability in human hepatocyte incubations. Knowledge from empirical SAR investigations was combined with an understanding of the molecular interactions in the crystal lattice to improve both cellular potency and solubility, and the composite parameters of LLE and pIC50-pSolubility were used to assess compound quality and progress. Predictive models were employed to efficiently mine the attractive chemical space identified resulting in the discovery of 42 (AZD3147), an extremely potent and selective dual inhibitor of mTORC1 and mTORC2 with physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties suitable for development as a potential clinical candidate.

  5. Lipophilic Lysine-Spermine Conjugates are Potent Polyamine Transport Inhibitors for use in Combination with a Polyamine Biosynthesis Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Mark R.; Graminski, Gerard F.; Weeks, Reitha S.; Chen, Yan; O’Brien, Thomas G.

    2009-01-01

    Cancer cells can overcome the ability of polyamine biosynthesis inhibitors from completely depleting their internal polyamines by the importation polyamines from external sources. We have developed a group of lipophilic polyamine analogs that potently inhibit the cellular polyamine uptake system and greatly increase the effectiveness of polyamine depletion when used in combination with DFMO, a well-studied polyamine biosynthesis inhibitor. By the attachment of an length-optimized C16 lipophilic substituent to the epsilon-nitrogen atom of our earlier lead compound, d-Lys-Spm (5), we have produced an analog, d-Lys(C16acyl)-Spm (11) with several orders of magnitude more potent cell growth inhibition on a variety of cultured cancer cell types including breast (MDA-MB-231), prostate (PC-3), melanoma (A375) and ovarian (SK-OV-3), among others. We discuss these results in the context of a possible membrane-catalyzed interaction with the extracellular polyamine transport apparatus. The resulting novel two-drug combination therapy targeting cellular polyamine metabolism has shown exceptional efficacy against cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) in a transgenic ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) mouse model of skin cancer. A majority (88%) of large, aggressive SCCs exhibited complete or near-complete remission to this combination therapy, while responses to each agent alone were poor. The availability of a potent polyamine transport inhibitor allows, for the first time, for a real test of the hypothesis that starving cells of polyamines will lead to objective clinical response. PMID:19281226

  6. Total synthesis of (29S,37S)-isomer of malevamide E, a potent ion-channel inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Gajula, Praveen Kumar; Sharma, Shrikant; Ampapathi, Ravi Sankar; Chakraborty, Tushar Kanti

    2013-01-14

    The first total synthesis of (29S,37S)-malevamide E (1), a potent ion channel inhibitor, has been achieved in a convergent fashion involving Julia-Kocienski olefination, Urpi acetal aldol and Shiina macrolactonization reactions as the key steps. The strategy developed herein is amenable for the synthesis of the other possible isomers in search for the correct stereoisomer of the naturally occurring molecule.

  7. Discovery of XEN445: a potent and selective endothelial lipase inhibitor raises plasma HDL-cholesterol concentration in mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shaoyi; Dean, Richard; Jia, Qi; Zenova, Alla; Zhong, Jing; Grayson, Celene; Xie, Clark; Lindgren, Andrea; Samra, Pritpaul; Sojo, Luis; van Heek, Margaret; Lin, Linus; Percival, David; Fu, Jian-Min; Winther, Michael D; Zhang, Zaihui

    2013-12-15

    Endothelial lipase (EL) activity has been implicated in HDL metabolism and in atherosclerotic plaque development; inhibitors are proposed to be efficacious in the treatment of dyslipidemia related cardiovascular disease. We describe here the discovery of a novel class of anthranilic acids EL inhibitors. XEN445 (compound 13) was identified as a potent and selective EL inhibitor, that showed good ADME and PK properties, and demonstrated in vivo efficacy in raising plasma HDLc concentrations in mice. PMID:24211162

  8. Discovery of potent, selective and orally bioavailable imidazo[1,5-a]pyrazine derived ACK1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jin, Meizhong; Wang, Jing; Kleinberg, Andrew; Kadalbajoo, Mridula; Siu, Kam W; Cooke, Andrew; Bittner, Mark A; Yao, Yan; Thelemann, April; Ji, Qunsheng; Bhagwat, Shripad; Mulvihill, Kristen M; Rechka, Josef A; Pachter, Jonathan A; Crew, Andrew P; Epstein, David; Mulvihill, Mark J

