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Sample records for 11p microdeletion including

  1. Microdeletions Including FMR1 in Three Female Patients with Intellectual Disability – Further Delineation of the Phenotype and Expression Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zink, A.M.; Wohlleber, E.; Engels, H.; Rødningen, O.K.; Ravn, K.; Heilmann, S.; Rehnitz, J.; Katzorke, N.; Kraus, C.; Blichfeldt, S.; Hoffmann, P.; Reutter, H.; Brockschmidt, F.F.; Kreiß-Nachtsheim, M.; Vogt, P.H.; Prescott, T.E.; Tümer, Z.; Lee, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is one of the most common causes of intellectual disability/developmental delay (ID/DD), especially in males. It is caused most often by CGG trinucleotide repeat expansions, and less frequently by point mutations and partial or full deletions of the FMR1 gene. The wide clinical spectrum of affected females partly depends on their X-inactivation status. Only few female ID/DD patients with microdeletions including FMR1 have been reported. We describe 3 female patients with 3.5-, 4.2- and 9.2-Mb de novo microdeletions in Xq27.3-q28 containing FMR1. X-inactivation was random in all patients, yet they presented with ID/DD as well as speech delay, macrocephaly and other features attributable to FXS. No signs of autism were present. Here, we further delineate the clinical spectrum of female patients with microdeletions. FMR1 expression studies gave no evidence for an absolute threshold below which signs of FXS present. Since FMR1 expression is known to be highly variable between unrelated females, and since FMR1 mRNA levels have been suggested to be more similar among family members, we further explored the possibility of an intrafamilial effect. Interestingly, FMR1 mRNA levels in all 3 patients were significantly lower than in their respective mothers, which was shown to be specific for patients with microdeletions containing FMR1. PMID:24715853

  2. A familial pericentric inversion of chromosome 11 associated with a microdeletion of 163 kb and microduplication of 288 kb at 11p13 and 11q22.3 without aniridia or eye anomalies.

    PubMed

    Balay, Lara; Totten, Ellen; Okada, Luna; Zell, Sidney; Ticho, Benjamin; Israel, Jeannette; Kogan, Jillene

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial deletions of 11p13 involving MPPED2, DCDC5, DCDC1, DNAJC24, IMMP1L, and ELP4 are previously reported to have downstream transcriptional effects on the expression of PAX6, due to a downstream regulatory region (DRR). Currently, no clear genotype-phenotype correlations have been established allowing for conclusive information regarding the exact location of the PAX6 DRR, though its location has been approximated in mouse models to be within the Elp4 gene. Of the clinical reports currently published examining patients with intact PAX6 genes but harboring deletions identified in genes downstream of PAX6, 100% indicate phenotypes which include aniridia, whereas approximately half report additional eye deformities, autism, or intellectual disability. In this clinical report, we present a 12-year-old male patient, his brother, and mother with pericentric inversions of chromosome 11 associated with submicroscopic interstitial deletions of 11p13 and duplications of 11q22.3. The inversions were identified by standard cytogenetic analysis; microarray and FISH detected the chromosomal imbalance. The patient's phenotype includes intellectual disability, speech abnormalities, and autistic behaviors, but interestingly neither the patient, his brother, nor mother have aniridia or other eye anomalies. To the best of our knowledge, these findings in three family members represent the only reported cases with 11p13 deletions downstream of PAX6 not demonstrating phenotypic characteristics of aniridia or abnormal eye development. Although none of the deleted genes are obvious candidates for the patient's phenotype, the absence of aniridia in the presence of this deletion in all three family members further delineates the location of the DRR for PAX6.

  3. Genetic mapping of the cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) locus on chromosome band 6p21 to include a microdeletion

    SciTech Connect

    Gelb, B.D.; Desnick, R.J.; Shevell, M.

    1995-08-28

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a generalized skeletal dysplasia with autosomal dominant inheritance. Recently, the CCD disease locus was localized to 23 and 17 cM regions of chromosome band 6p21 by linkage studies of seven affected families. Of note, the 23 cM region contained a microdeletion detected in one family at D6S459, an interval that was excluded in the 17 cM overlapping region. Here, linkage of CCD to 6p21 was independently confirmed with a maximal two-point LOD score of Z=5.12 with marker D6S452 at {theta}=0.00. Recombinant events in two affected individuals defined a CCD region of 7 cM from D6S465 to D6S282, which overlapped with the CCD region containing the microdeletion but did not overlap with the 17 cM critical region from D6S282 to D6S291. These results suggest the refined localization of the CCD region to 6 cM spanning markers D6S438 to D6S282, thereby reviving the possibility that the CCD gene lies within the microdeletion at D6S459. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Microdeletion and Microduplication Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Mrasek, Kristin; Klein, Elisabeth; Mulatinho, Milene; Llerena, Juan C.; Hardekopf, David; Pekova, Sona; Bhatt, Samarth; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Liehr, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The widespread use of whole genome analysis based on array comparative genomic hybridization in diagnostics and research has led to a continuously growing number of microdeletion and microduplication syndromes (MMSs) connected to certain phenotypes. These MMSs also include increasing instances in which the critical region can be reciprocally deleted or duplicated. This review catalogues the currently known MMSs and the corresponding critical regions including phenotypic consequences. Besides the pathogenic pathways leading to such rearrangements, the different detection methods and their limitations are discussed. Finally, the databases available for distinguishing between reported benign or pathogenic copy number alterations are highlighted. Overall, a review of MMSs that previously were also denoted “genomic disorders” or “contiguous gene syndromes” is given. PMID:22396478

  5. The Genetics of Microdeletion and Microduplication Syndromes: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Corey T.; Marques-Bonet, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities, including microdeletions and microduplications, have long been associated with abnormal developmental outcomes. Early discoveries relied on a common clinical presentation and the ability to detect chromosomal abnormalities by standard karyotype analysis or specific assays such as fluorescence in situ hybridization. Over the past decade, the development of novel genomic technologies has allowed more comprehensive, unbiased discovery of microdeletions and microduplications throughout the human genome. The ability to quickly interrogate large cohorts using chromosome microarrays and, more recently, next-generation sequencing has led to the rapid discovery of novel microdeletions and microduplications associated with disease, including very rare but clinically significant rearrangements. In addition, the observation that some microdeletions are associated with risk for several neurodevelopmental disorders contributes to our understanding of shared genetic susceptibility for such disorders. Here, we review current knowledge of microdeletion/duplication syndromes, with a particular focus on recurrent rearrangement syndromes. PMID:24773319

  6. A microdeletion encompassing PHF21A in an individual with global developmental delay and craniofacial anomalies.

    PubMed

    Labonne, Jonathan D J; Vogt, Julie; Reali, Lisa; Kong, Il-Keun; Layman, Lawrence C; Kim, Hyung-Goo

    2015-12-01

    In Potocki-Shaffer syndrome (PSS), the full phenotypic spectrum is manifested when deletions are at least 2.1 Mb in size at 11p11.2. The PSS-associated genes EXT2 and ALX4, together with PHF21A, all map to this region flanked by markers D11S1393 and D11S1319. Being proximal to EXT2 and ALX4, a 1.1 Mb region containing 12 annotated genes had been identified by deletion mapping to explain PSS phenotypes except multiple exostoses and parietal foramina. Here, we report a male patient with partial PSS phenotypes including global developmental delay, craniofacial anomalies, minor limb anomalies, and micropenis. Using microarray, qPCR, RT-qPCR, and Western blot analyses, we refined the candidate gene region, which harbors five genes, by excluding two genes, SLC35C1 and CRY2, which resulted in a corroborating role of PHF21A in developmental delay and craniofacial anomalies. This microdeletion contains the least number of genes at 11p11.2 reported to date. Additionally, we also discuss the phenotypes observed in our patient with respect to those of published cases of microdeletions across the Potocki-Shaffer interval.

  7. Novel microdeletion syndromes detected by chromosome microarrays.

    PubMed

    Slavotinek, Anne M

    2008-08-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) has revolutionized the cytogenetic testing available for patients with learning disabilities who have "chromosomal" phenotypes with dysmorphic features and multiple anomalies. Screening large patient cohorts with mental retardation by array CGH has recently lead to the characterization of many novel microdeletion and microduplication syndromes, initially according to the shared cytogenetic aberrations, with secondary characterization of the corresponding phenotypes. This review provides a detailed clinical and molecular cytogenetic description of several of the most common of these aberrations. We have chosen to focus on patients in whom the cytogenetic abnormalities were principally described by array CGH, rather than by G-banded karyotyping or fluorescence in-situ hybridization. The syndromes that we have chosen include the 17q21.31 deletion and 17q21.31 duplication syndromes, 15q13.3 deletion syndrome, 16p11.2 deletion syndrome, 15q24 deletion syndrome, 1q41q42 deletion syndrome, 2p15p16.1 deletion syndrome and 9q22.3 deletion syndrome. In time, we hypothesize that at least some of these will become as clinically well characterized and recognizable to the clinician as the commoner microdeletion syndromes today. Although the full extent of the phenotypes is still evolving for many of these novel microdeletions, it is clear that array CGH has heralded an unparalleled era of discovery for clinical cytogenetics. PMID:18512078

  8. An atypical 12q24.31 microdeletion implicates six genes including a histone demethylase KDM2B and a histone methyltransferase SETD1B in syndromic intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Labonne, Jonathan D J; Lee, Kang-Han; Iwase, Shigeki; Kong, Il-Keun; Diamond, Michael P; Layman, Lawrence C; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Kim, Hyung-Goo

    2016-07-01

    Microdeletion syndromes are frequent causes of neuropsychiatric disorders leading to intellectual disability as well as autistic features accompanied by epilepsy and craniofacial anomalies. From comparative deletion mapping of the smallest microdeletion to date at 12q24.31, found in a patient with overlapping clinical features of 12q24.31 microdeletion syndrome, we narrowed the putative critical region to 445 kb containing seven genes, one microRNA, and one non-coding RNA. Zebrafish in situ hybridization and comprehensive transcript analysis of annotated genes in the panels of human organ and brain suggest that these are all candidates for neurological phenotypes excluding the gene HPD. This is also corroborated by synteny analysis revealing the conservation of the order of these six candidate genes between humans and zebrafish. Among them, we propose histone demethylase KDM2B and histone methyltransferase SETD1B as the two most plausible candidate genes involved in intellectual disability, autism, epilepsy, and craniofacial anomalies. These two chromatin modifiers located approximately 224 kb apart were both commonly deleted in six patients, while two additional patients had either KDM2B or SETD1B deleted. The four additional candidate genes (ORAI1, MORN3, TMEM120B, RHOF), a microRNA MIR548AQ, and a non-coding RNA LINC01089 are localized between KDM2B and SETD1B. The 12q24.31 microdeletion syndrome with syndromic intellectual disability extends the growing list of microdeletion syndromes and underscores the causative roles of chromatin modifiers in cognitive and craniofacial development. PMID:27106595

  9. First report of a de novo 18q11.2 microdeletion including GATA6 associated with complex congenital heart disease and renal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bui, Peter H; Dorrani, Naghmeh; Wong, Derek; Perens, Gregory; Dipple, Katrina M; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola

    2013-07-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 18 have been previously reported in many patients. Most cases involve the more distal regions of the long arm (18q21.1->qter). However, proximal interstitial deletions involving 18q11.2 are extremely rare. Here we report on a 14-month-old female with a 4.7 Mb (19,667,062-24,401,876 hg19) de novo interstitial deletion within chromosomal band 18q11.2, which includes GATA6 and 24 other RefSeq genes. The clinical features of our patient include complex congenital heart defects, a double outlet right ventricle, a subaortic ventricular septal defect, D-malposed great arteries, an atrial septal defect, a dysplastic aortic valve and patent ductus arteriosus. In addition, she had renal anomalies-a duplicated collecting system on the left and mild right hydronephrosis. These heart and renal defects are not reported in other patients with 18q proximal interstitial deletions. Heterozygous point mutations in GATA6, encoding for a zinc finger transcription factor, have been shown to cause congenital heart defects. Given the well-established biological role of GATA6 in cardiac development, a deletion of GATA6 is very likely responsible for our patient's complex congenital heart defects. This is the smallest and most proximal 18q11.2 deletion involving GATA6 that is associated with complex congenital heart disease and renal anomalies.

  10. Interstitial microdeletions including the chromosome band 4q13.2 and the UBA6 gene as possible causes of intellectual disability and behavior disorder.

    PubMed

    Quintela, Ines; Barros, Francisco; Fernandez-Prieto, Montse; Martinez-Regueiro, Rocio; Castro-Gago, Manuel; Carracedo, Angel; Gomez-Lado, Carmen; Eiris, Jesus

    2015-12-01

    The few proximal 4q chromosomal aberrations identified in patients with neurodevelopmental phenotypes that have been published to date are variable in type, size and breakpoints and, therefore, encompass different chromosome bands and genes, making the establishment of genotype-phenotype correlations a challenging task. Here, microarray-based copy number analysis allowed us the detection of two novel and partially overlapping deletions in two unrelated families. In Family 1, a 4q13.1-q13.2 deletion of 3.84 Mb was identified in a mother with mild intellectual disability and in her two children, both with mild intellectual disability and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. In Family 2, a de novo 4q13.2-q13.3 deletion of 6.81 Mb was detected in a female patient, born to unaffected parents, with a diagnosis of mild intellectual disability, behavioral disorder and facial dysmorphism. The shortest region of overlap between these two aberrations is located at chromosome 4q13.2 and includes 17 genes amongst of which we suggest UBA6 (ubiquitin-like modifier-activating enzyme 6) as a strong candidate gene for these phenotypes. PMID:26284580

  11. A cryptic microdeletion including MBD5 occurring within the breakpoint of a reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 2 and 5 in a patient with developmental delay and obesity.

    PubMed

    Shichiji, Minobu; Ito, Yasushi; Shimojima, Keiko; Nakamu, Hidetsugu; Oguni, Hirokazu; Osawa, Makiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2013-04-01

    The 2q23.1 deletion syndrome has been recently recognized as a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with intellectual disability, epilepsy, and autism spectrum disorder. Recently, methyl-CpG-binding domain 5 gene (MBD5), located in the 2q23.1 region, has been considered as a single causative gene of this syndrome. We report on a female patient with a de novo reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 2 and 5. Chromosomal microarray testing revealed a cryptic 896 kb deletion that included MBD5. Although clinical manifestations of this patient are compatible with those of patients with 2q23.1 deletion syndrome, a focal pachygyria revealed by brain magnetic resonance imaging has never been observed in the previously reported cases. Obesity caused by hyperphagia was observed in our patient and 28% of the previously reported patients with the 2q23.1 deletion syndrome. For better medical management, appropriate dietary guidance against hyperphagia should be given to the patients' family.

  12. Proximal microdeletions and microduplications of 1q21.1 contribute to variable abnormal phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Jill A; Traylor, Ryan N; Schaefer, G Bradley; McPherson, Elizabeth W; Ballif, Blake C; Klopocki, Eva; Mundlos, Stefan; Shaffer, Lisa G; Aylsworth, Arthur S

    2012-07-01

    Chromosomal band 1q21.1 can be divided into two distinct regions, proximal and distal, based on segmental duplications that mediate recurrent rearrangements. Microdeletions and microduplications of the distal region within 1q21.1, which are susceptibility factors for a variety of neurodevelopmental phenotypes, have been more extensively studied than proximal microdeletions and microduplications. Proximal microdeletions are known as a susceptibility factor for thrombocytopenia-absent radius (TAR) syndrome, but it is unclear if these proximal microdeletions have other phenotypic consequences. Therefore, to elucidate the clinical significance of rearrangements of the proximal 1q21.1 region, we evaluated the phenotypes in patients identified with 1q21.1 rearrangements after referral for clinical microarray testing. We report clinical information for 55 probands with copy number variations (CNVs) involving proximal 1q21.1: 22 microdeletions and 20 reciprocal microduplications limited to proximal 1q21.1 and 13 microdeletions that include both the proximal and distal regions. Six individuals with proximal microdeletions have TAR syndrome. Three individuals with proximal microdeletions and two individuals with larger microdeletions of proximal and distal 1q21.1 have a 'partial' TAR phenotype. Furthermore, one subject with TAR syndrome has a smaller, atypical deletion, narrowing the critical deletion region for the syndrome. Otherwise, phenotypic features varied among individuals with these microdeletions and microduplications. The recurrent, proximal 1q21.1 microduplications are enriched in our population undergoing genetic testing compared with control populations. Therefore, CNVs in proximal 1q21.1 can be a contributing factor for the development of abnormal phenotypes in some carriers.

  13. Proximal microdeletions and microduplications of 1q21.1 contribute to variable abnormal phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Jill A; Traylor, Ryan N; Schaefer, G Bradley; McPherson, Elizabeth W; Ballif, Blake C; Klopocki, Eva; Mundlos, Stefan; Shaffer, Lisa G; Aylsworth, Arthur S

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal band 1q21.1 can be divided into two distinct regions, proximal and distal, based on segmental duplications that mediate recurrent rearrangements. Microdeletions and microduplications of the distal region within 1q21.1, which are susceptibility factors for a variety of neurodevelopmental phenotypes, have been more extensively studied than proximal microdeletions and microduplications. Proximal microdeletions are known as a susceptibility factor for thrombocytopenia-absent radius (TAR) syndrome, but it is unclear if these proximal microdeletions have other phenotypic consequences. Therefore, to elucidate the clinical significance of rearrangements of the proximal 1q21.1 region, we evaluated the phenotypes in patients identified with 1q21.1 rearrangements after referral for clinical microarray testing. We report clinical information for 55 probands with copy number variations (CNVs) involving proximal 1q21.1: 22 microdeletions and 20 reciprocal microduplications limited to proximal 1q21.1 and 13 microdeletions that include both the proximal and distal regions. Six individuals with proximal microdeletions have TAR syndrome. Three individuals with proximal microdeletions and two individuals with larger microdeletions of proximal and distal 1q21.1 have a ‘partial' TAR phenotype. Furthermore, one subject with TAR syndrome has a smaller, atypical deletion, narrowing the critical deletion region for the syndrome. Otherwise, phenotypic features varied among individuals with these microdeletions and microduplications. The recurrent, proximal 1q21.1 microduplications are enriched in our population undergoing genetic testing compared with control populations. Therefore, CNVs in proximal 1q21.1 can be a contributing factor for the development of abnormal phenotypes in some carriers. PMID:22317977

  14. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is part of the new 15q24 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Van Esch, Hilde; Backx, Liesbeth; Pijkels, Elly; Fryns, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The recurrent microdeletion 15q24 syndrome is rare with only 5 cases reported thus far. Here we describe an additional patient with this deletion, presenting with many features common to this syndrome, including developmental delay, loose connective tissue, digital and genital anomalies and a distinct facial gestalt. Interestingly, in addition, this patient has a large congenital diaphragmatic hernia, as was described in one other patient with a 15q24 microdeletion, indicating that this feature might be part of the syndrome. Chromosome 15q24 has a highly polymorphic architecture that is prone to genomic rearrangements underlying this novel microdeletion syndrome.

  15. Microdeletion 22q11 and oesophageal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Digilio, M. C.; Marino, B.; Bagolan, P.; Giannotti, A.; Dallapiccola, B.

    1999-01-01

    Oesophageal atresia (OA) is a congenital defect associated with additional malformations in 30-70% of the cases. In particular, OA is a component of the VACTERL association. Since some major features of the VACTERL association, including conotruncal heart defect, radial aplasia, and anal atresia, have been found in patients with microdeletion 22q11.2 (del(22q11.2)), we have screened for del(22q11.2) by fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) in 15 syndromic patients with OA. Del(22q11.2) was detected in one of them, presenting with OA, tetralogy of Fallot, anal atresia, neonatal hypocalcaemia, and subtle facial anomalies resembling those of velocardiofacial syndrome. The occurrence of del(22q11.2) in our series of patients with OA is low (1/15), but this chromosomal anomaly should be included among causative factors of malformation complexes with OA. In addition, clinical variability of del(22q11.2) syndrome is further corroborated with inclusion of OA in the list of the findings associated with the deletion.


Keywords: microdeletion 22q11; oesophageal atresia; VACTERL association; velocardiofacial syndrome PMID:10051013

  16. Adult expression of a 3q13.31 microdeletion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The emerging 3q13.31 microdeletion syndrome appears to encompass diverse neurodevelopmental conditions. However, the 3q13.31 deletion is rare and few adult cases have yet been reported. We examined a cohort with schizophrenia (n = 459) and adult control subjects (n = 26,826) using high-resolution microarray technology for deletions and duplications at the 3q13.31 locus. Results We report on the extended adult phenotype associated with a 3q13.31 microdeletion in a 41-year-old male proband with schizophrenia and a nonverbal learning disability. He was noted to have a speech impairment, delayed motor skills, and other features consistent with the 3q13.31 microdeletion syndrome. The 2.06 Mb deletion overlapped two microRNAs and seven RefSeq genes, including GAP43, LSAMP, DRD3, and ZBTB20. No overlapping 3q13.31 deletions or duplications were identified in control subjects. Conclusions Later-onset conditions like schizophrenia are increasingly associated with rare copy number variations and associated genomic disorders like the 3q13.31 microdeletion syndrome. Detailed phenotype information across the lifespan facilitates genotype-phenotype correlations, accurate genetic counselling, and anticipatory care. PMID:24650298

  17. Fifty microdeletions among 112 cases of sotos syndrome: Low copy repeats possibly mediate the common deletion

    SciTech Connect

    Kurotaki, Naohiro; Harada, Naoki; Shimokawa, Osamu; Miyake, Noriko; Kawame, Hiroshi; Uetake, Kimiaki; Makita, Yoshio; Kondoh, Tatsuro; Ogata, Tsutomu; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Nagai, Toshiro; Ozaki, Takao; Touyama, Mayumi; Shenhav, Ruthie; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Medne, Livija; Shiihara, Takashi; Ohtsu, Shigeyuki; Kato, Zen-ichiro; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Nishimoto, Junji; Lev, Dorit; Miyoshi, Yoko; Ishikiriyama, Satoshi; Sonoda, Tohru; Sakazume, Satoru; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Kurosawa, Kenji; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Ohta, Tohru; Kishino, Tatsuya; Niikawa, Norio; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2003-04-15

    Sotos syndrome (SoS) is an autosomal dominant overgrowth syndrome with characteristic craniofacial dysmorphic features and various degrees of mental retardation. We previously showed that haploin sufficiency of the NSD1 gene is the major cause of SoS, and submicroscopic deletions at 5q35, including NSD1, were found in about a half (20/42) of our patients examined. Since the first report, an additional 70 SoS cases consisting of 53 Japanese and 17 non-Japanese have been analyzed. We found 50 microdeletions (45 percent) and 16 point mutations (14 percent) among all the 112 cases. A large difference in the frequency of microdeletions between Japanese and non-Japanese patients was noted: 49 (52 percent) of the 95 Japanese patients and only one (6 percent) of the 17 non-Japanese had microdeletions. A sequence-based physical map was constructed to characterize the microdeletions. Most of the microdeletions were confirmed to be identical by FISH analysis. We identified highly homologous sequences, i.e., possible low copy repeats (LCRs), in regions flanking proximal and distal breakpoints of the common deletion. This suggests that LCRs may mediate the deletion. Such LCRs seem to be present in different populations. Thus the different frequency of microdeletions between Japanese and non-Japanese cases in our study may have been caused by patient-selection bias.

  18. New microdeletion and microduplication syndromes: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Nevado, Julián; Mergener, Rafaella; Palomares-Bralo, María; Souza, Karen Regina; Vallespín, Elena; Mena, Rocío; Martínez-Glez, Víctor; Mori, María Ángeles; Santos, Fernando; García-Miñaur, Sixto; García-Santiago, Fé; Mansilla, Elena; Fernández, Luis; de Torres, María Luisa; Riegel, Mariluce; Lapunzina, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Several new microdeletion and microduplication syndromes are emerging as disorders that have been proven to cause multisystem pathologies frequently associated with intellectual disability (ID), multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) and other phenotypic findings. In this paper, we review the “new” and emergent microdeletion and microduplication syndromes that have been described and recognized in recent years with the aim of summarizing their main characteristics and chromosomal regions involved. We decided to group them by genomic region and within these groupings have classified them into those that include ID, MCA, ASD or other findings. This review does not intend to be exhaustive but is rather a quick guide to help pediatricians, clinical geneticists, cytogeneticists and/or molecular geneticists. PMID:24764755

  19. Genetics Home Reference: 1q21.1 microdeletion

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 region may also be risk factors for schizophrenia. Some people with a 1q21.1 microdeletion do ... D, Stefansson K. Large recurrent microdeletions associated with schizophrenia. Nature. 2008 Sep 11;455(7210):232-6. ...

  20. A new familial case of microdeletion syndrome 10p15.3.

    PubMed

    Eggert, Marlene; Müller, Stefan; Heinrich, Uwe; Mehraein, Yasmin

    2016-04-01

    In 2012 a small terminal deletion in the short arm of chromosome 10 in the region 10p15.3 was reported as a novel microdeletion syndrome. By now 21 patients, including a single familial case, have been reported. Characteristic findings comprise variable cognitive impairment or developmental delay, disorder of speech development, as well as various dysmorphic signs. We here report on a new patient, an eight year old girl, with a microdeletion syndrome 10p15.3. She is a foster child showing intellectual deficits, disorder of speech development, behavioral problems, congenital heart defect, and several dysmorphic signs. The same microdeletion was subsequently found in the six year old maternal half-sister, showing very similar developmental and cognitive issues, including major speech impairment. The mother has not obtained a school degree. She was described as being a dissocial person with severe alcohol abuse and showing minor cognitive disability. Thus inheritance of the microdeletion from a probably symptomatic mother can be assumed. The patients presented here add up to the as yet small number of reported cases of microdeletion 10p15.3 and thereby might help to establish a more comprehensive clinical spectrum of this rather newly discovered syndrome. PMID:26921531

  1. Genetics Home Reference: 9q22.3 microdeletion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions 9q22.3 microdeletion 9q22.3 microdeletion Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description 9q22.3 microdeletion is a chromosomal change in which a ...

  2. Assessment of Cognitive Outcome Measures in Teenagers with 15q13.3 Microdeletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crutcher, Emeline; Ali, May; Harrison, John; Sovago, Judit; Gomez-Mancilla, Baltazar; Schaaf, Christian P

    2016-04-01

    15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome causes a spectrum of cognitive disorders, including intellectual disability and autism. We aimed to determine if any or all of three cognitive testing systems (the KiTAP, CogState, and Stanford-Binet) are suitable for assessment of cognitive function in affected individuals. These three tests were administered to ten individuals with 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome (14-18 years of age), and the results were analyzed to determine feasibility of use, potential for improvement, and internal consistency. It was determined that the KiTAP, CogState, and Stanford-Binet are valid tests of cognitive function in 15q13.3 microdeletion patients. Therefore, these tests may be considered for use as objective outcome measures in future clinical trials, assessing change in cognitive function over a period of pharmacological treatment.

  3. TCF12 microdeletion in a 72-year-old woman with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Piard, Juliette; Rozé, Virginie; Czorny, Alain; Lenoir, Marion; Valduga, Mylène; Fenwick, Aimée L; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Maldergem, Lionel Van

    2015-08-01

    Heterozygous mutations in TCF12 were recently identified as an important cause of craniosynostosis. In the original series, 14% of patients with a mutation in TCF12 had significant developmental delay or learning disability. We report on the first case of TCF12 microdeletion, detected by array-comparative genomic hybridization, in a 72-year-old patient presenting with intellectual deficiency and dysmorphism. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis indicated that exon 19, encoding the functionally important basic helix-loop-helix domain, was included in the deleted segment in addition to exon 20. We postulate that the TCF12 microdeletion is responsible for this patient's intellectual deficiency and facial phenotype.

  4. Assessment of Cognitive Outcome Measures in Teenagers with 15q13.3 Microdeletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crutcher, Emeline; Ali, May; Harrison, John; Sovago, Judit; Gomez-Mancilla, Baltazar; Schaaf, Christian P.

    2016-01-01

    15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome causes a spectrum of cognitive disorders, including intellectual disability and autism. We aimed to determine if any or all of three cognitive testing systems (the KiTAP, CogState, and Stanford-Binet) are suitable for assessment of cognitive function in affected individuals. These three tests were administered to ten…

  5. Microdeletion and Microduplication Analysis of Chinese Conotruncal Defects Patients with Targeted Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaojing; Wu, Dandan; Zhang, Ting; He, Li; Qin, Shengying; Li, Xiaotian

    2013-01-01

    Objective The current study aimed to develop a reliable targeted array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to detect microdeletions and microduplications in congenital conotruncal defects (CTDs), especially on 22q11.2 region, and for some other chromosomal aberrations, such as 5p15-5p, 7q11.23 and 4p16.3. Methods Twenty-seven patients with CTDs, including 12 pulmonary atresia (PA), 10 double-outlet right ventricle (DORV), 3 transposition of great arteries (TGA), 1 tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) and one ventricular septal defect (VSD), were enrolled in this study and screened for pathogenic copy number variations (CNVs), using Agilent 8 x 15K targeted aCGH. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to test the molecular results of targeted aCGH. Results Four of 27 patients (14.8%) had 22q11.2 CNVs, 1 microdeletion and 3 microduplications. qPCR test confirmed the microdeletion and microduplication detected by the targeted aCGH. Conclusion Chromosomal abnormalities were a well-known cause of multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). This aCGH using arrays with high-density coverage in the targeted regions can detect genomic imbalances including 22q11.2 and other 10 kinds CNVs effectively and quickly. This approach has the potential to be applied to detect aneuploidy and common microdeletion/microduplication syndromes on a single microarray. PMID:24098474

  6. Genetic mechanisms of tumor-specific loss of 11p DNA sequences in Wilms tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Dao, D D; Schroeder, W T; Chao, L Y; Kikuchi, H; Strong, L C; Riccardi, V M; Pathak, S; Nichols, W W; Lewis, W H; Saunders, G F

    1987-01-01

    Wilms tumor, a common childhood renal tumor, occurs in both a heritable and a nonheritable form. The heritable form may occasionally be attributed to a chromosome deletion at 11p13, and tumors from patients with normal constitutional chromosomes often show deletion or rearrangement of 11p13. It has been suggested that a germinal or somatic mutation may occur on one chromosome 11 and predispose to Wilms tumor and that a subsequent somatic genetic event on the normal homologue at 11p13 may permit tumor development. To study the frequency and mechanism of such tumor-specific genetic events, we have examined the karyotype and chromosome 11 genotype of normal and tumor tissues from 13 childhood renal tumor patients with different histologic tumor types and associated clinical conditions. Tumors of eight of the 12 Wilms tumor patients, including all viable tumors examined directly, show molecular evidence of loss of 11p DNA sequences by somatic recombination (four cases), chromosome loss (two cases), and recombination (two cases) or chromosome loss and duplication. One malignant rhabdoid tumor in a patient heterozygous for multiple 11p markers did not show any tumor-specific 11p alteration. These findings confirm the critical role of 11p sequences in Wilms tumor development and reveal that mitotic recombination may be the most frequent mechanism by which tumors develop. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:3039839

  7. Diagnosis of 9q22.3 microdeletion syndrome in utero following identification of craniosynostosis, overgrowth, and skeletal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Sara Chadwick; Zelley, Kristin; Nichols, Kim E; Eberhard, Moriah; Zackai, Elaine H; Martinez-Poyer, Juan

    2015-04-01

    9q22.3 microdeletion syndrome is a well-described contiguous deletion syndrome with features of Gorlin syndrome and other manifestations. Commonly reported findings in addition to those of Gorlin syndrome include metopic craniosynostosis, hydrocephalus, intellectual disability, and minor facial anomalies. The critical region for this condition was found to include the PTCH1 and FANCC genes; however, other genes are often deleted in affected individuals but their role in the observed phenotype is not understood. Fewer than 50 individuals with 9q22.3 microdeletion have been reported, all diagnosed postnatally on the basis of the phenotype. A confirmed prenatal diagnosis and accompanying fetal imaging has not been reported to date. We describe a patient with prenatally diagnosed 9q22.3 microdeletion syndrome following the ultrasonographic identification of trigonocephaly, macrosomia, organomegaly, ventriculomegaly, and anomalous vertebrae. PMID:25706929

  8. Prevalence of Y chromosome microdeletions in infertile Tunisian men.

    PubMed

    Hammami, Wajih; Kilani, Olfa; Ben Khelifa, Mariem; Ayed, Wiem; Abdelhak, Sonia; Bouzouita, Abderrezzak; Zhioua, Fethi; Amouri, Ahlem

    2014-01-01

    Yq microdeletions are the leading genetic cause of male infertility and its detection in clinically relevant for appropriate genetic counseling. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of Y microdeletion in a group of Tunisian infertile men and to compare the prevalence of these abnormalities with other countries and other Tunisian reported series. Totally, 105 Tunisian idiopathic infertile men (74 azoospermic and 31 severe oligozoospermic) were screened for the presence of Y chromosome microdeletions. The screening of Yq microdeletions was performed by two multiplex PCRs using six STS markers recommended by the EAA/EMQN. No microdeletions were detected in the men with severe oligozoospermia. In the azoospermic group, 2/74 (2.7%) patients showed Y chromosome microdeletions. Both had complete deletion of the AZFc region. No microdeletion was identified in the AZFa region or in the AZFb region. The estimated frequency of Y chromosome microdeletions in the present survey was similar to some other reports but lower than that of previous reports in Tunisian populations.

  9. Diagnostics of common microdeletion syndromes using fluorescence in situ hybridization: Single center experience in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Kurtovic-Kozaric, Amina; Mehinovic, Lejla; Stomornjak-Vukadin, Meliha; Kurtovic-Basic, Ilvana; Catibusic, Feriha; Kozaric, Mirza; Dinarevic, Senka Mesihovic; Hasanhodzic, Mensuda; Sumanovic-Glamuzina, Darinka

    2016-01-01

    Microdeletion syndromes are caused by chromosomal deletions of less than 5 megabases which can be detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We evaluated the most commonly detected microdeletions for the period from June 01, 2008 to June 01, 2015 in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, including DiGeorge, Prader-Willi/Angelman, Wolf-Hirschhorn, and Williams syndromes. We report 4 patients with DiGeorge syndromes, 4 patients with Prader-Willi/Angelman, 4 patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, and 3 patients with Williams syndrome in the analyzed 7 year period. Based on the positive FISH results for each syndrome, the incidence was calculated for the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. These are the first reported frequencies of the microdeletion syndromes in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. PMID:26937776

  10. Diagnostics of common microdeletion syndromes using fluorescence in situ hybridization: single center experience in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Kurtovic-Kozaric, Amina; Mehinovic, Lejla; Stomornjak-Vukadin, Meliha; Kurtovic-Basic, Ilvana; Catibusic, Feriha; Kozaric, Mirza; Mesihovic-Dinarevic, Senka; Hasanhodzic, Mensuda; Glamuzina, Darinka

    2016-01-01

    Microdeletion syndromes are caused by chromosomal deletions of less than 5 megabases which can be detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We evaluated the most commonly detected microdeletions for the period from June 01, 2008 to June 01, 2015 in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, including DiGeorge, Prader-Willi/Angelman, Wolf-Hirschhorn, and Williams syndromes. We report 4 patients with DiGeorge syndromes, 4 patients with Prader-Willi/Angelman, 4 patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, and 3 patients with Williams syndrome in the analyzed 7 year period. Based on the positive FISH results for each syndrome, the incidence was calculated for the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. These are the first reported frequencies of the microdeletion syndromes in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. PMID:26937776

  11. Characterization of core clinical phenotypes associated with recurrent proximal 15q25.2 microdeletions.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Trent; Brown, Natasha J; Stark, Zornitza; Bruno, Damien L; Oertel, Ralph; Chong, Belinda; Calabro, Vanessa; Kornberg, Andrew; Sanderson, Christine; Kelly, Julian; Howell, Katherine B; Savarirayan, Ravi; Hinds, Rupert; Greenway, Anthea; Slater, Howard R; White, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    A recurrent proximal microdeletion at 15q25.2 with an approximate 1.5 megabase smallest region of overlap has recently been reported in seven patients and is proposed to be associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), mild to moderate cognitive deficit, and/or features consistent with Diamond-Blackfan anemia. We report on four further patients and define the core phenotypic features of individuals with this microdeletion to include mild to moderate developmental delay or intellectual disability, postnatal short stature, anemia, and cryptorchidism in males. CDH and structural organ malformations appear to be less frequent associations, as is venous thrombosis. There is no consistent facial dysmorphism. Features novel to our patient group include dextrocardia, obstructive sleep apnea, and cleft lip.

  12. Clinical phenotype and candidate genes for the 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hosoki, Kana; Ohta, Tohru; Natsume, Jun; Imai, Sumiko; Okumura, Akihisa; Matsui, Takeshi; Harada, Naoki; Bacino, Carlos A; Scaglia, Fernando; Jones, Jeremy Y; Niikawa, Norio; Saitoh, Shinji

    2012-08-01

    Array-based technologies have led to the identification of many novel microdeletion and microduplication syndromes demonstrating multiple congenital anomalies and intellectual disability (MCA/ID). We have used chromosomal microarray analysis for the evaluation of patients with MCA/ID and/or neonatal hypotonia. Three overlapping de novo microdeletions at 5q31.3 with the shortest region of overlap (SRO) of 370 kb were detected in three unrelated patients. These patients showed similar clinical features including severe neonatal hypotonia, neonatal feeding difficulties, respiratory distress, characteristic facial features, and severe developmental delay. These features are consistent with the 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome originally proposed by Shimojima et al., providing further evidence that this syndrome is clinically discernible. The 370 kb SRO encompasses only four RefSeq genes including neuregulin 2 (NRG2) and purine-rich element binding protein A (PURA). NRG2 is one of the members of the neuregulin family related to neuronal and glial cell growth and differentiation, thus making NRG2 a good candidate for the observed phenotype. Moreover, PURA is also a good candidate because Pura-deficient mice demonstrate postnatal neurological manifestations.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: 15q13.3 microdeletion

    MedlinePlus

    ... with an increased risk of psychiatric disorders, particularly schizophrenia. Other signs and symptoms of 15q13.3 microdeletion ... more common in people with intellectual disability, epilepsy, schizophrenia, or autism spectrum disorders. Related Information What information ...

  14. Small Deletions of SATB2 Cause Some of the Clinical Features of the 2q33.1 Microdeletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Ballif, Blake C.; Lucas, Ann; Spence, Edward J.; Powell, Cynthia; Aylsworth, Arthur S.; Torchia, Beth A.; Shaffer, Lisa G.

    2009-01-01

    Recurrent deletions of 2q32q33 have recently been reported as a new microdeletion syndrome. Clinical features of this syndrome include severe mental retardation, growth retardation, dysmorphic features, thin and sparse hair, feeding difficulties and cleft or high palate. The commonly deleted region contains at least seven genes. Haploinsufficiency of one of these genes, SATB2, a DNA-binding protein that regulates gene expression, has been implicated as causative in the cleft or high palate of individuals with 2q32q33 microdeletion syndrome. In this study we describe three individuals with smaller microdeletions of this region, within 2q33.1. The deletions ranged in size from 173.1 kb to 185.2 kb and spanned part of SATB2. Review of clinical records showed similar clinical features among these individuals, including severe developmental delay and tooth abnormalities. Two of the individuals had behavioral problems. Only one of the subjects presented here had a cleft palate, suggesting reduced penetrance for this feature. Our results suggest that deletion of SATB2 is responsible for several of the clinical features associated with 2q32q33 microdeletion syndrome. PMID:19668335

  15. Chromosome 22q11.2 microdeletion in monozygotic twins with discordant phenotype and deletion size.

    PubMed

    Halder, Ashutosh; Jain, Manish; Chaudhary, Isha; Varma, Binuja

    2012-01-01

    We report on a pair of male monozygotic twins with 22q11.2 microdeletion, discordant phenotype and discordant deletion size. The second twin had findings suggestive of DiGeorge syndrome, while the first twin had milder anomalies without any cardiac malformation. The second twin had presented with intractable convulsion, cyanosis and cardiovascular failure in the fourth week of life and expired on the sixth week of life, whereas the first twin had some characteristic facial appearance with developmental delay but no other signs of the 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome including cardiovascular malformation. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis had shown a microdeletion on the chromosome 22q11.2 in both twins. The interphase FISH did not find any evidence for the mosaicism. The genomic DNA microarray analysis, using HumanCytoSNP-12 BeadChip (Illumina), was identical between the twins except different size of deletion of 22q11.2. The zygosity using HumanCytoSNP-12 BeadChip (Illumina) microarray analysis suggested monozygosity. This observation indicates that altered size of the deletion may be the underlying etiology for the discordance in phenotype in monozygotic twins. We think early post zygotic events (mitotic non-allelic homologous recombination) could have been played a role in the alteration of 22q11.2 deletion size and, thus phenotypic variability in the monozygotic twins. PMID:22413934

  16. The MEF2C-Related and 5q14.3q15 Microdeletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zweier, M.; Rauch, A.

    2012-01-01

    Disorders related to the autosomal transcription factor MEF2C located in 5q14.3 were first described in 2009 and have since evolved to one of the more common microdeletion syndromes. Mutational screening in a larger cohort revealed heterozygous de novo mutations of MEF2C in about 1% of patients with moderate to severe intellectual disability, and the phenotype is similar in patients with intragenic deletions and multigenic microdeletions. Clinically, MEF2C-related disorders are characterized by severe intellectual disability with absent speech and limited walking abilities, hypotonia, seizures, and a variety of minor brain anomalies. The majority of patients show a similar facial gestalt with broad forehead, flat nasal bridge, hypotonic mouth, and small chin, as well as strabismus, but this phenotype is clinically not well recognized. The course of the disease is generally quite uniform, but patients with point mutations and smaller deletions seem to have a higher chance of walking skills and a lower risk of refractory seizures. Patients in whom the microdeletion also includes the RASA1 gene show features of the respective capillary and arterio-venous malformations and fistula syndrome. The phenotypic overlap with Rett syndrome is explained by a shared pathway and, accordingly, diminished MECP2 and CDKL5 expression is measureable in patients with MEF2C defects. Further research of this pathway may therefore eventually lead to a common therapeutic target. PMID:22670137

  17. Non-coding RNA ANRIL and the number of plexiform neurofibromas in patients with NF1 microdeletions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Neurofibromatosis type-1 (NF1) is caused by mutations of the NF1 gene at 17q11.2. In 95% of non-founder NF1 patients, NF1 mutations are identifiable by means of a comprehensive mutation analysis. 5-10% of these patients harbour microdeletions encompassing the NF1 gene and its flanking regions. NF1 is characterised by tumours of the peripheral nerve sheaths, the pathognomonic neurofibromas. Considerable inter- and intra-familial variation in expressivity of the disease has been observed which is influenced by genetic modifiers unrelated to the constitutional NF1 mutation. The number of plexiform neurofibromas (PNF) in NF1 patients is a highly heritable genetic trait. Recently, SNP rs2151280 located within the non-coding RNA gene ANRIL at 9p21.3, was identified as being strongly associated with PNF number in a family-based association study. The T-allele of rs2151280, which correlates with reduced ANRIL expression, appears to be associated with higher PNF number. ANRIL directly binds to the SUZ12 protein, an essential component of polycomb repressive complex 2, and is required for SUZ12 occupancy of the CDKN2A/CDKN2B tumour suppressor genes as well as for their epigenetic silencing. Methods Here, we explored a potential association of PNF number and PNF volume with SNP rs2151280 in 29 patients with constitutional NF1 microdeletions using the exact Cochran-Armitage test for trends and the exact Mann–Whitney–Wilcoxon test. Both the PNF number and total tumour volume in these 29 NF1 patients were assessed by whole-body MRI. The NF1 microdeletions observed in these 29 patients encompassed the NF1 gene as well as its flanking regions, including the SUZ12 gene. Results In the 29 microdeletion patients investigated, neither the PNF number nor PNF volume was found to be associated with the T-allele of rs2151280. Conclusion Our findings imply that, at least in patients with NF1 microdeletions, PNF susceptibility is not associated with rs2151280. Although

  18. Complex Phenotype Associated with 17q21.31 Microdeletion

    PubMed Central

    Dornelles-Wawruk, H.; Pic-Taylor, A.; Rosenberg, C.; Krepischi, A.C.V.; Safatle, H.P.N.; Ferrari, I.; Mazzeu, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a patient carrying a 17q21.31 microdeletion and exhibiting many common syndrome features, together with other clinical signs which have rarely or never been described to date. The detected 695-kb 17q21.31 deletion is larger than in most previously reported cases but is still probably the result of recombination between flanking low-copy repeats. Due to the complexity of the patient's clinical condition, together with the presence of 3 previously unreported symptoms, namely chronic anemia, cervical vertebrae arthrosis and vertebrae fusion, this case is an important addition to the existing knowledge about the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome. PMID:24167466

  19. 6q22.33 microdeletion in a family with intellectual disability, variable major anomalies, and behavioral abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Mackenroth, Luisa; Hackmann, Karl; Beyer, Anke; Schallner, Jens; Novotna, Barbara; Klink, Barbara; Schröck, Evelin; Di Donato, Nataliya

    2015-11-01

    Interstitial deletions on the long arm of chromosome six have been described for several regions including 6q16, 6q22.1, and 6q21q22.1, and with variable phenotypes such as intellectual disability/developmental delay, growth retardation, major and minor facial anomalies. However, an isolated microdeletion of the sub-band 6q22.33 has not been reported so far and thus, no information about the specific phenotype associated with such a copy number variant is available. Here, we define the clinical picture of an isolated 6q22.33 microdeletion based on the phenotype of six members of one family with loss of approximately 1 Mb in this region. Main clinical features include mild intellectual disability and behavioral abnormalities as well as microcephaly, heart defect, and cleft lip and palate.

