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Sample records for 11craclopride binding potential

  1. The readiness potential reflects intentional binding

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Han-Gue; Wittmann, Marc; Hinterberger, Thilo; Schmidt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    When a voluntary action is causally linked with a sensory outcome, the action and its consequent effect are perceived as being closer together in time. This effect is called intentional binding. Although many experiments were conducted on this phenomenon, the underlying neural mechanisms are not well understood. While intentional binding is specific to voluntary action, we presumed that preconscious brain activity (the readiness potential, RP), which occurs before an action is made, might play an important role in this binding effect. In this study, the brain dynamics were recorded with electroencephalography (EEG) and analyzed in single-trials in order to estimate whether intentional binding is correlated with the early neural processes. Moreover, we were interested in different behavioral performance between meditators and non-meditators since meditators are expected to be able to keep attention more consistently on a task. Thus, we performed the intentional binding paradigm with 20 mindfulness meditators and compared them to matched controls. Although, we did not observe a group effect on either behavioral data or EEG recordings, we found that self-initiated movements following ongoing negative deflections of slow cortical potentials (SCPs) result in a stronger binding effect compared to positive potentials, especially regarding the perceived time of the consequent effect. Our results provide the first direct evidence that the early neural activity within the range of SCPs affects perceived time of a sensory outcome that is caused by intentional action. PMID:24959135

  2. Potential of goat probiotic to bind mutagens.

    PubMed

    Apás, Ana Lidia; González, Silvia Nelina; Arena, Mario Eduardo

    2014-08-01

    The mutagen binding ability of the goat probiotics (Lactobacillus reuteri DDL 19, Lactobacillus alimentarius DDL 48, Enterococcus faecium DDE 39, and Bifidobacterium bifidum DDBA) was evaluated. The oral administration of these probiotics reduced fecal mutagens and intestinal cancer markers in goats. Secondly, the effects of probiotics against the mutagenesis induced by sodium azide (SA), and Benzopyrene (B[α]P) by performing the modified Ames test using Salmonella typhimurium TA 100 was investigated. The capacity to bind benzopyrene and the stability of the bacterial-mutagen complex was analyzed by HPLC. The dismutagenic potential against both mutagens was proportional to probiotic concentration. Results showed that probiotic antimutagenic capacity against SA was ranging from 13 to 78%. The mixture of four goat probiotics (MGP) displayed higher antimutagenic activity against SA than any individual strains at the same cell concentration. This study shows that the highest diminution of mutagenicity in presence of B[α]P (74%) was observed in presence of MGP. The antimutagenic activity of nearly all the individual probiotic and the MGP were in concordance with the B[α]P binding determined by HPLC. According to our results, the B[α]P binding to probiotic was irreversible still after being washed with DMSO solution. The stability of the toxic compounds-bacterial cell binding is a key consideration when probiotic antimutagenic property is evaluated. MGP exhibits the ability to bind and detoxify potent mutagens, and this property can be useful in supplemented foods for goats since it can lead to the removal of potent mutagens and protect and enhance ruminal health and hence food safety of consumers.

  3. Triton Binding Energy of Kharkov Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, H.; Shebeko, O.; Arslanaliev, A.

    2017-03-01

    The Kharkov potential is a recent field theoretical model of nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction that has been built up in the framework of the instant form of relativistic dynamics starting with the total Hamiltonian of interacting meson and nucleon fields and using the method of unitary clothing transformations. The latter connect the representation of "bare" particles and the representation of "clothed" particles, i.e., the particles with physical properties. Unlike many available NN potentials each of which is the kernel of the corresponding nonrelativistic Lippmann-Schwinger (LS) equation this potential being dependent in momentum space on the Feynman-like propagators and covariant cutoff factors at the meson-nucleon vertices is the kernel of relativistic integral equations for the NN bound and scattering states. Therefore we do not need to invent any transform of a given nonrelativistic potential to its relativistic counterpart. As a feasible study, we have started with the so-called 5ch Faddeev calculation for three-nucleon bound state (triton) and obtained a reasonable value of its binding energy (-7.42 MeV).

  4. A tight-binding potential for helium in carbon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granot, Rebecca; Baer, Roi

    2008-12-01

    The presence of helium in carbon systems, such as diamonds and fullerenes is of interest for planetary sciences, geophysics, astrophysics, and evolution biology. Such systems typically involve a large number of atoms and require a fast method for assessing the interaction potential and forces. We developed a tight-binding approach, based on density functional calculations, which includes a many-body potential term. This latter term is essential for consolidating the density functional results of helium in bulky diamond and Helium passing through a benzene ring which is important for helium-fullerene applications. The method is simple to apply and exhibits good transferability properties.

  5. New potential binding determinant for hERG channel inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, P.; Zangerl-Plessl, E.-M.; Linder, T.; Windisch, A.; Hohaus, A.; Timin, E.; Hering, S.; Stary-Weinzinger, A.

    2016-04-01

    Human ether-à-go-go related gene (hERG) 1 channels conduct the rapid delayed rectifier K+ current (IKr) and are essential for the repolarization of the cardiac action potential. hERG1 inhibition by structurally diverse drugs may lead to life threatening arrhythmia. Putative binding determinants of hERG1 channel blockers include T623, S624 and V625 on the pore helix, and residues G648, Y652 and F656, located on segment S6. We and others have previously hypothesized that additional binding determinants may be located on helix S5, which is in close contact with the S6 segments. In order to test this hypothesis, we performed a detailed investigation combining ionic current measurements with two-microelectrode voltage clamp and molecular modeling techniques. We identified a novel aromatic high affinity binding determinant for blockers located in helix S5, F557, which is equally potent as Y652. Modeling supports a direct interaction with the outer pore helix.

  6. Direct GR Binding Sites Potentiate Clusters of TF Binding across the Human Genome.

    PubMed

    Vockley, Christopher M; D'Ippolito, Anthony M; McDowell, Ian C; Majoros, William H; Safi, Alexias; Song, Lingyun; Crawford, Gregory E; Reddy, Timothy E

    2016-08-25

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds the human genome at >10,000 sites but only regulates the expression of hundreds of genes. To determine the functional effect of each site, we measured the glucocorticoid (GC) responsive activity of nearly all GR binding sites (GBSs) captured using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in A549 cells. 13% of GBSs assayed had GC-induced activity. The responsive sites were defined by direct GR binding via a GC response element (GRE) and exclusively increased reporter-gene expression. Meanwhile, most GBSs lacked GC-induced reporter activity. The non-responsive sites had epigenetic features of steady-state enhancers and clustered around direct GBSs. Together, our data support a model in which clusters of GBSs observed with ChIP-seq reflect interactions between direct and tethered GBSs over tens of kilobases. We further show that those interactions can synergistically modulate the activity of direct GBSs and may therefore play a major role in driving gene activation in response to GCs.

  7. Divacancy binding energy, formation energy and surface energy of BCC transition metals using MEAM potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uniyal, Shweta; Chand, Manesh; Joshi, Subodh; Semalty, P. D.

    2016-05-01

    The modified embedded atom method (MEAM) potential parameters have been employed to calculate the unrelaxed divacancy formation energy, binding energy and surface energies for low index planes in bcc transition metals. The calculated results of divacancy binding energy and vacancy formation energy compare well with experimental and other available calculated results.

  8. Four-body atomic potential for modeling protein-ligand binding affinity: application to enzyme-inhibitor binding energy prediction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Models that are capable of reliably predicting binding affinities for protein-ligand complexes play an important role the field of structure-guided drug design. Methods Here, we begin by applying the computational geometry technique of Delaunay tessellation to each set of atomic coordinates for over 1400 diverse macromolecular structures, for the purpose of deriving a four-body statistical potential that serves as a topological scoring function. Next, we identify a second, independent set of three hundred protein-ligand complexes, having both high-resolution structures and known dissociation constants. Two-thirds of these complexes are randomly selected to train a predictive model of binding affinity as follows: two tessellations are generated in each case, one for the entire complex and another strictly for the isolated protein without its bound ligand, and a topological score is computed for each tessellation with the four-body potential. Predicted protein-ligand binding affinity is then based on an empirically derived linear function of the difference between both topological scores, one that appropriately scales the value of this difference. Results A comparison between experimental and calculated binding affinity values over the two hundred complexes reveals a Pearson's correlation coefficient of r = 0.79 with a standard error of SE = 1.98 kcal/mol. To validate the method, we similarly generated two tessellations for each of the remaining protein-ligand complexes, computed their topological scores and the difference between the two scores for each complex, and applied the previously derived linear transformation of this topological score difference to predict binding affinities. For these one hundred complexes, we again observe a correlation of r = 0.79 (SE = 1.93 kcal/mol) between known and calculated binding affinities. Applying our model to an independent test set of high-resolution structures for three hundred diverse enzyme-inhibitor complexes

  9. Contribution of three-body potentials to the binding energy of heavy atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zygelman, B.; Mittleman, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    The conversion of quantum electrodynamics to a configuration-space Hamiltonian formalism introduces three-electron potentials of relativistic origin. For heavy atoms, it is found that the contribution of these potentials to the inner-shell binding energy is no more than 0.21 eV. This is too small to explain the discrepancy between current theory and experiment. The uniqueness of the potentials obtained in the configuration-space Hamiltonian is also discussed.

  10. Psoralens potentiate ultraviolet light-induced inhibition of epidermal growth factor binding

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, J.D.; Lee, E.; Laskin, D.L.; Gallo, M.A.

    1986-11-01

    The psoralens, when activated by ultraviolet light of 320-400 nm (UVA light), are potent modulators of epidermal cell growth and differentiation. Previously, we reported that, in mammalian cells, these compounds bind to specific saturable high-affinity cellular receptor sites. In the present studies, we demonstrate that binding of psoralens to their receptors followed by UVA light activation is associated with inhibition of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor binding. Inhibition of EGF binding, which required UVA light, was rapid and dependent on the dose of UVA light (0.5-2.0 J/cm2), as well as the concentration of psoralens (10 nM to 1 microM). Higher doses of UVA light (2.0-6.0 J/cm2) by themselves were also inhibitory, indicating that psoralens potentiate the UVA-induced inhibition of EGF binding. A number of biologically active analogs of psoralen, including 8-methoxypsoralen, 5-methoxypsoralen, and 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen, when activated by UVA light, were found to be inhibitors of binding. Inhibition of EGF binding by psoralens was observed in a variety of human and mouse cell culture lines known to possess psoralen receptors. In the epidermal-derived line PAM 212, at least two populations of receptors with different affinities for EGF were found. Psoralens and UVA light selectively inhibited binding to the higher-affinity EGF receptors, an effect analogous to that of the phorbol ester tumor promoters. As observed with phorbol esters, photoactivated psoralens appeared to inhibit EGF binding by an indirect mechanism. These data demonstrate that the psoralens and UVA light have direct biological effects on cell-surface membranes. Since EGF is a growth-regulatory peptide, the ability of psoralens and UVA light to inhibit EGF binding may underlie the biologic effects of these agents in the skin.

  11. Na+ binding to the Na(+)-glucose cotransporter is potential dependent.

    PubMed

    Bennett, E; Kimmich, G A

    1992-02-01

    Activity of the Na(+)-glucose cotransporter in LLC-PK1 epithelial cells was assayed by measuring sugar-induced currents (IAMG) using whole cell recording techniques. IAMG was compared among cells by standardizing the measured currents to cell size using cell capacitance measurements. IAMG at a given membrane potential was measured as a function of alpha-methylglucoside (AMG) concentration and can be fit to Michaelis-Menten kinetics. IAMG at varying Na+ concentrations can be described by the Hill equation with a Hill coefficient of 1.6 at all tested potentials. At high external Na+ levels (155 mM), Na+ is at least 90% saturating at all tested potentials. Maximal currents at a given membrane potential (Im) are calculated from the Michaelis-Menten equation fit to data measuring IAMG vs. AMG concentration at a constant Na+ concentration. Im showed potential dependence under all conditions. Potential-dependent Na+ binding rate(s) cannot alone explain the observed potential dependence of Im under saturating Na+ conditions. Therefore, because Im is potential dependent, at least one step of the transport cycle other than external Na+ binding must be potential dependent. Im was also calculated from data taken at 40 mM external Na+. At all potentials studied, Im at 155 mM Na+ is greater than Im calculated at 40 mM Na+. This implies that the rate of external Na+ binding to the transporter at 40 mM also affects the maximal transport rate. Furthermore, Im at 40 mM external Na+ increases with hyperpolarization faster than Im at 155 mM Na+. Together, these facts indicate that the rate at which Na+ binds to the transporter is also potential dependent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Structural insights into Cydia pomonella pheromone binding protein 2 mediated prediction of potentially active semiochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zhen; Liu, Jiyuan; Zhang, Yalin

    2016-01-01

    Given the advantages of behavioral disruption application in pest control and the damage of Cydia pomonella, due progresses have not been made in searching active semiochemicals for codling moth. In this research, 31 candidate semiochemicals were ranked for their binding potential to Cydia pomonella pheromone binding protein 2 (CpomPBP2) by simulated docking, and this sorted result was confirmed by competitive binding assay. This high predicting accuracy of virtual screening led to the construction of a rapid and viable method for semiochemicals searching. By reference to binding mode analyses, hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interaction were suggested to be two key factors in determining ligand affinity, so is the length of molecule chain. So it is concluded that semiochemicals of appropriate chain length with hydroxyl group or carbonyl group at one head tended to be favored by CpomPBP2. Residues involved in binding with each ligand were pointed out as well, which were verified by computational alanine scanning mutagenesis. Progress made in the present study helps establish an efficient method for predicting potentially active compounds and prepares for the application of high-throughput virtual screening in searching semiochemicals by taking insights into binding mode analyses. PMID:26928635

  13. Structural insights into Cydia pomonella pheromone binding protein 2 mediated prediction of potentially active semiochemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhen; Liu, Jiyuan; Zhang, Yalin

    2016-03-01

    Given the advantages of behavioral disruption application in pest control and the damage of Cydia pomonella, due progresses have not been made in searching active semiochemicals for codling moth. In this research, 31 candidate semiochemicals were ranked for their binding potential to Cydia pomonella pheromone binding protein 2 (CpomPBP2) by simulated docking, and this sorted result was confirmed by competitive binding assay. This high predicting accuracy of virtual screening led to the construction of a rapid and viable method for semiochemicals searching. By reference to binding mode analyses, hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interaction were suggested to be two key factors in determining ligand affinity, so is the length of molecule chain. So it is concluded that semiochemicals of appropriate chain length with hydroxyl group or carbonyl group at one head tended to be favored by CpomPBP2. Residues involved in binding with each ligand were pointed out as well, which were verified by computational alanine scanning mutagenesis. Progress made in the present study helps establish an efficient method for predicting potentially active compounds and prepares for the application of high-throughput virtual screening in searching semiochemicals by taking insights into binding mode analyses.

  14. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  15. Identification and therapeutic potential of a vitronectin binding region of meningococcal msf.

    PubMed

    Hill, Darryl J; Griffiths, Natalie J; Borodina, Elena; Andreae, Clio A; Sessions, Richard B; Virji, Mumtaz

    2015-01-01

    The human pathogen Neisseria meningitides (Nm) attains serum resistance via a number of mechanisms, one of which involves binding to the host complement regulator protein vitronectin. We have shown previously that the Meningococcal surface fibril (Msf), a trimeric autotransporter, binds to the activated form of vitronectin (aVn) to increase Nm survival in human serum. In this study, we aimed to identify the aVn-binding region of Msf to assess its potential as an antigen which can elicit antibodies that block aVn binding and/or possess bactericidal properties. Using several recombinant Msf fragments spanning its surface-exposed region, the smallest aVn-binding recombinants were found to span residues 1-86 and 39-124. The use of further deletion constructs and overlapping recombinant Msf fragments suggested that a region of Msf comprising residues 39-82 may be primarily important for aVn binding and that other regions may also be involved but to a lesser extent. Molecular modelling implicated K66 and K68, conserved in all available Msf sequences, to be involved in the interaction. Recombinant fragments which bound to aVn were able to reduce the survival advantage conveyed by aVn-interaction in serum bactericidal assays. Antibodies raised against one such fragment inhibited aVn binding to Msf. In addition, the antibodies enhanced specific killing of Msf-expressing Nm in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, this study identifies an aVn-binding region of Msf, an adhesin known to impart serum resistance properties to the pathogen; and shows that this region of Msf can elicit antibodies with dual properties which reduce pathogen survival within the host and thus has potential as a vaccine antigen.

  16. Albumin binding as a potential biomarker of exposure to moderately low levels of organophosphorus pesticides.

    PubMed

    Tarhoni, Mabruka H; Lister, Timothy; Ray, David E; Carter, Wayne G

    2008-06-01

    We have evaluated the potential of plasma albumin to provide a sensitive biomarker of exposure to commonly used organophosphorus pesticides in order to complement the widely used measure of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition. Rat or human plasma albumin binding by tritiated-diisopropylfluorophosphate ((3)H-DFP) was quantified by retention of albumin on glass microfibre filters. Preincubation with unlabelled pesticide in vitro or dosing of F344 rats with pesticide in vivo resulted in a reduction in subsequent albumin radiolabelling with (3)H-DFP, the decrease in which was used to quantify pesticide binding. At pesticide exposures producing approximately 30% inhibition of AChE, rat plasma albumin binding in vitro by azamethiphos (oxon), chlorfenvinphos (oxon), chlorpyrifos-oxon, diazinon-oxon and malaoxon was reduced from controls by 9+/-1%, 67+/-2%, 56+/-2%, 54+/-2% and 8+/-1%, respectively. After 1 h of incubation with 19 microM (3)H-DFP alone, the level of binding to rat or human plasma albumins reached 0.011 or 0.039 moles of DFP per mole of albumin, respectively. This level of binding could be further increased by raising the concentration of (3)H-DFP, increasing the (3)H-DFP incubation time, or by substitution of commercial albumins for native albumin. Pesticide binding to albumin was presumed covalent since it survived 24 h dialysis. After dosing rats with pirimiphos-methyl (dimethoxy) or chlorfenvinphos (oxon) (diethoxy) pesticides, the resultant albumin binding were still significant 7 days after dosing. As in vitro, dosing of rats with malathion did not result in significant albumin binding in vivo. Our results suggest albumin may be a useful additional biomonitor for moderately low-level exposures to several widely used pesticides, and that this binding differs markedly between pesticides.

  17. DNA BINDING POTENTIAL OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE MEDIATED BY GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE THETA 1-1

    EPA Science Inventory


    DNA BINDING POTENTIAL OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE MEDIATED BY GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE THETA 1-1. R A Pegram1 and M K Ross2. 2Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; 1Pharmacokinetics Branch, NHEERL, ORD, United States Environmental Protection Ag...

  18. A potentiator induces conformational changes on the recombinant CFTR nucleotide binding domains in solution.

    PubMed

    Galfrè, Elena; Galeno, Lauretta; Moran, Oscar

    2012-11-01

    Nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the defective protein in cystic fibrosis, are responsible for controlling the gating of the chloride channel and are the putative binding sites for several candidate drugs in the disease treatment. We studied the effects of the application of 2-pyrimidin-7,8-benzoflavone (PBF), a strong potentiator of the CFTR, on the properties of recombinant and equimolar NBD1/NBD2 mixture in solution. The results indicate that the potentiator induces significant conformational changes of the NBD1/NBD2 dimer in solution. The potentiator does not modify the ATP binding constant, but reduces the ATP hydrolysis activity of the NBD1/NBD2 mixture. The intrinsic fluorescence and the guanidinium denaturation measurements indicate that the potentiator induces different conformational changes on the NBD1/NBD2 mixture in the presence and absence of ATP. It was confirmed from small-angle X-ray scattering experiments that, in absence of ATP, the NBD1/NBD2 dimer was disrupted by the potentiator, but in the presence of 2 mM ATP, the two NBDs kept dimerised, and a major change in the size and the shape of the structure was observed. We propose that these conformational changes could modify the NBDs-intracellular loop interaction in a way that would facilitate the open state of the channel.

  19. DNA binding properties and biological evaluation of dihydropyrimidinones derivatives as potential antitumor agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gongke; Li, Xiangrong; Gou, Yaping; Chen, Yuhan; Yan, Changling; Lu, Yan

    2013-10-01

    The binding properties of two medicinally important dihydropyrimidinones derivatives 5-(Ethoxycarbonyl)-6-methyl-4-phenyl-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-one (EMPD) and 5-(Ethoxycarbonyl)-6-methyl-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-one (EMCD) with calf-thymus DNA (ctDNA) were investigated by spectroscopy, viscosity, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and molecular modeling techniques. Simultaneously, their biological activities were evaluated with MTT assay method. The binding constants determined with spectroscopic titration and ITC were found to be in the same order of 104 M-1. According to the results of viscosity studies, fluorescence competitive binding experiment and ITC investigations, intercalative binding was evaluated as the dominant binding modes between the two compounds and ctDNA. Furthermore, the results of molecular modeling corroborated those obtained from spectroscopic, viscosimetric and ITC investigations. Evaluation of the antitumor activities of the two derivatives against different tumor cell lines proved that they exhibited significant tumor cell inhibition rate, accordingly blocking DNA transcription and replication. The present results favor the development of potential drugs related with dihydropyrimidinones derivatives in the treatment of some diseases.

  20. In vitro molecular evolution yields an NEIBM with a potential novel IgG binding property

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Peipei; Ding, Ying-Ying; He, Ting; Yang, Tong; Chen, Qiuli; Feng, Jiaojiao; Wang, Jinhong; Cao, Mingmei; Li, Xiangyu; Peng, Heng; Zhu, Huaimin; Cao, Jie; Pan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SpA) and protein G of groups C and G streptococci (SpG) are two well-defined bacterial immunoglobulin (Ig)-binding proteins (IBPs) with high affinity for specific sites on IgG from mammalian hosts. Both SpA and SpG contain several highly-homologous IgG-binding domains, each of which possesses similar binding characteristic of the whole corresponding proteins. Whether specific combinations of these domains could generate a molecule with novel IgG-binding properties remained unknown. We constructed a combinatorial phage library displaying randomly-rearranged A, B, C, D and E domains of SpA as well as the B2 (G2) and B3 (G3) domains of SpG. In vitro molecular evolution directed by human, rabbit, bovine, or goat polyclonal IgGs and four subclasses of mouse monoclonal IgGs generated one common combination, D-C-G3. A series of assays demonstrated that D-C-G3 exhibited a potential novel IgG binding property that was obviously different from those of both parent proteins. This study provides an example of successful protein engineering through in vitro molecular evolution and useful approaches for structure and function studies of IBPs. PMID:25366194

  1. Albumin Binding Function: The Potential Earliest Indicator for Liver Function Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Penglei; Yang, Huayu; Lu, Jingfen; Liao, Wenjun; Du, Shunda; Xu, Yingli; Xu, Haifeng; Lu, Xin; Sang, Xinting; Zhong, Shouxian; Huang, Jiefu

    2016-01-01

    Background. Currently there is no indicator that can evaluate actual liver lesion for early stages of viral hepatitis, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and cirrhosis. Aim of this study was to investigate if albumin binding function could better reflect liver function in these liver diseases. Methods. An observational study was performed on 193 patients with early NAFLD, viral hepatitis, and cirrhosis. Cirrhosis patients were separated according to Child-Pugh score into A, B, and C subgroup. Albumin metal ion binding capacity (Ischemia-modified albumin transformed, IMAT) and fatty acid binding capacity (total binding sites, TBS) were detected. Results. Both IMAT and TBS were significantly decreased in patients with NAFLD and early hepatitis. In hepatitis group, they declined prior to changes of liver enzymes. IMAT was significantly higher in cirrhosis Child-Pugh class A group than hepatitis patients and decreased in Child-Pugh class B and class C patients. Both IMAT/albumin and TBS/albumin decreased significantly in hepatitis and NAFLD group patients. Conclusions. This is the first study to discover changes of albumin metal ion and fatty acid binding capacities prior to conventional biomarkers for liver damage in early stage of liver diseases. They may become potential earliest sensitive indicators for liver function evaluation. PMID:28101103

  2. Identification of Inhibitors of CD36-Amyloid Beta Binding as Potential Agents for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Doens, Deborah; Valiente, Pedro A; Mfuh, Adelphe M; X T Vo, Anh; Tristan, Adilia; Carreño, Lizmar; Quijada, Mario; Nguyen, Vu T; Perry, George; Larionov, Oleg V; Lleonart, Ricardo; Fernández, Patricia L

    2017-02-15

    Neuroinflammation is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease pathology. Amyloid β has a central role in microglia activation and the subsequent secretion of inflammatory mediators that are associated with neuronal toxicity. The recognition of amyloid β by microglia depends on the expression of several receptors implicated in the clearance of amyloid and in cell activation. CD36 receptor expressed on microglia interacts with fibrils of amyloid inducing the release of proinflammatory cytokines and amyloid internalization. The interruption of the interaction CD36-amyloid β compromises the activation of microglia cells. We have developed and validated a new colorimetric assay to identify potential inhibitors of the binding of amyloid β to CD36. We have found seven molecules, structural analogues of the Trichodermamide family of natural products that interfere with the interaction CD36-amyloid β. By combining molecular docking and dynamics simulations, we suggested the second fatty acids binding site within the large luminal hydrophobic tunnel, present in the extracellular domain of CD36, as the binding pocket of these compounds. Free energy calculations predicted the nonpolar component as the driving force for the binding of these inhibitors. These molecules also inhibited the production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β by peritoneal macrophages stimulated with fibrils of amyloid β. This work serves as a platform for the identification of new potential anti-inflammatory agents for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Calcium ion binding to a soil fulvic acid using a donnan potential model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marinsky, J.A.; Mathuthu, A.; Ephraim, J.H.; Reddy, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    Calcium ion binding to a soil fulvic acid (Armadale Bh Horizon) was evaluated over a range of calcium ion concentrations, from pH 3.8 to 7.3, using potentiometric titrations and calcium ion electrode measurements. Fulvic acid concentration was constant (100 milligrams per liter) and calcium ion concentration varied up to 8 X 10-4 moles per liter. Experiments discussed here included: (1) titrations of fulvic acid-calcium ion containing solutions with sodium hydroxide; and (2) titrations of fully neutralized fulvic acid with calcium chloride solutions. Apparent binding constants (expressed as the logarithm of the value, log ??app) vary with solution pH, calcium ion concentration, degree of acid dissociation, and ionic strength (from log ??app = 2.5 to 3.9) and are similar to those reported by others. Fulvic acid charge, and the associated Donnan Potential, influences calcium ion-fulvic acid ion pair formation. A Donnan Potential corrrection term allowed calculation of intrinsic calcium ion-fulvic acid binding constants. Intrinsic binding constants vary from 1.2 to 2.5 (the average value is about log??= 1.6) and are similar to, but somewhat higher than, stability constants for calcium ion-carboxylic acid monodentate complexes. ?? by Oldenbourg Wissenschaftsverlag, Mu??nchen.

  4. Radioligand binding assays in the drug discovery process: potential pitfalls of high throughput screenings.

    PubMed

    Noël, F; Mendonça-Silva, D L; Quintas, L E

    2001-02-01

    Radioligand binding assays evaluating directly the ability of a drug to interact with a defined molecular target is part of the drug discovery process. The need for a high throughput rate in screening drugs is actually leading to simplified experimental schemes that increase the probability of false negative results. Special concern involves voltage-gated ion channel drug discovery where a great care is required in designing assays because of frequent multiplicity of (interacting) binding sites. To clearly illustrate this situation, three different assays used in the academic drug discovery program of the authors were selected because they are rich of intrinsic artifacts: (I) (20 mmol/l caffeine almost duplicated [3H]ryanodine binding (89% higher than control) to rat heart microsomes at 0.3 mumol/l free calcium but did not exert any effect when using a high (107 mumol/l) free calcium, as mostly used in ryanodine binding assays; (II) An agonist for the ionotropic glutamate receptor of the kainate type can distinctly affect [3H]kainate binding to chicken cerebellum membranes depending on its concentration: unlabelled kainic acid per se either stimulated about 30% (at 50-100 nmol/l), had no effect (at 200 nmol/l) or even progressively decreased (at 0.3-2 mumol/l) the binding of 5 nmol/l [3H]kainate, emphasizing the risk of using a single concentration for screening a drug; (III) in a classical [3H]flunitrazepam binding assay, the stimulatory effect of a GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) agonist was only observed when using extensively washed rat brain synaptosomes (10 mumol/l GABA increased flunitrazepam binding by 90%). On the other hand, the inhibitory effect of a GABA antagonist was only observed when using crude synaptosomes (10 mumol/l bicuculine reduced [3H]flunitrazepam binding by 40%). It can be concluded that carefully designed radioligand assays which can be performed in an academic laboratory are appropriate for screening a small number of drugs, especially if

  5. A group of thermodynamic potentials applicable to ligand binding by a polyfunctional macromolecule.

    PubMed Central

    Wyman, J

    1975-01-01

    The binding of ligands by a macromolecule can be well described by a group of potentials derivable from the energy and of which the original binding potential is one. The group is Abelian and is isomorphic with a group of symmetries. Each member corresponds to a particular set of experimental conditions--system open to some, closed to others, of the ligand-and the group as a whole is an immediate source of all possible linkage relations applicable to the macromolecule. Seen in terms of information theory it can be interpreted as a program for the response of the macromolecule to its ligands according to the conditions with which it is faced. The group provides a ready formulation of the effect of a ligand on the equilibrium constant for a reaction involving a set of macromolecules, and it leads to a clear-cut distinction between true and pseudolinkage. PMID:1055419

  6. IGF-binding protein 2 is a candidate target of therapeutic potential in cancer.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaofeng; Sun, Shanshan; Zhou, Xuan; Guo, Wenyu; Zhang, Lun

    2016-02-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-binding protein 2(IGFBP2), a key member of IGF family, has been reported as a notable oncogene in most human epithelium cancers. Increasing evidences suggested that IGFBP2 might be a candidate target of therapuetic potential by regulating key cancer metastasis and invasion-associated signaling networks, but there is still confusion about the mechanism on how IGFBP2 takes part in these processes. In this review, we summarized the current points of view that IGFBP2 functions in signaling pathways during tumorigenesis and tumor progression and discussed its potential clinical applications as a therapeutic target.

  7. Induced Long-Range Attractive Potentials of Human Serum Albumin by Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Takaaki; Komatsu, Teruyuki; Nakagawa, Akito; Tsuchida, Eishun

    2007-05-18

    Small-angle x-ray scattering and dielectric spectroscopy investigation on the solutions of recombinant human serum albumin and its heme hybrid revealed that heme incorporation induces a specific long-range attractive potential between protein molecules. This is evidenced by the enhanced forward intensity upon heme binding, despite no hindrance to rotatory Brownian motion, unbiased colloid osmotic pressure, and discontiguous nearest-neighbor distance, confirming monodispersity of the proteins. The heme-induced potential may play a trigger role in recognition of the ligand-filled human serum albumins in the circulatory system.

  8. Potential toxicity of amphenicol antibiotic: binding of chloramphenicol to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huilun; Rao, Honghao; He, Pengzhen; Qiao, Yongxiang; Wang, Fei; Liu, Haijun; Cai, Minmin; Yao, Jun

    2014-10-01

    Antibiotics are widely used in daily life but their abuse has posed a potential threat to human health. To evaluate the toxicity of chloramphenicol (CAP) at the protein level, the interaction between CAP and human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated by fluorescence, Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and molecular docking methods. Fluorescence data revealed that the fluorescence quenching of HSA by CAP was the result of the formation of CAP-HSA complex, and the binding constant was determined to be 3.196 × 10(4) L mol(-1) at 310 K. The thermodynamic determination indicated that the interaction was driven by enthalpy change and entropy change together, where the multiple hydrogen bonds (CAP and the residues Arg 222 and His 242 of HSA) and van der Waals forces were the dominant binding force. The site marker competition revealed that CAP bound into sub-domain IIA of HSA. The binding of CAP induced the drastic reduction in α-helix conformation and the significant enhancement in β-sheet conformation of HSA. Molecular docking study further confirmed the binding mode obtained by experimental study. This work provides a new quantitative evaluation method for antibiotics to cause the protein damage.

  9. Comparative studies of binding potential of Prunus armeniaca and Prunus domestica gums in tablets formulations.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Haroon; Khan, Mir Azam; Sadiq, Abdul; Khan, Shahzeb; Chishti, Kamran Ahmad; Rahman, Inayat U

    2015-05-01

    The current study was undertaken to compare the binding potential of Prunus armeniaca L. and Prunus domestica L. gums in tablets' formulations. Tablet batches (F-1 to F-9) were prepared Diclofenac sodium as model drug using 5%, 7.5% and 10% of each Prunus armeniaca L., Prunus domestica L. gums as binder. PVP K30 was used as a standard binder. Magnesium stearate was used as lubricant. Flow properties of granules (like bulk density, tapped density, Carr's index, Hausner's ratio, angle of repose) as well as the physical parameters of compressed tablets including hardness, friability, thickness and disintegration time were determined. Flow parameters of granules of all the batches were found good. Physical parameters (drug content, weight variation, thickness, hardness, friability, disintegration time) of formulated tablets were found within limit when tested. The dissolution studies showed that tablets formulations containing each Prunus domestica showed better binding capacity compared to Prunus armeniaca gum. The binding potential increased as the concentration of gums increased. The FTIR spectroscopic investigation showed that the formulations containing plant gum are compatible with the drug and other excipients used.

  10. Computational characterization of TTHA0379: A potential glycerophosphocholine binding protein of Ugp ATP-binding cassette transporter.

    PubMed

    Chandravanshi, Monika; Gogoi, Prerana; Kanaujia, Shankar Prasad

    2016-11-05

    For the de novo biosynthesis of phospholipids, byproducts such as sn-glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) and glycerophosphocholine (GPC) of glycerophospholipid metabolic pathway are imported inside the cell by an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter known as UgpABCE. Of which, UgpA and UgpE constitutes the transmembrane domains (TMDs), UgpC forms the dimer of ATP-hydrolyzing component and UgpB is the periplasmic substrate binding protein. Structurally, UgpABCE transporter displays similarity to the maltose ABC transporter of Escherichia coli; thus, has been grouped into the CUT1 (Carbohydrate Uptake Transporter-1) family of bacterial ABC transporters. Being a member of CUT1 family, several Ugp (Uptake glycerol phosphate) protein sequences in biological database(s) exhibit sequence and structure similarity to sugar ABC transporters and have been annotated as sugar binding proteins; one of such proteins is TTHA0379 from Thermus thermophilus HB8. Here, in this study, we used computational method(s) to distinguish UgpB and sugar binding proteins based on their primary and tertiary structure features. A comprehensive analysis of these proteins indicates that they are evolutionarily related to each other having common conserved features at their primary and tertiary structure levels. However, they display differences at their active sites owing to the dissimilarity in their ligand preferences. In addition, phylogenetic analysis of TTHA0379 along with UgpB and sugar binding proteins reveals that both the groups of proteins forms two distinct clades and TTHA0379 groups with UgpB proteins. Furthermore, analysis of the ligand binding pocket shows that all the essential features of glycerophosphocholine binding protein i.e. UgpB, are conserved in TTHA0379 as well. Combining these features, here, we designate TTHA0379 to be a GPC binding protein.

  11. Is There Consistency between the Binding Affinity and Inhibitory Potential of Natural Polyphenols as α-amylase Inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Shao, Rong; Xiao, Jianbo

    2016-07-26

    The inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols for α-amylases has attracted great interests among researchers. The structure-affinity properties of natural polyphenols binding to α-amylase and the structure-activity relationship of dietary polyphenols inhibiting α-amylase were deeply investigated. There is a lack of consistency between the structure-affinity relationship and the structure-activity relationship of natural polyphenols as α-amylase inhibitors. Is it consistent between the binding affinity and inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols as with α-amylase inhibitors? It was found that the consistency between the binding affinity and inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols as with α-amylase inhibitors is not equivocal. For example, there is no consistency between the binding affinity and the inhibitory potential of quercetin and its glycosides as α-amylase inhibitors. However, catechins with higher α-amylase inhibitory potential exhibited higher affinity with α-amylase.

  12. Pathway Analysis Revealed Potential Diverse Health Impacts of Flavonoids that Bind Estrogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Ge, Weigong; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids are frequently used as dietary supplements in the absence of research evidence regarding health benefits or toxicity. Furthermore, ingested doses could far exceed those received from diet in the course of normal living. Some flavonoids exhibit binding to estrogen receptors (ERs) with consequential vigilance by regulatory authorities at the U.S. EPA and FDA. Regulatory authorities must consider both beneficial claims and potential adverse effects, warranting the increases in research that has spanned almost two decades. Here, we report pathway enrichment of 14 targets from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) and the Herbal Ingredients’ Targets (HIT) database for 22 flavonoids that bind ERs. The selected flavonoids are confirmed ER binders from our earlier studies, and were here found in mainly involved in three types of biological processes, ER regulation, estrogen metabolism and synthesis, and apoptosis. Besides cancers, we conjecture that the flavonoids may affect several diseases via apoptosis pathways. Diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, viral myocarditis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease could be implicated. More generally, apoptosis processes may be importantly evolved biological functions of flavonoids that bind ERs and high dose ingestion of those flavonoids could adversely disrupt the cellular apoptosis process. PMID:27023590

  13. Human lipopolysaccharide-binding protein potentiates bactericidal activity of human bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein.

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, A H; Williams, R E; Nowakowski, G

    1995-01-01

    Human bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) from neutrophils and a recombinant amino-terminal fragment, rBPI23, bind to and are cytotoxic for gram-negative bacteria both in vitro and ex vivo in plasma or whole blood. To function in vivo as an extracellular bactericidal agent, rBPI23 must act in the presence of the lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP), which also binds to but has no reported cytotoxicity for gram-negative bacteria. LBP, which is present at 5 to 10 micrograms/ml in healthy humans and at much higher levels in septic patients, mediates proinflammatory host responses to gram-negative infection. On the basis of these previous observations, we have examined the effect of recombinant LBP (rLBP) on the bactericidal activity of rBPI23 against Escherichia coli J5 in vitro. Physiological concentrations of rLBP (5 to 20 micrograms/ml) had little or no bactericidal activity but reduced by up to approximately 10,000-fold the concentration of BPI required for bactericidal or related activities in assays which measure (i) cell viability as CFUs on solid media or growth in broth culture and (ii) protein synthesis following treatment with BPI. LBP also potentiated BPI-mediated permeabilization of the E. coli outer membrane to actinomycin D by about 100-fold but had no permeabilizing activity of its own. Under optimal conditions for potentiation, fewer than 100 BPI molecules were required to kill a single E. coli J5 bacterium. PMID:7822017

  14. Molecular Docking Studies to Explore Potential Binding Pockets and Inhibitors for Chikungunya Virus Envelope Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong T V; Yu, Haibo; Keller, Paul A

    2017-03-11

    The chikungunya virus (CHIKV) envelope glycoproteins are considered important potential targets for anti-CHIKV drug discovery due to their crucial roles in virus attachment and virus entry. In this study, using two available crystal structures of the immature and mature forms of envelope glycoproteins, virtual screenings based on blind dockings and focused dockings were carried out to identify potential binding pockets and hit compounds for the virus. The chemical library database of compounds, NCI Diversity Set II, was used in these docking studies. In addition to reproducing previously reported examples, new binding pockets were identified, e.g., Pocket 2 in the 3N40, and Pocket 2 and Pocket 3 in the 3N42. Convergences in conformational sampling in docking using AutoDock Vina were evaluated. An analysis of docking results was carried out to understand interactions of the envelope glycoproteins complexes. Some key residues for interactions, for example Gly91 and His230, are identified as possessing important roles in the fusion process.

  15. Human guanylate binding proteins potentiate the anti-chlamydia effects of interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Tietzel, Illya; El-Haibi, Christelle; Carabeo, Rey A

    2009-08-04

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular pathogens that are sensitive to pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma. IFN-gamma-inducible murine p47 GTPases have been demonstrated to function in resistance to chlamydia infection in vivo and in vitro. Because the human genome does not encode IFN-gamma-inducible homologues of these proteins, the significance of the p47 GTPase findings to chlamydia pathogenesis in humans is unclear. Here we report a pair of IFN-gamma-inducible proteins, the human guanylate binding proteins (hGBPs) 1 and 2 that potentiate the anti-chlamydial properties of IFN-gamma. hGBP1 and 2 localize to the inclusion membrane, and their anti-chlamydial functions required the GTPase domain. Alone, hGBP1 or 2 have mild, but statistically significant and reproducible negative effects on the growth of Chlamydia trachomatis, whilst having potent anti-chlamydial activity in conjunction with treatment with a sub-inhibitory concentration of IFN-gamma. Thus, hGBPs appear to potentiate the anti-chlamydial effects of IFN-gamma. Indeed, depletion of hGBP1 and 2 in cells treated with IFN-gamma led to an increase in inclusion size, indicative of better growth. Interestingly, chlamydia species/strains harboring the full-length version of the putative cytotoxin gene, which has been suggested to confer resistance to IFN-gamma was not affected by hGBP overexpression. These findings identify the guanylate binding proteins as potentiators of IFN-gamma inhibition of C. trachomatis growth, and may be the targets of the chlamydial cytotoxin.

  16. Identification and localization of xylose-binding proteins as potential biomarkers for liver fibrosis/cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yaogang; Sun, Xiu-Xuan; Zhang, Peixin; Qin, Xinmin; Chen, Wentian; Guo, Yonghong; Jia, Zhansheng; Bian, Huijie; Li, Zheng

    2016-02-01

    In our recent study, we found that the expression levels of total xylose-binding proteins (XBPs) were up-regulated significantly in activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs); however, the denomination, distribution, and function of the XBPs were uncharted. Herein, 70 XBPs from activated HSCs and 64 XBPs from quiescent HSCs were isolated, identified and annotated. A total of 30 XBPs were up-regulated (all fold change ≥ 1.5, p ≤ 0.05) and 14 XBPs were down-regulated (all fold change ≤ 0.67, p ≤ 0.05) in the activated HSCs. The XBPs were localized at the cytoplasm and cytoplasmic membrane in HSCs and cirrhotic liver tissues by cy/histochemistry. The XBPs (i.e. PDIA6 and CFL2) responsible for the regulation of protein binding were up-regulated and those responsible for the regulation of catalytic activity (i.e. TUBB and MX1) were up-regulated in the activated HSCs. 2 candidates (i.e. PDIA6 and APOA1) were then selected for further verification in the sera of patients with HBV-induced chronic hepatitis/cirrhosis using western blotting and serum microarrays. PDIA6 showed a higher discrimination (Area Under Curves, AUCs = 0.8985, p < 0.0001) relative to APOA1 (AUCs = 0.8738, p < 0.0001) in the sera of patients as biomarker candidate. In conclusion, the precision alteration of the XBPs associated with pathological changes in HSCs during liver fibrosis/cirrhosis may provide pivotal information needed to discover potential glycan-binding protein-related biomarkers for diagnosis of liver fibrosis/cirrhosis and for development of new anti-fibrotic strategies.

  17. L-Ferritin Binding to Scara5: A New Iron Traffic Pathway Potentially Implicated in Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mendes-Jorge, Luísa; Ramos, David; Valença, Andreia; López-Luppo, Mariana; Pires, Virgínia Maria Rico; Catita, Joana; Nacher, Victor; Navarro, Marc; Carretero, Ana; Rodriguez-Baeza, Alfonso; Ruberte, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Iron is essential in the retina because the heme-containing enzyme guanylate cyclase modulates phototransduction in rods and cones. Transferrin endocytosis is the classical pathway for obtaining iron from the blood circulation in the retina. However, the iron storage protein ferritin has been also recently proposed as an iron carrier. In this study, the presence of Scara5 and its binding to L-ferritin was investigated in the retina. Our results showed that Scara5, the specific receptor for L-ferritin, was expressed in mouse and human retinas in many cell types, including endothelial cells. Furthermore, we showed that intravenously injected ferritin crossed the blood retinal barrier through L-ferritin binding to Scara5 in endothelial cells. Thus, suggesting the existence of a new pathway for iron delivery and trafficking in the retina. In a murine model of photoreceptor degeneration, Scara5 was downregulated, pointing out this receptor as a potential player implicated in retinopathy and also as a possible therapeutic target. PMID:25259650

  18. From Erythromycin to Azithromycin and New Potential Ribosome-Binding Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Jelić, Dubravko; Antolović, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Macrolides, as a class of natural or semisynthetic products, express their antibacterial activity primarily by reversible binding to the bacterial 50S ribosomal subunits and by blocking nascent proteins’ progression through their exit tunnel in bacterial protein biosynthesis. Generally considered to be bacteriostatic, they may also be bactericidal at higher doses. The discovery of azithromycin from the class of macrolides, as one of the most important new drugs of the 20th century, is presented as an example of a rational medicinal chemistry approach to drug design, applying classical structure-activity relationship that will illustrate an impressive drug discovery success story. However, the microorganisms have developed several mechanisms to acquire resistance to antibiotics, including macrolide antibiotics. The primary mechanism for acquiring bacterial resistance to macrolides is a mutation of one or more nucleotides from the binding site. Although azithromycin is reported to show different, two-step process of the inhibition of ribosome function of some species, more detailed elaboration of that specific mode of action is needed. New macrocyclic derivatives, which could be more potent and less prone to escape bacterial resistance mechanisms, are also continuously evaluated. A novel class of antibiotic compounds—macrolones, which are derived from macrolides and comprise macrocyclic moiety, linker, and either free or esterified quinolone 3-carboxylic group, show excellent antibacterial potency towards key erythromycin-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains, with possibly decreased potential of bacterial resistance to macrolides. PMID:27598215

  19. Redox potential tuning through differential quinone binding in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    DOE PAGES

    Vermaas, Josh V.; Taguchi, Alexander T.; Dikanov, Sergei A.; ...

    2015-03-03

    Ubiquinone forms an integral part of the electron transport chain in cellular respiration and photosynthesis across a vast number of organisms. Prior experimental results have shown that the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is only fully functional with a limited set of methoxy-bearing quinones, suggesting that specific interactions with this substituent are required to drive electron transport and the formation of quinol. The nature of these interactions has yet to be determined. Through parameterization of a CHARMM-compatible quinone force field and subsequent molecular dynamics simulations of the quinone-bound RC, in this paper we have investigated and characterized themore » interactions of the protein with the quinones in the QA and QB sites using both equilibrium simulation and thermodynamic integration. In particular, we identify a specific interaction between the 2-methoxy group of ubiquinone in the QB site and the amide nitrogen of GlyL225 that we implicate in locking the orientation of the 2-methoxy group, thereby tuning the redox potential difference between the quinones occupying the QA and QB sites. Finally, disruption of this interaction leads to weaker binding in a ubiquinone analogue that lacks a 2-methoxy group, a finding supported by reverse electron transfer electron paramagnetic resonance experiments of the QA–QB– biradical and competitive binding assays.« less

  20. Phloem RNA-binding proteins as potential components of the long-distance RNA transport system

    PubMed Central

    Pallas, Vicente; Gómez, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) govern a myriad of different essential processes in eukaryotic cells. Recent evidence reveals that apart from playing critical roles in RNA metabolism and RNA transport, RBPs perform a key function in plant adaptation to various environmental conditions. Long-distance RNA transport occurs in land plants through the phloem, a conducting tissue that integrates the wide range of signaling pathways required to regulate plant development and response to stress processes. The macromolecules in the phloem pathway vary greatly and include defense proteins, transcription factors, chaperones acting in long-distance trafficking, and RNAs (mRNAs, siRNAs, and miRNAs). How these RNA molecules translocate through the phloem is not well understood, but recent evidence indicates the presence of translocatable RBPs in the phloem, which act as potential components of long-distance RNA transport system. This review updates our knowledge on the characteristics and functions of RBPs present in the phloem. PMID:23675378

  1. Binding energy of (Lambda)He-7 and test of charge symmetry breaking in the Lambda N interaction potential

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, O; Honda, D; Kaneta, M; Kato, F; Kawama, D; Maruyama, N; Matsumura, A; Nakamura, S N; Nomura, H; Nonaka, K; Ohtani, A; Okayasu, Y; Osaka, M; Oyamada, M; Sumihama, M; Tamura, H; Baker, O K; Cole, L; Christy, M; Gueye, P; Keppel, C; Tang, L; Yuan, L; Acha, A; Baturin, P; Boeglin, W; Kramer, L; Markowitz, P; Pamela, P; Perez, N; Raue, B; Reinhold, J; Rivera, R; Kato, S; Sato, Y; Takahashi, T; Daniel, A; Hungerford, Ed V; Ispiryan, M; Kalantarians, N; Lan, K J; Li, Y; Miyoshi, T; Randeniya, S; Rodriguez, V M; Bosted, P; Carlini, R; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Gaskell, D; Jones, M; Mack, D; Roche, J; Smith, G; Tvaskis, V; Vulcan, W; Wood, S; Yan, C; Asaturyan, A; Asaturyan, R; Egiyan, K; Mkrtchyan, H; Margaryan, A; Navasardyan, T; Tadevosyan, V; Zamkochian, S; Hu, B; Song, Y; Luo, W; Androic, D; Furic, M; Petkovic, T; Seva, T; Ahmidouch, A; Danagoulian, S; Gasparian, A; Halkyard, R; Johnson, K; Simicevic, N; Wells, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, M I; Gan, L; Benmokhtar, F; Horn, T; Elassar, M; Gibson, E F

    2011-09-01

    The binding energy of 7LambdaHe has been obtained for the first time with reaction spectroscopy using the (e, e'K+) reaction at Jefferson Lab's Hall C. A comparison among the binding energies of the A = 7 T = l iso-triplet hypernuclei, 7LambdaHe, 7LambdaLi*and 7LambdaBe, is made and possible charge symmetry breaking (CSB) in the LambdaN potential is discussed. For 7LambdaHe and 7LambdaBe, the shifts in binding energies are opposite to those predicted by a recent cluster model calculation, which assumes that the unexplained part of the binding energy difference between 4LambdaH and 4LambdaHe, is due to the CSB of the LambdaN potential. Further examination of CSB in light hypernuclear systems is required both experimentally and theoretically.

  2. Free energy profiles of cocaine esterase-cocaine binding process by molecular dynamics and potential of mean force simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxin; Huang, Xiaoqin; Han, Keli; Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2016-11-25

    The combined molecular dynamics (MD) and potential of mean force (PMF) simulations have been performed to determine the free energy profile of the CocE)-(+)-cocaine binding process in comparison with that of the corresponding CocE-(-)-cocaine binding process. According to the MD simulations, the equilibrium CocE-(+)-cocaine binding mode is similar to the CocE-(-)-cocaine binding mode. However, based on the simulated free energy profiles, a significant free energy barrier (∼5 kcal/mol) exists in the CocE-(+)-cocaine binding process whereas no obvious free energy barrier exists in the CocE-(-)-cocaine binding process, although the free energy barrier of ∼5 kcal/mol is not high enough to really slow down the CocE-(+)-cocaine binding process. In addition, the obtained free energy profiles also demonstrate that (+)-cocaine and (-)-cocaine have very close binding free energies with CocE, with a negligible difference (∼0.2 kcal/mol), which is qualitatively consistent with the nearly same experimental KM values of the CocE enzyme for (+)-cocaine and (-)-cocaine. The consistency between the computational results and available experimental data suggests that the mechanistic insights obtained from this study are reasonable.

  3. Novel Insight from Computational Virtual Screening Depict the Binding Potential of Selected Phytotherapeutics Against Probable Drug Targets of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Suman; Skariyachan, Sinosh

    2017-02-20

    This study explores computational screening and molecular docking approaches to screen novel herbal therapeutics against probable drug targets of Clostridium difficile. The essential genes were predicted by comparative genome analysis of C. difficile and best homologous organisms using BLAST search at database of essential genes (DEG). The functions of these genes in various metabolic pathways were predicted and some of these genes were considered as potential targets. Three major proteins were selected as putative targets, namely permease IIC component, ABC transporter and histidine kinase. The three-dimensional structures of these targets were predicted by molecular modelling. The herbal bioactive compounds were screened by computer-aided virtual screening and binding potentials against the drug targets were predicted by molecular docking. Quercetin present in Psidium guajava (binding energy of -9.1 kcal/mol), Ellagic acid found in Punica granatum and Psidium guajava (binding energy -9.0 kcal/mol) and Curcumin, present in Curcuma longa (binding energy -7.8 kcal/mol) demonstrated minimum binding energy and more number of interacting residues with the drug targets. Further, comparative study revealed that phytoligands demonstrated better binding affinities to the drug targets in comparison with usual ligands. Thus, this investigation explores the therapeutic probabilities of selected phytoligands against the putative drug targets of C. difficile.

  4. Numerical study of the tight-binding approach to overdamped Brownian motion on a tilted periodic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challis, K. J.

    2016-12-01

    We present a numerical study of the tight-binding approach to overdamped Brownian motion on a tilted periodic potential. In the tight-binding method the probability density is expanded on a basis of Wannier states to transform the Smoluchowski equation to a discrete master equation that can be interpreted in terms of thermal hopping between potential minima. We calculate the Wannier states and hopping rates for a variety of potentials, including tilted cosine and ratchet potentials. For deep potential minima the Wannier states are well localized and the hopping rates between nearest-neighbor states are qualitatively well described by Kramers' escape rate. The next-nearest-neighbor hopping rates are negative and must be negligible compared to the nearest-neighbor rates for the discrete master equation treatment to be valid. We find that the validity of the master equation extends beyond the quantitative applicability of Kramers' escape rate.

  5. Harmonic model of graphene based on a tight binding interatomic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, J. P.; Ariza, M. P.

    2016-08-01

    Like in many other materials, the presence of topological defects in graphene has been demonstrated to modify its behavior, thus enhancing features aimed at several technological applications, more specifically, its electronic and transport properties. In particular, pristine defect-free graphene has been shown to be of limited use for semiconductor-based electronics, whereas the presence of individual or cluster defect rings along grain boundaries hinders electron transport and introduce a transport gap, unveiling the possibility of novel electronic device applications based on the structural engineering of graphene-based materials. In this work, we present an atomic bondwise force-constant model from the tight binding potential by Xu et al. (1992), that accounts for the electron-mechanical coupling effects in graphene. First we verify that this computational scheme is capable of accurately predicting the defect energies and core structures of dislocation dipoles based on the theory of discrete dislocations of Ariza and Ortiz (2005). In order to demonstrate our ability to characterize the effect of patterned distributions of structural defects on the electronic structure of graphene, we present the electronic band structures and density of states curves of several defective graphene sheets.

  6. Intact Microtubules Preserve Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) Functionality through Receptor Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Storti, Barbara; Bizzarri, Ranieri; Cardarelli, Francesco; Beltram, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) is a protein currently under scrutiny as a pharmacological target for pain management therapies. Recently, the role of TRPV1-microtubule interaction in transducing nociception stimuli to cells by cytoskeletal rearrangement was proposed. In this work, we investigate TRPV1-microtubule interaction in living cells under the resting or activated state of TRPV1, as well as in presence of structurally intact or depolymerized cytoskeletal microtubules. We combined a toolbox of high resolution/high sensitivity fluorescence imaging techniques (such as FRET, correlation spectroscopy, and fluorescence anisotropy) to monitor TRPV1 aggregation status, membrane mobility, and interaction with microtubules. We found that TRPV1 is a dimeric membrane protein characterized by two populations with different diffusion properties in basal condition. After stimulation with resiniferatoxin, TRPV1 dimers tetramerize. The tetramers and the slower population of TRPV1 dimers bind dynamically to intact microtubules but not to tubulin dimers. Upon microtubule disassembly, the interaction with TRPV1 is lost thereby inducing receptor self-aggregation with partial loss of functionality. Intact microtubules play an essential role in maintaining TRPV1 functionality toward activation stimuli. This previously undisclosed property mirrors the recently reported role of TRPV1 in modulating microtubule assembly/disassembly and suggests the participation of these two players in a feedback cycle linking nociception and cytoskeletal remodeling. PMID:22262838

  7. Novel glyoxalase-I inhibitors possessing a “zinc-binding feature” as potential anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Al-Balas, Qosay A; Hassan, Mohammad A; Al-Shar’i, Nizar A; Mhaidat, Nizar M; Almaaytah, Ammar M; Al-Mahasneh, Fatima M; Isawi, Israa H

    2016-01-01

    Background The glyoxalase system including two thiol-dependent enzymes, glyoxalase I (Glo-I) and glyoxalase II, plays an important role in a ubiquitous metabolic pathway involved in cellular detoxification of cytotoxic 2-oxoaldehydes. Tumor cells have high glycolytic activity, leading to increased cellular levels of these toxic metabolites. The increased activity of the detoxification system in cancerous cells makes this pathway a viable target for developing novel anticancer agents. In this study, we examined the potential utility of non-glutathione-based inhibitors of the Glo-I enzyme as novel anticancer drugs. Methods Computer-aided drug design techniques, such as customized pharmacophoric features, virtual screening, and flexible docking, were used to achieve the project goals. Retrieved hits were extensively filtered and subsequently docked into the active site of the enzyme. The biological activities of retrieved hits were assessed using an in vitro assay against Glo-I. Results Since Glo-I is a zinc metalloenzyme, a customized Zn-binding pharmacophoric feature was used to search for selective inhibitors via virtual screening of a small-molecule database. Seven hits were selected, purchased, and biologically evaluated. Three of the seven hits inhibited Glo-I activity, the most effective of which exerted 76.4% inhibition at a concentration of 25 µM. Conclusion We successfully identified a potential Glo-I inhibitor that can serve as a lead compound for further optimization. Moreover, our in silico and experimental results were highly correlated. Hence, the docking protocol adopted in this study may be efficiently employed in future optimization steps. PMID:27574401

  8. Electrochemical potential releases a membrane-bound secretion intermediate of maltose-binding protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Geller, B L

    1990-01-01

    A secretionary intermediate of the Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein accumulated in the inner membrane when the membrane electrochemical potential was reduced and the cytosolic ATP concentration was normal. The intermediate was mature in size, but maintained a conformation similar to the cytosolic precursor form, and not the mature periplasmic protein, as measured by differences in susceptibility to proteinase K in vitro. The intermediate was located on the periplasmic side of the inner membrane. Restoration of the membrane electrochemical potential resulted in the movement of the intermediate from the inner membrane to the periplasm. In other experiments in which the ATP concentration was reduced by 96% and the electrochemical potential remained normal, no intermediate accumulated. Thus, the final step in the export of maltose-binding protein requires the electrochemical potential of the inner membrane and does not require ATP. Images PMID:2203734

  9. Retinol-binding protein 4 and its potential roles in hypercholesterolemia revealed by proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Jugnam-ang, Watcharapong; Pannengpetch, Supitcha; Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Patcharee; Thippakorn, Chadinee; Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Chartchalerm; Lawung, Ratana; Prachayasittiku, Virapong

    2015-01-01

    Effects of hypercholesterolemia on alterations of serum proteins have not been fully elucidated. Herein, using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in conjunction with LC-MS searching has successfully been carried out to investigate the change of protein expression profiles as consequences of raised blood cholesterol at different levels (normal group: total cholesterol 200 mg/dL; borderline high group: total cholesterol 200-239 mg/dL; and high group: total cholesterol ≥ 240 mg/dL) (n = 45). Results revealed that down-regulation of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) (-2.26 fold), transthyretin (-1.25 fold) and gelsolin (-1.47 fold) was observed in the high group. Meanwhile, the other proteins such as haptoglobin, complement factor B and CD5 antigen-like protein were up-regulated upto +3.24, +1.96 and +2.04 fold, respectively. Confirmation by Western blotting revealed a significant reduction of RBP4 (approximately 50 %) in individual samples derived from the high group. Presumptive conclusion can be drawn that down-regulation of RBP4 might be attributable to the inflammation of adipocytes caused by the release of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g. tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-1β) from adipose tissues. Moreover, the decrease of transthyretin might also be taken into accounts since it is known that the transthyretin usually forms complex with RBP4 to prevent glomerular filtration and excretion through the kidney. The suppressing effect on RBP4 should be potentiated by the increase of complement factor B and CD5 antigen-like protein, which rendered the adipose tissues to overwhelm the liberation of RBP4 to blood circulation by metabolic and inflammatory processes. Such inflammation could further modulate the induction of cytokine release (e.g. IL-6 and IL-1β), resulting in the synthesis of acute phase protein, in particular, haptoglobin and C-reactive proteins from hepatocytes. However, the mechanism of gelsolin reduction remains unclear. Among these

  10. Unquenchable Surface Potential Dramatically Enhances Cu(2+) Binding to Phosphatidylserine Lipids.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiao; Poyton, Matthew F; Baxter, Alexis J; Pullanchery, Saranya; Cremer, Paul S

    2015-06-24

    Herein, the apparent equilibrium dissociation constant, K(Dapp), between Cu(2+) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine (POPS), a negatively charged phospholipid, was measured as a function of PS concentrations in supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). The results indicated that K(Dapp) for Cu(2+) binding to PS-containing SLBs was enhanced by a factor of 17,000 from 110 nM to 6.4 pM as the PS density in the membrane was increased from 1.0 to 20 mol %. Although Cu(2+) bound bivalently to POPS at higher PS concentrations, this was not the dominant factor in increasing the binding affinity. Rather, the higher concentration of Cu(2+) within the double layer above the membrane was largely responsible for the tightening. Unlike the binding of other divalent metal ions such as Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) to PS, Cu(2+) binding does not alter the net negative charge on the membrane as the Cu(PS)2 complex forms. As such, the Cu(2+) concentration within the double layer region was greatly amplified relative to its concentration in bulk solution as the PS density was increased. This created a far larger enhancement to the apparent binding affinity than is observed by standard multivalent effects. These findings should help provide an understanding on the extent of Cu(2+)-PS binding in cell membranes, which may be relevant to biological processes such as amyloid-β peptide toxicity and lipid oxidation.

  11. Trypsin-Ligand Binding Free Energies from Explicit and Implicit Solvent Simulations with Polarizable Potential

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Dian; Zhang, Jiajing; Duke, Robert E.; Li, Guohui; Ren, Pengyu

    2009-01-01

    We have calculated the binding free energies of a series of benzamidine-like inhibitors to trypsin with a polarizable force field using both explicit and implicit solvent approaches. Free energy perturbation has been performed for the ligands in bulk water and in protein complex with molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated binding free energies are well within the accuracy of experimental measurement and the direction of change is predicted correctly in call cases. We analyzed the molecular dipole moments of the ligands in gas, water and protein environments. Neither binding affinity nor ligand solvation free energy in bulk water shows much dependence on the molecular dipole moments of the ligands. Substitution of the aromatic or the charged group in the ligand results in considerable change in the solvation energy in bulk water and protein whereas the binding affinity varies insignificantly due to cancellation. The effect of chemical modification on ligand charge distribution is mostly local. Replacing benzene with diazine has minimal impact on the atomic multipoles at the amidinium group. We have also utilized an implicit solvent based end-state approach to evaluate the binding free energies of these inhibitors. In this approach, the polarizable multipole model combined with Poisson-Boltzmann/surface area (PMPB/SA) provides the electrostatic interaction energy and the polar solvation free energy. Overall the relative binding free energies obtained from the PMPB/SA model are in good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:19399779

  12. Synthesis and biological evaluation of benzimidazole acridine derivatives as potential DNA-binding and apoptosis-inducing agents.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunmei; Li, Bin; Zhang, Bin; Sun, Qinsheng; Li, Lulu; Li, Xi; Chen, Changjun; Tan, Chunyan; Liu, Hongxia; Jiang, Yuyang

    2015-04-15

    The discovery of new effective DNA-targeted antitumor agent is needed because of their clinical significance. As acridines can intercalate into DNA and benzimidazoles have the ability to bind in the DNA minor groove, a series of novel benzimidazole acridine derivatives were designed and synthesized to be new DNA-targeted compounds. MTT assay indicated that most of the synthesized compounds displayed good antiproliferative activity, among which compound 8l demonstrated the highest activity against both K562 and HepG-2 cells. Further experiments showed that 8l displayed good DNA-binding capability and inhibited topoisomerase I activity. Moreover, compound 8l could induce apoptosis in K562 cell lines through mitochondrial pathway. These data suggested that compound 8l might be potential as new DNA-binding and apoptosis-inducing antitumor agents.

  13. Hemizona assay: use of fresh versus salt-stored human oocytes to evaluate sperm binding potential to the zona pellucida.

    PubMed

    Kruger, T F; Oehninger, S; Franken, D R; Hodgen, G D

    1991-06-01

    The hemizona assay (HZA) has a high predictive value for in vitro fertilization (IVF) results. Oocyte quality plays a significant role in the validation of this test. The question was asked whether human salt-stored oocytes (up to 30 days) are damaged and subsequently lose their sperm binding capacity when compared to fresh human oocytes. Equivalent binding in both the salt-stored and the fresh group of oocytes was observed in the hemizonae incubated with normal semen as well as in their matching halves incubated with semen from an infertile man. Based on the results, we conclude that salt-stored oocytes (pH 7.0) give reliable information regarding sperm binding potential under HZA conditions.

  14. Oncogenic potential of TAR RNA binding protein TRBP and its regulatory interaction with RNA-dependent protein kinase PKR.

    PubMed Central

    Benkirane, M; Neuveut, C; Chun, R F; Smith, S M; Samuel, C E; Gatignol, A; Jeang, K T

    1997-01-01

    TAR RNA binding protein (TRBP) belongs to an RNA binding protein family that includes the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR), Drosophila Staufen and Xenopus xlrbpa. One member of this family, PKR, is a serine/threonine kinase which has anti-viral and anti-proliferative effects. In this study we show that TRBP is a cellular down-regulator of PKR function. Assaying expression from an infectious HIV-1 molecular clone, we found that PKR inhibited viral protein synthesis and that over-expression of TRBP effectively countered this inhibition. In intracellular and in cell-free assays we show that TRBP directly inhibits PKR autophosphorylation through an RNA binding-independent pathway. Biologically, TRBP serves a growth-promoting role; cells that overexpress TRBP exhibit transformed phenotypes. Our results demonstrate the oncogenic potential of TRBP and are consistent with the notion that intracellular PKR function contributes physiologically towards regulating cellular proliferation. PMID:9034343

  15. Fatty acid binding proteins have the potential to channel dietary fatty acids into enterocyte nuclei[S

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Adriana; Knoll-Gellida, Anja; Canclini, Lucia; Silvarrey, Maria Cecilia; André, Michèle; Babin, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular lipid binding proteins, including fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) 1 and 2, are highly expressed in tissues involved in the active lipid metabolism. A zebrafish model was used to demonstrate differential expression levels of fabp1b.1, fabp1b.2, and fabp2 transcripts in liver, anterior intestine, and brain. Transcription levels of fabp1b.1 and fabp2 in the anterior intestine were upregulated after feeding and modulated according to diet formulation. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy immunodetection with gold particles localized these FABPs in the microvilli, cytosol, and nuclei of most enterocytes in the anterior intestinal mucosa. Nuclear localization was mostly in the interchromatin space outside the condensed chromatin clusters. Native PAGE binding assay of BODIPY-FL-labeled FAs demonstrated binding of BODIPY-FLC12 but not BODIPY-FLC5 to recombinant Fabp1b.1 and Fabp2. The binding of BODIPY-FLC12 to Fabp1b.1 was fully displaced by oleic acid. In vivo experiments demonstrated, for the first time, that intestinal absorption of dietary BODIPY-FLC12 was followed by colocalization of the labeled FA with Fabp1b and Fabp2 in the nuclei. These data suggest that dietary FAs complexed with FABPs are able to reach the enterocyte nucleus with the potential to modulate nuclear activity. PMID:26658423

  16. Cationic Peptides and Peptidomimetics Bind Glycosaminoglycans as Potential Sema3A Pathway Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Corredor, Miriam; Bonet, Roman; Moure, Alejandra; Domingo, Cecilia; Bujons, Jordi; Alfonso, Ignacio; Pérez, Yolanda; Messeguer, Àngel

    2016-03-29

    Semaphorin3A (Sema3A) is a vertebrate-secreted protein that was initially characterized as a repulsive-guidance cue. Semaphorins have crucial roles in several diseases; therefore, the development of Sema3A inhibitors is of therapeutic interest. Sema3A interacts with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), presumably through its C-terminal basic region. We used different biophysical techniques (i.e., NMR, surface plasmon resonance, isothermal titration calorimetry, fluorescence, and UV-visible spectroscopy) to characterize the binding of two Sema3A C-terminus-derived basic peptides (FS2 and NFS3) to heparin and chondroitin sulfate A. We found that these peptides bind to both GAGs with affinities in the low-micromolar range. On the other hand, a peptoid named SICHI (semaphorin-induced chemorepulsion inhibitor), which is positively charged at physiological pH, was first identified by our group as being able to block Sema3A chemorepulsion and growth-cone collapse in axons at the extracellular level. To elucidate the direct target for the reported SICHI inhibitory effect in the Sema3A signaling pathway, we looked first to the protein-protein interaction between secreted Sema3A and the Nrp1 receptor. However, our results show that SICHI does not bind directly to the Sema3A sema domain or to Nrp1 extracellular domains. We evaluated a new, to our knowledge, hypothesis, according to which SICHI binds to GAGs, thereby perturbing the Sema3A-GAG interaction. By using the above-mentioned techniques, we observed that SICHI binds to GAGs and competes with Sema3A C-terminus-derived basic peptides for binding to GAGs. These data support the ability of SICHI to block the biologically relevant interaction between Sema3A and GAGs, thus revealing SICHI as a new, to our knowledge, class of inhibitors that target the GAG-protein interaction.

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of potential inhibitors of human and Escherichia coli histidine triad nucleotide binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Bardaweel, Sanaa K; Ghosh, Brahma; Wagner, Carston R

    2012-01-01

    Based on recent substrate specificity studies, a series of ribonucleotide based esters and carbamates were synthesized and screened as inhibitors of the phosphoramidases and acyl-AMP hydrolases, Escherichia coli Histidine Triad Nucleotide Binding Protein (ecHinT) and human Histidine Triad Nucleotide Binding Protein 1 (hHint1). Using our established phosphoramidase assay, K(i) values were determined. All compounds exhibited non-competitive inhibition profiles. The carbamate based inhibitors were shown to successfully suppress the Hint1-associated phenotype in E. coli, suggesting that they are permeable intracellular inhibitors of ecHinT.

  18. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus; identification of M protein-binding peptide ligands with antiviral and diagnostic potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The membrane (M) protein is one of the major structural proteins of coronavirus particles. In this study, the M protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was used to biopan a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. Three phages expressing TGEV-M-binding peptides were identified and ...