    2013-02-15

    This Letter describes the medicinal chemistry effort towards a series of novel imidazo[1,5-a]pyrazine derived inhibitors of ACK1. Virtual screening led to the discovery of the initial hit, and subsequent exploration of structure-activity relationships and optimization of drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic properties led to the identification of potent, selective and orally bioavailable ACK1 inhibitors. PMID:23317569

  9. SK&F 97426-A a more potent bile acid sequestrant and hypocholesterolaemic agent than cholestyramine in the hamster.

    PubMed

    Benson, G M; Alston, D R; Bond, B C; Gee, A N; Glen, A; Haynes, C; Hickey, D M; Iqbal, S; Jackson, B; Jaxa-Chamiec, A A

    1993-06-01

    SK&F 97426-A is a novel bile acid sequestrant which was selected for comparison with cholestyramine in vivo because of its superior in vitro bile acid binding properties. The effects of the two sequestrants on faecal bile acid excretion, plasma total cholesterol, VLDL + LDL and HDL cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations and on liver enzymes involved in the synthesis and metabolism of cholesterol were investigated in normocholesterolaemic hamsters. Four studies were conducted to determine the relative potencies of the two resins using a range of doses of the sequestrants over treatment periods of up to 2 weeks. Curves fitted to the resulting data allowed common maximum responses and separate ED50s to be calculated for each sequestrant. The maximum response of both sequestrants was to increase bile acid excretion by 352% and lower plasma total cholesterol by 37-58%. LDL + VLDL and HDL cholesterol were reduced by 56-75% and 25-41%, respectively. SK&F 97426-A was 3 times more potent than cholestyramine at increasing the excretion of bile acids in the faeces and 2.1-3.4-fold and 2.3-3.2-fold more potent at lowering total plasma cholesterol and LDL plus VLDL cholesterol, respectively. In some of the experiments SK&F 97426-A was also more potent than cholestyramine at lowering HDL cholesterol. Plasma triglycerides were also lowered by both sequestrants by up to 31% after 1 week but the relative potency could not be determined. These HDL cholesterol and total triglyceride lowering effects of bile acid sequestrants in the hamster are known not to occur in people treated with cholestyramine. There were minimal differences between hamsters treated for 1 or 2 weeks in the relative potencies or ED50s calculated for the total plasma cholesterol, LDL + VLDL and HDL cholesterol. Both sequestrants may have been slightly more efficacious on these parameters after 2 weeks of treatment. Liver weights were reduced by about 15% by both sequestrants at 2% (w/w) in the diet for 1

  10. Identification of a Potent Inhibitor of CREB-Mediated Gene Transcription with Efficacious in Vivo Anticancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that nuclear transcription factor cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB) is overexpressed in many different types of cancers. Therefore, CREB has been pursued as a novel cancer therapeutic target. Naphthol AS-E and its closely related derivatives have been shown to inhibit CREB-mediated gene transcription and cancer cell growth. Previously, we identified naphthamide 3a as a different chemotype to inhibit CREB’s transcription activity. In a continuing effort to discover more potent CREB inhibitors, a series of structural congeners of 3a was designed and synthesized. Biological evaluations of these compounds uncovered compound 3i (666-15) as a potent and selective inhibitor of CREB-mediated gene transcription (IC50 = 0.081 ± 0.04 μM). 666-15 also potently inhibited cancer cell growth without harming normal cells. In an in vivo MDA-MB-468 xenograft model, 666-15 completely suppressed the tumor growth without overt toxicity. These results further support the potential of CREB as a valuable cancer drug target. PMID:26023867

