Science.gov

Sample records for 11craclopride binding potential

  1. The readiness potential reflects intentional binding.

    PubMed

    Jo, Han-Gue; Wittmann, Marc; Hinterberger, Thilo; Schmidt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    When a voluntary action is causally linked with a sensory outcome, the action and its consequent effect are perceived as being closer together in time. This effect is called intentional binding. Although many experiments were conducted on this phenomenon, the underlying neural mechanisms are not well understood. While intentional binding is specific to voluntary action, we presumed that preconscious brain activity (the readiness potential, RP), which occurs before an action is made, might play an important role in this binding effect. In this study, the brain dynamics were recorded with electroencephalography (EEG) and analyzed in single-trials in order to estimate whether intentional binding is correlated with the early neural processes. Moreover, we were interested in different behavioral performance between meditators and non-meditators since meditators are expected to be able to keep attention more consistently on a task. Thus, we performed the intentional binding paradigm with 20 mindfulness meditators and compared them to matched controls. Although, we did not observe a group effect on either behavioral data or EEG recordings, we found that self-initiated movements following ongoing negative deflections of slow cortical potentials (SCPs) result in a stronger binding effect compared to positive potentials, especially regarding the perceived time of the consequent effect. Our results provide the first direct evidence that the early neural activity within the range of SCPs affects perceived time of a sensory outcome that is caused by intentional action.

  2. Membrane potential mediates the cellular binding of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Edwin H.; Li, Ye; Kumar, Umesh; Sureka, Hursh V.; Zhang, Xianren; Payne, Christine K.

    2013-06-01

    The use of nanoparticles for cellular therapeutic or sensing applications requires nanoparticles to bind, or adhere, to the cell surface. While nanoparticle parameters such as size, shape, charge, and composition are important factors in cellular binding, the cell itself must also be considered. All cells have an electrical potential across the plasma membrane driven by an ion gradient. Under standard conditions the ion gradient will result in a -10 to -100 mV potential across the membrane with a net negative charge on the cytosolic face. Using a combination of flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy experiments and dissipative particle dynamics simulations, we have found that a decrease in membrane potential leads to decreased cellular binding of anionic nanoparticles. The decreased cellular binding of anionic nanoparticles is a general phenomenon, independent of depolarization method, nanoparticle composition, and cell type. Increased membrane potential reverses this trend resulting in increased binding of anionic nanoparticles. The cellular binding of cationic nanoparticles is minimally affected by membrane potential due to the interaction of cationic nanoparticles with cell surface proteins. The influence of membrane potential on the cellular binding of nanoparticles is especially important when considering the use of nanoparticles in the treatment or detection of diseases, such as cancer, in which the membrane potential is decreased.The use of nanoparticles for cellular therapeutic or sensing applications requires nanoparticles to bind, or adhere, to the cell surface. While nanoparticle parameters such as size, shape, charge, and composition are important factors in cellular binding, the cell itself must also be considered. All cells have an electrical potential across the plasma membrane driven by an ion gradient. Under standard conditions the ion gradient will result in a -10 to -100 mV potential across the membrane with a net negative charge on the

  3. New potential binding determinant for hERG channel inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, P.; Zangerl-Plessl, E.-M.; Linder, T.; Windisch, A.; Hohaus, A.; Timin, E.; Hering, S.; Stary-Weinzinger, A.

    2016-01-01

    Human ether-à-go-go related gene (hERG) 1 channels conduct the rapid delayed rectifier K+ current (IKr) and are essential for the repolarization of the cardiac action potential. hERG1 inhibition by structurally diverse drugs may lead to life threatening arrhythmia. Putative binding determinants of hERG1 channel blockers include T623, S624 and V625 on the pore helix, and residues G648, Y652 and F656, located on segment S6. We and others have previously hypothesized that additional binding determinants may be located on helix S5, which is in close contact with the S6 segments. In order to test this hypothesis, we performed a detailed investigation combining ionic current measurements with two-microelectrode voltage clamp and molecular modeling techniques. We identified a novel aromatic high affinity binding determinant for blockers located in helix S5, F557, which is equally potent as Y652. Modeling supports a direct interaction with the outer pore helix. PMID:27067805

  4. Binding of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids to phosphatidylcholine vesicles and alveolar macrophages: relationship between binding affinity and antifibrogenic potential of these drugs.

    PubMed

    Ma, J K; Mo, C G; Malanga, C J; Ma, J Y; Castranova, V

    1991-01-01

    A group of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids has been shown to exhibit various degrees of effectiveness in preventing silica-induced fibrosis in animal models. The objective of the present study was to characterize the binding of several of these alkaloids to phosphatidylcholine vesicles and rat alveolar macrophages using fluorometric and equilibrium dialysis methods, respectively. The lipid binding affinity of these alkaloids was found to depend upon several structural factors including hydrophobic substitutions, chiral configurations, and double oxygen bridge-restricted confirmation of the benzylisoquinoline moieties. Tetrandrine, which is a highly effective agent in preventing fibrosis, showed strong binding to both lipid vesicles and alveolar macrophages. In contrast, certain analogues of tetrandrine such as curine and tubocurine, which have little or no effect on silicosis, exhibited only weak binding to lipid vesicles and almost no binding to cells. The moderate binding affinity of fangchinoline to vesicles and cells corresponded to a moderate effectiveness of the compound as an antifibrogenic agent. Methoxyadiantifoline, an alkaloid of unknown antifibrogenic potential, also exhibited high binding affinities for lipid and cells. In conclusion, the results of these studies indicate that alveolar macrophages exhibit large binding capacities for certain members of this class of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids. A positive correlation was observed between binding affinity to alveolar macrophages and the reported antifibrotic potency of these compounds. These data also suggest that the ability of these drugs to interact with alveolar macrophages may be a key step in inhibition of the progression of silica-induced pulmonary disease. PMID:1663032

  5. Direct GR Binding Sites Potentiate Clusters of TF Binding across the Human Genome.

    PubMed

    Vockley, Christopher M; D'Ippolito, Anthony M; McDowell, Ian C; Majoros, William H; Safi, Alexias; Song, Lingyun; Crawford, Gregory E; Reddy, Timothy E

    2016-08-25

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds the human genome at >10,000 sites but only regulates the expression of hundreds of genes. To determine the functional effect of each site, we measured the glucocorticoid (GC) responsive activity of nearly all GR binding sites (GBSs) captured using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in A549 cells. 13% of GBSs assayed had GC-induced activity. The responsive sites were defined by direct GR binding via a GC response element (GRE) and exclusively increased reporter-gene expression. Meanwhile, most GBSs lacked GC-induced reporter activity. The non-responsive sites had epigenetic features of steady-state enhancers and clustered around direct GBSs. Together, our data support a model in which clusters of GBSs observed with ChIP-seq reflect interactions between direct and tethered GBSs over tens of kilobases. We further show that those interactions can synergistically modulate the activity of direct GBSs and may therefore play a major role in driving gene activation in response to GCs. PMID:27565349

  6. Direct GR Binding Sites Potentiate Clusters of TF Binding across the Human Genome.

    PubMed

    Vockley, Christopher M; D'Ippolito, Anthony M; McDowell, Ian C; Majoros, William H; Safi, Alexias; Song, Lingyun; Crawford, Gregory E; Reddy, Timothy E

    2016-08-25

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds the human genome at >10,000 sites but only regulates the expression of hundreds of genes. To determine the functional effect of each site, we measured the glucocorticoid (GC) responsive activity of nearly all GR binding sites (GBSs) captured using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in A549 cells. 13% of GBSs assayed had GC-induced activity. The responsive sites were defined by direct GR binding via a GC response element (GRE) and exclusively increased reporter-gene expression. Meanwhile, most GBSs lacked GC-induced reporter activity. The non-responsive sites had epigenetic features of steady-state enhancers and clustered around direct GBSs. Together, our data support a model in which clusters of GBSs observed with ChIP-seq reflect interactions between direct and tethered GBSs over tens of kilobases. We further show that those interactions can synergistically modulate the activity of direct GBSs and may therefore play a major role in driving gene activation in response to GCs.

  7. Three-center tight-binding potential model for C and Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wen-Cai; Wang, C. Z.; Zhao, Li-Zhen; Qin, Wei; Ho, K. M.

    2015-07-01

    A tight-binding potential model which goes beyond the Slater-Koster two-center approximation and includes explicit three-center and crystal field expressions is presented. Using carbon and silicon as examples, we show that various bulk structures, surface reconstructions, and the structures of clusters and liquids of C and Si can be well described by the present three-center tight-binding model. These results demonstrate that three-center interaction and crystal field effect are very important for improving the transferability of tight-binding models in describing the structures and properties of materials over a broad range of bonding configurations.

  8. Quantification of transport and binding parameters using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Potential for in vivo applications.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, E N; Jain, R K

    1990-01-01

    Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) has been used extensively in the study of transport and binding in biological media in vitro. The present study adapts and further develops FRAP so that it may be utilized for the in vivo quantification of binding parameters. The technique is validated in vitro by measuring mass transport and binding parameters for the Concanavalin A/Mannose binding system (a diffusion-limited system). The pseudo-equilibrium constant (the product of the equilibrium constant and the total concentration of binding sites) for this system was determined to be 26 +/- 15 which compares favorably with literature values ranging between 16 and 32. The applicability of this technique to measure parameters for monoclonal antibody/antigen interactions in a thin tissue preparation such as the rabbit ear chamber tissue preparation is also examined. Unlike other methods for measuring binding parameters, this is the only technique which has the potential to measure parameters relevant to antibody delivery in vivo. The proposed technique is noninvasive and does not require a priori knowledge of, independent measurement of, or variation in the concentration of binding sites or total concentration of binding species. PMID:2248992

  9. Contribution of three-body potentials to the binding energy of heavy atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zygelman, B.; Mittleman, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    The conversion of quantum electrodynamics to a configuration-space Hamiltonian formalism introduces three-electron potentials of relativistic origin. For heavy atoms, it is found that the contribution of these potentials to the inner-shell binding energy is no more than 0.21 eV. This is too small to explain the discrepancy between current theory and experiment. The uniqueness of the potentials obtained in the configuration-space Hamiltonian is also discussed.

  10. Engineered metalloregulation of azide binding affinity and reduction potential of horse heart myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Christie L; Mauk, A Grant

    2013-03-01

    Metal ion binding to a previously reported variant of horse heart myoglobin (Lys45Glu/Lys63Glu) with a metal ion binding site on the surface of the protein that is adjacent to the haem binding site has been shown to influence ligand binding and electrochemical properties of the protein. For example, the K(d) (μM) for binding of azide to this variant decreases from 277 ± 9 to 32 ± 3 following addition of a saturating concentration of Mn(2+) (the value for the wild-type protein under the same conditions is 26 ± 1). Similarly, the midpoint reduction potential E(m) (mV vs. standard hydrogen electrode) increases from 9 to 40 in the presence of a saturating concentration of Mn(2+) (the value for the wild-type protein under the same conditions is 45 ± 2). These results demonstrate the potential value of engineered metal ion binding sites as a means of regulating the functional properties of even simple haem proteins.

  11. Structural insights into Cydia pomonella pheromone binding protein 2 mediated prediction of potentially active semiochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zhen; Liu, Jiyuan; Zhang, Yalin

    2016-01-01

    Given the advantages of behavioral disruption application in pest control and the damage of Cydia pomonella, due progresses have not been made in searching active semiochemicals for codling moth. In this research, 31 candidate semiochemicals were ranked for their binding potential to Cydia pomonella pheromone binding protein 2 (CpomPBP2) by simulated docking, and this sorted result was confirmed by competitive binding assay. This high predicting accuracy of virtual screening led to the construction of a rapid and viable method for semiochemicals searching. By reference to binding mode analyses, hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interaction were suggested to be two key factors in determining ligand affinity, so is the length of molecule chain. So it is concluded that semiochemicals of appropriate chain length with hydroxyl group or carbonyl group at one head tended to be favored by CpomPBP2. Residues involved in binding with each ligand were pointed out as well, which were verified by computational alanine scanning mutagenesis. Progress made in the present study helps establish an efficient method for predicting potentially active compounds and prepares for the application of high-throughput virtual screening in searching semiochemicals by taking insights into binding mode analyses. PMID:26928635

  12. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  13. DNA BINDING POTENTIAL OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE MEDIATED BY GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE THETA 1-1

    EPA Science Inventory


    DNA BINDING POTENTIAL OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE MEDIATED BY GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE THETA 1-1. R A Pegram1 and M K Ross2. 2Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; 1Pharmacokinetics Branch, NHEERL, ORD, United States Environmental Protection Ag...

  14. Sevelamer in a diabetologist's perspective: a phosphate-binding resin with glucose-lowering potential.

    PubMed

    Brønden, A; Hansen, M; Sonne, D P; Rohde, U; Vilsbøll, T; Knop, F K

    2015-02-01

    Sevelamer is a calcium-free and metal-free phosphate-binding oral drug used in the management of hyperphosphataemia in chronic kidney disease. Preclinical and clinical trials have shown glucose and lipid-lowering effects of sevelamer, thereby giving rise to a potential role of the drug in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes. These 'novel' effects are most probably derived from the bile acid-binding properties of sevelamer. The proposed potential is supported by the approval of the bile acid sequestrant colesevelam in the United States for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and hypercholesterolaemia. This article offers a brief review on the effects of sevelamer and a perspective on the potential mechanisms behind the glucose-lowering effect of the drug.

  15. A potentiator induces conformational changes on the recombinant CFTR nucleotide binding domains in solution.

    PubMed

    Galfrè, Elena; Galeno, Lauretta; Moran, Oscar

    2012-11-01

    Nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the defective protein in cystic fibrosis, are responsible for controlling the gating of the chloride channel and are the putative binding sites for several candidate drugs in the disease treatment. We studied the effects of the application of 2-pyrimidin-7,8-benzoflavone (PBF), a strong potentiator of the CFTR, on the properties of recombinant and equimolar NBD1/NBD2 mixture in solution. The results indicate that the potentiator induces significant conformational changes of the NBD1/NBD2 dimer in solution. The potentiator does not modify the ATP binding constant, but reduces the ATP hydrolysis activity of the NBD1/NBD2 mixture. The intrinsic fluorescence and the guanidinium denaturation measurements indicate that the potentiator induces different conformational changes on the NBD1/NBD2 mixture in the presence and absence of ATP. It was confirmed from small-angle X-ray scattering experiments that, in absence of ATP, the NBD1/NBD2 dimer was disrupted by the potentiator, but in the presence of 2 mM ATP, the two NBDs kept dimerised, and a major change in the size and the shape of the structure was observed. We propose that these conformational changes could modify the NBDs-intracellular loop interaction in a way that would facilitate the open state of the channel.

  16. Identifying DNA-binding proteins using structural motifs and the electrostatic potential.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Hugh P; Garcia, Mario A; Jones, Susan; Thornton, Janet M

    2004-01-01

    Robust methods to detect DNA-binding proteins from structures of unknown function are important for structural biology. This paper describes a method for identifying such proteins that (i) have a solvent accessible structural motif necessary for DNA-binding and (ii) a positive electrostatic potential in the region of the binding region. We focus on three structural motifs: helix-turn-helix (HTH), helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) and helix-loop-helix (HLH). We find that the combination of these variables detect 78% of proteins with an HTH motif, which is a substantial improvement over previous work based purely on structural templates and is comparable to more complex methods of identifying DNA-binding proteins. Similar true positive fractions are achieved for the HhH and HLH motifs. We see evidence of wide evolutionary diversity for DNA-binding proteins with an HTH motif, and much smaller diversity for those with an HhH or HLH motif. PMID:15356290

  17. Absolute Binding Free Energy Calculations Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Restraining Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiyao; Deng, Yuqing; Roux, Benoît

    2006-01-01

    The absolute (standard) binding free energy of eight FK506-related ligands to FKBP12 is calculated using free energy perturbation molecular dynamics (FEP/MD) simulations with explicit solvent. A number of features are implemented to improve the accuracy and enhance the convergence of the calculations. First, the absolute binding free energy is decomposed into sequential steps during which the ligand-surrounding interactions as well as various biasing potentials restraining the translation, orientation, and conformation of the ligand are turned “on” and “off.” Second, sampling of the ligand conformation is enforced by a restraining potential based on the root mean-square deviation relative to the bound state conformation. The effect of all the restraining potentials is rigorously unbiased, and it is shown explicitly that the final results are independent of all artificial restraints. Third, the repulsive and dispersive free energy contribution arising from the Lennard-Jones interactions of the ligand with its surrounding (protein and solvent) is calculated using the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen separation. This separation also improves convergence of the FEP/MD calculations. Fourth, to decrease the computational cost, only a small number of atoms in the vicinity of the binding site are simulated explicitly, while all the influence of the remaining atoms is incorporated implicitly using the generalized solvent boundary potential (GSBP) method. With GSBP, the size of the simulated FKBP12/ligand systems is significantly reduced, from ∼25,000 to 2500. The computations are very efficient and the statistical error is small (∼1 kcal/mol). The calculated binding free energies are generally in good agreement with available experimental data and previous calculations (within ∼2 kcal/mol). The present results indicate that a strategy based on FEP/MD simulations of a reduced GSBP atomic model sampled with conformational, translational, and orientational restraining

  18. Calcium ion binding to a soil fulvic acid using a donnan potential model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marinsky, J.A.; Mathuthu, A.; Ephraim, J.H.; Reddy, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    Calcium ion binding to a soil fulvic acid (Armadale Bh Horizon) was evaluated over a range of calcium ion concentrations, from pH 3.8 to 7.3, using potentiometric titrations and calcium ion electrode measurements. Fulvic acid concentration was constant (100 milligrams per liter) and calcium ion concentration varied up to 8 X 10-4 moles per liter. Experiments discussed here included: (1) titrations of fulvic acid-calcium ion containing solutions with sodium hydroxide; and (2) titrations of fully neutralized fulvic acid with calcium chloride solutions. Apparent binding constants (expressed as the logarithm of the value, log ??app) vary with solution pH, calcium ion concentration, degree of acid dissociation, and ionic strength (from log ??app = 2.5 to 3.9) and are similar to those reported by others. Fulvic acid charge, and the associated Donnan Potential, influences calcium ion-fulvic acid ion pair formation. A Donnan Potential corrrection term allowed calculation of intrinsic calcium ion-fulvic acid binding constants. Intrinsic binding constants vary from 1.2 to 2.5 (the average value is about log??= 1.6) and are similar to, but somewhat higher than, stability constants for calcium ion-carboxylic acid monodentate complexes. ?? by Oldenbourg Wissenschaftsverlag, Mu??nchen.

  19. In Vivo Quantification of Tumor Receptor Binding Potential with Dual-Reporter Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Sexton, Kristian J.; Hextrum, Shannon K.; Yang, Harold H.; Klubben, W. Spencer; Gunn, Jason R.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Receptor availability represents a key component of current cancer management. However, no approaches have been adopted to do this clinically, and the current standard of care is invasive tissue biopsy. A dual-reporter methodology capable of quantifying available receptor binding potential of tumors in vivo within a clinically relevant time scale is presented. Procedures To test the methodology, a fluorescence imaging-based adaptation was validated against ex vivo and in vitro measures of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) binding potential in four tumor lines in mice, each line expected to express a different level of EGFR. Results A strong correlation was observed between in vivo and ex vivo measures of binding potential for all tumor lines (r=0.99, p<0.01, slope=1.80±0.48, and intercept=−0.58±0.84) and between in vivo and in vitro for the three lines expressing the least amount of EGFR (r=0.99, p<0.01, slope=0.64±0.32, and intercept=0.47±0.51). Conclusions By providing a fast and robust measure of receptor density in tumors, the presented methodology has powerful implications for improving choices in cancer intervention, evaluation, and monitoring, and can be scaled to the clinic with an imaging modality like SPECT. PMID:22203241

  20. How to derive tight-binding spd potentials? Application to zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufresne, Alice; Ribeiro, Fabienne; Tréglia, Guy

    2015-08-01

    We propose here a general methodology to derive tight-binding potentials accounting for spd hybridization in transition metals, dealing simultaneously with electronic structure and energy properties. This methodology is illustrated for zirconium which is largely used for technological applications, in particular in the nuclear industry, and whose modelling is known to be complex and challenging. Such potentials are very promising. Their fits have a clear physical meaning with a limited amount of parameters and their complexity can be adjusted as a function of the problem under consideration.

  1. X-point deformation potentials of III-V semiconductors in a tight-binding approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, M. C.; Armelles, G.

    1993-07-01

    The hydrostatic E1 and shear E2 deformation potentials of the III-V semiconductor compounds are calculated within a nearest-neighbor tight-binding approach. In the sp3s* parametrization, analytical expressions for both E1 and E2 are derived. The scaling law of the s*p interaction is modified in such a way that it provides deformation potentials at X in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. This phenomenological term takes into account the physical behavior of the actual excited states under strain and consequently, it allows us to describe accurately the dependence of the band-edge states under (001) biaxial strain.

  2. How to derive tight-binding spd potentials? Application to zirconium.

    PubMed

    Dufresne, Alice; Ribeiro, Fabienne; Tréglia, Guy

    2015-08-26

    We propose here a general methodology to derive tight-binding potentials accounting for spd hybridization in transition metals, dealing simultaneously with electronic structure and energy properties. This methodology is illustrated for zirconium which is largely used for technological applications, in particular in the nuclear industry, and whose modelling is known to be complex and challenging. Such potentials are very promising. Their fits have a clear physical meaning with a limited amount of parameters and their complexity can be adjusted as a function of the problem under consideration. PMID:26235825

  3. Induced Long-Range Attractive Potentials of Human Serum Albumin by Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Takaaki; Komatsu, Teruyuki; Nakagawa, Akito; Tsuchida, Eishun

    2007-05-18

    Small-angle x-ray scattering and dielectric spectroscopy investigation on the solutions of recombinant human serum albumin and its heme hybrid revealed that heme incorporation induces a specific long-range attractive potential between protein molecules. This is evidenced by the enhanced forward intensity upon heme binding, despite no hindrance to rotatory Brownian motion, unbiased colloid osmotic pressure, and discontiguous nearest-neighbor distance, confirming monodispersity of the proteins. The heme-induced potential may play a trigger role in recognition of the ligand-filled human serum albumins in the circulatory system.

  4. Potential toxicity of sulfanilamide antibiotic: binding of sulfamethazine to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiabin; Zhou, Xuefei; Zhang, Yalei; Gao, Haiping

    2012-08-15

    Antibiotics are widely used in daily life but their abuse has posed a potential threat to human health. The interaction between human serum albumin (HSA) and sulfamethazine (SMZ) was investigated by capillary electrophoresis, fluorescence spectrometry, and circular dichroism. The binding constant and site were determined to be 1.09×10(4) M(-1) and 1.14 at 309.5 K. The thermodynamic determination indicated that the interaction was driven by enthalpy change, where the electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bond were the dominant binding force. The binding distance between SMZ and tryptophan residue of HSA was obtained to be 3.07 nm according to Fǒrster non-radioactive energy transfer theory. The site marker competition revealed that SMZ bound into subdomain IIA of HSA. The binding of SMZ induced the unfolding of the polypeptides of HSA and transferred the secondary conformation of HSA. The equilibrium dialysis showed that only 0.13 mM SMZ decreased vitamin B(2) by 38% transported on the HSA. This work provides a new quantitative evaluation method for antibiotics to cause the protein damage. PMID:22750172

  5. Nuclear binding energy and symmetry energy of nuclear matter with modern nucleon-nucleon potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Hassaneen, Kh.S.A.; Abo-Elsebaa, H.M.; Sultan, E.A.; Mansour, H.M.M.

    2011-03-15

    Research Highlights: > The nuclear matter is studied within the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (BHF) approach employing the most recent accurate nucleon-nucleon potentials. > The results come out by approximating the single particle self-consistent potential with a parabolic form. > We discuss the current status of the Coester line, i.e., density and energy of the various saturation points being strongly linearly correlated. > The nuclear symmetry energy is calculated as the difference between the binding energy of pure neutron matter and that of symmetric nuclear matter. - Abstract: The binding energy of nuclear matter at zero temperature in the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approximation with modern nucleon-nucleon potentials is studied. Both the standard and continuous choices of single particle energies are used. These modern nucleon-nucleon potentials fit the deuteron properties and are phase shifts equivalent. Comparison with other calculations is made. In addition we present results for the symmetry energy obtained with different potentials, which is of great importance in astrophysical calculation.

  6. Periplasmic Binding Proteins in Thermophiles: Characterization and Potential Application of an Arginine-Binding Protein from Thermotoga maritima: A Brief Thermo-Story.

    PubMed

    Ausili, Alessio; Staiano, Maria; Dattelbaum, Jonathan; Varriale, Antonio; Capo, Alessandro; D'Auria, Sabato

    2013-01-01

    Arginine-binding protein from the extremophile Thermotoga maritima is a 27.7 kDa protein possessing the typical two-domain structure of the periplasmic binding proteins family. The protein is characterized by a very high specificity and affinity to bind to arginine, also at high temperatures. Due to its features, this protein could be taken into account as a potential candidate for the design of a biosensor for arginine. It is important to investigate the stability of proteins when they are used for biotechnological applications. In this article, we review the structural and functional features of an arginine-binding protein from the extremophile Thermotoga maritima with a particular eye on its potential biotechnological applications. PMID:25371336

  7. Semiclassical tight-binding dynamics in rapidly oscillating fields plus a static arbitrary potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, L. A.; Sanjinés, D.; Gallinar, J.-P.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate a semiclassical dynamics driven by a high-frequency ω inhomogeneous field, plus a static arbitrary potential on a one-dimensional tight-binding lattice. We find — in the approach of Kapitza's pendulum — an effective, time independent potential that describes the average of the electronic motion to order ω-2. This effective potential depends on the static external potential, on the lattice constant and on the applied high frequency field. Remarkably, we find that the dynamic correction of rapidly oscillating fields is formally identical to that associated to Kapitza's usual continuum result. Finally, applications are made to: the harmonic oscillator on the lattice, the Bloch oscillation effect and "dynamical localization" in arrays of optical waveguides (wherein an experimental prediction is made).

  8. Comparative studies of binding potential of Prunus armeniaca and Prunus domestica gums in tablets formulations.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Haroon; Khan, Mir Azam; Sadiq, Abdul; Khan, Shahzeb; Chishti, Kamran Ahmad; Rahman, Inayat U

    2015-05-01

    The current study was undertaken to compare the binding potential of Prunus armeniaca L. and Prunus domestica L. gums in tablets' formulations. Tablet batches (F-1 to F-9) were prepared Diclofenac sodium as model drug using 5%, 7.5% and 10% of each Prunus armeniaca L., Prunus domestica L. gums as binder. PVP K30 was used as a standard binder. Magnesium stearate was used as lubricant. Flow properties of granules (like bulk density, tapped density, Carr's index, Hausner's ratio, angle of repose) as well as the physical parameters of compressed tablets including hardness, friability, thickness and disintegration time were determined. Flow parameters of granules of all the batches were found good. Physical parameters (drug content, weight variation, thickness, hardness, friability, disintegration time) of formulated tablets were found within limit when tested. The dissolution studies showed that tablets formulations containing each Prunus domestica showed better binding capacity compared to Prunus armeniaca gum. The binding potential increased as the concentration of gums increased. The FTIR spectroscopic investigation showed that the formulations containing plant gum are compatible with the drug and other excipients used.

  9. Comparative studies of binding potential of Prunus armeniaca and Prunus domestica gums in tablets formulations.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Haroon; Khan, Mir Azam; Sadiq, Abdul; Khan, Shahzeb; Chishti, Kamran Ahmad; Rahman, Inayat U

    2015-05-01

    The current study was undertaken to compare the binding potential of Prunus armeniaca L. and Prunus domestica L. gums in tablets' formulations. Tablet batches (F-1 to F-9) were prepared Diclofenac sodium as model drug using 5%, 7.5% and 10% of each Prunus armeniaca L., Prunus domestica L. gums as binder. PVP K30 was used as a standard binder. Magnesium stearate was used as lubricant. Flow properties of granules (like bulk density, tapped density, Carr's index, Hausner's ratio, angle of repose) as well as the physical parameters of compressed tablets including hardness, friability, thickness and disintegration time were determined. Flow parameters of granules of all the batches were found good. Physical parameters (drug content, weight variation, thickness, hardness, friability, disintegration time) of formulated tablets were found within limit when tested. The dissolution studies showed that tablets formulations containing each Prunus domestica showed better binding capacity compared to Prunus armeniaca gum. The binding potential increased as the concentration of gums increased. The FTIR spectroscopic investigation showed that the formulations containing plant gum are compatible with the drug and other excipients used. PMID:26004724

  10. Evasins: Therapeutic Potential of a New Family of Chemokine-Binding Proteins from Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Bonvin, Pauline; Power, Christine A.; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.

    2016-01-01

    Blood-sucking parasites, such as ticks, remain attached to their hosts for relatively long periods of time in order to obtain their blood meal without eliciting an immune response. One mechanism used to avoid rejection is the inhibition of the recruitment of immune cells, which can be achieved by a class of chemokine-binding proteins (CKBPs) known as Evasins. We have identified three distinct Evasins produced by the salivary glands of the common brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus. They display different selectivities for chemokines, the first two identified show a narrow selectivity profile, while the third has a broader binding spectrum. The Evasins showed efficacy in animal models of inflammatory disease. Here, we will discuss the potential of their development for therapeutic use, addressing both the advantages and disadvantages that this entails. PMID:27375615

  11. Computational characterization of TTHA0379: A potential glycerophosphocholine binding protein of Ugp ATP-binding cassette transporter.

    PubMed

    Chandravanshi, Monika; Gogoi, Prerana; Kanaujia, Shankar Prasad

    2016-11-01

    For the de novo biosynthesis of phospholipids, byproducts such as sn-glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) and glycerophosphocholine (GPC) of glycerophospholipid metabolic pathway are imported inside the cell by an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter known as UgpABCE. Of which, UgpA and UgpE constitutes the transmembrane domains (TMDs), UgpC forms the dimer of ATP-hydrolyzing component and UgpB is the periplasmic substrate binding protein. Structurally, UgpABCE transporter displays similarity to the maltose ABC transporter of Escherichia coli; thus, has been grouped into the CUT1 (Carbohydrate Uptake Transporter-1) family of bacterial ABC transporters. Being a member of CUT1 family, several Ugp (Uptake glycerol phosphate) protein sequences in biological database(s) exhibit sequence and structure similarity to sugar ABC transporters and have been annotated as sugar binding proteins; one of such proteins is TTHA0379 from Thermus thermophilus HB8. Here, in this study, we used computational method(s) to distinguish UgpB and sugar binding proteins based on their primary and tertiary structure features. A comprehensive analysis of these proteins indicates that they are evolutionarily related to each other having common conserved features at their primary and tertiary structure levels. However, they display differences at their active sites owing to the dissimilarity in their ligand preferences. In addition, phylogenetic analysis of TTHA0379 along with UgpB and sugar binding proteins reveals that both the groups of proteins forms two distinct clades and TTHA0379 groups with UgpB proteins. Furthermore, analysis of the ligand binding pocket shows that all the essential features of glycerophosphocholine binding protein i.e. UgpB, are conserved in TTHA0379 as well. Combining these features, here, we designate TTHA0379 to be a GPC binding protein.

  12. Bridging the Gap: The Potential Role of Corticosteroid Binding Globulin in Cardiac Steroid Facilitation.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Hans Hendrik; Dieterle, Thomas; Trachsler, Aaron; Gencay, Mikael; Kaiser, Edelgard Anna

    2015-01-01

    Corticosteroid (glucocorticoids [GCs] and mineralcorticoids [MCs]) interact directly with cells of the cardiovascular system. Their signaling affects genomic and non-genomic receptors and comprises a multitude of alternative and interfering levels of interaction, which influence the physiological response. This review describes genomic and non-genomic pathways of steroid facilitation and portrays the current body of knowledge regarding corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG). The latter is a carrier protein facilitating corticosteroid availability in the circulation and has recently been discovered intrinsically in cardiomyocytes. Thought experiments highlight potential areas of clinical research and hypotheses are presented for steroid- carrier interaction. Furthermore, this review comprises a conclusive overview of disease conditions and substances that influence CBG levels and summarizes the potential of CBG as a potential future biomarker.

  13. Low-order moment expansions to tight binding for interatomic potentials: Successes and failures

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, J.D.; Voter, A.F.

    1995-09-15

    We discuss the use of moment-based approximations to tight binding. Using a maximum entropy form for the electronic density of states, we show that a general interatomic potential can be defined that is suitable for molecular-dynamics simulations and has several other desirable features. For covalent materials (C and Si), properties where the atoms are in equivalent environments are well converged at low-order moments. For defect environments, which offer a more critical (and relevant) test, the method is found to give less satisfactory results. For example, the vacancy formation energy for Si is too low by {similar_to}2 eV at 10 moments relative to exact tight binding. Attempts to improve the accuracy were unsuccessful, leading to the conclusion that potentials based on this approach are inadequate for covalent materials. We speculate that this may be a deficiency of low-order moment methods in general. For metals, in contrast to the covalent systems, we find that the low-order moment approach is better behaved. This finding is consistent with the success of existing empirical fourth-moment potentials for metals.

  14. Characterization of a Ligand Binding Site in the Human Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 Pore

    PubMed Central

    Klement, Göran; Eisele, Lina; Malinowsky, David; Nolting, Andreas; Svensson, Mats; Terp, Gitte; Weigelt, Dirk; Dabrowski, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The pharmacology and regulation of Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) ion channel activity is intricate due to the physiological function as an integrator of multiple chemical, mechanical, and temperature stimuli as well as differences in species pharmacology. In this study, we describe and compare the current inhibition efficacy of human TRPA1 on three different TRPA1 antagonists. We used a homology model of TRPA1 based on Kv1.2 to select pore vestibule residues available for interaction with ligands entering the vestibule. Site-directed mutation constructs were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and their functionality and pharmacology assessed to support and improve our homology model. Based on the functional pharmacology results we propose an antagonist-binding site in the vestibule of the TRPA1 ion channel. We use the results to describe the proposed intravestibular ligand-binding site in TRPA1 in detail. Based on the single site substitutions, we designed a human TRPA1 receptor by substituting several residues in the vestibule and adjacent regions from the rat receptor to address and explain observed species pharmacology differences. In parallel, the lack of effect on HC-030031 inhibition by the vestibule substitutions suggests that this molecule interacts with TRPA1 via a binding site not situated in the vestibule. PMID:23442958

  15. Characterization of a ligand binding site in the human transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 pore.

    PubMed

    Klement, Göran; Eisele, Lina; Malinowsky, David; Nolting, Andreas; Svensson, Mats; Terp, Gitte; Weigelt, Dirk; Dabrowski, Michael

    2013-02-19

    The pharmacology and regulation of Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) ion channel activity is intricate due to the physiological function as an integrator of multiple chemical, mechanical, and temperature stimuli as well as differences in species pharmacology. In this study, we describe and compare the current inhibition efficacy of human TRPA1 on three different TRPA1 antagonists. We used a homology model of TRPA1 based on Kv1.2 to select pore vestibule residues available for interaction with ligands entering the vestibule. Site-directed mutation constructs were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and their functionality and pharmacology assessed to support and improve our homology model. Based on the functional pharmacology results we propose an antagonist-binding site in the vestibule of the TRPA1 ion channel. We use the results to describe the proposed intravestibular ligand-binding site in TRPA1 in detail. Based on the single site substitutions, we designed a human TRPA1 receptor by substituting several residues in the vestibule and adjacent regions from the rat receptor to address and explain observed species pharmacology differences. In parallel, the lack of effect on HC-030031 inhibition by the vestibule substitutions suggests that this molecule interacts with TRPA1 via a binding site not situated in the vestibule.

  16. Pathway Analysis Revealed Potential Diverse Health Impacts of Flavonoids that Bind Estrogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Ge, Weigong; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids are frequently used as dietary supplements in the absence of research evidence regarding health benefits or toxicity. Furthermore, ingested doses could far exceed those received from diet in the course of normal living. Some flavonoids exhibit binding to estrogen receptors (ERs) with consequential vigilance by regulatory authorities at the U.S. EPA and FDA. Regulatory authorities must consider both beneficial claims and potential adverse effects, warranting the increases in research that has spanned almost two decades. Here, we report pathway enrichment of 14 targets from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) and the Herbal Ingredients’ Targets (HIT) database for 22 flavonoids that bind ERs. The selected flavonoids are confirmed ER binders from our earlier studies, and were here found in mainly involved in three types of biological processes, ER regulation, estrogen metabolism and synthesis, and apoptosis. Besides cancers, we conjecture that the flavonoids may affect several diseases via apoptosis pathways. Diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, viral myocarditis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease could be implicated. More generally, apoptosis processes may be importantly evolved biological functions of flavonoids that bind ERs and high dose ingestion of those flavonoids could adversely disrupt the cellular apoptosis process. PMID:27023590

  17. Ligands Binding and Molecular Simulation: the Potential Investigation of a Biosensor Based on an Insect Odorant Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xin; Zhang, Yanbo; Wang, Peidan; Qi, Jiangwei; Hu, Meiying; Zhong, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Based on mimicking biological olfaction, biosensors have been applied for the detection of various ligands in complex environment, which could represent one of the most promising research fields. In this study, the basic characters of one insect odorant binding protein (OBP) as a biosensor were explored. To explore the molecular recognition process, the tertiary structure of the protein was modeled and the protein-ligand interactions with 1,536,550 chemicals were investigated by the molecular docking. The availability of large amount of recombinant SlitOBP1 overcame the difficulty to obtain biological sensing material. After obtained the purified recombinant protein, the result of fluorescence binding assays proved the candidate protein has good affinities with the majority of the tested chemicals. With the aid of simulation docking, the key conserved amino acids within the binding site were identified and then mutated to alanine. After mutation, the protein-ligand binding characteristics were recorded, and the competitive binding assays were carried out to provide experimental verification. The detailed information on its structure and affinities investigated in this study could allow the design of specific mutants with desired characteristics, which provides a solid base for tailoring OBP for biosensor and provides a role model for screening the other elements in olfactory system for different applications. PMID:25552932

  18. Ligands binding and molecular simulation: the potential investigation of a biosensor based on an insect odorant binding protein.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xin; Zhang, Yanbo; Wang, Peidan; Qi, Jiangwei; Hu, Meiying; Zhong, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Based on mimicking biological olfaction, biosensors have been applied for the detection of various ligands in complex environment, which could represent one of the most promising research fields. In this study, the basic characters of one insect odorant binding protein (OBP) as a biosensor were explored. To explore the molecular recognition process, the tertiary structure of the protein was modeled and the protein-ligand interactions with 1,536,550 chemicals were investigated by the molecular docking. The availability of large amount of recombinant SlitOBP1 overcame the difficulty to obtain biological sensing material. After obtained the purified recombinant protein, the result of fluorescence binding assays proved the candidate protein has good affinities with the majority of the tested chemicals. With the aid of simulation docking, the key conserved amino acids within the binding site were identified and then mutated to alanine. After mutation, the protein-ligand binding characteristics were recorded, and the competitive binding assays were carried out to provide experimental verification. The detailed information on its structure and affinities investigated in this study could allow the design of specific mutants with desired characteristics, which provides a solid base for tailoring OBP for biosensor and provides a role model for screening the other elements in olfactory system for different applications. PMID:25552932

  19. RXP-E: A CX43-BINDING PEPTIDE THAT PREVENTS ACTION POTENTIAL PROPAGATION BLOCK

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Rebecca; Procida, Kristina; Vaidyanathan, Ravi; Coombs, Wanda; Jalife, Jose; Nielsen, Morten S.; Taffet, Steven M.; Delmar, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Gap junctions (GJs) provide a low-resistance pathway for cardiac electrical propagation. The role of GJ regulation in arrhythmia is unclear, partly due to limited availability of pharmacological tools. Recently, we showed that a peptide called “RXP-E” binds to the carboxyl terminal of connexin43 (Cx43) and prevents chemically-induced uncoupling in Cx43-expressing N2a cells. Here, pull-down experiments show RXP-E binding to adult cardiac Cx43. Patch-clamp studies revealed that RXP-E prevented heptanol-induced and acidification-induced uncoupling in pairs of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM’s). Separately, RXP-E was concatenated to a cytoplasmic transduction peptide for cytoplasmic translocation (CTP-RXP-E). The effect of RXP-E on action potential (AP) propagation was assessed by high resolution optical mapping in monolayers of NRVM’s, containing ~20% of randomly distributed myofibroblasts. In contrast to control experiments, when heptanol (2 mmol/L) was added to the superfusate of monolayers loaded with CTP-RXP-E, AP propagation was maintained, albeit at a slower velocity. Similarly, intracellular acidification (pHi=6.2) caused a loss of AP propagation in control monolayers; however, propagation was maintained in CTP-RXP-E treated cells, though at a slower rate. Patch clamp experiments revealed that RXP-E did not prevent heptanol-induced block of sodium currents, nor did it alter voltage dependence or amplitude of Kir2.1/Kir2.3 currents. RXP-E is the first synthetic molecule known to: (1) bind cardiac Cx43; (2) prevent heptanol and acidification-induced uncoupling of cardiac GJ’s and 3) preserve AP propagation among cardiac myocytes. RXP-E can be used to characterize the role of GJs in the function of multicellular systems, including the heart. PMID:18669919

  20. 18F-Fallypride binding potential in patients with schizophrenia compared to healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Lehrer, Douglas S.; Christian, Bradley T.; Kirbas, Cemil; Chiang, Meicheng; Sidhu, Shawn; Short, Holly; Wang, Binquan; Shi, Bingzhi; Chu, King-Wai; Merrill, Brian; Buchsbaum, Monte S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Molecular imaging of dopaminergic parameters has contributed to the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia, expanding our understanding of pathophysiology, clinical phenomenology and treatment. Our aim in this study was to compare 18F-fallypride binding potential BPND in a group of patients with schizophrenia-spectrum illness vs. controls, with a particular focus on the cortex and thalamus. Methods We acquired 18F-fallypride positron emission tomography images on 33 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder (28 with schizophrenia; 5 with schizoaffective disorder) and 18 normal controls. Twenty-four patients were absolutely neuroleptic naïve and nine were previously medicated, although only four had a lifetime neuroleptic exposure of greater than two weeks. Parametric images of 18F-fallypride BPND were calculated to compare binding across subjects. Results Decreased BPND was observed in the medial dorsal nucleus of the thalamus, prefrontal cortex, lateral temporal lobe and primary auditory cortex. These findings were most marked in subjects who had never previously received medication. Conclusions The regions with decreased BPND tend to match brain regions previously reported to show alterations in metabolic activity and blood flow and areas associated with the symptoms of schizophrenia. PMID:20655709

  1. Redox potential tuning through differential quinone binding in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Vermaas, Josh V; Taguchi, Alexander T; Dikanov, Sergei A; Wraight, Colin A; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2015-03-31

    Ubiquinone forms an integral part of the electron transport chain in cellular respiration and photosynthesis across a vast number of organisms. Prior experimental results have shown that the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is only fully functional with a limited set of methoxy-bearing quinones, suggesting that specific interactions with this substituent are required to drive electron transport and the formation of quinol. The nature of these interactions has yet to be determined. Through parameterization of a CHARMM-compatible quinone force field and subsequent molecular dynamics simulations of the quinone-bound RC, we have investigated and characterized the interactions of the protein with the quinones in the Q(A) and Q(B) sites using both equilibrium simulation and thermodynamic integration. In particular, we identify a specific interaction between the 2-methoxy group of ubiquinone in the Q(B) site and the amide nitrogen of GlyL225 that we implicate in locking the orientation of the 2-methoxy group, thereby tuning the redox potential difference between the quinones occupying the Q(A) and Q(B) sites. Disruption of this interaction leads to weaker binding in a ubiquinone analogue that lacks a 2-methoxy group, a finding supported by reverse electron transfer electron paramagnetic resonance experiments of the Q(A)⁻Q(B)⁻ biradical and competitive binding assays. PMID:25734689

  2. L-Ferritin Binding to Scara5: A New Iron Traffic Pathway Potentially Implicated in Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mendes-Jorge, Luísa; Ramos, David; Valença, Andreia; López-Luppo, Mariana; Pires, Virgínia Maria Rico; Catita, Joana; Nacher, Victor; Navarro, Marc; Carretero, Ana; Rodriguez-Baeza, Alfonso; Ruberte, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Iron is essential in the retina because the heme-containing enzyme guanylate cyclase modulates phototransduction in rods and cones. Transferrin endocytosis is the classical pathway for obtaining iron from the blood circulation in the retina. However, the iron storage protein ferritin has been also recently proposed as an iron carrier. In this study, the presence of Scara5 and its binding to L-ferritin was investigated in the retina. Our results showed that Scara5, the specific receptor for L-ferritin, was expressed in mouse and human retinas in many cell types, including endothelial cells. Furthermore, we showed that intravenously injected ferritin crossed the blood retinal barrier through L-ferritin binding to Scara5 in endothelial cells. Thus, suggesting the existence of a new pathway for iron delivery and trafficking in the retina. In a murine model of photoreceptor degeneration, Scara5 was downregulated, pointing out this receptor as a potential player implicated in retinopathy and also as a possible therapeutic target. PMID:25259650

  3. From Erythromycin to Azithromycin and New Potential Ribosome-Binding Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Jelić, Dubravko; Antolović, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Macrolides, as a class of natural or semisynthetic products, express their antibacterial activity primarily by reversible binding to the bacterial 50S ribosomal subunits and by blocking nascent proteins’ progression through their exit tunnel in bacterial protein biosynthesis. Generally considered to be bacteriostatic, they may also be bactericidal at higher doses. The discovery of azithromycin from the class of macrolides, as one of the most important new drugs of the 20th century, is presented as an example of a rational medicinal chemistry approach to drug design, applying classical structure-activity relationship that will illustrate an impressive drug discovery success story. However, the microorganisms have developed several mechanisms to acquire resistance to antibiotics, including macrolide antibiotics. The primary mechanism for acquiring bacterial resistance to macrolides is a mutation of one or more nucleotides from the binding site. Although azithromycin is reported to show different, two-step process of the inhibition of ribosome function of some species, more detailed elaboration of that specific mode of action is needed. New macrocyclic derivatives, which could be more potent and less prone to escape bacterial resistance mechanisms, are also continuously evaluated. A novel class of antibiotic compounds—macrolones, which are derived from macrolides and comprise macrocyclic moiety, linker, and either free or esterified quinolone 3-carboxylic group, show excellent antibacterial potency towards key erythromycin-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains, with possibly decreased potential of bacterial resistance to macrolides. PMID:27598215

  4. From Erythromycin to Azithromycin and New Potential Ribosome-Binding Antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Jelić, Dubravko; Antolović, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Macrolides, as a class of natural or semisynthetic products, express their antibacterial activity primarily by reversible binding to the bacterial 50S ribosomal subunits and by blocking nascent proteins' progression through their exit tunnel in bacterial protein biosynthesis. Generally considered to be bacteriostatic, they may also be bactericidal at higher doses. The discovery of azithromycin from the class of macrolides, as one of the most important new drugs of the 20th century, is presented as an example of a rational medicinal chemistry approach to drug design, applying classical structure-activity relationship that will illustrate an impressive drug discovery success story. However, the microorganisms have developed several mechanisms to acquire resistance to antibiotics, including macrolide antibiotics. The primary mechanism for acquiring bacterial resistance to macrolides is a mutation of one or more nucleotides from the binding site. Although azithromycin is reported to show different, two-step process of the inhibition of ribosome function of some species, more detailed elaboration of that specific mode of action is needed. New macrocyclic derivatives, which could be more potent and less prone to escape bacterial resistance mechanisms, are also continuously evaluated. A novel class of antibiotic compounds-macrolones, which are derived from macrolides and comprise macrocyclic moiety, linker, and either free or esterified quinolone 3-carboxylic group, show excellent antibacterial potency towards key erythromycin-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains, with possibly decreased potential of bacterial resistance to macrolides.

  5. From Erythromycin to Azithromycin and New Potential Ribosome-Binding Antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Jelić, Dubravko; Antolović, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Macrolides, as a class of natural or semisynthetic products, express their antibacterial activity primarily by reversible binding to the bacterial 50S ribosomal subunits and by blocking nascent proteins' progression through their exit tunnel in bacterial protein biosynthesis. Generally considered to be bacteriostatic, they may also be bactericidal at higher doses. The discovery of azithromycin from the class of macrolides, as one of the most important new drugs of the 20th century, is presented as an example of a rational medicinal chemistry approach to drug design, applying classical structure-activity relationship that will illustrate an impressive drug discovery success story. However, the microorganisms have developed several mechanisms to acquire resistance to antibiotics, including macrolide antibiotics. The primary mechanism for acquiring bacterial resistance to macrolides is a mutation of one or more nucleotides from the binding site. Although azithromycin is reported to show different, two-step process of the inhibition of ribosome function of some species, more detailed elaboration of that specific mode of action is needed. New macrocyclic derivatives, which could be more potent and less prone to escape bacterial resistance mechanisms, are also continuously evaluated. A novel class of antibiotic compounds-macrolones, which are derived from macrolides and comprise macrocyclic moiety, linker, and either free or esterified quinolone 3-carboxylic group, show excellent antibacterial potency towards key erythromycin-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains, with possibly decreased potential of bacterial resistance to macrolides. PMID:27598215

  6. Classification and comparison of ligand-binding sites derived from grid-mapped knowledge-based potentials.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Christian; Steinbeck, Christoph; Wohlfahrt, Gerd

    2006-03-01

    We describe the application of knowledge-based potentials implemented in the MOE program to compare the ligand-binding sites of several proteins. The binding probabilities for a polar and a hydrophobic probe are calculated on a grid to allow easy comparison of binding sites of superimposed related proteins. The method is fast and simple enough to simultaneously use structural information of multiple proteins of a target family. The method can be used to rapidly cluster proteins into subfamilies according to the similarity of hydrophobic and polar fields of their ligand-binding sites. Regions of the binding site which are common within a protein family can be identified and analysed for the design of family-targeted libraries or those which differ for improvement of ligand selectivity. The field-based hierarchical clustering is demonstrated for three protein families: the ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors, the ATP-binding sites of protein kinases and the substrate binding sites of proteases. More detailed comparisons are presented for serine proteases of the chymotrypsin family, for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor subfamily of nuclear receptors and for progesterone and androgen receptor. The results are in good accordance with structure-based analysis and highlight important differences of the binding sites, which have been also described in the literature.

  7. Coherent-potential approximation in the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Prabhakar P.; Gonis, A.

    1993-07-01

    We describe a consistent approach for applying the coherent-potential approximation (CPA) to the various representations of the linear muffin-tin orbital method. Unlike the previous works of Kudrnovský et al. [Phys. Rev. B 35, 2487 (1987); 41, 7515 (1990)], our results for the ensemble-averaged Green functions in the tight-binding representation yield E- and r-dependent quantities that are consistent with the traditional applications of the single-site CPA. To illustrate the reliability and the usefulness of our approach we compare the nonspherically averaged charge densities, calculated in real space, of ordered NiPt in L10 structure and the substitutionally disordered Ni0.5Pt0.5 on a face-centered-cubic lattice.

  8. Protein-binding and antioxidant potential of phenolics of mangosteen fruit (Garcinia mangostana).

    PubMed

    Naczk, M; Towsend, M; Zadernowski, R; Shahidi, F

    2011-09-15

    Phenolics were extracted from mangosteen fruit parts with 70% (v/v) aqueous acetone. The yield of crude extracts of phenolics (CP) ranged from 5.8% to 7.9%. The total phenolics (TPH) content ranged from 9.3mg to over 250mg of gallic acid equivalents per g of extract in the edible aril and skin, respectively. The formation of phenolic-protein complexes was assayed by both the dye-labelled bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the fluorescence quenching methods. Phenolics from peel and rind displayed a strong protein-precipitating potential. On the other hand, phenolics from edible aril exhibited greater affinity for BSA, as determined by the fluorescence quenching assay. The static quenching was the dominant mode of quenching of BSA fluorescence by mangosteen fruit phenolics. Mangosteen phenolics occupied two binding sites on BSA molecules located most likely in or near both tryptophan residues in the BSA molecule acting as an intrinsic fluorescence probe.

  9. The heterodimeric sweet taste receptor has multiple potential ligand binding sites.

    PubMed

    Cui, Meng; Jiang, Peihua; Maillet, Emeline; Max, Marianna; Margolskee, Robert F; Osman, Roman

    2006-01-01

    The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of two G protein coupled receptors, T1R2 and T1R3. This discovery has increased our understanding at the molecular level of the mechanisms underlying sweet taste. Previous experimental studies using sweet receptor chimeras and mutants show that there are at least three potential binding sites in this heterodimeric receptor. Receptor activity toward the artificial sweeteners aspartame and neotame depends on residues in the amino terminal domain of human T1R2. In contrast, receptor activity toward the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole depends on residues within the transmembrane domain of human T1R3. Furthermore, receptor activity toward the sweet protein brazzein depends on the cysteine rich domain of human T1R3. Although crystal structures are not available for the sweet taste receptor, useful homology models can be developed based on appropriate templates. The amino terminal domain, cysteine rich domain and transmembrane helix domain of T1R2 and T1R3 have been modeled based on the crystal structures of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1, tumor necrosis factor receptor, and bovine rhodopsin, respectively. We have used homology models of the sweet taste receptors, molecular docking of sweet ligands to the receptors, and site-directed mutagenesis of the receptors to identify potential ligand binding sites of the sweet taste receptor. These studies have led to a better understanding of the structure and function of this heterodimeric receptor, and can act as a guide for rational structure-based design of novel non-caloric sweeteners, which can be used in the fighting against obesity and diabetes. PMID:17168764

  10. The heterodimeric sweet taste receptor has multiple potential ligand binding sites.

    PubMed

    Cui, Meng; Jiang, Peihua; Maillet, Emeline; Max, Marianna; Margolskee, Robert F; Osman, Roman

    2006-01-01

    The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of two G protein coupled receptors, T1R2 and T1R3. This discovery has increased our understanding at the molecular level of the mechanisms underlying sweet taste. Previous experimental studies using sweet receptor chimeras and mutants show that there are at least three potential binding sites in this heterodimeric receptor. Receptor activity toward the artificial sweeteners aspartame and neotame depends on residues in the amino terminal domain of human T1R2. In contrast, receptor activity toward the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole depends on residues within the transmembrane domain of human T1R3. Furthermore, receptor activity toward the sweet protein brazzein depends on the cysteine rich domain of human T1R3. Although crystal structures are not available for the sweet taste receptor, useful homology models can be developed based on appropriate templates. The amino terminal domain, cysteine rich domain and transmembrane helix domain of T1R2 and T1R3 have been modeled based on the crystal structures of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1, tumor necrosis factor receptor, and bovine rhodopsin, respectively. We have used homology models of the sweet taste receptors, molecular docking of sweet ligands to the receptors, and site-directed mutagenesis of the receptors to identify potential ligand binding sites of the sweet taste receptor. These studies have led to a better understanding of the structure and function of this heterodimeric receptor, and can act as a guide for rational structure-based design of novel non-caloric sweeteners, which can be used in the fighting against obesity and diabetes.

  11. Simulation of symmetric nuclei and the role of Pauli potential in binding energies

    SciTech Connect

    M. Angeles Perez-Garcia, K. Tsushima, A. Valcarce

    2009-05-01

    It is shown that the use of a density dependent effective Pauli potential together with a nucleon-nucleon interaction potential plays a crucial role to reproduce not only the binding energies but also the matter root mean square radii of medium mass range spin-isospin saturated nuclei. This study is performed with a semiclassical Monte Carlo many-body simulation within the context of a simplified nucleon-nucleon interaction to focus on the effect of the genuine correlations due to the fermionic nature of nucleons. The procedure obtained is rather robust and it does not depend on the detailed features of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. For nuclei below saturation the density dependence may be represented in terms either of the nucleon number, $A$, or the associated Fermi momenta. When testing the simulation procedure for idealized "infinite" symmetric nuclear matter within the corresponding range of densities, it turns out that finite size effects affect the Pauli potential strength parametrization in systems up to about 120 particles while remaining approximately stable for larger systems.

  12. Binding Energy of 7ΛHe and Test of Charge Symmetry Breaking in the ΛN Interaction Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, O.; Fujii, Y.; Honda, D.; Kaneta, M.; Kato, F.; Kawama, D.; Maruyama, N.; Matsumura, A.; Nakamura, S. N.; Nomura, H.; Nonaka, K.; Ohtani, A.; Okayasu, Y.; Osaka, M.; Oyamada, M.; Sumihama, M.; Tamura, H.; Baker, O. K.; Cole, L.; Christy, M.; Gueye, P.; Keppel, C.; Tang, L.; Yuan, L.; Acha, A.; Baturin, P.; Boeglin, W.; Kramer, L.; Markowitz, P.; Pamela, P.; Perez, N.; Raue, B.; Reinhold, J.; Rivera, R.; Kato, S.; Sato, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Daniel, A.; Hungerford, Ed V.; Ispiryan, M.; Kalantarians, N.; Lan, K. J.; Li, Y.; Miyoshi, T.; Randeniya, S.; Rodriguez, V. M.; Bosted, P.; Carlini, R.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H.; Gaskell, D.; Jones, M.; Mack, D.; Roche, J.; Smith, G.; Tvaskis, V.; Vulcan, W.; Wood, S.; Yan, C.; Asaturyan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Egiyan, K.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Margaryan, A.; Marikyan, G.; Navasardyan, T.; Tadevosyan, V.; Zamkochian, S.; Hu, B.; Song, Y.; Luo, W.; Androic, D.; Furic, M.; Petkovic, T.; Seva, T.; Ahmidouch, A.; Danagoulian, S.; Gasparian, A.; Halkyard, R.; Johnston, K.; Simicevic, N.; Wells, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, M.-I.; Gan, L.; Benmokhtar, F.; Horn, T.; Elaasar, M.; Gibson, E. F.

    2011-09-01

    The binding energy of 7ΛHe has been obtained for the first time with reaction spectroscopy using the (e, e'K+) reaction at Jefferson Lab's Hall C. A comparison among the binding energies of the A = 7 T = l iso-triplet hypernuclei, 7ΛHe, 7ΛLi*and 7ΛBe, is made and possible charge symmetry breaking (CSB) in the ΛN potential is discussed. For 7ΛHe and 7ΛBe, the shifts in binding energies are opposite to those predicted by a recent cluster model calculation, which assumes that the unexplained part of the binding energy difference between 4ΛH and 4ΛHe, is due to the CSB of the ΛN potential. Further examination of CSB in light hypernuclear systems is required both experimentally and theoretically.

  13. Binding energy of (Lambda)He-7 and test of charge symmetry breaking in the Lambda N interaction potential

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, O; Honda, D; Kaneta, M; Kato, F; Kawama, D; Maruyama, N; Matsumura, A; Nakamura, S N; Nomura, H; Nonaka, K; Ohtani, A; Okayasu, Y; Osaka, M; Oyamada, M; Sumihama, M; Tamura, H; Baker, O K; Cole, L; Christy, M; Gueye, P; Keppel, C; Tang, L; Yuan, L; Acha, A; Baturin, P; Boeglin, W; Kramer, L; Markowitz, P; Pamela, P; Perez, N; Raue, B; Reinhold, J; Rivera, R; Kato, S; Sato, Y; Takahashi, T; Daniel, A; Hungerford, Ed V; Ispiryan, M; Kalantarians, N; Lan, K J; Li, Y; Miyoshi, T; Randeniya, S; Rodriguez, V M; Bosted, P; Carlini, R; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Gaskell, D; Jones, M; Mack, D; Roche, J; Smith, G; Tvaskis, V; Vulcan, W; Wood, S; Yan, C; Asaturyan, A; Asaturyan, R; Egiyan, K; Mkrtchyan, H; Margaryan, A; Navasardyan, T; Tadevosyan, V; Zamkochian, S; Hu, B; Song, Y; Luo, W; Androic, D; Furic, M; Petkovic, T; Seva, T; Ahmidouch, A; Danagoulian, S; Gasparian, A; Halkyard, R; Johnson, K; Simicevic, N; Wells, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, M I; Gan, L; Benmokhtar, F; Horn, T; Elassar, M; Gibson, E F

    2011-09-01

    The binding energy of 7LambdaHe has been obtained for the first time with reaction spectroscopy using the (e, e'K+) reaction at Jefferson Lab's Hall C. A comparison among the binding energies of the A = 7 T = l iso-triplet hypernuclei, 7LambdaHe, 7LambdaLi*and 7LambdaBe, is made and possible charge symmetry breaking (CSB) in the LambdaN potential is discussed. For 7LambdaHe and 7LambdaBe, the shifts in binding energies are opposite to those predicted by a recent cluster model calculation, which assumes that the unexplained part of the binding energy difference between 4LambdaH and 4LambdaHe, is due to the CSB of the LambdaN potential. Further examination of CSB in light hypernuclear systems is required both experimentally and theoretically.

  14. Harmonic model of graphene based on a tight binding interatomic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, J. P.; Ariza, M. P.

    2016-08-01

    Like in many other materials, the presence of topological defects in graphene has been demonstrated to modify its behavior, thus enhancing features aimed at several technological applications, more specifically, its electronic and transport properties. In particular, pristine defect-free graphene has been shown to be of limited use for semiconductor-based electronics, whereas the presence of individual or cluster defect rings along grain boundaries hinders electron transport and introduce a transport gap, unveiling the possibility of novel electronic device applications based on the structural engineering of graphene-based materials. In this work, we present an atomic bondwise force-constant model from the tight binding potential by Xu et al. (1992), that accounts for the electron-mechanical coupling effects in graphene. First we verify that this computational scheme is capable of accurately predicting the defect energies and core structures of dislocation dipoles based on the theory of discrete dislocations of Ariza and Ortiz (2005). In order to demonstrate our ability to characterize the effect of patterned distributions of structural defects on the electronic structure of graphene, we present the electronic band structures and density of states curves of several defective graphene sheets.

  15. The simplified reference tissue model: model assumption violations and their impact on binding potential.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Cristian A; Searle, Graham E; Gunn, Roger N

    2015-02-01

    Reference tissue models have gained significant traction over the last two decades as the methods of choice for the quantification of brain positron emission tomography data because they balance quantitative accuracy with less invasive procedures. The principal advantage is the elimination of the need to perform arterial cannulation of the subject to measure blood and metabolite concentrations for input function generation. In particular, the simplified reference tissue model (SRTM) has been widely adopted as it uses a simplified model configuration with only three parameters that typically produces good fits to the kinetic data and a stable parameter estimation process. However, the model's simplicity and its ability to generate good fits to the data, even when the model assumptions are not met, can lead to misplaced confidence in binding potential (BPND) estimates. Computer simulation were used to study the bias introduced in BPND estimates as a consequence of violating each of the four core SRTM model assumptions. Violation of each model assumption led to bias in BPND (both over and underestimation). Careful assessment of the bias in SRTM BPND should be performed for new tracers and applications so that an appropriate decision about its applicability can be made. PMID:25425078

  16. The EF-hand calcium-binding protein tescalcin is a potential oncotarget in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hee Kang, Yun; Ro Han, Seung; Kim, Jong-Tae; Lee, Seon-Jin; Il Yeom, Young; Min, Jeong-Ki; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Jae Wha; Yoon, Suk Ran; Yoon, Do-Young; Hong, Kwan Soo; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Kim, Hee Cheol; Lee, Young-Ha; Lee, Hee Gu

    2014-01-01

    Tescalcin (TESC) is an EF-hand calcium binding protein that is differentially expressed in several tissues, however it is not reported that the expression and functional roles of TESC in colorectal cancer. Levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of TESC in colorectal cancer tissues were assessed using RT-PCR, real time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and clinicopathologic analyses. Quantitative analysis of TESC levels in serum specimens was performed using sandwich ELISA. Colorectal cancer cells transfected with TESC small interfering RNA and short hairpin RNA were examined in cell proliferation assays, phospho-MAPK array, and mouse xenograft models. Here we demonstrated that TESC is overexpressed in colorectal cancer (CRC), but was not expressed in normal mucosa and premalignant dysplastic lesions. Furthermore, serum TESC levels were elevated in patients with CRC. Knockdown of TESC inhibited the Akt-dependent NF-κB pathway and decreased cell survival in vitro. Depletion of TESC reduced tumor growth in a CRC xenograft model. Thus, TESC is a potential diagnostic marker and oncotarget in colorectal cancer. PMID:24811141

  17. Maltose-binding protein is a potential carrier for oral immunizations.

    PubMed

    Bellot, P; Tiels, P; Melkebeek, V; Devriendt, B; Goddeeris, B M; Cox, E

    2013-03-15

    Maltose binding protein (MBP) is often fused to a relevant protein to improve its yield and facilitate its purification, but MBP can also enhance the immunogenicity of the fused proteins. Recent data suggest that MBP may potentiate antigen-presenting functions in immunized animals by providing intrinsic maturation stimuli to dendritic cells through TLR4. The aim of this study was to examine if an MBP-specific immune response can be elicited by oral administration of MBP. Therefore, in a first experiment the MBP specific immune response was analyzed after oral immunization with MBP or MBP+CT to piglets and both the systemic and mucosal immune responses were examined Although no high systemic response was observed in the MBP-group, a local mucosal IgM MBP-specific response in the jejunal Peyer's patches was observed. In the second experiment MBPFedF was orally administered to piglets. A significant systemic response against MBP and a weak response against FedF were found after oral administration of MBPFedF+CT. Also the presence of MBP-specific IgA ASC in the lamina propria indicates that a local intestinal immune response against MBP was induced. Our data suggests that MBP can cross the epithelial barrier reaching the gut-associated lymphoid tissue after oral administration to pigs, which implicates that MBP could act as a carrier and delivery system for fused proteins to target the vaccine antigens to intestinal immune cells. PMID:23078905

  18. Novel glyoxalase-I inhibitors possessing a “zinc-binding feature” as potential anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Al-Balas, Qosay A; Hassan, Mohammad A; Al-Shar’i, Nizar A; Mhaidat, Nizar M; Almaaytah, Ammar M; Al-Mahasneh, Fatima M; Isawi, Israa H

    2016-01-01

    Background The glyoxalase system including two thiol-dependent enzymes, glyoxalase I (Glo-I) and glyoxalase II, plays an important role in a ubiquitous metabolic pathway involved in cellular detoxification of cytotoxic 2-oxoaldehydes. Tumor cells have high glycolytic activity, leading to increased cellular levels of these toxic metabolites. The increased activity of the detoxification system in cancerous cells makes this pathway a viable target for developing novel anticancer agents. In this study, we examined the potential utility of non-glutathione-based inhibitors of the Glo-I enzyme as novel anticancer drugs. Methods Computer-aided drug design techniques, such as customized pharmacophoric features, virtual screening, and flexible docking, were used to achieve the project goals. Retrieved hits were extensively filtered and subsequently docked into the active site of the enzyme. The biological activities of retrieved hits were assessed using an in vitro assay against Glo-I. Results Since Glo-I is a zinc metalloenzyme, a customized Zn-binding pharmacophoric feature was used to search for selective inhibitors via virtual screening of a small-molecule database. Seven hits were selected, purchased, and biologically evaluated. Three of the seven hits inhibited Glo-I activity, the most effective of which exerted 76.4% inhibition at a concentration of 25 µM. Conclusion We successfully identified a potential Glo-I inhibitor that can serve as a lead compound for further optimization. Moreover, our in silico and experimental results were highly correlated. Hence, the docking protocol adopted in this study may be efficiently employed in future optimization steps. PMID:27574401

  19. Potential transition state analogue inhibitors for the penicillin-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Pechenov, Aleksandr; Stefanova, Miglena E; Nicholas, Robert A; Peddi, Sridhar; Gutheil, William G

    2003-01-21

    Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are ubiquitous bacterial enzymes involved in cell wall biosynthesis. The development of new PBP inhibitors is a potentially viable strategy for developing new antibacterial agents. Several potential transition state analogue inhibitors for the PBPs were synthesized, including peptide chloromethyl ketones, trifluoromethyl ketones, aldehydes, and boronic acids. These agents were characterized chemically, stereochemically, and as inhibitors of a set of low molecular mass PBPs: Escherichia coli (EC) PBP 5, Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) PBP 3, and NG PBP 4. A peptide boronic acid was the most effective PBP inhibitor in the series, with a preference observed for a d-boroAla-based over an l-boroAla-based inhibitor, as expected given that physiological PBP substrates are based on d-Ala at the cleavage site. The lowest K(I) of 370 nM was obtained for NG PBP 3 inhibition by Boc-l-Lys(Cbz)-d-boroAla (10b). Competitive inhibition was observed for this enzyme-inhibitor pair, as expected for an active site-directed inhibitor. For the three PBPs included in this study, an inverse correlation was observed between the values for log K(I) with 10b and the values for log(k(cat)/K(m)) for activity against the analogous substrate, and K(m)/K(I) ratios were 90, 1900, and 9600 for NG PBP 4, EC PBP 5, and NG PBP 3, respectively. These results demonstrate that peptide boronic acids can be effective transition state analogue inhibitors for the PBPs and provide a basis for the use of these agents as probes of PBP structure, function, and mechanism, as well as a possible basis for the development of new PBP-targeted antibacterial agents. PMID:12525187

  20. Characteristics of albumin binding to opossum kidney cells and identification of potential receptors.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, N J; Nahorski, S; Walls, J

    1997-02-01

    Albumin re-absorption in the kidney proximal tubule may be pathophysiological in disease. Opossum kidney (OK) cell monolayers were used to investigate the characteristics of [125I]-labelled albumin binding at 4 degrees C. Two binding sites were identified, one with high affinity (KD 154.8 +/-7 mg/l) and low capacity, the other with low affinity (KD 8300 +/- 1000 mg/l) and high capacity. Binding was sensitive to lectins Glycine max and Ulex europaeus I, but not other lectins, indicating involvement of a glycoprotein(s) in the binding process. Binding was also sensitive to a number of agents known to inhibit binding to scavenger receptors. [125I]-Labelled albumin ligand blotting of OK cell membrane proteins identified several albumin-binding proteins with identical lectin affinities to those proteins mediating albumin binding to OK cell monolayers. These results provide initial evidence of the identity of albumin receptors in kidney tubules, and suggest that they may be members of the family of scavenger receptors. PMID:9000429

  1. Electrochemical potential releases a membrane-bound secretion intermediate of maltose-binding protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Geller, B L

    1990-01-01

    A secretionary intermediate of the Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein accumulated in the inner membrane when the membrane electrochemical potential was reduced and the cytosolic ATP concentration was normal. The intermediate was mature in size, but maintained a conformation similar to the cytosolic precursor form, and not the mature periplasmic protein, as measured by differences in susceptibility to proteinase K in vitro. The intermediate was located on the periplasmic side of the inner membrane. Restoration of the membrane electrochemical potential resulted in the movement of the intermediate from the inner membrane to the periplasm. In other experiments in which the ATP concentration was reduced by 96% and the electrochemical potential remained normal, no intermediate accumulated. Thus, the final step in the export of maltose-binding protein requires the electrochemical potential of the inner membrane and does not require ATP. Images PMID:2203734

  2. Assessing the potential of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to probe reversible protein-protein recognition and binding

    PubMed Central

    Abriata, Luciano A.; Dal Peraro, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein recognition and binding are governed by diffusion, noncovalent forces and conformational flexibility, entangled in a way that only molecular dynamics simulations can dissect at high resolution. Here we exploited ubiquitin’s noncovalent dimerization equilibrium to assess the potential of atomistic simulations to reproduce reversible protein-protein binding, by running submicrosecond simulations of systems with multiple copies of the protein at millimolar concentrations. The simulations essentially fail because they lead to aggregates, yet they reproduce some specificity in the binding interfaces as observed in known covalent and noncovalent ubiquitin dimers. Following similar observations in literature we hint at electrostatics and water descriptions as the main liable force field elements, and propose that their optimization should consider observables relevant to multi-protein systems and unfolded proteins. Within limitations, analysis of binding events suggests salient features of protein-protein recognition and binding, to be retested with improved force fields. Among them, that specific configurations of relative direction and orientation seem to trigger fast binding of two molecules, even over 50 Å distances; that conformational selection can take place within surface-to-surface distances of 10 to 40 Å i.e. well before actual intermolecular contact; and that establishment of contacts between molecules further locks their conformations and relative orientations. PMID:26023027

  3. Synthesis and biological evaluation of benzimidazole acridine derivatives as potential DNA-binding and apoptosis-inducing agents.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunmei; Li, Bin; Zhang, Bin; Sun, Qinsheng; Li, Lulu; Li, Xi; Chen, Changjun; Tan, Chunyan; Liu, Hongxia; Jiang, Yuyang

    2015-04-15

    The discovery of new effective DNA-targeted antitumor agent is needed because of their clinical significance. As acridines can intercalate into DNA and benzimidazoles have the ability to bind in the DNA minor groove, a series of novel benzimidazole acridine derivatives were designed and synthesized to be new DNA-targeted compounds. MTT assay indicated that most of the synthesized compounds displayed good antiproliferative activity, among which compound 8l demonstrated the highest activity against both K562 and HepG-2 cells. Further experiments showed that 8l displayed good DNA-binding capability and inhibited topoisomerase I activity. Moreover, compound 8l could induce apoptosis in K562 cell lines through mitochondrial pathway. These data suggested that compound 8l might be potential as new DNA-binding and apoptosis-inducing antitumor agents.

  4. Protein binding and its potential for eliciting minimal systemic side effects with a novel inhaled corticosteroid, ciclesonide.