  19. Potential Cooperations between Odorant-Binding Proteins of the Scarab Beetle Holotrichia oblita Faldermann (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing; Guan, Li; Zhong, Tao; Li, Kebin; Yin, Jiao; Cao, Yazhong

    2013-01-01

    It was previously thought that the odorant binding proteins (OBPs) in the sensillum lymph might serve as carriers, which could carry lipophilic odorant molecules to olfactory receptors. In this study, two novel OBP genes of the scarab beetle Holotrichia oblita were screened using an antennal cDNA library. The full cDNA of HoblOBP3 and HoblOBP4 was cloned using reverse transcription PCR and rapid amplification of the cDNA ends. Homology modeling of both OBPs was performed using SWISS-MODEL on-line tools. Next, the two OBPs were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using Ni ion affinity chromatography. The ligand-binding properties of HoblOBP3 and HoblOBP4 in 42 ligands respectively were measured using the fluorescence probe N-phenyl-naphthylamine (1-NPN). The results obtained from competitive binding assays demonstrated that HoblOBP4 showed a broader range of binding affinities to the test compounds, while HoblOBP3 displays more specific binding affinity. Furthermore, other OBPs and CSPs were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using Ni ion affinity chromatography. Binding curves were measured for binary mixtures of OBPs and CSPs using 1-NPN, and the Scatchard plots exhibited “J”-like nonlinear correlation trends in some samples. In addition, competitive binding assays of the HoblOBP1 and HoblOBP2 mixtures and of the HoblOBP2 and HoblOBP4 mixtures with representative compounds unexpectedly demonstrated good affinity, which revealed extreme differences that were only obtained using the individual proteins. In the immunocytochemical analysis, colocalization of HoblOBP1 and HoblOBP2, and of HoblOBP2 and HoblOBP4, was detected in the sensilla basiconica and sensilla placodea, respectively. All of these results suggested that HoblOBP1 and HoblOBP2, as well as HoblOBP2 and HoblOBP4, may serve as heterodimers in the sensillum lymph. PMID:24376847

  20. Extracellular production of riboflavin-binding protein, a potential bitter inhibitor, by Brevibacillus choshinensis.

    PubMed

    Maehashi, Kenji; Matano, Mami; Saito, Makiko; Udaka, Shigezo

    2010-05-01

    Riboflavin-binding protein (RBP) is a glycophosphoprotein found in hen eggs. We previously identified the extraordinary characteristic of RBP in reducing bitterness. For a more detailed study on the mode of action and industrial application of this characteristic, we investigated the microbial production of recombinant RBP (rRBP). We constructed a chicken RBP gene expression vector by inserting the RBP cDNA in pNCMO2, the Escherichia coli-Brevibacillus choshinensis shuttle vector. B. choshinensis HPD31 transformants produced 0.8g/l of processed and unglycosylated RBP in a soluble form in the culture supernatant. However, the expressed RBP was partially dimerized and monomeric RBP was purified by two step anion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatographies. The purified rRBP elicited bitterness reduction against quinine and caffeine, although it largely lost its riboflavin-binding ability. These results indicated that glycosylation and riboflavin-binding ability are not essential for the bitterness reduction of RBP. In addition, we assessed the usefulness of the Brevibacillus system for the expression and secretion of RBP as a new type of bitterness inhibitor.

  1. Potential DNA binding and nuclease functions of ComEC domains characterized in silico

    PubMed Central

    Baker, James A.; Simkovic, Felix; Taylor, Helen M.C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial competence, which can be natural or induced, allows the uptake of exogenous double stranded DNA (dsDNA) into a competent bacterium. This process is known as transformation. A multiprotein assembly binds and processes the dsDNA to import one strand and degrade another yet the underlying molecular mechanisms are relatively poorly understood. Here distant relationships of domains in Competence protein EC (ComEC) of Bacillus subtilis (Uniprot: P39695) were characterized. DNA‐protein interactions were investigated in silico by analyzing models for structural conservation, surface electrostatics and structure‐based DNA binding propensity; and by data‐driven macromolecular docking of DNA to models. Our findings suggest that the DUF4131 domain contains a cryptic DNA‐binding OB fold domain and that the β‐lactamase‐like domain is the hitherto cryptic competence nuclease. Proteins 2016; 84:1431–1442. © 2016 The Authors Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27318187

  2. Binding motifs of CBP2 a potential cell surface target for carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sauk, J J; Coletta, R D; Norris, K; Hebert, C

    2000-05-01

    Previously we have shown (Hebert et al. [1999] J. Cell Biochem. 73:248-258) that among many cell lines the CBP2 gene product, Hsp47, eludes its retention receptor, erd2P, resulting in the appearance of Hsp47 on the cell surface associated with the tetraspanin protein CD9. Since Hsp47 possesses a highly restricted binding cleft, random peptide display libraries were used to characterize peptides binding to Hsp47 and then to target this protein on carcinoma cell lines in vitro. Comparison of the clones obtained from panning revealed little specific homology based on sequence alone. To determine whether carcinoma cells expressing Hsp47 could selectively take up the selected bacteriophages, traditional immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy were employed. These studies revealed that phage-displaying Hsp47 binding peptides bound to cell lines expressing Hsp47 and that the peptides were rapidly taken up to a location coincident with Hsp47 staining. These observations were confirmed by cytometric analyses. These data indicate that CBP2 product may provide a molecular target for chemotherapy and/or imaging of malignancies.

  3. A Rat α-Fetoprotein Binding Activity Prediction Model to Facilitate Assessment of the Endocrine Disruption Potential of Environmental Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Hong, Huixiao; Shen, Jie; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Ye, Hao; Ge, Weigong; Gong, Ping; Xiao, Wenming; Tong, Weida

    2016-03-25

    Endocrine disruptors such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), diethylstilbestrol (DES) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) are agents that interfere with the endocrine system and cause adverse health effects. Huge public health concern about endocrine disruptors has arisen. One of the mechanisms of endocrine disruption is through binding of endocrine disruptors with the hormone receptors in the target cells. Entrance of endocrine disruptors into target cells is the precondition of endocrine disruption. The binding capability of a chemical with proteins in the blood affects its entrance into the target cells and, thus, is very informative for the assessment of potential endocrine disruption of chemicals. α-fetoprotein is one of the major serum proteins that binds to a variety of chemicals such as estrogens. To better facilitate assessment of endocrine disruption of environmental chemicals, we developed a model for α-fetoprotein binding activity prediction using the novel pattern recognition method (Decision Forest) and the molecular descriptors calculated from two-dimensional structures by Mold² software. The predictive capability of the model has been evaluated through internal validation using 125 training chemicals (average balanced accuracy of 69%) and external validations using 22 chemicals (balanced accuracy of 71%). Prediction confidence analysis revealed the model performed much better at high prediction confidence. Our results indicate that the model is useful (when predictions are in high confidence) in endocrine disruption risk assessment of environmental chemicals though improvement by increasing number of training chemicals is needed.

  4. Displacement of insulin-like growth factors from their binding proteins as a potential treatment for stroke

    PubMed Central

    Loddick, Sarah A.; Liu, Xin-Jun; Lu, Zi-Xian; Liu, Changlu; Behan, Dominic P.; Chalmers, Derek C.; Foster, Alan C.; Vale, Wylie W.; Ling, Nicholas; De Souza, Errol B.

    1998-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I and IGF-II) play an important role in normal growth and brain development and protect brain cells from several forms of injury. The effects of IGFs are mediated by type-I and type-II receptors and modulated by potentially six specific binding proteins that form high-affinity complexes with IGFs in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and under most circumstances inactivate them. Because brain injury is commonly associated with increases in IGFs and their associated binding proteins, we hypothesized that displacement of this large “pool” of endogenous IGF from the binding proteins would elevate “free” IGF levels to elicit neuroprotective effects comparable to those produced by administration of exogenous IGF. A human IGF-I analog [(Leu24, 59, 60, Ala31)hIGF-I] with high affinity to IGF-binding proteins (Ki = 0.3–3.9 nM) and no biological activity at the IGF receptors (Ki = >10,000 nM) increased the levels of “free, bioavailable” IGF-I in the CSF. Intracerebroventricular administration of this analog up to 1h after an ischemic insult to the rat brain had a potent neuroprotective action comparable to IGF-I. This novel strategy for increasing “free” IGF levels in the brain may be useful for the treatment of stroke and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:9465113

  5. A Rat α-Fetoprotein Binding Activity Prediction Model to Facilitate Assessment of the Endocrine Disruption Potential of Environmental Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Huixiao; Shen, Jie; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Ye, Hao; Ge, Weigong; Gong, Ping; Xiao, Wenming; Tong, Weida

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), diethylstilbestrol (DES) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) are agents that interfere with the endocrine system and cause adverse health effects. Huge public health concern about endocrine disruptors has arisen. One of the mechanisms of endocrine disruption is through binding of endocrine disruptors with the hormone receptors in the target cells. Entrance of endocrine disruptors into target cells is the precondition of endocrine disruption. The binding capability of a chemical with proteins in the blood affects its entrance into the target cells and, thus, is very informative for the assessment of potential endocrine disruption of chemicals. α-fetoprotein is one of the major serum proteins that binds to a variety of chemicals such as estrogens. To better facilitate assessment of endocrine disruption of environmental chemicals, we developed a model for α-fetoprotein binding activity prediction using the novel pattern recognition method (Decision Forest) and the molecular descriptors calculated from two-dimensional structures by Mold2 software. The predictive capability of the model has been evaluated through internal validation using 125 training chemicals (average balanced accuracy of 69%) and external validations using 22 chemicals (balanced accuracy of 71%). Prediction confidence analysis revealed the model performed much better at high prediction confidence. Our results indicate that the model is useful (when predictions are in high confidence) in endocrine disruption risk assessment of environmental chemicals though improvement by increasing number of training chemicals is needed. PMID:27023588

  6. Binding energy and structure of e{sup +}Li and e{sup -}Li using a parametric model potential

    SciTech Connect

    Shertzer, J.; Ward, S. J.

    2006-02-15

    The parametric model potential developed by Peach for describing the electron interaction with the alkali-metal ion core yields energy levels that are in excellent agreement with the measurements of the spectra. Because of its relative simplicity, the l-independent model potential is an attractive choice for studying positron-alkali-metal collisions. In order to test how well the model potential can be used to describe an effective three-body system, we use the Peach model potential to calculate the energy and geometry of the weakly bound e{sup +}Li and e{sup -}Li systems. The binding energy is in good agreement with calculations using the exact Hamiltonian.

  7. Purely-long-range krypton molecules in singly and doubly excited binding potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Z. S.; Harmon, A.; Banister, J.; Norman, R.; Hoogeboom-Pot, K.; Walhout, M.

    2010-01-15

    Diatomic potentials for krypton are computed and also probed experimentally. For a probe-laser wavelength near 811 nm, several strong dipole-dipole interactions produce purely-long-range potential wells in the singly excited manifold of (s+p) potentials and in the doubly excited manifold of (p+p) and (s+d) potentials. Evidence of resonant photoassociation into bound states of these potential wells is observed in the emission of ions and ultraviolet photons from a magneto-optically trapped krypton cloud.

  8. Structural Comparison, Substrate Specificity, and Inhibitor Binding of AGPase Small Subunit from Monocot and Dicot: Present Insight and Future Potential

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Manabendra D.; Modi, Mahendra K.

    2014-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) is the first rate limiting enzyme of starch biosynthesis pathway and has been exploited as the target for greater starch yield in several plants. The structure-function analysis and substrate binding specificity of AGPase have provided enormous potential for understanding the role of specific amino acid or motifs responsible for allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanisms, which facilitate the engineering of AGPases. We report the three-dimensional structure, substrate, and inhibitor binding specificity of AGPase small subunit from different monocot and dicot crop plants. Both monocot and dicot subunits were found to exploit similar interactions with the substrate and inhibitor molecule as in the case of their closest homologue potato tuber AGPase small subunit. Comparative sequence and structural analysis followed by molecular docking and electrostatic surface potential analysis reveal that rearrangements of secondary structure elements, substrate, and inhibitor binding residues are strongly conserved and follow common folding pattern and orientation within monocot and dicot displaying a similar mode of allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanism. The results from this study along with site-directed mutagenesis complemented by molecular dynamics simulation will shed more light on increasing the starch content of crop plants to ensure the food security worldwide. PMID:25276800

  9. Structural comparison, substrate specificity, and inhibitor binding of AGPase small subunit from monocot and dicot: present insight and future potential.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Kishore; Sen, Priyabrata; Barooah, Madhumita; Choudhury, Manabendra D; Roychoudhury, Shubhadeep; Modi, Mahendra K

    2014-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) is the first rate limiting enzyme of starch biosynthesis pathway and has been exploited as the target for greater starch yield in several plants. The structure-function analysis and substrate binding specificity of AGPase have provided enormous potential for understanding the role of specific amino acid or motifs responsible for allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanisms, which facilitate the engineering of AGPases. We report the three-dimensional structure, substrate, and inhibitor binding specificity of AGPase small subunit from different monocot and dicot crop plants. Both monocot and dicot subunits were found to exploit similar interactions with the substrate and inhibitor molecule as in the case of their closest homologue potato tuber AGPase small subunit. Comparative sequence and structural analysis followed by molecular docking and electrostatic surface potential analysis reveal that rearrangements of secondary structure elements, substrate, and inhibitor binding residues are strongly conserved and follow common folding pattern and orientation within monocot and dicot displaying a similar mode of allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanism. The results from this study along with site-directed mutagenesis complemented by molecular dynamics simulation will shed more light on increasing the starch content of crop plants to ensure the food security worldwide.

  10. Improvement of osteogenic potential of biphasic calcium phosphate bone substitute coated with synthetic cell binding peptide sequences

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyunmin; Park, Nho-Jae; Jamiyandorj, Otgonbold; Hong, Min-Ho; Oh, Seunghan; Park, Young-Bum

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the improvement of osteogenic potential of biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) bone substitute coated with synthetic cell-binding peptide sequences in a standardized rabbit sinus model. Methods Standardized 6-mm diameter defects were created bilaterally on the maxillary sinus of ten male New Zealand white rabbits, receiving BCP bone substitute coated with synthetic cell binding peptide sequences on one side (experimental group) and BCP bone substitute without coating (control group) on the other side. Histologic and histomorphometric analysis of bone formation was carried out after a healing period of 4 or 8 weeks. Results Histological analysis revealed signs of new bone formation in both experimental groups (4- and 8-week healing groups) with a statistically significant increase in bone formation in the 4-week healing group compared to the control group. However, no statistically significant difference in bone formation was found between the 8-week healing group and the control group. Conclusions This study found that BCP bone substitute coated with synthetic cell-binding peptide sequences enhanced osteoinductive potential in a standardized rabbit sinus model and its effectiveness was greater in the 4-week healing group than in the 8-week healing group. PMID:23185697

  11. Molecular characterization, functional expression, tissue localization and protective potential of a Taenia solium fatty acid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Illescas, Oscar; Carrero, Julio C; Bobes, Raúl J; Flisser, Ana; Rosas, Gabriela; Laclette, Juan P

    2012-12-01

    The fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) comprise a family of proteins that are widely expressed in animal cells and perform a variety of vital functions. Here, we report the identification, characterization, recombinant expression, tissue localization and protective potential of a Taenia solium FABP (TsFABP1). The TsFABP1 primary structure showed all the conserved residues characteristic of the subfamily iv of the intracellular Lipid-Binding Proteins (iLBPs), including those involved in the binding stabilization of the fatty acid molecule. Through a competitive binding assay we found that TsFABP1 is able to bind at least six different fatty acids with preference toward palmitic and stearic acid, suggesting that TsFABP1 is a member of the iLBP subfamily iv. Immunolocalization assays carried out on larval and adult tissues of four species of taeniids using anti-TsFABP1 hyperimmune sera produced in mice and rabbit, showed intense labeling in the tegument of the spiral canal and in subtegumental cytons of the larvae. These findings suggest that the spiral canal might be a major place for FA uptake in the developing scolex. In contrast, only subtegumental cytons in the adult worms stained positive. We propose that TsFABP1 is involved in the mechanism to mobilize fatty acids between compartments in the extensive syncytial tissue of taeniids. Protection assays carried out in a murine model of cysticercosis showed that subcutaneous immunization with TsFABP1 resulted in about 45% reduction of parasite load against an intraperitoneal challenge with Taenia crassiceps cysts. This reduction in parasite load correlated with the level of cellular and humoral immune responses against TsFABP1, as determined in spleen lymphocyte proliferation and ELISA testing.

  12. Mapping protein pockets through their potential small-molecule binding volumes: QSCD applied to biological protein structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Keith; Patel, Nehal M.; Ledel, Aric; Moallemi, Ciamac C.; Wintner, Edward A.

    2004-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated a method, Quantized Surface Complementarity Diversity (QSCD), of defining molecular diversity by measuring shape and functional complementarity of molecules to a basis set of theoretical target surfaces [Wintner E.A. and Moallemi C.C., J. Med. Chem., 43 (2000) 1993]. In this paper we demonstrate a method of mapping actual protein pockets to the same basis set of theoretical target surfaces, thereby allowing categorization of protein pockets by their properties of shape and functionality. The key step in the mapping is a `dissection' algorithm that breaks any protein pocket into a set of potential small molecule binding volumes. It is these binding volumes that are mapped to the basis set of theoretical target surfaces, thus measuring a protein pocket not as a single surface but as a collection of molecular recognition environments.

  13. Extracellular matrix contains insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5: potentiation of the effects of IGF-I

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) have been shown to serve as carrier proteins for the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and to modulate their biologic effects. Since extracellular matrix (ECM) has been shown to be a reservoir for IGF-I and IGF-II, we examined the ECM of cultured human fetal fibroblasts and found that IGFBP-5 was incorporated intact into ECM, while mostly inert proteolytic fragments were found in the medium. In contrast, two other forms of IGFBP that are secreted by these cells were either present in ECM in minimal amounts (IGFBP-3) or not detected (IGFBP-4). Likewise, when purified IGFBPs were incubated with ECM, IGFBP-5 bound preferentially. IGFBP-5 was found to bind to types III and IV collagen, laminin, and fibronectin. Increasing salt concentrations inhibited the binding of IGFBP-5 to ECM and accelerated the release of IGFBP-5 from ECM, suggesting an ionic basis for this interaction. ECM-associated IGFBP-5 had a sevenfold decrease in affinity for IGF-I compared to IGFBP-5 in solution. Furthermore, when IGFBP-5 was present in cell culture substrata, it potentiated the growth stimulatory effects of IGF- I on fibroblasts. When IGFBP-5 was present only in the medium, it was degraded to a 22-kD fragment and had no effect on IGF-I-stimulated growth. We conclude that IGFBP-5 is present in fibroblast ECM, where it is protected from degradation and can potentiate the biologic actions of IGF-I. These findings provide a molecular explanation for the association of the IGF's with the extracellular matrix, and suggest that the binding of the IGF's to matrix, via IGFBP-5, may be important in mediating the cellular growth response to these growth factors. PMID:7683690

  14. Relationship of frontal D(2/3) binding potentials to cognition: a study of antipsychotic-naive schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Fagerlund, Birgitte; Pinborg, Lars H; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Friberg, Lars; Baaré, William F C; Gade, Anders; Svarer, Claus; Glenthøj, Birte Y

    2013-02-01

    Studies of in vivo dopamine receptors in schizophrenia have mostly focused on D(2) receptors in striatal areas or on D(1) receptors in cortex. No previous study has examined the correlation between cortical dopamine D(2/3) receptor binding potentials and cognition in schizophrenia patients. The objective was to examine this relation in the frontal cortex in first-episode, drug-naive schizophrenia patients. Based on preclinical and pharmacological evidence, we specifically expected to find a relation between D(2/3) receptor binding potentials and set shifting. This was a cross-sectional, case-control study using single-photon emission computerized tomography with the D(2/3)-receptor ligand [(123)I]epidepride, co-registered with structural magnetic resonance imaging and correlated to cognitive measures. Participants were 24 antipsychotic-naive, first-episode schizophrenia patients and 20 healthy controls matched for gender and age. For patients, a significant linear correlation between D(2/3) BP(ND) and set shifting was found, while significant quadratic associations were observed for verbal fluency, planning and attention. For controls, the only significant association with D(2/3) BP(ND) was a quadratic partial correlation for set shifting. The main findings indicated a relation between D(2/3) receptor binding in the frontal cortex and set shifting, planning and attention, but also support a differential involvement of cortical dopamine D(2/3) receptor binding in at least some cognitive functions, perhaps particularly attention, in schizophrenia patients compared to healthy people. The results suggest that cortical D(2/3) receptor function may be more involved in some cognitive functions (i.e. attention, fluency and planning) in patients with schizophrenia than in healthy people, suggesting that information processing in schizophrenia may be characterized by lower signal:noise ratios.

  15. Potential New Ligand Systems for Binding Uranyl Ions in Seawater Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, John

    2014-12-13

    Work began this quarter on a new project involving a combined computational and biosynthetic approach to selective recognition of uranyl ion in aqueous solution. This project exploits the results of computational studies to discover new ligand classes. Synthetic studies will follow to generate target systems for uranyl binding and determination of binding constants. The process will be iterative, with results from computation informing synthesis, and vice versa. The theme of the ligand classes to be examined initially will be biologically based. New phosphonate-containing α-amino acid N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) monomers were used recently to prepare well-defined phosphonate-containing poly-peptides and block copolypeptides. Our first approach is to utilize these phosphate- and phosphonate-containing NCAs for the coordination of uranyl. The work includes the laboratory-scale preparation of a series of NCAs and the full thermodynamic and spectroscopic characterization of the resulting uranyl complexes. We are also evaluating the sequestering activity in different physiological and environmental conditions of these copolymers as well as their biodegradability.

  16. Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 is a potential prognosis indicator of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Dong, Shuang; Hu, Jiangfeng; Duan, Bensong; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ruiyun; Zhou, Hongmei; Sheng, Haihui; Gao, Hengjun; Li, Shunlong; Zhang, Xianwen

    2015-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 (GNL3) is a GIP-binding nuclear protein that has been reported to be involved in various biological processes, including cell proliferation, cellular senescence and tumorigenesis. This study aimed to investigate the expression level of GNL3 in gastric cancer and to evaluate the relationship between its expression and clinical variables and overall survival of gastric cancer patients. The expression level of GNL3 was examined in 89 human gastric cancer samples using immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining. GNL3 in gastric cancer tissues was significantly upregulated compared with paracancerous tissues. GNL3 expression in adjacent non-cancerous tissues was associated with sex and tumor size. Survival analyses showed that GNL3 expression in both gastric cancer and adjacent non-cancerous tissues were not related to overall survival. However, in the subgroup of patients with larger tumor size (≥ 6 cm), a close association was found between GNL3 expression in gastric cancer tissues and overall survival. GNL3-positive patients had a shorter survival than GNL3-negative patients. Our study suggests that GNL3 might play an important role in the progression of gastric cancer and serve as a biomarker for poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients.

  17. Binding in pair potentials of liquid simple metals from nonlocality in electronic kinetic energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrot, F.; March, N. H.

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents an explicit expression for the pair potential in liquid simple metals from low-order density-gradient theory when the superposition of single-center displaced charges is employed. Numerical results are presented for the gradient expansion pair interaction in liquid Na and Be. The low-order density-gradient equation for the pair potential is presented.

  18. Benchmarking in vitro covalent binding burden as a tool to assess potential toxicity caused by nonspecific covalent binding of covalent drugs.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Upendra P; Obach, R Scott; Gilbert, Adam M

    2013-11-18

    Despite several advantages of covalent inhibitors (such as increased biochemical efficiency, longer duration of action on the target, and lower efficacious doses) over their reversible binding counterparts, there is a reluctance to use covalent inhibitors as a drug design strategy in pharmaceutical research. This reluctance is due to their anticipated reactions with nontargeted macromolecules. We hypothesized that there may be a threshold limit for nonspecific covalent binding, below which a covalent binding drug may be less likely to cause toxicity due to irreversible binding to off-target macromolecules. Estimation of in vivo covalent binding burden from in vitro data has previously been used as an approach to distinguish those agents more likely to cause toxicity (e.g., hepatotoxicity) via metabolic activation to reactive metabolites. We have extended this approach to nine covalent binding drugs to determine in vitro covalent binding burden. In vitro covalent binding burden was determined by incubating radiolabeled drugs with pooled human hepatocytes. These data were scaled to an estimate of in vivo covalent binding burden by combining the in vitro data with daily dose. Scaled in vivo daily covalent binding burden of marketed covalent drugs was found to be under 10 mg/day, which is in agreement with previously reported threshold value for metabolically activated reversible drugs. Covalent binding was also compared to the intrinsic reactivities of the covalent inhibitors assessed using nucleophiles glutathione and N-α-acetyl lysine. The intrinsic reactivity did not correlate with observed in vitro covalent binding, which demonstrated that the intrinsic reactivity of the electrophilic groups of covalent drugs does not exclusively account for the extent of covalent binding. The ramifications of these findings for consideration of using a covalent strategy in drug design are discussed.

  19. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Stable Colchicine Binding Site Tubulin Inhibitors as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To block the metabolically labile sites of novel tubulin inhibitors targeting the colchicine binding site based on SMART, ABI, and PAT templates, we have designed, synthesized, and biologically tested three focused sets of new derivatives with modifications at the carbonyl linker, the para-position in the C ring of SMART template, and modification of A ring of the PAT template. Structure–activity relationships of these compounds led to the identification of new benzimidazole and imidazo[4,5-c]pyridine-fused ring templates, represented by compounds 4 and 7, respectively, which showed enhanced antitumor activity and substantially improved the metabolic stability in liver microsomes compared to SMART. MOM group replaced TMP C ring and generated a potent analogue 15, which showed comparable potency to the parent SMART compound. Further modification of PAT template yielded another potent analogue 33 with 5-indolyl substituent at A ring. PMID:25122533

  20. Expanding GPCR homology model binding sites via a balloon potential: A molecular dynamics refinement approach.

    PubMed

    Kimura, S Roy; Tebben, Andrew J; Langley, David R

    2008-06-01

    Homology modeling of G protein-coupled receptors is becoming a widely used tool in drug discovery. However, unrefined models built using the bovine rhodopsin crystal structure as the template, often have binding sites that are too small to accommodate known ligands. Here, we present a novel systematic method to refine model active sites based on a pressure-guided molecular dynamics simulation. A distinct advantage of this approach is the ability to introduce systematic perturbations in model backbone atoms in addition to side chain adjustments. The method is validated on two test cases: (1) docking of retinal into an MD-relaxed structure of opsin and (2) docking of known ligands into a homology model of the CCR2 receptor. In both cases, we show that the MD expansion algorithm makes it possible to dock the ligands in poses that agree with the crystal structure or mutagenesis data.

  1. Discovery of MLL1 binding units, their localization to CpG Islands, and their potential function in mitotic chromatin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mixed Lineage Leukemia 1 (MLL1) is a mammalian ortholog of the Drosophila Trithorax. In Drosophila, Trithorax complexes transmit the memory of active genes to daughter cells through interactions with Trithorax Response Elements (TREs). However, despite their functional importance, nothing is known about sequence features that may act as TREs in mammalian genomic DNA. Results By analyzing results of reported DNA binding assays, we identified several CpG rich motifs as potential MLL1 binding units (defined as morphemes). We find that these morphemes are dispersed within a relatively large collection of human promoter sequences and appear densely packed near transcription start sites of protein-coding genes. Genome wide analyses localized frequent morpheme occurrences to CpG islands. In the human HOX loci, the morphemes are spread across CpG islands and in some cases tail into the surrounding shores and shelves of the islands. By analyzing results of chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we found a connection between morpheme occurrences, CpG islands, and chromatin segments reported to be associated with MLL1. Furthermore, we found a correspondence of reported MLL1-driven “bookmarked” regions in chromatin to frequent occurrences of MLL1 morphemes in CpG islands. Conclusion Our results implicate the MLL1 morphemes in sequence-features that define the mammalian TREs and provide a novel function for CpG islands. Apparently, our findings offer the first evidence for existence of potential TREs in mammalian genomic DNA and the first evidence for a connection between CpG islands and gene-bookmarking by MLL1 to transmit the memory of highly active genes during mitosis. Our results further suggest a role for overlapping morphemes in producing closely packed and multiple MLL1 binding events in genomic DNA so that MLL1 molecules could interact and reside simultaneously on extended potential transcriptional maintenance elements in human chromosomes to transmit the

  2. Identification of potential CCR5 inhibitors through pharmacophore-based virtual screening, molecular dynamics simulation and binding free energy analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Shu, Mao; Wang, Yuanqiang; Hu, Yong; Wang, Yuanliang; Luo, Yanfeng; Lin, Zhihua

    2016-10-18

    CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5), a member of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), plays a vital role in inflammatory responses to infection. Alterations in the expression of CCR5 have been correlated with disease progression in many types of cancers. The idea of using CCR5 as a target for therapeutic intervention has been demonstrated to prevent disease progression. To date, only a few compounds have been reported as CCR5 inhibitors. In this study, a series of CCR5 antagonists were used to construct pharmacophore models. Then the optimal model was utilized as a 3D query to identify novel chemical entities from structural databases. After refinement by molecular docking, drug-likeness analysis, molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) and binding free energy analysis, three potential inhibitors (25, 29 and 45) were identified. MD simulations suggested that the screened compounds retained the important common binding mode known for CCR5 inhibitors (maraviroc and nifeviroc), which occupied the bottom of a pocket and stabilized the conformation of CCR5. During the binding process, van der Waals interactions provided the substantial driving force. The most favorable contributions were from Tyr37, Trp86, Tyr89, Tyr108, Phe109, Phe112, Gln194, Thr195, Ile198, Trp248, Tyr251, Leu255, Thr259, Met279, Glu283 and Met287. The above results suggest that the hybrid strategy would provide a basis for rational drug design.

  3. Tight-binding approach to overdamped Brownian motion on a bichromatic periodic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, P. T. T.; Challis, K. J.; Jack, M. W.

    2016-02-01

    We present a theoretical treatment of overdamped Brownian motion on a time-independent bichromatic periodic potential with spatially fast- and slow-changing components. In our approach, we generalize the Wannier basis commonly used in the analysis of periodic systems to define a basis of S states that are localized at local minima of the potential. We demonstrate that the S states are orthonormal and complete on the length scale of the periodicity of the fast-changing potential, and we use the S-state basis to transform the continuous Smoluchowski equation for the system to a discrete master equation describing hopping between local minima. We identify the parameter regime where the master equation description is valid and show that the interwell hopping rates are well approximated by Kramers' escape rate in the limit of deep potential minima. Finally, we use the master equation to explore the system dynamics and determine the drift and diffusion for the system.

  4. Sex hormone binding globulin decrease as a potential pathogenetic factor for hirsutism in adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Cross, Graciela; Danilowicz, Karina; Kral, Martha; Caufriez, Anne; Copinschi, Georges; Bruno, Oscar D

    2008-01-01

    We investigated 252 non-obese female subjects aged 13-39 years to evaluate if an exaggerated descent of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels during adolescence can play a role in the development of hirsutism. Body hair was assessed according to Ferriman and Gallwey (FG), with a stringent criterion of normality of < or = 4. In 13-14 years girls, SHBG and free testosterone (FT) levels were similar in "hirsute" girls (FG > 4) and controls (FG < or = 4, regular menstrual cycles, no acne). In 15-18 years girls, SHBG values were lower in "hirsute" girls, FT levels were similar in both groups, FG correlated inversely with SHBG. In 19-39 yr women, FT levels were higher in "hirsute" subjects, SHBG values were similar in both groups, FG correlated positively with FT. Lowest SHBG values were observed at 15-18 years, but the slope of the decrease from 13-14 years values was greater in the "hirsute" group. FT values increased progressively with age, but the increase was greater in the "hirsute" group. Those results suggest an important role of SHBG decrease in adolescence vs. a more accentuated testosterone increase in adults, as factors conditioning the development of hirsutism in these two different periods of life.

  5. Recombinant TNF-binding protein from variola virus as a novel potential TNF antagonist.

    PubMed

    Gileva, I P; Nepomnyashchikh, T S; Ryazankin, I A; Shchelkunov, S N

    2009-12-01

    Gel-filtration chromatographic separation of the lysate of Sf21 insect cells infected with recombinant baculovirus BVi67 containing the gene for TNF-binding protein (CrmB) of variola virus (VARV) revealed that hTNF-cytotoxicity neutralization activity is associated with a fraction corresponding mainly to high molecular weight proteins (above 500 kDa) and less with fractions corresponding to proteins of 270 or 90 kDa. The recombinant VARV-CrmB protein has been purified by affinity chromatography. Difference in the experimentally determined and estimated (according to amino acid composition) VARV-CrmB molecular weight is due to glycosylation of the recombinant protein expressed in the insect cells. VARV-CrmB neutralizes in vitro the cytotoxic effect of hTNF and hLTalpha, and its TNF-neutralizing activity is two to three orders of magnitude higher compared to the analogous effects of type I and II soluble TNF receptors, comparable with the activity of mAb MAK195, and somewhat lower than the effect of the commercial drug Remicade.

  6. Mannose-binding lectin genotypes: potential role in tubal damage and adverse IVF outcome.

    PubMed

    Laisk, Triin; Peters, Maire; Salumets, Andres

    2011-12-01

    The innate immune system provides the first-line defence against genital tract pathogens and is also involved in establishing and maintaining a successful pregnancy. Genetic variation of factors regulating immune response can be associated with complications after genital tract infections and may lead to unfavourable pregnancy outcomes. This study focused on four polymorphisms in the mannose binding lectin gene (MBL2) and assessed their significance in tubal damage and female fertility by comparing genotype frequencies among 388 controls and women with tubal factor infertility (n=155) or previous ectopic pregnancy (n=178). The high-producing MBL2 genotype HYA/LYA was found to have a protective effect, while the hyper-producing MBL2 genotype HYA/HYA and low-producing MBL2 genotypes were associated with susceptibility to tubal factor infertility. Also, the low-producing genotypes showed association with early pregnancy loss in IVF treatment. In conclusion, these data suggest that certain MBL2 genotypes can be associated with tubal damage in patients with evidence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection and additionally may contribute to the pathogenesis of early pregnancy loss.

  7. The Drosophila Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 6 Family Member Has Two Isoforms and Is Potentially Involved in Embryonic Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Rodney; Oosthuysen, Brent; Cajee, Umar-Faruq; Mokgohloa, Lehlogonolo; Nweke, Ekene; Antunes, Ricardo Jorge; Coetzer, Theresa H. T.; Ntwasa, Monde

    2015-01-01

    The human retinoblastoma binding protein 6 (RBBP6) is implicated in esophageal, lung, hepatocellular and colon cancers. Furthermore, RBBP6 was identified as a strong marker for colon cancer prognosis and as a predisposing factor in familial myeloproliferative neoplasms. Functionally, the mammalian protein interacts with p53 and enhances the activity of Mdm2, the prototypical negative regulator of p53. However, since RBBP6 (known as PACT in mice) exists in multiple isoforms and pact−/− mice exhibit a more severe phenotype than mdm2−/− mutants, it must possess some Mdm2-independent functions. The function of the invertebrate homologue is poorly understood. This is complicated by the absence of the Mdm2 gene in both Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans. We have experimentally identified the promoter region of Snama, the Drosophila homologue, analyzed potential transcription factor binding sites and confirmed the existence of an additional isoform. Using band shift and co-immunoprecipitation assays combined with mass spectrometry, we found evidence that this gene may be regulated by, amongst others, DREF, which regulates hundreds of genes related to cell proliferation. The potential transcription factors for Snama fall into distinct functional groups, including anteroposterior embryonic patterning and nucleic acid metabolism. Significantly, previous work in mice shows that pact−/− induces an anteroposterior phenotype in embryos when rescued by simultaneous deletion of p53. Taken together, these observations indicate the significance of RBBP6 proteins in carcinogenesis and in developmental defects. PMID:25955646

  8. Autoantibodies to Ca2+ binding protein Calnuc is a potential marker in colon cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Lin, Ping; Qiu, Suimin; Peng, Xuan-Xian; Looi, Koksun; Farquhar, Marilyn Gist; Zhang, Jian-Ying

    2007-05-01

    Calnuc is a calcium (Ca2+) binding protein found in both Golgi and cytoplasm, and it may play a role in G protein- and Ca2+-regulated signal transduction events. This study was designed to investigate the possibility of whether Calnuc protein might be a tumor-associated antigen (TAA) that induces autoantibody response in human cancers, and to evaluate the feasibility of the Calnuc antigen-antibody system as a marker in cancer detection. Purified full-length recombinant Calnuc protein was used as an antigen in enzyme-linked immunoassay and Western blotting for the detection of autoantibodies in cancers. Sera from 447 patients with 9 different types of cancer were analyzed. Although the frequency of autoantibody to Calnuc was found to be 4.7% in total groups of cancer, it was not significantly different to that of normal individuals (1.2%). However, the frequency of autoantibody to Calnuc in colon cancer (11.5%) was significantly higher than that in normal individuals (1.2%). The expression analysis of Calnuc in multiple colon cancer tissues by immunohistochemistry on tissue array further confirmed the high specificity of Calnuc in colon cancer. Of 69 colon cancer tissue specimens examined, 41 tissues (59.4%) overexpressed Calnuc, while normal colon tissues did not show any expression of Calnuc. The subcellular distribution analysis of Calnuc examined by subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence indicates that Calnuc is a membrane associated protein and mostly distributed in Golgi, which is consistent with previous reports. With adding Calnuc into a TAA array (including p53, c-myc, cyclin B1, cyclin D1), the cumulative frequency of antibody to multiple TAAs in colon cancer was raised to 65.4% which is significantly higher than the cumulative frequency in normal individuals (6.1%). This indicates that a mini-array of multiple TAAs which includes Calnuc might provide a novel non-invasive approach to enhance antibody detection for colon cancer diagnosis.

  9. FK506-Binding Protein 10, a Potential Novel Drug Target for Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Staab-Weijnitz, Claudia A.; Fernandez, Isis E.; Knüppel, Larissa; Maul, Julia; Heinzelmann, Katharina; Juan-Guardela, Brenda M.; Hennen, Elisabeth; Preissler, Gerhard; Winter, Hauke; Neurohr, Claus; Hatz, Rudolf; Lindner, Michael; Behr, Jürgen; Kaminski, Naftali

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Increased abundance and stiffness of the extracellular matrix, in particular collagens, is a hallmark of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). FK506-binding protein 10 (FKBP10) is a collagen chaperone, mutations of which have been indicated in the reduction of extracellular matrix stiffness (e.g., in osteogenesis imperfecta). Objectives: To assess the expression and function of FKBP10 in IPF. Methods: We assessed FKBP10 expression in bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis (using quantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunofluorescence), analyzed microarray data from 99 patients with IPF and 43 control subjects from a U.S. cohort, and performed Western blot analysis from 6 patients with IPF and 5 control subjects from a German cohort. Subcellular localization of FKBP10 was assessed by immunofluorescent stainings. The expression and function of FKBP10, as well as its regulation by endoplasmic reticulum stress or transforming growth factor-β1, was analyzed by small interfering RNA–mediated loss-of-function experiments, quantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and quantification of secreted collagens in the lung and in primary human lung fibroblasts (phLF). Effects on collagen secretion were compared with those of the drugs nintedanib and pirfenidone, recently approved for IPF. Measurements and Main Results: FKBP10 expression was up-regulated in bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis and IPF. Immunofluorescent stainings demonstrated localization to interstitial (myo)fibroblasts and CD68+ macrophages. Transforming growth factor-β1, but not endoplasmic reticulum stress, induced FKBP10 expression in phLF. The small interfering RNA–mediated knockdown of FKBP10 attenuated expression of profibrotic mediators and effectors, including collagens I and V and α-smooth muscle actin, on the transcript and protein level. Importantly, loss of FKBP10 expression significantly suppressed collagen

  10. Virtual screening of potential inhibitors from TCM for the CPSF30 binding site on the NS1A protein of influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Ai, Haixin; Zhang, Li; Chang, Alan K; Wei, Hongyun; Che, Yuchen; Liu, Hongsheng

    2014-03-01

    Inhibition of CPSF30 function by the effector domain of influenza A virus of non-structural protein 1 (NS1A) protein plays a critical role in the suppression of host key antiviral response. The CPSF30-binding site of NS1A appears to be a very attractive target for the development of new drugs against influenza A virus. In this study, structure-based molecular docking was utilized to screen more than 30,000 compounds from a Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) database. Four drug-like compounds were selected as potential inhibitors for the CPSF30-binding site of NS1A. Docking conformation analysis results showed that these potential inhibitors could bind to the CPSF30-binding site with strong hydrophobic interactions and weak hydrogen bonds. Molecular dynamics simulations and MM-PBSA calculations suggested that two of the inhibitors, compounds 32056 and 31674, could stably bind to the CPSF30-binding site with high binding free energy. These two compounds could be modified to achieve higher binding affinity, so that they may be used as potential leads in the development of new anti-influenza drugs.

  11. Comparison of Chlorpyrifos-Oxon and Paraoxon Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition Dynamics: Potential role of a peripheral binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Kousba, Ahmed A.; Sultatos, L G.; Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

    2004-08-02

    The primary mechanism of action for organophosphorus (OP) insecticides involves the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by oxygenated metabolites (oxons). This inhibition has been attributed to the phosphorylation of the serine hydroxyl group located in the active site of the AChE molecule. The rate of phosphorylation is described by the bimolecular inhibitory rate constant (ki), which has been utilized for quantification of OP inhibitory capacity. It has been previously proposed that a peripheral binding site exists on the AChE molecule, which when occupied, reduces the capacity of additional oxon molecules to phosphorylate the active site. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the interaction of chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) and paraoxon (PO) with rat brain AChE using a modified Ellman assay in conjunction with a pharmacodynamic model to further assess the dynamics of AChE inhibition and the potential role of a peripheral binding site. The ki for AChE inhibition determined at oxon concentrations of 5 x 10{sup -4} 100 nM were 0.212 and 0.0216 nM-1h-1 for CPO and PO, respectively. The spontaneous reactivation rates of the inhibited AChE for CPO and PO were 0.087 and 0.078 h-1, respectively. In contrast, the ki estimated at a low oxon concentration (1 pM) were {approx} 1,000 and 10,000 -fold higher than those determined at high CPO and PO concentrations, respectively. At these low concentrations, the ki estimates were approximately similar for both CPO and PO (180 and 250 nM-1h-1, respectively). This implies that at low exposure concentrations, both oxons exhibited similar inhibitory potency in contrast to the marked difference exhibited at higher concentrations, which is consistent with the presence of a peripheral binding site on the AChE enzyme. These results support the potential importance of a secondary binding site associated with AChE kinetics, particularly at low environmentally relevant concentrations.

  12. Binding of oxygen with titanium dioxide on singlet potential energy surface: An ab initio investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanchikov, Georgii A.; Baklanov, Alexey V.

    2017-01-01

    Ab initio calculations have been carried out to investigate interaction of titanium dioxide TiO2 with oxygen O2 in ground triplet and excited singlet states. On a singlet potential energy surface (PES) formation of a stable compound of titanium peroxide TiO4 is revealed which should appear in reaction of TiO2 with singlet oxygen without activation barrier. This peroxide is lower in energy than the ground state of two individual molecules TiO2 + 3O2 by 34.6 kcal/mol. Location of conical intersection between triplet and singlet PESs of TiO2sbnd O2 is also investigated.

  13. External Zn(2+) binding to cysteine-substituted cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator constructs regulates channel gating and curcumin potentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangyu; Linsley, Rheeann; Norimatsu, Yohei

    2016-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is activated by ATP binding-induced dimerization of nucleotide-binding domains, the interaction between the phosphorylated regulatory (R) domain and the curcumin-sensitive interface between intracellular loop (ICL) 1 and ICL4, and the resultant inward-to-'outward' reorientation of transmembrane domains. Although transmembrane helices (TM) 2 and TM11 link the ICL1-ICL4 interface with the interface between extracellular loop (ECL) 1 and ECL6, it is unknown whether both interfaces are gating-coupled during the reorientation. Herein, R334C and T1122C mutations were used to engineer two Zn(2+) bridges near and at the ECL1-ECL6 interface, respectively, and the gating effects of a Zn(2+) disturbance at the ECL1-ECL6 interface on the stimulatory ICL1/ICL4-R interaction were determined. The results showed that both Zn(2+) bridges inhibited channel activity in a dose- and Cl(-) -dependent manner, and the inhibition was reversed by a washout or suppressed by thiol-specific modification. Interestingly, their Cl(-) -dependent Zn(2+) inhibition was weakened at higher Zn(2+) concentrations, their Zn(2+) affinity was stronger in the resting state than in the activated state, and their activation current noises were decreased by external Zn(2+) binding. More importantly, the external Zn(2+) inhibition was reversed by internal curcumin in the R334C construct but not in the T1122C mutant. Therefore, although both Zn(2+) bridges may promote channel closure, external Zn(2+) may disturb the ECL1-ECL6 interface and thus prevent the stimulatory ICL1/ICL4-R interaction and curcumin potentiation via a gating coupling between these two interfaces.

  14. Macrophage Membrane Potential Changes Associated with γ 2b/γ 1 Fc Receptor-Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, John Ding-E; Unkeless, Jay C.; Kaback, H. Ronald; Cohn, Zanvil A.

    1983-03-01

    We have studied the effects of specific ligands of the receptor for the IgG Fc fragment (FcR) on the membrane potential (Δ Psi ) of the macrophage cell line J774 by the [3H]tetraphenylphosphonium ion equilibration technique. We observe a membrane depolarization with binding of FcR ligands that is dependent on the degree of receptor crosslinking. Binding of the FcR by monovalent ligands is not sufficient to induce a significant drop in Δ Psi , but a sustained depolarization lasting ≈ 20 min occurs with insoluble multivalent ligands. This FcR-mediated depolarization can be inhibited by substitution of Na+ from the cell incubation medium with monovalent choline cation, indicating that depolarization is due to Na+ influx into the cell. The extracellular Ca2+ does not play a significant role in membrane depolarization. The depolarization response is not triggered by monoclonal antibodies directed against three other major macrophage surface antigens. The cell depolarization mediated by FcR ligands is followed by a prolonged hyperpolarization that can be partially blocked by ouabain and quinine, indicating that the hyperpolarization response is a result of a combination of a Na+, K+-ATPase activity and a Ca2+-activated K+ conductance. These data support our hypothesis that the mouse macrophage IgG FcR is a ligand-dependent ion channel.

  15. Redox potential tuning through differential quinone binding in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Vermaas, Josh V.; Taguchi, Alexander T.; Dikanov, Sergei A.; Wraight, Colin A.; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2015-03-03

    Ubiquinone forms an integral part of the electron transport chain in cellular respiration and photosynthesis across a vast number of organisms. Prior experimental results have shown that the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is only fully functional with a limited set of methoxy-bearing quinones, suggesting that specific interactions with this substituent are required to drive electron transport and the formation of quinol. The nature of these interactions has yet to be determined. Through parameterization of a CHARMM-compatible quinone force field and subsequent molecular dynamics simulations of the quinone-bound RC, in this paper we have investigated and characterized the interactions of the protein with the quinones in the QA and QB sites using both equilibrium simulation and thermodynamic integration. In particular, we identify a specific interaction between the 2-methoxy group of ubiquinone in the QB site and the amide nitrogen of GlyL225 that we implicate in locking the orientation of the 2-methoxy group, thereby tuning the redox potential difference between the quinones occupying the QA and QB sites. Finally, disruption of this interaction leads to weaker binding in a ubiquinone analogue that lacks a 2-methoxy group, a finding supported by reverse electron transfer electron paramagnetic resonance experiments of the QA–QB– biradical and competitive binding assays.

  16. Reproducing kernel potential energy surfaces in biomolecular simulations: Nitric oxide binding to myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Soloviov, Maksym; Meuwly, Markus

    2015-09-14

    Multidimensional potential energy surfaces based on reproducing kernel-interpolation are employed to explore the energetics and dynamics of free and bound nitric oxide in myoglobin (Mb). Combining a force field description for the majority of degrees of freedom and the higher-accuracy representation for the NO ligand and the Fe out-of-plane motion allows for a simulation approach akin to a mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics treatment. However, the kernel-representation can be evaluated at conventional force-field speed. With the explicit inclusion of the Fe-out-of-plane (Fe-oop) coordinate, the dynamics and structural equilibrium after photodissociation of the ligand are correctly described compared to experiment. Experimentally, the Fe-oop coordinate plays an important role for the ligand dynamics. This is also found here where the isomerization dynamics between the Fe–ON and Fe–NO state is significantly affected whether or not this co-ordinate is explicitly included. Although the Fe–ON conformation is metastable when considering only the bound {sup 2}A state, it may disappear once the {sup 4}A state is included. This explains the absence of the Fe–ON state in previous experimental investigations of MbNO.

  17. Discovery of membrane active benzimidazole quinolones-based topoisomerase inhibitors as potential DNA-binding antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Addla, Dinesh; Ponmani, Jeyakkumar; Wang, Ao; Xie, Dan; Wang, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Shao-Lin; Geng, Rong-Xia; Cai, Gui-Xin; Li, Shuo; Zhou, Cheng-He

    2016-03-23

    A series of novel benzimidazole quinolones as potential antimicrobial agents were designed and synthesized. Most of the prepared compounds exhibited good or even stronger antimicrobial activities in comparison with reference drugs. The most potent compound 15m was membrane active and did not trigger the development of resistance in bacteria. It not only inhibited the formation of biofilms but also disrupted the established Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli biofilms. It was able to inhibit the relaxation activity of E. coli topoisomerase IV at 10 μM concentration. Moreover, this compound also showed low toxicity against mammalian cells. Molecular modeling and experimental investigation of compound 15m with DNA suggested that this compound could effectively bind with DNA to form a steady 15m-DNA complex which might further block DNA replication to exert the powerful bioactivities.

  18. IMP1, an mRNA binding protein that reduces the metastatic potential of breast cancer in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Nwokafor, Chiso U.; Sellers, Rani S.; Singer, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Cells that are able to localize β-actin mRNA efficiently have decreased metastatic potential. Invasive carcinoma cells derived from primary mammary tumors have reduced levels of an RNA binding protein IMP1/ZBP1/IGF2BP1, required for β-actin mRNA localization. We showed previously that in human breast carcinoma cells in vitro, this protein suppresses invasion. In this work we examined whether its re-expression can suppress breast cancer metastasis in a breast cancer mouse model. We developed a mouse conditionally expressing IMP1-GFP (hereinafter referred to as the IMP1 transgene) specifically in the mammary gland of a PYMT breast cancer mouse. We found that mice conditionally expressing the IMP1 transgene showed little or no metastases to the lungs from the primary tumor in contrast to PYMT mice not expressing IMP1, which uniformly develop metastases at an early stage. PMID:27655671

  19. Multiple stepwise pattern for potential of mean force in unfolding the thrombin binding aptamer in complex with Sr2+.

    PubMed

    Yang, Changwon; Jang, Soonmin; Pak, Youngshang

    2011-12-14

    Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulation in conjunction with umbrella sampling, we obtained the unfolding free energy and the force extension profiles of the thrombin binding DNA aptamer (15-TBA) in complex with Sr(2+) (Protein Data Bank code: 1RDE). The resulting potential of mean force (PMF) displays a multiple stepwise pattern with distinct plateau regions. The detailed analysis of the simulation result indicated that each plateau was created by the interplay of the metal ion interacting with self-arranging guanine bases and the successive uptakes of water molecules. The current PMF simulation provides a quantitative description of the unfolding process of 15-TBA DNA driven by stretching and gives molecular insight on its detailed changes of base pair interactions in the presence of the metal cation.

  20. In Silico Characterization of the Binding Affinity of Dendrimers to Penicillin-Binding Proteins (PBPs): Can PBPs be Potential Targets for Antibacterial Dendrimers?

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shaimaa; Vepuri, Suresh B; Ramesh, Muthusamy; Kalhapure, Rahul; Suleman, Nadia; Govender, Thirumala

    2016-04-01

    We have shown that novel silver salts of poly (propyl ether) imine (PETIM) dendron and dendrimers developed in our group exhibit preferential antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus aureus. This led us to examine whether molecular modeling methods could be used to identify the key structural design principles for a bioactive lead molecule, explore the mechanism of binding with biological targets, and explain their preferential antibacterial activity. The current article reports the conformational landscape as well as mechanism of binding of generation 1 PETIM dendron and dendrimers to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) in order to understand the antibacterial activity profiles of their silver salts. Molecular dynamics at different simulation protocols and conformational analysis were performed to elaborate on the conformational features of the studied dendrimers, as well as to create the initial structure for further binding studies. The results showed that for all compounds, there were no significant conformational changes due to variation in simulation conditions. Molecular docking calculations were performed to investigate the binding theme between the studied dendrimers and PBPs. Interestingly, in significant accordance with the experimental data, dendron and dendrimer with aliphatic cores were found to show higher activity against S. aureus than the dendrimer with an aromatic core. The latter showed higher activity against MRSA. The findings from this computational and molecular modeling report together with the experimental results serve as a road map toward designing more potent antibacterial dendrimers against resistant bacterial strains.

  1. α-Tocopherols modify the membrane dipole potential leading to modulation of ligand binding by P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Davis, Sterenn; Davis, Benjamin M; Richens, Joanna L; Vere, Kelly-Ann; Petrov, Peter G; Winlove, C Peter; O'Shea, Paul

    2015-08-01

    α-Tocopherol (vitamin E) has attracted considerable attention as a potential protective or palliative agent. In vitro, its free radical-scavenging antioxidant action has been widely demonstrated. In vivo, however, vitamin E treatment exhibits negligible benefits against oxidative stress. α-Tocopherol influences lipid ordering within biological membranes and its derivatives have been suggested to inhibit the multi-drug efflux pump, P-glycoprotein (P-gp). This study employs the fluorescent membrane probe, 1-(3-sulfonatopropyl)-4-[β[2-(di-n-octylamino)-6-naphthyl]vinyl] pyridinium betaine, to investigate whether these effects are connected via influences on the membrane dipole potential (MDP), an intrinsic property of biological membranes previously demonstrated to modulate P-gp activity. α-Tocopherol and its non-free radical-scavenging succinate analog induced similar decreases in the MDP of phosphatidylcholine vesicles. α-Tocopherol succinate also reduced the MDP of T-lymphocytes, subsequently decreasing the binding affinity of saquinavir for P-gp. Additionally, α-tocopherol succinate demonstrated a preference for cholesterol-treated (membrane microdomain enriched) cells over membrane cholesterol-depleted cells. Microdomain disruption via cholesterol depletion decreased saquinavir's affinity for P-gp, potentially implicating these structures in the influence of α-tocopherol succinate on P-gp. This study provides evidence of a microdomain dipole potential-dependent mechanism by which α-tocopherol analogs influence P-gp activity. These findings have implications for the use of α-tocopherol derivatives for drug delivery across biological barriers.

  2. Characterizing the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPARγ) Ligand Binding Potential of Several Major Flame Retardants, Their Metabolites, and Chemical Mixtures in House Dust

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Mingliang; Webster, Thomas F.; Ferguson, P. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Background: Accumulating evidence has shown that some environmental contaminants can alter adipogenesis and act as obesogens. Many of these contaminants act via the activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) nuclear receptor. Objectives: Our goal was to determine the PPARγ ligand binding potency of several major flame retardants, including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), halogenated phenols and bisphenols, and their metabolites. Ligand binding activity of indoor dust and its bioactivated extracts were also investigated. Methods: We used a commercially available fluorescence polarization ligand binding assay to investigate the binding potency of flame retardants and dust extracts to human PPARγ ligand-binding domain. Rosiglitazone was used as a positive control. Results: Most of the tested compounds exhibited dose-dependent binding to PPARγ. Mono(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate, halogenated bisphenols and phenols, and hydroxylated PBDEs were found to be potent PPARγ ligands. The most potent compound was 3-OH-BDE-47, with an IC50 (concentration required to reduce effect by 50%) of 0.24 μM. The extent of halogenation and the position of the hydroxyl group strongly affected binding. In the dust samples, 21 of the 24 samples tested showed significant binding potency at a concentration of 3 mg dust equivalent (DEQ)/mL. A 3–16% increase in PPARγ binding potency was observed following bioactivation of the dust using rat hepatic S9 fractions. Conclusion: Our results suggest that several flame retardants are potential PPARγ ligands and that metabolism may lead to increased binding affinity. The PPARγ binding activity of house dust extracts at levels comparable to human exposure warrants further studies into agonistic or antagonistic activities and their potential health effects. Citation: Fang M, Webster TF, Ferguson PL, Stapleton HM. 2015. Characterizing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ) ligand binding

  3. Detailed Analysis of the Binding Mode of Vanilloids to Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type I (TRPV1) by a Mutational and Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Yoshikazu; Ogawa, Kazuo; Warabi, Eiji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Hirokawa, Takatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel and a multimodal sensor protein. Since the precise structure of TRPV1 was obtained by electron cryo-microscopy, the binding mode of representative agonists such as capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX) has been extensively characterized; however, detailed information on the binding mode of other vanilloids remains lacking. In this study, mutational analysis of human TRPV1 was performed, and four agonists (capsaicin, RTX, [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol) were used to identify amino acid residues involved in ligand binding and/or modulation of proton sensitivity. The detailed binding mode of each ligand was then simulated by computational analysis. As a result, three amino acids (L518, F591 and L670) were newly identified as being involved in ligand binding and/or modulation of proton sensitivity. In addition, in silico docking simulation and a subsequent mutational study suggested that [6]-gingerol might bind to and activate TRPV1 in a unique manner. These results provide novel insights into the binding mode of various vanilloids to the channel and will be helpful in developing a TRPV1 modulator. PMID:27606946

  4. The unusual lipid binding proteins of parasitic helminths and their potential roles in parasitism and as therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Gisela R; Pórfido, Jorge L; Ibáñez Shimabukuro, Marina; Rey Burusco, María F; Bélgamo, Julián A; Smith, Brian O; Kennedy, Malcolm W; Córsico, Betina

    2015-02-01

    In this review paper we aim at presenting the current knowledge on structural aspects of soluble lipid binding proteins (LBPs) found in parasitic helminths and to discuss their potential role as novel drug targets. Helminth parasites produce and secrete a great variety of LBPs that may participate in the acquisition of nutrients from their host, such as fatty acids and cholesterol. It is also postulated that LBPs might interfere in the regulation of the host׳s immune response by sequestering lipidic intermediates or delivering bioactive lipids. A detailed comprehension of the structure of these proteins, as well as their interactions with ligands and membranes, is important to understand host-parasite relationships that they may mediate. This information could also contribute to determining the role that these proteins may play in the biology of parasitic helminths and how they modulate the immune systems of their hosts, and also towards the development of new therapeutics and prevention of the diseases caused by these highly pathogenic parasites.

  5. Lobeline, a potential pharmacotherapy for drug addiction, binds to mu opioid receptors and diminishes the effects of opioid receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Miller, Dennis K; Lever, John R; Rodvelt, Kelli R; Baskett, James A; Will, Matthew J; Kracke, George R

    2007-07-10

    Lobeline diminishes the behavioral and neurochemical effects of nicotine and amphetamines, and is considered a potential pharmacotherapy for drug abuse and addiction. Lobeline has high affinity for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and inhibits the function of vesicular monoamine and dopamine transporters. The present study investigated the less-explored interaction of lobeline and the endogenous opioid system. In guinea pig brain homogenates, lobeline displaced (K(i)=0.74 microM) the binding of [(3)H]DAMGO [(D-Ala(2), N-ME-Phe(4), Gly(5)-ol)-enkephalin]. In a functional assay system comprised of MOR-1 mu opioid receptors and GIRK2 potassium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes, lobeline had no effect on the resting current, but maximally inhibited (IC(50)=1.1 microM) morphine- and DAMGO-activated potassium current in a concentration-dependent manner. In a second functional assay, lobeline-evoked [(3)H]overflow from rat striatal slices preloaded with [(3)H]dopamine was not blocked by naltrexone. Importantly, concentrations of lobeline (0.1-0.3 microM) that did not have intrinsic activity attenuated ( approximately 50%) morphine-evoked [(3)H]overflow. Overall, the results suggest that lobeline functions as a mu opioid receptor antagonist. The ability of lobeline to block psychostimulant effects may be mediated by opioid receptor antagonism, and lobeline could be investigated as a treatment for opiate addiction.

  6. Identification of a Nonstructural DNA-Binding Protein (DBP) as an Antigen with Diagnostic Potential for Human Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hongli; Wu, Chao; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Vernet, Guy; Jin, Qi; Wang, Jianwei; Hung, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Background Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) have been implicated as important agents in a wide range of human illnesses. To date, 58 distinct HAdV serotypes have been identified and can be grouped into six species. For the immunological diagnosis of adenoviruses, the hexon protein, a structural protein, has been used. The potential of other HAdV proteins has not been fully addressed. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, a nonstructural antigenic protein, the DNA binding protein (DBP) of human adenovirus 5 and 35 (Ad5, Ad35) - was identified using immunoproteomic technology. The expression of Ad5 and Ad35 DBP in insect cells could be detected by rhesus monkey serum antibodies and healthy adult human serum positive for Ad5 and Ad35. Recombinant DBPs elicited high titer antibodies in mice. Their conserved domain displayed immunological cross-reactions with heterologous DBP antibodies in Western blot assays. DBP-IgM ELISA showed higher sensitivity adenovirus IgM detection than the commercial Adenovirus IgM Human ELISA Kit. A Western blot method developed based on Ad5 DBP was highly consistent with (χ2 =  44.9, P<0.01) the Western blot assay for the hexon protein in the detection of IgG, but proved even more sensitive. Conclusions/Significance The HAdV nonstructural protein DBP is an antigenic protein that could serve as an alternative common antigen for adenovirus diagnosis. PMID:23516396

  7. Analysis of silver binding nucleolar organizer regions in exfoliative cytology smears of potentially malignant and malignant oral lesions.

    PubMed

    Sowmya, G V; Nahar, P; Astekar, M; Agarwal, H; Singh, M P

    2017-01-01

    Nucleolar organizer regions are nucleolar components that contain proteins that are stained selectively by silver methods; they can be identified as black dots throughout the nucleolus and are known as silver binding nucleolar organizer regions (AgNOR). The number of AgNOR is related to the cell cycle and the proliferative activity of the cells. We investigated AgNOR using exfoliative cytology smears of potentially malignant oral lesions. Eighty individuals were divided into four equal groups: healthy controls, oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis and oral squamous cell carcinoma. The mean number of AgNOR in each study group gradually increased from control to oral leukoplakia to oral submucous fibrosis to oral squamous cell carcinoma. The proliferative index was increased in the oral premalignant and malignant patients compared to normal subjects. The mean AgNOR size gradually increased from control to oral leukoplakia to oral submucous fibrosis to oral squamous cell carcinoma. Spherical shaped AgNOR were most common in controls, whereas large, clustered and kidney shapes were most common in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Multiparameter analysis of AgNOR in oral exfoliative smears is a simple, sensitive and cost-effective method for differentiating premalignant from malignant lesions and can be used in conjunction with routine cytomorphological evaluation.

  8. Ceramide binding to anandamide increases its half-life and potentiates its cytotoxicity in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Coralie; Mazzarino, Morgane; Yahi, Nouara; Varini, Karine; Garmy, Nicolas; Fantini, Jacques; Chahinian, Henri

    2017-04-04

    Anandamide (AEA) is a ubiquitous lipid that exerts neurotransmitter functions but also controls important biological functions such as proliferation, survival, or programmed cell death. The latter effects are also regulated by ceramide, a lipid enzymatically generated from sphingomyelin hydrolysis by sphingomyelinase. Ceramide has been shown to increase the cellular toxicity of AEA, but the mechanisms controlling this potentiating effect remained unclear. Here we have used a panel of in silico, physicochemical, biochemical and cellular approaches to study the crosstalk between AEA and ceramide apoptotic pathways. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that AEA and ceramide could form a stable complex in phosphatidylcholine membranes. Consistent with these data, we showed that AEA can specifically insert into ceramide monolayers whereas it did not penetrate into sphingomyelin membranes. Then we have studied the effects of ceramide on AEA-induced toxicity of human neuroblastoma cells. In these experiments, the cells have been either naturally enriched in ceramide by neutral sphingomyelinase pre-incubation or treated with C2-ceramide, a biologically active ceramide analog. Both treatments significantly increased the cytotoxicity of AEA as assessed by the MTS mitochondrial toxicity assay. This effect was correlated with the concomitant accumulation of natural ceramide (or its synthetic analog) and AEA in the cells. A kinetic study of AEA hydrolysis showed that ceramide inhibited the fatty acid amino hydrolase (FAAH) activity in cell extracts. Taken together, these data suggested that ceramide binds to AEA, increases its half-life and potentiates its cytotoxicity. Overall, these mechanisms account for a functional cross-talk between AEA and ceramide apoptotic pathways.

  9. Bacterial effector binds host cell adenylyl cyclase to potentiate Gαs-dependent cAMP production.

    PubMed

    Pulliainen, Arto T; Pieles, Kathrin; Brand, Cameron S; Hauert, Barbara; Böhm, Alex; Quebatte, Maxime; Wepf, Alexander; Gstaiger, Matthias; Aebersold, Ruedi; Dessauer, Carmen W; Dehio, Christoph

    2012-06-12

    Subversion of host organism cAMP signaling is an efficient and widespread mechanism of microbial pathogenesis. Bartonella effector protein A (BepA) of vasculotumorigenic Bartonella henselae protects the infected human endothelial cells against apoptotic stimuli by elevation of cellular cAMP levels by an as yet unknown mechanism. Here, adenylyl cyclase (AC) and the α-subunit of the AC-stimulating G protein (Gαs) were identified as potential cellular target proteins for BepA by gel-free proteomics. Results of the proteomics screen were evaluated for physical and functional interaction by: (i) a heterologous in vivo coexpression system, where human AC activity was reconstituted under the regulation of Gαs and BepA in Escherichia coli; (ii) in vitro AC assays with membrane-anchored full-length human AC and recombinant BepA and Gαs; (iii) surface plasmon resonance experiments; and (iv) an in vivo fluorescence bimolecular complementation-analysis. The data demonstrate that BepA directly binds host cell AC to potentiate the Gαs-dependent cAMP production. As opposed to the known microbial mechanisms, such as ADP ribosylation of G protein α-subunits by cholera and pertussis toxins, the fundamentally different BepA-mediated elevation of host cell cAMP concentration appears subtle and is dependent on the stimulus of a G protein-coupled receptor-released Gαs. We propose that this mechanism contributes to the persistence of Bartonella henselae in the chronically infected vascular endothelium.

  10. Bacterial effector binds host cell adenylyl cyclase to potentiate Gαs-dependent cAMP production

    PubMed Central

    Pulliainen, Arto T.; Pieles, Kathrin; Brand, Cameron S.; Hauert, Barbara; Böhm, Alex; Quebatte, Maxime; Wepf, Alexander; Gstaiger, Matthias; Aebersold, Ruedi; Dessauer, Carmen W.; Dehio, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Subversion of host organism cAMP signaling is an efficient and widespread mechanism of microbial pathogenesis. Bartonella effector protein A (BepA) of vasculotumorigenic Bartonella henselae protects the infected human endothelial cells against apoptotic stimuli by elevation of cellular cAMP levels by an as yet unknown mechanism. Here, adenylyl cyclase (AC) and the α-subunit of the AC-stimulating G protein (Gαs) were identified as potential cellular target proteins for BepA by gel-free proteomics. Results of the proteomics screen were evaluated for physical and functional interaction by: (i) a heterologous in vivo coexpression system, where human AC activity was reconstituted under the regulation of Gαs and BepA in Escherichia coli; (ii) in vitro AC assays with membrane-anchored full-length human AC and recombinant BepA and Gαs; (iii) surface plasmon resonance experiments; and (iv) an in vivo fluorescence bimolecular complementation-analysis. The data demonstrate that BepA directly binds host cell AC to potentiate the Gαs-dependent cAMP production. As opposed to the known microbial mechanisms, such as ADP ribosylation of G protein α-subunits by cholera and pertussis toxins, the fundamentally different BepA-mediated elevation of host cell cAMP concentration appears subtle and is dependent on the stimulus of a G protein-coupled receptor-released Gαs. We propose that this mechanism contributes to the persistence of Bartonella henselae in the chronically infected vascular endothelium. PMID:22635269

  11. Influence of the fluid structure on the binding potential: Comparing liquid drop profiles from density functional theory with results from mesoscopic theory.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Adam P; Thiele, Uwe; Archer, Andrew J

    2017-02-14

    For a film of liquid on a solid surface, the binding potential g(h) gives the free energy as a function of the film thickness h and also the closely related (structural) disjoining pressure Π=-∂g/∂h. The wetting behaviour of the liquid is encoded in the binding potential and the equilibrium film thickness corresponds to the value at the minimum of g(h). Here, the method we developed in the work of Hughes et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 074702 (2015)], and applied with a simple discrete lattice-gas model, is used with continuum density functional theory (DFT) to calculate the binding potential for a Lennard-Jones fluid and other simple liquids. The DFT used is based on fundamental measure theory and so incorporates the influence of the layered packing of molecules at the surface and the corresponding oscillatory density profile. The binding potential is frequently input in mesoscale models from which liquid drop shapes and even dynamics can be calculated. Here we show that the equilibrium droplet profiles calculated using the mesoscale theory are in good agreement with the profiles calculated directly from the microscopic DFT. For liquids composed of particles where the range of the attraction is much less than the diameter of the particles, we find that at low temperatures g(h) decays in an oscillatory fashion with increasing h, leading to highly structured terraced liquid droplets.

  12. Influence of the fluid structure on the binding potential: Comparing liquid drop profiles from density functional theory with results from mesoscopic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Adam P.; Thiele, Uwe; Archer, Andrew J.

    2017-02-01

    For a film of liquid on a solid surface, the binding potential g(h) gives the free energy as a function of the film thickness h and also the closely related (structural) disjoining pressure Π =-∂g /∂h . The wetting behaviour of the liquid is encoded in the binding potential and the equilibrium film thickness corresponds to the value at the minimum of g(h). Here, the method we developed in the work of Hughes et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 074702 (2015)], and applied with a simple discrete lattice-gas model, is used with continuum density functional theory (DFT) to calculate the binding potential for a Lennard-Jones fluid and other simple liquids. The DFT used is based on fundamental measure theory and so incorporates the influence of the layered packing of molecules at the surface and the corresponding oscillatory density profile. The binding potential is frequently input in mesoscale models from which liquid drop shapes and even dynamics can be calculated. Here we show that the equilibrium droplet profiles calculated using the mesoscale theory are in good agreement with the profiles calculated directly from the microscopic DFT. For liquids composed of particles where the range of the attraction is much less than the diameter of the particles, we find that at low temperatures g(h) decays in an oscillatory fashion with increasing h, leading to highly structured terraced liquid droplets.