  11. Evaluation of the analgesic effects of ammoxetine, a novel potent serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting-ting; Xue, Rui; Zhu, Lei; Li, Juan; Fan, Qiong-yin; Zhong, Bo-hua; Li, Yun-feng; Ye, Cai-ying; Zhang, You-zhi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The selective serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are commonly used for the treatment of neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia. Ammoxetine ((±)-3-(benzo[d] [1,3]dioxol-4-yloxy)-N-methyl-3-(thiophen-2-yl)propan-1-amine) has been identified as a novel potent SNRI. In this study, we evaluated the acute analgesic properties of ammoxetine in different animal models of pain, and examined the involvement of monoamines in its analgesic actions. Methods: The analgesic effects of ammoxetine were assayed using models of acetic acid- and formalin-induced pain in mice, neuropathic pain induced by sciatic nerve injury (SNI), chronic constriction injury (CCI) and reserpine-induced fibromyalgia pain in rats. The contents of 5-HT and NE in brain regions of fibromyalgia rats were measured using HPLC-ECD. In all the experiments, duloxetine was used as a positive control drug. Results: Oral administration of ammoxetine (0.625–10 mg/kg) or duloxetine (2.5–40 mg/kg) dose-dependently decreased the number of acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin-induced first phase and second phase paw licking time in mice. Oral administration of ammoxetine (2.5–10 mg/kg) or duloxetine (10 mg/kg) alleviated mechanical allodynia in SNI and CCI rats and thermal hyperalgesia in CCI rats. The antiallodynic effect of ammoxetine in CCI rats was abolished by pretreatment with para-chlorophenylalanine methyl ester hydrochloride (PCPA, a 5-HT synthesis inhibitor) or α-methyl-para-tyrosine methylester (AMPT, a catecholamine synthesis inhibitor). Oral administration of ammoxetine (30 mg/kg) or duloxetine (50 mg/kg) significantly attenuated tactile allodynia in rats with reserpine-induced fibromyalgia. In the fibromyalgia rats, administration of ammoxetine (10, 30 mg/kg) or duloxetine (30, 50 mg/kg) dose-dependently increased the levels of 5-HT and NE, and decreased the metabolite ratio of 5-HT (5-HIAA/5-HT) in the spinal cord, hypothalamus, thalamus and prefrontal cortex

  12. TMC647055, a Potent Nonnucleoside Hepatitis C Virus NS5B Polymerase Inhibitor with Cross-Genotypic Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Devogelaere, Benoit; Berke, Jan Martin; Vijgen, Leen; Dehertogh, Pascale; Fransen, Els; Cleiren, Erna; van der Helm, Liesbet; Nyanguile, Origène; Tahri, Abdellah; Amssoms, Katie; Lenz, Oliver; Cummings, Maxwell D.; Clayton, Reginald F.; Vendeville, Sandrine; Raboisson, Pierre; Simmen, Kenneth A.; Fanning, Gregory C.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major global health burden and is associated with an increased risk of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. There remains an unmet medical need for efficacious and safe direct antivirals with complementary modes of action for combination in treatment regimens to deliver a high cure rate with a short duration of treatment for HCV patients. Here we report the in vitro inhibitory activity, mode of action, binding kinetics, and resistance profile of TMC647055, a novel and potent nonnucleoside inhibitor of the HCV NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. In vitro combination studies with an HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitor demonstrated potent suppression of HCV RNA replication, confirming the potential for combination of these two classes in the treatment of chronic HCV infection. TMC647055 is a potent nonnucleoside NS5B polymerase inhibitor of HCV replication with a promising in vitro biochemical, kinetic, and virological profile that is currently undergoing clinical evaluation. PMID:22710121

  13. TMC647055, a potent nonnucleoside hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase inhibitor with cross-genotypic coverage.

    PubMed

    Devogelaere, Benoit; Berke, Jan Martin; Vijgen, Leen; Dehertogh, Pascale; Fransen, Els; Cleiren, Erna; van der Helm, Liesbet; Nyanguile, Origène; Tahri, Abdellah; Amssoms, Katie; Lenz, Oliver; Cummings, Maxwell D; Clayton, Reginald F; Vendeville, Sandrine; Raboisson, Pierre; Simmen, Kenneth A; Fanning, Gregory C; Lin, Tse-I

    2012-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major global health burden and is associated with an increased risk of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. There remains an unmet medical need for efficacious and safe direct antivirals with complementary modes of action for combination in treatment regimens to deliver a high cure rate with a short duration of treatment for HCV patients. Here we report the in vitro inhibitory activity, mode of action, binding kinetics, and resistance profile of TMC647055, a novel and potent nonnucleoside inhibitor of the HCV NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. In vitro combination studies with an HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitor demonstrated potent suppression of HCV RNA replication, confirming the potential for combination of these two classes in the treatment of chronic HCV infection. TMC647055 is a potent nonnucleoside NS5B polymerase inhibitor of HCV replication with a promising in vitro biochemical, kinetic, and virological profile that is currently undergoing clinical evaluation.

  14. Metabolism of 5'alpha,8'-cycloabscisic acid, a highly potent and long-lasting abscisic acid analogue, in radish seedlings.