    PubMed

    Rohatagi, Shashank; Luo, Yongyi; Shen, Liduo; Guo, Zuyu; Schemm, Christina; Huang, Yongqing; Chen, Kelly; David, Michael; Nave, Ruediger; King, S Peter

    2005-01-01

    Freely circulating, protein unbound, active inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) can cause systemic adverse effects. Desisobutyryl-ciclesonide (des-CIC) is the active metabolite of ciclesonide, an effective, novel ICS for persistent asthma. This study examines the free fraction of ciclesonide and des-CIC and determines whether the presence of other agents or disease states affects protein binding. Protein binding of des-CIC (0.5, 5.0, 25, 100, and 500 ng/mL) was determined, using both equilibrium dialysis and ultrafiltration, in plasma from humans (healthy and either renally or hepatically impaired) and several animal species and in the presence of either salicylates or warfarin. Dialyzed samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectroscopy to determine both free and bound concentrations of des-CIC. After ultrafiltration, spiked plasma plus H-des-CIC was separated into free and bound fractions by centrifugation and quantified by scintillation counting. Additionally, in another study, protein binding of ciclesonide was determined by equilibrium dialysis. For equilibrium dialysis, the mean percentages of des-CIC (0.5-500 ng/mL) plasma protein binding across species were high, approximately 99%, and no apparent saturation of protein binding was observed. Results were similar for ultrafiltration analysis. Protein binding of des-CIC did not change in the presence of warfarin or salicylates or in the plasma of renally or hepatically impaired patients. The protein binding of ciclesonide was 99.4% in human serum. The very low fraction of unbound des-CIC in the systemic circulation suggests minimal systemic exposure of unbound des-CIC, thus suggesting a low potential for systemic adverse effects after administration of inhaled ciclesonide. PMID:15891262

  5. The multifunctional LigB adhesin binds homeostatic proteins with potential roles in cutaneous infection by pathogenic Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Choy, Henry A; Kelley, Melissa M; Croda, Julio; Matsunaga, James; Babbitt, Jane T; Ko, Albert I; Picardeau, Mathieu; Haake, David A

    2011-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a potentially fatal zoonotic disease in humans and animals caused by pathogenic spirochetes, such as Leptospira interrogans. The mode of transmission is commonly limited to the exposure of mucous membrane or damaged skin to water contaminated by leptospires shed in the urine of carriers, such as rats. Infection occurs during seasonal flooding of impoverished tropical urban habitats with large rat populations, but also during recreational activity in open water, suggesting it is very efficient. LigA and LigB are surface localized proteins in pathogenic Leptospira strains with properties that could facilitate the infection of damaged skin. Their expression is rapidly induced by the increase in osmolarity encountered by leptospires upon transition from water to host. In addition, the immunoglobulin-like repeats of the Lig proteins bind proteins that mediate attachment to host tissue, such as fibronectin, fibrinogen, collagens, laminin, and elastin, some of which are important in cutaneous wound healing and repair. Hemostasis is critical in a fresh injury, where fibrinogen from damaged vasculature mediates coagulation. We show that fibrinogen binding by recombinant LigB inhibits fibrin formation, which could aid leptospiral entry into the circulation, dissemination, and further infection by impairing healing. LigB also binds fibroblast fibronectin and type III collagen, two proteins prevalent in wound repair, thus potentially enhancing leptospiral adhesion to skin openings. LigA or LigB expression by transformation of a nonpathogenic saprophyte, L. biflexa, enhances bacterial adhesion to fibrinogen. Our results suggest that by binding homeostatic proteins found in cutaneous wounds, LigB could facilitate leptospirosis transmission. Both fibronectin and fibrinogen binding have been mapped to an overlapping domain in LigB comprising repeats 9-11, with repeat 11 possibly enhancing binding by a conformational effect. Leptospirosis patient antibodies react

  6. Human RNASET2 derivatives as potential anti-angiogenic agents: actin binding sequence identification and characterization

    PubMed Central

    Nesiel-Nuttman, Liron; Doron, Shani; Schwartz, Betty; Shoseyov, Oded

    2015-01-01

    Human RNASET2 (hRNASET2) has been demonstrated to exert antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic effects independent of its ribonuclease capacity. We suggested that RNASET2 exerts its antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic activities via binding to actin and consequently inhibits cell motility. We focused herein on the identification of the actin binding site of hRNASET2 using defined sequences encountered within the whole hRNASET2 protein. For that purpose we designed 29 different hRNASET2-derived peptides. The 29 peptides were examined for their ability to bind immobilized actin. Two selected peptides-A103-Q159 consisting of 57 amino acids and peptide K108-K133 consisting of 26 amino acids were demonstrated to have the highest actin binding ability and concomitantly the most potent anti-angiogenic activity. Further analyses on the putative mechanisms associated with angiogenesis inhibition exerted by peptide K108-K133 involved its location during treatment within the HUVE cells. Peptide K108-K133 readily penetrates the cell membrane within 10 min of incubation. In addition, supplementation with angiogenin delays the entrance of peptide K108-K133 to the cell suggesting competition on the same cell internalization route. The peptide was demonstrated to co-localize with angiogenin, suggesting that both molecules bind analogous cellular epitopes, similar to our previously reported data for ACTIBIND and trT2-50. PMID:25815360

  7. A physical reference state unifies the structure-derived potential of mean force for protein folding and binding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Song; Zhang, Chi; Zhou, Hongyi; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2004-07-01

    Extracting knowledge-based statistical potential from known structures of proteins is proved to be a simple, effective method to obtain an approximate free-energy function. However, the different compositions of amino acid residues at the core, the surface, and the binding interface of proteins prohibited the establishment of a unified statistical potential for folding and binding despite the fact that the physical basis of the interaction (water-mediated interaction between amino acids) is the same. Recently, a physical state of ideal gas, rather than a statistically averaged state, has been used as the reference state for extracting the net interaction energy between amino acid residues of monomeric proteins. Here, we find that this monomer-based potential is more accurate than an existing all-atom knowledge-based potential trained with interfacial structures of dimers in distinguishing native complex structures from docking decoys (100% success rate vs. 52% in 21 dimer/trimer decoy sets). It is also more accurate than a recently developed semiphysical empirical free-energy functional enhanced by an orientation-dependent hydrogen-bonding potential in distinguishing native state from Rosetta docking decoys (94% success rate vs. 74% in 31 antibody-antigen and other complexes based on Z score). In addition, the monomer potential achieved a 93% success rate in distinguishing true dimeric interfaces from artificial crystal interfaces. More importantly, without additional parameters, the potential provides an accurate prediction of binding free energy of protein-peptide and protein-protein complexes (a correlation coefficient of 0.87 and a root-mean-square deviation of 1.76 kcal/mol with 69 experimental data points). This work marks a significant step toward a unified knowledge-based potential that quantitatively captures the common physical principle underlying folding and binding. A Web server for academic users, established for the prediction of binding free energy

  8. Metallomics investigations on potential binding partners of methylmercury in tuna fish muscle tissue using complementary mass spectrometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Kutscher, Daniel J; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo; Bettmer, Jörg

    2012-08-01

    In this study, the binding behaviour of methylmercury (MeHg(+)) towards proteins is investigated. Free sulfhydryl groups in cysteine residues are known to be the most likely binding partners, due to the high affinity of mercury to sulphur. However, detailed knowledge about discrete binding sites in living organisms has been so far scarce. A metallomics approach using different methods like size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as well as complementary mass spectrometric techniques (electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry, ESI-MS/MS) are combined to sequence and identify possible target proteins or peptides after enzymatic digestion. Potential targets for MeHg(+) in tuna fish muscle tissue are investigated using the certified reference material CRM464 as a model tissue. Different extraction procedures appropriate for the extraction of proteins are evaluated for their efficiency using isotope dilution analysis for the determination of total Hg in the extracts. Due to the high chemical stability of the mercury-sulphur bond, the bioconjugate can be quantitatively extracted with a combination of tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (TRIS) and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). Using different separation techniques such as SEC and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) it can be shown that major binding occurs to a high-molecular weight protein (M(w) > 200 kDa). A potential target protein, skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain, could be identified after tryptic digestion and capillary LC-ESI-MS/MS.

  9. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus; identification of M protein-binding peptide ligands with antiviral and diagnostic potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The membrane (M) protein is one of the major structural proteins of coronavirus particles. In this study, the M protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was used to biopan a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. Three phages expressing TGEV-M-binding peptides were identified and ...

  10. FR258900, a potential anti-hyperglycemic drug, binds at the allosteric site of glycogen phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Tiraidis, Costas; Alexacou, Kyra-Melinda; Zographos, Spyros E.; Leonidas, Demetres D.; Gimisis, Thanasis; Oikonomakos, Nikos G.

    2007-01-01

    FR258900 has been discovered as a novel inhibitor of human liver glycogen phosphorylase a and proved to suppress hepatic glycogen breakdown and reduce plasma glucose concentrations in diabetic mice models. To elucidate the mechanism of inhibition, we have determined the crystal structure of the cocrystallized rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase b–FR258900 complex and refined it to 2.2 Å resolution. The structure demonstrates that the inhibitor binds at the allosteric activator site, where the physiological activator AMP binds. The contacts from FR258900 to glycogen phosphorylase are dominated by nonpolar van der Waals interactions with Gln71, Gln72, Phe196, and Val45′ (from the symmetry-related subunit), and also by ionic interactions from the carboxylate groups to the three arginine residues (Arg242, Arg309, and Arg310) that form the allosteric phosphate-recognition subsite. The binding of FR258900 to the protein promotes conformational changes that stabilize an inactive T-state quaternary conformation of the enzyme. The ligand-binding mode is different from those of the potent phenoxy-phthalate and acyl urea inhibitors, previously described, illustrating the broad specificity of the allosteric site. PMID:17600143

  11. Potential Cooperations between Odorant-Binding Proteins of the Scarab Beetle Holotrichia oblita Faldermann (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing; Guan, Li; Zhong, Tao; Li, Kebin; Yin, Jiao; Cao, Yazhong

    2013-01-01

    It was previously thought that the odorant binding proteins (OBPs) in the sensillum lymph might serve as carriers, which could carry lipophilic odorant molecules to olfactory receptors. In this study, two novel OBP genes of the scarab beetle Holotrichia oblita were screened using an antennal cDNA library. The full cDNA of HoblOBP3 and HoblOBP4 was cloned using reverse transcription PCR and rapid amplification of the cDNA ends. Homology modeling of both OBPs was performed using SWISS-MODEL on-line tools. Next, the two OBPs were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using Ni ion affinity chromatography. The ligand-binding properties of HoblOBP3 and HoblOBP4 in 42 ligands respectively were measured using the fluorescence probe N-phenyl-naphthylamine (1-NPN). The results obtained from competitive binding assays demonstrated that HoblOBP4 showed a broader range of binding affinities to the test compounds, while HoblOBP3 displays more specific binding affinity. Furthermore, other OBPs and CSPs were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using Ni ion affinity chromatography. Binding curves were measured for binary mixtures of OBPs and CSPs using 1-NPN, and the Scatchard plots exhibited “J”-like nonlinear correlation trends in some samples. In addition, competitive binding assays of the HoblOBP1 and HoblOBP2 mixtures and of the HoblOBP2 and HoblOBP4 mixtures with representative compounds unexpectedly demonstrated good affinity, which revealed extreme differences that were only obtained using the individual proteins. In the immunocytochemical analysis, colocalization of HoblOBP1 and HoblOBP2, and of HoblOBP2 and HoblOBP4, was detected in the sensilla basiconica and sensilla placodea, respectively. All of these results suggested that HoblOBP1 and HoblOBP2, as well as HoblOBP2 and HoblOBP4, may serve as heterodimers in the sensillum lymph. PMID:24376847

  12. The interaction of mannose binding lectin (MBL) with mannose containing glycopeptides and the resultant potential impact on invasive fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Sealy, Patricia I; Garner, Bianca; Swiatlo, Ed; Chapman, Stanley W; Cleary, John D

    2008-09-01

    Mannnose-binding lectin (MBL) binds oligosaccharides on the surface of microorganisms to form complexes that activate the complement cascade and facilitate phagocytosis. Teicoplanin and dalbavancin glycopeptide antibiotics possess N-acetyl glucosamine and mannose oligosaccharides that may bind MBL. Pharmaceuticals capable of binding to MBL may decrease clearance of significant pathogens such as yeast. An invasive candidemia murine model was utilized to evaluate differences in survival between mannose- and teicoplanin-treated groups compared to a control group administered normal saline. Three groups of BALB/c mice were injected with Candida albicans ATCC 44858 (1.4 x 10(6) CFU). Pharmaceutical agents were administered 2 h pre-infection and 8 h post-infection. In vivo cumulative survival at 52 h revealed 10%, 30% and 90% survival rates for mice administered mannose, teicoplanin, and saline, respectively. There was 0% survival for mice given mannose or teicoplanin at 56 h, compared with 70% for the normal saline treated mice at the same time point (P < 0.05). This in vivo study shows 'accelerated progression of infection' for Candida-inoculated mice exposed to mannose or teicoplanin compared to those given normal saline. Further, protein polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis studies suggested a potential MBL-drug interaction which may attenuate complement activation, opsonization and phagocytosis.

  13. A Rat α-Fetoprotein Binding Activity Prediction Model to Facilitate Assessment of the Endocrine Disruption Potential of Environmental Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Hong, Huixiao; Shen, Jie; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Ye, Hao; Ge, Weigong; Gong, Ping; Xiao, Wenming; Tong, Weida

    2016-04-01

    Endocrine disruptors such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), diethylstilbestrol (DES) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) are agents that interfere with the endocrine system and cause adverse health effects. Huge public health concern about endocrine disruptors has arisen. One of the mechanisms of endocrine disruption is through binding of endocrine disruptors with the hormone receptors in the target cells. Entrance of endocrine disruptors into target cells is the precondition of endocrine disruption. The binding capability of a chemical with proteins in the blood affects its entrance into the target cells and, thus, is very informative for the assessment of potential endocrine disruption of chemicals. α-fetoprotein is one of the major serum proteins that binds to a variety of chemicals such as estrogens. To better facilitate assessment of endocrine disruption of environmental chemicals, we developed a model for α-fetoprotein binding activity prediction using the novel pattern recognition method (Decision Forest) and the molecular descriptors calculated from two-dimensional structures by Mold² software. The predictive capability of the model has been evaluated through internal validation using 125 training chemicals (average balanced accuracy of 69%) and external validations using 22 chemicals (balanced accuracy of 71%). Prediction confidence analysis revealed the model performed much better at high prediction confidence. Our results indicate that the model is useful (when predictions are in high confidence) in endocrine disruption risk assessment of environmental chemicals though improvement by increasing number of training chemicals is needed. PMID:27023588

  14. A Rat α-Fetoprotein Binding Activity Prediction Model to Facilitate Assessment of the Endocrine Disruption Potential of Environmental Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Huixiao; Shen, Jie; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Ye, Hao; Ge, Weigong; Gong, Ping; Xiao, Wenming; Tong, Weida

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), diethylstilbestrol (DES) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) are agents that interfere with the endocrine system and cause adverse health effects. Huge public health concern about endocrine disruptors has arisen. One of the mechanisms of endocrine disruption is through binding of endocrine disruptors with the hormone receptors in the target cells. Entrance of endocrine disruptors into target cells is the precondition of endocrine disruption. The binding capability of a chemical with proteins in the blood affects its entrance into the target cells and, thus, is very informative for the assessment of potential endocrine disruption of chemicals. α-fetoprotein is one of the major serum proteins that binds to a variety of chemicals such as estrogens. To better facilitate assessment of endocrine disruption of environmental chemicals, we developed a model for α-fetoprotein binding activity prediction using the novel pattern recognition method (Decision Forest) and the molecular descriptors calculated from two-dimensional structures by Mold2 software. The predictive capability of the model has been evaluated through internal validation using 125 training chemicals (average balanced accuracy of 69%) and external validations using 22 chemicals (balanced accuracy of 71%). Prediction confidence analysis revealed the model performed much better at high prediction confidence. Our results indicate that the model is useful (when predictions are in high confidence) in endocrine disruption risk assessment of environmental chemicals though improvement by increasing number of training chemicals is needed. PMID:27023588

  15. Localization of potential binding sites for the edema disease verotoxin (VT2e) in pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, T E; Coomber, B L; Gyles, C L

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify organs and cells to which the edema disease verotoxin (VT2e) could bind in pigs. Frozen 4-5 microns thick sections of organs usually affected in edema disease (colon, spinal cord, cerebellum and eyelid) and organs not usually affected (liver, ileum) from two 5- to 6-week-old weaned pigs were permeabilized with acetone, then exposed to VT2e. Unbound VT2e was removed by washing and bound VT2e was detected by immunohistochemistry. In the eyelid, double-label immunofluorescence was used to identify the cells to which VT2e bound. VT2e was shown to bind to all six organs that were examined. The toxin bound to arteries in all organs, to veins in all organs except the liver, and to enterocytes in the ileal crypts. Double labelling of eyelid with monoclonal antibodies specific for von Willebrand factor or alpha-smooth actin and VT2e showed that the toxin bound to endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. The binding of VT2e to endothelium is consistent with findings for other verotoxins but binding to vascular smooth muscle has not been reported for other verotoxins. It is concluded that i) factors other than the presence of receptors for VT2e influence the development of lesions in edema disease, and ii) smooth muscle necrosis, which is characteristic of the vascular lesions in edema disease, may be due to a direct action of toxin on smooth muscle cells. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:9553705

  16. Potential DNA binding and nuclease functions of ComEC domains characterized in silico

    PubMed Central

    Baker, James A.; Simkovic, Felix; Taylor, Helen M.C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial competence, which can be natural or induced, allows the uptake of exogenous double stranded DNA (dsDNA) into a competent bacterium. This process is known as transformation. A multiprotein assembly binds and processes the dsDNA to import one strand and degrade another yet the underlying molecular mechanisms are relatively poorly understood. Here distant relationships of domains in Competence protein EC (ComEC) of Bacillus subtilis (Uniprot: P39695) were characterized. DNA‐protein interactions were investigated in silico by analyzing models for structural conservation, surface electrostatics and structure‐based DNA binding propensity; and by data‐driven macromolecular docking of DNA to models. Our findings suggest that the DUF4131 domain contains a cryptic DNA‐binding OB fold domain and that the β‐lactamase‐like domain is the hitherto cryptic competence nuclease. Proteins 2016; 84:1431–1442. © 2016 The Authors Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27318187

  17. Extracellular production of riboflavin-binding protein, a potential bitter inhibitor, by Brevibacillus choshinensis.

    PubMed

    Maehashi, Kenji; Matano, Mami; Saito, Makiko; Udaka, Shigezo

    2010-05-01

    Riboflavin-binding protein (RBP) is a glycophosphoprotein found in hen eggs. We previously identified the extraordinary characteristic of RBP in reducing bitterness. For a more detailed study on the mode of action and industrial application of this characteristic, we investigated the microbial production of recombinant RBP (rRBP). We constructed a chicken RBP gene expression vector by inserting the RBP cDNA in pNCMO2, the Escherichia coli-Brevibacillus choshinensis shuttle vector. B. choshinensis HPD31 transformants produced 0.8g/l of processed and unglycosylated RBP in a soluble form in the culture supernatant. However, the expressed RBP was partially dimerized and monomeric RBP was purified by two step anion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatographies. The purified rRBP elicited bitterness reduction against quinine and caffeine, although it largely lost its riboflavin-binding ability. These results indicated that glycosylation and riboflavin-binding ability are not essential for the bitterness reduction of RBP. In addition, we assessed the usefulness of the Brevibacillus system for the expression and secretion of RBP as a new type of bitterness inhibitor. PMID:20045733

  18. Binding energy and structure of e{sup +}Li and e{sup -}Li using a parametric model potential

    SciTech Connect

    Shertzer, J.; Ward, S. J.

    2006-02-15

    The parametric model potential developed by Peach for describing the electron interaction with the alkali-metal ion core yields energy levels that are in excellent agreement with the measurements of the spectra. Because of its relative simplicity, the l-independent model potential is an attractive choice for studying positron-alkali-metal collisions. In order to test how well the model potential can be used to describe an effective three-body system, we use the Peach model potential to calculate the energy and geometry of the weakly bound e{sup +}Li and e{sup -}Li systems. The binding energy is in good agreement with calculations using the exact Hamiltonian.

  19. Purely-long-range krypton molecules in singly and doubly excited binding potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Z. S.; Harmon, A.; Banister, J.; Norman, R.; Hoogeboom-Pot, K.; Walhout, M.

    2010-01-15

    Diatomic potentials for krypton are computed and also probed experimentally. For a probe-laser wavelength near 811 nm, several strong dipole-dipole interactions produce purely-long-range potential wells in the singly excited manifold of (s+p) potentials and in the doubly excited manifold of (p+p) and (s+d) potentials. Evidence of resonant photoassociation into bound states of these potential wells is observed in the emission of ions and ultraviolet photons from a magneto-optically trapped krypton cloud.

  20. Molecular characterization, functional expression, tissue localization and protective potential of a Taenia solium fatty acid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Illescas, Oscar; Carrero, Julio C; Bobes, Raúl J; Flisser, Ana; Rosas, Gabriela; Laclette, Juan P

    2012-12-01

    The fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) comprise a family of proteins that are widely expressed in animal cells and perform a variety of vital functions. Here, we report the identification, characterization, recombinant expression, tissue localization and protective potential of a Taenia solium FABP (TsFABP1). The TsFABP1 primary structure showed all the conserved residues characteristic of the subfamily iv of the intracellular Lipid-Binding Proteins (iLBPs), including those involved in the binding stabilization of the fatty acid molecule. Through a competitive binding assay we found that TsFABP1 is able to bind at least six different fatty acids with preference toward palmitic and stearic acid, suggesting that TsFABP1 is a member of the iLBP subfamily iv. Immunolocalization assays carried out on larval and adult tissues of four species of taeniids using anti-TsFABP1 hyperimmune sera produced in mice and rabbit, showed intense labeling in the tegument of the spiral canal and in subtegumental cytons of the larvae. These findings suggest that the spiral canal might be a major place for FA uptake in the developing scolex. In contrast, only subtegumental cytons in the adult worms stained positive. We propose that TsFABP1 is involved in the mechanism to mobilize fatty acids between compartments in the extensive syncytial tissue of taeniids. Protection assays carried out in a murine model of cysticercosis showed that subcutaneous immunization with TsFABP1 resulted in about 45% reduction of parasite load against an intraperitoneal challenge with Taenia crassiceps cysts. This reduction in parasite load correlated with the level of cellular and humoral immune responses against TsFABP1, as determined in spleen lymphocyte proliferation and ELISA testing.

  1. Sterols and triterpenoids as potential anti-inflammatories: Molecular docking studies for binding to some enzymes involved in inflammatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Loza-Mejía, Marco A; Salazar, Juan Rodrigo

    2015-11-01

    Triterpenes and sterols are good candidates for the development of anti-inflammatory drugs and use in chemoprevention or chemotherapy of cancer via the interaction with therapeutic targets related to inflammation, such as COX-1 and -2; LOX-5; MPO, PLA2 and i-NOS. In this study, we use molecular docking to evaluate the potential binding of a database of selected sterol and triterpenoid compounds with several skeletons against enzymes related to inflammation to propose structural requirements beneficial for anti-inflammatory activity that can be used for the design of more potent and selective anti-inflammatory and antitumor drugs. Our results suggest that the substitution pattern is important and that there is an important relationship between the class of sterol or triterpenoid skeleton and enzyme binding.

  2. Metallomics investigations on potential binding partners of methylmercury in tuna fish muscle tissue using complementary mass spectrometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Kutscher, Daniel J; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo; Bettmer, Jörg

    2012-08-01

    In this study, the binding behaviour of methylmercury (MeHg(+)) towards proteins is investigated. Free sulfhydryl groups in cysteine residues are known to be the most likely binding partners, due to the high affinity of mercury to sulphur. However, detailed knowledge about discrete binding sites in living organisms has been so far scarce. A metallomics approach using different methods like size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as well as complementary mass spectrometric techniques (electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry, ESI-MS/MS) are combined to sequence and identify possible target proteins or peptides after enzymatic digestion. Potential targets for MeHg(+) in tuna fish muscle tissue are investigated using the certified reference material CRM464 as a model tissue. Different extraction procedures appropriate for the extraction of proteins are evaluated for their efficiency using isotope dilution analysis for the determination of total Hg in the extracts. Due to the high chemical stability of the mercury-sulphur bond, the bioconjugate can be quantitatively extracted with a combination of tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (TRIS) and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). Using different separation techniques such as SEC and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) it can be shown that major binding occurs to a high-molecular weight protein (M(w) > 200 kDa). A potential target protein, skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain, could be identified after tryptic digestion and capillary LC-ESI-MS/MS. PMID:22699869

  3. Functional specialization of stomatal bHLHs through modification of DNA-binding and phosphoregulation potential

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Kelli A.; Bergmann, Dominique C.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factor duplication events and subsequent specialization can drive evolution by facilitating biological innovation and developmental complexity. Identification of sequences that confer distinct biochemical function in vivo is an important step in understanding how related factors could refine specific developmental processes over time. Functional analysis of the basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) protein SPEECHLESS, one of three closely related transcription factors required for stomatal lineage progression in Arabidopsis thaliana, allowed a dissection of motifs associated with specific developmental outputs. Phosphorylated residues, shown previously to quantitatively affect activity, also allow a qualitative shift in function between division and cell fate-promoting activities. Our data also provide surprising evidence that, despite deep sequence conservation in DNA-binding domains, the functional requirement for these domains has diverged, with the three stomatal bHLHs exhibiting absolute, partial, or no requirements for DNA-binding residues for their in vivo activities. Using these data, we build a plausible model describing how the current unique and overlapping roles of these proteins might have evolved from a single ancestral protein. PMID:25304637

  4. Functional specialization of stomatal bHLHs through modification of DNA-binding and phosphoregulation potential.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kelli A; Bergmann, Dominique C

    2014-10-28

    Transcription factor duplication events and subsequent specialization can drive evolution by facilitating biological innovation and developmental complexity. Identification of sequences that confer distinct biochemical function in vivo is an important step in understanding how related factors could refine specific developmental processes over time. Functional analysis of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein SPEECHLESS, one of three closely related transcription factors required for stomatal lineage progression in Arabidopsis thaliana, allowed a dissection of motifs associated with specific developmental outputs. Phosphorylated residues, shown previously to quantitatively affect activity, also allow a qualitative shift in function between division and cell fate-promoting activities. Our data also provide surprising evidence that, despite deep sequence conservation in DNA-binding domains, the functional requirement for these domains has diverged, with the three stomatal bHLHs exhibiting absolute, partial, or no requirements for DNA-binding residues for their in vivo activities. Using these data, we build a plausible model describing how the current unique and overlapping roles of these proteins might have evolved from a single ancestral protein.

  5. Potential New Ligand Systems for Binding Uranyl Ions in Seawater Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, John

    2014-12-13

    Work began this quarter on a new project involving a combined computational and biosynthetic approach to selective recognition of uranyl ion in aqueous solution. This project exploits the results of computational studies to discover new ligand classes. Synthetic studies will follow to generate target systems for uranyl binding and determination of binding constants. The process will be iterative, with results from computation informing synthesis, and vice versa. The theme of the ligand classes to be examined initially will be biologically based. New phosphonate-containing α-amino acid N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) monomers were used recently to prepare well-defined phosphonate-containing poly-peptides and block copolypeptides. Our first approach is to utilize these phosphate- and phosphonate-containing NCAs for the coordination of uranyl. The work includes the laboratory-scale preparation of a series of NCAs and the full thermodynamic and spectroscopic characterization of the resulting uranyl complexes. We are also evaluating the sequestering activity in different physiological and environmental conditions of these copolymers as well as their biodegradability.

  6. Benchmarking in vitro covalent binding burden as a tool to assess potential toxicity caused by nonspecific covalent binding of covalent drugs.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Upendra P; Obach, R Scott; Gilbert, Adam M

    2013-11-18

    Despite several advantages of covalent inhibitors (such as increased biochemical efficiency, longer duration of action on the target, and lower efficacious doses) over their reversible binding counterparts, there is a reluctance to use covalent inhibitors as a drug design strategy in pharmaceutical research. This reluctance is due to their anticipated reactions with nontargeted macromolecules. We hypothesized that there may be a threshold limit for nonspecific covalent binding, below which a covalent binding drug may be less likely to cause toxicity due to irreversible binding to off-target macromolecules. Estimation of in vivo covalent binding burden from in vitro data has previously been used as an approach to distinguish those agents more likely to cause toxicity (e.g., hepatotoxicity) via metabolic activation to reactive metabolites. We have extended this approach to nine covalent binding drugs to determine in vitro covalent binding burden. In vitro covalent binding burden was determined by incubating radiolabeled drugs with pooled human hepatocytes. These data were scaled to an estimate of in vivo covalent binding burden by combining the in vitro data with daily dose. Scaled in vivo daily covalent binding burden of marketed covalent drugs was found to be under 10 mg/day, which is in agreement with previously reported threshold value for metabolically activated reversible drugs. Covalent binding was also compared to the intrinsic reactivities of the covalent inhibitors assessed using nucleophiles glutathione and N-α-acetyl lysine. The intrinsic reactivity did not correlate with observed in vitro covalent binding, which demonstrated that the intrinsic reactivity of the electrophilic groups of covalent drugs does not exclusively account for the extent of covalent binding. The ramifications of these findings for consideration of using a covalent strategy in drug design are discussed. PMID:24164572

  7. Binding in pair potentials of liquid simple metals from nonlocality in electronic kinetic energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrot, F.; March, N. H.

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents an explicit expression for the pair potential in liquid simple metals from low-order density-gradient theory when the superposition of single-center displaced charges is employed. Numerical results are presented for the gradient expansion pair interaction in liquid Na and Be. The low-order density-gradient equation for the pair potential is presented.

  8. A potential role for guanine nucleotide-binding protein in the regulation of endosomal proton transport.

    PubMed Central

    Gurich, R W; Codina, J; DuBose, T D

    1991-01-01

    The effects of guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) and GTP-gamma-S, known activators of GTP binding proteins, on proton transport were investigated in endosome-enriched vesicles (endosomes). Endosomes were prepared from rabbit renal cortex following the intravenous injection of FITC-dextran. The rate of intravesicular acidification was determined by measuring changes in fluorescence of FITC-dextran. Both GTP and GTP-gamma-S stimulated significantly the initial rate of proton transport. In contrast, GDP-beta-S, which does not activate GTP binding proteins, inhibited proton transport. The rank order of stimulation was GTP-gamma-S greater than GTP greater than control greater than GDP-beta-S. GTP-gamma-S stimulation of proton transport was also observed under conditions in which chloride entry was eliminated, i.e., 0 mM external chloride concentration in the presence of potassium/valinomycin voltage clamping. GTP-gamma-S did not affect proton leak in endosomes as determined by collapse of H+ ATPase-generated pH gradients. ADP ribosylation by treatment of endosomal membranes with pertussis toxin revealed two substrates corresponding to the 39-41 kD region and comigrating with alpha i subunits. Pretreatment of the membranes with pertussis toxin had no effect on proton transport in the absence of GTP or GTP-gamma-S. However, pretreatment with pertussis toxin blocked the stimulation of proton transport by GTP. In contrast, as reported in other membranes by others previously, pertussis toxin did not prevent the stimulation of proton transport by GTP-gamma-S. These findings, taken together, indicate that GTP binding proteins are present in endosomal membranes derived from renal cortex and that activation of G protein by GTP and GTP-gamma-S stimulates proton transport in a rank order identical to that reported for other transport pathways modulated by Gi proteins. Therefore, these studies suggest that G proteins are capable of stimulating the vacuolar H ATPase of endosomes

  9. The Dipole Potential Modifies the Clustering and Ligand Binding Affinity of ErbB Proteins and Their Signaling Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Tamás; Batta, Gyula; Hajdu, Tímea; Szabó, Ágnes; Váradi, Tímea; Zákány, Florina; Csomós, István; Szöllősi, János; Nagy, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Although activation of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases (ErbB1-4) is driven by oligomerization mediated by intermolecular interactions between the extracellular, the kinase and the transmembrane domains, the transmembrane domain has been largely neglected in this regard. The largest contributor to the intramembrane electric field, the dipole potential, alters the conformation of transmembrane peptides, but its effect on ErbB proteins is unknown. Here, we show by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and number and brightness (N&B) experiments that the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced increase in the homoassociation of ErbB1 and ErbB2 and their heteroassociation are augmented by increasing the dipole potential. These effects were even more pronounced for ErbB2 harboring an activating Val → Glu mutation in the transmembrane domain (NeuT). The signaling capacity of ErbB1 and ErbB2 was also correlated with the dipole potential. Since the dipole potential decreased the affinity of EGF to ErbB1, the augmented growth factor-induced effects at an elevated dipole potential were actually induced at lower receptor occupancy. We conclude that the dipole potential plays a permissive role in the clustering of ErbB receptors and that the effects of lipid rafts on ligand binding and receptor signaling can be partially attributed to the dipole potential. PMID:27775011

  10. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Stable Colchicine Binding Site Tubulin Inhibitors as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To block the metabolically labile sites of novel tubulin inhibitors targeting the colchicine binding site based on SMART, ABI, and PAT templates, we have designed, synthesized, and biologically tested three focused sets of new derivatives with modifications at the carbonyl linker, the para-position in the C ring of SMART template, and modification of A ring of the PAT template. Structure–activity relationships of these compounds led to the identification of new benzimidazole and imidazo[4,5-c]pyridine-fused ring templates, represented by compounds 4 and 7, respectively, which showed enhanced antitumor activity and substantially improved the metabolic stability in liver microsomes compared to SMART. MOM group replaced TMP C ring and generated a potent analogue 15, which showed comparable potency to the parent SMART compound. Further modification of PAT template yielded another potent analogue 33 with 5-indolyl substituent at A ring. PMID:25122533

  11. Lectin binding of human sperm associates with DEFB126 mutation and serves as a potential biomarker for subfertility

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Aijie; Cheng, Li; Diao, Hua; Wu, Yancheng; Zhou, Shumin; Shi, Changgen; Sun, Yangyang; Wang, Peng; Duan, Shiwei; Zheng, Jufen; Wu, Bin; Yuan, Yao; Gu, Yihua; Chen, Guowu; Sun, Xiaoxi; Shi, Huijuan; Tao, Shengce; Zhang, Yonglian

    2016-01-01

    Coating on the sperm surface, glycocalyx, plays a key role in sperm motility, maturation and fertilization. A comprehensive profile of sperm surface glycans will greatly facilitate both basic researches and clinical studies. Because of the capability of recognizing different glycan moieties, lectins are widely used in glycobiology. However, lacking high-throughput technology, limited lectins have been reported for analyzing the glycan of human sperm. In this study, we employed a lectin microarray for profiling the surface glycans of human sperm, on which 54 out of 91 lectins showed positive binding. Based on this technique, we compared lectin binding profiling of sperm with homozygous DEFB126 mutation (del/del) with that of wild type (wt/wt). DEFB126 was reported to contribute to the sialylation on sperm surface and its homozygous mutation was related to male subfertility. Six lectins (Jacalin/AIA, GHA, ACL, MPL, VVL and ABA) were found to develop lower binding affinity to sperm with del/del. Further validation showed that these lectins, especially ABA and MPL, can be potential biomarkers for clinical diagnosis of subfertility due to the mutation of DEFB126. Our research provides insight into the detection of some unexplained male subfertility, and the lectin microarray is generally applicable for infertility/subfertility sperm biomarker discovery. PMID:26832966

  12. Safranal as a novel anti-tubulin binding agent with potential use in cancer therapy: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Naghshineh, Ali; Dadras, Ali; Ghalandari, Behafarid; Riazi, Gholam Hossein; Modaresi, Seyed Mohamad Sadegh; Afrasiabi, Ali; Aslani, Mahsa Kiani

    2015-08-01

    Safranal, a component of saffron, indicates anti-tumor activities; however, the precise mechanism of this effect has remained elusive. In this study we investigated tubulin assembly and structure in the presence of safranal to open the new horizons about the potential of safranal as an anti-tumor agent via microtubule disfunction. Anti-microtubule activity of safranal was evaluated by turbidimetric method and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Safranal (0.1-70μM) was incubated with tubulin (5μM) and tubulin structural changes was surveyed using fluorometry. Tubulin binding site with safranal was estimated by molecular docking. Microtubule polymerization decreased significantly in the presence of safranal, regardless of its concentration and the IC50 value was obtained 72.19μM. Safranal was situated between α and β tubulin closer to α-tubulin and hydrogen bond with Gly 142 and hydrophobic interactions played critical roles for safranal molecule stabilization in binding site. It seems that decline of tubulin assembly could result from tubulin structural changes through safranal bindings between alpha and beta tubulin with ΔG(0) of -5.63kcal/mol. Safranal can be taken into account as an anticancer agent; however, in vivo experiments are required to confirm this conclusion.

  13. Hexokinase II binding to mitochondria is necessary for Kupffer cell activation and is potentiated by ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Shulga, Nataly; Pastorino, John G

    2014-09-19

    Ethanol exposure promotes the development of steatohepatitis, which can progress to end stage liver disease. Kupffer cells have been documented to play a key role in the genesis and progression of alcoholic liver disease with ethanol exposure enhancing Kupffer cell activation. In the present study, we identified the binding of hexokinase II to the mitochondria as a requirement for LPS-induced activation of Kupffer cells and its potentiation by ethanol. LPS and ethanol exposure induced a reduction in sirtuin-3 activity. In turn, the decline of sirtuin-3 activity led to the activation of cyclophilin-D, which mediated an increased binding of hexokinase II to the mitochondria. Suppression of cyclophilin-D expression or enforced detachment of hexokinase II from the mitochondria abrogated the LPS- and ethanol-induced stimulation of Kupffer cells, preventing NADPH oxidase and inflammasome activation. Moreover, activation of AMP-activated protein kinase restored sirtuin-3 activity, thereby preventing LPS and ethanol from stimulating the binding of hexokinase II to the mitochondria and precluding NADPH oxidase and inflammasome activation.

  14. Potential of carbohydrate-binding agents as therapeutics against enveloped viruses.

    PubMed

    François, K O; Balzarini, J

    2012-03-01

    Twenty-seven years after the discovery of HIV as the cause of AIDS more than 25 drugs directed against four different viral targets (i.e. reverse transcriptase, protease, integrase, envelope gp41) and one cellular target (i.e. CCR5 co-receptor) are available for treatment. However, the search for an efficient vaccine is still ongoing. One of the main problems is the presence of a continuously evolving dense carbohydrate shield, consisting of N-linked glycans that surrounds the virion and protects it against efficient recognition and persistent neutralization by the immune system. However, several lectins from the innate immune system specifically bind to these glycans in an attempt to process the virus antigens to provoke an immune response. Across a wide variety of different species in nature lectins can be found that can interact with the glycosylated envelope of HIV-1 and can block the infection of susceptible cells by the virus. In this review, we will give an overview of the lectins from non-mammalian origin that are endowed with antiviral properties and discuss the complex interactions between lectins of the innate immune system and HIV-1. Also, attention will be given to different carbohydrate-related modalities that can be exploited for antiviral chemotherapy.

  15. Recombinant TNF-binding protein from variola virus as a novel potential TNF antagonist.

    PubMed

    Gileva, I P; Nepomnyashchikh, T S; Ryazankin, I A; Shchelkunov, S N

    2009-12-01

    Gel-filtration chromatographic separation of the lysate of Sf21 insect cells infected with recombinant baculovirus BVi67 containing the gene for TNF-binding protein (CrmB) of variola virus (VARV) revealed that hTNF-cytotoxicity neutralization activity is associated with a fraction corresponding mainly to high molecular weight proteins (above 500 kDa) and less with fractions corresponding to proteins of 270 or 90 kDa. The recombinant VARV-CrmB protein has been purified by affinity chromatography. Difference in the experimentally determined and estimated (according to amino acid composition) VARV-CrmB molecular weight is due to glycosylation of the recombinant protein expressed in the insect cells. VARV-CrmB neutralizes in vitro the cytotoxic effect of hTNF and hLTalpha, and its TNF-neutralizing activity is two to three orders of magnitude higher compared to the analogous effects of type I and II soluble TNF receptors, comparable with the activity of mAb MAK195, and somewhat lower than the effect of the commercial drug Remicade.

  16. FK506 binding protein 51 positively regulates melanoma stemness and metastatic potential

    PubMed Central

    Romano, S; Staibano, S; Greco, A; Brunetti, A; Nappo, G; Ilardi, G; Martinelli, R; Sorrentino, A; Di Pace, A; Mascolo, M; Bisogni, R; Scalvenzi, M; Alfano, B; Romano, M F

    2013-01-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive skin cancer; there is no cure in advanced stages. Identifying molecular participants in melanoma progression may provide useful diagnostic and therapeutic tools. FK506 binding protein 51 (FKBP51), an immunophilin with a relevant role in developmental stages, is highly expressed in melanoma and correlates with aggressiveness and therapy resistance. We hypothesized a role for FKBP51 in melanoma invasive behaviour. FKBP51 promoted activation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) genes and improved melanoma cell migration and invasion. In addition, FKBP51 induced some melanoma stem cell (MCSC) genes. Purified MCSCs expressed high EMT genes levels, suggesting that genetic programs of EMT and MCSCs overlap. Immunohistochemistry of samples from patients showed intense FKBP51 nuclear signal and cytoplasmic positivity for the stem cell marker nestin in extravasating melanoma cells and metastatic brains. In addition, FKBP51 targeting by small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented the massive metastatic substitution of liver and lung in a mouse model of experimental metastasis. The present study provides evidence that the genetic programs of cancer stemness and invasiveness overlap in melanoma, and that FKBP51 plays a pivotal role in sustaining such a program. PMID:23559012

  17. Subtractive Cell-SELEX Selection of DNA Aptamers Binding Specifically and Selectively to Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells with High Metastatic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Yuan, Chun-Hui; Yang, Yi-Fei; Yin, Chang-Qing; Guan, Qing; Wang, Fu-Bing; Tu, Jian-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Relapse and metastasis are two key risk factors of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) prognosis; thus, it is emergent to develop an early and accurate detection method for prognostic evaluation of HCC after surgery. In this study, we sought to acquire oligonucleotide DNA aptamers that specifically bind to HCC cells with high metastatic potential. Two HCC cell lines derived from the same genetic background but with different metastatic potential were employed: MHCC97L (low metastatic properties) as subtractive targets and HCCLM9 (high metastatic properties) as screening targets. To mimic a fluid combining environment, initial DNA aptamers library was firstly labelled with magnetic nanoparticles using biotin-streptavidin system and then applied for aptamers selection. Through 10-round selection with subtractive Cell-SELEX, six aptamers, LY-1, LY-13, LY-46, LY-32, LY-27/45, and LY-7/43, display high affinity to HCCLM9 cells and do not bind to MHCC97L cells, as well as other tumor cell lines, including breast cancer, lung cancer, colon adenocarcinoma, gastric cancer, and cervical cancer, suggesting high specificity for HCCLM9 cells. Thus, the aptamers generated here will provide solid basis for identifying new diagnostic targets to detect HCC metastasis and also may provide valuable clues for developing new targeted therapeutics. PMID:27119081

  18. The Drosophila Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 6 Family Member Has Two Isoforms and Is Potentially Involved in Embryonic Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Rodney; Oosthuysen, Brent; Cajee, Umar-Faruq; Mokgohloa, Lehlogonolo; Nweke, Ekene; Antunes, Ricardo Jorge; Coetzer, Theresa H. T.; Ntwasa, Monde

    2015-01-01

    The human retinoblastoma binding protein 6 (RBBP6) is implicated in esophageal, lung, hepatocellular and colon cancers. Furthermore, RBBP6 was identified as a strong marker for colon cancer prognosis and as a predisposing factor in familial myeloproliferative neoplasms. Functionally, the mammalian protein interacts with p53 and enhances the activity of Mdm2, the prototypical negative regulator of p53. However, since RBBP6 (known as PACT in mice) exists in multiple isoforms and pact−/− mice exhibit a more severe phenotype than mdm2−/− mutants, it must possess some Mdm2-independent functions. The function of the invertebrate homologue is poorly understood. This is complicated by the absence of the Mdm2 gene in both Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans. We have experimentally identified the promoter region of Snama, the Drosophila homologue, analyzed potential transcription factor binding sites and confirmed the existence of an additional isoform. Using band shift and co-immunoprecipitation assays combined with mass spectrometry, we found evidence that this gene may be regulated by, amongst others, DREF, which regulates hundreds of genes related to cell proliferation. The potential transcription factors for Snama fall into distinct functional groups, including anteroposterior embryonic patterning and nucleic acid metabolism. Significantly, previous work in mice shows that pact−/− induces an anteroposterior phenotype in embryos when rescued by simultaneous deletion of p53. Taken together, these observations indicate the significance of RBBP6 proteins in carcinogenesis and in developmental defects. PMID:25955646

  19. FK506-Binding Protein 10, a Potential Novel Drug Target for Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Staab-Weijnitz, Claudia A.; Fernandez, Isis E.; Knüppel, Larissa; Maul, Julia; Heinzelmann, Katharina; Juan-Guardela, Brenda M.; Hennen, Elisabeth; Preissler, Gerhard; Winter, Hauke; Neurohr, Claus; Hatz, Rudolf; Lindner, Michael; Behr, Jürgen; Kaminski, Naftali

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Increased abundance and stiffness of the extracellular matrix, in particular collagens, is a hallmark of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). FK506-binding protein 10 (FKBP10) is a collagen chaperone, mutations of which have been indicated in the reduction of extracellular matrix stiffness (e.g., in osteogenesis imperfecta). Objectives: To assess the expression and function of FKBP10 in IPF. Methods: We assessed FKBP10 expression in bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis (using quantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunofluorescence), analyzed microarray data from 99 patients with IPF and 43 control subjects from a U.S. cohort, and performed Western blot analysis from 6 patients with IPF and 5 control subjects from a German cohort. Subcellular localization of FKBP10 was assessed by immunofluorescent stainings. The expression and function of FKBP10, as well as its regulation by endoplasmic reticulum stress or transforming growth factor-β1, was analyzed by small interfering RNA–mediated loss-of-function experiments, quantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and quantification of secreted collagens in the lung and in primary human lung fibroblasts (phLF). Effects on collagen secretion were compared with those of the drugs nintedanib and pirfenidone, recently approved for IPF. Measurements and Main Results: FKBP10 expression was up-regulated in bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis and IPF. Immunofluorescent stainings demonstrated localization to interstitial (myo)fibroblasts and CD68+ macrophages. Transforming growth factor-β1, but not endoplasmic reticulum stress, induced FKBP10 expression in phLF. The small interfering RNA–mediated knockdown of FKBP10 attenuated expression of profibrotic mediators and effectors, including collagens I and V and α-smooth muscle actin, on the transcript and protein level. Importantly, loss of FKBP10 expression significantly suppressed collagen

  20. Comparison of Chlorpyrifos-Oxon and Paraoxon Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition Dynamics: Potential role of a peripheral binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Kousba, Ahmed A.; Sultatos, L G.; Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

    2004-08-02

    The primary mechanism of action for organophosphorus (OP) insecticides involves the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by oxygenated metabolites (oxons). This inhibition has been attributed to the phosphorylation of the serine hydroxyl group located in the active site of the AChE molecule. The rate of phosphorylation is described by the bimolecular inhibitory rate constant (ki), which has been utilized for quantification of OP inhibitory capacity. It has been previously proposed that a peripheral binding site exists on the AChE molecule, which when occupied, reduces the capacity of additional oxon molecules to phosphorylate the active site. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the interaction of chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) and paraoxon (PO) with rat brain AChE using a modified Ellman assay in conjunction with a pharmacodynamic model to further assess the dynamics of AChE inhibition and the potential role of a peripheral binding site. The ki for AChE inhibition determined at oxon concentrations of 5 x 10{sup -4} 100 nM were 0.212 and 0.0216 nM-1h-1 for CPO and PO, respectively. The spontaneous reactivation rates of the inhibited AChE for CPO and PO were 0.087 and 0.078 h-1, respectively. In contrast, the ki estimated at a low oxon concentration (1 pM) were {approx} 1,000 and 10,000 -fold higher than those determined at high CPO and PO concentrations, respectively. At these low concentrations, the ki estimates were approximately similar for both CPO and PO (180 and 250 nM-1h-1, respectively). This implies that at low exposure concentrations, both oxons exhibited similar inhibitory potency in contrast to the marked difference exhibited at higher concentrations, which is consistent with the presence of a peripheral binding site on the AChE enzyme. These results support the potential importance of a secondary binding site associated with AChE kinetics, particularly at low environmentally relevant concentrations.

  1. Hydrostatic deformation potentials and the question of exciton binding energies and splittings in aluminium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Bernard

    2010-05-01

    By comparing a series of optical experiments performed on bulk aluminum nitride crystals and heteroepitaxial films, we determine the hydrostatic excitonic deformation potentials of AlN. The agreement between the whole available experimental data and our analysis consolidates this determination. Using the previously determined values of the valence-band deformation potentials which account for the strain-induced variation in the crystal-field splitting: d3=-8.19eV and d4=4.10eV we obtain values of -6.04 and 2.15 eV for the hydrostatic excitonic deformation potentials a1 and a2 in the context of the quasicubic approximation. This constitutes the first series of values coherent with the whole set of experimental data. The experimental value of 1s-2s splitting disagrees with the theory of excitons in anisotropic semiconductors. This disagreement, we attribute it to our poor knowledge of the valence-band dispersion relations of AlN and to the difficulty we face for including in the calculation plausible values for the anisotropic hole effective mass, dielectric constant.

  2. Cardiac myosin binding protein-C is a potential diagnostic biomarker for myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Govindan, Suresh; McElligott, Andrew; Muthusamy, Saminathan; Nair, Nandini; Barefield, David; Martin, Jody L; Gongora, Enrique; Greis, Kenneth D; Luther, Pradeep K; Winegrad, Saul; Henderson, Kyle K; Sadayappan, Sakthivel

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) is a thick filament assembly protein that stabilizes sarcomeric structure and regulates cardiac function; however, the profile of cMyBP-C degradation after myocardial infarction (MI) is unknown. We hypothesized that cMyBP-C is sensitive to proteolysis and is specifically increased in the bloodstream post-MI in rats and humans. Under these circumstances, elevated levels of degraded cMyBP-C could be used as a diagnostic tool to confirm MI. To test this hypothesis, we first established that cMyBP-C dephosphorylation is directly associated with increased degradation of this myofilament protein, leading to its release in vitro. Using neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes in vitro, we were able to correlate the induction of hypoxic stress with increased cMyBP-C dephosphorylation, degradation, and the specific release of N'-fragments. Next, to define the proteolytic pattern of cMyBP-C post-MI, the left anterior descending coronary artery was ligated in adult male rats. Degradation of cMyBP-C was confirmed by a reduction in total cMyBP-C and the presence of degradation products in the infarct tissue. Phosphorylation levels of cMyBP-C were greatly reduced in ischemic areas of the MI heart compared to non-ischemic regions and sham control hearts. Post-MI plasma samples from these rats, as well as humans, were assayed for cMyBP-C and its fragments by sandwich ELISA and immunoprecipitation analyses. Results showed significantly elevated levels of cMyBP-C in the plasma of all post-MI samples. Overall, this study suggests that cMyBP-C is an easily releasable myofilament protein that is dephosphorylated, degraded and released into the circulation post-MI. The presence of elevated levels of cMyBP-C in the blood provides a promising novel biomarker able to accurately rule in MI, thus aiding in the further assessment of ischemic heart disease.

  3. External Zn(2+) binding to cysteine-substituted cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator constructs regulates channel gating and curcumin potentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangyu; Linsley, Rheeann; Norimatsu, Yohei

    2016-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is activated by ATP binding-induced dimerization of nucleotide-binding domains, the interaction between the phosphorylated regulatory (R) domain and the curcumin-sensitive interface between intracellular loop (ICL) 1 and ICL4, and the resultant inward-to-'outward' reorientation of transmembrane domains. Although transmembrane helices (TM) 2 and TM11 link the ICL1-ICL4 interface with the interface between extracellular loop (ECL) 1 and ECL6, it is unknown whether both interfaces are gating-coupled during the reorientation. Herein, R334C and T1122C mutations were used to engineer two Zn(2+) bridges near and at the ECL1-ECL6 interface, respectively, and the gating effects of a Zn(2+) disturbance at the ECL1-ECL6 interface on the stimulatory ICL1/ICL4-R interaction were determined. The results showed that both Zn(2+) bridges inhibited channel activity in a dose- and Cl(-) -dependent manner, and the inhibition was reversed by a washout or suppressed by thiol-specific modification. Interestingly, their Cl(-) -dependent Zn(2+) inhibition was weakened at higher Zn(2+) concentrations, their Zn(2+) affinity was stronger in the resting state than in the activated state, and their activation current noises were decreased by external Zn(2+) binding. More importantly, the external Zn(2+) inhibition was reversed by internal curcumin in the R334C construct but not in the T1122C mutant. Therefore, although both Zn(2+) bridges may promote channel closure, external Zn(2+) may disturb the ECL1-ECL6 interface and thus prevent the stimulatory ICL1/ICL4-R interaction and curcumin potentiation via a gating coupling between these two interfaces. PMID:27175795

  4. Characterization of Thermobifida fusca cutinase-carbohydrate-binding module fusion proteins and their potential application in bioscouring.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Chen, Sheng; Xu, Meng; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur; Cavoco-Paulo, Artur; Wu, Jing; Chen, Jian

    2010-10-01

    Cutinase from Thermobifida fusca is thermally stable and has potential application in the bioscouring of cotton in the textile industry. In the present study, the carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) from T. fusca cellulase Cel6A (CBM(Cel6A)) and Cellulomonas fimi cellulase CenA (CBM(CenA)) were fused, separately, to the carboxyl terminus of T. fusca cutinase. Both fusion enzymes, cutinase-CBM(Cel6A) and cutinase-CBM(CenA), were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Enzyme characterization showed that both displayed similar catalytic properties and pH stabilities in response to T. fusca cutinase. In addition, both fusion proteins displayed an activity half-life of 53 h at their optimal temperature of 50°C. Compared to T. fusca cutinase, in the absence of pectinase, the binding activity on cotton fiber was enhanced by 2% for cutinase-CBM(Cel6A) and by 28% for cutinase-CBM(CenA), whereas in the presence of pectinase, the binding activity was enhanced by 40% for the former and 45% for the latter. Notably, a dramatic increase of up to 3-fold was observed in the amount of released fatty acids from cotton fiber by both cutinase-CBM fusion proteins when acting in concert with pectinase. This is the first report of improving the scouring efficiency of cutinase by fusing it with CBM. The improvement in activity and the strong synergistic effect between the fusion proteins and pectinase suggest that they may have better applications in textile bioscouring than the native cutinase. PMID:20729325

  5. Myc Promoter-Binding Protein-1 (MBP-1) Is a Novel Potential Prognostic Marker in Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Contino, Flavia; Mazzarella, Claudia; Sbacchi, Silvia; Roz, Elena; Lupo, Carmelo; Perconti, Giovanni; Giallongo, Agata; Migliorini, Paola; Marrazzo, Antonio; Feo, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    Background Alpha-enolase is a glycolytic enzyme that catalyses the formation of phosphoenolpyruvate in the cell cytoplasm. α-Enolase and the predominantly nuclear Myc promoter-binding protein-1 (MBP-1) originate from a single gene through the alternative use of translational starting sites. MBP-1 binds to the P2 c-myc promoter and competes with TATA-box binding protein (TBP) to suppress gene transcription. Although several studies have shown an antiproliferative effect of MBP-1 overexpression on several human cancer cells, to date detailed observations of α-enolase and MBP-1 relative expression in primary tumors versus normal tissues and their correlation with clinicopathological features have not been undertaken. Methodology and Findings We analyzed α-enolase and MBP-1 expression in normal breast epithelium and primary invasive ductal breast carcinoma (IDC) from 177 patients by Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses, using highly specific anti-α-enolase monoclonal antibodies. A significant increase in the expression of cytoplasmic α-enolase was observed in 98% of the tumors analysed, compared to normal tissues. Nuclear MBP-1 was found in almost all the normal tissues while its expression was retained in only 35% of the tumors. Statistically significant associations were observed among the nuclear expression of MBP-1 and ErbB2 status, Ki-67 expression, node status and tumor grade. Furthermore MBP-1 expression was associated with good survival of patients with IDC. Conclusions MBP-1 functions in repressing c-myc gene expression and the results presented indicate that the loss of nuclear MBP-1 expression in a large number of IDC may be a critical step in the development and progression of breast cancer and a predictor of adverse outcome. Nuclear MBP-1 appears to be a novel and valuable histochemical marker with potential prognostic value in breast cancer. PMID:20886042

  6. Synthesis, Molecular Structure, DNA/Protein Binding, Cytotoxicity, Apoptosis, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential of Dibenzoxanthenes Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui-Hui; Han, Bing-Jie; Li, Wei; Liu, Yun-Jun; Wang, Xiu-Zhen

    2015-12-01

    Two dibenzoxanthene isomers 3 and 4 were synthesized and characterized. The crystal structures of the two compounds were solved by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Binding of two compounds with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) and BSA (bovine serum albumin) has been thoroughly investigated by UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The DNA-binding constants were determined to be 2.51 (± 0.09) × 10(3) for compound 3 and 4.55 (± 0.10) × 10(3) for compound 4. Two compounds can cleave pBR322 DNA upon irradiation. Significant nuclear damages of BEL-7402 cells were observed with compound treatment in a comet assay. The cytotoxicity in vitro was investigated by MTT method. These compounds have been found to induce nuclear condensation and fragmentation in BEL-7402 cells. The two compounds can enhance intracellular reactive oxygen species and decrease the mitochondrial membrane potential. The compounds activated caspase-3 and caspase-7, down-regulated the expression levels of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, and up-regulated the expression levels of pro-apoptotic protein Bax. These compounds induce apoptosis of BEL-7402 cells through an ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway.

  7. Macrophage Membrane Potential Changes Associated with γ 2b/γ 1 Fc Receptor-Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, John Ding-E; Unkeless, Jay C.; Kaback, H. Ronald; Cohn, Zanvil A.

    1983-03-01

    We have studied the effects of specific ligands of the receptor for the IgG Fc fragment (FcR) on the membrane potential (Δ Psi ) of the macrophage cell line J774 by the [3H]tetraphenylphosphonium ion equilibration technique. We observe a membrane depolarization with binding of FcR ligands that is dependent on the degree of receptor crosslinking. Binding of the FcR by monovalent ligands is not sufficient to induce a significant drop in Δ Psi , but a sustained depolarization lasting ≈ 20 min occurs with insoluble multivalent ligands. This FcR-mediated depolarization can be inhibited by substitution of Na+ from the cell incubation medium with monovalent choline cation, indicating that depolarization is due to Na+ influx into the cell. The extracellular Ca2+ does not play a significant role in membrane depolarization. The depolarization response is not triggered by monoclonal antibodies directed against three other major macrophage surface antigens. The cell depolarization mediated by FcR ligands is followed by a prolonged hyperpolarization that can be partially blocked by ouabain and quinine, indicating that the hyperpolarization response is a result of a combination of a Na+, K+-ATPase activity and a Ca2+-activated K+ conductance. These data support our hypothesis that the mouse macrophage IgG FcR is a ligand-dependent ion channel.

  8. Multiple stepwise pattern for potential of mean force in unfolding the thrombin binding aptamer in complex with Sr2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Changwon; Jang, Soonmin; Pak, Youngshang

    2011-12-01

    Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulation in conjunction with umbrella sampling, we obtained the unfolding free energy and the force extension profiles of the thrombin binding DNA aptamer (15-TBA) in complex with Sr2+ (Protein Data Bank code: 1RDE). The resulting potential of mean force (PMF) displays a multiple stepwise pattern with distinct plateau regions. The detailed analysis of the simulation result indicated that each plateau was created by the interplay of the metal ion interacting with self-arranging guanine bases and the successive uptakes of water molecules. The current PMF simulation provides a quantitative description of the unfolding process of 15-TBA DNA driven by stretching and gives molecular insight on its detailed changes of base pair interactions in the presence of the metal cation.

  9. ASPP1 and ASPP2 bind active RAS, potentiate RAS signalling and enhance p53 activity in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Godin-Heymann, N; Dan Wang, X; Bergamaschi, D; Llanos, S; Lu, X

    2013-01-01

    RAS mutations occur frequently in human cancer and activated RAS signalling contributes to tumour development and progression. Apart from its oncogenic effects on cell growth, active RAS has tumour-suppressive functions via its ability to induce cellular senescence and apoptosis. RAS is known to induce p53-dependent cell cycle arrest, yet its effect on p53-dependent apoptosis remains unclear. We report here that apoptosis-stimulating protein of p53 (ASPP) 1 and 2, two activators of p53, preferentially bind active RAS via their N-terminal RAS-association domains (RAD). Additionally, ASPP2 colocalises with and contributes to RAS cellular membrane localisation and potentiates RAS signalling. In cancer cells, ASPP1 and ASPP2 cooperate with oncogenic RAS to enhance the transcription and apoptotic function of p53. Thus, loss of ASPP1 and ASPP2 in human cancer cells may contribute to the full transforming property of RAS oncogene. PMID:23392125

  10. Reproducing kernel potential energy surfaces in biomolecular simulations: Nitric oxide binding to myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Soloviov, Maksym; Meuwly, Markus

    2015-09-14

    Multidimensional potential energy surfaces based on reproducing kernel-interpolation are employed to explore the energetics and dynamics of free and bound nitric oxide in myoglobin (Mb). Combining a force field description for the majority of degrees of freedom and the higher-accuracy representation for the NO ligand and the Fe out-of-plane motion allows for a simulation approach akin to a mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics treatment. However, the kernel-representation can be evaluated at conventional force-field speed. With the explicit inclusion of the Fe-out-of-plane (Fe-oop) coordinate, the dynamics and structural equilibrium after photodissociation of the ligand are correctly described compared to experiment. Experimentally, the Fe-oop coordinate plays an important role for the ligand dynamics. This is also found here where the isomerization dynamics between the Fe–ON and Fe–NO state is significantly affected whether or not this co-ordinate is explicitly included. Although the Fe–ON conformation is metastable when considering only the bound {sup 2}A state, it may disappear once the {sup 4}A state is included. This explains the absence of the Fe–ON state in previous experimental investigations of MbNO.

  11. Proteomic identification of potential Clonorchis sinensis excretory/secretory products capable of binding and activating human hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyun; Hu, Fengyu; Hu, Xuchu; Chen, Wenjun; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2014-08-01

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence demonstrated that Clonorchis sinensis is an important risk factor of hepatic fibrosis and cholangiocarcinoma. C. sinensis excretory/secretory products (CsESPs) are protein complex including proteases, antioxidant enzymes, and metabolic enzymes, which may contribute to pathogenesis of liver fluke-associated hepatobiliary diseases. However, potential CsESP candidates involved into hepatic fibrosis and cholangiocarcinoma still remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we performed proteomic identification of CsESP candidates capable of binding and activating human hepatic stellate cell line LX-2. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the interaction of CsESPs with LX-2 cell membrane. LX-2 cells could be stimulated by CsESPs from 24 h post incubation (p < 0.05). Specifically, 50 μg/ml of CsESPs showed the strongest effect on cell proliferation in methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay which could also be demonstrated by flow cytometry analysis (p < 0.01). Furthermore, expression level of human type III collagen in LX-2 cells treated with CsESPs was significantly higher than that in control cells measured by molecular beacon and semiquantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR approaches (p < 0.01). Finally, CsESPs before and after incubation with LX-2 cells were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) analysis and matrix associated laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis. Nine proteins with abundance change above threefold were Rho GTPase-activating protein, mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit Va, α-enolase, phospholipase C, interleukin-15, insect-derived growth factor, cytochrome c oxidase subunit VI, DNAH1 protein, and kinesin light chain. Taken together, we identified potential CsESP candidates capable of binding and activating human hepatic stellate cells, providing more direct evidences that are previously unknown to accelerate strategies

  12. α-Tocopherols modify the membrane dipole potential leading to modulation of ligand binding by P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Davis, Sterenn; Davis, Benjamin M; Richens, Joanna L; Vere, Kelly-Ann; Petrov, Peter G; Winlove, C Peter; O'Shea, Paul

    2015-08-01

    α-Tocopherol (vitamin E) has attracted considerable attention as a potential protective or palliative agent. In vitro, its free radical-scavenging antioxidant action has been widely demonstrated. In vivo, however, vitamin E treatment exhibits negligible benefits against oxidative stress. α-Tocopherol influences lipid ordering within biological membranes and its derivatives have been suggested to inhibit the multi-drug efflux pump, P-glycoprotein (P-gp). This study employs the fluorescent membrane probe, 1-(3-sulfonatopropyl)-4-[β[2-(di-n-octylamino)-6-naphthyl]vinyl] pyridinium betaine, to investigate whether these effects are connected via influences on the membrane dipole potential (MDP), an intrinsic property of biological membranes previously demonstrated to modulate P-gp activity. α-Tocopherol and its non-free radical-scavenging succinate analog induced similar decreases in the MDP of phosphatidylcholine vesicles. α-Tocopherol succinate also reduced the MDP of T-lymphocytes, subsequently decreasing the binding affinity of saquinavir for P-gp. Additionally, α-tocopherol succinate demonstrated a preference for cholesterol-treated (membrane microdomain enriched) cells over membrane cholesterol-depleted cells. Microdomain disruption via cholesterol depletion decreased saquinavir's affinity for P-gp, potentially implicating these structures in the influence of α-tocopherol succinate on P-gp. This study provides evidence of a microdomain dipole potential-dependent mechanism by which α-tocopherol analogs influence P-gp activity. These findings have implications for the use of α-tocopherol derivatives for drug delivery across biological barriers.

  13. Metal binding mediated conformational change of XPA protein:a potential cytotoxic mechanism of nickel in the nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianping; Hu, Ziheng; Zhang, Yan; Gou, Xiaojun; Mu, Ying; Wang, Lirong; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2016-07-01

    structural biology information. Thus, we derived a putative cytotoxic mechanism associated with the nickel ion, where the Ni(2+) disrupts the conformation of the XPA Zn-finger, directly weakening its interaction with RPA70N, and thus lowering the effectiveness of the NER process. In sum, this work not only provides a theoretical insight into the multi-protein interactions involved in the NER process and potential cytotoxic mechanism associated with Ni(2+) binding in XPA, but may also facilitate rational anti-cancer drug design based on the NER mechanism. PMID:27307058

  14. TREK2 Expressed Selectively in IB4-Binding C-Fiber Nociceptors Hyperpolarizes Their Membrane Potentials and Limits Spontaneous Pain

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Cristian; Djouhri, Laiche; Watkins, Roger; Berry, Carol; Bromage, Kirsty

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing/spontaneous pain behavior is associated with ongoing/spontaneous firing (SF) in adult DRG C-fiber nociceptors (Djouhri et al., 2006). Causes of this SF are not understood. We show here that conducting (sometimes called uninjured) C-nociceptors in neuropathic pain models with more hyperpolarized resting membrane potentials (Ems) have lower SF rates. Understanding the control of their Ems may therefore be important for limiting pathological pain. We report that TREK2, a leak K+ channel, is selectively expressed in IB4 binding rat C-nociceptors. These IB4+ C-neurons are ∼10 mV more hyperpolarized than IB4− C-neurons in vivo (Fang et al., 2006). TREK2 knockdown by siRNA in these neurons in culture depolarized them by ∼10 mV, suggesting that TREK2 is responsible for this ∼10 mV difference. In vivo, more hyperpolarized C-nociceptor Ems were associated with higher cytoplasmic edge-TREK2 expression (edge-TREK2). Edge-TREK2 decreased in C-neurons 7 d after axotomy, and their Ems depolarized by ∼10 mV. This again supports a contribution of TREK2 to their Ems. These relationships between (1) Em and TREK2, (2) SF rate and Em, and (3) spontaneous pain behavior and C-nociceptor SF rate suggested that TREK2 knockdown might increase spontaneous pain. After CFA-induced inflammation, spontaneous foot lifting (a measure of spontaneous pain) was (1) greater in rats with naturally lower TREK2 in ipsilateral small DRG neurons and (2) increased by siRNA-induced TREK2 knockdown in vivo. We conclude that TREK2 hyperpolarizes IB4 binding C-nociceptors and limits pathological spontaneous pain. Similar TREK2 distributions in small DRG neurons of several species suggest that these role(s) of TREK2 may be widespread. PMID:24453337

  15. Detailed Analysis of the Binding Mode of Vanilloids to Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type I (TRPV1) by a Mutational and Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Mori, Yoshikazu; Ogawa, Kazuo; Warabi, Eiji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Hirokawa, Takatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel and a multimodal sensor protein. Since the precise structure of TRPV1 was obtained by electron cryo-microscopy, the binding mode of representative agonists such as capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX) has been extensively characterized; however, detailed information on the binding mode of other vanilloids remains lacking. In this study, mutational analysis of human TRPV1 was performed, and four agonists (capsaicin, RTX, [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol) were used to identify amino acid residues involved in ligand binding and/or modulation of proton sensitivity. The detailed binding mode of each ligand was then simulated by computational analysis. As a result, three amino acids (L518, F591 and L670) were newly identified as being involved in ligand binding and/or modulation of proton sensitivity. In addition, in silico docking simulation and a subsequent mutational study suggested that [6]-gingerol might bind to and activate TRPV1 in a unique manner. These results provide novel insights into the binding mode of various vanilloids to the channel and will be helpful in developing a TRPV1 modulator. PMID:27606946

  16. Detailed Analysis of the Binding Mode of Vanilloids to Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type I (TRPV1) by a Mutational and Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Yoshikazu; Ogawa, Kazuo; Warabi, Eiji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Hirokawa, Takatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel and a multimodal sensor protein. Since the precise structure of TRPV1 was obtained by electron cryo-microscopy, the binding mode of representative agonists such as capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX) has been extensively characterized; however, detailed information on the binding mode of other vanilloids remains lacking. In this study, mutational analysis of human TRPV1 was performed, and four agonists (capsaicin, RTX, [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol) were used to identify amino acid residues involved in ligand binding and/or modulation of proton sensitivity. The detailed binding mode of each ligand was then simulated by computational analysis. As a result, three amino acids (L518, F591 and L670) were newly identified as being involved in ligand binding and/or modulation of proton sensitivity. In addition, in silico docking simulation and a subsequent mutational study suggested that [6]-gingerol might bind to and activate TRPV1 in a unique manner. These results provide novel insights into the binding mode of various vanilloids to the channel and will be helpful in developing a TRPV1 modulator. PMID:27606946

  17. The unusual lipid binding proteins of parasitic helminths and their potential roles in parasitism and as therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Gisela R; Pórfido, Jorge L; Ibáñez Shimabukuro, Marina; Rey Burusco, María F; Bélgamo, Julián A; Smith, Brian O; Kennedy, Malcolm W; Córsico, Betina

    2015-02-01

    In this review paper we aim at presenting the current knowledge on structural aspects of soluble lipid binding proteins (LBPs) found in parasitic helminths and to discuss their potential role as novel drug targets. Helminth parasites produce and secrete a great variety of LBPs that may participate in the acquisition of nutrients from their host, such as fatty acids and cholesterol. It is also postulated that LBPs might interfere in the regulation of the host׳s immune response by sequestering lipidic intermediates or delivering bioactive lipids. A detailed comprehension of the structure of these proteins, as well as their interactions with ligands and membranes, is important to understand host-parasite relationships that they may mediate. This information could also contribute to determining the role that these proteins may play in the biology of parasitic helminths and how they modulate the immune systems of their hosts, and also towards the development of new therapeutics and prevention of the diseases caused by these highly pathogenic parasites.