  13. Analyses of the Binding between Water Soluble C60 Derivatives and Potential Drug Targets through a Molecular Docking Approach

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junjun; Zhang, Houjin

    2016-01-01

    Fullerene C60, a unique sphere-shaped molecule consisting of carbon, has been proved to have inhibitory effects on many diseases. However, the applications of C60 in medicine have been severely hindered by its complete insolubility in water and low solubility in almost all organic solvents. In this study, the water-soluble C60 derivatives and the C60 binding protein’s structures were collected from the literature. The selected proteins fall into several groups, including acetylcholinesterase, glutamate racemase, inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase, lumazine synthase, human estrogen receptor alpha, dihydrofolate reductase and N-myristoyltransferase. The C60 derivatives were docked into the binding sites in the proteins. The binding affinities of the C60 derivatives were calculated. The bindings between proteins and their known inhibitors or native ligands were also characterized in the same way. The results show that C60 derivatives form good interactions with the binding sites of different protein targets. In many cases, the binding affinities of C60 derivatives are better than those of known inhibitors and native ligands. This study demonstrates the interaction patterns of C60 derivatives and their binding partners, which will have good impact on the fullerene-based drug discovery. PMID:26829126

  14. Receptor binding characterization of the benzodiazepine radioligand sup 125 I-Ro16-0154: Potential probe for SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.W.; Woods, S.W.; Zoghbi, S.; Baldwin, R.M.; Innis, R.B. ); McBride, B.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The binding of an iodinated benzodiazepine (BZ) radioligand has been characterized, particularly in regard to its potential use as a neuroreceptor brain imaging agent with SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography). Ro16-0154 is an iodine-containing BZ antagonist and a close analog of Ro15-1788. In tissue homogenates prepared from human and monkey brain, the binding of {sup 125}I-labeled Ro16-0154 was saturable, of high affinity, and had high ratios of specific to non-specific binding. Physiological concentrations of NaCl enhanced specific binding approximately 15% compared to buffer without this salt. Kinetic studies of association and dissociation demonstrated a temperature dependent decrease in affinity with increasing temperature. Drug displacement studies confirmed that {sup 125}I-Ro16-0154 binds to the central type BZ receptor: binding is virtually identical to that of {sup 3}H-Ro15-1788 except that {sup 125}I-Ro16-0154 shows an almost 10 fold higher affinity at 37{degree}C. These in vitro results suggest that {sup 123}I-labeled Ro16-0154 shows promise as a selective, high affinity SPECT probe of the brain's BZ receptor.

  15. Study on the distribution of organic carbon in soil fractions and its reaction potential of binding the pesticides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Ashim

    2010-05-01

    STUDY ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC CARBON IN SOIL FRACTIONS AND ITS REACTION POTENTIAL OF BINDING THE PESTICIDES **SUMITRA ROY1, SANKHAJIT ROY1, *ASHIM CHOWDHURY2, SASWATI PRADHAN2 and PETER BURAUEL3 1Department of Agricultural Chemicals, Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalay, Mohanpur, West Bengal, India. 2Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Soil Science, University of Calcutta, West Bengal, India. 3Institute of Chemical Dynamics & Geosphere, FZ-Juelich, Germany. *Correspondence: ashimkly@hotmail.com **Research work carried out as DAAD Sandwich research fellow at FZ- Juelich, Germany Soil is the ultimate sink of all selectively applied pesticides. In addition to the basic physicochemical data of an active ingredient, the fate of the various compounds is largely determined by the type of application. Finally, pesticide and their metabolites, as well as structural elements, remain in the native carbon reserves of the soil or are sorbed & fixed to clay minerals and clay- humus complexes. Soil organic matter (SOM) and the soil microbial community are the crucial components which regulate soil processes and contribute towards the stability of the soil ecosystem. It is an energy source for biological mineralization processes, functions as a buffer and participates in chemical reaction. Knowledge is essential to understand the extent to which the SOM influences the mobilization and immobilization processes of foreign substance in soil and the substance transport and pollutant decomposition in soil. The freshly incorporated organic matter undergoes mineralization and the non mineralized carbon fraction is of special relevance with respect to soil stability in general and decisive for the fate and particular the persistence of xenobiotics in soil. The biological and physicochemical interactions establishing equilibrium between the organic matter bound, fixed or complexed to the soil matrix and that dissolve in the soil solution must be understood in detail to realize

  16. How the Binding of Human Transferrin Primes the Transferrin Receptor Potentiating Iron Release at Endosomal pH

    SciTech Connect

    B Eckenroth; A Steere; N Chasteen; S Everse; A Mason

    2011-12-31

    Delivery of iron to cells requires binding of two iron-containing human transferrin (hTF) molecules to the specific homodimeric transferrin receptor (TFR) on the cell surface. Through receptor-mediated endocytosis involving lower pH, salt, and an unidentified chelator, iron is rapidly released from hTF within the endosome. The crystal structure of a monoferric N-lobe hTF/TFR complex (3.22-{angstrom} resolution) features two binding motifs in the N lobe and one in the C lobe of hTF. Binding of Fe{sub N}hTF induces global and site-specific conformational changes within the TFR ectodomain. Specifically, movements at the TFR dimer interface appear to prime the TFR to undergo pH-induced movements that alter the hTF/TFR interaction. Iron release from each lobe then occurs by distinctly different mechanisms: Binding of His349 to the TFR (strengthened by protonation at low pH) controls iron release from the C lobe, whereas displacement of one N-lobe binding motif, in concert with the action of the dilysine trigger, elicits iron release from the N lobe. One binding motif in each lobe remains attached to the same {alpha}-helix in the TFR throughout the endocytic cycle. Collectively, the structure elucidates how the TFR accelerates iron release from the C lobe, slows it from the N lobe, and stabilizes binding of apohTF for return to the cell surface. Importantly, this structure provides new targets for mutagenesis studies to further understand and define this system.

  17. Vaccine Potential and Diversity of the Putative Cell Binding Factor (CBF, NMB0345/NEIS1825) Protein of Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Akoto, Charlene; Hill, Alison; Tan, Wei-Ming; Heckels, John Edward; Christodoulides, Myron

    2016-01-01

    The cbf gene from Neisseria meningitidis strain MC58 encoding the putative Cell Binding Factor (CBF, NMB0345/NEIS1825) protein was cloned into the pRSETA system and a ~36-kDa recombinant (r)CBF protein expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by metal affinity chromatography. High titres of rCBF antibodies were induced in mice following immunization with rCBF-saline, rCBF-Al(OH)3, rCBF-Liposomes or rCBF-Zwittergent (Zw) 3–14 micelles, both with and without incorporated monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) adjuvant. Anti-rCBF sera reacted in western blots of meningococcal lysates with a single protein band of molecular mass ~29.5 kDa, indicative of mature CBF protein, but did not react with a lysate of a Δnmb0345 mutant (CBF-), demonstrating specificity of the murine immune responses. CBF protein was produced by all strains of meningococci studied thus far and the protein was present on the surface of MC58 (CBF+) bacteria, but absent on Δnmb0345 mutant (CBF-) bacteria, as judged by FACS reactivity of anti-rCBF sera. Analysis of the NEIS1825 amino acid sequences from 6644 N. meningitidis isolates with defined Alleles in the pubmlst.org/Neisseria database showed that there were 141 ST types represented and there were 136 different allelic loci encoding 49 non-redundant protein sequences. Only 6/6644 (<0.1%) of N. meningitidis isolates lacked the nmb0345 gene. Amongst serogroup B isolates worldwide, ~68% and ~20% expressed CBF encoded by Allele 1 and 18 respectively, with the proteins sharing >99% amino acid identity. Murine antisera to rCBF in Zw 3–14 micelles + MPLA induced significant serum bactericidal activity (SBA) against homologous Allele 1 and heterologous Allele 18 strains, using both baby rabbit serum complement and human serum complement (h)SBA assays, but did not kill strains expressing heterologous protein encoded by Alelle 2 or 3. Furthermore, variable bactericidal activity was induced by murine antisera against different meningococcal strains in the h

  18. Improving the MVA Vaccine Potential by Deleting the Viral Gene Coding for the IL-18 Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Pascutti, María Fernanda; Rodríguez, Ana María; Maeto, Cynthia; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Gómez, Carmen E.; Esteban, Mariano; Calamante, Gabriela; Gherardi, María Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    Background Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA) is an attenuated strain of Vaccinia virus (VACV) currently employed in many clinical trials against HIV/AIDS and other diseases. MVA still retains genes involved in host immune response evasion, enabling its optimization by removing some of them. The aim of this study was to evaluate cellular immune responses (CIR) induced by an IL-18 binding protein gene (C12L) deleted vector (MVAΔC12L). Methodology/Principal Findings BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were immunized with different doses of MVAΔC12L or MVA wild type (MVAwt), then CIR to VACV epitopes in immunogenic proteins were evaluated in spleen and draining lymph nodes at acute and memory phases (7 and 40 days post-immunization respectively). Compared with parental MVAwt, MVAΔC12L immunization induced a significant increase of two to three-fold in CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell responses to different VACV epitopes, with increased percentage of anti-VACV cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells (CD107a/b+) during the acute phase of the response. Importantly, the immunogenicity enhancement was also observed after MVAΔC12L inoculation with different viral doses and by distinct routes (systemic and mucosal). Potentiation of MVA's CIR was also observed during the memory phase, in correlation with a higher protection against an intranasal challenge with VACV WR. Of note, we could also show a significant increase in the CIR against HIV antigens such as Env, Gag, Pol and Nef from different subtypes expressed from two recombinants of MVAΔC12L during heterologous DNA prime/MVA boost vaccination regimens. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates the relevance of IL-18 bp contribution in the immune response evasion during MVA infection. Our findings clearly show that the deletion of the viral IL-18 bp gene is an effective approach to increase MVA vaccine efficacy, as immunogenicity improvements were observed against vector antigens and more importantly to HIV antigens. PMID:22384183

  19. Potential effects of calcium binding protein S100A12 on severity evaluation and curative effect of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhang; Yinchu, Zhan; Yinsheng, Shi; Fengqing, Wu; Xiaoyang, Zhou; Jin, Li; Xiaofei, Gao

    2015-02-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis is a life threatening disease with a high rate of mortality, but its treatments are still controversial. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential effects of calcium binding protein S100A12 on severity evaluation and curative effect of severe acute pancreatitis induced by caerulein and lipopolysaccharide in mice. Intraperitoneal injection of 50 μg/kg caerulein for seven times (every interval time was an hour) and intraperitoneal injection of 10 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide for once to establish acute pancreatitis mice models. One hundred sixty specific pathogen-free imprinting control region (ICR) female mice were randomly divided into the control group (group A, normal saline), the mild group (group B, caerulein), the severe group (group C, caerulein + lipopolysaccharide), and the intervention group (group D, S100A12 recombinant antibodies + caerulein + lipopolysaccharide); each group had 40 mice. We sampled the blood at 8, 12, and 24 h after the beginning of building animal models. In each period of time, we respectively detected the serum S100A12, amylase (AMY), C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) levels. In addition, we observed and scored the pancreas and lungs histopathology of the mice. In each same period of time compared with group C, serum AMY, CRP, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α levels of group D were significantly decreased (p < 0.05). In each same period of time compared with group B and group C, serum S100A12 concentration of group D was significantly decreased (p < 0.05), and the pancreas and lungs histopathology were also much improved. These observations demonstrate that S100A12 recombinant antibodies were able to significantly reduce the severity of acute pancreatitis induced by caerulein and lipopolysaccharide in mice. Serum S100A12 may serve as a useful marker for disease severity and curative effect in mice with severe acute pancreatitis.

  20. Molecular Determinants of Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) Binding to Transient Receptor Potential V1 (TRPV1) Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Poblete, Horacio; Oyarzún, Ingrid; Olivero, Pablo; Comer, Jeffrey; Zuñiga, Matías; Sepulveda, Romina V.; Báez-Nieto, David; González Leon, Carlos; González-Nilo, Fernando; Latorre, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) has been recognized as an important activator of certain transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. More specifically, TRPV1 is a pain receptor activated by a wide range of stimuli. However, whether or not PI(4,5)P2 is a TRPV1 agonist remains open to debate. Utilizing a combined approach of mutagenesis and molecular modeling, we identified a PI(4,5)P2 binding site located between the TRP box and the S4-S5 linker. At this site, PI(4,5)P2 interacts with the amino acid residues Arg-575 and Arg-579 in the S4-S5 linker and with Lys-694 in the TRP box. We confirmed that PI(4,5)P2 behaves as a channel agonist and found that Arg-575, Arg-579, and Lys-694 mutations to alanine reduce PI(4,5)P2 binding affinity. Additionally, in silico mutations R575A, R579A, and K694A showed that the reduction in binding affinity results from the delocalization of PI(4,5)P2 in the binding pocket. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that PI(4,5)P2 binding induces conformational rearrangements of the structure formed by S6 and the TRP domain, which cause an opening of the lower TRPV1 channel gate. PMID:25425643

  1. Specificity of binding of beta-glucoside activators of ryegrass (1-->3)-beta-glucan synthase and the synthesis of some potential photoaffinity activators.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, K; Johnson, E; Stone, B A

    1996-01-01

    Structure-activity relationships among glycoside activators of ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) (1-->3)-beta-glucan synthase were investigated using a number of natural and synthetic glycosides, including some carrying photoaffinity functions. There is an absolute requirement for a beta-D-glycosyl moiety in the activator, both S- and N-glucosides are active, and the position of the glucosidic linkage in beta-glucose disaccharides has a significant effect on the affinity of binding. However, the binding requirement does not extend beyond a single beta-D-glucosyl residue, and beta-D-oligoglucosides are less effective than disaccharides. The nature of the aglycon has a major influence on the binding affinity. Hydrophobic aglycons lower the concentration required for half-maximal stimulation of the enzyme obtained from an Eadie-Hofstee plot of kinetic data (Ka) for activation, but charge aglycons increase Ka. Relative to methyl-beta-D-glucoside and cellobiose (Ka 1.1 mM), the most potent compounds tested were N-[4-(benzoyl)benzoyl]-beta-D-glucosylamine and 2'-[4-azidosalicylamino]ethyl-1-thio-beta-D-glucoside with K(a)s of approximately 30 microM. The latter also was tested for its potential to specifically label the beta-glucoside-binding site on the synthase, but under the conditions used the binding was found to be nonspecific. PMID:8756503

  2. pH Effect on the binding of chlorin derivatives with Cremophor EL, a potential drug delivery vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Sunita; Datta, Anindya

    2005-09-01

    The binding of chlorin p6 with Cremophor EL (CrEL) at pH 5 and pH 7 has been monitored by fluorescence techniques. Upon binding with the drug delivery agent, the fluorescent species are found to be one and the same at both pH values. This is explained by a hindrance to protonation of chlorin p6 trianions by Cremophor EL. Surprisingly, it is the more hydrophilic species between the two possible chlorin p6 ions that is found to get bound preferentially with the hydrophobic delivery medium.

  3. Structure of amylase-binding protein A of Streptococcus gordonii: a potential receptor for human salivary α-amylase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Ashish; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Ramasubbu, Narayanan; Gooley, Paul R

    2015-06-01

    Amylase-binding protein A (AbpA) of a number of oral streptococci is essential for the colonization of the dental pellicle. We have determined the solution structure of residues 24-195 of AbpA of Streptococcus gordonii and show a well-defined core of five helices in the region of 45-115 and 135-145. (13) Cα/β chemical shift and heteronuclear (15) N-{(1) H} NOE data are consistent with this fold and that the remainder of the protein is unstructured. The structure will inform future molecular experiments in defining the mechanism of human salivary α-amylase binding and biofilm formation by streptococci.

  4. Potential energy surface and binding energy in the presence of an external electric field: modulation of anion-π interactions for graphene-based receptors.

    PubMed

    Foroutan-Nejad, Cina; Marek, Radek

    2014-02-14

    Measuring the binding energy or scanning the potential energy surface (PES) of the charged molecular systems in the presence of an external electric field (EEF) requires a careful evaluation of the origin-dependency of the energy of the system and references. Scanning the PES for charged or purely ionic systems for obtaining the intrinsic energy barriers needs careful analysis of the electric work applied on ions by the EEF. The binding energy in the presence of an EEF is different from that in the absence of an electric field as the binding energy is an anisotropic characteristic which depends on the orientation of molecules with respect to the EEF. In this contribution we discuss various aspects of the PES and the concept of binding energy in the presence of an EEF. In addition, we demonstrate that the anion-π bonding properties can be modulated by applying a uniform EEF, which has a more pronounced effect on the larger, more polarizable π-systems. An analogous behavior is presumed for cation-π systems. We predict that understanding the phenomenon introduced in the present account has enormous potential, for example, for separating charged species on the surface of polarizable two-dimensional materials such as graphene or the surface of carbon nanotubes, in desalination of water.

  5. Exploration of DNA binding mode, chemical nuclease, cytotoxic and apoptotic potentials of diketone based oxovanadium(IV) complexes.

    PubMed

    Inamdar, Poonam Rajiv; Sheela, Angappan

    2015-05-01

    Two diketone based oxovanadium complexes, viz., bis(4,4,4-trifluoro-1-phenylbutane-1,3-dionato)oxovanadium(IV) (1) and bis(1,1,1-trifluoropentane-2,4-dionato)oxovanadium(IV) (2), have been synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic and analytical techniques. The DNA binding and the cleaving ability of the complexes is assessed by UV-vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, viscometry and gel electrophoretic studies. The DNA binding constant values (Kb) are found to be 1.95 ± 0.16 × 10(3)M(-1) for complex 1 and 1.064 ± 0.17 × 10(3)M(-1) for complex 2, respectively. Based on the results of the spectral and viscosity studies, it is observed that the complexes, interestingly, have preferred minor groove binding with DNA. Further, the concentration-dependent oxidative cleavage pattern of pBR322 in the presence of the activating reagent, hydrogen peroxide, has also been discussed. In addition, the complexes have shown moderate cytotoxic activity by inducing apoptosis against the cervical cancer cell line, HeLa. The results of in silico analysis and logP predictions are found to be in good agreement with the experimental observations. Thus, synthesized oxovanadium complexes have displayed promising DNA binding behavior and DNA cleavage activity with moderately cytotoxic nature.

  6. Formation and characterization of iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen as a potential iron supplement.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jianjun; Chen, Fei; Fan, Daidi; Zhu, Chenhui; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Xue, Wenjiao

    2013-10-01

    Iron incorporated into food can induce precipitation and unwanted interaction with other components in food. Iron-binding proteins represent a possibility to avoid these problems and other side effects, as the iron is protected. However, there are several technical problems associated with protein-iron complex formation. In this paper, the iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared under physiological conditions through phosphorylated modification. One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. Spectroscopy analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and equilibrium dialysis techniques were employed to investigate the characteristics of the Fe-G6P-HLC. The binding sites (nb) and apparent association constant (Kapp) between iron and phosphorylated HLC were measured at nb=23.7 and log Kapp=4.57, respectively. The amount of iron (Fe(2+) sulfate) binding to phosphorylated HLC was found to be a function of pH and phosphate content. In addition, the solubility and thermal stability of HLC were not significantly affected. The results should facilitate the utilization of HLC as a bioactive iron supplement in the food and medical industry and provide an important theoretical evidence for the application of HLC chelates.

  7. Phage-display for identifying peptides that bind the spike protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus and possess diagnostic potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spike (S) protein is a key structural protein of coronaviruses including, the porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV). The S protein is a type I membrane glycoprotein located in the viral envelope and is responsible for mediating the binding of viral particles to specific cell recepto...

  8. Characterization of substrate binding and catalysis in the potential antibacterial target N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmU)

    PubMed Central

    Mochalkin, Igor; Lightle, Sandra; Zhu, Yaqi; Ohren, Jeffrey F.; Spessard, Cindy; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.; Banotai, Craig; Melnick, Michael; McDowell, Laura

    2007-01-01

    N-Acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmU) catalyzes the first step in peptidoglycan biosynthesis in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The products of the GlmU reaction are essential for bacterial survival, making this enzyme an attractive target for antibiotic drug discovery. A series of Haemophilus influenzae GlmU (hiGlmU) structures were determined by X-ray crystallography in order to provide structural and functional insights into GlmU activity and inhibition. The information derived from these structures was combined with biochemical characterization of the K25A, Q76A, D105A, Y103A, V223A, and E224A hiGlmU mutants in order to map these active-site residues to catalytic activity of the enzyme and refine the mechanistic model of the GlmU uridyltransferase reaction. These studies suggest that GlmU activity follows a sequential substrate-binding order that begins with UTP binding noncovalently to the GlmU enzyme. The uridyltransferase active site then remains in an open apo-like conformation until N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate (GlcNAc-1-P) binds and induces a conformational change at the GlcNAc-binding subsite. Following the binding of GlcNAc-1-P to the UTP-charged uridyltransferase active site, the non-esterified oxygen of GlcNAc-1-P performs a nucleophilic attack on the α-phosphate group of UTP. The new data strongly suggest that the mechanism of phosphotransfer in the uridyltransferase reaction in GlmU is primarily through an associative mechanism with a pentavalent phosphate intermediate and an inversion of stereochemistry. Finally, the structural and biochemical characterization of the uridyltransferase active site and catalytic mechanism described herein provides a basis for the structure-guided design of novel antibacterial agents targeting GlmU activity. PMID:18029420

  9. Gene I, a potential cell-to-cell movement locus of cauliflower mosaic virus, encodes an RNA-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Citovsky, V.; Knorr, D.; Zambryski, P. )

    1991-03-15

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) pararetrovirus capable of cell-to-cell movement presumably through intercellular connections, the plasmodesmata, of the infected plant. This movement is likely mediated by a specific viral protein encoded by the gene I locus. Here we report that the purified gene I protein binds RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) but not dsDNA regardless of nucleotide sequence specificity. The binding is highly cooperative, and the affinity of the gene I protein for RNA is 10-fold higher than for ssDNA. CaMV replicates by reverse transcription of a 35S RNA that is homologous to the entire genome. The authors propose that the 35S RNA may be involved in cell-to-cell movement of CaMV as an intermediate that is transported through plasmodesmata as an RNA-gene I protein complex.

  10. Effects of heterocyclic aromatic substituents on binding affinities at two distinct sites of somatostatin receptors. Correlation with the electrostatic potential of the substituents.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vidya; Birzin, Elizabeth T; McVaugh, Cheryl T; Van Rijn, Rachel D; Rohrer, Susan P; Chicchi, Gary; Underwood, Dennis J; Thornton, Edward R; Smith, Amos B; Hirschmann, Ralph

    2003-05-08

    In our continuing program exploring glucose-based peptidomimetics of somatostatin (SRIF-14), we sought to improve the water solubility of our glycosides. This led to insights into the nature of the ligand binding sites at the SRIF receptor. Replacement of the C4 benzyl substituent in glucoside (+)-2 with pyridinylmethyl or pyrazin-2-ylmethyl congeners increased water solubility and enhanced affinity for the human SRIF subtype receptor 4 (sst4). We attribute this effect to hydrogen bond formation. The pyridin-3-ylmethyl substituent at C4, when combined with the imidazol-4-ylmethyl group at C2, generated (-)-19, which has the highest affinity of a glucose-based peptidomimetic at a human SRIF receptor to date (K(i) 53 +/- 23 nM, n = 6 at sst4). The C4 heterocyclic congeners of glucosides bearing a 1-methoxy substituent rather than an indole side chain at the anomeric carbon, such as (+)-16, also provided information about the Trp(8) binding pocket. We correlated the SARs at both the C4 and the Trp(8) binding pockets with calculations of the electrostatic potentials of the diverse C4 aromatic substituents using Spartan 3-21G(*) MO analysis. These calculations provide an approximate analysis of a molecule's ability to interact within a receptor binding site. Our binding studies show that benzene and indole rings, but not pyridinylmethyl nor pyrazin-2-ylmethyl rings, can bind the hydrophobic Trp(8) binding pocket of sst4. The Spartan 3-21G(*) MO analysis reveals significant negative electrostatic potential in the region of the pi-clouds for the benzene and indole rings but not for the pyridinylmethyl or pyrazin-2-ylmethyl congeners. Our data further demonstrate that the replacement of benzene or indole side chains by heterocyclic aromatic rings typified by pyridine and pyrazine not only enhances water solubility and hydrogen bonding capacity as expected, but can also profoundly diminish the ability of the pi-cloud of the aromatic substituent to interact with side chains

  11. The Rb97D gene encodes a potential RNA-binding protein required for spermatogenesis in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Karsch-Mizrachi, I; Haynes, S R

    1993-01-01

    Many proteins that bind RNA contain a common RNA-binding domain, the RNP motif. We have been studying two Drosophila RNP motif proteins, Hrb98DE and Hrb87F, which are hnRNA-binding proteins. We report here the characterization of the Rb97D gene, which encodes a protein that is closely related to the Hrb proteins in the RNP motif domain, but has a distinctive proline-rich C-terminal domain. The gene is located at 97D on the right arm of the third chromosome, near the rough gene. Multiple transcripts from the Rb97D gene are present at varying levels throughout development. The transcripts are generated by alternative processing in the coding and 3' untranslated regions, and can encode two protein isoforms. Analysis of a mutant containing a P element inserted into the 5' untranslated region of the gene demonstrates that Rb97D is required for male fertility. Possible models for the function of Rb97D in testes are discussed. Images PMID:8502565

  12. Blood Group Substances as Potential Therapeutic Agents for the Prevention and Treatment of Infection with Noroviruses Proving Novel Binding Patterns in Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yazawa, Shin; Yokobori, Takehiko; Ueta, Gen; Ide, Munenori; Altan, Bolag; Thongprachum, Aksara; Nishimura, Toyo; Nakajima, Tamiko; Kominato, Yoshihiko; Asao, Takayuki; Saniabadi, Abby R.; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Le Pendu, Jacques; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Blood group-related glycans determining ABO and Lewis blood groups are known to function as attachment factors for most of the norovirus (NoV) strains. To identify binding specificity of each NoV, recombinant norovirus-like particles (VLPs) and human saliva samples with different ABO, Lewis phenotypes and secretor status have been commonly applied. When binding specificities of VLPs prepared from 16 different genotypes of NoVs in GI and GII genogroups were characterized in samples of human gastric mucosa compared to human saliva based on blood group phenotypes, considerable differences were observed for several strains. Novel binding specificities determined by an ELISA using preparations from human gastric mucosa were also ascertained by immunohistochemical analyses using human jejunal mucosa, widely believed to be susceptible to NoV infection. Further, A, B and O(H) blood group substances prepared from porcine and squid tissues were found to be effective for preventing ABO blood group-specific binding of VLPs to both saliva and mucosa samples. Therefore, these blood group substances might have potential for the prevention and treatment of NoV infection. PMID:24558470

  13. Membrane-protease interactions. III: A consideration of the difference in binding potential of pancreatic proteases to erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts.

    PubMed

    Brecher, A S; Rosen, M; Burkholder, D E

    1999-09-01

    Trypsin and chymotrypsin readily bind to human erythrocyte ghosts and to resealed right-side-out ghosts, but not to intact erythrocytes, as followed with [3H]trypsin and [3H]chymotrypsin and with cold proteases in a caseinolytic assay. The proteases freely reacted with casein in the presence of intact cells. Trypsin activated trypsinogen over an 8-hr time course at a faster rate in the presence of erythrocytes than in the absence thereof, after a slight initial delay. Trypsinogen did not bind to intact erythrocytes, thereby behaving comparably to trypsin. These results suggest that different microenvironments exist about the erythrocyte ghosts and the intact erythrocytes, thereby permitting the proteases to bind to the former but not to the latter. Hence, in the absence of considerable ghosts in circulating blood, which may mask the binding site of the proteases, the proteases may be more readily accessible for interaction with circulating serpins, leading to inactivation of the proteases and protection from their degradative potential. The presence of the serpins in circulating blood may assist in the control of the degradative power of the pancreatic proteases in pancreatitis and may negatively modulate such processes as thrombosis, activation of the complement system, and vascular remodeling.

  14. Functional defect of variants in the adenosine triphosphate-binding sites of ABCB4 and their rescue by the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator potentiator, ivacaftor (VX-770).

    PubMed

    Delaunay, Jean-Louis; Bruneau, Alix; Hoffmann, Brice; Durand-Schneider, Anne-Marie; Barbu, Véronique; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Maurice, Michèle; Housset, Chantal; Callebaut, Isabelle; Aït-Slimane, Tounsia

    2017-02-01

    ABCB4 (MDR3) is an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter expressed at the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes, where it mediates phosphatidylcholine (PC) secretion. Variations in the ABCB4 gene are responsible for several biliary diseases, including progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 3 (PFIC3), a rare disease that can be lethal in the absence of liver transplantation. In this study, we investigated the effect and potential rescue of ABCB4 missense variations that reside in the highly conserved motifs of ABC transporters, involved in ATP binding. Five disease-causing variations in these motifs have been identified in ABCB4 (G535D, G536R, S1076C, S1176L, and G1178S), three of which are homologous to the gating mutations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR or ABCC7; i.e., G551D, S1251N, and G1349D), that were previously shown to be function defective and corrected by ivacaftor (VX-770; Kalydeco), a clinically approved CFTR potentiator. Three-dimensional structural modeling predicted that all five ABCB4 variants would disrupt critical interactions in the binding of ATP and thereby impair ATP-induced nucleotide-binding domain dimerization and ABCB4 function. This prediction was confirmed by expression in cell models, which showed that the ABCB4 mutants were normally processed and targeted to the plasma membrane, whereas their PC secretion activity was dramatically decreased. As also hypothesized on the basis of molecular modeling, PC secretion activity of the mutants was rescued by the CFTR potentiator, ivacaftor (VX-770).

  15. In vitro DNA binding profile of enantiomeric dinuclear Cu(II)/Ni(II) complexes derived from l-/d-histidine-terepthaldehyde reduced Schiff base as potential chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Imtiyaz; Arjmand, Farukh

    2016-11-01

    New chiral reduced Schiff base ligands, L1 and L2 derived from l-/d-histidine and terepthaldehyde, and their Cu(II) and Ni(II) dinuclear complexes 1 &2 (a and b) were synthesized and thoroughly characterized by various spectroscopic techniques. Comparative binding profile of both l-/d-enantiomeric Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes with ct-DNA was studied by employing optical and spectroscopic techniques to evaluate their enantiopreferential selectivity towards molecular target DNA and thereby explore their relative chemotherapeutic potential. Quantitative assessment of DNA binding propensity was ascertained by calculating Kb, K and Ksv values of 1 &2 (a and b) which demonstrated higher binding affinity of l-enantiomeric Cu(II) complex, 1a and followed the order as 1a>1b>2a>2b. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to analyze the morphological changes of the DNA condensate in presence of complexes 1 (a and b). The SEM micrographs condensates revealed morphological transitions and formation of different structural features implicating the condensation process between the complexes and biomolecule occurred to form compact massive structures. The gel electrophoretic assay of complex 1a was carried out with pBR322 plasmid DNA which revealed an efficient cleaving ability of the complex via oxidative pathway with the involvement of singlet oxygen ((1)O2) and the superoxide anion (O2(•-)) radicals as the ROS responsible the cleavage reactions. Molecular docking studies of 1 (a and b) with DNA revealed selective recognition of G-C residues of the narrow minor groove of the DNA duplex and complex 1a demonstrated binding affinity towards DNA ascertained from its higher binding energy values. Furthermore, the cytotoxic assessment of 1a was examined on a panel of cancer cell lines of different histological origin employing SRB assay which revealed remarkably good cytotoxic activity towards HL60, HeLa and MCF7 cancer cell lines.

  16. Electrostatic potential distribution of the gene V protein from Ff phage facilitates cooperative DNA binding: a model of the GVP-ssDNA complex.

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Y.; Zhang, H.; Wang, A. H.

    1995-01-01

    The crystal structure of the gene V protein (GVP) from the Ff filamentous phages (M13, fl, fd) has been solved for the wild-type and two mutant (Y41F and Y41H) proteins at high resolution. The Y41H mutant crystal structure revealed crystal packing interactions, which suggested a plausible scheme for constructing the polymeric protein shell of the GVP-single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) complex (Guan Y, et al., 1994, Biochemistry 33:7768-7778). The electrostatic potentials of the isolated and the cooperatively formed protein shell have been calculated using the program GRASP and they revealed a highly asymmetric pattern of the electrostatic charge distribution. The inner surface of the putative DNA-binding channel is positively charged, whereas the opposite outer surface is nearly neutral. The electrostatic calculation further demonstrated that the formation of the helical protein shell enhanced the asymmetry of the electrostatic distribution. A model of the GVP-ssDNA complex with the n = 4 DNA-binding mode could be built with only minor conformational perturbation to the GVP protein shell. The model is consistent with existing biochemical and biophysical data and provides clues to the properties of GVP, including the high cooperatively of the protein binding to ssDNA. The two antiparallel ssDNA strands form a helical ribbon with the sugar-phosphate backbones at the middle and the bases pointing away from each other. The bases are stacked and the Phe 73 residue is intercalated between two bases. The optimum binding to a tetranucleotide unit requires the participation of four GVP dimers, which may explain the cooperativity of the GVP binding to DNA. PMID:7757008

  17. Receptor Binding Profiles of Avian Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Subtypes on Human Cells as a Predictor of Pandemic Potential ▿ ‖

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Holly; Ayora-Talavera, Guadalupe; Ren, Junyuan; Loureiro, Silvia; Pickles, Raymond J.; Barclay, Wendy S.; Jones, Ian M.

    2011-01-01

    The host adaptation of influenza virus is partly dependent on the sialic acid (SA) isoform bound by the viral hemagglutinin (HA). Avian influenza viruses preferentially bind the α-2,3 SA and human influenza viruses the α-2,6 isoform. Each isoform is predominantly associated with different surface epithelial cell types of the human upper airway. Using recombinant HAs and human tracheal airway epithelial cells in vitro and ex vivo, we show that many avian HA subtypes do not adhere to this canonical view of SA specificity. The propensity of avian viruses to adapt to human receptors may thus be more widespread than previously supposed. PMID:21106732

  18. SRC Homology 2 Domain Binding Sites in Insulin, IGF-1 and FGF receptor mediated signaling networks reveal an extensive potential interactome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Specific peptide ligand recognition by modular interaction domains is essential for the fidelity of information flow through the signal transduction networks that control cell behavior in response to extrinsic and intrinsic stimuli. Src homology 2 (SH2) domains recognize distinct phosphotyrosine peptide motifs, but the specific sites that are phosphorylated and the complement of available SH2 domains varies considerably in individual cell types. Such differences are the basis for a wide range of available protein interaction microstates from which signaling can evolve in highly divergent ways. This underlying complexity suggests the need to broadly map the signaling potential of systems as a prerequisite for understanding signaling in specific cell types as well as various pathologies that involve signal transduction such as cancer, developmental defects and metabolic disorders. This report describes interactions between SH2 domains and potential binding partners that comprise initial signaling downstream of activated fibroblast growth factor (FGF), insulin (Ins), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) receptors. A panel of 50 SH2 domains screened against a set of 192 phosphotyrosine peptides defines an extensive potential interactome while demonstrating the selectivity of individual SH2 domains. The interactions described confirm virtually all previously reported associations while describing a large set of potential novel interactions that imply additional complexity in the signaling networks initiated from activated receptors. This study of pTyr ligand binding by SH2 domains provides valuable insight into the selectivity that underpins complex signaling networks that are assembled using modular protein interaction domains. PMID:22974441

  19. Computer aided prediction and identification of potential epitopes in the receptor binding domain (RBD) of spike (S) glycoprotein of MERS-CoV.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammad Tuhin; Morshed, Mohammed Monzur; Gazi, Md Amran; Musa, Md Abu; Kibria, Md Golam; Uddin, Md Jashim; Khan, Md Anik Ashfaq; Hasan, Shihab

    2014-01-01

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) belongs to the coronaviridae family. In spite of several outbreaks in the very recent years, no vaccine against this deadly virus is developed yet. In this study, the receptor binding domain (RBD) of Spike (S) glycoprotein of MERS-CoV was analyzed through Computational Immunology approach to identify the antigenic determinants (epitopes). In order to do so, the sequences of S glycoprotein that belong to different geographical regions were aligned to observe the conservancy of MERS-CoV RBD. The immune parameters of this region were determined using different in silico tools and Immune Epitope Database (IEDB). Molecular docking study was also employed to check the affinity of the potential epitope towards the binding cleft of the specific HLA allele. The N-terminus RBD (S367-S606) of S glycoprotein was found to be conserved among all the available strains of MERS-CoV. Based on the lower IC50 value, a total of eight potential T-cell epitopes and 19 major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class-I alleles were identified for this conserved region. A 9-mer epitope CYSSLILDY displayed interactions with the maximum number of MHC class-I molecules and projected the highest peak in the B-cell antigenicity plot which concludes that it could be a better choice for designing an epitope based peptide vaccine against MERSCoV considering that it must undergo further in vitro and in vivo experiments. Moreover, in molecular docking study, this epitope was found to have a significant binding affinity of -8.5 kcal/mol towards the binding cleft of the HLA-C*12:03 molecule.

  20. Selection and Characterization of Tau Binding ᴅ-Enantiomeric Peptides with Potential for Therapy of Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kukuk, Laura; Willbold, Dieter; Pickhardt, Marcus; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Horn, Anselm H. C.; Sticht, Heinrich; Malhis, Marwa Nidal; Will, Nadja; Schuster, Judith; Funke, Susanne Aileen

    2016-01-01

    A variety of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer disease (AD), are associated with neurofibrillary tangles composed of the tau protein, as well as toxic tau oligomers. Inhibitors of pathological tau aggregation, interrupting tau self-assembly, might be useful for the development of therapeutics. Employing mirror image phage display with a large peptide library (over 109 different peptides), we have identified tau fibril binding peptides consisting of d-enantiomeric amino acids. d-enantiomeric peptides are extremely protease stable and not or less immunogenic than l-peptides, and the suitability of d-peptides for in vivo applications have already been demonstrated. Phage display selections were performed using fibrils of the d-enantiomeric hexapeptide VQIVYK, representing residues 306 to 311 of the tau protein, as a target. VQIVYK has been demonstrated to be important for fibril formation of the full lengths protein and forms fibrils by itself. Here, we report on d-enantiomeric peptides, which bind to VQIVYK, tau isoforms like tau3RD (K19) as well as to full lengths tau fibrils, and modulate the aggregation of the respective tau form. The peptides are able to penetrate cells and might be interesting for therapeutic and diagnostic applications in AD research. PMID:28006031

  1. Collybistin binds and inhibits mTORC1 signaling: a potential novel mechanism contributing to intellectual disability and autism

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Camila Oliveira Freitas; Griesi-Oliveira, Karina; Rosenberg, Carla; Kok, Fernando; Martins, Stephanie; Rita Passos-Bueno, Maria; Sertie, Andrea Laurato

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis regulation via mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway has key roles in neural development and function, and its dysregulation is involved in neurodevelopmental disorders associated with autism and intellectual disability. mTOR regulates assembly of the translation initiation machinery by interacting with the eukaryotic initiation factor eIF3 complex and by controlling phosphorylation of key translational regulators. Collybistin (CB), a neuron-specific Rho-GEF responsible for X-linked intellectual disability with epilepsy, also interacts with eIF3, and its binding partner gephyrin associates with mTOR. Therefore, we hypothesized that CB also binds mTOR and affects mTORC1 signaling activity in neuronal cells. Here, by using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells from a male patient with a deletion of entire CB gene and from control individuals, as well as a heterologous expression system, we describe that CB physically interacts with mTOR and inhibits mTORC1 signaling pathway and protein synthesis. These findings suggest that disinhibited mTORC1 signaling may also contribute to the pathological process in patients with loss-of-function variants in CB. PMID:25898924

  2. Collybistin binds and inhibits mTORC1 signaling: a potential novel mechanism contributing to intellectual disability and autism.

    PubMed

    Machado, Camila Oliveira Freitas; Griesi-Oliveira, Karina; Rosenberg, Carla; Kok, Fernando; Martins, Stephanie; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Sertie, Andrea Laurato

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis regulation via mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway has key roles in neural development and function, and its dysregulation is involved in neurodevelopmental disorders associated with autism and intellectual disability. mTOR regulates assembly of the translation initiation machinery by interacting with the eukaryotic initiation factor eIF3 complex and by controlling phosphorylation of key translational regulators. Collybistin (CB), a neuron-specific Rho-GEF responsible for X-linked intellectual disability with epilepsy, also interacts with eIF3, and its binding partner gephyrin associates with mTOR. Therefore, we hypothesized that CB also binds mTOR and affects mTORC1 signaling activity in neuronal cells. Here, by using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells from a male patient with a deletion of entire CB gene and from control individuals, as well as a heterologous expression system, we describe that CB physically interacts with mTOR and inhibits mTORC1 signaling pathway and protein synthesis. These findings suggest that disinhibited mTORC1 signaling may also contribute to the pathological process in patients with loss-of-function variants in CB.

  3. Carbohydrate-binding specificities of potential probiotic Lactobacillus strains in porcine jejunal (IPEC-J2) cells and porcine mucin.

    PubMed

    Valeriano, Valerie Diane; Bagon, Bernadette B; Balolong, Marilen P; Kang, Dae-Kyung

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial lectins are carbohydrate-binding adhesins that recognize glycoreceptors in the gut mucus and epithelium of hosts. In this study, the contribution of lectin-like activities to adhesion of Lactobacillus mucosae LM1 and Lactobacillus johnsonii PF01, which were isolated from swine intestine, were compared to those of the commercial probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Both LM1 and PF01 strains have been reported to have good adhesion ability to crude intestinal mucus of pigs. To confirm this, we quantified their adhesion to porcine gastric mucin and intestinal porcine enterocytes isolated from the jejunum of piglets (IPEC-J2). In addition, we examined their carbohydrate-binding specificities by suspending bacterial cells in carbohydrate solutions prior to adhesion assays. We found that the selected carbohydrates affected the adherences of LM1 to IPEC-J2 cells and of LGG to mucin. In addition, compared to adhesion to IPEC-J2 cells, adhesion to mucin by both LM1 and LGG was characterized by enhanced specific recognition of glycoreceptor components such as galactose, mannose, and N-acetylglucosamine. Hydrophobic interactions might make a greater contribution to adhesion of PF01. A similar adhesin profile between a probiotic and a pathogen, suggest a correlation between shared pathogen-probiotic glycoreceptor recognition and the ability to exclude enteropathogens such as Escherichia coli K88 and Salmonella Typhimurium KCCM 40253. These findings extend our understanding of the mechanisms of the intestinal adhesion and pathogen-inhibition abilities of probiotic Lactobacillus strains.

  4. Photoelectron spectroscopy of aqueous solutions: streaming potentials of NaX (X = Cl, Br, and I) solutions and electron binding energies of liquid water and X-.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, Naoya; Karashima, Shutaro; Tang, Ying; Horio, Takuya; Abulimiti, Bumaliya; Suzuki, Yoshi-Ichi; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Oura, Masaki; Suzuki, Toshinori

    2014-05-07

    The streaming potentials of liquid beams of aqueous NaCl, NaBr, and NaI solutions are measured using soft X-ray, He(I), and laser multiphoton ionization photoelectron spectroscopy. Gaseous molecules are ionized in the vicinity of liquid beams and the photoelectron energy shifts are measured as a function of the distance between the ionization point and the liquid beam. The streaming potentials change their polarity with concentration of electrolytes, from which the singular points of concentration eliminating the streaming potentials are determined. The streaming currents measured in air also vanish at these concentrations. The electron binding energies of liquid water and I(-), Br(-), and Cl(-) anions are revisited and determined more accurately than in previous studies.

  5. Sugar-nucleotide-binding and autoglycosylating polypeptide(s) from nasturtium fruit: biochemical capacities and potential functions.

    PubMed

    Faik, A; Desveaux, D; MacLachlan, G

    2000-05-01

    Polypeptide assemblies cross-linked by S-S bonds (molecular mass>200 kDa) and single polypeptides folded with internal S-S cross-links (<41 kDa) have been detected by SDS/PAGE in particulate membranes and soluble extracts of developing cotyledons of nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus L.). When first prepared from fruit homogenates, these polypeptides were found to bind reversibly to UDP-Gal (labelled with [(14)C]Gal or [(3)H]uridine), and to co-precipitate specifically with added xyloglucan from solutions made with 67% ethanol. Initially, the bound UDP-[(14)C]Gal could be replaced (bumped) by adding excess UDP, or exchanged (chased) with UDP-Gal, -Glc, -Man or -Xyl. However, this capacity for turnover was lost during incubation in reaction media, or during SDS/PAGE under reducing conditions, even as the glycone moiety was conserved by autoglycosylation to form a stable 41 kDa polypeptide. Polyclonal antibodies raised to a similar product purified from Arabidopsis bound to all the labelled nasturtium polypeptides in immunoblotting tests. The antibodies also inhibited the binding of nasturtium polypeptides to UDP-Gal, the uptake of UDP-[(14)C]Gal into intact nasturtium membrane vesicles and the incorporation of [(14)C]Gal into nascent xyloglucan within these vesicles. This is the first direct evidence that these polypeptides facilitate the channelling of UDP-activated sugars from the cytoplasm through Golgi vesicle membranes to lumenal sites, where they can be used as substrates for glycosyltransferases to synthesize products such as xyloglucan.

  6. Reproducibility of quantitative measures of binding potential in rat striatum: A test re-test study using DTBZ dynamic PET studies

    SciTech Connect

    Avendaño-Estrada, A. Lara-Camacho, V. M. Ávila-García, M. C. Ávila- Rodríguez, M. A.

    2014-11-07

    There is great interest in the study of dopamine (DA) pathways due to the increasing number of patients with illnesses related to the dopaminergic system and molecular imaging based in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has been proven helpful for this task. Among the different radiopharmaceuticals available to study DA interaction, [{sup 11}C]Dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) has a high affinity for the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2) and its binding potential (BP) is a marker of DA terminal integrity. This paper reports on the intersubject reproducibility of BP measurements in rat striatum with [11C]DTBZ using the Logańs method.

  7. A variant at a potentially functional microRNA-binding site in BRIP1 was associated with risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongliang; Gao, Fengqin; Dahlstrom, Kristina R.; Li, Guojun; Sturgis, Erich M.; Zevallos, Jose P.; Wei, Qingyi; Liu, Zhensheng

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most serious forms of DNA damage to the cell, causing genomic instability and ultimately carcinogenesis. In this study, we hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the micro RNA (miRNA)-binding sites of DSB repair genes may influence cancer risk by dysregulating target gene expression. To test our hypothesis, we firstly performed functional prediction for common SNPs in DSB genes and found 12 potentially functional SNPs located at the miRNA-binding sites. We then investigated their associations with risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) in 1087 patients and 1090 cancer-free controls in a non-Hispanic white population. As a result, SNP rs7213430 in BRIP1 was found to be significantly associated with cancer risk (Ptrend = 0.021). Compared with the AA homozygotes, the G allele carriers had an increased risk of SCCHN (adjusted OR 1.16, 95 % CI 1.02–1.31). Marginal significance was found for another SNP rs15869 in BRCA2 (P = 0.053). Further, functional analyses showed that SNP rs7213430 is within the miR-101 seed-binding region, and the variant G allele could lead to significantly lower luciferase activity and BRIP1 mRNA expression, compared to the A allele with the presence of miR-101. Our results suggested that SNP rs7213430 in the 3′-UTR of BRIP1 might contribute to SCCHN susceptibility by affecting the binding activity of miR-101 and resulting in a decreased BRIP1 expression. Additional larger population and functional studies are warranted to confirm our findings. PMID:26711789

  8. Reversible Albumin-Binding GH Possesses a Potential Once-Weekly Treatment Profile in Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Janukonyté, Jurgita; Klose, Marianne; Marina, Djordje; Tanvig, Mette; Nielsen, Lene F.; Höybye, Charlotte; Andersen, Marianne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    2016-01-01

    Context: NNC0195-0092 is a reversible, albumin-binding GH derivative, developed for once-weekly administration. Objectives: The objective of the study was to evaluate safety, local tolerability, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics of multiple, once-weekly doses of NNC0195-0092, compared with daily GH. Design and Setting: This was a phase 1, randomized, open-label, active-controlled, multiple-dose, dose-escalation trial. Patients: Thirty-four GH-treated adult subjects (male, n = 25) with GH deficiency participated in the study. Interventions and Main Outcome Measures: Subjects were sequentially assigned into four cohorts of eight subjects, randomized within each cohort (3:1) to once-weekly NNC0195-0092 (n = 6) for 4 weeks (0.02, 0.04, 0.08, and 0.12 mg/kg) or daily injections of Norditropin NordiFlex (n = 2) for 4 weeks with a dose replicating the pretrial dose of somatropin. A safety assessment was performed prior to initiating treatment at the next dose level of NNC0195-0092. Daily GH treatment was discontinued 14 days before the trial start. Blood samples were drawn for assessment of safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics (IGF-1 and IGF-binding protein-3) profiles, and immunogenicity studies. Results: Numbers of adverse events were similar at the dose levels of 0.02, 0.04, and 0.08 mg/kg NNC0195-0092 vs daily injections of Norditropin NordiFlex, whereas the number of adverse events was greater at the highest dose level of NNC0195-0092 (0.12 mg/kg). NNC0195-0092 (area under the curve[0–168h]) and peak plasma concentration) increased in a dose-dependent manner, and a dose-dependent increase in IGF-1 levels was observed. IGF-1 profiles were elevated for at least 1 week, and for the 0.02-mg/kg and 0.04-mg/kg NNC0195-0092 doses, the observed IGF-1 levels were similar to the levels for the active control group. Conclusion: Four once-weekly doses of NNC0195-0092 (dose range 0.02–0.12 mg/kg) administered to adult patients with GH deficiency were well tolerated

  9. Potential RNA Binding Proteins in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Identified as Suppressors of Temperature-Sensitive Mutations in Npl3

    PubMed Central

    Henry, M.; Borland, C. Z.; Bossie, M.; Silver, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    The NPL3 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a protein with similarity to heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). Npl3p has been implicated in many nuclear-related events including RNA export, protein import, and rRNA processing. Several temperature-sensitive alleles of NPL3 have been isolated. We now report the sequence of these alleles. For one allele, npl3-1, four complementation groups of suppressors have been isolated. The cognate genes for the two recessive mutants were cloned. One of these is the previously known RNA15, which, like NPL3, also encodes a protein with similarity to the vertebrate hnRNP A/B protein family. The other suppressor corresponds to a newly defined gene we term HRP1, which also encodes a protein with similarity to the hnRNP A/B proteins of vertebrates. Mutations in HRP1 suppress all npl3 temperature-sensitive alleles but do not bypass an npl3 null allele. We show that HRP1 is essential for cell growth and that the corresponding protein is located in the nucleus. The discovery of two hnRNP homologues that can partially suppress the function of Np13p, also an RNA binding protein, will be discussed in terms of the possible roles for Npl3p in RNA metabolism. PMID:8770588

  10. Azadiradione ameliorates polyglutamine expansion disease in Drosophila by potentiating DNA binding activity of heat shock factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Naibedya; Ghosh, Suvranil; Jana, Manas; Ganguli, Arnab; Komarov, Andrei; Paul, Soumyadip; Dwivedi, Vibha; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Jana, Nihar R.; Lakhotia, Subhash C.; Chakrabarti, Gopal; Misra, Anup K.; Mandal, Subhash C.; Pal, Mahadeb

    2016-01-01

    Aggregation of proteins with the expansion of polyglutamine tracts in the brain underlies progressive genetic neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) like Huntington's disease and spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA). An insensitive cellular proteotoxic stress response to non-native protein oligomers is common in such conditions. Indeed, upregulation of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) function and its target protein chaperone expression has shown promising results in animal models of NDs. Using an HSF1 sensitive cell based reporter screening, we have isolated azadiradione (AZD) from the methanolic extract of seeds of Azadirachta indica, a plant known for its multifarious medicinal properties. We show that AZD ameliorates toxicity due to protein aggregation in cell and fly models of polyglutamine expansion diseases to a great extent. All these effects are correlated with activation of HSF1 function and expression of its target protein chaperone genes. Notably, HSF1 activation by AZD is independent of cellular HSP90 or proteasome function. Furthermore, we show that AZD directly interacts with purified human HSF1 with high specificity, and facilitates binding of HSF1 to its recognition sequence with higher affinity. These unique findings qualify AZD as an ideal lead molecule for consideration for drug development against NDs that affect millions worldwide. PMID:27835876

  11. APPL1 potentiates insulin sensitivity by facilitating the binding of IRS1/2 to the insulin receptor.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jiyoon; Galan, Amanda K; Xin, Xiaoban; Dong, Feng; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad A; Zhou, Lijun; Wang, Changhua; Li, Cuiling; Holmes, Bekke M; Sloane, Lauren B; Austad, Steven N; Guo, Shaodong; Musi, Nicolas; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Deng, Chuxia; White, Morris F; Liu, Feng; Dong, Lily Q

    2014-05-22

    Binding of insulin receptor substrate proteins 1 and 2 (IRS1/2) to the insulin receptor (IR) is essential for the regulation of insulin sensitivity and energy homeostasis. However, the mechanism of IRS1/2 recruitment to the IR remains elusive. Here, we identify adaptor protein APPL1 as a critical molecule that promotes IRS1/2-IR interaction. APPL1 forms a complex with IRS1/2 under basal conditions, and this complex is then recruited to the IR in response to insulin or adiponectin stimulation. The interaction between APPL1 and IR depends on insulin- or adiponectin-stimulated APPL1 phosphorylation, which is greatly reduced in insulin target tissues in obese mice. appl1 deletion in mice consistently leads to systemic insulin resistance and a significant reduction in insulin-stimulated IRS1/2, but not IR, tyrosine phosphorylation, indicating that APPL1 sensitizes insulin signaling by acting at a site downstream of the IR. Our study uncovers a mechanism regulating insulin signaling and crosstalk between the insulin and adiponectin pathways.

  12. Osteopontin and Latent-TGF β Binding-Protein 2 as potential diagnostic markers for HBV-related Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, André Nogueira; Plymoth, Amelie; Santos-Silva, Daniela; Ortiz-Cuaran, Sandra; Camey, Suzi; Guilloreau, Paule; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Khuhaprema, Thiravud; Mendy, Maimuna; Lesi, Olufunmilayo A.; Chang, Hee-Kyung; Oh, Jin-Kyoung; Lee, Duk-Hee; Shin, Hai-Rim; Kirk, Gregory D.; Merle, Philippe; Beretta, Laura; Hainaut, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Hepatitis B (HB) is the main risk factor for chronic liver disease (CLD) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in many low-resource countries, where diagnosis is constrained by lack of clinical, histopathological and biomarker resources. We have used proteomics to detect plasma biomarkers that outperform α-Fetoprotein (AFP), the most widely used biomarker for HCC diagnosis in low-resource contexts. Deep plasma proteome analysis was performed in HCC patients, patients with chronic liver disease (CLD) and in HB-carrier controls from Thailand (South-East Asia) and The Gambia (West-Africa). Mass spectrometry profiling identified Latent-Transforming Growth Factor β Binding-Protein 2 (LTBP2) and Osteopontin (OPN) as being significantly elevated in HCC versus CLD and controls. These two proteins were further analysed by ELISA in a total of 684 plasma samples, including 183 HCC, 274 CLD and 227 asymptomatic controls. When combined, LTBP2 and OPN showed an area under the receiver operating curve (ROC) of 0.85 in distinguishing HCC from CLD in subjects with α-Fetoprotein (AFP) < 20 ng/mL. In a prospective cohort of 115 CLD patients from Korea, increased plasma levels of LTBP2 and/or OPN were detected in plasma collected over 2 years prior to diagnosis in 21 subjects who developed HCC. Thus, the combination of LTBP2 and OPN outperformed AFP for diagnosis and prediction of HCC and may therefore improve biomarker-based detection of HBV-related HCC. PMID:24803312

  13. Crystal Structure of Dimeric Flavodoxin from Desulfovibrio gigas Suggests a Potential Binding Region for the Electron-Transferring Partner

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yin-Cheng; Chia, Tze Shyang; Fun, Hoong-Kun; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Flavodoxins, which exist widely in microorganisms, have been found in various pathways with multiple physiological functions. The flavodoxin (Fld) containing the cofactor flavin mononucleotide (FMN) from sulfur-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio gigas (D. gigas) is a short-chain enzyme that comprises 146 residues with a molecular mass of 15 kDa and plays important roles in the electron-transfer chain. To investigate its structure, we purified this Fld directly from anaerobically grown D. gigas cells. The crystal structure of Fld, determined at resolution 1.3 Å, is a dimer with two FMN packing in an orientation head to head at a distance of 17 Å, which generates a long and connected negatively charged region. Two loops, Thr59–Asp63 and Asp95–Tyr100, are located in the negatively charged region and between two FMN, and are structurally dynamic. An analysis of each monomer shows that the structure of Fld is in a semiquinone state; the positions of FMN and the surrounding residues in the active site deviate. The crystal structure of Fld from D. gigas agrees with a dimeric form in the solution state. The dimerization area, dynamic characteristics and structure variations between monomers enable us to identify a possible binding area for its functional partners. PMID:23322018

  14. Calcium-binding proteins in skeletal muscles of the mdx mice: potential role in the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pertille, Adriana; de Carvalho, Candida Luiza Tonizza; Matsumura, Cintia Yuri; Neto, Humberto Santo; Marques, Maria Julia

    2010-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is one of the most common hereditary diseases. Abnormal ion handling renders dystrophic muscle fibers more susceptible to necrosis and a rise in intracellular calcium is an important initiating event in dystrophic muscle pathogenesis. In the mdx mice, muscles are affected with different intensities and some muscles are spared. We investigated the levels of the calcium-binding proteins calsequestrin and calmodulin in the non-spared axial (sternomastoid and diaphragm), limb (tibialis anterior and soleus), cardiac and in the spared extraocular muscles (EOM) of control and mdx mice. Immunoblotting analysis showed a significant increase of the proteins in the spared mdx EOM and a significant decrease in the most affected diaphragm. Both proteins were comparable to the cardiac muscle controls. In limb and sternomastoid muscles, calmodulin and calsequestrin were affected differently. These results suggest that differential levels of the calcium-handling proteins may be involved in the pathogenesis of myonecrosis in mdx muscles. Understanding the signaling mechanisms involving Ca(2+)-calmodulin activation and calsequestrin expression may be a valuable way to develop new therapeutic approaches to the dystrophinopaties.

  15. Nanoparticle Fullerene (C60) demonstrated stable binding with antibacterial potential towards probable targets of drug resistant Salmonella typhi - a computational perspective and in vitro investigation.

    PubMed

    Skariyachan, Sinosh; Parveen, Asma; Garka, Shruti

    2016-11-23

    Salmonella typhi, a Gram negative bacterium, has become multidrug resistant (MDR) to wide classes of antibacterials which necessitate an alarming precaution. This study focuses on the binding potential and therapeutic insight of Nano-Fullerene C60 towards virulent targets of Salmonella typhi by computational prediction and preliminary in vitro assays. The clinical isolates of Salmonella typhi were collected and antibiotic susceptibility profiles were assessed. The drug targets of pathogen were selected by rigorous literature survey and gene network analysis by various metabolic network resources. Based on this study, 20 targets were screened and the 3D structures of few drug targets were retrieved from PDB and others were computationally predicted. The structures of nanoleads such as Fullerene C60, ZnO and CuO were retrieved from drug databases. The binding potential of these nanoleads towards all selected targets were predicted by molecular docking. The best docked conformations were screened and concept was investigated by preliminary bioassays. This study revealed that most of the isolates of Salmonella typhi were found to be MDR (p < .05). The theoretical models of selected drug targets showed high stereochemical validity. The molecular docking studies suggested that Fullerene C60 showed better binding affinity towards the drug targets when compared to ZnO and CuO. The preliminary in vitro assays suggested that 100 μg/L Fullerene C60 posses significant inhibitory activities and absence of drug resistance to this nanoparticle. This study suggests that Fullerene C60 can be scaled up as probable lead molecules against the major drug targets of MDR Salmonella typhi.

  16. Binding of insecticidal lectin Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) to midgut receptors of Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi provides clues to its insecticidal potential.

    PubMed

    Roy, Amit; Gupta, Sumanti; Hess, Daniel; Das, Kali Pada; Das, Sampa

    2014-07-01

    The insecticidal potential of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectins against hemipterans has been experimentally proven. However, the basis behind the toxicity of these lectins against hemipterans remains elusive. The present study elucidates the molecular basis behind insecticidal efficacy of Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) against Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi. Confocal microscopic analyses highlighted the binding of 25 kDa stable homodimeric lectin to insect midgut. Ligand blots followed by LC MS/MS analyses identified binding partners of CEA as vacuolar ATP synthase and sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum type Ca(2+) ATPase from B. tabaci, and ATP synthase, heat shock protein 70 and clathrin heavy chain assembly protein from L. erysimi. Internalization of CEA into hemolymph was confirmed by Western blotting. Glycoprotein nature of the receptors was identified through glycospecific staining. Deglycosylation assay indicated the interaction of CEA with its receptors to be probably glycan mediated. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed the interaction kinetics between ATP synthase of B. tabaci with CEA. Pathway prediction study based on Drosophila homologs suggested the interaction of CEA with insect receptors that probably led to disruption of cellular processes causing growth retardation and loss of fecundity of target insects. Thus, the present findings strengthen our current understanding of the entomotoxic potentiality of CEA, which will facilitate its future biotechnological applications.

  17. Plant phenolic volatiles inhibit quorum sensing in pectobacteria and reduce their virulence by potential binding to ExpI and ExpR proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Janak Raj; Khazanov, Netaly; Senderowitz, Hanoch; Burdman, Saul; Lipsky, Alexander; Yedidia, Iris

    2016-12-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a population density-dependent regulatory system in bacteria that couples gene expression to cell density through accumulation of diffusible signaling molecules. Pectobacteria are causal agents of soft rot disease in a range of economically important crops. They rely on QS to coordinate their main virulence factor, production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs). Plants have evolved an array of antimicrobial compounds to anticipate and cope with pathogens, of which essential oils (EOs) are widely recognized. Here, volatile EOs, carvacrol and eugenol, were shown to specifically interfere with QS, the master regulator of virulence in pectobacteria, resulting in strong inhibition of QS genes, biofilm formation and PCWDEs, thereby leading to impaired infection. Accumulation of the signal molecule N-acylhomoserine lactone declined upon treatment with EOs, suggesting direct interaction of EOs with either homoserine lactone synthase (ExpI) or with the regulatory protein (ExpR). Homology models of both proteins were constructed and docking simulations were performed to test the above hypotheses. The resulting binding modes and docking scores of carvacrol and eugenol support potential binding to ExpI/ExpR, with stronger interactions than previously known inhibitors of both proteins. The results demonstrate the potential involvement of phytochemicals in the control of Pectobacterium.

  18. Modelling of human leucyl aminopeptidases for in silico off target binding analysis of potential Plasmodium falciparum leucine aminopeptidase (PfA-M17) specific inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sahi, Shakti; Raj, Utkarsh; Chaudhary, Meenakshi; Nain, Vikrant

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most widespread infectious diseases in the world. Emergence of multi-drug resistant Plasmodium strains makes it crucial to identify new classes of compounds for anti-malarial therapy. Novel anti-malarial compounds from natural sources (Gomphostema niveum) as well as synthetic chemicals (5-aminolevulinic acid) have been reported in recent patents. Plasmodium falciparum leucyl aminopeptidase (PfA-M17) is a validated target for antimalarial drug development. However, known aminopeptidase inhibitors beset with the problem of non-specificity. Therefore, 3D structural models of PfA-M17 human homologs, Leucine aminopeptidase3 (hLAP3) and probable leucine aminopeptidase (hNPEPL1) were predicted for molecular docking based screening of potential inhibitors for their off target activity. Comparison of IC50 and docking scores of highly active hLAP3 inhibitors shows good correlation (r(2)≈ 0.8). Further, docking analysis with potential PfA-M17 inhibitor Compound-X (identified through virtual screening) shows much higher binding affinity towards PfA-M17 (docking score -11.44) than hLAP3 (docking score -4.26) and hNPEPL1 (docking score -5.08). This lead compound, Compound-X can act as a scaffold for further increasing PfA-M17 binding affinity and hLAP3 and hNPEPL1 3D structure models will be useful for screening of PfA-M17 specific inhibitors.

  19. The PCNA-associated factor KIAA0101/p15{sup PAF} binds the potential tumor suppressor product p33ING1b

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Fiona; Lammerts van Bueren, Kelly; Butterfield, Natalie; Bennetts, Jennifer S.; Bowles, Josephine; Adolphe, Christelle; Simms, Lisa A.; Young, Joanne; Walsh, Michael D.; Leggett, Barbara; Fowles, Lindsay F.; Wicking, Carol . E-mail: C.Wicking@imb.uq.edu.au

    2006-01-01

    The KIAA0101/p15{sup PAF}/OEATC-1 protein was initially isolated in a yeast two-hybrid screen for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) binding partners, and was shown to bind PCNA competitively with the cell cycle regulator p21{sup WAF}. PCNA is involved in DNA replication and damage repair. Using polyclonal antisera raised against a p15{sup PAF} fusion protein, we have shown that in a range of mammalian tumor and non-tumor cell lines the endogenous p15{sup PAF} protein localises to the nucleus and the mitochondria. Under normal conditions no co-localisation with PCNA could be detected, however following exposure to UV it was possible to co-immunoprecipitate p15{sup PAF} and PCNA from a number of cell lines, suggesting a UV-enhanced association of the two proteins. Overexpression of p15{sup PAF} in mammalian cells was also found to protect cells from UV-induced cell death. Based on similarities between the behaviour of p15{sup PAF} and the potential tumor suppressor product p33ING1b, we have further shown that these two proteins interact in the same complex in cell cultures. This suggests that p15{sup PAF} forms part of a larger protein complex potentially involved in the regulation of DNA repair, apoptosis and cell cycle progression.

  20. Plant phenolic volatiles inhibit quorum sensing in pectobacteria and reduce their virulence by potential binding to ExpI and ExpR proteins

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Janak Raj; Khazanov, Netaly; Senderowitz, Hanoch; Burdman, Saul; Lipsky, Alexander; Yedidia, Iris

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a population density-dependent regulatory system in bacteria that couples gene expression to cell density through accumulation of diffusible signaling molecules. Pectobacteria are causal agents of soft rot disease in a range of economically important crops. They rely on QS to coordinate their main virulence factor, production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs). Plants have evolved an array of antimicrobial compounds to anticipate and cope with pathogens, of which essential oils (EOs) are widely recognized. Here, volatile EOs, carvacrol and eugenol, were shown to specifically interfere with QS, the master regulator of virulence in pectobacteria, resulting in strong inhibition of QS genes, biofilm formation and PCWDEs, thereby leading to impaired infection. Accumulation of the signal molecule N-acylhomoserine lactone declined upon treatment with EOs, suggesting direct interaction of EOs with either homoserine lactone synthase (ExpI) or with the regulatory protein (ExpR). Homology models of both proteins were constructed and docking simulations were performed to test the above hypotheses. The resulting binding modes and docking scores of carvacrol and eugenol support potential binding to ExpI/ExpR, with stronger interactions than previously known inhibitors of both proteins. The results demonstrate the potential involvement of phytochemicals in the control of Pectobacterium. PMID:27905512

  1. Dual time-point imaging for post-dose binding potential estimation applied to a [(11)C]raclopride PET dose occupancy study.

    PubMed

    Alves, Isadora L; Willemsen, Antoon Tm; Dierckx, Rudi A; da Silva, Ana Maria M; Koole, Michel

    2017-03-01

    Receptor occupancy studies performed with PET often require time-consuming dynamic imaging for baseline and post-dose scans. Shorter protocol approximations based on standard uptake value ratios have been proposed. However, such methods depend on the time-point chosen for the quantification and often lead to overestimation and bias. The aim of this study was to develop a shorter protocol for the quantification of post-dose scans using a dual time-point approximation, which employs kinetic parameters from the baseline scan. Dual time-point was evaluated for a [(11)C]raclopride PET dose occupancy study with the D2 antagonist JNJ-37822681, obtaining estimates for binding potential and receptor occupancy. Results were compared to standard simplified reference tissue model and standard uptake value ratios-based estimates. Linear regression and Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated excellent correlation and agreement between dual time-point and the standard simplified reference tissue model approach. Moreover, the stability of dual time-point-based estimates is shown to be independent of the time-point chosen for quantification. Therefore, a dual time-point imaging protocol can be applied to post-dose [(11)C]raclopride PET scans, resulting in a significant reduction in total acquisition time while maintaining accuracy in the quantification of both the binding potential and the receptor occupancy.

  2. Beyond DNA binding - a review of the potential mechanisms mediating quinacrine's therapeutic activities in parasitic infections, inflammation, and cancers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This is an in-depth review of the history of quinacrine as well as its pharmacokinetic properties and established record of safety as an FDA-approved drug. The potential uses of quinacrine as an anti-cancer agent are discussed with particular attention to its actions on nuclear proteins, the arachidonic acid pathway, and multi-drug resistance, as well as its actions on signaling proteins in the cytoplasm. In particular, quinacrine's role on the NF-κB, p53, and AKT pathways are summarized. PMID:21569639

  3. Importance of a Potential Protein Kinase A Phosphorylation Site of Na+,K+-ATPase and Its Interaction Network for Na+ Binding.

    PubMed

    Einholm, Anja P; Nielsen, Hang N; Holm, Rikke; Toustrup-Jensen, Mads S; Vilsen, Bente

    2016-05-13

    The molecular mechanism underlying PKA-mediated regulation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase was explored in mutagenesis studies of the potential PKA site at Ser-938 and surrounding charged residues. The phosphomimetic mutations S938D/E interfered with Na(+) binding from the intracellular side of the membrane, whereas Na(+) binding from the extracellular side was unaffected. The reduction of Na(+) affinity is within the range expected for physiological regulation of the intracellular Na(+) concentration, thus supporting the hypothesis that PKA-mediated phosphorylation of Ser-938 regulates Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity in vivo Ser-938 is located in the intracellular loop between transmembrane segments M8 and M9. An extended bonding network connects this loop with M10, the C terminus, and the Na(+) binding region. Charged residues Asp-997, Glu-998, Arg-1000, and Lys-1001 in M10, participating in this bonding network, are crucial to Na(+) interaction. Replacement of Arg-1005, also located in the vicinity of Ser-938, with alanine, lysine, methionine, or serine resulted in wild type-like Na(+) and K(+) affinities and catalytic turnover rate. However, when combined with the phosphomimetic mutation S938E only lysine substitution of Arg-1005 was compatible with Na(+),K(+)-ATPase function, and the Na(+) affinity of this double mutant was reduced even more than in single mutant S938E. This result indicates that the positive side chain of Arg-1005 or the lysine substituent plays a mechanistic role as interaction partner of phosphorylated Ser-938, transducing the phosphorylation signal into a reduced affinity of Na(+) site III. Electrostatic interaction of Glu-998 is of minor importance for the reduction of Na(+) affinity by phosphomimetic S938E as revealed by combining S938E with E998A.