  20. 2q23.1 microdeletion identified by array comparative genomic hybridisation: an emerging phenotype with Angelman-like features?

    PubMed Central

    Jaillard, Sylvie; Dubourg, Christèle; Gérard-Blanluet, Marion; Delahaye, Andrée; Pasquier, Laurent; Dupont, Céline; Henry, Catherine; Tabet, Anne-Claude; Lucas, Josette; Aboura, Azzedine; David, Véronique; Benzacken, Brigitte; Odent, Sylvie; Pipiras, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Background Genome-wide screening of patients with mental retardation using Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (array-CGH) has identified several novel imbalances. With this genotype-first approach, the 2q22.3q23.3 deletion was recently described as a novel microdeletion syndrome. We report two unrelated patients with a de novo interstitial deletion mapping in this genomic region and presenting similar “pseudo-Angelman” phenotypes, including severe psychomotor retardation, speech impairment, epilepsy, microcephaly, ataxia and behavioural disabilities. Methods The microdeletions were identified by array-CGH using oligonucleotide and BAC-arrays, and further confirmed by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) and semi-quantitative PCR. Results The boundaries and sizes of the deletions in the two patients were different but an overlapping region of about 250 kb was defined, which mapped to 2q23.1 and included two genes: MBD5 and EPC2. The SIP1 gene associated with the Mowat Wilson syndrome was not included in the deleted genomic region. Discussion Haploinsufficiency of one of the deleted genes (MBD5 or EPC2) could be responsible for the common clinical features observed in the 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome and this hypothesis needs further investigation. PMID:18812405

  1. Severe Cleidocranial dysplasia and Hypophosphatasia in a child with microdeletion of the C-terminal region of RUNX2

    PubMed Central

    El-Gharbawy, Areeg H.; Peeden, Joseph N.; Lachman, Ralph S.; Graham, John M.; Moore, Stephen R.; Rimoin, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a rare autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasia due to mutations causing haploinsufficiency of RUNX2, an osteoblast transcription factor specific for bone and cartilage. The classic form of CCD is characterized by delayed closure of the fontanels, hypoplastic or aplastic clavicles and dental anomalies. Clinical reports suggest that a subset of patients with CCD have skeletal changes which mimic hypophosphatasia. Mutations in RUNX2 are detected in approximately 65% of cases of CCD, and microdeletions occur in 13%. We present clinical and radiological features in a 6-year-old child with severe CCD manifested by absence of the clavicles marked calvarial hypomineralization, osteoporosis and progressive kyphoscoliosis. Hypophosphatasia features included Bowdler spurs, severe osteopenia and low alkaline phosphatase. Following negative mutation analysis of RUNX2, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarray was performed. The result revealed a microdeletion in RUNX2, disrupting the C-terminal part of the gene. PMID:20014132

  2. 3q29 Microdeletion Syndrome: Clinical and Molecular Characterization of a New Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Willatt, Lionel ; Cox, James ; Barber, John ; Cabanas, Elisabet Dachs ; Collins, Amanda ; Donnai, Dian ; FitzPatrick, David R. ; Maher, Eddy ; Martin, Howard ; Parnau, Josep ; Pindar, Lesley ; Ramsay, Jacqueline ; Shaw-Smith, Charles ; Sistermans, Erik A. ; Tettenborn, Michael ; Trump, Dorothy ; de Vries, Bert B. A. ; Walker, Kate ; Raymond, F. Lucy 

    2005-01-01

    We report the identification of six patients with 3q29 microdeletion syndrome. The clinical phenotype is variable despite an almost identical deletion size. The phenotype includes mild-to-moderate mental retardation, with only slightly dysmorphic facial features that are similar in most patients: a long and narrow face, short philtrum, and high nasal bridge. Autism, gait ataxia, chest-wall deformity, and long and tapering fingers were noted in at least two of six patients. Additional features—including microcephaly, cleft lip and palate, horseshoe kidney and hypospadias, ligamentous laxity, recurrent middle ear infections, and abnormal pigmentation—were observed, but each feature was only found once, in a single patient. The microdeletion is ∼1.5 Mb in length, with molecular boundaries mapping within the same or adjacent bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones at either end of the deletion in all patients. The deletion encompasses 22 genes, including PAK2 and DLG1, which are autosomal homologues of two known X-linked mental retardation genes, PAK3 and DLG3. The presence of two nearly identical low-copy repeat sequences in BAC clones on each side of the deletion breakpoint suggests that nonallelic homologous recombination is the likely mechanism of disease causation in this syndrome. PMID:15918153

  3. 3q29 microdeletion syndrome: clinical and molecular characterization of a new syndrome.

    PubMed

    Willatt, Lionel; Cox, James; Barber, John; Cabanas, Elisabet Dachs; Collins, Amanda; Donnai, Dian; FitzPatrick, David R; Maher, Eddy; Martin, Howard; Parnau, Josep; Pindar, Lesley; Ramsay, Jacqueline; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Sistermans, Erik A; Tettenborn, Michael; Trump, Dorothy; de Vries, Bert B A; Walker, Kate; Raymond, F Lucy

    2005-07-01

    We report the identification of six patients with 3q29 microdeletion syndrome. The clinical phenotype is variable despite an almost identical deletion size. The phenotype includes mild-to-moderate mental retardation, with only slightly dysmorphic facial features that are similar in most patients: a long and narrow face, short philtrum, and high nasal bridge. Autism, gait ataxia, chest-wall deformity, and long and tapering fingers were noted in at least two of six patients. Additional features--including microcephaly, cleft lip and palate, horseshoe kidney and hypospadias, ligamentous laxity, recurrent middle ear infections, and abnormal pigmentation--were observed, but each feature was only found once, in a single patient. The microdeletion is approximately 1.5 Mb in length, with molecular boundaries mapping within the same or adjacent bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones at either end of the deletion in all patients. The deletion encompasses 22 genes, including PAK2 and DLG1, which are autosomal homologues of two known X-linked mental retardation genes, PAK3 and DLG3. The presence of two nearly identical low-copy repeat sequences in BAC clones on each side of the deletion breakpoint suggests that nonallelic homologous recombination is the likely mechanism of disease causation in this syndrome.

  4. Delineation of the clinically recognizable 17q22 contiguous gene deletion syndrome in a patient carrying the smallest microdeletion known to date.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Fernández, María Luisa; Fernández-Toral, Joaquin; Llano-Rivas, Isabel; Bermejo-Sánchez, Eva; MacDonald, Alexandra; Martínez-Frías, María Luisa

    2015-09-01

    We describe a patient with a 1.34 Mb microdeletion at chromosome band 17q22, which is also present in his affected mother. To better delineate this microdeletion syndrome, we compare the clinical and molecular characteristics of 10 previously reported cases and our patient. Of these, the present patient has the smallest deletion which includes five genes: MMD, TMEM100, PCTP, ANKFN1, and NOG. We compare the clinical manifestations described in relation to NOG, since this is the only gene whose loss is shared by our patient and the other eight patients. Previously, the clinical patterns associated with NOG mutations have been included under the general term "NOG-related symphalangism spectrum disorder (NOG-SSD)." Based on our analyses, and considering that there is a clinical correlation observed in cases with a "17q22 microdeletion including NOG" of which the main characteristics can be contributed to loss of this gene, we propose that the clinical patterns observed in these patients should be named as NOG-spectrum disorder-contiguous gene syndrome (NOGSD-CGS). This designation is important for clinicians because when a patient has defects concordant with alterations of NOG but also presents other anomalies not related to this gene, they would be able to suspect the existence of a microdeletion affecting 17q22, therefore, allowing an early diagnosis. This will also enable the clinician to provide the family with adequate information about the prognosis and the risk of reoccurrence in future potential offspring.

  5. 11p15-subband specific search for transcribed sequences using exon trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Loebbert, R.; Prawitt, D.; Monroe, D.

    1994-09-01

    Evidence from cytogenetic and molecular data suggest that the region 11p15 contains genes involved in different disorders, like Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), long QT syndrome (LQT), Usher syndrome type I and tumor development. Focusing on the subregion 11p15.1, we are isolating and characterizing new transcribed sequences. The applied strategy includes exon amplification and subsequent PCR screening of cDNA libraries. So far 100 YACs and 38 cosmid clones from 11p15.1-15.3 have been collected and are currently arrayed. 16 cosmids have been analyzed for transcribed sequences using the exon amplification scheme developed by Buckler et al. (1991). We were able to identify 18 exons that contain correct open reading frames and map back to the cosmid clones. A data base search revealed that two exons represent parts of known genes from this region (ST5 and AMPD3). Moreover, we identified one exon that represents an EGF-like repeat with homologies to various proteins. Using PCR and primers from the exon sequences, a fetal brain library, which has been arranged in the form of hierarchic arrayed phage pools, was screened. Up to now, two cDNA clones corresponding to different exons were isolated and are currently sequenced.

  6. Molecular Basis for Strain Variation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Adhesin Flo11p

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Lipke, Peter N.; Dranginis, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT FLO11 encodes a yeast cell wall flocculin that mediates a variety of adhesive phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Flo11p is implicated in many developmental processes, including flocculation, formation of pseudohyphae, agar invasion, and formation of microbial mats and biofilms. However, Flo11p mediates different processes in different yeast strains. To investigate the mechanisms by which FLO11 determines these differences in colony morphology, flocculation, and invasion, we studied gene structure, function, and expression levels. Nonflocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae Σ1278b cells exhibited significantly higher FLO11 mRNA expression, especially in the stationary phase, than highly flocculent S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus. The two strains varied in cell surface hydrophobicity, and Flo11p contributed significantly to surface hydrophobicity in S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus but not in strain Σ1278b. Sequencing of the FLO11 gene in S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus revealed strain-specific differences, including a 15-amino-acid insertion in the adhesion domain. Flo11p adhesion domains from strain Σ1278b and S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus were expressed and used to coat magnetic beads. The adhesion domain from each strain bound preferentially to homologous cells, and the preferences were independent of the cells in which the adhesion domains were produced. These results are consistent with the idea that strain-specific variations in the amino acid sequences in the adhesion domains cause different Flo11p flocculation activities. The results also imply that strain-specific differences in expression levels, posttranslational modifications, and allelic differences outside the adhesion domains have little effect on flocculation. IMPORTANCE As a nonmotile organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae employs the cell surface flocculin Flo11/Muc1 as an important means of adapting to environmental change. However, there is a great deal of strain variation in the

  7. Molecular Basis for Strain Variation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Adhesin Flo11p.

    PubMed

    Barua, Subit; Li, Li; Lipke, Peter N; Dranginis, Anne M

    2016-01-01

    FLO11 encodes a yeast cell wall flocculin that mediates a variety of adhesive phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Flo11p is implicated in many developmental processes, including flocculation, formation of pseudohyphae, agar invasion, and formation of microbial mats and biofilms. However, Flo11p mediates different processes in different yeast strains. To investigate the mechanisms by which FLO11 determines these differences in colony morphology, flocculation, and invasion, we studied gene structure, function, and expression levels. Nonflocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae Σ1278b cells exhibited significantly higher FLO11 mRNA expression, especially in the stationary phase, than highly flocculent S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus. The two strains varied in cell surface hydrophobicity, and Flo11p contributed significantly to surface hydrophobicity in S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus but not in strain Σ1278b. Sequencing of the FLO11 gene in S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus revealed strain-specific differences, including a 15-amino-acid insertion in the adhesion domain. Flo11p adhesion domains from strain Σ1278b and S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus were expressed and used to coat magnetic beads. The adhesion domain from each strain bound preferentially to homologous cells, and the preferences were independent of the cells in which the adhesion domains were produced. These results are consistent with the idea that strain-specific variations in the amino acid sequences in the adhesion domains cause different Flo11p flocculation activities. The results also imply that strain-specific differences in expression levels, posttranslational modifications, and allelic differences outside the adhesion domains have little effect on flocculation. IMPORTANCE As a nonmotile organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae employs the cell surface flocculin Flo11/Muc1 as an important means of adapting to environmental change. However, there is a great deal of strain variation in the expression of

  8. A novel microdeletion syndrome involving 5q14.3-q15: clinical and molecular cytogenetic characterization of three patients

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Hartmut; Wohlleber, Eva; Zink, Alexander; Hoyer, Juliane; Ludwig, Kerstin U; Brockschmidt, Felix F; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Moog, Ute; Hellmann-Mersch, Birgit; Weber, Ruthild G; Willatt, Lionel; Kreiß-Nachtsheim, Martina; Firth, Helen V; Rauch, Anita

    2009-01-01

    Molecular karyotyping is being increasingly applied to delineate novel disease causing microaberrations and related syndromes in patients with mental retardation of unknown aetiology. We report on three unrelated patients with overlapping de novo interstitial microdeletions involving 5q14.3-q15. All three patients presented with severe psychomotor retardation, epilepsy or febrile seizures, muscular hypotonia and variable brain and minor anomalies. Molecular karyotyping revealed three overlapping microdeletions measuring 5.7, 3.9 and 3.6 Mb, respectively. The microdeletions were identified using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays (Affymetrix 100K and Illumina 550K) and array comparative genomic hybridization (1 Mb Sanger array-CGH). Confirmation and segregation studies were performed using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and quantitative PCR. All three aberrations were confirmed and proven to have occurred de novo. The boundaries and sizes of the deletions in the three patients were different, but an overlapping region of around 1.6 Mb in 5q14.3 was defined. It included five genes: CETN3, AC093510.2, POLR3G, LYSMD3 and the proximal part of GPR98/MASS1, a known epilepsy gene. Haploinsufficiency of GPR98/MASS1 is probably responsible for the seizure phenotype in our patients. At least one other gene contained in the commonly deleted region, LYSMD3, shows a high level of central nervous expression during embryogenesis and is also, therefore, a good candidate gene for other central nervous system (CNS) symptoms, such as psychomotor retardation, brain anomalies and muscular hypotonia of the 5q14.3 microdeletion syndrome. PMID:19471318

  9. Identification of single gene deletions at 15q13.3: further evidence that CHRNA7 causes the 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hoppman-Chaney, N; Wain, K; Seger, P R; Superneau, D W; Hodge, J C

    2013-04-01

    The 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome (OMIM #612001) is characterized by a wide range of phenotypic features, including intellectual disability, seizures, autism, and psychiatric conditions. This deletion is inherited in approximately 75% of cases and has been found in mildly affected and normal parents, consistent with variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance. The common deletion is approximately 2 Mb and contains several genes; however, the gene(s) responsible for the resulting clinical features have not been clearly defined. Recently, four probands were reported with small deletions including only the CHRNA7 gene. These patients showed a wide range of phenotypic features similar to those associated with the larger 15q13.3 microdeletion. To further correlate genotype and phenotype, we queried our database of >15,000 patients tested in the Mayo Clinic Cytogenetics Laboratory from 2008 to 2011 and identified 19 individuals (10 probands and 9 family members) with isolated heterozygous CHRNA7 gene deletions. All but two infants displayed multiple features consistent with 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome. We also identified the first de novo deletion confined to CHRNA7 as well as the second known case with homozygous deletion of CHRNA7 only. These results provide further evidence implicating CHRNA7 as the gene responsible for the clinical findings associated with 15q13.3 microdeletion.

  10. The Koolen-de Vries syndrome: a phenotypic comparison of patients with a 17q21.31 microdeletion versus a KANSL1 sequence variant.

    PubMed

    Koolen, David A; Pfundt, Rolph; Linda, Katrin; Beunders, Gea; Veenstra-Knol, Hermine E; Conta, Jessie H; Fortuna, Ana Maria; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Dugan, Sarah; Halbach, Sara; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A; Winesett, Heather M; Chung, Wendy K; Dalton, Marguerite; Dimova, Petia S; Mattina, Teresa; Prescott, Katrina; Zhang, Hui Z; Saal, Howard M; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Willemsen, Marjolein H; Ockeloen, Charlotte W; Jongmans, Marjolijn C; Van der Aa, Nathalie; Failla, Pinella; Barone, Concetta; Avola, Emanuela; Brooks, Alice S; Kant, Sarina G; Gerkes, Erica H; Firth, Helen V; Õunap, Katrin; Bird, Lynne M; Masser-Frye, Diane; Friedman, Jennifer R; Sokunbi, Modupe A; Dixit, Abhijit; Splitt, Miranda; Kukolich, Mary K; McGaughran, Julie; Coe, Bradley P; Flórez, Jesús; Nadif Kasri, Nael; Brunner, Han G; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Gecz, Jozef; Romano, Corrado; Eichler, Evan E; de Vries, Bert B A

    2016-05-01

    The Koolen-de Vries syndrome (KdVS; OMIM #610443), also known as the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome, is a clinically heterogeneous disorder characterised by (neonatal) hypotonia, developmental delay, moderate intellectual disability, and characteristic facial dysmorphism. Expressive language development is particularly impaired compared with receptive language or motor skills. Other frequently reported features include social and friendly behaviour, epilepsy, musculoskeletal anomalies, congenital heart defects, urogenital malformations, and ectodermal anomalies. The syndrome is caused by a truncating variant in the KAT8 regulatory NSL complex unit 1 (KANSL1) gene or by a 17q21.31 microdeletion encompassing KANSL1. Herein we describe a novel cohort of 45 individuals with KdVS of whom 33 have a 17q21.31 microdeletion and 12 a single-nucleotide variant (SNV) in KANSL1 (19 males, 26 females; age range 7 months to 50 years). We provide guidance about the potential pitfalls in the laboratory testing and emphasise the challenges of KANSL1 variant calling and DNA copy number analysis in the complex 17q21.31 region. Moreover, we present detailed phenotypic information, including neuropsychological features, that contribute to the broad phenotypic spectrum of the syndrome. Comparison of the phenotype of both the microdeletion and SNV patients does not show differences of clinical importance, stressing that haploinsufficiency of KANSL1 is sufficient to cause the full KdVS phenotype. PMID:26306646

  11. Microdeletions of 3p21.31 characterized by developmental delay, distinctive features, elevated serum creatine kinase levels, and white matter involvement.

    PubMed

    Eto, Kaoru; Sakai, Norio; Shimada, Shino; Shioda, Mutsuki; Ishigaki, Keiko; Hamada, Yusuke; Shinpo, Michiko; Azuma, Junji; Tominaga, Koji; Shimojima, Keiko; Ozono, Keiichi; Osawa, Makiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2013-12-01

    Interstitial deletions of chromosome 3 are rare, and only one patient with a microdeletion of 3p21.31 has been reported to date. We identified two additional cases of patients with microdeletions of 3p21.31. The characteristic clinical features of developmental delay and distinctive facial features (including arched eyebrows, hypertelorism, epicanthus, and micrognathia) were seen both in the previously reported patient and in the two newly identified patients. In these two new cases, additional features, including elevated serum creatine kinase levels and characteristic neuroradiological features with white matter involvement, were seen. These features had not been described in the previous case in which the patient was examined during infancy, suggesting an age-dependent mechanism. The shortest region of overlap among the three deletions narrowed down the candidate genes that may be responsible for the common neurological features to the bassoon (presynaptic cytomatrix protein) gene (BSN), which has an important function in neuronal synapses. In this study, we confirmed common phenotypic features in the patients with microdeletions of 3p21.31 and identified additional features that have not been reported previously. Because the constellation of such characteristic features is quite unique, clinical manifestations of the patients with microdeletions of 3p21.31 would be clinically recognizable as a contiguous gene deletion syndrome.

  12. The Koolen-de Vries syndrome: a phenotypic comparison of patients with a 17q21.31 microdeletion versus a KANSL1 sequence variant.

    PubMed

    Koolen, David A; Pfundt, Rolph; Linda, Katrin; Beunders, Gea; Veenstra-Knol, Hermine E; Conta, Jessie H; Fortuna, Ana Maria; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Dugan, Sarah; Halbach, Sara; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A; Winesett, Heather M; Chung, Wendy K; Dalton, Marguerite; Dimova, Petia S; Mattina, Teresa; Prescott, Katrina; Zhang, Hui Z; Saal, Howard M; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Willemsen, Marjolein H; Ockeloen, Charlotte W; Jongmans, Marjolijn C; Van der Aa, Nathalie; Failla, Pinella; Barone, Concetta; Avola, Emanuela; Brooks, Alice S; Kant, Sarina G; Gerkes, Erica H; Firth, Helen V; Õunap, Katrin; Bird, Lynne M; Masser-Frye, Diane; Friedman, Jennifer R; Sokunbi, Modupe A; Dixit, Abhijit; Splitt, Miranda; Kukolich, Mary K; McGaughran, Julie; Coe, Bradley P; Flórez, Jesús; Nadif Kasri, Nael; Brunner, Han G; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Gecz, Jozef; Romano, Corrado; Eichler, Evan E; de Vries, Bert B A

    2016-05-01

    The Koolen-de Vries syndrome (KdVS; OMIM #610443), also known as the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome, is a clinically heterogeneous disorder characterised by (neonatal) hypotonia, developmental delay, moderate intellectual disability, and characteristic facial dysmorphism. Expressive language development is particularly impaired compared with receptive language or motor skills. Other frequently reported features include social and friendly behaviour, epilepsy, musculoskeletal anomalies, congenital heart defects, urogenital malformations, and ectodermal anomalies. The syndrome is caused by a truncating variant in the KAT8 regulatory NSL complex unit 1 (KANSL1) gene or by a 17q21.31 microdeletion encompassing KANSL1. Herein we describe a novel cohort of 45 individuals with KdVS of whom 33 have a 17q21.31 microdeletion and 12 a single-nucleotide variant (SNV) in KANSL1 (19 males, 26 females; age range 7 months to 50 years). We provide guidance about the potential pitfalls in the laboratory testing and emphasise the challenges of KANSL1 variant calling and DNA copy number analysis in the complex 17q21.31 region. Moreover, we present detailed phenotypic information, including neuropsychological features, that contribute to the broad phenotypic spectrum of the syndrome. Comparison of the phenotype of both the microdeletion and SNV patients does not show differences of clinical importance, stressing that haploinsufficiency of KANSL1 is sufficient to cause the full KdVS phenotype.

  13. MYC amplification in multiple marker chromosomes and EZH2 microdeletion in a man with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zhifu; Abdallah, Al-Ola; Govindarajan, Rangaswamy; Mehta, Paulette; Emanuel, Peter D; Papenhausen, Peter; Schichman, Steven A

    2015-03-01

    The role of MYC and EZH2 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) pathogenesis is poorly understood. Herein we present a case of AML with MYC amplification in marker chromosomes and a microdeletion of chromosome 7 below cytogenetic resolution. The karyotype of the patient's bone marrow aspirate showed three to five marker chromosomes in all dividing cells without other structural or numerical chromosomal abnormalities. Analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a probe specific for the human MYC gene revealed amplification of the oncogene localized to the marker chromosomes. Using whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray analysis, an approximately 4.4 Mb amplicon containing the MYC gene was identified with an estimated amplification of about 30 copies per leukemic cell and, thus, an average of about 8 copies per marker chromosome. A 6.4 Mb hemizygous microdeletion of chromosome 7 within band q36.1 was also found by SNP microarray analysis in a cellular-equivalent dosage of 50%. The microdeletion spans multiple genes, including EZH2, a gene with well-known cancer association. No mutation was found in the remaining EZH2 allele by next generation gene sequencing. The combination of MYC amplification and EZH2 deletion, which has not been described previously in AML, may suggest a synergistic role of the two oncogenes in the pathogenesis of the patient's acute leukemia.

  14. Burden Analysis of Rare Microdeletions Suggests a Strong Impact of Neurodevelopmental Genes in Genetic Generalised Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Trucks, Holger; Schulz, Herbert; de Kovel, Carolien G.; Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, Dorothée; Sonsma, Anja C. M.; Koeleman, Bobby P.; Lindhout, Dick; Weber, Yvonne G.; Lerche, Holger; Kapser, Claudia; Schankin, Christoph J.; Kunz, Wolfram S.; Surges, Rainer; Elger, Christian E.; Gaus, Verena; Schmitz, Bettina; Helbig, Ingo; Muhle, Hiltrud; Stephani, Ulrich; Klein, Karl M.; Rosenow, Felix; Neubauer, Bernd A.; Reinthaler, Eva M.; Zimprich, Fritz; Feucht, Martha; Møller, Rikke S.; Hjalgrim, Helle; De Jonghe, Peter; Suls, Arvid; Lieb, Wolfgang; Franke, Andre; Strauch, Konstantin; Gieger, Christian; Schurmann, Claudia; Schminke, Ulf; Nürnberg, Peter; Sander, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Genetic generalised epilepsy (GGE) is the most common form of genetic epilepsy, accounting for 20% of all epilepsies. Genomic copy number variations (CNVs) constitute important genetic risk factors of common GGE syndromes. In our present genome-wide burden analysis, large (≥ 400 kb) and rare (< 1%) autosomal microdeletions with high calling confidence (≥ 200 markers) were assessed by the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array in European case-control cohorts of 1,366 GGE patients and 5,234 ancestry-matched controls. We aimed to: 1) assess the microdeletion burden in common GGE syndromes, 2) estimate the relative contribution of recurrent microdeletions at genomic rearrangement hotspots and non-recurrent microdeletions, and 3) identify potential candidate genes for GGE. We found a significant excess of microdeletions in 7.3% of GGE patients compared to 4.0% in controls (P = 1.8 x 10-7; OR = 1.9). Recurrent microdeletions at seven known genomic hotspots accounted for 36.9% of all microdeletions identified in the GGE cohort and showed a 7.5-fold increased burden (P = 2.6 x 10-17) relative to controls. Microdeletions affecting either a gene previously implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders (P = 8.0 x 10-18, OR = 4.6) or an evolutionarily conserved brain-expressed gene related to autism spectrum disorder (P = 1.3 x 10-12, OR = 4.1) were significantly enriched in the GGE patients. Microdeletions found only in GGE patients harboured a high proportion of genes previously associated with epilepsy and neuropsychiatric disorders (NRXN1, RBFOX1, PCDH7, KCNA2, EPM2A, RORB, PLCB1). Our results demonstrate that the significantly increased burden of large and rare microdeletions in GGE patients is largely confined to recurrent hotspot microdeletions and microdeletions affecting neurodevelopmental genes, suggesting a strong impact of fundamental neurodevelopmental processes in the pathogenesis of common GGE syndromes. PMID:25950944

  15. Split Hand/Foot Malformation Associated with 7q21.3 Microdeletion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sivasankaran, Aswini; Srikanth, Ambika; Kulshreshtha, Pooja S.; Anuradha, Deenadayalu; Kadandale, Jayarama S.; Samuel, Chandra R.

    2016-01-01

    Split hand/foot malformation (SHFM) or ectrodactyly is a rare genetic condition affecting limb development. SHFM shows clinical and genetic heterogeneity. It can present as an isolated form or in combination with additional anomalies affecting the long bones (nonsyndromic form) or other organ systems including the craniofacial, genitourinary and ectodermal structures (syndromic ectrodactyly). This study reports a girl with SHFM who also exhibited developmental delay, mild dysmorphic facial features and sensorineural hearing loss. High-resolution banding analysis indicated an interstitial deletion within the 7q21 band. FISH using locus-specific BAC probes confirmed the microdeletion of 7q21.3. Chromosomal microarray analysis also revealed a microdeletion of 1.856 Mb in 7q21.3. However, a larger 8.44-Mb deletion involving bands 7q21.11q21.2 was observed, and the breakpoints were refined. The phenotype and the candidate genes underlying the pathogenesis of this disorder are discussed. PMID:27022330

  16. Genotype–phenotype relationship in three cases with overlapping 19p13.12 microdeletions

    PubMed Central

    Bonaglia, Maria C; Marelli, Susan; Novara, Francesca; Commodaro, Simona; Borgatti, Renato; Minardo, Grazia; Memo, Luigi; Mangold, Elisabeth; Beri, Silvana; Zucca, Claudio; Brambilla, Daniele; Molteni, Massimo; Giorda, Roberto; Weber, Ruthild G; Zuffardi, Orsetta

    2010-01-01

    We describe the detailed clinical and molecular characterization of three patients (aged 7, 84/12 and 31 years) with overlapping microdeletions in 19p13.12, extending to 19p13.13 in two cases. The patients share the following clinical features with a recently reported 10-year-old girl with a 19p13.12 microdeletion: mental retardation (MR), psychomotor and language delay, hearing impairment, brachycephaly, anteverted nares and ear malformations. All patients share a 359-kb deleted region in 19p13.12 harboring six genes (LPHN1, DDX39, CD97, PKN1, PTGER1 and GIPC1), several of which may be MR candidates because of their function and expression pattern. LPHN1 and PKN1 are the most appealing; LPHN1 for its interaction with Shank family proteins, and PKN1 because it is involved in a variety of functions in neurons, including cytoskeletal organization. Haploinsufficiency of GIPC1 may contribute to hearing impairment for its interaction with myosin VI. A behavioral phenotype was observed in all three patients; it was characterized by overactive disorder associated with MR and stereotyped movements (ICD10) in one patient and hyperactivity in the other two. As Ptger1-null mice show behavioral inhibition and impulsive aggression with defective social interaction, PTGER1 haploinsufficiency may be responsible for the behavioral traits observed in these patients. PMID:20648052

  17. De novo 15q13.3 microdeletion with cryptogenic West syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lacaze, Elodie; Gruchy, Nicolas; Penniello-Valette, Marie-José; Plessis, Ghislaine; Richard, Nicolas; Decamp, Mathieu; Mittre, Hervé; Leporrier, Nathalie; Andrieux, Joris; Kottler, Marie-Laure; Gerard, Marion

    2013-10-01

    West syndrome is a well-recognized form of epilepsy, defined by a triad of infantile spasms, hypsarrhythmia and developmental arrest. West syndrome is heterogenous, caused by mutations of genes ARX, STXBP1, KCNT1 among others; 16p13.11 and 17q21.31 microdeletions are less frequent, usually associated with intellectual disability and facial dysmorphism. So-called "idiopathic" West syndrome is of better prognostic, without prior intellectual deficiency and usually responsive to anti-epileptic treatment. We report on a boy falling within the scope of idiopathic West syndrome, with no dysmorphic features and normal development before the beginning of West syndrome, with a good resolution after treatment, bearing a de novo 15q13.3 microdeletion. Six genes are located in the deleted region, including CHRNA7, which encodes a subunit of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, and is frequently associated with epilepsy. Exploration of the 15q13.3 region should be proposed in idiopathic West syndrome.

  18. Asymmetric neonatal crying: microdeletion, infection or birth injury?--a case report.

    PubMed

    Kosi-Santić, Kornelija; Rudan, Dijana; Buković, Damir; Segregur, Jadranko; Wagner, Jasenka; Oresković, Slavko; Zupić, Tomislav; Radan, Mirjana

    2014-03-01

    Asymmetric neonatal crying is a rare minor congenital abnormality caused by unilateral agenesis or hypoplasia of depressor anguli oris muscle and depressor labii inferioris muscle. It is either an isolated clinical finding or one of the clinical findings included in several malformation syndromes linked to a microdeletion within a chromosomal region 22q11.2. Some malformations in that region are associated with serious cardiovascular anomalies. Nowadays, standard diagnostic techniques for detecting aberrations within the chromosomal region 22q11.2 are fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA). This short report describes an eutrophic female newborn whose both lip corners are symmetrically positioned while at rest; while crying, left lip corner and left half of the lower lip are falling. She also has partial bilateral syndactyly between second and third toe, open foramen ovale and by ultrasound detected hyperechogenic region in the thalamus and brain parenchyme. Aiming to investigate etiopathogenesis of the newborn asymmetric crying and accompanying minor abnormalities, we have tried to verify or exclude: microdeletion syndrome, TORCH infection and birth injury. Recognising such a paresis soon after the delivery is of great importance and can be helpful in detecting other accompanying anomalies, especially cardiovascular anomalies. PMID:24851637

  19. Identification of ANKRD11 and ZNF778 as candidate genes for autism and variable cognitive impairment in the novel 16q24.3 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, Marjolein H; Fernandez, Bridget A; Bacino, Carlos A; Gerkes, Erica; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Pfundt, Rolph; Sikkema-Raddatz, Birgit; Scherer, Stephen W; Marshall, Christian R; Potocki, Lorraine; van Bokhoven, Hans; Kleefstra, Tjitske

    2010-04-01

    The clinical use of array comparative genomic hybridization in the evaluation of patients with multiple congenital anomalies and/or mental retardation has recently led to the discovery of a number of novel microdeletion and microduplication syndromes. We present four male patients with overlapping molecularly defined de novo microdeletions of 16q24.3. The clinical features observed in these patients include facial dysmorphisms comprising prominent forehead, large ears, smooth philtrum, pointed chin and wide mouth, variable cognitive impairment, autism spectrum disorder, structural anomalies of the brain, seizures and neonatal thrombocytopenia. Although deletions vary in size, the common region of overlap is only 90 kb and comprises two known genes, Ankyrin Repeat Domain 11 (ANKRD11) (MIM 611192) and Zinc Finger 778 (ZNF778), and is located approximately 10 kb distally to Cadherin 15 (CDH15) (MIM 114019). This region is not found as a copy number variation in controls. We propose that these patients represent a novel and distinctive microdeletion syndrome, characterized by autism spectrum disorder, variable cognitive impairment, facial dysmorphisms and brain abnormalities. We suggest that haploinsufficiency of ANKRD11 and/or ZNF778 contribute to this phenotype and speculate that further investigation of non-deletion patients who have features suggestive of this 16q24.3 microdeletion syndrome might uncover other mutations in one or both of these genes.

  20. Identification of ANKRD11 and ZNF778 as candidate genes for autism and variable cognitive impairment in the novel 16q24.3 microdeletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Willemsen, Marjolein H; Fernandez, Bridget A; Bacino, Carlos A; Gerkes, Erica; de Brouwer, Arjan PM; Pfundt, Rolph; Sikkema-Raddatz, Birgit; Scherer, Stephen W; Marshall, Christian R; Potocki, Lorraine; van Bokhoven, Hans; Kleefstra, Tjitske

    2010-01-01

    The clinical use of array comparative genomic hybridization in the evaluation of patients with multiple congenital anomalies and/or mental retardation has recently led to the discovery of a number of novel microdeletion and microduplication syndromes. We present four male patients with overlapping molecularly defined de novo microdeletions of 16q24.3. The clinical features observed in these patients include facial dysmorphisms comprising prominent forehead, large ears, smooth philtrum, pointed chin and wide mouth, variable cognitive impairment, autism spectrum disorder, structural anomalies of the brain, seizures and neonatal thrombocytopenia. Although deletions vary in size, the common region of overlap is only 90 kb and comprises two known genes, Ankyrin Repeat Domain 11 (ANKRD11) (MIM 611192) and Zinc Finger 778 (ZNF778), and is located approximately 10 kb distally to Cadherin 15 (CDH15) (MIM 114019). This region is not found as a copy number variation in controls. We propose that these patients represent a novel and distinctive microdeletion syndrome, characterized by autism spectrum disorder, variable cognitive impairment, facial dysmorphisms and brain abnormalities. We suggest that haploinsufficiency of ANKRD11 and/or ZNF778 contribute to this phenotype and speculate that further investigation of non-deletion patients who have features suggestive of this 16q24.3 microdeletion syndrome might uncover other mutations in one or both of these genes. PMID:19920853

  1. Behavioral characteristics associated with 19p13.2 microdeletions.

    PubMed

    Welham, Alice; Barth, Bursharan; Moss, Joanna; Penhallow, Jessica; Sheth, Krupa; Wilde, Lucy; Wynn, Sarah; Oliver, Chris

    2015-10-01

    A small number of recent papers have described individuals with intellectual disabilities and microdeletions in chromosome band 19p13.2. However, little is known about the behavioral characteristics of individuals with microdeletions in this area. The current study examines behavioral characteristics of a series of 10 participants ranging in age from 2 to 20 years with 19p13.2 microdeletions. Parents/caregivers completed a series of established behavioral measures which have aided the elucidation of the behavioral phenotypes of a number of genetic neurodevelopmental syndromes. All but the youngest two participants (aged 2 and 3 years) were verbal, ambulant, and classified as "partly able" or "able" with regard to self-help skills. Six of eight participants for whom a screening measure for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) could be deployed met criteria for an ASD. Six of the 10 participants had displayed self-injurious behavior in the month prior to assessment, eight had displayed destruction/disruption of property, and eight had shown physically aggressive behaviors. Repetitive behaviors were prevalent in the sample (with all participants displaying at least one repetitive behavior to a clinically relevant level), as were problems with sleep. Low mood was not prevalent in this group, and nor were overactivity or impulsivity. Full determination of a behavioral phenotype for this group would require a larger sample size, distinguishing between genetic subtypes. However, the current data suggest that ASD characteristics, repetitive, and challenging behaviors (such as aggression and self-injury) might be associated with 19p13.2 microdeletions, providing a basis for future investigation.

  2. Homozygous microdeletion of exon 5 in ZNF277 in a girl with specific language impairment.

    PubMed

    Ceroni, Fabiola; Simpson, Nuala H; Francks, Clyde; Baird, Gillian; Conti-Ramsden, Gina; Clark, Ann; Bolton, Patrick F; Hennessy, Elizabeth R; Donnelly, Peter; Bentley, David R; Martin, Hilary; Parr, Jeremy; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Maestrini, Elena; Bacchelli, Elena; Fisher, Simon E; Newbury, Dianne F

    2014-10-01

    Specific language impairment (SLI), an unexpected failure to develop appropriate language skills despite adequate non-verbal intelligence, is a heterogeneous multifactorial disorder with a complex genetic basis. We identified a homozygous microdeletion of 21,379 bp in the ZNF277 gene (NM_021994.2), encompassing exon 5, in an individual with severe receptive and expressive language impairment. The microdeletion was not found in the proband's affected sister or her brother who had mild language impairment. However, it was inherited from both parents, each of whom carries a heterozygous microdeletion and has a history of language problems. The microdeletion falls within the AUTS1 locus, a region linked to autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs). Moreover, ZNF277 is adjacent to the DOCK4 and IMMP2L genes, which have been implicated in ASD. We screened for the presence of ZNF277 microdeletions in cohorts of children with SLI or ASD and panels of control subjects. ZNF277 microdeletions were at an increased allelic frequency in SLI probands (1.1%) compared with both ASD family members (0.3%) and independent controls (0.4%). We performed quantitative RT-PCR analyses of the expression of IMMP2L, DOCK4 and ZNF277 in individuals carrying either an IMMP2L_DOCK4 microdeletion or a ZNF277 microdeletion. Although ZNF277 microdeletions reduce the expression of ZNF277, they do not alter the levels of DOCK4 or IMMP2L transcripts. Conversely, IMMP2L_DOCK4 microdeletions do not affect the expression levels of ZNF277. We postulate that ZNF277 microdeletions may contribute to the risk of language impairments in a manner that is independent of the autism risk loci previously described in this region. PMID:24518835

  3. Homozygous microdeletion of exon 5 in ZNF277 in a girl with specific language impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ceroni, Fabiola; Simpson, Nuala H; Francks, Clyde; Baird, Gillian; Conti-Ramsden, Gina; Clark, Ann; Bolton, Patrick F; Hennessy, Elizabeth R; Donnelly, Peter; Bentley, David R; Martin, Hilary; Parr, Jeremy; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Maestrini, Elena; Bacchelli, Elena; Fisher, Simon E; Newbury, Dianne F

    2014-01-01

    Specific language impairment (SLI), an unexpected failure to develop appropriate language skills despite adequate non-verbal intelligence, is a heterogeneous multifactorial disorder with a complex genetic basis. We identified a homozygous microdeletion of 21,379 bp in the ZNF277 gene (NM_021994.2), encompassing exon 5, in an individual with severe receptive and expressive language impairment. The microdeletion was not found in the proband's affected sister or her brother who had mild language impairment. However, it was inherited from both parents, each of whom carries a heterozygous microdeletion and has a history of language problems. The microdeletion falls within the AUTS1 locus, a region linked to autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs). Moreover, ZNF277 is adjacent to the DOCK4 and IMMP2L genes, which have been implicated in ASD. We screened for the presence of ZNF277 microdeletions in cohorts of children with SLI or ASD and panels of control subjects. ZNF277 microdeletions were at an increased allelic frequency in SLI probands (1.1%) compared with both ASD family members (0.3%) and independent controls (0.4%). We performed quantitative RT-PCR analyses of the expression of IMMP2L, DOCK4 and ZNF277 in individuals carrying either an IMMP2L_DOCK4 microdeletion or a ZNF277 microdeletion. Although ZNF277 microdeletions reduce the expression of ZNF277, they do not alter the levels of DOCK4 or IMMP2L transcripts. Conversely, IMMP2L_DOCK4 microdeletions do not affect the expression levels of ZNF277. We postulate that ZNF277 microdeletions may contribute to the risk of language impairments in a manner that is independent of the autism risk loci previously described in this region. PMID:24518835

  4. Novel variation at chr11p13 associated with cystic fibrosis lung disease severity.

    PubMed

    Dang, Hong; Gallins, Paul J; Pace, Rhonda G; Guo, Xue-Liang; Stonebraker, Jaclyn R; Corvol, Harriet; Cutting, Garry R; Drumm, Mitchell L; Strug, Lisa J; Knowles, Michael R; O'Neal, Wanda K

    2016-01-01

    Published genome-wide association studies (GWASs) identified an intergenic region with regulatory features on chr11p13 associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease severity. Targeted resequencing in n=377, followed by imputation to n=6,365 CF subjects, was used to identify unrecognized genetic variants (including indels and microsatellite repeats) associated with phenotype. Highly significant associations were in strong linkage disequilibrium and were seen only in Phe508del homozygous CF subjects, indicating a CFTR genotype-specific mechanism. PMID:27408752

  5. Novel variation at chr11p13 associated with cystic fibrosis lung disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Hong; Gallins, Paul J; Pace, Rhonda G; Guo, Xue-liang; Stonebraker, Jaclyn R; Corvol, Harriet; Cutting, Garry R; Drumm, Mitchell L; Strug, Lisa J; Knowles, Michael R; O’Neal, Wanda K

    2016-01-01

    Published genome-wide association studies (GWASs) identified an intergenic region with regulatory features on chr11p13 associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease severity. Targeted resequencing in n=377, followed by imputation to n=6,365 CF subjects, was used to identify unrecognized genetic variants (including indels and microsatellite repeats) associated with phenotype. Highly significant associations were in strong linkage disequilibrium and were seen only in Phe508del homozygous CF subjects, indicating a CFTR genotype-specific mechanism. PMID:27408752

  6. Y chromosome azoospermia factor region microdeletions and transmission characteristics in azoospermic and severe oligozoospermic patients

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiao-Wei; Wei, Zhen-Tong; Jiang, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Song-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is an essential reproductive process that is regulated by many Y chromosome specific genes. Most of these genes are located in a specific region known as the azoospermia factor region (AZF) in the long arm of the human Y chromosome. AZF microdeletions are recognized as the most frequent structural chromosomal abnormalities and are the major cause of male infertility. Assisted reproductive techniques (ART) such as intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and testicular sperm extraction (TESE) can overcome natural fertilization barriers and help a proportion of infertile couples produce children; however, these techniques increase the transmission risk of genetic defects. AZF microdeletions and their associated phenotypes in infertile males have been extensively studied, and different AZF microdeletion types have been identified by sequence-tagged site polymerase chain reaction (STS-PCR), suspension array technology (SAT) and array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH); however, each of these approaches has limitations that need to be overcome. Even though the transmission of AZF microdeletions has been reported worldwide, arguments correlating ART and the incidence of AZF microdeletions and explaining the occurrence of de novo deletions and expansion have not been resolved. Using the newest findings in the field, this review presents a systematic update concerning progress in understanding the functions of AZF regions and their associated genes, AZF microdeletions and their phenotypes and novel approaches for screening AZF microdeletions. Moreover, the transmission characteristics of AZF microdeletions and the future direction of research in the field will be specifically discussed. PMID:26628946

  7. Report of a mother and daughter with the 12q14 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bibb, Audrey L; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Weaver, David D

    2012-02-01

    The 12q14 microdeletion syndrome is characterized by microcephaly, short stature, osteopoikilosis, weight deficiency, and learning disabilities. We report on a mother and daughter with a 12q14 microdeletion. To our knowledge these are the first reported familial cases with the syndrome. We also discuss the genes in the deleted area that may be contributing to the phenotype.