  18. Feature binding in perceptual priming and in episodic object recognition: evidence from event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Groh-Bordin, Christian; Zimmer, Hubert D; Mecklinger, Axel

    2005-08-01

    It is argued that explicit remembering is based on so-called episodic tokens binding together all perceptual features of a visual object. In episodic recognition, these features are collectively reactivated. In support of this view, it has been shown that changing sensory features of a stimulus from study to test decreases subject's performance in an episodic recognition task, even though the changed features are irrelevant for the recognition judgment. On the other hand, repetition priming is unaffected by such manipulations of perceptual specificity. Implicit memory performance is therefore thought to depend on structural representations, so-called types, comprising only invariant perceptual features, but no exemplar-specific details. Event-related potentials (ERPs) in our study revealed electrophysiological evidence for the differential involvement of these perceptual memory traces in explicit and implicit memory tasks. Participants attended either a living-nonliving task or an episodic recognition task with visually presented objects. During test both groups of participants processed new objects and old objects, which were repeated either identically or in a mirror-reversed version. In the implicit task ERPs showed an occipitoparietal repetition effect, which was the same for identically repeated items and mirror reversals. In contrast, in the explicit task an early mid-frontal old/new effect for identical but not for mirror-reversed old objects was observed indicating involuntary access to perceptual information during episodic retrieval. A later portion of the old/new effect solely differentiated both types of old items from new ones. PMID:16099366

  19. Analyses of the Binding between Water Soluble C60 Derivatives and Potential Drug Targets through a Molecular Docking Approach

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junjun; Zhang, Houjin

    2016-01-01

    Fullerene C60, a unique sphere-shaped molecule consisting of carbon, has been proved to have inhibitory effects on many diseases. However, the applications of C60 in medicine have been severely hindered by its complete insolubility in water and low solubility in almost all organic solvents. In this study, the water-soluble C60 derivatives and the C60 binding protein’s structures were collected from the literature. The selected proteins fall into several groups, including acetylcholinesterase, glutamate racemase, inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase, lumazine synthase, human estrogen receptor alpha, dihydrofolate reductase and N-myristoyltransferase. The C60 derivatives were docked into the binding sites in the proteins. The binding affinities of the C60 derivatives were calculated. The bindings between proteins and their known inhibitors or native ligands were also characterized in the same way. The results show that C60 derivatives form good interactions with the binding sites of different protein targets. In many cases, the binding affinities of C60 derivatives are better than those of known inhibitors and native ligands. This study demonstrates the interaction patterns of C60 derivatives and their binding partners, which will have good impact on the fullerene-based drug discovery. PMID:26829126

  20. Low serotonin1B receptor binding potential in the anterior cingulate cortex in drug-free patients with recurrent major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Tiger, Mikael; Farde, Lars; Rück, Christian; Varrone, Andrea; Forsberg, Anton; Lindefors, Nils; Halldin, Christer; Lundberg, Johan

    2016-07-30

    The pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD) is not fully understood and the diagnosis is largely based on history and clinical examination. So far, several lines of preclinical data and a single imaging study implicate a role for the serotonin1B (5-HT1B) receptor subtype. We sought to study 5-HT1B receptor binding in brain regions of reported relevance in patients with MDD. Subjects were examined at the Karolinska Institutet PET centre using positron emission tomography (PET) and the 5-HT1B receptor selective radioligand [(11)C]AZ10419369. Ten drug-free patients with recurrent MDD and ten control subjects matched for age and sex were examined. The main outcome measure was [(11)C]AZ10419369 binding in brain regions of reported relevance in the pathophysiology of MDD. The [(11)C]AZ10419369 binding potential was significantly lower in the MDD group compared with the healthy control group in the anterior cingulate cortex (20% between-group difference), the subgenual prefrontal cortex (17% between-group difference), and in the hippocampus (32% between-group difference). The low anterior cingulate [(11)C]AZ10419369 binding potential in patients with recurrent MDD positions 5-HT1B receptor binding in this region as a putative biomarker for MDD and corroborate a role of the anterior cingulate cortex and associated areas in the pathophysiology of recurrent MDD. PMID:27269199

  1. Study on the distribution of organic carbon in soil fractions and its reaction potential of binding the pesticides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Ashim

    2010-05-01

    STUDY ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC CARBON IN SOIL FRACTIONS AND ITS REACTION POTENTIAL OF BINDING THE PESTICIDES **SUMITRA ROY1, SANKHAJIT ROY1, *ASHIM CHOWDHURY2, SASWATI PRADHAN2 and PETER BURAUEL3 1Department of Agricultural Chemicals, Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalay, Mohanpur, West Bengal, India. 2Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Soil Science, University of Calcutta, West Bengal, India. 3Institute of Chemical Dynamics & Geosphere, FZ-Juelich, Germany. *Correspondence: ashimkly@hotmail.com **Research work carried out as DAAD Sandwich research fellow at FZ- Juelich, Germany Soil is the ultimate sink of all selectively applied pesticides. In addition to the basic physicochemical data of an active ingredient, the fate of the various compounds is largely determined by the type of application. Finally, pesticide and their metabolites, as well as structural elements, remain in the native carbon reserves of the soil or are sorbed & fixed to clay minerals and clay- humus complexes. Soil organic matter (SOM) and the soil microbial community are the crucial components which regulate soil processes and contribute towards the stability of the soil ecosystem. It is an energy source for biological mineralization processes, functions as a buffer and participates in chemical reaction. Knowledge is essential to understand the extent to which the SOM influences the mobilization and immobilization processes of foreign substance in soil and the substance transport and pollutant decomposition in soil. The freshly incorporated organic matter undergoes mineralization and the non mineralized carbon fraction is of special relevance with respect to soil stability in general and decisive for the fate and particular the persistence of xenobiotics in soil. The biological and physicochemical interactions establishing equilibrium between the organic matter bound, fixed or complexed to the soil matrix and that dissolve in the soil solution must be understood in detail to realize

  2. Study on the distribution of organic carbon in soil fractions and its reaction potential of binding the pesticides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Ashim

    2010-05-01

    STUDY ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC CARBON IN SOIL FRACTIONS AND ITS REACTION POTENTIAL OF BINDING THE PESTICIDES **SUMITRA ROY1, SANKHAJIT ROY1, *ASHIM CHOWDHURY2, SASWATI PRADHAN2 and PETER BURAUEL3 1Department of Agricultural Chemicals, Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalay, Mohanpur, West Bengal, India. 2Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Soil Science, University of Calcutta, West Bengal, India. 3Institute of Chemical Dynamics & Geosphere, FZ-Juelich, Germany. *Correspondence: ashimkly@hotmail.com **Research work carried out as DAAD Sandwich research fellow at FZ- Juelich, Germany Soil is the ultimate sink of all selectively applied pesticides. In addition to the basic physicochemical data of an active ingredient, the fate of the various compounds is largely determined by the type of application. Finally, pesticide and their metabolites, as well as structural elements, remain in the native carbon reserves of the soil or are sorbed & fixed to clay minerals and clay- humus complexes. Soil organic matter (SOM) and the soil microbial community are the crucial components which regulate soil processes and contribute towards the stability of the soil ecosystem. It is an energy source for biological mineralization processes, functions as a buffer and participates in chemical reaction. Knowledge is essential to understand the extent to which the SOM influences the mobilization and immobilization processes of foreign substance in soil and the substance transport and pollutant decomposition in soil. The freshly incorporated organic matter undergoes mineralization and the non mineralized carbon fraction is of special relevance with respect to soil stability in general and decisive for the fate and particular the persistence of xenobiotics in soil. The biological and physicochemical interactions establishing equilibrium between the organic matter bound, fixed or complexed to the soil matrix and that dissolve in the soil solution must be understood in detail to realize

  3. Interaction of isocitrate dehydrogenase with (RS)-3-bromo-2-ketoglutarate. A potential affinity label for. cap alpha. -ketoglutarate binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of oxidize nicotine adenine dinucleotide phosphate dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (from pig heart) with (RS)-3-bromo-2-ketoglutarate was investigated in an effort to evaluate the reagent's potential as a selective reagent for ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate binding sites. The enzyme is rapidly inactivated by 0.1 mM bromoketoglutarate at pH 7.4. With increasing concentration of reagent, the reaction shows a rate saturation; the minimum inactivation half-time is 3 min and K/sub inact/ for bromoketoglutarate is 250 ..mu..M. Isocitrate and NADP/sup +/ protect against inactivation, while ketoglutarate does not. When tested in the assay that monitors isocitrate oxidation, bromoketoglutarate is a competitive inhibitor (K/sub i/=100 ..mu..M) of the dehydrogenase. As judged by oxidation of NADPH, bromoketoglutarate is also a substrate for isocitrate dehydrogenase, exhibiting a K/sub m/ of 250 ..mu..M and a V/sub max/ comparable to that for isocitrate oxidation. The reduction of bromoketoglutarate is competitively inhibited by isocitrate (K/sub i/=3 ..mu..M) and ketoglutarate (K/sub i/=50 ..mu..M). Like the enzyme-catalyzed oxidation of isocitrate, the reduction of bromoketoglutarate is stereospecific, requires divalent metal ions, and shows absolute specificity for NADPH. However, since CO/sub 2/ is not required for catalytic turnover of bromoketoglutarate, its reduction is likely comparable to that of oxalosuccinate rather than the reductive carboxylation of ketoglutarate. Although bromoketoglutarate, as a substrate for isocitrate dehydrogenase, clearly has affinity for the active site, the irreversible inactivation of the enzyme by the reagent may result from modification outside the active-site region, since inactivation during catalytic turnover of bromoketoglutarate is not observed.

  4. Determination of [11C]PBR28 binding potential in vivo: a first human TSPO blocking study

    PubMed Central

    Owen, David R; Guo, Qi; Kalk, Nicola J; Colasanti, Alessandro; Kalogiannopoulou, Dimitra; Dimber, Rahul; Lewis, Yvonne L; Libri, Vincenzo; Barletta, Julien; Ramada-Magalhaes, Joaquim; Kamalakaran, Aruloly; Nutt, David J; Passchier, Jan; Matthews, Paul M; Gunn, Roger N; Rabiner, Eugenii A

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) targeting the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) is used to quantify neuroinflammation. Translocator protein is expressed throughout the brain, and therefore a classical reference region approach cannot be used to estimate binding potential (BPND). Here, we used blockade of the TSPO radioligand [11C]PBR28 with the TSPO ligand XBD173, to determine the non-displaceable volume of distribution (VND), and hence estimate the BPND. A total of 26 healthy volunteers, 16 high-affinity binders (HABs) and 10 mixed affinity binders (MABs) underwent a [11C]PBR28 PET scan with arterial sampling. Six of the HABs received oral XBD173 (10 to 90 mg), 2 hours before a repeat scan. In XBD173-dosed subjects, VND was estimated via the occupancy plot. Values of BPND for all subjects were calculated using this VND estimate. Total volume of distribution (VT) of MABs (2.94±0.31) was lower than VT of HABs (4.33±0.29) (P<0.005). There was dose-dependent occupancy of TSPO by XBD173 (ED50=0.34±0.13 mg/kg). The occupancy plot provided a VND estimate of 1.98 (1.69, 2.26). Based on these VND estimates, BPND for HABs is approximately twice that of MABs, consistent with predictions from in vitro data. Our estimates of [11C]PBR28 VND and hence BPND in the healthy human brain are consistent with in vitro predictions. XBD173 blockade provides a practical means of estimating VND for TSPO targeting radioligands. PMID:24643083

  5. How the Binding of Human Transferrin Primes the Transferrin Receptor Potentiating Iron Release at Endosomal pH

    SciTech Connect

    B Eckenroth; A Steere; N Chasteen; S Everse; A Mason

    2011-12-31

    Delivery of iron to cells requires binding of two iron-containing human transferrin (hTF) molecules to the specific homodimeric transferrin receptor (TFR) on the cell surface. Through receptor-mediated endocytosis involving lower pH, salt, and an unidentified chelator, iron is rapidly released from hTF within the endosome. The crystal structure of a monoferric N-lobe hTF/TFR complex (3.22-{angstrom} resolution) features two binding motifs in the N lobe and one in the C lobe of hTF. Binding of Fe{sub N}hTF induces global and site-specific conformational changes within the TFR ectodomain. Specifically, movements at the TFR dimer interface appear to prime the TFR to undergo pH-induced movements that alter the hTF/TFR interaction. Iron release from each lobe then occurs by distinctly different mechanisms: Binding of His349 to the TFR (strengthened by protonation at low pH) controls iron release from the C lobe, whereas displacement of one N-lobe binding motif, in concert with the action of the dilysine trigger, elicits iron release from the N lobe. One binding motif in each lobe remains attached to the same {alpha}-helix in the TFR throughout the endocytic cycle. Collectively, the structure elucidates how the TFR accelerates iron release from the C lobe, slows it from the N lobe, and stabilizes binding of apohTF for return to the cell surface. Importantly, this structure provides new targets for mutagenesis studies to further understand and define this system.

  6. Molecular determinants of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) binding to transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1) channels.

    PubMed

    Poblete, Horacio; Oyarzún, Ingrid; Olivero, Pablo; Comer, Jeffrey; Zuñiga, Matías; Sepulveda, Romina V; Báez-Nieto, David; González Leon, Carlos; González-Nilo, Fernando; Latorre, Ramón

    2015-01-23

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) has been recognized as an important activator of certain transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. More specifically, TRPV1 is a pain receptor activated by a wide range of stimuli. However, whether or not PI(4,5)P2 is a TRPV1 agonist remains open to debate. Utilizing a combined approach of mutagenesis and molecular modeling, we identified a PI(4,5)P2 binding site located between the TRP box and the S4-S5 linker. At this site, PI(4,5)P2 interacts with the amino acid residues Arg-575 and Arg-579 in the S4-S5 linker and with Lys-694 in the TRP box. We confirmed that PI(4,5)P2 behaves as a channel agonist and found that Arg-575, Arg-579, and Lys-694 mutations to alanine reduce PI(4,5)P2 binding affinity. Additionally, in silico mutations R575A, R579A, and K694A showed that the reduction in binding affinity results from the delocalization of PI(4,5)P2 in the binding pocket. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that PI(4,5)P2 binding induces conformational rearrangements of the structure formed by S6 and the TRP domain, which cause an opening of the lower TRPV1 channel gate.

  7. The Phospholipid-binding Protein SESTD1 Is a Novel Regulator of the Transient Receptor Potential Channels TRPC4 and TRPC5

    PubMed Central

    Miehe, Susanne; Bieberstein, Andrea; Arnould, Isabelle; Ihdene, Orhia; Rütten, Hartmut; Strübing, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    TRPC4 and TRPC5 are two closely related members of the mammalian transient receptor potential cation channel family that have been implicated in important physiological functions, such as growth cone guidance and smooth muscle contraction. To further unravel the role of TRPC4 and TRPC5 in these processes in vivo, detailed information about the molecular composition of native channel complexes and their association with cellular signaling networks is needed. We therefore searched a human aortic cDNA library for novel TRPC4-interacting proteins using a modified yeast two-hybrid assay. This screen identified SESTD1, a previously uncharacterized protein containing a lipid-binding SEC14-like domain as well as spectrin-type cytoskeleton interaction domains. SESTD1 was found to associate with TRPC4 and TRPC5 via the channel's calmodulin- and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-binding domain. In functional studies, we demonstrate that SESTD1 binds several phospholipid species in vitro and is essential for efficient receptor-mediated activation of TRPC5. Notably, phospholipid binding to SESTD1 was Ca2+-dependent. Because TRPC4 and -5 conduct Ca2+, SESTD1-channel signaling may be bidirectional and also couple TRPC activity to lipid signaling through SESTD1. The modulation of TRPC channel function by specific lipid-binding proteins, such as SESTD1, adds another facet to the complex regulation of these channels complementary to the previously described effects of direct channel-phospholipid interaction. PMID:20164195

  8. Molecular Determinants of Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) Binding to Transient Receptor Potential V1 (TRPV1) Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Poblete, Horacio; Oyarzún, Ingrid; Olivero, Pablo; Comer, Jeffrey; Zuñiga, Matías; Sepulveda, Romina V.; Báez-Nieto, David; González Leon, Carlos; González-Nilo, Fernando; Latorre, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) has been recognized as an important activator of certain transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. More specifically, TRPV1 is a pain receptor activated by a wide range of stimuli. However, whether or not PI(4,5)P2 is a TRPV1 agonist remains open to debate. Utilizing a combined approach of mutagenesis and molecular modeling, we identified a PI(4,5)P2 binding site located between the TRP box and the S4-S5 linker. At this site, PI(4,5)P2 interacts with the amino acid residues Arg-575 and Arg-579 in the S4-S5 linker and with Lys-694 in the TRP box. We confirmed that PI(4,5)P2 behaves as a channel agonist and found that Arg-575, Arg-579, and Lys-694 mutations to alanine reduce PI(4,5)P2 binding affinity. Additionally, in silico mutations R575A, R579A, and K694A showed that the reduction in binding affinity results from the delocalization of PI(4,5)P2 in the binding pocket. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that PI(4,5)P2 binding induces conformational rearrangements of the structure formed by S6 and the TRP domain, which cause an opening of the lower TRPV1 channel gate. PMID:25425643

  9. Vaccine Potential and Diversity of the Putative Cell Binding Factor (CBF, NMB0345/NEIS1825) Protein of Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Akoto, Charlene; Hill, Alison; Tan, Wei-Ming; Heckels, John Edward; Christodoulides, Myron

    2016-01-01

    The cbf gene from Neisseria meningitidis strain MC58 encoding the putative Cell Binding Factor (CBF, NMB0345/NEIS1825) protein was cloned into the pRSETA system and a ~36-kDa recombinant (r)CBF protein expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by metal affinity chromatography. High titres of rCBF antibodies were induced in mice following immunization with rCBF-saline, rCBF-Al(OH)3, rCBF-Liposomes or rCBF-Zwittergent (Zw) 3–14 micelles, both with and without incorporated monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) adjuvant. Anti-rCBF sera reacted in western blots of meningococcal lysates with a single protein band of molecular mass ~29.5 kDa, indicative of mature CBF protein, but did not react with a lysate of a Δnmb0345 mutant (CBF-), demonstrating specificity of the murine immune responses. CBF protein was produced by all strains of meningococci studied thus far and the protein was present on the surface of MC58 (CBF+) bacteria, but absent on Δnmb0345 mutant (CBF-) bacteria, as judged by FACS reactivity of anti-rCBF sera. Analysis of the NEIS1825 amino acid sequences from 6644 N. meningitidis isolates with defined Alleles in the pubmlst.org/Neisseria database showed that there were 141 ST types represented and there were 136 different allelic loci encoding 49 non-redundant protein sequences. Only 6/6644 (<0.1%) of N. meningitidis isolates lacked the nmb0345 gene. Amongst serogroup B isolates worldwide, ~68% and ~20% expressed CBF encoded by Allele 1 and 18 respectively, with the proteins sharing >99% amino acid identity. Murine antisera to rCBF in Zw 3–14 micelles + MPLA induced significant serum bactericidal activity (SBA) against homologous Allele 1 and heterologous Allele 18 strains, using both baby rabbit serum complement and human serum complement (h)SBA assays, but did not kill strains expressing heterologous protein encoded by Alelle 2 or 3. Furthermore, variable bactericidal activity was induced by murine antisera against different meningococcal strains in the h

  10. Vaccine Potential and Diversity of the Putative Cell Binding Factor (CBF, NMB0345/NEIS1825) Protein of Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Humbert, María Victoria; Hung, Miao-Chiu; Phillips, Renee; Akoto, Charlene; Hill, Alison; Tan, Wei-Ming; Heckels, John Edward; Christodoulides, Myron

    2016-01-01

    The cbf gene from Neisseria meningitidis strain MC58 encoding the putative Cell Binding Factor (CBF, NMB0345/NEIS1825) protein was cloned into the pRSETA system and a ~36-kDa recombinant (r)CBF protein expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by metal affinity chromatography. High titres of rCBF antibodies were induced in mice following immunization with rCBF-saline, rCBF-Al(OH)3, rCBF-Liposomes or rCBF-Zwittergent (Zw) 3-14 micelles, both with and without incorporated monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) adjuvant. Anti-rCBF sera reacted in western blots of meningococcal lysates with a single protein band of molecular mass ~29.5 kDa, indicative of mature CBF protein, but did not react with a lysate of a Δnmb0345 mutant (CBF-), demonstrating specificity of the murine immune responses. CBF protein was produced by all strains of meningococci studied thus far and the protein was present on the surface of MC58 (CBF+) bacteria, but absent on Δnmb0345 mutant (CBF-) bacteria, as judged by FACS reactivity of anti-rCBF sera. Analysis of the NEIS1825 amino acid sequences from 6644 N. meningitidis isolates with defined Alleles in the pubmlst.org/Neisseria database showed that there were 141 ST types represented and there were 136 different allelic loci encoding 49 non-redundant protein sequences. Only 6/6644 (<0.1%) of N. meningitidis isolates lacked the nmb0345 gene. Amongst serogroup B isolates worldwide, ~68% and ~20% expressed CBF encoded by Allele 1 and 18 respectively, with the proteins sharing >99% amino acid identity. Murine antisera to rCBF in Zw 3-14 micelles + MPLA induced significant serum bactericidal activity (SBA) against homologous Allele 1 and heterologous Allele 18 strains, using both baby rabbit serum complement and human serum complement (h)SBA assays, but did not kill strains expressing heterologous protein encoded by Alelle 2 or 3. Furthermore, variable bactericidal activity was induced by murine antisera against different meningococcal strains in the h

  11. Potential energy surface and binding energy in the presence of an external electric field: modulation of anion-π interactions for graphene-based receptors.

    PubMed

    Foroutan-Nejad, Cina; Marek, Radek

    2014-02-14

    Measuring the binding energy or scanning the potential energy surface (PES) of the charged molecular systems in the presence of an external electric field (EEF) requires a careful evaluation of the origin-dependency of the energy of the system and references. Scanning the PES for charged or purely ionic systems for obtaining the intrinsic energy barriers needs careful analysis of the electric work applied on ions by the EEF. The binding energy in the presence of an EEF is different from that in the absence of an electric field as the binding energy is an anisotropic characteristic which depends on the orientation of molecules with respect to the EEF. In this contribution we discuss various aspects of the PES and the concept of binding energy in the presence of an EEF. In addition, we demonstrate that the anion-π bonding properties can be modulated by applying a uniform EEF, which has a more pronounced effect on the larger, more polarizable π-systems. An analogous behavior is presumed for cation-π systems. We predict that understanding the phenomenon introduced in the present account has enormous potential, for example, for separating charged species on the surface of polarizable two-dimensional materials such as graphene or the surface of carbon nanotubes, in desalination of water.

  12. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of 1-Methyl-1,4-dihydroindeno[1,2-c]pyrazole Analogues as Potential Anticancer Agents Targeting Tubulin Colchicine Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Na; Wang, Jing-Jing; Ji, Ya-Ting; Zhao, Guo-Dong; Tang, Long-Qian; Zhang, Cheng-Mei; Guo, Xiu-Li; Liu, Zhao-Peng

    2016-06-01

    By targeting a new binding region at the interface between αβ-tubulin heterodimers at the colchicine binding site, we designed a series of 7-substituted 1-methyl-1,4-dihydroindeno[1,2-c]pyrazoles as potential tubulin polymerization inhibitors. Among the compounds synthesized, 2-(6-ethoxy-3-(3-ethoxyphenylamino)-1-methyl-1,4-dihydroindeno[1,2-c]pyrazol-7-yloxy)acetamide 6a and 2-(6-ethoxy-3-(3-ethoxyphenylamino)-1-methyl-1,4-dihydroindeno[1,2-c]pyrazol-7-yloxy)-N-hydroxyacetamide 6n showed noteworthy low nanomolar potency against HepG2, Hela, PC3, and MCF-7 cancer cell lines. In mechanism studies, 6a inhibited tubulin polymerization and disorganized microtubule in A549 cells by binding to tubulin colchicine binding site. 6a arrested A549 cells in G2/M phase that was related to the alterations in the expression of cyclin B1 and p-cdc2. 6a induced A549 cells apoptosis through the activation of caspase-3 and PARP. In addition, 6a inhibited capillary tube formation in a concentration-dependent manner. In nonsmall cell lung cancer xenografts mouse model, 6a suppressed tumor growth by 59.1% at a dose of 50 mg/kg (ip) without obvious toxicity, indicating its in vivo potential as anticancer agent. PMID:27172319

  13. Sequence-specific minor groove binding ligands as potential regulators of gene expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Belikov, S V; Grokhovsky, S L; Isaguliants, M G; Surovaya, A N; Gursky, G V

    2005-10-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter is induced by glucocorticoid hormone. A robust hormone- and receptor-dependent gene activation could be reproduced in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The homogeneous response in this system allowed a detailed analysis of the DNA-protein interactions following hormone activation. The strategy of artificial regulating of gene activity by sequence-specific minor groove binding ligands is very attractive. We have synthesized and studied the interaction with DNA of bis-linked netropsin derivatives in which two monomers are attached via short linkers in head-to-head and tail-to-tail manners. We have found that cis-diammine-platinum bridged bis-netropsin added to Xenopus oocytes media penetrates cellular and nuclear membrane and binds selectively to the MMTV promoter at the DNA segment that partly overlaps with the site recognized by glucocorticoid receptor. DNase I footprinting studies demonstrate that there are more stronger binding sites for cis-diammine-platinum bridged bis-netropsin on the naked MMTV DNA which are found to be inaccessible for its binding in oocytes. PMID:16060693

  14. Formation and characterization of iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen as a potential iron supplement.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jianjun; Chen, Fei; Fan, Daidi; Zhu, Chenhui; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Xue, Wenjiao

    2013-10-01

    Iron incorporated into food can induce precipitation and unwanted interaction with other components in food. Iron-binding proteins represent a possibility to avoid these problems and other side effects, as the iron is protected. However, there are several technical problems associated with protein-iron complex formation. In this paper, the iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared under physiological conditions through phosphorylated modification. One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. Spectroscopy analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and equilibrium dialysis techniques were employed to investigate the characteristics of the Fe-G6P-HLC. The binding sites (nb) and apparent association constant (Kapp) between iron and phosphorylated HLC were measured at nb=23.7 and log Kapp=4.57, respectively. The amount of iron (Fe(2+) sulfate) binding to phosphorylated HLC was found to be a function of pH and phosphate content. In addition, the solubility and thermal stability of HLC were not significantly affected. The results should facilitate the utilization of HLC as a bioactive iron supplement in the food and medical industry and provide an important theoretical evidence for the application of HLC chelates.

  15. Phage-display for identifying peptides that bind the spike protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus and possess diagnostic potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spike (S) protein is a key structural protein of coronaviruses including, the porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV). The S protein is a type I membrane glycoprotein located in the viral envelope and is responsible for mediating the binding of viral particles to specific cell recepto...

  16. Potential use of sugar binding proteins in reactors for regeneration of CO2 fixation acceptor D-Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Mahato, Sourav; De, Debojyoti; Dutta, Debajyoti; Kundu, Moloy; Bhattacharya, Sumana; Schiavone, Marc T; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K

    2004-01-01

    Sugar binding proteins and binders of intermediate sugar metabolites derived from microbes are increasingly being used as reagents in new and expanding areas of biotechnology. The fixation of carbon dioxide at emission source has recently emerged as a technology with potentially significant implications for environmental biotechnology. Carbon dioxide is fixed onto a five carbon sugar D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate. We present a review of enzymatic and non-enzymatic binding proteins, for 3-phosphoglycerate (3PGA), 3-phosphoglyceraldehyde (3PGAL), dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP), xylulose-5-phosphate (X5P) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) which could be potentially used in reactors regenerating RuBP from 3PGA. A series of reactors combined in a linear fashion has been previously shown to convert 3-PGA, (the product of fixed CO2 on RuBP as starting material) into RuBP (Bhattacharya et al., 2004; Bhattacharya, 2001). This was the basis for designing reactors harboring enzyme complexes/mixtures instead of linear combination of single-enzyme reactors for conversion of 3PGA into RuBP. Specific sugars in such enzyme-complex harboring reactors requires removal at key steps and fed to different reactors necessitating reversible sugar binders. In this review we present an account of existing microbial sugar binding proteins and their potential utility in these operations. PMID:15175111

  17. Effects of heterocyclic aromatic substituents on binding affinities at two distinct sites of somatostatin receptors. Correlation with the electrostatic potential of the substituents.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vidya; Birzin, Elizabeth T; McVaugh, Cheryl T; Van Rijn, Rachel D; Rohrer, Susan P; Chicchi, Gary; Underwood, Dennis J; Thornton, Edward R; Smith, Amos B; Hirschmann, Ralph

    2003-05-01

    In our continuing program exploring glucose-based peptidomimetics of somatostatin (SRIF-14), we sought to improve the water solubility of our glycosides. This led to insights into the nature of the ligand binding sites at the SRIF receptor. Replacement of the C4 benzyl substituent in glucoside (+)-2 with pyridinylmethyl or pyrazin-2-ylmethyl congeners increased water solubility and enhanced affinity for the human SRIF subtype receptor 4 (sst4). We attribute this effect to hydrogen bond formation. The pyridin-3-ylmethyl substituent at C4, when combined with the imidazol-4-ylmethyl group at C2, generated (-)-19, which has the highest affinity of a glucose-based peptidomimetic at a human SRIF receptor to date (K(i) 53 +/- 23 nM, n = 6 at sst4). The C4 heterocyclic congeners of glucosides bearing a 1-methoxy substituent rather than an indole side chain at the anomeric carbon, such as (+)-16, also provided information about the Trp(8) binding pocket. We correlated the SARs at both the C4 and the Trp(8) binding pockets with calculations of the electrostatic potentials of the diverse C4 aromatic substituents using Spartan 3-21G(*) MO analysis. These calculations provide an approximate analysis of a molecule's ability to interact within a receptor binding site. Our binding studies show that benzene and indole rings, but not pyridinylmethyl nor pyrazin-2-ylmethyl rings, can bind the hydrophobic Trp(8) binding pocket of sst4. The Spartan 3-21G(*) MO analysis reveals significant negative electrostatic potential in the region of the pi-clouds for the benzene and indole rings but not for the pyridinylmethyl or pyrazin-2-ylmethyl congeners. Our data further demonstrate that the replacement of benzene or indole side chains by heterocyclic aromatic rings typified by pyridine and pyrazine not only enhances water solubility and hydrogen bonding capacity as expected, but can also profoundly diminish the ability of the pi-cloud of the aromatic substituent to interact with side chains

  18. Gene I, a potential cell-to-cell movement locus of cauliflower mosaic virus, encodes an RNA-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Citovsky, V; Knorr, D; Zambryski, P

    1991-01-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) pararetrovirus capable of cell-to-cell movement presumably through intercellular connections, the plasmodesmata, of the infected plant. This movement is likely mediated by a specific viral protein encoded by the gene I locus. Here we report that the purified gene I protein binds RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) but not dsDNA regardless of nucleotide sequence specificity. The binding is highly cooperative, and the affinity of the gene I protein for RNA is 10-fold higher than for ssDNA. CaMV replicates by reverse transcription of a 358 RNA that is homologous to the entire genome. We propose that the 35S RNA may be involved in cell-to-cell movement of CaMV as an intermediate that is transported through plasmodesmata as an RNA-gene I protein complex. Images PMID:11607169

  19. Gene I, a potential cell-to-cell movement locus of cauliflower mosaic virus, encodes an RNA-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Citovsky, V.; Knorr, D.; Zambryski, P. )

    1991-03-15

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) pararetrovirus capable of cell-to-cell movement presumably through intercellular connections, the plasmodesmata, of the infected plant. This movement is likely mediated by a specific viral protein encoded by the gene I locus. Here we report that the purified gene I protein binds RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) but not dsDNA regardless of nucleotide sequence specificity. The binding is highly cooperative, and the affinity of the gene I protein for RNA is 10-fold higher than for ssDNA. CaMV replicates by reverse transcription of a 35S RNA that is homologous to the entire genome. The authors propose that the 35S RNA may be involved in cell-to-cell movement of CaMV as an intermediate that is transported through plasmodesmata as an RNA-gene I protein complex.

  20. Blood Group Substances as Potential Therapeutic Agents for the Prevention and Treatment of Infection with Noroviruses Proving Novel Binding Patterns in Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yazawa, Shin; Yokobori, Takehiko; Ueta, Gen; Ide, Munenori; Altan, Bolag; Thongprachum, Aksara; Nishimura, Toyo; Nakajima, Tamiko; Kominato, Yoshihiko; Asao, Takayuki; Saniabadi, Abby R.; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Le Pendu, Jacques; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Blood group-related glycans determining ABO and Lewis blood groups are known to function as attachment factors for most of the norovirus (NoV) strains. To identify binding specificity of each NoV, recombinant norovirus-like particles (VLPs) and human saliva samples with different ABO, Lewis phenotypes and secretor status have been commonly applied. When binding specificities of VLPs prepared from 16 different genotypes of NoVs in GI and GII genogroups were characterized in samples of human gastric mucosa compared to human saliva based on blood group phenotypes, considerable differences were observed for several strains. Novel binding specificities determined by an ELISA using preparations from human gastric mucosa were also ascertained by immunohistochemical analyses using human jejunal mucosa, widely believed to be susceptible to NoV infection. Further, A, B and O(H) blood group substances prepared from porcine and squid tissues were found to be effective for preventing ABO blood group-specific binding of VLPs to both saliva and mucosa samples. Therefore, these blood group substances might have potential for the prevention and treatment of NoV infection. PMID:24558470

  1. T6BP and NDP52 are myosin VI binding partners with potential roles in cytokine signalling and cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Morriswood, Brooke; Ryzhakov, Grigory; Puri, Claudia; Arden, Susan D.; Roberts, Rhys; Dendrou, Calliope; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2009-01-01

    Summary Myosin VI has been implicated in many cellular processes including endocytosis, secretion, membrane ruffling and cell motility. We carried out a yeast two-hybrid screen and identified TRAF6-binding protein (T6BP) and nuclear dot protein 52 (NDP52) as myosin VI binding partners. Myosin VI interaction with T6BP and NDP52 was confirmed in vitro and in vivo and the binding sites on each protein were accurately mapped. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy showed that T6BP, NDP52 and myosin VI are present at the trans side of the Golgi complex, and on vesicles in the perinuclear region. Although the SKICH domain in T6BP and NDP52 does not mediate recruitment into membrane ruffles, loss of T6BP and NDP52 in RNAi knockdown cells results in reduced membrane ruffling activity and increased stress fibre and focal adhesion formation. Furthermore, we observed in these knockdown cells an upregulation of constitutive secretion of alkaline phosphatase, implying that both proteins act as negative regulators of secretory traffic at the Golgi complex. T6BP was also found to inhibit NF-κB activation, implicating it in the regulation of TRAF6-mediated cytokine signalling. Thus myosin VI-T6BP interactions may link membrane trafficking pathways with cell adhesion and cytokine-dependent cell signalling. PMID:17635994

  2. Chromodomain-helicase-DNA binding protein 5, 7 and pronecrotic mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein serve as potential prognostic biomarkers in patients with resected pancreatic adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Seldon, Crystal S; Colbert, Lauren E; Hall, William A; Fisher, Sarah B; Yu, David S; Landry, Jerome C

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest cancers with a very poor prognosis. Recently, there has been a significant increase in research directed towards identifying potential biomarkers that can be used to diagnose and provide prognostic information for pancreatic cancer. These markers can be used clinically to optimize and personalize therapy for individual patients. In this review, we focused on 3 biomarkers involved in the DNA damage response pathway and the necroptosis pathway: Chromodomain-helicase-DNA binding protein 5, chromodomain-helicase-DNA binding protein 7, and mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein. The aim of this article is to review present literature provided for these biomarkers and current studies in which their effectiveness as prognostic biomarkers are analyzed in order to determine their future use as biomarkers in clinical medicine. Based on the data presented, these biomarkers warrant further investigation, and should be validated in future studies. PMID:27096031

  3. A Potential Substrate Binding Conformation of β-Lactams and Insight into the Broad Spectrum of NDM-1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qinghui; He, Lin

    2012-01-01

    New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) is a key enzyme that the pathogen Klebsiella pneumonia uses to hydrolyze almost all β-lactam antibiotics. It is currently unclear why NDM-1 has a broad spectrum of activity. Docking of the representatives of the β-lactam families into the active site of NDM-1 is reported here. All the β-lactams naturally fit the NDM-1 pocket, implying that NDM-1 can accommodate the substrates without dramatic conformation changes. The docking reveals two major binding modes of the β-lactams, which we tentatively name the S (substrate) and I (inhibitor) conformers. In the S conformers of all the β-lactams, the amide oxygen and the carboxylic group conservatively interact with two zinc ions, while the substitutions on the fused rings show dramatic differences in their conformations and positions. Since the bridging hydroxide ion/water in the S conformer is at the position for the nucleophilic attack, the S conformation may simulate the true binding of a substrate to NDM-1. The I conformer either blocks or displaces the bridging hydroxide ion/water, such as in the case of aztreonam, and is thus inhibitory. The docking also suggests that substitutions on the β-lactam ring are required for β-lactams to bind in the S conformation, and therefore, small β-lactams such as clavulanic acid would be inhibitors of NDM-1. Finally, our docking shows that moxalactam uses its tyrosyl-carboxylic group to compete with the S conformer and would thus be a poor substrate of NDM-1. PMID:22825119

  4. SRC Homology 2 Domain Binding Sites in Insulin, IGF-1 and FGF receptor mediated signaling networks reveal an extensive potential interactome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Specific peptide ligand recognition by modular interaction domains is essential for the fidelity of information flow through the signal transduction networks that control cell behavior in response to extrinsic and intrinsic stimuli. Src homology 2 (SH2) domains recognize distinct phosphotyrosine peptide motifs, but the specific sites that are phosphorylated and the complement of available SH2 domains varies considerably in individual cell types. Such differences are the basis for a wide range of available protein interaction microstates from which signaling can evolve in highly divergent ways. This underlying complexity suggests the need to broadly map the signaling potential of systems as a prerequisite for understanding signaling in specific cell types as well as various pathologies that involve signal transduction such as cancer, developmental defects and metabolic disorders. This report describes interactions between SH2 domains and potential binding partners that comprise initial signaling downstream of activated fibroblast growth factor (FGF), insulin (Ins), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) receptors. A panel of 50 SH2 domains screened against a set of 192 phosphotyrosine peptides defines an extensive potential interactome while demonstrating the selectivity of individual SH2 domains. The interactions described confirm virtually all previously reported associations while describing a large set of potential novel interactions that imply additional complexity in the signaling networks initiated from activated receptors. This study of pTyr ligand binding by SH2 domains provides valuable insight into the selectivity that underpins complex signaling networks that are assembled using modular protein interaction domains. PMID:22974441

  5. Computer aided prediction and identification of potential epitopes in the receptor binding domain (RBD) of spike (S) glycoprotein of MERS-CoV

    PubMed Central

    ali, Mohammad Tuhin; Morshed, Mohammed Monzur; Gazi, Md. Amran; Musa, Md. Abu; Kibria, Md Golam; Uddin, Md Jashim; Khan, Md. Anik Ashfaq; Hasan, Shihab

    2014-01-01

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) belongs to the coronaviridae family. In spite of several outbreaks in the very recent years, no vaccine against this deadly virus is developed yet. In this study, the receptor binding domain (RBD) of Spike (S) glycoprotein of MERS-CoV was analyzed through Computational Immunology approach to identify the antigenic determinants (epitopes). In order to do so, the sequences of S glycoprotein that belong to different geographical regions were aligned to observe the conservancy of MERS-CoV RBD. The immune parameters of this region were determined using different in silico tools and Immune Epitope Database (IEDB). Molecular docking study was also employed to check the affinity of the potential epitope towards the binding cleft of the specific HLA allele. The N-terminus RBD (S367-S606) of S glycoprotein was found to be conserved among all the available strains of MERS-CoV. Based on the lower IC50 value, a total of eight potential T-cell epitopes and 19 major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class-I alleles were identified for this conserved region. A 9-mer epitope CYSSLILDY displayed interactions with the maximum number of MHC class-I molecules and projected the highest peak in the B-cell antigenicity plot which concludes that it could be a better choice for designing an epitope based peptide vaccine against MERSCoV considering that it must undergo further in vitro and in vivo experiments. Moreover, in molecular docking study, this epitope was found to have a significant binding affinity of -8.5 kcal/mol towards the binding cleft of the HLA-C*12:03 molecule. PMID:25258490

  6. Exploring the potential binding sites of some known HDAC inhibitors on some HDAC8 conformers by docking studies.

    PubMed

    Sixto-López, Yudibeth; Gómez-Vidal, José A; Correa-Basurto, José

    2014-08-01

    We describe the conformational behavior of histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8) using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. HDAC8 conformers were used for the docking studies using some known HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), valproic acid (VPA), aroyl-pyrrole-hydroxy-amide (APHA-8) and tubacin to explore their interactions, binding modes, free energy values. The MD simulation show that HDAC8 make important surface changes at the catalytic site (CS) entrance as well as at two entrances locations in the 14-Å tunnel. In addition, we identify an alternate entrance to the 14-Å tunnel named adjacent to the catalytic site pocket (ACSP). By using docking studies, it was possible to elucidate the importance of hydrophobic and π-π interactions that are the most important for the ligand-HDAC8 complex structural stabilization. In conclusion, the ligand flexibility, molecular weight and chemical moieties (hydroxamic acid, aryl and aliphatic moieties) are the principal properties required to increase the binding affinity on HDAC8.

  7. Collybistin binds and inhibits mTORC1 signaling: a potential novel mechanism contributing to intellectual disability and autism.

    PubMed

    Machado, Camila Oliveira Freitas; Griesi-Oliveira, Karina; Rosenberg, Carla; Kok, Fernando; Martins, Stephanie; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Sertie, Andrea Laurato

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis regulation via mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway has key roles in neural development and function, and its dysregulation is involved in neurodevelopmental disorders associated with autism and intellectual disability. mTOR regulates assembly of the translation initiation machinery by interacting with the eukaryotic initiation factor eIF3 complex and by controlling phosphorylation of key translational regulators. Collybistin (CB), a neuron-specific Rho-GEF responsible for X-linked intellectual disability with epilepsy, also interacts with eIF3, and its binding partner gephyrin associates with mTOR. Therefore, we hypothesized that CB also binds mTOR and affects mTORC1 signaling activity in neuronal cells. Here, by using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells from a male patient with a deletion of entire CB gene and from control individuals, as well as a heterologous expression system, we describe that CB physically interacts with mTOR and inhibits mTORC1 signaling pathway and protein synthesis. These findings suggest that disinhibited mTORC1 signaling may also contribute to the pathological process in patients with loss-of-function variants in CB. PMID:25898924

  8. Heparin-Binding Epidermal Growth Factor and Its Receptors Mediate Decidualization and Potentiate Survival of Human Endometrial Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chobotova, Katya; Karpovich, Natalia; Carver, Janet; Manek, Sanjiv; Gullick, William J.; Barlow, David H.; Mardon, Helen J.

    2006-01-01

    Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) has pleiotropic biological functions in many tissues, including those of the female reproductive tract. It facilitates embryo development and mediates implantation and is thought to have a function in endometrial receptivity and maturation. The mature HB-EGF molecule manifests its activity as either a soluble factor (sol-HB-EGF) or a transmembrane precursor (tm-HB-EGF) and can bind two receptors, EGFR and ErbB4/HER4. In this study, we identify factors that modulate expression of HB-EGF, EGFR, and ErbB4 in endometrial stromal cells in vitro. We demonstrate that levels of sol- and tm-HB-EGF, EGFR, and ErbB4 are increased by cAMP, a potent inducer of decidualization of the endometrial stroma. We also show that production of sol- and tm-HB-EGF is differentially modulated by TNFα and TGFβ. Our data suggest that HB-EGF has a function in endometrial maturation in mediating decidualization and attenuating TNFα- and TGFβ-induced apoptosis of endometrial stromal cells. PMID:15562026

  9. Collybistin binds and inhibits mTORC1 signaling: a potential novel mechanism contributing to intellectual disability and autism.

    PubMed

    Machado, Camila Oliveira Freitas; Griesi-Oliveira, Karina; Rosenberg, Carla; Kok, Fernando; Martins, Stephanie; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Sertie, Andrea Laurato

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis regulation via mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway has key roles in neural development and function, and its dysregulation is involved in neurodevelopmental disorders associated with autism and intellectual disability. mTOR regulates assembly of the translation initiation machinery by interacting with the eukaryotic initiation factor eIF3 complex and by controlling phosphorylation of key translational regulators. Collybistin (CB), a neuron-specific Rho-GEF responsible for X-linked intellectual disability with epilepsy, also interacts with eIF3, and its binding partner gephyrin associates with mTOR. Therefore, we hypothesized that CB also binds mTOR and affects mTORC1 signaling activity in neuronal cells. Here, by using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells from a male patient with a deletion of entire CB gene and from control individuals, as well as a heterologous expression system, we describe that CB physically interacts with mTOR and inhibits mTORC1 signaling pathway and protein synthesis. These findings suggest that disinhibited mTORC1 signaling may also contribute to the pathological process in patients with loss-of-function variants in CB.

  10. High-resolution, three-dimensional modeling of human leukocyte antigen class I structure and surface electrostatic potential reveals the molecular basis for alloantibody binding epitopes.

    PubMed

    Kosmoliaptsis, Vasilis; Dafforn, Timothy R; Chaudhry, Afzal N; Halsall, David J; Bradley, J Andrew; Taylor, Craig J

    2011-11-01

    The potential of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) to stimulate humoral alloimmunity depends on the orientation, accessibility and physiochemical properties of polymorphic amino acids. We have generated high-resolution structural and physiochemical models of all common HLA class I alleles and analyzed the impact of amino acid polymorphisms on surface electrostatic potential. Atomic resolution three-dimensional structural models of HLA class I molecules were generated using the MODELLER computer algorithm. The molecular surface electrostatic potential was calculated using the DelPhi program. To confirm that electrostatic surface topography reflects known HLA B cell epitopes, we examined Bw4 and Bw6 and ascertained the impact of amino acid polymorphisms on their tertiary and physiochemical composition. The HLA protein structures generated performed well when subjected to stereochemical and energy-based testing for structural integrity. The electrostatic pattern and conformation of Bw4 and Bw6 epitopes are maintained among HLA molecules even when expressed in a different structural context. Importantly, variation in epitope amino acid composition does not always translate into a different electrostatic motif, providing an explanation for serologic cross-reactivity. Mutations of critical amino acids that abrogate antibody binding also induce distinct changes in epitope electrostatic properties. In conclusion, high-resolution structural modeling provides a physiochemical explanation for serologic patterns of antibody binding and provides novel insights into HLA immunogenicity. PMID:21840357

  11. Sugar-nucleotide-binding and autoglycosylating polypeptide(s) from nasturtium fruit: biochemical capacities and potential functions.

    PubMed

    Faik, A; Desveaux, D; MacLachlan, G

    2000-05-01

    Polypeptide assemblies cross-linked by S-S bonds (molecular mass>200 kDa) and single polypeptides folded with internal S-S cross-links (<41 kDa) have been detected by SDS/PAGE in particulate membranes and soluble extracts of developing cotyledons of nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus L.). When first prepared from fruit homogenates, these polypeptides were found to bind reversibly to UDP-Gal (labelled with [(14)C]Gal or [(3)H]uridine), and to co-precipitate specifically with added xyloglucan from solutions made with 67% ethanol. Initially, the bound UDP-[(14)C]Gal could be replaced (bumped) by adding excess UDP, or exchanged (chased) with UDP-Gal, -Glc, -Man or -Xyl. However, this capacity for turnover was lost during incubation in reaction media, or during SDS/PAGE under reducing conditions, even as the glycone moiety was conserved by autoglycosylation to form a stable 41 kDa polypeptide. Polyclonal antibodies raised to a similar product purified from Arabidopsis bound to all the labelled nasturtium polypeptides in immunoblotting tests. The antibodies also inhibited the binding of nasturtium polypeptides to UDP-Gal, the uptake of UDP-[(14)C]Gal into intact nasturtium membrane vesicles and the incorporation of [(14)C]Gal into nascent xyloglucan within these vesicles. This is the first direct evidence that these polypeptides facilitate the channelling of UDP-activated sugars from the cytoplasm through Golgi vesicle membranes to lumenal sites, where they can be used as substrates for glycosyltransferases to synthesize products such as xyloglucan.

  12. [Recognition of the potential SF-1 binding sites by SiteGA method, their experimental verification and search for new SF-1 target genes].

    PubMed

    Klimova, N V; Levitskiĭ, V G; Ignat'eva, E V; Vasil'ev, G V; Kobzev, V F; Busygina, T V; Merkulova, T I; Kolchanov, N A

    2006-01-01

    The SF-1 (Steroidogenic Factor-1) is a transcription factor known as a key regulator of the steroidogenic gene expression. SF-1 is required for the development and functioning at all levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and adrenal axis. Also it plays an essential role in sex determination. SF-1 is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and it activates gene expression by binding to DNA in a monomeric form. Here, we report the results of potential SF-1 binding sites identification by using the SiteGA recognition method. The SiteGA method was implemented using a genetic algorithm (GA) involving a iterative discriminant analyses of local dinucleotide context characteristics. These characteristics were compiled not only over the core binding sites region but over its flanks as well. Developed SiteGA method is characterized by considerably better recognition accuracy when compared to that for the weight matrix method. The experimental tests demonstrated that 83% of the sites recognized by the SiteGA method in the regulatory regions of steroidogenic genes, indeed, interact with the SF-1 factor. We also estimated the density of predicted sites in regulatory region of genes, the members of different functional groups and developed the criterion to search for new SF-1 target genes in genome sequences.

  13. Reproducibility of quantitative measures of binding potential in rat striatum: A test re-test study using DTBZ dynamic PET studies

    SciTech Connect

    Avendaño-Estrada, A. Lara-Camacho, V. M. Ávila-García, M. C. Ávila- Rodríguez, M. A.

    2014-11-07

    There is great interest in the study of dopamine (DA) pathways due to the increasing number of patients with illnesses related to the dopaminergic system and molecular imaging based in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has been proven helpful for this task. Among the different radiopharmaceuticals available to study DA interaction, [{sup 11}C]Dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) has a high affinity for the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2) and its binding potential (BP) is a marker of DA terminal integrity. This paper reports on the intersubject reproducibility of BP measurements in rat striatum with [11C]DTBZ using the Logańs method.

  14. Surrogate markers for cerebral blood flow correlate with [¹⁸F]-fallypride binding potential at dopamine D(2/3) receptors in human striatum.

    PubMed

    Cumming, Paul; Xiong, Guoming; la Fougère, Christian; Rominger, Axel; Bartenstein, Peter; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Piel, Markus; Rösch, Frank; Gründer, Gerhard; Vernaleken, Ingo

    2013-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with the high affinity dopamine D(2/3) receptor ligand [¹⁸F]-fallypride affords estimates of the binding potential (BP(ND) ) in extra-striatal regions of low receptor abundance, but the sufficient recording time for accurate measurements in striatum has been called into question. We have earlier argued that transient equilibrium measurements are obtained in striatum with [¹⁸F]-fallypride PET recordings of 3 h duration, which may be the practical limit for clinical investigations without interrupted scanning. However, the high extraction fraction of [¹⁸F]-fallypride predicts flow-dependence of tracer delivery to brain, which may be a source of variance of the apparent BP(ND) in regions of high binding. To test this prediction, we conducted a retrospective analysis of [¹⁸F]-fallypride PET data from a group of 50 healthy volunteers (age 18-58 years [mean ± SD: 32.6 ± 10.6), who had participated in clinical studies without arterial input measurements. We used the initial 120-s integral (AUC) of the venous confluence (VC) as a surrogate marker for cerebral blood flow (CBF) and tested for correlations between regional estimates of BP(ND) calculated by the simplified reference tissue model (SRTM) and the individual VC-AUC. The magnitude of BP(ND) in a high binding region (putamen), but not in a low binding region (thalamus) correlated positively with VC-AUC, suggesting that approximately 9% of the variance in the [¹⁸F]-fallypride BP(ND) in putamen can be attributed to individual differences in this surrogate marker for CBF, a contribution equal in magnitude to the effects of age on BP(ND) in putamen of the present healthy control group. PMID:23239525

  15. Reversible Albumin-Binding GH Possesses a Potential Once-Weekly Treatment Profile in Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Janukonyté, Jurgita; Klose, Marianne; Marina, Djordje; Tanvig, Mette; Nielsen, Lene F.; Höybye, Charlotte; Andersen, Marianne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    2016-01-01

    Context: NNC0195-0092 is a reversible, albumin-binding GH derivative, developed for once-weekly administration. Objectives: The objective of the study was to evaluate safety, local tolerability, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics of multiple, once-weekly doses of NNC0195-0092, compared with daily GH. Design and Setting: This was a phase 1, randomized, open-label, active-controlled, multiple-dose, dose-escalation trial. Patients: Thirty-four GH-treated adult subjects (male, n = 25) with GH deficiency participated in the study. Interventions and Main Outcome Measures: Subjects were sequentially assigned into four cohorts of eight subjects, randomized within each cohort (3:1) to once-weekly NNC0195-0092 (n = 6) for 4 weeks (0.02, 0.04, 0.08, and 0.12 mg/kg) or daily injections of Norditropin NordiFlex (n = 2) for 4 weeks with a dose replicating the pretrial dose of somatropin. A safety assessment was performed prior to initiating treatment at the next dose level of NNC0195-0092. Daily GH treatment was discontinued 14 days before the trial start. Blood samples were drawn for assessment of safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics (IGF-1 and IGF-binding protein-3) profiles, and immunogenicity studies. Results: Numbers of adverse events were similar at the dose levels of 0.02, 0.04, and 0.08 mg/kg NNC0195-0092 vs daily injections of Norditropin NordiFlex, whereas the number of adverse events was greater at the highest dose level of NNC0195-0092 (0.12 mg/kg). NNC0195-0092 (area under the curve[0–168h]) and peak plasma concentration) increased in a dose-dependent manner, and a dose-dependent increase in IGF-1 levels was observed. IGF-1 profiles were elevated for at least 1 week, and for the 0.02-mg/kg and 0.04-mg/kg NNC0195-0092 doses, the observed IGF-1 levels were similar to the levels for the active control group. Conclusion: Four once-weekly doses of NNC0195-0092 (dose range 0.02–0.12 mg/kg) administered to adult patients with GH deficiency were well tolerated

  16. Calcium-binding proteins in skeletal muscles of the mdx mice: potential role in the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pertille, Adriana; de Carvalho, Candida Luiza Tonizza; Matsumura, Cintia Yuri; Neto, Humberto Santo; Marques, Maria Julia

    2010-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is one of the most common hereditary diseases. Abnormal ion handling renders dystrophic muscle fibers more susceptible to necrosis and a rise in intracellular calcium is an important initiating event in dystrophic muscle pathogenesis. In the mdx mice, muscles are affected with different intensities and some muscles are spared. We investigated the levels of the calcium-binding proteins calsequestrin and calmodulin in the non-spared axial (sternomastoid and diaphragm), limb (tibialis anterior and soleus), cardiac and in the spared extraocular muscles (EOM) of control and mdx mice. Immunoblotting analysis showed a significant increase of the proteins in the spared mdx EOM and a significant decrease in the most affected diaphragm. Both proteins were comparable to the cardiac muscle controls. In limb and sternomastoid muscles, calmodulin and calsequestrin were affected differently. These results suggest that differential levels of the calcium-handling proteins may be involved in the pathogenesis of myonecrosis in mdx muscles. Understanding the signaling mechanisms involving Ca(2+)-calmodulin activation and calsequestrin expression may be a valuable way to develop new therapeutic approaches to the dystrophinopaties.

  17. Potential RNA Binding Proteins in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Identified as Suppressors of Temperature-Sensitive Mutations in Npl3

    PubMed Central

    Henry, M.; Borland, C. Z.; Bossie, M.; Silver, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    The NPL3 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a protein with similarity to heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). Npl3p has been implicated in many nuclear-related events including RNA export, protein import, and rRNA processing. Several temperature-sensitive alleles of NPL3 have been isolated. We now report the sequence of these alleles. For one allele, npl3-1, four complementation groups of suppressors have been isolated. The cognate genes for the two recessive mutants were cloned. One of these is the previously known RNA15, which, like NPL3, also encodes a protein with similarity to the vertebrate hnRNP A/B protein family. The other suppressor corresponds to a newly defined gene we term HRP1, which also encodes a protein with similarity to the hnRNP A/B proteins of vertebrates. Mutations in HRP1 suppress all npl3 temperature-sensitive alleles but do not bypass an npl3 null allele. We show that HRP1 is essential for cell growth and that the corresponding protein is located in the nucleus. The discovery of two hnRNP homologues that can partially suppress the function of Np13p, also an RNA binding protein, will be discussed in terms of the possible roles for Npl3p in RNA metabolism. PMID:8770588

  18. Binding of PAI-1 to endothelial cells stimulated by thymosin beta4 and modulation of their fibrinolytic potential.

    PubMed

    Boncela, Joanna; Smolarczyk, Katarzyna; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S

    2006-01-13

    Our previous studies showed that thymosin beta4 (Tbeta4) induced the synthesis of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) via the AP-1 dependent mechanism and its enhanced secretion. In this work we provide evidence that the released PAI-1 is accumulated on the surface of HUVECs, exclusively in its active form, in a complex with alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) that is also up-regulated and released from the cells. This mechanism is supported by several lines of experiments, in which expression of both proteins was analyzed by flow cytometry and their colocalization supported by confocal microscopy. PAI-1 did not bind to quiescent cells but only to the Tbeta4-activated endothelial cells. In contrast, significant amounts of AGP were found to be associated with the cells overexpressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) without Tbeta4 treatment. The AGP.PAI-1 complex was accumulated essentially at the basal surface of endothelial cells, and such cells showed (a) morphology characteristic for strongly adhered and spread cells and (b) significantly reduced plasmin formation. Taken together, these results provide the evidence supporting a novel mechanism by which active PAI-1 can be bound to the Tbeta4-activated endothelial cells, thus influencing their adhesive properties as well as their ability to generate plasmin.

  19. Modelling of human leucyl aminopeptidases for in silico off target binding analysis of potential Plasmodium falciparum leucine aminopeptidase (PfA-M17) specific inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sahi, Shakti; Raj, Utkarsh; Chaudhary, Meenakshi; Nain, Vikrant

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most widespread infectious diseases in the world. Emergence of multi-drug resistant Plasmodium strains makes it crucial to identify new classes of compounds for anti-malarial therapy. Novel anti-malarial compounds from natural sources (Gomphostema niveum) as well as synthetic chemicals (5-aminolevulinic acid) have been reported in recent patents. Plasmodium falciparum leucyl aminopeptidase (PfA-M17) is a validated target for antimalarial drug development. However, known aminopeptidase inhibitors beset with the problem of non-specificity. Therefore, 3D structural models of PfA-M17 human homologs, Leucine aminopeptidase3 (hLAP3) and probable leucine aminopeptidase (hNPEPL1) were predicted for molecular docking based screening of potential inhibitors for their off target activity. Comparison of IC50 and docking scores of highly active hLAP3 inhibitors shows good correlation (r(2)≈ 0.8). Further, docking analysis with potential PfA-M17 inhibitor Compound-X (identified through virtual screening) shows much higher binding affinity towards PfA-M17 (docking score -11.44) than hLAP3 (docking score -4.26) and hNPEPL1 (docking score -5.08). This lead compound, Compound-X can act as a scaffold for further increasing PfA-M17 binding affinity and hLAP3 and hNPEPL1 3D structure models will be useful for screening of PfA-M17 specific inhibitors.

  20. Binding of insecticidal lectin Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) to midgut receptors of Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi provides clues to its insecticidal potential.

    PubMed

    Roy, Amit; Gupta, Sumanti; Hess, Daniel; Das, Kali Pada; Das, Sampa

    2014-07-01

    The insecticidal potential of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectins against hemipterans has been experimentally proven. However, the basis behind the toxicity of these lectins against hemipterans remains elusive. The present study elucidates the molecular basis behind insecticidal efficacy of Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) against Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi. Confocal microscopic analyses highlighted the binding of 25 kDa stable homodimeric lectin to insect midgut. Ligand blots followed by LC MS/MS analyses identified binding partners of CEA as vacuolar ATP synthase and sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum type Ca(2+) ATPase from B. tabaci, and ATP synthase, heat shock protein 70 and clathrin heavy chain assembly protein from L. erysimi. Internalization of CEA into hemolymph was confirmed by Western blotting. Glycoprotein nature of the receptors was identified through glycospecific staining. Deglycosylation assay indicated the interaction of CEA with its receptors to be probably glycan mediated. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed the interaction kinetics between ATP synthase of B. tabaci with CEA. Pathway prediction study based on Drosophila homologs suggested the interaction of CEA with insect receptors that probably led to disruption of cellular processes causing growth retardation and loss of fecundity of target insects. Thus, the present findings strengthen our current understanding of the entomotoxic potentiality of CEA, which will facilitate its future biotechnological applications.

  1. The PCNA-associated factor KIAA0101/p15{sup PAF} binds the potential tumor suppressor product p33ING1b

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Fiona; Lammerts van Bueren, Kelly; Butterfield, Natalie; Bennetts, Jennifer S.; Bowles, Josephine; Adolphe, Christelle; Simms, Lisa A.; Young, Joanne; Walsh, Michael D.; Leggett, Barbara; Fowles, Lindsay F.; Wicking, Carol . E-mail: C.Wicking@imb.uq.edu.au

    2006-01-01

    The KIAA0101/p15{sup PAF}/OEATC-1 protein was initially isolated in a yeast two-hybrid screen for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) binding partners, and was shown to bind PCNA competitively with the cell cycle regulator p21{sup WAF}. PCNA is involved in DNA replication and damage repair. Using polyclonal antisera raised against a p15{sup PAF} fusion protein, we have shown that in a range of mammalian tumor and non-tumor cell lines the endogenous p15{sup PAF} protein localises to the nucleus and the mitochondria. Under normal conditions no co-localisation with PCNA could be detected, however following exposure to UV it was possible to co-immunoprecipitate p15{sup PAF} and PCNA from a number of cell lines, suggesting a UV-enhanced association of the two proteins. Overexpression of p15{sup PAF} in mammalian cells was also found to protect cells from UV-induced cell death. Based on similarities between the behaviour of p15{sup PAF} and the potential tumor suppressor product p33ING1b, we have further shown that these two proteins interact in the same complex in cell cultures. This suggests that p15{sup PAF} forms part of a larger protein complex potentially involved in the regulation of DNA repair, apoptosis and cell cycle progression.

  2. Binding of insecticidal lectin Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) to midgut receptors of Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi provides clues to its insecticidal potential.

    PubMed

    Roy, Amit; Gupta, Sumanti; Hess, Daniel; Das, Kali Pada; Das, Sampa

    2014-07-01

    The insecticidal potential of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectins against hemipterans has been experimentally proven. However, the basis behind the toxicity of these lectins against hemipterans remains elusive. The present study elucidates the molecular basis behind insecticidal efficacy of Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) against Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi. Confocal microscopic analyses highlighted the binding of 25 kDa stable homodimeric lectin to insect midgut. Ligand blots followed by LC MS/MS analyses identified binding partners of CEA as vacuolar ATP synthase and sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum type Ca(2+) ATPase from B. tabaci, and ATP synthase, heat shock protein 70 and clathrin heavy chain assembly protein from L. erysimi. Internalization of CEA into hemolymph was confirmed by Western blotting. Glycoprotein nature of the receptors was identified through glycospecific staining. Deglycosylation assay indicated the interaction of CEA with its receptors to be probably glycan mediated. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed the interaction kinetics between ATP synthase of B. tabaci with CEA. Pathway prediction study based on Drosophila homologs suggested the interaction of CEA with insect receptors that probably led to disruption of cellular processes causing growth retardation and loss of fecundity of target insects. Thus, the present findings strengthen our current understanding of the entomotoxic potentiality of CEA, which will facilitate its future biotechnological applications. PMID:24753494

  3. RALP1 Is a Rhoptry Neck Erythrocyte-Binding Protein of Plasmodium falciparum Merozoites and a Potential Blood-Stage Vaccine Candidate Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Tomoyuki; Miura, Kazutoyo; Yamasaki, Tsutomu; Arumugam, Thangavelu U.; Thongkukiatkul, Amporn; Takeo, Satoru; Takashima, Eizo; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Han, Eun-Taek; Long, Carole A.; Torii, Motomi

    2013-01-01

    Erythrocyte invasion by merozoites is an obligatory stage of Plasmodium infection and is essential to disease progression. Proteins in the apical organelles of merozoites mediate the invasion of erythrocytes and are potential malaria vaccine candidates. Rhoptry-associated, leucine zipper-like protein 1 (RALP1) of Plasmodium falciparum was previously found to be specifically expressed in schizont stages and localized to the rhoptries of merozoites by immunofluorescence assay (IFA). Also, RALP1 has been refractory to gene knockout attempts, suggesting that it is essential for blood-stage parasite survival. These characteristics suggest that RALP1 can be a potential blood-stage vaccine candidate antigen, and here we assessed its potential in this regard. Antibodies were raised against recombinant RALP1 proteins synthesized by using the wheat germ cell-free system. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated for the first time that RALP1 is a rhoptry neck protein of merozoites. Moreover, our IFA data showed that RALP1 translocates from the rhoptry neck to the moving junction during merozoite invasion. Growth and invasion inhibition assays revealed that anti-RALP1 antibodies inhibit the invasion of erythrocytes by merozoites. The findings that RALP1 possesses an erythrocyte-binding epitope in the C-terminal region and that anti-RALP1 antibodies disrupt tight-junction formation, are evidence that RALP1 plays an important role during merozoite invasion of erythrocytes. In addition, human sera collected from areas in Thailand and Mali where malaria is endemic recognized this protein. Overall, our findings indicate that RALP1 is a rhoptry neck erythrocyte-binding protein and that it qualifies as a potential blood-stage vaccine candidate. PMID:24002067

  4. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) mutants are susceptible to matrix metalloproteinase proteolysis: potential role in human MBL deficiency.

    PubMed

    Butler, Georgina S; Sim, Derek; Tam, Eric; Devine, Dana; Overall, Christopher M

    2002-05-17

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) plays a critical role in innate immunity. Point mutations in the collagen-like domain (R32C, G34D, or G37E) of MBL cause a serum deficiency, predisposing patients to infections and diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. We examined whether MBL mutants show enhanced susceptibility to proteolysis by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which are important mediators in inflammatory tissue destruction. Human and rat MBL were resistant to proteolysis in the native state but were cleaved selectively within the collagen-like domain by multiple MMPs after heat denaturation. In contrast, rat MBL with mutations homologous to those of the human variants (R23C, G25D, or G28E) was cleaved efficiently without denaturation in the collagen-like domain by MMP-2 and MMP-9 (gelatinases A and B) and MMP-14 (membrane type-1 MMP), as well as by MMP-1 (collagenase-1), MMP-8 (neutrophil collagenase), MMP-3 (stromelysin-1), neutrophil elastase, and bacterial collagenase. Sites and order of cleavage of the rat MBL mutants for MMP-2 and MMP-9 were: Gly(45)-Lys(46) --> Gly(51)-Ser(52) --> Gly(63)-Gln(64) --> Asn(80)-Met(81) which differed from that of MMP-14, Gly(39)-Leu(40) --> Asn(80)-Met(81), revealing that the MMPs were not functionally interchangeable. These sites were homologous to those cleaved in denatured human MBL. Hence, perturbation of the collagen-like structure of MBL by natural mutations or by denaturation renders MBL susceptible to MMP cleavage. MMPs are likely to contribute to MBL deficiency in individuals with variant alleles and may also be involved in clearance of MBL and modulation of the host response in normal individuals.

  5. Intense isolectin-B4 binding in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons distinguishes C-fiber nociceptors with broad action potentials and high Nav1.9 expression.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xin; Djouhri, Laiche; McMullan, Simon; Berry, Carol; Waxman, Stephen G; Okuse, Kenji; Lawson, Sally N

    2006-07-01

    Binding to isolectin-B4 (IB4) and expression of tyrosine kinase A (trkA) (the high-affinity NGF receptor) have been used to define two different subgroups of nociceptive small dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We previously showed that only nociceptors have high trkA levels. However, information about sensory and electrophysiological properties in vivo of single identified IB4-binding neurons, and about their trkA expression levels, is lacking. IB4-positive (IB4+) and small dark neurons had similar size distributions. We examined IB4-binding levels in >120 dye-injected DRG neurons with sensory and electrophysiological properties recorded in vivo. Relative immunointensities for trkA and two TTX-resistant sodium channels (Nav1.8 and Nav1.9) were also measured in these neurons. IB4+ neurons were classified as strongly or weakly IB4+. All strongly IB4+ neurons were C-nociceptor type (C-fiber nociceptive or unresponsive). Of 32 C-nociceptor-type neurons examined, approximately 50% were strongly IB4+, approximately 20% were weakly IB4+ and approximately 30% were IB4-. Adelta low-threshold mechanoreceptive (LTM) neurons were weakly IB4+ or IB4-. All 33 A-fiber nociceptors and all 44 Aalpha/beta-LTM neurons examined were IB4-. IB4+ compared with IB4- C-nociceptor-type neurons had longer somatic action potential durations and rise times, slower conduction velocities, more negative membrane potentials, and greater immunointensities for Nav1.9 but not Nav1.8. Immunointensities of IB4 binding in C-neurons were positively correlated with those of Nav1.9 but not Nav1.8. Of 23 C-neurons tested for both trkA and IB4, approximately 35% were trkA+/IB4+ but with negatively correlated immunointensities; 26% were IB4+/trkA-, and 35% were IB4-/trkA+. We conclude that strongly IB4+ DRG neurons are exclusively C-nociceptor type and that high Nav1.9 expression may contribute to their distinct membrane properties. PMID:16822986

  6. Computational prediction of antibody binding sites on tetracycline antibiotics: electrostatic potentials and average local ionization energies on molecular surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Pankaj; Sukumar, N; Murray, Jane S; Giese, Rossman F; Wood, Troy D

    2009-01-29

    Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used for the analysis of tetracycline, chlortetracycline, oxytetracycline, and their transformed compounds in environmental water samples. The antibodies employed in ELISA showed high relative affinity for tetracycline, epitetracycline, chlortetracycline, and epichlortetracycline as compared to anhydrotetracycline, epianhydrotetracycline, and anhydrochlortetracycline. The specificity and crossreactivity of these antibodies are discussed in relation to the electrostatic potentials and average local ionization energies computed on the molecular surfaces of tetracycline antibiotics and their transformed compounds with an objective of identifying common features as well as differences that may be related to the experimentally observed variation in cross-reactivity values. The computations were performed at both the HF/STO-3G and HF/6-31+G* levels using the Gaussian 98 program. The results in this study are based upon molecular electrostatic potentials and local ionization energies computed on isodensity molecular surfaces. The surface electrostatic potentials are characterized in terms of a group of statistically defined quantities, which include the average deviation, the positive, negative, and total variances, positive and negative surface extrema, and a parameter indicating the degree of electrostatic balance.

  7. Beyond DNA binding - a review of the potential mechanisms mediating quinacrine's therapeutic activities in parasitic infections, inflammation, and cancers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This is an in-depth review of the history of quinacrine as well as its pharmacokinetic properties and established record of safety as an FDA-approved drug. The potential uses of quinacrine as an anti-cancer agent are discussed with particular attention to its actions on nuclear proteins, the arachidonic acid pathway, and multi-drug resistance, as well as its actions on signaling proteins in the cytoplasm. In particular, quinacrine's role on the NF-κB, p53, and AKT pathways are summarized. PMID:21569639

  8. Enhancing the Apoptotic Potential of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein-3 in Prostate Cancer by Modulation of CK2 Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Laura J.; Mehta, Hemal; Cohen, Pinchas

    2009-01-01

    IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) promotes apoptosis by both IGF-dependent and -independent mechanisms. We have previously reported that phosphorylation of IGFBP-3 (S156) by DNA-dependent protein kinase enhances its nuclear accumulation and is essential for its ability to interact with retinoid X receptor-α and induce apoptosis in cultured prostate cancer cells. Using specific chemical inhibitors and small interfering RNA, we demonstrate that preventing casein kinase 2 (CK2) activation enhanced the apoptotic potential of IGFBP-3. We mapped potential CK2 phosphosphorylation sites in IGFBP-3 to S167 and S175 and identified that wild-type IGFBP-3- and IGFBP-3-S175A-induced apoptosis to a comparable extent. In contrast, IGFBP-3-S167A was far more potently apoptosis inducing due to inability to undergo CK2 phosphorylation. Pretreatment of 22RV1 cells with IGFBP-3 small interfering RNA also limits the ability of high doses of CK2 inhibitor to induce apoptosis. These effects can be reversed by the addition of exogenous IGFBP-3 protein, suggesting reciprocal regulation of cell survival and apoptosis by IGFBP-3 and CK2. These studies reveal multisite phosphorylation of IGFBP-3 that both positively and negatively regulate its apoptotic potential. Understanding such intrinsic regulation of IGFBP-3 action may enhance the development of potential cancer therapies. PMID:19556345

  9. Genome-wide analysis of FoxO1 binding in hepatic chromatin: Potential involvement of FoxO1 in linking retinoid signaling to hepatic gluconeogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong-Ju; Joshi, Pujan; Hong, Seung-Hyun; Mosure, Kathleen; Shin, Dong-Guk; Osborne, Timothy F.

    2012-01-01

    The forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 is a critical regulator of hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism, and dysregulation of FoxO1 function has been implicated in diabetes and insulin resistance. We globally identified FoxO1 occupancy in mouse hepatic chromatin on a genome-wide level by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq). To establish the specific functional significance of FoxO1 against other FoxO proteins, ChIP-seq was performed with chromatin from liver-specific FoxO1 knockout and wild-type mice. Here we identified 401 genome-wide FoxO1-binding locations. Motif search reveals a sequence element, 5′ GTAAACA 3′, consistent with a previously known FoxO1-binding site. Gene set enrichment analysis shows that the data from FoxO1 ChIP-seq are highly correlated with the global expression profiling of genes regulated by FoxO1, demonstrating the functional relevance of our FoxO1 ChIP-seq study. Interestingly, gene ontology analysis reveals the functional significance of FoxO1 in retinoid metabolic processes. We show here that FoxO1 directly binds to the genomic sites for the genes in retinoid metabolism. Notably, deletion of FoxO1 caused a significantly reduced induction of Pck1 and Pdk4 in response to retinoids. As Pck1 and Pdk4 are downstream targets of retinoid signaling, these results suggest that FoxO1 plays a potential role in linking retinoid metabolism to hepatic gluconeogenesis. PMID:23066095

  10. Binding energy of the donor impurities in GaAs-Ga 1- x Al x As quantum well wires with Morse potential in the presence of electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aciksoz, Esra; Bayrak, Orhan; Soylu, Asim

    2016-10-01

    The behavior of a donor in the GaAs-Ga1-x Al x As quantum well wire represented by the Morse potential is examined within the framework of the effective-mass approximation. The donor binding energies are numerically calculated for with and without the electric and magnetic fields in order to show their influence on the binding energies. Moreover, how the donor binding energies change for the constant potential parameters (D e, r e, and a) as well as with the different values of the electric and magnetic field strengths is determined. It is found that the donor binding energy is highly dependent on the external electric and magnetic fields as well as parameters of the Morse potential. Project supported by the Turkish Science Research Council (TÜBİTAK) and the Financial Supports from Akdeniz and Nigde Universities.