  4. Higher Pre-treatment 5-HT1A Receptor Binding Potential in Bipolar Disorder Depression is Associated with Treatment Remission: A Naturalistic Treatment Pilot PET Study

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Martin J; Hesselgrave, Natalie; Ciarleglio, Adam; Ogden, R Todd; Sullivan, Gregory M; Mann, J John; Parsey, Ramin V

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar Disorder is a major cause of disability and a high risk for suicide. The pathophysiology of the disorder remains largely unknown. Medication choice for bipolar depression patients involves trial and error. Our group reported previously that brain serotonin 1A (5HT1A) receptor binding measured by positron emission tomography (PET) is higher in bipolar depression. We now investigated whether pretreatment 5HT1A levels correlates with antidepressant medication outcome. 41 medication-free DSM-IV diagnosed, bipolar patients in a major depressive episode (MDE) had brain PET scans performed using [11C]WAY-100635 and a metabolite corrected arterial input function. The patients then received naturalistic psychopharmacologic treatment as outpatients and a follow up Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) after 3 months of treatment. Patients with 24 item HDRS scores less than 10 were considered to have remitted. A linear mixed effects model was used to compare BPF (binding potential, proportional to the total number of available receptors) in 13 brain regions of interest between remitters and non-remitters. 34 patients completed 3 months of treatment and ratings; 9 had remitted. Remitters and non-remitters did not differ in age, sex or recent medication history with serotonergic medications. Remitters had higher [11C]WAY-100635 BPF across all brain regions compared with non-remitters (p=0.02). Higher pre-treatment brain 5HT1A receptor binding was associated with remission after 3 months of pharmacological treatment in bipolar depression. Prospective treatment studies are warranted to determine whether this test predicts outcome of specific types of treatment. PMID:23720414

  5. Higher pretreatment 5-HT1A receptor binding potential in bipolar disorder depression is associated with treatment remission: a naturalistic treatment pilot PET study.

    PubMed

    Lan, Martin J; Hesselgrave, Natalie; Ciarleglio, Adam; Ogden, R Todd; Sullivan, Gregory M; Mann, J John; Parsey, Ramin V

    2013-11-01

    Bipolar disorder is a major cause of disability and a high risk for suicide. The pathophysiology of the disorder remains largely unknown. Medication choice for bipolar depression patients involves trial and error. Our group reported previously that brain serotonin 1A (5-HT(1A)) receptor binding measured by positron emission tomography (PET) is higher in bipolar depression. We now investigated whether pretreatment 5-HT(1A) levels correlates with antidepressant medication outcome. Forty-one medication-free DSM-IV diagnosed, bipolar patients in a major depressive episode had brain PET scans performed using [(11)C]WAY-100635 and a metabolite corrected arterial input function. The patients then received naturalistic psychopharmacologic treatment as outpatients and a follow up Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) after 3 months of treatment. Patients with 24 item HDRS scores less than 10 were considered to have remitted. A linear mixed effects model was used to compare BP(F) (binding potential, proportional to the total number of available receptors) in 13 brain regions of interest between remitters and nonremitters. Thirty-four patients completed 3 months of treatment and ratings; 9 had remitted. Remitters and nonremitters did not differ in age, sex, or recent medication history with serotonergic medications. Remitters had higher [(11)C]WAY-100635 BP(F) across all brain regions compared with nonremitters (P = 0.02). Higher pretreatment brain 5-HT(1A) receptor binding was associated with remission after 3 months of pharmacological treatment in bipolar depression. Prospective treatment studies are warranted to determine whether this test predicts outcome of specific types of treatment.

  6. On the role of a conserved, potentially helix-breaking residue in the tRNA-binding alpha-helix of archaeal CCA-adding enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyundae D; Sood, Vanita D; Baker, David; Weiner, Alan M

    2008-07-01

    Archaeal class I CCA-adding enzymes use a ribonucleoprotein template to build and repair the universally conserved 3'-terminal CCA sequence of the acceptor stem of all tRNAs. A wealth of structural and biochemical data indicate that the Archaeoglobus fulgidus CCA-adding enzyme binds primarily to the tRNA acceptor stem through a long, highly conserved alpha-helix that lies nearly parallel to the acceptor stem and makes many contacts with its sugar-phosphate backbone. Although the geometry of this alpha-helix is nearly ideal in all available cocrystal structures, the helix contains a highly conserved, potentially helix-breaking proline or glycine near the N terminus. We performed a mutational analysis to dissect the role of this residue in CCA-addition activity. We found that the phylogenetically permissible P295G mutant and the phylogenetically absent P295T had little effect on CCA addition, whereas P295A and P295S progressively interfered with CCA addition (C74>C75>A76 addition). We also examined the effects of these mutations on tRNA binding and the kinetics of CCA addition, and performed a computational analysis using Rosetta Design to better understand the role of P295 in nucleotide transfer. Our data indicate that CCA-adding activity does not correlate with the stability of the pre-addition cocrystal structures visualized by X-ray crystallography. Rather, the data are consistent with a transient conformational change involving P295 of the tRNA-binding alpha-helix during or between one or more steps in CCA addition.

  7. Binding energy of the donor impurities in GaAs-Ga 1- x Al x As quantum well wires with Morse potential in the presence of electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aciksoz, Esra; Bayrak, Orhan; Soylu, Asim

    2016-10-01

    The behavior of a donor in the GaAs-Ga1-x Al x As quantum well wire represented by the Morse potential is examined within the framework of the effective-mass approximation. The donor binding energies are numerically calculated for with and without the electric and magnetic fields in order to show their influence on the binding energies. Moreover, how the donor binding energies change for the constant potential parameters (D e, r e, and a) as well as with the different values of the electric and magnetic field strengths is determined. It is found that the donor binding energy is highly dependent on the external electric and magnetic fields as well as parameters of the Morse potential. Project supported by the Turkish Science Research Council (TÜBİTAK) and the Financial Supports from Akdeniz and Nigde Universities.

  8. Binding Energy and Dissociation Barrier: Experimental Determination of the Key Parameters of the Potential Energy Curve of Diethyl Ether on Si(001).

    PubMed

    Reutzel, Marcel; Lipponer, Marcus; Dürr, Michael; Höfer, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    The key parameters of the potential energy curve of organic molecules on semiconductor surfaces, binding energy of the intermediate state and dissociation barrier, were experimentally investigated for the model system of diethyl ether (Et2O) on Si(001). Et2O adsorbs via a datively bonded intermediate from which it converts via ether cleavage into a covalently attached final state. This thermally activated conversion into the final state was followed in real-time by means of optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) at different temperatures and the associated energy barrier ϵa = 0.38 ± 0.05 eV and pre-exponential factor νa = 10(4±1) s(-1) were determined. From molecular beam experiments on the initial sticking probability, the difference between the desorption energy ϵd and ϵa was extracted and thus the binding energy of the intermediate state was determined (0.62 ± 0.08 eV). The results are discussed in terms of general chemical trends as well as with respect to a wider applicability on adsorbate reactions on semiconductor surfaces.

  9. Evaluation of allergenic potential for rice seed protein components utilizing a rice proteome database and an allergen database in combination with IgE-binding of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Kana; Hino, Shingo; Oshima, Kenzi; Nadano, Daita; Urisu, Atsuo; Takaiwa, Fumio; Matsuda, Tsukasa

    2016-01-01

    Among 131 rice endosperm proteins previously identified by MS-based proteomics, most of the proteins showed low or almost no sequence similarity to known allergens in databases, whereas nine proteins did it significantly. The sequence of two proteins showed high overall identity with Hsp70-like hazel tree pollen allergen (Cor a 10) and barley α-amylase (Hor v 16), respectively, whereas the others showed low identity (28-58%) with lemon germin-like protein (Cit l 1), corn zein (Zea m 50 K), wheat chitinase-like xylanase inhibitor (Tri a XI), and kinase-like pollen allergen of Russian thistle (Sal k 1). Immuno-dot blot analysis showed that recombinant proteins for these rice seed homologs were positive in the IgE-binding, but not necessarily similarity dependent, from some allergic patients. These results suggest that utilization of proteome and sequence databases in combination with IgE-binding analysis was effective to screen and evaluate allergenic potential of rice seed protein components.

  10. Effect of surface and membrane potentials on IAA (indoleactic acid) uptake and binding by zucchini membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, K.A.; Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1986-08-01

    The polar transport of the endogenous hormone controlling extension growth of plant cells, indoleacetic acid (IAA), is thought to depend on transmembrane pH and electrical gradients resulting in part from the action of proton ATPases in the plasma membrane. Elements of this transport process are permeation of the membrane by the undissociated lipophilic indoleacetic acid (IAAH) from the acidic apoplast, followed by dissociation of the weak acid and accumulation of the IAA anion (IAA/sup -/) in the alkaline cytoplasm; a saturable symport of IAA/sup -/ with one or more protons; a carrier-mediated efflux of IAA/sup -/ down a considerable electrochemical gradient. The efflux is greater from the basal than the apical end of cells and is thought to be responsible for the overall polarity of the process. This step is also the site of action of napthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and herbicides that inhibit polar transport but stimulate net accumulation of auxin by tissues and cells. We are using membrane vesicles as a simplified system for studying the mechanisms involved in the transport and accumulation of auxin. In particular, we are interested in determining the involvement of the transmembrane pH (pH/sub o/ < pH/sub i/) and voltage gradients (K/sup +/ diffusion potential, (K/sup +/)/sub in/ > (K/sup +/)/sub out/) in IAA uptake. 19 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Theoretical study of alkali cation-benzene complexes: potential energy surfaces and binding energies with improved results for rubidium and cesium.

    PubMed

    Coletti, Cecilia; Re, Nazzareno

    2006-05-25

    High level ab initio quantum chemical calculations have been carried out on the binding of alkali metal to benzene with special attention to heavier metals for which the agreement between the most recent theoretical investigations and the experimental bond dissociation energies (BDEs) is not very good. We performed BSSE-corrected geometry optimizations employing the MP2 level of theory with large basis sets and a modified Stuttgart RSC 1997 basis set for rubidium and cesium and carried out single point energy calculations at the MP4 level, obtaining, also for the latter metals, BDE values in good agreement with the experimental results. Furthermore, in view of the development of empirical correction terms to force fields to describe cation-pi interactions, we evaluated the potential energy surface along the benzene symmetry axis and discussed the role of the BSSE correction on the accuracy of our results.

  12. Overexpression of Sna3 stabilizes tryptophan permease Tat2, potentially competing for the WW domain of Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase with its binding protein Bul1.

    PubMed

    Hiraki, Toshiki; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2010-01-04

    Tryptophan permease Tat2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes Rsp5-dependent degradation upon exposure to high hydrostatic pressure and it limits the growth of tryptophan auxotrophs. Overexpression of SNA3 encoding an endosomal/vacuolar protein possessing the PPAY motif allowed growth at 25 MPa, which was potentiated by marked stabilization of Tat2. This appeared to depend on the PPAY motif, which interacted with the WW domain of Rsp5. Subcellular localization of Rsp5 was unchanged by overexpression of either SNA3 or SNA3-AAAY. While the loss of Bul1, a binding protein of Rsp5, or the rsp5-ww3 mutation allowed high-pressure growth, overexpression of BUL1 abolished the Sna3-mediated growth at 25 MPa. These results suggest that Sna3 and Bul1 compete for the WW domain of Rsp5 upon Tat2 ubiquitination.

  13. Role of surface layer collagen binding protein from indigenous Lactobacillus plantarum 91 in adhesion and its anti-adhesion potential against gut pathogen.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Tyagi, Ashish; Kaushik, Jai Kumar; Saklani, Asha Chandola; Grover, Sunita; Batish, Virender Kumar

    2013-12-14

    Human feacal isolates were ascertain as genus Lactobacillus using specific primer LbLMA1/R16-1 and further identified as Lactobacillus plantarum with species specific primers Lpl-3/Lpl-2. 25 L. plantarum strains were further assessed for hydrophobicity following the microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) method and colonization potentials based on their adherence to immobilized human collagen type-1. Surface proteins were isolated from selected L. plantarum 91(Lp91) strain. The purified collagen binding protein (Cbp) protein was assessed for its anti-adhesion activity against enteric Escherichia coli 0157:H7 pathogen on immobilized collagen. Four L. plantarum strains displayed high degree of hydrophobicity and significant adhesion to collagen. A 72 kDa protein was purified which reduced 59.71% adhesion of E. coli 0157:H7 on immobilized collagen as compared to control well during adhesion assay. Cbp protein is the major influencing factor in inhibition of E. coli 0157:H7 adhesion with extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Hydrophobicity and adhesion potential are closely linked attributes precipitating in better colonization potential of the lactobacillus strains. Cbp is substantiated as a crucial surface protein contributing in adhesion of lactobacillus strains. The study can very well be the platform for commercialization of indigenous probiotic strain once their functional attributes are clinically explored.

  14. Theranostic multimodular potential of zinc-doped ferrite-saturated metal-binding protein-loaded novel nanocapsules in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kamalapuram, Sishir K; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Roy, Kislay; Chaudhary, Rajneesh; Sehgal, Rakesh; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2016-01-01

    The present study successfully developed orally deliverable multimodular zinc (Zn) iron oxide (Fe3O4)-saturated bovine lactoferrin (bLf)-loaded polymeric nanocapsules (NCs), and evaluated their theranostic potential (antitumor efficacy, magnetophotothermal efficacy and imaging capability) in an in vivo human xenograft CpG-island methylator phenotype (CIMP)-1+/CIMP2−/chromosome instability-positive colonic adenocarcinoma (Caco2) and claudin-low, triple-negative (ER−/PR−/HER2−; MDA-MB-231) breast cancer model. Mice fed orally on the Zn-Fe-bLf NC diet showed downregulation in tumor volume and complete regression in tumor volume after 45 days of feeding. In human xenograft colon cancer, vehicle-control NC diet-group (n=5) mice showed a tumor volume of 52.28±11.55 mm3, and Zn-Fe-bLf NC diet (n=5)-treated mice had a tumor-volume of 0.10±0.073 mm3. In the human xenograft breast cancer model, Zn-Fe-bLf NC diet (n=5)-treated mice showed a tumor volume of 0.051±0.062 mm3 within 40 days of feeding. Live mouse imaging conducted by near-infrared fluorescence imaging of Zn-Fe-bLf NCs showed tumor site-specific localization and regression of colon and breast tumor volume. Ex vivo fluorescence-imaging analysis of the vital organs of mice exhibited sparse localization patterns of Zn-Fe-bLf NCs and also confirmed tumor-specific selective localization patterns of Zn-Fe-bLf NCs. Dual imaging using magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography scans revealed an unprecedented theranostic ability of the Zn-Fe-bLf NCs. These observations warrant consideration of multimodular Zn-Fe-bLf NCs for real-time cancer imaging and simultaneous cancer-targeted therapy. PMID:27099495

  15. Neurotoxic potential of lunar and martian dust: influence on em, proton gradient, active transport, and binding of glutamate in rat brain nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Krisanova, Natalia; Kasatkina, Ludmila; Sivko, Roman; Borysov, Arseniy; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Slenzka, Klaus; Borisova, Tatiana

    2013-08-01

    The harmful effects of lunar dust (LD) on directly exposed tissues are documented in the literature, whereas researchers are only recently beginning to consider its effects on indirectly exposed tissues. During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and transported to the central nervous system. The neurotoxic potential of LD and martian dust (MD) has not yet been assessed. Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter involved in most aspects of normal brain function, whereas disturbances in glutamate homeostasis contribute to the pathogenesis of major neurological disorders. The research was focused on the analysis of the effects of LD/MD simulants (JSC-1a/JSC, derived from volcanic ash) on the key characteristics of glutamatergic neurotransmission. The average size of LD and MD particles (even minor fractions) before and after sonication was determined by dynamic light scattering. With the use of radiolabeled l-[(14)C]glutamate, it was shown that there is an increase in l-[(14)C]glutamate binding to isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) in low [Na(+)] media and at low temperature in the presence of LD. MD caused significantly lesser changes under the same conditions, whereas nanoparticles of magnetite had no effect at all. Fluorimetric experiments with potential-sensitive dye rhodamine 6G and pH-sensitive dye acridine orange showed that the potential of the plasma membrane of the nerve terminals and acidification of synaptic vesicles were not altered by LD/MD (and nanoparticles of magnetite). Thus, the unique effect of LD to increase glutamate binding to the nerve terminals was shown. This can have deleterious effects on extracellular glutamate homeostasis in the central nervous system and cause alterations in the ambient level of glutamate, which is extremely important for proper synaptic transmission. During a long-term mission, a combination of constant irritation due

  16. A moderate metal-binding hydrazone meets the criteria for a bioinorganic approach towards Parkinson's disease: Therapeutic potential, blood-brain barrier crossing evaluation and preliminary toxicological studies.

    PubMed

    Cukierman, Daphne Schneider; Pinheiro, Ana Beatriz; Castiñeiras-Filho, Sergio L P; da Silva, Anastácia Sá P; Miotto, Marco C; De Falco, Anna; de P Ribeiro, Thales; Maisonette, Silvia; da Cunha, Alessandra L M C; Hauser-Davis, Rachel A; Landeira-Fernandez, J; Aucélio, Ricardo Q; Outeiro, Tiago F; Pereira, Marcos D; Fernández, Claudio O; Rey, Nicolás A

    2017-02-22

    Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases share similar amyloidogenic mechanisms, in which metal ions might play an important role. In this last neuropathy, misfolding and aggregation of α-synuclein (α-Syn) are crucial pathological events. A moderate metal-binding compound, namely, 8-hydroxyquinoline-2-carboxaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (INHHQ), which was previously reported as a potential 'Metal-Protein Attenuating Compound' for Alzheimer's treatment, is well-tolerated by healthy Wistar rats and does not alter their major organ weights, as well as the tissues' reduced glutathione and biometal levels, at a concentration of 200mgkg(-1). INHHQ definitively crosses the blood-brain barrier and can be detected in the brain of rats so late as 24h after intraperitoneal administration. After 48h, brain clearance is complete. INHHQ is able to disrupt, in vitro, anomalous copper-α-Syn interactions, through a mechanism probably involving metal ions sequestering. This compound is non-toxic to H4 (human neuroglioma) cells and partially inhibits intracellular α-Syn oligomerization. INHHQ, thus, shows definite potential as a therapeutic agent against Parkinson's as well.

  17. Binding and inhibition of drug transport proteins by heparin: a potential drug transporter modulator capable of reducing multidrug resistance in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunliang; Scully, Michael; Petralia, Gloria; Kakkar, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, multidrug resistance (MDR), associated with increased activity of transmembrane drug transporter proteins which impair cytotoxic treatment by rapidly removing the drugs from the targeted cells. Previously, it has been shown that heparin treatment of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy increases survival. In order to determine whether heparin is capable reducing MDR and increasing the potency of chemotherapeutic drugs, the cytoxicity of a number of agents toward four cancer cell lines (a human enriched breast cancer stem cell line, two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and a human lung cancer cell line A549) was tested in the presence or absence of heparin. Results demonstrated that heparin increased the cytotoxicity of a range of chemotherapeutic agents. This effect was associated with the ability of heparin to bind to several of the drug transport proteins of the ABC and non ABC transporter systems. Among the ABC system, heparin treatment caused significant inhibition of the ATPase activity of ABCG2 and ABCC1, and of the efflux function observed as enhanced intracellular accumulation of specific substrates. Doxorubicin cytoxicity, which was enhanced by heparin treatment of MCF-7 cells, was found to be under the control of one of the major non-ABC transporter proteins, lung resistance protein (LRP). LRP was also shown to be a heparin-binding protein. These findings indicate that heparin has a potential role in the clinic as a drug transporter modulator to reduce multidrug resistance in cancer patients.

  18. Role of Factor H Binding Protein in Neisseria meningitidis Virulence and Its Potential as a Vaccine Candidate To Broadly Protect against Meningococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Lisa K.; Zagursky, Robert J.; Lin, Shuo L.; Murphy, Ellen; Zlotnick, Gary W.; Hoiseth, Susan K.; Jansen, Kathrin U.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Neisseria meningitidis is a Gram-negative microorganism that exists exclusively in humans and can cause devastating invasive disease. Although capsular polysaccharide-based vaccines against serogroups A, C, Y, and W135 are widely available, the pathway to a broadly protective vaccine against serogroup B has been more complex. The last 11 years has seen the discovery and development of the N. meningitidis serogroup B (MnB) outer membrane protein factor H binding protein (fHBP) as a vaccine component. Since the initial discovery of fHBP, a tremendous amount of work has accumulated on the diversity, structure, and regulation of this important protein. fHBP has proved to be a virulence factor for N. meningitidis and a target for functional bactericidal antibodies. fHBP is critical for survival of meningococci in the human host, as it is responsible for the primary interaction with human factor H (fH). Binding of hfH by the meningococcus serves to downregulate the host alternative complement pathway and helps the organism evade host innate immunity. Preclinical studies have shown that an fHBP-based vaccine can elicit serum bactericidal antibodies capable of killing MnB, and the vaccine has shown very encouraging results in human clinical trials. This report reviews our current knowledge of fHBP. In particular, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of fHBP, its importance to N. meningitidis, and its potential role as a vaccine for preventing MnB disease. PMID:23699256

  19. A human centromere protein, CENP-B, has a DNA binding domain containing four potential alpha helices at the NH2 terminus, which is separable from dimerizing activity

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The alphoid DNA-CENP-B (centromere protein B) complex is the first sequence-specific DNA/protein complex detected in the centromeric region of human chromosomes. In the reaction, CENP-B recognizes a 17-bp sequence (CENP-B box) and assembles two alphoid DNA molecules into a complex, which is designated complex A (Muro, Y., H. Masumoto, K. Yoda, N. Nozaki, M. Ohashi, and T. Okazaki. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 116:585-596). Since CENP-B gene is conserved in mammalian species and CENP-B boxes are found also in mouse centromere satellite DNA (minor satellite), this sequence-specific DNA-protein interaction may be important for some kind of common centromere function. In this study we have characterized the structure of CENP-B and CENP-B-alphoid DNA complex. We have shown by chemical cross-linking that CENP-B formed a dimer, and have estimated by molecular weight determination the composition of complex A to be a CENP-B dimer and two molecules of alphoid DNA. The DNA binding domain has been delimited within the NH2-terminal 125-amino acid region containing four potential alpha-helices using truncated CENP-B made in Escherichia coli cells. We have shown that CENP-B had sites highly sensitive to proteases and that the DNA binding domain was separable from the dimerizing activity by the proteolytic cleavage at 20 kD from the COOH terminus of the molecule. Thus, CENP-B may organize a higher order structure in the centromere by juxtaposing two CENP-B boxes in the alphoid DNA repeat through both the DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions. PMID:1469042

  20. Short-day potentiation of low temperature-induced gene expression of a C-repeat-binding factor-controlled gene during cold acclimation in silver birch.

    PubMed

    Puhakainen, Tuula; Li, Chunyang; Boije-Malm, Maria; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko; Heino, Pekka; Palva, E Tapio

    2004-12-01

    Development of winter hardiness in trees is a two-stage process involving sequential perception of distinct environmental cues, short-day (SD) photoperiod and low temperature (LT). We have shown that both SD and LT are recognized by leaves of silver birch (Betula pendula cv Roth) leading to increased freezing tolerance, and thus leaves can be used as an experimental model to study the physiological and molecular events taking place during cold acclimation. To obtain a molecular marker for the acclimation process in birch we cloned a gene, designated Bplti36, encoding a 36-kD acidic SK2 type of dehydrin. The gene was responsive to LT, drought, salt, and exogenous abscisic acid. This responsiveness to abiotic stresses and abscisic acid was retained when Bplti36 was introduced to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The LT induction of the gene appeared to be under the control of the C-repeat-binding factor pathway as suggested by the presence of several C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element/LT-responsive elements in the Bplti36 promoter and its constitutive expression in C-repeat-binding factor overproducing Arabidopsis. In birch SD photoperiod at normal-growth temperature did not result in significant induction of Bplti36. However, preexposure to SD followed by LT treatment resulted in a remarkable increase in Bplti36 transcript accumulation as compared to LT-treated plants grown at long-day photoperiod. This suggests that SD photoperiod potentiates the LT response by conditioning the leaf tissue to be more responsive to the LT stimulus.

  1. Multi-Species Comparative Analysis of the Equine ACE Gene Identifies a Highly Conserved Potential Transcription Factor Binding Site in Intron 16

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Natasha A.; Tammen, Imke; Raadsma, Herman W.

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is essential for control of blood pressure. The human ACE gene contains an intronic Alu indel (I/D) polymorphism that has been associated with variation in serum enzyme levels, although the functional mechanism has not been identified. The polymorphism has also been associated with cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, renal disease and elite athleticism. We have characterized the ACE gene in horses of breeds selected for differing physical abilities. The equine gene has a similar structure to that of all known mammalian ACE genes. Nine common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) discovered in pooled DNA were found to be inherited in nine haplotypes. Three of these SNPs were located in intron 16, homologous to that containing the Alu polymorphism in the human. A highly conserved 18 bp sequence, also within that intron, was identified as being a potential binding site for the transcription factors Oct-1, HFH-1 and HNF-3β, and lies within a larger area of higher than normal homology. This putative regulatory element may contribute to regulation of the documented inter-individual variation in human circulating enzyme levels, for which a functional mechanism is yet to be defined. Two equine SNPs occurred within the conserved area in intron 16, although neither of them disrupted the putative binding site. We propose a possible regulatory mechanism of the ACE gene in mammalian species which was previously unknown. This advance will allow further analysis leading to a better understanding of the mechanisms underpinning the associations seen between the human Alu polymorphism and enzyme levels, cardiovascular disease states and elite athleticism. PMID:23408978

  2. The glucocorticoid receptor binds to a sequence overlapping the TATA box of the human osteocalcin promoter: a potential mechanism for negative regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Strömstedt, P E; Poellinger, L; Gustafsson, J A; Carlstedt-Duke, J

    1991-01-01

    Expression of the human osteocalcin promoter is negatively regulated by glucocorticoids in vivo. In vitro DNase I and exonuclease III footprinting analysis showed binding of purified glucocorticoid receptor in close proximity to and overlapping with the TATA box of the osteocalcin gene. These results imply competition or interference with binding of the TATA box-binding transcription factor IID as a mechanism of repression of this gene by glucocorticoids. In support of this notion, point mutation analysis of the receptor binding site indicated that flanking nucleotides and not the TATA box motif per se were important for receptor interaction. Moreover, DNA binding competition assays showed specific binding of the receptor only to the TATA box region of the osteocalcin gene and not to the corresponding region of an immunoglobulin heavy-chain promoter. Images PMID:2038339

  3. Mixed kappa agonists and mu agonists/antagonists as potential pharmacotherapeutics for cocaine abuse: synthesis and opioid receptor binding affinity of N-substituted derivatives of morphinan.

    PubMed

    Neumeyer, J L; Gu, X H; van Vliet, L A; DeNunzio, N J; Rusovici, D E; Cohen, D J; Negus, S S; Mello, N K; Bidlack, J M

    2001-10-22

    A series of new N-substituted derivatives of morphinan was synthesized and their binding affinity for the three opioid receptors (mu, delta, and kappa) was determined. A paradoxical effect of N-propargyl (MCL-117) and N-(3-iodoprop-(2E)-enyl) (MCL-118) substituents on the binding affinities for the mu and kappa opioid receptors was observed. All of these novel derivatives showed a preference for the mu and kappa versus delta binding.

  4. Drug-protein binding of Danhong injection and the potential influence of drug combination with aspirin: Insight by ultrafiltration LC-MS and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junfeng; Yi, Xiaojiao; Huang, Peng; Chen, Shuqing; Wu, Yongjiang

    2017-02-05

    Danhong injection (DHI) is a widely used Chinese medicine injection (CMI) for the clinical treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. In this study, a simple and efficient in vitro method based on ultrafiltration LC-MS and molecular modeling has been developed to study the human serum albumin (HSA) binding of the compounds in DHI. Seven major components including protocatechuic aldehyde, p-coumaric acid, salvianolic acid D, rosmarinic acid, salvianolic acid E, lithospermic acid and salvianolic acid B were identified as HSA ligands and their binding degrees in the proposed non-saturated model were 26.17, 37.69, 99.77, 91.78, 96.91, 99.42 and 98.10%, respectively. Considering the drug-HSA binding property of the compounds in DHI may change during drug combination therapy, competitive binding assay was carried out to evaluate the influence of aspirin on the DHI-HSA binding. Experimental results revealed that the salvianolic acids in DHI had stronger binding ability to HSA than sodium salicylate. To further verify the results above, molecular modeling and probe displacement assay were conducted to investigate the optimum binding site and binding affinity of the ligands on HSA. Our findings suggested that the established method could be a powerful tool to study the drug-HSA binding property of CMIs.

  5. Recruitment of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 into specific intranuclear compartments depends on tyrosine phosphorylation that affects its DNA-binding and transactivation potential.

    PubMed Central

    Ktistaki, E; Ktistakis, N T; Papadogeorgaki, E; Talianidis, I

    1995-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF-4) is a prominent member of the family of liver-enriched transcription factors, playing a role in the expression of a large number of liver-specific genes. We report here that HNF-4 is a phosphoprotein and that phosphorylation at tyrosine residue(s) is important for its DNA-binding activity and, consequently, for its transactivation potential both in cell-free systems and in cultured cells. Tyrosine phosphorylation did not affect the transport of HNF-4 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus but had a dramatic effect on its subnuclear localization. HNF-4 was concentrated in distinct nuclear compartments, as evidenced by in situ immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. This compartmentalization disappeared when tyrosine phosphorylation was inhibited by genistein. The correlation between the intranuclear distribution of HNF-4 and its ability to activate endogenous target genes demonstrates a phosphorylation signal-dependent pathway in the regulation of transcription factor activity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7568236

  6. Adipocyte Fatty Acid Binding Protein Potentiates Toxic Lipids-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Macrophages via Inhibition of Janus Kinase 2-dependent Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Hoo, Ruby L. C.; Shu, Lingling; Cheng, Kenneth K. Y.; Wu, Xiaoping; Liao, Boya; Wu, Donghai; Zhou, Zhiguang; Xu, Aimin

    2017-01-01

    Lipotoxicity is implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity-related inflammatory complications by promoting macrophage infiltration and activation. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP) play key roles in obesity and mediate inflammatory activity through similar signaling pathways. However, little is known about their interplay in lipid-induced inflammatory responses. Here, we showed that prolonged treatment of palmitic acid (PA) increased ER stress and expression of A-FABP, which was accompanied by reduced autophagic flux in macrophages. Over-expression of A-FABP impaired PA-induced autophagy associating with enhanced ER stress and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, while genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of A-FABP reversed the conditions. PA-induced expression of autophagy-related protein (Atg)7 was attenuated in A-FABP over-expressed macrophages, but was elevated in A-FABP-deficient macrophages. Mechanistically, A-FABP potentiated the effects of PA by inhibition of Janus Kinase (JAK)2 activity, thus diminished PA-induced Atg7 expression contributing to impaired autophagy and further augmentation of ER stress. These findings suggest that A-FABP acts as autophagy inhibitor to instigate toxic lipids-induced ER stress through inhibition of JAK2-dependent autophagy, which in turn triggers inflammatory responses in macrophages. A-FABP-JAK2 axis may represent an important pathological pathway contributing to obesity-related inflammatory diseases. PMID:28094778

  7. Lobular Distribution and Variability in Hepatic ATP Binding Cassette Protein B1 (ABCB1, P-gp): Ontogenetic Differences and Potential for Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Abanda, Ngu Njei; Riches, Zoe; Collier, Abby C.

    2017-01-01

    The ATP Binding Cassette B1 (ABCB1) transporter has critical roles in endo- and xenobiotic efficacy and toxicity. To understand population variability in hepatic transport we determined ABCB1 mRNA and protein levels in total liver lysates sampled from 8 pre-defined sites (n = 24, 18–69 years), and in S9 from randomly acquired samples (n = 87, 7 days–87 years). ABCB1 levels did not differ significantly throughout individual livers and showed 4.4-fold protein variation between subjects. Neither mRNA nor protein levels varied with sex, ethnicity, obesity or triglycerides in lysates or S9 (that showed the same relationships), but protein levels were lower in pediatric S9 (p < 0.0001), with 76% of adult ABCB1 present at birth and predicted to mature in 5 years. Pediatric total liver lysates were not available. In summary, opportunistic collection for studying human hepatic ABCB1 is acceptable. Additionally, ABCB1 may be lower in children, indicating differential potential for toxicity and response to therapy in this special population. PMID:28218636

  8. Human cartilage chitinase 3-like protein 2: cloning, expression, and production of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies for osteoarthritis detection and identification of potential binding partners.

    PubMed

    Ranok, Araya; Khunkaewla, Panida; Suginta, Wipa

    2013-10-01

    Human cartilage chitinase 3-like protein 2 (CHI3L2 or YKL-39) is a member of family-18 glycosyl hydrolases that lacks chitinase activity. YKL-39 is known as a potential marker for the activation of chondrocytes and the progression of osteoarthritis. In this study, we cloned and expressed a functional form of human YKL-39 in the bacterial system. The Escherichia coli expressed YKL-30 was used as immugen for production of anti YKL-39 polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. Both antibody types were highly selective, reacting only with YKL-39. Isotype mapping identified two hybridoma clones (so called clones 6H11 and 8H3) to be IgM isotype. Dot blot assay showed that the monoclonal antibody was strongly active with the synovial fluid of an osteoarthritis patient, human monocyte, and T lymphocyte cell lines. Database search for protein binding partners gave high hits with several glycoproteins that play particular roles in cartilage tissue scaffolding, connective tissue formation, and cell-cell interactions. In conclusion, anti YKL-39 polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies were raised and tested to be suitable for immunological applications, such as the investigation of the YKL-39 regulating pathway and the development of an immunosensing tool for sensitive detection of cartilage tissue destruction.

  9. Human Mu Opioid Receptor (OPRM1 A118G) polymorphism is associated with brain mu-opioid receptor binding potential in smokers

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Riju; Ruparel, Kosha; Newberg, Andrew; Wileyto, E. Paul; Loughead, James W.; Divgi, Chaitanya; Blendy, Julie A.; Logan, Jean; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Lerman, Caryn

    2011-01-01

    Evidence points to the endogenous opioid system, and the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) in particular, in mediating the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, including nicotine. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human MOR gene (OPRM1 A118G) has been shown to alter receptor protein level in preclinical models and smoking behavior in humans. To clarify the underlying mechanisms for these associations, we conducted an in vivo investigation of the effects of OPRM1 A118G genotype on MOR binding potential (BPND or receptor availability). Twenty-two smokers prescreened for genotype (12 A/A, 10 */G) completed two [11C]carfentanil positron emission tomography (PET) imaging sessions following overnight abstinence and exposure to a nicotine-containing cigarette and a denicotinized cigarette. Independent of session, smokers homozygous for the wild-type OPRM1 A allele exhibited significantly higher levels of MOR BPND than smokers carrying the G allele in bilateral amygdala, left thalamus, and left anterior cingulate cortex. Among G allele carriers, the extent of subjective reward difference (denicotinized versus nicotine cigarette) was associated significantly with MOR BPND difference in right amygdala, caudate, anterior cingulate cortex, and thalamus. Future translational investigations can elucidate the role of MORs in nicotine addiction, which may lead to development of novel therapeutics. PMID:21576462

  10. Anabaena circadian clock proteins KaiA and KaiB reveal a potential common binding site to their partner KaiC

    PubMed Central

    Garces, Robert G; Wu, Ning; Gillon, Wanda; Pai, Emil F

    2004-01-01

    The cyanobacterial clock proteins KaiA and KaiB are proposed as regulators of the circadian rhythm in cyanobacteria. Mutations in both proteins have been reported to alter or abolish circadian rhythmicity. Here, we present molecular models of both KaiA and KaiB from the cyanobacteria Anabaena sp PCC7120 deduced by crystal structure analysis, and we discuss how clock-changing or abolishing mutations may cause their resulting circadian phenotype. The overall fold of the KaiA monomer is that of a four-helix bundle. KaiB, on the other hand, adopts an alpha–beta meander motif. Both proteins purify and crystallize as dimers. While the folds of the two proteins are clearly different, their size and some surface features of the physiologically relevant dimers are very similar. Notably, the functionally relevant residues Arg 69 of KaiA and Arg 23 of KaiB align well in space. The apparent structural similarities suggest that KaiA and KaiB may compete for a potential common binding site on KaiC. PMID:15071498

  11. Human Mu Opioid Receptor (OPRM1A118G) polymorphism is associated with brain mu- opioid receptor binding potential in smokers

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.; Logan, J.; Ray, R.; Ruparel, K.; Newberg, A.; Wileyto, E.P.; Loughead, J.W.; Divgi, C.; Blendy, J.A.; Logan, J.; Zubieta, J.-K.; Lerman, C.

    2011-04-15

    Evidence points to the endogenous opioid system, and the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) in particular, in mediating the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, including nicotine. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human MOR gene (OPRM1 A118G) has been shown to alter receptor protein level in preclinical models and smoking behavior in humans. To clarify the underlying mechanisms for these associations, we conducted an in vivo investigation of the effects of OPRM1 A118G genotype on MOR binding potential (BP{sub ND} or receptor availability). Twenty-two smokers prescreened for genotype (12 A/A, 10 */G) completed two [{sup 11}C] carfentanil positron emission tomography (PET) imaging sessions following overnight abstinence and exposure to a nicotine-containing cigarette and a denicotinized cigarette. Independent of session, smokers homozygous for the wild-type OPRM1 A allele exhibited significantly higher levels of MOR BP{sub ND} than smokers carrying the G allele in bilateral amygdala, left thalamus, and left anterior cingulate cortex. Among G allele carriers, the extent of subjective reward difference (denicotinized versus nicotine cigarette) was associated significantly with MOR BP{sub ND} difference in right amygdala, caudate, anterior cingulate cortex, and thalamus. Future translational investigations can elucidate the role of MORs in nicotine addiction, which may lead to development of novel therapeutics.

  12. Specific binding of lacosamide to collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2) and direct impairment of its canonical function: implications for the therapeutic potential of lacosamide.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sarah M; Khanna, Rajesh

    2015-04-01

    The novel antiepileptic drug lacosamide (LCM; SPM927, Vimpat®) has been heralded as having a dual-mode of action through interactions with both the voltage-gated sodium channel and the neurite outgrowth-promoting collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2). Lacosamide's ability to dampen neuronal excitability through the voltage-gated sodium channel likely underlies its efficacy in attenuating the symptoms of epilepsy (i.e., seizures). While the role of CRMP2 in epilepsy has not been well studied, given the proposed involvement of circuit reorganization in epileptogenesis, the ability of lacosamide to alter CRMP2 function may prove disease modifying. Recently, however, the validity of lacosamide's interaction with CRMP2 has come under scrutiny. In this review, we address the contradictory reports concerning the binding of lacosamide to CRMP2 as well as the ability of lacosamide to directly impact CRMP2 function. Additionally, we address similarly the contradicting reports regarding the potential disease-modifying effect of lacosamide on the development and progression of epilepsy. As the vast majority of antiepileptic drugs influences only the symptoms of epilepsy, the ability to hinder disease progression would be a major breakthrough in efforts to cure or prevent this debilitating syndrome.

  13. Liquid drops on a surface: Using density functional theory to calculate the binding potential and drop profiles and comparing with results from mesoscopic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Adam P.; Thiele, Uwe; Archer, Andrew J.

    2015-02-01

    The contribution to the free energy for a film of liquid of thickness h on a solid surface due to the interactions between the solid-liquid and liquid-gas interfaces is given by the binding potential, g(h). The precise form of g(h) determines whether or not the liquid wets the surface. Note that differentiating g(h) gives the Derjaguin or disjoining pressure. We develop a microscopic density functional theory (DFT) based method for calculating g(h), allowing us to relate the form of g(h) to the nature of the molecular interactions in the system. We present results based on using a simple lattice gas model, to demonstrate the procedure. In order to describe the static and dynamic behaviour of non-uniform liquid films and drops on surfaces, a mesoscopic free energy based on g(h) is often used. We calculate such equilibrium film height profiles and also directly calculate using DFT the corresponding density profiles for liquid drops on surfaces. Comparing quantities such as the contact angle and also the shape of the drops, we find good agreement between the two methods. We also study in detail the effect on g(h) of truncating the range of the dispersion forces, both those between the fluid molecules and those between the fluid and wall. We find that truncating can have a significant effect on g(h) and the associated wetting behaviour of the fluid.

  14. Recombinant protein truncation strategy for inducing bactericidal antibodies to the macrophage infectivity potentiator protein of Neisseria meningitidis and circumventing potential cross-reactivity with human FK506-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Bielecka, Magdalena K; Devos, Nathalie; Gilbert, Mélanie; Hung, Miao-Chiu; Weynants, Vincent; Heckels, John E; Christodoulides, Myron

    2015-02-01

    A recombinant macrophage infectivity potentiator (rMIP) protein of Neisseria meningitidis induces significant serum bactericidal antibody production in mice and is a candidate meningococcal vaccine antigen. However, bioinformatics analysis of MIP showed some amino acid sequence similarity to human FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) in residues 166 to 252 located in the globular domain of the protein. To circumvent the potential concern over generating antibodies that could recognize human proteins, we immunized mice with recombinant truncated type I rMIP proteins that lacked the globular domain and the signal leader peptide (LP) signal sequence (amino acids 1 to 22) and contained the His purification tag at either the N or C terminus (C-term). The immunogenicity of truncated rMIP proteins was compared to that of full (i.e., full-length) rMIP proteins (containing the globular domain) with either an N- or C-terminal His tag and with or without the LP sequence. By comparing the functional murine antibody responses to these various constructs, we determined that C-term His truncated rMIP (-LP) delivered in liposomes induced high levels of antibodies that bound to the surface of wild-type but not Δmip mutant meningococci and showed bactericidal activity against homologous type I MIP (median titers of 128 to 256) and heterologous type II and III (median titers of 256 to 512) strains, thereby providing at least 82% serogroup B strain coverage. In contrast, in constructs lacking the LP, placement of the His tag at the N terminus appeared to abrogate bactericidal activity. The strategy used in this study would obviate any potential concerns regarding the use of MIP antigens for inclusion in bacterial vaccines.

  15. Proteomic identification of calcium-binding chaperone calreticulin as a potential mediator for the neuroprotective and neuritogenic activities of fruit-derived glycoside amygdalin.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuanyuan; Yang, Chuanbin; Zhao, Jia; Tse, Hung Fat; Rong, Jianhui

    2015-02-01

    Amygdalin is a fruit-derived glycoside with the potential for treating neurodegenerative diseases. This study was designed to identify the neuroprotective and neuritogenic activities of amygdalin. We initially demonstrated that amygdalin enhanced nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neuritogenesis and attenuated 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in rat dopaminergic PC12 cells. To define protein targets for amygdalin, we selected a total of 11 mostly regulated protein spots from two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels for protein identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry. We verified the effect of amygdalin on six representative proteins (i.e., calreticulin, Hsp90β, Grp94, 14-3-3η, 14-3-3ζ/δ and Rab GDI-α) for biological relevance to neuronal survival and differentiation. Calcium-binding chaperone calreticulin is of special interest for its activities to promote folding, oligomeric assembly and quality control of proteins that modulate cell survival and differentiation. We transiently knocked down calreticulin expression by specific siRNA and studied its effect on the neuroprotective and neuritogenic activities of amygdalin. We found that amygdalin failed to enhance NGF-induced neuritogenesis in calreticulin-siRNA transfected cells. On the other hand, amygdalin rescued 6-OHDA-induced loss of calreticulin expression. We also found that amygdalin increased the intracellular calcium concentration possibly via inducing calreticulin. Collectively, our results demonstrated the role of calreticulin in mediating the neuroprotective and neuritogenic activities of amygdalin.

  16. Women with Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Have Increased Harm Avoidance and Reduced 5-HT1A Receptor Binding Potential in the Anterior Cingulate and Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Åhs, Fredrik; Savic, Ivanka

    2013-01-01

    Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a common condition, characterized by somatic distress upon exposure to odors. As in other idiopathic environmental intolerances, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Contrary to the expectations it was recently found that persons with MCS activate the odor-processing brain regions less than controls, while their activation of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is increased. The present follow-up study was designed to test the hypotheses that MCS subjects have increased harm avoidance and deviations in the serotonin system, which could render them intolerant to environmental odors. Twelve MCS and 11 control subjects, age 22–44, all working or studying females, were included in a PET study where 5-HT1A receptor binding potential (BP) was assessed after bolus injection of [11C]WAY100635. Psychological profiles were assessed by the Temperament and Character Inventory and the Swedish universities Scales of Personality. All MCS and 12 control subjects were also tested for emotional startle modulation in an acoustic startle test. MCS subjects exhibited significantly increased harm avoidance, and anxiety compared to controls. They also had a reduced 5-HT1A receptor BP in amygdala (p = 0.029), ACC (p = 0.005) (planned comparisons, significance level 0.05), and insular cortex (p = 0.003; significance level p<0.005 with Bonferroni correction), and showed an inverse correlation between degree of anxiety and the BP in the amygdala (planned comparison). No group by emotional category difference was found in the startle test. Increased harm avoidance and the observed changes in the 5-HT1A receptor BP in the regions processing harm avoidance provides a plausible pathophysiological ground for the symptoms described in MCS, and yields valuable information for our general understanding of idiopathic environmental intolerances. PMID:23349968

  17. Far upstream element-binding protein 1 (FUBP1) is a potential c-Myc regulator in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and its expression promotes ESCC progression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Zhu, Jun-Ya; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Bao, Bo-Jun; Guan, Cheng-Qi; Yang, Xiao-Jing; Liu, Yan-Hua; Huang, Yue-Jiao; Ni, Run-Zhou; Ji, Li-Li

    2016-03-01

    The human far upstream element (FUSE) binding protein 1 (FUBP1) belongs to an ancient family which is required for proper regulation of the c-Myc proto-oncogene. Although c-Myc plays an important role in development of various carcinomas, the relevance of FUBP1 and their contribution to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) development remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between FUBP1 and c-Myc as well as their contribution to ESCC development. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses were performed to evaluate FUBP1 expression. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis was performed to explore the correlation between FUBP1 and c-Myc in ESCC. In addition, the role of FUBP1 in ESCC proliferation was studied in ESCC cells through knocking FUBP1 down. The regulation of FUBP1 on proliferation was confirmed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, flow cytometric assays, and clone formation assays. The expressions of FUBP1 and c-Myc were both upregulated in ESCC tissues. In addition to correlation between expression of FUBP1 and tumor grade, we also confirmed the correlation of FUBP1, c-Myc, and Ki-67 expression by twos. Moreover, upregulation of FUBP1 and c-Myc in ESCC was associated with poor survival. FUBP1 was confirmed to activate c-Myc in ESCC tissues and cells. FUBP1 was demonstrated to promote proliferation of ESCC cells. Moreover, downregulation of both FUBP1 and c-Myc was confirmed to inhibit proliferation of ESCC cells. Our results indicated that FUBP1 may potentially stimulate c-Myc expression in ESCC and its expression may promote ESCC progression.

  18. Tissue- and cell-specific localization of galectins, β-galactose-binding animal lectins, and their potential functions in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Nio-Kobayashi, Junko

    2017-01-01

    Fifteen galectins, β-galactose-binding animal lectins, are known to be distributed throughout the body. We herein summarize current knowledge on the tissue- and cell-specific localization of galectins and their potential functions in health and disease. Galectin-3 is widely distributed in epithelia, including the simple columnar epithelium in the gut, stratified squamous epithelium in the gut and skin, and transitional epithelium and several regions in nephrons in the urinary tract. Galectin-2 and galectin-4/6 are gut-specific, while galectin-7 is found in the stratified squamous epithelium in the gut and skin. The reproductive tract mainly contains galectin-1 and galectin-3, and their expression markedly changes during the estrous/menstrual cycle. The galectin subtype expressed in the corpus luteum (CL) changes in association with luteal function. The CL of women and cows displays a "galectin switch" with coordinated changes in the major galectin subtype and its ligand glycoconjugate structure. Macrophages express galectin-3, which may be involved in phagocytotic activity. Lymphoid tissues contain galectin-3-positive macrophages, which are not always stained with the macrophage marker, F4/80. Subsets of neurons in the brain and dorsal root ganglion express galectin-1 and galectin-3, which may contribute to the regeneration of damaged axons, stem cell differentiation, and pain control. The subtype-specific contribution of galectins to implantation, fibrosis, and diabetes are also discussed. The function of galectins may differ depending on the tissues or cells in which they act. The ligand glycoconjugate structures mediated by glycosyltransferases including MGAT5, ST6GAL1, and C2GnT are important for revealing the functions of galectins in healthy and disease states.

  19. Computational investigation of the binding mode of bis(hydroxylphenyl)arenes in 17β-HSD1: molecular dynamics simulations, MM-PBSA free energy calculations, and molecular electrostatic potential maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negri, Matthias; Recanatini, Maurizio; Hartmann, Rolf W.

    2011-09-01

    17β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (17β-HSD1) catalyzes the last step of the estrogen biosynthesis, namely the reduction of estrone to the biologically potent estradiol. As such it is a potentially attractive drug target for the treatment of estrogen-dependent diseases like breast cancer and endometriosis. 17β-HSD1 belongs to the bisubstrate enzymes and exists as an ensemble of conformations. These principally differ in the region of the βFαG'-loop, suggesting a prominent role in substrate and inhibitor binding. Although several classes of potent non-steroidal 17β-HSD1 inhibitors currently exist, their binding mode is still unclear. We aimed to elucidate the binding mode of bis(hydroxyphenyl)arenes, a highly potent class of 17β-HSD1 inhibitors, and to rank these compounds correctly with respect to their inhibitory potency, two essential aspects in drug design. Ensemble docking experiments resulted in a steroidal binding mode for the closed enzyme conformations and in an alternative mode for the opened and occluded conformers with the inhibitors placed below the NADPH interacting with it synergically via π-π stacking and H-bond formation. Both binding modes were investigated by MD simulations and MM-PBSA binding free energy estimations using as representative member for this class compound 1 (50 nM). Notably, only the alternative binding mode proved stable and was energetically more favorable, while when simulated in the steroidal binding mode compound 1 was displaced from the active site. In parallel, ab initio studies of small NADPH-inhibitor complexes were performed, which supported the importance of the synergistic interaction between inhibitors and cofactor.

  20. Enhancement of the Regenerative Potential of Anorganic Bovine Bone Graft Utilizing a Polyglutamate-Modified BMP2 Peptide with Improved Binding to Calcium-Containing Materials

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Jennifer L.; Bonvallet, Paul P.; Abou-Arraj, Ramzi V.; Schupbach, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Autogenous bone is the gold standard material for bone grafting in craniofacial and orthopedic regenerative medicine. However, due to complications associated with harvesting donor bone, clinicians often use commercial graft materials that may lose their osteoinductivity due to processing. This study was aimed to functionalize one of these materials, anorganic bovine bone (ABB), with osteoinductive peptides to enhance regenerative capacity. Two peptides known to induce osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells were evaluated: (1) DGEA, an amino acid motif within collagen I and (2) a biomimetic peptide derived from bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP2pep). To achieve directed coupling of the peptides to the graft surface, the peptides were engineered with a heptaglutamate domain (E7), which confers specific binding to calcium moieties within bone mineral. Peptides with the E7 domain exhibited greater anchoring to ABB than unmodified peptides, and E7 peptides were retained on ABB for at least 8 weeks in vivo. To assess the osteoinductive potential of the peptide-conjugated ABB, ectopic bone formation was evaluated utilizing a rat subcutaneous pouch model. ABB conjugated with full-length recombinant BMP2 (rBMP2) was also implanted as a model for current clinical treatments utilizing rBMP2 passively adsorbed to carriers. These studies showed that E7BMP2pep/ABB samples induced more new bone formation than all other peptides, and an equivalent amount of new bone as compared with rBMP2/ABB. A mandibular defect model was also used to examine intrabony healing of peptide-conjugated ABB. Bone healing was monitored at varying time points by positron emission tomography imaging with 18F-NaF, and it was found that the E7BMP2pep/ABB group had greater bone metabolic activity than all other groups, including rBMP2/ABB. Importantly, animals implanted with rBMP2/ABB exhibited complications, including inflammation and formation of cataract-like lesions in the eye, whereas no

  1. The increased binding affinity of curcumin with human serum albumin in the presence of rutin and baicalin: A potential for drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bing-Mi; Zhang, Jun; Hao, Ai-Jun; Xu, Liang; Wang, Dan; Ji, Hui; Sun, Shi-Jie; Chen, Bo-Qi; Liu, Bin

    2016-02-01

    The impacts of rutin and baicalin on the interaction of curcumin (CU) with human serum albumin (HSA) were investigated by fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies under imitated physiological conditions. The results showed that the fluorescence quenching of HSA by CU was a simultaneous static and dynamic quenching process, irrespective of the presence or absence of flavonoids. The binding constants between CU and HSA in the absence and presence of rutin and baicalin were 2.268 × 105 M- 1, 3.062 × 105 M- 1, and 3.271 × 105 M- 1, indicating that the binding affinity was increased in the case of two flavonoids. Furthermore, the binding distance determined according to Förster's theory was decreased in the presence of flavonoids. Combined with the fact that flavonoids and CU have the same binding site (site I), it can be concluded that they may simultaneously bind in different regions in site I, and formed a ternary complex of flavonoid-HSA-CU. Meanwhile, the results of fluorescence quenching, CD and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra revealed that flavonoids further strengthened the microenvironmental and conformational changes of HSA induced by CU binding. Therefore, it is possible to develop a novel complex involving CU, flavonoid and HSA for CU delivery. The work may provide some valuable information in terms of improving the poor bioavailabiliy of CU.

  2. Endomorphins 1 and 2 inhibit IL-10 and IL-12 production and innate immune functions, and potentiate NF-kappaB DNA binding in THP-1 differentiated to macrophage-like cells.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Y; Ohura, K

    2002-09-01

    We evaluated immunological effects of opioid peptides endomorphins 1 and 2 on the production of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-12 cytokines, functions related to innate immunity and NF-kappaB DNA binding in human cell line THP-1. Endomorphins 1 and 2 inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated IL-10 and IL-12 production in THP-1 differentiated to macrophage-like cells by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Similarly, they suppressed LPS-stimulated IL-10 and IL-12 production in THP-1 matured to monocytes by 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. In addition, endomorphins 1 and 2 led to marked potentiation of NF-kappaB binding in THP-1 differentiated to macrophage-like cells. Furthermore, these endomorphins further potentiated LPS-induced NF-kappaB binding. Moreover, they inhibited chemotaxis, phagocytosis of Escherichia coli and PMA-stimulated production of hydrogen peroxide in THP-1 differentiated to macrophage-like cells. These results suggest that endomorphins 1 and 2 may inhibit THP-1 functions, such as cytokine production and functions related to innate immune, and potentiate NF-kappaB DNA binding in THP-1.

  3. Genome-Wide Ultrabithorax Binding Analysis Reveals Highly Targeted Genomic Loci at Developmental Regulators and a Potential Connection to Polycomb-Mediated Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Meireles-Filho, Antonio C. A.; Pagani, Michaela; Stark, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Hox homeodomain transcription factors are key regulators of animal development. They specify the identity of segments along the anterior-posterior body axis in metazoans by controlling the expression of diverse downstream targets, including transcription factors and signaling pathway components. The Drosophila melanogaster Hox factor Ultrabithorax (Ubx) directs the development of thoracic and abdominal segments and appendages, and loss of Ubx function can lead for example to the transformation of third thoracic segment appendages (e.g. halters) into second thoracic segment appendages (e.g. wings), resulting in a characteristic four-wing phenotype. Here we present a Drosophila melanogaster strain with a V5-epitope tagged Ubx allele, which we employed to obtain a high quality genome-wide map of Ubx binding sites using ChIP-seq. We confirm the sensitivity of the V5 ChIP-seq by recovering 7/8 of well-studied Ubx-dependent cis-regulatory regions. Moreover, we show that Ubx binding is predictive of enhancer activity as suggested by comparison with a genome-scale resource of in vivo tested enhancer candidates. We observed densely clustered Ubx binding sites at 12 extended genomic loci that included ANTP-C, BX-C, Polycomb complex genes, and other regulators and the clustered binding sites were frequently active enhancers. Furthermore, Ubx binding was detected at known Polycomb response elements (PREs) and was associated with significant enrichments of Pc and Pho ChIP signals in contrast to binding sites of other developmental TFs. Together, our results show that Ubx targets developmental regulators via strongly clustered binding sites and allow us to hypothesize that regulation by Ubx might involve Polycomb group proteins to maintain specific regulatory states in cooperative or mutually exclusive fashion, an attractive model that combines two groups of proteins with prominent gene regulatory roles during animal development. PMID:27575958

  4. A 1.3Å Structure of Zinc-bound N-terminal Domain of Calmodulin Elucidates Potential Early Ion-binding Step

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Julia T.; Guo, Qing; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2007-01-01

    Summary Calmodulin (CaM) is a 16.8 kDa calcium binding protein involved in calcium-signal transduction. It is the canonical member of the EF-hand family of proteins, which are characterized by a helix-loop-helix calcium-binding motif. CaM is comprised of N- and C-terminal globular domains (N-CaM and C-CaM), and within each domain there are two EF-hand motifs. Upon binding calcium, CaM undergoes a significant, global conformational change involving reorientation of the four helix bundles in each of its two domains. This conformational change upon ion binding is a key component of the signal transduction and regulatory roles of CaM, yet the precise nature of this transition is still unclear. Here, we present a 1.3Å structure of zinc-bound N-terminal calmodulin (N-CaM) solved by single wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) phasing of a selenomethionyl-N-CaM. Our zinc-bound N-CaM structure differs from previously reported CaM structures and resembles calcium-free apo-CaM despite the zinc binding to both EF-hand motifs. Structural comparison with calcium-free apo-CaM, calcium-loaded CaM, and a crosslinked calcium-loaded CaM suggests that our zinc-bound N-CaM reveals an intermediate step in the initiation of metal ion binding at the first EF-hand motif. Our data also suggests that metal ion coordination by two key residues in the first metal-binding site represents an initial step in the conformational transition induced by metal binding. This is followed by reordering of the N-terminal region of the helix exiting from this first binding loop. This conformational switch should be incorporated into models of either step-wise conformational transition or flexible, dynamic energetic state-sampling based transition. PMID:17942116

  5. Sodium-dependent high-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)hemicholinium-3 in the rat brain: a potentially selective marker for presynaptic cholinergic sites

    SciTech Connect

    Vickroy, T.W.; Roeske, W.R.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1984-12-03

    An attempt has been made to describes the membrane binding properties of (/sup 3/H)hemicholinium-3 ((/sup 3/H)HC-3), a selective inhibitor of sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake (SDHACU) in cholinergic nerve terminals. Under the described assay conditions. (/sup 3/H)HC-3 binds with a saturable population of high-affinity (apparent K/sub d/ = 1.9 nM CNS membrane sites having the regional distribution: striatum >> hippocampus > cerebral cortex > cerebellum. High-affinity (/sup 3/H)HC-3 binding is entirely dependent upon the presence of sodium chloride (EC/sub 50/ = 35-50 mM) and is markedly reduced when other salts of sodium or monovalent ions are substituted. (/sup 3/H)HC-3 binding is inhibited by choline (K/sub i/ = 6..mu..M) and acetylcholine (K/sub i/ = 35..mu..M) but markedly less sensitive to other cholinergic agents and metabolic inhibitors. In light of the similar ionic dependencies, regional distributions and pharmacological specificities of (/sup 3/H)HC-3 binding and SDHACU, closely associated sites may be involved in both processes. 2 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  6. Serum amyloid A, protein Z, and C4b-binding protein β chain as new potential biomarkers for pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ting-Ting; Shi, Li-Ying; Wei, Li-Liang; Li, Xiang; Yang, Su; Wang, Chong; Liu, Chang-Ming; Chen, Zhong-Liang; Tu, Hui-Hui; Li, Zhong-Jie; Li, Ji-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to discover novel biomarkers for pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Differentially expressed proteins in the serum of patients with TB were screened and identified by iTRAQ-two dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 79 abnormal proteins were discovered in patients with TB compared with healthy controls. Of these, significant differences were observed in 47 abnormally expressed proteins between patients with TB or pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Patients with TB (n = 136) exhibited significantly higher levels of serum amyloid A (SAA), vitamin K-dependent protein Z (PROZ), and C4b-binding protein β chain (C4BPB) than those in healthy controls (n = 66) (P<0.0001 for each) albeit significantly lower levels compared with those in patients with pneumonia (n = 72) (P<0.0001 for each) or COPD (n = 72) (P<0.0001, P<0.0001, P = 0.0016, respectively). After 6 months of treatment, the levels of SAA and PROZ were significantly increased (P = 0.022, P<0.0001, respectively), whereas the level of C4BPB was significantly decreased (P = 0.0038) in treated TB cases (n = 72). Clinical analysis showed that there were significant differences in blood clotting and lipid indices in patients with TB compared with healthy controls, patients with pneumonia or COPD, and treated TB cases (P<0.05). Correlation analysis revealed significant correlations between PROZ and INR (rs = 0.414, P = 0.044), and between C4BPB and FIB (rs = 0.617, P = 0.0002) in patients with TB. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the area under the curve value of the diagnostic model combining SAA, PROZ, and C4BPB to discriminate the TB group from the healthy control, pneumonia, COPD, and cured TB groups was 0.972, 0.928, 0.957, and 0.969, respectively. Together, these results suggested that SAA, PROZ, and C4BPB may serve as new potential biomarkers for TB. Our study may thus provide experimental data for

  7. Water clusters in an argon matrix: infrared spectra from molecular dynamics simulations with a self-consistent charge density functional-based tight binding/force-field potential.

    PubMed

    Simon, Aude; Iftner, Christophe; Mascetti, Joëlle; Spiegelman, Fernand

    2015-03-19

    The present theoretical study aims at investigating the effects of an argon matrix on the structures, energetics, dynamics, and infrared (IR) spectra of small water clusters (H2O)n (n = 1-6). The potential energy surface is obtained from a hybrid self-consistent charge density functional-based tight binding/force-field approach (SCC-DFTB/FF) in which the water clusters are treated at the SCC-DFTB level and the matrix is modeled at the FF level by a cluster consisting of ∼340 Ar atoms with a face centered cubic (fcc) structure, namely (H2O)n/Ar. With respect to a pure FF scheme, this allows a quantum description of the molecular system embedded in the matrix, along with all-atom geometry optimization and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the (H2O)n/Ar system. Finite-temperature IR spectra are derived from the MD simulations. The SCC-DFTB/FF scheme is first benchmarked on (H2O)Arn clusters against correlated wave function results and DFT calculations performed in the present work, and against FF data available in the literature. Regarding (H2O)n/Ar systems, the geometries of the water clusters are found to adapt to the fcc environment, possibly leading to intermolecular distortion and matrix perturbation. Several energetical quantities are estimated to characterize the water clusters in the matrix. In the particular case of the water hexamer, substitution and insertion energies for the prism, bag, and cage are found to be lower than that for the 6-member ring isomer. Finite-temperature MD simulations show that the water monomer has a quasifree rotation motion at 13 K, in agreement with experimental data. In the case of the water dimer, the only large-amplitude motion is a distortion-rotation intermolecular motion, whereas only vibration motions around the nuclei equilibrium positions are observed for clusters with larger sizes. Regarding the IR spectra, we find that the matrix environment leads to redshifts of the stretching modes and almost no shift of the

  8. Platelet factor 4 binds to glycanated forms of thrombomodulin and to protein C. A potential mechanism for enhancing generation of activated protein C.

    PubMed

    Dudek, A Z; Pennell, C A; Decker, T D; Young, T A; Key, N S; Slungaard, A

    1997-12-12

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is an abundant platelet alpha-granule heparin-binding protein. We have previously shown that PF4 accelerates up to 25-fold the proteolytic conversion of protein C to activated protein C by the thrombin.thrombomodulin complex by increasing its affinity for protein C 30-fold. This stimulatory effect requires presence of the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain in protein C and is enhanced by the presence of a chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan (GAG) domain on thrombomodulin. We hypothesized that cationic PF4 binds to both protein C and thrombomodulin through these anionic domains. Qualitative SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of avidin extracts of solutions containing biotinylated PF4 and candidate ligands shows that PF4 binds to GAG+ but not GAG- forms of thrombomodulin and native but not Gla-domainless protein C. Quantitative analysis using the surface plasmon resonance-based BIAcoreTM biosensor system confirms the extremely high affinity of PF4 for heparin (KD = 4 nM) and shows that PF4 binds to GAG+ thrombomodulin with a KD of 31 nM and to protein C with a KD of 0.37 microM. In contrast, PF4 had no measurable interaction with GAG- thrombomodulin or Gla-domainless protein C. Western blot analysis of normal human plasma extracted with biotinylated PF4 demonstrates PF4 binding to protein C in a physiologic context. Thus, PF4 binds with relative specificity and high affinity to the GAG- domain of thrombomodulin and the Gla domain of protein C. These interactions may enhance the affinity of the thrombin.thrombomodulin complex for protein C and thereby promote the generation of activated protein C.

  9. Diuretic drug binding to human glutathione transferase P1-1: potential role of Cys-101 revealed in the double mutant C47S/Y108V.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Soriano, Indalecio; Parker, Lorien J; Primavera, Alessandra; Wielens, Jerome; Holien, Jessica K; Casas-Solvas, Juan M; Vargas-Berenguel, Antonio; Aguilera, Ana M; Nuccetelli, Marzia; Mazzetti, Anna P; Lo Bello, Mario; Parker, Michael W; García-Fuentes, Luis

    2011-01-01

    The diuretic drug ethacrynic acid (EA), both an inhibitor and substrate of pi class glutathione S-transferase (GST P1-1), has been tested in clinical trials as an adjuvant in chemotherapy. We recently studied the role of the active site residue Tyr-108 in binding EA to the enzyme and found that the analysis was complicated by covalent binding of this drug to the highly reactive Cys-47. Previous attempts to eliminate this binding by chemical modification yielded ambiguous results and therefore we decided here to produce a double mutant C47S/Y108V by site directed mutagenesis and further expression in Escherichia coli and the interaction of EA and its GSH conjugate (EASG) examined by calorimetric studies and X-ray diffraction. Surprisingly, in the absence of Cys-47, Cys-101 (located at the dimer interface) becomes a target for modification by EA, albeit at a lower conjugation rate than Cys-47. The Cys-47 → Ser mutation in the double mutant enzyme induces a positive cooperativity between the two subunits when ligands with affinity to G-site bind to enzyme. However, this mutation does not seem to affect the thermodynamic properties of ligand binding to the electrophilic binding site (H-site) and the thermal or chemical stability of this double mutant does not significantly affect the unfolding mechanism in either the absence or presence of ligand. Crystal structures of apo and an EASG complex are essentially identical with a few exceptions in the H-site and in the water network at the dimer interface.

  10. The Arabidopsis Multistress Regulator TSPO Is a Heme Binding Membrane Protein and a Potential Scavenger of Porphyrins via an Autophagy-Dependent Degradation Mechanism[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Vanhee, Celine; Zapotoczny, Grzegorz; Masquelier, Danièle; Ghislain, Michel; Batoko, Henri

    2011-01-01

    TSPO, a stress-induced, posttranslationally regulated, early secretory pathway-localized plant cell membrane protein, belongs to the TspO/MBR family of regulatory proteins, which can bind porphyrins. This work finds that boosting tetrapyrrole biosynthesis enhanced TSPO degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana and that TSPO could bind heme in vitro and in vivo. This binding required the His residue at position 91 (H91), but not that at position 115 (H115). The H91A and double H91A/H115A substitutions stabilized TSPO and rendered the protein insensitive to heme-regulated degradation, suggesting that heme binding regulates At-TSPO degradation. TSPO degradation was inhibited in the autophagy-defective atg5 mutant and was sensitive to inhibitors of type III phosphoinositide 3-kinases, which regulate autophagy in eukaryotic cells. Mutation of the two Tyr residues in a putative ubiquitin-like ATG8 interacting motif of At-TSPO did not affect heme binding in vitro but stabilized the protein in vivo, suggesting that downregulation of At-TSPO requires an active autophagy pathway, in addition to heme. Abscisic acid–dependent TSPO induction was accompanied by an increase in unbound heme levels, and downregulation of TSPO coincided with the return to steady state levels of unbound heme, suggesting that a physiological consequence of active TSPO downregulation may be heme scavenging. In addition, overexpression of TSPO attenuated aminolevulinic acid–induced porphyria in plant cells. Taken together, these data support a role for TSPO in porphyrin binding and scavenging during stress in plants. PMID:21317376

  11. Screening of transgenic proteins expressed in transgenic food crops for the presence of short amino acid sequences identical to potential, IgE – binding linear epitopes of allergens

    PubMed Central

    Kleter, Gijs A; Peijnenburg, Ad ACM

    2002-01-01

    Background Transgenic proteins expressed by genetically modified food crops are evaluated for their potential allergenic properties prior to marketing, among others by identification of short identical amino acid sequences that occur both in the transgenic protein and allergenic proteins. A strategy is proposed, in which the positive outcomes of the sequence comparison with a minimal length of six amino acids are further screened for the presence of potential linear IgE-epitopes. This double track approach involves the use of literature data on IgE-epitopes and an antigenicity prediction algorithm. Results Thirty-three transgenic proteins have been screened for identities of at least six contiguous amino acids shared with allergenic proteins. Twenty-two transgenic proteins showed positive results of six- or seven-contiguous amino acids length. Only a limited number of identical stretches shared by transgenic proteins (papaya ringspot virus coat protein, acetolactate synthase GH50, and glyphosate oxidoreductase) and allergenic proteins could be identified as (part of) potential linear epitopes. Conclusion Many transgenic proteins have identical stretches of six or seven amino acids in common with allergenic proteins. Most identical stretches are likely to be false positives. As shown in this study, identical stretches can be further screened for relevance by comparison with linear IgE-binding epitopes described in literature. In the absence of literature data on epitopes, antigenicity prediction by computer aids to select potential antibody binding sites that will need verification of IgE binding by sera binding tests. Finally, the positive outcomes of this approach warrant further clinical testing for potential allergenicity. PMID:12477382

  12. A graphical method to compare the in vivo binding potential of PET radioligands in the absence of a reference region: application to [11C]PBR28 and [18F]PBR111 for TSPO imaging

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qi; Owen, David R; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Turkheimer, Federico E; Gunn, Roger N

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands for a reversible central nervous system (CNS) demand a high specific to nonspecific signal characterized by the binding potential (BPND). The quantification of BPND requires the determination of the nondisplaceable binding usually derived from a reference region devoid of the target of interest. However, for many CNS targets, there is no valid reference region available. In such cases, the total volume of distribution (VT) is often used as the outcome measure, which includes both the specific and nonspecific binding signals. Here we present a graphical method that allows for direct comparison of the binding potential of ligands using the regional VT data alone via linear regression. The method was first validated using literature data for five serotonin transporter ligands, for which a reference region exists, and then applied to two second generation 18 kDa translocator protein radioligands, namely [11C]PBR28 and [18F]PBR111. The analysis determined that [11C]PBR28 had a higher BPND than [18F]PBR111. PMID:24736889

  13. Binding Procurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of the binding procurement process in purchasing Aerospace Flight Battery Systems. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) requested NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group to develop a set of guideline requirements document for Binding Procurement Contracts.

  14. Potential role of the binding of whey proteins to human buccal cells on the perception of astringency in whey protein beverages.