  8. Noninvasive prenatal testing for microdeletion syndromes and expanded trisomies: proceed with caution.

    PubMed

    Vora, Neeta L; OʼBrien, Barbara M

    2014-05-01

    The identification of circulating cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma has led to the introduction of noninvasive prenatal tests with high sensitivity and high specificity for common aneuploidies (trisomy 13, trisomy 18, trisomy 21). A new expanded noninvasive prenatal testing panel that includes five microdeletion syndromes (22q11 deletion syndrome, cri-du-chat [5p minus], Prader Willi or Angelman syndrome, 1p36 deletion syndrome) and two aneuploidies usually associated with nonviable pregnancies (trisomy 16 and trisomy 22) is now available. This expanded panel will be performed unless an opt-out box is checked. Because these disorders are so rare, the positive predictive value is expected to be low. As with all new screening tests and technologies, the expanded panel should be appropriately studied before it is widely adopted. PMID:24785862

  9. Simple, Rapid and Inexpensive Quantitative Fluorescent PCR Method for Detection of Microdeletion and Microduplication Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Stofanko, Martin; Gonçalves-Dornelas, Higgor; Cunha, Pricila Silva; Pena, Heloísa B.; Vianna-Morgante, Angela M.; Pena, Sérgio Danilo Junho

    2013-01-01

    Because of economic limitations, the cost-effective diagnosis of patients affected with rare microdeletion or microduplication syndromes is a challenge in developing countries. Here we report a sensitive, rapid, and affordable detection method that we have called Microdeletion/Microduplication Quantitative Fluorescent PCR (MQF-PCR). Our procedure is based on the finding of genomic regions with high homology to segments of the critical microdeletion/microduplication region. PCR amplification of both using the same primer pair, establishes competitive kinetics and relative quantification of amplicons, as happens in microsatellite-based Quantitative Fluorescence PCR. We used patients with two common microdeletion syndromes, the Williams-Beuren syndrome (7q11.23 microdeletion) and the 22q11.2 microdeletion syndromes and discovered that MQF-PCR could detect both with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Additionally, we demonstrated that the same principle could be reliably used for detection of microduplication syndromes, by using patients with the Lubs (MECP2 duplication) syndrome and the 17q11.2 microduplication involving the NF1 gene. We propose that MQF-PCR is a useful procedure for laboratory confirmation of the clinical diagnosis of microdeletion/microduplication syndromes, ideally suited for use in developing countries, but having general applicability as well. PMID:23620743

  10. Identifying candidate genes for 2p15p16.1 microdeletion syndrome using clinical, genomic, and functional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Hani; Badduke, Chansonette; Qiao, Ying; Colnaghi, Rita; Abramowicz, Iga; Alcantara, Diana; Dunham, Christopher; Wen, Jiadi; Wildin, Robert S.; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J.M.; Eichmeyer, Jennifer; Lehman, Anna; Maranda, Bruno; Martell, Sally; Shan, Xianghong; Lewis, Suzanne M.E.; O’Driscoll, Mark; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl Y.

    2016-01-01

    The 2p15p16.1 microdeletion syndrome has a core phenotype consisting of intellectual disability, microcephaly, hypotonia, delayed growth, common craniofacial features, and digital anomalies. So far, more than 20 cases of 2p15p16.1 microdeletion syndrome have been reported in the literature; however, the size of the deletions and their breakpoints vary, making it difficult to identify the candidate genes. Recent reports pointed to 4 genes (XPO1, USP34, BCL11A, and REL) that were included, alone or in combination, in the smallest deletions causing the syndrome. Here, we describe 8 new patients with the 2p15p16.1 deletion and review all published cases to date. We demonstrate functional deficits for the above 4 candidate genes using patients’ lymphoblast cell lines (LCLs) and knockdown of their orthologs in zebrafish. All genes were dosage sensitive on the basis of reduced protein expression in LCLs. In addition, deletion of XPO1, a nuclear exporter, cosegregated with nuclear accumulation of one of its cargo molecules (rpS5) in patients’ LCLs. Other pathways associated with these genes (e.g., NF-κB and Wnt signaling as well as the DNA damage response) were not impaired in patients’ LCLs. Knockdown of xpo1a, rel, bcl11aa, and bcl11ab resulted in abnormal zebrafish embryonic development including microcephaly, dysmorphic body, hindered growth, and small fins as well as structural brain abnormalities. Our multifaceted analysis strongly implicates XPO1, REL, and BCL11A as candidate genes for 2p15p16.1 microdeletion syndrome. PMID:27699255

  11. Identifying candidate genes for 2p15p16.1 microdeletion syndrome using clinical, genomic, and functional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Hani; Badduke, Chansonette; Qiao, Ying; Colnaghi, Rita; Abramowicz, Iga; Alcantara, Diana; Dunham, Christopher; Wen, Jiadi; Wildin, Robert S.; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J.M.; Eichmeyer, Jennifer; Lehman, Anna; Maranda, Bruno; Martell, Sally; Shan, Xianghong; Lewis, Suzanne M.E.; O’Driscoll, Mark; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl Y.

    2016-01-01

    The 2p15p16.1 microdeletion syndrome has a core phenotype consisting of intellectual disability, microcephaly, hypotonia, delayed growth, common craniofacial features, and digital anomalies. So far, more than 20 cases of 2p15p16.1 microdeletion syndrome have been reported in the literature; however, the size of the deletions and their breakpoints vary, making it difficult to identify the candidate genes. Recent reports pointed to 4 genes (XPO1, USP34, BCL11A, and REL) that were included, alone or in combination, in the smallest deletions causing the syndrome. Here, we describe 8 new patients with the 2p15p16.1 deletion and review all published cases to date. We demonstrate functional deficits for the above 4 candidate genes using patients’ lymphoblast cell lines (LCLs) and knockdown of their orthologs in zebrafish. All genes were dosage sensitive on the basis of reduced protein expression in LCLs. In addition, deletion of XPO1, a nuclear exporter, cosegregated with nuclear accumulation of one of its cargo molecules (rpS5) in patients’ LCLs. Other pathways associated with these genes (e.g., NF-κB and Wnt signaling as well as the DNA damage response) were not impaired in patients’ LCLs. Knockdown of xpo1a, rel, bcl11aa, and bcl11ab resulted in abnormal zebrafish embryonic development including microcephaly, dysmorphic body, hindered growth, and small fins as well as structural brain abnormalities. Our multifaceted analysis strongly implicates XPO1, REL, and BCL11A as candidate genes for 2p15p16.1 microdeletion syndrome.

  12. Prevalent false positives of azoospermia factor a (AZFa) microdeletions caused by single-nucleotide polymorphism rs72609647 in the sY84 screening of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qing; Chen, Guo-Wu; Yan, Tao-Fei; Wang, Hui; Liu, Yu-Ling; Li, Zheng; Duan, Shi-Wei; Sun, Fei; Feng, Yun; Shi, Hui-Juan

    2011-11-01

    Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been widely used to detect Y-chromosome microdeletions, which is one of the major causes of male infertility. Both the European Academy of Andrology (EAA) and the European Molecular Genetics Quality Network (EMQN) have recommended the use of sY84 and sY86 markers for the detection of azoospermia factor a (AZFa) microdeletion during DNA testing for male infertility. In this study, a large-scale analysis of AZF microdeletion in a total of 630 Chinese males, including healthy semen donors (n=200), infertile males with normal sperm count (n=226) and patients with either nonobstructive azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia (n=204), was performed. A series of nine sequence-tagged site (STS) markers from the AZF region of the Y chromosome was used to detect microdeletions. All primers were designed based on the recommendations of the National Center for Biotechnology Information. An unusually high incidence (73/630, 11.6%) of sY84-absent but sY86-present genotypes was observed in the AZFa microdeletion screening. Sequencing the sY84-flanking region revealed a total of 73 patients with sY84-absent but sY86-present genotypes have a T-to-G transversion at the fifth base from the 5' end of the reverse sY84 primer. These prevalent false positives, which were not only observed in infertile men, but also observed in donors, resulted from a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) named rs72609647 in the targeting sequence of the reverse sY84 primer. Our study suggests that a pre-screening of existence of rs72609647 polymorphism can prevent the frequent false positive results of AZFa microdeletions detection in the infertile Chinese males. Given the SNP rs72609647 was recently found in a deep sequencing of a Chinese individual, the current EAA and EMQN standards may need to be scrutinized among different populations to avoid the potential genetic variations in the primer binding sequences. PMID:21765443

  13. Y chromosome microdeletions and alterations of spermatogenesis, patient approach and genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Rives, Nathalie

    2014-05-01

    Infertility affects 15% of couples at reproductive age and human male infertility appears frequently idiopathic. The main genetic causes of spermatogenesis defect responsible for non-obstructive azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia are constitutional chromosomal abnormalities and microdeletions in the azoospermia factor region of the Y chromosome. The improvement of the Yq microdeletion screening method gave new insights in the mechanism responsible for the genesis of Yq microdeletions and for the consequences of the management of male infertility and genetic counselling in case of assisted reproductive technology.

  14. Self-Interaction of Human Pex11pβ during Peroxisomal Growth and Division

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Monica; Aroso, Miguel; Gomes, Silvia; Magalhaes, Ana Cristina; Ribeiro, Daniela; Islinger, Markus; Schrader, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Pex11 proteins are involved in membrane elongation and division processes associated with the multiplication of peroxisomes. Human Pex11pβ has recently been linked to a new disorder affecting peroxisome morphology and dynamics. Here, we have analyzed the exact membrane topology of Pex11pβ. Studies with an epitope-specific antibody and protease protection assays show that Pex11pβ is an integral membrane protein with two transmembrane domains flanking an internal region exposed to the peroxisomal matrix and N- and C-termini facing the cytosol. A glycine-rich internal region within Pex11pβ is dispensable for peroxisome membrane elongation and division. However, we demonstrate that an amphipathic helix (Helix 2) within the first N-terminal 40 amino acids is crucial for membrane elongation and self-interaction of Pex11pβ. Interestingly, we find that Pex11pβ self-interaction strongly depends on the detergent used for solubilization. We also show that N-terminal cysteines are not essential for membrane elongation, and that putative N-terminal phosphorylation sites are dispensable for Pex11pβ function. We propose that self-interaction of Pex11pβ regulates its membrane deforming activity in conjunction with membrane lipids. PMID:23308220

  15. Assessment of 11p loci status of Simpson-Golabi-Behmel (SGBS) somatic overgrowth syndrome and associated embryonal tumours

    SciTech Connect

    Xuan, J.Y.; McKenzie, A.E.; Hughes-Benzie, R.

    1994-09-01

    SGBS, a somatic overgrowth syndrome which we have recently mapped to Xq25-q27, shows significant clinical overlap with the more common Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) including an increased risk of developing embryonal tumors. Two genes from the BWS-linked 11p15 region, IGF2 and H19, are known to undergo parental imprinting. Relaxation of this imprinting has recently been demonstrated in some BWS cases and isolated Wilm`s tumour (WT). Since SGBS and BWS have been postulated to represent distinct defects in a common pathway, we have studied the methylation pattern and transcriptional activity of IGF2 and H19 in isolated SGBS +/- WT tissue. No consistent methylation abnormalities were observed in genomic DNA isolated from SGBS WBC, placenta, fibroblast or cleft lip tissues. Genotyping of H19 cDNA polymorphisms from SGBS fibroblast revealed normal mono-allelic gene expression. IGF2 is currently being analyzed in a similar fashion. It appears that, in distinction from some cases of BWS, abberant 11p15 loci imprinting is not a factor in SGBS pathogenesis in our study population. Furthermore, genotyping with microsatellites in a large SGBS kindred did not reveal inheritance of a common 11p13-15.5 chromosomal region in the 3 children with WT. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) secondary to a maternal allele duplication was detected in the 11p15.5 loci in the tumor tissue of both SGBS WTs assayed. Thus, while spontaneous relaxation of 11p15 loci imprinting was not observed in either SGBS or SGBS WT, a de facto LOH-based imprinting abnormality is observed in SGBS associated WT. It is unknown if SGBS predisposes renal cells to LOH or confers a cellular selective advantage following LOH or both.

  16. Single cell analysis demonstrating somatic mosaicism involving 11p in a patient with paternal isodisomy and Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Bischoff, F.Z.; McCaskill, C.; Subramanian, S.

    1994-09-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome (BWS) is characterized by numerous growth abnormalities including exomphalos, macroglossia, gigantism, and hemihypertrophy or hemihyperplasia. The {open_quotes}BWS gene{close_quotes} appears to be maternally repressed and is suspected to function as a growth factor or regulator of somatic growth, since activation of this gene through a variety of mechanisms appears to result in somatic overgrowth and tumor development. Mosaic paternal isodisomy of 11p has been observed previously by others in patients with BWS by Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA. The interpretation of these results was primarily based on the intensities of the hybridization signals for the different alleles. In our study, we demonstrate somatic mosaicism directly through PCR and single cell analysis. Peripheral blood was obtained from a patient with BWS and initial genomic DNA analysis by PCR was suggestive of somatic mosaicism for paternal isodisomy of 11p. Through micromanipulation, single cells were isolated and subjected to primer extention preamplification. Locus-specific microsatellite marker analyses by PCR were performed to determine the chromosome 11 origins in the preamplified individual cells. Two populations of cells were detected, a population of cells with normal biparental inheritance and a population of cells with paternal isodisomy of 11p and biparental disomy of 11q. Using the powerful approach of single cell analysis, the detected somatic mosaicism provides evidence for a mitotic recombinational event that has resulted in loss of the maternal 11p region and gain of a second copy of paternal 11p in some cells. The direct demonstration of mosaicism may explain the variable phenotypes and hemihypertrophy often observed in BWS.

  17. A 1.6-Mb microdeletion in chromosome 17q22 leads to NOG-related symphalangism spectrum disorder without intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiuhong; Luo, Huajie; Chai, Yongchuan; Wang, Xiaowen; Sun, Lianhua; He, Longxia; Chen, Penghui; Wu, Hao; Yang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Microdeletions in chromosome 17q22, where the NOG gene resides, have been reported leading to the NOG-related symphalangism spectrum disorder (NOG-SSD), intellectual disability and other developmental abnormalities. In this study we reported a dominant Chinese Han family segregating with typical NOG-SSD symptoms including proximal symphalangism, conductive hearing loss, amblyopia and strabismus, but not intellectual disability. Sanger sequencing identified no pathogenic mutation in the coding regions of candidate genes NOG, GDF5 and FGF9. SNP genotyping in the genomic region surrounding NOG identified loss of heterozygosity in the affected family members. By array comparative genomic hybridization and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, we identified and mapped the breakpoints of a novel 1.6-Mb microdeletion in chromosome 17q22 that included NOG and twelve other genes. It is the first microdeletion reported in chromosome 17q22 that is associated with NOG-SSD only but not with intellectual disability. Our results may help identifying the dosage sensitive genes for intellectual disability and other developmental abnormalities in chromosome 17q22. Our study also suggested that genomic deletions in chromosome 17q22 should be screened in the NOG-SSD patients in which no pathogenic mutation is identified by conventional sequencing methods.

  18. The membrane remodeling protein Pex11p activates the GTPase Dnm1p during peroxisomal fission

    PubMed Central

    Opalinski, Lukasz; Landgraf, Christiane; Costello, Joseph; Schrader, Michael; Krikken, Arjen M.; Knoops, Kèvin; Kram, Anita M.; Volkmer, Rudolf; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2015-01-01

    The initial phase of peroxisomal fission requires the peroxisomal membrane protein Peroxin 11 (Pex11p), which remodels the membrane, resulting in organelle elongation. Here, we identify an additional function for Pex11p, demonstrating that Pex11p also plays a crucial role in the final step of peroxisomal fission: dynamin-like protein (DLP)-mediated membrane scission. First, we demonstrate that yeast Pex11p is necessary for the function of the GTPase Dynamin-related 1 (Dnm1p) in vivo. In addition, our data indicate that Pex11p physically interacts with Dnm1p and that inhibiting this interaction compromises peroxisomal fission. Finally, we demonstrate that Pex11p functions as a GTPase activating protein (GAP) for Dnm1p in vitro. Similar observations were made for mammalian Pex11β and the corresponding DLP Drp1, indicating that DLP activation by Pex11p is conserved. Our work identifies a previously unknown requirement for a GAP in DLP function. PMID:25941407

  19. Identification and characterization of marker chromosomes, de novo rearrangements and microdeletions in 100 cases with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.M.; Liu, Y.; Papenhausen, P.R.

    1994-09-01

    Results of molecular cytogenetic analysis are presented for 100 cases in which fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used as an adjunct to standard cytogenetics. Commercially available centromeric, telomeric, chromosome painting and unique sequence probes were used. Cases were from a 12-month period (June 1993-May 1994) and included examples of sex chromosome abnormalities (8), duplications (5), de novo translocations (6), satellited (12) and non-satellited (7) markers, and microdeletion syndromes (62). Satellited marker chromosomes were evaluated using a combination of DAPI/Distamycin A staining, hybridization with a classical satellite probe for chromosome 15 and hybridization with alpha-satellite probes for chromosomes 13, 14, 21 and 22. Markers positive for the chromosome 15 probe were further evaluated using unique sequence probes for the Prader-Willi/Angelman region. Microdeletion analysis was performed for Prader-Willi/Angelman (49) and DiGeorge/VCF (13) syndromes. Seven cases evaluated for Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome demonstrated evidence of a deletion within this region. Uniparental disomy analysis was available in cases where a deletion was not detected by FISH, yet follow-up was clinically indicated. Two cases evaluated for DiGeorge/VCF syndrome demonstrated molecular evidence of a deletion. Included in our analysis is an example of familial DiGeorge syndrome.

  20. 15q11.2 microdeletion (BP1-BP2) and developmental delay, behaviour issues, epilepsy and congenital heart disease: a series of 52 patients.

    PubMed

    Vanlerberghe, Clémence; Petit, Florence; Malan, Valérie; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Bouquillon, Sonia; Boute, Odile; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Delobel, Bruno; Duban, Bénédicte; Vallee, Louis; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Lemaitre, Marie-Pierre; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Pigeyre, Marie; Lanco-Dosen, Sandrine; Plessis, Ghislaine; Gerard, Marion; Decamp, Matthieu; Mathieu, Michèle; Morin, Gilles; Jedraszak, Guillaume; Bilan, Frédéric; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Fauvert, Delphine; Roume, Joëlle; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Caumes, Roseline; Puechberty, Jacques; Genevieve, David; Sarda, Pierre; Pinson, Lucie; Blanchet, Patricia; Lemeur, Nathalie; Sheth, Frenny; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Andrieux, Joris

    2015-03-01

    Proximal region of chromosome 15 long arm is rich in duplicons that, define five breakpoints (BP) for 15q rearrangements. 15q11.2 microdeletion between BP1 and BP2 has been previously associated with developmental delay and atypical psychological patterns. This region contains four highly-conserved and non-imprinted genes: NIPA1, NIPA2, CYFIP1, TUBGCP5. Our goal was to investigate the phenotypes associated with this microdeletion in a cohort of 52 patients. This copy number variation (CNV) was prevalent in 0.8% patients presenting with developmental delay, psychological pattern issues and/or multiple congenital malformations. This was studied by array-CGH at six different French Genetic laboratories. We collected data from 52 unrelated patients (including 3 foetuses) after excluding patients with an associated genetic alteration (known CNV, aneuploidy or known monogenic disease). Out of 52 patients, mild or moderate developmental delay was observed in 68.3%, 85.4% had speech impairment and 63.4% had psychological issues such as Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder, Autistic Spectrum Disorder or Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Seizures were noted in 18.7% patients and associated congenital heart disease in 17.3%. Parents were analysed for abnormalities in the region in 65.4% families. Amongst these families, 'de novo' microdeletions were observed in 18.8% and 81.2% were inherited from one of the parents. Incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity were observed amongst the patients. Our results support the hypothesis that 15q11.2 (BP1-BP2) microdeletion is associated with developmental delay, abnormal behaviour, generalized epilepsy and congenital heart disease. The later feature has been rarely described. Incomplete penetrance and variability of expression demands further assessment and studies.

  1. Assessment of 2q23.1 Microdeletion Syndrome Implicates MBD5 as a Single Causal Locus of Intellectual Disability, Epilepsy, and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Talkowski, Michael E.; Mullegama, Sureni V.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; van Bon, Bregje W.M.; Shen, Yiping; Repnikova, Elena A.; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Thrush, Devon Lamb; Kathiresan, Sekar; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Chiang, Colby; Hanscom, Carrie; Ernst, Carl; Lindgren, Amelia M.; Morton, Cynthia C.; An, Yu; Astbury, Caroline; Brueton, Louise A.; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D.; Ades, Lesley C.; Fichera, Marco; Romano, Corrado; Innis, Jeffrey W.; Williams, Charles A.; Bartholomew, Dennis; Van Allen, Margot I.; Parikh, Aditi; Zhang, Lilei; Wu, Bai-Lin; Pyatt, Robert E.; Schwartz, Stuart; Shaffer, Lisa G.; de Vries, Bert B.A.; Gusella, James F.; Elsea, Sarah H.

    2011-01-01

    Persons with neurodevelopmental disorders or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often harbor chromosomal microdeletions, yet the individual genetic contributors within these regions have not been systematically evaluated. We established a consortium of clinical diagnostic and research laboratories to accumulate a large cohort with genetic alterations of chromosomal region 2q23.1 and acquired 65 subjects with microdeletion or translocation. We sequenced translocation breakpoints; aligned microdeletions to determine the critical region; assessed effects on mRNA expression; and examined medical records, photos, and clinical evaluations. We identified a single gene, methyl-CpG-binding domain 5 (MBD5), as the only locus that defined the critical region. Partial or complete deletion of MBD5 was associated with haploinsufficiency of mRNA expression, intellectual disability, epilepsy, and autistic features. Fourteen alterations, including partial deletions of noncoding regions not typically captured or considered pathogenic by current diagnostic screening, disrupted MBD5 alone. Expression profiles and clinical characteristics were largely indistinguishable between MBD5-specific alteration and deletion of the entire 2q23.1 interval. No copy-number alterations of MBD5 were observed in 7878 controls, suggesting MBD5 alterations are highly penetrant. We surveyed MBD5 coding variations among 747 ASD subjects compared to 2043 non-ASD subjects analyzed by whole-exome sequencing and detected an association with a highly conserved methyl-CpG-binding domain missense variant, p.79Gly>Glu (c.236G>A) (p = 0.012). These results suggest that genetic alterations of MBD5 cause features of 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome and that this epigenetic regulator significantly contributes to ASD risk, warranting further consideration in research and clinical diagnostic screening and highlighting the importance of chromatin remodeling in the etiology of these complex disorders. PMID:21981781

  2. Assessment of 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome implicates MBD5 as a single causal locus of intellectual disability, epilepsy, and autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Talkowski, Michael E; Mullegama, Sureni V; Rosenfeld, Jill A; van Bon, Bregje W M; Shen, Yiping; Repnikova, Elena A; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Thrush, Devon Lamb; Kathiresan, Sekar; Ruderfer, Douglas M; Chiang, Colby; Hanscom, Carrie; Ernst, Carl; Lindgren, Amelia M; Morton, Cynthia C; An, Yu; Astbury, Caroline; Brueton, Louise A; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D; Ades, Lesley C; Fichera, Marco; Romano, Corrado; Innis, Jeffrey W; Williams, Charles A; Bartholomew, Dennis; Van Allen, Margot I; Parikh, Aditi; Zhang, Lilei; Wu, Bai-Lin; Pyatt, Robert E; Schwartz, Stuart; Shaffer, Lisa G; de Vries, Bert B A; Gusella, James F; Elsea, Sarah H

    2011-10-01

    Persons with neurodevelopmental disorders or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often harbor chromosomal microdeletions, yet the individual genetic contributors within these regions have not been systematically evaluated. We established a consortium of clinical diagnostic and research laboratories to accumulate a large cohort with genetic alterations of chromosomal region 2q23.1 and acquired 65 subjects with microdeletion or translocation. We sequenced translocation breakpoints; aligned microdeletions to determine the critical region; assessed effects on mRNA expression; and examined medical records, photos, and clinical evaluations. We identified a single gene, methyl-CpG-binding domain 5 (MBD5), as the only locus that defined the critical region. Partial or complete deletion of MBD5 was associated with haploinsufficiency of mRNA expression, intellectual disability, epilepsy, and autistic features. Fourteen alterations, including partial deletions of noncoding regions not typically captured or considered pathogenic by current diagnostic screening, disrupted MBD5 alone. Expression profiles and clinical characteristics were largely indistinguishable between MBD5-specific alteration and deletion of the entire 2q23.1 interval. No copy-number alterations of MBD5 were observed in 7878 controls, suggesting MBD5 alterations are highly penetrant. We surveyed MBD5 coding variations among 747 ASD subjects compared to 2043 non-ASD subjects analyzed by whole-exome sequencing and detected an association with a highly conserved methyl-CpG-binding domain missense variant, p.79Gly>Glu (c.236G>A) (p = 0.012). These results suggest that genetic alterations of MBD5 cause features of 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome and that this epigenetic regulator significantly contributes to ASD risk, warranting further consideration in research and clinical diagnostic screening and highlighting the importance of chromatin remodeling in the etiology of these complex disorders.

  3. Fis1, DLP1, and Pex11p coordinately regulate peroxisome morphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Shinta; Tanaka, Atsushi; Fujiki, Yukio . E-mail: yfujiscb@mbox.nc.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2007-05-01

    Dynamin-like protein 1 (DLP1) and Pex11p{beta} function in morphogenesis of peroxisomes. In the present work, we investigated whether Fis1 is involved in fission of peroxisomes. Endogenous Fis1 was morphologically detected in peroxisomes as well as mitochondria in wild-type CHO-K1 and DLP1-defective ZP121 cells. Subcellular fractionation studies also revealed the presence of Fis1 in peroxisomes. Peroxisomal Fis1 showed the same topology, i.e., C-tail anchored membrane protein, as the mitochondrial one. Furthermore, ectopic expression of FIS1 induced peroxisome proliferation in CHO-K1 cells, while the interference of FIS1 RNA resulted in tubulation of peroxisomes, hence reducing the number of peroxisomes. Fis1 interacted with Pex11p{beta}, by direct binding apparently involving the C-terminal region of Pex11p{beta} in the interaction. Pex11p{beta} also interacted with each other, whereas the binding of Pex11p{beta} to DLP1 was not detectable. Moreover, ternary complexes comprising Fis1, Pex11p{beta}, and DLP1 were detected by chemical cross-linking. We also showed that the highly conserved N-terminal domain of Pex11p{beta} was required for the homo-oligomerization of Pex11p{beta} and indispensable for the peroxisome-proliferating activity. Taken together, these findings indicate that Fis1 plays important roles in peroxisome division and maintenance of peroxisome morphology in mammalian cells, possibly in a concerted manner with Pex11p{beta} and DLP1.

  4. [Analysis of microdeletions in 22q11 in Colombian patients with congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Salazar, Marleny; Villalba, Guiovanny; Mateus, Heidi; Villegas, Victoria; Fonseca, Dora; Núñez, Federico; Caicedo, Víctor; Pachón, Sonia; Bernal, Jaime E

    2011-12-01

    Cardiac defects are the most frequent congenital malformations, with an incidence estimated between 4 and 12 per 1000 newborns. Their etiology is multifactorial and might be attributed to genetic predispositions and environmental factors. Since 1990 these types of pathologies have been associated with 22q11 microdeletion. In this study, the frequency of microdeletion 22q11 was determined in 61 patients with non-syndromic congenital heart disease. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and TUPLE1 and STR D10S2198 genes were amplified by multiplex PCR and visualized in agarose gels. Gene content was quantified by densitometry. Three patients were found with microdeletion 22q11, representing a 4.9% frequency. This microdeletion was associated with two cases of Tetralogy of Fallot and a third case with atrial septal defect (ASD). In conclusion, the frequency for microdeletion 22q11 in the population analyzed was 4.9%. The cases that presented Teratology of Fallot had a frequency for this microdeletion of 7.4% and for ASD of 11.1%.

  5. Detection of chromosomal abnormalities and the 22q11 microdeletion in fetuses with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wei; Wang, Shuyu

    2014-11-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities and the 22q11 microdeletion are implicated in congenital heart defects (CHDs). This study was designed to detect these abnormalities in fetuses and determine the effect of genetic factors on CHD etiology. Between January 2010 and December 2011, 113 fetuses with CHD treated at the Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital were investigated, using chromosome karyotyping of either amniotic fluid cell or umbilical cord blood cell samples. Fetuses with a normal result were then investigated for the 22q11 microdeletion by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Of the 113 patients, 12 (10.6%) exhibited chromosomal abnormalities, while 6 (5.3%) of the remaining 101 cases presented with a 22q11 microdeletion. The incidence of chromosomal abnormalities was significantly higher in the group of fetuses presenting with extracardiac malformations in addition to CHD (P<0.001), although the detection of the 22q11 microdeletion was not significantly different between the two groups (P=0.583). In addition, all fetuses with the 22q11 microdeletion occurred de novo. In conclusion, genetic factors are important in the etiology of CHD. Where fetuses present with cardiac defects, additional chromosomal analysis is required to detect extracardiac abnormalities. Fetuses with heart defects should also be considered for 22q11 microdeletion detection to evaluate fetal prognosis, particularly prior to surgery.

  6. Identification of a common microdeletion cluster in 7q21.3 subband among patients with myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Asou, Hiroya; Matsui, Hirotaka; Ozaki, Yuko; Nagamachi, Akiko; Nakamura, Megumi; Aki, Daisuke; Inaba, Toshiya

    2009-05-29

    Monosomy 7 and interstitial deletions in the long arm of chromosome 7 (-7/7q-) is a common nonrandom chromosomal abnormality found frequently in myeloid disorders including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML). Using a short probe-based microarray comparative genomic hybridization (mCGH) technology, we identified a common microdeletion cluster in 7q21.3 subband, which is adjacent to 'hot deletion region' thus far identified by conventional methods. This common microdeletion cluster contains three poorly characterized genes; Samd9, Samd9L, and a putative gene LOC253012, which we named Miki. Gene copy number assessment of three genes by real-time PCR revealed heterozygous deletion of these three genes in adult patients with AML and MDS at high frequency, in addition to JMML patients. Miki locates to mitotic spindles and centrosomes and downregulation of Miki by RNA interference induced abnormalities in mitosis and nuclear morphology, similar to myelodysplasia. In addition, a recent report indicated Samd9 as a tumor suppressor. These findings indicate the usefulness of the short probe-based CGH to detect microdeletions. The three genes located to 7q21.3 would be candidates for myeloid tumor-suppressor genes on 7q.

  7. 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome: Description of a case further contributing to the delineation of Koolen-de Vries syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Pia; Madia, Francesca; Santulli, Lia; Del Gaudio, Luigi; Caccavale, Carmela; Zara, Federico; Traverso, Monica; Cirillo, Mario; Striano, Salvatore; Coppola, Antonietta

    2016-08-01

    The widespread use of Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) technology has enabled the identification of several syndromes associated with copy number variants (CNVs) including the 17q21.31 microdeletion. The 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome, also known as Koolen-de Vries syndrome, was first described in 2006 in individuals with intellectual disabilities and organ abnormalities. We report the clinical, instrumental, cytogenetic and molecular investigations of a boy admitted for epilepsy and intellectual disabilities. We carried out detailed analysis of the clinical phenotype of this patient and investigated the genetic basis by using aCGH. We identified a de novo microdeletion on chromosome 17q21.31, compatible with Koolen-de Vries syndrome. Our case shares some of the typical characteristics of the syndrome already described by other authors: delayed psychomotor development, primarily affecting the expressive language, dysmorphic facial features, and epilepsy. However the clinical outcome was not severe as the intellectual disabilities were moderate with good adaptive and functional behaviour. Epilepsy was easily controlled by a single drug, and he never needed surgery for organ abnormalities.

  8. Expanding the genotype-phenotype correlation in subtelomeric 19p13.3 microdeletions using high resolution clinical chromosomal microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Peddibhotla, Sirisha; Khalifa, Mohamed; Probst, Frank J; Stein, Jennifer; Harris, Leslie L; Kearney, Debra L; Vance, Gail H; Bull, Marilyn J; Grange, Dorothy K; Scharer, Gunter H; Kang, Sue-Hae L; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bacino, Carlos A; Cheung, Sau W; Patel, Ankita

    2013-12-01

    Structural rearrangements of chromosome 19p are rare, and their resulting phenotypic consequences are not well defined. This is the first study to report a cohort of eight patients with subtelomeric 19p13.3 microdeletions, identified using clinical chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA). The deletion sizes ranged from 0.1 to 0.86 Mb. Detailed analysis of the patients' clinical features has enabled us to define a constellation of clinical abnormalities that include growth delay, multiple congenital anomalies, global developmental delay, learning difficulties, and dysmorphic facial features. There are eight genes in the 19p13.3 region that may potentially contribute to the clinical phenotype via haploinsufficiency. Moreover, in silico genomic analysis of 19p13.3 microdeletion breakpoints revealed numerous highly repetitive sequences, suggesting LINEs/SINEs-mediated events in generating these microdeletions. Thus, subtelomeric 19p13.3 appears important for normal embryonic and childhood development. The clinical description of patients with deletions in this genomic interval will assist clinicians to identify and treat individuals with similar deletions.

  9. A 15q13.3 microdeletion segregating with autism

    PubMed Central

    Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Wing, Kirsty; Akha, Elham Sadighi; Knight, Samantha JL; Bölte, Sven; Schmötzer, Gabriele; Duketis, Eftichia; Poustka, Fritz; Klauck, Sabine M; Poustka, Annemarie; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Bailey, Anthony J; Monaco, Anthony P

    2009-01-01

    Autism and mental retardation (MR) show high rates of comorbidity and potentially share genetic risk factors. In this study, a rare ∼2 Mb microdeletion involving chromosome band 15q13.3 was detected in a multiplex autism family. This genomic loss lies between distal break points of the Prader–Willi/Angelman syndrome locus and was first described in association with MR and epilepsy. Together with recent studies that have also implicated this genomic imbalance in schizophrenia, our data indicate that this CNV shows considerable phenotypic variability. Further studies should aim to characterise the precise phenotypic range of this CNV and may lead to the discovery of genetic or environmental modifiers. PMID:19050728

  10. Assessing the Cognitive Translational Potential of a Mouse Model of the 22q11.2 Microdeletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Simon RO.; Fejgin, Kim; Gastambide, Francois; Vogt, Miriam A.; Kent, Brianne A.; Nielsen, Vibeke; Nielsen, Jacob; Gass, Peter; Robbins, Trevor W.; Saksida, Lisa M.; Stensbøl, Tine B.; Tricklebank, Mark D.; Didriksen, Michael; Bussey, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    A chromosomal microdeletion at the 22q11.2 locus is associated with extensive cognitive impairments, schizophrenia and other psychopathology in humans. Previous reports indicate that mouse models of the 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) may model the genetic basis of cognitive deficits relevant for neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. To assess the models usefulness for drug discovery, a novel mouse (Df(h22q11)/+) was assessed in an extensive battery of cognitive assays by partners within the NEWMEDS collaboration (Innovative Medicines Initiative Grant Agreement No. 115008). This battery included classic and touchscreen-based paradigms with recognized sensitivity and multiple attempts at reproducing previously published findings in 22q11.2DS mouse models. This work represents one of the most comprehensive reports of cognitive functioning in a transgenic animal model. In accordance with previous reports, there were non-significant trends or marginal impairment in some tasks. However, the Df(h22q11)/+ mouse did not show comprehensive deficits; no robust impairment was observed following more than 17 experiments and 14 behavioral paradigms. Thus – within the current protocols – the 22q11.2DS mouse model fails to mimic the cognitive alterations observed in human 22q11.2 deletion carriers. We suggest that the 22q11.2DS model may induce liability for cognitive dysfunction with additional “hits” being required for phenotypic expression. PMID:27507786

  11. A twin sibling with Prader-Willi syndrome caused by type 2 microdeletion following assisted reproductive technology: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HAN, JI YOON; PARK, JOONHONG; JANG, WOORI; CHAE, HYOJIN; KIM, MYUNGSHIN; KIM, YONGGOO

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neurobehavioral imprinting disorder, which arises due to an absence of paternally expressed genes within the 15q11.2-q13 region. This occurs via one of the three main genetic mechanisms, as follows: Deletion of the paternally inherited 15q11.2-q13 region, maternal uniparental disomy and imprinting defect. Recent studies have reported an association between imprinting disorders and assisted reproductive technologies (ART). The current study presents a 6-year-old female patient who is a dizygotic twin, in which one was born with de novo microdeletion at 15q11.2-q13.1 following in vitro fertilization. The patient had characteristic facial features including narrow bifrontal diameter, strabismus, downturned mouth, feeding problems and generalized hypotonia during infancy, developmental delay, mental retardation and rapid weight gain. Based upon phenotypic resemblance and the medical records, methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and array-based comparative genome hybridization analyses demonstrate type 2 microdeletion between breaking point 2 (BP2) and BP3, which occur from MKRN3 through HERC2 at 15q11.2-q13.1. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to report a PWS case born following ART reported in South Korea. In addition to previous studies, the present study contributes to the consensus regarding genotype-phenotype comparisons in this respect. PMID:27330749

  12. Assessing the Cognitive Translational Potential of a Mouse Model of the 22q11.2 Microdeletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Simon Ro; Fejgin, Kim; Gastambide, Francois; Vogt, Miriam A; Kent, Brianne A; Nielsen, Vibeke; Nielsen, Jacob; Gass, Peter; Robbins, Trevor W; Saksida, Lisa M; Stensbøl, Tine B; Tricklebank, Mark D; Didriksen, Michael; Bussey, Timothy J

    2016-10-01

    A chromosomal microdeletion at the 22q11.2 locus is associated with extensive cognitive impairments, schizophrenia and other psychopathology in humans. Previous reports indicate that mouse models of the 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) may model the genetic basis of cognitive deficits relevant for neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. To assess the models usefulness for drug discovery, a novel mouse (Df(h22q11)/+) was assessed in an extensive battery of cognitive assays by partners within the NEWMEDS collaboration (Innovative Medicines Initiative Grant Agreement No. 115008). This battery included classic and touchscreen-based paradigms with recognized sensitivity and multiple attempts at reproducing previously published findings in 22q11.2DS mouse models. This work represents one of the most comprehensive reports of cognitive functioning in a transgenic animal model. In accordance with previous reports, there were non-significant trends or marginal impairment in some tasks. However, the Df(h22q11)/+ mouse did not show comprehensive deficits; no robust impairment was observed following more than 17 experiments and 14 behavioral paradigms. Thus - within the current protocols - the 22q11.2DS mouse model fails to mimic the cognitive alterations observed in human 22q11.2 deletion carriers. We suggest that the 22q11.2DS model may induce liability for cognitive dysfunction with additional "hits" being required for phenotypic expression.

  13. A cryptic familial rearrangement of 11p15.5, involving both imprinting centers, in a family with a history of short stature.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lindsay A; Rupps, Rosemarie; Peñaherrera, Maria S; Robinson, Wendy P; Patel, Millan S; Eydoux, Patrice; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2014-06-01

    Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, dysmorphic facial features and body asymmetry. Both hypomethylation of the telomeric imprinting control region 1 (ICR1) at 11p15.5 and maternal duplication of 11p15.5 have been implicated in the etiology of this disorder. Here we report the origin and segregation of the first reported between-arm intrachromosomal insertion of 11p15.5 that encompasses both ICR1 and ICR2 in a multigenerational family with a history of short stature. One (or any odd number) crossover within the centromeric segment during meiosis would produce recombinant chromosomes; one with a duplication of the inserted segment and the other a deletion. In this 4-generation family, there were six instances of transmission of the recombinant chromosome with duplication of the11p15.5 segment, which leads to a SRS phenotype when maternally inherited and a Beckwith-Wiedemann phenotype when paternally transmitted. The size of the duplicated region is ~1.9 Mb as determined by microarray analysis. This study provides further evidence that maternally inherited duplications of 11p15.5 result in a SRS phenotype that includes short stature and other variable features. The methylation status of the extra copy of the duplicated region of 11p15.5 ultimately predicts the resulting phenotype. Thus, the different phenotype based on parental mode of transmission is of importance in the genetic counseling of these patients.