  11. Heparin-binding growth factor type 1 (acidic fibroblast growth factor): a potential biphasic autocrine and paracrine regulator of hepatocyte regeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Kan, M; Huang, J S; Mansson, P E; Yasumitsu, H; Carr, B; McKeehan, W L

    1989-01-01

    Heparin-binding growth factor type 1 (HBGF-1; sometimes termed acidic fibroblast growth factor) is potentially an important factor in liver regeneration. HBGF-1 alone (half-maximal effect at 60 pM) stimulated hepatocyte DNA synthesis and bound to a high-affinity receptor (Kd = 62 pM; 5000 per cell). Epidermal growth factor (EGF) neutralized or masked the mitogenic effect of HBGF-1 concurrent with appearance of low-affinity HBGF-1 binding sites. HBGF-1 reduced the inhibitory effect of transforming growth factor type beta (TGF-beta) on the EGF stimulus. Nanomolar levels of HBGF-1 decreased the EGF stimulus. An increase in hepatic HBGF-1 gene expression after partial hepatectomy precedes increases in expression of the EGF homolog, TGF-alpha, and nonparenchymal-cell-derived TGF-beta in the regenerating liver. Expression of HBGF-1 mRNA occurs in both hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells and persists for 7 days in liver tissue after partial hepatectomy. HBGF-1 acting through a high-affinity receptor is a candidate for the early autocrine stimulus that drives hepatocyte DNA synthesis prior to or concurrent with the EGF/TGF-alpha stimulus. It may allow hepatocyte proliferation to proceed in the presence of low levels of TGF-beta. An EGF/TGF-alpha-dependent change in HBGF-1 receptor phenotype and increasing levels of nonparenchymal-cell-derived HBGF-1 and TGF-beta may serve to limit hepatocyte proliferation. Images PMID:2477840

  12. The molecular defect in type IIB von Willebrand disease. Identification of four potential missense mutations within the putative GpIb binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, K A; Nichols, W C; Bruck, M E; Bahou, W F; Shapiro, A D; Bowie, E J; Gralnick, H R; Ginsburg, D

    1991-01-01

    Type IIB von Willebrand Disease (vWD) is characterized by the selective loss of large von Willebrand Factor (vWF) multimers from plasma, presumably due to their increased reactivity with platelets and subsequent clearance from the circulation. Using the PCR, one of a panel of four potential missense mutations was identified in each of the 14 patients studied from 11 unrelated families. None of these substitutions was encountered in a large panel of normal DNAs. These changes all represent C----T transitions at CpG dinucleotides, proposed "hot spots" for mutation in the human genome. The four resulting amino acid substitutions, Arg543----Trp, Arg545----Cys, Val553----Met, and Arg578----Gln, are all clustered within the GpIb binding domain of vWF. Disruption of this latter functional domain may explain the pathogenesis of Type IIB vWD. By sequence polymorphism analysis, the Arg543----Trp substitution was shown to have occurred as at least two independent mutational events. This latter observation, along with the identification of mutations in all 14 patients studied and their localization to the GpIb binding domain, all strongly suggest that these substitutions represent the authentic defects responsible for Type IIB vWD. This panel of mutations may provide a useful diagnostic tool for the majority of patients with Type IIB vWD. Images PMID:1672694

  13. Bicyclic [3.3.0]-Octahydrocyclopenta[c]pyrrolo Antagonists of Retinol Binding Protein 4: Potential Treatment of Atrophic Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Stargardt Disease.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Christopher L; Racz, Boglarka; Freeman, Emily E; Conlon, Michael P; Chen, Ping; Stafford, Douglas G; Schwarz, Daniel M C; Zhu, Lei; Kitchen, Douglas B; Barnes, Keith D; Dobri, Nicoleta; Michelotti, Enrique; Cywin, Charles L; Martin, William H; Pearson, Paul G; Johnson, Graham; Petrukhin, Konstantin

    2015-08-13

    Antagonists of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) impede ocular uptake of serum all-trans retinol (1) and have been shown to reduce cytotoxic bisretinoid formation in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which is associated with the pathogenesis of both dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and Stargardt disease. Thus, these agents show promise as a potential pharmacotherapy by which to stem further neurodegeneration and concomitant vision loss associated with geographic atrophy of the macula. We previously disclosed the discovery of a novel series of nonretinoid RBP4 antagonists, represented by bicyclic [3.3.0]-octahydrocyclopenta[c]pyrrolo analogue 4. We describe herein the utilization of a pyrimidine-4-carboxylic acid fragment as a suitable isostere for the anthranilic acid appendage of 4, which led to the discovery of standout antagonist 33. Analogue 33 possesses exquisite in vitro RBP4 binding affinity and favorable drug-like characteristics and was found to reduce circulating plasma RBP4 levels in vivo in a robust manner (>90%). PMID:26181715

  14. Binding Energy and Dissociation Barrier: Experimental Determination of the Key Parameters of the Potential Energy Curve of Diethyl Ether on Si(001).

    PubMed

    Reutzel, Marcel; Lipponer, Marcus; Dürr, Michael; Höfer, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    The key parameters of the potential energy curve of organic molecules on semiconductor surfaces, binding energy of the intermediate state and dissociation barrier, were experimentally investigated for the model system of diethyl ether (Et2O) on Si(001). Et2O adsorbs via a datively bonded intermediate from which it converts via ether cleavage into a covalently attached final state. This thermally activated conversion into the final state was followed in real-time by means of optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) at different temperatures and the associated energy barrier ϵa = 0.38 ± 0.05 eV and pre-exponential factor νa = 10(4±1) s(-1) were determined. From molecular beam experiments on the initial sticking probability, the difference between the desorption energy ϵd and ϵa was extracted and thus the binding energy of the intermediate state was determined (0.62 ± 0.08 eV). The results are discussed in terms of general chemical trends as well as with respect to a wider applicability on adsorbate reactions on semiconductor surfaces.

  15. Effect of amino acid substitutions in a potential metal-binding site of AnfA on expression from the anfH promoter in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Premakumar, R; Loveless, T M; Bishop, P E

    1994-10-01

    AnfA, an activator required for transcription of the structural genes encoding nitrogenase 3 (anfHDGK) in Azotobacter vinelandii, has a potential metal-binding site [(S19)H(C21)FTGE(C26)R] in its N terminus. Growth studies and expression of an anfH-lacZ fusion in mutants containing amino acid substitutions in this site indicate that Ser-19 is not required for AnfA activity whereas Cys-21 and Cys-26 are required. Residual expression of the anfH-lacZ fusion in AnfA- mutants was found to be due to activation by VnfA, the activator required for expression of genes encoding nitrogenase 2.

  16. Connective tissue growth factor differentially binds to members of the cystine knot superfamily and potentiates platelet-derived growth factor-B signaling in rabbit corneal fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Pi, Liya; Chung, Pei-Yu; Sriram, Sriniwas; Rahman, Masmudur M; Song, Wen-Yuan; Scott, Edward W; Petersen, Bryon E; Schultz, Gregory S

    2015-01-01

    (P < 0.01). Cells containing the cystine knot of BMP-4 expressed the second most activity, with a 24.77 ± 0.47 fold increase (P < 0.01). Cells that contained the cystine knot of TGF-β1 had a 3.80 ± 0.66 fold increase (P < 0.05) and the ones with the cystine knot of PDGF-B had a 2.64 ± 0.33 fold increase of β-galactosidase activity (P < 0.01). Further SPR analysis showed that the association rate between VEGF-A 165 and CTGF was faster than PDGF-BB and CTGF. The calculated dissociation constant (KD) of CTGF to VEGF165 and PDGF-BB was 1.8 and 43 nmol/L respectively. PDGF-BB ligand and PDGFRβ receptor formed a stable complex with a low dissociation constant 1.4 nmol/L. Increasing the concentration of CTGF up to 263.2 nmol/L significantly the ligand/receptor binding. In addition, CTGF potentiated phosphorylation of PDGFRβ and AKT in rabbit corneal fibroblast cells stimulated by PDGF-BB in tissue culture condition. In contrast, CTGF did not affect PDGF-B induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2. CONCLUSION: CTGF has a differential binding affinity to VEGF-A, PDGF-B, BMP-4, and TGF-β. Its weak association with PDGF-B may represent a novel mechanism to enhance PDGF-B signaling. PMID:26629321

  17. Effect of surface and membrane potentials on IAA (indoleactic acid) uptake and binding by zucchini membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, K.A.; Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1986-08-01

    The polar transport of the endogenous hormone controlling extension growth of plant cells, indoleacetic acid (IAA), is thought to depend on transmembrane pH and electrical gradients resulting in part from the action of proton ATPases in the plasma membrane. Elements of this transport process are permeation of the membrane by the undissociated lipophilic indoleacetic acid (IAAH) from the acidic apoplast, followed by dissociation of the weak acid and accumulation of the IAA anion (IAA/sup -/) in the alkaline cytoplasm; a saturable symport of IAA/sup -/ with one or more protons; a carrier-mediated efflux of IAA/sup -/ down a considerable electrochemical gradient. The efflux is greater from the basal than the apical end of cells and is thought to be responsible for the overall polarity of the process. This step is also the site of action of napthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and herbicides that inhibit polar transport but stimulate net accumulation of auxin by tissues and cells. We are using membrane vesicles as a simplified system for studying the mechanisms involved in the transport and accumulation of auxin. In particular, we are interested in determining the involvement of the transmembrane pH (pH/sub o/ < pH/sub i/) and voltage gradients (K/sup +/ diffusion potential, (K/sup +/)/sub in/ > (K/sup +/)/sub out/) in IAA uptake. 19 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Role of surface layer collagen binding protein from indigenous Lactobacillus plantarum 91 in adhesion and its anti-adhesion potential against gut pathogen.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Tyagi, Ashish; Kaushik, Jai Kumar; Saklani, Asha Chandola; Grover, Sunita; Batish, Virender Kumar

    2013-12-14

    Human feacal isolates were ascertain as genus Lactobacillus using specific primer LbLMA1/R16-1 and further identified as Lactobacillus plantarum with species specific primers Lpl-3/Lpl-2. 25 L. plantarum strains were further assessed for hydrophobicity following the microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) method and colonization potentials based on their adherence to immobilized human collagen type-1. Surface proteins were isolated from selected L. plantarum 91(Lp91) strain. The purified collagen binding protein (Cbp) protein was assessed for its anti-adhesion activity against enteric Escherichia coli 0157:H7 pathogen on immobilized collagen. Four L. plantarum strains displayed high degree of hydrophobicity and significant adhesion to collagen. A 72 kDa protein was purified which reduced 59.71% adhesion of E. coli 0157:H7 on immobilized collagen as compared to control well during adhesion assay. Cbp protein is the major influencing factor in inhibition of E. coli 0157:H7 adhesion with extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Hydrophobicity and adhesion potential are closely linked attributes precipitating in better colonization potential of the lactobacillus strains. Cbp is substantiated as a crucial surface protein contributing in adhesion of lactobacillus strains. The study can very well be the platform for commercialization of indigenous probiotic strain once their functional attributes are clinically explored.

  19. Theranostic multimodular potential of zinc-doped ferrite-saturated metal-binding protein-loaded novel nanocapsules in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kamalapuram, Sishir K; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Roy, Kislay; Chaudhary, Rajneesh; Sehgal, Rakesh; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2016-01-01

    The present study successfully developed orally deliverable multimodular zinc (Zn) iron oxide (Fe3O4)-saturated bovine lactoferrin (bLf)-loaded polymeric nanocapsules (NCs), and evaluated their theranostic potential (antitumor efficacy, magnetophotothermal efficacy and imaging capability) in an in vivo human xenograft CpG-island methylator phenotype (CIMP)-1+/CIMP2−/chromosome instability-positive colonic adenocarcinoma (Caco2) and claudin-low, triple-negative (ER−/PR−/HER2−; MDA-MB-231) breast cancer model. Mice fed orally on the Zn-Fe-bLf NC diet showed downregulation in tumor volume and complete regression in tumor volume after 45 days of feeding. In human xenograft colon cancer, vehicle-control NC diet-group (n=5) mice showed a tumor volume of 52.28±11.55 mm3, and Zn-Fe-bLf NC diet (n=5)-treated mice had a tumor-volume of 0.10±0.073 mm3. In the human xenograft breast cancer model, Zn-Fe-bLf NC diet (n=5)-treated mice showed a tumor volume of 0.051±0.062 mm3 within 40 days of feeding. Live mouse imaging conducted by near-infrared fluorescence imaging of Zn-Fe-bLf NCs showed tumor site-specific localization and regression of colon and breast tumor volume. Ex vivo fluorescence-imaging analysis of the vital organs of mice exhibited sparse localization patterns of Zn-Fe-bLf NCs and also confirmed tumor-specific selective localization patterns of Zn-Fe-bLf NCs. Dual imaging using magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography scans revealed an unprecedented theranostic ability of the Zn-Fe-bLf NCs. These observations warrant consideration of multimodular Zn-Fe-bLf NCs for real-time cancer imaging and simultaneous cancer-targeted therapy. PMID:27099495

  20. Neurotoxic Potential of Lunar and Martian Dust: Influence on Em, Proton Gradient, Active Transport, and Binding of Glutamate in Rat Brain Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Krisanova, Natalia; Kasatkina, Ludmila; Sivko, Roman; Borysov, Arseniy; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Slenzka, Klaus; Borisova, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The harmful effects of lunar dust (LD) on directly exposed tissues are documented in the literature, whereas researchers are only recently beginning to consider its effects on indirectly exposed tissues. During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and transported to the central nervous system. The neurotoxic potential of LD and martian dust (MD) has not yet been assessed. Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter involved in most aspects of normal brain function, whereas disturbances in glutamate homeostasis contribute to the pathogenesis of major neurological disorders. The research was focused on the analysis of the effects of LD/MD simulants (JSC-1a/JSC, derived from volcanic ash) on the key characteristics of glutamatergic neurotransmission. The average size of LD and MD particles (even minor fractions) before and after sonication was determined by dynamic light scattering. With the use of radiolabeled l-[14C]glutamate, it was shown that there is an increase in l-[14C]glutamate binding to isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) in low [Na+] media and at low temperature in the presence of LD. MD caused significantly lesser changes under the same conditions, whereas nanoparticles of magnetite had no effect at all. Fluorimetric experiments with potential-sensitive dye rhodamine 6G and pH-sensitive dye acridine orange showed that the potential of the plasma membrane of the nerve terminals and acidification of synaptic vesicles were not altered by LD/MD (and nanoparticles of magnetite). Thus, the unique effect of LD to increase glutamate binding to the nerve terminals was shown. This can have deleterious effects on extracellular glutamate homeostasis in the central nervous system and cause alterations in the ambient level of glutamate, which is extremely important for proper synaptic transmission. During a long-term mission, a combination of constant irritation

  1. Neurotoxic potential of lunar and martian dust: influence on em, proton gradient, active transport, and binding of glutamate in rat brain nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Krisanova, Natalia; Kasatkina, Ludmila; Sivko, Roman; Borysov, Arseniy; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Slenzka, Klaus; Borisova, Tatiana

    2013-08-01

    The harmful effects of lunar dust (LD) on directly exposed tissues are documented in the literature, whereas researchers are only recently beginning to consider its effects on indirectly exposed tissues. During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and transported to the central nervous system. The neurotoxic potential of LD and martian dust (MD) has not yet been assessed. Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter involved in most aspects of normal brain function, whereas disturbances in glutamate homeostasis contribute to the pathogenesis of major neurological disorders. The research was focused on the analysis of the effects of LD/MD simulants (JSC-1a/JSC, derived from volcanic ash) on the key characteristics of glutamatergic neurotransmission. The average size of LD and MD particles (even minor fractions) before and after sonication was determined by dynamic light scattering. With the use of radiolabeled l-[(14)C]glutamate, it was shown that there is an increase in l-[(14)C]glutamate binding to isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) in low [Na(+)] media and at low temperature in the presence of LD. MD caused significantly lesser changes under the same conditions, whereas nanoparticles of magnetite had no effect at all. Fluorimetric experiments with potential-sensitive dye rhodamine 6G and pH-sensitive dye acridine orange showed that the potential of the plasma membrane of the nerve terminals and acidification of synaptic vesicles were not altered by LD/MD (and nanoparticles of magnetite). Thus, the unique effect of LD to increase glutamate binding to the nerve terminals was shown. This can have deleterious effects on extracellular glutamate homeostasis in the central nervous system and cause alterations in the ambient level of glutamate, which is extremely important for proper synaptic transmission. During a long-term mission, a combination of constant irritation due

  2. Neurotoxic potential of lunar and martian dust: influence on em, proton gradient, active transport, and binding of glutamate in rat brain nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Krisanova, Natalia; Kasatkina, Ludmila; Sivko, Roman; Borysov, Arseniy; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Slenzka, Klaus; Borisova, Tatiana

    2013-08-01

    The harmful effects of lunar dust (LD) on directly exposed tissues are documented in the literature, whereas researchers are only recently beginning to consider its effects on indirectly exposed tissues. During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and transported to the central nervous system. The neurotoxic potential of LD and martian dust (MD) has not yet been assessed. Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter involved in most aspects of normal brain function, whereas disturbances in glutamate homeostasis contribute to the pathogenesis of major neurological disorders. The research was focused on the analysis of the effects of LD/MD simulants (JSC-1a/JSC, derived from volcanic ash) on the key characteristics of glutamatergic neurotransmission. The average size of LD and MD particles (even minor fractions) before and after sonication was determined by dynamic light scattering. With the use of radiolabeled l-[(14)C]glutamate, it was shown that there is an increase in l-[(14)C]glutamate binding to isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) in low [Na(+)] media and at low temperature in the presence of LD. MD caused significantly lesser changes under the same conditions, whereas nanoparticles of magnetite had no effect at all. Fluorimetric experiments with potential-sensitive dye rhodamine 6G and pH-sensitive dye acridine orange showed that the potential of the plasma membrane of the nerve terminals and acidification of synaptic vesicles were not altered by LD/MD (and nanoparticles of magnetite). Thus, the unique effect of LD to increase glutamate binding to the nerve terminals was shown. This can have deleterious effects on extracellular glutamate homeostasis in the central nervous system and cause alterations in the ambient level of glutamate, which is extremely important for proper synaptic transmission. During a long-term mission, a combination of constant irritation due

  3. Solution Structure of the PAS Domain of a Thermophilic YybT Protein Homolog Reveals a Potential Ligand-binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Edward; Rao, Feng; Pasunooti, Swathi; Pham, Thi Huong; Soehano, Ishin; Turner, Mark S.; Liew, Chong Wai; Lescar, Julien; Pervushin, Konstantin; Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2013-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis protein YybT (or GdpP) and its homologs were recently established as stress signaling proteins that exert their biological effect by degrading the bacterial messenger cyclic di-AMP. YybT homologs contain a small Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) domain (∼80 amino acids) that can bind b-type heme with 1:1 stoichiometry despite the small size of the domain and the lack of a conserved heme iron-coordinating residue. We determined the solution structure of the PAS domain of GtYybT from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans by NMR spectroscopy to further probe its function. The solution structure confirms that PASGtYybT adopts the characteristic PAS fold composed of a five-stranded antiparallel β sheet and a few short α-helices. One α-helix and three central β-strands of PASGtYybT are noticeably shorter than those of the typical PAS domains. Despite the small size of the protein domain, a hydrophobic pocket is formed by the side chains of nonpolar residues stemming from the β-strands and α-helices. A set of residues in the vicinity of the pocket and in the C-terminal region at the dimeric interface exhibits perturbed NMR parameters in the presence of heme or zinc protoporphyrin. Together, the results unveil a compact PAS domain with a potential ligand-binding pocket and reinforce the view that the PASYybT domains function as regulatory domains in the modulation of cellular cyclic di-AMP concentration. PMID:23504327

  4. Metal binding properties of the EPS produced by Halomonas sp. TG39 and its potential in enhancing trace element bioavailability to eukaryotic phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Biller, Dondra V; Shimmield, Tracy; Green, David H

    2012-12-01

    An emergent property of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by marine bacteria is their net negative charge, predominantly conferred by their high uronic acids content. Here, we investigated the EPS produced by an algal-associated marine bacterium, Halomonas sp. strain TG39, for its capacity to sequester trace metals and mediate their bioavailability to eukaryotic phytoplankton. Metal analysis of the purified EPS revealed that it contained high levels of K, Ca, Mg and several essential trace metals, including Zn, Cu, Fe and the metalloid Si. Desorption experiments with marine sediment showed that the EPS possessed a specific binding capacity for Ca, Si, Fe, Mn, Mg and Al. Depending on the ionic conditions, Fe was the third or fourth most highly-adsorbed metal out of 27 elements analyzed. Experiments employing Fe-limited synthetic ocean seawater showed that growth of the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii (axenic strain) was enhanced when incubated in the presence of either purified EPS or EPS that had been pre-exposed to marine sediment, compared to non-EPS amended controls. This growth enhancement was attributed to the EPS binding and increasing the bioavailability of key trace metal elements, such as Fe(III). Since the bacterium used in this study was originally isolated from a marine micro-alga, this work highlights the possibility that bacterial associates of eukaryotic algae could be influencing the bioavailability of Fe(III) to phytoplankton via their production of polyanionic EPS. More widely, this work reinforces the potential importance of marine bacterial EPS in trace metal biogeochemical cycling.

  5. Fibronectin fragments containing the RGDS cell-binding domain mediate monocyte migration into the rabbit lung. A potential mechanism for C5 fragment-induced monocyte lung accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, D E; Henson, P M; Clark, R A

    1990-01-01

    Many inflammatory processes are characterized by an early phase of neutrophil migration and a later phase of monocyte migration into the inflammatory site. Mechanisms that govern the transition between phases are the subject of these investigations. Acute lung inflammation induced by C5 fragments in the rabbit leads to an initial neutrophil influx and plasma leakage into the alveolar space, followed by monocyte influx that we have previously shown to be dependent on prior emigration of neutrophils. Neutrophil enzymes are known to cleave intact fibronectin into fragments that are monocyte chemotaxins in vitro. Accordingly, generation of appropriate fibronectin fragments in situ by proteolytic enzymes from infiltrating neutrophils might represent a potential mechanism for attraction of monocytes into the lung. The studies reported herein demonstrate that a 120-kD fragment of fibronectin containing the RGDS fibroblast cell-binding domain induced monocyte migration into the rabbit lung in vivo. Intact fibronectin was inactive. A significant proportion of the monocyte migration was neutrophil independent. Intact fibronectin was present in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from C5 fragment-treated animals rendered neutropenic, but absent in lavage from normal C5 fragment-treated animals. Fibronectin fragments were present in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from both C5 fragment-treated and control rabbits. In addition, the amount of fibronectin was significantly increased in lavage of C5 fragment-treated normal but not neutropenic animals. Monoclonal antibodies directed against an epitope of fibronectin containing the RGDS cell-binding domain significantly inhibited the C5 fragment-induced monocyte migration, but not neutrophil migration. These studies suggest that chemotactic fibronectin fragments may in part be responsible for the recruitment of monocytes into areas of acute lung inflammation. Images PMID:2212000

  6. Lunasin potentiates the effect of oxaliplatin preventing outgrowth of colon cancer metastasis, binds to α5β1 integrin and suppresses FAK/ERK/NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Dia, Vermont P; Gonzalez de Mejia, Elvira

    2011-12-27

    The effect of lunasin on colon cancer metastasis was studied using three human colon cancer cell lines in vitro and a liver metastasis model of colon cancer in vivo. Lunasin bound with α5β1 integrin and internalized into the nucleus of KM12L4 human colon cancer cells. Lunasin (10 μM) inhibited the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) by 28%, 39% and 60% in RKO, HCT-116 and KM12L4 human colon cancer cells, respectively. Lunasin caused an increase in the expression of the inhibitor of kappa B alpha (IκB-α), a decrease in nuclear p50 NF-κB and a reduction in the migration of cancer cells. Lunasin (4 mg/kg bw) inhibited metastasis and potentiated the effect of oxaliplatin by reducing the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Liver metastatic nodules were reduced from 28 (PBS) to 14 (lunasin, P = 0.047) while combination of lunasin and oxaliplatin to 5 (P = 0.004). The tumor burden was reduced from 0.13 (PBS) to 0.10 (lunasin, P = 0.039) to 0.04 (lunasin + oxaliplatin, P < 0.0001). Moreover, lunasin potentiated the effect of oxaliplatin in modifying expression of proteins involved in apoptosis and metastasis including Bax, Bcl-2, IKK-α and p-p65. Lunasin inhibited metastasis of human colon cancer cells by direct binding with α5β1 integrin suppressing FAK/ERK/NF-κB signaling, and potentiated the effect of oxaliplatin in preventing the outgrowth of metastasis.

  7. Potentiation of growth factor signaling by insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 in breast epithelial cells requires sphingosine kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Janet L; Lin, Mike Z; McGowan, Eileen M; Baxter, Robert C

    2009-09-18

    We have investigated the mechanism underlying potentiation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR1) signaling by IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in MCF-10A breast epithelial cells, focusing on a possible involvement of the sphingosine kinase (SphK) system. IGFBP-3 potentiated EGF-stimulated EGF receptor activation and DNA synthesis, and this was blocked by inhibitors of SphK activity or small interference RNA-mediated silencing of SphK1, but not SphK2, expression. Similarly, IGFR1 phosphorylation and DNA synthesis stimulated by LR3-IGF-I (an IGF-I analog not bound by IGFBP-3), were enhanced by IGFBP-3, and this was blocked by SphK1 silencing. SphK1 expression and activity were stimulated by IGFBP-3 approximately 2-fold over 24 h. Silencing of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) or S1P3, but not S1P2, abolished the effect of IGFBP-3 on EGF-stimulated EGFR activation. The effects of IGFBP-3 could be reproduced with exogenous S1P or medium conditioned by cells treated with IGFBP-3, and this was also blocked by inhibition of S1P1 and S1P3. These data indicate that potentiation of growth factor signaling by IGFBP-3 in MCF-10A cells requires SphK1 activity and S1P1/S1P3, suggesting that S1P, the product of SphK activity and ligand for S1P1 and S1P3, is the "missing link" mediating IGF and EGFR transactivation and cell growth stimulation by IGFBP-3.

  8. Evaluation of potential implication of membrane estrogen binding sites on ERE-dependent transcriptional activity and intracellular estrogen receptor-alpha regulation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hye Sook; Leclercq, Guy

    2002-01-01

    The potential involvement of membrane estrogen binding sites in the induction of ERE-dependent transcriptional activity as well as in the regulation of intracellular estrogen receptor alpha (ER-alpha) level under estradiol (E2) stimulation was investigated. Our approach relied upon the use of two DCC-treated E2-BSA (bovine serum albumin) solutions (E2-6-BSA and E2-17-BSA). The absence of detectable free E2 in these solutions was established. Both E2-BSA conjugates led to a transient dose-dependent stimulation of the expression of ERE-luciferase (LUC) reporter gene in MVLN cells (MCF-7 cells stably transfected with a pVit-tk-LUC reporter plasmid), a property not recorded with free E2, which maintained enhanced transcriptional activity during the whole experiment. A very low concentration of E2 (10 pM) synergistically acted with E2-BSA conjugates. Hence, ERE-dependent transcriptional activity induced by these conjugates appeared to result from their known interactions with membrane estrogen binding sites. Anti-estrogens (AEs: 4-OH-TAM and RU 58,668), which antagonize genomic ER responses, abrogated the luciferase activity induced by E2-BSA conjugates, confirming a potential relationship between membrane-related signals and intracellular ER. Moreover, induction of luciferase was recorded when the cells were exposed to IBMX (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine) and cyclic nucleotides (cAMP/cGMP), suggesting the implication of the latter in the signal transduction pathway leading to the expression of the reporter gene. Growth factors (IGF-I, EGF and TGF-alpha) also slightly stimulated luciferase and synergistically acted with 10 pM E2, or 1 microM E2-BSA conjugates, in agreement with the concept of a cross-talk between steroids and peptides acting on the cell membrane. Remarkably, E2-BSA conjugates, IBMX and all investigated growth factors failed to down-regulate intracellular ER in MCF-7 cells, indicating the need for a direct intracellular interaction of the ligand with the

  9. The membrane-tubulating potential of amphiphysin 2/BIN1 is dependent on the microtubule-binding cytoplasmic linker protein 170 (CLIP-170).

    PubMed

    Meunier, Brigitte; Quaranta, Muriel; Daviet, Laurent; Hatzoglou, Anastassia; Leprince, Corinne

    2009-02-01

    Amphiphysins are BIN-amphiphysin-RVS (BAR) domain-containing proteins that influence membrane curvature in sites such as T-tubules in muscular cells, endocytic pits in neuronal as well as non-neuronal cells, and possibly cytoplasmic endosomes. This effect on lipid membranes is fulfilled by diverse amphiphysin 2/BIN1 isoforms, generated by alternative splicing and showing distinct structural and functional properties. In this study, our goal was to characterize the functional role of a ubiquitously expressed amphiphysin 2/BIN1 by the characterization of new molecular partners. We performed a two-hybrid screen with an isoform of amphiphysin 2/BIN1 expressed in HeLa cells. We identified CLIP-170 as an amphiphysin 2/BIN1-interacting molecule. CLIP-170 is a plus-end tracking protein involved in microtubule (MT) stability and recruitment of dynactin. The binding between amphiphysin 2/BIN1 and CLIP-170 is dependent on the N-terminal part of amphiphysin 2 (mostly the BAR domain) and an internal coiled-coil region of CLIP-170. This partnership was confirmed by GST pull-down assay and by co-immunoprecipitation in HeLa cells that express endogenous amphiphysin 2 (mostly isoforms 6, 9 and 10). When overexpressed in HeLa cells, amphiphysin 2/BIN1 leads to the formation of intracellular tubules which can closely align with MTs. After MT depolymerization by nocodazole, amphiphysin 2-stained tubules disappear, and reappear after nocodazole washout. Furthermore, depletion of CLIP-170 by RNAi induced a decrease in the proportion of cells with amphiphysin 2-stained tubules and an increase in the proportion of cells with no tubules. This result suggests the existence of a mechanistic link between the two types of tubules, which is likely to involve the +TIP protein, CLIP-170. Amphiphysin 2/BIN1 may be an anchoring point on membranes for CLIP-170, and consequently for MT. Then, the pushing force of polymerizing MT could help amphiphysin 2/BIN1 in its tubulation potential. We propose

  10. Identification, genome mapping, and CTCF binding of potential insulators within the FXYD5-COX7A1 locus of human chromosome 19q13.12.

    PubMed

    Akopov, Sergey B; Ruda, Vera M; Batrak, Vera V; Vetchinova, Anna S; Chernov, Igor P; Nikolaev, Lev G; Bode, Jürgen; Sverdlov, Eugene D

    2006-10-01

    Identification of insulators is one of the most difficult problems in functional mapping of genomes. For this reason, up to now only a few insulators have been described. In this article we suggest an approach that allows direct isolation of insulators by a simple positive-negative selection based on blocking enhancer effects by insulators. The approach allows selection of fragments capable of blocking enhancers from mixtures of genomic fragments prepared from up to 1-Mb genomic regions. Using this approach, a 1-Mb human genome locus was analyzed and eight potential insulators were selected. Five of the eight sequences were positioned in intergenic regions and two were within introns. The genes of the alpha-polypeptide H+/K+ exchanging ATPase (ATP4A) and amyloid beta (A4) precursor-like protein 1 (APLP1) within the locus studied were found to be flanked by insulators on both sides. Both genes are characterized by distinct tissue-specific expression that differs from the tissue specificity of the surrounding genes. The data obtained are consistent with the conception that insulators subdivide genomic DNA into loop domains that comprise genes characterized by similar expression profiles. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we demonstrated also that at least six of the putative insulators revealed in this work could bind the CTCF transcription factor in vivo. We believe that the proposed approach could be a useful instrument for functional analysis of genomes.

  11. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c mediates increase of postprandial stearic acid, a potential target for improving insulin resistance, in hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xia; Liu, Liyan; Na, Lixin; Lu, Huimin; Li, Songtao; Li, Ying; Sun, Changhao

    2013-02-01

    Elevated serum free fatty acids (FFAs) levels play an important role in the development of insulin resistance (IR) and diabetes. We investigated the dynamic changes and the underlying regulatory mechanism of postprandial FFA profile in hyperlipidemia (HLP) and their relation with insulin sensitivity in both humans and mice. We found that serum stearic acid (SA) is the only fatty acid that is increased dramatically in the postprandial state. The elevation of SA is due to increased insulin-stimulated de novo synthesis mediated by sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c)/acetyl-CoA carboxylase/fatty acid synthase/elongation of long-chain fatty acid family member 6 (ELOVL6) and the elongation of palmitic acid (PA) catalyzed by ELOVL6. Downregulation of SREBP-1c or ELOVL6 by small interfering RNA can reduce SA synthesis in liver and serum SA level, followed by amelioration of IR in HLP mice. However, inhibition of SREBP-1c is more effective in improving IR than suppression of ELOVL6, which resulted in accumulation of PA. In summary, increased postprandial SA is caused by the insulin-stimulated SREBP-1c pathway and elongation of PA in HLP. Reduction of postprandial SA is a good candidate for improving IR, and SREBP-1c is potentially a better target to prevent IR and diabetes by decreasing SA.

  12. Quantification of the binding potential of cell-surface receptors in fresh excised specimens via dual-probe modeling of SERS nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Lagnojita; Wang, Yu; Yang, Cynthia; Khan, Altaz; Brankov, Jovan G; Liu, Jonathan T C; Tichauer, Kenneth M

    2015-01-01

    The complete removal of cancerous tissue is a central aim of surgical oncology, but is difficult to achieve in certain cases, especially when the removal of surrounding normal tissues must be minimized. Therefore, when post-operative pathology identifies residual tumor at the surgical margins, re-excision surgeries are often necessary. An intraoperative approach for tumor-margin assessment, insensitive to nonspecific sources of molecular probe accumulation and contrast, is presented employing kinetic-modeling analysis of dual-probe staining using surface-enhanced Raman scattering nanoparticles (SERS NPs). Human glioma (U251) and epidermoid (A431) tumors were implanted subcutaneously in six athymic mice. Fresh resected tissues were stained with an equimolar mixture of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted and untargeted SERS NPs. The binding potential (BP; proportional to receptor concentration) of EGFR - a cell-surface receptor associated with cancer - was estimated from kinetic modeling of targeted and untargeted NP concentrations in response to serial rinsing. EGFR BPs in healthy, U251, and A431 tissues were 0.06 ± 0.14, 1.13 ± 0.40, and 2.23 ± 0.86, respectively, which agree with flow-cytometry measurements and published reports. The ability of this approach to quantify the BP of cell-surface biomarkers in fresh tissues opens up an accurate new approach to analyze tumor margins intraoperatively.

  13. Specific binding of lacosamide to collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2) and direct impairment of its canonical function: implications for the therapeutic potential of lacosamide.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sarah M; Khanna, Rajesh

    2015-04-01

    The novel antiepileptic drug lacosamide (LCM; SPM927, Vimpat®) has been heralded as having a dual-mode of action through interactions with both the voltage-gated sodium channel and the neurite outgrowth-promoting collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2). Lacosamide's ability to dampen neuronal excitability through the voltage-gated sodium channel likely underlies its efficacy in attenuating the symptoms of epilepsy (i.e., seizures). While the role of CRMP2 in epilepsy has not been well studied, given the proposed involvement of circuit reorganization in epileptogenesis, the ability of lacosamide to alter CRMP2 function may prove disease modifying. Recently, however, the validity of lacosamide's interaction with CRMP2 has come under scrutiny. In this review, we address the contradictory reports concerning the binding of lacosamide to CRMP2 as well as the ability of lacosamide to directly impact CRMP2 function. Additionally, we address similarly the contradicting reports regarding the potential disease-modifying effect of lacosamide on the development and progression of epilepsy. As the vast majority of antiepileptic drugs influences only the symptoms of epilepsy, the ability to hinder disease progression would be a major breakthrough in efforts to cure or prevent this debilitating syndrome.

  14. Liquid drops on a surface: using density functional theory to calculate the binding potential and drop profiles and comparing with results from mesoscopic modelling.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Adam P; Thiele, Uwe; Archer, Andrew J

    2015-02-21

    The contribution to the free energy for a film of liquid of thickness h on a solid surface due to the interactions between the solid-liquid and liquid-gas interfaces is given by the binding potential, g(h). The precise form of g(h) determines whether or not the liquid wets the surface. Note that differentiating g(h) gives the Derjaguin or disjoining pressure. We develop a microscopic density functional theory (DFT) based method for calculating g(h), allowing us to relate the form of g(h) to the nature of the molecular interactions in the system. We present results based on using a simple lattice gas model, to demonstrate the procedure. In order to describe the static and dynamic behaviour of non-uniform liquid films and drops on surfaces, a mesoscopic free energy based on g(h) is often used. We calculate such equilibrium film height profiles and also directly calculate using DFT the corresponding density profiles for liquid drops on surfaces. Comparing quantities such as the contact angle and also the shape of the drops, we find good agreement between the two methods. We also study in detail the effect on g(h) of truncating the range of the dispersion forces, both those between the fluid molecules and those between the fluid and wall. We find that truncating can have a significant effect on g(h) and the associated wetting behaviour of the fluid.

  15. Human Mu Opioid Receptor (OPRM1A118G) polymorphism is associated with brain mu- opioid receptor binding potential in smokers

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.; Logan, J.; Ray, R.; Ruparel, K.; Newberg, A.; Wileyto, E.P.; Loughead, J.W.; Divgi, C.; Blendy, J.A.; Logan, J.; Zubieta, J.-K.; Lerman, C.

    2011-04-15

    Evidence points to the endogenous opioid system, and the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) in particular, in mediating the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, including nicotine. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human MOR gene (OPRM1 A118G) has been shown to alter receptor protein level in preclinical models and smoking behavior in humans. To clarify the underlying mechanisms for these associations, we conducted an in vivo investigation of the effects of OPRM1 A118G genotype on MOR binding potential (BP{sub ND} or receptor availability). Twenty-two smokers prescreened for genotype (12 A/A, 10 */G) completed two [{sup 11}C] carfentanil positron emission tomography (PET) imaging sessions following overnight abstinence and exposure to a nicotine-containing cigarette and a denicotinized cigarette. Independent of session, smokers homozygous for the wild-type OPRM1 A allele exhibited significantly higher levels of MOR BP{sub ND} than smokers carrying the G allele in bilateral amygdala, left thalamus, and left anterior cingulate cortex. Among G allele carriers, the extent of subjective reward difference (denicotinized versus nicotine cigarette) was associated significantly with MOR BP{sub ND} difference in right amygdala, caudate, anterior cingulate cortex, and thalamus. Future translational investigations can elucidate the role of MORs in nicotine addiction, which may lead to development of novel therapeutics.

  16. Identification, genome mapping, and CTCF binding of potential insulators within the FXYD5-COX7A1 locus of human chromosome 19q13.12.

    PubMed

    Akopov, Sergey B; Ruda, Vera M; Batrak, Vera V; Vetchinova, Anna S; Chernov, Igor P; Nikolaev, Lev G; Bode, Jürgen; Sverdlov, Eugene D

    2006-10-01

    Identification of insulators is one of the most difficult problems in functional mapping of genomes. For this reason, up to now only a few insulators have been described. In this article we suggest an approach that allows direct isolation of insulators by a simple positive-negative selection based on blocking enhancer effects by insulators. The approach allows selection of fragments capable of blocking enhancers from mixtures of genomic fragments prepared from up to 1-Mb genomic regions. Using this approach, a 1-Mb human genome locus was analyzed and eight potential insulators were selected. Five of the eight sequences were positioned in intergenic regions and two were within introns. The genes of the alpha-polypeptide H+/K+ exchanging ATPase (ATP4A) and amyloid beta (A4) precursor-like protein 1 (APLP1) within the locus studied were found to be flanked by insulators on both sides. Both genes are characterized by distinct tissue-specific expression that differs from the tissue specificity of the surrounding genes. The data obtained are consistent with the conception that insulators subdivide genomic DNA into loop domains that comprise genes characterized by similar expression profiles. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we demonstrated also that at least six of the putative insulators revealed in this work could bind the CTCF transcription factor in vivo. We believe that the proposed approach could be a useful instrument for functional analysis of genomes. PMID:17019650

  17. In silico studies and fluorescence binding assays of potential anti-prion compounds reveal an important binding site for prion inhibition from PrP(C) to PrP(Sc).

    PubMed

    Pagadala, Nataraj S; Perez-Pineiro, Rolando; Wishart, David S; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2015-02-16

    To understand the pharmacophore properties of 2-aminothiazoles and design novel inhibitors against the prion protein, a highly predictive 3D quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) has been developed by performing comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative similarity analysis (CoMSIA). Both CoMFA and CoMSIA maps reveal the presence of the oxymethyl groups in meta and para positions on the phenyl ring of compound 17 (N-[4-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]quinolin-2-amine), is necessary for activity while electro-negative nitrogen of quinoline is highly favorable to enhance activity. The blind docking results for these compounds show that the compound with quinoline binds with higher affinity than isoquinoline and naphthalene groups. Out of 150 novel compounds retrieved using finger print analysis by pharmacophoric model predicted based on five test sets of compounds, five compounds with diverse scaffolds were selected for biological evaluation as possible PrP inhibitors. Molecular docking combined with fluorescence quenching studies show that these compounds bind to pocket-D of SHaPrP near Trp145. The new antiprion compounds 3 and 6, which bind with the interaction energies of -12.1 and -13.2 kcal/mol, respectively, show fluorescence quenching with binding constant (Kd) values of 15.5 and 44.14 μM, respectively. Further fluorescence binding assays with compound 5, which is similar to 2-aminothiazole as a positive control, also show that the molecule binds to the pocket-D with the binding constant (Kd) value of 84.7 μM. Finally, both molecular docking and a fluorescence binding assay of noscapine as a negative control reveals the same binding site on the surface of pocket-A near a rigid loop between β2 and α2 interacting with Arg164. This high level of correlation between molecular docking and fluorescence quenching studies confirm that these five compounds are likely to act as inhibitors for prion propagation while

  18. The non-ligand binding beta-isoform of the human glucocorticoid receptor (hGR beta): tissue levels, mechanism of action, and potential physiologic role.

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, M.; Elliot, S.; Kino, T.; Bamberger, C.; Karl, M.; Webster, E.; Chrousos, G. P.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alternative splicing of the transcripts of the human glucocorticoid receptor gene results in two mutually exclusive products, the classic, ligand-binding glucocorticoid receptor (hGR alpha), and a dominant negative non-ligand-binding isoform, hGR beta. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined the existence of and quantified both hGR alpha and hGR beta isoforms in a panel of human tissues, as well as in intact and fractionated HeLa cells, using specific quantitative Western blots and/or immunocytochemistry. We studied the potential interactions of hGR beta with heat shock protein (hsp) 90 and/or hGR alpha using cross-immunoadsorption/precipitation procedures followed by Western blots. RESULTS: For the first time, we demonstrated the natural existence of the hGR beta protein, which was widely expressed in human tissues. The ratio of immunoreactive hGR alpha to hGR beta varied from 0.2 to 1.0 among different tissues, and was approximately 0.2 in HeLa cells. In the latter, both isoforms were distributed in the cytoplasm and nucleus in the absence of the hormonal ligand, and translocated into the nucleus after addition of dexamethasone. The cytosolic and nuclear hGR alpha-to-hGR beta ratio remained the same before and after dexamethasone exposure, suggesting that upon activation the two isoforms translocated into the nucleus in equal proportions. hGR alpha- and hGR beta-specific antibodies cross-adsorbed and precipitated cytosolic and nuclear glucocorticoid hGR alpha and hGR beta, respectively, as well as hsp90, suggesting that hGR alpha and hGR beta are in complex with hsp90 and/or each other. CONCLUSIONS: The hGR beta protein is widely expressed throughout the human body and present mostly in the cytoplasm of human cells, in complex with hsp90 and other proteins. In the presence of glucocorticoid, hGR beta probably heterodimerizes with ligand-bound hGR alpha and translocates into the nucleus to act as a dominant negative inhibitor of the classic receptor. Images

  19. Oestradiol alters central 5HT1A receptor binding potential differences related to psychosocial stress but not differences related to 5HTTLPR genotype in female rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Michopoulos, Vasiliki; Diaz, Maylen Perez; Embree, Molly; Reding, Kathy; Votaw, John R.; Mun, Jiyoung; Voll, Ronald J.; Goodman, Mark M.; Wilson, Mark; Sanchez, Mar; Toufexis, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Social subordination in female macaques represents a well-described model of chronic psychosocial stress. Additionally, a length polymorphism (5HTTLPR) in the regulatory region of the serotonin (5HT) transporter (5HTT) gene (SLC6A4) is present in rhesus macaques, which has been linked to adverse outcomes similar to what has been described in humans with an analogous 5HTTLPR polymorphism. The present study determined the effects of social status and the 5HTTLPR genotype on 5HT1A receptor binding potential (5HT1A BPND) in brain regions implicated in emotional regulation and stress reactivity in ovariectomised female monkeys, and then assessed how these effects were altered by 17β-oestradiol (E2) treatment. Areas analyzed included the prefrontal cortex [anterior cingulate (ACC); medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; orbitofrontal prefrontal cortex], amygdala, hippocampus, hypothalamus and raphe nucleui. Positron emission tomography (PET) using p-[18F]MPPF was performed to determine the levels of 5HT1A BPND under a non-E2 and a 3-wk E2 treatment condition. The short variant (s-variant) 5HTTLPR genotype produced a significant reduction in 5HT1A BPND in the mPFC regardless of social status, and subordinate s-variant females showed a reduction in 5HT1A BPND within the ACC. Both these effects of 5HTTLPR were unaffected by E2. Additionally, E2 reduced 5HT1A BPND in the dorsal raphe of all females irrespective of psychosocial stress or 5HTTLPR genotype. Hippocampal 5HT1A BPND was attenuated in subordinate females regardless of 5HTTLPR genotype during the non-E2 condition, an effect that was normalised with E2. Similarly, 5HT1A BPND in the hypothalamus was significantly lower in subordinate females regardless of 5HTTLPR genotype, an effect reversed with E2. Together, the data indicate that the effect of E2 on modulation of central 5HT1A BPND may only occur in brain regions that show no 5HTTLPR genotype-linked control of 5HT1A binding. PMID:24382202

  20. Striatal D2/3 Binding Potential Values in Drug-Naïve First-Episode Schizophrenia Patients Correlate With Treatment Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Sanne; Pinborg, Lars Hageman; Svarer, Claus; Jensen, Lars Thorbjørn; Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard; Allerup, Peter; Bak, Nikolaj; Rasmussen, Hans; Frandsen, Erik; Rostrup, Egill; Glenthøj, Birte Yding

    2015-01-01

    One of best validated findings in schizophrenia research is the association between blockade of dopamine D2 receptors and the effects of antipsychotics on positive psychotic symptoms. The aim of the present study was to examine correlations between baseline striatal D2/3 receptor binding potential (BPp) values and treatment outcome in a cohort of antipsychotic-naïve first-episode schizophrenia patients. Additionally, we wished to investigate associations between striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor blockade and alterations of negative symptoms as well as functioning and subjective well-being. Twenty-eight antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients and 26 controls were included in the study. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with [123I]iodobenzamide ([123I]-IBZM) was used to examine striatal D2/3 receptor BPp. Patients were examined before and after 6 weeks of treatment with the D2/3 receptor antagonist amisulpride. There was a significant negative correlation between striatal D2/3 receptor BPp at baseline and improvement of positive symptoms in the total group of patients. Comparing patients responding to treatment to nonresponders further showed significantly lower baseline BPp in the responders. At follow-up, the patients demonstrated a negative correlation between the blockade and functioning, whereas no associations between blockade and negative symptoms or subjective well-being were observed. The results show an association between striatal BPp of dopamine D2/3 receptors in antipsychotic-naïve first-episode patients with schizophrenia and treatment response. Patients with a low BPp have a better treatment response than patients with a high BPp. The results further suggest that functioning may decline at high levels of dopamine receptor blockade. PMID:25698711

  1. Striatal D(2/3) Binding Potential Values in Drug-Naïve First-Episode Schizophrenia Patients Correlate With Treatment Outcome.

    PubMed

    Wulff, Sanne; Pinborg, Lars Hageman; Svarer, Claus; Jensen, Lars Thorbjørn; Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard; Allerup, Peter; Bak, Nikolaj; Rasmussen, Hans; Frandsen, Erik; Rostrup, Egill; Glenthøj, Birte Yding

    2015-09-01

    One of best validated findings in schizophrenia research is the association between blockade of dopamine D2 receptors and the effects of antipsychotics on positive psychotic symptoms. The aim of the present study was to examine correlations between baseline striatal D(2/3) receptor binding potential (BP(p)) values and treatment outcome in a cohort of antipsychotic-naïve first-episode schizophrenia patients. Additionally, we wished to investigate associations between striatal dopamine D(2/3) receptor blockade and alterations of negative symptoms as well as functioning and subjective well-being. Twenty-eight antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients and 26 controls were included in the study. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with [(123)I]iodobenzamide ([(123)I]-IBZM) was used to examine striatal D(2/3) receptor BP(p). Patients were examined before and after 6 weeks of treatment with the D(2/3) receptor antagonist amisulpride. There was a significant negative correlation between striatal D(2/3) receptor BP(p) at baseline and improvement of positive symptoms in the total group of patients. Comparing patients responding to treatment to nonresponders further showed significantly lower baseline BP(p) in the responders. At follow-up, the patients demonstrated a negative correlation between the blockade and functioning, whereas no associations between blockade and negative symptoms or subjective well-being were observed. The results show an association between striatal BP(p) of dopamine D(2/3) receptors in antipsychotic-naïve first-episode patients with schizophrenia and treatment response. Patients with a low BP(p) have a better treatment response than patients with a high BP(p). The results further suggest that functioning may decline at high levels of dopamine receptor blockade.

  2. Proteomic identification of calcium-binding chaperone calreticulin as a potential mediator for the neuroprotective and neuritogenic activities of fruit-derived glycoside amygdalin.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuanyuan; Yang, Chuanbin; Zhao, Jia; Tse, Hung Fat; Rong, Jianhui

    2015-02-01

    Amygdalin is a fruit-derived glycoside with the potential for treating neurodegenerative diseases. This study was designed to identify the neuroprotective and neuritogenic activities of amygdalin. We initially demonstrated that amygdalin enhanced nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neuritogenesis and attenuated 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in rat dopaminergic PC12 cells. To define protein targets for amygdalin, we selected a total of 11 mostly regulated protein spots from two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels for protein identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry. We verified the effect of amygdalin on six representative proteins (i.e., calreticulin, Hsp90β, Grp94, 14-3-3η, 14-3-3ζ/δ and Rab GDI-α) for biological relevance to neuronal survival and differentiation. Calcium-binding chaperone calreticulin is of special interest for its activities to promote folding, oligomeric assembly and quality control of proteins that modulate cell survival and differentiation. We transiently knocked down calreticulin expression by specific siRNA and studied its effect on the neuroprotective and neuritogenic activities of amygdalin. We found that amygdalin failed to enhance NGF-induced neuritogenesis in calreticulin-siRNA transfected cells. On the other hand, amygdalin rescued 6-OHDA-induced loss of calreticulin expression. We also found that amygdalin increased the intracellular calcium concentration possibly via inducing calreticulin. Collectively, our results demonstrated the role of calreticulin in mediating the neuroprotective and neuritogenic activities of amygdalin. PMID:25465157

  3. Women with Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Have Increased Harm Avoidance and Reduced 5-HT1A Receptor Binding Potential in the Anterior Cingulate and Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Åhs, Fredrik; Savic, Ivanka

    2013-01-01

    Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a common condition, characterized by somatic distress upon exposure to odors. As in other idiopathic environmental intolerances, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Contrary to the expectations it was recently found that persons with MCS activate the odor-processing brain regions less than controls, while their activation of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is increased. The present follow-up study was designed to test the hypotheses that MCS subjects have increased harm avoidance and deviations in the serotonin system, which could render them intolerant to environmental odors. Twelve MCS and 11 control subjects, age 22–44, all working or studying females, were included in a PET study where 5-HT1A receptor binding potential (BP) was assessed after bolus injection of [11C]WAY100635. Psychological profiles were assessed by the Temperament and Character Inventory and the Swedish universities Scales of Personality. All MCS and 12 control subjects were also tested for emotional startle modulation in an acoustic startle test. MCS subjects exhibited significantly increased harm avoidance, and anxiety compared to controls. They also had a reduced 5-HT1A receptor BP in amygdala (p = 0.029), ACC (p = 0.005) (planned comparisons, significance level 0.05), and insular cortex (p = 0.003; significance level p<0.005 with Bonferroni correction), and showed an inverse correlation between degree of anxiety and the BP in the amygdala (planned comparison). No group by emotional category difference was found in the startle test. Increased harm avoidance and the observed changes in the 5-HT1A receptor BP in the regions processing harm avoidance provides a plausible pathophysiological ground for the symptoms described in MCS, and yields valuable information for our general understanding of idiopathic environmental intolerances. PMID:23349968

  4. Enhancement of the Regenerative Potential of Anorganic Bovine Bone Graft Utilizing a Polyglutamate-Modified BMP2 Peptide with Improved Binding to Calcium-Containing Materials.

    PubMed

    Bain, Jennifer L; Bonvallet, Paul P; Abou-Arraj, Ramzi V; Schupbach, Peter; Reddy, Michael S; Bellis, Susan L

    2015-09-01

    Autogenous bone is the gold standard material for bone grafting in craniofacial and orthopedic regenerative medicine. However, due to complications associated with harvesting donor bone, clinicians often use commercial graft materials that may lose their osteoinductivity due to processing. This study was aimed to functionalize one of these materials, anorganic bovine bone (ABB), with osteoinductive peptides to enhance regenerative capacity. Two peptides known to induce osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells were evaluated: (1) DGEA, an amino acid motif within collagen I and (2) a biomimetic peptide derived from bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP2pep). To achieve directed coupling of the peptides to the graft surface, the peptides were engineered with a heptaglutamate domain (E7), which confers specific binding to calcium moieties within bone mineral. Peptides with the E7 domain exhibited greater anchoring to ABB than unmodified peptides, and E7 peptides were retained on ABB for at least 8 weeks in vivo. To assess the osteoinductive potential of the peptide-conjugated ABB, ectopic bone formation was evaluated utilizing a rat subcutaneous pouch model. ABB conjugated with full-length recombinant BMP2 (rBMP2) was also implanted as a model for current clinical treatments utilizing rBMP2 passively adsorbed to carriers. These studies showed that E7BMP2pep/ABB samples induced more new bone formation than all other peptides, and an equivalent amount of new bone as compared with rBMP2/ABB. A mandibular defect model was also used to examine intrabony healing of peptide-conjugated ABB. Bone healing was monitored at varying time points by positron emission tomography imaging with (18)F-NaF, and it was found that the E7BMP2pep/ABB group had greater bone metabolic activity than all other groups, including rBMP2/ABB. Importantly, animals implanted with rBMP2/ABB exhibited complications, including inflammation and formation of cataract-like lesions in the eye, whereas

  5. The increased binding affinity of curcumin with human serum albumin in the presence of rutin and baicalin: A potential for drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bing-Mi; Zhang, Jun; Hao, Ai-Jun; Xu, Liang; Wang, Dan; Ji, Hui; Sun, Shi-Jie; Chen, Bo-Qi; Liu, Bin

    2016-02-01

    The impacts of rutin and baicalin on the interaction of curcumin (CU) with human serum albumin (HSA) were investigated by fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies under imitated physiological conditions. The results showed that the fluorescence quenching of HSA by CU was a simultaneous static and dynamic quenching process, irrespective of the presence or absence of flavonoids. The binding constants between CU and HSA in the absence and presence of rutin and baicalin were 2.268 × 105 M- 1, 3.062 × 105 M- 1, and 3.271 × 105 M- 1, indicating that the binding affinity was increased in the case of two flavonoids. Furthermore, the binding distance determined according to Förster's theory was decreased in the presence of flavonoids. Combined with the fact that flavonoids and CU have the same binding site (site I), it can be concluded that they may simultaneously bind in different regions in site I, and formed a ternary complex of flavonoid-HSA-CU. Meanwhile, the results of fluorescence quenching, CD and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra revealed that flavonoids further strengthened the microenvironmental and conformational changes of HSA induced by CU binding. Therefore, it is possible to develop a novel complex involving CU, flavonoid and HSA for CU delivery. The work may provide some valuable information in terms of improving the poor bioavailabiliy of CU.

  6. New potential role of serum apolipoprotein E mediated by its binding to clumping factor A during Staphylococcus aureus invasive infections to humans

    PubMed Central

    Hair, Pamela S.; Nyalwidhe, Julius O.; Cunnion, Kenji M.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a crucial human pathogen expressing various immune-evasion proteins that interact with the host-cell molecules. Clumping factor A (ClfA) is a microbial surface protein that promotes S. aureus binding to fibrinogen, and is associated with septic arthritis and infective endocarditis. In order to identify the major human serum proteins that bind the ClfA, we utilized recombinant ClfA region A in a plate-based assay. SDS-PAGE analysis of the bound proteins yielded five prominent bands, which were analysed by MS yielding apolipoprotein E (ApoE) as the predominant protein. ClfA-sufficient S. aureus bound purified ApoE by more than one log greater than an isogenic ClfA-deficient mutant. An immunodot-blot assay yielded a linearity model for ClfA binding to human ApoE with a stoichiometric-binding ratio of 1.702 at maximal Pearson's correlation coefficient (0.927). These data suggest that ApoE could be a major and novel binding target for the S. aureus virulence factor ClfA. Thus, ClfA recruitment of serum ApoE to the S. aureus surface may sequester ApoE and blunt its host defence function against S. aureus-invasive infections to humans. In this context, compounds that can block or suppress ClfA binding to ApoE might be utilized as prophylactic or therapeutic agents. PMID:25878259

  7. Protein Binding Pocket Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stank, Antonia; Kokh, Daria B; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-05-17

    different classes of protein pocket dynamics: (1) appearance/disappearance of a subpocket in an existing pocket; (2) appearance/disappearance of an adjacent pocket on the protein surface in the direct vicinity of an already existing pocket; (3) pocket breathing, which may be caused by side-chain fluctuations or backbone or interdomain vibrational motion; (4) opening/closing of a channel or tunnel, connecting a pocket inside the protein with solvent, including lid motion; and (5) the appearance/disappearance of an allosteric pocket at a site on a protein distinct from an already existing pocket with binding of a ligand to the allosteric binding site affecting the original pocket. We suggest that the class of pocket dynamics, as well as the type and extent of protein motion affecting the binding pocket, should be factors considered in choosing the most appropriate computational approach to study a given binding pocket. Furthermore, we examine the relationship between pocket dynamics classes and induced fit, conformational selection, and gating models of ligand binding on binding kinetics and thermodynamics. We discuss the implications of protein binding pocket dynamics for drug design and conclude with potential future directions for computational analysis of protein binding pocket dynamics.

  8. Protein Binding Pocket Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stank, Antonia; Kokh, Daria B; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-05-17

    different classes of protein pocket dynamics: (1) appearance/disappearance of a subpocket in an existing pocket; (2) appearance/disappearance of an adjacent pocket on the protein surface in the direct vicinity of an already existing pocket; (3) pocket breathing, which may be caused by side-chain fluctuations or backbone or interdomain vibrational motion; (4) opening/closing of a channel or tunnel, connecting a pocket inside the protein with solvent, including lid motion; and (5) the appearance/disappearance of an allosteric pocket at a site on a protein distinct from an already existing pocket with binding of a ligand to the allosteric binding site affecting the original pocket. We suggest that the class of pocket dynamics, as well as the type and extent of protein motion affecting the binding pocket, should be factors considered in choosing the most appropriate computational approach to study a given binding pocket. Furthermore, we examine the relationship between pocket dynamics classes and induced fit, conformational selection, and gating models of ligand binding on binding kinetics and thermodynamics. We discuss the implications of protein binding pocket dynamics for drug design and conclude with potential future directions for computational analysis of protein binding pocket dynamics. PMID:27110726

  9. Genome-Wide Ultrabithorax Binding Analysis Reveals Highly Targeted Genomic Loci at Developmental Regulators and a Potential Connection to Polycomb-Mediated Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Meireles-Filho, Antonio C. A.; Pagani, Michaela; Stark, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Hox homeodomain transcription factors are key regulators of animal development. They specify the identity of segments along the anterior-posterior body axis in metazoans by controlling the expression of diverse downstream targets, including transcription factors and signaling pathway components. The Drosophila melanogaster Hox factor Ultrabithorax (Ubx) directs the development of thoracic and abdominal segments and appendages, and loss of Ubx function can lead for example to the transformation of third thoracic segment appendages (e.g. halters) into second thoracic segment appendages (e.g. wings), resulting in a characteristic four-wing phenotype. Here we present a Drosophila melanogaster strain with a V5-epitope tagged Ubx allele, which we employed to obtain a high quality genome-wide map of Ubx binding sites using ChIP-seq. We confirm the sensitivity of the V5 ChIP-seq by recovering 7/8 of well-studied Ubx-dependent cis-regulatory regions. Moreover, we show that Ubx binding is predictive of enhancer activity as suggested by comparison with a genome-scale resource of in vivo tested enhancer candidates. We observed densely clustered Ubx binding sites at 12 extended genomic loci that included ANTP-C, BX-C, Polycomb complex genes, and other regulators and the clustered binding sites were frequently active enhancers. Furthermore, Ubx binding was detected at known Polycomb response elements (PREs) and was associated with significant enrichments of Pc and Pho ChIP signals in contrast to binding sites of other developmental TFs. Together, our results show that Ubx targets developmental regulators via strongly clustered binding sites and allow us to hypothesize that regulation by Ubx might involve Polycomb group proteins to maintain specific regulatory states in cooperative or mutually exclusive fashion, an attractive model that combines two groups of proteins with prominent gene regulatory roles during animal development. PMID:27575958

  10. Genome-Wide Ultrabithorax Binding Analysis Reveals Highly Targeted Genomic Loci at Developmental Regulators and a Potential Connection to Polycomb-Mediated Regulation.

    PubMed

    Shlyueva, Daria; Meireles-Filho, Antonio C A; Pagani, Michaela; Stark, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Hox homeodomain transcription factors are key regulators of animal development. They specify the identity of segments along the anterior-posterior body axis in metazoans by controlling the expression of diverse downstream targets, including transcription factors and signaling pathway components. The Drosophila melanogaster Hox factor Ultrabithorax (Ubx) directs the development of thoracic and abdominal segments and appendages, and loss of Ubx function can lead for example to the transformation of third thoracic segment appendages (e.g. halters) into second thoracic segment appendages (e.g. wings), resulting in a characteristic four-wing phenotype. Here we present a Drosophila melanogaster strain with a V5-epitope tagged Ubx allele, which we employed to obtain a high quality genome-wide map of Ubx binding sites using ChIP-seq. We confirm the sensitivity of the V5 ChIP-seq by recovering 7/8 of well-studied Ubx-dependent cis-regulatory regions. Moreover, we show that Ubx binding is predictive of enhancer activity as suggested by comparison with a genome-scale resource of in vivo tested enhancer candidates. We observed densely clustered Ubx binding sites at 12 extended genomic loci that included ANTP-C, BX-C, Polycomb complex genes, and other regulators and the clustered binding sites were frequently active enhancers. Furthermore, Ubx binding was detected at known Polycomb response elements (PREs) and was associated with significant enrichments of Pc and Pho ChIP signals in contrast to binding sites of other developmental TFs. Together, our results show that Ubx targets developmental regulators via strongly clustered binding sites and allow us to hypothesize that regulation by Ubx might involve Polycomb group proteins to maintain specific regulatory states in cooperative or mutually exclusive fashion, an attractive model that combines two groups of proteins with prominent gene regulatory roles during animal development. PMID:27575958

  11. Limiting the Number of Potential Binding Modes by Introducing Symmetry into Ligands: Structure-Based Design of Inhibitors for Trypsin-Like Serine Proteases.

    PubMed

    Furtmann, Norbert; Häußler, Daniela; Scheidt, Tamara; Stirnberg, Marit; Steinmetzer, Torsten; Bajorath, Jürgen; Gütschow, Michael

    2016-01-11

    In the absence of X-ray data, the exploration of compound binding modes continues to be a challenging task. For structure-based design, specific features of active sites in different targets play a major role in rationalizing ligand binding characteristics. For example, dibasic compounds have been reported as potent inhibitors of various trypsin-like serine proteases, the active sites of which contain several binding pockets that can be targeted by cationic moieties. This results in several possible orientations within the active site, complicating the binding mode prediction of such compounds by docking tools. Therefore, we introduced symmetry in bi- and tribasic compounds to reduce conformational space in docking calculations and to simplify binding mode selection by limiting the number of possible pocket occupations. Asymmetric bisbenzamidines were used as starting points for a multistage and structure-guided optimization. A series of 24 final compounds with either two or three benzamidine substructures was ultimately synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of five serine proteases, leading to potent symmetric inhibitors for the pharmaceutical drug targets matriptase, matriptase-2, thrombin and factor Xa. This study underlines the relevance of ligand symmetry for chemical biology.

  12. The Autocrine Mitogenic Loop of the Ciliate Euplotes raikovi: The Pheromone Membrane-bound Forms Are the Cell Binding Sites and Potential Signaling Receptors of Soluble Pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Ortenzi, Claudio; Alimenti, Claudio; Vallesi, Adriana; Di Pretoro, Barbara; Terza, Antonietta La; Luporini, Pierangelo

    2000-01-01

    Homologous proteins, denoted pheromones, promote cell mitotic proliferation and mating pair formation in the ciliate Euplotes raikovi, according to whether they bind to cells in an autocrine- or paracrine-like manner. The primary transcripts of the genes encoding these proteins undergo alternate splicing, which generates at least two distinct mRNAs. One is specific for the soluble pheromone, the other for a pheromone isoform that remains anchored to the cell surface as a type II protein, whose extracellular C-terminal region is structurally equivalent to the secreted form. The 15-kDa membrane-bound isoform of pheromone Er-1, denoted Er-1mem and synthesized by the same E. raikovi cells that secrete Er-1, has been purified from cell membranes by affinity chromatography prepared with matrix-bound Er-1, and its extracellular and cytoplasmic regions have been expressed as recombinant proteins. Using the purified material and these recombinant proteins, it has been shown that Er-1mem has the property of binding pheromones competitively through its extracellular pheromone-like domain and associating reversibly and specifically with a guanine nucleotide-binding protein through its intracellular domain. It has been concluded that the membrane-bound pheromone isoforms of E. raikovi represent the cell effective pheromone binding sites and are functionally equipped for transducing the signal generated by this binding. PMID:10749941

  13. Water clusters in an argon matrix: infrared spectra from molecular dynamics simulations with a self-consistent charge density functional-based tight binding/force-field potential.

    PubMed

    Simon, Aude; Iftner, Christophe; Mascetti, Joëlle; Spiegelman, Fernand

    2015-03-19

    The present theoretical study aims at investigating the effects of an argon matrix on the structures, energetics, dynamics, and infrared (IR) spectra of small water clusters (H2O)n (n = 1-6). The potential energy surface is obtained from a hybrid self-consistent charge density functional-based tight binding/force-field approach (SCC-DFTB/FF) in which the water clusters are treated at the SCC-DFTB level and the matrix is modeled at the FF level by a cluster consisting of ∼340 Ar atoms with a face centered cubic (fcc) structure, namely (H2O)n/Ar. With respect to a pure FF scheme, this allows a quantum description of the molecular system embedded in the matrix, along with all-atom geometry optimization and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the (H2O)n/Ar system. Finite-temperature IR spectra are derived from the MD simulations. The SCC-DFTB/FF scheme is first benchmarked on (H2O)Arn clusters against correlated wave function results and DFT calculations performed in the present work, and against FF data available in the literature. Regarding (H2O)n/Ar systems, the geometries of the water clusters are found to adapt to the fcc environment, possibly leading to intermolecular distortion and matrix perturbation. Several energetical quantities are estimated to characterize the water clusters in the matrix. In the particular case of the water hexamer, substitution and insertion energies for the prism, bag, and cage are found to be lower than that for the 6-member ring isomer. Finite-temperature MD simulations show that the water monomer has a quasifree rotation motion at 13 K, in agreement with experimental data. In the case of the water dimer, the only large-amplitude motion is a distortion-rotation intermolecular motion, whereas only vibration motions around the nuclei equilibrium positions are observed for clusters with larger sizes. Regarding the IR spectra, we find that the matrix environment leads to redshifts of the stretching modes and almost no shift of the

  14. Water clusters in an argon matrix: infrared spectra from molecular dynamics simulations with a self-consistent charge density functional-based tight binding/force-field potential.

    PubMed

    Simon, Aude; Iftner, Christophe; Mascetti, Joëlle; Spiegelman, Fernand

    2015-03-19

    The present theoretical study aims at investigating the effects of an argon matrix on the structures, energetics, dynamics, and infrared (IR) spectra of small water clusters (H2O)n (n = 1-6). The potential energy surface is obtained from a hybrid self-consistent charge density functional-based tight binding/force-field approach (SCC-DFTB/FF) in which the water clusters are treated at the SCC-DFTB level and the matrix is modeled at the FF level by a cluster consisting of ∼340 Ar atoms with a face centered cubic (fcc) structure, namely (H2O)n/Ar. With respect to a pure FF scheme, this allows a quantum description of the molecular system embedded in the matrix, along with all-atom geometry optimization and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the (H2O)n/Ar system. Finite-temperature IR spectra are derived from the MD simulations. The SCC-DFTB/FF scheme is first benchmarked on (H2O)Arn clusters against correlated wave function results and DFT calculations performed in the present work, and against FF data available in the literature. Regarding (H2O)n/Ar systems, the geometries of the water clusters are found to adapt to the fcc environment, possibly leading to intermolecular distortion and matrix perturbation. Several energetical quantities are estimated to characterize the water clusters in the matrix. In the particular case of the water hexamer, substitution and insertion energies for the prism, bag, and cage are found to be lower than that for the 6-member ring isomer. Finite-temperature MD simulations show that the water monomer has a quasifree rotation motion at 13 K, in agreement with experimental data. In the case of the water dimer, the only large-amplitude motion is a distortion-rotation intermolecular motion, whereas only vibration motions around the nuclei equilibrium positions are observed for clusters with larger sizes. Regarding the IR spectra, we find that the matrix environment leads to redshifts of the stretching modes and almost no shift of the

  15. Inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate binding sites in neuronal and non-neuronal tissues. Properties, comparisons and potential physiological significance.

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, P J; Irvine, R F

    1992-01-01

    1. Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 binding sites were studied in cerebellar and hepatic microsomes from rat, and in bovine adrenal-cortical microsomes. 2. At pH 7.0, all three tissues showed specific binding, with Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 being the most potent competing ligand of those tested [which included Ins(1,4,5)P3, Ins(1,3,4,5,6)P5 and InsP6] and Scatchard analysis suggested two sites; a site with high affinity and high specificity [Kd (1-6) x 10(-9) M] and a site with low affinity and low specificity [Kd (2-6) x 10(-7) M]. 3. At pH 5.5, cerebellar and bovine adrenal microsomes showed similar binding properties: two affinities with a similar specificity for Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 as at pH 7.0. 4. However, when assayed in a low-ionic strength acetate-based buffer at pH 5.0, cerebellar microsomes retain specific Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 binding sites, whereas bovine adrenal and hepatic microsomal binding sites lose much of their specificity, as InsP6 and Ins(1,3,4,5,6)P5 are equally as potent as Ins(1,3,4,5)P4. 5. Pi (25 mM), which is frequently included in Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 binding assays, had a small inhibitory effect on binding of cerebellar and adrenal microsomes at pH 5.5, but a large effect at pH 7.0, so that a considerable decrease occurs in the amount of specific binding at pH 5.5 compared with that at pH 7.0, if Pi is omitted from the binding assay. 6. Cerebellar and adrenal microsomes were used in a ligand-displacement mass assay (conducted under near-physiological conditions, at pH 7.0) on extracts of cerebral-cortex slices stimulated with agonists, and both preparations faithfully detected the increases in Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 that occurred, implying that Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 is the principal ligand on these binding sites in intact cells. 7. Apparent contradictions in the literature with regard to Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 binding sites in neuronal and peripheral tissues can be largely accounted for by the data, and the properties of the binding sites detected at physiological pH are consistent with the possibility

  16. Binding Procurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of the binding procurement process in purchasing Aerospace Flight Battery Systems. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) requested NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group to develop a set of guideline requirements document for Binding Procurement Contracts.

  17. Equal impact of diffusion and DNA binding rates on the potential spatial distribution of nuclear factor κB transcription factor inside the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Sycheva, A M; Kel, A; Nikolaev, E N; Moshkovskii, S A

    2014-06-01

    There are two physical processes that influence the spatial distribution of transcription factor molecules entering the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell, the binding to genomic DNA and the diffusion throughout the nuclear volume. Comparison of the DNA-protein association rate constant and the protein diffusion constant may determine which one is the limiting factor. If the process is diffusion-limited, transcription factor molecules are captured by DNA before their even distribution in the nuclear volume. Otherwise, if the reaction rate is limiting, these molecules diffuse evenly and then find their binding sites. Using well-studied human NF-κB dimer as an example, we calculated its diffusion constant using the Debye-Smoluchowski equation. The value of diffusion constant was about 10(-15) cm(3)/s, and it was comparable to the NF-κB association rate constant for DNA binding known from previous studies. Thus, both diffusion and DNA binding play an equally important role in NF-κB spatial distribution. The importance of genome 3D-structure in gene expression regulation and possible dependence of gene expression on the local concentration of open chromatin can be hypothesized from our theoretical estimate.

  18. A mutant of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 deficient in binding alpha-helix partners displays reduced oncogenic potential in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Marie; Song, Shiyu; Liem, Amy; Androphy, Elliot; Liu, Yun; Lambert, Paul F

    2002-12-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small DNA tumor viruses that are the causative agent of warts and are associated with many anogenital cancers. The viral gene encoding the E6 protein has been found to be involved in HPV oncogenesis. E6 is known to inactivate the cellular tumor suppressor, p53. In addition, E6 has been shown to bind to a variety of other cellular proteins. The focus of this study was to determine what role the interactions of E6 with a subset of cellular proteins which contain a common alpha-helical domain in their E6 binding region (alpha-helix partners) play in E6-mediated phenotypes. We generated transgenic mice expressing a mutant of E6, E6(I128T), which is defective for binding at least a subset of the alpha-helix partners, including E6AP, the ubiquitin ligase that mediates E6-dependent degradation of the p53 protein, to determine whether binding of alpha-helix partners plays a role in E6-mediated activities in vivo. Unlike mice expressing the wild-type E6 (strain K14E6(WT)), the mice expressing E6(I128T) lacked the ability to alter the radiation-induced block to DNA synthesis and promote the formation of benign skin tumors in conjunction with chemical carcinogens. Additionally, they displayed reduced levels of skin hyperplasia, spontaneous skin tumors, and tumor progression activity compared to those of the K14E6(WT) mice. From these results, we conclude that a domain in E6 that mediates alpha-helix partner binding is critical for E6-induced phenotypes in transgenic mice.