    PubMed

    Ye, Aiqian; Zheng, Tao; Ye, Jack Z; Singh, Harjinder

    2012-07-16

    Whey protein beverages have been shown to be astringent, which means that they are not appealing to consumers. The exact mechanism of astringency in whey protein beverages is yet to be fully elucidated. In this preliminary study, the binding between β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), lactoferrin (LF) and human oral epithelial cells (HSC-2 and NO-1-N-1 cells) at pH 3.5 and pH 7.4 was assayed as a function of protein concentration using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The binding of β-LG and LF to HSC-2 and NO-1-N-1 cells was dependent on protein type, protein concentration, pH and time. The intensity of the binding to HSC-2 and NO-1-N-1 cells was much greater for LF than for β-LG and was protein concentration dependent, which was consistent with the in vivo astringency perception of LF and β-LG. The findings demonstrated that the binding interaction between whey proteins and human oral epithelial cells may play an important role in the perception of astringency in whey protein beverages.

  15. Generation of the first structure-based pharmacophore model containing a selective "zinc binding group" feature to identify potential glyoxalase-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Al-Balas, Qosay; Hassan, Mohammad; Al-Oudat, Buthina; Alzoubi, Hassan; Mhaidat, Nizar; Almaaytah, Ammar

    2012-11-22

    Within this study, a unique 3D structure-based pharmacophore model of the enzyme glyoxalase-1 (Glo-1) has been revealed. Glo-1 is considered a zinc metalloenzyme in which the inhibitor binding with zinc atom at the active site is crucial. To our knowledge, this is the first pharmacophore model that has a selective feature for a "zinc binding group" which has been customized within the structure-based pharmacophore model of Glo-1 to extract ligands that possess functional groups able to bind zinc atom solely from database screening. In addition, an extensive 2D similarity search using three diverse similarity techniques (Tanimoto, Dice, Cosine) has been performed over the commercially available "Zinc Clean Drug-Like Database" that contains around 10 million compounds to help find suitable inhibitors for this enzyme based on known inhibitors from the literature. The resultant hits were mapped over the structure based pharmacophore and the successful hits were further docked using three docking programs with different pose fitting and scoring techniques (GOLD, LibDock, CDOCKER). Nine candidates were suggested to be novel Glo-1 inhibitors containing the "zinc binding group" with the highest consensus scoring from docking.

  16. Equal impact of diffusion and DNA binding rates on the potential spatial distribution of nuclear factor κB transcription factor inside the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Sycheva, A M; Kel, A; Nikolaev, E N; Moshkovskii, S A

    2014-06-01

    There are two physical processes that influence the spatial distribution of transcription factor molecules entering the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell, the binding to genomic DNA and the diffusion throughout the nuclear volume. Comparison of the DNA-protein association rate constant and the protein diffusion constant may determine which one is the limiting factor. If the process is diffusion-limited, transcription factor molecules are captured by DNA before their even distribution in the nuclear volume. Otherwise, if the reaction rate is limiting, these molecules diffuse evenly and then find their binding sites. Using well-studied human NF-κB dimer as an example, we calculated its diffusion constant using the Debye-Smoluchowski equation. The value of diffusion constant was about 10(-15) cm(3)/s, and it was comparable to the NF-κB association rate constant for DNA binding known from previous studies. Thus, both diffusion and DNA binding play an equally important role in NF-κB spatial distribution. The importance of genome 3D-structure in gene expression regulation and possible dependence of gene expression on the local concentration of open chromatin can be hypothesized from our theoretical estimate.

  17. Crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of the botulinum C-D mosaic neurotoxin reveals potential roles of lysines 1118 and 1136 in membrane interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Buchko, Garry W.; Qin, Ling; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.

    2011-01-07

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by different strains of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are responsible for the disease botulism and include a group of immunologically distinct serotypes (A, B, E, and F) that are considered to be the most lethal natural proteins known for humans. Two BoNT serotypes, C and D, while rarely associated with human infection, are responsible for deadly botulism outbreaks afflicting animals. Also associated with animal infections is the BoNT C-D mosaic protein (BoNT/CD), a BoNT subtype that is essentially a hybrid of the BoNT/C (~two-thirds) and BoNT/D (~one-third) serotypes. While the amino acid sequence of the heavy chain receptor binding (HCR) domain of BoNT/CD (BoNT/CD-HCR) is very similar to the corresponding amino acid sequence of BoNT/D, BoNT/CD-HCR binds synaptosome membranes better than BoNT/D-HCR. To obtain structural insights for the different membrane binding properties, the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR (S867-E1280) was determined at 1.56 Å resolution and compared to previously reported structures for BoNT/D-HCR. Overall, the BoNT/CD-HCR structure is similar to the two sub-domain organization observed for other BoNT HCRs: an N-terminal jellyroll barrel motif and a C-terminal β-trefoil fold. Comparison of the structure of BoNT/CD-HCR with BoNT/D-HCR indicates that K1118 has a similar structural role as the equivalent residue, E1114, in BoNT/D-HCR, while K1136 has a structurally different role than the equivalent residue, G1132, in BoNT/D-HCR. Lysine-1118 forms a salt bridge with E1247 and may enhance membrane interactions by stabilizing the putative membrane binding loop (K1240-N1248). Lysine-1136 is observed on the surface of the protein. A sulfate ion bound to K1136 may mimic a natural interaction with the negatively changed phospholipid membrane surface. Liposome-binding experiments demonstrate that BoNT/CD-HCR binds phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes more tightly than BoNT/D-HCR

  18. Crystal Structure of the Receptor Binding Domain of the botulinum C-D Mosiac Neurotoxin Reveals Potential Roles of Lysines 1118 and 1136 in Membrane Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Y Zhang; G Buchko; L Qin; H Robinson; S Varnum

    2011-12-31

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by different strains of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are responsible for the disease botulism and include a group of immunologically distinct serotypes (A, B, E, and F) that are considered to be the most lethal natural proteins known for humans. Two BoNT serotypes, C and D, while rarely associated with human infection, are responsible for deadly botulism outbreaks afflicting animals. Also associated with animal infections is the BoNT C-D mosaic protein (BoNT/CD), a BoNT subtype that is essentially a hybrid of the BoNT/C ({approx}two-third) and BoNT/D ({approx}one-third) serotypes. While the amino acid sequence of the heavy chain receptor binding (HCR) domain of BoNT/CD (BoNT/CD-HCR) is very similar to the corresponding amino acid sequence of BoNT/D, BoNT/CD-HCR binds synaptosome membranes better than BoNT/D-HCR. To obtain structural insights for the different membrane binding properties, the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR (S867-E1280) was determined at 1.56 {angstrom} resolution and compared to previously reported structures for BoNT/D-HCR. Overall, the BoNT/CD-HCR structure is similar to the two sub-domain organization observed for other BoNT HCRs: an N-terminal jellyroll barrel motif and a C-terminal {beta}-trefoil fold. Comparison of the structure of BoNT/CD-HCR with BoNT/D-HCR indicates that K1118 has a similar structural role as the equivalent residue, E1114, in BoNT/D-HCR, while K1136 has a structurally different role than the equivalent residue, G1132, in BoNT/D-HCR. Lysine-1118 forms a salt bridge with E1247 and may enhance membrane interactions by stabilizing the putative membrane binding loop (K1240-N1248). Lysine-1136 is observed on the surface of the protein. A sulfate ion bound to K1136 may mimic a natural interaction with the negatively changed phospholipid membrane surface. Liposome-binding experiments demonstrate that BoNT/CD-HCR binds phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes more tightly than BoNT/D-HCR.

  19. The pyrokinin/ pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide (PBAN) family of peptides and their receptors in Insecta: evolutionary trace indicates potential receptor ligand-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Jurenka, R; Nusawardani, T

    2011-06-01

    The pyrokinin/pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide (PBAN) family of G-protein-coupled receptors and their ligands have been identified in various insects. Physiological functions of pyrokinin peptides include muscle contraction, whereas PBAN regulates, among other functions, pheromone production in moths which indicates the pleiotropic nature of these peptides. Based on the alignment of annotated genomic sequences, the pyrokinin/PBAN family of receptors have similarity with the corresponding structures of the capa or periviscerokinin receptors of insects and the neuromedin U receptors of vertebrates. In our study, evolutionary trace (ET) analysis on the insect receptor sequences was conducted to predict the putative ligand recognition and binding sites. The ET analysis of four class-specific receptors indicated several amino acid residues that are conserved in the transmembrane domains. The receptor extracellular domains exhibit several class-specific amino acid residues, which could indicate putative domains for activation of these receptors by ligand recognition and binding.

  20. An olive pollen protein with allergenic activity, Ole e 10, defines a novel family of carbohydrate-binding modules and is potentially implicated in pollen germination

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    CBMs (carbohydrate-binding modules) are the most common non-catalytic modules associated with enzymes active in plant cell-wall hydrolysis. They have been frequently identified by amino acid sequence alignments, but only a few have been experimentally established to have a carbohydrate-binding activity. A small olive pollen protein, Ole e 10 (10 kDa), has been described as a major inducer of type I allergy in humans. In the present study, the ability of Ole e 10 to bind several polysaccharides has been analysed by affinity gel electrophoresis, which demonstrated that the protein bound 1,3-β-glucans preferentially. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies confirmed binding to laminarin, at a protein/ligand ratio of 1:1. The interaction of Ole e 10 with laminarin induced a conformational change in the protein, as detected by CD and fluorescence analyses, and an increase of 3.6 °C in the thermal denaturation temperature of Ole e 10 in the presence of the glycan. These results, and the absence of alignment of the sequence of Ole e 10 with that of any classified CBM, indicate that this pollen protein defines a novel family of CBMs, which we propose to name CBM43. Immunolocalization of Ole e 10 in mature and germinating pollen by transmission electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated the co-localization of Ole e 10 and callose (1,3-β-glucan) in the growing pollen tube, suggesting a role for this protein in the metabolism of carbohydrates and in pollen tube wall re-formation during germination. PMID:15882149

  1. Binding of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C-zeta (PLC-zeta) to phospholipid membranes: potential role of an unstructured cluster of basic residues.

    PubMed

    Nomikos, Michail; Mulgrew-Nesbitt, Anna; Pallavi, Payal; Mihalyne, Gyongyi; Zaitseva, Irina; Swann, Karl; Lai, F Anthony; Murray, Diana; McLaughlin, Stuart

    2007-06-01

    Phospholipase C-zeta (PLC-zeta) is a sperm-specific enzyme that initiates the Ca2+ oscillations in mammalian eggs that activate embryo development. It shares considerable sequence homology with PLC-delta1, but lacks the PH domain that anchors PLC-delta1 to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, PIP2. Thus it is unclear how PLC-zeta interacts with membranes. The linker region between the X and Y catalytic domains of PLC-zeta, however, contains a cluster of basic residues not present in PLC-delta1. Application of electrostatic theory to a homology model of PLC-zeta suggests this basic cluster could interact with acidic lipids. We measured the binding of catalytically competent mouse PLC-zeta to phospholipid vesicles: for 2:1 phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine (PC/PS) vesicles, the molar partition coefficient, K, is too weak to be of physiological significance. Incorporating 1% PIP2 into the 2:1 PC/PS vesicles increases K about 10-fold, to 5x10(3) M-1, a biologically relevant value. Expressed fragments corresponding to the PLC-zeta X-Y linker region also bind with higher affinity to polyvalent than monovalent phosphoinositides on nitrocellulose filters. A peptide corresponding to the basic cluster (charge=+7) within the linker region, PLC-zeta-(374-385), binds to PC/PS vesicles with higher affinity than PLC-zeta, but its binding is less sensitive to incorporating PIP2. The acidic residues flanking this basic cluster in PLC-zeta may account for both these phenomena. FRET experiments suggest the basic cluster could not only anchor the protein to the membrane, but also enhance the local concentration of PIP2 adjacent to the catalytic domain.

  2. Isolation of an inhibitory insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein from bone cell-conditioned medium: A potential local regulator of IGF action

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, S.; Bautista, C.M.; Wergedal, J.; Baylink, D.J. )

    1989-11-01

    Inhibitory insulin-like growth factor binding protein (In-IGF-BP) has been purified to homogeneity from medium conditioned by TE89 human osteosarcoma cells by two different methods using Sephadex G-100 gel filtration, FPLC Mono Q ion-exchange, HPLC C{sub 4} reverse-phase, HPLC CN reverse-phase and affinity chromatographies. In-IGF-BP thus purified appeared to be homogeneous and unique by the following criteria. (i) N-terminal sequence analysis yielded a unique sequence (Asp-Glu-Ala-Ile-His-Cys-Pro-Pro-Glu-Ser-Glu-Ala-Lys-Leu-Ala). (ii) Amino acid composition of In-IGF-BP revealed marked differences with the amino acid compositions of other known PBs. (iii) In-IGF-BP exhibited a single band with molecular mass of 25 kDa under reducing conditions on sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gels. IGF-I and IGF-II but not insulin displaced the binding of {sup 125}I-labeled IGF-I or {sup 125}I-labeled IGF-II binding to In-IGF-BP. In-IGF-BP inhibited basal, IGF-stimulated bone cell proliferation and serum-stimulated bone cell proliferation. Forskolin increases synthesis of In-IGF-BP in TE85 human osteosarcoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Based on these findings, the authors conclude that In-IGF-BP is a protein that has a unique sequence and significant biological actions on bone cells.

  3. Polymorphism of the OLR1 3'UTR potential microRNA binding site and risk of Alzheimer's disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Y; Wu, J B; Wang, X; Zhao, J F; Song, H; Yuan, L D

    2014-12-04

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that contributes to dementia in the elderly population. Genome-wide linkage analysis has identified chromosome 12p as the AD-susceptible region, which includes lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (OLR1). The OLR1 +1073 C/T single-nucleotide polymorphism is located in the 3'-untranslated region of the gene and may influence the binding of regulatory microRNAs (miRNAs) and OLR1 protein homeostasis. A number of studies have reported an association between this variant and AD. However, the results are controversial. A meta-analysis of case-control studies examining the relationship between the OLR1 +1073 C/T single-nucleotide polymorphism and AD risk was performed. Five studies were selected that included 2419 cases and 2381 controls. The results revealed a significantly decreased AD risk in the recessive model (TT vs TC + CC: odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.65-0.96). The control group in one of the studies was in Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium, so we performed additional meta-analysis excluding this study. The significance was much more pronounced in the recessive model (TT vs TC + CC: OR = 0.72, 95%CI = 0.62-0.85). Using miRanda and RNA hybrid methods, the polymorphic allele was shown to influence the binding of various miRNAs. Our results suggested that the +1073 C/T polymorphism decreased the risk of AD. The polymorphic allele was also predicted to affect the binding site of many miRNAs, which may explain the relationship between the +1073 C/T variant and AD.

  4. Imidazoline binding sites in the endocrine pancreas: can they fulfil their potential as targets for the development of new insulin secretagogues?

    PubMed

    Morgan, N G; Chan, S L

    2001-09-01

    A variety of compounds containing an imidazoline ring have the ability to stimulate insulin secretion. Many of these also improve glycaemia in experimental models of type 2 diabetes and in man, suggesting that this class may be useful in the development of new orally active anti-diabetic drugs. However, the mechanisms by which imidazolines promote insulin secretion have not been clarified. The response does not appear to be due to the binding of ligands to either of the two major types of "imidazoline receptor" defined by pharmacological criteria (I1 and I2 sites) but may result from interaction with a novel imidazoline binding site. One such site has been identified in association with the ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channel in the beta-cell and has been designated "I3". Electrophysiological and biochemical evidence suggest that the I3 site may be intrinsic to the ion-conducting pore component, Kir6.2, of the K(ATP) channel, but the effects of imidazoline ligands on insulin secretion can be dissociated from the regulation of Kir6.2. Indeed, there is increasing evidence that some imidazolines can control exocytosis directly, both in beta-cells and in pancreatic alpha-cells. Thus, it is proposed that a further imidazoline binding site is primarily responsible for control of hormone secretion. Evidence is reviewed which suggests that this site occupies a central position within an amplification pathway that also mediates the effects of cAMP in the beta-cell. Characterisation of this site should provide the stimulus for the design of new insulin secretagogues that are devoid of K(ATP) channel-blocking properties.

  5. Retina-specific nuclear receptor: A potential regulator of cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein expressed in retinal pigment epithelium and Müller glial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, F; Figueroa, D J; Marmorstein, A D; Zhang, Q; Petrukhin, K; Caskey, C T; Austin, C P

    1999-12-21

    In an effort to identify nuclear receptors important in retinal disease, we screened a retina cDNA library for nuclear receptors. Here we describe the identification of a retina-specific nuclear receptor (RNR) from both human and mouse. Human RNR is a splice variant of the recently published photoreceptor cell-specific nuclear receptor [Kobayashi, M., Takezawa, S., Hara, K., Yu, R. T., Umesono, Y., Agata, K., Taniwaki, M., Yasuda, K. & Umesono, K. (1999) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96, 4814-4819] whereas the mouse RNR is a mouse ortholog. Northern blot and reverse transcription-PCR analyses of human mRNA samples demonstrate that RNR is expressed exclusively in the retina, with transcripts of approximately 7.5 kb, approximately 3.0 kb, and approximately 2.3 kb by Northern blot analysis. In situ hybridization with multiple probes on both primate and mouse eye sections demonstrates that RNR is expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium and in Müller glial cells. By using the Gal4 chimeric receptor/reporter cotransfection system, the ligand binding domain of RNR was found to repress transcriptional activity in the absence of exogenous ligand. Gel mobility shift assays revealed that RNR can interact with the promoter of the cellular retinaldehyde binding protein gene in the presence of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and/or retinoid X receptor (RXR). These data raise the possibility that RNR acts to regulate the visual cycle through its interaction with cellular retinaldehyde binding protein and therefore may be a target for retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration.

  6. Conventional and microwave-assisted synthesis, characterization, DFT calculations, in vitro DNA binding and cleavage studies of potential chemotherapeutic diorganotin(IV) mandelates.

    PubMed

    Mridula; Nath, Mala

    2016-09-01

    Diorganotin(IV) complexes of the general formulae {[R2Sn(L)]2O}(R=Me (1), n-Bu (2), and n-Oct (3); L=anion of mandelic acid) and {[R2Sn(L)]2Cl2}(R=Ph (4)) have been synthesized by conventional thermal method (1a-3a), except 4a and by microwave-assisted reactions (1b-4b). The elemental analysis, IR, NMR ((1)H, (13)C and (119)Sn) and ESI-MS/DART-mass spectral studies revealed that dimeric 1:1 complexes with SnOSn bridges (1-3) are formed possessing distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry around the Sn atoms, except 4b which exhibits octahedral geometry with SnClSn bridges. The proposed geometries have been validated by density functional theory calculations. Thermal behavior of 1b-4b, studied by using thermogravimetry (TG), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) techniques, indicated that all except 4b are stable up to 200°C. In vitro interaction studies of 1b-4b with CT-DNA were performed by UV-Vis, fluorescence titrations and results suggest that the complexes are binding to DNA via an intercalative mode. The binding affinity and quenching ability were quantified in terms of intrinsic binding constant (Kb) (3.74×10(4)M(-1), 2b; >3.67×10(4)M(-1), 4b; >3.03×10(4)M(-1), 3b; >0.72×10(4)M(-1), 1b) and Stern-Volmer quenching constant (Ksv) (2.16×10(5), 2b; >1.73×10(5), 4b; >1.66×10(5)3b; >1.51×10(5), 1b) which showed high binding affinity of 2b with CT-DNA. The cleavage studies of 1b-4b with pBR322 plasmid DNA was ascertained by agarose gel electrophoresis. They exhibited effective cleavage of supercoiled plasmid DNA into its nicked form (1b, 3b, 4b) and even into its linear form in presence of 2b.

  7. Neuronal Activity-Induced Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein-1 (SREBP1) is Disrupted in Dysbindin-Null Mice-Potential Link to Cognitive Impairment in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Bang, Sookhee; McMullen, Mary F; Kazi, Hala; Talbot, Konrad; Ho, Mei-Xuan; Carlson, Greg; Arnold, Steven E; Ong, Wei-Yi; Kim, Sangwon F

    2017-04-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic debilitating neuropsychiatric disorder that affects about 1 % of the population. Dystrobrevin-binding protein 1 (DTNBP1 or dysbindin) is one of the Research Domain Constructs (RDoC) associated with cognition and is significantly reduced in the brain of schizophrenia patients. To further understand the molecular underpinnings of pathogenesis of schizophrenia, we have performed microarray analyses of the hippocampi from dysbindin knockout mice, and found that genes involved in the lipogenic pathway are suppressed. Moreover, we discovered that maturation of a master transcriptional regulator for lipid synthesis, sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP1) is induced by neuronal activity, and is required for induction of the immediate early gene ARC (activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein), necessary for synaptic plasticity and memory. We found that nuclear SREBP1 is dramatically reduced in dysbindin-1 knockout mice and postmortem brain tissues from human patients with schizophrenia. Furthermore, activity-dependent maturation of SREBP1 as well as ARC expression were attenuated in dysbindin-1 knockout mice, and these deficits were restored by an atypical antipsychotic drug, clozapine. Together, results indicate an important role of dysbindin-1 in neuronal activity induced SREBP1 and ARC, which could be related to cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

  8. Activated RhoA Binds to the Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain of PDZ-RhoGEF, a Potential Site for Autoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhe; Medina, Frank; Liu, Mu-ya; Thomas, Celestine; Sprang, Stephen R.; Sternweis, Paul C.

    2010-07-19

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyze exchange of GDP for GTP by stabilizing the nucleotide-free state of the small GTPases through their Dbl homology/pleckstrin homology (DH {center_dot} PH) domains. Unconventionally, PDZ-RhoGEF (PRG), a member of the RGS-RhoGEFs, binds tightly to both nucleotide-free and activated RhoA (RhoA {center_dot} GTP). We have characterized the interaction between PRG and activated RhoA and determined the structure of the PRG-DH {center_dot} PH-RhoA {center_dot} GTP{gamma}S (guanosine 5{prime}-O-[{gamma}-thio]triphosphate) complex. The interface bears striking similarity to a GTPase-effector interface and involves the switch regions in RhoA and a hydrophobic patch in PRG-PH that is conserved among all Lbc RhoGEFs. The two surfaces that bind activated and nucleotide-free RhoA on PRG-DH {center_dot} PH do not overlap, and a ternary complex of PRG-DH {center_dot} PH bound to both forms of RhoA can be isolated by size-exclusion chromatography. This novel interaction between activated RhoA and PH could play a key role in regulation of RhoGEF activity in vivo.

  9. Interaction of brain fatty acid-binding protein with the polyunsaturated fatty acid environment as a potential determinant of poor prognosis in malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Elsherbiny, Marwa E.; Emara, Marwan; Godbout, Roseline

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common adult brain cancers. In spite of aggressive treatment, recurrence occurs in the great majority of patients and is invariably fatal. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are abundant in brain, particularly ω-6 arachidonic acid (AA) and ω-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Although the levels of ω-6 and ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are tightly regulated in brain, the ω-6:ω-3 ratio is dramatically increased in malignant glioma, suggesting deregulation of fundamental lipid homeostasis in brain tumor tissue. The migratory properties of malignant glioma cells can be modified by altering the ratio of AA:DHA in growth medium, with increased migration observed in AA-rich medium. This fatty acid-dependent effect on cell migration is dependent on expression of the brain fatty acid binding protein (FABP7) previously shown to bind DHA and AA. Increased levels of enzymes involved in eicosanoid production in FABP7-positive malignant glioma cells suggest that FABP7 is an important modulator of AA metabolism. We provide evidence that increased production of eicosanoids in FABP7-positive malignant glioma growing in an AA-rich environment contributes to tumor infiltration in the brain. We discuss pathways and molecules that may underlie FABP7/AA-mediated promotion of cell migration and FABP7/DHA-mediated inhibition of cell migration in malignant glioma. PMID:23981365

  10. Differential methylation status of IGF2-H19 locus does not affect the fertility of crossbred bulls but some of the CTCF binding sites could be potentially important.

    PubMed

    Jena, Subas C; Kumar, Sandeep; Rajput, Sandeep; Roy, Bhaskar; Verma, Arpana; Kumaresan, Arumugam; Mohanty, Tushar K; De, Sachinandan; Kumar, Rakesh; Datta, Tirtha K

    2014-04-01

    Associations between abnormal methylation of spermatozoan DNA with male infertility have been sought in recent years to identify a molecular explanation of differential spermatozoan function. The present work was undertaken to investigate the methylation profile of differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in the IGF2-H19 locus of Bos taurus X Bos indicus crossbred bull spermatozoa. Bulls having more than at least 100 insemination records over a period of 12 years were classified into two groups of five bulls each belonging to low- and high-fertility groups. The IGF2 and H19 DMR sequences in B. indicus cattle were observed to be in absolute homology with B. taurus cattle. The DNA of crossbred bull spermatozoa was isolated, bisulfite treated, and amplified for specific DMR regions using methylation-change-specific primers. The overall degree of methylation at IGF2-H19 DMRs was not found to be significantly different among two groups of bulls. The sixth CTCF binding site (CCCTC) identified in H19 DMR, however, had a significant methylation difference between the high- and low-fertility bulls. It was concluded that alteration of the methylation levels at IGF2-H19 DMRs might not be responsible for the fertility difference of crossbred bulls, although the role played by the specific CTCF binding sites at this locus, which could influence IGF2 expression during spermatogenesis and early embryonic development, deserves further attention.

  11. Fine-tuning the extent and dynamics of binding cleft opening as a potential general regulatory mechanism in parvulin-type peptidyl prolyl isomerases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajlik, András; Kovács, Bertalan; Permi, Perttu; Gáspári, Zoltán

    2017-03-01

    Parvulins or rotamases form a distinct group within peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerases. Their exact mode of action as well as the role of conserved residues in the family are still not unambiguously resolved. Using backbone S2 order parameters and NOEs as restraints, we have generated dynamic structural ensembles of three distinct parvulins, SaPrsA, TbPin1 and CsPinA. The resulting ensembles are in good agreement with the experimental data but reveal important differences between the three enzymes. The largest difference can be attributed to the extent of the opening of the substrate binding cleft, along which motional mode the three molecules occupy distinct regions. Comparison with a wide range of other available parvulin structures highlights structural divergence along the bottom of the binding cleft acting as a hinge during the opening-closing motion. In the prototype WW-domain containing parvulin, Pin1, this region is also important in forming contacts with the WW domain known to modulate enzymatic activity of the catalytic domain. We hypothesize that modulation of the extent and dynamics of the identified ‘breathing motion’ might be one of the factors responsible for functional differences in the distinct parvulin subfamilies.

  12. The phthalocyanine prototype derivative Alcian Blue is the first synthetic agent with selective anti-human immunodeficiency virus activity due to its gp120 glycan-binding potential.

    PubMed

    François, Katrien O; Pannecouque, Christophe; Auwerx, Joeri; Lozano, Virginia; Pérez-Pérez, Maria-Jésus; Schols, Dominique; Balzarini, Jan

    2009-11-01

    Alcian Blue (AB), a phthalocyanine derivative, is able to prevent infection by a wide spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), HIV-2, and simian immunodeficiency virus strains in various cell types [T cells, (co)receptor-transfected cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells]. With the exception of herpes simplex virus, AB is inactive against a broad variety of other (DNA and RNA) viruses. Time-of-addition studies show that AB prevents HIV-1 infection at the virus entry stage, exactly at the same time as carbohydrate-binding agents do. AB also efficiently prevents fusion between persistently HIV-1-infected HUT-78 cells and uninfected (CD4(+)) lymphocytes, DC-SIGN-directed HIV-1 capture, and subsequent transmission to uninfected (CD4(+)) T lymphocytes. Prolonged passaging of HIV-1 at dose-escalating concentrations of AB resulted in the selection of mutant virus strains in which several N-glycans of the HIV-1 gp120 envelope were deleted and in which positively charged amino acid mutations in both gp120 and gp41 appeared. A mutant virus strain in which four N-glycans were deleted showed a 10-fold decrease in sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of AB. These data suggest that AB is likely endowed with carbohydrate-binding properties and can be considered an important lead compound in the development of novel synthetic nonpeptidic antiviral drugs targeting the glycans of the envelope of HIV.

  13. Fine-tuning the extent and dynamics of binding cleft opening as a potential general regulatory mechanism in parvulin-type peptidyl prolyl isomerases

    PubMed Central

    Czajlik, András; Kovács, Bertalan; Permi, Perttu; Gáspári, Zoltán

    2017-01-01

    Parvulins or rotamases form a distinct group within peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerases. Their exact mode of action as well as the role of conserved residues in the family are still not unambiguously resolved. Using backbone S2 order parameters and NOEs as restraints, we have generated dynamic structural ensembles of three distinct parvulins, SaPrsA, TbPin1 and CsPinA. The resulting ensembles are in good agreement with the experimental data but reveal important differences between the three enzymes. The largest difference can be attributed to the extent of the opening of the substrate binding cleft, along which motional mode the three molecules occupy distinct regions. Comparison with a wide range of other available parvulin structures highlights structural divergence along the bottom of the binding cleft acting as a hinge during the opening-closing motion. In the prototype WW-domain containing parvulin, Pin1, this region is also important in forming contacts with the WW domain known to modulate enzymatic activity of the catalytic domain. We hypothesize that modulation of the extent and dynamics of the identified ‘breathing motion’ might be one of the factors responsible for functional differences in the distinct parvulin subfamilies. PMID:28300139

  14. Two genes encoding GF14 (14-3-3) proteins in Zea mays. Structure, expression, and potential regulation by the G-box binding complex.

    PubMed Central

    de Vetten, N C; Ferl, R J

    1994-01-01

    Two maize (Zea mays) genes, designated GRF1 and GRF2, have been isolated and characterized. The proteins encoded by these genes, called GF14 proteins, participate in protein/DNA complexes and show more than 60% identity with a highly conserved, widely distributed protein family, collectively referred to as 14-3-3 proteins. Members of the 14-3-3 protein family have been reported to activate Tyr and Trp hydroxylases, modulate protein kinase C activity, and activate ADP-ribosyltransferase. The mRNAs of the GRF genes are encoded by six exons interrupted by five introns. The transcriptional units of the GRF genes were found to be very similar, with complete conservation of the intron positions. In addition, the length and nucleotide sequences of the two genes' introns were highly conserved. The 5' flanking sequences of the two GRF genes were compared and regions of homology and divergence identified. This comparison revealed the presence of a conserved G-box element in the 5' flanking region of both genes. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays of maize protein extract with the GRF G-box indicates that GBF binds to this G-box site in the 5' up stream region of GRF. Antibody supershifts indicate that GF14 protein is associated with the G-box-binding complex that interacts with the GRF upstream region. PMID:7846163

  15. Photoelectron spectroscopy of aqueous solutions: Streaming potentials of NaX (X = Cl, Br, and I) solutions and electron binding energies of liquid water and X{sup −}

    SciTech Connect

    Kurahashi, Naoya; Horio, Takuya; Suzuki, Toshinori; Karashima, Shutaro; Suzuki, Yoshi-Ichi; Tang, Ying; Abulimiti, Bumaliya; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Oura, Masaki

    2014-05-07

    The streaming potentials of liquid beams of aqueous NaCl, NaBr, and NaI solutions are measured using soft X-ray, He(I), and laser multiphoton ionization photoelectron spectroscopy. Gaseous molecules are ionized in the vicinity of liquid beams and the photoelectron energy shifts are measured as a function of the distance between the ionization point and the liquid beam. The streaming potentials change their polarity with concentration of electrolytes, from which the singular points of concentration eliminating the streaming potentials are determined. The streaming currents measured in air also vanish at these concentrations. The electron binding energies of liquid water and I{sup −}, Br{sup −}, and Cl{sup −} anions are revisited and determined more accurately than in previous studies.

  16. IL-1 binds to high affinity receptors on human osteosarcoma cells and potentiates prostaglandin E2 stimulation of cAMP production

    SciTech Connect

    Rodan, S.B.; Wesolowski, G.; Chin, J.; Limjuco, G.A.; Schmidt, J.A.; Rodan, G.A. )

    1990-08-15

    IL-1 is a potent bone resorbing agent. Its mechanism of action is unknown, but the presence of osteoblasts was shown to be necessary for IL-1 stimulation of bone resorption by isolated osteoclasts. This study examines the presence of IL-1R and IL-1 effects in osteoblastic cells from a clonal human osteosarcoma cell line, Saos-2/B-10. We found that the binding affinity and the number of binding sites increases substantially during the postconfluent stage. Scatchard and curve-fitting analysis revealed one class of high affinity binding sites, with Kd/Ki's of 40 +/- 17 pM (mean +/- SD) for IL-1 alpha (n = 5) and 9 +/- 7 pM for IL-1 beta (n = 5) and 2916 +/- 2438 (n = 6) receptors/cell. Incubation of the cells with 125I-IL-1 alpha (100 pM) at 4 degrees C, followed by incubation at 37 degrees C up to 4 h, revealed internalization of receptor-bound IL-1 alpha. Chemical cross-linking studies showed that the IL-1R in Saos-2/B-10 cells had a molecular mass of approximately 80 kDa. To assess the biologic effect of IL-1 in Saos-2/B-10 cells, we determined PGE2 content and adenylate cyclase activity. Although IL-1 had no effect on PGE2 synthesis, both IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta enhanced PGE2 stimulation of adenylate cyclase two- to four-fold in a dose-dependent manner. The half-maximal effect for IL-1 alpha was seen at 8 to 10 pM and for IL-1 beta at 0.6 to 1.8 pM. IL-1 did not enhance basal adenylate cyclase or stimulation by parathyroid hormone, isoproterenol, or forskolin. IL-1 enhancement of PGE2-stimulated adenylate cyclase was detected between 1 to 2 h, was maximal at 4 to 5 h, was not prevented by cycloheximide treatment, and was seen in membranes from IL-1 pretreated cells. These data show effects of IL-1 on a human osteoblast-like cell line that are mediated by high affinity receptors. These IL-1 effects could contribute to the biologic action of IL-1 on bone.

  17. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiaohan; Guo, Hong

    2015-08-05

    Although one of an enzyme’s hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. We know that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. We report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Finally, our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involving the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination.

  18. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes

    DOE PAGES

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; ...

    2015-08-05

    Although one of an enzyme’s hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. We know that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. We report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Finally, our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involvingmore » the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination.« less

  19. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiaohan; Guo, Hong

    2015-09-01

    Although one of an enzyme's hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. It is known that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. Here we report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involving the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination.

  20. Computer-aided diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease based on [123I]FP-CIT SPECT binding potential images, using the voxels-as-features approach and support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Francisco P. M.; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2015-04-01

    Objective. The aim of the present study was to develop a fully-automated computational solution for computer-aided diagnosis in Parkinson syndrome based on [123I]FP-CIT single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Approach. A dataset of 654 [123I]FP-CIT SPECT brain images from the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative were used. Of these, 445 images were of patients with Parkinson’s disease at an early stage and the remainder formed a control group. The images were pre-processed using automated template-based registration followed by the computation of the binding potential at a voxel level. Then, the binding potential images were used for classification, based on the voxel-as-feature approach and using the support vector machines paradigm. Main results. The obtained estimated classification accuracy was 97.86%, the sensitivity was 97.75% and the specificity 98.09%. Significance. The achieved classification accuracy was very high and, in fact, higher than accuracies found in previous studies reported in the literature. In addition, results were obtained on a large dataset of early Parkinson’s disease subjects. In summation, the information provided by the developed computational solution potentially supports clinical decision-making in nuclear medicine, using important additional information beyond the commonly used uptake ratios and respective statistical comparisons. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01141023)

  1. High-level ab initio calculations for the four low-lying families of minima of (H2O)(20): 1. Estimates of MP2/CBS binding energies and comparison with empirical potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Fanourgakis, Georgios S.; Apra, Edoardo; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2004-08-08

    We report estimates of complete basis set (CBS) limits at the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation level of theory (MP2) for the binding energies of the lowest lying isomers within each of the four major families of minima of (H2O)20. These were obtained by performing MP2 calculations with the family of correlation-consistent basis sets up to quadruple zeta quality, augmented with additional diffuse functions (aug-cc-pVnZ, n=D, T, Q). The MP2/CBS estimates are: -200.1 kcal/mol (dodecahedron, 30 hydrogen bonds), -212.6 kcal/mol (fused cubes, 36 hydrogen bonds), -215.0 (face-sharing pentagonal prisms, 35 hydrogen bonds) and –217.9 kcal/mol (edge-sharing pentagonal prisms, 34 hydrogen bonds). The energetic ordering of the various (H2O)20 isomers does not follow monotonically the number of hydrogen bonds as in the case of smaller clusters such as the different isomers of the water hexamer. The dodecahedron lies ca. 18 kcal/mol higher in energy than the most stable edge-sharing pentagonal prism isomer. The TIP4P, ASP-W4, TTM2-R, AMOEBA and TTM2-F empirical potentials also predict the energetic stabilization of the edge-sharing pentagonal prisms with respect to the dodecahedron, albeit they universally underestimate the cluster binding energies with respect to the MP2/CBS result. Among them, the TTM2-F potential was found to predict the absolute cluster binding energies to within < 1% from the corresponding MP2/CBS values, whereas the error for the rest of the potentials considered in this study ranges from 3-5%.

  2. High-level ab initio calculations for the four low-lying families of minima of (H2O)20. I. Estimates of MP2/CBS binding energies and comparison with empirical potentials.

    PubMed

    Fanourgakis, George S; Aprà, Edoardo; Xantheas, Sotiris S

    2004-08-08

    We report estimates of complete basis set (CBS) limits at the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation level of theory (MP2) for the binding energies of the lowest-lying isomers within each of the four major families of minima of (H(2)O)(20). These were obtained by performing MP2 calculations with the family of correlation-consistent basis sets up to quadruple zeta quality, augmented with additional diffuse functions (aug-cc-pVnZ, n=D, T, Q). The MP2/CPS estimates are -200.1 (dodecahedron, 30 hydrogen bonds), -212.6 (fused cubes, 36 hydrogen bonds), -215.0 (face-sharing pentagonal prisms, 35 hydrogen bonds), and -217.9 kcal/mol (edge-sharing pentagonal prisms, 34 hydrogen bonds). The energetic ordering of the various (H(2)O)(20) isomers does not follow monotonically the number of hydrogen bonds as in the case of smaller clusters such as the different isomers of the water hexamer. The dodecahedron lies ca. 18 kcal/mol higher in energy than the most stable edge-sharing pentagonal prism isomer. The TIP4P, ASP-W4, TTM2-R, AMOEBA, and TTM2-F empirical potentials also predict the energetic stabilization of the edge-sharing pentagonal prisms with respect to the dodecahedron, albeit they universally underestimate the cluster binding energies with respect to the MP2/CBS result. Among them, the TTM2-F potential was found to predict the absolute cluster binding energies to within <1% from the corresponding MP2/CBS values, whereas the error for the rest of the potentials considered in this study ranges from 3% to 5%.

  3. Tight-binding study of the hole subband structure properties of p-type delta-doped quantum wells in Si by using a Thomas-Fermi-Dirac potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrfguez-Vargas, I.; Madrigal-Melchor, J.; Vlaev, S. J.

    2009-05-01

    We present the hole subband structure of p-type delta-doped single, double, multiple and superlattice quantum wells in Si. We use the first neighbors sp3s' tight-binding approximation including spin for the hole level structure analysis. The parameters of the tight-binding hamiltonian were taken from Klimeck et al. [Klimeck G, Bowen R C, Boykin T B, Salazar-Lazaro C, Cwik T A and Stoica A 2000 Superlattice. Microst. 27 77], first neighbors parameters that give realiable results for the valence band of Si. The calculations are based on a scheme previously proposed and applied to delta-doped quantum well systems [Vlaev S J and Gaggero-Sager L M 1998 Phys. Rev. B 58 1142]. The scheme relies on the incorporation of the delta-doped quantum well potential in the diagonal terms of the tight-binding hamiltonian. We give a detail description of the delta-doped quantum well structures, this is, we study the hole subband structure behavior as a function of the impurity density, the interwell distance of the doped planes and the superlattice period. We also compare our results with the available theoretical and experimental data, obtaining a reasonable agreement.

  4. Complexes of a Zn-metalloenzyme binding site with hydroxamate-containing ligands. A case for detailed benchmarkings of polarizable molecular mechanics/dynamics potentials when the experimental binding structure is unknown.

    PubMed

    Gresh, Nohad; Perahia, David; de Courcy, Benoit; Foret, Johanna; Roux, Céline; El-Khoury, Lea; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Salmon, Laurent

    2016-12-15

    Zn-metalloproteins are a major class of targets for drug design. They constitute a demanding testing ground for polarizable molecular mechanics/dynamics aimed at extending the realm of quantum chemistry (QC) to very long-duration molecular dynamics (MD). The reliability of such procedures needs to be demonstrated upon comparing the relative stabilities of competing candidate complexes of inhibitors with the recognition site stabilized in the course of MD. This could be necessary when no information is available regarding the experimental structure of the inhibitor-protein complex. Thus, this study bears on the phosphomannose isomerase (PMI) enzyme, considered as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of several bacterial and parasitic diseases. We consider its complexes with 5-phospho-d-arabinonohydroxamate and three analog ligands differing by the number and location of their hydroxyl groups. We evaluate the energy accuracy expectable from a polarizable molecular mechanics procedure, SIBFA. This is done by comparisons with ab initio quantum-chemistry (QC) calculations in the following cases: (a) the complexes of the four ligands in three distinct structures extracted from the entire PMI-ligand energy-minimized structures, and totaling up to 264 atoms; (b) the solvation energies of several energy-minimized complexes of each ligand with a shell of 64 water molecules; (c) the conformational energy differences of each ligand in different conformations characterized in the course of energy-minimizations; and (d) the continuum solvation energies of the ligands in different conformations. The agreements with the QC results appear convincing. On these bases, we discuss the prospects of applying the procedure to ligand-macromolecule recognition problems. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Structural Analysis of Papain-Like NlpC/P60 Superfamily Enzymes with a Circularly Permuted Topology Reveals Potential Lipid Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingping; Rawlings, Neil D.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2011-01-01

    NlpC/P60 superfamily papain-like enzymes play important roles in all kingdoms of life. Two members of this superfamily, LRAT-like and YaeF/YiiX-like families, were predicted to contain a catalytic domain that is circularly permuted such that the catalytic cysteine is located near the C-terminus, instead of at the N-terminus. These permuted enzymes are widespread in virus, pathogenic bacteria, and eukaryotes. We determined the crystal structure of a member of the YaeF/YiiX-like family from Bacillus cereus in complex with lysine. The structure, which adopts a ligand-induced, “closed” conformation, confirms the circular permutation of catalytic residues. A comparative analysis of other related protein structures within the NlpC/P60 superfamily is presented. Permutated NlpC/P60 enzymes contain a similar conserved core and arrangement of catalytic residues, including a Cys/His-containing triad and an additional conserved tyrosine. More surprisingly, permuted enzymes have a hydrophobic S1 binding pocket that is distinct from previously characterized enzymes in the family, indicative of novel substrate specificity. Further analysis of a structural homolog, YiiX (PDB 2if6) identified a fatty acid in the conserved hydrophobic pocket, thus providing additional insights into possible function of these novel enzymes. PMID:21799766

  6. Structural Analysis of Papain-Like NlpC/P60 Superfamily Enzymes with a Circularly Permuted Topology Reveals Potential Lipid Binding Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Qingping; Rawlings, Neil D.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2012-07-11

    NlpC/P60 superfamily papain-like enzymes play important roles in all kingdoms of life. Two members of this superfamily, LRAT-like and YaeF/YiiX-like families, were predicted to contain a catalytic domain that is circularly permuted such that the catalytic cysteine is located near the C-terminus, instead of at the N-terminus. These permuted enzymes are widespread in virus, pathogenic bacteria, and eukaryotes. We determined the crystal structure of a member of the YaeF/YiiX-like family from Bacillus cereus in complex with lysine. The structure, which adopts a ligand-induced, 'closed' conformation, confirms the circular permutation of catalytic residues. A comparative analysis of other related protein structures within the NlpC/P60 superfamily is presented. Permutated NlpC/P60 enzymes contain a similar conserved core and arrangement of catalytic residues, including a Cys/His-containing triad and an additional conserved tyrosine. More surprisingly, permuted enzymes have a hydrophobic S1 binding pocket that is distinct from previously characterized enzymes in the family, indicative of novel substrate specificity. Further analysis of a structural homolog, YiiX (PDB 2if6) identified a fatty acid in the conserved hydrophobic pocket, thus providing additional insights into possible function of these novel enzymes.

  7. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Nonretinoid Retinol Binding Protein 4 Antagonists for the Potential Treatment of Atrophic Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Stargardt Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of lipofuscin in the retina is associated with pathogenesis of atrophic age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease. Lipofuscin bisretinoids (exemplified by N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine) seem to mediate lipofuscin toxicity. Synthesis of lipofuscin bisretinoids depends on the influx of retinol from serum to the retina. Compounds antagonizing the retinol-dependent interaction of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) with transthyretin in the serum would reduce serum RBP4 and retinol and inhibit bisretinoid formation. We recently showed that A1120 (3), a potent carboxylic acid based RBP4 antagonist, can significantly reduce lipofuscin bisretinoid formation in the retinas of Abca4–/– mice. As part of the NIH Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network project we undertook the in vitro exploration to identify novel conformationally flexible and constrained RBP4 antagonists with improved potency and metabolic stability. We also demonstrate that upon acute and chronic dosing in rats, 43, a potent cyclopentyl fused pyrrolidine antagonist, reduced circulating plasma RBP4 protein levels by approximately 60%. PMID:25210858

  8. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of nonretinoid retinol binding protein 4 antagonists for the potential treatment of atrophic age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Christopher L; Dobri, Nicoleta; Freeman, Emily E; Conlon, Michael P; Chen, Ping; Stafford, Douglas G; Schwarz, Daniel M C; Golden, Kathy C; Zhu, Lei; Kitchen, Douglas B; Barnes, Keith D; Racz, Boglarka; Qin, Qiong; Michelotti, Enrique; Cywin, Charles L; Martin, William H; Pearson, Paul G; Johnson, Graham; Petrukhin, Konstantin

    2014-09-25

    Accumulation of lipofuscin in the retina is associated with pathogenesis of atrophic age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease. Lipofuscin bisretinoids (exemplified by N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine) seem to mediate lipofuscin toxicity. Synthesis of lipofuscin bisretinoids depends on the influx of retinol from serum to the retina. Compounds antagonizing the retinol-dependent interaction of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) with transthyretin in the serum would reduce serum RBP4 and retinol and inhibit bisretinoid formation. We recently showed that A1120 (3), a potent carboxylic acid based RBP4 antagonist, can significantly reduce lipofuscin bisretinoid formation in the retinas of Abca4(-/-) mice. As part of the NIH Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network project we undertook the in vitro exploration to identify novel conformationally flexible and constrained RBP4 antagonists with improved potency and metabolic stability. We also demonstrate that upon acute and chronic dosing in rats, 43, a potent cyclopentyl fused pyrrolidine antagonist, reduced circulating plasma RBP4 protein levels by approximately 60%.

  9. A platform to screen for C-type lectin receptor-binding carbohydrates and their potential for cell-specific targeting and immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Maglinao, Maha; Eriksson, Magdalena; Schlegel, Mark K; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Johannssen, Timo; Götze, Sebastian; Seeberger, Peter H; Lepenies, Bernd

    2014-02-10

    Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) in innate immunity represent a superfamily of pattern recognition receptors that recognize carbohydrate structures on pathogens and self-antigens. The primary interaction of an antigen-presenting cell and a pathogen shapes the following immune response. Therefore, the identification of CLR ligands that can either enhance or modulate the immune response is of interest. We have developed a screening platform based on glycan arrays to identify immune modulatory carbohydrate ligands of CLRs. A comprehensive library of CLRs was expressed by fusing the extracellular part of each respective CLR, the part containing the carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD), to the Fc fragment of human IgG1 molecules. CLR-Fc fusion proteins display the CRD in a dimeric form, are properly glycosylated, and can be detected by a secondary antibody with a conjugated fluorophore. Thus, they are valuable tools for high-throughput screening. We were able to identify novel carbohydrate binders of CLRs using the glycan array technology. These CLR-binding carbohydrates were then covalently attached to the model antigen ovalbumin. The ovalbumin neoglycoconjugates were used in a dendritic cell/T cell co-culture assay to stimulate transgenic T cells in vitro. In addition, mice were immunized with these conjugates to analyze the immune modulatory properties of the CLR ligands in vivo. The CLR ligands induced an increased Th1 cytokine production in vitro and modulated the humoral response in vivo. The platform described here allows for the identification of CLR ligands, as well as the evaluation of each ligand's cell-specific targeting and immune modulatory properties.

  10. A family 6 carbohydrate-binding module potentiates the efficiency of a recombinant xylanase used to supplement cereal-based diets for poultry.

    PubMed

    Fontes, C M G A; Ponte, P I P; Reis, T C; Soares, M C; Gama, L T; Dias, F M V; Ferreira, L M A

    2004-10-01

    (1) Cellulases and xylanases display a modular architecture that comprises a catalytic module linked to one or more non-catalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). On the basis of primary structure similarity, CBMs have been classified into more than 30 different families. These non-catalytic modules mediate a prolonged and intimate contact of the enzyme with the target substrate, eliciting efficient hydrolysis of the insoluble polysaccharides. (2) Xylanases are very effective in improving the nutritive value of wheat- or rye-based diets for broiler chicks although the role of non-catalytic CBMs in the function of exogenous modular xylanases in vivo remains to be determined. (3) A study was undertaken to investigate the importance of a family 6 CBM in the function of recombinant derivatives of xylanase 11A (Xyn11A) of Clostridium thermocellum used to supplement cereal-based diets for poultry. (4) The data show that birds fed on a wheat-based diet supplemented with the modular xylanase display an increased final body weight when compared with birds receiving Xyn11A catalytic module or birds receiving the enzyme mixture Roxazyme G. (5) Interestingly, the modular xylanase was truncated and transformed into its single domain counterpart on the duodenum of birds fed on the wheat-based diets, most possibly due to the action of pancreatic proteases. (6) Together the data point to the importance of CBMs in the function of feed xylanases and suggest, that in chicken fed on wheat-based diets, the main sites for exogenous enzymes action might be the gastrointestinal (GI) compartments preceding the duodenum, most probably the crop.

  11. Inhibitory Potential of Antifungal Drugs on ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters P-Glycoprotein, MRP1 to MRP5, BCRP, and BSEP.

    PubMed

    Lempers, Vincent J C; van den Heuvel, Jeroen J M W; Russel, Frans G M; Aarnoutse, Rob E; Burger, David M; Brüggemann, Roger J; Koenderink, Jan B

    2016-06-01

    Inhibition of ABC transporters is a common mechanism underlying drug-drug interactions (DDIs). We determined the inhibitory potential of antifungal drugs currently used for invasive fungal infections on ABC transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp), MRP1 to MRP5, BCRP, and BSEP in vitro Membrane vesicles isolated from transporter-overexpressing HEK 293 cells were used to investigate the inhibitory potential of antifungal drugs (250 μM) on transport of model substrates. Concentration-inhibition curves were determined if transport inhibition was >60%. Fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) for P-gp and BCRP were both 2 μM for itraconazole, 5 and 12 μM for hydroxyitraconazole, 3 and 6 μM for posaconazole, and 3 and 11 μM for isavuconazole, respectively. BSEP was strongly inhibited by itraconazole and hydroxyitraconazole (3 and 17 μM, respectively). Fluconazole and voriconazole did not inhibit any transport for >60%. Micafungin uniquely inhibited all transporters, with strong inhibition of MRP4 (4 μM). Anidulafungin and caspofungin showed strong inhibition of BCRP (7 and 6 μM, respectively). Amphotericin B only weakly inhibited BCRP-mediated transport (127 μM). Despite their wide range of DDIs, azole antifungals exhibit selective inhibition on efflux transporters. Although echinocandins display low potential for clinically relevant DDIs, they demonstrate potent in vitro inhibitory activity. This suggests that inhibition of ABC transporters plays a crucial role in the inexplicable (non-cytochrome P450-mediated) DDIs with antifungal drugs.

  12. Inhibitory Potential of Antifungal Drugs on ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters P-Glycoprotein, MRP1 to MRP5, BCRP, and BSEP

    PubMed Central

    Lempers, Vincent J. C.; van den Heuvel, Jeroen J. M. W.; Russel, Frans G. M.; Aarnoutse, Rob E.; Burger, David M.; Koenderink, Jan B.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of ABC transporters is a common mechanism underlying drug-drug interactions (DDIs). We determined the inhibitory potential of antifungal drugs currently used for invasive fungal infections on ABC transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp), MRP1 to MRP5, BCRP, and BSEP in vitro. Membrane vesicles isolated from transporter-overexpressing HEK 293 cells were used to investigate the inhibitory potential of antifungal drugs (250 μM) on transport of model substrates. Concentration-inhibition curves were determined if transport inhibition was >60%. Fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) for P-gp and BCRP were both 2 μM for itraconazole, 5 and 12 μM for hydroxyitraconazole, 3 and 6 μM for posaconazole, and 3 and 11 μM for isavuconazole, respectively. BSEP was strongly inhibited by itraconazole and hydroxyitraconazole (3 and 17 μM, respectively). Fluconazole and voriconazole did not inhibit any transport for >60%. Micafungin uniquely inhibited all transporters, with strong inhibition of MRP4 (4 μM). Anidulafungin and caspofungin showed strong inhibition of BCRP (7 and 6 μM, respectively). Amphotericin B only weakly inhibited BCRP-mediated transport (127 μM). Despite their wide range of DDIs, azole antifungals exhibit selective inhibition on efflux transporters. Although echinocandins display low potential for clinically relevant DDIs, they demonstrate potent in vitro inhibitory activity. This suggests that inhibition of ABC transporters plays a crucial role in the inexplicable (non-cytochrome P450-mediated) DDIs with antifungal drugs. PMID:27001813

  13. An investigation into the effect of the structure of bile salt aggregates on the binding interactions and ESIHT dynamics of curcumin: a photophysical approach to probe bile salt aggregates as a potential drug carrier.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Sarthak; Ghosh, Surajit; Banik, Debasis; Banerjee, Chiranjib; Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2013-11-07

    This work demonstrates the utilization of bile salt aggregates as a potential biological host system for studying the binding interactions and dynamics of the poorly-water-soluble drug curcumin by means of photophysical techniques. We found that the level of degradation of curcumin is greatly suppressed upon encapsulation into the nanocavities of three different bile salt aggregates. However, NaTC aggregates are more effective to suppress the level of degradation of curcumin than NaCh and NaDC aggregates. We also report the modulation of the photophysical and dynamical properties of curcumin into the nanocavities of bile salt aggregates using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The reduced level of interaction of curcumin with water upon incorporation into the different binding sites of bile salt aggregates results in an enhanced fluorescence intensity along with the blue shift in the emission maxima of curcumin. However, the observation of higher fluorescence quantum yield as well as longer fluorescence lifetime in NaTC aggregates compared to that in NaCh and NaDC aggregates clearly indicates a more effective decrease in the excited-state intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer (ESIHT) mediated nonradiative deactivation of curcumin by the interaction with the anionic headgroup of NaTC. The binding and location of curcumin into the bile salt aggregates has been further confirmed from the steady-state fluorescence anisotropy measurements. In addition, we have shown the effect of addition of salt on the photophysical properties of curcumin in the confined environments of bile salt aggregates. Our results indicate that on addition of salt the time scale of ESIHT process of curcumin in bile salt aggregates is markedly increased.

  14. Theoretical insight into the binding energy and detonation performance of ε-, γ-, β-CL-20 cocrystals with β-HMX, FOX-7, and DMF in different molar ratios, as well as electrostatic potential.

    PubMed

    Feng, Rui-Zhi; Zhang, Shu-Hai; Ren, Fu-de; Gou, Rui-Jun; Gao, Li

    2016-06-01

    Molecular dynamics method was employed to study the binding energies on the selected crystal planes of the ε-, γ-, β-conformation 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (ε-, γ-, β-CL-20) cocrystal explosives with 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethylene (FOX-7), 1,3,5,7-tetranitro- 1,3,5,7-tetrazacyclooctane with β-conformation (β-HMX) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) in different molar ratios. The oxygen balance, density, detonation velocity, detonation pressure, and surface electrostatic potential were analyzed. The results indicate that the binding energies E b (*) and stabilities are in the order of 1:1 > 2:1 > 3:1 > 5:1 > 8:1 (CL-20:FOX-7/β-HMX/DMF). The values of E b (*) and stabilities of the energetic-nonenergetic CL-20/DMF cocrystals are far larger than those of the energetic-energetic CL-20/FOX-7 and CL-20/β-HMX, and those of CL-20/β-HMX are the smallest. For CL-20/FOX-7 and CL-20/β-HMX, the largest E b (*) appears in the cocrystals with the 1:1, 1:2 or 1:3 molar ratio, and the stabilities of the cocrystals with the excess ratio of CL-20 are weaker than those in the cocrystals with the excess ratio of FOX-7 or β-HMX. In CL-20/FOX-7, CL-20 prefers adopting the γ-form, and ε-CL-20 is the preference in CL-20/β-HMX, and ε-CL-20 and β-CL-20 can be found in CL-20/DMF. The CL-20/FOX-7 and CL-20/β-HMX cocrystals with low molar ratios can meet the requirements of low sensitive high energetic materials. Surface electrostatic potential reveals the nature of the sensitivity change upon the cocrystal formation. Graphical Abstract MD method was employed to study the binding energies on the selected crystal planes in the ε-, γ-, β-CL-20 cocrystals with FOX-7, β-HMX and DMF in different molar ratios. Surface electrostatic potential reveals the nature of the sensitivity change in cocrystals.

  15. Effect of VK framework-1 glycosylation on the binding affinity of lymphoma-specific murine and chimeric LL2 antibodies and its potential use as a novel conjugation site.

    PubMed

    Leung, S O; Dion, A S; Pellegrini, M C; Losman, M J; Grebenau, R C; Goldenberg, D M; Hansen, H J

    1995-02-08

    A potential asparagine (Asn)-linked glycosylation site was identified in the VK FRI sequence of an anti-B lymphoma monoclonal antibody (MAb), LL2.SDS-PAGE analysis and endo-F treatment of both murine and chimeric LL2 antibodies indicated that this site was glycosylated; however, no differences in the binding affinity to Raji cells were observed between the native murine LL2 and the endo-F-deglycosylated murine LL2 antibodies. Elimination of the glycosylation site from the chimeric LL2 antibody was accomplished by an Asn to Gln mutation in the tri-acceptor site found in the light chain. The resultant aglycosylated chimeric LL2 exhibited a similar Raji cell binding affinity to that of the glycosylated form. The results are in agreement with computer modeling studies which suggested the lack of interactions between the oligosaccharide moiety and the CDRs. The finding is interesting because it enables a wider choice of human framework sequences, which in most cases do not have a corresponding glycosylation site, for the humanization of the LL2 VK domain, as well as a greater latitude of host expression systems. Most importantly, the LL2 VK carbohydrate moiety might be used as a novel conjugation site for drugs and radionuclides without compromising the immunoreactivity of the antibody.

  16. New modulated design and synthesis of chiral CuII/SnIV bimetallic potential anticancer drug entity: In vitro DNA binding and pBR322 DNA cleavage activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabassum, Sartaj; Sharma, Girish Chandra; Arjmand, Farukh

    2012-05-01

    A new chiral ligand scaffold L derived from (R)-2-amino-2-phenyl ethanol and diethyl oxalate was isolated and thoroughly characterized by various spectroscopic methods. The ligand L was allowed to react with CuCl2·2H2O and NiCl2·6H2O to achieve monometallic complexes 1 and 2, respectively. Subsequently modulation of 1 and 2 was carried out in the presence of SnCl4·5H2O to obtain heterobimetallic potential drug candidates 3 and 4 possessing (CuII/SnIV and NiII/SnIV) metallic cores, respectively and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic data including 1H, 13C and 119Sn NMR in case of 3 and 4. In vitro DNA binding studies revealed that complex 3 avidly binds to DNA as quantified by Kb and Ksv values. Complex 3 exhibits a remarkable DNA cleavage activity (concentration dependent) with pBR322 DNA and the cleavage activity of 3 was significantly enhanced in the presence of activators and follows the order H2O2 > Asc > MPA > GSH. Complex 3 cleave pBR322 DNA via hydrolytic pathway and accessible to major groove of DNA.

  17. 99mTc(CO)3-Labeled Benzothiazole Derivatives Preferentially Bind Cerebrovascular Amyloid: Potential Use as Imaging Agents for Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jianhua; Cui, Mengchao; Dai, Jiapei; Liu, Boli

    2015-08-03

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a disorder affecting the elderly that is characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition in blood vessel walls of the brain. A series of 99mTc(CO)3-labeled benzothiazole derivatives as potential SPECT imaging probes for cerebrovascular Aβ deposition is reported. Rhenium surrogate displayed high affinities to Aβ aggregates with Ki values ranging from 106 to 42 nM, and they strongly stained Aβ deposits in transgenic mice (Tg) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. In vitro autoradiography on brain sections of Tg and AD patients confirmed that [99mTc]24 possessed sufficient affinity for Aβ plaques, and [99mTc]24 could only label Aβ deposition in blood vessels but not Aβ plaques in the parenchyma of the brain of AD patients. Moreover, [99mTc]24 possessed favorable initial uptake (1.21% ID/g) and fast blood washout (blood2 min/blood60 min=23) in normal mice. These preliminary results suggest that [99mTc]24 may be used as an Aβ imaging probe for the detection of CAA.

  18. ZNF555 protein binds to transcriptional activator site of 4qA allele and ANT1: potential implication in Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Elena; Rich, Jeremy; Karoutas, Adam; Tarlykov, Pavel; Cochet, Emilie; Malysheva, Daria; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Ogryzko, Vasily; Pirozhkova, Iryna

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is an epi/genetic satellite disease associated with at least two satellite sequences in 4q35: (i) D4Z4 macrosatellite and (ii) β-satellite repeats (BSR), a prevalent part of the 4qA allele. Most of the recent FSHD studies have been focused on a DUX4 transcript inside D4Z4 and its tandem contraction in FSHD patients. However, the D4Z4-contraction alone is not pathological, which would also require the 4qA allele. Since little is known about BSR, we investigated the 4qA BSR functional role in the transcriptional control of the FSHD region 4q35. We have shown that an individual BSR possesses enhancer activity leading to activation of the Adenine Nucleotide Translocator 1 gene (ANT1), a major FSHD candidate gene. We have identified ZNF555, a previously uncharacterized protein, as a putative transcriptional factor highly expressed in human primary myoblasts that interacts with the BSR enhancer site and impacts the ANT1 promoter activity in FSHD myoblasts. The discovery of the functional role of the 4qA allele and ZNF555 in the transcriptional control of ANT1 advances our understanding of FSHD pathogenesis and provides potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26184877

  19. ZNF555 protein binds to transcriptional activator site of 4qA allele and ANT1: potential implication in Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Elena; Rich, Jeremy; Karoutas, Adam; Tarlykov, Pavel; Cochet, Emilie; Malysheva, Daria; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Ogryzko, Vasily; Pirozhkova, Iryna

    2015-09-30

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is an epi/genetic satellite disease associated with at least two satellite sequences in 4q35: (i) D4Z4 macrosatellite and (ii) β-satellite repeats (BSR), a prevalent part of the 4qA allele. Most of the recent FSHD studies have been focused on a DUX4 transcript inside D4Z4 and its tandem contraction in FSHD patients. However, the D4Z4-contraction alone is not pathological, which would also require the 4qA allele. Since little is known about BSR, we investigated the 4qA BSR functional role in the transcriptional control of the FSHD region 4q35. We have shown that an individual BSR possesses enhancer activity leading to activation of the Adenine Nucleotide Translocator 1 gene (ANT1), a major FSHD candidate gene. We have identified ZNF555, a previously uncharacterized protein, as a putative transcriptional factor highly expressed in human primary myoblasts that interacts with the BSR enhancer site and impacts the ANT1 promoter activity in FSHD myoblasts. The discovery of the functional role of the 4qA allele and ZNF555 in the transcriptional control of ANT1 advances our understanding of FSHD pathogenesis and provides potential therapeutic targets.

  20. Potentiating the cellular targeting and anti-tumor activity of Dp44mT via binding to human serum albumin: two saturable mechanisms of Dp44mT uptake by cells.

    PubMed

    Merlot, Angelica M; Sahni, Sumit; Lane, Darius J R; Fordham, Ashleigh M; Pantarat, Namfon; Hibbs, David E; Richardson, Vera; Doddareddy, Munikumar R; Ong, Jennifer A; Huang, Michael L H; Richardson, Des R; Kalinowski, Danuta S

    2015-04-30

    Di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT) demonstrates potent anti-cancer activity. We previously demonstrated that 14C-Dp44mT enters and targets cells through a carrier/receptor-mediated uptake process. Despite structural similarity, 2-benzoylpyridine 4-ethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Bp4eT) and pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone (PIH) enter cells via passive diffusion. Considering albumin alters the uptake of many drugs, we examined the effect of human serum albumin (HSA) on the cellular uptake of Dp44mT, Bp4eT and PIH. Chelator-HSA binding studies demonstrated the following order of relative affinity: Bp4eT≈PIH>Dp44mT. Interestingly, HSA decreased Bp4eT and PIH uptake, potentially due to its high affinity for the ligands. In contrast, HSA markedly stimulated Dp44mT uptake by cells, with two saturable uptake mechanisms identified. The first mechanism saturated at 5-10 µM (B(max):1.20±0.04 × 10⁷ molecules/cell; K(d):33±3 µM) and was consistent with a previously identified Dp44mT receptor/carrier. The second mechanism was of lower affinity, but higher capacity (B(max):2.90±0.12 × 10⁷ molecules/cell; K(d):65±6 µM), becoming saturated at 100 µM and was only evident in the presence of HSA. This second saturable Dp44mT uptake process was inhibited by excess HSA and had characteristics suggesting it was mediated by a specific binding site. Significantly, the HSA-mediated increase in the targeting of Dp44mT to cancer cells potentiated apoptosis and could be important for enhancing efficacy.

  1. Potentiation of the synergistic activities of chitinases ChiA, ChiB and ChiC from Serratia marcescens CFFSUR-B2 by chitobiase (Chb) and chitin binding protein (CBP).

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Román, Martha Ingrid; Dunn, Michael F; Tinoco-Valencia, Raunel; Holguín-Meléndez, Francisco; Huerta-Palacios, Graciela; Guillén-Navarro, Karina

    2014-01-01

    With the goal of understanding the chitinolytic mechanism of the potential biological control strain Serratia marcescens CFFSUR-B2, genes encoding chitinases ChiA, ChiB and ChiC, chitobiase (Chb) and chitin binding protein (CBP) were cloned, the protein products overexpressed in Escherichia coli as 6His-Sumo fusion proteins and purified by affinity chromatography. Following affinity tag removal, the chitinolytic activity of the recombinant proteins was evaluated individually and in combination using colloidal chitin as substrate. ChiB and ChiC were highly active while ChiA was inactive. Reactions containing both ChiB and ChiC showed significantly increased N-acetylglucosamine trimer and dimer formation, but decreased monomer formation, compared to reactions with either enzyme alone. This suggests that while both ChiB and ChiC have a general affinity for the same substrate, they attack different sites and together degrade chitin more efficiently than either enzyme separately. Chb and CBP in combination with ChiB and ChiC (individually or together) increased their chitinase activity. We report for the first time the potentiating effect of Chb on the activity of the chitinases and the synergistic activity of a mixture of all five proteins (the three chitinases, Chb and CBP). These results contribute to our understanding of the mechanism of action of the chitinases produced by strain CFFSUR-B2 and provide a molecular basis for its high potential as a biocontrol agent against fungal pathogens.