    PubMed

    Todoroki, Yasushi; Sawada, Masao; Matsumoto, Miyuki; Tsukada, Shigeko; Ueno, Kotomi; Isaka, Masatoshi; Owaki, Mariko; Hirai, Nobuhiro

    2004-01-15

    We synthesized 5'alpha,8'-cycloabscisic acid (CycloABA), a highly potent and long-lasting abscisic acid (ABA) analogue, by a different method from that reported before. CycloABA fed to radish seedlings had more metabolic tolerance than ABA. The major metabolite of CycloABA was the glucose conjugate, which was the minor metabolite of ABA. The 8'-hydroxylated metabolite and its cyclized isomer, which were major metabolites of ABA, were not found as metabolites of CycloABA. The present results suggest that the highly potent and long-lasting activity of CycloABA is caused by resistance to ABA 8'-hydroxylase, and that CycloABA is partially metabolized to the glucose conjugate by ABA glucosyltransferase.

  15. Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus) essential oil as a potent anti-inflammatory and antifungal drugs

    PubMed Central

    Boukhatem, Mohamed Nadjib; Ferhat, Mohamed Amine; Kameli, Abdelkrim; Saidi, Fairouz; Kebir, Hadjer Tchoketch

    2014-01-01

    Background Volatile oils obtained from lemon grass [Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf, Poaceae family] are used in traditional medicine as remedies for the treatment of various diseases. Aims In the present study, lemon grass essential oil (LGEO) was evaluated for its in vivo topical and oral anti-inflammatory effects, and for its in vitro antifungal activity using both liquid and vapor phases. Methods The chemical profile of LGEO as determined by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis revealed two major components: geranial (42.2%), and neral (31.5%). The antifungal activity of LGEO was evaluated against several pathogenic yeasts and filamentous fungi using disc diffusion and vapor diffusion methods. Results LGEO exhibited promising antifungal effect against Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, and Aspergillus niger, with different inhibition zone diameters (IZDs) (35–90 mm). IZD increased with increasing oil volume. Significantly, higher anti-Candida activity was observed in the vapor phase. For the evaluation of the anti-inflammatory effect, LGEO (10 mg/kg, administered orally) significantly reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema with a similar effect to that observed for oral diclofenac (50 mg/kg), which was used as the positive control. Oral administration of LGEO showed dose-dependent anti-inflammatory activity. In addition, topical application of LGEO in vivo resulted in a potent anti-inflammatory effect, as demonstrated by using the mouse model of croton oil-induced ear edema. To our knowledge, this is the first such report to be published. The topical application of LGEO at doses of 5 and 10 µL/ear significantly reduced acute ear edema induced by croton oil in 62.5 and 75% of the mice, respectively. In addition, histological analysis clearly confirmed that LGEO inhibits the skin inflammatory response in animal models. Conclusion Results of the present study indicate that LGEO has a noteworthy potential for the development of drugs for the treatment of

  16. Radio detection of cosmic ray induced air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fliescher, Stefan; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    AERA—the Auger Engineering Radio Array—is currently being set up at the southern site of the Pierre Auger Observatory. AERA will explore the potential of the radio-detection technique to cosmic ray induced air showers with respect to the next generation of large-scale surface detectors. As AERA is co-located with the low-energy enhancements of the Pierre Auger Observatory, the observation of air showers in coincidence with the Auger surface and fluorescence detector will allow to study the radio emission processes in detail and to calibrate the radio signal. Finally, the combined reconstruction of shower parameters with three independent techniques promises new insights into the nature of cosmic rays in the transition region from 1017 to 1019 eV.Besides the detection of coherent radiation in the MHz frequency range, the setups AMBER—Air-shower Microwave Bremsstrahlung Experimental Radiometer—and MIDAS—MIcrowave Detection of Air Showers—prepare to check the possibility to detect air showers due the emission of molecular bremsstrahlung in the GHz range at the Auger site.This article presents the status of the radio-detection setups and discusses their physics potential as well as experimental challenges. Special focus is laid on the first stage of AERA which is the startup to the construction of a 20 km2 radio array.