  19. Crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of the botulinum C-D mosaic neurotoxin reveals potential roles of lysines 1118 and 1136 in membrane interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Buchko, Garry W.; Qin, Ling; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.

    2011-01-07

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by different strains of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are responsible for the disease botulism and include a group of immunologically distinct serotypes (A, B, E, and F) that are considered to be the most lethal natural proteins known for humans. Two BoNT serotypes, C and D, while rarely associated with human infection, are responsible for deadly botulism outbreaks afflicting animals. Also associated with animal infections is the BoNT C-D mosaic protein (BoNT/CD), a BoNT subtype that is essentially a hybrid of the BoNT/C (~two-thirds) and BoNT/D (~one-third) serotypes. While the amino acid sequence of the heavy chain receptor binding (HCR) domain of BoNT/CD (BoNT/CD-HCR) is very similar to the corresponding amino acid sequence of BoNT/D, BoNT/CD-HCR binds synaptosome membranes better than BoNT/D-HCR. To obtain structural insights for the different membrane binding properties, the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR (S867-E1280) was determined at 1.56 Å resolution and compared to previously reported structures for BoNT/D-HCR. Overall, the BoNT/CD-HCR structure is similar to the two sub-domain organization observed for other BoNT HCRs: an N-terminal jellyroll barrel motif and a C-terminal β-trefoil fold. Comparison of the structure of BoNT/CD-HCR with BoNT/D-HCR indicates that K1118 has a similar structural role as the equivalent residue, E1114, in BoNT/D-HCR, while K1136 has a structurally different role than the equivalent residue, G1132, in BoNT/D-HCR. Lysine-1118 forms a salt bridge with E1247 and may enhance membrane interactions by stabilizing the putative membrane binding loop (K1240-N1248). Lysine-1136 is observed on the surface of the protein. A sulfate ion bound to K1136 may mimic a natural interaction with the negatively changed phospholipid membrane surface. Liposome-binding experiments demonstrate that BoNT/CD-HCR binds phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes more tightly than BoNT/D-HCR

  20. Crystal Structure of the Receptor Binding Domain of the botulinum C-D Mosiac Neurotoxin Reveals Potential Roles of Lysines 1118 and 1136 in Membrane Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Y Zhang; G Buchko; L Qin; H Robinson; S Varnum

    2011-12-31

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by different strains of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are responsible for the disease botulism and include a group of immunologically distinct serotypes (A, B, E, and F) that are considered to be the most lethal natural proteins known for humans. Two BoNT serotypes, C and D, while rarely associated with human infection, are responsible for deadly botulism outbreaks afflicting animals. Also associated with animal infections is the BoNT C-D mosaic protein (BoNT/CD), a BoNT subtype that is essentially a hybrid of the BoNT/C ({approx}two-third) and BoNT/D ({approx}one-third) serotypes. While the amino acid sequence of the heavy chain receptor binding (HCR) domain of BoNT/CD (BoNT/CD-HCR) is very similar to the corresponding amino acid sequence of BoNT/D, BoNT/CD-HCR binds synaptosome membranes better than BoNT/D-HCR. To obtain structural insights for the different membrane binding properties, the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR (S867-E1280) was determined at 1.56 {angstrom} resolution and compared to previously reported structures for BoNT/D-HCR. Overall, the BoNT/CD-HCR structure is similar to the two sub-domain organization observed for other BoNT HCRs: an N-terminal jellyroll barrel motif and a C-terminal {beta}-trefoil fold. Comparison of the structure of BoNT/CD-HCR with BoNT/D-HCR indicates that K1118 has a similar structural role as the equivalent residue, E1114, in BoNT/D-HCR, while K1136 has a structurally different role than the equivalent residue, G1132, in BoNT/D-HCR. Lysine-1118 forms a salt bridge with E1247 and may enhance membrane interactions by stabilizing the putative membrane binding loop (K1240-N1248). Lysine-1136 is observed on the surface of the protein. A sulfate ion bound to K1136 may mimic a natural interaction with the negatively changed phospholipid membrane surface. Liposome-binding experiments demonstrate that BoNT/CD-HCR binds phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes more tightly than BoNT/D-HCR.

  1. An olive pollen protein with allergenic activity, Ole e 10, defines a novel family of carbohydrate-binding modules and is potentially implicated in pollen germination

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    CBMs (carbohydrate-binding modules) are the most common non-catalytic modules associated with enzymes active in plant cell-wall hydrolysis. They have been frequently identified by amino acid sequence alignments, but only a few have been experimentally established to have a carbohydrate-binding activity. A small olive pollen protein, Ole e 10 (10 kDa), has been described as a major inducer of type I allergy in humans. In the present study, the ability of Ole e 10 to bind several polysaccharides has been analysed by affinity gel electrophoresis, which demonstrated that the protein bound 1,3-β-glucans preferentially. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies confirmed binding to laminarin, at a protein/ligand ratio of 1:1. The interaction of Ole e 10 with laminarin induced a conformational change in the protein, as detected by CD and fluorescence analyses, and an increase of 3.6 °C in the thermal denaturation temperature of Ole e 10 in the presence of the glycan. These results, and the absence of alignment of the sequence of Ole e 10 with that of any classified CBM, indicate that this pollen protein defines a novel family of CBMs, which we propose to name CBM43. Immunolocalization of Ole e 10 in mature and germinating pollen by transmission electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated the co-localization of Ole e 10 and callose (1,3-β-glucan) in the growing pollen tube, suggesting a role for this protein in the metabolism of carbohydrates and in pollen tube wall re-formation during germination. PMID:15882149

  2. Binding of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C-zeta (PLC-zeta) to phospholipid membranes: potential role of an unstructured cluster of basic residues.

    PubMed

    Nomikos, Michail; Mulgrew-Nesbitt, Anna; Pallavi, Payal; Mihalyne, Gyongyi; Zaitseva, Irina; Swann, Karl; Lai, F Anthony; Murray, Diana; McLaughlin, Stuart

    2007-06-01

    Phospholipase C-zeta (PLC-zeta) is a sperm-specific enzyme that initiates the Ca2+ oscillations in mammalian eggs that activate embryo development. It shares considerable sequence homology with PLC-delta1, but lacks the PH domain that anchors PLC-delta1 to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, PIP2. Thus it is unclear how PLC-zeta interacts with membranes. The linker region between the X and Y catalytic domains of PLC-zeta, however, contains a cluster of basic residues not present in PLC-delta1. Application of electrostatic theory to a homology model of PLC-zeta suggests this basic cluster could interact with acidic lipids. We measured the binding of catalytically competent mouse PLC-zeta to phospholipid vesicles: for 2:1 phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine (PC/PS) vesicles, the molar partition coefficient, K, is too weak to be of physiological significance. Incorporating 1% PIP2 into the 2:1 PC/PS vesicles increases K about 10-fold, to 5x10(3) M-1, a biologically relevant value. Expressed fragments corresponding to the PLC-zeta X-Y linker region also bind with higher affinity to polyvalent than monovalent phosphoinositides on nitrocellulose filters. A peptide corresponding to the basic cluster (charge=+7) within the linker region, PLC-zeta-(374-385), binds to PC/PS vesicles with higher affinity than PLC-zeta, but its binding is less sensitive to incorporating PIP2. The acidic residues flanking this basic cluster in PLC-zeta may account for both these phenomena. FRET experiments suggest the basic cluster could not only anchor the protein to the membrane, but also enhance the local concentration of PIP2 adjacent to the catalytic domain.

  3. Analysis of the spacing between the two palindromes of activation sequence-1 with respect to binding to different TGA factors and transcriptional activation potential.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Stefanie; Thurow, Corinna; Niggeweg, Ricarda; Gatz, Christiane

    2002-02-01

    In higher plants, activation sequence-1 (as-1) of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter mediates both salicylic acid- and auxin-inducible transcriptional activation. Originally found in viral and T-DNA promoters, as-1-like elements are also functional elements of plant promoters activated in the course of a defence response upon pathogen attack. as-1-like elements are characterised by two imperfect palindromes with the palindromic centres being spaced by 12 bp. They are recognised by plant nuclear as-1-binding factor ASF-1, the major component of which is basic/leucine zipper (bZIP) protein TGA2.2 (approximately 80%) in Nicotiana tabacum. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, ASF-1 as well as bZIP proteins TGA2.2, TGA2.1 and TGA1a showed a 3-10-fold reduced binding affinity to mutant as-1 elements encoding insertions of 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 bp between the palindromes, respectively. This correlated with a 5-10-fold reduction in transcriptional activation from these elements in transient expression assays. Although ASF-1 and TGA factors bound efficiently to a mutant element carrying a 2 bp deletion between the palindromes [as-1/(-2)], the latter was strongly compromised with respect to mediating gene expression in vivo. A fusion protein consisting of TGA2.2 and a constitutive activation domain mediated transactivation from as-1/(-2) demonstrating binding of TGA factors in vivo. We therefore conclude that both DNA binding and transactivation require optimal positioning of TGA factors on the as-1 element.

  4. Analysis of the spacing between the two palindromes of activation sequence-1 with respect to binding to different TGA factors and transcriptional activation potential

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Stefanie; Thurow, Corinna; Niggeweg, Ricarda; Gatz, Christiane

    2002-01-01

    In higher plants, activation sequence-1 (as-1) of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter mediates both salicylic acid- and auxin-inducible transcriptional activation. Originally found in viral and T-DNA promoters, as-1-like elements are also functional elements of plant promoters activated in the course of a defence response upon pathogen attack. as-1-like elements are characterised by two imperfect palindromes with the palindromic centres being spaced by 12 bp. They are recognised by plant nuclear as-1-binding factor ASF-1, the major component of which is basic/leucine zipper (bZIP) protein TGA2.2 (∼80%) in Nicotiana tabacum. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, ASF-1 as well as bZIP proteins TGA2.2, TGA2.1 and TGA1a showed a 3–10-fold reduced binding affinity to mutant as-1 elements encoding insertions of 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 bp between the palindromes, respectively. This correlated with a 5–10-fold reduction in transcriptional activation from these elements in transient expression assays. Although ASF-1 and TGA factors bound efficiently to a mutant element carrying a 2 bp deletion between the palindromes [as-1/(–2)], the latter was strongly compromised with respect to mediating gene expression in vivo. A fusion protein consisting of TGA2.2 and a constitutive activation domain mediated transactivation from as-1/(–2) demonstrating binding of TGA factors in vivo. We therefore conclude that both DNA binding and transactivation require optimal positioning of TGA factors on the as-1 element. PMID:11809891

  5. The tyrosine gate as a potential entropic lever in the receptor-binding site of the bacterial adhesin FimH.

    PubMed

    Wellens, Adinda; Lahmann, Martina; Touaibia, Mohamed; Vaucher, Jonathan; Oscarson, Stefan; Roy, René; Remaut, Han; Bouckaert, Julie

    2012-06-19

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are the major causative agents of urinary tract infections. During infection, UPEC adhere to mannosylated glycoreceptors on the urothelium via the FimH adhesin located at the tip of type 1 pili. Synthetic FimH antiadhesives such as alkyl and phenyl α-D-mannopyranosides are thus ideal candidates for the chemical interception of this crucial step in pathogenesis. The crystal structures of the FimH lectin domain in its ligand-free form and in complexes with eight medium- and high-affinity mannopyranoside inhibitors are presented. The thermodynamic profiles of the FimH-inhibitor interactions indicate that the binding of FimH to α-D-mannopyranose is enthalpy-driven and has a negative entropic change. Addition of a hydrophobic aglycon influences the binding enthalpy and can induce a favorable entropic change. The alleviation of the entropic cost is at least in part explained by increased dynamics in the tyrosine gate (Tyr48 and Tyr137) of the FimH receptor-binding site upon binding of the ligand. Ligands with a phenyl group directly linked to the anomeric oxygen of α-D-mannose introduce the largest dynamics into the Tyr48 side chain, because conjugation with the anomeric oxygen of α-D-mannose forces the aromatic aglycon into a conformation that comes into close contact (≈2.65 Å) with Tyr48. A propargyl group in this position predetermines the orientation of the aglycon and significantly decreases affinity. FimH has the highest affinity for α-D-mannopyranosides substituted with hydrophobic aglycons that are compatible in shape and electrostatic properties to the tyrosine gate, such as heptyl α-D-mannose. PMID:22657089

  6. Synthesis of 1-boraadamantaneamine derivatives with selective astrocyte vs C6 glioma antiproliferative activity. A novel class of anti-hepatitis C agents with potential to bind CD81.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Carl E; Mohler, Michael L; Kang, Gyong Suk; Miller, Duane D; Geisert, Eldon E; Chang, Yu-An; Fleischer, Everly B; Shea, Kenneth J

    2003-07-01

    A variety of amine complexes with 1-boraadamatane were synthesized and subsequently evaluated for an antiproliferative effect on CD81-enriched cell lines to provide evidence for binding and activation of CD81. CD81 is a member of the tetraspanin family of membrane proteins found in all cell lineages in the liver. CD81 signals for antiproliferation when bound by antibodies. It is known that the HCV-E2 envelope glycoprotein binds to the CD81 protein. While it is unclear whether virus entry into host cells is directly linked to virus attachment via CD81 for HCV, this step in the viral life cycle has recently proven to be an effective point of attack for other viruses including HIV and rhinoviruses. The aim of the current study concerns the synthesis of amantidine analogues by appending primary amines to 1-boraadamantane to evaluate such compounds for CD81-dependent antiproliferation of CD81-enriched cell lines (astrocyte) vs CD81-deficient cell lines (C6 glioma). If the antiproliferative effect of these amantidine analogues proves to be an effect of binding and activating CD81, then these compounds may have the potential to prevent or treat HCV infections. Each compound's potential for preventive and therapeutic activity stems from the compound's potential to block viral attachment, virus-cell fusion, or virus entry into host cells or to counter potential mechanisms of HCV immune evasion. Out of a library of over 500 compounds, including randomly selected small molecules and rationally designed small molecules, only the 1-boraadamantaneamine compounds and structurally similar analogues display a significant antiproliferative effect on the CD81-enriched astrocytes relative to the CD81-deficient cell lines. In fact, 1-boraadamantane.l-phenylalanine methyl ester complex (5), 1-boraadamantane.ethanolamine complex (8), and (S)-2-[(adamantane-1-carbonyl)amino]-3-phenylpropionic acid (15) show a dose-dependent, astrocyte-selective antiproliferative activity in the

  7. Structural insights for MPP8 chromodomain interaction with histone H3 lysine 9: potential effect of phosphorylation on methyl-lysine binding

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yanqi; Horton, John R.; Bedford, Mark T.; Zhang, Xing; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2011-01-01

    M phase phosphoprotein 8 (MPP8) harbors a N-terminal chromodomain and a C-terminal ankyrin repeat domain. MPP8, via its chromodomain, binds histone H3 peptide tri- or di-methylated at lysine 9 (H3K9me3/2) in submicromolar affinity. We determined the crystal structure of MPP8 chromodomain in complex with H3K9me3 peptide. MPP8 interacts with at least six histone H3 residues from glutamine 5 to serine 10, enabling its ability to distinguish lysine 9 containing peptide (QTARKS) from that of lysine 27 (KAARKS), both sharing the ARKS sequence. A partial hydrophobic cage with three aromatic residues (Phe59, Trp80, Tyr83) and one aspartate (Asp87) encloses the methylated lysine 9. MPP8 has been reported to be phosphorylated in vivo, including the cage residue Tyr83 and the succeeding Thr84 and Ser85. Modeling a phosphate group onto the side chain hydroxyl oxygen of Tyr83 suggests the negatively charged phosphate group could enhance the binding of positively charged methyl-lysine or create a regulatory signal by allowing or inhibiting binding of other protein(s). PMID:21419134

  8. Isolation of an inhibitory insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein from bone cell-conditioned medium: A potential local regulator of IGF action

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, S.; Bautista, C.M.; Wergedal, J.; Baylink, D.J. )

    1989-11-01

    Inhibitory insulin-like growth factor binding protein (In-IGF-BP) has been purified to homogeneity from medium conditioned by TE89 human osteosarcoma cells by two different methods using Sephadex G-100 gel filtration, FPLC Mono Q ion-exchange, HPLC C{sub 4} reverse-phase, HPLC CN reverse-phase and affinity chromatographies. In-IGF-BP thus purified appeared to be homogeneous and unique by the following criteria. (i) N-terminal sequence analysis yielded a unique sequence (Asp-Glu-Ala-Ile-His-Cys-Pro-Pro-Glu-Ser-Glu-Ala-Lys-Leu-Ala). (ii) Amino acid composition of In-IGF-BP revealed marked differences with the amino acid compositions of other known PBs. (iii) In-IGF-BP exhibited a single band with molecular mass of 25 kDa under reducing conditions on sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gels. IGF-I and IGF-II but not insulin displaced the binding of {sup 125}I-labeled IGF-I or {sup 125}I-labeled IGF-II binding to In-IGF-BP. In-IGF-BP inhibited basal, IGF-stimulated bone cell proliferation and serum-stimulated bone cell proliferation. Forskolin increases synthesis of In-IGF-BP in TE85 human osteosarcoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Based on these findings, the authors conclude that In-IGF-BP is a protein that has a unique sequence and significant biological actions on bone cells.

  9. Interdependence of coenzyme-induced conformational work and binding potential in yeast alcohol and porcine heart lactate dehydrogenases: a hydrogen-deuterium exchange study.

    PubMed

    De Weck, Z; Pande, J; Kägi, J H

    1987-07-28

    Binding of NAD coenzymes to yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and porcine heart lactate dehydrogenase (PHLDH) was studied by hydrogen-deuterium exchange with the infrared technique. Conformational changes in the enzymes specific to the coenzymes and their fragments were observed, and the pH dependence of the exchange reaction shows that it conforms to the EX-2 scheme. In both YADH and PHLDH the magnitude of the conformational change of measured by exchange retardation is considerably larger for NAD+ than for NADH. Studies with coenzyme fragments like ADP-ribose, ADP, and AMP also highlight the lack of rigorous correlation between structural features such as charge and size and their influence on exchange behavior. Ternary complexes such as YADH-NAD+-pyrazole, PHLDH-NAD+-oxalate, and PHLDH-NADH-oxamate, which mimic the transition state, have a significantly more pronounced effect on exchange rates than the corresponding binary complexes. The outstanding feature of this study is the demonstration that in the binary enzyme-coenzyme complexes the more loosely bound NAD+ is more effective in retarding exchange than the more firmly bound NADH. These differences are attributed to the unequal structural constraints exerted by the two coenzymes upon the enzymes, which translate to unequal expenditure of transconformational work in the formation of the two complexes. The opposing variation in the free energy of binding and the transconformational work expended can be viewed as an unequal partitioning of the net free energy gain resulting from the protein-ligand interaction into a binding term and that required for conformational change.

  10. Identification of an RNA-binding protein that is phosphorylated by PTH and potentially mediates PTH-induced destabilization of Npt2a mRNA.

    PubMed

    Murray, Rebecca D; Merchant, Michael L; Hardin, Ericka; Clark, Barbara; Khundmiri, Syed J; Lederer, Eleanor D

    2016-02-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a key regulator of the expression and function of the type IIa sodium-phosphate cotransporter (Npt2a), the protein responsible for regulated renal phosphate reabsorption. We previously showed that PTH induces rapid decay of Npt2a mRNA through posttranscriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that PTH-induced changes in RNA-binding protein (RBP) activity mediate the degradation of Npt2a mRNA. To address this aim, we treated opossum kidney (OK) cells, a PTH-sensitive proximal tubule cell culture model, with 100 nM PTH for 30 min and 2 h, followed by mass spectrometry characterization of the PTH-stimulated phosphoproteome. We identified 1,182 proteins differentially phosphorylated in response to PTH, including 68 RBPs. Preliminary analysis identified a phospho-RBP, hnRNPK-homology-type-splicing regulatory protein (KSRP), with predicted binding sites for the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of Npt2a mRNA. Western blot analysis confirmed expression of KSRP in OK cells and showed PTH-dependent translocation to the nucleus. Immunoprecipitation of KSRP from control and PTH-treated cells followed by RNA isolation and RT-quantitative PCR analysis identified Npt2a mRNA from both control and PTH-treated KSRP pulldowns. Knockdown of KSRP followed by PTH treatment showed that KSRP is required for mediating PTH-stimulated reduction in sodium/hydrogen exchanger 3 mRNA, but not Npt2a mRNA. We conclude that 1) PTH is a major regulator of both transcription and translation, and 2) KSRP binds Npt2a mRNA but its role in PTH regulation of Npt2a mRNA is not clear. PMID:26834145

  11. Identification of an RNA-binding protein that is phosphorylated by PTH and potentially mediates PTH-induced destabilization of Npt2a mRNA.

    PubMed

    Murray, Rebecca D; Merchant, Michael L; Hardin, Ericka; Clark, Barbara; Khundmiri, Syed J; Lederer, Eleanor D

    2016-02-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a key regulator of the expression and function of the type IIa sodium-phosphate cotransporter (Npt2a), the protein responsible for regulated renal phosphate reabsorption. We previously showed that PTH induces rapid decay of Npt2a mRNA through posttranscriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that PTH-induced changes in RNA-binding protein (RBP) activity mediate the degradation of Npt2a mRNA. To address this aim, we treated opossum kidney (OK) cells, a PTH-sensitive proximal tubule cell culture model, with 100 nM PTH for 30 min and 2 h, followed by mass spectrometry characterization of the PTH-stimulated phosphoproteome. We identified 1,182 proteins differentially phosphorylated in response to PTH, including 68 RBPs. Preliminary analysis identified a phospho-RBP, hnRNPK-homology-type-splicing regulatory protein (KSRP), with predicted binding sites for the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of Npt2a mRNA. Western blot analysis confirmed expression of KSRP in OK cells and showed PTH-dependent translocation to the nucleus. Immunoprecipitation of KSRP from control and PTH-treated cells followed by RNA isolation and RT-quantitative PCR analysis identified Npt2a mRNA from both control and PTH-treated KSRP pulldowns. Knockdown of KSRP followed by PTH treatment showed that KSRP is required for mediating PTH-stimulated reduction in sodium/hydrogen exchanger 3 mRNA, but not Npt2a mRNA. We conclude that 1) PTH is a major regulator of both transcription and translation, and 2) KSRP binds Npt2a mRNA but its role in PTH regulation of Npt2a mRNA is not clear.

  12. The Modification of Indium Tin Oxide with Phosphonic Acids: Mechanism of Binding, Tuning of Surface Properties, and Potential for Use in Organic Electronic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hotchkiss, Peter J.; Jones, Simon C.; Paniagua, Sergio A.; Sharma, Asha; Kippelen, Bernard; Armstrong, Neal R.; Marder, Seth R.

    2012-03-20

    Transparent metal oxides, in particular, indium tin oxide (ITO), are critical transparent contact materials for applications in next-generation organic electronics, including organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic photovoltaics (OPVs). Understanding and controlling the surface properties of ITO allows for the molecular engineering of the ITO–organic interface, resulting in fine control of the interfacial chemistries and electronics. In particular, both surface energy matching and work function compatibility at material interfaces can result in marked improvement in OLED and OPV performance. Although there are numerous ways to change the surface properties of ITO, one of the more successful surface modifications is the use of monolayers based on organic molecules with widely variable end functional groups. Phosphonic acids (PAs) are known to bind strongly to metal oxides and form robust monolayers on many different metal oxide materials. They also demonstrate several advantages over other functionalizing moieties such as silanes or carboxylic acids. Most notably, PAs can be stored in ambient conditions without degradation, and the surface modification procedures are typically robust and easy to employ. This Account focuses on our research studying PA binding to ITO, the tunable properties of the resulting surfaces, and subsequent effects on the performance of organic electronic devices. We have used surface characterization techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared reflection adsorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) to determine that PAs bind to ITO in a predominantly bidentate fashion (where two of three oxygen atoms from the PA are involved in surface binding). Modification of the functional R-groups on PAs allows us to control and tune the surface energy and work function of the ITO surface. In one study using fluorinated benzyl PAs, we can keep the surface energy of ITO relatively low and constant but tune the surface work

  13. Synthesis of oligodiaminomannoses and analysis of their RNA duplex binding properties and their potential application as siRNA-based drugs.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Rintaro; Doi, Akiko; Maeda, Yusuke; Wada, Takeshi

    2015-09-28

    The synthesis of artificial cationic oligodiaminosaccharides, α-(1 → 4)-linked-2,6-diamino-2,6-dideoxy-d-mannopyranose oligomers (ODAMans), and their interactions with RNA duplexes are described. The monomer through the pentamer, all of which bear unnatural 2,6-diaminomannose moieties, were successfully prepared. UV melting and fluorescence anisotropy analyses revealed that the ODAMans bound and thermodynamically stabilized both 12mer RNA duplexes and an siRNA. Furthermore, it was clearly shown that the siRNA acquired substantial RNase A resistance due to its binding to the ODAMan 4mer. PMID:26256756

  14. Nucleus Accumbens 1, a Pox virus and Zinc finger/Bric-a-brac Tramtrack Broad protein binds to TAR DNA-binding protein 43 and has a potential role in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Scofield, M D; Korutla, L; Jackson, T G; Kalivas, P W; Mackler, S A

    2012-12-27

    Protein degradation is a critical component of cellular maintenance. The intracellular translocation and targeting of the Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS) differentially coordinates a protein's half-life and thereby its function. Nucleus Accumbens 1 (NAC1), a member of the Pox virus and Zinc finger/Bric-a-brac Tramtrack Broad complex (POZ/BTB) family of proteins, participates in the coordinated proteolysis of synaptic proteins by mediating recruitment of the UPS to dendritic spines. Here we report a novel interaction between NAC1 and TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43), a protein identified as the primary component of ubiquitinated protein aggregates found in patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). In vitro translated full-length TDP-43 associated with both the POZ/BTB domain and the non-POZ/BTB domain of NAC1 in GST pulldown assays. Other POZ/BTB proteins (including zinc finger POZ/BTB proteins and atypical POZ/BTB proteins) showed weak interactions with TDP-43. In addition, NAC1 and TDP-43 were present in the same immunocomplexes in different regions of mouse brain and spinal cord. In primary spinal cord cultures, TDP-43 expression was mainly nuclear, whereas NAC1 was both nuclear and cytoplasmic. In order to mimic ALS-like toxicity in the spinal cord culture system, we elevated extracellular glutamate levels resulting in the selective loss of motor neurons. Using this model, it was found that glutamate toxicity elicited a dose-dependent translocation of TDP-43 out of the nucleus of cholinergic neurons and increased the co-localization of NAC1 and TDP-43. These findings suggest that NAC1 may function to link TDP-43 to the proteasome; thereby, facilitating the post-translational modifications of TDP-43 that lead to the development of ALS.

  15. Crystals of the Arp2/3 complex in two new space groups with structural information about actin-related protein 2 and potential WASP binding sites.

    PubMed

    Jurgenson, Christopher T; Pollard, Thomas D

    2015-09-01

    Co-crystals of the bovine Arp2/3 complex with the CA motif from N-WASP in two new space groups were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The crystals in the orthorhombic space group P212121 contained one complex per asymmetric unit, with unit-cell parameters a = 105.48, b = 156.71, c = 177.84 Å, and diffracted to 3.9 Å resolution. The crystals in the tetragonal space group P41 contained two complexes per asymmetric unit, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 149.93, c = 265.91 Å, and diffracted to 5.0 Å resolution. The electron-density maps of both new crystal forms had densities for small segments of subdomains 1 and 2 of Arp2. Both maps had density at the binding site on Arp3 for the C-terminal EWE tripeptide from N-WASP and a binding site proposed for the C motif of N-WASP in the barbed-end groove of Arp2. The map from the tetragonal crystal form had density near the barbed end of Arp3 that may correspond to the C helix of N-WASP. The noise levels and the low resolution of the maps made the assignment of specific molecular structures for any of these CA peptides impossible.

  16. Activated RhoA Binds to the Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain of PDZ-RhoGEF, a Potential Site for Autoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhe; Medina, Frank; Liu, Mu-ya; Thomas, Celestine; Sprang, Stephen R.; Sternweis, Paul C.

    2010-07-19

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyze exchange of GDP for GTP by stabilizing the nucleotide-free state of the small GTPases through their Dbl homology/pleckstrin homology (DH {center_dot} PH) domains. Unconventionally, PDZ-RhoGEF (PRG), a member of the RGS-RhoGEFs, binds tightly to both nucleotide-free and activated RhoA (RhoA {center_dot} GTP). We have characterized the interaction between PRG and activated RhoA and determined the structure of the PRG-DH {center_dot} PH-RhoA {center_dot} GTP{gamma}S (guanosine 5{prime}-O-[{gamma}-thio]triphosphate) complex. The interface bears striking similarity to a GTPase-effector interface and involves the switch regions in RhoA and a hydrophobic patch in PRG-PH that is conserved among all Lbc RhoGEFs. The two surfaces that bind activated and nucleotide-free RhoA on PRG-DH {center_dot} PH do not overlap, and a ternary complex of PRG-DH {center_dot} PH bound to both forms of RhoA can be isolated by size-exclusion chromatography. This novel interaction between activated RhoA and PH could play a key role in regulation of RhoGEF activity in vivo.

  17. Functional Characterization of Hevea brasiliensis CRT/DRE Binding Factor 1 Gene Revealed Regulation Potential in the CBF Pathway of Tropical Perennial Tree.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han; Cai, Haibin; Fu, Haitian; An, Zewei; Fang, Jialin; Hu, Yanshi; Guo, Dianjing; Huang, Huasun

    2015-01-01

    Rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis) are susceptible to low temperature and therefore are only planted in the tropical regions. In the past few decades, although rubber trees have been successfully planted in the northern margin of tropical area in China, they suffered from cold injury during the winter. To understand the physiological response under cold stress, we isolated a C-repeat binding factor 1 (CBF1) gene from the rubber tree. This gene (HbCBF1) was found to respond to cold stress but not drought or ABA stress. The corresponding HbCBF1 protein showed CRT/DRE binding activity in gel shift experiment. To further characterize its molecular function, the HbCBF1 gene was overexpressed in Arabidopsis. The HbCBF1 over expression (OE) line showed enhanced cold resistance and relatively slow dehydration, and the expression of Arabidopsis CBF pathway downstream target genes, e.g. AtCOR15a and AtRD29a, were significantly activated under non-acclimation condition. These data suggest HbCBF1 gene is a functional member of the CBF gene family, and may play important regulation function in rubber tree. PMID:26361044

  18. Photoelectron spectroscopy of aqueous solutions: Streaming potentials of NaX (X = Cl, Br, and I) solutions and electron binding energies of liquid water and X{sup −}

    SciTech Connect

    Kurahashi, Naoya; Horio, Takuya; Suzuki, Toshinori; Karashima, Shutaro; Suzuki, Yoshi-Ichi; Tang, Ying; Abulimiti, Bumaliya; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Oura, Masaki

    2014-05-07

    The streaming potentials of liquid beams of aqueous NaCl, NaBr, and NaI solutions are measured using soft X-ray, He(I), and laser multiphoton ionization photoelectron spectroscopy. Gaseous molecules are ionized in the vicinity of liquid beams and the photoelectron energy shifts are measured as a function of the distance between the ionization point and the liquid beam. The streaming potentials change their polarity with concentration of electrolytes, from which the singular points of concentration eliminating the streaming potentials are determined. The streaming currents measured in air also vanish at these concentrations. The electron binding energies of liquid water and I{sup −}, Br{sup −}, and Cl{sup −} anions are revisited and determined more accurately than in previous studies.

  19. IL-1 binds to high affinity receptors on human osteosarcoma cells and potentiates prostaglandin E2 stimulation of cAMP production

    SciTech Connect

    Rodan, S.B.; Wesolowski, G.; Chin, J.; Limjuco, G.A.; Schmidt, J.A.; Rodan, G.A. )

    1990-08-15

    IL-1 is a potent bone resorbing agent. Its mechanism of action is unknown, but the presence of osteoblasts was shown to be necessary for IL-1 stimulation of bone resorption by isolated osteoclasts. This study examines the presence of IL-1R and IL-1 effects in osteoblastic cells from a clonal human osteosarcoma cell line, Saos-2/B-10. We found that the binding affinity and the number of binding sites increases substantially during the postconfluent stage. Scatchard and curve-fitting analysis revealed one class of high affinity binding sites, with Kd/Ki's of 40 +/- 17 pM (mean +/- SD) for IL-1 alpha (n = 5) and 9 +/- 7 pM for IL-1 beta (n = 5) and 2916 +/- 2438 (n = 6) receptors/cell. Incubation of the cells with 125I-IL-1 alpha (100 pM) at 4 degrees C, followed by incubation at 37 degrees C up to 4 h, revealed internalization of receptor-bound IL-1 alpha. Chemical cross-linking studies showed that the IL-1R in Saos-2/B-10 cells had a molecular mass of approximately 80 kDa. To assess the biologic effect of IL-1 in Saos-2/B-10 cells, we determined PGE2 content and adenylate cyclase activity. Although IL-1 had no effect on PGE2 synthesis, both IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta enhanced PGE2 stimulation of adenylate cyclase two- to four-fold in a dose-dependent manner. The half-maximal effect for IL-1 alpha was seen at 8 to 10 pM and for IL-1 beta at 0.6 to 1.8 pM. IL-1 did not enhance basal adenylate cyclase or stimulation by parathyroid hormone, isoproterenol, or forskolin. IL-1 enhancement of PGE2-stimulated adenylate cyclase was detected between 1 to 2 h, was maximal at 4 to 5 h, was not prevented by cycloheximide treatment, and was seen in membranes from IL-1 pretreated cells. These data show effects of IL-1 on a human osteoblast-like cell line that are mediated by high affinity receptors. These IL-1 effects could contribute to the biologic action of IL-1 on bone.

  20. High-level ab initio calculations for the four low-lying families of minima of (H2O)(20): 1. Estimates of MP2/CBS binding energies and comparison with empirical potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Fanourgakis, Georgios S.; Apra, Edoardo; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2004-08-08

    We report estimates of complete basis set (CBS) limits at the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation level of theory (MP2) for the binding energies of the lowest lying isomers within each of the four major families of minima of (H2O)20. These were obtained by performing MP2 calculations with the family of correlation-consistent basis sets up to quadruple zeta quality, augmented with additional diffuse functions (aug-cc-pVnZ, n=D, T, Q). The MP2/CBS estimates are: -200.1 kcal/mol (dodecahedron, 30 hydrogen bonds), -212.6 kcal/mol (fused cubes, 36 hydrogen bonds), -215.0 (face-sharing pentagonal prisms, 35 hydrogen bonds) and –217.9 kcal/mol (edge-sharing pentagonal prisms, 34 hydrogen bonds). The energetic ordering of the various (H2O)20 isomers does not follow monotonically the number of hydrogen bonds as in the case of smaller clusters such as the different isomers of the water hexamer. The dodecahedron lies ca. 18 kcal/mol higher in energy than the most stable edge-sharing pentagonal prism isomer. The TIP4P, ASP-W4, TTM2-R, AMOEBA and TTM2-F empirical potentials also predict the energetic stabilization of the edge-sharing pentagonal prisms with respect to the dodecahedron, albeit they universally underestimate the cluster binding energies with respect to the MP2/CBS result. Among them, the TTM2-F potential was found to predict the absolute cluster binding energies to within < 1% from the corresponding MP2/CBS values, whereas the error for the rest of the potentials considered in this study ranges from 3-5%.

  1. Computer-aided diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease based on [123I]FP-CIT SPECT binding potential images, using the voxels-as-features approach and support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Francisco P. M.; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2015-04-01

    Objective. The aim of the present study was to develop a fully-automated computational solution for computer-aided diagnosis in Parkinson syndrome based on [123I]FP-CIT single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Approach. A dataset of 654 [123I]FP-CIT SPECT brain images from the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative were used. Of these, 445 images were of patients with Parkinson’s disease at an early stage and the remainder formed a control group. The images were pre-processed using automated template-based registration followed by the computation of the binding potential at a voxel level. Then, the binding potential images were used for classification, based on the voxel-as-feature approach and using the support vector machines paradigm. Main results. The obtained estimated classification accuracy was 97.86%, the sensitivity was 97.75% and the specificity 98.09%. Significance. The achieved classification accuracy was very high and, in fact, higher than accuracies found in previous studies reported in the literature. In addition, results were obtained on a large dataset of early Parkinson’s disease subjects. In summation, the information provided by the developed computational solution potentially supports clinical decision-making in nuclear medicine, using important additional information beyond the commonly used uptake ratios and respective statistical comparisons. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01141023)

  2. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiaohan; Guo, Hong

    2015-09-01

    Although one of an enzyme's hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. It is known that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. Here we report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involving the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination. PMID:26244568

  3. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes

    DOE PAGES

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiaohan; Guo, Hong

    2015-08-05

    Although one of an enzyme’s hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. We know that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. We report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Finally, our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involvingmore » the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination.« less

  4. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiaohan; Guo, Hong

    2015-08-05

    Although one of an enzyme’s hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. We know that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. We report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Finally, our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involving the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination.

  5. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiaohan; Guo, Hong

    2015-09-01

    Although one of an enzyme's hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. It is known that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. Here we report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involving the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination.

  6. Water-soluble DNA minor groove binders as potential chemotherapeutic agents: synthesis, characterization, DNA binding and cleavage, antioxidation, cytotoxicity and HSA interactions.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xia-Bing; Liu, Dan-Dan; Lin, Yuan; Hu, Wei; Mao, Zong-Wan; Le, Xue-Yi

    2014-06-21

    Two new water-soluble copper(ii)-dipeptide complexes: [Cu(glygly)(PyTA)]ClO4·1.5H2O (1) and [Cu(glygly)(PzTA)]ClO4·1.5H2O (2) (glygly = glycylglycine anion, PyTA = 2,4-diamino-6-(2'-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine and PzTA = 2,4-diamino-6-(2'-pyrazino)-1,3,5-triazine), utilizing two interrelated DNA base-like ligands (PyTA and PzTA), have been synthesized and characterized. The structure elucidation for 1 performed by single crystal X-ray diffraction showed a one dimensional chain conformation in which the central copper ions arrange in a five-coordinate distorted square-pyramidal geometry. Spectroscopic titration, viscosity and electrophoresis measurements revealed that the complexes bound to DNA via an outside groove binding mode, and cleaved pBR322 DNA efficiently in the presence of ascorbate, probably via an oxidative mechanism with the involvement of ˙OH and ˙O2(-). Notably, the complexes exhibited considerable in vitro cytotoxicity against four human carcinoma cell lines (HepG2, HeLa, A549 and U87) with IC50 values ranging from 41.68 to 159.17 μM, in addition to their excellent SOD mimics (IC50 ~ 0.091 and 0.114 μM). Besides, multispectroscopic evidence suggested their HSA-binding at the cavity containing Trp-214 in subdomain IIA with moderate affinity, mainly via hydrophobic interaction. Further, the molecular docking technique utilized for ascertaining the mechanism and mode of action towards DNA and HSA theoretically verified the experimental results. PMID:24770345

  7. Regulation of Calcium-Independent Phospholipase A2 Expression by Adrenoceptors and Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein-Potential Crosstalk Between Sterol and Glycerophospholipid Mediators.

    PubMed

    Chew, Wee-Siong; Ong, Wei-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) is an 85-kDa enzyme that releases docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from glycerophospholipids. DHA can be metabolized to resolvins and neuroprotectins that have anti-inflammatory properties and effects on neural plasticity. Recent studies show an important role of prefrontal cortical iPLA2 in hippocampo-prefrontal cortical LTP and antidepressant-like effect of the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (NRI) antidepressant, maprotiline. In this study, we elucidated the cellular mechanisms through which stimulation of adrenergic receptors could lead to increased iPLA2 expression. Treatment of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with maprotiline, another tricyclic antidepressant with noradrenaline reuptake inhibiting properties, nortriptyline, and the adrenergic receptor agonist, phenylephrine, resulted in increased iPLA2β mRNA expression. This increase was blocked by inhibitors to alpha-1 adrenergic receptor, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP). Maprotiline and phenylephrine induced binding of SREBP-2 to sterol regulatory element (SRE) region on the iPLA2 promoter, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Together, results indicate that stimulation of adrenoreceptors causes increased iPLA2 expression via MAP kinase/ERK 1/2 and SREBP, and suggest a possible mechanism for effect of CNS noradrenaline on neural plasticity and crosstalk between sterol and glycerophospholipid mediators, that may play a role in physiological or pathophysiological processes in the brain and other organs.

  8. Evidence for protein kinase C-dependent and -independent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase in T cells: potential role of additional diacylglycerol binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Puente, L G; Stone, J C; Ostergaard, H L

    2000-12-15

    Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) is a critical signal transduction event for CTL activation, but the signaling mechanisms responsible are not fully characterized. Protein kinase C (PKC) is thought to contribute to MAPK activation following TCR stimulation. We have found that dependence on PKC varies with the method used to stimulate the T cells. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in CTL stimulated with soluble cross-linked anti-CD3 is completely inhibited by the PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide (BIM). In contrast, only the later time points in the course of ERK activation are sensitive to BIM when CTL are stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3, a condition that stimulates CTL degranulation. Surprisingly, MAPK activation in response to immobilized anti-CD3 is strongly inhibited at all time points by the diacylglycerol (DAG)-binding domain inhibitor calphostin C implicating the contribution of a DAG-dependent but PKC-independent pathway in the activation of ERK in CTL clones. Chronic exposure to phorbol ester down-regulates the expression of DAG-responsive PKC isoforms; however, this treatment of CTL clones does not inhibit anti-CD3-induced activation of MAPK. Phorbol ester-treated cells have reduced expression of several isoforms of PKC but still express the recently described DAG-binding Ras guanylnucleotide-releasing protein. These results indicate that the late phase of MAPK activation in CTL clones in response to immobilized anti-CD3 stimulation requires PKC while the early phase requires a DAG-dependent, BIM-resistant component.

  9. Analysis of the Key Elements of FFAT-Like Motifs Identifies New Proteins That Potentially Bind VAP on the ER, Including Two AKAPs and FAPP2

    PubMed Central

    Mikitova, Veronika; Levine, Timothy P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Two phenylalanines (FF) in an acidic tract (FFAT)-motifs were originally described as having seven elements: an acidic flanking region followed by 6 residues (EFFDA–E). Such motifs are found in several lipid transfer protein (LTP) families, and they interact with a protein on the cytosolic face of the ER called vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein (VAP). Mutation of which causes ER stress and motor neuron disease, making it important to determine which proteins bind VAP. Among other proteins that bind VAP, some contain FFAT-like motifs that are missing one or more of the seven elements. Defining how much variation is tolerated in FFAT-like motifs is a preliminary step prior to the identification of the full range of VAP interactors. Results We used a quantifiable in vivo system that measured ER targeting in a reporter yeast strain that over-expressed VAP to study the effect of substituting different elements of FFAT-like motifs in turn. By defining FFAT-like motifs more widely than before, we found them in novel proteins the functions of which had not previously been directly linked to the ER, including: two PKA anchoring proteins, AKAP220 and AKAP110; a family of plant LTPs; and the glycolipid LTP phosphatidylinositol-four-phosphate adaptor-protein-2 (FAPP-2). Conclusion All of the seven essential elements of a FFAT motif tolerate variation, and weak targeting to the ER via VAP is still detected if two elements are substituted. In addition to the strong FFAT motifs already known, there are additional proteins with weaker FFAT-like motifs, which might be functionally important VAP interactors. PMID:22276202

  10. Estrogen receptors bind to and activate the HOXC4/HoxC4 promoter to potentiate HoxC4-mediated activation-induced cytosine deaminase induction, immunoglobulin class switch DNA recombination, and somatic hypermutation.

    PubMed

    Mai, Thach; Zan, Hong; Zhang, Jinsong; Hawkins, J Seth; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2010-11-26

    Estrogen enhances antibody and autoantibody responses through yet to be defined mechanisms. It has been suggested that estrogen up-regulates the expression of activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AID), which is critical for antibody class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM), through direct activation of this gene. AID, as we have shown, is induced by the HoxC4 homeodomain transcription factor, which binds to a conserved HoxC4/Oct site in the AICDA/Aicda promoter. Here we show that estrogen-estrogen receptor (ER) complexes do not directly activate the AID gene promoter in B cells undergoing CSR. Rather, they bind to three evolutionarily conserved and cooperative estrogen response elements (EREs) we identified in the HOXC4/HoxC4 promoter. By binding to these EREs, ERs synergized with CD154 or LPS and IL-4 signaling to up-regulate HoxC4 expression, thereby inducing AID and CSR without affecting B cell proliferation or plasmacytoid differentiation. Estrogen administration in vivo significantly potentiated CSR and SHM in the specific antibody response to the 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl hapten conjugated with chicken γ-globulin. Ablation of HoxC4 (HoxC4(-/-)) abrogated the estrogen-mediated enhancement of AID gene expression and decreased CSR and SHM. Thus, estrogen enhances AID expression by activating the HOXC4/HoxC4 promoter and inducing the critical AID gene activator, HoxC4.

  11. The cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 transactivates epithelial membrane protein 2, a potential tumor suppressor in the urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Chien-Feng; Wu, Wen-Jeng; Wu, Wen-Ren; Liao, Yu-Jing; Chen, Lih-Ren; Huang, Chun-Nung; Li, Ching-Chia; Li, Wei-Ming; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Chen, Yi-Ling; Liang, Shih-Shin; Chow, Nan-Haw; Shiue, Yow-Ling

    2015-04-20

    In this study, we report that EMP2 plays a tumor suppressor role by inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest, suppressing cell viability, proliferation, colony formation/anchorage-independent cell growth via regulation of G2/M checkpoints in distinct urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma (UBUC)-derived cell lines. Genistein treatment or exogenous expression of the cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1) gene in different UBUC-derived cell lines induced EMP2 transcription and subsequent translation. Mutagenesis on either or both cAMP-responsive element(s) dramatically decreased the EMP2 promoter activity with, without genistein treatment or exogenous CREB1 expression, respectively. Significantly correlation between the EMP2 immunointensity and primary tumor, nodal status, histological grade, vascular invasion and mitotic activity was identified. Multivariate analysis further demonstrated that low EMP2 immunoexpression is an independent prognostic factor for poor disease-specific survival. Genistein treatments, knockdown of EMP2 gene and double knockdown of CREB1 and EMP2 genes significantly inhibited tumor growth and notably downregulated CREB1 and EMP2 protein levels in the mice xenograft models. Therefore, genistein induced CREB1 transcription, translation and upregulated pCREB1(S133) protein level. Afterward, pCREB1(S133) transactivated the tumor suppressor gene, EMP2, in vitro and in vivo. Our study identified a novel transcriptional target, which plays a tumor suppressor role, of CREB1.

  12. Structural Analysis of Papain-Like NlpC/P60 Superfamily Enzymes with a Circularly Permuted Topology Reveals Potential Lipid Binding Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Qingping; Rawlings, Neil D.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2012-07-11

    NlpC/P60 superfamily papain-like enzymes play important roles in all kingdoms of life. Two members of this superfamily, LRAT-like and YaeF/YiiX-like families, were predicted to contain a catalytic domain that is circularly permuted such that the catalytic cysteine is located near the C-terminus, instead of at the N-terminus. These permuted enzymes are widespread in virus, pathogenic bacteria, and eukaryotes. We determined the crystal structure of a member of the YaeF/YiiX-like family from Bacillus cereus in complex with lysine. The structure, which adopts a ligand-induced, 'closed' conformation, confirms the circular permutation of catalytic residues. A comparative analysis of other related protein structures within the NlpC/P60 superfamily is presented. Permutated NlpC/P60 enzymes contain a similar conserved core and arrangement of catalytic residues, including a Cys/His-containing triad and an additional conserved tyrosine. More surprisingly, permuted enzymes have a hydrophobic S1 binding pocket that is distinct from previously characterized enzymes in the family, indicative of novel substrate specificity. Further analysis of a structural homolog, YiiX (PDB 2if6) identified a fatty acid in the conserved hydrophobic pocket, thus providing additional insights into possible function of these novel enzymes.

  13. Diagnostic potential of Fasciola gigantica-derived 14.5 kDa fatty acid binding protein in the immunodiagnosis of bubaline fascioliasis.

    PubMed

    Allam, G; Bauomy, I R; Hemyeda, Z M; Diab, T M; Sakran, T F

    2013-06-01

    The 14.5 kDa fatty acid binding protein (FABP) was isolated from the crude extract of adult Fasciola gigantica worms. Polyclonal anti-FABP IgG was generated in rabbits immunized with prepared FABP antigen. Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was applied to detect coproantigen in stools and circulating Fasciola antigen (CA) in sera of 126 water buffaloes by using purified and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated anti-FABP IgG. Sandwich ELISA sensitivity was 96.97% and 94.95%; while specificity was 94.12% and 82.35% for coproantigen and CA detection, respectively. However, sensitivity and specificity of the Kato-Katz technique was 73.74% and 100%, respectively. The diagnostic efficacy of sandwich ELISA was 96.55% and 93.1% for coproantigen and CA detection, respectively. In contrast, the diagnostic efficacy of the Kato-Katz technique was 77.59%. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that the purified 14.5 kDa FABP provides a more suitable antigen for immunodiagnosis of early and current bubaline fascioliasis by using sandwich ELISA.

  14. Tumor-promoting function of single nucleotide polymorphism rs1836724 (C3388T) alters multiple potential legitimate microRNA binding sites at the 3'-untranslated region of ErbB4 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Fatemeh; Mesrian Tanha, Hamzeh; Mojtabavi Naeini, Marjan; Ghaedi, Kamran; Azadeh, Mansoureh

    2016-05-01

    ErbB4 can act as either a tumor-suppressor gene or an oncogene in breast cancer. Multiple genetic factors including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) affect gene expression patterns. Multiple 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) SNPs reside within the target binding site of microRNAs, which can strengthen or weaken binding to target genes. The present study aimed to predict potential 3'‑UTR variants of ErbB4 that alter the target binding site of microRNAs (miRNAs) and to clarify the association of the potential variant with the risk of developing breast cancer. In silico prediction was performed to identify potential functional SNPs within miRNA target binding sites in the 3'‑UTR of ErbB4. Thus, 146 patients and controls were genotyped using restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction. In addition to the Cochran-Armitage test for trend, allele and genotype frequency differences were determined to investigate the association between rs1836724 and the susceptibility to breast cancer. Bioinformatics analysis identified rs1836724 to be a polymorphism in the seed region of four miRNA binding sites (hsa-miR335-5p, hsa-miR-28-5p, has‑miR‑708‑5p and has‑miR‑665), which may participate in the development of breast cancer. Logistic regression data indicated that the T allele of the polymorphism [OR (95% CI)=1.72 (1.056‑2.808), P=0.029] is associated with the risk of breast cancer. Using bioinformatics tools, a correlation was indicated between the presence of the T allele and a reduction in ErbB4 RNA silencing based on miRNA interaction. Furthermore, case subgroup data analysis revealed an association between the C/T genotype and an ER positive phenotype [OR (95% CI)=6.00 (1.082‑33.274), P=0.028] compared with the T/T genotype. ErbB4 and estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) are regulated by identical miRNAs thus there may be a competition for binding sites. Due to this pattern, if the interaction between miRNAs with one gene is reduced, it

  15. DIPA-family coiled-coils bind conserved isoform-specific head domain of p120-catenin family: potential roles in hydrocephalus and heterotopia

    PubMed Central

    Markham, Nicholas O.; Doll, Caleb A.; Dohn, Michael R.; Miller, Rachel K.; Yu, Huapeng; Coffey, Robert J.; McCrea, Pierre D.; Gamse, Joshua T.; Reynolds, Albert B.

    2014-01-01

    p120-catenin (p120) modulates adherens junction (AJ) dynamics by controlling the stability of classical cadherins. Among all p120 isoforms, p120-3A and p120-1A are the most prevalent. Both stabilize cadherins, but p120-3A is preferred in epithelia, whereas p120-1A takes precedence in neurons, fibroblasts, and macrophages. During epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, E- to N-cadherin switching coincides with p120-3A to -1A alternative splicing. These isoforms differ by a 101–amino acid “head domain” comprising the p120-1A N-terminus. Although its exact role is unknown, the head domain likely mediates developmental and cancer-associated events linked to p120-1A expression (e.g., motility, invasion, metastasis). Here we identified delta-interacting protein A (DIPA) as the first head domain–specific binding partner and candidate mediator of isoform 1A activity. DIPA colocalizes with AJs in a p120-1A- but not 3A-dependent manner. Moreover, all DIPA family members (Ccdc85a, Ccdc85b/DIPA, and Ccdc85c) interact reciprocally with p120 family members (p120, δ-catenin, p0071, and ARVCF), suggesting significant functional overlap. During zebrafish neural tube development, both knockdown and overexpression of DIPA phenocopy N-cadherin mutations, an effect bearing functional ties to a reported mouse hydrocephalus phenotype associated with Ccdc85c. These studies identify a novel, highly conserved interaction between two protein families that may participate either individually or collectively in N-cadherin–mediated development. PMID:25009281

  16. Dual role of fatty acid-binding protein 5 on endothelial cell fate: a potential link between lipid metabolism and angiogenic responses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chen-Wei; Liang, Xiaoliang; Lipsky, Samantha; Karaaslan, Cagatay; Kozakewich, Harry; Hotamisligil, Gokhan S; Bischoff, Joyce; Cataltepe, Sule

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABP) are small molecular mass intracellular lipid chaperones that are expressed in a tissue-specific manner with some overlaps. FABP4 and FABP5 share ~55 % amino acid sequence homology and demonstrate synergistic effects in regulation of metabolic and inflammatory responses in adipocytes and macrophages. Recent studies have shown that FABP4 and FABP5 are also co-expressed in a subset of endothelial cells (EC). FABP4, which has a primarily microvascular distribution, enhances angiogenic responses of ECs, including proliferation, migration, and survival. However, the vascular expression of FABP5 has not been well characterized, and the role of FABP5 in regulation of angiogenic responses in ECs has not been studied to date. Herein we report that while FABP4 and FABP5 are co-expressed in microvascular ECs in several tissues, FABP5 expression is also detected in ECs of larger blood vessels. In contrast to FABP4, EC-FABP5 levels are not induced by VEGF-A or bFGF. FABP5 deficiency leads to a profound impairment in EC proliferation and chemotactic migration. These effects are recapitulated in an ex vivo assay of angiogenesis, the aortic ring assay. Interestingly, in contrast to FABP4-deficient ECs, FABP5-deficient ECs are significantly more resistant to apoptotic cell death. The effect of FABP5 on EC proliferation and survival is mediated, only in part, by PPARδ-dependent pathways. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that EC-FABP5, similar to EC-FABP4, promotes angiogenic responses under certain conditions, but it can also exert opposing effects on EC survival as compared to EC-FABP4. Thus, the balance between FABP4 and FABP5 in ECs may be important in regulation of angiogenic versus quiescent phenotypes in blood vessels.

  17. A platform to screen for C-type lectin receptor-binding carbohydrates and their potential for cell-specific targeting and immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Maglinao, Maha; Eriksson, Magdalena; Schlegel, Mark K; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Johannssen, Timo; Götze, Sebastian; Seeberger, Peter H; Lepenies, Bernd

    2014-02-10

    Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) in innate immunity represent a superfamily of pattern recognition receptors that recognize carbohydrate structures on pathogens and self-antigens. The primary interaction of an antigen-presenting cell and a pathogen shapes the following immune response. Therefore, the identification of CLR ligands that can either enhance or modulate the immune response is of interest. We have developed a screening platform based on glycan arrays to identify immune modulatory carbohydrate ligands of CLRs. A comprehensive library of CLRs was expressed by fusing the extracellular part of each respective CLR, the part containing the carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD), to the Fc fragment of human IgG1 molecules. CLR-Fc fusion proteins display the CRD in a dimeric form, are properly glycosylated, and can be detected by a secondary antibody with a conjugated fluorophore. Thus, they are valuable tools for high-throughput screening. We were able to identify novel carbohydrate binders of CLRs using the glycan array technology. These CLR-binding carbohydrates were then covalently attached to the model antigen ovalbumin. The ovalbumin neoglycoconjugates were used in a dendritic cell/T cell co-culture assay to stimulate transgenic T cells in vitro. In addition, mice were immunized with these conjugates to analyze the immune modulatory properties of the CLR ligands in vivo. The CLR ligands induced an increased Th1 cytokine production in vitro and modulated the humoral response in vivo. The platform described here allows for the identification of CLR ligands, as well as the evaluation of each ligand's cell-specific targeting and immune modulatory properties.

  18. Colorimetry and constant-potential coulometry determinations of transferrin-bound iron, total iron-binding capacity, and total iron in serum containing iron-dextran, with use of sodium dithionite and alumina columns.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, J C; Alexander, N M

    1990-10-01

    After the parenteral administration of iron-dextran (imferon), the increased total iron concentrations in serum can be determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy and by colorimetric methods involving sodium dithionite, which reductively dissociates iron from the dextran complex. We report that constant-potential coulometry detects only about 55-70% of dextran-bound iron before dithionite reduction and variable amounts after reaction with the reducing agent. In addition, we have developed a procedure for determining transferrin-bound iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), total iron, and dextran-bound iron with the Kodak Ektachem colorimetric system. In determining total serum iron, the sample is first mixed with sodium dithionite, which rapidly dissociates all dextran-bound iron, but does not remove iron from either transferrin or hemoglobin. After the mixture is applied to an Ektachem slide, transferrin-bound iron is released at pH 4 and is detected together with the iron previously bound to dextran. TIBC is determined by mixing serum with ferric citrate in moderate excess and filtering through a small alumina (Al2O3) column, which binds excess free iron and iron-dextran; the iron in the column eluate represents the TIBC. Transferrin-bound iron is determined by applying diluted serum without added ferric citrate to an alumina column and measuring the iron in the column eluate. Dextran-bound iron is equivalent to the difference between total and transferrin-bound iron. Using this method, we found that transferrin iron-binding sites are saturated in vitro by excess iron-dextran less efficiently than by ferric citrate.

  19. Theoretical insight into the binding energy and detonation performance of ε-, γ-, β-CL-20 cocrystals with β-HMX, FOX-7, and DMF in different molar ratios, as well as electrostatic potential.

    PubMed

    Feng, Rui-Zhi; Zhang, Shu-Hai; Ren, Fu-de; Gou, Rui-Jun; Gao, Li

    2016-06-01

    Molecular dynamics method was employed to study the binding energies on the selected crystal planes of the ε-, γ-, β-conformation 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (ε-, γ-, β-CL-20) cocrystal explosives with 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethylene (FOX-7), 1,3,5,7-tetranitro- 1,3,5,7-tetrazacyclooctane with β-conformation (β-HMX) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) in different molar ratios. The oxygen balance, density, detonation velocity, detonation pressure, and surface electrostatic potential were analyzed. The results indicate that the binding energies E b (*) and stabilities are in the order of 1:1 > 2:1 > 3:1 > 5:1 > 8:1 (CL-20:FOX-7/β-HMX/DMF). The values of E b (*) and stabilities of the energetic-nonenergetic CL-20/DMF cocrystals are far larger than those of the energetic-energetic CL-20/FOX-7 and CL-20/β-HMX, and those of CL-20/β-HMX are the smallest. For CL-20/FOX-7 and CL-20/β-HMX, the largest E b (*) appears in the cocrystals with the 1:1, 1:2 or 1:3 molar ratio, and the stabilities of the cocrystals with the excess ratio of CL-20 are weaker than those in the cocrystals with the excess ratio of FOX-7 or β-HMX. In CL-20/FOX-7, CL-20 prefers adopting the γ-form, and ε-CL-20 is the preference in CL-20/β-HMX, and ε-CL-20 and β-CL-20 can be found in CL-20/DMF. The CL-20/FOX-7 and CL-20/β-HMX cocrystals with low molar ratios can meet the requirements of low sensitive high energetic materials. Surface electrostatic potential reveals the nature of the sensitivity change upon the cocrystal formation. Graphical Abstract MD method was employed to study the binding energies on the selected crystal planes in the ε-, γ-, β-CL-20 cocrystals with FOX-7, β-HMX and DMF in different molar ratios. Surface electrostatic potential reveals the nature of the sensitivity change in cocrystals. PMID:27168198

  20. Theoretical insight into the binding energy and detonation performance of ε-, γ-, β-CL-20 cocrystals with β-HMX, FOX-7, and DMF in different molar ratios, as well as electrostatic potential.

    PubMed

    Feng, Rui-Zhi; Zhang, Shu-Hai; Ren, Fu-de; Gou, Rui-Jun; Gao, Li

    2016-06-01

    Molecular dynamics method was employed to study the binding energies on the selected crystal planes of the ε-, γ-, β-conformation 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (ε-, γ-, β-CL-20) cocrystal explosives with 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethylene (FOX-7), 1,3,5,7-tetranitro- 1,3,5,7-tetrazacyclooctane with β-conformation (β-HMX) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) in different molar ratios. The oxygen balance, density, detonation velocity, detonation pressure, and surface electrostatic potential were analyzed. The results indicate that the binding energies E b (*) and stabilities are in the order of 1:1 > 2:1 > 3:1 > 5:1 > 8:1 (CL-20:FOX-7/β-HMX/DMF). The values of E b (*) and stabilities of the energetic-nonenergetic CL-20/DMF cocrystals are far larger than those of the energetic-energetic CL-20/FOX-7 and CL-20/β-HMX, and those of CL-20/β-HMX are the smallest. For CL-20/FOX-7 and CL-20/β-HMX, the largest E b (*) appears in the cocrystals with the 1:1, 1:2 or 1:3 molar ratio, and the stabilities of the cocrystals with the excess ratio of CL-20 are weaker than those in the cocrystals with the excess ratio of FOX-7 or β-HMX. In CL-20/FOX-7, CL-20 prefers adopting the γ-form, and ε-CL-20 is the preference in CL-20/β-HMX, and ε-CL-20 and β-CL-20 can be found in CL-20/DMF. The CL-20/FOX-7 and CL-20/β-HMX cocrystals with low molar ratios can meet the requirements of low sensitive high energetic materials. Surface electrostatic potential reveals the nature of the sensitivity change upon the cocrystal formation. Graphical Abstract MD method was employed to study the binding energies on the selected crystal planes in the ε-, γ-, β-CL-20 cocrystals with FOX-7, β-HMX and DMF in different molar ratios. Surface electrostatic potential reveals the nature of the sensitivity change in cocrystals.

  1. ZNF555 protein binds to transcriptional activator site of 4qA allele and ANT1: potential implication in Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Elena; Rich, Jeremy; Karoutas, Adam; Tarlykov, Pavel; Cochet, Emilie; Malysheva, Daria; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Ogryzko, Vasily; Pirozhkova, Iryna

    2015-09-30

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is an epi/genetic satellite disease associated with at least two satellite sequences in 4q35: (i) D4Z4 macrosatellite and (ii) β-satellite repeats (BSR), a prevalent part of the 4qA allele. Most of the recent FSHD studies have been focused on a DUX4 transcript inside D4Z4 and its tandem contraction in FSHD patients. However, the D4Z4-contraction alone is not pathological, which would also require the 4qA allele. Since little is known about BSR, we investigated the 4qA BSR functional role in the transcriptional control of the FSHD region 4q35. We have shown that an individual BSR possesses enhancer activity leading to activation of the Adenine Nucleotide Translocator 1 gene (ANT1), a major FSHD candidate gene. We have identified ZNF555, a previously uncharacterized protein, as a putative transcriptional factor highly expressed in human primary myoblasts that interacts with the BSR enhancer site and impacts the ANT1 promoter activity in FSHD myoblasts. The discovery of the functional role of the 4qA allele and ZNF555 in the transcriptional control of ANT1 advances our understanding of FSHD pathogenesis and provides potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26184877

  2. ZNF555 protein binds to transcriptional activator site of 4qA allele and ANT1: potential implication in Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Elena; Rich, Jeremy; Karoutas, Adam; Tarlykov, Pavel; Cochet, Emilie; Malysheva, Daria; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Ogryzko, Vasily; Pirozhkova, Iryna

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is an epi/genetic satellite disease associated with at least two satellite sequences in 4q35: (i) D4Z4 macrosatellite and (ii) β-satellite repeats (BSR), a prevalent part of the 4qA allele. Most of the recent FSHD studies have been focused on a DUX4 transcript inside D4Z4 and its tandem contraction in FSHD patients. However, the D4Z4-contraction alone is not pathological, which would also require the 4qA allele. Since little is known about BSR, we investigated the 4qA BSR functional role in the transcriptional control of the FSHD region 4q35. We have shown that an individual BSR possesses enhancer activity leading to activation of the Adenine Nucleotide Translocator 1 gene (ANT1), a major FSHD candidate gene. We have identified ZNF555, a previously uncharacterized protein, as a putative transcriptional factor highly expressed in human primary myoblasts that interacts with the BSR enhancer site and impacts the ANT1 promoter activity in FSHD myoblasts. The discovery of the functional role of the 4qA allele and ZNF555 in the transcriptional control of ANT1 advances our understanding of FSHD pathogenesis and provides potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26184877

  3. Potentiating the cellular targeting and anti-tumor activity of Dp44mT via binding to human serum albumin: two saturable mechanisms of Dp44mT uptake by cells

    PubMed Central

    Merlot, Angelica M.; Sahni, Sumit; Lane, Darius J.R.; Fordham, Ashleigh M.; Pantarat, Namfon; Hibbs, David E.; Richardson, Vera; Doddareddy, Munikumar R.; Ong, Jennifer A.; Huang, Michael L.H.

    2015-01-01

    Di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT) demonstrates potent anti-cancer activity. We previously demonstrated that 14C-Dp44mT enters and targets cells through a carrier/receptor-mediated uptake process. Despite structural similarity, 2-benzoylpyridine 4-ethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Bp4eT) and pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone (PIH) enter cells via passive diffusion. Considering albumin alters the uptake of many drugs, we examined the effect of human serum albumin (HSA) on the cellular uptake of Dp44mT, Bp4eT and PIH. Chelator-HSA binding studies demonstrated the following order of relative affinity: Bp4eT≈PIH>Dp44mT. Interestingly, HSA decreased Bp4eT and PIH uptake, potentially due to its high affinity for the ligands. In contrast, HSA markedly stimulated Dp44mT uptake by cells, with two saturable uptake mechanisms identified. The first mechanism saturated at 5-10 μM (Bmax:1.20±0.04 × 107 molecules/cell; Kd:33±3 μM) and was consistent with a previously identified Dp44mT receptor/carrier. The second mechanism was of lower affinity, but higher capacity (Bmax:2.90±0.12 × 107 molecules/cell; Kd:65±6 μM), becoming saturated at 100 μM and was only evident in the presence of HSA. This second saturable Dp44mT uptake process was inhibited by excess HSA and had characteristics suggesting it was mediated by a specific binding site. Significantly, the HSA-mediated increase in the targeting of Dp44mT to cancer cells potentiated apoptosis and could be important for enhancing efficacy. PMID:25848850

  4. Potentiation of the synergistic activities of chitinases ChiA, ChiB and ChiC from Serratia marcescens CFFSUR-B2 by chitobiase (Chb) and chitin binding protein (CBP).

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Román, Martha Ingrid; Dunn, Michael F; Tinoco-Valencia, Raunel; Holguín-Meléndez, Francisco; Huerta-Palacios, Graciela; Guillén-Navarro, Karina

    2014-01-01

    With the goal of understanding the chitinolytic mechanism of the potential biological control strain Serratia marcescens CFFSUR-B2, genes encoding chitinases ChiA, ChiB and ChiC, chitobiase (Chb) and chitin binding protein (CBP) were cloned, the protein products overexpressed in Escherichia coli as 6His-Sumo fusion proteins and purified by affinity chromatography. Following affinity tag removal, the chitinolytic activity of the recombinant proteins was evaluated individually and in combination using colloidal chitin as substrate. ChiB and ChiC were highly active while ChiA was inactive. Reactions containing both ChiB and ChiC showed significantly increased N-acetylglucosamine trimer and dimer formation, but decreased monomer formation, compared to reactions with either enzyme alone. This suggests that while both ChiB and ChiC have a general affinity for the same substrate, they attack different sites and together degrade chitin more efficiently than either enzyme separately. Chb and CBP in combination with ChiB and ChiC (individually or together) increased their chitinase activity. We report for the first time the potentiating effect of Chb on the activity of the chitinases and the synergistic activity of a mixture of all five proteins (the three chitinases, Chb and CBP). These results contribute to our understanding of the mechanism of action of the chitinases produced by strain CFFSUR-B2 and provide a molecular basis for its high potential as a biocontrol agent against fungal pathogens.

  5. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is transcriptionally induced by the Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1) and can be inhibited with Iressa in basal-like breast cancer, providing a potential target for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stratford, Anna L; Habibi, Golareh; Astanehe, Arezoo; Jiang, Helen; Hu, Kaiji; Park, Eugene; Shadeo, Ashleen; Buys, Timon PH; Lam, Wan; Pugh, Trevor; Marra, Marco; Nielsen, Torsten O; Klinge, Uwe; Mertens, Peter R; Aparicio, Samuel; Dunn, Sandra E

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Basal-like breast cancers (BLBCs) are very aggressive, and present serious clinical challenges as there are currently no targeted therapies available. We determined the regulatory role of Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1) on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression in BLBC, and the therapeutic potential of inhibiting EGFR. We pursued this in light of our recent work showing that YB-1 induces the expression of EGFR, a new BLBC marker. Methods Primary tumour tissues were evaluated for YB1 protein expression by immunostaining tissue microarrays, while copy number changes were assessed by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). The ability of YB-1 to regulate EGFR was evaluated using luciferase reporter, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and gel shift assays. The impact of Iressa on monolayer cell growth was measured using an ArrayScan VTI high-throughput analyser to count cell number, and colony formation in soft agar was used to measure anchorage-independent growth. Results YB-1 (27/37 or 73% of cases, P = 3.899 × 10-4) and EGFR (20/37 or 57.1% of cases, P = 9.206 × 10-12) are expressed in most cases of BLBC. However, they are not typically amplified in primary BLBC, suggesting overexpression owing to transcriptional activation. In support of this, we demonstrate that YB-1 promotes EGFR reporter activity. YB-1 specifically binds the EGFR promoter at two different YB-1-responsive elements (YREs) located at -940 and -968 using ChIP and gel shift assays in a manner that is dependent on the phosphorylation of S102 on YB-1. Inhibiting EGFR with Iressa suppressed the growth of SUM149 cells by ~40% in monolayer, independent of mutations in the receptor. More importantly anchorage-independent growth of BLBC cell lines was inhibited with combinations of Iressa and YB-1 suppression. Conclusion We have identified for the first time a causal link for the expression of EGFR in BLBC through the induction by YB-1 where it binds specifically to two

  6. Spectroscopic investigation of the binding interactions of a membrane potential molecule in various supramolecular confined environments: contrasting behavior of surfactant molecules in relocation or release of the probe between nanocarriers and DNA surface.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Surajit; Banik, Debasis; Roy, Arpita; Kundu, Niloy; Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2014-12-01

    The fluorescence and optical properties of membrane potential probes are widely used to measure cellular transmembrane potentials. Hemicyanine dyes are also able to bind to membranes. The spectral properties of these molecules depend upon the charge shift from the donor moiety to the acceptor moiety. Changes in their spectral properties, i.e. absorption and emission maxima or intensities, are helpful in characterizing model membranes, microheterogeneous media, etc. In this article, we have demonstrated the binding interaction of a membrane potential probe, 1-ethyl-2-(4-(p-dimethylaminophenyl)-1,3-butadienyl)-pyridinium perchlorate (LDS 698), with various supramolecular confined environments. The larger dipole moment in the ground state compared to the excited state is a unique feature of hemicyanine dyes. Due to this unique feature, red shifts in the absorption maxima are observed in hydrophobic environments, compared with bulk solvent. On addition of surfactants and CT DNA to an aqueous solution containing LDS 698, significant increase in the emission intensity along with the quantum yield and lifetime indicate partition of the probe molecules into organized assemblies. In the case of the sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-water system, due to interactions between the cationic LDS 698 and the anionic dodecyl sulfate moiety, the fluorescence intensity at ∼666 nm decreases and an additional peak at ∼590 nm appears at premicellar concentration (∼0.20 mM-4.50 mM). But at ∼5.50 mM SDS concentration, the absorbance in the higher wavelength region increases again, indicating encapsulation of the probe in micellar aggregates. This observation indicates that the premicellar aggregation behavior of SDS can also be judged by observing the changes in the UV-vis and fluorescence spectral patterns. The temperature dependent study also indicates that non-radiative deactivation of the dye molecules is highly restricted in the DNA micro-environment, compared with micelles

  7. Insights into the relationship between the haem-binding pocket and the redox potential of c6 cytochromes: four atomic resolution structures of c6 and c6-like proteins from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002.

    PubMed

    Bialek, Wojciech; Krzywda, Szymon; Zatwarnicki, Pawel; Jaskolski, Mariusz; Kolesinski, Piotr; Szczepaniak, Andrzej

    2014-11-01

    The structure of cytochrome c6C from the mesophilic cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 has been determined at 1.03 Å resolution. This is the first structural report on the recently discovered cyanobacterial cytochrome c6-like proteins found in marine and nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. Despite high similarity in the overall three-dimensional fold between cytochromes c6 and c6C, the latter shows saliently different electrostatic properties in terms of surface charge distribution and dipole moments. Its midpoint redox potential is less than half of the value for typical c6 cytochromes and results mainly from the substitution of one residue in the haem pocket. Here, high-resolution crystal structures of mutants of both cytochromes c6 and c6C are presented, and the impact of the mutation of specific residues in the haem-binding pocket on the redox potential is discussed. These findings contribute to the elucidation of the structure-function relationship of c6-like cytochromes.