  14. Association of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) haploinsufficiency with lower adaptive behaviour and reduced cognitive functioning in WAGR/11p13 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Han, Joan C; Thurm, Audrey; Golden Williams, Christine; Joseph, Lisa A; Zein, Wadih M; Brooks, Brian P; Butman, John A; Brady, Sheila M; Fuhr, Shannon R; Hicks, Melanie D; Huey, Amanda E; Hanish, Alyson E; Danley, Kristen M; Raygada, Margarita J; Rennert, Owen M; Martinowich, Keri; Sharp, Stephen J; Tsao, Jack W; Swedo, Susan E

    2013-01-01

    In animal studies, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is an important regulator of central nervous system development and synaptic plasticity. WAGR (Wilms tumour, Aniridia, Genitourinary anomalies, and mental Retardation) syndrome is caused by 11p13 deletions of variable size near the BDNF locus and can serve as a model for studying human BDNF haploinsufficiency (+/-). We hypothesized that BDNF+/- would be associated with more severe cognitive impairment in subjects with WAGR syndrome. Twenty-eight subjects with WAGR syndrome (6-28 years), 12 subjects with isolated aniridia due to PAX6 mutations/microdeletions (7-54 years), and 20 healthy controls (4-32 years) received neurocognitive assessments. Deletion boundaries for the subjects in the WAGR group were determined by high-resolution oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization. Within the WAGR group, BDNF+/- subjects (n = 15), compared with BDNF intact (+/+) subjects (n = 13), had lower adaptive behaviour (p = .02), reduced cognitive functioning (p = .04), higher levels of reported historical (p = .02) and current (p = .02) social impairment, and higher percentage meeting cut-off score for autism (p = .047) on Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised. These differences remained nominally significant after adjusting for visual acuity. Using diagnostic measures and clinical judgement, 3 subjects (2 BDNF+/- and 1 BDNF+/+) in the WAGR group (10.7%) were classified with autism spectrum disorder. A comparison group of visually impaired subjects with isolated aniridia had cognitive functioning comparable to that of healthy controls. In summary, among subjects with WAGR syndrome, BDNF+/- subjects had a mean Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Compose score that was 14-points lower and a mean intelligence quotient (IQ) that was 20-points lower than BDNF+/+ subjects. Our findings support the hypothesis that BDNF plays an important role in human neurocognitive development.

  15. Decrease in fertilization and cleavage rates, but not in clinical outcomes for infertile men with AZF microdeletion of the Y chromosome.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan-Chang; Wu, Tong-Hua; Li, Guan-Gui; Yin, Biao; Liu, Hong-Jie; Song, Cheng; Mo, Mei-Lan; Zeng, Yong

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to explore whether the presence of a Y chromosome azoospermia factor (AZF) microdeletion confers any adverse effect on embryonic development and clinical outcomes after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) treatment. Fifty-seven patients with AZF microdeletion were included in the present study and 114 oligozoospermia and azoospermia patients without AZF microdeletion were recruited as controls. Both AZF and control groups were further divided into subgroups based upon the methods of semen collection: the AZF-testicular sperm extraction subgroup (AZF-TESE, n = 14), the AZF-ejaculation subgroup (AZF-EJA, n = 43), the control-TESE subgroup (n = 28) and the control-EJA subgroup (n = 86). Clinical data were analyzed in the two groups and four subgroups respectively. A retrospective case-control study was performed. A significantly lower fertilization rate (69.27 versus 75.70%, P = 0.000) and cleavage rate (89.55 versus 94.39%, P = 0.000) was found in AZF group compared with the control group. Furthermore, in AZF-TESE subgroup, the fertilization rate (67.54 versus 74.25%, P = 0.037) and cleavage rate (88.96 versus 94.79%, P = 0.022) were significantly lower than in the control-TESE subgroup; similarly, the fertilization rate (69.85 versus 75.85%, P = 0.004) and cleavage rate (89.36 versus 94.26%, P = 0.002) in AZF-EJA subgroup were significantly lower than in the control-EJA subgroup; however, the fertilization rate and cleavage rate in AZF-TESE (control-TESE) subgroup was similar to that in the AZF-EJA (control-EJA) subgroup. The other clinical outcomes were comparable between four subgroups (P > 0.05). Therefore, sperm from patients with AZF microdeletion, obtained either by ejaculation or TESE, may have lower fertilization and cleavage rates, but seem to have comparable clinical outcomes to those from patients without AZF microdeletion.

  16. Varicocele and male infertility in Northeast China: Y chromosome microdeletion as an underlying cause.

    PubMed

    Dai, R L; Hou, Y; Li, F B; Yue, J M; Xi, Q; Liu, R Z

    2015-06-12

    The prevalence of Y chromosome microdeletions among azoospermic, severe oligozoospermic, moderate oligozoospermic, and mild oligozoospermic patients with varicocele-related and idiopathic infertility shows conflicting data in Asian countries. We aimed to detect this frequency in Northeast China, and investigated spermatogenic defects whether associated with varicocele or Y chromosome microdeletions. All samples underwent a thorough physical examination, semen analysis, and PCR analyses for Y chromosome microdeletions. We randomly selected 150 infertile non-obstructive azoospermic patients with left varicocele (Group 1), 150 idiopathic non-obstructive azoospermic infertility patients (Group 2), 150 infertile severe oligozoospermic patients with left varicocele (Group 3), 150 idiopathic severe oligozoospermic infertility patients (Group 4), 150 infertile moderate oligozoospermic patients with left varicocele (Group 5), 150 idiopathic moderate oligozoospermic infertility patients (Group 6), 150 infertile mild oligozoospermic patients with left varicocele (Group 7), 150 idiopathic mild oligozoospermic infertility patients (Group 8), and 60 healthy unrelated men with proven fertility were recruited as control subjects (Group 9). We observed that our samples from Northeastern China had a higher frequency of microdeletions among the non-obstructive azoospermic individuals with varicocele, as compared with other Asian countries. Furthermore, the spermatogenic defect is due to the underlying Y chromosome microdeletion, and not the varicocele itself. Although varicocele is not the cause of male infertility, it may be associated with male infertility in the Northeastern Chinese population.

  17. Investigation of TBR1 Hemizygosity: Four Individuals with 2q24 Microdeletions

    PubMed Central

    Traylor, R.N.; Dobyns, W.B.; Rosenfeld, J.A.; Wheeler, P.; Spence, J.E.; Bandholz, A.M.; Bawle, E.V.; Carmany, E.P.; Powell, C.M.; Hudson, B.; Schultz, R.A.; Shaffer, L.G.; Ballif, B.C.

    2012-01-01

    TBR1 encodes a transcription factor with critical roles in corticogenesis, including cortical neuron migration and axon pathfinding, establishment of regional and laminar identity of cortical neurons, and control of glutamatergic neuronal cell fate. Based upon TBR1's role in cortical development, we sought to investigate TBR1 hemizygosity in individuals referred for genetic evaluation of intellectual disability and developmental delay. We describe 4 patients with microdeletions identified by molecular cytogenetic techniques, encompassing TBR1 and spanning 2q24.1q31.1, ranging in size from 2.17 to 12.34 Mb. Only the patient with the largest deletion had a possible cortical malformation. Mild ventriculomegaly is the only common brain anomaly, present in all patients; a Chiari I malformation is seen in 2 patients, and mega cisterna magna is seen in a third. Our findings are consistent with Tbr1 mouse models showing that hemizygosity of the gene requires additional genetic factors for the manifestation of severe structural brain malformations. Other syndromic features are present in these patients, including autism spectrum disorders, ocular colobomas, and craniosynostosis, features that are likely affected by the deletion of genes other than TBR1. PMID:23112752

  18. A 500-kb physical map and contig from the Harvey ras-1 gene to the 11p telomere

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, M.W. |; Munroe, D.J.; Bric, E.

    1996-07-15

    A contiguous physical map was constructed from the Harvey ras-1 (HRAS1) gene to the 11p telomere. The contig spans approximately 500 kb and is minimally composed of a telomere-containing YAC and P1 and cosmid clones. Included in the contig are 11 sequence-tagged sites derived from P1 and cosmid ends. Three genes were places on the contig in the following order: telomere-ribonuclease/angiogenin inhibitor (RNH)-Harvey ras-1(HRAS1)-HRAS1-related complex (HRC). Two novel tetranucleotide repeats (heterozygosity of 66 and 68%) and a complex CA repeat (heterozygosity of 78%) were isolated and characterized. 33 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  19. Trapping MBD5 to understand 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Deborah Y; Zhou, Zhaolan

    2014-01-01

    Despite genetic evidence implicating MBD5 as the only overlapping gene between various 2q23.1 microdeletions, the function of MBD5 and its causality to 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome, a disorder characterized by developmental delay and autistic features, has yet to be determined. In this issue of EMBO Molecular Medicine, Camarena et al generate an Mbd5 gene-trap mouse model and show for the first time that mice with reduced MBD5 expression develop behavioral abnormalities with neuronal function deficits, mimicking symptoms in 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome, thus supporting a causal role for MBD5 haploinsufficiency in the disorder. PMID:25001217

  20. The Influence of Microdeletions and Microduplications of 16p11.2 on Global Transcription Profiles.

    PubMed

    Kusenda, Mary; Vacic, Vladimir; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Rodgers, Linda; Pavon, Kevin; Meth, Jennifer; Kumar, Ravinesh A; Christian, Susan L; Peeters, Hilde; Cho, Shawn S; Addington, Anjene; Rapoport, Judith L; Sebat, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) of a 600 kb region on 16p11.2 are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders and changes in brain volume. The authors hypothesize that abnormal brain development associated with this CNV can be attributed to changes in transcriptional regulation. The authors determined the effects of 16p11.2 dosage on gene expression by transcription profiling of lymphoblast cell lines derived from 6 microdeletion carriers, 15 microduplication carriers and 15 controls. Gene dosage had a significant influence on the transcript abundance of a majority (20/34) of genes within the CNV region. In addition, a limited number of genes were dysregulated in trans. Genes most strongly correlated with patient head circumference included SULT1A, KCTD13, and TMEM242. Given the modest effect of 16p11.2 copy number on global transcriptional regulation in lymphocytes, larger studies utilizing neuronal cell types may be needed in order to elucidate the signaling pathways that influence brain development in this genetic disorder. PMID:26391891

  1. Y Choromosomal Microdeletion Screening in The Workup of Male Infertility and Its Current Status in India

    PubMed Central

    Suganthi, Ramaswamy; Vijesh, Vijayabhavanath Vijayakumaran; Vandana, Nambiar; Fathima Ali Benazir, Jahangir

    2014-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is an essential stage in human male gamete development, which is regulated by many Y chromosome specific genes. Most of these genes are centred in a specific region located on the long arm of the human Y chromosome known as the azoospermia factor region (AZF). Deletion events are common in Y chromosome because of its peculiar structural organization. Astonishingly, among the several known genetic causes of male infertility, Y chromosomal microdeletions emerged as the most frequent structural chromosome anomaly associated with the quantitative reduction of sperm. The development of assisted reproductive techniques (ART) like intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and testicular sperm extraction (TESE) helps to bypass the natural barriers of fertilization, but it increases the concern about the transmission of genetic defects. Experimental evidence suggested that the men with Y chromosomal microdeletions vertically transmitted their deletion as well as related fertility disorders to their offspring via these ART techniques. In India, infertility is on alarming rise. ART centres have opened up in virtually every state but still most of the infertility centres in India do not choose to perform Y chromosomal microdeletion diagnosis because of some advanced theoretical reasons. Moreover, there is no consensus among the clinicians about the diagnosis and management of Y chromosomal microdeletion defects. The current review discusses thoroughly the role of Y chromosome microdeletion screening in the workup of male infertility, its significance as a diagnostic test, novel approaches for screening Y deletions and finally a systematic review on the current status of Y chromosome microdeletion deletion screening in India. PMID:24520494

  2. Developmental delay and connective tissue disorder in four patients sharing a common microdeletion at 6q13-14.

    PubMed

    Van Esch, Hilde; Rosser, Elisabeth M; Janssens, Sandra; Van Ingelghem, Ingrid; Loeys, Bart; Menten, Bjorn

    2010-10-01

    Interstitial deletions of the long arm of chromosome 6 are rare, and most reported cases represent large, cytogenetically detectable deletions. The implementation of array comparative genome hybridisation in the diagnostic work-up of patients presenting with congenital disorders, including developmental delay, has enabled identification of many patients with smaller chromosomal imbalances. In this report, the cases are presented of four patients with a de novo interstitial deletion of chromosome 6q13-14, resulting in a common microdeletion of 3.7 Mb. All presented with developmental delay, mild dysmorphism and signs of lax connective tissue. Interestingly, the common deleted region harbours 16 genes, of which COL12A1 is a good candidate for the connective tissue pathology.

  3. Behavioral abnormalities are common and severe in patients with distal 22q11.2 microdeletions and microduplications

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, Valerie; McRae, Anne; Dineen, Richard; Saulsberry, Alexandria; Hoganson, George; Schrift, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We describe six individuals with microdeletions and microduplications in the distal 22q11.2 region detected by microarray. Five of the abnormalities have breakpoints in the low-copy repeats (LCR) in this region and one patient has an atypical rearrangement. Two of the six patients with abnormalities in the region between LCR22 D–E have hearing loss, which has previously been reported only once in association with these abnormalities. We especially note the behavioral/neuropsychiatric problems, including the severity and early onset, in patients with distal 22q11.2 rearrangements. Our patients add to the genotype–phenotype correlations which are still being generated for these chromosomal anomalies. PMID:26247050

  4. Polysaccharide benefits dry storage survival of the biocontrol agent Pseudomonas fluorescens S11:P:12 effective against several maladies of stored potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens S11:P:12 (NRRL B-21133) is a biological control agent able to suppress several storage maladies of potatoes including sprouting, Fusarium dry rot incited by Gibberella pulicaris, pink rot incited by Phytophthora erythroseptica, and late blight incited by Phytophthora infestan...

  5. A cryptic familial rearrangement of 11p15.5, involving both imprinting centers, in a family with a history of short stature.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lindsay A; Rupps, Rosemarie; Peñaherrera, Maria S; Robinson, Wendy P; Patel, Millan S; Eydoux, Patrice; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2014-06-01

    Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, dysmorphic facial features and body asymmetry. Both hypomethylation of the telomeric imprinting control region 1 (ICR1) at 11p15.5 and maternal duplication of 11p15.5 have been implicated in the etiology of this disorder. Here we report the origin and segregation of the first reported between-arm intrachromosomal insertion of 11p15.5 that encompasses both ICR1 and ICR2 in a multigenerational family with a history of short stature. One (or any odd number) crossover within the centromeric segment during meiosis would produce recombinant chromosomes; one with a duplication of the inserted segment and the other a deletion. In this 4-generation family, there were six instances of transmission of the recombinant chromosome with duplication of the11p15.5 segment, which leads to a SRS phenotype when maternally inherited and a Beckwith-Wiedemann phenotype when paternally transmitted. The size of the duplicated region is ~1.9 Mb as determined by microarray analysis. This study provides further evidence that maternally inherited duplications of 11p15.5 result in a SRS phenotype that includes short stature and other variable features. The methylation status of the extra copy of the duplicated region of 11p15.5 ultimately predicts the resulting phenotype. Thus, the different phenotype based on parental mode of transmission is of importance in the genetic counseling of these patients. PMID:24668696

  6. Chromosome 16 microdeletion in a patient with juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (Batten disease)

    SciTech Connect

    Taschner, P.E.M.; Vos, N. de; Thompson, A.D.; Callen, D.F.; Doggett, N.; Mole, S.E.; Dooley, T.P.; Barth, P.G.; Breuning, M.H. |

    1995-03-01

    The gene that is involved in juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL), or Batten disease - CLN3 - has been localized to 16p12, and the mutation shows a strong association with alleles of microsatellite markers D16S298, D16S299, and D16S288. Recently, haplotype analysis of a Batten patient from a consanguineous relationship indicated homozygosity for a D16S298 null allele. PCR analysis with different primers on DNA from the patient and his family suggests the presence of a cytogenetically undetectable deletion, which was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. The microdeletion is embedded in a region containing chromosome 16-specific repeated sequences. However, putative candidates for CLN3, members of the highly homologous sulfotransferase gene family, which are also present in this region in several copies, were not deleted in the patient. If the microdeletion in this patient is responsible for Batten disease, then we conclude that the sulfotransferase genes are probably not involved in JNCL. By use of markers and probes flanking D15S298, the maximum size of the microdeletion was determined to be {approximately}29 kb. The microdeletion may affect the CLN3 gene, which is expected to be in close proximity to D16S298. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Loss-of-function variants of SETD5 cause intellectual disability and the core phenotype of microdeletion 3p25.3 syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kuechler, Alma; Zink, Alexander M; Wieland, Thomas; Lüdecke, Hermann-Josef; Cremer, Kirsten; Salviati, Leonardo; Magini, Pamela; Najafi, Kimia; Zweier, Christiane; Czeschik, Johanna Christina; Aretz, Stefan; Endele, Sabine; Tamburrino, Federica; Pinato, Claudia; Clementi, Maurizio; Gundlach, Jasmin; Maylahn, Carina; Mazzanti, Laura; Wohlleber, Eva; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Kariminejad, Roxana; Schlessinger, Avner; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Strom, Tim M; Novarino, Gaia; Engels, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) has an estimated prevalence of 2–3%. Due to its extreme heterogeneity, the genetic basis of ID remains elusive in many cases. Recently, whole exome sequencing (WES) studies revealed that a large proportion of sporadic cases are caused by de novo gene variants. To identify further genes involved in ID, we performed WES in 250 patients with unexplained ID and their unaffected parents and included exomes of 51 previously sequenced child–parents trios in the analysis. Exome analysis revealed de novo intragenic variants in SET domain-containing 5 (SETD5) in two patients. One patient carried a nonsense variant, and the other an 81 bp deletion located across a splice-donor site. Chromosomal microarray diagnostics further identified four de novo non-recurrent microdeletions encompassing SETD5. CRISPR/Cas9 mutation modelling of the two intragenic variants demonstrated nonsense-mediated decay of the resulting transcripts, pointing to a loss-of-function (LoF) and haploinsufficiency as the common disease-causing mechanism of intragenic SETD5 sequence variants and SETD5-containing microdeletions. In silico domain prediction of SETD5, a predicted SET domain-containing histone methyltransferase (HMT), substantiated the presence of a SET domain and identified a novel putative PHD domain, strengthening a functional link to well-known histone-modifying ID genes. All six patients presented with ID and certain facial dysmorphisms, suggesting that SETD5 sequence variants contribute substantially to the microdeletion 3p25.3 phenotype. The present report of two SETD5 LoF variants in 301 patients demonstrates a prevalence of 0.7% and thus SETD5 variants as a relatively frequent cause of ID. PMID:25138099

  8. 46,XY disorder of sex development and developmental delay associated with a novel 9q33.3 microdeletion encompassing NR5A1

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Tracy; Blanchard, Leah; Desai, Khyati; Nimkarn, Saroj; Cohen, Ninette; Edelmann, Lisa; Mehta, Lakshmi

    2013-01-01

    Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) is a nuclear receptor encoded by the NR5A1 gene. SF1 affects both sexual and adrenal development through the regulation of target gene expression. Genotypic male and female SF1 knockout mice have adrenal and gonadal agenesis with persistent Müllerian structures and early lethality. There have been several reports of NR5A1 mutations in individuals with 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis (CGD) or other disorders of sex development (DSD) with or without an adrenal phenotype. To date microdeletions involving NR5A1 have been reported in only two patients with DSDs. We report a novel microdeletion encompassing NR5A1 in a patient with 46,XY DSD and developmental delay. The phenotypically female patient initially presented with mild developmental delay and dysmorphisms. Chromosome analysis revealed a 46,XY karyotype. A 1.54 Mb microdeletion of chromosome 9q33.3 including NR5A1 was detected by array CGH and confirmed by FISH. Normal maternal FISH results indicated that this was most likely a de novo event. Since most NR5A1 mutations have been ascertained through gonadal or adrenal abnormalities, the additional findings of developmental delay and minor facial dysmorphisms are possibly related to haploinsufficiency of other genes within the 1.54 Mb deleted region. This report further confirms the role of NR5A1 deletions in 46,XY DSD and reinforces the utility of aCGH in the work up of DSDs of unclear etiology. PMID:24056159

  9. Evaluation of H.264/AVC over IEEE 802.11p vehicular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozas-Ramallal, Ismael; Fernández-Caramés, Tiago M.; Dapena, Adriana; García-Naya, José Antonio

    2013-12-01

    The capacity of vehicular networks to offer non-safety services, like infotainment applications or the exchange of multimedia information between vehicles, have attracted a great deal of attention to the field of Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS). In particular, in this article we focus our attention on IEEE 802.11p which defines enhancements to IEEE 802.11 required to support ITS applications. We present an FPGA-based testbed developed to evaluate H.264/AVC (Advanced Video Coding) video transmission over vehicular networks. The testbed covers some of the most common situations in vehicle-to-vehicle and roadside-to-vehicle communications and it is highly flexible, allowing the performance evaluation of different vehicular standard configurations. We also show several experimental results to illustrate the quality obtained when H.264/AVC encoded video is transmitted over IEEE 802.11p networks. The quality is measured considering two important parameters: the percentage of recovered group of pictures and the frame quality. In order to improve performance, we propose to substitute the convolutional channel encoder used in IEEE 802.11p for a low-density parity-check code encoder. In addition, we suggest a simple strategy to decide the optimum number of iterations needed to decode each packet received.

  10. Evidence for linkage of a new region (11p14) to eczema and allergic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Guilloud-Bataille, Michel; Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Bousquet, Jean; Charpin, Denis; Gormand, Frédéric; Hochez, Joëlle; Just, Jocelyne; Lemainque, Arnaud; Le Moual, Nicole; Matran, Régis; Neukirch, Françoise; Oryszczyn, Marie-Pierre; Paty, Evelyne; Pin, Isabelle; Vervloet, Daniel; Kauffmann, Francine; Lathrop, Mark; Demenais, Florence; Dizier, Marie-Hélène

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Asthma, allergic rhinitis (AR) and atopic dermatitis also called eczema are allergic co-morbidites which are likely to depend on pleiotropic genetic effects as well as on specific genetic factors. After a previous genome-wide linkage screen conducted for asthma and AR in a sample of 295 French EGEA families ascertained through asthmatic subjects, the aim here was to search for genetic factors involved in eczema and more particularly those ones shared by the three allergic diseases using the same EGEA data. In this sake, eczema and phenotypes of ‘allergic disease’ accounting for the joint information on the presence/absence of the three diseases were examined by linkage analyses using the Maximum Likelihood Binomial (MLB) method. A fine mapping was carried out in regions detected for potential linkage, followed by association studies using the Family Based Association Test (FBAT). Evidence for linkage to 11p14 region was shown for ‘allergic disease’ and eczema. Linkage was also indicated between eczema and 5q13 and between ‘allergic disease’ and both 5p15 and 17q21 regions. Fine mapping supported the evidence of linkage to 11p14 and FBAT analyses showed association between ‘allergic disease’ and a marker located at the linkage peak on 11p14. Further investigations in this region will allow identifying genetic factor(s) which could have pleiotropic effect in the three allergic diseases. PMID:17943316

  11. Further delineation of the 15q13 microdeletion and duplication syndromes: A clinical spectrum varying from non-pathogenic to a severe outcome

    PubMed Central

    van Bon, B.W.M.; Mefford, H.C.; Menten, B.; Koolen, D. A.; Sharp, A. J.; Nillesen, W.M.; Innis, J.W.; de Ravel, T.J.L.; Mercer, C.L.; Fichera, M.; Stewart, H.; Connell, L. E.; Õunap, K.; Lachlan, K.; Castle, B.; Van der Aa, N.; van Ravenswaaij, C.; Nobrega, M.A.; Serra-Juhé, C; Simonic, I.; de Leeuw, N.; Pfundt, R.; Bongers, E.M.; Baker, C.; Finnemore, P.; Huang, S.; Maloney, V.K.; Crolla, J.A.; van Kalmthout, M.; Elia, M.; Vandeweyer, G.; Fryns, J.P.; Janssens, S.; Foulds, N.; Reitano, S.; Smith, K.; Parkel, S.; Loeys, B.; Woods, C.G.; Oostra, A.; Speleman, F.; Pereira, A.C.; Kurg, A.; Willatt, L.; Knight, S.J.L.; Vermeesch, J.R.; Romano, C.; Barber, J.C.; Mortier, G.; Pérez-Jurado, L.A.; Kooy, F.; Brunner, H.G.; Eichler, E.E.; Kleefstra, T.; de Vries, B.B.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Recurrent 15q13.3 microdeletions were recently identified with identical proximal (BP4) and distal (BP5) breakpoints and associated with mild to moderate mental retardation and epilepsy. Methods To further assess the clinical implications of this novel 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome, eighteen new probands with a deletion were molecularly and clinically characterised. In addition, we evaluated the characteristics of a family with a more proximal deletion between BP3 and BP4. Finally, four patients with a duplication in the BP3-BP4-BP5 region were included in this study to ascertain the clinical significance of duplications in this region. Results The 15q13.3 microdeletion in our series was associated with a highly variable intra- and inter-familial phenotype. At least 11 of the 18 deletions identified were inherited. Moreover, 7 of 10 siblings from four different families also had this deletion: one had a mild developmental delay, four had only learning problems during childhood, but functioned well in daily life as adults, whereas the other two had no learning problems at all. In contrast to previous findings, seizures were not a common feature in our series (only 2 of 17 living probands). Three patients with deletions had cardiac defects and deletion of the KLF13 gene, located in the critical region, may contribute to these abnormalities. The limited data from the single family with the more proximal BP3-BP4 deletion suggest this deletion may have little clinical significance. Patients with duplications of the BP3-BP4-BP5 region did not share a recognizable phenotype, but psychiatric disease was noted in 2 of 4 patients. Conclusions Overall, our findings broaden the phenotypic spectrum associated with 15q13.3 deletions and suggest that, in some individuals, deletion of 15q13.3 is not sufficient to cause disease. The existence of microdeletion syndromes, associated with an unpredictable and variable phenotypic outcome, will pose the clinician with

  12. Hippocampal Malrotation is Associated with Chromosome 22q11.2 Microdeletion

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Danielle M.; Krings, Timo; Chow, Eva W.C.; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Bassett, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) are at a seven fold increased risk of developing seizures. However, only a fraction of these patients exhibit structural abnormalities such as polymicrogyria (PMG) and periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) that are known to cause seizures and to be associated with 22q11DS. In this study we used a dedicated seizure imaging protocol to look for additional structural abnormalities in these individuals that may explain the elevated risk of seizure disorder in this patient group. Methods Nineteen consecutive adult subjects with 22q11DS underwent a 3 Tesla MRI with a dedicated high-resolution seizure protocol. Neurological exam was performed in all patients. Genome-wide analysis excluded the presence of other pathogenic microdeletions or duplications. Results Structural abnormalities were found in 11 of 14 subjects with sufficient image quality. These included three patients with PNH, one of whom had associated PMG. In addition, there was a surprisingly high prevalence of unilateral hippocampal malrotation (HIMAL), observed in 9 of 14 cases (64%). EEG findings showed interictal epileptiform discharges with focal distribution in four patients and generalized discharges in one patient. Conclusion The results suggest that, in addition to other known structural abnormalities, 22q11DS is associated with HIMAL. It has been suggested that this developmental abnormality of the hippocampus may predispose or otherwise contribute to epileptogenesis. However in this study we observed HIMAL in a large proportion of patients, with and without epilepsy. Therefore, other as yet unknown factors may contribute to the high prevalence of epilepsy in this population. PMID:23968937

  13. The 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome: clinical and behavioural phenotype

    PubMed Central

    van Bon, Bregje WM; Koolen, David A; Brueton, Louise; McMullan, Dominic; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D; Adès, Lesley C; Peters, Gregory; Gibson, Kate; Novara, Francesca; Pramparo, Tiziano; Bernardina, Bernardo Dalla; Zoccante, Leonardo; Balottin, Umberto; Piazza, Fausta; Pecile, Vanna; Gasparini, Paolo; Guerci, Veronica; Kets, Marleen; Pfundt, Rolph; de Brouwer, Arjan P; Veltman, Joris A; de Leeuw, Nicole; Wilson, Meredith; Antony, Jayne; Reitano, Santina; Luciano, Daniela; Fichera, Marco; Romano, Corrado; Brunner, Han G; Zuffardi, Orsetta; de Vries, Bert BA

    2010-01-01

    Six submicroscopic deletions comprising chromosome band 2q23.1 in patients with severe mental retardation (MR), short stature, microcephaly and epilepsy have been reported, suggesting that haploinsufficiency of one or more genes in the 2q23.1 region might be responsible for the common phenotypic features in these patients. In this study, we report the molecular and clinical characterisation of nine new 2q23.1 deletion patients and a clinical update on two previously reported patients. All patients were mentally retarded with pronounced speech delay and additional abnormalities including short stature, seizures, microcephaly and coarse facies. The majority of cases presented with stereotypic repetitive behaviour, a disturbed sleep pattern and a broad-based gait. These features led to the initial clinical impression of Angelman, Rett or Smith–Magenis syndromes in several patients. The overlapping 2q23.1 deletion region in all 15 patients comprises only one gene, namely, MBD5. Interestingly, MBD5 is a member of the methyl CpG-binding domain protein family, which also comprises MECP2, mutated in Rett's syndrome. Another gene in the 2q23.1 region, EPC2, was deleted in 12 patients who had a broader phenotype than those with a deletion of MBD5 only. EPC2 is a member of the polycomb protein family, involved in heterochromatin formation and might be involved in causing MR. Patients with a 2q23.1 microdeletion present with a variable phenotype and the diagnosis should be considered in mentally retarded children with coarse facies, seizures, disturbed sleeping patterns and additional specific behavioural problems. PMID:19809484

  14. The 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome: clinical and behavioural phenotype.

    PubMed

    van Bon, Bregje W M; Koolen, David A; Brueton, Louise; McMullan, Dominic; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D; Adès, Lesley C; Peters, Gregory; Gibson, Kate; Moloney, Susan; Novara, Francesca; Pramparo, Tiziano; Dalla Bernardina, Bernardo; Zoccante, Leonardo; Balottin, Umberto; Piazza, Fausta; Pecile, Vanna; Gasparini, Paolo; Guerci, Veronica; Kets, Marleen; Pfundt, Rolph; de Brouwer, Arjan P; Veltman, Joris A; de Leeuw, Nicole; Wilson, Meredith; Antony, Jayne; Reitano, Santina; Luciano, Daniela; Fichera, Marco; Romano, Corrado; Brunner, Han G; Zuffardi, Orsetta; de Vries, Bert B A

    2010-02-01

    Six submicroscopic deletions comprising chromosome band 2q23.1 in patients with severe mental retardation (MR), short stature, microcephaly and epilepsy have been reported, suggesting that haploinsufficiency of one or more genes in the 2q23.1 region might be responsible for the common phenotypic features in these patients. In this study, we report the molecular and clinical characterisation of nine new 2q23.1 deletion patients and a clinical update on two previously reported patients. All patients were mentally retarded with pronounced speech delay and additional abnormalities including short stature, seizures, microcephaly and coarse facies. The majority of cases presented with stereotypic repetitive behaviour, a disturbed sleep pattern and a broad-based gait. These features led to the initial clinical impression of Angelman, Rett or Smith-Magenis syndromes in several patients. The overlapping 2q23.1 deletion region in all 15 patients comprises only one gene, namely, MBD5. Interestingly, MBD5 is a member of the methyl CpG-binding domain protein family, which also comprises MECP2, mutated in Rett's syndrome. Another gene in the 2q23.1 region, EPC2, was deleted in 12 patients who had a broader phenotype than those with a deletion of MBD5 only. EPC2 is a member of the polycomb protein family, involved in heterochromatin formation and might be involved in causing MR. Patients with a 2q23.1 microdeletion present with a variable phenotype and the diagnosis should be considered in mentally retarded children with coarse facies, seizures, disturbed sleeping patterns and additional specific behavioural problems.

  15. Establishment of a Conditionally Immortalized Wilms Tumor Cell Line with a Homozygous WT1 Deletion within a Heterozygous 11p13 Deletion and UPD Limited to 11p15

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Artur; Löhers, Katharina; Beier, Manfred; Leube, Barbara; de Torres, Carmen; Mora, Jaume; Arora, Parineeta; Jat, Parmjit S.; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    We describe a stromal predominant Wilms tumor with focal anaplasia and a complex, tumor specific chromosome 11 aberration: a homozygous deletion of the entire WT1 gene within a heterozygous 11p13 deletion and an additional region of uniparental disomy (UPD) limited to 11p15.5-p15.2 including the IGF2 gene. The tumor carried a heterozygous p.T41A mutation in CTNNB1. Cells established from the tumor carried the same chromosome 11 aberration, but a different, homozygous p.S45Δ CTNNB1 mutation. Uniparental disomy (UPD) 3p21.3pter lead to the homozygous CTNNB1 mutation. The tumor cell line was immortalized using the catalytic subunit of human telomerase (hTERT) in conjunction with a novel thermolabile mutant (U19dl89-97tsA58) of SV40 large T antigen (LT). This cell line is cytogenetically stable and can be grown indefinitely representing a valuable tool to study the effect of a complete lack of WT1 in tumor cells. The origin/fate of Wilms tumors with WT1 mutations is currently poorly defined. Here we studied the expression of several genes expressed in early kidney development, e.g. FOXD1, PAX3, SIX1, OSR1, OSR2 and MEIS1 and show that these are expressed at similar levels in the parental and the immortalized Wilms10 cells. In addition the limited potential for muscle/ osteogenic/ adipogenic differentiation similar to all other WT1 mutant cell lines is also observed in the Wilms10 tumor cell line and this is retained in the immortalized cells. In summary these Wilms10 cells are a valuable model system for functional studies of WT1 mutant cells. PMID:27213811

  16. Homozygosity mapping, to chromosome 11p, of the gene for familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, P M; Cote, G J; Hallman, D M; Mathew, P M

    1995-02-01

    Familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI) is a rare, autosomal recessive disease of unregulated insulin secretion, defined by elevations in serum insulin despite severe hypoglycemia. We used the homozygosity gene-mapping strategy to localize this disorder to the region of chromosome 11p between markers D11S1334 and D11S899 (maximum LOD score 5.02 [theta = 0] at marker D11S926) in five consanguineous families of Saudi Arabian origin. These results extend those of a recent report that also placed PHHI on chromosome 11p, between markers D11S926 and D11S928. Comparison of the boundaries of these two overlapping regions allows the PHHI locus to be assigned to the 4-cM region between the markers D11S926 and D11S899. Identification of this gene may allow a better understanding of other disorders of glucose homeostasis, by providing insight into the regulation of insulin release.

  17. Homozygosity mapping, to chromosome 11p, of the gene for familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, P.M.; Cote, G.J.; Hallman, D.M.; Mathew, P.M.

    1995-02-01

    Familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI) is a rare, autosomal recessive disease of unregulated insulin secretion, defined by elevations in serum insulin despite severe hypoglycemia. We used the homozygosity gene-mapping strategy to localize this disorder to the region of chromosome 11p between markers D11S1334 and D11S899 (maximum LOD score 5.02 [{theta} = 0] at marker D11S926) in five consanguineous families of Saudi Arabian origin. These results extend those of a recent report that also placed PHHI on chromosome 11p, between markers D11S926 and D11S928. Comparison of the boundaries of these two overlapping regions allows the PHHI locus to be assigned to the 4-cM region between the markers D11S926 and D11S899. Identification of this gene may allow a better understanding of other disorders of glucose homeostasis, by providing insight into the regulation of insulin release. 37 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Anophthalmia, hearing loss, abnormal pituitary development and response to growth hormone therapy in three children with microdeletions of 14q22q23

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microdeletions of 14q22q23 have been associated with eye abnormalities and pituitary defects. Other phenotypic features in deletion carriers including hearing loss and response to growth hormone therapy are less well recognized. We studied genotype and phenotype of three newly identified children with 14q22q23 deletions, two girls and one boy with bilateral anophthalmia, and compared them with previously published deletion patients and individuals with intragenic defects in genes residing in the region. Results The three deletions were de novo and ranged in size between 5.8 and 8.9 Mb. All three children lacked one copy of the OTX2 gene and in one of them the deletion involved also the BMP4 gene. All three patients presented partial conductive hearing loss which tended to improve with age. Analysis of endocrine and growth phenotypes showed undetectable anterior pituitary, growth hormone deficiency and progressive growth retardation in all three patients. Growth hormone therapy led to partial catch-up growth in two of the three patients but just prevented further height loss in the third. Conclusions The pituitary hypoplasia, growth hormone deficiency and growth retardation associated with 14q22q23 microdeletions are very remarkable, and the latter appears to have an atypical response to growth hormone therapy in some of the cases. PMID:24581273

  19. Clinical report of microphthalmia and optic nerve coloboma associated with a de novo microdeletion of chromosome 16p11.2.

    PubMed

    Bardakjian, Tanya M; Kwok, Simon; Slavotinek, Anne M; Schneider, Adele S

    2010-12-01

    Anophthalmia and microphthalmia are etiologically and clinically heterogeneous. We present a 13-year-old boy with microphthalmia and multiple anomalies who was evaluated as part of our research into the etiology of microphthalmia. His clinical features included left microphthalmia, persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous and posterior coloboma, right posterior pole coloboma, pectus excavatum, mild hypotonia, mild delays in speech and motor development, and an anxiety disorder with social difficulties. Investigations with a chromosome microarray revealed a de novo deletion of chromosome 16p11.2 of approximately 882 kb in size. Deletions of this region of chromosome 16p11.2 are a newly delineated microdeletion syndrome, but this is the first report of microphthalmia and coloboma associated with monosomy for 16p11.2, and emphasizes the clinical variability that can be present with this deletion. This report contributes to the growing knowledge regarding this microdeletion and suggests that rare copy number changes may be a cause of microphthalmia and other eye anomalies.

  20. Disruption of Mbd5 in mice causes neuronal functional deficits and neurobehavioral abnormalities consistent with 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Camarena, Vladimir; Cao, Lei; Abad, Clemer; Abrams, Alexander; Toledo, Yaima; Araki, Kimi; Araki, Masatake; Walz, Katherina; Young, Juan I

    2014-01-01

    2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome is characterized by intellectual disability, motor delay, autistic-like behaviors, and a distinctive craniofacial phenotype. All patients carry a partial or total deletion of methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 5 (MBD5), suggesting that haploinsufficiency of this gene is responsible for the phenotype. To confirm this hypothesis and to examine the role of MBD5 in vivo, we have generated and characterized an Mbd5 gene-trap mouse model. Our study indicates that the Mbd5+/GT mouse model recapitulates most of the hallmark phenotypes observed in 2q23.1 deletion carriers including abnormal social behavior, cognitive impairment, and motor and craniofacial abnormalities. In addition, neuronal cultures uncovered a deficiency in neurite outgrowth. These findings support a causal role of MBD5 in 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome and suggest a role for MBD5 in neuronal processes. The Mbd5+/GT mouse model will advance our understanding of the abnormal brain development underlying the emergence of 2q23.1 deletion-associated behavioral and cognitive symptoms. Subject Categories Genetics, Gene Therapy & Genetic Disease; Neuroscience PMID:25001218

  1. Positive regulation of apoptosis by HCA66, a new Apaf-1 interacting protein, and its putative role in the physiopathology of NF1 microdeletion syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Piddubnyak, V; Rigou, P; Michel, L; Rain, J-C; Geneste, O; Wolkenstein, P; Vidaud, D; Hickman, J A; Mauviel, A; Poyet, J-L

    2007-06-01

    As a component of the apoptosome, a caspase-activating complex, Apaf-1 plays a central role in the mitochondrial caspase activation pathway of apoptosis. We report here the identification of a novel Apaf-1 interacting protein, hepatocellular carcinoma antigen 66 (HCA66) that is able to modulate selectively Apaf-1-dependent apoptosis through its direct association with the CED4 domain of Apaf-1. Expression of HCA66 was able to potentiate Apaf-1, but not receptor-mediated apoptosis, by increasing downstream caspase activity following cytochrome c release from the mitochondria. Conversely, cells depleted of HCA66 were severely impaired for apoptosome-dependent apoptosis. Interestingly, expression of the Apaf-1-interacting domain of HCA66 had the opposite effect of the full-length protein, interfering with the Apaf-1 apoptotic pathway. Using a cell-free system, we showed that reduction of HCA66 expression was associated with a diminished amount of caspase-9 in the apoptosome, resulting in a lower ability of the apoptosome to activate caspase-3. HCA66 maps to chromosome 17q11.2 and is among the genes heterozygously deleted in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) microdeletion syndrome patients. These patients often have a distinct phenotype compared to other NF1 patients, including a more severe tumour burden. Our results suggest that reduced expression of HCA66, owing to haploinsufficiency of HCA66 gene, could render NF1 microdeleted patients-derived cells less susceptible to apoptosis.

  2. Breakpoint Associated with a novel 2.3 Mb deletion in the VCFS region of 22q11 and the role of Alu (SINE) in recurring microdeletions

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Raihan K; Zhang, Yang; Siu, Victoria Mok; Fan, Yao-Shan; O'Reilly, Richard L; Rao, Jay; Singh, Shiva M

    2006-01-01

    Background Chromosome 22q11.2 region is highly susceptible to rearrangement, specifically deletions that give rise to a variety of genomic disorders including velocardiofacial or DiGeorge syndrome. Individuals with this 22q11 microdeletion syndrome are at a greatly increased risk to develop schizophrenia. Methods Genotype analysis was carried out on the DNA from a patient with the 22q11 microdeletion using genetic markers and custom primer sets to define the deletion. Bioinformatic analysis was performed for molecular characterization of the deletion breakpoint sequences in this patient. Results This 22q11 deletion patient was established to have a novel 2.3 Mb deletion with a proximal breakpoint located between genetic markers RH48663 and RH48348 and a distal breakpoint between markers D22S1138 and SHGC-145314. Molecular characterization of the sequences at the breakpoints revealed a 270 bp shared sequence of the breakpoint regions (SSBR) common to both ends that share >90% sequence similarity to each other and also to short interspersed nuclear elements/Alu elements. Conclusion This Alu sequence like SSBR is commonly in the proximity of all known deletion breakpoints of 22q11 region and also in the low copy repeat regions (LCRs). This sequence may represent a preferred sequence in the breakpoint regions or LCRs for intra-chromosomal homologous recombination mechanisms resulting in common 22q11 deletion. PMID:16512914

  3. Definition of 5q11.2 microdeletion syndrome reveals overlap with CHARGE syndrome and 22q11 deletion syndrome phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Snijders Blok, Charlotte; Corsten-Janssen, Nicole; FitzPatrick, David R; Romano, Corrado; Fichera, Marco; Vitello, Girolamo Aurelio; Willemsen, Marjolein H; Schoots, Jeroen; Pfundt, Rolph; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M A; Hoefsloot, Lies; Kleefstra, Tjitske

    2014-11-01

    Microdeletions of the 5q11.2 region are rare; in literature only two patients with a deletion in this region have been reported so far. In this study, we describe four additional patients and further define this new 5q11.2 microdeletion syndrome. A comparison of the features observed in all six patients with overlapping 5q11.2 deletions showed a phenotypic spectrum that overlaps with CHARGE syndrome and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome including choanal atresia, developmental delay, heart defects, external ear abnormalities, and short stature. No colobomas or abnormalities of semicircular canals and olfactory nerves were reported. Two male patients had genital abnormalities. We estimated a 2.0 Mb (53.0-55.0 Mb) Shortest Region of Overlap (SRO) for the main clinical characteristics of the syndrome. This region contains nine genes and two non-coding microRNAs. In this region DHX29 serves as the candidate gene as it encodes an ATP-dependent RNA-helicase that is involved in the initiation of RNA translation. Screening a small cohort of 14 patients who presented the main features, however, did not reveal any pathogenic abnormalities of DHX29.