  2. Regulation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 expression in trigeminal ganglion neurons via methyl-CpG binding protein 2 signaling contributes tongue heat sensitivity and inflammatory hyperalgesia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Azumi; Honda, Kuniya; Shirakawa, Tetsuro; Iwata, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Background Pain hypoalgesia has been reported in Rett syndrome patients, a severe neurodevelopmental disorder which can be attributed to mutations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Here, we examined the role of MeCP2 signaling in tongue heat sensitivity in the normal and inflamed state using Mecp2 heterozygous (Mecp2+/−) mice. Results Heat hypoalgesia of the tongue occurred in Mecp2+/− mice and submucosal injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant into the tongue produced a long-lasting heat hyperalgesia at the inflamed site in wild-type mice but not in Mecp2+/− mice. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 was expressed in a large number of MeCP2-immunoreactive trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the tongue in both wild-type and Mecp2+/− mice (70.9% in wild type; 72.1% in Mecp2+/−). The number of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1-immunoreactive trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the tongue was smaller in Mecp2+/− mice relative to wild-type mice (30.5% in wild type; 20.2% in Mecp2+/−). Following complete Freund’s adjuvant injection, the number of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1- and MeCP2-immunoreactive trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the tongue, as well as MeCP2 protein expression in trigeminal ganglion, was significantly increased in wild-type mice but not in Mecp2+/− mice. Additionally, tongue heat hyperalgesia following complete Freund’s adjuvant injection was completely suppressed by the administration of SB366791, a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 antagonist, in the tongue. Conclusions These findings indicate that tongue heat sensitivity and hypersensitivity are dependent on the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 which is regulated via MeCP2 signaling in trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the tongue. PMID:27030715

  3. Evaluation of Several Two-Step Scoring Functions Based on Linear Interaction Energy, Effective Ligand Size, and Empirical Pair Potentials for Prediction of Protein-Ligand Binding Geometry and Free Energy

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Obaidur; Estrada, Trilce P.; Doren, Douglas J.; Taufer, Michela; Brooks, Charles L.; Armen, Roger S.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of several two-step scoring approaches for molecular docking were assessed for their ability to predict binding geometries and free energies. Two new scoring functions designed for “step 2 discrimination” were proposed and compared to our CHARMM implementation of the linear interaction energy (LIE) approach using the Generalized-Born with Molecular Volume (GBMV) implicit solvation model. A scoring function S1 was proposed by considering only “interacting” ligand atoms as the “effective size” of the ligand, and extended to an empirical regression-based pair potential S2. The S1 and S2 scoring schemes were trained and five-fold cross validated on a diverse set of 259 protein-ligand complexes from the Ligand Protein Database (LPDB). The regression-based parameters for S1 and S2 also demonstrated reasonable transferability in the CSARdock 2010 benchmark using a new dataset (NRC HiQ) of diverse protein-ligand complexes. The ability of the scoring functions to accurately predict ligand geometry was evaluated by calculating the discriminative power (DP) of the scoring functions to identify native poses. The parameters for the LIE scoring function with the optimal discriminative power (DP) for geometry (step 1 discrimination) were found to be very similar to the best-fit parameters for binding free energy over a large number of protein-ligand complexes (step 2 discrimination). Reasonable performance of the scoring functions in enrichment of active compounds in four different protein target classes established that the parameters for S1 and S2 provided reasonable accuracy and transferability. Additional analysis was performed to definitively separate scoring function performance from molecular weight effects. This analysis included the prediction of ligand binding efficiencies for a subset of the CSARdock NRC HiQ dataset where the number of ligand heavy atoms ranged from 17 to 35. This range of ligand heavy atoms is where improved accuracy of

  4. Evaluation of several two-step scoring functions based on linear interaction energy, effective ligand size, and empirical pair potentials for prediction of protein-ligand binding geometry and free energy.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Obaidur; Estrada, Trilce P; Doren, Douglas J; Taufer, Michela; Brooks, Charles L; Armen, Roger S

    2011-09-26

    The performances of several two-step scoring approaches for molecular docking were assessed for their ability to predict binding geometries and free energies. Two new scoring functions designed for "step 2 discrimination" were proposed and compared to our CHARMM implementation of the linear interaction energy (LIE) approach using the Generalized-Born with Molecular Volume (GBMV) implicit solvation model. A scoring function S1 was proposed by considering only "interacting" ligand atoms as the "effective size" of the ligand and extended to an empirical regression-based pair potential S2. The S1 and S2 scoring schemes were trained and 5-fold cross-validated on a diverse set of 259 protein-ligand complexes from the Ligand Protein Database (LPDB). The regression-based parameters for S1 and S2 also demonstrated reasonable transferability in the CSARdock 2010 benchmark using a new data set (NRC HiQ) of diverse protein-ligand complexes. The ability of the scoring functions to accurately predict ligand geometry was evaluated by calculating the discriminative power (DP) of the scoring functions to identify native poses. The parameters for the LIE scoring function with the optimal discriminative power (DP) for geometry (step 1 discrimination) were found to be very similar to the best-fit parameters for binding free energy over a large number of protein-ligand complexes (step 2 discrimination). Reasonable performance of the scoring functions in enrichment of active compounds in four different protein target classes established that the parameters for S1 and S2 provided reasonable accuracy and transferability. Additional analysis was performed to definitively separate scoring function performance from molecular weight effects. This analysis included the prediction of ligand binding efficiencies for a subset of the CSARdock NRC HiQ data set where the number of ligand heavy atoms ranged from 17 to 35. This range of ligand heavy atoms is where improved accuracy of predicted ligand

  5. Binding and molecular dynamic studies of sesquiterpenes (2R-acetoxymethyl-1,3,3-trimethyl-4t-(3-methyl-2-buten-1-yl)-1t-cyclohexanol) derived from marine Streptomyces sp. VITJS8 as potential anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Naine, S Jemimah; Devi, C Subathra; Mohanasrinivasan, V; Doss, C George Priya; Kumar, D Thirumal

    2016-03-01

    The main aim of the current study is to explore the bioactive potential of Streptomyces sp. VITJS8 isolated from the marine saltern. The cultural, biochemical, and morphological studies were performed to acquire the characteristic features of the potent isolate VITJS8. The 16Sr DNA sequencing was performed to investigate the phylogenetic relationship between the Streptomyces genera. The structure of the compound was elucidated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), infra-red (IR), and ultra-violet (UV) spectroscopic data analysis. The GC-MS showed the retention time at 22.39 with a single peak indicating the purity of the active compound, and the molecular formula was established as C14H9ONCl2 based on the peak at m/z 277 [M](+). Furthermore, separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), their retention time (t r) 2.761 was observed with the absorption maxima at 310 nm. The active compound showed effective inhibitory potential against four clinical pathogens at 500 μg/mL. The antioxidant activity was found effective at the IC50 value of 500 μg/mL with 90 % inhibition. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-ditetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay revealed the cytotoxicity against HepG2 cells at IC50 of 250 μg/mL. The progression of apoptosis was evidenced by morphological changes by nuclear staining. The DNA fragmentation pattern was observed at 250 μg/mL concentration. Based on flow cytometric analysis, it was evident that the compound was effective in inhibiting the sub-G0/G1 phase of cell cycle. The in vitro findings were also supported by the binding mode molecular docking studies. The active compound revealed minimum binding energy of -7.84 and showed good affinity towards the active region of topoisomerase-2α that could be considered as a suitable inhibitor. Lastly, we performed 30 ns molecular dynamic simulation analysis using GROMACS to aid in better designing of anticancer drugs. Simulation result of root mean square deviation (RMSD

  6. Microbial starch-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanoja, Romina; Oviedo, Norma; Sánchez, Sergio

    2005-06-01

    Glucosidic bonds from different non-soluble polysaccharides such as starch, cellulose and xylan are hydrolyzed by amylases, cellulases and xylanases, respectively. These enzymes are produced by microorganisms. They have a modular structure that is composed of a catalytic domain and at least one non-catalytic domain that is involved in polysaccharide binding. Starch-binding modules are present in microbial enzymes that are involved in starch metabolism; these are classified into several different families on the basis of their amino acid sequence similarities. Such binding domains promote attachment to the substrate and increase its concentration at the active site of the enzyme, which allows microorganisms to degrade non-soluble starch. Fold similarities are better conserved than sequences; nevertheless, it is possible to notice two evolutionary clusters of microbial starch-binding domains. These domains have enormous potential as tags for protein immobilization, as well as for the tailoring of enzymes that play a part in polysaccharide metabolism.

  7. The oxidation-state-dependent ATP-binding site of cytochrome c. Implication of an essential arginine residue and the effect of occupancy on the oxidation-reduction potential.

    PubMed Central

    Corthésy, B E; Wallace, C J

    1988-01-01

    Arg-91 is not part of the active site of cytochrome c that mediates binding and electron transfer, yet it is absolutely conserved in eukaryotic cytochromes c, indicating a special function. The physicochemical properties of analogues are unaffected by the modification of this residue, so they can be used with confidence to study the role of Arg-91. We have established limiting conditions under which this residue alone is specifically modified by cyclohexane-1,2-dione, and have subsequently shown that ATP, and to a lesser extent ADP or Pi, protects it from the action of the reagent in an oxidation-state-dependent manner. These observations strongly support the idea that this site exerts a controlling influence on cytochrome c activity in the electron transport or other cellular redox systems, and we have commenced a study of how that influence might operate. We find that the redox potentials of both cytochrome c and analogue are little affected by changing ATP or Pi concentrations. PMID:2843168

  8. Experimental and computational approaches of a novel methyl (2E)-2-{[N-(2-formylphenyl)(4-methylbenzene)sulfonamido]methyl}-3-(4-chlorophenyl)prop-2-enoate: A potential antimicrobial agent and an inhibition of penicillin-binding protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugavel, S.; Vetri velan, V.; Kannan, Damodharan; Bakthadoss, Manickam

    2016-07-01

    The title compound methyl(2E)-2-{[N-(2-formylphenyl) (4-methylbenzene)sulfonamido]methyl}-3-(4-chlorophenyl) prop-2-enoate (MFMSC) has been synthesized and single crystals were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature. Structural and vibrational spectroscopic studies were carried out by using single crystal X-ray diffraction, FT-IR and NMR spectral analysis together with DFT method using GAUSSIAN'03 software. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out by VEDA program. NBO analysis, Mulliken charge analysis, HOMO-LUMO, MEP, Global chemical reactivity descriptors and thermodynamic properties have been analyzed. The hyperpolarisability calculation reveals the present material has a reasonably good propensity for nonlinear optical activity. The obtained antimicrobial activity results indicate that the compound shows good to moderate activity against all tested bacterial and fungal pathogens. A computational study was also carried out to predict the drug-likeness and ADMET properties of the title compound. Due to the different potential biological activity of the title compound, molecular docking study is also reported and the compound might exhibit inhibitory activity against penicillin-binding protein PBP-2X.

  9. The influence of measurement uncertainties on the evaluation of the distribution volume ratio and binding potential in rat studies on a microPET® R4: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sossi, Vesna; Camborde, Marie-Laure; Tropini, Giorgia; Newport, Danny; Rahmim, Arman; Doudet, Doris J.; Ruth, Thomas J.

    2005-06-01

    In small animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, the injectable radiotracer dose is often limited by the tracer mass which, together with the tracer kinetics and scanner sensitivity, dictates the statistical quality of the time activity curves (TACs) used to extract biological parameters. We investigated the effect of measurement uncertainty on the determination of the distribution volume ratio (DVR) and binding potential (BP) as estimated using the tissue input Logan (DVRL, BPL) and the ratio (DVRr, BPr) methods for two tracers, with the Concorde microPET® R4 camera. Parameters' coefficients of variation (COV) were estimated from a combination of rat and phantom data. For 11C-dihydrotetrabenazine, the COV was 11% for the BPL and 13.4% for the BPr when using TACs obtained from individual regions of interest (ROIs) and segmented attenuation correction. The COVs were reduced to 7.5% (BPL) and 8.6% (BPr) when the striatal and cerebellar TACs were estimated as averages of 3 and 2 ROIs respectively. Results obtained for 11C-methylphenidate (MP) yielded approximately 30% higher COVs. With measured attenuation correction, the COVs were on average 100% higher. The presented method can be used to examine the contribution of a variety of imaging conditions to the uncertainty of biologically meaningful parameters.

  10. The structure of human cleavage factor I(m) hints at functions beyond UGUA-specific RNA binding: a role in alternative polyadenylation and a potential link to 5' capping and splicing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Gilmartin, Gregory M; Doublié, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    3'-end cleavage and subsequent polyadenylation are critical steps in mRNA maturation. The precise location where cleavage occurs (referred to as poly(A) site) is determined by a tripartite mechanism in which a A(A/U)UAAA hexamer, GU rich downstream element and UGUA upstream element are recognized by the cleavage and polyadenylation factor (CPSF), cleavage stimulation factor (CstF) and cleavage factor I(m) (CFI(m)), respectively. CFI(m) is composed of a smaller 25 kDa subunit (CFI(m)25) and a larger 59, 68 or 72 kDa subunit. CFI(m)68 interacts with CFI(m)25 through its N-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM). We recently solved the crystal structures of CFI(m)25 bound to RNA and of a complex of CFI(m)25, the RRM domain of CFI(m)68 and RNA. Our study illustrated the molecular basis for UGUA recognition by the CFI(m) complex, suggested a possible mechanism for CFI(m) mediated alternative polyadenylation, and revealed potential links between CFI(m) and other mRNA processing factors, such as the 20 kDa subunit of the cap binding protein (CBP20), and the splicing regulator U2AF65.

  11. Measurement of binding potential of [C11]WIN 35,428 for dopamine re-uptake site in normal human brain: Comparison of graphical and non-linear least-squares analytic method

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoi, F.; Wong, D.F.; Marenco, S.

    1994-05-01

    (C11)WIN 35,428 was evaluated as a specific radioligand for the dopamine re-uptake site in brain by PET scanning. Twenty mCi of [C11]WIN 35,428 was administered IV to 8 normal volunteers (19-81 y.o.). Fifty dynamic PET scan images were acquired with blood sampling, for 90 min after [C11]WIN 35,428 injection. Four different kinetic modeling procedures were used to estimate the binding potential, k3/k4. The k3 and k4 parameters reflect the rate constants for binding to and dissociation from receptors, respectively. The first model is a three-compartment model which is a standard non-linear least-squares analysis with constraint of the k1/k2 ratio. This consists of a plasma, ligand free and a specifically bound compartment. The k1/k2 ratio was estimated with a two-compartment model using plasma and cerebellar data. The other three models are two-compartment models. This consists of a plasma and a brain (cerebellum or striatum) compartment. The second model is a two-compartment graphical method of Gjedde. The distribution volume of [C11]WIN in striatum and cerebellum was plotted as an intercept. The third model approach is the graphical method of Logan, which was a modification of the Gjedde approach. The distribution volume of [C11]WIN in striatum and cerebellum was plotted as a slope. The fourth model consisted of a direct fit a f cerebellum and striatum without plasma input. The mean value and standard deviation of k3/k4 in each model was 4.38 {plus_minus} 0.81, 3.93 {plus_minus} 0.98, 4.15 {plus_minus} 0.83, and 6.90 {plus_minus} 2.19, respectively. There is a significant difference between k3/k4 values of the constraint method and that of the last method. There is no significant difference between the k3/k4 values of the constraint method and the other two methods.

  12. Engineering RNA-binding proteins for biology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Varani, Gabriele

    2013-08-01

    RNA-binding proteins play essential roles in the regulation of gene expression. Many have modular structures and combine relatively few common domains in various arrangements to recognize RNA sequences and/or structures. Recent progress in engineering the specificity of the PUF class RNA-binding proteins has shown that RNA-binding domains may be combined with various effector or functional domains to regulate the metabolism of targeted RNAs. Designer RNA-binding proteins with tailored sequence specificity will provide valuable tools for biochemical research as well as potential therapeutic applications. In this review, we discuss the suitability of various RNA-binding domains for engineering RNA-binding specificity, based on the structural basis for their recognition. We also compare various protein engineering and design methods applied to RNA-binding proteins, and discuss future applications of these proteins.

  13. Concentrations of metals and potential metal-binding compounds and speciation of Cd, Zn and Cu in phloem and xylem saps from castor bean plants (Ricinus communis) treated with four levels of cadmium.

    PubMed

    Hazama, Kenji; Nagata, Shinji; Fujimori, Tamaki; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Yoneyama, Tadakatsu

    2015-06-01

    We examined the concentrations of metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Fe and Mn) and potential metal-binding compounds [nicotianamine (NA), thiol compounds and citrate] in xylem and phloem saps from 4-week-old castor bean plants (Ricinus communis) treated with 0 (control), 0.1, 1.0, and 10 μM Cd for 3 weeks. Treatment with 0.1 and 1 μM Cd produced no visible damage, while 10 μM Cd retarded growth. Cadmium concentrations in both saps were higher than those in the culture solution at 0.1 μM, similar at 1.0 μM and lower at 10 μM. Cd at 10 μM reduced Cu and Fe concentrations in both saps. NA concentrations measured by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (MS) in xylem sap (20 μM) were higher than the Cu concentrations, and those in phloem sap (150 μM) were higher than those of Zn, Fe and Cu combined. Reduced glutathione concentrations differed in xylem and phloem saps (1-2 and 30-150 μM, respectively), but oxidized glutathione concentrations were similar. Phloem sap phytochelatin 2 concentration increased from 0.8 μM in controls to 8 μM in 10 μM Cd. Free citrate was 2-4 μM in xylem sap and 70-100 μM in phloem sap. Total bound forms of Cd in phloem and xylem saps from 1 μM Cd-treated plants were 54 and 8%, respectively. Treatment of phloem sap with proteinaseK reduced high-molecular compounds while increasing fractions of low-molecular Cd-thiol complexes. Zinc-NA, Fe-NA and Cu-NA were identified in the phloem sap fraction of control plants by electrospray ionization time-of-flight MS, and the xylem sap contained Cu-NA.

  14. Carboplatin binding to histidine

    SciTech Connect

    Tanley, Simon W. M.; Diederichs, Kay; Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J.; Levy, Colin; Schreurs, Antoine M. M.; Helliwell, John R.

    2014-08-29

    An X-ray crystal structure showing the binding of purely carboplatin to histidine in a model protein has finally been obtained. This required extensive crystallization trials and various novel crystal structure analyses. Carboplatin is a second-generation platinum anticancer agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine (in hen egg-white lysozyme; HEWL) showed the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high NaCl concentration used in the crystallization conditions. HEWL co-crystallizations with carboplatin in NaBr conditions have now been carried out to confirm whether carboplatin converts to the bromine form and whether this takes place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin observed previously in NaCl conditions. Here, it is reported that a partial chemical transformation takes place but to a transplatin form. Thus, to attempt to resolve purely carboplatin binding at histidine, this study utilized co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin without NaCl to eliminate the partial chemical conversion of carboplatin. Tetragonal HEWL crystals co-crystallized with carboplatin were successfully obtained in four different conditions, each at a different pH value. The structural results obtained show carboplatin bound to either one or both of the N atoms of His15 of HEWL, and this particular variation was dependent on the concentration of anions in the crystallization mixture and the elapsed time, as well as the pH used. The structural details of the bound carboplatin molecule also differed between them. Overall, the most detailed crystal structure showed the majority of the carboplatin atoms bound to the platinum centre; however, the four-carbon ring structure of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate moiety (CBDC) remained elusive. The potential impact of the results for the administration of carboplatin as an anticancer agent are described.

  15. Estimation of the binding modes with important human cytochrome P450 enzymes, drug interaction potential, pharmacokinetics, and hepatotoxicity of ginger components using molecular docking, computational, and pharmacokinetic modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhu, Shengrong

    2015-01-01

    Ginger is one of the most commonly used herbal medicines for the treatment of numerous ailments and improvement of body functions. It may be used in combination with prescribed drugs. The coadministration of ginger with therapeutic drugs raises a concern of potential deleterious drug interactions via the modulation of the expression and/or activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, resulting in unfavorable therapeutic outcomes. This study aimed to determine the molecular interactions between 12 main active ginger components (6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, 10-gingerol, 6-shogaol, 8-shogaol, 10-shogaol, ar-curcumene, β-bisabolene, β-sesquiphelandrene, 6-gingerdione, (-)-zingiberene, and methyl-6-isogingerol) and human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 and to predict the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET) of the 12 ginger components using computational approaches and comprehensive literature search. Docking studies showed that ginger components interacted with a panel of amino acids in the active sites of CYP1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 mainly through hydrogen bond formation, to a lesser extent, via π-π stacking. The pharmacokinetic simulation studies showed that the [I]/[Ki ] value for CYP2C9, 2C19, and 3A4 ranged from 0.0002 to 19.6 and the R value ranged from 1.0002 to 20.6 and that ginger might exhibit a high risk of drug interaction via inhibition of the activity of human CYP2C9 and CYP3A4, but a low risk of drug interaction toward CYP2C19-mediated drug metabolism. Furthermore, it has been evaluated that the 12 ginger components possessed a favorable ADMET profiles with regard to the solubility, absorption, permeability across the blood-brain barrier, interactions with CYP2D6, hepatotoxicity, and plasma protein binding. The validation results showed that there was no remarkable effect of ginger on the metabolism of warfarin in humans, whereas concurrent use of ginger and nifedipine exhibited a

  16. Human sex hormone-binding globulin binding affinities of 125 structurally diverse chemicals and comparison with their binding to androgen receptor, estrogen receptor, and α-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Hong, Huixiao; Branham, William S; Ng, Hui Wen; Moland, Carrie L; Dial, Stacey L; Fang, Hong; Perkins, Roger; Sheehan, Daniel; Tong, Weida

    2015-02-01

    One endocrine disruption mechanism is through binding to nuclear receptors such as the androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor (ER) in target cells. The concentration of a chemical in serum is important for its entry into the target cells to bind the receptors, which is regulated by the serum proteins. Human sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is the major transport protein in serum that can bind androgens and estrogens and thus change a chemical's availability to enter the target cells. Sequestration of an androgen or estrogen in the serum can alter the chemical elicited AR- and ER-mediated responses. To better understand the chemical-induced endocrine activity, we developed a competitive binding assay using human pregnancy plasma and measured the binding to the human SHBG for 125 structurally diverse chemicals, most of which were known to bind AR and ER. Eighty seven chemicals were able to bind the human SHBG in the assay, whereas 38 chemicals were nonbinders. Binding data for human SHBG are compared with that for rat α-fetoprotein, ER and AR. Knowing the binding profiles between serum and nuclear receptors will improve assessment of a chemical's potential for endocrine disruption. The SHBG binding data reported here represent the largest data set of structurally diverse chemicals tested for human SHBG binding. Utilization of the SHBG binding data with AR and ER binding data could enable better evaluation of endocrine disrupting potential of chemicals through AR- and ER-mediated responses since sequestration in serum could be considered.

  17. The prion protein binds thiamine.

    PubMed

    Perez-Pineiro, Rolando; Bjorndahl, Trent C; Berjanskii, Mark V; Hau, David; Li, Li; Huang, Alan; Lee, Rose; Gibbs, Ebrima; Ladner, Carol; Dong, Ying Wei; Abera, Ashenafi; Cashman, Neil R; Wishart, David S

    2011-11-01

    Although highly conserved throughout evolution, the exact biological function of the prion protein is still unclear. In an effort to identify the potential biological functions of the prion protein we conducted a small-molecule screening assay using the Syrian hamster prion protein [shPrP(90-232)]. The screen was performed using a library of 149 water-soluble metabolites that are known to pass through the blood-brain barrier. Using a combination of 1D NMR, fluorescence quenching and surface plasmon resonance we identified thiamine (vitamin B1) as a specific prion ligand with a binding constant of ~60 μM. Subsequent studies showed that this interaction is evolutionarily conserved, with similar binding constants being seen for mouse, hamster and human prions. Various protein construct lengths, both with and without the unstructured N-terminal region in the presence and absence of copper, were examined. This indicates that the N-terminus has no influence on the protein's ability to interact with thiamine. In addition to thiamine, the more biologically abundant forms of vitamin B1 (thiamine monophosphate and thiamine diphosphate) were also found to bind the prion protein with similar affinity. Heteronuclear NMR experiments were used to determine thiamine's interaction site, which is located between helix 1 and the preceding loop. These data, in conjunction with computer-aided docking and molecular dynamics, were used to model the thiamine-binding pharmacophore and a comparison with other thiamine binding proteins was performed to reveal the common features of interaction.

  18. Measuring Equilibrium Binding Constants for the WT1-DNA Interaction Using a Filter Binding Assay.

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Equilibrium binding of WT1 to specific sites in DNA and potentially RNA molecules is central in mediating the regulatory roles of this protein. In order to understand the functional effects of mutations in the nucleic acid-binding domain of WT1 proteins and/or mutations in the DNA- or RNA-binding sites, it is necessary to measure the equilibrium constant for formation of the protein-nucleic acid complex. This chapter describes the use of a filter binding assay to make accurate measurements of the binding of the WT1 zinc finger domain to the consensus WT1-binding site in DNA. The method described is readily adapted to the measurement of the effects of mutations in either the WT1 zinc finger domain or the putative binding sites within a promoter element or cellular RNA.

  19. The structure of SSO2064, the first representative of Pfam family PF01796, reveals a novel two-domain zinc-ribbon OB-fold architecture with a potential acyl-CoA-binding role

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, S. Sri; Aravind, L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Caruthers, Jonathan; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    SSO2064 is the first structural representative of PF01796 (DUF35), a large prokaryotic family with a wide phylogenetic distribution. The structure reveals a novel two-domain architecture comprising an N-terminal, rubredoxin-like, zinc ribbon and a C-terminal, oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) fold domain. Additional N-terminal helical segments may be involved in protein–protein interactions. Domain architectures, genomic context analysis and functional evidence from certain bacterial representatives of this family suggest that these proteins form a novel fatty-acid-binding component that is involved in the biosynthesis of lipids and polyketide antibiotics and that they possibly function as acyl-CoA-binding proteins. This structure has led to a re-evaluation of the DUF35 family, which has now been split into two entries in the latest Pfam release (v.24.0). PMID:20944206

  20. Ureaplasma urealyticum binds mannose-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Benstein, Barbara D; Ourth, Donald D; Crouse, Dennis T; Shanklin, D Radford

    2004-10-01

    Mannose-binding C-type lectin (MBL) is an important component of innate immunity in mammals. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), an acute phase protein, acts as an opsonin for phagocytosis and also activates the mannan-binding lectin complement pathway. It may play a particularly significant role during infancy before adequate specific protection can be provided by the adaptive immune system. Ureaplasma urealyticum has been linked to several diseases including pneumonia and chronic lung disease (CLD) in premature infants. We therefore investigated the ability of U. urealyticum to bind MBL. A guinea pig IgG anti-rabbit-MBL antiserum was produced. An immunoblot (dot-blot) assay done on nitrocellulose membrane determined that the anti-MBL antibody had specificity against both rabbit and human MBL. Pure cultures of U. urealyticum, serotype 3, were used to make slide preparations. The slides containing the organisms were then incubated with nonimmune rabbit serum containing MBL. Ureaplasma was shown to bind rabbit MBL with an immunocytochemical assay using the guinea pig IgG anti-rabbit MBL antiserum. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled anti-guinea pig IgG was used to localize the reaction. The anti-MBL antiserum was also used in an immunocytochemical assay to localize U. urealyticum in histological sections of lungs from mice specifically infected with this organism. The same method also indicated binding of MBL by ureaplasma in human lung tissue obtained at autopsy from culture positive infants. Our results demonstrate that ureaplasma has the capacity to bind MBL. The absence of MBL may play a role in the predisposition of diseases related to this organism.

  1. Synthetic LPS-Binding Polymer Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tian

    -bovine serum albumin (BSA) binding, which showed that, different from NPs FITC-LPS interactions, variation of TBAm's content in NPs had very little influence on BSA binding, instead, more cationic NPs with higher content of APM were found to possess higher BSA binding. Additionally, GUA-containing NPs exhibited particularly high BSA binding capacity, especially under low ionic strength conditions. In the current formulations, the aggregation and saturation effects make NPs unsuitable in practical applications. Nevertheless, we anticipate that by attaching NPs onto certain substrates, particles may be effectively separated from each other, and the NPs' LPS binding capacity could potentially be further improved.

  2. Protein and lipid binding parameters in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) blood and liver fractions to extrapolate from an in vitro metabolic degradation assay to in vivo bioaccumulation potential of hydrophobic organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Escher, Beate I; Cowan-Ellsberry, Christina E; Dyer, Scott; Embry, Michelle R; Erhardt, Susan; Halder, Marlies; Kwon, Jung-Hwan; Johanning, Karla; Oosterwijk, Mattheus T T; Rutishauser, Sibylle; Segner, Helmut; Nichols, John

    2011-07-18

    Binding of hydrophobic chemicals to colloids such as proteins or lipids is difficult to measure using classical microdialysis methods due to low aqueous concentrations, adsorption to dialysis membranes and test vessels, and slow kinetics of equilibration. Here, we employed a three-phase partitioning system where silicone (polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS) serves as a third phase to determine partitioning between water and colloids and acts at the same time as a dosing device for hydrophobic chemicals. The applicability of this method was demonstrated with bovine serum albumin (BSA). Measured binding constants (K(BSAw)) for chlorpyrifos, methoxychlor, nonylphenol, and pyrene were in good agreement with an established quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR). A fifth compound, fluoxypyr-methyl-heptyl ester, was excluded from the analysis because of apparent abiotic degradation. The PDMS depletion method was then used to determine partition coefficients for test chemicals in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver S9 fractions (K(S9w)) and blood plasma (K(bloodw)). Measured K(S9w) and K(bloodw) values were consistent with predictions obtained using a mass-balance model that employs the octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)) as a surrogate for lipid partitioning and K(BSAw) to represent protein binding. For each compound, K(bloodw) was substantially greater than K(S9w), primarily because blood contains more lipid than liver S9 fractions (1.84% of wet weight vs 0.051%). Measured liver S9 and blood plasma binding parameters were subsequently implemented in an in vitro to in vivo extrapolation model to link the in vitro liver S9 metabolic degradation assay to in vivo metabolism in fish. Apparent volumes of distribution (V(d)) calculated from the experimental data were similar to literature estimates. However, the calculated binding ratios (f(u)) used to relate in vitro metabolic clearance to clearance by the intact liver were 10 to 100 times lower than values

  3. Evolving nucleotide binding surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber-Emmons, T.; Rein, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the stability and nature of binding of a nucleotide to several known dehydrogenases. The employed approach includes calculation of hydrophobic stabilization of the binding motif and its intermolecular interaction with the ligand. The evolutionary changes of the binding motif are studied by calculating the Euclidean deviation of the respective dehydrogenases. Attention is given to the possible structural elements involved in the origin of nucleotide recognition by non-coded primordial polypeptides.

  4. Theoretical studies of binding of mannose-binding protein to monosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aida-Hyugaji, Sachiko; Takano, Keiko; Takada, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Haruo; Kojima, Naoya; Mizuochi, Tsuguo; Inoue, Yasushi

    2004-11-01

    Binding properties of mannose-binding protein (MBP) to monosaccharides are discussed based on ab initio molecular orbital calculations for cluster models constructed. The calculated binding energies indicate that MBP has an affinity for N-acetyl- D-glucosamine, D-mannose, L-fucose, and D-glucose rather than D-galactose and N-acetyl- D-galactosamine, which is consistent with the biochemical experimental results. Electrostatic potential surfaces at the binding site of four monosaccharides having binding properties matched well with that of MBP. A vacant frontier orbital was found to be localized around the binding site of MBP, suggesting that MBP-monosaccharide interaction may occur through electrostatic and orbital interactions.

  5. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Packer, S; Fairchild, R G; Watts, K P; Greenberg, D; Hannon, S J

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed. (PSB)

  6. Penicillin Binding Protein 1 Is Important in the Compensatory Response of Staphylococcus aureus to Daptomycin-Induced Membrane Damage and Is a Potential Target for β-Lactam–Daptomycin Synergy

    PubMed Central

    Berti, Andrew D.; Theisen, Erin; Sauer, John-Demian; Nonejuie, Poochit; Olson, Joshua; Pogliano, Joseph; Sakoulas, George; Nizet, Victor; Proctor, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    The activity of daptomycin (DAP) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is enhanced in the presence of β-lactam antibiotics. This effect is more pronounced with β-lactam antibiotics that exhibit avid binding to penicillin binding protein 1 (PBP1). Here, we present evidence that PBP1 has a significant role in responding to DAP-induced stress on the cell. Expression of the pbpA transcript, encoding PBP1, was specifically induced by DAP exposure whereas expression of pbpB, pbpC, and pbpD, encoding PBP2, PBP3, and PBP4, respectively, remained unchanged. Using a MRSA COL strain with pbpA under an inducible promoter, increased pbpA transcription was accompanied by reduced susceptibility to, and killing by, DAP in vitro. Exposure to β-lactams that preferentially inactivate PBP1 was not associated with increased DAP binding, suggesting that synergy in the setting of anti-PBP1 pharmacotherapy results from increased DAP potency on a per-molecule basis. Combination exposure in an in vitro pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model system with β-lactams that preferentially inactivate PBP1 (DAP-meropenem [MEM] or DAP-imipenem [IPM]) resulted in more-rapid killing than did combination exposure with DAP-nafcillin (NAF) (nonselective), DAP-ceftriaxone (CRO) or DAP-cefotaxime (CTX) (PBP2 selective), DAP-cefaclor (CEC) (PBP3 selective), or DAP-cefoxitin (FOX) (PBP4 selective). Compared to β-lactams with poor PBP1 binding specificity, exposure of S. aureus to DAP plus PBP1-selective β-lactams resulted in an increased frequency of septation and cell wall abnormalities. These data suggest that PBP1 activity may contribute to survival during DAP-induced metabolic stress. Therefore, targeted inactivation of PBP1 may enhance the antimicrobial efficiency of DAP, supporting the use of DAP–β-lactam combination therapy for serious MRSA infections, particularly when the β-lactam undermines the PBP1-mediated compensatory response. PMID:26525797

  7. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding.

  8. Comparison of the antimicrobial adhesion potential of human body fluid glycoconjugates using fucose-binding lectin (PA-IIL) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Ulex europaeus lectin (UEA-I).

    PubMed

    Lerrer, Batia; Lesman-Movshovich, Efrat; Gilboa-Garber, Nechama

    2005-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a fucose-binding lectin (PA-IIL) which strongly binds to human cells. This lectin was shown to be highly sensitive to inhibition by fucose-bearing human milk glycoproteins. Since the glycans of these glycoproteins mimic human cell receptors, they may function as decoys in blocking lectin-dependent pathogen adhesion to the host cells. Human saliva and seminal fluid also contain such compounds, and body fluids of individuals who are "secretors" express additional fucosylated (alpha 1,2) residues. The latter are selectively detected by Ulex europaeus lectin UEA-I. The aim of the present research was to compare the PA-IIL and UEA-I interactions with human salivas and seminal fluids of "secretors" and "nonsecretors" with those obtained with the respective milks. Using hemagglutination inhibition and Western blot analyses, we showed that PA-IIL interactions with the saliva and seminal fluid glycoproteins were somewhat weaker than those obtained with the milk and that "nonsecretor" body fluids were not less efficient than those of "secretors" in PA-IIL blocking. UEA-I, which interacted only with the "secretors" glycoproteins, was most sensitive to those of the seminal fluids.

  9. New modulated design, docking and synthesis of carbohydrate-conjugate heterobimetallic CuII-SnIV complex as potential topoisomerase II inhibitor: in vitro DNA binding, cleavage and cytotoxicity against human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Sartaj; Afzal, Mohd; Arjmand, Farukh

    2014-03-03

    New carbohydrate-conjugate heterobimetallic complexes [C₂₂H₅₀N₆O₁₃CuSnCl₂] (3) and [C₂₂H₅₈N₆O₁₇NiSnCl₂] (4) were synthesized from their monometallic analogs [C₂₂H₅₂N₆O₁₃Cu] (1) and [C₂₂H₆₀N₆O₁₇Ni] (2) containing N-glycoside ligand (L). In vitro DNA binding studies of L and complexes (1-4) with CT DNA were carried out by employing various biophysical and molecular docking techniques which revealed that heterobimetallic complex 3 strongly binds to DNA in comparison to 4, monometallic complexes (1 and 2) and the free ligand. Complex 3 cleaves pBR322 DNA via hydrolytic pathway (confirmed by T4 DNA ligase assay) and inhibited Topo-II activity in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, complex 3 was docked into the ATPase domain of human-Topo-II in order to probe the possible mechanism of inhibition.

  10. Type II oestrogen binding sites in human colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Piantelli, M; Ricci, R; Larocca, L M; Rinelli, A; Capelli, A; Rizzo, S; Scambia, G; Ranelletti, F O

    1990-01-01

    Seven cases of colorectal adenocarcinomas were investigated for the presence of oestrogen receptors and progesterone receptors. The tumours specifically bound oestradiol. This binding almost exclusively resulted from the presence of high numbers of type II oestrogen binding sites. Oestrogen receptors were absent or present at very low concentrations. Immunohistochemical investigation of nuclear oestrogen receptors gave negative results. This indicates that antioestrogen receptor antibodies recognise oestrogen receptors but not type II oestrogen binding sites. The presence of specific type II oestrogen binding sites and progesterone binding offers further evidence for a potential role for these steroids and their receptors in colorectal carcinoma. PMID:2266171

  11. Metallochaperones: bind and deliver

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, A.C.

    2010-03-08

    Metallochaperones deliver metal ions directly to target proteins via specific protein-protein interactions. Recent research has led to a molecular picture of how some metallochaperones bind metal ions, recognize their partner proteins, and accomplish metal ion transfer.

  12. SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin)

    MedlinePlus

    ... as: Testosterone-estrogen Binding Globulin; TeBG Formal name: Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Related tests: Testosterone , Free Testosterone, ... I should know? How is it used? The sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) test may be used ...

  13. FACS binding assay for analysing GDNF interactions.

    PubMed

    Quintino, Luís; Baudet, Aurélie; Larsson, Jonas; Lundberg, Cecilia

    2013-08-15

    Glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a secreted protein with great therapeutic potential. However, in order to analyse the interactions between GDNF and its receptors, researchers have been mostly dependent of radioactive binding assays. We developed a FACS-based binding assay for GDNF as an alternative to current methods. We demonstrated that the FACS-based assay using TGW cells allowed readily detection of GDNF binding and displacement to endogenous receptors. The dissociation constant and half maximal inhibitory concentration obtained were comparable to other studies using standard binding assays. Overall, this FACS-based, simple to perform and adaptable to high throughput setup, provides a safer and reliable alternative to radioactive methods.

  14. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  15. Copper(II) complexes of salicylic acid combining superoxide dismutase mimetic properties with DNA binding and cleaving capabilities display promising chemotherapeutic potential with fast acting in vitro cytotoxicity against cisplatin sensitive and resistant cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Mark; Kellett, Andrew; McCann, Malachy; Rosair, Georgina; McNamara, Mary; Howe, Orla; Creaven, Bernadette S; McClean, Siobhán; Kia, Agnieszka Foltyn-Arfa; O'Shea, Denis; Devereux, Michael

    2012-03-08

    The complexes [Cu(salH)(2)(H(2)O)] (1), [Cu(dipsH)(2)(H(2)O)] (2), {Cu(3-MeOsal)(H(2)O)(0.75)}(n) (3), [Cu(dipsH)(2)(BZDH)(2)] (4), [Cu(dipsH)(2)(2-MeOHBZDH)(2)]·EtOH (5), [Cu(sal)(phen)] (6), [Cu(dips)(phen)]·H(2)O (7), and [Cu(3-MeOsal)(phen)]·H(2)O (8) (salH(2) = salicylic acid; dipsH(2) = 3,5-diisopropylsalicylic acid; 3-MeOsalH(2) = 3-methoxysalicylic acid; BZDH = benzimidazole; 2-MeOHBZDH = 2 methanolbenzimidazole and phen =1,10-phenanthroline) were prepared and characterized. Structures of 4, 5, and 8 were determined by X-ray crystallography. Compounds 1-8 are potent superoxide dismutase mimetics, and they are inactive as inhibitors of COX-2 activity. Compounds 1, 4, and 5 exhibit moderate inhibition of COX-1. Complexes 6-8 display rapid micromolar cytotoxicity against cisplatin sensitive (breast (MCF-7), prostate (DU145), and colon (HT29)) and cisplatin resistant (ovarian (SK-OV-3)) cell lines compared to 1-5, and they exhibit potent in vitro DNA binding and cleavage capabilities.

  16. The binding specificity and affinity determinants of family 1 and family 3 cellulose binding modules

    PubMed Central

    Lehtiö, Janne; Sugiyama, Junji; Gustavsson, Malin; Fransson, Linda; Linder, Markus; Teeri, Tuula T.

    2003-01-01

    Cellulose binding modules (CBMs) potentiate the action of cellulolytic enzymes on insoluble substrates. Numerous studies have established that three aromatic residues on a CBM surface are needed for binding onto cellulose crystals and that tryptophans contribute to higher binding affinity than tyrosines. However, studies addressing the nature of CBM–cellulose interactions have so far failed to establish the binding site on cellulose crystals targeted by CBMs. In this study, the binding sites of CBMs on Valonia cellulose crystals have been visualized by transmission electron microscopy. Fusion of the CBMs with a modified staphylococcal protein A (ZZ-domain) allowed direct immuno-gold labeling at close proximity of the actual CBM binding site. The transmission electron microscopy images provide unequivocal evidence that the fungal family 1 CBMs as well as the family 3 CBM from Clostridium thermocellum CipA have defined binding sites on two opposite corners of Valonia cellulose crystals. In most samples these corners are worn to display significant area of the hydrophobic (110) plane, which thus constitutes the binding site for these CBMs. PMID:12522267

  17. Molecular simulations of multimodal ligand-protein binding: elucidation of binding sites and correlation with experiments.

    PubMed

    Freed, Alexander S; Garde, Shekhar; Cramer, Steven M

    2011-11-17

    Multimodal chromatography, which employs more than one mode of interaction between ligands and proteins, has been shown to have unique selectivity and high efficacy for protein purification. To test the ability of free solution molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit water to identify binding regions on the protein surface and to shed light on the "pseudo affinity" nature of multimodal interactions, we performed MD simulations of a model protein ubiquitin in aqueous solution of free ligands. Comparisons of MD with NMR spectroscopy of ubiquitin mutants in solutions of free ligands show a good agreement between the two with regard to the preferred binding region on the surface of the protein and several binding sites. MD simulations also identify additional binding sites that were not observed in the NMR experiments. "Bound" ligands were found to be sufficiently flexible and to access a number of favorable conformations, suggesting only a moderate loss of ligand entropy in the "pseudo affinity" binding of these multimodal ligands. Analysis of locations of chemical subunits of the ligand on the protein surface indicated that electrostatic interaction units were located on the periphery of the preferred binding region on the protein. The analysis of the electrostatic potential, the hydrophobicity maps, and the binding of both acetate and benzene probes were used to further study the localization of individual ligand moieties. These results suggest that water-mediated electrostatic interactions help the localization and orientation of the MM ligand to the binding region with additional stability provided by nonspecific hydrophobic interactions.

  18. Sigma Receptor Binding Assays.

    PubMed

    Chu, Uyen B; Ruoho, Arnold E

    2015-12-08

    Sigma receptors, both Sigma-1(S1R) and Sigma-2 (S2R), are small molecule-regulated, primarily endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane-associated sites. A number of drugs bind to sigma receptors, including the antipsychotic haloperidol and (+)-pentazocine, an opioid analgesic. Sigma receptors are implicated in many central nervous system disorders, in particular Alzheimer's disease and conditions associated with motor control, such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Described in this unit are radioligand binding assays used for the pharmacological characterization of S1R and S2R. Methods detailed include a radioligand saturation binding assay for defining receptor densities and a competitive inhibition binding assay employing [³H]-(+)-pentazocine for identifying and characterizing novel ligands that interact with S1R. Procedures using [³H]-1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine ([³H]-DTG), a nonselective sigma receptor ligand, are described for conducting a saturation binding and competitive inhibition assays for the S2R site. These protocols are of value in drug discovery in identifying new sigma ligands and in the characterization of these receptors.

  19. Aluminum binding by humus

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetti, M.F.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, W. van; Kinniburgh, D.

    1996-10-01

    The need for qualitative and quantitative description of the chemical speciation of Al, in particular and other metal ions in general, is stressed by the increased mobilization of metal ions in water and soils due to acid rain deposition. In this paper we present new data of Al binding to two humic acids. These new data sets and the some previously published data will be analyzed with the NICA-Donnan model using one set of parameters to describe the Al binding to the different humic substances. Once the experimental data is described with the NICA-Donnan approach, we will show the effect of Ca on Al binding and surface speciation as well as the effect of Al on the charge of the humic particles. The parameters derived from the laboratory experiments will be used to describe the variation of the field based Al partition coefficient.

  20. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Carolyn

    1999-10-05

    This invention provides a system for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, this system can be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  1. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Caroline

    2001-10-09

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  2. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Caroline

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  3. MD-2 binds cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Kim, Jungsu; Gonen, Ayelet; Viriyakosol, Suganya; Miller, Yury I

    2016-02-19

    Cholesterol is a structural component of cellular membranes, which is transported from liver to peripheral cells in the form of cholesterol esters (CE), residing in the hydrophobic core of low-density lipoprotein. Oxidized CE (OxCE) is often found in plasma and in atherosclerotic lesions of subjects with cardiovascular disease. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that OxCE activates inflammatory responses in macrophages via toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4). Here we demonstrate that cholesterol binds to myeloid differentiation-2 (MD-2), a TLR4 ancillary molecule, which is a binding receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and is indispensable for LPS-induced TLR4 dimerization and signaling. Cholesterol binding to MD-2 was competed by LPS and by OxCE-modified BSA. Furthermore, soluble MD-2 in human plasma and MD-2 in mouse atherosclerotic lesions carried cholesterol, the finding supporting the biological significance of MD-2 cholesterol binding. These results help understand the molecular basis of TLR4 activation by OxCE and mechanisms of chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis.

  4. MD-2 binds cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Kim, Jungsu; Gonen, Ayelet; Viriyakosol, Suganya; Miller, Yury I.

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is a structural component of cellular membranes, which is transported from liver to peripheral cells in the form of cholesterol esters (CE), residing in the hydrophobic core of low-density lipoprotein. Oxidized CE (OxCE) is often found in plasma and in atherosclerotic lesions of subjects with cardiovascular disease. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that OxCE activates inflammatory responses in macrophages via toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4). Here we demonstrate that cholesterol binds to myeloid differentiation-2 (MD-2), a TLR4 ancillary molecule, which is a binding receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and is indispensable for LPS-induced TLR4 dimerization and signaling. Cholesterol binding to MD-2 was competed by LPS and by OxCE-modified BSA. Furthermore, soluble MD-2 in human plasma and MD-2 in mouse atherosclerotic lesions carried cholesterol, the finding supporting the biological significance of MD-2 cholesterol binding. These results help understand the molecular basis of TLR4 activation by OxCE and mechanisms of chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis. PMID:26806306

  5. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  6. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  7. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories—episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities.

  8. SIGMA RECEPTOR BINDING ASSAYS

    PubMed Central

    CHU, UYEN B.; RUOHO, ARNOLD E.

    2016-01-01

    Sigma receptors belong to a class of small molecule-regulated, primarily endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane-associated receptors, of which there are two subtypes: the Sigma-1 receptor (S1R) and the Sigma-2 receptor (S2R). Both S1R and S2R bind to a number of drugs including antipsychotic, haloperidol, and the opioid analgesic, (+)-pentazocine. Sigma receptors are implicated in multiple disease pathologies associated with the nervous system including diseases affecting motor control such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Alzeimher's disease. This unit describes methods for the pharmacological characterization of S1R and S2R using radioligand-binding assays. In the first section, radioligand saturation binding assay to determine receptor densities and competitive inhibition assays to characterize affinities of novel compounds are presented for S1R using the selective S1R ligand, [3H]-(+)-pentazocine. The second section describes radioligand saturation binding assay and competitive inhibition assays for the S2R using a non-selective S1R and S2R ligand, [3H]-1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine ([3H]-DTG). PMID:26646191

  9. Novel DNA-binding properties of the RNA-binding protein TIAR.

    PubMed

    Suswam, Esther A; Li, Yan Yan; Mahtani, Harry; King, Peter H

    2005-01-01

    TIA-1 related protein binds avidly to uridine-rich elements in mRNA and pre-mRNAs of a wide range of genes, including interleukin (IL)-8 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The protein has diverse regulatory roles, which in part depend on the locus of binding within the transcript, including translational control, splicing and apoptosis. Here, we observed selective and potent inhibition of TIAR-RNP complex formation with IL-8 and VEGF 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTRs) using thymidine-rich deoxyoligonucleotide (ODN) sequences derived from the VEFG 3'-UTR. We show by ultraviolet crosslinking and electrophoretic mobility shift assays that TIAR can bind directly to single-stranded, thymidine-rich ODNs but not to double-stranded ODNs containing the same sequence. TIAR had a nearly 6-fold greater affinity for DNA than RNA (K(d)app = 1.6x10(-9) M versus 9.4 x 10(-9) M). Truncation of TIAR indicated that the high affinity DNA-binding site overlaps with the RNA-binding site involving RNA recognition motif 2 (RRM2). However, RRM1 alone could also bind to DNA. Finally, we show that TIAR can be displaced from single-stranded DNA by active transcription through the binding site. These results provide a potential mechanism by which TIAR can shuttle between RNA and DNA ligands.

  10. Ligand binding by PDZ domains.

    PubMed

    Chi, Celestine N; Bach, Anders; Strømgaard, Kristian; Gianni, Stefano; Jemth, Per

    2012-01-01

    The postsynaptic density protein-95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) protein domain family is one of the most common protein-protein interaction modules in mammalian cells, with paralogs present in several hundred human proteins. PDZ domains are found in most cell types, but neuronal proteins, for example, are particularly rich in these domains. The general function of PDZ domains is to bring proteins together within the appropriate cellular compartment, thereby facilitating scaffolding, signaling, and trafficking events. The many functions of PDZ domains under normal physiological as well as pathological conditions have been reviewed recently. In this review, we focus on the molecular details of how PDZ domains bind their protein ligands and their potential as drug targets in this context.

  11. Heavy quark interactions and quarkonium binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satz, Helmut

    2009-06-01

    We consider heavy quark interactions in quenched and unquenched lattice QCD. In a region just above the deconfinement point, non-Abelian gluon polarization leads to a strong increase in the binding. Comparing quark-antiquark and quark-quark interaction, the dependence of the binding on the separation distance r is found to be the same for the colorless singlet Q{\\skew3\\bar{Q}} and the colored anti-triplet QQ state. In a potential model description of in-medium J/ψ behavior, this enhancement of the binding leads to a survival up to temperatures of 1.5 Tc or higher; it could also result in J/ψ flow. Based on joint work with O Kaczmarek and F Karsch.

  12. Carbohydrate-binding protein identification by coupling structural similarity searching with binding affinity prediction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huiying; Yang, Yuedong; von Itzstein, Mark; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2014-11-15

    Carbohydrate-binding proteins (CBPs) are potential biomarkers and drug targets. However, the interactions between carbohydrates and proteins are challenging to study experimentally and computationally because of their low binding affinity, high flexibility, and the lack of a linear sequence in carbohydrates as exists in RNA, DNA, and proteins. Here, we describe a structure-based function-prediction technique called SPOT-Struc that identifies carbohydrate-recognizing proteins and their binding amino acid residues by structural alignment program SPalign and binding affinity scoring according to a knowledge-based statistical potential based on the distance-scaled finite-ideal gas reference state (DFIRE). The leave-one-out cross-validation of the method on 113 carbohydrate-binding domains and 3442 noncarbohydrate binding proteins yields a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.56 for SPalign alone and 0.63 for SPOT-Struc (SPalign + binding affinity scoring) for CBP prediction. SPOT-Struc is a technique with high positive predictive value (79% correct predictions in all positive CBP predictions) with a reasonable sensitivity (52% positive predictions in all CBPs). The sensitivity of the method was changed slightly when applied to 31 APO (unbound) structures found in the protein databank (14/31 for APO versus 15/31 for HOLO). The result of SPOT-Struc will not change significantly if highly homologous templates were used. SPOT-Struc predicted 19 out of 2076 structural genome targets as CBPs. In particular, one uncharacterized protein in Bacillus subtilis (1oq1A) was matched to galectin-9 from Mus musculus. Thus, SPOT-Struc is useful for uncovering novel carbohydrate-binding proteins. SPOT-Struc is available at http://sparks-lab.org.

  13. Binding energy levels of a slowly moving ion in dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hongwei; Li, Fuli

    2013-02-01

    The near field electric potential of a slowly moving ion in complex plasmas is studied. We find that the potential consists of the Debye-Hückel potential, the wake potential, and the potential associated with charge fluctuations. The binding energy levels of the ion are calculated by use of the Ritz variation method. The results show that the binding energy levels are related to the magnetic quantum number m. The binding energy levels are affected by speed of the ion and dust grain number density. In contract to isolated ion or static ion in plasmas, the binding energy levels of the ion are pushed up and even become unbounded.

  14. Alpine ski bindings and injuries. Current findings.

    PubMed

    Natri, A; Beynnon, B D; Ettlinger, C F; Johnson, R J; Shealy, J E

    1999-07-01

    In spite of the fact that the overall incidence of alpine ski injuries has decreased during the last 25 years, the incidence of serious knee sprains usually involving the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has risen dramatically since the late 1970s. This trend runs counter to a dramatic reduction in lower leg injuries that began in the early 1970s and to date has lowered the risk of injury below the knee by almost 90%. One of the primary design objectives of modern ski boots and bindings has been to protect the skier from tibia and ankle fractures. So, in that sense, they have done an excellent job. However, despite advances in equipment design, modern ski bindings have not protected the knee from serious ligament trauma. At the present time, we are unaware of any binding design, settings or function that can protect both the knee and lower extremities from serious ligament sprains. No innovative change in binding design appears to be on the horizon that has the potential to reduce the risk of these severe knee injuries. Indeed, only 1 study has demonstrated a means to help reduce this risk of serious knee sprains, and this study involved education of skiers, not ski equipment. Despite the inability of bindings to reduce the risk of severe knee injuries there can be no doubt that improvement in ski bindings has been the most important factor in the marked reduction in incidence of lower leg and ankle injuries during the last 25 years. The authors strongly endorse the application of present International Standards Organisation (ISO) and American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards concerning mounting, setting and maintaining modern 'state of the art' bindings.

  15. Allosteric binding sites on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Wess, Jürgen

    2005-12-01

    In this issue of Molecular Pharmacology, Tränkle et al. (p. 1597) present new findings regarding the existence of a second allosteric site on the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 mAChR). The M2 mAChR is a prototypic class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that has proven to be a very useful model system to study the molecular mechanisms involved in the binding of allosteric GPCR ligands. Previous studies have identified several allosteric muscarinic ligands, including the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor tacrine and the bis-pyridinium derivative 4,4'-bis-[(2,6-dichloro-benzyloxy-imino)-methyl]-1,1'-propane-1,3-diyl-bis-pyridinium dibromide (Duo3), which, in contrast to conventional allosteric muscarinic ligands, display concentration-effect curves with slope factors >1. By analyzing the interactions of tacrine and Duo3 with other allosteric muscarinic agents predicted to bind to the previously identified ;common' allosteric binding site, Tränkle et al. provide evidence suggesting that two allosteric agents and one orthosteric ligand may be able to bind to the M2 mAChR simultaneously. Moreover, studies with mutant mAChRs indicated that the M2 receptor epitopes involved in the binding of tacrine and Duo3 may not be identical. Molecular modeling and ligand docking studies suggested that the additional allosteric site probably represents a subdomain of the receptor's allosteric binding cleft. Because allosteric binding sites have been found on many other GPCRs and drugs interacting with these sites are thought to have great therapeutic potential, the study by Tränkle et al. should be of considerable general interest.

  16. Exploring the binding dynamics of BAR proteins.

    PubMed

    Kabaso, Doron; Gongadze, Ekaterina; Jorgačevski, Jernej; Kreft, Marko; Van Rienen, Ursula; Zorec, Robert; Iglič, Aleš

    2011-09-01

    We used a continuum model based on the Helfrich free energy to investigate the binding dynamics of a lipid bilayer to a BAR domain surface of a crescent-like shape of positive (e.g. I-BAR shape) or negative (e.g. F-BAR shape) intrinsic curvature. According to structural data, it has been suggested that negatively charged membrane lipids are bound to positively charged amino acids at the binding interface of BAR proteins, contributing a negative binding energy to the system free energy. In addition, the cone-like shape of negatively charged lipids on the inner side of a cell membrane might contribute a positive intrinsic curvature, facilitating the initial bending towards the crescent-like shape of the BAR domain. In the present study, we hypothesize that in the limit of a rigid BAR domain shape, the negative binding energy and the coupling between the intrinsic curvature of negatively charged lipids and the membrane curvature drive the bending of the membrane. To estimate the binding energy, the electric potential at the charged surface of a BAR domain was calculated using the Langevin-Bikerman equation. Results of numerical simulations reveal that the binding energy is important for the initial instability (i.e. bending of a membrane), while the coupling between the intrinsic shapes of lipids and membrane curvature could be crucial for the curvature-dependent aggregation of negatively charged lipids near the surface of the BAR domain. In the discussion, we suggest novel experiments using patch clamp techniques to analyze the binding dynamics of BAR proteins, as well as the possible role of BAR proteins in the fusion pore stability of exovesicles.

  17. Mucin Binding Reduces Colistin Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Johnny X.; Blaskovich, Mark A. T.; Pelingon, Ruby; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela; Elliott, Alysha G.; Butler, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Colistin has found increasing use in treating drug-resistant bacterial lung infections, but potential interactions with pulmonary biomolecules have not been investigated. We postulated that colistin, like aminoglycoside antibiotics, may bind to secretory mucin in sputum or epithelial mucin that lines airways, reducing free drug levels. To test this hypothesis, we measured binding of colistin and other antibiotics to porcine mucin, a family of densely glycosylated proteins used as a surrogate for human sputum and airway mucin. Antibiotics were incubated in dialysis tubing with or without mucin, and concentrations of unbound antibiotics able to penetrate the dialysis tubing were measured over time using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The percentage of antibiotic measured in the dialysate after 4 h in the presence of mucin, relative to the amount without mucin, was 15% for colistin, 16% for polymyxin B, 19% for tobramycin, 52% for ciprofloxacin, and 78% for daptomycin. Antibiotics with the strongest mucin binding had an overall polybasic positive charge, whereas those with comparatively little binding were less basic. When comparing MICs measured with or without added mucin, colistin and polymyxin B showed >100-fold increases in MICs for multiple Gram-negative bacteria. Preclinical evaluation of mucin binding should become a standard procedure when considering the potential pulmonary use of new or existing antibiotics, particularly those with a polybasic overall charge. In the airways, mucin binding may reduce the antibacterial efficacy of inhaled or intravenously administered colistin, and the presence of sub-MIC effective antibiotic concentrations could result in the development of antibiotic resistance. PMID:26169405

  18. Mucin Binding Reduces Colistin Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Johnny X; Blaskovich, Mark A T; Pelingon, Ruby; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela; Elliott, Alysha G; Butler, Mark S; Montgomery, A Bruce; Cooper, Matthew A

    2015-10-01

    Colistin has found increasing use in treating drug-resistant bacterial lung infections, but potential interactions with pulmonary biomolecules have not been investigated. We postulated that colistin, like aminoglycoside antibiotics, may bind to secretory mucin in sputum or epithelial mucin that lines airways, reducing free drug levels. To test this hypothesis, we measured binding of colistin and other antibiotics to porcine mucin, a family of densely glycosylated proteins used as a surrogate for human sputum and airway mucin. Antibiotics were incubated in dialysis tubing with or without mucin, and concentrations of unbound antibiotics able to penetrate the dialysis tubing were measured over time using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The percentage of antibiotic measured in the dialysate after 4 h in the presence of mucin, relative to the amount without mucin, was 15% for colistin, 16% for polymyxin B, 19% for tobramycin, 52% for ciprofloxacin, and 78% for daptomycin. Antibiotics with the strongest mucin binding had an overall polybasic positive charge, whereas those with comparatively little binding were less basic. When comparing MICs measured with or without added mucin, colistin and polymyxin B showed >100-fold increases in MICs for multiple Gram-negative bacteria. Preclinical evaluation of mucin binding should become a standard procedure when considering the potential pulmonary use of new or existing antibiotics, particularly those with a polybasic overall charge. In the airways, mucin binding may reduce the antibacterial efficacy of inhaled or intravenously administered colistin, and the presence of sub-MIC effective antibiotic concentrations could result in the development of antibiotic resistance.

  19. Five of Five VHHs Neutralizing Poliovirus Bind the Receptor-Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Mike; Schotte, Lise; Thys, Bert; Filman, David J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nanobodies, or VHHs, that recognize poliovirus type 1 have previously been selected and characterized as candidates for antiviral agents or reagents for standardization of vaccine quality control. In this study, we present high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of poliovirus with five neutralizing VHHs. All VHHs bind the capsid in the canyon at sites that extensively overlap the poliovirus receptor-binding site. In contrast, the interaction involves a unique (and surprisingly extensive) surface for each of the five VHHs. Five regions of the capsid were found to participate in binding with all five VHHs. Four of these five regions are known to alter during the expansion of the capsid associated with viral entry. Interestingly, binding of one of the VHHs, PVSS21E, resulted in significant changes of the capsid structure and thus seems to trap the virus in an early stage of expansion. IMPORTANCE We describe the cryo-electron microscopy structures of complexes of five neutralizing VHHs with the Mahoney strain of type 1 poliovirus at resolutions ranging from 3.8 to 6.3Å. All five VHHs bind deep in the virus canyon at similar sites that overlap extensively with the binding site for the receptor (CD155). The binding surfaces on the VHHs are surprisingly extensive, but despite the use of similar binding surfaces on the virus, the binding surface on the VHHs is unique for each VHH. In four of the five complexes, the virus remains essentially unchanged, but for the fifth there are significant changes reminiscent of but smaller in magnitude than the changes associated with cell entry, suggesting that this VHH traps the virus in a previously undescribed early intermediate state. The neutralizing mechanisms of the VHHs and their potential use as quality control agents for the end game of poliovirus eradication are discussed. PMID:26764003

  20. Neurosteroid binding to the amino terminal and glutamate binding domains of ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Krasnodara; Bartle, Emily; Roark, Ryan; Fanelli, David; Pham, Melissa; Pollard, Beth; Borkowski, Brian; Rhoads, Sarah; Kim, Joon; Rocha, Monica; Kahlson, Martha; Kangala, Melinda; Gentile, Lisa

    2012-06-01

    The endogenous neurosteroids, pregnenolone sulfate (PS) and 3α-hydroxy-5β-pregnan-20-one sulfate (PREGAS), have been shown to differentially regulate the ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) family of ligand-gated ion channels. Upon binding to these receptors, PREGAS decreases current flow through the channels. Upon binding to non-NMDA or NMDA receptors containing an GluN2C or GluN2D subunit, PS also decreases current flow through the channels, however, upon binding to NMDA receptors containing an GluN2A or GluN2B subunit, flow through the channels increases. To begin to understand this differential regulation, we have cloned the S1S2 and amino terminal domains (ATD) of the NMDA GluN2B and GluN2D and AMPA GluA2 subunits. Here we present results that show that PS and PREGAS bind to different sites in the ATD of the GluA2 subunit, which when combined with previous results from our lab, now identifies two binding domains for each neurosteroid. We also show both neurosteroids bind only to the ATD of the GluN2D subunit, suggesting that this binding is distinct from that of the AMPA GluA2 subunit, with both leading to iGluR inhibition. Finally, we provide evidence that both PS and PREGAS bind to the S1S2 domain of the NMDA GluN2B subunit. Neurosteroid binding to the S1S2 domain of NMDA subunits responsible for potentiation of iGluRs and to the ATD of NMDA subunits responsible for inhibition of iGluRs, provides an interesting option for therapeutic design.

  1. AB-Bind: Antibody binding mutational database for computational affinity predictions.

    PubMed

    Sirin, Sarah; Apgar, James R; Bennett, Eric M; Keating, Amy E

    2016-02-01

    Antibodies (Abs) are a crucial component of the immune system and are often used as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. The need for high-affinity and high-specificity antibodies in research and medicine is driving the development of computational tools for accelerating antibody design and discovery. We report a diverse set of antibody binding data with accompanying structures that can be used to evaluate methods for modeling antibody interactions. Our Antibody-Bind (AB-Bind) database includes 1101 mutants with experimentally determined changes in binding free energies (ΔΔG) across 32 complexes. Using the AB-Bind data set, we evaluated the performance of protein scoring potentials in their ability to predict changes in binding free energies upon mutagenesis. Numerical correlations between computed and observed ΔΔG values were low (r = 0.16-0.45), but the potentials exhibited predictive power for classifying variants as improved vs weakened binders. Performance was evaluated using the area under the curve (AUC) for receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves; the highest AUC values for 527 mutants with |ΔΔG| > 1.0 kcal/mol were 0.81, 0.87, and 0.88 using STATIUM, FoldX, and Discovery Studio scoring potentials, respectively. Some methods could also enrich for variants with improved binding affinity; FoldX and Discovery Studio were able to correctly rank 42% and 30%, respectively, of the 80 most improved binders (those with ΔΔG < -1.0 kcal/mol) in the top 5% of the database. This modest predictive performance has value but demonstrates the continuing need to develop and improve protein energy functions for affinity prediction.

  2. DNA binding studies of tartrazine food additive.

    PubMed

    Kashanian, Soheila; Zeidali, Sahar Heidary

    2011-07-01

    The interaction of native calf thymus DNA with tartrazine in 10 mM Tris-HCl aqueous solution at neutral pH 7.4 was investigated. Tartrazine is a nitrous derivative and may cause allergic reactions, with a potential of toxicological risk. Also, tartrazine induces oxidative stress and DNA damage. Its DNA binding properties were studied by UV-vis and circular dichroism spectra, competitive binding with Hoechst 33258, and viscosity measurements. Tartrazine molecules bind to DNA via groove mode as illustrated by hyperchromism in the UV absorption band of tartrazine, decrease in Hoechst-DNA solution fluorescence, unchanged viscosity of DNA, and conformational changes such as conversion from B-like to C-like in the circular dichroism spectra of DNA. The binding constants (K(b)) of DNA with tartrazine were calculated at different temperatures. Enthalpy and entropy changes were calculated to be +37 and +213 kJ mol(-1), respectively, according to the Van't Hoff equation, which indicated that the reaction is predominantly entropically driven. Also, tartrazine does not cleave plasmid DNA. Tartrazine interacts with calf thymus DNA via a groove interaction mode with an intrinsic binding constant of 3.75 × 10(4) M(-1).

  3. Optical binding between dielectric nanowires (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Simon; Simpson, Stephen H.

    2016-09-01

    Optical binding occurs when micron-sized particles interact through the exchange of scattered photons. It has been observed both in systems of colloidal dielectric particles and between metallic nanoparticles, and can result in the formation of clusters and coupled dynamical behaviour. Optical binding between spherical particles has been studied in some detail, but little work has appeared in the literature to describe binding effects in lower symmetry systems. In the present paper we discuss recent theoretical work and computer simulations of optical binding effects operating between dielectric nanowires in counter propagating beams. The reduction in symmetry from simple spheres introduces new opportunities for binding, including different types of orientational ordering and anisotropies in the spatial arrangements that are possible for the bound particles. Various ordered configurations are possible, including ladder-like structures and oriented lattices. The stability of these structures to thermal perturbations will be discussed. Asymmetric arrangements of the nanowires are also possible, as a consequence of interactions between the nanowires and the underlying counter-propagating laser field. These configurations lead to a diversity of non-conservative effects, including uniform translation in linearly polarised beams and synchronous rotations in circularly polarised beams, suggesting potential applications of such bound structures in micro-machines.

  4. Conciliating binding efficiency and polypharmacology.

    PubMed

    Mestres, Jordi; Gregori-Puigjané, Elisabet

    2009-09-01

    The association between molecular size and risk of failure has promoted the use of binding efficiency as a prioritization metric in lead selection. Even though by extension it is often referred to as "ligand efficiency", the concept was originally conceived to be strictly applicable to comparing the binding efficiencies of ligands for a single target. With current trends in designing drugs to bind efficiently to multiple targets, a revision of the original binding efficiency definition is carried out. To this aim, the dependency of binding efficiency on polypharmacology is highlighted in a retrospective analysis of a set of antipsychotic drugs. Statistical standardization of target binding efficiencies relative to basal values obtained from a large background of medicinal chemistry compounds is proposed as a means to conciliate the concepts of binding efficiency and polypharmacology. Finally, the interplay between binding efficiency and therapeutic efficacy for optimizing natural products, random hits, and fragments is discussed.

  5. Library Binding Manual. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakhanpal, S. K.

    This procedural manual is designed to be used in bindery sections in public, university and special libraries. It briefly discusses these general matters: administrative control; selection of a binder; when and what to bind; conventional binding; routines; missing issues; schedule for shipments; temporary binding; rare books, maps and newspapers;…

  6. An Electrostatic Funnel in the GABA-Binding Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lightstone, Felice C.

    2016-01-01

    The γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAA-R) is a major inhibitory neuroreceptor that is activated by the binding of GABA. The structure of the GABAA-R is well characterized, and many of the binding site residues have been identified. However, most of these residues are obscured behind the C-loop that acts as a cover to the binding site. Thus, the mechanism by which the GABA molecule recognizes the binding site, and the pathway it takes to enter the binding site are both unclear. Through the completion and detailed analysis of 100 short, unbiased, independent molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated this phenomenon of GABA entering the binding site. In each system, GABA was placed quasi-randomly near the binding site of a GABAA-R homology model, and atomistic simulations were carried out to observe the behavior of the GABA molecules. GABA fully entered the binding site in 19 of the 100 simulations. The pathway taken by these molecules was consistent and non-random; the GABA molecules approach the binding site from below, before passing up behind the C-loop and into the binding site. This binding pathway is driven by long-range electrostatic interactions, whereby the electrostatic field acts as a ‘funnel’ that sweeps the GABA molecules towards the binding site, at which point more specific atomic interactions take over. These findings define a nuanced mechanism whereby the GABAA-R uses the general zwitterionic features of the GABA molecule to identify a potential ligand some 2 nm away from the binding site. PMID:27119953

  7. Americium binding to humic acid.

    PubMed

    Peters, A J; Hamilton-Taylor, J; Tipping, E

    2001-09-01

    The binding of americium (Am) by peat humic acid (PHA) has been investigated at Am concentrations between 10(-1) and 10(-7) M at pH approximately 2.6 in the presence and absence of Cu as a competing ion. Cu-PHA binding was also investigated in order to derive independent binding constants for use in modeling the competitive binding studies. Humic ion-binding model VI was used to compare the acquired data with previously published binding data and to investigate the importance of high-affinity binding sites in metal-PHA binding. Am was not observed to bind to high-affinity, low-concentration binding sites. The model VI parameter deltaLK2 takes into accountthe small number of strong sites in PHA and was found to be important for Cu-PHA binding but not for Am-PHA binding, regardless of whether Cu was present. Analysis of the PHA sample revealed that it contained a considerable quantity of Fe not removed by the extraction procedure, much of which is believed to be present as Fe(III). Model VI was then used to investigate the possible importance of the presence of Fe(III) in the Am-PHA binding experiments. When Fe(III) was assumed to be present, improved descriptions of the data by model VI were obtained by assuming that all of the metals [Am, Cu, and Fe(III)] undergo strong binding. This highlights the importance of Fe(III) competition in metal-PHA binding studies and possible shortcomings in the extraction procedure used to extract PHA.

  8. Fucosyl neoglycoprotein binds to mouse epididymal spermatozoa and inhibits sperm binding to the egg zona pellucida.

    PubMed

    Oh, Y S; Ahn, H S; Gye, M C

    2013-12-01

    Glycan epitopes of cellular glycoconjugates act as versatile biochemical signals, and this sugar coding plays an important role in cell-to-cell recognition processes. In this study, our aims were to determine the distribution of sperm receptors with activity for fucosyl- and galactosyl glycans and to address whether monosugar neoglycoproteins functionally mimic the binding between zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins and spermatozoa. In mouse epididymal spermatozoa with intact acrosomes, fucopyranosyl bovine serum albumin (BSA-Fuc) bound to the segment of the acrosome, the equatorial segment, and the postacrosome region of the sperm head. Galactosyl BSA (BSA-Gal) binding activity was similar to that of BSA-Fuc, but was weaker. In acrosome-reacted spermatozoa treated with the Ca(2+) ionophore A23187, BSA-zuc binding was lost in the apical segment of the acrosome but remained in the equatorial segment and postacrosome regions. BSA-Gal binding to the equatorial region was increased. In the presence of 2.5 μg ml(-1) BSA-Fuc, in vitro sperm-ZP binding was significantly decreased, indicating that fucosyl BSA functionally mimics ZP glycoproteins during sperm-egg ZP interactions. At the same concentration, BSA-Gal was not effective. Fucosyl BSA that efficiently inhibited the sperm-ZP binding can mimic the ZP glycoconjugate and has potential for use as a sperm fertility control agent in mouse.