  8. Ion-pair binding: is binding both binding better?

    PubMed

    Roelens, Stefano; Vacca, Alberto; Francesconi, Oscar; Venturi, Chiara

    2009-08-17

    It is often tempting to explain chemical phenomena on the basis of intuitive principles, but this practice can frequently lead to biased analysis of data and incorrect conclusions. One such intuitive principle is brought into play in the binding of salts by synthetic receptors. Following the heuristic concept that "binding both is binding better", it is widely believed that ditopic receptors capable of binding both ionic partners of a salt are more effective than monotopic receptors because of a cooperative effect. Using a newly designed ditopic receptor and a generalized binding descriptor, we show here that, when the problem is correctly formulated and the appropriate algorithm is derived, the cooperativity principle is neither general nor predictable, and that competition between ion binding and ion pairing may even lead to inhibition rather than enhancement of the binding of an ion to a ditopic receptor.

  9. Analyzing binding data.

    PubMed

    Motulsky, Harvey J; Neubig, Richard R

    2010-07-01

    Measuring the rate and extent of radioligand binding provides information on the number of binding sites, and their affinity and accessibility of these binding sites for various drugs. This unit explains how to design and analyze such experiments.

  10. Experimental and computational approaches of a novel methyl (2E)-2-{[N-(2-formylphenyl)(4-methylbenzene)sulfonamido]methyl}-3-(4-chlorophenyl)prop-2-enoate: A potential antimicrobial agent and an inhibition of penicillin-binding protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugavel, S.; Vetri velan, V.; Kannan, Damodharan; Bakthadoss, Manickam

    2016-07-01

    The title compound methyl(2E)-2-{[N-(2-formylphenyl) (4-methylbenzene)sulfonamido]methyl}-3-(4-chlorophenyl) prop-2-enoate (MFMSC) has been synthesized and single crystals were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature. Structural and vibrational spectroscopic studies were carried out by using single crystal X-ray diffraction, FT-IR and NMR spectral analysis together with DFT method using GAUSSIAN'03 software. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out by VEDA program. NBO analysis, Mulliken charge analysis, HOMO-LUMO, MEP, Global chemical reactivity descriptors and thermodynamic properties have been analyzed. The hyperpolarisability calculation reveals the present material has a reasonably good propensity for nonlinear optical activity. The obtained antimicrobial activity results indicate that the compound shows good to moderate activity against all tested bacterial and fungal pathogens. A computational study was also carried out to predict the drug-likeness and ADMET properties of the title compound. Due to the different potential biological activity of the title compound, molecular docking study is also reported and the compound might exhibit inhibitory activity against penicillin-binding protein PBP-2X.

  11. The influence of measurement uncertainties on the evaluation of the distribution volume ratio and binding potential in rat studies on a microPET® R4: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sossi, Vesna; Camborde, Marie-Laure; Tropini, Giorgia; Newport, Danny; Rahmim, Arman; Doudet, Doris J.; Ruth, Thomas J.

    2005-06-01

    In small animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, the injectable radiotracer dose is often limited by the tracer mass which, together with the tracer kinetics and scanner sensitivity, dictates the statistical quality of the time activity curves (TACs) used to extract biological parameters. We investigated the effect of measurement uncertainty on the determination of the distribution volume ratio (DVR) and binding potential (BP) as estimated using the tissue input Logan (DVRL, BPL) and the ratio (DVRr, BPr) methods for two tracers, with the Concorde microPET® R4 camera. Parameters' coefficients of variation (COV) were estimated from a combination of rat and phantom data. For 11C-dihydrotetrabenazine, the COV was 11% for the BPL and 13.4% for the BPr when using TACs obtained from individual regions of interest (ROIs) and segmented attenuation correction. The COVs were reduced to 7.5% (BPL) and 8.6% (BPr) when the striatal and cerebellar TACs were estimated as averages of 3 and 2 ROIs respectively. Results obtained for 11C-methylphenidate (MP) yielded approximately 30% higher COVs. With measured attenuation correction, the COVs were on average 100% higher. The presented method can be used to examine the contribution of a variety of imaging conditions to the uncertainty of biologically meaningful parameters.

  12. Carboplatin binding to histidine

    SciTech Connect

    Tanley, Simon W. M.; Diederichs, Kay; Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J.; Levy, Colin; Schreurs, Antoine M. M.; Helliwell, John R.

    2014-08-29

    An X-ray crystal structure showing the binding of purely carboplatin to histidine in a model protein has finally been obtained. This required extensive crystallization trials and various novel crystal structure analyses. Carboplatin is a second-generation platinum anticancer agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine (in hen egg-white lysozyme; HEWL) showed the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high NaCl concentration used in the crystallization conditions. HEWL co-crystallizations with carboplatin in NaBr conditions have now been carried out to confirm whether carboplatin converts to the bromine form and whether this takes place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin observed previously in NaCl conditions. Here, it is reported that a partial chemical transformation takes place but to a transplatin form. Thus, to attempt to resolve purely carboplatin binding at histidine, this study utilized co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin without NaCl to eliminate the partial chemical conversion of carboplatin. Tetragonal HEWL crystals co-crystallized with carboplatin were successfully obtained in four different conditions, each at a different pH value. The structural results obtained show carboplatin bound to either one or both of the N atoms of His15 of HEWL, and this particular variation was dependent on the concentration of anions in the crystallization mixture and the elapsed time, as well as the pH used. The structural details of the bound carboplatin molecule also differed between them. Overall, the most detailed crystal structure showed the majority of the carboplatin atoms bound to the platinum centre; however, the four-carbon ring structure of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate moiety (CBDC) remained elusive. The potential impact of the results for the administration of carboplatin as an anticancer agent are described.

  13. Phospholipase A2 and 3H-hemicholinium-3 binding sites in rat brain: A potential second-messenger role for fatty acids in the regulation of high-affinity choline uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Saltarelli, M.D.; Yamada, K.; Coyle, J.T. )

    1990-01-01

    The involvement of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and fatty acid release in the regulation of sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake in rat brain was assessed in vitro through the use of the specific binding of 3H-hemicholinium-3 (3H-HCh-3). Addition of arachidonic acid and other unsaturated fatty acids to rat striatal membranes in vitro resulted in a dose-dependent, temperature-independent activation of 3H-HCh-3 binding. Scatchard analysis revealed that these changes in binding result from a 2-fold increase in the affinity and capacity of 3H-HCh-3 binding. Saturated fatty acids, lysophospholipids, and phospholipids did not affect specific 3H-HCh-3 binding. Addition of defatted BSA to membranes, which had been treated previously with arachidonic acid, completely reversed the increase in specific 3H-HCh-3 binding. However, several inhibitors of fatty acid metabolism, including nordihydroguaiaretic acid, indomethacin, catalase, and superoxide dismutase, did not alter arachidonic acid-induced changes in 3H-HCh-3 binding, suggesting that unsaturated fatty acids, and not their metabolites, are directly responsible for the observed activation of specific 3H-HCh-3 binding. Additionally, unsaturated fatty acids dose-dependently inhibited high-affinity 3H-choline uptake in rat striatal synaptosomes, apparently due to the disruption of synaptosomal integrity. The phospholipase A2 inhibitors quinacrine hydrochloride, trifluoperazine, and 4-bromophenacylbromide dose-dependently inhibited potassium depolarization-induced activation of specific 3H-HCh-3 binding in slices of rat brain in vitro. Similarly, both quinacrine and trifluoperazine inhibited the metabolism of phospholipids and the release of fatty acids evoked by either elevated KCl or calcium ionophore A23187.

  14. Concentrations of metals and potential metal-binding compounds and speciation of Cd, Zn and Cu in phloem and xylem saps from castor bean plants (Ricinus communis) treated with four levels of cadmium.

    PubMed

    Hazama, Kenji; Nagata, Shinji; Fujimori, Tamaki; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Yoneyama, Tadakatsu

    2015-06-01

    We examined the concentrations of metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Fe and Mn) and potential metal-binding compounds [nicotianamine (NA), thiol compounds and citrate] in xylem and phloem saps from 4-week-old castor bean plants (Ricinus communis) treated with 0 (control), 0.1, 1.0, and 10 μM Cd for 3 weeks. Treatment with 0.1 and 1 μM Cd produced no visible damage, while 10 μM Cd retarded growth. Cadmium concentrations in both saps were higher than those in the culture solution at 0.1 μM, similar at 1.0 μM and lower at 10 μM. Cd at 10 μM reduced Cu and Fe concentrations in both saps. NA concentrations measured by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (MS) in xylem sap (20 μM) were higher than the Cu concentrations, and those in phloem sap (150 μM) were higher than those of Zn, Fe and Cu combined. Reduced glutathione concentrations differed in xylem and phloem saps (1-2 and 30-150 μM, respectively), but oxidized glutathione concentrations were similar. Phloem sap phytochelatin 2 concentration increased from 0.8 μM in controls to 8 μM in 10 μM Cd. Free citrate was 2-4 μM in xylem sap and 70-100 μM in phloem sap. Total bound forms of Cd in phloem and xylem saps from 1 μM Cd-treated plants were 54 and 8%, respectively. Treatment of phloem sap with proteinaseK reduced high-molecular compounds while increasing fractions of low-molecular Cd-thiol complexes. Zinc-NA, Fe-NA and Cu-NA were identified in the phloem sap fraction of control plants by electrospray ionization time-of-flight MS, and the xylem sap contained Cu-NA.

  15. Functional screen for secreted proteins by monoclonal antibody library and identification of Mac-2 Binding protein (Mac-2BP) as a potential therapeutic target and biomarker for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lichao; Chen, Lizhao; Sun, Lixin; Pan, Jian; Yu, Long; Han, LuLu; Yang, Zhihua; Luo, Yuanming; Ran, Yuliang

    2013-02-01

    Identification of secreted proteins of lung cancer could provide new candidates of serum biomarkers for cancer diagnosis or targets for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we developed a novel strategy that combined functional monoclonal antibody library screening technique and mass spectrometry to identify functional secreted proteins. BALB/c mice were immunized with cancer cells isolated from fresh human lung cancer tissues. The monoclonal antibody library containing 1160 mAbs was established with the mouse spleen cells, whose serum had most anti-proliferative effect on lung cancer cells. Monoclonal antibodies were subjected to an immunoreactive and functional screen and monoclonal antibodies that reacted strongly with secreted proteins in condition medium and lung cancer tissues with high inhibotion of cell proliferation were selected. Antigens that recognized by antibodies were obtained by immunoprecipitation and then identified by mass spectrometry. Mac-2-binding protein (Mac-2BP), the antigen of 13H3 antibody, was identified using this approach. Functional studies demonstrated that the 13H3 antibody suppressed lung cancer cell lines ANIP-973 and A549 proliferation in vitro and inhibit ANIP973 xenograft tumors growth in vivo by inducing cell-cycle arrest at G1 phase, with up-regulation of p27 and down-regulation of cyclin D1. Moreover, the serum level of Mac-2BP was significantly higher in lung cancer patients than healthy controls. At a cutoff value of 6 μg/ml, Mac-2BP might be a diagnostic biomarker of lung cancer, especially for SCLC. Mac-2BP concentrations of 6 μg/ml or higher was associated with poor overall survival in univariate analysis, and was an independent predictor in the multivariate COX analysis. Together, these results firstly demonstrated that Mac-2BP can be used as a therapeutic target and potential biomarker for lung cancer. Our strategy is feasible, which may facilitate the identification of novel secreted biomarkers of lung cancer.

  16. Concentrations of metals and potential metal-binding compounds and speciation of Cd, Zn and Cu in phloem and xylem saps from castor bean plants (Ricinus communis) treated with four levels of cadmium.

    PubMed

    Hazama, Kenji; Nagata, Shinji; Fujimori, Tamaki; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Yoneyama, Tadakatsu

    2015-06-01

    We examined the concentrations of metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Fe and Mn) and potential metal-binding compounds [nicotianamine (NA), thiol compounds and citrate] in xylem and phloem saps from 4-week-old castor bean plants (Ricinus communis) treated with 0 (control), 0.1, 1.0, and 10 μM Cd for 3 weeks. Treatment with 0.1 and 1 μM Cd produced no visible damage, while 10 μM Cd retarded growth. Cadmium concentrations in both saps were higher than those in the culture solution at 0.1 μM, similar at 1.0 μM and lower at 10 μM. Cd at 10 μM reduced Cu and Fe concentrations in both saps. NA concentrations measured by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (MS) in xylem sap (20 μM) were higher than the Cu concentrations, and those in phloem sap (150 μM) were higher than those of Zn, Fe and Cu combined. Reduced glutathione concentrations differed in xylem and phloem saps (1-2 and 30-150 μM, respectively), but oxidized glutathione concentrations were similar. Phloem sap phytochelatin 2 concentration increased from 0.8 μM in controls to 8 μM in 10 μM Cd. Free citrate was 2-4 μM in xylem sap and 70-100 μM in phloem sap. Total bound forms of Cd in phloem and xylem saps from 1 μM Cd-treated plants were 54 and 8%, respectively. Treatment of phloem sap with proteinaseK reduced high-molecular compounds while increasing fractions of low-molecular Cd-thiol complexes. Zinc-NA, Fe-NA and Cu-NA were identified in the phloem sap fraction of control plants by electrospray ionization time-of-flight MS, and the xylem sap contained Cu-NA. PMID:25403762

  17. Functional Screen for Secreted Proteins by Monoclonal Antibody Library and Identification of Mac-2 Binding Protein (Mac-2BP) as a Potential Therapeutic Target and Biomarker for Lung Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lichao; Chen, Lizhao; Sun, Lixin; Pan, Jian; Yu, Long; Han, LuLu; Yang, Zhihua; Luo, Yuanming; Ran, Yuliang

    2013-01-01

    Identification of secreted proteins of lung cancer could provide new candidates of serum biomarkers for cancer diagnosis or targets for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we developed a novel strategy that combined functional monoclonal antibody library screening technique and mass spectrometry to identify functional secreted proteins. BALB/c mice were immunized with cancer cells isolated from fresh human lung cancer tissues. The monoclonal antibody library containing 1160 mAbs was established with the mouse spleen cells, whose serum had most anti-proliferative effect on lung cancer cells. Monoclonal antibodies were subjected to an immunoreactive and functional screen and monoclonal antibodies that reacted strongly with secreted proteins in condition medium and lung cancer tissues with high inhibotion of cell proliferation were selected. Antigens that recognized by antibodies were obtained by immunoprecipitation and then identified by mass spectrometry. Mac-2-binding protein (Mac-2BP), the antigen of 13H3 antibody, was identified using this approach. Functional studies demonstrated that the 13H3 antibody suppressed lung cancer cell lines ANIP-973 and A549 proliferation in vitro and inhibit ANIP973 xenograft tumors growth in vivo by inducing cell-cycle arrest at G1 phase, with up-regulation of p27 and down-regulation of cyclin D1. Moreover, the serum level of Mac-2BP was significantly higher in lung cancer patients than healthy controls. At a cutoff value of 6 μg/ml, Mac-2BP might be a diagnostic biomarker of lung cancer, especially for SCLC. Mac-2BP concentrations of 6 μg/ml or higher was associated with poor overall survival in univariate analysis, and was an independent predictor in the multivariate COX analysis. Together, these results firstly demonstrated that Mac-2BP can be used as a therapeutic target and potential biomarker for lung cancer. Our strategy is feasible, which may facilitate the identification of novel secreted biomarkers of lung cancer

  18. Estimation of the binding modes with important human cytochrome P450 enzymes, drug interaction potential, pharmacokinetics, and hepatotoxicity of ginger components using molecular docking, computational, and pharmacokinetic modeling studies

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhu, Shengrong

    2015-01-01

    Ginger is one of the most commonly used herbal medicines for the treatment of numerous ailments and improvement of body functions. It may be used in combination with prescribed drugs. The coadministration of ginger with therapeutic drugs raises a concern of potential deleterious drug interactions via the modulation of the expression and/or activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, resulting in unfavorable therapeutic outcomes. This study aimed to determine the molecular interactions between 12 main active ginger components (6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, 10-gingerol, 6-shogaol, 8-shogaol, 10-shogaol, ar-curcumene, β-bisabolene, β-sesquiphelandrene, 6-gingerdione, (−)-zingiberene, and methyl-6-isogingerol) and human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 and to predict the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET) of the 12 ginger components using computational approaches and comprehensive literature search. Docking studies showed that ginger components interacted with a panel of amino acids in the active sites of CYP1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 mainly through hydrogen bond formation, to a lesser extent, via π–π stacking. The pharmacokinetic simulation studies showed that the [I]/[Ki] value for CYP2C9, 2C19, and 3A4 ranged from 0.0002 to 19.6 and the R value ranged from 1.0002 to 20.6 and that ginger might exhibit a high risk of drug interaction via inhibition of the activity of human CYP2C9 and CYP3A4, but a low risk of drug interaction toward CYP2C19-mediated drug metabolism. Furthermore, it has been evaluated that the 12 ginger components possessed a favorable ADMET profiles with regard to the solubility, absorption, permeability across the blood–brain barrier, interactions with CYP2D6, hepatotoxicity, and plasma protein binding. The validation results showed that there was no remarkable effect of ginger on the metabolism of warfarin in humans, whereas concurrent use of ginger and nifedipine exhibited

  19. Estimation of the binding modes with important human cytochrome P450 enzymes, drug interaction potential, pharmacokinetics, and hepatotoxicity of ginger components using molecular docking, computational, and pharmacokinetic modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhu, Shengrong

    2015-01-01

    Ginger is one of the most commonly used herbal medicines for the treatment of numerous ailments and improvement of body functions. It may be used in combination with prescribed drugs. The coadministration of ginger with therapeutic drugs raises a concern of potential deleterious drug interactions via the modulation of the expression and/or activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, resulting in unfavorable therapeutic outcomes. This study aimed to determine the molecular interactions between 12 main active ginger components (6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, 10-gingerol, 6-shogaol, 8-shogaol, 10-shogaol, ar-curcumene, β-bisabolene, β-sesquiphelandrene, 6-gingerdione, (-)-zingiberene, and methyl-6-isogingerol) and human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 and to predict the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET) of the 12 ginger components using computational approaches and comprehensive literature search. Docking studies showed that ginger components interacted with a panel of amino acids in the active sites of CYP1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 mainly through hydrogen bond formation, to a lesser extent, via π-π stacking. The pharmacokinetic simulation studies showed that the [I]/[Ki ] value for CYP2C9, 2C19, and 3A4 ranged from 0.0002 to 19.6 and the R value ranged from 1.0002 to 20.6 and that ginger might exhibit a high risk of drug interaction via inhibition of the activity of human CYP2C9 and CYP3A4, but a low risk of drug interaction toward CYP2C19-mediated drug metabolism. Furthermore, it has been evaluated that the 12 ginger components possessed a favorable ADMET profiles with regard to the solubility, absorption, permeability across the blood-brain barrier, interactions with CYP2D6, hepatotoxicity, and plasma protein binding. The validation results showed that there was no remarkable effect of ginger on the metabolism of warfarin in humans, whereas concurrent use of ginger and nifedipine exhibited a

  20. Human sex hormone-binding globulin binding affinities of 125 structurally diverse chemicals and comparison with their binding to androgen receptor, estrogen receptor, and α-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Hong, Huixiao; Branham, William S; Ng, Hui Wen; Moland, Carrie L; Dial, Stacey L; Fang, Hong; Perkins, Roger; Sheehan, Daniel; Tong, Weida

    2015-02-01

    One endocrine disruption mechanism is through binding to nuclear receptors such as the androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor (ER) in target cells. The concentration of a chemical in serum is important for its entry into the target cells to bind the receptors, which is regulated by the serum proteins. Human sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is the major transport protein in serum that can bind androgens and estrogens and thus change a chemical's availability to enter the target cells. Sequestration of an androgen or estrogen in the serum can alter the chemical elicited AR- and ER-mediated responses. To better understand the chemical-induced endocrine activity, we developed a competitive binding assay using human pregnancy plasma and measured the binding to the human SHBG for 125 structurally diverse chemicals, most of which were known to bind AR and ER. Eighty seven chemicals were able to bind the human SHBG in the assay, whereas 38 chemicals were nonbinders. Binding data for human SHBG are compared with that for rat α-fetoprotein, ER and AR. Knowing the binding profiles between serum and nuclear receptors will improve assessment of a chemical's potential for endocrine disruption. The SHBG binding data reported here represent the largest data set of structurally diverse chemicals tested for human SHBG binding. Utilization of the SHBG binding data with AR and ER binding data could enable better evaluation of endocrine disrupting potential of chemicals through AR- and ER-mediated responses since sequestration in serum could be considered.

  1. Diarylferrocene tweezers for cation binding.

    PubMed

    Lima, Carlos F R A C; Fernandes, Ana M; Melo, André; Gonçalves, Luís M; Silva, Artur M S; Santos, Luís M N B F

    2015-10-01

    The host-guest chemistry of ferrocene derivatives was explored by a combined experimental and theoretical study. Several 1-arylferrocenes and 1,1'-diarylferrocenes were synthesized by the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction. The ability of these compounds to bind small cations in the gas phase was investigated experimentally by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The results evidenced a noticeable ability of all 1,1'-diarylferrocenes studied to bind cations, while the same was not observed for the corresponding 1-arylferrocenes nor ferrocene. The 1,1'-diarylferrocenecation relative interaction energies were evaluated by ESI-MS and quantum chemical calculations and showed that cation binding in these systems follows electrostatic trends. It was found that, due to their unique molecular shape and smooth torsional potentials, 1,1'-diarylferrocenes can act as molecular tweezers of small-sized cations in the gas phase. PMID:26309143

  2. Pt(CN)2-4 and Au(CN)-2: potential general probes for anion-binding sites of proteins. 35Cl and 81Br nuclear-magnetic-resonance studies.

    PubMed

    Norne, J E; Lilja, H; Lindman, B; Einarsson, R; Zeppezauer, M

    1975-11-15

    Nuclear magnetic quadrupole relaxation appears to be a general method for studying the binding of anions to proteins. This is shown by the increase in transverse quadrupole relaxation rate of 35Cl- and 81Br- in the presence of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase, lysozyme, trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin, human carbonic anhydrase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase and human serum albumin. Of the many possible binding sites at the surface of a protein (e.g. positively charged amino acid side-chains) only a few account for the main part of the relaxation enhancement. This is shown by the decrease in 35Cl- and 81Br- relaxation rate on addition of functional ligands. Large, kinetically inert, complex anions like Pt(CN)2-4 and Au(CN)-2 are found to act as strong competitors towards halogen ions for the high-affinity anion binding sites of a number of proteins. Titrations with complex anions following the 35Cl- or 81Br- relaxation rates are found to be helpful in attempts to elucidate binding mechanisms. Especially, the complex anions may be useful probes for the discrimination between general and metallic anion binding sites in proteins and they also permit correlation of information from X-ray investigations of crystals with that from physical measurements in solution. From the change in halide ion quadrupole relaxation rate on addition of strongly binding ligands the quadrupole coupling constants of the high affinity Cl- and Br- binding sites are estimated using certain assumptions. It is found that for several proteins, comprising the metal-free proteins but also alcohol dehydrogenase and Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase, the 35Cl quadrupole coupling constants have approximately the same values. For some other metallo-proteins like carbonic anhydrase and a zinc - serum-albumin complex considerably greater quadrupole coupling constants were obtained. The estimated quadrupole coupling constants are used as a basis for a discussion of the interactions involved in anion

  3. Measuring Equilibrium Binding Constants for the WT1-DNA Interaction Using a Filter Binding Assay.

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Equilibrium binding of WT1 to specific sites in DNA and potentially RNA molecules is central in mediating the regulatory roles of this protein. In order to understand the functional effects of mutations in the nucleic acid-binding domain of WT1 proteins and/or mutations in the DNA- or RNA-binding sites, it is necessary to measure the equilibrium constant for formation of the protein-nucleic acid complex. This chapter describes the use of a filter binding assay to make accurate measurements of the binding of the WT1 zinc finger domain to the consensus WT1-binding site in DNA. The method described is readily adapted to the measurement of the effects of mutations in either the WT1 zinc finger domain or the putative binding sites within a promoter element or cellular RNA.

  4. The TRPV5/6 calcium channels contain multiple calmodulin binding sites with differential binding properties.

    PubMed

    Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V; Bokhovchuk, Fedir M; Vuister, Geerten W

    2012-06-01

    The epithelial Ca(2+) channels TRPV5/6 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 5/6) are thoroughly regulated in order to fine-tune the amount of Ca(2+) reabsorption. Calmodulin has been shown to be involved into calcium-dependent inactivation of TRPV5/6 channels by binding directly to the distal C-terminal fragment of the channels (de Groot et al. in Mol Cell Biol 31:2845-2853, 12). Here, we investigate this binding in detail and find significant differences between TRPV5 and TRPV6. We also identify and characterize in vitro four other CaM binding fragments of TRPV5/6, which likely are also involved in TRPV5/6 channel regulation. The five CaM binding sites display diversity in binding modes, binding stoichiometries and binding affinities, which may fine-tune the response of the channels to varying Ca(2+)-concentrations. PMID:22354706

  5. Epidermal growth factor suppresses insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 levels in human papillomavirus type 16-immortalized cervical epithelial cells and thereby potentiates the effects of insulin-like growth factor 1.

    PubMed

    Hembree, J R; Agarwal, C; Eckert, R L

    1994-06-15

    Human ectocervical epithelial cells are a primary target for infection by oncogenic papillomaviruses, which are strongly implicated as causative agents in the genesis of cervical cancer. Growth factors have been implicated as agents that stimulate proliferation and enhance the possibility of malignant transformation. In the present study we utilize several human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16-immortalized ectocervical epithelial cell lines to investigate the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) on cell proliferation and the production of IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs). ECE16-1 cells, an HPV16-immortalized/nontumorigenic cell line, maintained in defined medium, produce and release high levels of IGFBP-3 (38/42 kDa) as well as smaller amounts of a 24-kDa IGFBP. Supplementation of defined medium with EGF causes a dose-dependent increase in cell growth and a concomitant decrease in the levels of IGFBP-3 released into the culture medium. EGF suppression of IGFBP-3 is maintained even when EGF-stimulated cell growth is suppressed 67% due to the simultaneous presence of 3 ng/ml of TGF beta 1, indicating that EGF suppression of IGFBP-3 levels is independent of EGF effects on cell growth. EGF suppression of IGFBP-3 production is correlated with a reduction in IGFBP-3 mRNA level. In the presence of EGF, the growth response of the cells to ng amounts of IGF-I is significantly enhanced. Moreover, the simultaneous presence of both EGF and IGF-I reduces the level of IGFBP-3 more efficiently than EGF alone. We also observe that the IGFBP-3 level is decreased and the 24-kDa IGFBP level is increased in HPV16-positive tumorigenic versus nontumorigenic cell lines. This is the first report of EGF acting as a positive regulator of IGF-I action via the IGFBPs. On the basis of these findings, we propose that EGF stimulates ECE16-1 cell growth via a dual-action mechanism by (a) stimulating growth directly via the EGF mitogenic pathway and (b

  6. Analyzing radioligand binding data.

    PubMed

    Motulsky, Harvey; Neubig, Richard

    2002-08-01

    Radioligand binding experiments are easy to perform, and provide useful data in many fields. They can be used to study receptor regulation, discover new drugs by screening for compounds that compete with high affinity for radioligand binding to a particular receptor, investigate receptor localization in different organs or regions using autoradiography, categorize receptor subtypes, and probe mechanisms of receptor signaling, via measurements of agonist binding and its regulation by ions, nucleotides, and other allosteric modulators. This unit reviews the theory of receptor binding and explains how to analyze experimental data. Since binding data are usually best analyzed using nonlinear regression, this unit also explains the principles of curve fitting with nonlinear regression.

  7. Characterizing low affinity epibatidine binding to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Along with high affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd1≈10 pM) to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), low affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd2≈1-10 nM) to an independent binding site has been reported. Studying this low affinity binding is important because it might contribute understanding about the structure and synthesis of α4β2 nAChR. The binding behavior of epibatidine and α4β2 AChR raises a question about interpreting binding data from two independent sites with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding, both of which can affect equilibrium binding of [3H]epibatidine and α4β2 nAChR. If modeled incorrectly, ligand depletion and nonspecific binding lead to inaccurate estimates of binding constants. Fitting total equilibrium binding as a function of total ligand accurately characterizes a single site with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding. The goal of this study was to determine whether this approach is sufficient with two independent high and low affinity sites. Results Computer simulations of binding revealed complexities beyond fitting total binding for characterizing the second, low affinity site of α4β2 nAChR. First, distinguishing low-affinity specific binding from nonspecific binding was a potential problem with saturation data. Varying the maximum concentration of [3H]epibatidine, simultaneously fitting independently measured nonspecific binding, and varying α4β2 nAChR concentration were effective remedies. Second, ligand depletion helped identify the low affinity site when nonspecific binding was significant in saturation or competition data, contrary to a common belief that ligand depletion always is detrimental. Third, measuring nonspecific binding without α4β2 nAChR distinguished better between nonspecific binding and low-affinity specific binding under some circumstances of competitive binding than did presuming nonspecific binding to be residual [3H]epibatidine binding after adding a large concentration of

  8. Carboplatin binding to histidine.

    PubMed

    Tanley, Simon W M; Diederichs, Kay; Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M J; Levy, Colin; Schreurs, Antoine M M; Helliwell, John R

    2014-09-01

    Carboplatin is a second-generation platinum anticancer agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine (in hen egg-white lysozyme; HEWL) showed the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high NaCl concentration used in the crystallization conditions. HEWL co-crystallizations with carboplatin in NaBr conditions have now been carried out to confirm whether carboplatin converts to the bromine form and whether this takes place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin observed previously in NaCl conditions. Here, it is reported that a partial chemical transformation takes place but to a transplatin form. Thus, to attempt to resolve purely carboplatin binding at histidine, this study utilized co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin without NaCl to eliminate the partial chemical conversion of carboplatin. Tetragonal HEWL crystals co-crystallized with carboplatin were successfully obtained in four different conditions, each at a different pH value. The structural results obtained show carboplatin bound to either one or both of the N atoms of His15 of HEWL, and this particular variation was dependent on the concentration of anions in the crystallization mixture and the elapsed time, as well as the pH used. The structural details of the bound carboplatin molecule also differed between them. Overall, the most detailed crystal structure showed the majority of the carboplatin atoms bound to the platinum centre; however, the four-carbon ring structure of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate moiety (CBDC) remained elusive. The potential impact of the results for the administration of carboplatin as an anticancer agent are described.

  9. Synthetic LPS-Binding Polymer Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tian

    -bovine serum albumin (BSA) binding, which showed that, different from NPs FITC-LPS interactions, variation of TBAm's content in NPs had very little influence on BSA binding, instead, more cationic NPs with higher content of APM were found to possess higher BSA binding. Additionally, GUA-containing NPs exhibited particularly high BSA binding capacity, especially under low ionic strength conditions. In the current formulations, the aggregation and saturation effects make NPs unsuitable in practical applications. Nevertheless, we anticipate that by attaching NPs onto certain substrates, particles may be effectively separated from each other, and the NPs' LPS binding capacity could potentially be further improved.

  10. A novel polynuclear Cu(I)-sulfur cluster with 1,2-dithiolate-o-carborane ligands as a potential in vitro antitumour agent and its DNA binding properties.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhong; Jiang, Jin; Lu, Jing; Li, Dacheng; Cheng, Shuang; Dou, Jianmin

    2013-04-14

    A novel polynuclear Cu(I)-sulfur cluster, (C54H62B30Cu6N8S6), bearing 1,2-dithiolate-o-carborane and 1,10-phenanthroline ligands was synthesized. The complex displayed rapid, low micromolar in vitro cytotoxicity against a range of epithelial tumour cells and efficient CT-DNA binding. PMID:23426331

  11. The 18-kilodalton Chlamydia trachomatis histone H1-like protein (Hc1) contains a potential N-terminal dimerization site and a C-terminal nucleic acid-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, L B; Birkelund, S; Holm, A; Ostergaard, S; Christiansen, G

    1996-02-01

    The Chlamydia trachomatis histone H1-like protein (Hc1) is a DNA-binding protein specific for the metabolically inactive chlamydial developmental form, the elementary body. Hc1 induces DNA condensation in Escherichia coli and is a strong inhibitor of transcription and translation. These effects may, in part, be due to Hc1-mediated alterations of DNA topology. To locate putative functional domains within Hc1, polypeptides Hc1(2-57) and Hc1(53-125), corresponding to the N- and C-terminal parts of Hc1, respectively, were generated. By chemical cross-linking with ethylene glycol-bis (succinic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester), purified recombinant Hc1 was found to form dimers. The dimerization site was located in the N-terminal part of Hc1 (Hc1(2-57)). Moreover, circular dichroism measurements indicated an overall alpha-helical structure of this region. By using limited proteolysis, Southwestern blotting, and gel retardation assays, Hc1(53-125) was shown to contain a domain capable of binding both DNA and RNA. Under the same conditions, Hc1(2-57) had no nucleic acid-binding activity. Electron microscopy of Hc1-DNA and Hc1(53-125)-DNA complexes revealed differences suggesting that the N-terminal part of Hc1 may affect the DNA-binding properties of Hc1. PMID:8576073

  12. Tight-Binding Configuration Interaction (TBCI): A Noniterative Approach to Incorporating Electrostatics into Tight Binding.

    PubMed

    Iron, Mark A; Heyden, Andreas; Staszewska, Grażyna; Truhlar, Donald G

    2008-05-01

    We present a new electronic structure approximation called Tight Binding Configuration Interaction. It uses a tight-binding Hamiltonian to obtain orbitals that are used in a configuration interaction calculation that includes explicit charge interactions. This new method is better capable of predicting energies, ionization potentials, and fragmentation charges than the Wolfsberg-Helmholz Tight-Binding and Many-Body Tight-Binding models reported earlier (Staszewska, G.; Staszewski, P.; Schultz, N. E.; Truhlar, D. Phys. Rev. B 2005, 71, 045423). The method is illustrated for clusters and nanoparticles containing aluminum.

  13. Analyzing radioligand binding data.

    PubMed

    Motulsky, H; Neubig, R

    2001-05-01

    A radioligand is a radioactively labeled drug that can associate with a receptor, transporter, enzyme, or any protein of interest. Measuring the rate and extent of binding provides information on the number of binding sites, and their affinity and accessibility for various drugs. Radioligand binding experiments are easy to perform, and provide useful data in many fields. For example, radioligand binding studies are used to study receptor regulation, investigate receptor localization in different organs or regions using autoradiography, categorize receptor subtypes, and probe mechanisms of receptor signaling. This unit reviews the theory of receptor binding and explains how to analyze experimental data. Since binding data are usually best analyzed using nonlinear regression, this unit also explains the principles of curve fitting with nonlinear regression.

  14. Evolving nucleotide binding surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber-Emmons, T.; Rein, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the stability and nature of binding of a nucleotide to several known dehydrogenases. The employed approach includes calculation of hydrophobic stabilization of the binding motif and its intermolecular interaction with the ligand. The evolutionary changes of the binding motif are studied by calculating the Euclidean deviation of the respective dehydrogenases. Attention is given to the possible structural elements involved in the origin of nucleotide recognition by non-coded primordial polypeptides.

  15. Theoretical studies of binding of mannose-binding protein to monosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aida-Hyugaji, Sachiko; Takano, Keiko; Takada, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Haruo; Kojima, Naoya; Mizuochi, Tsuguo; Inoue, Yasushi

    2004-11-01

    Binding properties of mannose-binding protein (MBP) to monosaccharides are discussed based on ab initio molecular orbital calculations for cluster models constructed. The calculated binding energies indicate that MBP has an affinity for N-acetyl- D-glucosamine, D-mannose, L-fucose, and D-glucose rather than D-galactose and N-acetyl- D-galactosamine, which is consistent with the biochemical experimental results. Electrostatic potential surfaces at the binding site of four monosaccharides having binding properties matched well with that of MBP. A vacant frontier orbital was found to be localized around the binding site of MBP, suggesting that MBP-monosaccharide interaction may occur through electrostatic and orbital interactions.

  16. LhcaR1 of the red alga Porphyridium cruentum encodes a polypeptide of the LHCI complex with seven potential chlorophyll a-binding residues that are conserved in most LHCs.

    PubMed

    Tan, S; Cunningham, F X; Gantt, E

    1997-01-01

    The accessory light-harvesting polypeptides associated with photosystem I (LHCI) in Porphyridium cruentum bind chlorophyll a, zeaxanthin and beta-carotene. A cDNA library of P. cruentum was screened with an antiserum specific to the LHCI polypeptides, and an 0.9 kb fragment was identified as coding for an LHCI polypeptide. This cDNA, which we named LhcaR1, has an open reading frame encoding 222 amino acid residues including a putative transit peptide of 28 amino acids. Hydropathy analysis suggests that there are three transmembrane helices in the mature polypeptide. Each of the amino acid residues that bind chlorophyll (six residues) and serve in stabilizing the helices in higher-plant LHCs are conserved in helices 1 and 3 of P. cruentum LhcaR1. The N-terminal flanking regions of these two helices also show high sequence conservation with other LHCs. Helix 2 contains a seventh putative chlorophyll-binding site, but resembles helix 2 of higher-plant LHCs to a lesser degree. A sequence motif of 11 residues found near the N-terminus and in each of the three helices suggests the possibility that the red algal LhcaR1 derives from a gene duplication. Polypeptides of the expected molecular weight in six other red algae (Achrochaetium, Bangia, Callithamnion, Cyanidium, Polysiphonia, Spermothamnion) were recognized by the antiserum to P. cruentum LHCI, indicating a wide distribution of LHCI in rhodophytes.

  17. Calmodulin Binding Proteins and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Eshak, Kristeen; Myre, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The small, calcium-sensor protein, calmodulin, is ubiquitously expressed and central to cell function in all cell types. Here the literature linking calmodulin to Alzheimer's disease is reviewed. Several experimentally-verified calmodulin-binding proteins are involved in the formation of amyloid-β plaques including amyloid-β protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin-1, and ADAM10. Many others possess potential calmodulin-binding domains that remain to be verified. Three calmodulin binding proteins are associated with the formation of neurofibrillary tangles: two kinases (CaMKII, CDK5) and one protein phosphatase (PP2B or calcineurin). Many of the genes recently identified by genome wide association studies and other studies encode proteins that contain putative calmodulin-binding domains but only a couple (e.g., APOE, BIN1) have been experimentally confirmed as calmodulin binding proteins. At least two receptors involved in calcium metabolism and linked to Alzheimer's disease (mAchR; NMDAR) have also been identified as calmodulin-binding proteins. In addition to this, many proteins that are involved in other cellular events intimately associated with Alzheimer's disease including calcium channel function, cholesterol metabolism, neuroinflammation, endocytosis, cell cycle events, and apoptosis have been tentatively or experimentally verified as calmodulin binding proteins. The use of calmodulin as a potential biomarker and as a therapeutic target is discussed. PMID:25812852

  18. Binding capacity: cooperativity and buffering in biopolymers.

    PubMed Central

    Di Cera, E; Gill, S J; Wyman, J

    1988-01-01

    The group of linkage potentials resulting from the energy of a physicochemical system expressed per mol of a reference component, say a polyfunctional macromolecule, leads to the concept of binding capacity. This concept applies equally to both chemical and physical ligands and opens the way to consideration of higher-order linkage relationships. It provides a means of exploring the consequences of thermodynamic stability on generalized binding phenomena in biopolymers. PMID:3422436

  19. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Packer, S; Fairchild, R G; Watts, K P; Greenberg, D; Hannon, S J

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed. (PSB)

  20. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding.

  1. The Effect of Mutation of Carboxyl Side-Chain Amino Acids Near the Heme on the Midpoint Potentials and Ligand Binding Constants of Nitrophorin 2 and Its NO, Histamine and Imidazole Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Robert E.; Shokhirev, Maxim N.; Ho, Arthur Y. W.; Yang, Fei; Shokhireva, Tatiana K.; Zhang, Hongjun; Weichsel, Andrzej; Montfort, William R.; Walker, F. Ann

    2009-01-01

    Nitrophorins (NPs) are a group of NO-carrying heme proteins found in the saliva of a bloodsucking insect from tropical Central and South America, Rhodnius prolixus, the “kissing bug”. NO is kept stable for long periods of time by binding it as an axial ligand to a ferriheme center. The fact that the nitrophorins are stabilized as FeIII-NO proteins is a unique property, for most heme proteins are readily autoreduced by excess NO, and bind NO to the Fe(II) heme irreversibly (Kds in the pM range). In contrast, the nitrophorins, as Fe(III) heme centers, have Kds in the μM to nM range, and thus allow NO to dissociate upon dilution following injection into the tissues of the victim. This NO can cause vasodilation, and thereby allow more blood to be transported to the site of the wound. We have prepared thirteen site-directed mutants of three major nitrophorins, NP2, NP1 and NP4, to investigate the stabilization of the ferric–NO heme center and preservation of reversible binding that facilitates these proteins’ NO storage, transport and release functions. Of the mutations in which Glu and/or Asp were replaced by Ala, most of these carboxyls show a significant role stabilizing FeIII-NO over FeII-NO, with buried E53 of NP2 or E55 of NP1 and NP4 being the most important, and partially buried D29 of NP2 or D30 of NP4 being second in importance. The pKas of the carboxyl groups studied vary significantly, but all are largely deprotonated at pH 7.5 except E124. PMID:19175316

  2. Penicillin Binding Protein 1 Is Important in the Compensatory Response of Staphylococcus aureus to Daptomycin-Induced Membrane Damage and Is a Potential Target for β-Lactam–Daptomycin Synergy

    PubMed Central

    Berti, Andrew D.; Theisen, Erin; Sauer, John-Demian; Nonejuie, Poochit; Olson, Joshua; Pogliano, Joseph; Sakoulas, George; Nizet, Victor; Proctor, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    The activity of daptomycin (DAP) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is enhanced in the presence of β-lactam antibiotics. This effect is more pronounced with β-lactam antibiotics that exhibit avid binding to penicillin binding protein 1 (PBP1). Here, we present evidence that PBP1 has a significant role in responding to DAP-induced stress on the cell. Expression of the pbpA transcript, encoding PBP1, was specifically induced by DAP exposure whereas expression of pbpB, pbpC, and pbpD, encoding PBP2, PBP3, and PBP4, respectively, remained unchanged. Using a MRSA COL strain with pbpA under an inducible promoter, increased pbpA transcription was accompanied by reduced susceptibility to, and killing by, DAP in vitro. Exposure to β-lactams that preferentially inactivate PBP1 was not associated with increased DAP binding, suggesting that synergy in the setting of anti-PBP1 pharmacotherapy results from increased DAP potency on a per-molecule basis. Combination exposure in an in vitro pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model system with β-lactams that preferentially inactivate PBP1 (DAP-meropenem [MEM] or DAP-imipenem [IPM]) resulted in more-rapid killing than did combination exposure with DAP-nafcillin (NAF) (nonselective), DAP-ceftriaxone (CRO) or DAP-cefotaxime (CTX) (PBP2 selective), DAP-cefaclor (CEC) (PBP3 selective), or DAP-cefoxitin (FOX) (PBP4 selective). Compared to β-lactams with poor PBP1 binding specificity, exposure of S. aureus to DAP plus PBP1-selective β-lactams resulted in an increased frequency of septation and cell wall abnormalities. These data suggest that PBP1 activity may contribute to survival during DAP-induced metabolic stress. Therefore, targeted inactivation of PBP1 may enhance the antimicrobial efficiency of DAP, supporting the use of DAP–β-lactam combination therapy for serious MRSA infections, particularly when the β-lactam undermines the PBP1-mediated compensatory response. PMID:26525797

  3. Comparison of the antimicrobial adhesion potential of human body fluid glycoconjugates using fucose-binding lectin (PA-IIL) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Ulex europaeus lectin (UEA-I).

    PubMed

    Lerrer, Batia; Lesman-Movshovich, Efrat; Gilboa-Garber, Nechama

    2005-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a fucose-binding lectin (PA-IIL) which strongly binds to human cells. This lectin was shown to be highly sensitive to inhibition by fucose-bearing human milk glycoproteins. Since the glycans of these glycoproteins mimic human cell receptors, they may function as decoys in blocking lectin-dependent pathogen adhesion to the host cells. Human saliva and seminal fluid also contain such compounds, and body fluids of individuals who are "secretors" express additional fucosylated (alpha 1,2) residues. The latter are selectively detected by Ulex europaeus lectin UEA-I. The aim of the present research was to compare the PA-IIL and UEA-I interactions with human salivas and seminal fluids of "secretors" and "nonsecretors" with those obtained with the respective milks. Using hemagglutination inhibition and Western blot analyses, we showed that PA-IIL interactions with the saliva and seminal fluid glycoproteins were somewhat weaker than those obtained with the milk and that "nonsecretor" body fluids were not less efficient than those of "secretors" in PA-IIL blocking. UEA-I, which interacted only with the "secretors" glycoproteins, was most sensitive to those of the seminal fluids.

  4. Type II oestrogen binding sites in human colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Piantelli, M; Ricci, R; Larocca, L M; Rinelli, A; Capelli, A; Rizzo, S; Scambia, G; Ranelletti, F O

    1990-01-01

    Seven cases of colorectal adenocarcinomas were investigated for the presence of oestrogen receptors and progesterone receptors. The tumours specifically bound oestradiol. This binding almost exclusively resulted from the presence of high numbers of type II oestrogen binding sites. Oestrogen receptors were absent or present at very low concentrations. Immunohistochemical investigation of nuclear oestrogen receptors gave negative results. This indicates that antioestrogen receptor antibodies recognise oestrogen receptors but not type II oestrogen binding sites. The presence of specific type II oestrogen binding sites and progesterone binding offers further evidence for a potential role for these steroids and their receptors in colorectal carcinoma. PMID:2266171

  5. Metallochaperones: bind and deliver

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, A.C.

    2010-03-08

    Metallochaperones deliver metal ions directly to target proteins via specific protein-protein interactions. Recent research has led to a molecular picture of how some metallochaperones bind metal ions, recognize their partner proteins, and accomplish metal ion transfer.

  6. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  7. Mammalian Argonaute-DNA binding?

    PubMed

    Smalheiser, Neil R; Gomes, Octavio L A

    2015-01-01

    When a field shares the consensus that a particular phenomenon does NOT occur, this may reflect extensive experimental investigations with negative outcomes, or may represent the "common sense" position based on current knowledge and established ways of thinking. The current consensus of the RNA field is that eukaryotic Argonaute (Ago) proteins employ RNA guides and target other RNAs. The alternative -- that eukaryotic Ago has biologically important interactions with DNA in vivo - has not been seriously considered, in part because the only role contemplated for DNA was as a guide strand, and in part because it did not seem plausible that any natural source of suitable DNAs exists in eukaryotic cells. However, eukaryotic Argonaute domains bind DNA in the test tube, and several articles report that small inhibitory double-stranded DNAs do have the ability to silence target RNAs in a sequence-dependent (though poorly characterized) manner. A search of the literature identified potential DNA binding partners for Ago, including (among others) single-stranded DNAs residing in extracellular vesicles, and cytoplasmic satellite-repeat DNA fragments that are associated with the plasma membrane and transcribed by Pol II. It is interesting to note that both cytoplasmic and extracellular vesicle DNA are expressed at greatly elevated levels in cancer cells relative to normal cells. In such a pathological scenario, if not under normal conditions, there may be appreciable binding of Ago to DNA despite its lower affinity compared to RNA. If so, DNA might displace Ago from binding to its normal partners (miRNAs, siRNAs and other short ncRNAs), disrupting tightly controlled post-transcriptional gene silencing processes that are vital to correct functioning of a normal cell. The possible contribution to cancer pathogenesis is a strong motivator for further investigation of Ago-DNA binding. More generally, this case underscores the need for better informatics tools to allow

  8. The Mitogenic Potential of Heparin-Binding Epidermal Growth Factor in the Human Endometrium Is Mediated by the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Is Modulated by Tumor Necrosis Factor-α

    PubMed Central

    CHOBOTOVA, KATYA; MUCHMORE, MARY-ELIZABETH; CARVER, JANET; YOO, HYUNG-J; MANEK, SANJIV; GULLICK, WILLIAM J.; BARLOW, DAVID H.; MARDON, HELEN J.

    2006-01-01

    Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF), a member of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family, is implicated in a variety of biological processes, including reproduction. Previous studies describe increased levels of HB-EGF in the human endometrium during the midsecretory stage of the menstrual cycle, suggesting a function for HB-EGF in implantation of the human blastocyst. Here we have investigated the expression and function of the soluble and transmembrane forms of HB-EGF in the human endometrium. We show that the expression of the transmembrane form of HB-EGF in the human endometrium is modulated according to the stage of the menstrual cycle. We present data demonstrating that both the soluble and transmembrane forms of HB-EGF induce DNA synthesis in human endometrial stromal cells. Furthermore, TNFα has a cooperative effect on HB-EGF, EGF, TGFα, and betacellulin-induced DNA synthesis in stromal cells, suggesting roles for the EGF family and TNFα in regeneration and maturation of human endometrium. Induction of DNA synthesis by HB-EGF and its modulation by TNFα in endometrial stromal cells are mediated by the EGF receptor and not the HB-EGF receptor ErbB4. Our data suggest key functions for HB-EGF, TNFα, and the EGF receptor in endometrial maturation, via autocrine/paracrine and juxtacrine pathways, in preparation for embryo implantation. PMID:12466384

  9. Squaring cooperative binding circles

    PubMed Central

    Deutman, Alexander B. C.; Monnereau, Cyrille; Moalin, Mohamed; Coumans, Ruud G. E.; Veling, Nico; Coenen, Michiel; Smits, Jan M. M.; de Gelder, René; Elemans, Johannes A. A. W.; Ercolani, Gianfranco; Nolte, Roeland J. M.; Rowan, Alan E.

    2009-01-01

    The cooperative binding effects of viologens and pyridines to a synthetic bivalent porphyrin receptor are used as a model system to study how the magnitudes of these effects relate to the experimentally obtained values. The full thermodynamic and kinetic circles concerning both activation and inhibition of the cage of the receptor for the binding of viologens were measured and evaluated. The results strongly emphasize the apparent character of measured binding and rate constants, in which the fractional saturation of receptors with other guests is linearly expressed in these constants. The presented method can be used as a simple tool to better analyze and comprehend the experimentally observed kinetics and thermodynamics of natural and artificial cooperative systems. PMID:19470643

  10. Mechanisms for optical binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, David L.; Davila Romero, Luciana C.

    2009-08-01

    The phenomenon of optical binding is now experimentally very well established. With a recognition of the facility to collect and organize particles held in an optical trap, the related term 'optical matter' has also been gaining currency, highlighting possibilities for a significant interplay between optically induced inter-particle forces and other interactions such as chemical bonding and dispersion forces. Optical binding itself has a variety of interpretations. With some of these explanations being more prominent than others, and their applicability to some extent depending on the nature of the particles involved, a listing of these has to include the following: collective scattering, laser-dressed Casimir forces, virtual photon coupling, optically induced dipole resonance, and plasmon resonance coupling. It is the purpose of this paper to review and to establish the extent of fundamental linkages between these theoretical descriptions, recognizing the value that each has in relating the phenomenon of optical binding to the broader context of other, closely related physical measurements.

  11. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Caroline

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  12. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Caroline

    2001-10-09

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  13. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Carolyn

    1999-10-05

    This invention provides a system for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, this system can be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  14. Phage display of engineered binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Levisson, Mark; Spruijt, Ruud B; Winkel, Ingrid Nolla; Kengen, Servé W M; van der Oost, John

    2014-01-01

    In current purification processes optimization of the capture step generally has a large impact on cost reduction. At present, valuable biomolecules are often produced in relatively low concentrations and, consequently, the eventual selective separation from complex mixtures can be rather inefficient. A separation technology based on a very selective high-affinity binding may overcome these problems. Proteins in their natural environment manifest functionality by interacting specifically and often with relatively high affinity with other molecules, such as substrates, inhibitors, activators, or other proteins. At present, antibodies are the most commonly used binding proteins in numerous applications. However, antibodies do have limitations, such as high production costs, low stability, and a complex patent landscape. A novel approach is therefore to use non-immunoglobulin engineered binding proteins in affinity purification. In order to obtain engineered binders with a desired specificity, a large mutant library of the new to-be-developed binding protein has to be created and screened for potential binders. A powerful technique to screen and select for proteins with desired properties from a large pool of variants is phage display. Here, we indicate several criteria for potential binding protein scaffolds and explain the principle of M13 phage display. In addition, we describe experimental protocols for the initial steps in setting up a M13 phage display system based on the pComb3X vector, including construction of the phagemid vector, production of phages displaying the protein of interest, and confirmation of display on the M13 phage.

  15. Detection of secondary binding sites in proteins using fragment screening

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, R. Frederick; Verdonk, Marcel L.; Saini, Harpreet K.; Tickle, Ian J.; Jhoti, Harren

    2015-01-01

    Proteins need to be tightly regulated as they control biological processes in most normal cellular functions. The precise mechanisms of regulation are rarely completely understood but can involve binding of endogenous ligands and/or partner proteins at specific locations on a protein that can modulate function. Often, these additional secondary binding sites appear separate to the primary binding site, which, for example for an enzyme, may bind a substrate. In previous work, we have uncovered several examples in which secondary binding sites were discovered on proteins using fragment screening approaches. In each case, we were able to establish that the newly identified secondary binding site was biologically relevant as it was able to modulate function by the binding of a small molecule. In this study, we investigate how often secondary binding sites are located on proteins by analyzing 24 protein targets for which we have performed a fragment screen using X-ray crystallography. Our analysis shows that, surprisingly, the majority of proteins contain secondary binding sites based on their ability to bind fragments. Furthermore, sequence analysis of these previously unknown sites indicate high conservation, which suggests that they may have a biological function, perhaps via an allosteric mechanism. Comparing the physicochemical properties of the secondary sites with known primary ligand binding sites also shows broad similarities indicating that many of the secondary sites may be druggable in nature with small molecules that could provide new opportunities to modulate potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26655740

  16. High molecular weight kininogen binds to unstimulated platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, E J; Schutsky, D; Knight, L C; Schmaier, A H

    1986-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine if the unstimulated platelet membrane has a site for high molecular weight kininogen (HMWK) binding. 125I-HMWK bound to unstimulated platelets. Zn++ was required for 125I-HMWK binding to unstimulated platelets and binding was maximal at 50 microM Zn++. Neither Mg++ nor Ca++ substituted for Zn++ in supporting 125I-HMWK binding to unstimulated platelets, and neither ion potentiated binding in the presence of 50 microM zinc. 125I-HMWK competed with equal affinity with HMWK for binding, and excess HMWK inhibited 125I-HMWK-platelet binding. Only HMWK, not prekallikrein, Factor XII, Factor XI, Factor V, fibrinogen, or fibronectin inhibited 125I-HMWK-platelet binding. 125I-HMWK binding to unstimulated platelets was 89% reversible within 10 min with a 50-fold molar excess of HMWK. Unstimulated platelets contained a single set of saturable, high affinity binding sites for 125I-HMWK with an apparent dissociation constant of 0.99 nM +/- 0.35 and 3,313 molecules/platelet +/- 843. These studies indicate that the unstimulated external platelet membrane has a binding site for HMWK that could serve as a surface to modulate contact phase activation. Images PMID:3722381

  17. Detection of secondary binding sites in proteins using fragment screening.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, R Frederick; Verdonk, Marcel L; Saini, Harpreet K; Tickle, Ian J; Jhoti, Harren

    2015-12-29

    Proteins need to be tightly regulated as they control biological processes in most normal cellular functions. The precise mechanisms of regulation are rarely completely understood but can involve binding of endogenous ligands and/or partner proteins at specific locations on a protein that can modulate function. Often, these additional secondary binding sites appear separate to the primary binding site, which, for example for an enzyme, may bind a substrate. In previous work, we have uncovered several examples in which secondary binding sites were discovered on proteins using fragment screening approaches. In each case, we were able to establish that the newly identified secondary binding site was biologically relevant as it was able to modulate function by the binding of a small molecule. In this study, we investigate how often secondary binding sites are located on proteins by analyzing 24 protein targets for which we have performed a fragment screen using X-ray crystallography. Our analysis shows that, surprisingly, the majority of proteins contain secondary binding sites based on their ability to bind fragments. Furthermore, sequence analysis of these previously unknown sites indicate high conservation, which suggests that they may have a biological function, perhaps via an allosteric mechanism. Comparing the physicochemical properties of the secondary sites with known primary ligand binding sites also shows broad similarities indicating that many of the secondary sites may be druggable in nature with small molecules that could provide new opportunities to modulate potential therapeutic targets.

  18. Enhanced Prediction of Src Homology 2 (SH2) Domain Binding Potentials Using a Fluorescence Polarization-derived c-Met, c-Kit, ErbB, and Androgen Receptor Interactome*

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Kin K.; Hause, Ronald J.; Barkinge, John L.; Ciaccio, Mark F.; Chuu, Chih-Pin; Jones, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Many human diseases are associated with aberrant regulation of phosphoprotein signaling networks. Src homology 2 (SH2) domains represent the major class of protein domains in metazoans that interact with proteins phosphorylated on the amino acid residue tyrosine. Although current SH2 domain prediction algorithms perform well at predicting the sequences of phosphorylated peptides that are likely to result in the highest possible interaction affinity in the context of random peptide library screens, these algorithms do poorly at predicting the interaction potential of SH2 domains with physiologically derived protein sequences. We employed a high throughput interaction assay system to empirically determine the affinity between 93 human SH2 domains and phosphopeptides abstracted from several receptor tyrosine kinases and signaling proteins. The resulting interaction experiments revealed over 1000 novel peptide-protein interactions and provided a glimpse into the common and specific interaction potentials of c-Met, c-Kit, GAB1, and the human androgen receptor. We used these data to build a permutation-based logistic regression classifier that performed considerably better than existing algorithms for predicting the interaction potential of several SH2 domains. PMID:24728074

  19. The folate binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Corrocher, R; Olivieri, O; Pacor, M L

    1991-01-01

    Folates are essential molecules for cell life and, not surprisingly, their transport in biological fluids and their transfer to cells are finely regulated. Folate binding proteins play a major role in this regulation. This paper will review our knowledge on these proteins and examine the most recent advances in this field. PMID:1820987

  20. MD-2 binds cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Kim, Jungsu; Gonen, Ayelet; Viriyakosol, Suganya; Miller, Yury I

    2016-02-19

    Cholesterol is a structural component of cellular membranes, which is transported from liver to peripheral cells in the form of cholesterol esters (CE), residing in the hydrophobic core of low-density lipoprotein. Oxidized CE (OxCE) is often found in plasma and in atherosclerotic lesions of subjects with cardiovascular disease. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that OxCE activates inflammatory responses in macrophages via toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4). Here we demonstrate that cholesterol binds to myeloid differentiation-2 (MD-2), a TLR4 ancillary molecule, which is a binding receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and is indispensable for LPS-induced TLR4 dimerization and signaling. Cholesterol binding to MD-2 was competed by LPS and by OxCE-modified BSA. Furthermore, soluble MD-2 in human plasma and MD-2 in mouse atherosclerotic lesions carried cholesterol, the finding supporting the biological significance of MD-2 cholesterol binding. These results help understand the molecular basis of TLR4 activation by OxCE and mechanisms of chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis.

  1. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories—episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities.

  2. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  3. Lectin binding in meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Kleinert, R; Radner, H

    1987-01-01

    Forty-two meningiomas of different morphological sub-type were examined to determine their pattern of binding to 11 different lectins which characterize cell surface components such as carbohydrate residues. Histiocytic and xanthoma cells within meningiomas could be demonstrated with six different lectins: wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), peanut agglutinin (PNA) Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin (BPA), Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), Vicia fava agglutinin (VFA) and Soyabean agglutinin (SBA). Vascular elements including endothelial cells and intimal cells, bound Ulex europaeus agglutinin type 1 (UEA 1), WGA and HPA. The fibrous stroma in fibrous and fibroblastic meningiomas bound PNA, Laburnum alpinum agglutinin (LAA) and SBA. Tumour cells in meningotheliomatous meningiomas and some areas of anaplastic meningiomas bound Concanavalin A, PNA, LAA and VFA whereas tumour cells in fibrous and fibroblastic meningiomas bound BPA, LAA and VFA. Lectin binding has proved to be of value in detecting histiocytic and xanthoma cells together with vascular elements within meningiomas. In addition, the different lectin binding patterns allow different histological sub-types of meningioma to be distinguished although the biological significance of the binding patterns is unclear. PMID:3658105

  4. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  5. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics.

    PubMed

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories-episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities. PMID:26520084

  6. Linoleic acid binding properties of ovalbumin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sponton, Osvaldo E; Perez, Adrián A; Carrara, Carlos R; Santiago, Liliana G

    2015-04-01

    In the present work, ovalbumin (OVA) solutions (10 g/L, 50 mM NaCl, pH 7.5) were heat-treated at 75, 80 and 85°C (namely, OVA-75, OVA-80 and OVA-85, respectively), from 0 to 25 min. OVA nanoparticles (OVAn) around 100 nm were obtained. For 3 min of heat treatment, OVAn sizes increased with temperature, but for a heating time longer than 10 min, OVA-75 showed the highest size values. OVAn surface hydrophobicity increased 6-8 folds in comparison with native OVA and wavelength blue shifts of 25-30 nm in maximum fluorescence intensity were registered. These results suggest that buried hydrophobic residues were exposed to the aqueous medium. Binding experiments with linoleic acid (LA) as polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) model were carried out. Firstly, binding ability of OVAn was determined from LA titration curves of intrinsic fluorescence measurements. OVA-85 at 5 min presented the highest binding ability and it was used for further binding properties studies (turbidity, particle size distribution--PSD--analysis and ζ-potential measurements). Turbidity measurement and PSD analysis showed that OVAn-LA nanocomplexes were formed, avoiding LA supramolecular self-assembly formation. The union of LA to OVAn surface confers them significant lower ζ-potential and larger size. Hence, fluorescence and ζ-potential results showed that LA would bind to OVAn by mean of hydrophobic interactions. Information derived from this work could be important to potentially use OVAn as PUFA vehiculization with applications in several industrial sectors (food, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, etc.).

  7. Niobium Uptake and Release by Bacterial Ferric Ion Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanbo; Harvey, Ian; Campopiano, Dominic; Sadler, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Ferric ion binding proteins (Fbps) transport FeIII across the periplasm and are vital for the virulence of many Gram negative bacteria. Iron(III) is tightly bound in a hinged binding cleft with octahedral coordination geometry involving binding to protein side chains (including tyrosinate residues) together with a synergistic anion such as phosphate. Niobium compounds are of interest for their potential biological activity, which has been little explored. We have studied the binding of cyclopentadienyl and nitrilotriacetato NbV complexes to the Fbp from Neisseria gonorrhoeae by UV-vis spectroscopy, chromatography, ICP-OES, mass spectrometry, and Nb K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These data suggest that NbV binds strongly to Fbp and that a dinuclear NbV centre can be readily accommodated in the interdomain binding cleft. The possibility of designing niobium-based antibiotics which block iron uptake by pathogenic bacteria is discussed. PMID:20445753

  8. Molecular mechanism of CO2 and SO2 molecules binding to the air/liquid interface of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ionic liquid: A Molecular dynamics study with polarizable potential models

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, Collin D.; Chang, Tsun-Mei; Dang, Liem X.

    2010-11-25

    Molecular dynamics simulations with many-body interactions were carried out to understand the bulk and interfacial absorption of gases in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIMBF4). A new polarizable molecular model was developed for BMIMBF4, which was found to give the correct liquid density, but also had good agreement with experiment for its surface tension and X-ray reflectivity. The potential of mean force of CO2 and SO2 were calculated across the air-BMIMBF4 interface, and the bulk free energies were calculated with the free energy perturbation method. A new polarizable model was also developed for CO2. The air-BMIMBF4 interface had enhanced BMIM density, which was mostly related to its butyl group, followed by enhanced BF4 density a few angstroms towards the liquid bulk. The density profiles were observed to exhibit oscillations between high BMIM and BF4 density, indicating the presence of surface layering induced by the interface. The potential of mean force for CO2 and SO2 showed more negative free energies in regions of enhanced BF4 density, while more positive free energies in regions of high BMIM density. Moreover, these gases showed free energy minimums at the interface, where the BMIM alkyl groups were found to be most prevalent. Our results show the importance of ionic liquid interfacial ordering for understanding gas solvation in them. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  9. Mucin Binding Reduces Colistin Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Johnny X; Blaskovich, Mark A T; Pelingon, Ruby; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela; Elliott, Alysha G; Butler, Mark S; Montgomery, A Bruce; Cooper, Matthew A

    2015-10-01

    Colistin has found increasing use in treating drug-resistant bacterial lung infections, but potential interactions with pulmonary biomolecules have not been investigated. We postulated that colistin, like aminoglycoside antibiotics, may bind to secretory mucin in sputum or epithelial mucin that lines airways, reducing free drug levels. To test this hypothesis, we measured binding of colistin and other antibiotics to porcine mucin, a family of densely glycosylated proteins used as a surrogate for human sputum and airway mucin. Antibiotics were incubated in dialysis tubing with or without mucin, and concentrations of unbound antibiotics able to penetrate the dialysis tubing were measured over time using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The percentage of antibiotic measured in the dialysate after 4 h in the presence of mucin, relative to the amount without mucin, was 15% for colistin, 16% for polymyxin B, 19% for tobramycin, 52% for ciprofloxacin, and 78% for daptomycin. Antibiotics with the strongest mucin binding had an overall polybasic positive charge, whereas those with comparatively little binding were less basic. When comparing MICs measured with or without added mucin, colistin and polymyxin B showed >100-fold increases in MICs for multiple Gram-negative bacteria. Preclinical evaluation of mucin binding should become a standard procedure when considering the potential pulmonary use of new or existing antibiotics, particularly those with a polybasic overall charge. In the airways, mucin binding may reduce the antibacterial efficacy of inhaled or intravenously administered colistin, and the presence of sub-MIC effective antibiotic concentrations could result in the development of antibiotic resistance. PMID:26169405

  10. Mucin Binding Reduces Colistin Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Johnny X; Blaskovich, Mark A T; Pelingon, Ruby; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela; Elliott, Alysha G; Butler, Mark S; Montgomery, A Bruce; Cooper, Matthew A

    2015-10-01

    Colistin has found increasing use in treating drug-resistant bacterial lung infections, but potential interactions with pulmonary biomolecules have not been investigated. We postulated that colistin, like aminoglycoside antibiotics, may bind to secretory mucin in sputum or epithelial mucin that lines airways, reducing free drug levels. To test this hypothesis, we measured binding of colistin and other antibiotics to porcine mucin, a family of densely glycosylated proteins used as a surrogate for human sputum and airway mucin. Antibiotics were incubated in dialysis tubing with or without mucin, and concentrations of unbound antibiotics able to penetrate the dialysis tubing were measured over time using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The percentage of antibiotic measured in the dialysate after 4 h in the presence of mucin, relative to the amount without mucin, was 15% for colistin, 16% for polymyxin B, 19% for tobramycin, 52% for ciprofloxacin, and 78% for daptomycin. Antibiotics with the strongest mucin binding had an overall polybasic positive charge, whereas those with comparatively little binding were less basic. When comparing MICs measured with or without added mucin, colistin and polymyxin B showed >100-fold increases in MICs for multiple Gram-negative bacteria. Preclinical evaluation of mucin binding should become a standard procedure when considering the potential pulmonary use of new or existing antibiotics, particularly those with a polybasic overall charge. In the airways, mucin binding may reduce the antibacterial efficacy of inhaled or intravenously administered colistin, and the presence of sub-MIC effective antibiotic concentrations could result in the development of antibiotic resistance.

  11. Five of Five VHHs Neutralizing Poliovirus Bind the Receptor-Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Mike; Schotte, Lise; Thys, Bert; Filman, David J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nanobodies, or VHHs, that recognize poliovirus type 1 have previously been selected and characterized as candidates for antiviral agents or reagents for standardization of vaccine quality control. In this study, we present high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of poliovirus with five neutralizing VHHs. All VHHs bind the capsid in the canyon at sites that extensively overlap the poliovirus receptor-binding site. In contrast, the interaction involves a unique (and surprisingly extensive) surface for each of the five VHHs. Five regions of the capsid were found to participate in binding with all five VHHs. Four of these five regions are known to alter during the expansion of the capsid associated with viral entry. Interestingly, binding of one of the VHHs, PVSS21E, resulted in significant changes of the capsid structure and thus seems to trap the virus in an early stage of expansion. IMPORTANCE We describe the cryo-electron microscopy structures of complexes of five neutralizing VHHs with the Mahoney strain of type 1 poliovirus at resolutions ranging from 3.8 to 6.3Å. All five VHHs bind deep in the virus canyon at similar sites that overlap extensively with the binding site for the receptor (CD155). The binding surfaces on the VHHs are surprisingly extensive, but despite the use of similar binding surfaces on the virus, the binding surface on the VHHs is unique for each VHH. In four of the five complexes, the virus remains essentially unchanged, but for the fifth there are significant changes reminiscent of but smaller in magnitude than the changes associated with cell entry, suggesting that this VHH traps the virus in a previously undescribed early intermediate state. The neutralizing mechanisms of the VHHs and their potential use as quality control agents for the end game of poliovirus eradication are discussed. PMID:26764003

  12. AB-Bind: Antibody binding mutational database for computational affinity predictions.

    PubMed

    Sirin, Sarah; Apgar, James R; Bennett, Eric M; Keating, Amy E

    2016-02-01

    Antibodies (Abs) are a crucial component of the immune system and are often used as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. The need for high-affinity and high-specificity antibodies in research and medicine is driving the development of computational tools for accelerating antibody design and discovery. We report a diverse set of antibody binding data with accompanying structures that can be used to evaluate methods for modeling antibody interactions. Our Antibody-Bind (AB-Bind) database includes 1101 mutants with experimentally determined changes in binding free energies (ΔΔG) across 32 complexes. Using the AB-Bind data set, we evaluated the performance of protein scoring potentials in their ability to predict changes in binding free energies upon mutagenesis. Numerical correlations between computed and observed ΔΔG values were low (r = 0.16-0.45), but the potentials exhibited predictive power for classifying variants as improved vs weakened binders. Performance was evaluated using the area under the curve (AUC) for receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves; the highest AUC values for 527 mutants with |ΔΔG| > 1.0 kcal/mol were 0.81, 0.87, and 0.88 using STATIUM, FoldX, and Discovery Studio scoring potentials, respectively. Some methods could also enrich for variants with improved binding affinity; FoldX and Discovery Studio were able to correctly rank 42% and 30%, respectively, of the 80 most improved binders (those with ΔΔG < -1.0 kcal/mol) in the top 5% of the database. This modest predictive performance has value but demonstrates the continuing need to develop and improve protein energy functions for affinity prediction. PMID:26473627

  13. C60 fullerene binding to DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshehri, Mansoor H.; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2014-09-01

    Fullerenes have attracted considerable attention in various areas of science and technology. Owing to their exceptional physical, chemical, and biological properties, they have many applications, particularly in cosmetic and medical products. Using the Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential function and the continuum approximation, which assumes that intermolecular interactions can be approximated by average atomic surface densities, we determine the binding energies of a C60 fullerene with respect to both single-strand and double-strand DNA molecules. We assume that all configurations are in a vacuum and that the C60 fullerene is initially at rest. Double integrals are performed to determine the interaction energy of the system. We find that the C60 fullerene binds to the double-strand DNA molecule, at either the major or minor grooves, with binding energies of -4.7 eV or -2.3 eV, respectively, and that the C60 molecule binds to the single-strand DNA molecule with a binding energy of -1.6 eV. Our results suggest that the C60 molecule is most likely to be linked to the major groove of the dsDNA molecule.

  14. Library Binding Manual. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakhanpal, S. K.

    This procedural manual is designed to be used in bindery sections in public, university and special libraries. It briefly discusses these general matters: administrative control; selection of a binder; when and what to bind; conventional binding; routines; missing issues; schedule for shipments; temporary binding; rare books, maps and newspapers;…

  15. An Electrostatic Funnel in the GABA-Binding Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lightstone, Felice C.