  4. Disruption of Mbd5 in mice causes neuronal functional deficits and neurobehavioral abnormalities consistent with 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Camarena, Vladimir; Cao, Lei; Abad, Clemer; Abrams, Alexander; Toledo, Yaima; Araki, Kimi; Araki, Masatake; Walz, Katherina; Young, Juan I

    2014-01-01

    2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome is characterized by intellectual disability, motor delay, autistic-like behaviors, and a distinctive craniofacial phenotype. All patients carry a partial or total deletion of methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 5 (MBD5), suggesting that haploinsufficiency of this gene is responsible for the phenotype. To confirm this hypothesis and to examine the role of MBD5 in vivo, we have generated and characterized an Mbd5 gene-trap mouse model. Our study indicates that the Mbd5(+/) (GT) mouse model recapitulates most of the hallmark phenotypes observed in 2q23.1 deletion carriers including abnormal social behavior, cognitive impairment, and motor and craniofacial abnormalities. In addition, neuronal cultures uncovered a deficiency in neurite outgrowth. These findings support a causal role of MBD5 in 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome and suggest a role for MBD5 in neuronal processes. The Mbd5(+/) (GT) mouse model will advance our understanding of the abnormal brain development underlying the emergence of 2q23.1 deletion-associated behavioral and cognitive symptoms.

  5. Nasal speech and hypothyroidism are common hallmarks of 12q15 microdeletions.

    PubMed

    Vergult, Sarah; Krgovic, Danijela; Loeys, Bart; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Liedén, Agne; Anderlid, Britt-Marie; Sharkey, Freddie; Joss, Shelagh; Mortier, Geert; Menten, Björn

    2011-10-01

    The introduction of array CGH in clinical diagnostics has led to the discovery of many new microdeletion/microduplication syndromes. Most of them are rare and often present with a variable range of clinical anomalies. In this study we report three patients with a de novo overlapping microdeletion of chromosome bands 12q15q21.1. The deletions are ∼2.5 Mb in size, with a 1.34-Mb common deleted region containing six RefSeq genes. All three patients present with learning disability or developmental delay, nasal speech and hypothyroidism. In this paper we will further elaborate on the genotype-phenotype correlation associated with this deletion and compare our patients with previously reported cases. PMID:21505450

  6. [Screening of azoospermia factor microdeletions on Y chromosome in infertile men by QF-PCR].

    PubMed

    Yuanyuan, Zhang; Qiang, Du; Xiaoliang, Liu; Wanting, Cui; Rong, He; Yanyan, Zhao

    2014-06-01

    To assess the application of quantitative fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (QF-PCR) on rapid screening of azoospermia factor (AZF) microdeletions, 1218 infertile men with non-obstructive azoospermia or oligospermia were detected for 9 sequence tagged sites (STSs) in AZF region by multiplex QF-PCR combined with capillary electrophoresis. AMEL (amelogenin) as well as SRY (sex-determining region of Y chromosome) located on short arm of sex chromosome was selected as internal control. Karyotyping was performed on Giemsa-banded metaphase chromosomes of peripheral blood lymphocytes. Of the 1218 patients, 105 (8.62%) were identified as AZF microdeletions. Deletion of AZFc (67.62%) was the most frequent, followed by deletion of AZFb,c (20.95%), AZFb (7.62%) and AZFa (3.81%). Five patients presented with deletions of both AZFa,b,c and AMEL-Y, indicating sex reversal which was confirmed to be 46,XX by karyotyping. Among the 105 patients with AZF microdeletions, 16 were karyotyped as chromosomal anomalies, most commonly 46,XY,Yqh- (75%, 12/16). In addition, of the total 1218 patients examined, 86 patients showed abnormal AMEL-X/AMEL- Y ratio, suggesting a possibility of sex chromosome anomalies, and 68 of them were verified as sex chromosome aneuploid by karyotyping. Multiplex QF-PCR is capable to detect all markers in one reaction and is also suggestive for sex chromosome anomalies. It could serve as an effective technique for screening Y-microdeletions, and thus have general application in diagnosis and treatment of male infertility.

  7. Aberrant splicing of the PTPRD gene mimics microdeletions identified at this locus in neuroblastomas.

    PubMed

    Nair, Prakash; De Preter, Katleen; DePreter, Katleen; Vandesompele, Jo; Speleman, Frank; Stallings, Raymond L

    2008-03-01

    Neuroblastoma (NBL), a pediatric tumor arising from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system, is characterized by numerous recurrent large-scale chromosomal imbalances. High resolution oligonucleotide array CGH analysis of NBL has previously identified microdeletions that are confined to the 5' UTR of the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor D (PTPRD) gene, implicating this gene in the pathogenesis of these tumors. Here, we demonstrate that the 5' UTR of this gene, consisting of 11 noncoding exons, is also aberrantly spliced in >50% of NBL primary tumors and cell lines. The loss of exons from the 5' UTR region through aberrant splicing results in aberrant mRNA isoforms that are similar to those generated through microdeletions. The aberrant splicing or microdeletion of 5' UTR exons in such a high proportion of tumors indicates that loss of these exons dys-regulates the mRNA sequence. To further validate the role of PTPRD in NBL, we have examined the expression of this gene in normal fetal adrenal neuroblasts (the cell of origin of NBL) and in tumors from patients with either low stage or high stage disease. This gene is expressed at lower levels in high stage NBL tumors, particularly those with amplification of MYCN, relative to low stage tumors or normal fetal adrenal neuroblasts, consistent with the possibility that loss of the 5' UTR exons have destabilized the mRNA.

  8. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and imprinted genes on chromosome 11p15.5

    SciTech Connect

    Weksberg, R.; Perlikowski, S.; Squire, J.

    1994-09-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a syndrome characterized by generalized and regional overgrowth as well as a predisposition to specific embryonal tumors. We have previously reported biallelic expression of insulin like growth factor 2 (IGF2) in fibroblasts from sporadic cases of BWS. In these cells, the normal expression pattern for IGF2 is allele-specific and derived from the paternal allele. To determine whether biallelic expression of IGF2 in BWS patients results from aberrant regulation of a single gene or multiple genes in an imprinted domain, we undertook the study of a second gene in the 11p15.5 imprinted region. H19 is normally stringently regulated, expressed primarily from the maternal allele, and in many tissues reciprocal expression of H19 and IGF2 has been documented. Since no protein product for H19 has been identified, the RNA itself may be biologically active and it may have a tumor suppressor function. Moreover, H19 has been suggested as a candidate gene in BWS, especially in autosomal dominant pedigrees. Using an Rsa1 polymorphism in the transcribed region of H19, we found that the expression of H19 in 8 patients with sporadic BWS is consistently nonallelic and in the informative cases is always from the maternal allele. This is also true for the two cases of BWS where biallelic IGF2 expression has been documented. We conclude that IGF2 biallelic expression does not represent a general loss of imprint control. If H19 and IGF2 do normally respond to common signals within an imprinted domain at 11p15.5, we suggest that BWS patients with biallelic IGF2 expression can escape from such imprinting constraints. To study this region in more detail, we have developed a replication timing assay for IGF2 and H19 to determine whether loss of asynchronous replication accompanies biallelic IGF2 expression.

  9. A novel familial 11p15.4 microduplication associated with intellectual disability, dysmorphic features, and obesity with involvement of the ZNF214 gene.

    PubMed

    Sofos, Elvera; Pescosolido, Matthew F; Quintos, Jose B; Abuelo, Dianne; Gunn, Shelly; Hovanes, Karine; Morrow, Eric M; Shur, Natasha

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated a patient with mild intellectual disability, obesity, overgrowth, and dysmorphic features. Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis showed a single copy number increase of a BAC clone in the 11p15.4 region. Oligonucleotide aCGH refined the duplication to approximately 2.29  megabases (Mb) in size. Testing the parents revealed that the father, who had learning disabilities and overgrowth, also had the 11p15.4 duplication, and the mother had a normal microarray. In addition, the patient's brother and grandmother all share clinical features with the proband and tested positive for the duplication. The duplicated region (Chr11:6,934,067-9,220,605) encompasses 29 genes, including the ZNF214 gene, which has been postulated to play a role in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome [Alders et al., 2000]. This three-generation pedigree outlines features of a novel microduplication syndrome.

  10. An inferential study of the phenotype for the chromosome 15q24 microdeletion syndrome: a bootstrap analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Prado, Dolores; Cortés, Ernesto; Aguilar-Segura, María Soledad; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco

    2016-01-01

    In January 2012, a review of the cases of chromosome 15q24 microdeletion syndrome was published. However, this study did not include inferential statistics. The aims of the present study were to update the literature search and calculate confidence intervals for the prevalence of each phenotype using bootstrap methodology. Published case reports of patients with the syndrome that included detailed information about breakpoints and phenotype were sought and 36 were included. Deletions in megabase (Mb) pairs were determined to calculate the size of the interstitial deletion of the phenotypes studied in 2012. To determine confidence intervals for the prevalence of the phenotype and the interstitial loss, we used bootstrap methodology. Using the bootstrap percentiles method, we found wide variability in the prevalence of the different phenotypes (3–100%). The mean interstitial deletion size was 2.72 Mb (95% CI [2.35–3.10 Mb]). In comparison with our work, which expanded the literature search by 45 months, there were differences in the prevalence of 17% of the phenotypes, indicating that more studies are needed to analyze this rare disease. PMID:26925314

  11. An inferential study of the phenotype for the chromosome 15q24 microdeletion syndrome: a bootstrap analysis.

    PubMed

    Palazón-Bru, Antonio; Ramírez-Prado, Dolores; Cortés, Ernesto; Aguilar-Segura, María Soledad; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco

    2016-01-01

    In January 2012, a review of the cases of chromosome 15q24 microdeletion syndrome was published. However, this study did not include inferential statistics. The aims of the present study were to update the literature search and calculate confidence intervals for the prevalence of each phenotype using bootstrap methodology. Published case reports of patients with the syndrome that included detailed information about breakpoints and phenotype were sought and 36 were included. Deletions in megabase (Mb) pairs were determined to calculate the size of the interstitial deletion of the phenotypes studied in 2012. To determine confidence intervals for the prevalence of the phenotype and the interstitial loss, we used bootstrap methodology. Using the bootstrap percentiles method, we found wide variability in the prevalence of the different phenotypes (3-100%). The mean interstitial deletion size was 2.72 Mb (95% CI [2.35-3.10 Mb]). In comparison with our work, which expanded the literature search by 45 months, there were differences in the prevalence of 17% of the phenotypes, indicating that more studies are needed to analyze this rare disease.

  12. Excess functional copy of allele at chromosomal region 11p15 may cause Wiedemann-Beckwith (EMG) syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, T.; Saitoh, S.; Jinno, Y.; Niikawa, N.; Matsumoto, T.; Narahara, K.; Fukushima, Y.

    1994-02-15

    Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome (WBS) is a genetic disorder with overgrowth and predisposition to Wilms` tumor. The putative locus of the gene responsible for this syndrome is assigned to chromosome region 11p15.5, and genomic imprinting in this region has been proposed: the paternally derived gene(s) at 11p15.5 is selectively expressed, while the maternally transmitted gene(s) is inactive. The authors examined 18 patients for the parental origin of their 11p15 regions. DNA polymorphism analyses using 6 loci on chromosome 11 showed that 2 patients with duplications of 11p15 regions from their respective fathers and one from the mother, indicating the transmission of an excessive paternal gene at 11p15 to each patient. The result, together with the previous findings in karyotypically normal or abnormal patients and in overgrowth mouse experiments, are consistent with imprinting hypothesis that overexpression of paternally derived gene(s) at 11p15.5, probably the human insulin-like growth factor II (IFG-II) gene, may cause the phenotype. Total constitutional uniparental paternal disomy (UPD) or segmental UPD for the 6 loci examined of chromosome 11 was not observed in our 12 sporadic patients. In order to explain completely the inheritance of this syndrome in patients with various chromosomal constitutions, the authors propose an alternative imprinting mechanism involving the other locus that may be paternally imprinted and may suppress the expression of this gene. 28 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Renal carcinoma with (6;11)(p21;q12) translocation: report of an adult case.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Akira; Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Takamori, Hiroki; Kuroda, Naoto

    2011-09-01

    An extremely rare adult example of renal carcinoma with t(6;11)(p21;q12 or q13) is presented here. The tumor of a 45-year-old Japanese male, excised under the diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma, was a well circumscribed 7 cm mass with light brown sectioned surfaces. Histologically, it was composed of a major population of large polygonal epithelioid cells in a nested alveolar growth and a subpopulation of smaller cells clustering around hyaline basement membrane material. The former cells possessed ample, clear to eosinophilic granular cytoplasm with well-defined cell borders and the latter was frequently accompanied by psammomatous calcification. These tumor cells exhibited immunoreactivity for melanoma markers, transcription factor EB and cathepsin K, but were not reactive for epithelial markers and transcription factor E3. While pulmonary metastatic foci that were noted preoperatively progressed rapidly following interferon-based therapy, subsequent sunitinib malate yielded a partial response and stabilized the lung metastasis for 6 months after surgery. We could trace 20 cases of 6p21 translocation renal carcinoma, among which only four were in individuals older than 40 years. Description of a new case like this is important since little is known about the prognosis and treatment of adult patients with this condition.

  14. Candida tropicalis Antifungal Cross-Resistance Is Related to Different Azole Target (Erg11p) Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Forastiero, A.; Mesa-Arango, A. C.; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A.; Alcazar-Fuoli, L.; Bernal-Martinez, L.; Pelaez, T.; Lopez, J. F.; Grimalt, J. O.; Gomez-Lopez, A.; Cuesta, I.; Zaragoza, O.

    2013-01-01

    Candida tropicalis ranks between third and fourth among Candida species most commonly isolated from clinical specimens. Invasive candidiasis and candidemia are treated with amphotericin B or echinocandins as first-line therapy, with extended-spectrum triazoles as acceptable alternatives. Candida tropicalis is usually susceptible to all antifungal agents, although several azole drug-resistant clinical isolates are being reported. However, C. tropicalis resistant to amphotericin B is uncommon, and only a few strains have reliably demonstrated a high level of resistance to this agent. The resistance mechanisms operating in C. tropicalis strains isolated from clinical samples showing resistance to azole drugs alone or with amphotericin B cross-resistance were elucidated. Antifungal drug resistance was related to mutations of the azole target (Erg11p) with or without alterations of the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway. The antifungal drug resistance shown in vitro correlated very well with the results obtained in vivo using the model host Galleria mellonella. Using this panel of strains, the G. mellonella model system was validated as a simple, nonmammalian minihost model that can be used to study in vitro-in vivo correlation of antifungals in C. tropicalis. The development in C. tropicalis of antifungal drug resistance with different mechanisms during antifungal treatment has potential clinical impact and deserves specific prospective studies. PMID:23877676

  15. The D4 dopamine receptor gene maps on 11p proximal to HRAS

    SciTech Connect

    Petronis, A.; Kennedy, J.L.; Van Tol, H.H.M. ); Lichter, J.B.; Livak, K.J. )

    1993-10-01

    The dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) is of high interest in neuropsychiatric illness due to its anatomical distribution in the limbic system and its relatively high affinity for the atypical antipsychotic clozapine. Also, D4 receptors are expressed in cardiac tissue, and D4 maps in the same region as the inherited cardiac disease referred to as Long QT syndrome. DRD4 was genetically mapped near the tip of the short arm of chromosome 11, close to the oncogene Harvey-RAS (HRAS). Multipoint linkage analysis of several large families could not define the location of DRD4 proximal versus distal to HRAS, although it was evident that DRD4 was located distal to the gene for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). A proximal localization of DRD4 relative to HRAS was thus demonstrated. The localization is inferred from a single recombination event, and additional studies on families segregating analyzed polymorphisms would be valuable. Exact order of the genes on 11p15 will greatly assist the resolving power of linkage studies in this region, as applied to neuropsychiatric diseases, as well as Long QT syndrome and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

  16. A new case of 13q12.2q13.1 microdeletion syndrome contributes to phenotype delineation.

    PubMed

    Mandrile, Giorgia; Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Calcia, Alessandro; Brussino, Alessandro; Grosso, Enrico; Savin, Elisa; Giachino, Daniela Francesca; Brusco, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    A recently described genetic disorder has been associated with 13q12.3 microdeletion spanning three genes, namely, KATNAL1, LINC00426, and HMGB1. Here, we report a new case with similar clinical features that we have followed from birth to 5 years old. The child carried a complex rearrangement with a double translocation: 46,XX,t(7;13)(p15;q14),t(11;15)(q23;q22). Array-CGH identified a de novo microdeletion at 13q12.2q13.1 spanning 3-3.4 Mb and overlapping 13q12.3 critical region. Clinical features resembling those reported in the literature confirm the existence of a distinct 13q12.3 microdeletion syndrome and provide further evidence that is useful to characterize its phenotypic expression during the 5 years of development.

  17. Fryns syndrome phenotype caused by chromosome microdeletions at 15q26.2 and 8p23.1

    PubMed Central

    Slavotinek, A; Lee, S; Davis, R; Shrit, A; Leppig, K; Rhim, J; Jasnosz, K; Albertson, D; Pinkel, D

    2005-01-01

    Background: Fryns syndrome (FS) is the commonest autosomal recessive syndrome in which congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a cardinal feature. It has been estimated that 10% of patients with CDH have FS. The autosomal recessive inheritance in FS contrasts with the sporadic inheritance for the majority of patients with CDH and renders the correct diagnosis critical for accurate genetic counselling. The cause of FS is unknown. Methods: We have used array comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH) to screen patients who have CDH and additional phenotypic anomalies consistent with FS for cryptic chromosome aberrations. Results: We present three probands who were previously diagnosed with FS who had submicroscopic chromosome deletions detected by array CGH after normal karyotyping with G-banded chromosome analysis. Two female infants were found to have microdeletions involving chromosome band 15q26.2 and one male had a deletion of chromosome band 8p23.1. Conclusions: We conclude that phenotypes similar to FS can be caused by submicroscopic chromosome deletions and that high resolution karyotyping, including array CGH if possible, should be performed prior to the diagnosis of FS to provide an accurate recurrence risk in patients with CDH and physical anomalies consistent with FS. PMID:16141010

  18. Allelic imbalances and microdeletions affecting the PTPRD gene in cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas detected using single nucleotide polymorphism microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Purdie, Karin J; Lambert, Sally R; Teh, Muy-Teck; Chaplin, Tracy; Molloy, Gael; Raghavan, Manoj; Kelsell, David P; Leigh, Irene M; Harwood, Catherine A; Proby, Charlotte M; Young, Bryan D

    2007-07-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) are the second most commonly diagnosed cancers in fair-skinned people; yet the genetic mechanisms involved in SCC tumorigenesis remain poorly understood. We have used single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray analysis to examine genome-wide allelic imbalance in 16 primary and 2 lymph node metastatic SCC using paired non-tumour samples to counteract normal copy number variation. The most common genetic change was loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on 9p, observed in 13 of 16 primary SCC. Other recurrent events included LOH on 3p (9 tumors), 2q, 8p, and 13 (each in 8 SCC) and allelic gain on 3q and 8q (each in 6 tumors). Copy number-neutral LOH was observed in a proportion of samples, implying that somatic recombination had led to acquired uniparental disomy, an event not previously demonstrated in SCC. As well as recurrent patterns of gross chromosomal changes, SNP microarray analysis revealed, in 2 primary SCC, a homozygous microdeletion on 9p23 within the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type D (PTPRD) locus, an emerging frequent target of homozygous deletion in lung cancer and neuroblastoma. A third sample was heterozygously deleted within this locus and PTPRD expression was aberrant. Two of the 3 primary SCC with PTPRD deletion had demonstrated metastatic potential. Our data identify PTPRD as a candidate tumor suppressor gene in cutaneous SCC with a possible association with metastasis.

  19. Prospective assessment of Y-chromosome microdeletions and reproductive outcomes among infertile couples of Japanese and African origin

    PubMed Central

    Kihaile, Paul E; Yasui, Atsushi; Shuto, Yoshihiro

    2005-01-01

    Background To compare the frequency of Y-chromosome microdeletions in Japanese and African azoospermic and oligozoospermic men and describe embryo characteristics and reproductive outcome following in vitro fertilization (IVF) with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Methods Our study was performed prospectively at two centers, a private IVF clinic and a university hospital. Japanese and African (Tanzanian) men with nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA) and oligozoospermia (concentration < 5 × 106 /ml) were evaluated for Y-chromosome microdeletions (n = 162). Of the 47 men with NOA, 26 were Japanese and 21 were Africans. Of the 115 men with oligozoospermia, 87 were Japanese and 28 were Africans. Reproductive outcomes of patients with Y-chromosome microdeletions were then compared with those of 19 IVF+ICSI cycles performed on couples with Y-chromosome intact males/tubal factor infertility which served as a control group. Results Seven azoospermic and oligozoospermic patients had Y-chromosome deletions; the total number of deletions in the AZFc region was five. There was only one deletion in the AZFa region and one complete deletion involving all three regions (AZFa, b, and c) within AZF. In our study population, microdeletion frequency among Japanese men was 6.2% (95% CI, 4.25% – 14.45%), whereas no deletions were identified in the African group (95% CI, 0.0% – 7.27%). The difference between the two groups was not statistically significant, however. Embryos derived from ICSI utilizing sperm with Y-chromosome microdeletion showed reduced rates of fertilization, blastocyst development, implantation, and pregnancy compared to the Y-chromosome intact group, although these observed differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion The observed frequency of Y-chromosome microdeletion was 6.2% among Japanese azoospermic and oligozoospermic males; no microdeletions were identified among our African study patients. In this population of couples undergoing IVF

  20. Severe sex differentiation disorder in a boy with a 3.8 Mb 10q25.3-q26.12 microdeletion encompassing EMX2.

    PubMed

    Piard, Juliette; Mignot, Brigitte; Arbez-Gindre, Francine; Aubert, Didier; Morel, Yves; Roze, Virginie; McElreavy, Kenneth; Jonveaux, Philippe; Valduga, Mylène; Van Maldergem, Lionel

    2014-10-01

    The molecular basis of male disorders of sex development (DSD) remains unexplained in a large number of cases. EMX2 has been proposed to play a role in the masculinization process for the past two decades, but formal evidence for this causal role is scarce. The aim of this study is to yield additional support to this hypothesis by reporting on a male patient who presented with 46,XY DSD, a single kidney, intellectual disability, and the smallest microdeletion including EMX2 reported to date. EMX2 haploinsufficiency is likely to explain the masculinization defect observed in our patient, similar to what has been described in the mouse. In the case of cytogenetically diagnosed cases, deletions of EMX2 have been associated with a wide range of DSD, ranging from hypospadias to complete sex reversal.

  1. Birth seasonality in Korean Prader-Willi syndrome with chromosome 15 microdeletion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Aram; Lee, Yeon Hee; Nam, Soon Young; Jeong, Yu Ju; Kyung, Yechan; Huh, Rimm; Lee, Jieun; Kwun, Younghee; Cho, Sung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a well-known genetic disorder, and microdeletion on chromosome 15 is the most common causal mechanism. Several previous studies have suggested that various environmental factors might be related to the pathogenesis of microdeletion in PWS. In this study, we investigated birth seasonality in Korean PWS. Methods A total of 211 PWS patients born from 1980 to 2014 were diagnosed by methylation polymerase chain reaction at Samsung Medical Center. Of the 211 patients, 138 were born from 2000-2013. Among them, the 74 patients of a deletion group and the 22 patients of a maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) group were compared with general populations born from 2000 using the Walter and Elwood method and cosinor analysis. Results There was no statistical significance in seasonal variation in births of the total 211 patients with PWS (χ2=7.2522, P=0.2982). However, a significant difference was found in the monthly variation between PWS with the deletion group and the at-risk general population (P<0.05). In the cosinor model, the peak month of birth for PWS patients in the deletion group was January, while the nadir occurred in July, with statistical significance (amplitude=0.23, phase=1.2, low point=7.2). The UPD group showed the peak birth month in spring; however, this result was not statistically significant (χ2=3.39, P=0.1836). Conclusion Correlation with birth seasonality was identified in a deletion group of Korean PWS patients. Further studies are required to identify the mechanism related to seasonal effects of environmental factors on microdeletion on chromosome 15. PMID:25883926

  2. High Levels of Sample-to-Sample Variation Confound Data Analysis for Non-Invasive Prenatal Screening of Fetal Microdeletions.

    PubMed

    Chu, Tianjiao; Yeniterzi, Suveyda; Yatsenko, Svetlana A; Dunkel, Mary; Shaw, Patricia A; Bunce, Kimberly D; Peters, David G

    2016-01-01

    Our goal was to test the hypothesis that inter-individual genomic copy number variation in control samples is a confounding factor in the non-invasive prenatal detection of fetal microdeletions via the sequence-based analysis of maternal plasma DNA. The database of genomic variants (DGV) was used to determine the "Genomic Variants Frequency" (GVF) for each 50kb region in the human genome. Whole genome sequencing of fifteen karyotypically normal maternal plasma and six CVS DNA controls samples was performed. The coefficient of variation of relative read counts (cv.RTC) for these samples was determined for each 50kb region. Maternal plasma from two pregnancies affected with a chromosome 5p microdeletion was also sequenced, and analyzed using the GCREM algorithm. We found strong correlation between high variance in read counts and GVF amongst controls. Consequently we were unable to confirm the presence of the microdeletion via sequencing of maternal plasma samples obtained from two sequential affected pregnancies. Caution should be exercised when performing NIPT for microdeletions. It is vital to develop our understanding of the factors that impact the sensitivity and specificity of these approaches. In particular, benign copy number variation amongst controls is a major confounder, and their effects should be corrected bioinformatically. PMID:27249650

  3. High Levels of Sample-to-Sample Variation Confound Data Analysis for Non-Invasive Prenatal Screening of Fetal Microdeletions

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Tianjiao; Yeniterzi, Suveyda; Yatsenko, Svetlana A.; Dunkel, Mary; Shaw, Patricia A.; Bunce, Kimberly D.; Peters, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Our goal was to test the hypothesis that inter-individual genomic copy number variation in control samples is a confounding factor in the non-invasive prenatal detection of fetal microdeletions via the sequence-based analysis of maternal plasma DNA. The database of genomic variants (DGV) was used to determine the “Genomic Variants Frequency” (GVF) for each 50kb region in the human genome. Whole genome sequencing of fifteen karyotypically normal maternal plasma and six CVS DNA controls samples was performed. The coefficient of variation of relative read counts (cv.RTC) for these samples was determined for each 50kb region. Maternal plasma from two pregnancies affected with a chromosome 5p microdeletion was also sequenced, and analyzed using the GCREM algorithm. We found strong correlation between high variance in read counts and GVF amongst controls. Consequently we were unable to confirm the presence of the microdeletion via sequencing of maternal plasma samples obtained from two sequential affected pregnancies. Caution should be exercised when performing NIPT for microdeletions. It is vital to develop our understanding of the factors that impact the sensitivity and specificity of these approaches. In particular, benign copy number variation amongst controls is a major confounder, and their effects should be corrected bioinformatically. PMID:27249650

  4. Pedigrees of infertile Chinese men with Y chromosome microdeletions derived from natural transmission and de novo mutation.

    PubMed

    Li, L L; Zhu, Y Z; Yu, X W; Wang, R X; Hu, Z M; Liu, R Z

    2015-01-01

    Y chromosome microdeletions can cause male infertility and are classified as natural transmission and de novo mutations. To examine the source of these deletions in Chinese men and to provide a theoretical and laboratory basis for genetic counseling, patients from Northeast China with primary male infertility (N = 22) and their fathers were investigated. Karyotype analysis was performed on peripheral blood lymphocytes using standard G-banding. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction amplification using 18 specific sequence-tagged sites was selected to detect Y chromosome microdeletions. De novo mutations were observed in 17 father-son pairs, leading to a mutation rate of 77.27% (17/22), while the vertical transmission of Yq AZFc microdeletions was detected in 5 cases of the families investigated (29.41%, 5/17). There were no statistically significant differences between vertically transmitted and de novo mutations in men with AZFc deletions regarding age, testicular volume, and reproductive hormone levels. Most Y chromosome microdeletions in men from Northeast China are the result of de novo mutations via natural conception, and men with Yq AZFc deletions showed no clear differences between vertical transmission and de novo mutations.

  5. Copy number variation and microdeletions of the Y chromosome linked genes and loci across different categories of Indian infertile males

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Anju; Yadav, Sandeep Kumar; Misro, Man Mohan; Ahmad, Jamal; Ali, Sher

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed 34 azoospermic (AZ), 43 oligospermic (OS), and 40 infertile males with normal spermiogram (INS) together with 55 normal fertile males (NFM) from the Indian population. AZ showed more microdeletions in the AZFa and AZFb regions whereas oligospermic ones showed more microdeletions in the AZFc region. Frequency of the AZF partial deletions was higher in males with spermatogenic impairments than in INS. Significantly, SRY, DAZ and BPY2 genes showed copy number variation across different categories of the patients and much reduced copies of the DYZ1 repeat arrays compared to that in normal fertile males. Likewise, INS showed microdeletions, sequence and copy number variation of several Y linked genes and loci. In the context of infertility, STS deletions and copy number variations both were statistically significant (p = 0.001). Thus, semen samples used during in vitro fertilization (IVF) and assisted reproductive technology (ART) must be assessed for the microdeletions of AZFa, b and c regions in addition to the affected genes reported herein. Present study is envisaged to be useful for DNA based diagnosis of different categories of the infertile males lending support to genetic counseling to the couples aspiring to avail assisted reproductive technologies. PMID:26638807

  6. Renal cell carcinomas with t(6;11) (p21;q12): presentation of two cases with computed tomography findings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, YiJun; Yao, Jin; Chen, Ni; Zeng, Hao; Zhang, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Renal cell carcinomas with t(6;11) (p21;q12) translocation are extremely rare and primarily affect children and young adults. To our knowledge, there has been no case report focusing on the imaging manifestations in the existing literature. Hence, we describe the computed tomography findings of two young adults.

  7. Microdeletions of chromosome 17p13.3 markers in an unselected survey of probands with type I lissencephaly

    SciTech Connect

    Giannakoudis, J.; Wrisch, A.; Farber, C.

    1994-09-01

    Type I lissencephaly (MIM No.247200, McKusick, 1992), a brain malformation characterized by a smooth cerebral surface, exhibits a four-layered cortex and leads to mental retardation and other neurological anomalies. Lissencephaly, type I occurs either isolated (ILS) or in association with dysmorphic facial features (Miller-Dieker syndrome, MDS). Microdeletions were detected within a 350 kb critical segment in 17p13.3 in about 13% of patients with ILS and about 90% with MDS. Most of these patients were selected for molecular analysis, however, by an already known abnormal karyotype. Therefore, the diagnostic value of microsatellite and VNTR markers to identify deletions in unselected ILS/MDS patients is still unknown. We have tested the respective significance of a novel (CA)17 VNDR element (D17S379) and of the VNTR marker YNZ22 (D17S5) to identify deletions in an unselected survey of 28 ILS/MDS patients. For D17S379, 50% of our patients were heterozygous, while 46% were uninformative with respect to segregation of alleles within their family. One patient (3.6%) was shown to be deleted for a paternal allele. PCR for D17S5, which maps proximal to the ILS region, disclosed a deletion in 3 patients (10.7%), including the one seen also by D17S379. Altogether, 75% were heterozygous and only 14% uninformative for this locus. Our results suggest that the combined PCR analysis for two of the most significant markers within the ILS/MDS region disclose a deletion in about 10% of unselected patients with features of type I lissencephaly. The low frequency of deletions detected may reflect different mutation mechanisms, genetic heterogeneity, the need for more densely spaced markers around the critical region, and/or more strict clinical criteria for defining the study group.

  8. 4p16.3 microdeletions and microduplications detected by chromosomal microarray analysis: New insights into mechanisms and critical regions.

    PubMed

    Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau-Wai; Breman, Amy M; Bacino, Carlos A

    2016-10-01

    Deletions in the 4p16.3 region cause Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, a well known contiguous microdeletion syndrome with the critical region for common phenotype mapped in WHSCR2. Recently, duplications in 4p16.3 were reported in three patients with developmental delay and dysmorphic features. Through chromosomal microarray analysis, we identified 156 patients with a deletion (n = 109) or duplication (n = 47) in 4p16.3 out of approximately 60,000 patients analyzed by Baylor Miraca Genetics Laboratories. Seventy-five of the postnatally detected deletions encompassed the entire critical region, 32 (43%) of which were associated with other chromosome rearrangements, including six patients (8%) that had a duplication adjacent to the terminal deletion. Our data indicate that Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome deletions with an adjacent duplication occur at a higher frequency than previously appreciated. Pure deletions (n = 14) or duplications (n = 15) without other copy number changes distal to or inside the WHSCR2 were identified for mapping of critical regions. Our data suggest that deletion of the segment from 0.6 to 0.9 Mb from the terminus of 4p causes a seizure phenotype and duplications of a region distal to the previously defined smallest region of overlap for 4p16.3 microduplication syndrome are associated with neurodevelopmental problems. We detected seven Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome deletions and one 4p16.3 duplication prenatally; all of the seven are either >8 Mb in size and/or associated with large duplications. In conclusion, our study provides deeper insight into the molecular mechanisms, the critical regions and effective prenatal diagnosis for 4p16.3 deletions/ duplications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Nonimmune fetal hydrops and placentomegaly: Diagnosis of familial Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome with trisomy 11p15 using FISH

    SciTech Connect

    Drut, R.M.; Drut, R.

    1996-03-15

    We have studied a family in which four members of the same generation were affected with Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome (WBS). Trisomy 11p15 was demonstrated using molecular probes in interphase nuclei of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded placenta from a stillborn fetus and in peripheral blood lymphocytes from two liveborn female relatives. Clinical examination showed nonimmune hydrops and placentomegaly in two siblings and multiple phenotypic abnormalities consistent with WBS in the two other relatives. Paternal karyotype of the stillborn infants demonstrated a reciprocal translocation (46,XY,t(10;11) (q26;p15)) explaining the origin of the extra 11p15 material. This study illustrates the advantages of FISH for interphase analysis of chromosome aberrations otherwise not detected even by conventional cytogenetic analysis and documents that nonimmune hydrops associated with placentomegaly may be presenting features in familial WBS. 24 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Engineering microdeletions and microduplications by targeting segmental duplications with CRISPR

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Derek J. C.; Ragavendran, Ashok; Manavalan, Poornima; Stortchevoi, Alexei; Seabra, Catarina M.; Erdin, Serkan; Collins, Ryan L.; Blumenthal, Ian; Chen, Xiaoli; Shen, Yiping; Sahin, Mustafa; Zhang, Chengsheng; Lee, Charles; Gusella, James F.; Talkowski, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent, reciprocal genomic disorders resulting from non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between near-identical segmental duplications (SDs) are a major cause of human disease, often producing phenotypically distinct syndromes. The genomic architecture of flanking SDs presents a significant challenge for modeling these syndromes; however, the capability to efficiently generate reciprocal copy number variants (CNVs) that mimic NAHR would represent an invaluable modeling tool. We describe here a CRISPR/Cas9 genome engineering method, Single-guide-CRISPR/Cas-targeting-Of-Repetitive-Elements (SCORE), to model reciprocal genomic disorders and demonstrate its capabilities by generating reciprocal CNVs of 16p11.2 and 15q13.3, including alteration of one copy-equivalent of the SDs that mediate NAHR in vivo. The method is reproducible and RNAseq reliably clusters transcriptional signatures from human subjects with in vivo CNV and their corresponding in vitro models. This new approach will provide broad applicability for the study of genomic disorders and, with further development, may also permit efficient correction of these defects. PMID:26829649

  11. Engineering microdeletions and microduplications by targeting segmental duplications with CRISPR.

    PubMed

    Tai, Derek J C; Ragavendran, Ashok; Manavalan, Poornima; Stortchevoi, Alexei; Seabra, Catarina M; Erdin, Serkan; Collins, Ryan L; Blumenthal, Ian; Chen, Xiaoli; Shen, Yiping; Sahin, Mustafa; Zhang, Chengsheng; Lee, Charles; Gusella, James F; Talkowski, Michael E

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent, reciprocal genomic disorders resulting from non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between near-identical segmental duplications (SDs) are a major cause of human disease, often producing phenotypically distinct syndromes. The genomic architecture of flanking SDs presents a challenge for modeling these syndromes; however, the capability to efficiently generate reciprocal copy number variants (CNVs) that mimic NAHR would represent a valuable modeling tool. We describe here a CRISPR/Cas9 genome engineering method, single-guide CRISPR/Cas targeting of repetitive elements (SCORE), to model reciprocal genomic disorders and demonstrate its capabilities by generating reciprocal CNVs of 16p11.2 and 15q13.3, including alteration of one copy-equivalent of the SDs that mediate NAHR in vivo. The method is reproducible, and RNA sequencing reliably clusters transcriptional signatures from human subjects with in vivo CNVs and their corresponding in vitro models. This new approach will provide broad applicability for the study of genomic disorders and, with further development, may also permit efficient correction of these defects.

  12. Engineering microdeletions and microduplications by targeting segmental duplications with CRISPR.

    PubMed

    Tai, Derek J C; Ragavendran, Ashok; Manavalan, Poornima; Stortchevoi, Alexei; Seabra, Catarina M; Erdin, Serkan; Collins, Ryan L; Blumenthal, Ian; Chen, Xiaoli; Shen, Yiping; Sahin, Mustafa; Zhang, Chengsheng; Lee, Charles; Gusella, James F; Talkowski, Michael E

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent, reciprocal genomic disorders resulting from non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between near-identical segmental duplications (SDs) are a major cause of human disease, often producing phenotypically distinct syndromes. The genomic architecture of flanking SDs presents a challenge for modeling these syndromes; however, the capability to efficiently generate reciprocal copy number variants (CNVs) that mimic NAHR would represent a valuable modeling tool. We describe here a CRISPR/Cas9 genome engineering method, single-guide CRISPR/Cas targeting of repetitive elements (SCORE), to model reciprocal genomic disorders and demonstrate its capabilities by generating reciprocal CNVs of 16p11.2 and 15q13.3, including alteration of one copy-equivalent of the SDs that mediate NAHR in vivo. The method is reproducible, and RNA sequencing reliably clusters transcriptional signatures from human subjects with in vivo CNVs and their corresponding in vitro models. This new approach will provide broad applicability for the study of genomic disorders and, with further development, may also permit efficient correction of these defects. PMID:26829649

  13. 12q14 Microdeletions: Additional Case Series with Confirmation of a Macrocephaly Region

    PubMed Central

    Mc Cormack, Adrian; Sharpe, Cynthia; Gregersen, Nerine; Smith, Warwick; Hayes, Ian; George, Alice M.; Love, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    To date, there have been only a few reports of patients carrying a microdeletion in chromosome 12q14. These patients usually present with pre- and postnatal growth retardation, and developmental delay. Here we report on two additional patients with both genotype and phenotype differences. Similar to previously published cases, one patient has haploinsufficiency of the HMGA2 gene and shows severe short stature and developmental delay. The second patient is only one of a handful without the loss of the HMGA2 gene and shows a much better growth profile, but with absolute macrocephaly. This patient's deletion is unique and hence defines a likely macrocephaly locus that contributes to the general phenotype characterising the 12q14 syndrome. PMID:26266063

  14. Chromosome anomalies and Y chromosome microdeletions as causal factors in male infertility.

    PubMed

    Chandley, A C

    1998-04-01

    Among the 10% or so of men who are diagnosed as oligo- or azoospermic in the absence of any physical obstruction, research is now showing that between 8 and 15% carry a microdeletion in the long arm of the Y chromosome which, by loss of specific DNA segments, leads to loss of vital genes for sperm production. Chromosomal anomalies account for approximately 2% of all men who attend infertility clinics, rising to 15% among those with azoospermia. There are serious implications for couples seeking help by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), since chromosomal or gene defects which might normally be lost or eliminated by natural means could be transmitted in offspring. The need for genetic testing of ICSI donors and their offspring is raised, and a requirement for counselling is recommended. PMID:9663769

  15. An association of 19p13.2 microdeletions with Malan syndrome and Chiari malformation.

    PubMed

    Shimojima, Keiko; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Tamasaki, Akiko; Sangu, Noriko; Shimada, Shino; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2015-04-01

    Patients with microdeletions in the 19p13.2 chromosomal region show developmental delays, overgrowth, and distinctive features with big head appearances. These manifestations are now recognized as Sotos syndrome-like features (Sotos syndrome 2) or Malan syndrome. We identified three female patients with 19p13.2 deletions involving NFIX, a gene responsible for Malan syndrome. We compared the genotypic and phenotypic data of these patients with those of the patients previously reported. The most of the clinical features were found to overlap; however, Chiari malformation type I was observed in two of the three patients evaluated in this study. Because Chiari malformation type I has never been reported in the patients with NSD1-related Sotos syndrome, this finding indicates the possible role of 19p13.2 deletion in patients with mimicking features of Sotos syndrome but have negative NSD1 testing results.

  16. Microdeletions of 3q29 Confer High Risk for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Mulle, Jennifer Gladys; Dodd, Anne F.; McGrath, John A.; Wolyniec, Paula S.; Mitchell, Adele A.; Shetty, Amol C.; Sobreira, Nara L.; Valle, David; Rudd, M. Katharine; Satten, Glen; Cutler, David J.; Pulver, Ann E.; Warren, Stephen T.