  9. Collagen binding to Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Holderbaum, D.; Hall, G.S.; Ehrhart, L.A.

    1986-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can bind soluble collagen in a specific, saturable manner. We have previously shown that some variability exists in the degree of collagen binding between different strains of heat-killed, formaldehyde-fixed S. aureus which are commercially available as immunologic reagents. The present study demonstrates that live S. aureus of the Cowan 1 strain binds amounts of collagen per organism equivalent to those demonstrated previously in heat-killed, formaldehyde-fixed bacteria but has an affinity over 100 times greater, with Kd values of 9.7 X 10(-11) M and 4.3 X 10(-8) M for live and heat-killed organisms, respectively. Studies were also carried out with S. aureus killed by ionizing radiation, since this method of killing the organism seemed less likely to alter the binding moieties on the surface than did heat killing. Bacteria killed by exposure to gamma radiation bound collagen in a manner essentially indistinguishable from that of live organisms. Binding of collagen to irradiated cells of the Cowan 1 strain was rapid, with equilibrium reached by 30 min at 22 degrees C, and was fully reversible. The binding was not inhibited by fibronectin, fibrinogen, C1q, or immunoglobulin G, suggesting a binding site for collagen distinct from those for these proteins. Collagen binding was virtually eliminated in trypsin-treated organisms, indicating that the binding site has a protein component. Of four strains examined, Cowan 1 and S. aureus ATCC 25923 showed saturable, specific binding, while strains Woods and S4 showed a complete lack of binding. These results suggest that some strains of S. aureus contain high-affinity binding sites for collagen. While the number of binding sites per bacterium varied sixfold in the two collagen-binding strains, the apparent affinity was similar.

  10. Cognitive Binding in Schizophrenia: Weakened Integration of Temporal Intersensory Information

    PubMed Central

    Tschacher, Wolfgang; Bergomi, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive functioning is based on binding processes, by which different features and elements of neurocognition are integrated and coordinated. Binding is an essential ingredient of, for instance, Gestalt perception. We have implemented a paradigm of causality perception based on the work of Albert Michotte, in which 2 identical discs move from opposite sides of a monitor, steadily toward, and then past one another. Their coincidence generates an ambiguous percept of either “streaming” or “bouncing,” which the subjects (34 schizophrenia spectrum patients and 34 controls with mean age 27.9 y) were instructed to report. The latter perception is a marker of the binding processes underlying perceived causality (type I binding). In addition to this visual task, acoustic stimuli were presented at different times during the task (150 ms before and after visual coincidence), which can modulate perceived causality. This modulation by intersensory and temporally delayed stimuli is viewed as a different type of binding (type II). We show here, using a mixed-effects hierarchical analysis, that type II binding distinguishes schizophrenia spectrum patients from healthy controls, whereas type I binding does not. Type I binding may even be excessive in some patients, especially those with positive symptoms; Type II binding, however, was generally attenuated in patients. The present findings point to ways in which the disconnection (or Gestalt) hypothesis of schizophrenia can be refined, suggesting more specific markers of neurocognitive functioning and potential targets of treatment. PMID:21860043

  11. Diversity of Cyclic Di-GMP-Binding Proteins and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) synthetases and hydrolases (GGDEF, EAL, and HD-GYP domains) can be readily identified in bacterial genome sequences by using standard bioinformatic tools. In contrast, identification of c-di-GMP receptors remains a difficult task, and the current list of experimentally characterized c-di-GMP-binding proteins is likely incomplete. Several classes of c-di-GMP-binding proteins have been structurally characterized; for some others, the binding sites have been identified; and for several potential c-di-GMP receptors, the binding sites remain to be determined. We present here a comparative structural analysis of c-di-GMP-protein complexes that aims to discern the common themes in the binding mechanisms that allow c-di-GMP receptors to bind it with (sub)micromolar affinities despite the 1,000-fold excess of GTP. The available structures show that most receptors use their Arg and Asp/Glu residues to bind c-di-GMP monomers, dimers, or tetramers with stacked guanine bases. The only exception is the EAL domains that bind c-di-GMP monomers in an extended conformation. We show that in c-di-GMP-binding signature motifs, Arg residues bind to the O-6 and N-7 atoms at the Hoogsteen edge of the guanine base, while Asp/Glu residues bind the N-1 and N-2 atoms at its Watson-Crick edge. In addition, Arg residues participate in stacking interactions with the guanine bases of c-di-GMP and the aromatic rings of Tyr and Phe residues. This may account for the presence of Arg residues in the active sites of every receptor protein that binds stacked c-di-GMP. We also discuss the implications of these structural data for the improved understanding of the c-di-GMP signaling mechanisms. PMID:26055114

  12. Structural identification of DnaK binding sites within bovine and sheep bactenecin Bac7.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Michael; Kieslich, Bjorn; Berthold, Nicole; Knappe, Daniel; Hoffmann, Ralf; Strater, Norbert

    2014-04-01

    Bacterial resistance against common antibiotics is an increasing health problem. New pharmaceuticals for the treatment of infections caused by resistant pathogens are needed. Small proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PrAMPs) from insects are known to bind intracellularly to the conventional substrate binding cleft of the E. coli Hsp70 chaperone DnaK. Furthermore, bactenecins from mammals, members of the cathelicidin family, also contain potential DnaK binding sites. Crystal structures of bovine and sheep Bac7 in complex with the DnaK substrate binding domain show that the peptides bind in the forward binding mode with a leucine positioned in the central hydrophobic pocket. In most structures, proline and arginine residues preceding leucine occupy the hydrophobic DnaK binding sites -1 and -2. Within bovine Bac7, four potential DnaK binding sites were identified.

  13. Multipose binding in molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Atkovska, Kalina; Samsonov, Sergey A; Paszkowski-Rogacz, Maciej; Pisabarro, M Teresa

    2014-02-14

    Molecular docking has been extensively applied in virtual screening of small molecule libraries for lead identification and optimization. A necessary prerequisite for successful differentiation between active and non-active ligands is the accurate prediction of their binding affinities in the complex by use of docking scoring functions. However, many studies have shown rather poor correlations between docking scores and experimental binding affinities. Our work aimed to improve this correlation by implementing a multipose binding concept in the docking scoring scheme. Multipose binding, i.e., the property of certain protein-ligand complexes to exhibit different ligand binding modes, has been shown to occur in nature for a variety of molecules. We conducted a high-throughput docking study and implemented multipose binding in the scoring procedure by considering multiple docking solutions in binding affinity prediction. In general, improvement of the agreement between docking scores and experimental data was observed, and this was most pronounced in complexes with large and flexible ligands and high binding affinities. Further developments of the selection criteria for docking solutions for each individual complex are still necessary for a general utilization of the multipose binding concept for accurate binding affinity prediction by molecular docking.

  14. New DNA-binding radioprotectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roger

    The normal tissue damage associated with cancer radiotherapy has motivated the development at Peter Mac of a new class of DNA-binding radioprotecting drugs that could be applied top-ically to normal tissues at risk. Methylproamine (MP), the lead compound, reduces radiation induced cell kill at low concentrations. For example, experiments comparing the clonogenic survival of transformed human keratinocytes treated with 30 micromolar MP before and dur-ing various doses of ionising radiation, with the radiation dose response for untreated cells, indicate a dose reduction factor (DRF) of 2. Similar survival curve experiments using various concentrations of MP, with parallel measurements of uptake of MP into cell nuclei, have en-abled the relationship between drug uptake and extent of radioprotection to be established. Radioprotection has also been demonstrated after systemic administration to mice, for three different endpoints, namely lung, jejunum and bone marrow (survival at 30 days post-TBI). The results of pulse radiolysis studies indicated that the drugs act by reduction of transient radiation-induced oxidative species on DNA. This hypothesis was substantiated by the results of experiments in which MP radioprotection of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, assessed as -H2AX foci, in the human keratinocyte cell line. For both endpoints, the extent of radioprotection increased with MP concentration up to a maximal value. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that radioprotection by MP is mediated by attenuation of the extent of initial DNA damage. However, although MP is a potent radioprotector, it becomes cytotoxic at higher concentrations. This limitation has been addressed in an extensive program of lead optimisation and some promising analogues have emerged from which the next lead will be selected. Given the clinical potential of topical radioprotection, the new analogues are being assessed in terms of delivery to mouse oral mucosa. This is

  15. 2'-Substitution of cocaine selectively enhances dopamine and norepinephrine transporter binding.

    PubMed

    Seale, T W; Avor, K; Singh, S; Hall, N; Chan, H M; Basmadjian, G P

    1997-11-10

    Few studies have characterized the effect of substituents at the 2'-position of cocaine on transporter binding potency and selectivity. We synthesized 2'-OH-, 2'-F- and 2'-acetoxy-cocaines and compared their binding potencies for rat dopamine, norepinephrine and 5-hydroxytryptamine transporters to cocaine, 3'-OH-, 4'-OH-, 2'-OH,4'-I-cocaine derivatives, and to the transporter selective ligands WIN 35,428, nisoxetine and paroxetine. Unlike most substitutions, 2'-OH- and 2'-acetoxy-groups increased cocaine's binding potency for the dopamine transporter (10- and 4-fold, respectively). These substituents also enhanced binding to the norepinephrine transporter (52- and 35-fold, respectively) but had less effect on 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter binding. 2'-Hydroxylation also enhanced binding of 4'-I cocaine, an analog with low DA binding potency. The ability of 2'-substituents to substantially increase cocaine binding potency and to alter selectivity for brain transporters indicates the potential importance of the 2'-position in transporter binding.

  16. Metal binding components in human amniotic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, P.G.; Zlotkin, S.H.; Sarkar, B. )

    1990-02-26

    Amniotic fluid is a potential source of both nutritionally essential and toxic metals for the fetus. As the binding pattern of these metals in amniotic fluid may be one of the determining factors in their availability to the fetus, the objective of this study was to investigate metal binding in vitro. The binding of six trace metals, Mn(II), Ni(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), and Fe(III), to components of human amniotic fluid was studied by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration at physiological pH, using radioisotopes as tracers and 50 mM TRIS/HCl as the elution buffer. The amniotic fluid was collected at 16-16.5 weeks gestation by amniocentesis and pooled for analysis. Extensive amounts of Fe, Cu, Zn, and Cd and small amounts of Mn and Ni were bound to high molecular weight proteins with elution patterns similar to those seen for the binding of these metals in serum. In addition, large amounts of Fe, Mn, Ni and Cd and small amounts of Zn and Cu were associated with low molecular weight component(s). The identity of these latter components is unknown, but they play an important biological role in amniotic fluid.

  17. Exploiting Receptor Competition to Enhance Nanoparticle Binding Selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano

    2017-02-01

    Nanoparticles functionalized with multiple ligands can be programed to bind biological targets depending on the receptors they express, providing a general mechanism exploited in various technologies, from selective drug delivery to biosensing. For binding to be highly selective, ligands should exclusively interact with specific targeted receptors, because the formation of bonds with other, untargeted ones would lead to nonspecific binding and potentially harmful behavior. This poses a particular problem for multivalent nanoparticles, because even very weak bonds can collectively lead to strong binding. A statistical mechanical model is used here to describe how competition between different receptors together with multivalent effects can be harnessed to design ligand-functionalized nanoparticles insensitive to the presence of untargeted receptors, preventing nonspecific binding.

  18. Enhanced anion binding by heteroatom replacement in bambusurils.

    PubMed

    Solel, Ephrath; Singh, Mandeep; Reany, Ofer; Keinan, Ehud

    2016-05-11

    This study was driven by the hypothesis that heteroatom replacement in bambusurils could significantly modify their anion binding properties. Indeed, calculations with various glycoluril and bambusuril analogs predict that such replacements significantly alter their molecular electrostatic potential and binding properties. Both polarization and electrostatic interactions contribute to anion binding, leading to a general trend of affinity among the neutral molecules: X = S > O > NH. In bambusurils the heteroatom replacement at the portal carbonyls affect the induced dipole more significantly than replacements at the equatorial carbonyls. The stronger polarization and stronger anion binding manifest the increased aptitude of the portal heteroatoms as electron sinks. Notably, this study predicts that protonated aza-bambusurils would not only bind multiple anions along their main axis, but could also function as synthetic anion channels.

  19. Binding site number variation and high-affinity binding consensus of Myb-SANT-like transcription factor Adf-1 in Drosophilidae

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Michael; Juan, Elvira

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the evolution of transcription factor binding sites and corresponding functional change of transcriptional regulation. In this context, we have examined the structural changes of the ADF-1 binding sites at the Adh promoters of Drosophila funebris and D. virilis. We detected an expanded footprinted region in D. funebris that contains various adjacent binding sites with different binding affinities. ADF-1 was described to direct sequence-specific DNA binding to sites consisting of the multiple trinucleotide repeat . The ADF-1 recognition sites with high binding affinity differ from this trinucleotide repeat consensus sequence and a new consensus sequence is proposed for the high-affinity ADF-1 binding sites. In vitro transcription experiments with the D. funebris and D. virilis ADF-1 binding regions revealed that stronger ADF-1 binding to the expanded D. funebris ADF-1 binding region only moderately lead to increased transcriptional activity of the Adh gene. The potential of this regional expansion is discussed in the context of different ADF-1 cellular concentrations and maintenance of the ADF-1 stimulus. Altogether, evolutionary change of ADF-1 binding regions involves both, rearrangements of complex binding site cluster and also nucleotide substitutions within sites that lead to different binding affinities. PMID:20542916

  20. Method And Apparatus For Detecting Chemical Binding

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.; Wells, Cyndi A.

    2005-02-22

    The method for screening binding between a target binder and potential pharmaceutical chemicals involves sending a solution (preferably an aqueous solution) of the target binder through a conduit to a size exclusion filter, the target binder being too large to pass through the size exclusion filter, and then sending a solution of one or more potential pharmaceutical chemicals (preferably an aqueous solution) through the same conduit to the size exclusion filter after target binder has collected on the filter. The potential pharmaceutical chemicals are small enough to pass through the filter. Afterwards, x-rays are sent from an x-ray source to the size exclusion filter, and if the potential pharmaceutical chemicals form a complex with the target binder, the complex produces an x-ray fluorescence signal having an intensity that indicates that a complex has formed.

  1. Method and apparatus for detecting chemical binding

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.; Wells, Cyndi A.

    2007-07-10

    The method for screening binding between a target binder and potential pharmaceutical chemicals involves sending a solution (preferably an aqueous solution) of the target binder through a conduit to a size exclusion filter, the target binder being too large to pass through the size exclusion filter, and then sending a solution of one or more potential pharmaceutical chemicals (preferably an aqueous solution) through the same conduit to the size exclusion filter after target binder has collected on the filter. The potential pharmaceutical chemicals are small enough to pass through the filter. Afterwards, x-rays are sent from an x-ray source to the size exclusion filter, and if the potential pharmaceutical chemicals form a complex with the target binder, the complex produces an x-ray fluorescence signal having an intensity that indicates that a complex has formed.

  2. Protein binding elements in the human beta-polymerase promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Englander, E W; Wilson, S H

    1990-01-01

    The core promoter for human DNA polymerase beta contains discrete binding sites for mammalian nuclear proteins, as revealed by DNasel footprinting and gel mobility shift assays. Two sites correspond to sequences identical with the Sp1 factor binding element, and a third site includes an eight residue palindromic sequence, TGACGTCA, known as the CRE element of several cAMP responsive promoters; the 5 to 10 residues flanking this palindrome on each side have no apparent sequence homology with known elements in other promoters. Nuclear extract from a variety of tissues and cells were examined; these included rat liver and testes and cultured cells of human and hamster origin. The DNasel footprint is strong over and around the palindromic element for each of the extracts and is equivalent in size (approximately 22 residues); footprinting over the Sp1 binding sites is seen also. Two potential tissue-specific binding sites, present in liver but not in testes, were found corresponding to residues -13 to -10 and +33 to +48, respectively. Protein binding to the palindromic element was confirmed by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay with the core promoter as probe. Binding specificity of the 22 residue palindromic element, as revealed by oligonucleotide competition, is different from that of AP-1 binding element. Controlled proteolysis with trypsin was used to study structural properties of proteins forming the mobility shift bands. Following digestion with trypsin, most of the palindrome binding activity of each extract corresponded to a sharp, faster migrating band, potentially representing a DNA binding domain of the palindrome binding protein. Images PMID:2315044

  3. Radiobrominated triphenylethylenes as estrogen receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Seevers, R.H.; Meese, R.C.; Friedman, A.M.; DeSombre, E.R.

    1985-05-01

    Estrogen receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals have potential for use in the diagnosis and treatment of cancers of the female reproductive system. Tamoxifen is an antiestrogen derived from the triphenylethylene skeleton which is used in the treatment of mammary carcinoma. Hydroxytamoxifen is a metabolite of tamoxifen which binds tightly to the estrogen receptor. Two triphenylethylene derivatives based on the structure of hydroxytamoxifen have been prepared: 1-bromo-1-phenyl-2- (2-dimethylamino)-4-ethoxyphenyl -2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) ethene (1) where the ethyl group of hydroxytamoxifen has been replaced by a bromine, and 1-bromo-1-phenyl-2,2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) ethene (2) with a similar substitution and also lacking the aminoethoxy side chain believed to confer antiestrogenicity. Both 1 and 2 bind strongly to the estrogen receptor. 2 has been labeled with the Auger electron emitting nuclide Br-80m in moderate yields in high specific activity using either N-bromosuccinimide or N-bromophthalimide and shows promise as a potential radiotherapy agent.

  4. Whole-genome cartography of estrogen receptor alpha binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Yo; Vega, Vinsensius B; Thomsen, Jane S; Zhang, Tao; Kong, Say Li; Xie, Min; Chiu, Kuo Ping; Lipovich, Leonard; Barnett, Daniel H; Stossi, Fabio; Yeo, Ailing; George, Joshy; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A; Lee, Yew Kok; Charn, Tze Howe; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Miller, Lance D; Cheung, Edwin; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Ruan, Yijun; Bourque, Guillaume; Wei, Chia-Lin; Liu, Edison T

    2007-06-01

    Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation-paired end diTag cloning and sequencing strategy, we mapped estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) binding sites in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We identified 1,234 high confidence binding clusters of which 94% are projected to be bona fide ERalpha binding regions. Only 5% of the mapped estrogen receptor binding sites are located within 5 kb upstream of the transcriptional start sites of adjacent genes, regions containing the proximal promoters, whereas vast majority of the sites are mapped to intronic or distal locations (>5 kb from 5' and 3' ends of adjacent transcript), suggesting transcriptional regulatory mechanisms over significant physical distances. Of all the identified sites, 71% harbored putative full estrogen response elements (EREs), 25% bore ERE half sites, and only 4% had no recognizable ERE sequences. Genes in the vicinity of ERalpha binding sites were enriched for regulation by estradiol in MCF-7 cells, and their expression profiles in patient samples segregate ERalpha-positive from ERalpha-negative breast tumors. The expression dynamics of the genes adjacent to ERalpha binding sites suggest a direct induction of gene expression through binding to ERE-like sequences, whereas transcriptional repression by ERalpha appears to be through indirect mechanisms. Our analysis also indicates a number of candidate transcription factor binding sites adjacent to occupied EREs at frequencies much greater than by chance, including the previously reported FOXA1 sites, and demonstrate the potential involvement of one such putative adjacent factor, Sp1, in the global regulation of ERalpha target genes. Unexpectedly, we found that only 22%-24% of the bona fide human ERalpha binding sites were overlapping conserved regions in whole genome vertebrate alignments, which suggest limited conservation of functional binding sites. Taken together, this genome-scale analysis suggests complex but definable rules governing ERalpha binding and gene

  5. Ligand binding analysis and screening by chemical denaturation shift.

    PubMed

    Schön, Arne; Brown, Richard K; Hutchins, Burleigh M; Freire, Ernesto

    2013-12-01

    The identification of small molecule ligands is an important first step in drug development, especially drugs that target proteins with no intrinsic activity. Toward this goal, it is important to have access to technologies that are able to measure binding affinities for a large number of potential ligands in a fast and accurate way. Because ligand binding stabilizes the protein structure in a manner dependent on concentration and binding affinity, the magnitude of the protein stabilization effect elicited by binding can be used to identify and characterize ligands. For example, the shift in protein denaturation temperature (Tm shift) has become a popular approach to identify potential ligands. However, Tm shifts cannot be readily transformed into binding affinities, and the ligand rank order obtained at denaturation temperatures (≥60°C) does not necessarily coincide with the rank order at physiological temperature. An alternative approach is the use of chemical denaturation, which can be implemented at any temperature. Chemical denaturation shifts allow accurate determination of binding affinities with a surprisingly wide dynamic range (high micromolar to sub nanomolar) and in situations where binding changes the cooperativity of the unfolding transition. In this article, we develop the basic analytical equations and provide several experimental examples.

  6. RNA binding domain of Jamestown Canyon virus S segment RNAs.

    PubMed

    Ogg, Monica M; Patterson, Jean L

    2007-12-01

    Jamestown Canyon virus (JCV) is a member of the Bunyaviridae family, Orthobunyavirus genus, California serogroup. Replication and, ultimately, assembly and packaging rely on the process of encapsidation. Therefore, the ability of viral RNAs (vRNAs) (genomic and antigenomic) to interact with the nucleocapsid protein (N protein) and the location of this binding domain on the RNAs are of interest. The questions to be addressed are the following. Where is the binding domain located on both the vRNA and cRNA strands, is this RNA bound when double or single stranded, and does this identified region have the ability to transform the binding potential of nonviral RNA? Full-length viral and complementary S segment RNA, as well as 3' deletion mutants of both vRNA and cRNA, nonviral RNA, and hybrid viral/nonviral RNA, were analyzed for their ability to interact with bacterially expressed JCV N protein. RNA-nucleocapsid interactions were examined by UV cross-linking, filter binding assays, and the generation of hybrid RNA to help define the area responsible for RNA-protein binding. The assays identified the region responsible for binding to the nucleocapsid as being contained within the 5' half of both the genomic and antigenomic RNAs. This region, if placed within nonviral RNA, is capable of altering the binding potential of nonviral RNA to levels seen with wild-type vRNAs.

  7. Measuring Multivalent Binding Interactions by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Dam, Tarun K; Talaga, Melanie L; Fan, Ni; Brewer, Curtis F

    2016-01-01

    Multivalent glycoconjugate-protein interactions are central to many important biological processes. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) can potentially reveal the molecular and thermodynamic basis of such interactions. However, calorimetric investigation of multivalency is challenging. Binding of multivalent glycoconjugates to proteins (lectins) often leads to a stoichiometry-dependent precipitation process due to noncovalent cross-linking between the reactants. Precipitation during ITC titration severely affects the quality of the baseline as well as the signals. Hence, the resulting thermodynamic data are not dependable. We have made some modifications to address this problem and successfully studied multivalent glycoconjugate binding to lectins. We have also modified the Hill plot equation to analyze high quality ITC raw data obtained from multivalent binding. As described in this chapter, ITC-driven thermodynamic parameters and Hill plot analysis of ITC raw data can provide valuable information about the molecular mechanism of multivalent lectin-glycoconjugate interactions. The methods described herein revealed (i) the importance of functional valence of multivalent glycoconjugates, (ii) that favorable entropic effects contribute to the enhanced affinities associated with multivalent binding, (iii) that with the progression of lectin binding, the microscopic affinities of the glycan epitopes of a multivalent glycoconjugate decrease (negative cooperativity), (iv) that lectin binding to multivalent glycoconjugates, especially to mucins, involves internal diffusion jumps, (bind and jump) and (v) that scaffolds of glycoconjugates influence their entropy of binding.

  8. Recombinant human MDM2 oncoprotein shows sequence composition selectivity for binding to both RNA and DNA.

    PubMed

    Challen, Christine; Anderson, John J; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A; Lightowlers, Robert N; Lunec, John

    2012-03-01

    MDM2 is a 90 kDa nucleo-phosphoprotein that binds p53 and other proteins contributing to its oncogenic properties. Its structure includes an amino proximal p53 binding site, a central acidic domain and a carboxy region which incorporates Zinc and Ring Finger domains suggestive of nucleic acid binding or transcription factor function. It has previously been reported that a bacculovirus expressed MDM2 protein binds RNA in a sequence-specific manner through the Ring Finger domain, however, its ability to bind DNA has yet to be examined. We report here that a bacterially expressed human MDM2 protein binds both DNA as well as the previously defined RNA consensus sequence. DNA binding appears selective and involves the carboxy-terminal domain of the molecule. RNA binding is inhibited by an MDM2 specific antibody, which recognises an epitope within the carboxy region of the protein. Selection cloning and sequence analysis of MDM2 DNA binding sequences, unlike RNA binding sequences, revealed no obvious DNA binding consensus sequence, but preferential binding to oligopurine:pyrimidine-rich stretches. Our results suggest that the observed preferential DNA binding may occur through the Zinc Finger or in a charge-charge interaction through the Ring Finger, thereby implying potentially different mechanisms for DNA and RNA MDM2 binding.

  9. Rat α-Fetoprotein binding affinities of a large set of structurally diverse chemicals elucidated the relationships between structures and binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Hong, Huixiao; Branham, William S; Dial, Stacey L; Moland, Carrie L; Fang, Hong; Shen, Jie; Perkins, Roger; Sheehan, Daniel; Tong, Weida

    2012-11-19

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals interfere with the endocrine system in animals, including humans, to exert adverse effects. One of the mechanisms of endocrine disruption is through the binding of receptors such as the estrogen receptor (ER) in target cells. The concentration of any chemical in serum is important for its entry into the target cells to bind the receptors. α-Fetoprotein (AFP) is a major transport protein in rodent serum that can bind with estrogens and thus change a chemical's availability for entrance into the target cell. Sequestration of an estrogen in the serum can alter the chemical's potential for disrupting estrogen receptor-mediated responses. To better understand endocrine disruption, we developed a competitive binding assay using rat amniotic fluid, which contains very high levels of AFP, and measured the binding to the rat AFP for 125 structurally diverse chemicals, most of which are known to bind ER. Fifty-three chemicals were able to bind the rat AFP in the assay, while 72 chemicals were determined to be nonbinders. Observations from closely examining the relationship between the binding data and structures of the tested chemicals are rationally explained in a manner consistent with proposed binding regions of rat AFP in the literature. The data reported here represent the largest data set of structurally diverse chemicals tested for rat AFP binding. The data assist in elucidating binding interactions and mechanisms between chemicals and rat AFP and, in turn, assist in the evaluation of the endocrine disrupting potential of chemicals.

  10. Lactoperoxidase binding to streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, K M; Adamson, M; Arnold, R

    1979-01-01

    There have been conflicting reports regarding the binding of lactoperoxidase to bacterial cell surfaces. We describe here the effects of cell-bound lactoperoxidase on acid production by suspensions of Streptococcus mutans (NCTC 10449) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and thiocyanate. Saline suspensions of log-phase bacteria were treated with 0.1 mg of lactoperoxidase per ml and were then washed thoroughly. The addition of hydrogen peroxide and thiocyanate markedly reduced the acid production of these lactoperoxidase-treated bacteria but had no effect on the acid production of untreated controls. After a 3-h incubation in saline, the lactoperoxidase-treated bacteria produced acid in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and thiocyanate at the same rate as untreated bacteria. These observations suggest that lactoperoxidase is initially bound to the cell surface in an enzymatically active form at a concentration sufficient to inhibit acid production. The lactoperoxidase is slowly degraded or desorbed as the bacteria stand in saline suspension. PMID:39032

  11. MicroRNA-320a and microRNA-4496 attenuate Helicobacter pylori cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA)-induced cancer-initiating potential and chemoresistance by targeting β-catenin and ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G, member 2.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong Woo; Yang, Eun Sun; Noh, Yu Na; Hwang, Won Chan; Jo, Se-Young; Suh, Young-Ah; Park, Won Sang; Choi, Kang-Yell; Min, Do Sik

    2017-04-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori is closely linked to an increased risk of gastric cancer. Although cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA), a major virulence factor of H. pylori, is known to be a causal factor for gastric carcinogenesis, the molecular link between CagA and gastric cancer-initiating cell (CIC)-like properties remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that CagA is required for increased expression of β-catenin and its target CIC markers via downregulation of microRNA (miR)-320a and miR-4496. CagA promoted gastric CIC properties and was responsible for chemoresistance. miR-320a and miR-4496 attenuated the in vitro self-renewal and tumour-initiating capacity of CagA-expressing CICs by targeting β-catenin. Moreover, miR-320a and miR-4496 decreased CagA-induced chemoresistance by targeting ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G, member 2 (ABCG2) at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, respectively. Combination therapy with 5-fluorouracil and miR-320a/miR-4496 suppressed gastric tumourigenesis and metastatic potential in an orthotopic mouse model, probably via suppression of CagA-induced CIC properties and chemoresistance. Our results provide novel evidence that CIC properties, chemoresistance and tumourigenesis associated with H. pylori are linked to CagA-induced upregulation of β-catenin and ABCG2. These data provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of CagA-induced carcinogenisis and the therapeutic potential of of miR-320a and miR-4496. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Two Unique Ligand-Binding Clamps of Rhizopus oryzae Starch Binding Domain for Helical Structure Disruption of Amylose

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ting-Ying; Ci, Yuan-Pei; Chou, Wei-I; Lee, Yuan-Chuan; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Chou, Wei-Yao; Li, Kun-Mou; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2012-01-01

    The N-terminal starch binding domain of Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase (RoSBD) has a high binding affinity for raw starch. RoSBD has two ligand-binding sites, each containing a ligand-binding clamp: a polyN clamp residing near binding site I is unique in that it is expressed in only three members of carbohydrate binding module family 21 (CBM21) members, and a Y32/F58 clamp located at binding site II is conserved in several CBMs. Here we characterized different roles of these sites in the binding of insoluble and soluble starches using an amylose-iodine complex assay, atomic force microscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, site-directed mutagenesis, and structural bioinformatics. RoSBD induced the release of iodine from the amylose helical cavity and disrupted the helical structure of amylose type III, thereby significantly diminishing the thickness and length of the amylose type III fibrils. A point mutation in the critical ligand-binding residues of sites I and II, however, reduced both the binding affinity and amylose helix disruption. This is the first molecular model for structure disruption of the amylose helix by a non-hydrolytic CBM21 member. RoSBD apparently twists the helical amylose strands apart to expose more ligand surface for further SBD binding. Repeating the process triggers the relaxation and unwinding of amylose helices to generate thinner and shorter amylose fibrils, which are more susceptible to hydrolysis by glucoamylase. This model aids in understanding the natural roles of CBMs in protein-glycan interactions and contributes to potential molecular engineering of CBMs. PMID:22815939

  13. Managing a Library Binding Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill-Oldham, Jan

    Library binding is one of the activities typically included in newly created preservation departments, but librarians continue to discover that transforming a traditional binding program into one that better meets preservation objectives requires considerable investment of time. This resource guide is intended to help libraries review their…

  14. Binding Energy and Enzymatic Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, David E.; Raines, Ronald T.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the fundamental role that the favorable free energy of binding of the rate-determining transition state plays in catalysis. The principle that all of the catalytic factors discussed are realized by the use of this binding energy is reviewed. (CW)

  15. Empirically Unbinding the Double Bind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, David H.

    The theoretical concept of the double bind and the possibilities for researching it are discussed. The author has observed that theory and research, which should be reciprocal and mutually beneficial, have been working, as concerns the double bind, at odds with one another. Two approaches to empirically investigating the concept are considered via…

  16. Derived amino acid sequences of the nosZ gene (respiratory N2O reductase) from Alcaligenes eutrophus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas stutzeri reveal potential copper-binding residues. Implications for the CuA site of N2O reductase and cytochrome-c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Zumft, W G; Dreusch, A; Löchelt, S; Cuypers, H; Friedrich, B; Schneider, B

    1992-08-15

    The nosZ genes encoding the multicopper enzyme nitrous oxide reductase of Alcaligenes eutrophus H16 and the type strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were cloned and sequenced for structural comparison of their gene products with the homologous product of the nosZ gene from Pseudomonas stutzeri [Viebrock, A. & Zumft, W. G. (1988) J. Bacteriol. 170, 4658-4668] and the subunit II of cytochrome-c oxidase (COII). Both types of enzymes possess the CuA binding site. The nosZ genes were identified in cosmid libraries by hybridization with an internal 1.22-kb PstI fragment (NS220) of nosZ from P. stutzeri. The derived amino acid sequences indicate unprocessed gene products of 70084 Da (A. eutrophus) and 70695 Da (P. aeruginosa). The N-terminal sequences of the NosZ proteins have the characteristics of signal peptides for transport. A homologous domain, extending over at least 50 residues, is shared among the three derived NosZ sequences and the CuA binding region of 32 COII sequences. Only three out of nine cysteine residues of the NosZ protein (P. stutzeri) are invariant. Cys618 and Cys622 are assigned to a binuclear center, A, which is thought to represent the CuA site of NosZ and is located close to the C terminus. Two conserved histidines, one methionine, one aspartate, one valine and two aromatic residues are also part of the CuA consensus sequence, which is the domain homologous between the two enzymes. The CuA consensus sequence, however, lacks four strictly conserved residues present in all COII sequences. Cys165 is likely to be a ligand of a second binuclear center, Z, for which we assume mainly histidine coordination. Of 23 histidine residues in NosZ (P. stutzeri), 14 are invariant, 7 of which are in regions with a degree of conservation well above the 50% positional identity between the Alcaligenes and Pseudomonas sequences. Conserved tryptophan residues are located close to several potential copper ligands. Trp615 may contribute to the observed quenching of

  17. The productive cellulase binding capacity of cellulosic substrates.

    PubMed

    Karuna, Nardrapee; Jeoh, Tina

    2017-03-01

    Cellulosic biomass is the most promising feedstock for renewable biofuel production; however, the mechanisms of the heterogeneous cellulose saccharification reaction are still unsolved. As cellulases need to bind isolated molecules of cellulose at the surface of insoluble cellulose fibrils or larger aggregated cellulose structures in order to hydrolyze glycosidic bonds, the "accessibility of cellulose to cellulases" is considered to be a reaction limiting property of cellulose. We have defined the accessibility of cellulose to cellulases as the productive binding capacity of cellulose, that is, the concentration of productive binding sites on cellulose that are accessible for binding and hydrolysis by cellulases. Productive cellulase binding to cellulose results in hydrolysis and can be quantified by measuring hydrolysis rates. In this study, we measured the productive Trichoderma reesei Cel7A (TrCel7A) binding capacity of five cellulosic substrates from different sources and processing histories. Swollen filter paper and bacterial cellulose had higher productive binding capacities of ∼6 µmol/g while filter paper, microcrystalline cellulose, and algal cellulose had lower productive binding capacities of ∼3 µmol/g. Swelling and regenerating filter paper using phosphoric acid increased the initial accessibility of the reducing ends to TrCel7A from 4 to 6 µmol/g. Moreover, this increase in initial productive binding capacity accounted in large part for the difference in the overall digestibility between filter paper and swollen filter paper. We further demonstrated that an understanding of how the productive binding capacity declines over the course of the hydrolysis reaction has the potential to predict overall saccharification time courses. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 533-542. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. (/sup 3/)tetrahydrotrazodone binding. Association with serotonin binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, D.A.; Taylor, D.P.; Enna, S.J.

    1983-05-01

    High (17 nM) and low (603 nM) affinity binding sites for (/sup 3/)tetrahydrotrazodone ((/sup 3/) THT), a biologically active analogue of trazodone, have been identified in rat brain membranes. The substrate specificity, concentration, and subcellular and regional distributions of these sites suggest that they may represent a component of the serotonin transmitter system. Pharmacological analysis of (/sup 3/)THT binding, coupled with brain lesion and drug treatment experiments, revealed that, unlike other antidepressants, (/sup 3/) THT does not attach to either a biogenic amine transporter or serotonin binding sites. Rather, it would appear that (/sup 3/)THT may be an antagonist ligand for the serotonin binding site. This probe may prove of value in defining the mechanism of action of trazodone and in further characterizing serotonin receptors.

  19. Protein-Binding RNA Aptamers Affect Molecular Interactions Distantly from Their Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Daniel M.; Thuesen, Cathrine K.; Bøtkjær, Kenneth A.; Behrens, Manja A.; Dam, Karen; Sørensen, Hans P.; Pedersen, Jan S.; Ploug, Michael; Jensen, Jan K.; Andreasen, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamer selection is a powerful strategy for the development of regulatory agents for molecular intervention. Accordingly, aptamers have proven their diligence in the intervention with serine protease activities, which play important roles in physiology and pathophysiology. Nonetheless, there are only a few studies on the molecular basis underlying aptamer-protease interactions and the associated mechanisms of inhibition. In the present study, we use site-directed mutagenesis to delineate the binding sites of two 2´-fluoropyrimidine RNA aptamers (upanap-12 and upanap-126) with therapeutic potential, both binding to the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). We determine the subsequent impact of aptamer binding on the well-established molecular interactions (plasmin, PAI-1, uPAR, and LRP-1A) controlling uPA activities. One of the aptamers (upanap-126) binds to the area around the C-terminal α-helix in pro-uPA, while the other aptamer (upanap-12) binds to both the β-hairpin of the growth factor domain and the kringle domain of uPA. Based on the mapping studies, combined with data from small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, we construct a model for the upanap-12:pro-uPA complex. The results suggest and highlight that the size and shape of an aptamer as well as the domain organization of a multi-domain protein such as uPA, may provide the basis for extensive sterical interference with protein ligand interactions considered distant from the aptamer binding site. PMID:25793507

  20. Pharmacological characterization of actin-binding (-)-doliculide.

    PubMed

    Foerster, Florian; Braig, Simone; Chen, Tao; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Vollmar, Angelika M

    2014-09-15

    Natural compounds offer a broad spectrum of potential drug candidates against human malignancies. Several cytostatic drugs, which are in clinical use for decades, derive directly from natural sources or are synthetically optimized derivatives of natural lead structures. An eukaryote target molecule to which many natural derived anti-cancer drugs bind to is the microtubule network. Of similar importance for the cell is the actin cytoskeleton, responsible for cell movements, migration of cells and cytokinesis. Nature provides also a broad range of compounds directed against actin as intracellular target, but none of these actin-targeting compounds has ever been brought to clinical trials. One reason why actin-binding compounds have not yet been considered for further clinical investigations is that little is known about their pharmacological properties in cancer cells. Herein, we focused on the closer characterization of doliculide, an actin binding natural compound of marine origin in the breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and MDA-MB-231. We used fluorescence-recovery-after-photobleaching (FRAP) analysis to determine doliculide's early effects on the actin cytoskeleton and rhodamin-phalloidin staining for long-term effects on the actin CSK. After validating the disruption of the actin network, we further investigated the functional effects of doliculide. Doliculide treatment leads to inhibition of proliferation and impairs the migratory potential. Finally, we could also show that doliculide leads to the induction of apoptosis in both cell lines. Our data for the first time provide a closer characterization of doliculide in breast cancer cells and propagate doliculide for further investigations as lead structure and potential therapeutic option as actin-targeting compound.

  1. Calmodulin-binding proteins are developmentally regulated in gametes and embryos of fucoid algae

    SciTech Connect

    Brawley, S.H.; Roberts, D.M.

    1989-02-01

    Calcium-binding proteins and calmodulin-binding proteins were identified in gametes and zygotes of the marine brown algae Fucus vesiculosus, Fucus distichus, and Pelvetia fastigiata using gel (SDS-PAGE) overlay techniques. A calcium current appears to be important during cell polarization in fucoid zygotes, but there are no biochemical data on calcium-binding proteins in these algae. By using a sensitive 45Ca2+ overlay method designed to detect high-affinity calcium-binding proteins, at least 9-11 polypeptides were detected in extracts of fucoid gametes and zygotes. All samples had calcium-binding proteins with apparent molecular weights of about 17 and 30 kDa. A 17-kDa calcium-binding protein was purified by calcium-dependent hydrophobic chromatography and was identified as calmodulin by immunological and enzyme activator criteria. A 125I-calmodulin overlay assay was used to identify potential targets of calmodulin action. Sperm contained one major calmodulin-binding protein of about 45 kDa. Eggs lacked major calmodulin-binding activity. A 72-kDa calmodulin-binding protein was prominent in zygotes from 1-65 hr postfertilization. Both calmodulin-binding proteins showed calcium-dependent binding activity. Overall, the data suggest that the appearance and distribution of certain calcium-binding and calmodulin-binding proteins are under developmental regulation, and may reflect the different roles of calcium during fertilization and early embryogenesis.

  2. Shiga toxin binds to activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S A; Polanowska-Grabowska, R K; Fujii, J; Obrig, T; Gear, A R L

    2004-03-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is associated with acute renal failure in children and can be caused by Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli. Thrombocytopenia and formation of renal thrombi are characteristic of HUS, suggesting that platelet activation is involved in its pathogenesis. However, whether Shiga toxin directly activates platelets is controversial. The present study evaluates if potential platelet sensitization during isolation by different procedures influences platelet interaction with Shiga toxin. Platelets isolated from sodium citrate anticoagulated blood were exposed during washing to EDTA and higher g forces than platelets prepared from acid-citrate-dextrose (ACD) plasma. Platelet binding of Stx was significantly higher in EDTA-washed preparations relative to ACD-derived platelets. Binding of Stx was also increased with ACD-derived platelets when activated with thrombin (1 U mL-1) and exposure of the Gb3 Stx receptor was detected only on platelets subjected to EDTA, higher g forces or thrombin. EDTA-exposed platelets lost their normal discoid shape and were larger. P-selectin (CD62P) exposure was significantly increased in EDTA-washed preparations relative to ACD-derived platelets, suggesting platelet activation. Taken together, these results suggest that direct binding of Stx occurs only on 'activated' platelets rather than on resting platelets. The ability of Stx to interact with previously activated platelets may be an important element in understanding the pathogenesis of HUS.

  3. Photochemical Microscale Electrophoresis Allows Fast Quantification of Biomolecule Binding.

    PubMed

    Möller, Friederike M; Kieß, Michael; Braun, Dieter

    2016-04-27

    Intricate spatiotemporal patterns emerge when chemical reactions couple to physical transport. We induce electrophoretic transport by a confined photochemical reaction and use it to infer the binding strength of a second, biomolecular binding reaction under physiological conditions. To this end, we use the photoactive compound 2-nitrobenzaldehyde, which releases a proton upon 375 nm irradiation. The charged photoproducts locally perturb electroneutrality due to differential diffusion, giving rise to an electric potential Φ in the 100 μV range on the micrometer scale. Electrophoresis of biomolecules in this field is counterbalanced by back-diffusion within seconds. The biomolecule concentration is measured by fluorescence and settles proportionally to exp(-μ/D Φ). Typically, binding alters either the diffusion coefficient D or the electrophoretic mobility μ. Hence, the local biomolecule fluorescence directly reflects the binding state. A fit to the law of mass action reveals the dissociation constant of the binding reaction. We apply this approach to quantify the binding of the aptamer TBA15 to its protein target human-α-thrombin and to probe the hybridization of DNA. Dissociation constants in the nanomolar regime were determined and match both results in literature and in control experiments using microscale thermophoresis. As our approach is all-optical, isothermal and requires only nanoliter volumes at nanomolar concentrations, it will allow for the fast screening of biomolecule binding in low volume multiwell formats.

  4. Pressure locking and thermal binding of gate valves

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, E.M.

    1996-12-01

    Pressure locking and thermal binding represent potential common mode failure mechanisms that can cause safety-related power-operated gate valves to fail in the closed position, thus rendering redundant safety-related systems incapable of performing their safety functions. Supplement 6 to Generic Letter 89-10, {open_quotes}Safety-Related Motor-Operated Gate Valve Testing and Surveillance,{close_quotes} provided an acceptable approach to addressing pressure locking and thermal binding of gate valves. More recently, the NRC has issued Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves,{close_quotes} to request that licensees take certain actions to ensure that safety-related power-operated gate valves that are susceptible to pressure locking or thermal binding are capable of performing their safety functions within the current licensing bases. Over the past two years, several plants in Region I determined that valves in certain systems were potentially susceptible to pressure locking and thermal binding, and have taken various corrective actions. The NRC Region I Systems Engineering Branch has been actively involved in the inspection of licensee actions in response to the pressure locking and thermal binding issue. Region I continues to maintain an active involvement in this area, including participation with the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation in reviewing licensee responses to Generic Letter 95-07.

  5. Competitive binding between mercury and copper for reduced sulfur binding sites on dissolved organic matter from the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbig, C. A.; Aiken, G. R.; Ryan, J. N.

    2007-12-01

    Lewis acids) are inadequate for assessing competitive effects with mercury(II)-DOM binding at low metal to DOM ratios. In the environment, copper(II) may be found at concentrations several orders of magnitude greater than mercury(II) concentrations and the concentration of copper(II) may significantly exceed the concentration of strong binding sites on DOM. Potential competition between mercury and borderline metals may influence mercury speciation and significantly affect the biogeochemical modeling of mercury in aquatic systems.

  6. Superresolution microscopy with transient binding.

    PubMed

    Molle, Julia; Raab, Mario; Holzmeister, Susanne; Schmitt-Monreal, Daniel; Grohmann, Dina; He, Zhike; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2016-06-01

    For single-molecule localization based superresolution, the concentration of fluorescent labels has to be thinned out. This is commonly achieved by photophysically or photochemically deactivating subsets of molecules. Alternatively, apparent switching of molecules can be achieved by transient binding of fluorescent labels. Here, a diffusing dye yields bright fluorescent spots when binding to the structure of interest. As the binding interaction is weak, the labeling is reversible and the dye ligand construct diffuses back into solution. This approach of achieving superresolution by transient binding (STB) is reviewed in this manuscript. Different realizations of STB are discussed and compared to other localization-based superresolution modalities. We propose the development of labeling strategies that will make STB a highly versatile tool for superresolution microscopy at highest resolution.

  7. Chiral discrimination in optical binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Kayn A.; Andrews, David L.

    2015-05-01

    The laser-induced intermolecular force that exists between two or more particles in the presence of an electromagnetic field is commonly termed "optical binding." Distinct from the single-particle forces that are at play in optical trapping at the molecular level, the phenomenon of optical binding is a manifestation of the coupling between optically induced dipole moments in neutral particles. In other, more widely known areas of optics, there are many examples of chiral discrimination—signifying the different response a chiral material has to the handedness of an optical input. In the present analysis, extending previous work on chiral discrimination in optical binding, a mechanism is identified using a quantum electrodynamical approach. It is shown that the optical binding force between a pair of chiral molecules can be significantly discriminatory in nature, depending upon both the handedness of the interacting particles and the polarization of the incident light, and it is typically several orders of magnitude larger than previously reported.

  8. Modulation of Ca(2+) entry by polypeptides of the inositol 1,4, 5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) that bind transient receptor potential (TRP): evidence for roles of TRP and IP3R in store depletion-activated Ca(2+) entry.

    PubMed

    Boulay, G; Brown, D M; Qin, N; Jiang, M; Dietrich, A; Zhu, M X; Chen, Z; Birnbaumer, M; Mikoshiba, K; Birnbaumer, L

    1999-12-21

    Homologues of Drosophilia transient receptor potential (TRP) have been proposed to be unitary subunits of plasma membrane ion channels that are activated as a consequence of active or passive depletion of Ca(2+) stores. In agreement with this hypothesis, cells expressing TRPs display novel Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels that can be activated by the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) protein. Expression of TRPs alters cells in many ways, including up-regulation of IP3Rs not coded for by TRP genes, and proof that TRP forms channels of these and other cells is still missing. Here, we document physical interaction of TRP and IP3R by coimmunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase-pulldown experiments and identify two regions of IP3R, F2q and F2g, that interact with one region of TRP, C7. These interacting regions were expressed in cells with an unmodified complement of TRPs and IP3Rs to study their effect on agonist- as well as store depletion-induced Ca(2+) entry and to test for a role of their respective binding partners in Ca(2+) entry. C7 and an F2q-containing fragment of IP3R decreased both forms of Ca(2+) entry. In contrast, F2g enhanced the two forms of Ca(2+) entry. We conclude that store depletion-activated Ca(2+) entry occurs through channels that have TRPs as one of their normal structural components, and that these channels are directly activated by IP3Rs. IP3Rs, therefore, have the dual role of releasing Ca(2+) from stores and activating Ca(2+) influx in response to either increasing IP3 or decreasing luminal Ca(2+).

  9. DBD2BS: connecting a DNA-binding protein with its binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Ting-Ying; Lin, Chih-Kang; Lin, Chih-Wei; Weng, Yi-Zhong; Chen, Chien-Yu; Chang, Darby Tien-Hao

    2012-01-01

    By binding to short and highly conserved DNA sequences in genomes, DNA-binding proteins initiate, enhance or repress biological processes. Accurately identifying such binding sites, often represented by position weight matrices (PWMs), is an important step in understanding the control mechanisms of cells. When given coordinates of a DNA-binding domain (DBD) bound with DNA, a potential function can be used to estimate the change of binding affinity after base substitutions, where the changes can be summarized as a PWM. This technique provides an effective alternative when the chromatin immunoprecipitation data are unavailable for PWM inference. To facilitate the procedure of predicting PWMs based on protein–DNA complexes or even structures of the unbound state, the web server, DBD2BS, is presented in this study. The DBD2BS uses an atom-level knowledge-based potential function to predict PWMs characterizing the sequences to which the query DBD structure can bind. For unbound queries, a list of 1066 DBD–DNA complexes (including 1813 protein chains) is compiled for use as templates for synthesizing bound structures. The DBD2BS provides users with an easy-to-use interface for visualizing the PWMs predicted based on different templates and the spatial relationships of the query protein, the DBDs and the DNAs. The DBD2BS is the first attempt to predict PWMs of DBDs from unbound structures rather than from bound ones. This approach increases the number of existing protein structures that can be exploited when analyzing protein–DNA interactions. In a recent study, the authors showed that the kernel adopted by the DBD2BS can generate PWMs consistent with those obtained from the experimental data. The use of DBD2BS to predict PWMs can be incorporated with sequence-based methods to discover binding sites in genome-wide studies. Available at: http://dbd2bs.csie.ntu.edu.tw/, http://dbd2bs.csbb.ntu.edu.tw/, and http://dbd2bs.ee.ncku.edu.tw. PMID:22693214

  10. Structure and Function of Nematode RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kaymak, Ebru; Wee, L.M.; Ryder, Sean P.

    2010-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins are critical effectors of gene expression. They guide mRNA localization, translation, and stability, and potentially play a role in regulating mRNA synthesis. The structural basis for RNA recognition by RNA-binding proteins is the key to understanding how they target specific transcripts for regulation. Compared to other metazoans, nematode genomes contain a significant expansion in several RNA-binding protein families, including Pumilio-FBF (PUF), TTP-like zinc finger (TZF), and argonaute-like (AGO) proteins. Genetic data suggest that individual members of each family have distinct functions, presumably due to sequence variations that alter RNA binding specificity or protein interaction partners. In this review, we highlight example structures and identify the variable regions that likely contribute to functional divergence in nematodes. PMID:20418095

  11. Plasmonic-Based Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy: Application to Molecular Binding

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Shaopeng; Shan, Xiaonan; Li, Jinghong; Tao, Nongjian

    2012-01-01

    Plasmonic-based electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (P-EIS) is developed to investigate molecular binding on surfaces. Its basic principle relies on the sensitive dependence of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) signal on surface charge density, which is modulated by applying an AC potential to a SPR chip surface. The AC component of the SPR response gives the electrochemical impedance, and the DC component provides the conventional SPR detection. The plasmonic-based impedance measured over a range of frequency is in quantitative agreement with the conventional electrochemical impedance. Compared to the conventional SPR detection, P-EIS is sensitive to molecular binding taking place on the chip surface, and less sensitive to bulk refractive index changes or non-specific binding. Moreover, this new approach allows for simultaneous SPR and surface impedance analysis of molecular binding processes. PMID:22122514

  12. Lipid binding to the carotenoid binding site in photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sasmit S; Tang, Kai; Kálmán, László

    2011-10-12

    Lipid binding to the carotenoid binding site near the inactive bacteriochlorophyll monomer was probed in the reaction centers of carotenoid-less mutant, R-26 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Recently, a marked light-induced change of the local dielectric constant in the vicinity of the inactive bacteriochlorophyll monomer was reported in wild type that was attributed to structural changes that ultimately lengthened the lifetime of the charge-separated state by 3 orders of magnitude (Deshmukh, S. S.; Williams, J. C.; Allen, J. P.; Kalman, L. Biochemistry 2011, 50, 340). Here in the R-26 reaction centers, the combination of light-induced structural changes and lipid binding resulted in a 5 orders of magnitude increase in the lifetime of the charge-separated state involving the oxidized dimer and the reduced primary quinone in proteoliposomes. Only saturated phospholipids with fatty acid chains of 12 and 14 carbon atoms long were bound successfully at 8 °C by cooling the reaction center protein slowly from room temperature. In addition to reporting a dramatic increase of the lifetime of the charge-separated state at physiologically relevant temperatures, this study reveals a novel lipid binding site in photosynthetic reaction center. These results shed light on a new potential application of the reaction center in energy storage as a light-driven biocapacitor since the charges separated by ∼30 Å in a low-dielectric medium can be prevented from recombination for hours.

  13. Chemical binding affinity estimation using MSB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.

    2011-03-01

    Binding affinity can be estimated in several ways in the laboratory but there is no viable way to estimate binding affinity in vivo without assumptions on the number of binding sites. Magnetic spectroscopy of nanoparticle Brownian motion, MSB, measures the rotational Brownian motion. The MSB signal is affected by nanoparticle binding affinity so it provides a mechanism to measure the chemical binding affinity. We present a possible mechanism to quantify the binding affinity and test that mechanism using viscous solutions.

  14. An ancient and variable mannose-binding lectin from the coral Acropora millepora binds both pathogens and symbionts.

    PubMed

    Kvennefors, E Charlotte E; Leggat, William; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Degnan, Bernard M; Barnes, Andrew C

    2008-01-01

    Corals form the framework of the world's coral reefs and are under threat from increases in disease and bleaching (symbiotic dysfunction), yet the mechanisms of pathogen and symbiont recognition remain largely unknown. Here we describe the isolation and characterisation of an ancient mannose-binding lectin in the coral Acropora millepora, which is likely to be involved in both processes. The lectin ('Millectin') was isolated by affinity chromatography and was shown to bind to bacterial pathogens as well as coral symbionts, dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium. cDNA analysis of Millectin indicate extensive sequence variation in the binding region, reflecting its ability to recognise various mannose-like carbohydrate structures on non-self cells, including symbionts and pathogens. This is the first mannose-binding lectin to show extensive sequence variability as observed for pattern recognition proteins in other invertebrate immune systems and, given that invertebrates rely on non-adaptive immunity, is a potential keystone component of coral defence mechanisms.

  15. Acyl-CoA binding proteins: multiplicity and function.

    PubMed

    Gossett, R E; Frolov, A A; Roths, J B; Behnke, W D; Kier, A B; Schroeder, F

    1996-09-01

    The physiological role of long-chain fatty acyl-CoA is thought to be primarily in intermediary metabolism of fatty acids. However, recent data show that nM to microM levels of these lipophilic molecules are potent regulators of cell functions in vitro. Although long-chain fatty acyl-CoA are present at several hundred microM concentration in the cell, very little long-chain fatty acyl-CoA actually exists as free or unbound molecules, but rather is bound with high affinity to membrane lipids and/or proteins. Recently, there is growing awareness that cytosol contains nonenzymatic proteins also capable of binding long-chain fatty acyl-CoA with high affinity. Although the identity of the cytosolic long-chain fatty acyl-CoA binding protein(s) has been the subject of some controversy, there is growing evidence that several diverse nonenzymatic cytosolic proteins will bind long-chain fatty acyl-CoA. Not only does acyl-CoA binding protein specifically bind medium and long-chain fatty acyl-CoA (LCFA-CoA), but ubiquitous proteins with multiple ligand specificities such as the fatty acid binding proteins and sterol carrier protein-2 also bind LCFA-CoA with high affinity. The potential of these acyl-CoA binding proteins to influence the level of free LCFA-CoA and thereby the amount of LCFA-CoA bound to regulatory sites in proteins and enzymes is only now being examined in detail. The purpose of this article is to explore the identity, nature, function, and pathobiology of these fascinating newly discovered long-chain fatty acyl-CoA binding proteins. The relative contributions of these three different protein families to LCFA-CoA utilization and/or regulation of cellular activities are the focus of new directions in this field.

  16. Structural and Histone Binding Ability Characterizations of Human PWWP Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Amaya, Maria F.; Xu, Chao; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Qiu, Wei; Wang, Yanming; Min, Jinrong

    2013-09-25

    The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently. The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3. PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical {beta}-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third {beta}-strands and a C-terminal {alpha}-helix bundle. Both the canonical {beta}-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.

  17. Binding of cellulose binding modules reveal differences between cellulose substrates

    PubMed Central

    Arola, Suvi; Linder, Markus B.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between cellulase enzymes and their substrates is of central importance to several technological and scientific challenges. Here we report that the binding of cellulose binding modules (CBM) from Trichoderma reesei cellulases Cel6A and Cel7A show a major difference in how they interact with substrates originating from wood compared to bacterial cellulose. We found that the CBM from TrCel7A recognizes the two substrates differently and as a consequence shows an unexpected way of binding. We show that the substrate has a large impact on the exchange rate of the studied CBM, and moreover, CBM-TrCel7A seems to have an additional mode of binding on wood derived cellulose but not on cellulose originating from bacterial source. This mode is not seen in double CBM (DCBM) constructs comprising both CBM-TrCel7A and CBM-TrCel6A. The linker length of DCBMs affects the binding properties, and slows down the exchange rates of the proteins and thus, can be used to analyze the differences between the single CBM. These results have impact on the cellulase research and offer new understanding on how these industrially relevant enzymes act. PMID:27748440

  18. The binding domain structure of retinoblastoma-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Figge, J.; Breese, K.; Vajda, S.; Zhu, Q. L.; Eisele, L.; Andersen, T. T.; MacColl, R.; Friedrich, T.; Smith, T. F.

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma gene product (Rb), a cellular growth suppressor, complexes with viral and cellular proteins that contain a specific binding domain incorporating three invariant residues: Leu-X-Cys-X-Glu, where X denotes a nonconserved residue. Hydrophobic and electrostatic properties are strongly conserved in this segment even though the nonconserved amino acids vary considerably from one Rb-binding protein to another. In this report, we present a diagnostic computer pattern for a high-affinity Rb-binding domain featuring the three conserved residues as well as the conserved physico-chemical properties. Although the pattern encompasses only 10 residues (with only 4 of these explicitly defined), it exhibits 100% sensitivity and 99.95% specificity in database searches. This implies that a certain pattern of structural and physico-chemical properties encoded by this short sequence is sufficient to govern specific Rb binding. We also present evidence that the secondary structural conformation through this region is important for effective Rb binding. PMID:8382993

  19. Interactive association of drugs binding to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Zhang, Yao; Liang, Hong

    2014-02-27

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is an abundant plasma protein, which attracts great interest in the pharmaceutical industry since it can bind a remarkable variety of drugs impacting their delivery and efficacy and ultimately altering the drug's pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Additionally, HSA is widely used in clinical settings as a drug delivery system due to its potential for improving targeting while decreasing the side effects of drugs. It is thus of great importance from the viewpoint of pharmaceutical sciences to clarify the structure, function, and properties of HSA-drug complexes. This review will succinctly outline the properties of binding site of drugs in IIA subdomain within the structure of HSA. We will also give an overview on the binding characterization of interactive association of drugs to human serum albumin that may potentially lead to significant clinical applications.

  20. Influence of sulfhydryl sites on metal binding by bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nell, Ryan M.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2017-02-01

    The role of sulfhydryl sites within bacterial cell envelopes is still unknown, but the sites may control the fate and bioavailability of metals. Organic sulfhydryl compounds are important complexing ligands in aqueous systems and they can influence metal speciation in natural waters. Though representing only approximately 5-10% of the total available binding sites on bacterial surfaces, sulfhydryl sites exhibit high binding affinities for some metals. Due to the potential importance of bacterial sulfhydryl sites in natural systems, metal-bacterial sulfhydryl site binding constants must be determined in order to construct accurate models of the fate and distribution of metals in these systems. To date, only Cd-sulfhydryl binding has been quantified. In this study, the thermodynamic stabilities of Mn-, Co-, Ni-, Zn-, Sr- and Pb-sulfhydryl bacterial cell envelope complexes were determined for the bacterial species Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Metal adsorption experiments were conducted as a function of both pH, ranging from 5.0 to 7.0, and metal loading, from 0.5 to 40.0 μmol/g (wet weight) bacteria, in batch experiments in order to determine if metal-sulfhydryl binding occurs. Initially, the data were used to calculate the value of the stability constants for the important metal-sulfhydryl bacterial complexes for each metal-loading condition studied, assuming a single binding reaction for the dominant metal-binding site type under the pH conditions of the experiments. For most of the metals that we studied, these calculated stability constant values increased significantly with decreasing metal loading, strongly suggesting that our initial assumption was not valid and that more than one type of binding occurs at the assumed binding site. We then modeled each dataset with two distinct site types with identical acidity constants: one site with a high metal-site stability constant value, which we take to represent metal-sulfhydryl binding and which dominates under low

  1. Optical spectroscopic exploration of binding of Cochineal Red A with two homologous serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Bolel, Priyanka; Mahapatra, Niharendu; Halder, Mintu

    2012-04-11

    Cochineal Red A is a negatively charged synthetic azo food colorant and a potential carcinogen. We present here the study of binding of Cochineal Red A with two homologous serum albumins, human (HSA) and bovine (BSA), in aqueous pH 7.4 buffer by optical spectroscopic techniques. Protein intrinsic fluorescence quenching by Cochineal Red A occurs through ground-state static interaction and its binding with BSA is stronger than with HSA. The magnitudes of thermodynamic parameters suggest that dye binding occurs principally via electrostatic complexation. Site-marker competitive binding shows that Cochineal Red A binds primarily to site I of serum albumins. Circular dichroic spectra indicate that dye binding results in some conformational modification of serum albumins. Increased ionic strength of the medium results in lowering of binding. This study provides an important insight into possible means of removal of dye toxicity.

  2. Inhibition of RNA Polymerase II Transcription in Human Cells by Synthetic DNA-Binding Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Liliane A.; Gulizia, Richard J.; Trauger, John W.; Baird, Eldon E.; Mosier, Donald E.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.; Dervan, Peter B.

    1998-10-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding small molecules that can permeate human cells potentially could regulate transcription of specific genes. Multiple cellular DNA-binding transcription factors are required by HIV type 1 for RNA synthesis. Two pyrrole--imidazole polyamides were designed to bind DNA sequences immediately adjacent to binding sites for the transcription factors Ets-1, lymphoid-enhancer binding factor 1, and TATA-box binding protein. These synthetic ligands specifically inhibit DNA-binding of each transcription factor and HIV type 1 transcription in cell-free assays. When used in combination, the polyamides inhibit virus replication by >99% in isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no detectable cell toxicity. The ability of small molecules to target predetermined DNA sequences located with RNA polymerase II promoters suggests a general approach for regulation of gene expression, as well as a mechanism for the inhibition of viral replication.

  3. FAD binding, cobinamide binding and active site communication in the corrin reductase (CobR)

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Andrew D.; Taylor, Samantha L.; Scott, Alan; Rowe, Michelle L.; Johnson, Christopher M.; Rigby, Stephen E. J.; Geeves, Michael A.; Pickersgill, Richard W.; Howard, Mark J.; Warren, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosylcobalamin, the coenzyme form of vitamin B12, is one Nature's most complex coenzyme whose de novo biogenesis proceeds along either an anaerobic or aerobic metabolic pathway. The aerobic synthesis involves reduction of the centrally chelated cobalt metal ion of the corrin ring from Co(II) to Co(I) before adenosylation can take place. A corrin reductase (CobR) enzyme has been identified as the likely agent to catalyse this reduction of the metal ion. Herein, we reveal how Brucella melitensis CobR binds its coenzyme FAD (flavin dinucleotide) and we also show that the enzyme can bind a corrin substrate consistent with its role in reduction of the cobalt of the corrin ring. Stopped-flow kinetics and EPR reveal a mechanistic asymmetry in CobR dimer that provides a potential link between the two electron reduction by NADH to the single electron reduction of Co(II) to Co(I). PMID:24909839

  4. SCOWLP classification: Structural comparison and analysis of protein binding regions

    PubMed Central

    Teyra, Joan; Paszkowski-Rogacz, Maciej; Anders, Gerd; Pisabarro, M Teresa

    2008-01-01

    Background Detailed information about protein interactions is critical for our understanding of the principles governing protein recognition mechanisms. The structures of many proteins have been experimentally determined in complex with different ligands bound either in the same or different binding regions. Thus, the structural interactome requires the development of tools to classify protein binding regions. A proper classification may provide a general view of the regions that a protein uses to bind others and also facilitate a detailed comparative analysis of the interacting information for specific protein binding regions at atomic level. Such classification might be of potential use for deciphering protein interaction networks, understanding protein function, rational engineering and design. Description Protein binding regions (PBRs) might be ideally described as well-defined separated regions that share no interacting residues one another. However, PBRs are often irregular, discontinuous and can share a wide range of interacting residues among them. The criteria to define an individual binding region can be often arbitrary and may differ from other binding regions within a protein family. Therefore, the rational behind protein interface classification should aim to fulfil the requirements of the analysis to be performed. We extract detailed interaction information of protein domains, peptides and interfacial solvent from the SCOWLP database and we classify the PBRs of each domain family. For this purpose, we define a similarity index based on the overlapping of interacting residues mapped in pair-wise structural alignments. We perform our classification with agglomerative hierarchical clustering using the complete-linkage method. Our classification is calculated at different similarity cut-offs to allow flexibility in the analysis of PBRs, feature especially interesting for those protein families with conflictive binding regions. The hierarchical

  5. Binding Interpretations of Anaphors by Korean Heritage Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Ji-Hye; Montrul, Silvina; Yoon, James

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the potential incomplete acquisition of binding interpretations in Korean-English bilinguals by asking whether and how the majority language of these bilinguals (English) influences their family or heritage language (Korean), especially when exposure to and use of English starts very early. The experiment tested the…

  6. Ion binding capacity of enzyme modified citrus peel and pectin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A wide ranging group of enzyme modified pectin and polygalacturonic acid (PGA) samples were tested for their biosorption potential, specifically their ability to bind Pb. Two sample sets were the pH 4.5 and 7.5 demethylated series obtained from demethylation of a model homogalacturonan produced usi...

  7. Characterization of the binding sites for dicarboxylic acids on bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Tonsgard, J H; Meredith, S C

    1991-01-01

    Dicarboxylic acids are prominent features of several diseases, including Reye's syndrome and inborn errors of mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation. Moreover, dicarboxylic acids are potentially toxic to cellular processes. Previous studies [Tonsgard, Mendelson & Meredith (1988) J. Clin. Invest. 82, 1567-1573] demonstrated that long-chain dicarboxylic acids have a single high-affinity binding site and between one and three lower-affinity sites on albumin. Medium-chain-length dicarboxylic acids have a single low-affinity site. We further characterized dicarboxylic acid binding to albumin in order to understand the potential effects of drugs and other ligands on dicarboxylic acid binding and toxicity. Progesterone and oleate competitively inhibit octadecanedioic acid binding to the single high-affinity site. Octanoate inhibits binding to the low-affinity sites. Dansylated probes for subdomain 2AB inhibit dodecanedioic acid binding whereas probes for subdomain 3AB do not. In contrast, low concentrations of octadecanedioic acid inhibit the binding of dansylated probes to subdomain 3AB and 2AB. L-Tryptophan, which binds in subdomain 3AB, inhibits hexadecanedioic acid binding but has no effect on dodecanedioic acid. Bilirubin and acetylsalicylic acid, which bind in subdomain 2AB, inhibit the binding of medium-chain and long-chain dicarboxylic acids. Our results suggest that long-chain dicarboxylic acids bind in subdomains 2C, 3AB and 2AB. The single low-affinity binding site for medium-chain dicarboxylic acids is in subdomain 2AB. These studies suggest that dicarboxylic acids are likely to be unbound in disease states and may be potentially toxic. PMID:2064600

  8. Water binding in legume seeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vertucci, C. W.; Leopold, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    The physical status of water in seeds has a pivotal role in determining the physiological reactions that can take place in the dry state. Using water sorption isotherms from cotyledon and axis tissue of five leguminous seeds, the strength of water binding and the numbers of binding sites have been estimated using van't Hoff analyses and the D'Arcy/Watt equation. These parameters of water sorption are calculated for each of the three regions of water binding and for a range of temperatures. Water sorption characteristics are reflective of the chemical composition of the biological materials as well as the temperature at which hydration takes place. Changes in the sorption characteristics with temperature and hydration level may suggest hydration-induced structural changes in cellular components.

  9. Galectin-3-Binding and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Balan, Vitaly; Raz, Avraham

    2013-01-01

    i. Summary Galectin-3 is a member of a family of carbohydrate-binding proteins. It is present in the nucleus, the cytoplasm and also extracellular matrix of many normal and neoplastic cell types. Arrays of reports show an upregulation of this protein in transformed and metastatic cell lines (1, 2). Moreover, in many human carcinomas, an increased expression of galectin-3 correlates with progressive tumor stages (3–6). Several lines of analysis have demonstrated that the galectins participate in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions by recognizing and binding complimentary glycoconjugates and thereby play a crucial role in normal and pathological processes. Elevated expression of the protein is associated with an increased capacity for anchorage-independent growth, homotypic aggregation, and tumor cell lung colonization (7–9). In this chapter we describe the methods of purification of galectin-3 from transformed E. coli and some of the commonly used functional assays for analyzing galectin-3 binding. PMID:22674139

  10. Murine protein which binds preferentially to oligo-C-rich single-stranded nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Goller, M; Funke, B; Gehe-Becker, C; Kröger, B; Lottspeich, F; Horak, I

    1994-01-01

    Two single-stranded nucleic acid binding proteins mCBP and mCTBP were identified by means of their binding to a potential recombination hotspot in LTRs of mouse retro-transposons. Both are nuclear proteins of 35 and 55 kDa respectively. mCBP binds preferentially to oligo dC, mCTBP to oligo dCdT. mCBP was purified and its cDNA was isolated and sequenced. Images PMID:8208614

  11. Computational Characterization and Prediction of Estrogen Receptor Coactivator Binding Site Inhibitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Gutendorf, andJ. Westendorf. 2000. Endocrine disruptors in fried meat: PhIP is an estrogen. Proceedings of the American Association for Cancer...binding site of the ERa LBD [3-5]. Because these studies have focused on the estradiol binding site, new potential ER disruptors that bind in the co...activator site have been missed. Our proposal focuses on developing a new computational approach to predict therapeutically useful ERa disruptors by

  12. Models of metal binding structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Brown, G.K.; MacCarthy, P.; Cabaniss, S.E.