    2016-01-01

    The γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAA-R) is a major inhibitory neuroreceptor that is activated by the binding of GABA. The structure of the GABAA-R is well characterized, and many of the binding site residues have been identified. However, most of these residues are obscured behind the C-loop that acts as a cover to the binding site. Thus, the mechanism by which the GABA molecule recognizes the binding site, and the pathway it takes to enter the binding site are both unclear. Through the completion and detailed analysis of 100 short, unbiased, independent molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated this phenomenon of GABA entering the binding site. In each system, GABA was placed quasi-randomly near the binding site of a GABAA-R homology model, and atomistic simulations were carried out to observe the behavior of the GABA molecules. GABA fully entered the binding site in 19 of the 100 simulations. The pathway taken by these molecules was consistent and non-random; the GABA molecules approach the binding site from below, before passing up behind the C-loop and into the binding site. This binding pathway is driven by long-range electrostatic interactions, whereby the electrostatic field acts as a ‘funnel’ that sweeps the GABA molecules towards the binding site, at which point more specific atomic interactions take over. These findings define a nuanced mechanism whereby the GABAA-R uses the general zwitterionic features of the GABA molecule to identify a potential ligand some 2 nm away from the binding site. PMID:27119953

  16. An Electrostatic Funnel in the GABA-Binding Pathway.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Timothy S; Lightstone, Felice C

    2016-04-01

    The γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAA-R) is a major inhibitory neuroreceptor that is activated by the binding of GABA. The structure of the GABAA-R is well characterized, and many of the binding site residues have been identified. However, most of these residues are obscured behind the C-loop that acts as a cover to the binding site. Thus, the mechanism by which the GABA molecule recognizes the binding site, and the pathway it takes to enter the binding site are both unclear. Through the completion and detailed analysis of 100 short, unbiased, independent molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated this phenomenon of GABA entering the binding site. In each system, GABA was placed quasi-randomly near the binding site of a GABAA-R homology model, and atomistic simulations were carried out to observe the behavior of the GABA molecules. GABA fully entered the binding site in 19 of the 100 simulations. The pathway taken by these molecules was consistent and non-random; the GABA molecules approach the binding site from below, before passing up behind the C-loop and into the binding site. This binding pathway is driven by long-range electrostatic interactions, whereby the electrostatic field acts as a 'funnel' that sweeps the GABA molecules towards the binding site, at which point more specific atomic interactions take over. These findings define a nuanced mechanism whereby the GABAA-R uses the general zwitterionic features of the GABA molecule to identify a potential ligand some 2 nm away from the binding site. PMID:27119953

  17. Analysis of protein kinase C requirement for exocytosis in permeabilized rat basophilic leukaemia RBL-2H3 cells: a GTP-binding protein(s) as a potential target for protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Buccione, R; Di Tullio, G; Caretta, M; Marinetti, M R; Bizzarri, C; Francavilla, S; Luini, A; De Matteis, M A

    1994-01-01

    The role of protein kinase C in calcium-dependent exocytosis was investigated in permeabilized rat basophilic leukaemia cells. When protein kinase C was down-regulated by phorbol myristate acetate (1 microM for 3-6 h) or inhibited by pharmacological agents such as calphostin C (1 microM) or a protein kinase C-specific pseudo-substrate peptide inhibitor (100-200 microM), cells lost the ability to secrete in response to 10 microM free Ca2+. In contrast, a short treatment (15 min) with phorbol myristate acetate, which maximally activates protein kinase C, potentiated the effects of calcium. Biochemical analysis of protein kinase C-deprived cells indicated that loss of the Ca(2+)-induced secretory response correlated with disappearance of protein kinase C-alpha. In addition, at the concentrations effective for exocytosis, calcium caused translocation of protein kinase C-alpha to the membrane fraction and stimulated phospholipase C, suggesting that, in permeabilized cells, protein kinase C can be activated by calcium through generation of the phospholipase C metabolite diacylglycerol. The delta, epsilon and zeta Ca(2+)-independent protein kinase C isoenzymes were insensitive to phorbol myristate acetate-induced down-regulation and did not, as expected, translocate to the particulate fraction in response to calcium. Interestingly, secretory competence was restored in cells depleted of protein kinase C or in which protein kinase C itself was inhibited by non-hydrolysable GTP analogues, but not by GTP, suggesting that protein kinase C might regulate the ability of a G protein(s) directly controlling the exocytotic machinery to be activated by endogenous GTP. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8129713

  18. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H.; Cogdell, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding. PMID:24915077

  19. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding. PMID:24915077

  20. Fucosyl neoglycoprotein binds to mouse epididymal spermatozoa and inhibits sperm binding to the egg zona pellucida.

    PubMed

    Oh, Y S; Ahn, H S; Gye, M C

    2013-12-01

    Glycan epitopes of cellular glycoconjugates act as versatile biochemical signals, and this sugar coding plays an important role in cell-to-cell recognition processes. In this study, our aims were to determine the distribution of sperm receptors with activity for fucosyl- and galactosyl glycans and to address whether monosugar neoglycoproteins functionally mimic the binding between zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins and spermatozoa. In mouse epididymal spermatozoa with intact acrosomes, fucopyranosyl bovine serum albumin (BSA-Fuc) bound to the segment of the acrosome, the equatorial segment, and the postacrosome region of the sperm head. Galactosyl BSA (BSA-Gal) binding activity was similar to that of BSA-Fuc, but was weaker. In acrosome-reacted spermatozoa treated with the Ca(2+) ionophore A23187, BSA-zuc binding was lost in the apical segment of the acrosome but remained in the equatorial segment and postacrosome regions. BSA-Gal binding to the equatorial region was increased. In the presence of 2.5 μg ml(-1) BSA-Fuc, in vitro sperm-ZP binding was significantly decreased, indicating that fucosyl BSA functionally mimics ZP glycoproteins during sperm-egg ZP interactions. At the same concentration, BSA-Gal was not effective. Fucosyl BSA that efficiently inhibited the sperm-ZP binding can mimic the ZP glycoconjugate and has potential for use as a sperm fertility control agent in mouse.

  1. BINDING OF ANTIGEN BY IMMUNOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Bystryn, Jean-Claude; Siskind, Gregory W.; Uhr, Jonathan W.

    1973-01-01

    The binding of antigen to cells with antibody on their surface has been studied in a model system consisting of murine myeloma cells (MOPC 315) and DNP conjugates. Specific binding occurred between the DNP groups of DNP conjugates and cell surface immunoglobulin. Using this model, the binding affinities of multivalent and univalent DNP conjugates were measured directly by equilibrium-binding techniques and indirectly by displacement of bound conjugate with univalent hapten. With both approaches the multivalent conjugate was shown to bind to cells with an avidity 100–300 fold greater than the univalent hapten. Nonspecific binding of unrelated protein and repeated washing of cells was found to markedly dedecrease the specific binding of univalent conjugates, presumably because the relatively weak bonds dissociate readily. PMID:4734402

  2. Diversity of Cyclic Di-GMP-Binding Proteins and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shan-Ho; Galperin, Michael Y

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) synthetases and hydrolases (GGDEF, EAL, and HD-GYP domains) can be readily identified in bacterial genome sequences by using standard bioinformatic tools. In contrast, identification of c-di-GMP receptors remains a difficult task, and the current list of experimentally characterized c-di-GMP-binding proteins is likely incomplete. Several classes of c-di-GMP-binding proteins have been structurally characterized; for some others, the binding sites have been identified; and for several potential c-di-GMP receptors, the binding sites remain to be determined. We present here a comparative structural analysis of c-di-GMP-protein complexes that aims to discern the common themes in the binding mechanisms that allow c-di-GMP receptors to bind it with (sub)micromolar affinities despite the 1,000-fold excess of GTP. The available structures show that most receptors use their Arg and Asp/Glu residues to bind c-di-GMP monomers, dimers, or tetramers with stacked guanine bases. The only exception is the EAL domains that bind c-di-GMP monomers in an extended conformation. We show that in c-di-GMP-binding signature motifs, Arg residues bind to the O-6 and N-7 atoms at the Hoogsteen edge of the guanine base, while Asp/Glu residues bind the N-1 and N-2 atoms at its Watson-Crick edge. In addition, Arg residues participate in stacking interactions with the guanine bases of c-di-GMP and the aromatic rings of Tyr and Phe residues. This may account for the presence of Arg residues in the active sites of every receptor protein that binds stacked c-di-GMP. We also discuss the implications of these structural data for the improved understanding of the c-di-GMP signaling mechanisms.

  3. Diversity of Cyclic Di-GMP-Binding Proteins and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) synthetases and hydrolases (GGDEF, EAL, and HD-GYP domains) can be readily identified in bacterial genome sequences by using standard bioinformatic tools. In contrast, identification of c-di-GMP receptors remains a difficult task, and the current list of experimentally characterized c-di-GMP-binding proteins is likely incomplete. Several classes of c-di-GMP-binding proteins have been structurally characterized; for some others, the binding sites have been identified; and for several potential c-di-GMP receptors, the binding sites remain to be determined. We present here a comparative structural analysis of c-di-GMP-protein complexes that aims to discern the common themes in the binding mechanisms that allow c-di-GMP receptors to bind it with (sub)micromolar affinities despite the 1,000-fold excess of GTP. The available structures show that most receptors use their Arg and Asp/Glu residues to bind c-di-GMP monomers, dimers, or tetramers with stacked guanine bases. The only exception is the EAL domains that bind c-di-GMP monomers in an extended conformation. We show that in c-di-GMP-binding signature motifs, Arg residues bind to the O-6 and N-7 atoms at the Hoogsteen edge of the guanine base, while Asp/Glu residues bind the N-1 and N-2 atoms at its Watson-Crick edge. In addition, Arg residues participate in stacking interactions with the guanine bases of c-di-GMP and the aromatic rings of Tyr and Phe residues. This may account for the presence of Arg residues in the active sites of every receptor protein that binds stacked c-di-GMP. We also discuss the implications of these structural data for the improved understanding of the c-di-GMP signaling mechanisms. PMID:26055114

  4. Multipose binding in molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Atkovska, Kalina; Samsonov, Sergey A; Paszkowski-Rogacz, Maciej; Pisabarro, M Teresa

    2014-02-14

    Molecular docking has been extensively applied in virtual screening of small molecule libraries for lead identification and optimization. A necessary prerequisite for successful differentiation between active and non-active ligands is the accurate prediction of their binding affinities in the complex by use of docking scoring functions. However, many studies have shown rather poor correlations between docking scores and experimental binding affinities. Our work aimed to improve this correlation by implementing a multipose binding concept in the docking scoring scheme. Multipose binding, i.e., the property of certain protein-ligand complexes to exhibit different ligand binding modes, has been shown to occur in nature for a variety of molecules. We conducted a high-throughput docking study and implemented multipose binding in the scoring procedure by considering multiple docking solutions in binding affinity prediction. In general, improvement of the agreement between docking scores and experimental data was observed, and this was most pronounced in complexes with large and flexible ligands and high binding affinities. Further developments of the selection criteria for docking solutions for each individual complex are still necessary for a general utilization of the multipose binding concept for accurate binding affinity prediction by molecular docking.

  5. New DNA-binding radioprotectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roger

    The normal tissue damage associated with cancer radiotherapy has motivated the development at Peter Mac of a new class of DNA-binding radioprotecting drugs that could be applied top-ically to normal tissues at risk. Methylproamine (MP), the lead compound, reduces radiation induced cell kill at low concentrations. For example, experiments comparing the clonogenic survival of transformed human keratinocytes treated with 30 micromolar MP before and dur-ing various doses of ionising radiation, with the radiation dose response for untreated cells, indicate a dose reduction factor (DRF) of 2. Similar survival curve experiments using various concentrations of MP, with parallel measurements of uptake of MP into cell nuclei, have en-abled the relationship between drug uptake and extent of radioprotection to be established. Radioprotection has also been demonstrated after systemic administration to mice, for three different endpoints, namely lung, jejunum and bone marrow (survival at 30 days post-TBI). The results of pulse radiolysis studies indicated that the drugs act by reduction of transient radiation-induced oxidative species on DNA. This hypothesis was substantiated by the results of experiments in which MP radioprotection of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, assessed as -H2AX foci, in the human keratinocyte cell line. For both endpoints, the extent of radioprotection increased with MP concentration up to a maximal value. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that radioprotection by MP is mediated by attenuation of the extent of initial DNA damage. However, although MP is a potent radioprotector, it becomes cytotoxic at higher concentrations. This limitation has been addressed in an extensive program of lead optimisation and some promising analogues have emerged from which the next lead will be selected. Given the clinical potential of topical radioprotection, the new analogues are being assessed in terms of delivery to mouse oral mucosa. This is

  6. Metal binding components in human amniotic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, P.G.; Zlotkin, S.H.; Sarkar, B. )

    1990-02-26

    Amniotic fluid is a potential source of both nutritionally essential and toxic metals for the fetus. As the binding pattern of these metals in amniotic fluid may be one of the determining factors in their availability to the fetus, the objective of this study was to investigate metal binding in vitro. The binding of six trace metals, Mn(II), Ni(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), and Fe(III), to components of human amniotic fluid was studied by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration at physiological pH, using radioisotopes as tracers and 50 mM TRIS/HCl as the elution buffer. The amniotic fluid was collected at 16-16.5 weeks gestation by amniocentesis and pooled for analysis. Extensive amounts of Fe, Cu, Zn, and Cd and small amounts of Mn and Ni were bound to high molecular weight proteins with elution patterns similar to those seen for the binding of these metals in serum. In addition, large amounts of Fe, Mn, Ni and Cd and small amounts of Zn and Cu were associated with low molecular weight component(s). The identity of these latter components is unknown, but they play an important biological role in amniotic fluid.

  7. Prediction of binding to MHC class I molecules.

    PubMed

    Adams, H P; Koziol, J A

    1995-09-25

    The binding of antigenic peptide sequences to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules is a prerequisite for stimulation of cytotoxic T cell responses. Neural networks are here used to predict the binding capacity of polypeptides to MHC class I molecules encoded by the gene HLA-A*0201. Given a large database of 552 nonamers and 486 decamers and their known binding capacities, the neural networks achieve a predictive hit rate of 0.78 for classifying peptides which might induce an immune response (good or intermediate binders) vs. those which cannot (weak or non-binders). The neural nets also depict specific motifs for different binding capacities. This approach is in principle applicable to all MHC class I and II molecules, given a suitable set of known binding capacities. The trained networks can then be used to perform a systematic search through all pathogen or tumor antigen protein sequences for potential cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes.

  8. Identification and characterization of anion binding sites in RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, Jeffrey S.; Chase, Elaine; Costantino, David A.; Golden, Barbara L.

    2010-05-24

    Although RNA molecules are highly negatively charged, anions have been observed bound to RNA in crystal structures. It has been proposed that anion binding sites found within isolated RNAs represent regions of the molecule that could be involved in intermolecular interactions, indicating potential contact points for negatively charged amino acids from proteins or phosphate groups from an RNA. Several types of anion binding sites have been cataloged based on available structures. However, currently there is no method for unambiguously assigning anions to crystallographic electron density, and this has precluded more detailed analysis of RNA-anion interaction motifs and their significance. We therefore soaked selenate into two different types of RNA crystals and used the anomalous signal from these anions to identify binding sites in these RNA molecules unambiguously. Examination of these sites and comparison with other suspected anion binding sites reveals features of anion binding motifs, and shows that selenate may be a useful tool for studying RNA-anion interactions.

  9. Trifluoperazine binding to mutant calmodulins.

    PubMed

    Massom, L R; Lukas, T J; Persechini, A; Kretsinger, R H; Watterson, D M; Jarrett, H W

    1991-01-22

    Trifluoperazine (TFP) binding by 14 calmodulins, including 12 produced by site-directed mutagenesis, was determined. While vertebrate calmodulin binds 4.2 +/- 0.2 equiv of TFP, Escherichia coli expressed but unmutated calmodulins bind about 5.0 +/- 0.5 equiv of TFP. The cause for this difference is not known. The E. coli expressed proteins consist of two different series expressed from different calmodulin genes, CaMI and SYNCAM. The wild-type genes code for proteins that differ by nine conservative amino acid substitutions. Both these calmodulins bind 5 equiv of TFP with similar affinities, thus none of these conservative substitutions has any additional effect on TFP binding. Some altered calmodulins (deletion of EE83-84 or SEEE81-84, changing DEE118-120----KKK, M124----I,E120----K, or E82----K) have no appreciable effect on TFP binding. Other mutations affect either the binding of one TFP (deletion of E84) or about two TFP (changing E84----K, EEE82-84----KKK, E67----A, DEQ6-8----KKK, or E11----K). The mutations that affect TFP binding are localized to three regions of calmodulin: The amino-terminal alpha-helix, the central helix between the two globular ends of calmodulin, and a calcium-binding site in the second calcium-binding domain. The results are consistent with each of these regions either directly participating in drug binding or involved structurally in maintaining or inducing the correct conformation for TFP binding in the amino-terminal half of calmodulin.

  10. Method and apparatus for detecting chemical binding

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.; Wells, Cyndi A.

    2007-07-10

    The method for screening binding between a target binder and potential pharmaceutical chemicals involves sending a solution (preferably an aqueous solution) of the target binder through a conduit to a size exclusion filter, the target binder being too large to pass through the size exclusion filter, and then sending a solution of one or more potential pharmaceutical chemicals (preferably an aqueous solution) through the same conduit to the size exclusion filter after target binder has collected on the filter. The potential pharmaceutical chemicals are small enough to pass through the filter. Afterwards, x-rays are sent from an x-ray source to the size exclusion filter, and if the potential pharmaceutical chemicals form a complex with the target binder, the complex produces an x-ray fluorescence signal having an intensity that indicates that a complex has formed.

  11. Method And Apparatus For Detecting Chemical Binding

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.; Wells, Cyndi A.

    2005-02-22

    The method for screening binding between a target binder and potential pharmaceutical chemicals involves sending a solution (preferably an aqueous solution) of the target binder through a conduit to a size exclusion filter, the target binder being too large to pass through the size exclusion filter, and then sending a solution of one or more potential pharmaceutical chemicals (preferably an aqueous solution) through the same conduit to the size exclusion filter after target binder has collected on the filter. The potential pharmaceutical chemicals are small enough to pass through the filter. Afterwards, x-rays are sent from an x-ray source to the size exclusion filter, and if the potential pharmaceutical chemicals form a complex with the target binder, the complex produces an x-ray fluorescence signal having an intensity that indicates that a complex has formed.

  12. Radiobrominated triphenylethylenes as estrogen receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Seevers, R.H.; Meese, R.C.; Friedman, A.M.; DeSombre, E.R.

    1985-05-01

    Estrogen receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals have potential for use in the diagnosis and treatment of cancers of the female reproductive system. Tamoxifen is an antiestrogen derived from the triphenylethylene skeleton which is used in the treatment of mammary carcinoma. Hydroxytamoxifen is a metabolite of tamoxifen which binds tightly to the estrogen receptor. Two triphenylethylene derivatives based on the structure of hydroxytamoxifen have been prepared: 1-bromo-1-phenyl-2- (2-dimethylamino)-4-ethoxyphenyl -2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) ethene (1) where the ethyl group of hydroxytamoxifen has been replaced by a bromine, and 1-bromo-1-phenyl-2,2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) ethene (2) with a similar substitution and also lacking the aminoethoxy side chain believed to confer antiestrogenicity. Both 1 and 2 bind strongly to the estrogen receptor. 2 has been labeled with the Auger electron emitting nuclide Br-80m in moderate yields in high specific activity using either N-bromosuccinimide or N-bromophthalimide and shows promise as a potential radiotherapy agent.

  13. Binding kinetics of lock-key colloids: surface diffusion enhancement of the rate of specific binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon-Melendez, Laura; Beltran-Villegas, Daniel J.; van Anders, Greg; Liu, Jun; Spellings, Matthew; Sacanna, Stefano; Pine, David J.; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Larson, Ronald G.; Solomon, Michael J.

    2014-03-01

    The kinetics of anisotropic particle assembly are expected to be slow due to specific directional interactions between the assembly building blocks. We investigate the lock-and-key colloidal system (Sacanna et al, Nature 464, 575-578 (2010)), to identify and understand the mechanisms that lead to specific lock-key pair binding. For lock pockets of a particular shape, we experimentally identify the importance of nonspecific lock-key binding as a pathway to specific lock-key pair formation. In this pathway, key particles can diffuse on the surface of the lock and bind specifically to the dimple of the lock. We find that this mechanism can be more important to specific bond formation than the direct binding mechanism. We model the surface diffusion mechanism as a mean first-passage time problem. Using an anisotropic interaction potential between a lock and key particle pair (van Anders et al, arXiv:1309.1187), we compare Stokesian dynamics simulations of lock and key binding to the experiments. We propose that nonspecific interactions can play an important role in accelerating anisotropic particle assembly. This work is supported by the U.S. Army Research Office under Grant Award W911NF-10-1-0518.

  14. Calmodulin Binding Proteins and Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    O’Day, Danton H.; Eshak, Kristeen; Myre, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The small, calcium-sensor protein, calmodulin, is ubiquitously expressed and central to cell function in all cell types. Here the literature linking calmodulin to Alzheimer’s disease is reviewed. Several experimentally-verified calmodulin-binding proteins are involved in the formation of amyloid-β plaques including amyloid-β protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin-1, and ADAM10. Many others possess potential calmodulin-binding domains that remain to be verified. Three calmodulin binding proteins are associated with the formation of neurofibrillary tangles: two kinases (CaMKII, CDK5) and one protein phosphatase (PP2B or calcineurin). Many of the genes recently identified by genome wide association studies and other studies encode proteins that contain putative calmodulin-binding domains but only a couple (e.g., APOE, BIN1) have been experimentally confirmed as calmodulin binding proteins. At least two receptors involved in calcium metabolism and linked to Alzheimer’s disease (mAchR; NMDAR) have also been identified as calmodulin-binding proteins. In addition to this, many proteins that are involved in other cellular events intimately associated with Alzheimer’s disease including calcium channel function, cholesterol metabolism, neuroinflammation, endocytosis, cell cycle events, and apoptosis have been tentatively or experimentally verified as calmodulin binding proteins. The use of calmodulin as a potential biomarker and as a therapeutic target is discussed. PMID:25812852

  15. Designing ligands to bind proteins.

    PubMed

    Whitesides, George M; Krishnamurthy, Vijay M

    2005-11-01

    The ability to design drugs (so-called 'rational drug design') has been one of the long-term objectives of chemistry for 50 years. It is an exceptionally difficult problem, and many of its parts lie outside the expertise of chemistry. The much more limited problem - how to design tight-binding ligands (rational ligand design) - would seem to be one that chemistry could solve, but has also proved remarkably recalcitrant. The question is 'Why is it so difficult?' and the answer is 'We still don't entirely know'. This perspective discusses some of the technical issues - potential functions, protein plasticity, enthalpy/entropy compensation, and others - that contribute, and suggests areas where fundamental understanding of protein-ligand interactions falls short of what is needed. It surveys recent technological developments (in particular, isothermal titration calorimetry) that will, hopefully, make now the time for serious progress in this area. It concludes with the calorimetric examination of the association of a series of systematically varied ligands with a model protein. The counterintuitive thermodynamic results observed serve to illustrate that, even in relatively simple systems, understanding protein-ligand association is challenging.

  16. Measuring Multivalent Binding Interactions by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Dam, Tarun K; Talaga, Melanie L; Fan, Ni; Brewer, Curtis F

    2016-01-01

    Multivalent glycoconjugate-protein interactions are central to many important biological processes. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) can potentially reveal the molecular and thermodynamic basis of such interactions. However, calorimetric investigation of multivalency is challenging. Binding of multivalent glycoconjugates to proteins (lectins) often leads to a stoichiometry-dependent precipitation process due to noncovalent cross-linking between the reactants. Precipitation during ITC titration severely affects the quality of the baseline as well as the signals. Hence, the resulting thermodynamic data are not dependable. We have made some modifications to address this problem and successfully studied multivalent glycoconjugate binding to lectins. We have also modified the Hill plot equation to analyze high quality ITC raw data obtained from multivalent binding. As described in this chapter, ITC-driven thermodynamic parameters and Hill plot analysis of ITC raw data can provide valuable information about the molecular mechanism of multivalent lectin-glycoconjugate interactions. The methods described herein revealed (i) the importance of functional valence of multivalent glycoconjugates, (ii) that favorable entropic effects contribute to the enhanced affinities associated with multivalent binding, (iii) that with the progression of lectin binding, the microscopic affinities of the glycan epitopes of a multivalent glycoconjugate decrease (negative cooperativity), (iv) that lectin binding to multivalent glycoconjugates, especially to mucins, involves internal diffusion jumps, (bind and jump) and (v) that scaffolds of glycoconjugates influence their entropy of binding.

  17. Engineering knottins as novel binding agents.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sarah J; Cochran, Jennifer R

    2012-01-01

    Cystine-knot miniproteins, also known as knottins, contain a conserved core of three tightly woven disulfide bonds which impart extraordinary thermal and proteolytic stability. Interspersed between their conserved cysteine residues are constrained loops that possess high levels of sequence diversity among knottin family members. Together these attributes make knottins promising molecular scaffolds for protein engineering and translational applications. While naturally occurring knottins have shown potential as both diagnostic agents and therapeutics, protein engineering is playing an important and increasing role in creating designer molecules that bind to a myriad of biomedical targets. Toward this goal, rational and combinatorial approaches have been used to engineer knottins with novel molecular recognition properties. Here, methods are described for creating and screening knottin libraries using yeast surface display and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Protocols are also provided for producing knottins by synthetic and recombinant methods, and for measuring the binding affinity of knottins to target proteins expressed on the cell surface.

  18. Binding Energy and Enzymatic Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, David E.; Raines, Ronald T.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the fundamental role that the favorable free energy of binding of the rate-determining transition state plays in catalysis. The principle that all of the catalytic factors discussed are realized by the use of this binding energy is reviewed. (CW)

  19. RNA binding specificity of Ebola virus transcription factor VP30.

    PubMed

    Schlereth, Julia; Grünweller, Arnold; Biedenkopf, Nadine; Becker, Stephan; Hartmann, Roland K

    2016-09-01

    The transcription factor VP30 of the non-segmented RNA negative strand Ebola virus balances viral transcription and replication. Here, we comprehensively studied RNA binding by VP30. Using a novel VP30:RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay, we tested truncated variants of 2 potential natural RNA substrates of VP30 - the genomic Ebola viral 3'-leader region and its complementary antigenomic counterpart (each ∼155 nt in length) - and a series of other non-viral RNAs. Based on oligonucleotide interference, the major VP30 binding region on the genomic 3'-leader substrate was assigned to the internal expanded single-stranded region (∼ nt 125-80). Best binding to VP30 was obtained with ssRNAs of optimally ∼ 40 nt and mixed base composition; underrepresentation of purines or pyrimidines was tolerated, but homopolymeric sequences impaired binding. A stem-loop structure, particularly at the 3'-end or positioned internally, supports stable binding to VP30. In contrast, dsRNA or RNAs exposing large internal loops flanked by entirely helical arms on both sides are not bound. Introduction of a 5´-Cap(0) structure impaired VP30 binding. Also, ssDNAs bind substantially weaker than isosequential ssRNAs and heparin competes with RNA for binding to VP30, indicating that ribose 2'-hydroxyls and electrostatic contacts of the phosphate groups contribute to the formation of VP30:RNA complexes. Our results indicate a rather relaxed RNA binding specificity of filoviral VP30, which largely differs from that of the functionally related transcription factor of the Paramyxoviridae which binds to ssRNAs as short as 13 nt with a preference for oligo(A) sequences. PMID:27315567

  20. Cooperative binding: a multiple personality.

    PubMed

    Martini, Johannes W R; Diambra, Luis; Habeck, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Cooperative binding has been described in many publications and has been related to or defined by several different properties of the binding behavior of the ligand to the target molecule. In addition to the commonly used Hill coefficient, other characteristics such as a sigmoidal shape of the overall titration curve in a linear plot, a change of ligand affinity of the other binding sites when a site of the target molecule becomes occupied, or complex roots of the binding polynomial have been used to define or to quantify cooperative binding. In this work, we analyze how the different properties are related in the most general model for binding curves based on the grand canonical partition function and present several examples which highlight differences between the cooperativity characterizing properties which are discussed. Our results mainly show that among the presented definitions there are not two which fully coincide. Moreover, this work poses the question whether it can make sense to distinguish between positive and negative cooperativity based on the macroscopic binding isotherm only. This article shall emphasize that scientists who investigate cooperative effects in biological systems could help avoiding misunderstandings by stating clearly which kind of cooperativity they discuss.

  1. Mechanisms of in vivo binding site selection of the hematopoietic master transcription factor PU.1.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thu-Hang; Minderjahn, Julia; Schmidl, Christian; Hoffmeister, Helen; Schmidhofer, Sandra; Chen, Wei; Längst, Gernot; Benner, Christopher; Rehli, Michael

    2013-07-01

    The transcription factor PU.1 is crucial for the development of many hematopoietic lineages and its binding patterns significantly change during differentiation processes. However, the 'rules' for binding or not-binding of potential binding sites are only partially understood. To unveil basic characteristics of PU.1 binding site selection in different cell types, we studied the binding properties of PU.1 during human macrophage differentiation. Using in vivo and in vitro binding assays, as well as computational prediction, we show that PU.1 selects its binding sites primarily based on sequence affinity, which results in the frequent autonomous binding of high affinity sites in DNase I inaccessible regions (25-45% of all occupied sites). Increasing PU.1 concentrations and the availability of cooperative transcription factor interactions during lineage differentiation both decrease affinity thresholds for in vivo binding and fine-tune cell type-specific PU.1 binding, which seems to be largely independent of DNA methylation. Occupied sites were predominantly detected in active chromatin domains, which are characterized by higher densities of PU.1 recognition sites and neighboring motifs for cooperative transcription factors. Our study supports a model of PU.1 binding control that involves motif-binding affinity, PU.1 concentration, cooperativeness with neighboring transcription factor sites and chromatin domain accessibility, which likely applies to all PU.1 expressing cells.

  2. Oligomerization of Mannan-binding Lectin Dictates Binding Properties and Complement Activation.

    PubMed

    Kjaer, T R; Jensen, L; Hansen, A; Dani, R; Jensenius, J C; Dobó, J; Gál, P; Thiel, S

    2016-07-01

    The complement system is a part of the innate immune system and is involved in recognition and clearance of pathogens and altered-self structures. The lectin pathway of the complement system is initiated when soluble pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) with collagen-like regions bind to foreign or altered self-surfaces. Associated with the collagen-like stems of these PRMs are three mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine proteases (MASPs) and two MBL-associated proteins (MAps). The most studied of the PRMs, MBL, is present in serum mainly as trimeric and tetrameric oligomers of the structural subunit. We hypothesized that oligomerization of MBL may influence both the potential to bind to micro organisms and the interaction with the MASPs and MAps, thus influencing the ability to initiate complement activation. When testing binding at 37 °C, we found higher binding of tetrameric MBL to Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) than trimeric and dimeric MBL. In serum, we found that tetrameric MBL was the main oligomeric form present in complexes with the MASPs and MAp44. Such preference was confirmed using purified forms of recombinant MBL (rMBL) oligomers, where tetrameric rMBL interacted stronger with all of the MASPs and MAp44, compared to trimeric MBL. As a direct consequence of the weaker interaction with the MASPs, we found that trimeric rMBL was inferior to tetrameric rMBL in activating the complement system. Our data suggest that the oligomeric state of MBL is crucial both for the binding properties and the effector function of MBL.

  3. Heparin-binding mechanism of the IGF2/IGF-binding protein 2 complex.

    PubMed

    Lund, Jacob; Søndergaard, Mads T; Conover, Cheryl A; Overgaard, Michael T

    2014-06-01

    IGF1 and IGF2 are potent stimulators of diverse cellular activities such as differentiation and mitosis. Six IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP1-IGFBP6) are primary regulators of IGF half-life and receptor availability. Generally, the binding of IGFBPs inhibits IGF receptor activation. However, it has been shown that IGFBP2 in complex with IGF2 (IGF2/IGFBP2) stimulates osteoblast function in vitro and increases skeletal mass in vivo. IGF2 binding to IGFBP2 greatly increases the affinity for 2- or 3-carbon O-sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), e.g. heparin and heparan sulfate, which is hypothesized to preferentially and specifically target the IGF2/IGFBP2 complex to the bone matrix. In order to obtain a more detailed understanding of the interactions between the IGF2/IGFBP2 complex and GAGs, we investigated heparin-binding properties of IGFBP2 and the IGF2/IGFBP2 complex in a quantitative manner. For this study, we mutated key positively charged residues within the two heparin-binding domains (HBDs) in IGFBP2 and in one potential HBD in IGF2. Using heparin affinity chromatography, we demonstrate that the two IGFBP2 HBDs contribute differentially to GAG binding in free IGFBP2 and the IGF2/IGFBP2 protein complex. Moreover, we identify a significant contribution from the HBD in IGF2 to the increased IGF2/IGFBP2 heparin affinity. Using molecular modeling, we present a novel model for the IGF2/IGFBP2 interaction with heparin where all three proposed HBDs constitute a positively charged and surface-exposed area that would serve to promote the increased heparin affinity of the complex compared with free intact IGFBP2.

  4. (/sup 3/)tetrahydrotrazodone binding. Association with serotonin binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, D.A.; Taylor, D.P.; Enna, S.J.

    1983-05-01

    High (17 nM) and low (603 nM) affinity binding sites for (/sup 3/)tetrahydrotrazodone ((/sup 3/) THT), a biologically active analogue of trazodone, have been identified in rat brain membranes. The substrate specificity, concentration, and subcellular and regional distributions of these sites suggest that they may represent a component of the serotonin transmitter system. Pharmacological analysis of (/sup 3/)THT binding, coupled with brain lesion and drug treatment experiments, revealed that, unlike other antidepressants, (/sup 3/) THT does not attach to either a biogenic amine transporter or serotonin binding sites. Rather, it would appear that (/sup 3/)THT may be an antagonist ligand for the serotonin binding site. This probe may prove of value in defining the mechanism of action of trazodone and in further characterizing serotonin receptors.

  5. Missing Fragments: Detecting Cooperative Binding in Fragment-Based Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The aim of fragment-based drug design (FBDD) is to identify molecular fragments that bind to alternate subsites within a given binding pocket leading to cooperative binding when linked. In this study, the binding of fragments to human phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase is used to illustrate how (a) current protocols may fail to detect fragments that bind cooperatively, (b) theoretical approaches can be used to validate potential hits, and (c) apparent false positives obtained when screening against cocktails of fragments may in fact indicate promising leads. PMID:24900472

  6. Missing fragments: detecting cooperative binding in fragment-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Nair, Pramod C; Malde, Alpeshkumar K; Drinkwater, Nyssa; Mark, Alan E

    2012-04-12

    The aim of fragment-based drug design (FBDD) is to identify molecular fragments that bind to alternate subsites within a given binding pocket leading to cooperative binding when linked. In this study, the binding of fragments to human phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase is used to illustrate how (a) current protocols may fail to detect fragments that bind cooperatively, (b) theoretical approaches can be used to validate potential hits, and (c) apparent false positives obtained when screening against cocktails of fragments may in fact indicate promising leads. PMID:24900472

  7. Detection of persistent organic pollutants binding modes with androgen receptor ligand binding domain by docking and molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are persistent in the environment after release from industrial compounds, combustion productions or pesticides. The exposure of POPs has been related to various reproductive disturbances, such as reduced semen quality, testicular cancer, and imbalanced sex ratio. Among POPs, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (4,4’-DDE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are the most widespread and well-studied compounds. Recent studies have revealed that 4,4’-DDE is an antagonist of androgen receptor (AR). However, the mechanism of the inhibition remains elusive. CB-153 is the most common congener of PCBs, while the action of CB-153 on AR is still under debate. Results Molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) approaches have been employed to study binding modes and inhibition mechanism of 4,4’-DDE and CB-153 against AR ligand binding domain (LBD). Several potential binding sites have been detected and analyzed. One possible binding site is the same binding site of AR natural ligand androgen 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Another one is on the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation function (AF2) region, which is crucial for the co-activators recruitment. Besides, a novel possible binding site was observed for POPs with low binding free energy with the receptor. Detailed interactions between ligands and the receptor have been represented. The disrupting mechanism of POPs against AR has also been discussed. Conclusions POPs disrupt the function of AR through binding to three possible biding sites on AR/LBD. One of them shares the same binding site of natural ligand of AR. Another one is on AF2 region. The third one is in a cleft near N-terminal of the receptor. Significantly, values of binding free energy of POPs with AR/LBD are comparable to that of natural ligand androgen DHT. PMID:24053684

  8. Rapid screening of environmental chemicals for estrogen receptor binding capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Bolger, R; Wiese, T E; Ervin, K; Nestich, S; Checovich, W

    1998-01-01

    Over the last few years, an increased awareness of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and their potential to affect wildlife and humans has produced a demand for practical screening methods to identify endocrine activity in a wide range of environmental and industrial chemicals. While it is clear that in vivo methods will be required to identify adverse effects produced by these chemicals, in vitro assays can define particular mechanisms of action and have the potential to be employed as rapid and low-cost screens for use in large scale EDC screening programs. Traditional estrogen receptor (ER) binding assays are useful for characterizing a chemical's potential to be an estrogen-acting EDC, but they involve displacement of a radioactive ligand from crude receptor preparations at low temperatures. The usefulness of these assays for realistically determining the ER binding interactions of weakly estrogenic environmental and industrial compounds that have low aqueous solubility is unclear. In this report, we present a novel fluorescence polarization (FP) method that measures the capacity of a competitor chemical to displace a high affinity fluorescent ligand from purified, recombinant human ER-[alpha] at room temperature. The ER-[alpha] binding interactions generated for 15 natural and synthetic compounds were found to be similar to those determined with traditional receptor binding assays. We also discuss the potential to employ this FP technology to binding studies involving ER-ss and other receptors. Thus, the assay introduced in this study is a nonradioactive receptor binding method that shows promise as a high throughput screening method for large-scale testing of environmental and industrial chemicals for ER binding interactions. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9721254

  9. Predicting Nonspecific Ion Binding Using DelPhi

    PubMed Central

    Petukh, Marharyta; Zhenirovskyy, Maxim; Li, Chuan; Li, Lin; Wang, Lin; Alexov, Emil

    2012-01-01

    Ions are an important component of the cell and affect the corresponding biological macromolecules either via direct binding or as a screening ion cloud. Although some ion binding is highly specific and frequently associated with the function of the macromolecule, other ions bind to the protein surface nonspecifically, presumably because the electrostatic attraction is strong enough to immobilize them. Here, we test such a scenario and demonstrate that experimentally identified surface-bound ions are located at a potential that facilitates binding, which indicates that the major driving force is the electrostatics. Without taking into consideration geometrical factors and structural fluctuations, we show that ions tend to be bound onto the protein surface at positions with strong potential but with polarity opposite to that of the ion. This observation is used to develop a method that uses a DelPhi-calculated potential map in conjunction with an in-house-developed clustering algorithm to predict nonspecific ion-binding sites. Although this approach distinguishes only the polarity of the ions, and not their chemical nature, it can predict nonspecific binding of positively or negatively charged ions with acceptable accuracy. One can use the predictions in the Poisson-Boltzmann approach by placing explicit ions in the predicted positions, which in turn will reduce the magnitude of the local potential and extend the limits of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. In addition, one can use this approach to place the desired number of ions before conducting molecular-dynamics simulations to neutralize the net charge of the protein, because it was shown to perform better than standard screened Coulomb canned routines, or to predict ion-binding sites in proteins. This latter is especially true for proteins that are involved in ion transport, because such ions are loosely bound and very difficult to detect experimentally. PMID:22735539

  10. Splice Form Dependence of b-Neurexin/Neuroligin Binding Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Koehnke, J.; Katsamba, P; Ahlsen, G; Bahna, F; Vendome, J; Honig, B; Shapiro, L; Jin, X

    2010-01-01

    Alternatively spliced {beta}-neurexins ({beta}-NRXs) and neuroligins (NLs) are thought to have distinct extracellular binding affinities, potentially providing a {beta}-NRX/NL synaptic recognition code. We utilized surface plasmon resonance to measure binding affinities between all combinations of alternatively spliced {beta}-NRX 1-3 and NL 1-3 ectodomains. Binding was observed for all {beta}-NRX/NL pairs. The presence of the NL1 B splice insertion lowers {beta}-NRX binding affinity by 2-fold, while {beta}-NRX splice insertion 4 has small effects that do not synergize with NL splicing. New structures of glycosylated {beta}-NRXs 1 and 2 containing splice insertion 4 reveal that the insertion forms a new {beta} strand that replaces the {beta}10 strand, leaving the NL binding site intact. This helps to explain the limited effect of splice insert 4 on NRX/NL binding affinities. These results provide new structural insights and quantitative binding information to help determine whether and how splice isoform choice plays a role in {beta}-NRX/NL-mediated synaptic recognition.

  11. Pressure locking and thermal binding of gate valves

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, E.M.

    1996-12-01

    Pressure locking and thermal binding represent potential common mode failure mechanisms that can cause safety-related power-operated gate valves to fail in the closed position, thus rendering redundant safety-related systems incapable of performing their safety functions. Supplement 6 to Generic Letter 89-10, {open_quotes}Safety-Related Motor-Operated Gate Valve Testing and Surveillance,{close_quotes} provided an acceptable approach to addressing pressure locking and thermal binding of gate valves. More recently, the NRC has issued Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves,{close_quotes} to request that licensees take certain actions to ensure that safety-related power-operated gate valves that are susceptible to pressure locking or thermal binding are capable of performing their safety functions within the current licensing bases. Over the past two years, several plants in Region I determined that valves in certain systems were potentially susceptible to pressure locking and thermal binding, and have taken various corrective actions. The NRC Region I Systems Engineering Branch has been actively involved in the inspection of licensee actions in response to the pressure locking and thermal binding issue. Region I continues to maintain an active involvement in this area, including participation with the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation in reviewing licensee responses to Generic Letter 95-07.

  12. Superresolution microscopy with transient binding.

    PubMed

    Molle, Julia; Raab, Mario; Holzmeister, Susanne; Schmitt-Monreal, Daniel; Grohmann, Dina; He, Zhike; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2016-06-01

    For single-molecule localization based superresolution, the concentration of fluorescent labels has to be thinned out. This is commonly achieved by photophysically or photochemically deactivating subsets of molecules. Alternatively, apparent switching of molecules can be achieved by transient binding of fluorescent labels. Here, a diffusing dye yields bright fluorescent spots when binding to the structure of interest. As the binding interaction is weak, the labeling is reversible and the dye ligand construct diffuses back into solution. This approach of achieving superresolution by transient binding (STB) is reviewed in this manuscript. Different realizations of STB are discussed and compared to other localization-based superresolution modalities. We propose the development of labeling strategies that will make STB a highly versatile tool for superresolution microscopy at highest resolution. PMID:26773299

  13. When is protein binding important?

    PubMed

    Heuberger, Jules; Schmidt, Stephan; Derendorf, Hartmut

    2013-09-01

    The present paper is an ode to a classic citation by Benet and Hoener (2002. Clin Pharm Ther 71(3):115-121). The now classic paper had a huge impact on drug development and the way the issue of protein binding is perceived and interpreted. Although the authors very clearly pointed out the limitations and underlying assumptions for their delineations, these are too often overlooked and the classic paper's message is misinterpreted by broadening to cases that were not intended. Some members of the scientific community concluded from the paper that protein binding is not important. This was clearly not intended by the authors, as they finished their paper with a paragraph entitled: "When is protein binding important?" Misinterpretation of the underlying assumptions in the classic work can result in major pitfalls in drug development. Therefore, we revisit the topic of protein binding with the intention of clarifying when clinically relevant changes should be considered during drug development.

  14. Superresolution microscopy with transient binding.

    PubMed

    Molle, Julia; Raab, Mario; Holzmeister, Susanne; Schmitt-Monreal, Daniel; Grohmann, Dina; He, Zhike; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2016-06-01

    For single-molecule localization based superresolution, the concentration of fluorescent labels has to be thinned out. This is commonly achieved by photophysically or photochemically deactivating subsets of molecules. Alternatively, apparent switching of molecules can be achieved by transient binding of fluorescent labels. Here, a diffusing dye yields bright fluorescent spots when binding to the structure of interest. As the binding interaction is weak, the labeling is reversible and the dye ligand construct diffuses back into solution. This approach of achieving superresolution by transient binding (STB) is reviewed in this manuscript. Different realizations of STB are discussed and compared to other localization-based superresolution modalities. We propose the development of labeling strategies that will make STB a highly versatile tool for superresolution microscopy at highest resolution.

  15. Plasmonic-Based Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy: Application to Molecular Binding

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Shaopeng; Shan, Xiaonan; Li, Jinghong; Tao, Nongjian

    2012-01-01

    Plasmonic-based electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (P-EIS) is developed to investigate molecular binding on surfaces. Its basic principle relies on the sensitive dependence of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) signal on surface charge density, which is modulated by applying an AC potential to a SPR chip surface. The AC component of the SPR response gives the electrochemical impedance, and the DC component provides the conventional SPR detection. The plasmonic-based impedance measured over a range of frequency is in quantitative agreement with the conventional electrochemical impedance. Compared to the conventional SPR detection, P-EIS is sensitive to molecular binding taking place on the chip surface, and less sensitive to bulk refractive index changes or non-specific binding. Moreover, this new approach allows for simultaneous SPR and surface impedance analysis of molecular binding processes. PMID:22122514

  16. Plasma variation of corticosteroid-binding globulin and sex hormone-binding globulin.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J G; Möpert, B; Shand, B I; Doogue, M P; Soule, S G; Frampton, C M; Elder, P A

    2006-04-01

    Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) circulate in plasma and bind their cognate ligands with high affinity, offering a steroid delivery system to target tissues by a variety of mechanisms. Analysis of these steroid-binding proteins is gaining importance in the clinical setting, although more information is warranted on their diurnal and biological variation. This study shows that plasma SHBG (in normal subjects) exhibits little diurnal or biological variation over the 30 day period studied, in contrast to CBG, where plasma levels peak in the early afternoon. This leads to attenuation of the diurnal free cortisol level rhythm compared to total cortisol. We also show that plasma CBG is significantly lower in male subjects with the metabolic syndrome compared to age-matched lean counterparts, and may therefore act as a surrogate marker of insulin resistance. The consequence of lower levels of CBG in these obese male subjects is reflected by higher levels of circulating free cortisol, potentially offering a more favourable environment for adipogenesis.

  17. Lipid binding to the carotenoid binding site in photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sasmit S; Tang, Kai; Kálmán, László

    2011-10-12

    Lipid binding to the carotenoid binding site near the inactive bacteriochlorophyll monomer was probed in the reaction centers of carotenoid-less mutant, R-26 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Recently, a marked light-induced change of the local dielectric constant in the vicinity of the inactive bacteriochlorophyll monomer was reported in wild type that was attributed to structural changes that ultimately lengthened the lifetime of the charge-separated state by 3 orders of magnitude (Deshmukh, S. S.; Williams, J. C.; Allen, J. P.; Kalman, L. Biochemistry 2011, 50, 340). Here in the R-26 reaction centers, the combination of light-induced structural changes and lipid binding resulted in a 5 orders of magnitude increase in the lifetime of the charge-separated state involving the oxidized dimer and the reduced primary quinone in proteoliposomes. Only saturated phospholipids with fatty acid chains of 12 and 14 carbon atoms long were bound successfully at 8 °C by cooling the reaction center protein slowly from room temperature. In addition to reporting a dramatic increase of the lifetime of the charge-separated state at physiologically relevant temperatures, this study reveals a novel lipid binding site in photosynthetic reaction center. These results shed light on a new potential application of the reaction center in energy storage as a light-driven biocapacitor since the charges separated by ∼30 Å in a low-dielectric medium can be prevented from recombination for hours.

  18. Metal binding to the HIV nucleocapsid peptide.

    PubMed

    McLendon, G; Hull, H; Larkin, K; Chang, W

    1999-04-01

    Co(II) and Zn(II) binding constants have been measured for binding to the HIV-1 nucleocapsid N-terminal metal binding domain (residues 1-18), using competition titration methods and monitoring Co(II) binding by visible absorbance spectroscopy. Enthalpies for binding were directly measured by isothermal titration colorimetry. The results are compared with recent studies of related systems, including a study of Zn(II) binding by the full length protein.

  19. Structural and Histone Binding Ability Characterizations of Human PWWP Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Amaya, Maria F.; Xu, Chao; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Qiu, Wei; Wang, Yanming; Min, Jinrong

    2013-09-25

    The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently. The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3. PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical {beta}-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third {beta}-strands and a C-terminal {alpha}-helix bundle. Both the canonical {beta}-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.

  20. Probabilistic Inference of Transcription Factor Binding from Multiple Data Sources

    PubMed Central

    Lähdesmäki, Harri; Rust, Alistair G.; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2008-01-01

    An important problem in molecular biology is to build a complete understanding of transcriptional regulatory processes in the cell. We have developed a flexible, probabilistic framework to predict TF binding from multiple data sources that differs from the standard hypothesis testing (scanning) methods in several ways. Our probabilistic modeling framework estimates the probability of binding and, thus, naturally reflects our degree of belief in binding. Probabilistic modeling also allows for easy and systematic integration of our binding predictions into other probabilistic modeling methods, such as expression-based gene network inference. The method answers the question of whether the whole analyzed promoter has a binding site, but can also be extended to estimate the binding probability at each nucleotide position. Further, we introduce an extension to model combinatorial regulation by several TFs. Most importantly, the proposed methods can make principled probabilistic inference from multiple evidence sources, such as, multiple statistical models (motifs) of the TFs, evolutionary conservation, regulatory potential, CpG islands, nucleosome positioning, DNase hypersensitive sites, ChIP-chip binding segments and other (prior) sequence-based biological knowledge. We developed both a likelihood and a Bayesian method, where the latter is implemented with a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. Results on a carefully constructed test set from the mouse genome demonstrate that principled data fusion can significantly improve the performance of TF binding prediction methods. We also applied the probabilistic modeling framework to all promoters in the mouse genome and the results indicate a sparse connectivity between transcriptional regulators and their target promoters. To facilitate analysis of other sequences and additional data, we have developed an on-line web tool, ProbTF, which implements our probabilistic TF binding prediction method using multiple data sources

  1. Binding of cellulose binding modules reveal differences between cellulose substrates

    PubMed Central

    Arola, Suvi; Linder, Markus B.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between cellulase enzymes and their substrates is of central importance to several technological and scientific challenges. Here we report that the binding of cellulose binding modules (CBM) from Trichoderma reesei cellulases Cel6A and Cel7A show a major difference in how they interact with substrates originating from wood compared to bacterial cellulose. We found that the CBM from TrCel7A recognizes the two substrates differently and as a consequence shows an unexpected way of binding. We show that the substrate has a large impact on the exchange rate of the studied CBM, and moreover, CBM-TrCel7A seems to have an additional mode of binding on wood derived cellulose but not on cellulose originating from bacterial source. This mode is not seen in double CBM (DCBM) constructs comprising both CBM-TrCel7A and CBM-TrCel6A. The linker length of DCBMs affects the binding properties, and slows down the exchange rates of the proteins and thus, can be used to analyze the differences between the single CBM. These results have impact on the cellulase research and offer new understanding on how these industrially relevant enzymes act. PMID:27748440

  2. The binding domain structure of retinoblastoma-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Figge, J.; Breese, K.; Vajda, S.; Zhu, Q. L.; Eisele, L.; Andersen, T. T.; MacColl, R.; Friedrich, T.; Smith, T. F.

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma gene product (Rb), a cellular growth suppressor, complexes with viral and cellular proteins that contain a specific binding domain incorporating three invariant residues: Leu-X-Cys-X-Glu, where X denotes a nonconserved residue. Hydrophobic and electrostatic properties are strongly conserved in this segment even though the nonconserved amino acids vary considerably from one Rb-binding protein to another. In this report, we present a diagnostic computer pattern for a high-affinity Rb-binding domain featuring the three conserved residues as well as the conserved physico-chemical properties. Although the pattern encompasses only 10 residues (with only 4 of these explicitly defined), it exhibits 100% sensitivity and 99.95% specificity in database searches. This implies that a certain pattern of structural and physico-chemical properties encoded by this short sequence is sufficient to govern specific Rb binding. We also present evidence that the secondary structural conformation through this region is important for effective Rb binding. PMID:8382993

  3. Calcium-dependent and -independent binding of soybean calmodulin isoforms to the calmodulin binding domain of tobacco MAPK phosphatase-1.

    PubMed

    Rainaldi, Mario; Yamniuk, Aaron P; Murase, Tomohiko; Vogel, Hans J

    2007-03-01

    The recent finding of an interaction between calmodulin (CaM) and the tobacco mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (NtMKP1) establishes an important connection between Ca(2+) signaling and the MAPK cascade, two of the most important signaling pathways in plant cells. Here we have used different biophysical techniques, including fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy as well as microcalorimetry, to characterize the binding of soybean CaM isoforms, SCaM-1 and -4, to synthetic peptides derived from the CaM binding domain of NtMKP1. We find that the actual CaM binding region is shorter than what had previously been suggested. Moreover, the peptide binds to the SCaM C-terminal domain even in the absence of free Ca(2+) with the single Trp residue of the NtMKP1 peptides buried in a solvent-inaccessible hydrophobic region. In the presence of Ca(2+), the peptides bind first to the C-terminal lobe of the SCaMs with a nanomolar affinity, and at higher peptide concentrations, a second peptide binds to the N-terminal domain with lower affinity. Thermodynamic analysis demonstrates that the formation of the peptide-bound complex with the Ca(2+)-loaded SCaMs is driven by favorable binding enthalpy due to a combination of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Experiments with CaM proteolytic fragments showed that the two domains bind the peptide in an independent manner. To our knowledge, this is the first report providing direct evidence for sequential binding of two identical peptides of a target protein to CaM. Discussion of the potential biological role of this interaction motif is also provided.

  4. Inhibition of RNA Polymerase II Transcription in Human Cells by Synthetic DNA-Binding Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Liliane A.; Gulizia, Richard J.; Trauger, John W.; Baird, Eldon E.; Mosier, Donald E.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.; Dervan, Peter B.

    1998-10-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding small molecules that can permeate human cells potentially could regulate transcription of specific genes. Multiple cellular DNA-binding transcription factors are required by HIV type 1 for RNA synthesis. Two pyrrole--imidazole polyamides were designed to bind DNA sequences immediately adjacent to binding sites for the transcription factors Ets-1, lymphoid-enhancer binding factor 1, and TATA-box binding protein. These synthetic ligands specifically inhibit DNA-binding of each transcription factor and HIV type 1 transcription in cell-free assays. When used in combination, the polyamides inhibit virus replication by >99% in isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no detectable cell toxicity. The ability of small molecules to target predetermined DNA sequences located with RNA polymerase II promoters suggests a general approach for regulation of gene expression, as well as a mechanism for the inhibition of viral replication.

  5. Ion binding to biological macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Petukh, Marharyta; Alexov, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Biological macromolecules carry out their functions in water and in the presence of ions. The ions can bind to the macromolecules either specifically or non-specifically, or can simply to be a part of the water phase providing physiological gradient across various membranes. This review outlines the differences between specific and non-specific ion binding in terms of the function and stability of the corresponding macromolecules. Furthermore, the experimental techniques to identify ion positions and computational methods to predict ion binding are reviewed and their advantages compared. It is indicated that specifically bound ions are relatively easier to be revealed while non-specifically associated ions are difficult to predict. In addition, the binding and the residential time of non-specifically bound ions are very much sensitive to the environmental factors in the cells, specifically to the local pH and ion concentration. Since these characteristics differ among the cellular compartments, the non-specific ion binding must be investigated with respect to the sub-cellular localization of the corresponding macromolecule. PMID:25774076

  6. Cholesterol binding to ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, Irena; Singh, Dev K.; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies demonstrated that membrane cholesterol is a major regulator of ion channel function. The goal of this review is to discuss significant advances that have been recently achieved in elucidating the mechanisms responsible for cholesterol regulation of ion channels. The first major insight that comes from growing number of studies that based on the sterol specificity of cholesterol effects, show that several types of ion channels (nAChR, Kir, BK, TRPV) are regulated by specific sterol-protein interactions. This conclusion is supported by demonstrating direct saturable binding of cholesterol to a bacterial Kir channel. The second major advance in the field is the identification of putative cholesterol binding sites in several types of ion channels. These include sites at locations associated with the well-known cholesterol binding motif CRAC and its reversed form CARC in nAChR, BK, and TRPV, as well as novel cholesterol binding regions in Kir channels. Notably, in the majority of these channels, cholesterol is suggested to interact mainly with hydrophobic residues in non-annular regions of the channels being embedded in between transmembrane protein helices. We also discuss how identification of putative cholesterol binding sites is an essential step to understand the mechanistic basis of cholesterol-induced channel regulation. Clearly, however, these are only the first few steps in obtaining a general understanding of cholesterol-ion channels interactions and their roles in cellular and organ functions. PMID:24616704

  7. FAD binding, cobinamide binding and active site communication in the corrin reductase (CobR)

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Andrew D.; Taylor, Samantha L.; Scott, Alan; Rowe, Michelle L.; Johnson, Christopher M.; Rigby, Stephen E. J.; Geeves, Michael A.; Pickersgill, Richard W.; Howard, Mark J.; Warren, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosylcobalamin, the coenzyme form of vitamin B12, is one Nature's most complex coenzyme whose de novo biogenesis proceeds along either an anaerobic or aerobic metabolic pathway. The aerobic synthesis involves reduction of the centrally chelated cobalt metal ion of the corrin ring from Co(II) to Co(I) before adenosylation can take place. A corrin reductase (CobR) enzyme has been identified as the likely agent to catalyse this reduction of the metal ion. Herein, we reveal how Brucella melitensis CobR binds its coenzyme FAD (flavin dinucleotide) and we also show that the enzyme can bind a corrin substrate consistent with its role in reduction of the cobalt of the corrin ring. Stopped-flow kinetics and EPR reveal a mechanistic asymmetry in CobR dimer that provides a potential link between the two electron reduction by NADH to the single electron reduction of Co(II) to Co(I). PMID:24909839

  8. Models of metal binding structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Brown, G.K.; MacCarthy, P.; Cabaniss, S.E.

    1998-01-01

    Fulvic acid, isolated from the Suwannee River, Georgia, was assessed for its ability to bind Ca2+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+ ions at pH 6 before and after extensive fractionation that was designed to reveal the nature of metal binding functional groups. The binding constant for Ca2+ ion had the greatest increase of all the ions in a metal binding fraction that was selected for intensive characterization for the purpose of building quantitative average model structures. The 'metal binding' fraction was characterized by quantitative 13C NMR, 1H NMR, and FT-1R spectrometry and elemental, titrimetric, and molecular weight determinations. The characterization data revealed that carboxyl groups were clustered in short- chain aliphatic dibasic acid structures. The Ca2+ binding data suggested that ether-substituted oxysuccinic acid structures are good models for the metal binding sites at pH 6. Structural models were derived based upon oxidation and photolytic rearrangements of cutin, lignin, and tannin precursors. These structural models rich in substituted dibasic acid structures revealed polydentate binding sites with the potential for both inner-sphere and outer-sphere type binding. The majority of the fulvic acid molecule was involved with metal binding rather than a small substructural unit.Fulvic acid, isolated from the Suwannee River, Georgia, was assessed for its ability to bind Ca2+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+ ions at pH 6 before and after extensive fractionation that was designed to reveal the nature of metal binding functional groups. The binding constant for Ca2+ ion had the greatest increase of all the ions in a metal binding fraction that was selected for intensive characterization for the purpose of building quantitative average model structures. The `metal binding' fraction was characterized by quantitative 13C NMR, 1H NMR, and FT-IR spectrometry and elemental, titrimetric, and molecular weight determinations. The characterization data revealed that

  9. Binding Interpretations of Anaphors by Korean Heritage Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Ji-Hye; Montrul, Silvina; Yoon, James

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the potential incomplete acquisition of binding interpretations in Korean-English bilinguals by asking whether and how the majority language of these bilinguals (English) influences their family or heritage language (Korean), especially when exposure to and use of English starts very early. The experiment tested the…

  10. Water binding in legume seeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vertucci, C. W.; Leopold, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    The physical status of water in seeds has a pivotal role in determining the physiological reactions that can take place in the dry state. Using water sorption isotherms from cotyledon and axis tissue of five leguminous seeds, the strength of water binding and the numbers of binding sites have been estimated using van't Hoff analyses and the D'Arcy/Watt equation. These parameters of water sorption are calculated for each of the three regions of water binding and for a range of temperatures. Water sorption characteristics are reflective of the chemical composition of the biological materials as well as the temperature at which hydration takes place. Changes in the sorption characteristics with temperature and hydration level may suggest hydration-induced structural changes in cellular components.

  11. HIV: Cell Binding and Entry

    PubMed Central

    Wilen, Craig B.; Tilton, John C.; Doms, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    The first step of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication cycle—binding and entry into the host cell—plays a major role in determining viral tropism and the ability of HIV to degrade the human immune system. HIV uses a complex series of steps to deliver its genome into the host cell cytoplasm while simultaneously evading the host immune response. To infect cells, the HIV protein envelope (Env) binds to the primary cellular receptor CD4 and then to a cellular coreceptor. This sequential binding triggers fusion of the viral and host cell membranes, initiating infection. Revealing the mechanism of HIV entry has profound implications for viral tropism, transmission, pathogenesis, and therapeutic intervention. Here, we provide an overview into the mechanism of HIV entry, provide historical context to key discoveries, discuss recent advances, and speculate on future directions in the field. PMID:22908191

  12. Binding Kinetics in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Ferruz, Noelia; De Fabritiis, Gianni

    2016-07-01

    Over the last years, researchers have increasingly become interested in measuring and understanding drugs' binding kinetics, namely the time in which drug and its target associate and dissociate. Historically, drug discovery programs focused on the optimization of target affinity as a proxy of in-vivo efficacy. However, often the efficacy of a ligand is not appropriately described by the in-vitro measured drug-receptor affinity, but rather depends on the lifetime of the in-vivo drug-receptor interaction. In this review we review recent works that highlight the importance of binding kinetics, molecular determinants for rational optimization and the recent emergence of computational methods as powerful tools in measuring and understanding binding kinetics. PMID:27492236

  13. Trifluoperazine regulation of calmodulin binding to Fas: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Di; Yan, Qi; Chen, Yabing; McDonald, Jay M; Song, Yuhua

    2011-08-01

    Death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) formation is a critical step in Fas-mediated signaling for apoptosis. Previous experiments have demonstrated that the calmodulin (CaM) antagonist, trifluoperazine (TFP) regulates CaM-Fas binding and affects Fas-mediated DISC formation. In this study, we investigated the anti-cooperative characteristics of TFP binding to CaM and the effect of TFP on the CaM-Fas interaction from both structural and thermodynamic perspectives using combined molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy analyses. We studied the interactions of different numbers of TFP molecules with CaM and explored the effects of the resulting conformational changes in CaM on CaM-Fas binding. Results from these analyses showed that the number of TFP molecules bound to CaM directly influenced α-helix formation and hydrogen bond occupancy within the α-helices of CaM, contributing to the conformational and motion changes in CaM. These changes affected CaM binding to Fas, resulting in secondary structural changes in Fas and conformational and motion changes of Fas in CaM-Fas complexes, potentially perturbing the recruitment of Fas-associated death domain for DISC formation. The computational results from this study reveal the structural and molecular mechanisms that underlie the role of the CaM antagonist, TFP, in regulation of CaM-Fas binding and Fas-mediated DISC formation in a concentration-dependent manner.

  14. Acoustic micromixing increases antibody-antigen binding in immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Tran, Phong; Petkovic-Duran, Karolina; Swallow, Tony; Zhu, Yonggang

    2015-08-01

    Sound wave-assisted acoustic micromixing has been shown to increase the binding of molecules in small volumes (10-100 μL) where effective mixing is difficult to achieve through conventional techniques. The aim of this work is to study whether acoustic micromixing can increase the binding efficiency of antibodies to their antigens, a reaction that forms the basis of immunoassays, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Using a procedure from a general ELISA and immobilizing an antigen on wells of 96-well plates, it was found that acoustic micromixing at 125-150 Hz increased the initial rate of antibody-antigen binding by over 80 % and the total binding at the end point (i.e., 45 min) by over 50 %. As a result, acoustic micromixing achieved a binding level in 9 min that would otherwise take 45 min on a standard platform rocking mixer. Therefore acoustic micromixing has the potential to increase the detection sensitivity of ELISA as well as shorten the antigen-antibody binding times from typically 45-60 min to 15 min.

  15. Discovery of 12-mer peptides that bind to wood lignin.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Asako; Isozaki, Katsuhiro; Nakamura, Masaharu; Takaya, Hikaru; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Lignin, an abundant terrestrial polymer, is the only large-volume renewable feedstock composed of an aromatic skeleton. Lignin has been used mostly as an energy source during paper production; however, recent interest in replacing fossil fuels with renewable resources has highlighted its potential value in providing aromatic chemicals. Highly selective degradation of lignin is pivotal for industrial production of paper, biofuels, chemicals, and materials. However, few studies have examined natural and synthetic molecular components recognizing the heterogeneous aromatic polymer. Here, we report the first identification of lignin-binding peptides possessing characteristic sequences using a phage display technique. The consensus sequence HFPSP was found in several lignin-binding peptides, and the outer amino acid sequence affected the binding affinity of the peptides. Substitution of phenylalanine7 with Ile in the lignin-binding peptide C416 (HFPSPIFQRHSH) decreased the affinity of the peptide for softwood lignin without changing its affinity for hardwood lignin, indicating that C416 recognised structural differences between the lignins. Circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated that this peptide adopted a highly flexible random coil structure, allowing key residues to be appropriately arranged in relation to the binding site in lignin. These results provide a useful platform for designing synthetic and biological catalysts selectively bind to lignin. PMID:26903196

  16. Detecting O2 binding sites in protein cavities

    PubMed Central

    Kitahara, Ryo; Yoshimura, Yuichi; Xue, Mengjun; Kameda, Tomoshi; Mulder, Frans A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Internal cavities are important elements in protein structure, dynamics, stability and function. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to investigate the binding of molecular oxygen (O2) to cavities in a well-studied model for ligand binding, the L99A mutant of T4 lysozyme. On increasing the O2 concentration to 8.9 mM, changes in 1H, 15N, and 13C chemical shifts and signal broadening were observed specifically for backbone amide and side chain methyl groups located around the two hydrophobic cavities of the protein. O2-induced longitudinal relaxation enhancements for amide and methyl protons could be adequately accounted for by paramagnetic dipolar relaxation. These data provide the first experimental demonstration that O2 binds specifically to the hydrophobic, and not the hydrophilic cavities, in a protein. Molecular dynamics simulations visualized the rotational and translational motions of O2 in the cavities, as well as the binding and egress of O2, suggesting that the channel consisting of helices D, E, G, H, and J could be the potential gateway for ligand binding to the protein. Due to strong paramagnetic relaxation effects, O2 gas-pressure NMR measurements can detect hydrophobic cavities when populated to as little as 1%, and thereby provide a general and highly sensitive method for detecting oxygen binding in proteins. PMID:26830762

  17. CREB Binds to Multiple Loci on Human Chromosome 22

    PubMed Central

    Euskirchen, Ghia; Royce, Thomas E.; Bertone, Paul; Martone, Rebecca; Rinn, John L.; Nelson, F. Kenneth; Sayward, Fred; Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Miller, Perry; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman; Snyder, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) is an important transcription factor that can be activated by hormonal stimulation and regulates neuronal function and development. An unbiased, global analysis of where CREB binds has not been performed. We have mapped for the first time the binding distribution of CREB along an entire human chromosome. Chromatin immunoprecipitation of CREB-associated DNA and subsequent hybridization of the associated DNA to a genomic DNA microarray containing all of the nonrepetitive DNA of human chromosome 22 revealed 215 binding sites corresponding to 192 different loci and 100 annotated potential gene targets. We found binding near or within many genes involved in signal transduction and neuronal function. We also found that only a small fraction of CREB binding sites lay near well-defined 5′ ends of genes; the majority of sites were found elsewhere, including introns and unannotated regions. Several of the latter lay near novel unannotated transcriptionally active regions. Few CREB targets were found near full-length cyclic AMP response element sites; the majority contained shorter versions or close matches to this sequence. Several of the CREB targets were altered in their expression by treatment with forskolin; interestingly, both induced and repressed genes were found. Our results provide novel molecular insights into how CREB mediates its functions in humans. PMID:15082775

  18. Discovery of 12-mer peptides that bind to wood lignin

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Asako; Isozaki, Katsuhiro; Nakamura, Masaharu; Takaya, Hikaru; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Lignin, an abundant terrestrial polymer, is the only large-volume renewable feedstock composed of an aromatic skeleton. Lignin has been used mostly as an energy source during paper production; however, recent interest in replacing fossil fuels with renewable resources has highlighted its potential value in providing aromatic chemicals. Highly selective degradation of lignin is pivotal for industrial production of paper, biofuels, chemicals, and materials. However, few studies have examined natural and synthetic molecular components recognizing the heterogeneous aromatic polymer. Here, we report the first identification of lignin-binding peptides possessing characteristic sequences using a phage display technique. The consensus sequence HFPSP was found in several lignin-binding peptides, and the outer amino acid sequence affected the binding affinity of the peptides. Substitution of phenylalanine7 with Ile in the lignin-binding peptide C416 (HFPSPIFQRHSH) decreased the affinity of the peptide for softwood lignin without changing its affinity for hardwood lignin, indicating that C416 recognised structural differences between the lignins. Circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated that this peptide adopted a highly flexible random coil structure, allowing key residues to be appropriately arranged in relation to the binding site in lignin. These results provide a useful platform for designing synthetic and biological catalysts selectively bind to lignin. PMID:26903196

  19. Escherchia coli ribose binding protein based bioreporters revisited

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, Artur; Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Belkin, Shimshon; Roy, Shantanu; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2014-01-01

    Bioreporter bacteria, i.e., strains engineered to respond to chemical exposure by production of reporter proteins, have attracted wide interest because of their potential to offer cheap and simple alternative analytics for specified compounds or conditions. Bioreporter construction has mostly exploited the natural variation of sensory proteins, but it has been proposed that computational design of new substrate binding properties could lead to completely novel detection specificities at very low affinities. Here we reconstruct a bioreporter system based on the native Escherichia coli ribose binding protein RbsB and one of its computationally designed variants, reported to be capable of binding 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Our results show in vivo reporter induction at 50 nM ribose, and a 125 nM affinity constant for in vitro ribose binding to RbsB. In contrast, the purified published TNT-binding variant did not bind TNT nor did TNT cause induction of the E. coli reporter system. PMID:25005019

  20. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Si, Jingna; Cui, Jing; Cheng, Jin; Wu, Rongling

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%-8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein-RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein-RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  1. Canine malignant melanoma alpha-3 integrin binding peptides

    PubMed Central

    Aina, Olulanu H.; Maeda, Yoshiko; Harrison, Matthew; Zwingenberger, Allison L.; Walker, Naomi J.; Lam, Kit S.; Kent, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to develop novel targeted imaging and therapeutic agents that can aid in early diagnosis, detection of metastasis and treatment of melanoma. Alpha-3 integrin is overexpressed in 82% of metastatic melanomas in humans and may be a potential target for peptide ligands carrying therapeutic agents. Five melanoma cell lines were generated from canine primary oral and metastatic canine tumors, grown in mice, and validated with melanoma markers Melan A, S-100, Micropthalmia transcription factor (MITF), Tyrosinase, and MART-1. The melanoma cell lines were tested for binding affinity to previously published alpha-3 integrin-binding peptides containing the cdGXGXXc motif. Fluorescent conjugates of the alpha-3 integrin binding OA02 peptide were used to quantify receptor affinity in the cell lines, a specimen of canine primary oral melanoma, and melanoma xenografts. Alpha-3 integrin was expressed by all 5 canine melanoma cell lines. Four of the 5 lines as well as the primary canine tumor showed affinity to alpha-3 integrin binding peptides with the cdGXGXXc motif. Optical imaging of canine melanoma xenografts in nude mice indicates rapid, strong uptake of the optical tracer in the tumor with an average persistence of approximately 48 hours. Ex vivo images showed high tumor-to-background ratio, with tumor signals more than twice that of the kidney and other vital organs. We propose that integrin alpha-3 integrin binding ligands could potentially become useful probes for imaging and delivery of cytotoxic agents for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:21722969

  2. The Fundamental Role of Flexibility on the Strength of Molecular Binding

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Jack F.; Gilson, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    Non-covalent molecular association underlies a diverse set of biologically and technologically relevant phenomena, including the action of drugs on their biomolecular targets and self- and supra-molecular assembly processes. Computer models employed to model binding frequently use interaction potentials with atomistic detail while neglecting the thermal molecular motions of the binding species. However, errors introduced by this simplification and, more broadly, the thermodynamic consequences of molecular flexibility on binding, are little understood. Here, we isolate the fundamental relationship of molecular flexibility to binding thermodynamics via simulations of simplified molecules with a wide range of flexibilities but the same interaction potential. Disregarding molecular motion is found to generate large errors in binding entropy, enthalpy and free energy, even for molecules that are nearly rigid. Indeed, small decreases in rigidity markedly reduce affinity for highly rigid molecules. Remarkably, precisely the opposite occurs for more flexible molecules, for which increasing flexibility leads to stronger binding affinity. We also find that differences in flexibility suffice to generate binding specificity: for example, a planar surface selectively binds rigid over flexible molecules. Intriguingly, varying molecular flexibility while keeping interaction potentials constant leads to near-linear enthalpy-entropy compensation over a wide range of flexibilities, with the unexpected twist that increasing flexibility produces opposite changes in entropy and enthalpy for molecules in the flexible versus the rigid regime. Molecular flexibility is thus a crucial determinant of binding affinity and specificity and variations in flexibility can lead to strong yet non-intuitive consequences. PMID:22707976

  3. Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2007-01-23

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  4. Cell-Binding Assays for Determining the Affinity of Protein-Protein Interactions: Technologies and Considerations.