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a severe psychiatric illness that affects ∼1% of the population and has a strong genetic underpinning. Recently, genome-wide analysis of copy-number variation (CNV) has implicated rare and de novo events as important in SZ. Here, we report a genome-wide analysis of 245 SZ cases and 490 controls, all of Ashkenazi Jewish descent. Because many studies have found an excess burden of large, rare deletions in cases, we limited our analysis to deletions over 500 kb in size. We observed seven large, rare deletions in cases, with 57% of these being de novo. We focused on one 836 kb de novo deletion at chromosome 3q29 that falls within a 1.3–1.6 Mb deletion previously identified in children with intellectual disability (ID) and autism, because increasing evidence suggests an overlap of specific rare copy-number variants (CNVs) between autism and SZ. By combining our data with prior CNV studies of SZ and analysis of the data of the Genetic Association Information Network (GAIN), we identified six 3q29 deletions among 7545 schizophrenic subjects and one among 39,748 controls, resulting in a statistically significant association with SZ (p = 0.02) and an odds ratio estimate of 17 (95% confidence interval: 1.36–1198.4). Moreover, this 3q29 deletion region contains two linkage peaks from prior SZ family studies, and the minimal deletion interval implicates 20 annotated genes, including PAK2 and DLG1, both paralogous to X-linked ID genes and now strong candidates for SZ susceptibility. PMID:20691406

  17. A complex microdeletion 17q12 phenotype in a patient with recurrent de novo membranous nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Microdeletions on chromosome 17q12 cause of diverse spectrum of disorders and have only recently been identified as a rare cause of Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuester-Hauser-Syndrome (MRKH), which is characterized by uterus aplasia ± partial/complete vaginal aplasia in females with a regular karyotype. For the first time we report about a patient with a 17q12 microdeletion who is affected by MRKH in combination with a vascular and soft tissue disorder. Repeatedly she suffered from kidney transplant failure caused by consuming membranous nephropathy. Case presentation A 38-year-old female patient had been diagnosed with right kidney aplasia, left kidney dysplasia and significantly impaired renal function during infancy. Aged 16 she had to start hemodialysis. Three years later she received her first kidney transplant. Only then she was diagnosed with MRKH. The kidney transplant was lost due to consuming nephrotic syndrome caused by de novo membranous nephropathy, as was a second kidney transplant years later. In addition, a hyperelasticity syndrome affects the patient with congenital joint laxity, kyphoscoliosis, bilateral hip dysplasia, persistent hypermobility of both elbows, knees and hips. Her clinical picture resembles a combination of traits of a hypermobile and a vascular form of Ehlers-Danlos-Syndrome, but no mutations in the COL3A1 gene was underlying. Instead, array-based comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) detected a heterozygous 1.43 Mb deletion on chromosome 17q12 encompassing the two renal developmental genes HNF1β and LHX1. Conclusions Deletions of HNF1β have recently drawn significant attention in pediatric nephrology as an important cause of prenatally hyperechogenic kidneys, renal aplasia and renal hypodysplasia. In contrast, membranous nephropathy represents an often-unaccounted cause of nephrotic syndrome in the adult population. A causative connection between theses two conditions has never been postulated, but is suggestive enough in

  18. Clinical characterization of a male patient with the recently described 8q21.11 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quintela, Ines; Barros, Francisco; Castro-Gago, Manuel; Carracedo, Angel; Eiris, Jesus

    2015-06-01

    The 8q21.11 microdeletion syndrome (OMIM # 614230) has been recently described and is primarily characterized by intellectual disability and facial dysmorphism. We describe here a male patient of 9 years 9 months of age with moderate intellectual disability and dysmorphic facial features. A high resolution copy number variation analysis, performed with the Affymetrix Cytogenetics Whole-Genome 2.7 M SNP array, allowed the identification of a heterozygous 7.069 Mb microdeletion at chromosome 8q21.11-q21.13. Clinical comparison of our patient with literature shows many similarities. However, the whole facial appearance of our patient, especially the elongated rather than rounded face and the absence of a wide nasal bridge and epicanthal folds, confers him a phenotype similar only to a subset, but not to the majority, of the hitherto described patients. PMID:25898976

  19. VATER/VACTERL Association and Caudal Regression with Xq25-q27.3 Microdeletion: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Puvabanditsin, Surasak; Van Gurp, James; February, Melissa; Khalil, Marwa; Mayne, Julia; Ai McConnell, Jennifer; Mehta, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    We report a term female neonate with vertebral anomalies, anal and urethral atresia, esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF), renal agenesis, pulmonary hypoplasia, genital and sacral appendages, and a single umbilical artery. Genetic studies revealed a 20.91 Mb interstitial deletion of the long arm of X chromosome: Xq25-q27.3. This is a new case of VATER/VACTERL association with Xq25 microdeletion. PMID:26881326

  20. Recurrent Microdeletions at Xq27.3-Xq28 and Male Infertility: A Study in the Czech Population

    PubMed Central

    Chylíková, Blanka; Hrdlička, Ivan; Veselá, Kamila; Řežábek, Karel; Liška, František

    2016-01-01

    Background Genetic causes of male infertility are hypothesized to involve multiple types of mutations, from single gene defects to complex chromosome rearrangements. Recently, several recurrent X-chromosome microdeletions (located in subtelomeric region of the long arm) were reported to be associated with male infertility in Spanish and Italian males. The aim of our study was to test their prevalence and infertility association in population of men from the Czech Republic. Methods 107 males with pathological sperm evaluation resulting in nonobstructive infertility were compared to 131 males with normal fecundity. X-chromosome microdeletions were assessed by +/- PCR with three primer pairs for each region Xcnv64 (Xq27.3), Xcnv67 (Xq28) and Xcnv69 (Xq28). The latter microdeletion was further characterized by amplification across the deleted region, dividing the deletion into three types; A, B and C. Results We detected presence of isolated Xcnv64 deletion in 3 patients and 14 controls, and Xcnv69 in 3 patients and 6 controls (1 and 1 patient vs.4 and 1 control for types A and B respectively). There was one control with combined Xcnv64 and Xcnv69 type B deletions, and one patient with combination of Xcnv64 and Xcnv69 type C deletions. The frequency of the deletions was thus not higher in patient compared to control group, Xcnv64 was marginally associated with controls (adjusted Fisher´s exact test P = 0.043), Xcnv69 was not associated (P = 0.452). We excluded presence of more extensive rearrangements in two subjects with combined Xcnv64 and Xcnv69 deletions. There was no Xcnv67 deletion in our cohort. Conclusion In conclusion, the two previously reported X-linked microdeletions (Xcnv64 and Xcnv69) do not seem to confer a significant risk to impaired spermatogenesis in the Czech population. The potential clinical role of the previously reported patient-specific Xcnv67 remains to be determined in a larger study population. PMID:27257673

  1. 16p13.11 microdeletion in a patient with hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Miteff, Christina I; Smith, Robert L; Bain, Nicole L; Subramanian, Gopinath; Brown, Janis E; Kamien, Ben

    2015-01-01

    We describe a patient with hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome. The pathophysiology of hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome remains uncertain and there are probably multiple potential contributing factors. Our patient had a chromosomal 16p13.11 microdeletion that confers susceptibility to various types of epilepsy. This is the first report detailing an association of hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome with a 16p13.11 deletion and identifies another potential causal factor for hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome. PMID:24453159

  2. Interplay between promoter methylation and chromosomal loss in gene silencing at 3p11-p14 in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lando, Malin; Fjeldbo, Christina S; Wilting, Saskia M; Snoek, Barbara C; Aarnes, Eva-Katrine; Forsberg, Malin F; Kristensen, Gunnar B; Steenbergen, Renske DM; Lyng, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    Loss of 3p11-p14 is a frequent event in epithelial cancer and a candidate prognostic biomarker in cervical cancer. In addition to loss, promoter methylation can participate in gene silencing and promote tumor aggressiveness. We have performed a complete mapping of promoter methylation at 3p11-p14 in two independent cohorts of cervical cancer patients (n = 149, n = 121), using Illumina 450K methylation arrays. The aim was to investigate whether hyperm-ethylation was frequent and could contribute to gene silencing and disease aggressiveness either alone or combined with loss. By comparing the methylation level of individual CpG sites with corresponding data of normal cervical tissue, 26 out of 41 genes were found to be hypermethylated in both cohorts. The frequency of patients with hypermethylation of these genes was found to be higher at tumor stages of 3 and 4 than in stage 1 tumors. Seventeen of the 26 genes were transcriptionally downregulated in cancer compared to normal tissue, whereof 6 genes showed a significant correlation between methylation and expression. Integrated analysis of methylation, gene dosage, and expression of the 26 hypermethylated genes identified 3 regulation patterns encompassing 8 hypermethylated genes; a methylation driven pattern (C3orf14, GPR27, ZNF717), a gene dosage driven pattern (THOC7, PSMD6), and a combined methylation and gene dosage driven pattern (FHIT, ADAMTS9, LRIG1). In survival analysis, patients with both hypermethylation and loss of LRIG1 had a worse outcome compared to those harboring only hypermethylation or none of the events. C3orf14 emerged as a novel methylation regulated suppressor gene, for which knockdown was found to promote invasive growth in human papilloma virus (HPV)-transformed keratinocytes. In conclusion, hypermethylation at 3p11-p14 is common in cervical cancer and may exert a selection pressure during carcinogenesis alone or combined with loss. Information on both events could lead to improved

  3. Current Status of Testing for Microdeletion Syndromes and Rare Autosomal Trisomies Using Cell-Free DNA Technology.

    PubMed

    Yaron, Yuval; Jani, Jacques; Schmid, Maximilian; Oepkes, Dick

    2015-11-01

    Noninvasive prenatal testing using cell-free DNA in maternal blood for trisomy 21 was introduced in 2011. This technology has continuously evolved with the addition of screening for trisomy 18 and trisomy 13 followed by the inclusion of sex chromosome aneuploidies. Expanded noninvasive prenatal test panels have recently become available, which enable screening for microdeletion syndromes such as the 22q11.2 deletion (associated with the velocardiofacial syndrome) and others. However, the performance data for these microdeletion syndromes are derived from a small number of samples, mostly generated in vitro. Rigorous performance evaluation, as was done at least for trisomy 21 testing using cell-free DNA analysis, is difficult to perform given the rarity of each condition. In addition, detection rates may vary considerably depending on deletion size. Importantly, positive predictive values (PPVs), strongly influenced by the low prevalence, are expected to be significantly lower than 10% for most conditions. Thus, screening in an average-risk population is likely to have many more false-positives than affected cases detected. Conversely, testing in a high-risk population such as fetuses with cardiac anomalies may have higher PPVs, but a negative result needs to be considered carefully as a result of uncertain information about detection rates and a significant residual risk for other copy number variants and single gene disorders. This article integrates current knowledge on cell-free DNA testing for microdeletions with the aim to assist clinicians and policymakers in designing optimal programs for screening in pregnancy.

  4. t(9;11)(p22;p15) with NUP98-LEDGF fusion gene in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Morerio, Cristina; Acquila, Maura; Rosanda, Cristina; Rapella, Annamaria; Tassano, Elisa; Micalizzi, Concetta; Panarello, Claudio

    2005-04-01

    The rare t(9;11)(p22;p15) translocation is associated with adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with immature forms. We report a novel fusion of the NUP98 and LEDGF genes in a pediatric AML with intermediate characteristics between M2-M3 French-American-British (FAB) subtypes exhibiting the same chromosomal rearrangement. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) studies identified the chimeric transcript product of in-frame fusion of NUP98 exon 8 to LEDGF exon 4.

  5. Substantial prevalence of microdeletions of the Y-chromosome in infertile men with idiopathic azoospermia and oligozoospermia detected using a sequence-tagged site-based mapping strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Najmabadi, H.; Huang, V.; Bhasin, D.

    1996-04-01

    Genes on the long arm of Y (Yq), particularly within interval 6, are believed to play a critical role in human spermatogenesis. Cytogenetically detectable deletions of this region are associated with azoospermia in men, but are relatively uncommon. The objective of this study was to validate a sequence-tagged site (STS)-mapping strategy for the detection of Yq microdeletions and to use this method to determine the proportion of men with idiopathic azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia who carry microdeletions in Yq. STS mapping of a sufficiently large sample of infertile men should also help further localize the putative gene(s) involved in the pathogenesis of male infertility. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral leukocytes of 16 normal fertile men, 7 normal fertile women, 60 infertile men, and 15 patients with the X-linked disorder, ichthyosis. PCR primers were synthesized for 26 STSs that span Yq interval 6. None of the 16 normal men of known fertility had microdeletions. Seven normal fertile women failed to amplify any of the 26 STSs, providing evidence of their Y specificity. No microdeletions were detected in any of the 15 patients with ichthyosis. Of the 60 infertile men typed with 26 STSs, 11 (18%; 10 azoospermic and 1 oligozoospermic) failed to amplify 1 or more STS. Interestingly, 4 of the 11 patients had microdeletions in a region that is outside the Yq region from which the DAZ (deleted in azoospermia gene region) gene was cloned. In an additional 3 patients, microdeletions were present both inside and outside the DAZ region. The physical locations of these microdeletions provide further support for the concept that a gene(s) on Yq deletion interval 6 plays an important role in spermatogenesis. The presence of deletions that do not overlap with the DAZ region suggests that genes other than the DAZ gene may also be implicated in the pathogenesis of some subsets of male infertility. 48 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Neurodevelopmental features in 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome: report of a new patient with intractable seizures and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Motobayashi, Mitsuo; Nishimura-Tadaki, Akira; Inaba, Yuji; Kosho, Tomoki; Miyatake, Satoko; Niimi, Taemi; Nishimura, Takafumi; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Koike, Kenichi

    2012-04-01

    2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome is a recently characterized chromosomal aberration disorder uncovered through array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). Although the cardinal feature is intellectual disability (ID), neurodevelopmental features of the syndrome have not been systematically reviewed. We present a 5-year-old boy with severe psychomotor developmental delay/ID, progressive microcephaly with brain atrophy, growth retardation, and several external anomalies. He manifested intractable epilepsy, effectively treated with combined antiepileptic drug therapy including topiramate. Array CGH demonstrated a de novo interstitial deletion of approximately 1 Mb at 2q23.1-q23.2, involving four genes including MBD5. Nineteen patients have been reported to have the syndrome, including present patient. All patients whose data were available had ID, 17 patients (89%) had seizures, and microcephaly was evident in 9 of 18 patients (50%). Deletion sizes ranged from 200 kb to 5.5 Mb, comprising 1-15 genes. MBD5, the only gene deleted in all patients, is considered to be responsible for ID and epilepsy. Furthermore, the deletion junction was sequenced for the first time in a patient with the syndrome; and homology of three nucleotides, identified at the distal and proximal breakpoints, suggested that the deletion might have been mediated by recently-delineated genomic rearrangement mechanism Fork Stalling and Template Switching (FoSTeS)/microhomology-mediated break-induced replication (MMBIR).

  7. KAT6A, a chromatin modifier from the 8p11-p12 amplicon is a candidate oncogene in luminal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Turner-Ivey, Brittany; Guest, Stephen T; Irish, Jonathan C; Kappler, Christiana S; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Wilson, Robert C; Ethier, Stephen P

    2014-08-01

    The chromosome 8p11-p12 amplicon is present in 12% to 15% of breast cancers, resulting in an increase in copy number and expression of several chromatin modifiers in these tumors, including KAT6A. Previous analyses in SUM-52 breast cancer cells showed amplification and overexpression of KAT6A, and subsequent RNAi screening identified KAT6A as a potential driving oncogene. KAT6A is a histone acetyltransferase previously identified as a fusion partner with CREB binding protein in acute myeloid leukemia. Knockdown of KAT6A in SUM-52 cells, a luminal breast cancer cell line harboring the amplicon, resulted in reduced growth rate compared to non-silencing controls and profound loss of clonogenic capacity both in mono-layer and in soft agar. The normal cell line MCF10A, however, did not exhibit slower growth with knockdown of KAT6A. SUM-52 cells with KAT6A knockdown formed fewer mammospheres in culture compared to controls, suggesting a possible role for KAT6A in self-renewal. Previous data from our laboratory identified FGFR2 as a driving oncogene in SUM-52 cells. The colony forming efficiency of SUM-52 KAT6A knockdown cells in the presence of FGFR inhibition was significantly reduced compared to cells with KAT6A knockdown only. These data suggest that KAT6A may be a novel oncogene in breast cancers bearing the 8p11-p12 amplicon. While there are other putative oncogenes in the amplicon, the identification of KAT6A as a driving oncogene suggests that chromatin-modifying enzymes are a key class of oncogenes in these cancers, and play an important role in the selection of this amplicon in luminal B breast cancers. PMID:25220592

  8. KAT6A, a Chromatin Modifier from the 8p11-p12 Amplicon is a Candidate Oncogene in Luminal Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Turner-Ivey, Brittany; Guest, Stephen T.; Irish, Jonathan C.; Kappler, Christiana S.; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Wilson, Robert C.; Ethier, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    The chromosome 8p11-p12 amplicon is present in 12% to 15% of breast cancers, resulting in an increase in copy number and expression of several chromatin modifiers in these tumors, including KAT6A. Previous analyses in SUM-52 breast cancer cells showed amplification and overexpression of KAT6A, and subsequent RNAi screening identified KAT6A as a potential driving oncogene. KAT6A is a histone acetyltransferase previously identified as a fusion partner with CREB binding protein in acute myeloid leukemia. Knockdown of KAT6A in SUM-52 cells, a luminal breast cancer cell line harboring the amplicon, resulted in reduced growth rate compared to non-silencing controls and profound loss of clonogenic capacity both in mono-layer and in soft agar. The normal cell line MCF10A, however, did not exhibit slower growth with knockdown of KAT6A. SUM-52 cells with KAT6A knockdown formed fewer mammospheres in culture compared to controls, suggesting a possible role for KAT6A in self-renewal. Previous data from our laboratory identified FGFR2 as a driving oncogene in SUM-52 cells. The colony forming efficiency of SUM-52 KAT6A knockdown cells in the presence of FGFR inhibition was significantly reduced compared to cells with KAT6A knockdown only. These data suggest that KAT6A may be a novel oncogene in breast cancers bearing the 8p11-p12 amplicon. While there are other putative oncogenes in the amplicon, the identification of KAT6A as a driving oncogene suggests that chromatin-modifying enzymes are a key class of oncogenes in these cancers, and play an important role in the selection of this amplicon in luminal B breast cancers. PMID:25220592

  9. A large-scale survey of the novel 15q24 microdeletion syndrome in autism spectrum disorders identifies an atypical deletion that narrows the critical region

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The 15q24 microdeletion syndrome has been recently described as a recurrent, submicroscopic genomic imbalance found in individuals with intellectual disability, typical facial appearance, hypotonia, and digital and genital abnormalities. Gene dosage abnormalities, including copy number variations (CNVs), have been identified in a significant fraction of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). In this study we surveyed two ASD cohorts for 15q24 abnormalities to assess the frequency of genomic imbalances in this interval. Methods We screened 173 unrelated subjects with ASD from the Central Valley of Costa Rica and 1336 subjects with ASD from 785 independent families registered with the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) for CNVs across 15q24 using oligonucleotide arrays. Rearrangements were confirmed by array comparative genomic hybridization and quantitative PCR. Results Among the patients from Costa Rica, an atypical de novo deletion of 3.06 Mb in 15q23-q24.1 was detected in a boy with autism sharing many features with the other 13 subjects with the 15q24 microdeletion syndrome described to date. He exhibited intellectual disability, constant smiling, characteristic facial features (high anterior hairline, broad medial eyebrows, epicanthal folds, hypertelorism, full lower lip and protuberant, posteriorly rotated ears), single palmar crease, toe syndactyly and congenital nystagmus. The deletion breakpoints are atypical and lie outside previously characterized low copy repeats (69,838-72,897 Mb). Genotyping data revealed that the deletion had occurred in the paternal chromosome. Among the AGRE families, no large 15q24 deletions were observed. Conclusions From the current and previous studies, deletions in the 15q24 region represent rare causes of ASDs with an estimated frequency of 0.1 to 0.2% in individuals ascertained for ASDs, although the proportion might be higher in sporadic cases. These rates compare with a frequency of about 0.3% in

  10. Prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletion among men with severe semen abnormalities and its correlation with successful sperm retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas, Mariano; Thomas, Sumi; Kamath, Mohan S.; Ramalingam, Ramya; Kongari, Ann Marie; Yuvarani, S; Srivastava, Vivi M.; George, Korula

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletion among men with azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia and its correlation with successful surgical sperm retrieval. SETTING AND DESIGN: A prospective study in a tertiary level infertility unit. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a prospective observation study, men with azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia (concentration <5 million/ml) attending the infertility center underwent genetic screening. Peripheral blood karyotype was done by Giemsa banding. Y chromosome microdeletion study was performed by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: The study group consisted of 220 men, 133 of whom had azoospermia and 87 had severe oligozoospermia. Overall, 21/220 (9.5%) men had chromosomal abnormalities and 13/220 (5.9%) men had Y chromosome microdeletions. Chromosomal abnormalities were seen in 14.3% (19/133) of azoospermic men and Y chromosome microdeletions in 8.3% (11/133). Of the 87 men with severe oligozoospermia, chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions were each seen in 2.3% (2/87). Testicular sperm aspiration was done in 13 men and was successful in only one, who had a deletion of azoospermia factor c. CONCLUSIONS: Our study found a fairly high prevalence of genetic abnormality in men with severe semen abnormalities and a correlation of genetic abnormalities with surgical sperm retrieval outcomes. These findings support the need for genetic screening of these men prior to embarking on surgical sperm retrieval and assisted reproductive technology intracytoplasmic sperm injection. PMID:27803587

  11. Diagnostic analysis of the Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome: five cosmids should be used for microdeletion detection and low number of protein truncating mutations

    PubMed Central

    Petrij, F.; Dauwerse, H.; Blough, R.; Giles, R.; van der Smagt, J. J; Wallerstein, R.; Maaswinkel-Mooy, P.; van Karnebeek, C. D; van Ommen, G.-J. B; van Haeringen, A.; Rubinstein, J.; Saal, H.; Hennekam, R.; Peters, D.; Breuning, M.

    2000-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is a malformation syndrome characterised by facial abnormalities, broad thumbs, broad big toes, and mental retardation. In a subset of RTS patients, microdeletions, translocations, and inversions involving chromosome band 16p13.3 can be detected. We have previously shown that disruption of the human CREB binding protein (CREBBP or CBP) gene, either by these gross chromosomal rearrangements or by point mutations, leads to RTS. CBP is a large nuclear protein involved in transcription regulation, chromatin remodelling, and the integration of several different signal transduction pathways. Here we report diagnostic analysis of CBP in 194 RTS patients, divided into several subsets. In one case the mother is also suspect of having RTS. Analyses of the entire CBP gene by the protein truncation test showed 4/37 truncating mutations. Two point mutations, one 11 bp deletion, and one mutation affecting the splicing of the second exon were detected by subsequent sequencing. Screening the CBP gene for larger deletions, by using different cosmid probes in FISH, showed 14/171 microdeletions. Using five cosmid probes that contain the entire gene, we found 8/89 microdeletions of which 4/8 were 5' or interstitial. This last subset of microdeletions would not have been detected using the commonly used 3' probe RT1, showing the necessity of using all five probes.


Keywords: Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS); CREB binding protein (CBP/CREBBP); protein truncation test (PTT); microdeletion PMID:10699051

  12. Microdeletion 15q26.2qter and Microduplication 18q23 in a Patient with Prader-Willi-Like Syndrome: Clinical Findings.

    PubMed

    Dello Russo, Patrizia; Demori, Eliana; Sechi, Annalisa; Passon, Nadia; Romagno, Daniela; Gnan, Chiara; Zoratti, Raffaele; Damante, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The small interstitial deletion in the long arm of chromosome 15 causing Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome is well known, whereas cases that report terminal deletions in 15q in association with the Prader-Willi-like phenotype are very rare. By using GTG-banding analysis, metaphase FISH, MLPA analysis, and genome-wide array CGH, we detected an unbalanced translocation involving a microdeletion of the distal part of 15q and a microduplication of the distal part of 18q. The unbalanced translocation was found in a boy that was referred with clinical suspicion of Prader-Willi syndrome. In the 15q-deleted region, 23 genes have been identified, and 13 of them are included in the OMIM database. Among these, the deleted IGFR1, MEF2A, CHSY1, and TM2D3 genes could contribute to the patient's phenotype. Seven genes are included in the duplicated chromosome segment 18q, but only one (CTDP1) is present in the OMIM database. We suggest that the deleted chromosome segment 15q26.2qter may be responsible for the phenotype of our case and may also be a candidate locus of Prader-Willi-like syndrome. PMID:27160288

  13. 9q33.3q34.11 microdeletion: new contiguous gene syndrome encompassing STXBP1, LMX1B and ENG genes assessed using reverse phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Nambot, Sophie; Masurel, Alice; El Chehadeh, Salima; Mosca-Boidron, Anne-Laure; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Lefebvre, Mathilde; Marle, Nathalie; Thevenon, Julien; Perez-Martin, Stéphanie; Dulieu, Véronique; Huet, Frédéric; Plessis, Ghislaine; Andrieux, Joris; Jouk, Pierre-Simon; Billy-Lopez, Gipsy; Coutton, Charles; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Heron, Delphine; Rooryck, Caroline; Goldenberg, Alice; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Joly-Hélas, Géraldine; Calenda, Patricia; Kuentz, Paul; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Dupuis-Girod, Sophie; Callier, Patrick; Faivre, Laurence

    2016-06-01

    The increasing use of array-CGH in malformation syndromes with intellectual disability could lead to the description of new contiguous gene syndrome by the analysis of the gene content of the microdeletion and reverse phenotyping. Thanks to a national and international call for collaboration by Achropuce and Decipher, we recruited four patients carrying de novo overlapping deletions of chromosome 9q33.3q34.11, including the STXBP1, the LMX1B and the ENG genes. We restrained the selection to these three genes because the effects of their haploinsufficency are well described in the literature and easily recognizable clinically. All deletions were detected by array-CGH and confirmed by FISH. The patients display common clinical features, including intellectual disability with epilepsy, owing to the presence of STXBP1 within the deletion, nail dysplasia and bone malformations, in particular patellar abnormalities attributed to LMX1B deletion, epistaxis and cutaneous-mucous telangiectasias explained by ENG haploinsufficiency and common facial dysmorphism. This systematic analysis of the genes comprised in the deletion allowed us to identify genes whose haploinsufficiency is expected to lead to disease manifestations and complications that require personalized follow-up, in particular for renal, eye, ear, vascular and neurological manifestations. PMID:26395556

  14. Case fatality rate and associated factors in patients with 22q11 microdeletion syndrome: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Repetto, Gabriela M; Guzmán, M Luisa; Delgado, Iris; Loyola, Hugo; Palomares, Mirta; Lay-Son, Guillermo; Vial, Cecilia; Benavides, Felipe; Espinoza, Karena; Alvarez, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Objective Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion is the most commonly occurring known microdeletion syndrome. Deaths related to the syndrome have been reported, but the magnitude of death has not been quantified. This study evaluated the deletion's impact on survival and its clinical manifestations in a large cohort of Chilean patients. Design Demographic and clinical data of individuals with 22q11 deletions diagnosed between 1998 and 2013 were collected from medical records and death certificates. Case fatality rate was calculated and compared with national vital statistics. OR with 95% CI analysis was used to assess the association between clinical manifestations and death. Setting Genetic services in tertiary care centres in Chile, following patients with 22q11.2 deletion. Outcomes Fatality rate and associated factors. Results 59 of 419 patients (14.1%) died during the study period at a median of 3.4 months (range 0 to 32 years of age). Factors associated with death included congenital heart disease (OR 5.27; 95% CI 2.06 to 13.99; p<0.0001), hypocalcaemia (OR 4.27; 95% CI 1.67 to 11.15; p<0.002) and airway malacia (OR 13.37; 95% CI 1.19 to 110.51; p<0.002). Patients with deletions and defects such as tetralogy of Fallot with or without pulmonary atraesia, truncus arteriosus or ventricular septal defect, had a 2.6-fold to 4.6-fold higher death rate compared with nationwide reports for the same types of defects. Conclusions In this cohort, we observed a death rate of 14.1%, implying that one in seven patients with 22q11 deletion died during the study period. Significant associations with cardiac defects, hypocalcaemia and airway malacia were observed. Furthermore, the death risk in patients with 22q11 deletion and cardiac defects exceeded the global figures observed in Chile for infants with structurally similar but apparently isolated anomalies. These observations indicate a need to identify patients who may require specific perioperative management to improve survival

  15. Recurrence risk figures for isolated tetralogy of Fallot after screening for 22q11 microdeletion.

    PubMed Central

    Digilio, M C; Marino, B; Giannotti, A; Toscano, A; Dallapiccola, B

    1997-01-01

    Isolated tetralogy of Fallot (TF) has a multifactorial mode of inheritance in most cases, and recurrence risk rates of 2.5-3% have been attributed to first degree relatives of an affected child. In a subgroup of patients with a strong family history, the transmission of a monogenic trait has been suspected. Microdeletion 22q11 (del(22q11)) can cause TF in the setting of DiGeorge and velocardiofacial syndromes, and has also been related to familial conotruncal cardiac defects. Empirical risk figures in families after exclusion of del(22q11) have never been calculated. We have investigated the overall occurrence of congenital heart defect (CHD) in relatives of 102 patients with isolated non-syndromic TF previously screened for del(22q11). Our results show that the frequency of CHD is 3% in sibs, 0.5% in parents, 0.3% in grandparents, 0.2% in uncles or aunts, and 0.6% in first cousins. The recurrence risk rate for sibs in our series is the same as that previously estimated, indicating that after exclusion of patients with del(22q11) genetic counselling to patients with isolated TF should not be modified. A high concordance rate among our affected sibs has been documented. Gene(s) different from those located on chromosome 22q11 must be involved in causing familial aggregation of non-syndromic TF in these cases. Images PMID:9132487

  16. Clinical and Genetic Heterogeneity of the 15q13.3 Microdeletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hassfurther, Ariane; Komini, Eleni; Fischer, Judith; Leipoldt, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The 15q13.3 microdeletion is a recurrent CNV, presumably mediated by NAHR between segmental duplications in chromosome 15. The 15q13.3 deletion and duplication are associated with a wide range of clinical manifestations, such as intellectual deficits, seizures, autism, language and developmental delay, neuropsychiatric impairments, and behavioral problems illustrating incomplete penetrance and expressivity. This study comprises an evaluation of 106 symptomatic patients carrying the heterozygous deletion, as well as of 21 patients carrying the duplication, who have been described in previous studies. The analysis shows considerable heterogeneity for the manifestation of different key symptoms and familiar occurrence. Furthermore, 8 new patients are introduced. Convoluted familiar connections give new insights into the complexity of symptomatic manifestation. In previous studies, different opinions have been expressed as to the nature and precise location of the deletion breakpoints. Here, we show that not CHRNA7 and CHRFAM7A, but rather FAM7A or GOLGA8, serve as breakpoint regions concerning our patients. The deletion is described as heterogeneous in size. However, we assume that not only different breakpoints but also the imprecision of aCGH analysis on chromosome 15 due to segmental duplications accounts for the variability in size. PMID:26997942

  17. The Pattern of Cortical Dysfunction in a Mouse Model of a Schizophrenia-Related Microdeletion

    PubMed Central

    Fénelon, Karine; Xu, Bin; Lai, Cora S.; Mukai, Jun; Markx, Sander; Stark, Kimberly L.; Hsu, Pei-Ken; Gan, Wen-Biao; Fischbach, Gerald D.; MacDermott, Amy B.

    2013-01-01

    We used a mouse model of the schizophrenia-predisposing 22q11.2 microdeletion to evaluate how this genetic lesion affects cortical neural circuits at the synaptic, cellular, and molecular levels. Guided by cognitive deficits, we demonstrated that mutant mice display robust deficits in high-frequency synaptic transmission and short-term plasticity (synaptic depression and potentiation), as well as alterations in long-term plasticity and dendritic spine stability. Apart from previously reported reduction in dendritic complexity of layer 5 pyramidal neurons, altered synaptic plasticity occurs in the context of relatively circumscribed and often subtle cytoarchitectural changes in neuronal density and inhibitory neuron numbers. We confirmed the pronounced DiGeorge critical region 8 (Dgcr8)-dependent deficits in primary micro-RNA processing and identified additional changes in gene expression and RNA splicing that may underlie the effects of this mutation. Reduction in Dgcr8 levels appears to be a major driver of altered short-term synaptic plasticity in prefrontal cortex and working memory but not of long-term plasticity and cytoarchitecture. Our findings inform the cortical synaptic and neuronal mechanisms of working memory impairment in the context of psychiatric disorders. They also provide insight into the link between micro-RNA dysregulation and genetic liability to schizophrenia and cognitive dysfunction. PMID:24027283

  18. Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome and uniparental disomy 11p: fine mapping of the recombination breakpoints and evaluation of several techniques

    PubMed Central

    Romanelli, Valeria; Meneses, Heloisa N M; Fernández, Luis; Martínez-Glez, Victor; Gracia-Bouthelier, Ricardo; F Fraga, Mario; Guillén, Encarna; Nevado, Julián; Gean, Esther; Martorell, Loreto; Marfil, Victoria Esteban; García-Miñaur, Sixto; Lapunzina, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a phenotypically and genotypically heterogeneous overgrowth syndrome characterized by somatic overgrowth, macroglossia and abdominal wall defects. Other usual findings are hemihyperplasia, embryonal tumours, adrenocortical cytomegaly, ear anomalies, visceromegaly, renal abnormalities, neonatal hypoglycaemia, cleft palate, polydactyly and a positive family history. BWS is a complex, multigenic disorder associated, in up to 90% of patients, with alteration in the expression or function of one or more genes in the 11p15.5 imprinted gene cluster. There are several molecular anomalies associated with BWS and the large proportion of cases, about 85%, is sporadic and karyotypically normal. One of the major categories of BWS molecular alteration (10–20% of cases) is represented by mosaic paternal uniparental disomy (pUPD), namely patients with two paternally derived copies of chromosome 11p15 and no maternal contribution for that. In these patients, in addition to the effects of IGF2 overexpression, a decreased level of the maternally expressed gene CDKN1C may contribute to the BWS phenotype. In this paper, we reviewed a series of nine patients with BWS because of pUPD using several methods with the aim to evaluate the percentage of mosaicism, the methylation status at both loci, the extension of the pUPD at the short arm and the breakpoints of recombination. Fine mapping of mitotic recombination breakpoints by single-nucleotide polymorphism-array in individuals with UPD and fine estimation of epigenetic defects will provide a basis for understanding the aetiology of BWS, allowing more accurate prognostic predictions and facilitating management and surveillance of individuals with this disorder. PMID:21248736

  19. Common variable immunodeficiency associated with microdeletion of chromosome 1q42.1-q42.3 and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate kinase B (ITPKB) deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Ankmalika G; Yel, Leman; Cao, Jia N; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gupta, Sudhir

    2016-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a heterogenous disorder characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia and impaired specific antibody response and increased susceptibility to infections, autoimmunity and malignancies. A number of gene mutations, including ICOS, TACI and BAFF-R, and CD19, CD20, CD21, CD81, MSH5 and LRBA have been described; however, they account for approximately 20–25% of total cases of CVID. In this study, we report a patient with CVID with an intrinsic microdeletion of chromosome 1q42.1-42.3, where gene for inositol 1,3,4, trisphosphate kinase β (ITPKB) is localized. ITPKB has an important role in the development, survival and function of B cells. In this subject, the expression of ITPKB mRNA as well as ITKPB protein was significantly reduced. The sequencing of ITPKB gene revealed three variants, two of them were missense variants and third was a synonymous variant; the significance of each of them in relation to CVID is discussed. This case suggests that a deficiency of ITPKB may have a role in CVID. PMID:26900472

  20. 14q13 distal microdeletion encompassing NKX2-1 and PAX9: Patient report and refinement of the associated phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Mattia; De Mattia, Delia; Pansini, Angela; Schettini, Federico; Buonadonna, Antonia Lucia; Capozza, Manuela; Ficarella, Romina; Laforgia, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    Chromosome 14q11-q22 deletion syndrome (OMIM 613457) is a rare genomic disorder whose associated phenotype is heterogeneous, depending on the size, and, mostly, on the deleted region. We report the clinical and molecular characterization of a female newborn, whose phenotype was characterized by poor growth, dysmorphic facial features, subclinical hypothyroidism, and mild reduction of CD3CD8 Lymphocytes with increased CD4/CD8 ratio. By array-CGH, we identified a 4.08 de novo interstitial deletion of the 14q13.2q21.1 region, which includes 16 OMIM genes.Our patient phenotype is compared with other published cases, for a better classification of the 14q11-q22 deletion syndrome. We demonstrated that the 14q13.2q21.1 deletion, which encompasses NKX2-1, but not FOXG1 gene and HPE8 region, identifies a well defined, more benign, microdeletion syndrome. This report confirms that an early identification with accurate characterization of the genomic disorders is of great relevance, enabling proper genetic counseling of the reproductive risk, as well as disease prognosis, and patient management. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27148860

  1. Prevalence of microdeletion 22q11 in patients with hypernasal speech due to velopharyngeal insufficiency: Expanded phenotype and clinical comparison to nondeletion

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel-Bartelt, J.; Cytrynbaum, C.; Witzel, M.A.; Teshima, I.E.

    1994-09-01

    Microdeletion 22q11.2 has been reported as a frequent ethiology of both velocardiofacial (VCF) and DiGeorge syndromes. We have studied the prevalence of microdeletion 22q11 in a group of patients ascertained through a Speech and Language clinic presenting with (1) velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) and (2) difficultly in school. Growth parameters were measured, and facies were scored for features of VCF. Microdeletions were detected at locus D22S75 by FISH with probe N25 (Oncor), and at 22q11.2 with high resolution banding analysis (HRB). One child with typical VCF facies was considered to have a deletion at 22q11 with HRB, but is not deleted with N25, indicating that N25 may not detect all deletion patients. An additional 8/30 children tested to date were deleted with the N25 probe. Heart defects were present in only 2/8 deletion patients: VSD/ASD and PS/AS. One N25 deletion patient was atypica; he has a tall, lanky habitus (height = 90%), and facies not characteristic of CVF. As expected, there is a trend to lower head size, smaller ear size, and more typical facies in deletion patients; however, four of the nondeletion patients also had a clinical diagnosis of VCF. Medially displaced carotid arteries were present in both groups, which is therefore not a diagnostic feature of microdeletion 22q11. Our findings indicate that the microdeletion 22q11 is frequent (26% in this series) in a population with VPI, even when not selected for typical facies. We believe this series supports the view that microdeletion 22q11 has a broader clinical phenotype than previously recognized.

  2. A de novo microdeletion in a patient with inner ear abnormalities suggests that the 10q26.13 region contains the responsible gene

    PubMed Central

    Sangu, Noriko; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Shimojima, Keiko; Ondo, Yumiko; Nishikawa, Masanori; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Microdeletions in the 10q26.1 region are related to intellectual disability, growth delay, microcephaly, distinctive craniofacial features, cardiac defects, genital abnormalities and inner ear abnormalities. The genes responsible for inner ear abnormalities have been narrowed to fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene (FGFR2), H6 family homeobox 2 gene (HMX2) and H6 family homeobox 3 gene (HMX3). An additional patient with distinctive craniofacial features, congenital deafness and balance dysfunctions showed a de novo microdeletion of 10q26.11q26.13, indicating the existence of a gene responsible for inner ear abnormalities in this region. PMID:27274859

  3. [Familial presentation of microdeletion and inverted microduplication with array-CGH].

    PubMed

    Beseler-Soto, Beatriz; Jiménez-Candel, M Isabel; Pedrón-Marzal, Gema; Pérez-García, Begoña; Carpena-Lucas, Pedro J

    2014-12-16

    INTRODUCTION. Over the years the field of genetics has advanced significantly. Following the polymerase chain reaction and mass sequencing techniques, the array-CGH technique (comparative genomic hybridization) has helped to improve genetic procedures. A resolution of up to 200 kb is currently being accomplished in the human genome. CASE REPORTS. We report the case of two sisters with delays in developmental milestones and a characteristic phenotype with normal results from initial studies of the karyotype and subtelomeric regions. Array-CGH was later used to detect a deletion and duplication that were different in each of the sisters, this being the result of a balanced paternal translocation. In the two cases, despite being the result of the same translocation, the genetic and phenotype expression were different. CONCLUSIONS. The precision achieved by means of array-CGH is making it possible to establish a correlation between minimum gains or losses of the genome and the clinical features. Chromosome 3 codes for genes that play a fundamental role in neurological development (contactins, neurotransmitter modulator proteins, etc.) and chromosome 10 codes for proteins involved in apoptosis and proteins regulating transcription. In the literature there have been reports of chromosome 3 deletion syndrome and monosomy 10. Likewise, there are also descriptions of rearrangements between these chromosomes in individuals from the same family. Nevertheless, we describe two cases of a family with a micro-deletion and an inverted microduplication, detected by means of array-CGH, that have not been reported to date. This technique can provide a diagnostic and prognostic approximation as regards development and offer genetic counselling.

  4. Localization of a highly conserved human potassium channel gene (NGK2-KV4-KCNC1) to chromosome 11p15

    SciTech Connect

    Ried, T.; Ward, D.C. ); Rudy, B.; Miera, V.S. de; Lau, D.; Sen, K. )

    1993-02-01

    Several genes (the Shaker or Sh gene family) encoding components of voltage-gated K[sub +] channels have been identified in various species. Based on sequence similarities Sh genes are classified into four groups or subfamilies. Mammalian genes of each one of these subfamilies also show high levels of sequence similarity to one of four related Drosophila genes: Shaker, Shab, Shaw, and Shal. Here we report the isolation of human cDNAs for a Shaw-related product (NGK2,KV2.1a) previously identified in rat and mice. A comparison of the nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence of NGK2 in rodents and humans shows that this product is highly conserved in mammals; the human NGK2 protein shows over 99% amino acid sequence identity to its rodent homologue. The gene (NGK2-KV4; KCNC1) encoding NGK2 was mapped to human chromosome 11p15 by fluorescence in situ hybridization with the human NGK2 cDNAs. 65 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. GADD45α and γ interaction with CDK11p58 regulates SPDEF protein stability and SPDEF-mediated effects on cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Rodrigo E; Paccez, Juliano D; Duncan, Kristal C; Morale, Mirian G; Simabuco, Fernando M; Dillon, Simon; Correa, Ricardo G; Gu, Xuesong; Libermann, Towia A; Zerbini, Luiz F

    2016-03-22

    The epithelium-specific Ets transcription factor, SPDEF, plays a critical role in metastasis of prostate and breast cancer cells. While enhanced SPDEF expression blocks migration and invasion, knockdown of SPDEF expression enhances migration, invasion, and metastasis of cancer cells. SPDEF expression and activation is tightly regulated in cancer cells; however, the precise mechanism of SPDEF regulation has not been explored in detail. In this study we provide evidence that the cell cycle kinase CDK11p58, a protein involved in G2/M transition and degradation of several transcription factors, directly interacts with and phosphorylates SPDEF on serine residues, leading to subsequent ubiquitination and degradation of SPDEF through the proteasome pathway. As a consequence of CDK11p58 mediated degradation of SPDEF, this loss of SPDEF protein results in increased prostate cancer cell migration and invasion. In contrast, knockdown of CDK11p58 protein expression by interfering RNA or SPDEF overexpression inhibit migration and invasion of cancer cells. We demonstrate that CDK11p58 mediated degradation of SPDEF is attenuated by Growth Arrest and DNA damage-inducible 45 (GADD45) α and , two proteins inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest. We show that GADD45 α and γ, directly interact with CDK11p58 and thereby inhibit CDK11p58 activity, and consequentially SPDEF phosphorylation and degradation, ultimately reducing prostate cancer cell migration and invasion. Our findings provide new mechanistic insights into the complex regulation of SPDEF activity linked to cancer metastasis and characterize a previously unidentified SPDEF/CDK11p58/GADD45α/γ pathway that controls SPDEF protein stability and SPDEF-mediated effects on cancer cell migration and invasion. PMID:26885618

  6. GADD45α and γ interaction with CDK11p58 regulates SPDEF protein stability and SPDEF-mediated effects on cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Rodrigo E.; Paccez, Juliano D.; Duncan, Kristal C.; Morale, Mirian G.; Simabuco, Fernando M.; Dillon, Simon; Correa, Ricardo G.; Gu, Xuesong; Libermann, Towia A.; Zerbini, Luiz F.

    2016-01-01

    The epithelium-specific Ets transcription factor, SPDEF, plays a critical role in metastasis of prostate and breast cancer cells. While enhanced SPDEF expression blocks migration and invasion, knockdown of SPDEF expression enhances migration, invasion, and metastasis of cancer cells. SPDEF expression and activation is tightly regulated in cancer cells; however, the precise mechanism of SPDEF regulation has not been explored in detail. In this study we provide evidence that the cell cycle kinase CDK11p58, a protein involved in G2/M transition and degradation of several transcription factors, directly interacts with and phosphorylates SPDEF on serine residues, leading to subsequent ubiquitination and degradation of SPDEF through the proteasome pathway. As a consequence of CDK11p58 mediated degradation of SPDEF, this loss of SPDEF protein results in increased prostate cancer cell migration and invasion. In contrast, knockdown of CDK11p58 protein expression by interfering RNA or SPDEF overexpression inhibit migration and invasion of cancer cells. We demonstrate that CDK11p58 mediated degradation of SPDEF is attenuated by Growth Arrest and DNA damage-inducible 45 (GADD45) α and, two proteins inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest. We show that GADD45 α and γ, directly interact with CDK11p58 and thereby inhibit CDK11p58 activity, and consequentially SPDEF phosphorylation and degradation, ultimately reducing prostate cancer cell migration and invasion. Our findings provide new mechanistic insights into the complex regulation of SPDEF activity linked to cancer metastasis and characterize a previously unidentified SPDEF/CDK11p58/GADD45α/γ pathway that controls SPDEF protein stability and SPDEF-mediated effects on cancer cell migration and invasion. PMID:26885618

  7. Rearrangements at the 11p15 locus and overexpression of insulin-like growth factor-II gene in sporadic adrenocortical tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Gicquel, C.; Schneid, H.; Le Bouc, Y.; Bertagna, X.; Francillard-Leblond, M.; Luton, J.P.; Girard, F.