  17. CD20-targeted tetrameric interferon-α, a novel and potent immunocytokine for the therapy of B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Cardillo, Thomas M.; Stein, Rhona; Chang, Chien-Hsing

    2009-01-01

    Interferon-α (IFN-α) has direct inhibitory effects on some tumors and is a potent stimulator of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. A tumor-targeting antibody-IFN-α conjugate (mAb-IFN-α) could kill by direct actions of the monoclonal antibody (mAb) and IFN-α on tumor cells and also potentiate a tumor-directed immune response. The modular Dock-and-Lock method (DNL) was used to generate 20-2b, the first immunocytokine having 4 cytokine (IFN-α2b) groups that are fused to the humanized anti-CD20 mAb, veltuzumab. Additional mAb-IFN-α constructs, each retaining potent IFN-α2b biologic activity, also were produced by DNL. The 20-2b shows enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity compared with veltuzumab but lacks complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The 20-2b inhibits in vitro proliferation of lymphoma cells and depletes them from whole human blood more potently than the combination of veltuzumab and a nontargeting, irrelevant, mAb-IFN-α. The 20-2b demonstrated superior therapeutic efficacy compared with veltuzumab or nontargeting mAb-IFN-α in 3 human lymphoma xenograft models, even though mouse immune cells respond poorly to human IFN-α2b. Targeting IFN-α with an anti-CD20 mAb makes the immunocytokine more potent than either agent alone. These findings suggest that 20-2b merits clinical evaluation as a new candidate antilymphoma therapeutic. PMID:19710501

  18. Discovery of a new method for potent drug development using power function of stoichiometry ofhomomeric biocomplexes or biological nanomotors

    PubMed Central

    Pi, Fengmei; Vieweger, Mario; Zhao, Zhengyi; Wang, Shaoying; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Multidrug resistance and the appearance of incurable diseases inspire the quest for potent therapeutics. Areas Covered We review a new methodology in designing potent drugs by targeting multi-subunit homomeric biological motors, machines, or complexes with Z>1 and K=1, where Z is the stoichiometry of the target, and K is the number of drugged subunits required to block the function of the complex. The condition is similar to a series, electrical circuit of Christmas decorations; failure of one light bulb causes the entire lighting system to lose power. In most multisubunit, homomeric biological systems, a sequential coordination or cooperative action mechanism is utilized, thus K equals 1. Drug inhibition depends on the ratio of drugged to nondrugged complexes. When K=1, and Z>1, the inhibition effect follows a power law with respect to Z, leading to enhanced drug potency. The hypothesis that the potency of drug inhibition depends on the stoichiometry of the targeted biological complexes was recently quantified by Yang-Hui's Triangle (or binomial distribution), and proved using a highly sensitive in vitro phi29 viral DNA packaging system. Examples of targeting homomeric bio-complexes with high stoichiometry for potent drug discovery are discussed. Expert Opinion Biomotors with multiple subunits are widespread in viruses, bacteria, and cells, making this approach generally applicable in the development of inhibition drugs with high efficiency. PMID:26307193

  19. Acetoxybenzhydrols as highly active and stable analogues of 1'S-1'-acetoxychavicol, a potent antiallergic principal from Alpinia galanga.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara, Tomohisa; Manse, Yoshiaki; Morimoto, Takayuki; Qilong, Wang; Matsuda, Hisashi; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Muraoka, Osamu

    2009-06-01

    Through SAR studies on 1'S-1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (1) against Type I antiallergic activity by indexing release of beta-hexosaminidase, a marker of antigen-IgE-mediated degranulation in RBL-2H3 cells, more stable and potent analogue, 4-(methoxycarbonyloxyphenylmethyl)phenyl acetate (16), has been developed. The compound 16 also strongly inhibited the antigen-IgE-mediated TNF-alpha and IL-4 production.

  20. A Potent Peptidomimetic Inhibitor of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype a Has a Very Different Conformation Than SNAP-25 Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Zuniga, J.E.; Schmidt, J.J.; Fenn, T.; Burnett, J.C.; Arac, D.; Gussio, R.; Stafford, R.G.; Badie, S.S.; Bavari, S.; Brunger, A.T.

    2009-05-28

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A is the most lethal of all known toxins. Here, we report the crystal structure, along with SAR data, of the zinc metalloprotease domain of BoNT/A bound to a potent peptidomimetic inhibitor (Ki = 41 nM) that resembles the local sequence of the SNAP-25 substrate. Surprisingly, the inhibitor adopts a helical conformation around the cleavage site, in contrast to the extended conformation of the native substrate. The backbone of the inhibitor's P1 residue displaces the putative catalytic water molecule and concomitantly interacts with the 'proton shuttle' E224. This mechanism of inhibition is aided by residue contacts in the conserved S1' pocket of the substrate binding cleft, and the induction of new hydrophobic pockets, which are not present in the apo form, especially for the P2' residue of the inhibitor. Our inhibitor is specific for BoNT/A as it does not inhibit other BoNT serotypes or thermolysin.