    PubMed

    Hunter, S A; Cochran, J R

    2016-01-01

    Determining the equilibrium-binding affinity (Kd) of two interacting proteins is essential not only for the biochemical study of protein signaling and function but also for the engineering of improved protein and enzyme variants. One common technique for measuring protein-binding affinities uses flow cytometry to analyze ligand binding to proteins presented on the surface of a cell. However, cell-binding assays require specific considerations to accurately quantify the binding affinity of a protein-protein interaction. Here we will cover the basic assumptions in designing a cell-based binding assay, including the relevant equations and theory behind determining binding affinities. Further, two major considerations in measuring binding affinities-time to equilibrium and ligand depletion-will be discussed. As these conditions have the potential to greatly alter the Kd, methods through which to avoid or minimize them will be provided. We then outline detailed protocols for performing direct- and competitive-binding assays against proteins displayed on the surface of yeast or mammalian cells that can be used to derive accurate Kd values. Finally, a comparison of cell-based binding assays to other types of binding assays will be presented. PMID:27586327

  5. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  6. Positive Emotion Facilitates Audiovisual Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Miho S.; Watanabe, Katsumi; Kitagawa, Norimichi

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that positive emotions can facilitate integrative and associative information processing in cognitive functions. The present study examined whether emotions in observers can also enhance perceptual integrative processes. We tested 125 participants in total for revealing the effects of emotional states and traits in observers on the multisensory binding between auditory and visual signals. Participants in Experiment 1 observed two identical visual disks moving toward each other, coinciding, and moving away, presented with a brief sound. We found that for participants with lower depressive tendency, induced happy moods increased the width of the temporal binding window of the sound-induced bounce percept in the stream/bounce display, while no effect was found for the participants with higher depressive tendency. In contrast, no effect of mood was observed for a simple audiovisual simultaneity discrimination task in Experiment 2. These results provide the first empirical evidence of a dependency of multisensory binding upon emotional states and traits, revealing that positive emotions can facilitate the multisensory binding processes at a perceptual level. PMID:26834585

  7. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of calcium binding in gramicidin A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baştuğ, Turgut; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2006-06-01

    An important issue in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of biomolecules is whether membrane proteins can be described using nonpolarizable force fields. To shed further light into this question, we study calcium ion binding and blocking of the gramicidin A channel which has not been investigated in MD simulations before. Potential of mean force calculations for calcium and potassium ions using a nonpolarizable force field reveal that calcium binding to the channel is much weaker compared to potassium, and hence calcium block of potassium current cannot be described. Inclusion of polarization interaction in force fields may help to rectify this problem.

  9. The Multiple Carbohydrate Binding Specificities of Helicobacter pylori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teneberg, Susann

    Persistent colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Adhesion of microbes to the target tissue is an important determinant for successful initiation, establishment and maintenance of infection, and a variety of different candidate carbohydrate receptors for H. pylori have been identified. Here the different the binding specifities, and their potential role in adhesion to human gastric epithelium are described. Finally, recent findings on the roles of sialic acid binding SabA adhesin in interactions with human neutrophils and erythrocytes are discussed.

  10. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein enhances the biologic response to IGF-I

    SciTech Connect

    Elgin, R.G.; Busby, H.W. Jr.; Clemmons, D.R.

    1987-05-01

    The insulin-like growth factors IGF-I and IGF-II circulate in blood bound to carrier proteins. The higher molecular mass IGF-binding protein complex (150 kDa) is composed of subunits, and one subunits that forms this complex is growth hormone dependent. In addition, many cell types and tissues secrete another form of IGF binding protein that is not growth hormone dependent. Both forms of the IGF binding protein are believed to inactivate the IGFs and to function as delivery systems to tissues. This conclusion was based on studies that determined the effects of impure preparations of these binding proteins or that examined the effect of these proteins only on the insulin-like actions of the IGFs. The authors report here that a pure preparation of the extracellular form of the IGF binding protein (purified from human amniotic fluid) markedly potentiated replication of several cell types in response to human IGF-I. Secondary cultures of human, mouse, and chicken embryo fibroblasts as well as porcine aortic smooth muscle cells showed marked enhancement of their DNA synthesis response to IGF-I in the presence of this protein. The binding protein not only potentiated the DNA synthesis response but also enhanced the increase in cell number in response to IGF-I. This stimulation is specific for growth factors that bind to the binding protein since incubation with insulin, which binds to the type I IGF receptor but not to the binding protein, did not result in potentiation of this response. They conclude that a form of IGF binding protein that is present in extracellular fluids and is secreted by many types of cells can markedly potentiate the cellular response to IGF-I.

  11. Identification and Investigation of Novel Binding Fragments in the Fatty Acid Binding Protein 6 (FABP6).

    PubMed

    Hendrick, Alan G; Müller, Ilka; Willems, Henriëtte; Leonard, Philip M; Irving, Steve; Davenport, Richard; Ito, Takashi; Reeves, Jenny; Wright, Susanne; Allen, Vivienne; Wilkinson, Stephen; Heffron, Helen; Bazin, Richard; Turney, Jennifer; Mitchell, Philip J

    2016-09-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 6 (FABP6) is a potential drug discovery target, which, if inhibited, may have a therapeutic benefit for the treatment of diabetes. Currently, there are no published inhibitors of FABP6, and with the target believed to be amenable to fragment-based drug discovery, a structurally enabled program was initiated. This program successfully identified fragment hits using the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) platform. Several hits were validated with SAR and were found to be displaced by the natural ligand taurocholate. We report the first crystal structure of human FABP6 in the unbound form, in complex with cholate, and with one of the key fragments. PMID:27500412

  12. Complement binding to Leishmania donovani promastigotes (LD)

    SciTech Connect

    Puentes, S.M.; Bates, P.A.; Dwyer, D.M.; Joiner, K.A.

    1986-03-01

    To study the binding and processing of C3 on LD, parasites in various phases of growth were incubated in human serum deficient in complement component 8 containing /sup 125/I-C3. Uptake of /sup 125/I-C3 is rapid, peaking at 1.7-2.1 x 10/sup 6/ C3 molecules bound per parasite at 15 minutes for all growth phases, and decreases thereafter with continued incubation. One half of total C3 bound is spontaneously released by 90 minutes of incubation with all LD phases and occurs at a similar rate for LD washed free of serum and incubated at 37/sup 0/ C in buffer. As assessed by SDS-PAGE autoradiography, C3 on the surface of LD is present as C3b (36 to 50%) and iC3b (50 to 65%), linked covalently via a bond resistant to hydroxylamine treatment, presumably an amide linkage. Immunoblot analysis of purified membranes from serum-incubated LD, using rabbit antibody to C3 and LD surface constituents, strongly suggests that a major C3 acceptor is the LD acid phosphatase (AP). These results, in conjunction with recent studies, suggest a previously unrecognized role of AP as a C3 acceptor and, thus, as a molecule potentially involved in parasite binding and uptake.

  13. Obligate Ordered Binding of Human Lactogenic Cytokines*

    PubMed Central

    Voorhees, Jeffery L.; Brooks, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Class 1 cytokines bind two receptors to create an active heterotrimeric complex. It has been argued that ligand binding to their receptors is an ordered process, but a structural mechanism describing this process has not been determined. We have previously described an obligate ordered binding mechanism for the human prolactin/prolactin receptor heterotrimeric complex. In this work we expand this conceptual understanding of ordered binding to include three human lactogenic hormones: prolactin, growth hormone, and placental lactogen. We independently blocked either of the two receptor binding sites of each hormone and used surface plasmon resonance to measure human prolactin receptor binding kinetics and stoichiometries to the remaining binding surface. When site 1 of any of the three hormones was blocked, site 2 could not bind the receptor. But blocking site 2 did not affect receptor binding at site 1, indicating a requirement for receptor binding to site 1 before site 2 binding. In addition we noted variable responses to the presence of zinc in hormone-receptor interaction. Finally, we performed Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) analyses where receptor binding at subsaturating stoichiometries induced changes in FRET signaling, indicative of binding-induced changes in hormone conformation, whereas at receptor:hormone ratios in excess of 2:1 no additional changes in FRET signaling were observed. These results strongly support a conformationally mediated obligate-ordered receptor binding for each of the three lactogenic hormones. PMID:20427283

  14. N-terminal DNA-binding domains contribute to differential DNA-binding specificities of NF-kappa B p50 and p65.

    PubMed Central

    Toledano, M B; Ghosh, D; Trinh, F; Leonard, W J

    1993-01-01

    We previously reported that either oxidation or alkylation of NF-kappa B in vitro abrogates DNA binding. We used this phenomenon to help elucidate structural determinants of NF-kappa B binding. We now demonstrate that Cys-62 of NF-kappa B p50 mediates the redox effect and lies within an N-terminal region required for DNA binding but not for dimerization. Several point mutations in this region confer a transdominant negative binding phenotype to p50. The region is highly conserved in all Rel family proteins, and we have determined that it is also critical for DNA binding of NF-kappa B p65. Replacement of the N-terminal region of p65 with the corresponding region from p50 changes its DNA-binding specificity towards that of p50. These data suggest that the N-terminal regions of p50 and p65 are critical for DNA binding and help determine the DNA-binding specificities of p50 and p65. We have defined within the N-terminal region a sequence motif, R(F/G)(R/K)YXCE, which is present in Rel family proteins and also in zinc finger proteins capable of binding to kappa B sites. The potential significance of this finding is discussed. Images PMID:8423807

  15. Characterization of the Estradiol-Binding Site Structure of Human Protein Disulfide Isomerase (PDI)

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xin-Miao; Wang, Pan; Zhu, Bao Ting

    2011-01-01

    Background Earlier studies showed that 17β-estradiol (E2), an endogenous female sex hormone, can bind to human protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), a protein folding catalyst for disulfide bond formation and rearrangement. This binding interaction can modulate the intracellular levels of E2 and its biological actions. However, the structure of PDI's E2-binding site is still unclear at present, which is the focus of this study. Methodology/Principal Findings The E2-binding site structure of human PDI was studied by using various biochemical approaches coupled with radiometric receptor-binding assays, site-directed mutagenesis, and molecular computational modeling. Analysis of various PDI protein fragments showed that the [3H]E2-binding activity is not associated with the single b or b' domain but is associated with the b-b' domain combination. Computational docking analyses predicted that the E2-binding site is located in a hydrophobic pocket composed mainly of the b' domain and partially of the b domain. A hydrogen bond, formed between the 3-hydroxyl group of E2 and His256 of PDI is critical for the binding interaction. This binding model was jointly confirmed by a series of detailed experiments, including site-directed mutagenesis of the His256 residue coupled with selective modifications of the ligand structures to alter the binding interaction. Conclusions/Significance The results of this study elucidated the structural basis for the PDI–E2 binding interaction and the reservoir role of PDI in modulating the intracellular E2 levels. The identified PDI E2-binding site is quite different from its known peptide binding sites. Given that PDI is a potential therapeutic target for cancer chemotherapy and HIV prevention and that E2 can inhibit PDI activity in vitro, the E2-binding site structure of human PDI determined here offers structural insights which may aid in the rational design of novel PDI inhibitors. PMID:22073283

  16. Physical factors affecting chloroquine binding to melanin.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, R L; Pendleton, P; Gerber, J P

    2015-10-01

    Chloroquine is an antimalarial drug but is also prescribed for conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Long-term users risk toxic side effects, including retinopathy, thought to be caused by chloroquine accumulation on ocular melanin. Although the binding potential of chloroquine to melanin has been investigated previously, our study is the first to demonstrate clear links between chloroquine adsorption by melanin and system factors including temperature, pH, melanin type, and particle size. In the current work, two Sepia melanins were compared with bovine eye as a representative mammalian melanin. Increasing the surface anionic character due to a pH change from 4.7 to 7.4 increased each melanin's affinity for chloroquine. Although the chloroquine isotherms exhibited an apparently strong interaction with each melanin, isosteric heat analysis indicated a competitive interaction. Buffer solution cations competed effectively at low surface coverage; chloroquine adsorption occurs via buffer cation displacement and is promoted by temperature-influenced secondary structure swelling.

  17. Ligand Binding Thermodynamics in Drug Discovery: Still a Hot Tip?

    PubMed

    Geschwindner, Stefan; Ulander, Johan; Johansson, Patrik

    2015-08-27

    The use of ligand binding thermodynamics has been proposed as a potential success factor to accelerate drug discovery. However, despite the intuitive appeal of optimizing binding enthalpy, a number of factors complicate routine use of thermodynamic data. On a macroscopic level, a range of experimental parameters including temperature and buffer choice significantly influence the observed thermodynamic signatures. On a microscopic level, solute effects, structural flexibility, and cooperativity lead to nonlinear changes in enthalpy. This multifactorial character hides essential enthalpy contributions of intermolecular contacts, making them experimentally nonobservable. In this perspective, we present three case studies, reflect on some key factors affecting thermodynamic signatures, and investigate their relation to the hydrophobic effect, enthalpy-entropy compensation, lipophilic ligand efficiency, and promiscuity. The studies highlight that enthalpy and entropy cannot be used as direct end points but can together with calculations increase our understanding of ligand binding and identify interesting outliers that do not behave as expected.

  18. RNA binding proteins in neurodegeneration: Seq and you shall receive

    PubMed Central

    Nussbacher, Julia K.; Batra, Ranjan; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Yeo, Gene W.

    2015-01-01

    As critical players in gene regulation, RNA binding proteins are taking center stage in our understanding of cellular function and disease. In our era of bench-top sequencers and unprecedented computational power, biological questions can be addressed in a systematic, genome-wide manner. Development of high-throughput sequencing methodologies provides unparalleled potential to discover new mechanisms of disease-associated perturbations of RNA homeostasis. Complementary to candidate single-gene studies, these innovative technologies may elicit the discovery of unexpected mechanisms, and allow us to determine the widespread influence of the multifunctional RNA binding proteins on their targets. As disruption of RNA processing is increasingly implicated in neurological diseases, these approaches will continue to provide insights into the roles of RNA binding proteins in disease pathogenesis. PMID:25765321

  19. Thalidomide mimics uridine binding to an aromatic cage in cereblon.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Marcus D; Boichenko, Iuliia; Coles, Murray; Zanini, Fabio; Lupas, Andrei N; Hernandez Alvarez, Birte

    2014-12-01

    Thalidomide and its derivatives lenalidomide and pomalidomide are important anticancer agents but can cause severe birth defects via an interaction with the protein cereblon. The ligand-binding domain of cereblon is found, with a high degree of conservation, in both bacteria and eukaryotes. Using a bacterial model system, we reveal the structural determinants of cereblon substrate recognition, based on a series of high-resolution crystal structures. For the first time, we identify a cellular ligand that is universally present: we show that thalidomide and its derivatives mimic and compete for the binding of uridine, and validate these findings in vivo. The nature of the binding pocket, an aromatic cage of three tryptophan residues, further suggests a role in the recognition of cationic ligands. Our results allow for general evaluation of pharmaceuticals for potential cereblon-dependent teratogenicity.

  20. Architectural repertoire of ligand-binding pockets on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Weisel, Martin; Kriegl, Jan M; Schneider, Gisbert

    2010-03-01

    Knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of ligand binding sites in proteins provides valuable information for computer-assisted drug design. We present a method for the automated extraction and classification of ligand binding site topologies, in which protein surface cavities are represented as branched frameworks. The procedure employs a growing neural gas approach for pocket topology assignment and pocket framework generation. We assessed the structural diversity of 623 known ligand binding site topologies based on framework cluster analysis. At a resolution of 5 A only 23 structurally distinct topology groups were formed; this suggests an overall limited structural diversity of ligand-accommodating protein cavities. Higher resolution allowed for identification of protein-family specific pocket features. Pocket frameworks highlight potentially preferred modes of ligand-receptor interactions and will help facilitate the identification of druggable subpockets suitable for ligand affinity and selectivity optimization. PMID:20069621

  1. Protein-DNA binding in high-resolution

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, Shaun; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental and computational methodologies are enabling ultra-high resolution genome-wide profiles of protein-DNA binding events. For example, the ChIP-exo protocol precisely characterizes protein-DNA crosslinking patterns by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with 5′ → 3′ exonuclease digestion. Similarly, deeply sequenced chromatin accessibility assays (e.g. DNase-seq and ATACseq) enable the detection of protected footprints at protein-DNA binding sites. With these techniques and others, we have the potential to characterize the individual nucleotides that interact with transcription factors, nucleosomes, RNA polymerases, and other regulatory proteins in a particular cellular context. In this review, we explain the experimental assays and computational analysis methods that enable high-resolution profiling of protein-DNA binding events. We discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with such approaches. PMID:26038153

  2. Decomposition of the factors that govern binding site preference in a multiple rotaxane.

    PubMed

    Angelo, Joseph P; Sohlberg, Karl

    2009-06-18

    A particularly interesting class of multiple rotaxanes consists of complexes where one long shaft threads two rings. If the shaft contains three or more potential binding sites for the rings, multiple co-conformations are possible. Such a complex is a molecular topological analogue to an abacus. Here we address the question, how does strength of ring binding to the shaft vary with respect to position on the shaft? Previous studies have found that a shaft with three binding sites exhibits strongest ring binding at the center site. Here a five-binding-site shaft is studied. We employ a novel method to partition the total energy of the system into contributions from intercomponent binding and intracomponent distortion. The method uses the output of quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations to determine fitting parameters in a set of coupled equations. The solution of the equations yields the energy partitioning and reveals the influence of long-range intercomponent interactions.

  3. Binding of Protein Factor CTCF within Chicken Genome Alpha-Globin Locus.

    PubMed

    Kotova, E S; Akopov, S B; Didych, D A; Petrova, N V; Iarovaia, O V; Razin, S V; Nikolaev, L G

    2016-01-01

    A systematic search for DNA fragments containing potential CTCF transcription factor binding sites in the chicken alpha-globin domain and its flanking regions was performed by means of the two-dimension electrophoretic mobility shift assay. For the alpha-globin domain fragments selected, the occupancy by the CTCF in erythroid and lymphoid chicken cells was tested by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Only one of 13 DNA fragments capable of CTCF binding in vitro was efficiently bound to this protein in vivo in erythroid cells, and somewhat less efficiently - in lymphoid cells. So, binding of CTCF to the DNA fragment in vitro in most cases does not mean that this fragment will be occupied by CTCF in the cell nucleus. Yet, CTCF binding in vivo, as a rule, is accompanied by the binding of the protein to this DNA region in vitro. During the erythroid differentiation, no significant changes in CTCF binding to the DNA fragments studied were detected. PMID:27099788

  4. Binding of Protein Factor CTCF within Chicken Genome Alpha-Globin Locus

    PubMed Central

    Kotova, E. S.; Akopov, S. B.; Didych, D. A.; Petrova, N. V.; Iarovaia, O. V.; Razin, S. V.; Nikolaev, L. G.

    2016-01-01

    A systematic search for DNA fragments containing potential CTCF transcription factor binding sites in the chicken alpha-globin domain and its flanking regions was performed by means of the two-dimension electrophoretic mobility shift assay. For the alpha-globin domain fragments selected, the occupancy by the CTCF in erythroid and lymphoid chicken cells was tested by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Only one of 13 DNA fragments capable of CTCF binding in vitro was efficiently bound to this protein in vivo in erythroid cells, and somewhat less efficiently – in lymphoid cells. So, binding of CTCF to the DNA fragment in vitro in most cases does not mean that this fragment will be occupied by CTCF in the cell nucleus. Yet, CTCF binding in vivo, as a rule, is accompanied by the binding of the protein to this DNA region in vitro. During the erythroid differentiation, no significant changes in CTCF binding to the DNA fragments studied were detected. PMID:27099788

  5. Structural basis for induced-fit binding of Rho-kinase to the inhibitor Y-27632.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroto; Miwa, Yukiko; Kasa, Miyuki; Kitano, Ken; Amano, Mutsuki; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2006-09-01

    Rho-kinase is a main player in the regulation of cytoskeletal events and a promising drug target in the treatment of both vascular and neurological disorders. Here we report the crystal structure of the Rho-kinase catalytic domain in complex with the specific inhibitor Y-27632. Comparison with the structure of PKA bound to this inhibitor revealed a potential induced-fit binding mode that can be accommodated by the phosphate binding loop. This binding mode resembles to that observed in the Rho-kinase-fasudil complex. A structural database search indicated that a pocket underneath the phosphate-binding loop is present that favors binding to a small aromatic ring. Introduction of such a ring group might spawn a new modification scheme of pre-existing protein kinase inhibitors for improved binding capability. PMID:16891330

  6. Metal replacement in "zinc finger" and its effect on DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Predki, P F; Sarkar, B

    1994-01-01

    Metal replacement studies were used to investigate the metal requirement of a bacterially expressed polypeptide encoding the zinc finger DNA binding domain of the estrogen receptor. Apopolypeptide was generated by dialysis of native polypeptide against low-pH buffer under reducing conditions. Specific DNA binding can be restored by refolding the apopolypeptide in the presence of ionic zinc, cadmium, or cobalt. However, refolding in the presence of copper or nickel fails to regenerate DNA binding activity. While cobalt-reconstituted polypeptide has a reduced affinity for its AGGTCA-binding site compared to zinc- or cadmium-polypeptide, it has the surprising property of increased cooperative DNA binding. Our work indicates that metal substitution results in a range of effects upon DNA binding in vitro. The potential biological significance of metal substitution in vivo is discussed. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:7843097

  7. Dynamic Conformational Changes in MUNC18 Prevent Syntaxin Binding

    PubMed Central

    Bar-On, Dana; Nachliel, Esther; Gutman, Menachem; Ashery, Uri

    2011-01-01

    The Sec1/munc18 protein family is essential for vesicle fusion in eukaryotic cells via binding to SNARE proteins. Protein kinase C modulates these interactions by phosphorylating munc18a thereby reducing its affinity to one of the central SNARE members, syntaxin-1a. The established hypothesis is that the reduced affinity of the phosphorylated munc18a to syntaxin-1a is a result of local electrostatic repulsion between the two proteins, which interferes with their compatibility. The current study challenges this paradigm and offers a novel mechanistic explanation by revealing a syntaxin-non-binding conformation of munc18a that is induced by the phosphomimetic mutations. In the present study, using molecular dynamics simulations, we explored the dynamics of the wild-type munc18a versus phosphomimetic mutant munc18a. We focused on the structural changes that occur in the cavity between domains 3a and 1, which serves as the main syntaxin-binding site. The results of the simulations suggest that the free wild-type munc18a exhibits a dynamic equilibrium between several conformations differing in the size of its cavity (the main syntaxin-binding site). The flexibility of the cavity's size might facilitate the binding or unbinding of syntaxin. In silico insertion of phosphomimetic mutations into the munc18a structure induces the formation of a conformation where the syntaxin-binding area is rigid and blocked as a result of interactions between residues located on both sides of the cavity. Therefore, we suggest that the reduced affinity of the phosphomimetic mutant/phosphorylated munc18a is a result of the closed-cavity conformation, which makes syntaxin binding energetically and sterically unfavorable. The current study demonstrates the potential of phosphoryalation, an essential biological process, to serve as a driving force for dramatic conformational changes of proteins modulating their affinity to target proteins. PMID:21390273

  8. Dynamic conformational changes in munc18 prevent syntaxin binding.

    PubMed

    Bar-On, Dana; Nachliel, Esther; Gutman, Menachem; Ashery, Uri

    2011-03-01

    The Sec1/munc18 protein family is essential for vesicle fusion in eukaryotic cells via binding to SNARE proteins. Protein kinase C modulates these interactions by phosphorylating munc18a thereby reducing its affinity to one of the central SNARE members, syntaxin-1a. The established hypothesis is that the reduced affinity of the phosphorylated munc18a to syntaxin-1a is a result of local electrostatic repulsion between the two proteins, which interferes with their compatibility. The current study challenges this paradigm and offers a novel mechanistic explanation by revealing a syntaxin-non-binding conformation of munc18a that is induced by the phosphomimetic mutations. In the present study, using molecular dynamics simulations, we explored the dynamics of the wild-type munc18a versus phosphomimetic mutant munc18a. We focused on the structural changes that occur in the cavity between domains 3a and 1, which serves as the main syntaxin-binding site. The results of the simulations suggest that the free wild-type munc18a exhibits a dynamic equilibrium between several conformations differing in the size of its cavity (the main syntaxin-binding site). The flexibility of the cavity's size might facilitate the binding or unbinding of syntaxin. In silico insertion of phosphomimetic mutations into the munc18a structure induces the formation of a conformation where the syntaxin-binding area is rigid and blocked as a result of interactions between residues located on both sides of the cavity. Therefore, we suggest that the reduced affinity of the phosphomimetic mutant/phosphorylated munc18a is a result of the closed-cavity conformation, which makes syntaxin binding energetically and sterically unfavorable. The current study demonstrates the potential of phosphorylation, an essential biological process, to serve as a driving force for dramatic conformational changes of proteins modulating their affinity to target proteins. PMID:21390273

  9. Spectroscopic characterization of inductive binding in ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessen, D.; Asher, R. L.; Brucat, P. J.

    1990-12-01

    Molecular ions without conventional covalent bonds have been synthesized via supersonic adiabatic expansion and studied in a tandem time-of-fligth mass spectrometer. Resonant laser photofragmentation of these ions reveal a wealth of vibrational and electronic structure previously unknown. The ground and excited state "bond" strengths of transition-metal rare-gas diatomic ions (MRg+) are determined spectroscopically. The vibrational structure of these diatomics has been analyzed using model metal rare-gas interatomic potential that incorporates only charge induced-dipole as the attractive force. This potential is used to predict the binding energy and structure of the MRg+n, n = 2-14, clusters. V+ is predicted to be four coordinate in its first "solvation shell" with Ar in accord with experimental observation. The dynamic of the MRg+n ions is probed by classical trajectory analysis of a model many-body potential. An example demonstrates that the lowest energy structure of a cluster can be less important to its dynamical structure at finite temperature than higher-lying, lower-symmetry isomers. Resonant photodissociation spectroscopy is used to show the existence of the charge dipole bound V(OH2)+ in both ground and excited states.

  10. MutaBind estimates and interprets the effects of sequence variants on protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Simonetti, Franco L; Goncearenco, Alexander; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-07-01

    Proteins engage in highly selective interactions with their macromolecular partners. Sequence variants that alter protein binding affinity may cause significant perturbations or complete abolishment of function, potentially leading to diseases. There exists a persistent need to develop a mechanistic understanding of impacts of variants on proteins. To address this need we introduce a new computational method MutaBind to evaluate the effects of sequence variants and disease mutations on protein interactions and calculate the quantitative changes in binding affinity. The MutaBind method uses molecular mechanics force fields, statistical potentials and fast side-chain optimization algorithms. The MutaBind server maps mutations on a structural protein complex, calculates the associated changes in binding affinity, determines the deleterious effect of a mutation, estimates the confidence of this prediction and produces a mutant structural model for download. MutaBind can be applied to a large number of problems, including determination of potential driver mutations in cancer and other diseases, elucidation of the effects of sequence variants on protein fitness in evolution and protein design. MutaBind is available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/mutabind/. PMID:27150810

  11. Probing the electrostatics and pharmacologic modulation of sequence-specific binding by the DNA-binding domain of the ETS-family transcription factor PU.1: a binding affinity and kinetics investigation

    PubMed Central

    Munde, Manoj; Poon, Gregory M. K.; Wilson, W. David

    2013-01-01

    Members of the ETS family of transcription factors regulate a functionally diverse array of genes. All ETS proteins share a structurally-conserved but sequence-divergent DNA-binding domain, known as the ETS domain. Although the structure and thermodynamics of the ETS-DNA complexes are well known, little is known about the kinetics of sequence recognition, a facet that offers potential insight into its molecular mechanism. We have characterized DNA binding by the ETS domain of PU.1 by biosensor-surface plasmon resonance (SPR). SPR analysis revealed a striking kinetic profile for DNA binding by the PU.1 ETS domain. At low salt concentrations, it binds high-affinity cognate DNA with a very slow association rate constant (≤105 M−1 s−1), compensated by a correspondingly small dissociation rate constant. The kinetics are strongly salt-dependent but mutually balance to produce a relatively weak dependence in the equilibrium constant. This profile contrasts sharply with reported data for other ETS domains (e.g., Ets-1, TEL) for which high-affinity binding is driven by rapid association (>107 M−1 s−1). We interpret this difference in terms of the hydration properties of ETS-DNA binding and propose that at least two mechanisms of sequence recognition are employed by this family of DNA-binding domain. Additionally, we use SPR to demonstrate the potential for pharmacological inhibition of sequence-specific ETS-DNA binding, using the minor groove-binding distamycin as a model compound. Our work establishes SPR as a valuable technique for extending our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of ETS-DNA interactions as well as developing potential small-molecule agents for biotechnological and therapeutic purposes. PMID:23416556

  12. Characterization of tumor binding by the IC-21 macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Crawford, E K; Latham, P S; Shah, E M; Hasday, J D

    1990-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the SV40-transformed murine macrophage cell line IC-21 is a suitable model to study the selective high avidity binding of tumor cells by subpopulations of activated macrophages. IC-21 macrophages bound P815, RBL5, and EL-4 murine tumor cells with high avidity, as measured by the inverted centrifugation method. Tumor binding by IC-21 macrophages was competitively inhibited by crude membrane vesicles prepared from tumor cells but not by cell membranes prepared from nontransformed splenic leukocytes, suggesting that this process was mediated by tumor-specific binding sites. IC-21 macrophages and primary cultures of pyran copolymer-elicited peritoneal macrophages demonstrated similar tumor binding avidity, kinetics, saturability, and metabolic requirements for optimal high avidity tumor binding. However, compared with primary cultures of pyran copolymer-elicited peritoneal macrophages, IC-21 macrophages bound 4-fold more tumor cells and were more homogeneous for tumor binding capability. Finally, one third of maximal tumor cell binding by IC-21 macrophages was completed within 5 min of contact with tumor, suggesting that IC-21 macrophages constitutively expressed some high avidity tumor binding sites. Their stable and homogeneous capability for binding tumor cells and their ease of growth make the IC-21 macrophage cell line a potentially valuable model for elucidating the molecular mechanisms responsible for selective high avidity tumor binding by subpopulations of activated macrophages. PMID:2164442

  13. A Key Evolutionary Mutation Enhances DNA Binding of the FOXP2 Forkhead Domain.

    PubMed

    Morris, Gavin; Fanucchi, Sylvia

    2016-04-01

    Forkhead box (FOX) transcription factors share a conserved forkhead DNA binding domain (FHD) and are key role players in the development of many eukaryotic species. Their involvement in various congenital disorders and cancers makes them clinically relevant targets for novel therapeutic strategies. Among them, the FOXP subfamily of multidomain transcriptional repressors is unique in its ability to form DNA binding homo and heterodimers. The truncated FOXP2 FHD, in the absence of the leucine zipper, exists in equilibrium between monomeric and domain-swapped dimeric states in vitro. As a consequence, determining the DNA binding properties of the FOXP2 FHD becomes inherently difficult. In this work, two FOXP2 FHD hinge loop mutants have been generated to successfully prevent both the formation (A539P) and the dissociation (F541C) of the homodimers. This allows for the separation of the two species for downstream DNA binding studies. Comparison of DNA binding of the different species using electrophoretic mobility shift assay, fluorescence anisotropy and isothermal titration calorimetry indicates that the wild-type FOXP2 FHD binds DNA as a monomer. However, comparison of the DNA-binding energetics of the monomer and wild-type FHD, reveals that there is a difference in the mechanism of binding between the two species. We conclude that the naturally occurring reverse mutation (P539A) seen in the FOXP subfamily increases DNA binding affinity and may increase the potential for nonspecific binding compared to other FOX family members.

  14. Transthyretin-binding activity of contaminants in blood from polar bear (Ursus maritimus) cubs.

    PubMed

    Bytingsvik, Jenny; Simon, Eszter; Leonards, Pim E G; Lamoree, Marja; Lie, Elisabeth; Aars, Jon; Derocher, Andrew E; Wiig, Oystein; Jenssen, Bjørn M; Hamers, Timo

    2013-05-01

    We determined the transthyretin (TTR)-binding activity of blood-accumulating contaminants in blood plasma samples of approximately 4-months-old polar bear (Ursus maritimus) cubs from Svalbard sampled in 1998 and 2008. The TTR-binding activity was measured as thyroxine (T4)-like equivalents (T4-EQMeas). Our findings show that the TTR-binding activity related to contaminant levels was significantly lower (45%) in 2008 than in 1998 (mean ± standard error of mean: 1998, 2265 ± 231 nM; 2008, 1258 ± 170 nM). Although we cannot exclude a potential influence of between-year differences in capture location and cub body mass, our findings most likely reflect reductions of TTR-binding contaminants or their precursors in the arctic environment (e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs]). The measured TTR-binding activity correlated positively with the cubs' plasma levels of hydroxylated PCBs (OH-PCBs). No such association was found between TTR-binding activity and the plasma levels of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs). The OH-PCBs explained 60 ± 7% and 54 ± 4% of the TTR-binding activity in 1998 and 2008, respectively, and PFASs explained ≤1.2% both years. Still, almost half the TTR-binding activity could not be explained by the contaminants we examined. The considerable levels of TTR-binding contaminants warrant further effect directed analysis (EDA) to identify the contaminants responsible for the unexplained part of the observed TTR-binding activity.

  15. Microarrays for identifying binding sites and probing structure of RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Kierzek, Ryszard; Turner, Douglas H.; Kierzek, Elzbieta

    2015-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays are widely used in various biological studies. In this review, application of oligonucleotide microarrays for identifying binding sites and probing structure of RNAs is described. Deep sequencing allows fast determination of DNA and RNA sequence. High-throughput methods for determination of secondary structures of RNAs have also been developed. Those methods, however, do not reveal binding sites for oligonucleotides. In contrast, microarrays directly determine binding sites while also providing structural insights. Microarray mapping can be used over a wide range of experimental conditions, including temperature, pH, various cations at different concentrations and the presence of other molecules. Moreover, it is possible to make universal microarrays suitable for investigations of many different RNAs, and readout of results is rapid. Thus, microarrays are used to provide insight into oligonucleotide sequences potentially able to interfere with biological function. Better understanding of structure–function relationships of RNA can be facilitated by using microarrays to find RNA regions capable to bind oligonucleotides. That information is extremely important to design optimal sequences for antisense oligonucleotides and siRNA because both bind to single-stranded regions of target RNAs. PMID:25505162

  16. Acid Gas Capture Using CO2-Binding Organic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Heldebrant, David J.; Koech, Phillip K.; Rainbolt, James E.; Zheng, Feng

    2010-11-10

    Current chemical CO2 scrubbing technology is primarily aqueous alkanolamine based. These systems rapidly bind CO2 (forming water-soluble carbamate and bicarbonate salts) however, the process has serious disadvantages. The concentration of monoethanolamine rarely exceeds 30 wt % due to the corrosive nature of the solution, and this reduces the maximum CO2 volumetric (≤108 g/L) and gravimetric capacity (≤7 wt%) of the CO2 scrubber. The ≤30 wt % loading of ethanolamine also means that a large excess of water must be pumped and heated during CO2 capture and release, and this greatly increases the energy requirements especially considering the high specific heat of water (4 j/g-1K-1). Our approach is to switch to organic systems that chemically bind CO2 as liquid alkylcarbonate salts. Our CO2-binding organic liquids have higher CO2 solubility, lower specific heats, potential for less corrosion and lower binding energies for CO2 than aqueous systems. CO2BOLs also reversibly bind and release mixed sulfur oxides. Furthermore the CO2BOL system can be direct solvent replacements for any solvent based CO2 capture systems because they are commercially available reagents and because they are fluids they would not require extensive process re-engineering.

  17. Anchored clathrate waters bind antifreeze proteins to ice

    PubMed Central

    Garnham, Christopher P.; Campbell, Robert L.; Davies, Peter L.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism by which antifreeze proteins (AFPs) irreversibly bind to ice has not yet been resolved. The ice-binding site of an AFP is relatively hydrophobic, but also contains many potential hydrogen bond donors/acceptors. The extent to which hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic effect contribute to ice binding has been debated for over 30 years. Here we have elucidated the ice-binding mechanism through solving the first crystal structure of an Antarctic bacterial AFP. This 34-kDa domain, the largest AFP structure determined to date, folds as a Ca2+-bound parallel beta-helix with an extensive array of ice-like surface waters that are anchored via hydrogen bonds directly to the polypeptide backbone and adjacent side chains. These bound waters make an excellent three-dimensional match to both the primary prism and basal planes of ice and in effect provide an extensive X-ray crystallographic picture of the AFP∶ice interaction. This unobstructed view, free from crystal-packing artefacts, shows the contributions of both the hydrophobic effect and hydrogen bonding during AFP adsorption to ice. We term this mode of binding the “anchored clathrate” mechanism of AFP action. PMID:21482800

  18. Anchored Clathrate Waters Bind Antifreeze Proteins to Ice

    SciTech Connect

    C Garnham; R Campbell; P Davies

    2011-12-31

    The mechanism by which antifreeze proteins (AFPs) irreversibly bind to ice has not yet been resolved. The ice-binding site of an AFP is relatively hydrophobic, but also contains many potential hydrogen bond donors/acceptors. The extent to which hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic effect contribute to ice binding has been debated for over 30 years. Here we have elucidated the ice-binding mechanism through solving the first crystal structure of an Antarctic bacterial AFP. This 34-kDa domain, the largest AFP structure determined to date, folds as a Ca{sup 2+}-bound parallel beta-helix with an extensive array of ice-like surface waters that are anchored via hydrogen bonds directly to the polypeptide backbone and adjacent side chains. These bound waters make an excellent three-dimensional match to both the primary prism and basal planes of ice and in effect provide an extensive X-ray crystallographic picture of the AFP{vert_ellipsis}ice interaction. This unobstructed view, free from crystal-packing artefacts, shows the contributions of both the hydrophobic effect and hydrogen bonding during AFP adsorption to ice. We term this mode of binding the 'anchored clathrate' mechanism of AFP action.

  19. Identification of Chondrocyte-Binding Peptides by Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Crystal S.F.; Lui, Julian C.; Baron, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    As an initial step toward targeting cartilage tissue for potential therapeutic applications, we sought cartilage-binding peptides using phage display, a powerful technology for selection of peptides that bind to molecules of interest. A library of phage displaying random 12-amino acid peptides was iteratively incubated with cultured chondrocytes to select phage that bind cartilage. The resulting phage clones demonstrated increased affinity to chondrocytes by ELISA, when compared to a wild-type, insertless phage. Furthermore, the selected phage showed little preferential binding to other cell types, including primary skin fibroblast, myocyte and hepatocyte cultures, suggesting a tissue-specific interaction. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the selected phage bound chondrocytes themselves and the surrounding extracellular matrix. FITC-tagged peptides were synthesized based on the sequence of cartilage-binding phage clones. These peptides, but not a random peptide, bound cultured chondrocytes, and extracelluar matrix. In conclusion, using phage display, we identified peptide sequences that specifically target chondrocytes. We anticipate that such peptides may be coupled to therapeutic molecules to provide targeted treatment for cartilage disorders. PMID:23440926

  20. Anion binding in biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V.; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P.; Bevers, Loes E.; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2009-11-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L3 (2p3/2) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  1. Effects of membrane physical parameters on hematoporphyrin-derivative binding to liposomes: a spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, E.; Malik, Z.; Ehrenberg, B.

    1987-01-01

    Physical parameters of membrane bilayers were studied for their effect on the binding of hematoporphyrin derivative (Hpd), which is used as a sensitizer in photodynamic therapy of cancerous tissues. The purpose of this study was to clarify which parameters were relevant, under physiological conditions, to the selectivity of Hpd binding to cancer cells. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to measure the relative partitioning of the dye between the lipid and aqueous media. Increasing the microviscosity of the liposomes' membranes by various bilayer additives results in a strong reduction of Hpd binding, to an extent independent of the specific additive. The effect of temperature near the physiological value as well as the effect of cross membrane potential are small. Surface potential does not affect the binding constant, indicating that the binding species does not carry a net electric charge.

  2. Homology modeling, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics simulations elucidated α-fetoprotein binding modes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An important mechanism of endocrine activity is chemicals entering target cells via transport proteins and then interacting with hormone receptors such as the estrogen receptor (ER). α-Fetoprotein (AFP) is a major transport protein in rodent serum that can bind and sequester estrogens, thus preventing entry to the target cell and where they could otherwise induce ER-mediated endocrine activity. Recently, we reported rat AFP binding affinities for a large set of structurally diverse chemicals, including 53 binders and 72 non-binders. However, the lack of three-dimensional (3D) structures of rat AFP hinders further understanding of the structural dependence for binding. Therefore, a 3D structure of rat AFP was built using homology modeling in order to elucidate rat AFP-ligand binding modes through docking analyses and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Methods Homology modeling was first applied to build a 3D structure of rat AFP. Molecular docking and Molecular Mechanics-Generalized Born Surface Area (MM-GBSA) scoring were then used to examine potential rat AFP ligand binding modes. MD simulations and free energy calculations were performed to refine models of binding modes. Results A rat AFP tertiary structure was first obtained using homology modeling and MD simulations. The rat AFP-ligand binding modes of 13 structurally diverse, representative binders were calculated using molecular docking, (MM-GBSA) ranking and MD simulations. The key residues for rat AFP-ligand binding were postulated through analyzing the binding modes. Conclusion The optimized 3D rat AFP structure and associated ligand binding modes shed light on rat AFP-ligand binding interactions that, in turn, provide a means to estimate binding affinity of unknown chemicals. Our results will assist in the evaluation of the endocrine disruption potential of chemicals. PMID:24266910

  3. Beryllium(II) binding to ATP and ADP: potentiometric determination of the thermodynamic constants and implications for in vivo toxicity.

    PubMed

    Boukhalfa, Hakim; Lewis, James G; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2004-04-01

    Highly toxic beryllium(II) is divalent metal ion with a high charge density, making it a potential target for binding to bio-molecules rich in O donor groups. In aqueous solution Be2+ binds to ATP and ADP to form 1:1 Be2+:ATP and Be2+:ADP complexes in relatively acidic media. At neutral pH the complex formed undergoes hydrolysis. Be2+ binding to ATP and ADP is much stronger than Ca2+ and Mg2+ binding. The high affinity of Be2+ toward ATP and ADP binding suggests a mechanism relevant to understanding the in vivo chemical toxicity of this metal.

  4. Binding Mode Prediction of Evodiamine within Vanilloid Receptor TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhanli; Sun, Lidan; Yu, Hui; Zhang, Yanhui; Gong, Wuzhuang; Jin, Hongwei; Zhang, Liangren; Liang, Huaping

    2012-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the potential binding mode of drugs is crucial to computer-aided drug design paradigms. It has been reported that evodiamine acts as an agonist of the vanilloid receptor Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1). However, the precise interaction between evodiamine and TRPV1 was still not fully understood. In this perspective, the homology models of TRPV1 were generated using the crystal structure of the voltage-dependent shaker family K+ channel as a template. We then performed docking and molecular dynamics simulation to gain a better understanding of the probable binding modes of evodiamine within the TRPV1 binding pocket. There are no significant interspecies differences in evodiamine binding in rat, human and rabbit TRPV1 models. Pharmacophore modeling further provided confidence for the validity of the docking studies. This study is the first to shed light on the structural determinants required for the interaction between TRPV1 and evodiamine, and gives new suggestions for the rational design of novel TRPV1 ligands. PMID:22942745

  5. A novel mechanism of ligand binding and release in the odorant binding protein 20 from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Ziemba, Brian P; Murphy, Emma J; Edlin, Hannah T; Jones, David N M

    2013-01-01

    Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes that transmit malaria are attracted to humans by the odor molecules that emanate from skin and sweat. Odorant binding proteins (OBPs) are the first component of the olfactory apparatus to interact with odorant molecules, and so present potential targets for preventing transmission of malaria by disrupting the normal olfactory responses of the insect. AgamOBP20 is one of a limited subset of OBPs that it is preferentially expressed in female mosquitoes and its expression is regulated by blood feeding and by the day/night light cycles that correlate with blood-feeding behavior. Analysis of AgamOBP20 in solution reveals that the apo-protein exhibits significant conformational heterogeneity but the binding of odorant molecules results in a significant conformational change, which is accompanied by a reduction in the conformational flexibility present in the protein. Crystal structures of the free and bound states reveal a novel pathway for entrance and exit of odorant molecules into the central-binding pocket, and that the conformational changes associated with ligand binding are a result of rigid body domain motions in α-helices 1, 4, and 5, which act as lids to the binding pocket. These structures provide new insights into the specific residues involved in the conformational adaptation to different odorants and have important implications in the selection and development of reagents targeted at disrupting normal OBP function. PMID:23081820

  6. The MLLE Domain of the Ubiquitin Ligase UBR5 Binds to Its Catalytic Domain to Regulate Substrate Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Escobar, Juliana; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Kozlov, Guennadi; Gehring, Kalle

    2015-01-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases catalyze the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2-conjugating enzyme to a substrate. UBR5, homologous to the E6AP C terminus (HECT)-type E3 ligase, mediates the ubiquitination of proteins involved in translation regulation, DNA damage response, and gluconeogenesis. In addition, UBR5 functions in a ligase-independent manner by prompting protein/protein interactions without ubiquitination of the binding partner. Despite recent functional studies, the mechanisms involved in substrate recognition and selective ubiquitination of its binding partners remain elusive. The C terminus of UBR5 harbors the HECT catalytic domain and an adjacent MLLE domain. MLLE domains mediate protein/protein interactions through the binding of a conserved peptide motif, termed PAM2. Here, we characterize the binding properties of the UBR5 MLLE domain to PAM2 peptides from Paip1 and GW182. The crystal structure with a Paip1 PAM2 peptide reveals the network of hydrophobic and ionic interactions that drive binding. In addition, we identify a novel interaction of the MLLE domain with the adjacent HECT domain mediated by a PAM2-like sequence. Our results confirm the role of the MLLE domain of UBR5 in substrate recruitment and suggest a potential role in regulating UBR5 ligase activity. PMID:26224628

  7. SFS, a Novel Fibronectin-Binding Protein from Streptococcus equi, Inhibits the Binding between Fibronectin and Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Lindmark, Hans; Guss, Bengt

    1999-01-01

    The obligate parasitic bacterium Streptococcus equi subsp. equi is the causative agent of strangles, a serious disease of the upper respiratory tract in horses. In this study we have, using shotgun phage display, cloned from S. equi subsp. equi and characterized a gene, called sfs, encoding a protein termed SFS, representing a new type of fibronectin (Fn)-binding protein. The sfs gene was found to be present in all 50 isolates of S. equi subsp. equi tested and in 41 of 48 S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus isolates tested. The sfs gene is down-regulated during growth in vitro compared to fnz, a previously characterized gene encoding an Fn-binding protein from S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus. Sequence comparisons revealed no similarities to previously characterized Fn-binding proteins, but high scores were obtained against collagen. Besides similarity due to the high content of glycine, serine, and proline residues present in both proteins, there was a nine-residue motif present both in collagen and in the Fn-binding domain of SFS. By searching the Oklahoma S. pyogenes database, we found that this motif is also present in a potential cell surface protein from S. pyogenes. Protein SFS was found to inhibit the binding between Fn and collagen in a concentration-dependent way. PMID:10225899

  8. The MLLE domain of the ubiquitin ligase UBR5 binds to its catalytic domain to regulate substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Escobar, Juliana; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Kozlov, Guennadi; Gehring, Kalle

    2015-09-11

    E3 ubiquitin ligases catalyze the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2-conjugating enzyme to a substrate. UBR5, homologous to the E6AP C terminus (HECT)-type E3 ligase, mediates the ubiquitination of proteins involved in translation regulation, DNA damage response, and gluconeogenesis. In addition, UBR5 functions in a ligase-independent manner by prompting protein/protein interactions without ubiquitination of the binding partner. Despite recent functional studies, the mechanisms involved in substrate recognition and selective ubiquitination of its binding partners remain elusive. The C terminus of UBR5 harbors the HECT catalytic domain and an adjacent MLLE domain. MLLE domains mediate protein/protein interactions through the binding of a conserved peptide motif, termed PAM2. Here, we characterize the binding properties of the UBR5 MLLE domain to PAM2 peptides from Paip1 and GW182. The crystal structure with a Paip1 PAM2 peptide reveals the network of hydrophobic and ionic interactions that drive binding. In addition, we identify a novel interaction of the MLLE domain with the adjacent HECT domain mediated by a PAM2-like sequence. Our results confirm the role of the MLLE domain of UBR5 in substrate recruitment and suggest a potential role in regulating UBR5 ligase activity.

  9. Feature-Based Binding and Phase Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonenko, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Current theories of binding cannot provide a uniform account for many facts associated with the distribution of anaphors, such as long-distance binding effects and the subject-orientation of monomorphemic anaphors. Further, traditional binding theory is incompatible with minimalist assumptions. In this dissertation I propose an analysis of…

  10. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, G.K.

    1997-04-29

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described. 11 figs.

  11. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, Gisela K.

    1997-01-01

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described.

  12. Evolution of Protein-binding DNA Sequences through Competitive Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Weiqun; Gerland, Ulrich; Hwa, Terence; Levine, Herbert

    2002-03-01

    The dynamics of in vitro DNA evolution controlled via competitive binding of DNA sequences to proteins has been explored in a recent serial transfer experiment footnote B. Dubertret, S.Liu, Q. Ouyang, A. Libchaber, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 6022 (2001).. Motivated by the experiment, we investigate a continuum model for this evolution process in various parameter regimes. We establish a self-consistent mean-field evolution equation, determine its dynamical properties and finite population size corrections. In addition, we discuss the experimental implications of our results.

  13. Identifying human milk glycans that inhibit norovirus binding using surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jing; Piskarev, Vladimir E; Xia, Ming; Huang, Pengwei; Jiang, Xi; Likhosherstov, Leonid M; Novikova, Olga S; Newburg, David S; Ratner, Daniel M

    2013-12-01

    Human milk glycans inhibit binding between norovirus and its host glycan receptor; such competitive inhibition by human milk glycans is associated with a reduced risk of infection. The relationship between the presence of specific structural motifs in the human milk glycan and its ability to inhibit binding by specific norovirus strains requires facile, accurate and miniaturized-binding assays. Toward this end, a high-throughput biosensor platform was developed based on surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) of glycan microarrays. The SPRi was validated, and its utility was tested, by measuring binding specificities between defined human milk glycan epitopes and the capsids of two common norovirus strains, VA387 and Norwalk. Human milk oligosaccharide (HMOS)-based neoglycoconjugates, including chemically derived neoglycoproteins and oligosaccharide-glycine derivatives, were used to represent polyvalent glycoconjugates and monovalent oligosaccharides, respectively, in human milk. SPRi binding results established that the glycan motifs that bind norovirus capsids depend upon strain; VA387 capsid interacts with two neoglycoproteins, whereas Norwalk capsid binds to a different set of HMOS motifs in the form of both polyvalent neoglycoproteins and monovalent oligosaccharides. SPRi competitive binding assays further demonstrated that specific norovirus-binding glycans are able to inhibit norovirus capsid binding to their host receptors. A polyvalent neoglycoconjugate with clustered carbohydrate moieties is required for the inhibition of VA387 capsid binding to host receptor glycans, whereas both monovalent oligosaccharides and polyvalent neoglycoconjugates are able to inhibit Norwalk capsid binding to its host receptor. Binding of HMOS and HMOS-based neoglycoconjugates to norovirus capsids depends upon the specific strain characteristics, implying that HMOS and their polyvalent derivatives are potential anti-adhesive agents for norovirus prophylaxis.

  14. Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul O.; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2010-04-20

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  15. Binding energy and structure of e{sup +}Na

    SciTech Connect

    Shertzer, J.; Ward, S. J.

    2010-06-15

    We calculate the nonadiabatic binding energy and geometry of the weakly bound state of e{sup +}Na. We use the Peach model potential, which includes both the dipole and an effective quadrupole term in the polarization, to describe the interaction of the electron and positron with the ion core. The effective three-body Schroedinger equation is solved with the finite element method. Because the model potential gives rise to three spurious states, the true ground state of e{sup +}Na is embedded in a dense spectrum of spurious states. We develop a method for extracting the correct ground state for e{sup +}Na, even when the energy is nearly degenerate with a spurious level. The calculated value for the binding energy is consistent with other calculations.

  16. Glucocorticoid receptor transformation and DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    Tienrungroj, W.

    1986-01-01

    The overall goal is to probe the mechanism whereby glucocorticoid receptors are transformed from a non-DNA-binding form to their active DNA-binding form. The author has examined the effect of an endogenous inhibitor purified from rat liver cytosol on receptor binding to DNA. The inhibitor binds to transformed receptors in whole cytosol and prevent their binding to DNA. He also examined the role of sulfhydryl groups in determining the DNA binding activity of the transformed receptor and in determining the transformation process. Treatment of rat liver cytosol containing temperature-transformed, (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone-bound receptors at 0/sup 0/C with the sulfhydryl modifying reagent methyl methanethiosulfonate inhibits the DNA-binding activity of the receptor, and DNA-binding activity is restored after addition of dithiothreitol. In addition, he has examined the relationship between receptor phosphorylation and DNA binding. Untransformed receptor complexes purified from cytosol prepared from mouse L cells grown in medium containing (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate contain two components, a 100 k-Da and a 90-kDa subunit, both of which are phosphoproteins. On transformation, the receptor dissociates from the 90-kDa protein. Transformation of the complex under cell free conditions does not result in a dephosphorylation of the 100-kDa steroid-binding protein. Transformed receptor that has been bound to DNA and purified by monoclonal antibody is still in a phosphorylated form. These results suggest that dephosphorylation is not required for receptor binding to DNA.

  17. Computational Design of DNA-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Thyme, Summer; Song, Yifan

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the outcome of engineered and naturally occurring sequence perturbations to protein-DNA interfaces requires accurate computational modeling technologies. It has been well established that computational design to accommodate small numbers of DNA target site substitutions is possible. This chapter details the basic method of design used in the Rosetta macromolecular modeling program that has been successfully used to modulate the specificity of DNA-binding proteins. More recently, combining computational design and directed evolution has become a common approach for increasing the success rate of protein engineering projects. The power of such high-throughput screening depends on computational methods producing multiple potential solutions. Therefore, this chapter describes several protocols for increasing the diversity of designed output. Lastly, we describe an approach for building comparative models of protein-DNA complexes in order to utilize information from homologous sequences. These models can be used to explore how nature modulates specificity of protein-DNA interfaces and potentially can even be used as starting templates for further engineering. PMID:27094297

  18. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 583: predispute, voluntary, binding arbitration.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    : Arbitration is a form of dispute resolution that is an alternative to 'taking a case to court.' Weighing the potential advantages and disadvantages, predispute arbitration may represent a valid alternative dispute resolution strategy for physicians and patients. When correctly prepared, contractual agreements between patients and physicians for predispute, voluntary, binding arbitration can satisfy both individual and societal needs and, at the same time, meet relevant ethical principles. PMID:24463692

  19. Mammalian synthetic circuits with RNA binding proteins delivered by RNA

    PubMed Central

    Wroblewska, Liliana; Kitada, Tasuku; Endo, Kei; Siciliano, Velia; Stillo, Breanna; Saito, Hirohide; Weiss, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic regulatory circuits encoded on RNA rather than DNA could provide a means to control cell behavior while avoiding potentially harmful genomic integration in therapeutic applications. We create post-transcriptional circuits using RNA-binding proteins, which can be wired in a plug-and-play fashion to create networks of higher complexity. We show that the circuits function in mammalian cells when encoded on modified mRNA or self-replicating RNA. PMID:26237515

  20. Photoactive Spatial Proximity Probes for Binding Pairs with Epigenetic Marks

    PubMed Central

    Ezhov, Roman N.; Metzel, Greg A.; Mukhina, Olga A.; Musselman, Catherine A.; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.; Gustafson, Tiffany P.; Kutateladze, Andrei G.

    2014-01-01

    A new strategy for encoding polypeptide libraries with photolabile tags is developed. The photoassisted assay, based on conditional release of encoding tags only from bound pairs, can differentiate between peptides which have minor differences in a form of post-translational modifications with epigenetic marks. The encoding strategy is fully compatible with automated peptide synthesis. The encoding pendants are compact and do not perturb potential binding interactions. PMID:25197204

  1. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 583: predispute, voluntary, binding arbitration.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    : Arbitration is a form of dispute resolution that is an alternative to 'taking a case to court.' Weighing the potential advantages and disadvantages, predispute arbitration may represent a valid alternative dispute resolution strategy for physicians and patients. When correctly prepared, contractual agreements between patients and physicians for predispute, voluntary, binding arbitration can satisfy both individual and societal needs and, at the same time, meet relevant ethical principles.

  2. Binding Preferences of Amino Acids for Gold Nanoparticles: A Molecular Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Shao, Qing; Hall, Carol K

    2016-08-01

    A better understanding of the binding preference of amino acids for gold nanoparticles of different diameters could aid in the design of peptides that bind specifically to nanoparticles of a given diameter. Here we identify the binding preference of 19 natural amino acids for three gold nanoparticles with diameters of 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 nm, and investigate the mechanisms that govern these preferences. We calculate potentials of mean force between 36 entities (19 amino acids and 17 side chains) and the three gold nanoparticles in explicit water using well-tempered metadynamics simulations. Comparing these potentials of mean force determines the amino acids' nanoparticle binding preferences and if these preferences are controlled by the backbone, the side chain, or both. Twelve amino acids prefer to bind to the 4.0 nm gold nanoparticle, and seven prefer to bind to the 2.0 nm one. We also use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to investigate how water molecules near the nanoparticle influence the binding of the amino acids. The solvation shells of the larger nanoparticles have higher water densities than those of the smaller nanoparticles while the orientation distributions of the water molecules in the shells of all three nanoparticles are similar. The nanoparticle preferences of the amino acids depend on whether their binding free energy is determined mainly by their ability to replace or to reorient water molecules in the nanoparticle solvation shell. The amino acids whose binding free energy depends mainly on the replacement of water molecules are likely to prefer to bind to the largest nanoparticle and tend to have relatively simple side chain structures. Those whose binding free energy depends mainly on their ability to reorient water molecules prefer a smaller nanoparticle and tend to have more complex side chain structures.

  3. Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Atshaves, B.P.; Martin, G.G.; Hostetler, H.A.; McIntosh, A.L.; Kier, A.B.; Schroeder, F.

    2010-01-01

    While low levels of unesterified long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) are normal metabolic intermediates of dietary and endogenous fat, LCFAs are also potent regulators of key receptors/enzymes, and at high levels become toxic detergents within the cell. Elevated levels of LCFAs are associated with diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Consequently, mammals evolved fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) that bind/sequester these potentially toxic free fatty acids in the cytosol and present them for rapid removal in oxidative (mitochondria, peroxisomes) or storage (endoplasmic reticulum, lipid droplets) organelles. Mammals have a large (15 member) family of FABPs with multiple members occurring within a single cell type. The first described FABP, liver-FABP (L-FABP, or FABP1), is expressed in very high levels (2-5% of cytosolic protein) in liver as well as intestine and kidney. Since L-FABP facilitates uptake and metabolism of LCFAs in vitro and in cultured cells, it was expected that abnormal function or loss of L-FABP would reduce hepatic LCFA uptake/oxidation and thereby increase LCFAs available for oxidation in muscle and/or storage in adipose. This prediction was confirmed in vitro with isolated liver slices and cultured primary hepatocytes from L-FABP gene-ablated mice. Despite unaltered food consumption when fed a control diet ad libitum, the L-FABP null mice exhibited age- and sex-dependent weight gain and increased fat tissue mass. The obese phenotype was exacerbated in L-FABP null mice pair-fed a high fat diet. Taken together with other findings, these data suggest that L-FABP could have an important role in preventing age- or diet-induced obesity. PMID:20537520

  4. Sterol carrier protein-2: binding protein for endocannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Liedhegner, Elizabeth Sabens; Vogt, Caleb D; Sem, Daniel S; Cunningham, Christopher W; Hillard, Cecilia J

    2014-08-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system, consisting of eCB ligands and the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R), subserves retrograde, activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in the brain. eCB signaling occurs "on-demand," thus the processes regulating synthesis, mobilization and degradation of eCBs are also primary mechanisms for the regulation of CB1R activity. The eCBs, N-arachidonylethanolamine (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), are poorly soluble in water. We hypothesize that their aqueous solubility, and, therefore, their intracellular and transcellular distribution, are facilitated by protein binding. Using in silico docking studies, we have identified the nonspecific lipid binding protein, sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP-2), as a potential AEA binding protein. The docking studies predict that AEA and AM404 associate with SCP-2 at a putative cholesterol binding pocket with ∆G values of -3.6 and -4.6 kcal/mol, respectively. These values are considerably higher than cholesterol (-6.62 kcal/mol) but consistent with a favorable binding interaction. In support of the docking studies, SCP-2-mediated transfer of cholesterol in vitro is inhibited by micromolar concentrations of AEA; and heterologous expression of SCP-2 in HEK 293 cells increases time-related accumulation of AEA in a temperature-dependent fashion. These results suggest that SCP-2 facilitates cellular uptake of AEA. However, there is no effect of SCP-2 transfection on the cellular accumulation of AEA determined at equilibrium or the IC50 values for AEA, AM404 or 2-AG to inhibit steady state accumulation of radiolabelled AEA. We conclude that SCP-2 is a low affinity binding protein for AEA that can facilitate its cellular uptake but does not contribute significantly to intracellular sequestration of AEA.

  5. The structural basis of pregnane X receptor binding promiscuity

    PubMed Central

    Ngan, Chi-Ho; Beglov, Dmitri; Rudnitskaya, Aleksandra N.; Kozakov, Dima; Waxman, David J.; Vajda, Sandor

    2009-01-01

    The steroid and xenobiotic-responsive human pregnane X receptor (PXR) binds a broad range of structurally diverse compounds. The structures of the apo and ligand-bound forms of PXR are very similar, in contrast to most promiscuous proteins that generally adapt their shape to different ligands. We investigated the structural origins of PXR's recognition promiscuity using computational solvent mapping, a technique developed for the identification and characterization of hot spots, i.e., regions of the protein surface that are major contributors to the binding free energy. Results reveal that the smooth and nearly spherical binding site of PXR has a well-defined hot spot structure, with four hot spots located on four different sides of the pocket and a fifth close to its center. Three of these hot spots are already present in the ligand-free protein. The most important hot spot is defined by three structurally and sequentially conserved residues, W299, F288, and Y306. This largely hydrophobic site is not very specific, and interacts with all known PXR ligands. Depending on their sizes and shapes, individual PXR ligands extend into 2, 3, or 4 more hot spot regions. The large number of potential arrangements within the binding site explains why PXR is able to accommodate a large variety of compounds. All five hot spots include at least one important residue, which is conserved in all mammalian PXRs, suggesting that the hot spot locations have remained largely invariant during mammalian evolution. The same side chains also show a high level of structural conservation across hPXR structures. However, each of the hPXR hot spots also includes residues with moveable side chains, further increasing the size variation in ligands that PXR can bind. Results also suggest a unique signal transduction mechanism between the PXR homodimerization interface and its co-activator binding site. PMID:19856963

  6. dimerization and DNA binding alter phosphorylation of Fos and Jun

    SciTech Connect

    Abate, C.; Baker, S.J.; Curran, T. ); Lees-Miller, S.P.; Anderson, C.W. ); Marshak, D.R. )

    1993-07-15

    Fos and Jun form dimeric complexes that bind to activator protein 1 (AP-1) DNA sequences and regulate gene expression. The levels of expression and activities of these proteins are regulated by a variety of extracellular stimuli. They are thought to function in nuclear signal transduction processes in many different cell types. The role of Fos and Jun in gene transcription is complex and may be regulated in several ways including association with different dimerization partners, interactions with other transcription factors, effects on DNA topology, and reduction/oxidation of a conserved cysteine residue in the DNA-binding domain. In addition, phosphorylation has been suggested to control the activity of Fos and Jun. Here the authors show that phosphorylation of Fos and Jun by several protein kinases is affected by dimerization and binding to DNA. Jun homodimers are phosphorylated efficiently by casein kinase II, whereas Fos-Jun heterodimers are not. DNA binding also reduces phosphorylation of Jun by casein kinase II, p34[sup cdc2] (cdc2) kinase, and protein kinase C. Phosphorylation of Fos by cAMP-dependent protein kinase and cdc2 is relatively insensitive to dimerization and DNA binding, whereas phosphorylation of Fos and Jun by DNA-dependent protein kinase is dramatically stimulated by binding to the AP-1 site. These results imply that different protein kinases can distinguish among Fos and Jun proteins in the form of monomers, homodimers, and heterodimers and between DNA-bound and non-DNA-bound proteins. Thus, potentially, these different states of Fos and Jun can be recognized and regulated independently by phosphorylation. 44 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Isolation and characterizations of oxalate-binding proteins in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Roop-ngam, Piyachat; Chaiyarit, Sakdithep; Pongsakul, Nutkridta; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2012-08-01

    Oxalate-binding proteins are thought to serve as potential modulators of kidney stone formation. However, only few oxalate-binding proteins have been identified from previous studies. Our present study, therefore, aimed for large-scale identification of oxalate-binding proteins in porcine kidney using an oxalate-affinity column containing oxalate-conjugated EAH Sepharose 4B beads for purification followed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to resolve the recovered proteins. Comparing with those obtained from the controlled column containing uncoupled EAH-Sepharose 4B (to subtract the background of non-specific bindings), a total of 38 protein spots were defined as oxalate-binding proteins. These protein spots were successfully identified by quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) and/or tandem MS (MS/MS) as 26 unique proteins, including several nuclear proteins, mitochondrial proteins, oxidative stress regulatory proteins, metabolic enzymes and others. Identification of oxalate-binding domain using the PRATT tool revealed "L-x(3,5)-R-x(2)-[AGILPV]" as a functional domain responsible for oxalate-binding in 25 of 26 (96%) unique identified proteins. We report herein, for the first time, large-scale identification and characterizations of oxalate-binding proteins in the kidney. The presence of positively charged arginine residue in the middle of this functional domain suggested its significance for binding to the negatively charged oxalate. These data will enhance future stone research, particularly on stone modulators. PMID:22796524

  8. Ligand deconstruction: Why some fragment binding positions are conserved and others are not.

    PubMed

    Kozakov, Dima; Hall, David R; Jehle, Stefan; Jehle, Sefan; Luo, Lingqi; Ochiana, Stefan O; Jones, Elizabeth V; Pollastri, Michael; Allen, Karen N; Whitty, Adrian; Vajda, Sandor

    2015-05-19

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) relies on the premise that the fragment binding mode will be conserved on subsequent expansion to a larger ligand. However, no general condition has been established to explain when fragment binding modes will be conserved. We show that a remarkably simple condition can be developed in terms of how fragments coincide with binding energy hot spots--regions of the protein where interactions with a ligand contribute substantial binding free energy--the locations of which can easily be determined computationally. Because a substantial fraction of the free energy of ligand binding comes from interacting with the residues in the energetically most important hot spot, a ligand moiety that sufficiently overlaps with this region will retain its location even when other parts of the ligand are removed. This hypothesis is supported by eight case studies. The condition helps identify whether a protein is suitable for FBDD, predicts the size of fragments required for screening, and determines whether a fragment hit can be extended into a higher affinity ligand. Our results show that ligand binding sites can usefully be thought of in terms of an anchor site, which is the top-ranked hot spot and dominates the free energy of binding, surrounded by a number of weaker satellite sites that confer improved affinity and selectivity for a particular ligand and that it is the intrinsic binding potential of the protein surface that determines whether it can serve as a robust binding site for a suitably optimized ligand. PMID:25918377

  9. Identification of clustered YY1 binding sites in Imprinting Control Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J D; Hinz, A; Bergmann, A; Huang, J; Ovcharenko, I; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-04-19

    Mammalian genomic imprinting is regulated by Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) that are usually associated with tandem arrays of transcription factor binding sites. In the current study, the sequence features derived from a tandem array of YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR (differentially methylated region) led us to identify three additional clustered YY1 binding sites, which are also localized within the DMRs of Xist, Tsix, and Nespas. These regions have been shown to play a critical role as ICRs for the regulation of surrounding genes. These ICRs have maintained a tandem array of YY1 binding sites during mammalian evolution. The in vivo binding of YY1 to these regions is allele-specific and only to the unmethylated active alleles. Promoter/enhancer assays suggest that a tandem array of YY1 binding sites function as a potential orientation-dependent enhancer. Insulator assays revealed that the enhancer-blocking activity is detected only in the YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR but not in the YY1 binding sites of other DMRs. Overall, our identification of three additional clustered YY1 binding sites in imprinted domains suggests a significant role for YY1 in mammalian genomic imprinting.

  10. OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus of mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Devos, R; Richards, J G; Campfield, L A; Tartaglia, L A; Guisez, Y; van der Heyden, J; Travernier, J; Plaetinck, G; Burn, P

    1996-05-28

    Binding studies were conducted to identify the anatomical location of brain target sites for OB protein, the ob gene product. 125I-labeled recombinant mouse OB protein or alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion proteins were used for in vitro and in vivo binding studies. Coronal brain sections or fresh tissue from lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats were probed to identify potential central OB protein-binding sites. We report here that recombinant OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus. The binding of OB protein (either radiolabeled or the alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion protein) and its displacement by unlabeled OB protein was similar in lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats. These findings suggest that OB protein binds with high affinity to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus. After binding to the choroid plexus receptor, OB protein may then be transported across the blood-brain barrier into the cerebrospinal fluid. Alternatively, binding of OB protein to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus may activate afferent neural inputs to the neural network that regulates feeding behavior and energy balance or may result in the clearance or degradation of OB protein. The identification of the choroid plexus as a brain binding site for OB protein will provide the basis for the construction of expression libraries and facilitate the rapid cloning of the choroid plexus OB receptor.

  11. Exploration of Gated Ligand Binding Recognizes an Allosteric Site for Blocking FABP4-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Li, Xiang; Dong, Zigang

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), reversibly binding to fatty acids and other lipids with high affinities, is a potential target for treatment of cancers. The binding site of FABP4 is buried in an interior cavity and thereby ligand binding/unbinding is coupled with opening/closing of FABP4. It is a difficult task both experimentally and computationally to illuminate the entry or exit pathway, especially with the conformational gating. In this report we combine extensive computer simulations, clustering analysis, and Markov state model to investigate the binding mechanism of FABP4 and troglitazone. Our simulations capture spontaneous binding and unbinding events as well as the conformational transition of FABP4 between the open and closed states. An allosteric binding site on the protein surface is recognized for development of novel FABP4 inhibitors. The binding affinity is calculated and compared with the experimental value. The kinetic analysis suggests that ligand residence on the protein surface may delay the binding process. Overall, our results provide a comprehensive picture of ligand diffusion on the protein surface, ligand migration into the buried cavity, and the conformational change of FABP4 at an atomic level. PMID:26580122

  12. Comparison of crystal and solution hemoglobin binding of selected antigelling agents and allosteric modifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Mehanna, A.S.; Abraham, D.J. )

    1990-04-24

    This paper details comprehensive binding studies (solution and X-ray) of human hemoglobin A with a group of halogenated carboxylic acids that were investigated as potential antisickling agents. It is, to our knowledge, the first study to compare solution and crystal binding for a series of compounds under similar high-salt conditions used for cocrystallization. The compounds include ((3,4-dichlorobenzyl)oxy)acetic acid, ((p-bromobenzyl)oxy)acetic acid, clofibric acid, and bezafibrate. The location and stereochemistry of binding sites have been established by X-ray crystallography, while the number of binding sites and affinity constants were measured by using equilibrium dialysis. The observed crystal structures are consistent with the binding observed in solution and that the number of binding sites is independent of salt concentration, while the binding constant increases with increasing salt concentration. The studies also reveal that relatively small changes in the chemical structure of a drug molecule can result in entirely different binding sites on the protein. Moreover, the X-ray studies provide a possible explanation for the multiplicity in function exhibited by these compounds as allosteric modulators and/or antisickling agents. Finally, the studies indicate that these compounds bind differently to the R and T states of hemoglobin, and observation of special significance to the original design of these agents.

  13. Ligand deconstruction: Why some fragment binding positions are conserved and others are not

    PubMed Central

    Kozakov, Dima; Hall, David R.; Jehle, Stefan; Luo, Lingqi; Ochiana, Stefan O.; Jones, Elizabeth V.; Pollastri, Michael; Allen, Karen N.; Whitty, Adrian; Vajda, Sandor

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) relies on the premise that the fragment binding mode will be conserved on subsequent expansion to a larger ligand. However, no general condition has been established to explain when fragment binding modes will be conserved. We show that a remarkably simple condition can be developed in terms of how fragments coincide with binding energy hot spots—regions of the protein where interactions with a ligand contribute substantial binding free energy—the locations of which can easily be determined computationally. Because a substantial fraction of the free energy of ligand binding comes from interacting with the residues in the energetically most important hot spot, a ligand moiety that sufficiently overlaps with this region will retain its location even when other parts of the ligand are removed. This hypothesis is supported by eight case studies. The condition helps identify whether a protein is suitable for FBDD, predicts the size of fragments required for screening, and determines whether a fragment hit can be extended into a higher affinity ligand. Our results show that ligand binding sites can usefully be thought of in terms of an anchor site, which is the top-ranked hot spot and dominates the free energy of binding, surrounded by a number of weaker satellite sites that confer improved affinity and selectivity for a particular ligand and that it is the intrinsic binding potential of the protein surface that determines whether it can serve as a robust binding site for a suitably optimized ligand. PMID:25918377

  14. Infinite sets and double binds.

    PubMed

    Arden, M

    1984-01-01

    There have been many attempts to bring psychoanalytical theory up to date. This paper approaches the problem by discussing the work of Gregory Bateson and Ignacio Matte-Blanco, with particular reference to the use made by these authors of Russell's theory of logical types. Bateson's theory of the double bind and Matte-Blanco's bilogic are both based on concepts of logical typing. It is argued that the two theories can be linked by the idea that neurotic symptoms are based on category errors in thinking. Clinical material is presented from the analysis of a middle-aged woman. The intention is to demonstrate that the process of making interpretations can be thought of as revealing errors in thinking. Changes in the patient's inner world are then seen to be the result of clarifying childhood experiences based on category errors. Matte-Blanco's theory of bilogic and infinite experiences is a re-evaluation of the place of the primary process in mental life. It is suggested that a combination of bilogic and double bind theory provides a possibility of reformulating psychoanalytical theory. PMID:6544755

  15. Infinite sets and double binds.

    PubMed

    Arden, M

    1984-01-01

    There have been many attempts to bring psychoanalytical theory up to date. This paper approaches the problem by discussing the work of Gregory Bateson and Ignacio Matte-Blanco, with particular reference to the use made by these authors of Russell's theory of logical types. Bateson's theory of the double bind and Matte-Blanco's bilogic are both based on concepts of logical typing. It is argued that the two theories can be linked by the idea that neurotic symptoms are based on category errors in thinking. Clinical material is presented from the analysis of a middle-aged wo