    1994-06-01

    Little is known about the pathophysiology of sporadic adrenocortical tumors in adults. Because loss of heterozygosity at the 11p15 locus has been described in childhood tumors, particularly in adrenocortical tumors associated with the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, and because insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) is a crucial regulator of fetal adrenal growth, the authors looked for structural analysis at the 11p15 locus and IGF-II gene expression in 23 sporadic adrenocortical adult tumors: 6 carcinomas (5 with Cushing`s syndrome and 1 nonsecreting) and 17 benign adenomas (13 with Cushing`s syndrome, 1 pure androgen secreting, and 3 nonsecreting). Twenty-one patients were informative at the 11p15 locus, and six (four carcinomas and two adenomas) of them (28.5%) exhibited 11p15 structural abnormalities in tumor DNA (five, a uniparental disomy and one, a mosaicism). In a single case that could be further studied, a paternal isodisomy was observed. Very high IGF-II mRNA contents were detected in seven tumors (30%; 5 of the 6 carcinomas and 2 of the 17 adenomas). They were particularly found in tumors with uniparental disomy at the 11p15 locus. Overall, a strong correlation existed between IGF-II mRNA contents and DNA demethylation at the IGF-II locus. These data show that genetic alterations involving the 11p15 locus were highly frequent in malignant tumors, but found only in rare adenomas. These results in combination with evidence for overexpression of IGF-II from the 11p15.5 locus suggest that abnormalities in structure and/or expression of the IGF-II gene play a role as a late event of a multistep process of tumorigenesis. 58 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Toward the gene(s) for Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome and associated tumors in two different regions of 11p15

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, J.; Chehenase, V.; Boulevin, C.

    1994-09-01

    Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome (WBS) is a malformation syndrome associated with predisposition to different types of tumors (WT, ADCC). Cytogenetic and familial studies mapped the WBS locus to 11p15.5. Genomic imprinting has been implicated in the expression of the syndrome. Using 11p15 specific markers we have determined the parental origin of both chromosomes 11 in sporadic WBS cases. Probands in 5 out of 26 informative families (25%) displayed uniparental disomy (UPD) corresponding to a paternal isodisomy for region 11p15.5. Mosaic phenotypes reflect the timing of their origin and the fate of cells involved as well as the cell-specific pattern of imprinting. Somatic mosaicism for UPD may thus explain the incomplete forms of WBS, the association of hemihypertrophy in sporadic WBS and even some cases of isolated hemihypertrophy. Moreover, the risk (60%) of developing a tumor seems higher for patients with paternal 11p UPD than for WBS patients in general (7.5%). Two different genomic libraries specific for region 11p15.5 were constructed and screened to isolate and characterize the gene(s) responsible for WBS and/or tumor progression. The characterization and and the localization of these cDNAs are in progress. 5 CA repeats genetically mapped in 11p15 were used to isolate YACs (CEPH). These CA repeats are now physically mapped using a panel of hybrids specific for the 11p15 region, and the contigs of YACs mapping in the regions of interest will be used to isolate coding sequences.

  9. Mutations in PDX1, the human lipoyl-containing component X of the pyruvate dehydrogenase-complex gene on chromosome 11p1, in congenital lactic acidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Aral, B; Benelli, C; Ait-Ghezala, G; Amessou, M; Fouque, F; Maunoury, C; Créau, N; Kamoun, P; Marsac, C

    1997-01-01

    We have identified and sequenced a cDNA that encodes an apparent human orthologue of a yeast protein-X component (ScPDX1) of pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes. The new human cDNA that has been referred to as "HsPDX1" cDNA was cloned by use of the "database cloning" strategy and had a 1,506-bp open reading frame. The amino acid sequence of the protein encoded by the cDNA was 20% identical with that encoded by the yeast PDX1 gene and 40% identical with that encoded by the lipoate acetyltransferase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase and included a lipoyl-bearing domain that is conserved in some dehydrogenase enzyme complexes. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the major HsPDX1 mRNA was 2.5 kb in length and was expressed mainly in human skeletal and cardiac muscles but was also present, at low levels, in other tissues. FISH analysis performed with a P1-derived artificial chromosome (PAC)-containing HsPDX1 gene sublocalized the gene to 11p1.3. Molecular investigation of PDX1 deficiency in four patients with neonatal lactic acidemias revealed mutations 78del85 and 965del59 in a homozygous state, and one other patient had no PDX1 mRNA expression. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9399911

  10. The Identification of Microdeletion and Reciprocal Microduplication in 22q11.2 Using High-Resolution CMA Technology

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Ana Julia Cunha; Pinto, Irene Plaza; Cunha, Damiana Mirian da Cruz e; Ribeiro, Cristiano Luiz; da Silva, Claudio Carlos; da Cruz, Aparecido Divino; Minasi, Lysa Bernardes

    2016-01-01

    The chromosome 22q11.2 region has long been implicated in genomic diseases. Some genomic regions exhibit numerous low copy repeats with high identity in which they provide increased genomic instability and mediate deletions and duplications in many disorders. DiGeorge Syndrome is the most common deletion syndrome and reciprocal duplications could be occurring in half of the frequency of microdeletions. We described five patients with phenotypic variability that carries deletions or reciprocal duplications at 22q11.2 detected by Chromosomal Microarray Analysis. The CytoScan HD technology was used to detect changes in the genome copy number variation of patients who had clinical indication to global developmental delay and a normal karyotype. We observed in our study three microdeletions and two microduplications in 22q11.2 region with variable intervals containing known genes and unstudied transcripts as well as the LCRs that are often flanking and within this genomic rearrangement. The identification of these variants is of particular interest because it may provide insight into genes or genomic regions that are crucial for specific phenotypic manifestations and are useful to assist in the quest for understanding the mechanisms subjacent to genomic deletions and duplications. PMID:27123452

  11. 17q24.2 microdeletions: a new syndromal entity with intellectual disability, truncal obesity, mood swings and hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Vergult, Sarah; Dauber, Andrew; Delle Chiaie, Barbara; Van Oudenhove, Elke; Simon, Marleen; Rihani, Ali; Loeys, Bart; Hirschhorn, Joel; Pfotenhauer, Jean; Phillips, John A; Mohammed, Shehla; Ogilvie, Caroline; Crolla, John; Mortier, Geert; Menten, Björn

    2012-05-01

    Although microdeletions of the long arm of chromosome 17 are being reported with increasing frequency, deletions of chromosome band 17q24.2 are rare. Here we report four patients with a microdeletion encompassing chromosome band 17q24.2 with a smallest region of overlap of 713 kb containing five Refseq genes and one miRNA. The patients share the phenotypic characteristics, such as intellectual disability (4/4), speech delay (4/4), truncal obesity (4/4), seizures (2/4), hearing loss (3/4) and a particular facial gestalt. Hallucinations and mood swings were also noted in two patients. The PRKCA gene is a very interesting candidate gene for many of the observed phenotypic features, as this gene plays an important role in many cellular processes. Deletion of this gene might explain the observed truncal obesity and could also account for the hallucinations and mood swings seen in two patients, whereas deletion of a CACNG gene cluster might be responsible for the seizures observed in two patients. In one of the patients, the PRKAR1A gene responsible for Carney Complex and the KCNJ2 gene causal for Andersen syndrome are deleted. This is the first report of a patient with a whole gene deletion of the KCNJ2 gene. PMID:22166941

  12. De Novo microdeletion on an inherited Robertsonian translocation chromosome: A cause for dysmorphism in the apparently balanced translocation carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Bonthron, D.T.; Smith, S.J.L.; Fantes, J.; Gosden, C.M.

    1993-09-01

    Robertsonian translocations are usually ascertained through abnormal children, making proposed phenotypic effects of apparently balanced translocations difficult to study in an unbiased way. From molecular genetic studies, though, some apparently balanced rearrangments are now known to be associated with phenotypic abnormalities resulting from uniparental disomy. Molecular explanations for other cases in which abnormality is seen in a balanced translocation carrier are being sought. In the present paper, an infant is described who has retarded growth, developmental delay, gross muscular hypotonia, slender habitus, frontal bossing, micrognathia, hooked nose, abundant wispy hair, and blue sclerae. Cytogenetically, she appeared to be a carrier of a balanced, paternally derived 14;21 Robertsonian translocation. Analysis of DNA polymorphisms showed that she had no paternal allele at the D14S13 locus (14q32). Study of additional DNA markers within 14q32 revealed that her previously undescribed phenotype results from an interstitial microdeletion within 14q32. Fluorescent in situ hybridization was used to show that this microdeletion had occurred de novo on the Robertsonian translocation chromosome. These observations may reactivate old suspicions of a causal association between Robertsonian translocations and de novo rearrangements in offspring; a systematic search for similar subcytogentic rearrangements in other families, in which there are phenotypically abnormal children with apparently balanced translocations, may be fruitful. The clinical and molecular genetic data presented also define a new contiguous gene syndrome due to interstitial 14q32 deletion. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. BACs-on-Beads technology: a reliable test for rapid detection of aneuploidies and microdeletions in prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    García-Herrero, Sandra; Campos-Galindo, Inmaculada; Martínez-Conejero, José Antonio; Serra, Vicente; Olmo, Inés; Lara, Coral; Simón, Carlos; Rubio, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The risk of fetal aneuploidies is usually estimated based on high resolution ultrasound combined with biochemical determination of criterion in maternal blood, with invasive procedures offered to the population at risk. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a new rapid aneuploidy screening test on amniotic fluid (AF) or chorionic villus (CV) samples based on BACs-on-Beads (BoBs) technology and to compare the results with classical karyotyping by Giemsa banding (G-banding) of cultured cells in metaphase as the gold standard technique. The prenatal-BoBs kit was used to study aneuploidies involving chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, and Y as well as nine microdeletion syndromes in 321 AF and 43 CV samples. G-banding of metaphase cultured cells was performed concomitantly for all prenatal samples. A microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) was also carried out in a subset of samples. Prenatal-BoBs results were widely confirmed by classical karyotyping. Only six karyotype findings were not identified by Prenatal-BoBs, all of them due to the known limitations of the technique. In summary, the BACs-on-Beads technology was an accurate, robust, and efficient method for the rapid diagnosis of common aneuploidies and microdeletion syndromes in prenatal samples.

  14. BACs-on-Beads Technology: A Reliable Test for Rapid Detection of Aneuploidies and Microdeletions in Prenatal Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Conejero, José Antonio; Serra, Vicente; Olmo, Inés; Lara, Coral; Simón, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The risk of fetal aneuploidies is usually estimated based on high resolution ultrasound combined with biochemical determination of criterion in maternal blood, with invasive procedures offered to the population at risk. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a new rapid aneuploidy screening test on amniotic fluid (AF) or chorionic villus (CV) samples based on BACs-on-Beads (BoBs) technology and to compare the results with classical karyotyping by Giemsa banding (G-banding) of cultured cells in metaphase as the gold standard technique. The prenatal-BoBs kit was used to study aneuploidies involving chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, and Y as well as nine microdeletion syndromes in 321 AF and 43 CV samples. G-banding of metaphase cultured cells was performed concomitantly for all prenatal samples. A microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) was also carried out in a subset of samples. Prenatal-BoBs results were widely confirmed by classical karyotyping. Only six karyotype findings were not identified by Prenatal-BoBs, all of them due to the known limitations of the technique. In summary, the BACs-on-Beads technology was an accurate, robust, and efficient method for the rapid diagnosis of common aneuploidies and microdeletion syndromes in prenatal samples. PMID:24795887

  15. Diagnostic analysis of the Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome: five cosmids should be used for microdeletion detection and low number of protein truncating mutations.

    PubMed

    Petrij, F; Dauwerse, H G; Blough, R I; Giles, R H; van der Smagt, J J; Wallerstein, R; Maaswinkel-Mooy, P D; van Karnebeek, C D; van Ommen, G J; van Haeringen, A; Rubinstein, J H; Saal, H M; Hennekam, R C; Peters, D J; Breuning, M H

    2000-03-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is a malformation syndrome characterised by facial abnormalities, broad thumbs, broad big toes, and mental retardation. In a subset of RTS patients, microdeletions, translocations, and inversions involving chromosome band 16p13.3 can be detected. We have previously shown that disruption of the human CREB binding protein (CREBBP or CBP) gene, either by these gross chromosomal rearrangements or by point mutations, leads to RTS. CBP is a large nuclear protein involved in transcription regulation, chromatin remodelling, and the integration of several different signal transduction pathways. Here we report diagnostic analysis of CBP in 194 RTS patients, divided into several subsets. In one case the mother is also suspect of having RTS. Analyses of the entire CBP gene by the protein truncation test showed 4/37 truncating mutations. Two point mutations, one 11 bp deletion, and one mutation affecting the splicing of the second exon were detected by subsequent sequencing. Screening the CBP gene for larger deletions, by using different cosmid probes in FISH, showed 14/171 microdeletions. Using five cosmid probes that contain the entire gene, we found 8/89 microdeletions of which 4/8 were 5' or interstitial. This last subset of microdeletions would not have been detected using the commonly used 3' probe RT1, showing the necessity of using all five probes.

  16. A Novel Microdeletion in 1(p34.2p34.3), Involving the "SLC2A1" ("GLUT1") Gene, and Severe Delayed Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeer, Sascha; Koolen, David A; Visser, Gepke; Brackel, Hein J. L.; van der Burgt, Ineke; de Leeuw, Nicole; Willemsen, Michel A. A. P.; Sistermans, Erik A.; Pfundt, Rolph; de Vries, Bert B. A.

    2007-01-01

    A "de novo" 4.1-megabase microdeletion of chromosome 1p34.2p34.3 has been identified by array-based comparative genomic hybridization in a young male with severely delayed development, microcephaly, pronounced hypotonia, and facial dysmorphism. The deleted region encompasses 48 genes, among them the glucose transporter 1 ("SLC2A1" or "GLUT1")…

  17. The emerging microduplication 3q13.31: Expanding the genotype-phenotype correlations of the reciprocal microdeletion 3q13.31 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hervé, B; Fauvert, D; Dard, R; Roume, J; Cognard, S; Goidin, D; Lozach, F; Molina-Gomes, D; Vialard, F

    2016-09-01

    Microdeletion and microduplication syndromes are well-known causes of developmental delay and/or malformations of differing severity. It was recently reported that a microdeletion at the 3q13.31 locus is associated with a new syndrome combining developmental delay, postnatal overgrowth and dysmorphic features. However, the reciprocal microduplication has only been described in a few case reports displaying some clinical features of the microdeletion syndrome. Here, we report on a female infant with a 3.34 Mb microduplication of the 3q13.2q13.31 region inherited from her mother. The infant presented with severe intellectual disability, learning difficulties, intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation and skeletal particularities but no dysmorphic traits. This microduplication encompassed the previously described shortest region of overlap, which contains five genes (DRD3, ZNF80, TIGIT, MIR568 and ZBTB20). We reviewed the phenotypes described in the literature on microduplications and in the well-characterized 3q13.31 microdeletion syndrome. In agreement with the literature data, DRD3 and ZBTB20 appear to be strong candidate genes for neurodevelopmental defects and growth retardation. Lastly, we consider the putative mechanism of this rearrangement, which may involve a particular kind of nonallelic homologous recombination of human endogenous retrovirus elements. PMID:27568866

  18. De Novo 17q24.2-q24.3 microdeletion presenting with generalized hypertrichosis terminalis, gingival fibromatous hyperplasia, and distinctive facial features.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Hanan H; Fukai, Ryoko; Miyake, Noriko; Gamal El Din, Amina A; Eid, Maha M; Eid, Ola M; Thomas, Manal M; El-Badry, Tarek H; Tosson, Angie M S; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2015-10-01

    Generalized hypertrichosis is a feature of several genetic disorders, and the nosology of these entities is still provisional. Recent studies have implicated chromosome 17q24.2-q24.3 microdeletion and the reciprocal microduplication in a very rare form of congenital generalized hypertrichosis terminalis (CGHT) with or without gingival hyperplasia. Here, we report on a 5-year-old Egyptian girl born to consanguineous parents. The girl presented with CGHT and gingival hyperplasia for whom we performed detailed clinical, pathological, and molecular studies. The girl had coarse facies characterized by bilateral epicanthic folds, thick and abundant eyelashes, a broad nose, full cheeks, and lips that constituted the distinctive facial features for this syndrome. Biopsy of the gingiva showed epithelial marked acanthosis and hyperkeratosis with hyperplastic thick collagen bundles and dense fibrosis in the underlying tissues. Array analysis indicated a 17q24.2-q24.3 chromosomal microdeletion. We validated this microdeletion by real-time quantitative PCR and confirmed a perfect co-segregation of the disease phenotype within the family. In summary, this study indicates that 17q24.2-q24.3 microdeletion caused CGHT with gingival hyperplasia and distinctive facies, which should be differentiated from the autosomal recessive type that lacks the distinctive facies.

  19. [Subchromosomal microdeletion identified by molecular karyotyping using DNA microarrays (array CGH) in Rett syndrome girls negative for MECP2 gene mutations].

    PubMed

    Vorsanova, S G; Iurov, I Iu; Voinova, V Iu; Kurinnaia, O S; Zelenova, M A; Demidova, I A; Ulas, E V; Iurov, Iu B

    2013-01-01

    Molecular karyotyping using DNA microarrays (array CGH) was applied for identification of subchromosomal microdeletions in a cohort of 12 girls with clinical features of RETT syndrome, but negative for MECP2 gene mutations. Recurrent microdeletions of MECP2 gene in chromosome X (locus Xq28) were identified in 5 girls of 12 studied. Probably RTT girls with subchromosomic microdeletions in Xq28 could represent a special subtype of the disease, which appears as clinically milder than the classic form of disease. In one case, an atypical form of RTT was associated with genomic abnormalities affecting CDKL5 gene and region critical for microdeletion Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes (15q11.2). In addition, data are presented for the first time that genetic variation in regions 3p13, 3q27.1, and 1q21.1-1q21.2 could associate with RTT-like clinical manifestations. Without application of molecular karyotyping technology and bioinformatic method of assessing the pathogenic significance of genomic rearrangements these RTT-like girls negative for MECP2 gene mutations were considered as cases of idiopathic mental retardation associated with autism. It should be noted that absence of intragenic mutations in MECP2 gene is not sufficient criteria to reject the clinical diagnosis of RTT. To avoid errors in the genetic diagnosis of this genetically heterogeneous brain disease molecular cytogenetic studies using high resolution oligonucleotide array CGH (molecular karyotyping) are needed.

  20. The translocation t(2;11)(p21;q23) without MLL gene rearrangement--a possible marker of good prognosis in myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Pavel; Lysak, Daniel; Vokurka, Samuel; Michalova, Kyra; Sarova, Iveta; Jonasova, Anna; Hruba, Martina; Rykovska, Anna; Subrt, Ivan

    2014-06-01

    The translocation t(2;11)(p21;q23) is associated with de novo myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and has an overall frequency of approximately 1%. The outcome of MDS patients with this translocation is not clear until now, because most of the clinical data addressing the t(2;11)(p21;q23) has been collected without investigating the status of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene. In this report, we present seven new patients with MDS diagnosis and the t(2;11)(p21;q23) in bone marrow cells; all of them without MLL gene rearrangement. They were found in two databases consisting of 1185 patients of two Czech institutions. These patients tended to be younger and showed a strong male predominance. A cytological and histological assessment of bone marrow at diagnosis revealed only mild MDS with marked dysplasia in megakaryopoiesis. Similar to other primary abnormalities in MDS (e.g. deletion of 11q), the t(2;11)(p21;q23) was frequently associated with deletion of 5q. Our results stress the common clinicopathological features of this entity and indicate that the t(2;11)(p21;q23) may be associated with a good prognosis for MDS patients (median survival 72 months).

  1. Familial 1.3-Mb 11p15.5p15.4 Duplication in Three Generations Causing Silver-Russell and Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Vals, Mari-Anne; Kahre, Tiina; Mee, Pille; Muru, Kai; Kallas, Eha; Žilina, Olga; Tillmann, Vallo; Õunap, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) are 2 opposite growth-affecting disorders. The common molecular cause for both syndromes is an abnormal regulation of genes in chromosomal region 11p15, where 2 imprinting control regions (ICR) control fetal and postnatal growth. Also, many submicroscopic chromosomal disturbances like duplications in 11p15 have been described among SRS and BWS patients. Duplications involving both ICRs cause SRS or BWS, depending on which parent the aberration is inherited from. We describe to our knowledge the smallest familial pure 1.3-Mb duplication in chromosomal region 11p15.5p15.4 that involves both ICRs and is present in 3 generations causing an SRS or BWS phenotype. PMID:26732610

  2. Phenotypic and functional consequences of haploinsufficiency of genes from exocyst and retinoic acid pathway due to a recurrent microdeletion of 2p13.2

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rare, recurrent genomic imbalances facilitate the association of genotype with abnormalities at the “whole body” level. However, at the cellular level, the functional consequences of recurrent genomic abnormalities and how they can be linked to the phenotype are much less investigated. Method and results We report an example of a functional analysis of two genes from a new, overlapping microdeletion of 2p13.2 region (from 72,140,702-72,924,626). The subjects shared intellectual disability (ID), language delay, hyperactivity, facial asymmetry, ear malformations, and vertebral and/or craniofacial abnormalities. The overlapping region included two genes, EXOC6B and CYP26B1, which are involved in exocytosis/Notch signaling and retinoic acid (RA) metabolism, respectively, and are of critical importance for early morphogenesis, symmetry as well as craniofacial, skeleton and brain development. The abnormal function of EXOC6B was documented in patient lymphoblasts by its reduced expression and with perturbed expression of Notch signaling pathway genes HES1 and RBPJ, previously noted to be the consequence of EXOC6B dysfunction in animal and cell line models. Similarly, the function of CYP26B1 was affected by the deletion since the retinoic acid induced expression of this gene in patient lymphoblasts was significantly lower compared to controls (8% of controls). Conclusion Haploinsufficiency of CYP26B1 and EXOC6B genes involved in retinoic acid and exocyst/Notch signaling pathways, respectively, has not been reported previously in humans. The developmental anomalies and phenotypic features of our subjects are in keeping with the dysfunction of these genes, considering their known role. Documenting their dysfunction at the cellular level in patient cells enhanced our understanding of biological processes which contribute to the clinical phenotype. PMID:23837398

  3. Polysaccharide Production Benefits Dry Storage Survival of the Biocontrol Agent Pseudomonas fluorescens S11:P:12 Effective Against Several Maladies of Stored Potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens S11:P:12 (NRRL B-21133) is a biological control agent able to suppress several potato diseases and sprouting. Notably, it produces a polysaccharide during liquid cultivation; and the objective of this work was to determine the role of this material in the bio-control process...

  4. Molecular characterization of G11P[25] and G3P[3] human rotavirus strains associated with asymptomatic infection in South India.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Indrani; Iturriza-Gomara, Miren; Rajendran, Priya; Primrose, Beryl; Ramani, Sasirekha; Gray, James J; Brown, David W; Kang, Gagandeep

    2007-11-01

    Rotaviruses are the major etiological agents of diarrhea in children less than 5 years of age. Two unusual rotavirus strains not previously reported in India, G11P[25] (CRI 10795) and G3P[3] (CRI 33594) were isolated from faecal samples of asymptomatic children in India. The strains were characterized by sequence analysis of the genes encoding the VP7, VP4, VP6, and NSP4. The G11P[25] strain was closely related to the human G11P[25] strains from Bangladesh (with 98% identity at the nucleotide [nt] level and the amino acid [aa] level for the VP7 gene and 96% identity at the nt and 98% at the aa level for the VP4 gene). The G3P[3] strain was found to be related to a G3P[3] strain isolated in Thailand (CMH222; 88% identity at the nt level and 97% at aa level for the VP7 gene and 84% identity at the nt level and 90% at the aa level for the VP4 gene). Phylogenetic analysis of the VP6 and the NSP4 genes revealed that the Vellore G11P[25] strain was of VP6 subgroup II and NSP4 genotype B. The G3P[3] strain was identified as NSP4 genotype C and the VP6 gene showed 97% identity at the deduced amino acid level with strain CMH222 (Thailand) strain but did not cluster with sequences of SGI, SGII, SGI+II or SG-nonI/nonII. Both strains had gene segments of animal rotavirus origin suggesting inter-species transmission of rotavirus, and in the case of G11P[25] possibly underwent reassortment subsequently with human strains resulting in an animal-human hybrid strain. PMID:17854037

  5. Genome-wide association study identifies two novel regions at 11p15.5-p13 and 1p31 with major impact on acute-phase serum amyloid A.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Carola; Albrecht, Eva; Hysi, Pirro G; Lagou, Vasiliki; Waldenberger, Melanie; Tönjes, Anke; Prokopenko, Inga; Heim, Katharina; Blackburn, Hannah; Ried, Janina S; Kleber, Marcus E; Mangino, Massimo; Thorand, Barbara; Peters, Annette; Hammond, Christopher J; Grallert, Harald; Boehm, Bernhard O; Kovacs, Peter; Geistlinger, Ludwig; Prokisch, Holger; Winkelmann, Bernhard R; Spector, Tim D; Wichmann, H-Erich; Stumvoll, Michael; Soranzo, Nicole; März, Winfried; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Gieger, Christian

    2010-11-01

    Elevated levels of acute-phase serum amyloid A (A-SAA) cause amyloidosis and are a risk factor for atherosclerosis and its clinical complications, type 2 diabetes, as well as various malignancies. To investigate the genetic basis of A-SAA levels, we conducted the first genome-wide association study on baseline A-SAA concentrations in three population-based studies (KORA, TwinsUK, Sorbs) and one prospective case cohort study (LURIC), including a total of 4,212 participants of European descent, and identified two novel genetic susceptibility regions at 11p15.5-p13 and 1p31. The region at 11p15.5-p13 (rs4150642; p = 3.20×10(-111)) contains serum amyloid A1 (SAA1) and the adjacent general transcription factor 2 H1 (GTF2H1), Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome 5 (HPS5), lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), and lactate dehydrogenase C (LDHC). This region explains 10.84% of the total variation of A-SAA levels in our data, which makes up 18.37% of the total estimated heritability. The second region encloses the leptin receptor (LEPR) gene at 1p31 (rs12753193; p = 1.22×10(-11)) and has been found to be associated with CRP and fibrinogen in previous studies. Our findings demonstrate a key role of the 11p15.5-p13 region in the regulation of baseline A-SAA levels and provide confirmative evidence of the importance of the 1p31 region for inflammatory processes and the close interplay between A-SAA, leptin, and other acute-phase proteins. PMID:21124955

  6. Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome associated with Chiari type I malformation caused by a large 16p13.3 microdeletion: a contiguous gene syndrome?

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Cezary; Volz, Kim; Ranola, Maria; Kitch, Karla; Karim, Tariza; O'Neil, Joseph; Smith, Jodi; Torres-Martinez, Wilfredo

    2010-02-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome (RSTS, OMIM 180849) is a rare condition, which in 65% of cases is caused by haploinsufficiency of CREBBP (cAMP response element binding protein binding protein) localized to 16p13.3. A small subset of RSTS cases caused by 16p13.3 microdeletions involving neighboring genes have been recently suggested to be a true contiguous gene syndrome called severe RSTS or 16p13.3 deletion syndrome (OMIM 610543). In the present report, we describe a case of a 2-year-old female with RSTS who, besides most of the typical features of RSTS has corpus callosum dysgenesis and a Chiari type I malformation which required neurosurgical decompression. CGH microarray showed a approximately 520.7 kb microdeletion on 16p13.3 involving CREBBP, ADCY9, and SRL genes. We hypothesize that the manifestations in this patient might be influenced by the haploinsufficiency for ADCY9 and SRL.

  7. 15q26.1 microdeletion encompassing only CHD2 and RGMA in two adults with moderate intellectual disability, epilepsy and truncal obesity.

    PubMed

    Courage, Carolina; Houge, Gunnar; Gallati, Sabina; Schjelderup, Jack; Rieubland, Claudine

    2014-09-01

    We report two patients with microdeletions in chromosomal subdomain 15q26.1 encompassing only two genes, CHD2 and RGMA. Both patients present a distinct phenotype with intellectual disability, epilepsy, behavioral issues, truncal obesity, scoliosis and facial dysmorphism. CHD2 haploinsufficiency is known to cause intellectual disability and epilepsy, RGMA haploinsufficiency might explain truncal obesity with onset around puberty observed in our two patients. PMID:24932903

  8. Myelodysplastic syndrome with a t(2;11)(p21;q23-24) and translocation breakpoint close to miR-125b-1.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Jim; Aamot, Hege Vangstein; Roberto, Roberta; Tjønnfjord, Geir E; Micci, Francesca; Heim, Sverre

    2012-10-01

    The upregulation of oncogenes and the formation of fusion genes are commonly observed in hematological malignancies with recurring balanced translocations. However, in some malignancies exhibiting balanced chromosomal rearrangements, neither oncogene deregulation nor generation of fusion genes appears to be involved, suggesting that other mechanisms are at play. In the rare myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) containing a t(2;11)(p21;q23-24) translocation, breakpoints near a microRNA locus, miR-125b-1, in 11q24 have been suggested to be pathogenetically involved. Here we report the detailed mapping and sequencing of the breakpoint located only 2 kilobases from miR-125b-1 in an MDS patient with a t(2;11)(p21;q23-24).

  9. Interplay of boron localized states and electron transport in B x Ga1-x As0.11 P0.89:Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostheim, L.; Klar, P. J.; Liebich, S.; Ludewig, P.; Volz, K.; Stolz, W.

    2016-07-01

    We study the magnetotransport properties of n-type B x Ga1-x As0.11 P0.89:Te alloy samples with 0≤slant x≤slant 0.038 in magnetic fields up to 4 T between 10 and 280 K, some samples also under hydrostatic pressure up to 15 kbar. As a general trend the resistivity increases with increasing x, as both the carrier concentration and the mobility of electrons decrease. The free carrier concentration and mobility of the reference sample GaAs0.11 P0.89:Te is almost independent of the applied hydrostatic pressure, in particular, at higher temperatures whereas the B0.018Ga0.982As0.11P0.89:Te sample exhibits a different behavior. Its resistivity decreases due to a substantial increase of its free carrier concentration under pressure. This behavior is explained by the existence of a boron-related density of localized states in the vicinity of the conduction band edge of the alloy. The boron states act as electron traps as well as efficient scattering centers. Applying hydrostatic pressure shifts the energetic positions of conduction band edge at the X-point and of the boron states apart, reducing the impact of boron on the electronic transport properties of the alloy.

  10. Angelman syndrome and severe infections in a patient with de novo 15q11.2-q13.1 deletion and maternally inherited 2q21.3 microdeletion.

    PubMed

    Neubert, Gerda; von Au, Katja; Drossel, Katrin; Tzschach, Andreas; Horn, Denise; Nickel, Renate; Kaindl, Angela M

    2013-01-10

    Angelman syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by mental retardation, severe speech disorder, facial dysmorphism, secondary microcephaly, ataxia, seizures, and abnormal behaviors such as easily provoked laughter. It is most frequently caused by a de novo maternal deletion of chromosome 15q11-q13 (about 70-90%), but can also be caused by paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15q11-q13 (3-7%), an imprinting defect (2-4%) or in mutations in the ubiquitin protein ligase E3A gene UBE3A mostly leading to frame shift mutation. In addition, for patients with overlapping clinical features (Angelman-like syndrome), mutations in methyl-CpG binding protein 2 gene MECP2 and cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene CDKL5 as well as a microdeletion of 2q23.1 including the methyl-CpG binding domain protein 5 gene MBD5 have been described. Here, we describe a patient who carries a de novo 5Mb-deletion of chromosome 15q11.2-q13.1 known to be associated with Angelman syndrome and a further, maternally inherited deletion 2q21.3 (~364kb) of unknown significance. In addition to classic features of Angelman syndrome, she presented with severe infections in the first year of life, a symptom that has not been described in patients with Angelman syndrome. The 15q11.2-q13.1 deletion contains genes critical for Prader-Willi syndrome, the Angelman syndrome causing genes UBE3A and ATP10A/C, and several non-imprinted genes: GABRB3 and GABRA5 (both encoding subunits of GABA A receptor), GOLGA6L2, HERC2 and OCA2 (associated with oculocutaneous albinism II). The deletion 2q21.3 includes exons of the genes RAB3GAP1 (associated with Warburg Micro syndrome) and ZRANB3 (not disease-associated). Despite the normal phenotype of the mother, the relevance of the 2q21.3 microdeletion for the phenotype of the patient cannot be excluded, and further case reports will need to address this point.

  11. Microhomology-mediated mechanisms underlie non-recurrent disease-causing microdeletions of the FOXL2 gene or its regulatory domain.

    PubMed

    Verdin, Hannah; D'haene, Barbara; Beysen, Diane; Novikova, Yana; Menten, Björn; Sante, Tom; Lapunzina, Pablo; Nevado, Julian; Carvalho, Claudia M B; Lupski, James R; De Baere, Elfride

    2013-01-01

    Genomic disorders are often caused by recurrent copy number variations (CNVs), with nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) as the underlying mechanism. Recently, several microhomology-mediated repair mechanisms--such as microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ), fork stalling and template switching (FoSTeS), microhomology-mediated break-induced replication (MMBIR), serial replication slippage (SRS), and break-induced SRS (BISRS)--were described in the etiology of non-recurrent CNVs in human disease. In addition, their formation may be stimulated by genomic architectural features. It is, however, largely unexplored to what extent these mechanisms contribute to rare, locus-specific pathogenic CNVs. Here, fine-mapping of 42 microdeletions of the FOXL2 locus, encompassing FOXL2 (32) or its regulatory domain (10), serves as a model for rare, locus-specific CNVs implicated in genetic disease. These deletions lead to blepharophimosis syndrome (BPES), a developmental condition affecting the eyelids and the ovary. For breakpoint mapping we used targeted array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), quantitative PCR (qPCR), long-range PCR, and Sanger sequencing of the junction products. Microhomology, ranging from 1 bp to 66 bp, was found in 91.7% of 24 characterized breakpoint junctions, being significantly enriched in comparison with a random control sample. Our results show that microhomology-mediated repair mechanisms underlie at least 50% of these microdeletions. Moreover, genomic architectural features, like sequence motifs, non-B DNA conformations, and repetitive elements, were found in all breakpoint regions. In conclusion, the majority of these microdeletions result from microhomology-mediated mechanisms like MMEJ, FoSTeS, MMBIR, SRS, or BISRS. Moreover, we hypothesize that the genomic architecture might drive their formation by increasing the susceptibility for DNA breakage or promote replication fork stalling. Finally, our locus-centered study

  12. The RNA binding motif protein 15B (RBM15B/OTT3) is a functional competitor of serine-arginine (SR) proteins and antagonizes the positive effect of the CDK11p110-cyclin L2α complex on splicing.

    PubMed

    Loyer, Pascal; Busson, Adeline; Trembley, Janeen H; Hyle, Judith; Grenet, Jose; Zhao, Wei; Ribault, Catherine; Montier, Tristan; Kidd, Vincent J; Lahti, Jill M

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report the identification of the RNA binding motif protein RBM15B/OTT3 as a new CDK11(p110) binding partner that alters the effects of CDK11 on splicing. RBM15B was initially identified as a binding partner of the Epstein-Barr virus mRNA export factor and, more recently, as a cofactor of the nuclear export receptor NXF1. In this study, we found that RBM15B co-elutes with CDK11(p110), cyclin L2α, and serine-arginine (SR) proteins, including SF2/ASF, in a large nuclear complex of ∼1-MDa molecular mass following size exclusion chromatography. Using co-immunoprecipitation experiments and in vitro pulldown assays, we mapped two distinct domains of RBM15B that are essential for its direct interaction with the N-terminal extension of CDK11(p110), cyclin L2α, and SR proteins such as 9G8 and SF2/ASF. Finally, we established that RBM15B is a functional competitor of the SR proteins SF2/ASF and 9G8, inhibits formation of the functional spliceosomal E complex, and antagonizes the positive effect of the CDK11(p110)-cyclin L2α complex on splicing both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21044963

  13. A three-generation family with terminal microdeletion involving 5p15.33-32 due to a whole-arm 5;15 chromosomal translocation with a steady phenotype of atypical cri du chat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Elmakky, Amira; Carli, Diana; Lugli, Licia; Torelli, Paola; Guidi, Battista; Falcinelli, Cristina; Fini, Sergio; Ferrari, Fabrizio; Percesepe, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    Cri du chat syndrome is characterized by cat-like cry, facial dysmorphisms, microcephaly, speech delay, intellectual disability and slow growth rate, which are present with variable frequency. The typical cri du chat syndrome, due to 5p15.2 deletion, includes severe intellectual disability, facial dysmorphisms, neonatal hypotonia and pre- and post-natal growth retardation, whereas more distal deletions in 5p15.3 lead to cat-like cry and speech delay and produce the clinical picture of the atypical cri du chat syndrome, with minimal or absent intellectual impairment. In this article we report a three-generation family with an unbalanced whole arm translocation between chromosome 5 and 15 and a microdeletion of 5.5 Mb involving 5p15.33-32. By reporting the smallest terminal deletion of 5p15.3 described so far and by reviewing the literature we discuss the genotype/phenotype correlations of the distal region of the cri du chat syndrome. The previously described critical region for the speech delay may be narrowed down and microcephaly, growth retardation and dysmorphic facial features can be included in the phenotypic expression of the atypical cri du chat syndrome due to 5p15.3 deletions. PMID:24556499

  14. Review of renal carcinoma with t(6;11)(p21;q12) with focus on clinical and pathobiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Naoto; Tanaka, Azusa; Sasaki, Naomi; Ishihara, Akira; Matsuura, Keiko; Moriyama, Masatsugu; Nagashima, Yoji; Inoue, Keiji; Petersson, Fredrik; Martignoni, Guido; Michal, Michal; Hes, Ondrej

    2013-06-01

    Recently, a new category of MiTF/TFE family translocation carcinomas of the kidney has been proposed. This category includes Xp11.2 renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and the t(6;11) RCC. These tumors share clinical, morphological, immunohistochemical and molecular genetic features. In this article, we review t(6;11) RCC. This tumor predominantly affects children and young adults. Macroscopically, the tumor generally forms a well circumscribed mass. Satellite nodules may be observed. Histologically, the tumor comprises large cells and small cells surrounded by basement membrane material. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells show nuclear immunolabeling for TFEB and usually express Cathepsin-K in the cytoplasm. Karyotyping detects the rearrangement between chromosome 6p21 and chromosome 11q12. Alpha-TFEB fusion can be detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Most cases affecting children and young adults seem to be indolent, but some adult cases have presented with metastasis or caused death. As previously reported cases remain limited to date, further examination in a large scale study will be needed in order to elucidate clinical behavior and molecular characteristics.

  15. Translocation Renal Cell Carcinoma t(6;11)(p21;q12) and Sickle Cell Anemia: First Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Chaste, Damien; Vian, Emmanuel; Verhoest, Gregory; Blanchet, Pascal

    2014-02-01

    Translocation renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a family of rare tumors recently identified in the pediatric and young adult population. We report the first case of a young woman from French West Indies with sickle cell anemia who developed a translocation RCC t(6;11)(p21;q12). Usually people with the sickle cell condition are known to develop renal medullary carcinoma (RMC). To our knowledge, this is the first case described in the literature of a translocation RCC associated with sickle cell disease. Here we discuss the relation between translocation RCC, RMC, and sickle cell disease.

  16. A de novo microdeletion of SEMA5A in a boy with autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Mosca-Boidron, Anne-Laure; Gueneau, Lucie; Huguet, Guillaume; Goldenberg, Alice; Henry, Céline; Gigot, Nadège; Pallesi-Pocachard, Emilie; Falace, Antonio; Duplomb, Laurence; Thevenon, Julien; Duffourd, Yannis; ST-Onge, Judith; Chambon, Pascal; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Callier, Patrick; Marle, Nathalie; Payet, Muriel; Ragon, Clemence; Goubran Botros, Hany; Buratti, Julien; Calderari, Sophie; Dumas, Guillaume; Delorme, Richard; Lagarde, Nathalie; Pinoit, Jean-Michel; Rosier, Antoine; Masurel-Paulet, Alice; Cardoso, Carlos; Mugneret, Francine; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Campion, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Bourgeron, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Semaphorins are a large family of secreted and membrane-associated proteins necessary for wiring of the brain. Semaphorin 5A (SEMA5A) acts as a bifunctional guidance cue, exerting both attractive and inhibitory effects on developing axons. Previous studies have suggested that SEMA5A could be a susceptibility gene for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). We first identified a de novo translocation t(5;22)(p15.3;q11.21) in a patient with ASD and intellectual disability (ID). At the translocation breakpoint on chromosome 5, we observed a 861-kb deletion encompassing the end of the SEMA5A gene. We delineated the breakpoint by NGS and observed that no gene was disrupted on chromosome 22. We then used Sanger sequencing to search for deleterious variants affecting SEMA5A in 142 patients with ASD. We also identified two independent heterozygous variants located in a conserved functional domain of the protein. Both variants were maternally inherited and predicted as deleterious. Our genetic screens identified the first case of a de novo SEMA5A microdeletion in a patient with ASD and ID. Although our study alone cannot formally associate SEMA5A with susceptibility to ASD, it provides additional evidence that Semaphorin dysfunction could lead to ASD and ID. Further studies on Semaphorins are warranted to better understand the role of this family of genes in susceptibility to neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:26395558

  17. The 22q11.2 microdeletion: fifteen years of insights into the genetic and neural complexity of psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Liam J.; Crabtree, Gregg W.; Markx, Sander; Stark, Kimberly L.; Chaverneff, Florence; Xu, Bin; Mukai, Jun; Fenelon, Karine; Hsu, Pei-Ken; Gogos, Joseph A.; Karayiorgou, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Over the last fifteen years it has become established that 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is a true genetic risk factor for schizophrenia. Carriers of deletions in chromosome 22q11.2 develop schizophrenia at rate of 25–30% and such deletions account for as many as 1–2% of cases of sporadic schizophrenia in the general population. Access to a relatively homogeneous population of individuals that suffer from schizophrenia as the result of a shared etiological factor and the potential to generate etiologically valid mouse models provides an immense opportunity to better understand the pathobiology of this disease. In this review we survey the clinical literature associated with the 22q11.2 microdeletions with a focus on neuroanatomical changes. Then, we highlight results from work modeling this structural mutation in animals. The key biological pathways disrupted by the mutation are discussed and how these changes impact the structure and function of neural circuits is described. PMID:20920576

  18. Rapid molecular cytogenetic analysis of X-chromosomal microdeletions: Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for complex glycerol kinase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, K.C.; Lindsay, E.A.; McCabe, E.R.B.