    1998-01-01

    Fulvic acid, isolated from the Suwannee River, Georgia, was assessed for its ability to bind Ca2+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+ ions at pH 6 before and after extensive fractionation that was designed to reveal the nature of metal binding functional groups. The binding constant for Ca2+ ion had the greatest increase of all the ions in a metal binding fraction that was selected for intensive characterization for the purpose of building quantitative average model structures. The 'metal binding' fraction was characterized by quantitative 13C NMR, 1H NMR, and FT-1R spectrometry and elemental, titrimetric, and molecular weight determinations. The characterization data revealed that carboxyl groups were clustered in short- chain aliphatic dibasic acid structures. The Ca2+ binding data suggested that ether-substituted oxysuccinic acid structures are good models for the metal binding sites at pH 6. Structural models were derived based upon oxidation and photolytic rearrangements of cutin, lignin, and tannin precursors. These structural models rich in substituted dibasic acid structures revealed polydentate binding sites with the potential for both inner-sphere and outer-sphere type binding. The majority of the fulvic acid molecule was involved with metal binding rather than a small substructural unit.Fulvic acid, isolated from the Suwannee River, Georgia, was assessed for its ability to bind Ca2+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+ ions at pH 6 before and after extensive fractionation that was designed to reveal the nature of metal binding functional groups. The binding constant for Ca2+ ion had the greatest increase of all the ions in a metal binding fraction that was selected for intensive characterization for the purpose of building quantitative average model structures. The `metal binding' fraction was characterized by quantitative 13C NMR, 1H NMR, and FT-IR spectrometry and elemental, titrimetric, and molecular weight determinations. The characterization data revealed that

  13. Discovery of 12-mer peptides that bind to wood lignin.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Asako; Isozaki, Katsuhiro; Nakamura, Masaharu; Takaya, Hikaru; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-02-23

    Lignin, an abundant terrestrial polymer, is the only large-volume renewable feedstock composed of an aromatic skeleton. Lignin has been used mostly as an energy source during paper production; however, recent interest in replacing fossil fuels with renewable resources has highlighted its potential value in providing aromatic chemicals. Highly selective degradation of lignin is pivotal for industrial production of paper, biofuels, chemicals, and materials. However, few studies have examined natural and synthetic molecular components recognizing the heterogeneous aromatic polymer. Here, we report the first identification of lignin-binding peptides possessing characteristic sequences using a phage display technique. The consensus sequence HFPSP was found in several lignin-binding peptides, and the outer amino acid sequence affected the binding affinity of the peptides. Substitution of phenylalanine7 with Ile in the lignin-binding peptide C416 (HFPSPIFQRHSH) decreased the affinity of the peptide for softwood lignin without changing its affinity for hardwood lignin, indicating that C416 recognised structural differences between the lignins. Circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated that this peptide adopted a highly flexible random coil structure, allowing key residues to be appropriately arranged in relation to the binding site in lignin. These results provide a useful platform for designing synthetic and biological catalysts selectively bind to lignin.

  14. Human papillomavirus capsids preferentially bind and infect tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Kines, Rhonda C.; Cerio, Rebecca J.; Roberts, Jeffrey N.; Thompson, Cynthia D.; de Los Pinos, Elisabet; Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiller, John T.

    2015-01-01

    We previously determined that human papillomavirus (HPV) virus-like particles (VLPs) and pseudovirions (PsV) did not, respectively, bind to or infect intact epithelium of the cervicovaginal tract. However, they strongly bound heparin sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) on the basement membrane of disrupted epithelium and infected the keratinocytes that subsequently entered the disrupted site. We here report that HPV capsids (VLP and PsV) have the same restricted tropism for a wide variety of disrupted epithelial and mesothelial tissues, whereas intact tissues remain resistant to binding. However, the HPV capsids directly bind and infect most tumor-derived cell lines in vitro and have analogous tumor-specific properties in vivo, after local or intravenous injection, using orthotopic models for human ovarian and lung cancer, respectively. The pseudovirions also specifically infected implanted primary human ovarian tumors. Heparin and ι-carrageenan blocked binding and infection of all tumor lines tested, implying that tumor cell binding is HSPG-dependent. A survey using a panel of modified heparins indicate that N-sulfation and, to a lesser degree O-6 sulfation of the surface HSPG on the tumors are important for HPV binding. Therefore, it appears that tumor cells consistently evolve HSPG modification patterns that mimic the pattern normally found on the basement membrane but not on the apical surfaces of normal epithelial or mesothelial cells. Consequently, appropriately modified HPV VLPs and/or PsV could be useful reagents to detect and potentially treat a remarkably broad spectrum of cancers. PMID:26317490

  15. Detecting O2 binding sites in protein cavities

    PubMed Central

    Kitahara, Ryo; Yoshimura, Yuichi; Xue, Mengjun; Kameda, Tomoshi; Mulder, Frans A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Internal cavities are important elements in protein structure, dynamics, stability and function. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to investigate the binding of molecular oxygen (O2) to cavities in a well-studied model for ligand binding, the L99A mutant of T4 lysozyme. On increasing the O2 concentration to 8.9 mM, changes in 1H, 15N, and 13C chemical shifts and signal broadening were observed specifically for backbone amide and side chain methyl groups located around the two hydrophobic cavities of the protein. O2-induced longitudinal relaxation enhancements for amide and methyl protons could be adequately accounted for by paramagnetic dipolar relaxation. These data provide the first experimental demonstration that O2 binds specifically to the hydrophobic, and not the hydrophilic cavities, in a protein. Molecular dynamics simulations visualized the rotational and translational motions of O2 in the cavities, as well as the binding and egress of O2, suggesting that the channel consisting of helices D, E, G, H, and J could be the potential gateway for ligand binding to the protein. Due to strong paramagnetic relaxation effects, O2 gas-pressure NMR measurements can detect hydrophobic cavities when populated to as little as 1%, and thereby provide a general and highly sensitive method for detecting oxygen binding in proteins. PMID:26830762

  16. Escherchia coli ribose binding protein based bioreporters revisited

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, Artur; Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Belkin, Shimshon; Roy, Shantanu; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2014-01-01

    Bioreporter bacteria, i.e., strains engineered to respond to chemical exposure by production of reporter proteins, have attracted wide interest because of their potential to offer cheap and simple alternative analytics for specified compounds or conditions. Bioreporter construction has mostly exploited the natural variation of sensory proteins, but it has been proposed that computational design of new substrate binding properties could lead to completely novel detection specificities at very low affinities. Here we reconstruct a bioreporter system based on the native Escherichia coli ribose binding protein RbsB and one of its computationally designed variants, reported to be capable of binding 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Our results show in vivo reporter induction at 50 nM ribose, and a 125 nM affinity constant for in vitro ribose binding to RbsB. In contrast, the purified published TNT-binding variant did not bind TNT nor did TNT cause induction of the E. coli reporter system. PMID:25005019

  17. Discovery of 12-mer peptides that bind to wood lignin

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Asako; Isozaki, Katsuhiro; Nakamura, Masaharu; Takaya, Hikaru; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Lignin, an abundant terrestrial polymer, is the only large-volume renewable feedstock composed of an aromatic skeleton. Lignin has been used mostly as an energy source during paper production; however, recent interest in replacing fossil fuels with renewable resources has highlighted its potential value in providing aromatic chemicals. Highly selective degradation of lignin is pivotal for industrial production of paper, biofuels, chemicals, and materials. However, few studies have examined natural and synthetic molecular components recognizing the heterogeneous aromatic polymer. Here, we report the first identification of lignin-binding peptides possessing characteristic sequences using a phage display technique. The consensus sequence HFPSP was found in several lignin-binding peptides, and the outer amino acid sequence affected the binding affinity of the peptides. Substitution of phenylalanine7 with Ile in the lignin-binding peptide C416 (HFPSPIFQRHSH) decreased the affinity of the peptide for softwood lignin without changing its affinity for hardwood lignin, indicating that C416 recognised structural differences between the lignins. Circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated that this peptide adopted a highly flexible random coil structure, allowing key residues to be appropriately arranged in relation to the binding site in lignin. These results provide a useful platform for designing synthetic and biological catalysts selectively bind to lignin. PMID:26903196

  18. Structural signatures of antibiotic binding sites on the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    David-Eden, Hilda; Mankin, Alexander S.; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2010-01-01

    The ribosome represents a major target for antibacterial drugs. Being a complex molecular machine, it offers many potential sites for functional interference. The high-resolution structures of ribosome in complex with various antibiotics provide a unique data set for understanding the universal features of drug-binding pockets on the ribosome. In this work, we have analyzed the structural and evolutionary properties of 65 antibiotic binding sites (ABSs) in the ribosome. We compared these sites to similar-size computed pockets extracted from the small and large ribosomal subunits. Based on this analysis, we defined properties of the known drug-binding sites, which constitute the signature of a ‘druggable’ site. The most noticeable properties of the ABSs are prevalence of non-paired bases, a strong bias in favor of unusual syn conformation of the RNA bases and an unusual sugar pucker. We propose that despite the different geometric and chemical properties of diverse antibiotics, their binding sites tend to have common attributes that possibly reflect the potency of the pocket for binding small molecules. Finally, we utilized the ensemble of properties to derive a druggability index, which can be used in conjunction with site functionality information to identify new drug-binding sites on the ribosome. PMID:20494981

  19. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Si, Jingna; Cui, Jing; Cheng, Jin; Wu, Rongling

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%–8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein–RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein–RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions. PMID:26540053

  20. Difference in redox behaviors between copper-binding octarepeat and nonoctarepeat sites in prion protein.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Norifumi; Kuwata, Kazuo

    2009-11-01

    We studied the redox behavior of copper-binding sites in prion protein (PrP) to clarify copper's role in the pathological mechanism underlying prion diseases. We investigated the coordination structures, binding affinities, and redox potentials of copper-binding peptide fragments derived from the N-terminal domain of PrP by density functional theory calculations. We used four models for copper-binding moieties in PrP(60-96): two were derived from the PHGGGWGQ octapeptide repeat region of PrP(60-91), and the others were tripeptide Gly-Thr-His fragments derived from the copper-binding nonoctarepeat site around His96. We found that such PrP-derived copper-binding complexes exhibit conformationally dependent redox behavior; for example, the copper-binding complex derived from the octarepeat region tends to possess high reduction potential for the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple, exceeding 0 V versus the standard hydrogen electrode, whereas the copper-binding nonoctarepeat model around His96 tends to possess high oxidation potential for the Cu(II)/Cu(III) couple and stabilize the higher-valent Cu(III) state. It is possible that such distinct redox activities of a copper-binding PrP are involved in the mechanism underlying prion diseases.

  1. Development of bacterium-based heavy metal biosorbents: Enhanced uptake of cadmium and mercury by Escherichia coli expressing a metal binding motif

    SciTech Connect

    Pazirandeh, M.; Wells, B.M.; Ryan, R.L.

    1998-10-01

    A gene coding for a de novo peptide sequence containing a metal binding motif was chemically synthesized and expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion with the maltose binding protein. Bacterial cells expressing the metal binding peptide fusion demonstrated enhanced binding of Cd{sup 2+} and Hg{sup 2+} compared to bacterial cells lacking the metal binding peptide. The potential use of genetically engineered bacteria as biosorbents for the removal of heavy metals from wastewaters is discussed.

  2. Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2007-01-23

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  3. Ankyrin-independent membrane protein-binding sites for brain and erythrocyte spectrin.

    PubMed

    Steiner, J P; Bennett, V

    1988-10-05

    Brain spectrin reassociates in in vitro binding assays with protein(s) in highly extracted brain membranes quantitatively depleted of ankyrin and spectrin. These newly described membrane sites for spectrin are biologically significant and involve a protein since (a) binding occurs optimally at physiological pH (6.7-6.9) and salt concentrations (50 mM), (b) binding is abolished by digestion of membranes with alpha-chymotrypsin, (c) Scatchard analysis is consistent with a binding capacity of at least 50 pmol/mg total membrane protein, and highest affinity of 3 nM. The major ankyrin-independent binding activity of brain spectrin is localized to the beta subunit of spectrin. Brain membranes also contain high affinity binding sites for erythrocyte spectrin, but a 3-4 fold lower capacity than for brain spectrin. Some spectrin-binding sites associate preferentially with brain spectrin, some with erythrocyte spectrin, and some associate with both types of spectrin. Erythrocyte spectrin contains distinct binding domains for ankyrin and brain membrane protein sites, since the Mr = 72,000 spectrin-binding fragment of ankyrin does not compete for binding of spectrin to brain membranes. Spectrin binds to a small number of ankyrin-independent sites in erythrocyte membranes present in about 10,000-15,000 copies/cell or 10% of the number of sites for ankyrin. Brain spectrin binds to these sites better than erythrocyte spectrin suggesting that erythrocytes have residual binding sites for nonerythroid spectrin. Ankyrin-independent-binding proteins that selectively bind to certain isoforms of spectrin provide a potentially important flexibility in cellular localization and time of synthesis of proteins involved in spectrin-membrane interactions. This flexibility has implications for assembly of the membrane skeleton and targeting of spectrin isoforms to specialized regions of cells.

  4. Determining Membrane Protein-Lipid Binding Thermodynamics Using Native Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiao; Liu, Yang; Liu, Wen; Liang, Xiaowen; Russell, David H; Laganowsky, Arthur

    2016-04-06

    Membrane proteins are embedded in the biological membrane where the chemically diverse lipid environment can modulate their structure and function. However, the thermodynamics governing the molecular recognition and interaction of lipids with membrane proteins is poorly understood. Here, we report a method using native mass spectrometry (MS), to determine thermodynamics of individual ligand binding events to proteins. Unlike conventional methods, native MS can resolve individual ligand binding events and, coupled with an apparatus to control the temperature, determine binding thermodynamic parameters, such as for protein-lipid interactions. We validated our approach using three soluble protein-ligand systems (maltose binding protein, lysozyme, and nitrogen regulatory protein) and obtained similar results to those using isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance. We also determined for the first time the thermodynamics of individual lipid binding to the ammonia channel (AmtB), an integral membrane protein from Escherichia coli. Remarkably, we observed distinct thermodynamic signatures for the binding of different lipids and entropy-enthalpy compensation for binding lipids of variable chain length. Additionally, using a mutant form of AmtB that abolishes a specific phosphatidylglycerol (PG) binding site, we observed distinct changes in the thermodynamic signatures for binding PG, implying these signatures can identify key residues involved in specific lipid binding and potentially differentiate between specific lipid binding sites.

  5. Allosteric Dynamic Control of Binding

    PubMed Central

    Sumbul, Fidan; Acuner-Ozbabacan, Saliha Ece; Haliloglu, Turkan

    2015-01-01

    Proteins have a highly dynamic nature and there is a complex interrelation between their structural dynamics and binding behavior. By assuming various conformational ensembles, they perform both local and global fluctuations to interact with other proteins in a dynamic infrastructure adapted to functional motion. Here, we show that there is a significant association between allosteric mutations, which lead to high-binding-affinity changes, and the hinge positions of global modes, as revealed by a large-scale statistical analysis of data in the Structural Kinetic and Energetic Database of Mutant Protein Interactions (SKEMPI). We further examined the mechanism of allosteric dynamics by conducting studies on human growth hormone (hGH) and pyrin domain (PYD), and the results show how mutations at the hinge regions could allosterically affect the binding-site dynamics or induce alternative binding modes by modifying the ensemble of accessible conformations. The long-range dissemination of perturbations in local chemistry or physical interactions through an impact on global dynamics can restore the allosteric dynamics. Our findings suggest a mechanism for the coupling of structural dynamics to the modulation of protein interactions, which remains a critical phenomenon in understanding the effect of mutations that lead to functional changes in proteins. PMID:26338442

  6. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  7. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  8. PREDICTING ER BINDING AFFINITY FOR EDC RANKING AND PRIORITIZATION: A COMPARISON OF THREE MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comparative analysis of how three COREPA models for ER binding affinity performed when used to predict potential estrogen receptor (ER) ligands is presented. Models I and II were developed based on training sets of 232 and 279 rat ER binding affinity measurements, respectively....

  9. Protein binding assay for hyaluronate

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, B.E.; Underhill, C.B.

    1986-11-01

    A relatively quick and simple assay for hyaluronate was developed using the specific binding protein, hyaluronectin. The hyaluronectin was obtained by homogenizing the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats, and then centrifuging the homogenate. The resulting supernatant was used as a source of crude hyaluronectin. In the binding assay, the hyaluronectin was mixed with (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate, followed by an equal volume of saturated (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, which precipitated the hyaluronectin and any (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate associated with it, but left free (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in solution. The mixture was then centrifuged, and the amount of bound (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in the precipitate was determined. Using this assay, the authors found that hyaluronectin specifically bound hyaluronate, since other glycosaminoglycans failed to compete for the binding protein. In addition, the interaction between hyaluronectin and hyaluronate was of relatively high affinity, and the size of the hyaluronate did not appear to substantially alter the amount of binding. To determine the amount of hyaluronate in an unknown sample, they used a competition assay in which the binding of a set amount of (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate was blocked by the addition of unlabeled hyaluronate. By comparing the degree of competition of the unknown samples with that of known amounts of hyaluronate, it was possible to determine the amount of hyaluronate in the unknowns. They have found that this method is sensitive to 1 ..mu..g or less of hyaluronate, and is unaffected by the presence of proteins.

  10. Rare-event induced binding transition of heteropolymers.

    PubMed

    Tang, L H; Chaté, H

    2001-01-29

    Sequence heterogeneity broadens the binding transition of a polymer onto a linear or planar substrate. This effect is analyzed in a real-space renormalization group scheme designed to capture the statistics of rare events. In the strongly disordered regime, binding initiates at an exponentially rare set of "good contacts." Renormalization of the contact potential yields a Kosterlitz--Thouless-type transition in any dimension. This and other predictions are confirmed by extensive numerical simulations of a directed polymer interacting with a columnar defect.

  11. The Multiple Carbohydrate Binding Specificities of Helicobacter pylori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teneberg, Susann

    Persistent colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Adhesion of microbes to the target tissue is an important determinant for successful initiation, establishment and maintenance of infection, and a variety of different candidate carbohydrate receptors for H. pylori have been identified. Here the different the binding specifities, and their potential role in adhesion to human gastric epithelium are described. Finally, recent findings on the roles of sialic acid binding SabA adhesin in interactions with human neutrophils and erythrocytes are discussed.

  12. Physical factors affecting chloroquine binding to melanin.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, R L; Pendleton, P; Gerber, J P

    2015-10-01

    Chloroquine is an antimalarial drug but is also prescribed for conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Long-term users risk toxic side effects, including retinopathy, thought to be caused by chloroquine accumulation on ocular melanin. Although the binding potential of chloroquine to melanin has been investigated previously, our study is the first to demonstrate clear links between chloroquine adsorption by melanin and system factors including temperature, pH, melanin type, and particle size. In the current work, two Sepia melanins were compared with bovine eye as a representative mammalian melanin. Increasing the surface anionic character due to a pH change from 4.7 to 7.4 increased each melanin's affinity for chloroquine. Although the chloroquine isotherms exhibited an apparently strong interaction with each melanin, isosteric heat analysis indicated a competitive interaction. Buffer solution cations competed effectively at low surface coverage; chloroquine adsorption occurs via buffer cation displacement and is promoted by temperature-influenced secondary structure swelling.

  13. Prediction of DNA-binding proteins from relational features

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The process of protein-DNA binding has an essential role in the biological processing of genetic information. We use relational machine learning to predict DNA-binding propensity of proteins from their structures. Automatically discovered structural features are able to capture some characteristic spatial configurations of amino acids in proteins. Results Prediction based only on structural relational features already achieves competitive results to existing methods based on physicochemical properties on several protein datasets. Predictive performance is further improved when structural features are combined with physicochemical features. Moreover, the structural features provide some insights not revealed by physicochemical features. Our method is able to detect common spatial substructures. We demonstrate this in experiments with zinc finger proteins. Conclusions We introduced a novel approach for DNA-binding propensity prediction using relational machine learning which could potentially be used also for protein function prediction in general. PMID:23146001

  14. Protein-DNA binding in high-resolution

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, Shaun; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental and computational methodologies are enabling ultra-high resolution genome-wide profiles of protein-DNA binding events. For example, the ChIP-exo protocol precisely characterizes protein-DNA crosslinking patterns by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with 5′ → 3′ exonuclease digestion. Similarly, deeply sequenced chromatin accessibility assays (e.g. DNase-seq and ATACseq) enable the detection of protected footprints at protein-DNA binding sites. With these techniques and others, we have the potential to characterize the individual nucleotides that interact with transcription factors, nucleosomes, RNA polymerases, and other regulatory proteins in a particular cellular context. In this review, we explain the experimental assays and computational analysis methods that enable high-resolution profiling of protein-DNA binding events. We discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with such approaches. PMID:26038153

  15. Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli bind fibronectin and laminin.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Rosa María; Almanza, Yolanda; González, Rafael; García, Santos; Heredia, Norma

    2009-04-01

    Avian colisepticemia frequently occurs after respiratory tract damage, the primary site for infection allows bacteria to encounter an exposed basement membrane, where laminin and fibronectin are important components. We investigated the ability of an isolate of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli to bind fibronectin and laminin. Using Far-western dot blot analysis, we demonstrated the ability of this microorganism to bind basement membrane proteins fibronectin and laminin. Results from an ELISA-based approach indicate that the binding to these membrane proteins was bacterial-dose dependent. Furthermore, two specific E. coli polypeptides, of 32 kDa and 130 kDa, reacted with laminin and fibronectin, respectively. Further evaluation of these potential bacterial adhesins may provide insights into the pathogenesis of colibacillosis.

  16. HIGH AFFINITY, DSRNA BINDING BY DISCONNECTED INTERACTING PROTEIN 1†

    PubMed Central

    Catanese, Daniel J.; Matthews, Kathleen S.

    2010-01-01

    Disconnected Interacting Protein 1 (DIP1) appears from sequence analysis and preliminary binding studies to be a member of the dsRNA-binding protein family. Of interest, DIP1 was shown previously to interact with and influence multiple proteins involved in transcription regulation in Drosophila melanogaster. We show here that the longest isoform of this protein, DIP1-c, exhibits a 500-fold preference for dsRNA over dsDNA of similar nucleotide sequence. Further, DIP1-c demonstrated very high affinity for a subset of dsRNA ligands, with binding in the picomolar range for VA1 RNA and miR-iab-4 precursor stem-loop, a potential physiological RNA target involved in regulating expression of its protein partner, Ultrabithorax. PMID:20643095

  17. Ligand Binding Thermodynamics in Drug Discovery: Still a Hot Tip?

    PubMed

    Geschwindner, Stefan; Ulander, Johan; Johansson, Patrik

    2015-08-27

    The use of ligand binding thermodynamics has been proposed as a potential success factor to accelerate drug discovery. However, despite the intuitive appeal of optimizing binding enthalpy, a number of factors complicate routine use of thermodynamic data. On a macroscopic level, a range of experimental parameters including temperature and buffer choice significantly influence the observed thermodynamic signatures. On a microscopic level, solute effects, structural flexibility, and cooperativity lead to nonlinear changes in enthalpy. This multifactorial character hides essential enthalpy contributions of intermolecular contacts, making them experimentally nonobservable. In this perspective, we present three case studies, reflect on some key factors affecting thermodynamic signatures, and investigate their relation to the hydrophobic effect, enthalpy-entropy compensation, lipophilic ligand efficiency, and promiscuity. The studies highlight that enthalpy and entropy cannot be used as direct end points but can together with calculations increase our understanding of ligand binding and identify interesting outliers that do not behave as expected.

  18. Using structure to inform carbohydrate binding module function.

    PubMed

    Abbott, D Wade; van Bueren, Alicia Lammerts

    2014-10-01

    Generally, non-catalytic carbohydrate binding module (CBM) specificity has been shown to parallel the catalytic activity of the carbohydrate active enzyme (CAZyme) module it is appended to. With the rapid expansion in metagenomic sequence space for the potential discovery of new CBMs in addition to the recent emergence of several new CBM families that display diverse binding profiles and novel functions, elucidating the function of these protein modules has become a much more challenging task. This review summarizes several approaches that have been reported for using primary structure to inform CBM specificity and streamlining their biophysical characterization. In addition we discuss general trends in binding site architecture and several newly identified functions for CBMs. Streams of investigation that will facilitate the development and refinement of sequence-based prediction tools are suggested.

  19. The family 21 carbohydrate-binding module of glucoamylase from Rhizopus oryzae consists of two sites playing distinct roles in ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Wei-I; Pai, Tun-Wen; Liu, Shi-Hwei; Hsiung, Bor-Kai; Chang, Margaret D.-T.

    2006-01-01

    The starch-hydrolysing enzyme GA (glucoamylase) from Rhizopus oryzae is a commonly used glycoside hydrolase in industry. It consists of a C-terminal catalytic domain and an N-terminal starch-binding domain, which belong to the CBM21 (carbohydrate-binding module, family 21). In the present study, a molecular model of CBM21 from R. oryzae GA (RoGACBM21) was constructed according to PSSC (progressive secondary structure correlation), modified structure-based sequence alignment, and site-directed mutagenesis was used to identify and characterize potential ligand-binding sites. Our model suggests that RoGACBM21 contains two ligand-binding sites, with Tyr32 and Tyr67 grouped into site I, and Trp47, Tyr83 and Tyr93 grouped into site II. The involvement of these aromatic residues has been validated using chemical modification, UV difference spectroscopy studies, and both qualitative and quantitative binding assays on a series of RoGACBM21 mutants. Our results further reveal that binding sites I and II play distinct roles in ligand binding, the former not only is involved in binding insoluble starch, but also facilitates the binding of RoGACBM21 to long-chain soluble polysaccharides, whereas the latter serves as the major binding site mediating the binding of both soluble polysaccharide and insoluble ligands. In the present study we have for the first time demonstrated that the key ligand-binding residues of RoGACBM21 can be identified and characterized by a combination of novel bioinformatics methodologies in the absence of resolved three-dimensional structural information. PMID:16509822

  20. Redox regulation of c-Jun DNA binding by reversible S-glutathiolation.

    PubMed

    Klatt, P; Molina, E P; De Lacoba, M G; Padilla, C A; Martinez-Galesteo, E; Barcena, J A; Lamas, S

    1999-09-01

    Redox control of the transcription factor c-Jun maps to a single cysteine in its DNA binding domain. However, the nature of the oxidized state of this cysteine and, thus, the potential molecular mechanisms accounting for the redox regulation of c-Jun DNA binding remain unclear. To address this issue, we have analyzed the purified recombinant c-Jun DNA binding domain for redox-dependent thiol modifications and concomitant changes in DNA binding activity. We show that changes in the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione provide the potential to oxidize c-Jun sulfhydryls by mechanisms that include both protein disulfide formation and S-glutathiolation. We provide evidence that S-glutathiolation, which is specifically targeted to the cysteine residue located in the DNA binding site of the protein, may account for the reversible redox regulation of c-Jun DNA binding. Furthermore, based on a molecular model of the S-glutathiolated protein, we discuss the structural elements facilitating S-glutathiolation and how this modification interferes with DNA binding. Given the structural similarities between the positively charged cysteine-containing DNA binding motif of c-Jun and the DNA binding site of related oxidant-sensitive transcriptional activators, the unprecedented phenomenon of redox-triggered S-thiolation of a transcription factor described in this report suggests a novel role for protein thiolation in the redox control of transcription.

  1. Dynamic conformational changes in munc18 prevent syntaxin binding.

    PubMed

    Bar-On, Dana; Nachliel, Esther; Gutman, Menachem; Ashery, Uri

    2011-03-01

    The Sec1/munc18 protein family is essential for vesicle fusion in eukaryotic cells via binding to SNARE proteins. Protein kinase C modulates these interactions by phosphorylating munc18a thereby reducing its affinity to one of the central SNARE members, syntaxin-1a. The established hypothesis is that the reduced affinity of the phosphorylated munc18a to syntaxin-1a is a result of local electrostatic repulsion between the two proteins, which interferes with their compatibility. The current study challenges this paradigm and offers a novel mechanistic explanation by revealing a syntaxin-non-binding conformation of munc18a that is induced by the phosphomimetic mutations. In the present study, using molecular dynamics simulations, we explored the dynamics of the wild-type munc18a versus phosphomimetic mutant munc18a. We focused on the structural changes that occur in the cavity between domains 3a and 1, which serves as the main syntaxin-binding site. The results of the simulations suggest that the free wild-type munc18a exhibits a dynamic equilibrium between several conformations differing in the size of its cavity (the main syntaxin-binding site). The flexibility of the cavity's size might facilitate the binding or unbinding of syntaxin. In silico insertion of phosphomimetic mutations into the munc18a structure induces the formation of a conformation where the syntaxin-binding area is rigid and blocked as a result of interactions between residues located on both sides of the cavity. Therefore, we suggest that the reduced affinity of the phosphomimetic mutant/phosphorylated munc18a is a result of the closed-cavity conformation, which makes syntaxin binding energetically and sterically unfavorable. The current study demonstrates the potential of phosphorylation, an essential biological process, to serve as a driving force for dramatic conformational changes of proteins modulating their affinity to target proteins.

  2. Identification, characterization, and developmental regulation of embryonic benzodiazepine binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, L.A.; Gibbs, T.T.; Farb, D.H.

    1987-06-01

    We report the identification and characterization of 2 classes of benzodiazepine binding sites in the embryonic chick CNS. Binding was examined by competition and saturation binding experiments, using as radioligands /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, a classical benzodiazepine anxiolytic, and /sup 3/H-Ro5-4864, a convulsant benzodiazepine. The results demonstrate that high-affinity (KD = 2.3 nM) /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding sites (site-A) are present by embryonic day 5 (Hamburger and Hamilton stage 27) and increase throughout development (Bmax = 0.3 and 1.3 pmol/mg protein in 7 and 20 d brain membranes, respectively). When 7 or 20 d brain membranes are photoaffinity-labeled with /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam and ultraviolet light, the radioactivity migrates as 2 bands on SDS-PAGE, consistent with Mrs of 48,000 and 51,000. GABA potentiates /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding at both 7 and 20 d of development, indicating that site-A is coupled to receptors for GABA early in development. Importantly, we have also identified a novel site (site-B) that binds classical benzodiazepine agonists with low affinity (micromolar) but displays high affinity for Ro5-4864 (KD = 41 nM). Site-B displays characteristics expected for a functional receptor, including stereospecificity and sensitivity to inactivation by heat and protease treatment. Saturation binding studies employing /sup 3/H-Ro5-4864 indicate that the levels of site-B are similar in 7 and 20 d brain (ca. 2.5 pmol/mg protein). The function of site-B is not known, but its preponderance in 7 d brain, relative to site-A, suggests that it might be important during early embryonic development.

  3. Binding of white spot syndrome virus to Artemia sp. cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shuying; Li, Guangda; Feng, Wenpo; Huang, Jie

    2013-10-01

    Using differential velocity centrifugation, cell membranes of Artemia sp. were prepared, and their binding to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) was analyzed in vitro. The results indicated that WSSV can specifically bind to Artemia cell membranes, and that WSSV receptor very likely existed in this membrane, which suggested that Artemia sp. may be a reservoir of WSSV. This study investigated the specific WSSV binding site by performing competitive inhibition experiments using shrimp gill cell membranes to bind WSSV to Artemia cell membranes. The results showed that shrimp gill cell membranes had a distinct inhibition effect on the specific binding of Artemia cell membranes to WSSV. Thus, potentially similar WSSV receptors or binding sites existed on Artemia sp. cell membranes and shrimp gill cell membranes. Taken together, these findings may provide experimental basis for the development of an effective approach to controlling WSSV, and theoretical basis for the study of WSSV receptors.

  4. Electrostatic contributions to heat capacity changes of DNA-ligand binding.

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, K; Sharp, K

    1998-01-01

    Significant heat capacity changes (DeltaCp) often accompany protein unfolding, protein binding, and specific DNA-ligand binding reactions. Such changes are widely used to analyze contributions arising from hydrophobic and polar hydration. Current models relate the magnitude of DeltaCp to the solvent accessible surface area (ASA) of the molecule. However, for many binding systems-particularly those involving non-peptide ligands-these models predict a DeltaCp that is significantly different from the experimentally measured value. Electrostatic interactions provide a potential source of heat capacity changes and do not scale with ASA. Using finite-difference Poisson-Boltzmann methods (FDPB), we have determined the contribution of electrostatics to the DeltaCp associated with binding for DNA binding reactions involving the ligands DAPI, netropsin, lexitropsin, and the lambda repressor binding domain. PMID:9675178

  5. Probing the electrostatics and pharmacological modulation of sequence-specific binding by the DNA-binding domain of the ETS family transcription factor PU.1: a binding affinity and kinetics investigation.

    PubMed

    Munde, Manoj; Poon, Gregory M K; Wilson, W David

    2013-05-27

    Members of the ETS family of transcription factors regulate a functionally diverse array of genes. All ETS proteins share a structurally conserved but sequence-divergent DNA-binding domain, known as the ETS domain. Although the structure and thermodynamics of the ETS-DNA complexes are well known, little is known about the kinetics of sequence recognition, a facet that offers potential insight into its molecular mechanism. We have characterized DNA binding by the ETS domain of PU.1 by biosensor-surface plasmon resonance (SPR). SPR analysis revealed a striking kinetic profile for DNA binding by the PU.1 ETS domain. At low salt concentrations, it binds high-affinity cognate DNA with a very slow association rate constant (≤10(5)M(-)(1)s(-)(1)), compensated by a correspondingly small dissociation rate constant. The kinetics are strongly salt dependent but mutually balance to produce a relatively weak dependence in the equilibrium constant. This profile contrasts sharply with reported data for other ETS domains (e.g., Ets-1, TEL) for which high-affinity binding is driven by rapid association (>10(7)M(-)(1)s(-)(1)). We interpret this difference in terms of the hydration properties of ETS-DNA binding and propose that at least two mechanisms of sequence recognition are employed by this family of DNA-binding domain. Additionally, we use SPR to demonstrate the potential for pharmacological inhibition of sequence-specific ETS-DNA binding, using the minor groove-binding distamycin as a model compound. Our work establishes SPR as a valuable technique for extending our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of ETS-DNA interactions as well as developing potential small-molecule agents for biotechnological and therapeutic purposes.

  6. An Experimentally Based Computer Search Identifies Unstructured Membrane-binding Sites in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brzeska, Hanna; Guag, Jake; Remmert, Kirsten; Chacko, Susan; Korn, Edward D.

    2010-01-01

    Programs exist for searching protein sequences for potential membrane-penetrating segments (hydrophobic regions) and for lipid-binding sites with highly defined tertiary structures, such as PH, FERM, C2, ENTH, and other domains. However, a rapidly growing number of membrane-associated proteins (including cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, GTP-binding proteins, and their effectors) bind lipids through less structured regions. Here, we describe the development and testing of a simple computer search program that identifies unstructured potential membrane-binding sites. Initially, we found that both basic and hydrophobic amino acids, irrespective of sequence, contribute to the binding to acidic phospholipid vesicles of synthetic peptides that correspond to the putative membrane-binding domains of Acanthamoeba class I myosins. Based on these results, we modified a hydrophobicity scale giving Arg- and Lys-positive, rather than negative, values. Using this basic and hydrophobic scale with a standard search algorithm, we successfully identified previously determined unstructured membrane-binding sites in all 16 proteins tested. Importantly, basic and hydrophobic searches identified previously unknown potential membrane-binding sites in class I myosins, PAKs and CARMIL (capping protein, Arp2/3, myosin I linker; a membrane-associated cytoskeletal scaffold protein), and synthetic peptides and protein domains containing these newly identified sites bound to acidic phospholipids in vitro. PMID:20018884

  7. Temporal binding of interval markers

    PubMed Central

    Derichs, Christina; Zimmermann, Eckart

    2016-01-01

    How we estimate the passage of time is an unsolved mystery in neuroscience. Illusions of subjective time provide an experimental access to this question. Here we show that time compression and expansion of visually marked intervals result from a binding of temporal interval markers. Interval markers whose onset signals were artificially weakened by briefly flashing a whole-field mask were bound in time towards markers with a strong onset signal. We explain temporal compression as the consequence of summing response distributions of weak and strong onset signals. Crucially, temporal binding occurred irrespective of the temporal order of weak and strong onset markers, thus ruling out processing latencies as an explanation for changes in interval duration judgments. If both interval markers were presented together with a mask or the mask was shown in the temporal interval center, no compression occurred. In a sequence of two intervals, masking the middle marker led to time compression for the first and time expansion for the second interval. All these results are consistent with a model view of temporal binding that serves a functional role by reducing uncertainty in the final estimate of interval duration. PMID:27958311

  8. Anion binding in biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V.; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P.; Bevers, Loes E.; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2009-11-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L3 (2p3/2) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  9. Contribution of Sequence Motif, Chromatin State, and DNA Structure Features to Predictive Models of Transcription Factor Binding in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Zing Tsung-Yeh; Shiu, Shin-Han; Tsai, Huai-Kuang

    2015-08-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding is determined by the presence of specific sequence motifs (SM) and chromatin accessibility, where the latter is influenced by both chromatin state (CS) and DNA structure (DS) properties. Although SM, CS, and DS have been used to predict TF binding sites, a predictive model that jointly considers CS and DS has not been developed to predict either TF-specific binding or general binding properties of TFs. Using budding yeast as model, we found that machine learning classifiers trained with either CS or DS features alone perform better in predicting TF-specific binding compared to SM-based classifiers. In addition, simultaneously considering CS and DS further improves the accuracy of the TF binding predictions, indicating the highly complementary nature of these two properties. The contributions of SM, CS, and DS features to binding site predictions differ greatly between TFs, allowing TF-specific predictions and potentially reflecting different TF binding mechanisms. In addition, a "TF-agnostic" predictive model based on three DNA "intrinsic properties" (in silico predicted nucleosome occupancy, major groove geometry, and dinucleotide free energy) that can be calculated from genomic sequences alone has performance that rivals the model incorporating experiment-derived data. This intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions not only across TFs, but also across DNA-binding domain families with distinct structural folds. Furthermore, these predicted binding regions can help identify TF binding sites that have a significant impact on target gene expression. Because the intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions across DNA-binding domain families, it is TF agnostic and likely describes general binding potential of TFs. Thus, our findings suggest that it is feasible to establish a TF agnostic model for identifying functional regulatory regions in potentially any sequenced genome.

  10. Contribution of Sequence Motif, Chromatin State, and DNA Structure Features to Predictive Models of Transcription Factor Binding in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Zing Tsung-Yeh; Shiu, Shin-Han; Tsai, Huai-Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding is determined by the presence of specific sequence motifs (SM) and chromatin accessibility, where the latter is influenced by both chromatin state (CS) and DNA structure (DS) properties. Although SM, CS, and DS have been used to predict TF binding sites, a predictive model that jointly considers CS and DS has not been developed to predict either TF-specific binding or general binding properties of TFs. Using budding yeast as model, we found that machine learning classifiers trained with either CS or DS features alone perform better in predicting TF-specific binding compared to SM-based classifiers. In addition, simultaneously considering CS and DS further improves the accuracy of the TF binding predictions, indicating the highly complementary nature of these two properties. The contributions of SM, CS, and DS features to binding site predictions differ greatly between TFs, allowing TF-specific predictions and potentially reflecting different TF binding mechanisms. In addition, a "TF-agnostic" predictive model based on three DNA “intrinsic properties” (in silico predicted nucleosome occupancy, major groove geometry, and dinucleotide free energy) that can be calculated from genomic sequences alone has performance that rivals the model incorporating experiment-derived data. This intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions not only across TFs, but also across DNA-binding domain families with distinct structural folds. Furthermore, these predicted binding regions can help identify TF binding sites that have a significant impact on target gene expression. Because the intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions across DNA-binding domain families, it is TF agnostic and likely describes general binding potential of TFs. Thus, our findings suggest that it is feasible to establish a TF agnostic model for identifying functional regulatory regions in potentially any sequenced genome. PMID:26291518

  11. Interatomic Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei

    2010-01-01

    In spite of greatly increased computer speeds, the application of ab initio methods for an atomistic simulation of materials is still limited to relatively small ensembles of atoms and, in molecular dynamics, relatively short simulation times (~5 ps). In contrast, the use of empirical or semiempirical interatomic potentials makes it possible to simulate much larger systems (~ up to a few million atoms) for much longer times (~100 ns), and thus to tackle such problems as plastic deformation, ion-solid interaction, or atomic diffusion. This chapter reviews various interatomic potentials used in large-scale computer simulations.

  12. Anchored Clathrate Waters Bind Antifreeze Proteins to Ice

    SciTech Connect

    C Garnham; R Campbell; P Davies

    2011-12-31

    The mechanism by which antifreeze proteins (AFPs) irreversibly bind to ice has not yet been resolved. The ice-binding site of an AFP is relatively hydrophobic, but also contains many potential hydrogen bond donors/acceptors. The extent to which hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic effect contribute to ice binding has been debated for over 30 years. Here we have elucidated the ice-binding mechanism through solving the first crystal structure of an Antarctic bacterial AFP. This 34-kDa domain, the largest AFP structure determined to date, folds as a Ca{sup 2+}-bound parallel beta-helix with an extensive array of ice-like surface waters that are anchored via hydrogen bonds directly to the polypeptide backbone and adjacent side chains. These bound waters make an excellent three-dimensional match to both the primary prism and basal planes of ice and in effect provide an extensive X-ray crystallographic picture of the AFP{vert_ellipsis}ice interaction. This unobstructed view, free from crystal-packing artefacts, shows the contributions of both the hydrophobic effect and hydrogen bonding during AFP adsorption to ice. We term this mode of binding the 'anchored clathrate' mechanism of AFP action.

  13. Discriminatory effects in the optical binding of chiral nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Kayn A.; Bradshaw, David S.; Andrews, David L.

    2015-08-01

    The laser-induced intermolecular force that exists between two or more particles subjected to a moderately intense laser beam is termed `optical binding'. Completely distinct from the single-particle forces that give rise to optical trapping, the phenomenon of optical binding is a manifestation of the coupling between optically induced dipole moments in neutral particles. In conjunction with optical trapping, the optomechanical forces in optical binding afford means for the manipulation and fabrication of optically bound matter. The Casimir-Polder potential that is intrinsic to all matter can be overridden by the optical binding force in cases where the laser beam is of sufficient intensity. Chiral discrimination can arise when the laser input has a circular polarization, if the particles are themselves chiral. Then, it emerges that the interaction between particles with a particular handedness is responsive to the left- or right-handedness of the light. The present analysis, which expands upon previous studies of chiral discrimination in optical binding, identifies a novel mechanism that others have previously overlooked, signifying that the discriminatory effect is much more prominent than originally thought. The new theory leads to results for freely-tumbling chiral particles subjected to circularly polarized light. Rigorous conditions are established for the energy shifts to be non-zero and display discriminatory effects with respect to the handedness of the incident beam. Detailed calculations indicate that the energy shift is larger than those previously reported by three orders of magnitude.

  14. Digestibility and IgE-Binding of Glycosylated Codfish Parvalbumin

    PubMed Central

    de Jongh, Harmen H. J.; Robles, Carlos López; Nordlee, Julie A.; Lee, Poi-Wah; Baumert, Joseph L.; Hamilton, Robert G.; Taylor, Steve L.; Koppelman, Stef J.

    2013-01-01

    Food-processing conditions may alter the allergenicity of food proteins by different means. In this study, the effect of the glycosylation as a result of thermal treatment on the digestibility and IgE-binding of codfish parvalbumin is investigated. Native and glycosylated parvalbumins were digested with pepsin at various conditions relevant for the gastrointestinal tract. Intact proteins and peptides were analysed for apparent molecular weight and IgE-binding. Glycosylation did not substantially affect the digestion. Although the peptides resulting from digestion were relatively large (3 and 4 kDa), the IgE-binding was strongly diminished. However, the glycosylated parvalbumin had a strong propensity to form dimers and tetramers, and these multimers bound IgE intensely, suggesting stronger IgE-binding than monomeric parvalbumin. We conclude that glycosylation of codfish parvalbumin does not affect the digestibility of parvalbumin and that the peptides resulting from this digestion show low IgE-binding, regardless of glycosylation. Glycosylation of parvalbumin leads to the formation of higher order structures that are more potent IgE binders than native, monomeric parvalbumin. Therefore, food-processing conditions applied to fish allergen can potentially lead to increased allergenicity, even while the protein's digestibility is not affected by such processing. PMID:23878817

  15. Anchored clathrate waters bind antifreeze proteins to ice.

    PubMed

    Garnham, Christopher P; Campbell, Robert L; Davies, Peter L

    2011-05-03

    The mechanism by which antifreeze proteins (AFPs) irreversibly bind to ice has not yet been resolved. The ice-binding site of an AFP is relatively hydrophobic, but also contains many potential hydrogen bond donors/acceptors. The extent to which hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic effect contribute to ice binding has been debated for over 30 years. Here we have elucidated the ice-binding mechanism through solving the first crystal structure of an Antarctic bacterial AFP. This 34-kDa domain, the largest AFP structure determined to date, folds as a Ca(2+)-bound parallel beta-helix with an extensive array of ice-like surface waters that are anchored via hydrogen bonds directly to the polypeptide backbone and adjacent side chains. These bound waters make an excellent three-dimensional match to both the primary prism and basal planes of ice and in effect provide an extensive X-ray crystallographic picture of the AFPice interaction. This unobstructed view, free from crystal-packing artefacts, shows the contributions of both the hydrophobic effect and hydrogen bonding during AFP adsorption to ice. We term this mode of binding the "anchored clathrate" mechanism of AFP action.

  16. Acid Gas Capture Using CO2-Binding Organic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Heldebrant, David J.; Koech, Phillip K.; Rainbolt, James E.; Zheng, Feng

    2010-11-10

    Current chemical CO2 scrubbing technology is primarily aqueous alkanolamine based. These systems rapidly bind CO2 (forming water-soluble carbamate and bicarbonate salts) however, the process has serious disadvantages. The concentration of monoethanolamine rarely exceeds 30 wt % due to the corrosive nature of the solution, and this reduces the maximum CO2 volumetric (≤108 g/L) and gravimetric capacity (≤7 wt%) of the CO2 scrubber. The ≤30 wt % loading of ethanolamine also means that a large excess of water must be pumped and heated during CO2 capture and release, and this greatly increases the energy requirements especially considering the high specific heat of water (4 j/g-1K-1). Our approach is to switch to organic systems that chemically bind CO2 as liquid alkylcarbonate salts. Our CO2-binding organic liquids have higher CO2 solubility, lower specific heats, potential for less corrosion and lower binding energies for CO2 than aqueous systems. CO2BOLs also reversibly bind and release mixed sulfur oxides. Furthermore the CO2BOL system can be direct solvent replacements for any solvent based CO2 capture systems because they are commercially available reagents and because they are fluids they would not require extensive process re-engineering.

  17. PEP-19 modulates calcium binding to calmodulin by electrostatic steering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Putkey, John A.

    2016-01-01

    PEP-19 is a small protein that increases the rates of Ca2+ binding to the C-domain of calmodulin (CaM) by an unknown mechanism. Although an IQ motif promotes binding to CaM, an acidic sequence in PEP-19 is required to modulate Ca2+ binding and to sensitize HeLa cells to ATP-induced Ca2+ release. Here, we report the NMR solution structure of a complex between PEP-19 and the C-domain of apo CaM. The acidic sequence of PEP-19 associates between helices E and F of CaM via hydrophobic interactions. This allows the acidic side chains in PEP-19 to extend toward the solvent and form a negatively charged surface that resembles a catcher's mitt near Ca2+ binding loop III of CaM. The topology and gradients of negative electrostatic surface potential support a mechanism by which PEP-19 increases the rate of Ca2+ binding to the C-domain of CaM by ‘catching' and electrostatically steering Ca2+ to site III. PMID:27876793

  18. Mg2+ ions: do they bind to nucleobase nitrogens?

    PubMed Central

    Leonarski, Filip; D'Ascenzo, Luigi; Auffinger, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Given the many roles proposed for Mg2+ in nucleic acids, it is essential to accurately determine their binding modes. Here, we surveyed the PDB to classify Mg2+ inner-sphere binding patterns to nucleobase imine N1/N3/N7 atoms. Among those, purine N7 atoms are considered to be the best nucleobase binding sites for divalent metals. Further, Mg2+ coordination to N7 has been implied in several ribozyme catalytic mechanisms. We report that Mg2+ assigned near imine nitrogens derive mostly from poor interpretations of electron density patterns and are most often misidentified Na+, K+, NH4+ ions, water molecules or spurious density peaks. Consequently, apart from few documented exceptions, Mg2+ ions do not bind to N7 atoms. Without much of a surprise, Mn2+, Zn2+ and Cd2+, which have a higher affinity for nitrogens, may contact N7 atoms when present in crystallization buffers. In this respect, we describe for the first time a potential Zn2+ ribosomal binding site involving two purine N7 atoms. Further, we provide a set of guidelines to help in the assignment of Mg2+ in crystallographic, cryo-EM, NMR and model building practices and discuss implications of our findings related to ion substitution experiments. PMID:27923930

  19. Transthyretin-binding activity of contaminants in blood from polar bear (Ursus maritimus) cubs.

    PubMed

    Bytingsvik, Jenny; Simon, Eszter; Leonards, Pim E G; Lamoree, Marja; Lie, Elisabeth; Aars, Jon; Derocher, Andrew E; Wiig, Oystein; Jenssen, Bjørn M; Hamers, Timo

    2013-05-07

    We determined the transthyretin (TTR)-binding activity of blood-accumulating contaminants in blood plasma samples of approximately 4-months-old polar bear (Ursus maritimus) cubs from Svalbard sampled in 1998 and 2008. The TTR-binding activity was measured as thyroxine (T4)-like equivalents (T4-EQMeas). Our findings show that the TTR-binding activity related to contaminant levels was significantly lower (45%) in 2008 than in 1998 (mean ± standard error of mean: 1998, 2265 ± 231 nM; 2008, 1258 ± 170 nM). Although we cannot exclude a potential influence of between-year differences in capture location and cub body mass, our findings most likely reflect reductions of TTR-binding contaminants or their precursors in the arctic environment (e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs]). The measured TTR-binding activity correlated positively with the cubs' plasma levels of hydroxylated PCBs (OH-PCBs). No such association was found between TTR-binding activity and the plasma levels of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs). The OH-PCBs explained 60 ± 7% and 54 ± 4% of the TTR-binding activity in 1998 and 2008, respectively, and PFASs explained ≤1.2% both years. Still, almost half the TTR-binding activity could not be explained by the contaminants we examined. The considerable levels of TTR-binding contaminants warrant further effect directed analysis (EDA) to identify the contaminants responsible for the unexplained part of the observed TTR-binding activity.

  20. Models of metal binding structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Leenheer, J.A.; Brown, G.K.; Cabaniss, S.E.; MacCarthy, P.

    1998-08-15

    Fulvic acid, isolated from the Suwannee River, Georgia, was assessed for its ability to bind Ca{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} ions at pH 6 before and after extensive fractionation that was designed to reveal the nature of metal binding functional groups. The binding constant for Ca{sup 2+} ion had the greatest increase of all the ions in a metal binding fraction that was selected for intensive characterization for the purpose of building quantitative average model structures. The metal binding fraction was characterized by quantitative {sup 13}C NMR, {sup 1}H NMR, and FT-IR spectrometry and elemental, titrimetric, and molecular weight determinations. The characterization data revealed that carboxyl groups were clustered in short-chain aliphatic dibasic acid structures. The Ca{sup 2+} binding data suggested that ether-substituted oxysuccinic acid structures are good models for the metal binding sites at pH 6. Structural models were derived based upon oxidation and photolytic rearrangements of cutin, lignin, and tannin precursors. These structural models rich in substituted dibasic acid structures revealed polydentate binding sites with the potential for both inner-sphere and outer-sphere type binding. The majority of the fulvic acid molecule was involved with metal binding rather than a small substructural unit.

  1. Protein-Ligand Binding from Distancefield Distances and Hamiltonian Replica Exchange Simulations.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, Anita; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2013-02-12

    The calculation of protein-ligand binding free energies is an important goal in the field of computational chemistry. Applying path-sampling methods for this purpose involves calculating the associated potential of mean force (PMF) and gives insight into the binding free energy along the binding process. Without a priori knowledge about the binding path, sampling reversible binding can be difficult to achieve. To alleviate this problem, we introduce the distancefield (DF) as a reaction coordinate for such calculations. DF is a grid-based method in which the shortest distance between the binding site and a ligand is determined avoiding routes that pass through the protein. Combining this reaction coordinate with Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics (HREMD) allows for the reversible binding of the ligand to the protein. A comparison is made between umbrella sampling using regular distance restraints and HREMD with DF restraints to study aspirin binding to the protein phospholipase A2. Although the free energies of binding are similar for both methods, the increased sampling with HREMD has a significant influence on the shape of the PMF. A remarkable agreement between the calculated binding free energies from the PMF and the experimental estimate is obtained.

  2. Relaxed selection against accidental binding of transcription factors with conserved chromatin contexts.

    PubMed

    Babbitt, G A

    2010-10-15

    The spurious (or nonfunctional) binding of transcription factors (TF) to the wrong locations on DNA presents a formidable challenge to genomes given the relatively low ceiling for sequence complexity within the short lengths of most binding motifs. The high potential for the occurrence of random motifs and subsequent nonfunctional binding of many transcription factors should theoretically lead to natural selection against the occurrence of spurious motif throughout the genome. However, because of the active role that chromatin can influence over eukaryotic gene regulation, it may also be expected that many supposed spurious binding sites could escape purifying selection if (A) they simply occur in regions of high nucleosome occupancy or (B) their surrounding chromatin was dynamically involved in their identity and function. We compared nucleosome occupancy and the presence/absence of functionally conserved chromatin context to the strength of selection against spurious binding of various TF binding motifs in Saccharomyces yeast. While we find no direct relationship with nucleosome occupancy, we find strong evidence that transcription factors spatially associated with evolutionarily conserved chromatin states are under relaxed selection against accidental binding. Transcription factors (with/without) a conserved chromatin context were found to occur on average, (87.7%/49.3%) of their expected frequencies. Functional binding motifs with conserved chromatin contexts were also significantly shorter in length and more often clustered. These results indicate a role of chromatin context dependency in relaxing selection against spurious binding in nearly half of all TF binding motifs throughout the yeast genome.

  3. Determination of energies and sites of binding of PFOA and PFOS to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Salvalaglio, Matteo; Muscionico, Isabella; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2010-11-25

    Structure and energies of the binding sites of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) to human serum albumin (HSA) were determined through molecular modeling. The calculations consisted of a compound approach based on docking, followed by molecular dynamics simulations and by the estimation of the free binding energies adopting WHAM-umbrella sampling and semiempirical methodologies. The binding sites so determined are common either to known HSA fatty acids sites or to other HSA sites known to bind to pharmaceutical compounds such as warfarin, thyroxine, indole, and benzodiazepin. Among the PFOA binding sites, five have interaction energies in excess of -6 kcal/mol, which become nine for PFOS. The calculated binding free energy of PFOA to the Trp 214 binding site is the highest among the PFOA complexes, -8.0 kcal/mol, in good agreement with literature experimental data. The PFOS binding site with the highest energy, -8.8 kcal/mol, is located near the Trp 214 binding site, thus partially affecting its activity. The maximum number of ligands that can be bound to HSA is 9 for PFOA and 11 for PFOS. The calculated data were adopted to predict the level of complexation of HSA as a function of the concentration of PFOA and PFOS found in human blood for different levels of exposition. The analysis of the factors contributing to the complex binding energy permitted to outline a set of guidelines for the rational design of alternative fluorinated surfactants with a lower bioaccumulation potential.

  4. A Key Evolutionary Mutation Enhances DNA Binding of the FOXP2 Forkhead Domain.

    PubMed

    Morris, Gavin; Fanucchi, Sylvia

    2016-04-05

    Forkhead box (FOX) transcription factors share a conserved forkhead DNA binding domain (FHD) and are key role players in the development of many eukaryotic species. Their involvement in various congenital disorders and cancers makes them clinically relevant targets for novel therapeutic strategies. Among them, the FOXP subfamily of multidomain transcriptional repressors is unique in its ability to form DNA binding homo and heterodimers. The truncated FOXP2 FHD, in the absence of the leucine zipper, exists in equilibrium between monomeric and domain-swapped dimeric states in vitro. As a consequence, determining the DNA binding properties of the FOXP2 FHD becomes inherently difficult. In this work, two FOXP2 FHD hinge loop mutants have been generated to successfully prevent both the formation (A539P) and the dissociation (F541C) of the homodimers. This allows for the separation of the two species for downstream DNA binding studies. Comparison of DNA binding of the different species using electrophoretic mobility shift assay, fluorescence anisotropy and isothermal titration calorimetry indicates that the wild-type FOXP2 FHD binds DNA as a monomer. However, comparison of the DNA-binding energetics of the monomer and wild-type FHD, reveals that there is a difference in the mechanism of binding between the two species. We conclude that the naturally occurring reverse mutation (P539A) seen in the FOXP subfamily increases DNA binding affinity and may increase the potential for nonspecific binding compared to other FOX family members.

  5. Sequence Specific Binding of Beta Carboline Alkaloid Harmalol with Deoxyribonucleotides: Binding Heterogeneity, Conformational, Thermodynamic and Cytotoxic Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Sarita; Pandya, Prateek; Bhadra, Kakali

    2014-01-01

    Background Base dependent binding of the cytotoxic alkaloid harmalol to four synthetic polynucleotides, poly(dA).poly(dT), poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT), poly(dG).poly(dC) and poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC) was examined by various photophysical and calorimetric studies, and molecular docking. Methodology/Principal Findings Binding data obtained from absorbance according to neighbor exclusion model indicated that the binding constant decreased in the order poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC)>poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT)>poly(dA).poly(dT)>poly(dG).poly(dC). The same trend was shown by the competition dialysis, change in fluorescence steady state intensity, stabilization against thermal denaturation, increase in the specific viscosity and perturbations in circular dichroism spectra. Among the polynucleotides, poly(dA).poly(dT) and poly(dG).poly(dC) showed positive cooperativity where as poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC) and poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT) showed non cooperative binding. Isothermal calorimetric data on the other hand showed enthalpy driven exothermic binding with a hydrophobic contribution to the binding Gibbs energy with poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC), and poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT) where as harmalol with poly(dA).poly(dT) showed entropy driven endothermic binding and with poly(dG).poly(dC) it was reported to be entropy driven exothermic binding. The study also tested the in vitro chemotherapeutic potential of harmalol in HeLa, MDA-MB-231, A549, and HepG2 cell line by MTT assay. Conclusions/Significance Studies unequivocally established that harmalol binds strongly with hetero GC polymer by mechanism of intercalation where the alkaloid resists complete overlap to the DNA base pairs inside the intercalation cavity and showed maximum cytotoxicity on HepG2 with IC50 value of 14 µM. The results contribute to the understanding of binding, specificity, energetic, cytotoxicity and docking of harmalol-DNA complexation that will guide synthetic efforts of medicinal chemists for developing better therapeutic agents

  6. Nucleotides of transcription factor binding sites exert interdependent effects on the binding affinities of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Bulyk, Martha L.; Johnson, Philip L. F.; Church, George M.

    2002-01-01

    We can determine the effects of many possible sequence variations in transcription factor binding sites using microarray binding experiments. Analysis of wild-type and mutant Zif268 (Egr1) zinc fingers bound to microarrays containing all possible central 3 bp triplet binding sites indicates that the nucleotides of transcription factor binding sites cannot be treated independently. This indicates that the current practice of characterizing transcription factor binding sites by mutating individual positions of binding sites one base pair at a time does not provide a true picture of the sequence specificity. Similarly, current bioinformatic practices using either just a consensus sequence, or even mononucleotide frequency weight matrices to provide more complete descriptions of transcription factor binding sites, are not accurate in depicting the true binding site specificities, since these methods rely upon the assumption that the nucleotides of binding sites exert independent effects on binding affinity. Our results stress the importance of complete reference tables of all possible binding sites for comparing protein binding preferences for various DNA sequences. We also show results suggesting that microarray binding data using particular subsets of all possible binding sites can be used to extrapolate the relative binding affinities of all possible full-length binding sites, given a known binding site for use as a starting sequence for site preference refinement. PMID:11861919

  7. Binding Mode Prediction of Evodiamine within Vanilloid Receptor TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhanli; Sun, Lidan; Yu, Hui; Zhang, Yanhui; Gong, Wuzhuang; Jin, Hongwei; Zhang, Liangren; Liang, Huaping

    2012-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the potential binding mode of drugs is crucial to computer-aided drug design paradigms. It has been reported that evodiamine acts as an agonist of the vanilloid receptor Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1). However, the precise interaction between evodiamine and TRPV1 was still not fully understood. In this perspective, the homology models of TRPV1 were generated using the crystal structure of the voltage-dependent shaker family K+ channel as a template. We then performed docking and molecular dynamics simulation to gain a better understanding of the probable binding modes of evodiamine within the TRPV1 binding pocket. There are no significant interspecies differences in evodiamine binding in rat, human and rabbit TRPV1 models. Pharmacophore modeling further provided confidence for the validity of the docking studies. This study is the first to shed light on the structural determinants required for the interaction between TRPV1 and evodiamine, and gives new suggestions for the rational design of novel TRPV1 ligands. PMID:22942745

  8. The study of zinc ions binding to casein.

    PubMed

    Pomastowski, P; Sprynskyy, M; Buszewski, B

    2014-08-01

    The presented research was focused on physicochemical study of casein properties and the kinetics of zinc ions binding to the protein. Moreover, a fast and simple method of casein extraction from cow's milk has been proposed. Casein isoforms, zeta potential (ζ) and particle size of the separated caseins were characterized with the use of capillary electrophoresis, zeta potential analysis and field flow fractionation (FFF) technique, respectively. The kinetics of the metal-binding process was investigated in batch adsorption experiments. Intraparticle diffusion model, first-order and zero-order kinetic models were applied to test the kinetic experimental data. Analysis of changes in infrared bands registered for casein before and after zinc binding was also performed. The obtained results showed that the kinetic process of zinc binding to casein is not homogeneous but is expressed with an initial rapid stage with about 70% of zinc ions immobilized by casein and with a much slower second step. Maximum amount of bound zinc in the experimental conditions was 30.04mgZn/g casein.

  9. On the calculation of absolute macromolecular binding free energies

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hengbin; Sharp, Kim

    2002-01-01

    The standard framework for calculating the absolute binding free energy of a macromolecular association reaction A + B → AB with an association constant KAB is to equate chemical potentials of the species on the left- and right-hand sides of this reaction and evaluate the chemical potentials from theory. This theory involves (usually hidden) assumptions about what constitutes the bound species, AB, and where the contribution of the solvent appears. We present here an alternative derivation that can be traced back to Bjerrum, in which the expectation value of KAB is obtained directly through the statistical mechanical method of evaluating its ensemble (Boltzmann-weighted) average. The generalized Bjerrum approach more clearly delineates: (i) the different contributions to binding; (ii) the origin of the much-discussed and somewhat controversial association entropy term; and (iii) where the solvent contribution appears. This approach also allows approximations required for practical evaluation of the binding constant in complex macromolecular systems, to be introduced in a well defined way. We provide an example, with application to test cases that illustrate a range of binding behavior. PMID:12149474

  10. Binding interaction between a queen pheromone component HOB and pheromone binding protein ASP1 of Apis cerana.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chen; Fu, Yuxia; Jiang, Hongtao; Zhuang, Shulin; Li, Hongliang

    2015-01-01

    The honeybee's social behavior is closely related to the critical response to pheromone, while pheromone binding proteins (PBPs) play an important role in binding and transferring those pheromones. Here we report one known PBP, antennal special protein 1(ASP1), which has high affinity with a queen mandibular pheromone component, methyl-p-hydroxybenzoate (HOB). In this study, multiple fluorescent spectra, UV absorption spectra, circular dichroism (CD) spectra and molecular docking analysis were combined to clarify the binding process. Basically, fluorescence intensity of ASP1 could be considerably quenched by HOB with an appropriate interaction distance (3.1 nm), indicating that a complex, which is more stable in lower temperature, was formed. The fact ΔH < 0, ΔS < 0, by thermodynamic analysis, indicated the van der Waals and hydrogen bond as main driving force. Moreover, synchronous fluorescence spectra and CD spectra analysis showed the change of partial hydrophilicity of ASP1 and the increase of α-helix after HOB addition. In conclusion, ASP1 can strongly and spontaneously interact with HOB. But the binding ability decreases with the rise of temperature, which may be necessary for sufficient social stability of hives. This study provides elucidation of the detailed binding mechanism and potential physicochemical basis of thermal stability to the social behavior of honeybee.

  11. Cooperative Ligand Binding to Linear Chain Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applequist, Jon

    1977-01-01

    Summarizes the Ising model of ligand binding as it applies to cooperative binding to long chain molecules. Also presents some illustrations which help to visualize the connection between the interaction parameters and the shape of the binding isotherm. (Author/MR)

  12. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, G.K.

    1997-04-29

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described. 11 figs.

  13. Feature-Based Binding and Phase Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonenko, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Current theories of binding cannot provide a uniform account for many facts associated with the distribution of anaphors, such as long-distance binding effects and the subject-orientation of monomorphemic anaphors. Further, traditional binding theory is incompatible with minimalist assumptions. In this dissertation I propose an analysis of…

  14. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, Gisela K.

    1997-01-01

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described.

  15. Identifying human milk glycans that inhibit norovirus binding using surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jing; Piskarev, Vladimir E; Xia, Ming; Huang, Pengwei; Jiang, Xi; Likhosherstov, Leonid M; Novikova, Olga S; Newburg, David S; Ratner, Daniel M

    2013-12-01

    Human milk glycans inhibit binding between norovirus and its host glycan receptor; such competitive inhibition by human milk glycans is associated with a reduced risk of infection. The relationship between the presence of specific structural motifs in the human milk glycan and its ability to inhibit binding by specific norovirus strains requires facile, accurate and miniaturized-binding assays. Toward this end, a high-throughput biosensor platform was developed based on surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) of glycan microarrays. The SPRi was validated, and its utility was tested, by measuring binding specificities between defined human milk glycan epitopes and the capsids of two common norovirus strains, VA387 and Norwalk. Human milk oligosaccharide (HMOS)-based neoglycoconjugates, including chemically derived neoglycoproteins and oligosaccharide-glycine derivatives, were used to represent polyvalent glycoconjugates and monovalent oligosaccharides, respectively, in human milk. SPRi binding results established that the glycan motifs that bind norovirus capsids depend upon strain; VA387 capsid interacts with two neoglycoproteins, whereas Norwalk capsid binds to a different set of HMOS motifs in the form of both polyvalent neoglycoproteins and monovalent oligosaccharides. SPRi competitive binding assays further demonstrated that specific norovirus-binding glycans are able to inhibit norovirus capsid binding to their host receptors. A polyvalent neoglycoconjugate with clustered carbohydrate moieties is required for the inhibition of VA387 capsid binding to host receptor glycans, whereas both monovalent oligosaccharides and polyvalent neoglycoconjugates are able to inhibit Norwalk capsid binding to its host receptor. Binding of HMOS and HMOS-based neoglycoconjugates to norovirus capsids depends upon the specific strain characteristics, implying that HMOS and their polyvalent derivatives are potential anti-adhesive agents for norovirus prophylaxis.

  16. Identifying human milk glycans that inhibit norovirus binding using surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jing; Piskarev, Vladimir E; Xia, Ming; Huang, Pengwei; Jiang, Xi; Likhosherstov, Leonid M; Novikova, Olga S; Newburg, David S; Ratner, Daniel M

    2013-01-01

    Human milk glycans inhibit binding between norovirus and its host glycan receptor; such competitive inhibition by human milk glycans is associated with a reduced risk of infection. The relationship between the presence of specific structural motifs in the human milk glycan and its ability to inhibit binding by specific norovirus strains requires facile, accurate and miniaturized-binding assays. Toward this end, a high-throughput biosensor platform was developed based on surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) of glycan microarrays. The SPRi was validated, and its utility was tested, by measuring binding specificities between defined human milk glycan epitopes and the capsids of two common norovirus strains, VA387 and Norwalk. Human milk oligosaccharide (HMOS)-based neoglycoconjugates, including chemically derived neoglycoproteins and oligosaccharide-glycine derivatives, were used to represent polyvalent glycoconjugates and monovalent oligosaccharides, respectively, in human milk. SPRi binding results established that the glycan motifs that bind norovirus capsids depend upon strain; VA387 capsid interacts with two neoglycoproteins, whereas Norwalk capsid binds to a different set of HMOS motifs in the form of both polyvalent neoglycoproteins and monovalent oligosaccharides. SPRi competitive binding assays further demonstrated that specific norovirus-binding glycans are able to inhibit norovirus capsid binding to their host receptors. A polyvalent neoglycoconjugate with clustered carbohydrate moieties is required for the inhibition of VA387 capsid binding to host receptor glycans, whereas both monovalent oligosaccharides and polyvalent neoglycoconjugates are able to inhibit Norwalk capsid binding to its host receptor. Binding of HMOS and HMOS-based neoglycoconjugates to norovirus capsids depends upon the specific strain characteristics, implying that HMOS and their polyvalent derivatives are potential anti-adhesive agents for norovirus prophylaxis. PMID:24026239

  17. Nonphysiological binding of ethylene by plants.

    PubMed

    Abeles, F B

    1984-03-01

    Ethylene binding to seedling tissue of Vicia faba, Phaseolus vulgaris, Glycine max, and Triticum aestivum was demonstrated by determining transit time required for ethylene to move through a glass tube filled with seedling tissue. Transit time for ethylene was greater than that for methane indicating that these tissues had an affinity for ethylene. However, the following observations suggest that the binding was not physiological. Inhibitors of ethylene action such as Ag(+) ions and CO(2) did not decrease binding. Mushrooms which have no known sites of ethylene action also demonstrated ethylene binding. The binding of acetylene, propylene, ethylene, propane, and ethane more closely followed their solubility in water than any known physiological activity.

  18. Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul O.; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2010-04-20

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  19. Binding energy and structure of e{sup +}Na

    SciTech Connect

    Shertzer, J.; Ward, S. J.

    2010-06-15

    We calculate the nonadiabatic binding energy and geometry of the weakly bound state of e{sup +}Na. We use the Peach model potential, which includes both the dipole and an effective quadrupole term in the polarization, to describe the interaction of the electron and positron with the ion core. The effective three-body Schroedinger equation is solved with the finite element method. Because the model potential gives rise to three spurious states, the true ground state of e{sup +}Na is embedded in a dense spectrum of spurious states. We develop a method for extracting the correct ground state for e{sup +}Na, even when the energy is nearly degenerate with a spurious level. The calculated value for the binding energy is consistent with other calculations.

  20. Resolving the problem of trapped water in binding cavities: prediction of host-guest binding free energies in the SAMPL5 challenge by funnel metadynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhakat, Soumendranath; Söderhjelm, Pär

    2017-01-01

    The funnel metadynamics method enables rigorous calculation of the potential of mean force along an arbitrary binding path and thereby evaluation of the absolute binding free energy. A problem of such physical paths is that the mechanism characterizing the binding process is not always obvious. In particular, it might involve reorganization of the solvent in the binding site, which is not easily captured with a few geometrically defined collective variables that can be used for biasing. In this paper, we propose and test a simple method to resolve this trapped-water problem by dividing the process into an artificial host-desolvation step and an actual binding step. We show that, under certain circumstances, the contribution from the desolvation step can be calculated without introducing further statistical errors. We apply the method to the problem of predicting host-guest binding free energies in the SAMPL5 blind challenge, using two octa-acid hosts and six guest molecules. For one of the hosts, well-converged results are obtained and the prediction of relative binding free energies is the best among all the SAMPL5 submissions. For the other host, which has a narrower binding pocket, the statistical uncertainties are slightly higher; longer simulations would therefore be needed to obtain conclusive results.