    1995-07-17

    Diagnosis of X-chromosomal microdeletions has relied upon the traditional methods of Southern blotting and DNA amplification, with carrier identification requiring time-consuming and unreliable dosage calculations. In this report, we describe rapid molecular cytogenetic identification of deleted DNA in affected males with the Xp21 contiguous gene syndrome (complex glycerol kinase deficiency, CGKD) and female carriers for this disorder. CGKD deletions involve the genes for glycerol kinase, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and/or adrenal hypoplasia congenita. We report an improved method for diagnosis of deletions in individuals with CGKD and for identification of female carriers within their families using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a cosmid marker (cosmid 35) within the glycerol kinase gene. When used in combination with an Xq control probe, affected males demonstrate a single signal from the control probe, while female carriers demonstrate a normal chromosome with two signals, as well as a deleted chromosome with a single signal from the control probe. FISH analysis for CGKD provides the advantages of speed and accuracy for evaluation of submicroscopic X-chromosome deletions, particularly in identification of female carriers. In addition to improving carrier evaluation, FISH will make prenatal diagnosis of CGKD more readily available. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Loss of SLC38A5 and FTSJ1 at Xp11.23 in three brothers with non-syndromic mental retardation due to a microdeletion in an unstable genomic region.

    PubMed

    Froyen, Guy; Bauters, Marijke; Boyle, Jackie; Van Esch, Hilde; Govaerts, Karen; van Bokhoven, Hans; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Moraine, Claude; Chelly, Jamel; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Marynen, Peter; Gecz, Jozef; Turner, Gillian

    2007-06-01

    Using high resolution X chromosome array-CGH we identified an interstitial microdeletion at Xp11.23 in three brothers with moderate to severe mental retardation (MR) without dysmorphic features. The extent of the deletion was subsequently delineated to about 50 kb by regular PCR and included only the SLC38A5 and FTSJ1 genes. The loss of the FTSJ1 MR gene in males is expected to result in the observed phenotype but the contribution of the deletion of the solute carrier SLC38A5 gene is less clear. Their mother also carries the deletion and completely inactivates the aberrant X chromosome. Interestingly, the distal breakpoint is situated within a 200 kb SSX repeat region that appears to stimulate recombination since subtle copy number changes often occur at this location and it is frequently involved in translocations in tumours. Since this apparent SSX unstable structure is flanked proximally by FTSJ1 and PQBP1, subtle deletions or duplications at this location would be expected to cause MR, as in our family. So far, we have screened a cohort of 300 patients but did not find additional aberrations at the FTSJ1 locus indicating that the frequency is likely to be low.

  20. A 1.7-Mb YAC contig around the human BDNF gene (11p13): integration of the physical, genetic, and cytogenetic maps in relation to WAGR syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Rosier, M.F.; Martin, A.; Houlgatte, R.

    1994-11-01

    WAGR (Wilms tumor, aniridia, genito-urinary abnormalities, mental retardation) syndrome in humans is associated with deletions of the 11p13 region. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene maps to this region, and its deletion seems to contribute to the severity of the patient`s mental retardation. Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) carrying the BDNF gene have been isolated and characterized. Localization of two known exons of this gene leads to a minimal estimation of its size of about 40 kb. Chimerism of the BDNF YACs has been investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization and chromosome assignment on somatic cell hybrids. Using the BDNF gene, YAC end sequence tagged sites (STS), and Genethon microsatellite markers, the authors constructed a 1.7-Mb contig and refined the cytogenetic map at 11p13. The resulting integrated physical, genetic, and cytogenetic map constitutes a resource for the characterization of genes that may be involved in the WAGR syndrome. 42 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Imprinting of the gene encoding a human cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p57KIP2, on chromosome 11p15.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, S; Thompson, J S; Edwards, M C; Bartletta, J M; Grundy, P; Kalikin, L M; Harper, J W; Elledge, S J; Feinberg, A P

    1996-01-01

    Parental origin-specific alterations of chromosome 11p15 in human cancer suggest the involvement of one or more maternally expressed imprinted genes involved in embryonal tumor suppression and the cancer-predisposing Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). The gene encoding cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p57KIP2, whose overexpression causes G1 phase arrest, was recently cloned and mapped to this band. We find that the p57KIP2 gene is imprinted, with preferential expression of the maternal allele. However, the imprint is not absolute, as the paternal allele is also expressed at low levels in most tissues, and at levels comparable to the maternal allele in fetal brain and some embryonal tumors. The biochemical function, chromosomal location, and imprinting of the p57KIP2 gene match the properties predicted for a tumor suppressor gene at 11p15.5. However, as the p57KIP2 gene is 500 kb centromeric to the gene encoding insulin-like growth factor 2, it is likely to be part of a large domain containing other imprinted genes. Thus, loss of heterozygosity or loss of imprinting might simultaneously affect several genes at this locus that together contribute to tumor and/or growth- suppressing functions that are disrupted in BWS and embryonal tumors. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8610162

  2. Identification of a microdeletion at 7q21.3 with fluorescence in situ hybridization in a patient with split hand/split foot (ectrodactyly)

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, L.; Massa, H.; Disteche, C.

    1994-09-01

    Split hand/split foot (SHSF), often referred to as ectrodactyly or lobster claw deformity, is a human developmental disorder characterized by a deep median cleft of the hands and feet, missing digits, and fusion of remaining digits. This anomaly can be seen alone, frequently autosomal dominant, or in association with other abnormalities. One locus for this defect has been localized to chromosome 7q21.3-q22.1. We report a patient with SHSF plus mental retardation, short stature and dysmorphic features who was found to have a microdeletion at this locus detected only with the aid of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). T.H. is a 7 y.o. male who was referred for evaluation of foot anomalies and mild mental retardation. History was remarkable for growth retardation of postnatal onset and hypotonia. Renal ultrasound and audiology evaluation were normal. Physical exam revealed dysplastic ears, micrognathia, long philtrum, high narrow palate, and malformations of the feet consistent with SHSF. Family history was negative for limb abnormalities and mental retardation. A number of patients with SHSF and other anomalies have been found to have deletions involving chromosome 7q21-q22; therefore, high resolution chromosome analysis was performed in T.H. but was inconclusive. Cosmids and yeast artificial chromosomes which we had previously mapped to the SHSF critical region were used as FISH probes and a microdeletion was detected. We were thus able to determine the etiology of this child`s abnormalities and provide accurate genetic counseling, which would not have been possible with standard cytogenetic techniques. This technique also allowed us to further refine the SHSF critical region. This case illustrates the utility of FISH for the rapid identification of suspect microdeletions in SHSF. This approach should also be useful as an expeditious way of defining the critical regions for the location of genes which give rise to other developmental malformations.

  3. Contribution of mGluR5 to pathophysiology in a mouse model of human chromosome 16p11.2 microdeletion.

    PubMed

    Tian, Di; Stoppel, Laura J; Heynen, Arnold J; Lindemann, Lothar; Jaeschke, Georg; Mills, Alea A; Bear, Mark F

    2015-02-01

    Human chromosome 16p11.2 microdeletion is the most common gene copy number variation in autism, but the synaptic pathophysiology caused by this mutation is largely unknown. Using a mouse with the same genetic deficiency, we found that metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5)-dependent synaptic plasticity and protein synthesis was altered in the hippocampus and that hippocampus-dependent memory was impaired. Notably, chronic treatment with a negative allosteric modulator of mGluR5 reversed the cognitive deficit.

  4. Genome-wide association and linkage identify modifier loci of lung disease severity in cystic fibrosis at 11p13 and 20q13.2

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Fred A.; Strug, Lisa J.; Doshi, Vishal K.; Commander, Clayton W.; Blackman, Scott M.; Sun, Lei; Berthiaume, Yves; Cutler, David; Cojocaru, Andreea; Collaco, J. Michael; Corey, Mary; Dorfman, Ruslan; Goddard, Katrina; Green, Deanna; Kent, Jack W.; Lange, Ethan M.; Lee, Seunggeun; Li, Weili; Luo, Jingchun; Mayhew, Gregory M.; Naughton, Kathleen M.; Pace, Rhonda G.; Paré, Peter; Rommens, Johanna M.; Sandford, Andrew; Stonebraker, Jaclyn R.; Sun, Wei; Taylor, Chelsea; Vanscoy, Lori L.; Zou, Fei; Blangero, John; Zielenski, Julian; O’Neal, Wanda K.; Drumm, Mitchell L.; Durie, Peter R.; Knowles, Michael R.; Cutting, Garry R.

    2012-01-01

    A combined genome-wide association and linkage study was used to identify loci causing variation in CF lung disease severity. A significant association (P=3. 34 × 10-8) near EHF and APIP (chr11p13) was identified in F508del homozygotes (n=1,978). The association replicated in F508del homozygotes (P=0.006) from a separate family-based study (n=557), with P=1.49 × 10-9 for the three-study joint meta-analysis. Linkage analysis of 486 sibling pairs from the family-based study identified a significant QTL on chromosome 20q13.2 (LOD=5.03). Our findings provide insight into the causes of variation in lung disease severity in CF and suggest new therapeutic targets for this life-limiting disorder. PMID:21602797

  5. Extramedullary relapse of AML with t(9;11)(p22;q23) associated with clonal evolution from trisomy 8 into tetrasomy 8.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tohru; Tsukuda, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Hirokazu; Yoshimoto, Mitsuru; Tsujisaki, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a patient with extramedullary relapse of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) without involving bone marrow. A 57-year-old man was diagnosed as having acute monoblastic leukemia with t(9;11)(p22;q23) and trisomy 8. Ten months after achieving complete response (CR) with chemotherapy, masses developed in his left forearm and in the back of his thigh, preceded by enigmatic peripheral neurological symptoms. Aspiration from the forearm showed leukemic relapse, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed that the majority of the cells had 11q23 anomaly and tetrasomy 8. Bone marrow or meningeal relapse was not observed. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of clonal evolution associated with the development of myeloid sarcoma as a relapse in AML. PMID:20190481

  6. LAMTOR1-PRKCD and NUMA1-SFMBT1 fusion genes identified by RNA sequencing in aneurysmal benign fibrous histiocytoma with t(3;11)(p21;q13).

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila; Bjerkehagen, Bodil; Lobmaier, Ingvild; Heim, Sverre

    2015-11-01

    RNA sequencing of an aneurysmal benign fibrous histiocytoma with the karyotype 46,XY,t(3;11)(p21;q13),del(6)(p23)[17]/46,XY[2] showed that the t(3;11) generated two fusion genes: LAMTOR1-PRKCD and NUMA1-SFMBT1. RT-PCR together with Sanger sequencing verified the presence of fusion transcripts from both fusion genes. In the LAMTOR1-PRKCD fusion, the part of the PRKCD gene coding for the catalytic domain of the serine/threonine kinase is under control of the LAMTOR1 promoter. In the NUMA1-SFMBT1 fusion, the part of the SFMBT1 gene coding for two of four malignant brain tumor domains and the sterile alpha motif domain is controlled by the NUMA1 promoter. The data support a neoplastic genesis of aneurysmal benign fibrous histiocytoma and indicate a pathogenetic role for LAMTOR1-PRKCD and NUMA1-SFMBT1.

  7. Tuberculin Skin Test Negativity Is Under Tight Genetic Control of Chromosomal Region 11p14-15 in Settings With Different Tuberculosis Endemicities

    PubMed Central

    Cobat, Aurélie; Poirier, Christine; Hoal, Eileen; Boland-Auge, Anne; de La Rocque, France; Corrard, François; Grange, Ghislain; Migaud, Mélanie; Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Schurr, Erwin; Alcaïs, Alexandre; Delacourt, Christophe; Abel, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    A substantial proportion of subjects exposed to a contagious tuberculosis case display lack of tuberculin skin test (TST) reactivity. We previously mapped a major locus (TST1) controlling lack of TST reactivity in families from an area in South Africa where tuberculosis is hyperendemic. Here, we conducted a household tuberculosis contact study in a French area where the endemicity of tuberculosis is low. A genome-wide analysis of TST negativity identified a significant linkage signal (P < 3 × 10−5) in close vicinity of TST1. Combined analysis of the 2 samples increased evidence of linkage (P = 2.4 × 10−6), further implicating genetic factors located on 11p14-15. This region overlaps the TNF1 locus controlling mycobacteria-driven tumor necrosis factor α production. PMID:25143445

  8. Is t(10;11)(p11.2;q23) involving MLL and ABI-1 genes associated with congenital acute monocytic leukemia?

    PubMed

    Morerio, Cristina; Rosanda, Cristina; Rapella, Annamaria; Micalizzi, Concetta; Panarello, Claudio

    2002-11-01

    Congenital, or perinatal, leukemias are rarely observed, but retrospective molecular studies seem to suggest a more frequent onset in prenatal life. Myelocytic types are common, and chromosome band 11q23 rearrangements at the MLL locus are characteristic genetic markers. The fusion of the MLL gene with one of its partners, ABI-1, has recently been described in two infant leukemia patients with monocytic involvement and good clinical outcome. We report a case of congenital monocytic leukemia with the same gene involvement and good response to chemotherapy. The blast metaphases were probed by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and t(10;11)(p11.2;q23) involving MLL and ABI-1 genes was demonstrated with the same breakpoint in ABI-1. The congenital presentation of this case suggests a possible relationship of this genetic event with in utero leukemogenesis.

  9. Functional EGFR germline polymorphisms may confer risk for EGFR somatic mutations in non-small cell lung cancer, with a predominant effect on exon 19 microdeletions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wanqing; He, Lijun; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Krishnaswamy, Soundararajan; Kanteti, Rajani; Wang, Yi-Ching; Salgia, Ravi; Ratain, Mark J

    2011-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the EGFR tyrosine kinase (TK) domain play a critical role in the development and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Strong genetic influence on susceptibility to these mutations has been suggested. To identify the genetic factors conferring risk for the EGFR TK mutations in NSCLC, a case-control study was conducted in 141 Taiwanese NSCLC patients by focusing on three functional polymorphisms in the EGFR gene [-216G/T, intron 1(CA)n and R497K]. Allelic imbalance (AI) of the EGFR -216G/T polymorphism was also tested in the heterozygous patients as well as in the NCI-60 cancer cell lines to further verify its function. We found that the frequencies of the alleles -216T and CA-19 are significantly higher in the patients with any mutation (p=0.032 and 0.01, respectively), in particular in those with exon 19 microdeletions (p=0.006 and 0.033, respectively), but not in the patients with L858R mutation. The -216T allele is favored to be amplified in both tumor DNA of lung cancer patients and cancer cell lines. We conclude that the local haplotype structures across the EGFR gene may favor the development of cellular malignancies and thus significantly confer risk to the occurrence of EGFR mutations in NSCLC, particularly the exon 19 microdeletions. PMID:21292812

  10. X-linked mixed deafness (DFN3): Cloning and characterization of the critical region allows the identification of novel microdeletions and a duplication

    SciTech Connect

    Cremers, F.P.M.; de Kok, Y.J.M.; Huber, I.

    1994-09-01

    We have constructed a 1.8 megabase YAC contig in the Xq21.41 region using DXS169, DXS26, and DXS995. This contig encompasses the X-linked mixed deafness (DFN3) gene(s) as judged from detailed physical mapping of large Xq21 deletions associated with contiguous gene syndromes and two microdeletions associated with classical DFN3. As a prerequisite for positional cloning of the DFN3 gene, a 850-kb cosmid contig spanning the critical region was constructed by subcloning of two YACs and by cosmid walking in the ICRF X-chromosome library. Using Southern- and PFGE-analysis, we were able to identify 2 novel microdeletions and a 150-kb duplication associated with DFN3. We also identified a sizeable deletion in a patient suffering from choroideremia and mental retardation. This deletion encompasses 40 kb of the distal end of the cosmid contig. Since this patient does not show hearing loss, this finding positions the distal boundary of the DFN3 critical region in our cosmid contig. Our observations suggest that the DFN3 gene is very large (>400 kb) spanning the loci DXS26 and DXS995. In collaboration with Drs. B. Korn and A. Poustka (DKFZ, Heidelberg), cosmids from the contig were used to enrich for cDNAs from the relevant region. Detailed characterization of these cDNAs should soon enable us to identify the DFN3 gene(s).

  11. Molecular screening for microdeletions at 9p22-p24 and 11q23-q24 in a large cohort of patients with trigonocephaly.

    PubMed

    Jehee, F S; Johnson, D; Alonso, L G; Cavalcanti, D P; de Sá Moreira, E; Alberto, F L; Kok, F; Kim, C; Wall, S A; Jabs, E W; Boyadjiev, S A; Wilkie, A O M; Passos-Bueno, M R

    2005-06-01

    Trigonocephaly is a rare form of craniosynostosis characterized by the premature closure of the metopic suture. To contribute to a better understanding of the genetic basis of metopic synostosis and in an attempt to restrict the candidate regions related to metopic suture fusion, we studied 76 unrelated patients with syndromic and non-syndromic trigonocephaly. We found a larger proportion of syndromic cases in our population and the ratio of affected male to female was 1.8 : 1 and 5 : 1 in the non-syndromic and syndromic groups, respectively. A microdeletion screening at 9p22-p24 and 11q23-q24 was carried out for all patients and deletions in seven of them were detected, corresponding to 19.4% of all syndromic cases. Deletions were not found in non-syndromic patients. We suggest that a molecular screening for microdeletions at 9p22-p24 and 11q23-q24 should be offered to all syndromic cases with an apparently normal karyotype because it can potentially elucidate the cause of trigonocephaly in this subset of patients. We also suggest that genes on the X-chromosome play a major role in syndromic trigonocephaly.

  12. Differing Microdeletion Sizes and Breakpoints in Chromosome 7q11.23 in Williams-Beuren Syndrome Detected by Chromosomal Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Huang, Linhuan; Luo, Yanmin; Huang, Xuan; Lin, Shaobin; Fang, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) manifests as supravalvular aortic stenosis, intellectual disability, developmental delay and characteristic facial features. The common WBS deletion region ranges from 1.55 to 1.84 Mb and primarily contains the ELN gene. We analyzed 10 patients diagnosed with 7q11.23 microdeletion syndrome by chromosomal microarray analysis. The clinical features of these patients varied from classic WBS to normal phenotype. All 10 patients exhibited different sizes and breakpoints of chromosome microdeletions ranging from 44 kb to 9.88 Mb. The hemizygosity of the ELN gene was detected in 7 patients, while a normal ELN gene was present in 3 other patients with small deletions. We observed that the phenotypic features of WBS varied in fetuses, children and adults, influenced by the genes, deletion size and breakpoint. Our findings provide more information on the genotype-phenotype correlations of WBS. However, further research is needed to explore the size and breakpoint effect and functions of the genes on chromosome 7q11.23. PMID:27022327

  13. Feasibility and Outcomes of Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification on Buccal Smears as a Screening Method for Microdeletions and Duplications among 300 Adults with an Intellectual Disability of Unknown Aetiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peppink, D.; Douma-Kloppenburg, D. D.; de Rooij-Askes, E. S. P.; van Zoest, I. M.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; van Hagen, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Determining the aetiology of intellectual disability (ID) enables anticipation of specific comorbidity and can thus be beneficial. Blood sampling, however, is considered stressful for people with ID. Our aim was to evaluate the feasibility of a non-invasive screening technique of nine microdeletions/duplications among adults with ID of…

  14. Discovery of a potentially deleterious variant in TMEM87B in a patient with a hemizygous 2q13 microdeletion suggests a recessive condition characterized by congenital heart disease and restrictive cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, Curtis R.; Geiger, Elizabeth A.; Salvador, Blake J.; Elias, Ellen R.; Cavanaugh, Jean L.; Chatfield, Kathryn C.; Miyamoto, Shelley D.; Shaikh, Tamim H.

    2016-01-01

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a rare cause of heart muscle disease with the highest mortality rate among cardiomyopathy types. The etiology of RCM is poorly understood, although genetic causes have been implicated, and syndromic associations have been described. Here, we describe a patient with an atrial septal defect and restrictive cardiomyopathy along with craniofacial anomalies and intellectual disabilities. Initial screening using chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) identified a maternally inherited 2q13 microdeletion. The patient had many of the features reported in previous cases with the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome. However, the inheritance of the microdeletion from an unaffected mother combined with the low incidence (10%) and milder forms of cardiac defects in previously reported cases made the clinical significance of the CMA results unclear. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) with trio-based analysis was performed and identified a paternally inherited TMEM87B mutation (c.1366A>G, p.Asn456Asp) in the patient. TMEM87B, a highly conserved, transmembrane protein of currently unknown function, lies within the critical region of the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome. Furthermore, a recent study had demonstrated that depletion of TMEM87B in zebrafish embryos affected cardiac development and led to cardiac hypoplasia. Thus, by combining CMA and WES, we potentially uncover an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a severe cardiac phenotype caused by mutations in TMEM87B. This study expands the spectrum of phenotypes associated with the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome and also further suggests the role of TMEM87B in its etiology, especially the cardiac pathology. PMID:27148590

  15. Discovery of a potentially deleterious variant in TMEM87B in a patient with a hemizygous 2q13 microdeletion suggests a recessive condition characterized by congenital heart disease and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hung-Chun; Coughlin, Curtis R; Geiger, Elizabeth A; Salvador, Blake J; Elias, Ellen R; Cavanaugh, Jean L; Chatfield, Kathryn C; Miyamoto, Shelley D; Shaikh, Tamim H

    2016-05-01

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a rare cause of heart muscle disease with the highest mortality rate among cardiomyopathy types. The etiology of RCM is poorly understood, although genetic causes have been implicated, and syndromic associations have been described. Here, we describe a patient with an atrial septal defect and restrictive cardiomyopathy along with craniofacial anomalies and intellectual disabilities. Initial screening using chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) identified a maternally inherited 2q13 microdeletion. The patient had many of the features reported in previous cases with the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome. However, the inheritance of the microdeletion from an unaffected mother combined with the low incidence (10%) and milder forms of cardiac defects in previously reported cases made the clinical significance of the CMA results unclear. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) with trio-based analysis was performed and identified a paternally inherited TMEM87B mutation (c.1366A>G, p.Asn456Asp) in the patient. TMEM87B, a highly conserved, transmembrane protein of currently unknown function, lies within the critical region of the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome. Furthermore, a recent study had demonstrated that depletion of TMEM87B in zebrafish embryos affected cardiac development and led to cardiac hypoplasia. Thus, by combining CMA and WES, we potentially uncover an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a severe cardiac phenotype caused by mutations in TMEM87B. This study expands the spectrum of phenotypes associated with the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome and also further suggests the role of TMEM87B in its etiology, especially the cardiac pathology. PMID:27148590

  16. Characterization of the human mucin gene MUC5AC: a consensus cysteine-rich domain for 11p15 mucin genes?

    PubMed Central

    Guyonnet Duperat, V; Audie, J P; Debailleul, V; Laine, A; Buisine, M P; Galiegue-Zouitina, S; Pigny, P; Degand, P; Aubert, J P; Porchet, N

    1995-01-01

    To date five human mucin cDNAs (MUC2, 5A, 5B, 5C and 6) mapped to 11p15.3-15.5, so it appears that this chromosome region might contain several distinct gene loci for mucins. Three of these cDNAs, MUC5A, B and C, were cloned in our laboratory and previously published. A common number, 5, was recommended by the Human Gene Mapping Nomenclature Committee to designate them because of their common provenance from human tracheobronchial mucosa. In order to define whether they are products of the same gene locus or distinct loci, we describe in this paper physical mapping of these cDNAs using the strategy of analysis of CpG islands by pulse-field gel electrophoresis. The data suggest that MUC5A and MUC5C are part of the same gene (called MUC5AC) which is distinct from MUC5B. In the second part of this work, complete sequences of the inserts corresponding to previously described (JER47, JER58) and novel (JER62, JUL32, MAR2, MAR10 and MAR11) cDNAs of the so-called MUC5AC gene are presented and analysed. The data show that in this mucin gene, the tandem repeat domain is interrupted several times with a subdomain encoding a 130 amino acid cysteine-rich peptide in which the TR3A and TR3B peptides previously isolated by Rose et al. [Rose, Kaufman and Martin (1989) J. Biol. Chem., 264, 8193-8199] from airway mucins are found. A consensus peptide sequence for these subdomains involving invariant positions of most of the cysteines is proposed. The consensus nucleotide sequence of this subdomain is also found in the MUC2 gene and in the MUC5B gene, two other mucin genes mapped to 11p15. The functional significance for secreted mucins of these cysteine-rich subdomains and the modular organization of mucin peptides are discussed. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 8 PMID:7826332

  17. Characterization of the human mucin gene MUC5AC: a consensus cysteine-rich domain for 11p15 mucin genes?

    PubMed

    Guyonnet Duperat, V; Audie, J P; Debailleul, V; Laine, A; Buisine, M P; Galiegue-Zouitina, S; Pigny, P; Degand, P; Aubert, J P; Porchet, N

    1995-01-01

    To date five human mucin cDNAs (MUC2, 5A, 5B, 5C and 6) mapped to 11p15.3-15.5, so it appears that this chromosome region might contain several distinct gene loci for mucins. Three of these cDNAs, MUC5A, B and C, were cloned in our laboratory and previously published. A common number, 5, was recommended by the Human Gene Mapping Nomenclature Committee to designate them because of their common provenance from human tracheobronchial mucosa. In order to define whether they are products of the same gene locus or distinct loci, we describe in this paper physical mapping of these cDNAs using the strategy of analysis of CpG islands by pulse-field gel electrophoresis. The data suggest that MUC5A and MUC5C are part of the same gene (called MUC5AC) which is distinct from MUC5B. In the second part of this work, complete sequences of the inserts corresponding to previously described (JER47, JER58) and novel (JER62, JUL32, MAR2, MAR10 and MAR11) cDNAs of the so-called MUC5AC gene are presented and analysed. The data show that in this mucin gene, the tandem repeat domain is interrupted several times with a subdomain encoding a 130 amino acid cysteine-rich peptide in which the TR3A and TR3B peptides previously isolated by Rose et al. [Rose, Kaufman and Martin (1989) J. Biol. Chem., 264, 8193-8199] from airway mucins are found. A consensus peptide sequence for these subdomains involving invariant positions of most of the cysteines is proposed. The consensus nucleotide sequence of this subdomain is also found in the MUC2 gene and in the MUC5B gene, two other mucin genes mapped to 11p15. The functional significance for secreted mucins of these cysteine-rich subdomains and the modular organization of mucin peptides are discussed.

  18. EMQN best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic testing and reporting of chromosome 11p15 imprinting disorders: Silver-Russell and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eggermann, Katja; Bliek, Jet; Brioude, Frédéric; Algar, Elizabeth; Buiting, Karin; Russo, Silvia; Tümer, Zeynep; Monk, David; Moore, Gudrun; Antoniadi, Thalia; Macdonald, Fiona; Netchine, Irène; Lombardi, Paolo; Soellner, Lukas; Begemann, Matthias; Prawitt, Dirk; Maher, Eamonn R; Mannens, Marcel; Riccio, Andrea; Weksberg, Rosanna; Lapunzina, Pablo; Grønskov, Karen; Mackay, Deborah Jg; Eggermann, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Molecular genetic testing for the 11p15-associated imprinting disorders Silver-Russell and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (SRS, BWS) is challenging because of the molecular heterogeneity and complexity of the affected imprinted regions. With the growing knowledge on the molecular basis of these disorders and the demand for molecular testing, it turned out that there is an urgent need for a standardized molecular diagnostic testing and reporting strategy. Based on the results from the first external pilot quality assessment schemes organized by the European Molecular Quality Network (EMQN) in 2014 and in context with activities of the European Network of Imprinting Disorders (EUCID.net) towards a consensus in diagnostics and management of SRS and BWS, best practice guidelines have now been developed. Members of institutions working in the field of SRS and BWS diagnostics were invited to comment, and in the light of their feedback amendments were made. The final document was ratified in the course of an EMQN best practice guideline meeting and is in accordance with the general SRS and BWS consensus guidelines, which are in preparation. These guidelines are based on the knowledge acquired from peer-reviewed and published data, as well as observations of the authors in their practice. However, these guidelines can only provide a snapshot of current knowledge at the time of manuscript submission and readers are advised to keep up with the literature.

  19. Measurement of the χ b (3 P) mass and of the relative rate of χ b1(1 P) and χ b2(1 P) production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R. F.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Lespinasse, M.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-10-01

    The production of χ b mesons in proton-proton collisions is studied using a data sample collected by the LHCb detector, at centre-of-mass energies of =7 and 8 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb-1. The χ b mesons are identified through their decays to ϒ(1 S) γ and ϒ(2 S) γ using photons that converted to e + e - pairs in the detector. The relative prompt production rate of χ b1(1 P) and χ b2(1 P) mesons is measured as a function of the ϒ(1 S) transverse momentum in the χ b rapidity range 2.0 < y <4.5. A precise measurement of the χ b (3 P) mass is also performed. Assuming a mass splitting between the χ b1(3 P) and the χ b2(3 P) states of 10.5 MeV/c2, the measured mass of the χ b1(3 P) meson is

  20. Renal cell carcinomas with t(6;11)(p21;q12) presenting with tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma-like features.

    PubMed

    Rao, Qiu; Zhang, Xiu-Mei; Tu, Pin; Xia, Qiu-Yuan; Shen, Qin; Zhou, Xiao-Jun; Shi, Qun-Li

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we reported an additional genetically confirmed case of renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) with t(6;11)(p21;q12) showing an unusual histological pattern. Histologically, the tumor was entirely composed of small to intermediate sized tubules and cysts. The tubules and cysts were lined by a single layer of flat, hobnail, cuboidal to columnar epithelial cells. Most cells demonstrated abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm with regular, round or oval nuclei and some inconspicuous nucleoli. All these morphological features are suggestive of tubulocystic carcinoma of the kidney. However, the tumor demonstrated moderately (2+) or strongly (3+) positive staining for TFEB, Cathepsin K, Ksp-cadherin, and vimentin but negative for TFE3, CD10, HMB45, melan A, CKpan, and CK7. Using a recently developed TFEB split FISH assay, the presence of TFEB rearrangement was demonstrated. Our results support the clinical application of a TFEB break-apart FISH assay for diagnosis and confirmation of TFEB RCC and further expand the morphologic spectrum that may be present in these neoplasms, sometimes raising a challenging differential diagnosis with other renal tumors.

  1. EMQN best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic testing and reporting of chromosome 11p15 imprinting disorders: Silver–Russell and Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Eggermann, Katja; Bliek, Jet; Brioude, Frédéric; Algar, Elizabeth; Buiting, Karin; Russo, Silvia; Tümer, Zeynep; Monk, David; Moore, Gudrun; Antoniadi, Thalia; Macdonald, Fiona; Netchine, Irène; Lombardi, Paolo; Soellner, Lukas; Begemann, Matthias; Prawitt, Dirk; Maher, Eamonn R; Mannens, Marcel; Riccio, Andrea; Weksberg, Rosanna; Lapunzina, Pablo; Grønskov, Karen; Mackay, Deborah JG; Eggermann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Molecular genetic testing for the 11p15-associated imprinting disorders Silver–Russell and Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome (SRS, BWS) is challenging because of the molecular heterogeneity and complexity of the affected imprinted regions. With the growing knowledge on the molecular basis of these disorders and the demand for molecular testing, it turned out that there is an urgent need for a standardized molecular diagnostic testing and reporting strategy. Based on the results from the first external pilot quality assessment schemes organized by the European Molecular Quality Network (EMQN) in 2014 and in context with activities of the European Network of Imprinting Disorders (EUCID.net) towards a consensus in diagnostics and management of SRS and BWS, best practice guidelines have now been developed. Members of institutions working in the field of SRS and BWS diagnostics were invited to comment, and in the light of their feedback amendments were made. The final document was ratified in the course of an EMQN best practice guideline meeting and is in accordance with the general SRS and BWS consensus guidelines, which are in preparation. These guidelines are based on the knowledge acquired from peer-reviewed and published data, as well as observations of the authors in their practice. However, these guidelines can only provide a snapshot of current knowledge at the time of manuscript submission and readers are advised to keep up with the literature. PMID:27165005

  2. Two-locus admixture linkage analysis of bipolar and unipolar affective disorder supports the presence of susceptibility loci on chromosomes 11p15 and 21q22

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, C.; Kalsi, G.; O`Neill, J.

    1997-02-01

    Following a report of a linkage study that yielded evidence for a susceptibility locus for bipolar affective disorder on the long arm of chromosome 21, we studied 23 multiply affected pedigrees collected from Iceland and the UK, using the markers PFKL, D21S171, and D21S49. Counting only bipolar cases as affected, a two-point LOD of 1.28 was obtained using D21S171 ({theta} = 0.01, {alpha} = 0.35), with three Icelandic families producing LODs of 0.63, 0.62, and 1.74 (all at {theta} = 0.0). Affected sib pair analysis demonstrated increased allele sharing at D21S171 (P = 0.001) when unipolar cases were also considered affected. The same set of pedigrees had previously been typed for a tyrosine hydroxylase gene (TH) polymorphism at 11p15 and had shown some moderate evidence for linkage. When information from TH and the 21q markers was combined in a two-locus admixture analysis, an overall admixture LOD of 3.87 was obtained using the bipolar affection model. Thus the data are compatible with the hypothesis that a locus at or near TH influences susceptibility in some pedigrees, while a locus near D21S171 is active in others. Similar analyses in other datasets should be carried out to confirm or refute our tentative finding. 66 refs., 3 tabs.

  3. Renal cell carcinomas with t(6;11)(p21;q12) presenting with tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma-like features.

    PubMed

    Rao, Qiu; Zhang, Xiu-Mei; Tu, Pin; Xia, Qiu-Yuan; Shen, Qin; Zhou, Xiao-Jun; Shi, Qun-Li

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we reported an additional genetically confirmed case of renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) with t(6;11)(p21;q12) showing an unusual histological pattern. Histologically, the tumor was entirely composed of small to intermediate sized tubules and cysts. The tubules and cysts were lined by a single layer of flat, hobnail, cuboidal to columnar epithelial cells. Most cells demonstrated abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm with regular, round or oval nuclei and some inconspicuous nucleoli. All these morphological features are suggestive of tubulocystic carcinoma of the kidney. However, the tumor demonstrated moderately (2+) or strongly (3+) positive staining for TFEB, Cathepsin K, Ksp-cadherin, and vimentin but negative for TFE3, CD10, HMB45, melan A, CKpan, and CK7. Using a recently developed TFEB split FISH assay, the presence of TFEB rearrangement was demonstrated. Our results support the clinical application of a TFEB break-apart FISH assay for diagnosis and confirmation of TFEB RCC and further expand the morphologic spectrum that may be present in these neoplasms, sometimes raising a challenging differential diagnosis with other renal tumors. PMID:23826432

  4. Pericentric inversion of chromosome 11 (p14.3q21) associated with developmental delays, hypopigmented skin lesions and abnormal brain MRI findings - a new case report

    SciTech Connect

    Zachor, D.A.; Lofton, M.

    1994-09-01

    We report 3 year old male, referred for evaluation of developmental delays. Pregnancy was complicated by oligohydramnios, proteinuria and prematurity. Medical history revealed: bilateral inguinal hernia, small scrotal sac, undescended testes, developmental delays and behavioral problems. The child had: microcephaly, facial dysmorphic features, single palmar creases, hypopigmented skin lesions of variable size, intermittent exotropia and small retracted testes. Neurological examination was normal. Cognitive level was at the average range with mild delay in his adaptive behavior. Expressive language delays and severe articulation disorder were noted, as well as clumsiness, poor control and precision of gross and fine motor skills. Chromosomal analysis of peripheral leukocytes indicated that one of the number 11 chromosomes had undergone a pericentric inversion with breakpoints on the short (p) arm at band p14.3 and the long (q) arm at band q21. An MRI of the brain showed mild delay in myelinization pattern of white matter. Chromosome 11 inversion in other sites was associated with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and several malignancies. To our knowledge this is the first description of inv(11)(p14.3q21) that is associated with microcephaly, dysmorphic features, hypopigmented skin lesions and speech delay. This inversion may disrupt the expression of the involved genes. However, additional cases with the same cytogenetic anomaly are needed to explore the phenotypic significance of this disorder.

  5. 34 CFR 303.15 - Include; including.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include; including. 303.15 Section 303.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS...

  6. An acetylcholine alpha7 positive allosteric modulator rescues a schizophrenia-associated brain endophenotype in the 15q13.3 microdeletion, encompassing CHRNA7.

    PubMed

    Gass, Natalia; Weber-Fahr, Wolfgang; Sartorius, Alexander; Becker, Robert; Didriksen, Michael; Stensbøl, Tine Bryan; Bastlund, Jesper Frank; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Schwarz, Adam J

    2016-07-01

    The 15q13.3 microdeletion copy number variation is strongly associated with schizophrenia and epilepsy. The CHRNA7 gene, encoding nicotinic acetylcholine alpha 7 receptors (nAChA7Rs), is hypothesized to be one of the main genes in this deletion causing the neuropsychiatric phenotype. Here we used a recently developed 15q13.3 microdeletion mouse model to explore whether an established schizophrenia-associated connectivity phenotype is replicated in a murine model, and whether positive modulation of nAChA7 receptor might pharmacologically normalize the connectivity patterns. Resting-state fMRI data were acquired from male mice carrying a hemizygous 15q13.3 microdeletion (N=9) and from wild-type mice (N=9). To study the connectivity profile of 15q13.3 mice and test the effect of nAChA7 positive allosteric modulation, the 15q13.3 mice underwent two imaging sessions, one week apart, receiving a single intraperitoneal injection of either 15mg/kg Lu AF58801 or saline. The control group comprised wild-type mice treated with saline. We performed seed-based functional connectivity analysis to delineate aberrant connectivity patterns associated with the deletion (15q13.3 mice (saline treatment) versus wild-type mice (saline treatment)) and their modulation by Lu AF58801 (15q13.3 mice (Lu AF58801 treatment) versus 15q13.3 mice (saline treatment)). Compared to wild-type mice, 15q13.3 mice evidenced a predominant hyperconnectivity pattern. The main effect of Lu AF58801 was a normalization of elevated functional connectivity between prefrontal and frontal, hippocampal, striatal, thalamic and auditory regions. The strongest effects were observed in brain regions expressing nAChA7Rs, namely hippocampus, cerebral cortex and thalamus. These effects may underlie the antiepileptic, pro-cognitive and auditory gating deficit-reversal effects of nAChA7R stimulation. PMID:27061851

  7. Genetic linkage mapping for a susceptibility locus to bipolar illness: Chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 7, 9, 10p, 11p, 22, and Xpter

    SciTech Connect

    Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Hseih, W.T.; Goldin, L.R.

    1994-09-15

    We are conducting a genome search for a predisposing locus to bipolar (manic-depressive) illness by genotyping 21 moderate-sized pedigrees. We report linkage data derived from screening marker loci on chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 7, 9, 10p, 11p, 22, and the pseudoautosomal region at Xpter. To analyze for linkage, two-point marker to illness lod scores were calculated under a dominant model with either 85% or 50% maximum penetrance and a recessive model with 85% maximum penetrance, and two affection status models. Under the dominant high penetrance model the cumulative lod scores in the pedigree series were less than -2 at {theta} = 0.01 in 134 of 142 loci examined, indicating that if the disease is genetically homogeneous, linkage could be excluded in these marker regions. Similar results were obtained using the other genetic models. Heterogeneity analysis was conducted when indicated, but no evidence for linkage was found. In the course of mapping we found a positive total lod score greater than +3 at the D7S78 locus at {theta} = 0.01 under a dominant, 50% penetrance model. The lod scores for additional markers within the D7S78 region failed to support the initial finding, implying that this was a spurious positive. Analysis with affected pedigree member method for COL1A2 and D7S78 showed no significance for linkage, but for PLANH1, at the weighting functions f(p)=1 and f(p)=1/sqrt(p), borderline P values of 0.036 and 0.047 were obtained. We also detected new polymorphisms at the mineralo-corticoid receptor (MLR) and calmodulin II (CALMII) genes. These genes were genetically mapped and under affection status model 2 and a dominant, high penetrance mode of transmission the lod scores of {le}2 at {theta} = 0.01 were found. 39 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  8. Distinctive Skeletal Abnormalities With No Microdeletions or Microduplications on Array-CGH in a Boy With Mohr Syndrome (Oro-Facial-Digital Type II)

    PubMed Central

    Kaissi, Ali Al; Pospischill, Renata; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    We describe a constellation of distinctive skeletal abnormalities in an 8-year-old boy who presented with the full clinical criteria of oro-facial-digital (OFD) type II (Mohr syndrome): bony changes of obtuse mandibular angle, bimanual hexadactyly and unilateral synostosis of the metacarpo-phalanges of 3-4, bilateral coxa valga associated with moderate hip subluxation, over-tubulation of the long bones, vertical talus of the left foot and talipes equinovarus of the right foot respectively. Interestingly, we encountered variable minor malformations in his parents, confirming the autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. There were no microdeletions or microduplications after performing array-CGH-analysis. We report what might be a constellation of unreported skeletal abnormalities in a child with OFD type II (Mohr syndrome). PMID:26566416

  9. A microdeletion of the GABRB3 locus on 15q in a child with generalized seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, B.; Krueger, L.; Nook, J.

    1994-09-01

    A 13-month-old female presented with a history of infrequent febrile tonic-clonic seizures and recent onset of daily absence and clusters of myoclonic seizures. She had minimal developmental delays, slight frontal bossing, a wide nasal bridge and macrostomia. Initial EEG was normal as were multiple metabolic and biochemical determinations. Subsequent EEGs demonstrated normal back ground activity with frequent bursts of generalized, irregular spikes and polyspikes. The child responded favorably to a course of parenteral ACTH and at 17 months, she was maintained on valproic acid, was seizure-free and had a normal EEG. Examination was notable for prominent, socially appropriate smiling, age-appropriate speech, and significant ataxia and tremor. High resolution G-banded chromosome analysis revealed a suspected deletion of 15q11.2 and part of 15q12. FISH was performed with ONCOR probes to the D15S11, SNRPN, D15S10 and GABRB3 loci. A total of 30 metaphase cells (from two separate blood samples) were examined and revealed positive hybridization on both chromosome 15 homologues for D15S11, SNRPN, and D15S10. However, the GABRB3 probe revealed positive hybridization to only one chromosome 15 homologue, thus supporting the interpretation of a deletion of this region. FISH analyses of the patient`s parents are in progress as are methylation studies. To our knowledge, these findings represent the first report of a deletion of GAMRB3 which does not extend proximally to include all of D15S10 in a patient presenting with generalizied seizures. Careful comparison of this patient`s phenotype to that of Angelman syndrome will therefore be most informative for furthering genotype-phenotype correlations within this critical region of 15q.

  10. Ancient Haplotypes at the 15q24.2 Microdeletion Region Are Linked to Brain Expression of MAN2C1 and Children's Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, Alejandro; Esko, Tõnu; Pappa, Irene; Gutiérrez, Armand; Lopez-Espinosa, Maria-Jose; Llop, Sabrina; Bustamante, Mariona; Tiemeier, Henning; Metspalu, Andres; Wilsonx, James F.; Reina-Castillón, Judith; Shin, Jean; Pausova, Zdenka; Paus, Tomáš; Sunyer, Jordi; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A.; González, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The chromosome bands 15q24.1-15q24.3 contain a complex region with numerous segmental duplications that predispose to regional microduplications and microdeletions, both of which have been linked to intellectual disability, speech delay and autistic features. The region may also harbour common inversion polymorphisms whose functional and phenotypic manifestations are unknown. Using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data, we detected four large contiguous haplotype-genotypes at 15q24 with Mendelian inheritance in 2,562 trios, African origin, high population stratification and reduced recombination rates. Although the haplotype-genotypes have been most likely generated by decreased or absent recombination among them, we could not confirm that they were the product of inversion polymorphisms in the region. One of the blocks was composed of three haplotype-genotypes (N1a, N1b and N2), which significantly correlated with intelligence quotient (IQ) in 2,735 children of European ancestry from three independent population cohorts. Homozygosity for N2 was associated with lower verbal IQ (2.4-point loss, p-value = 0.01), while homozygosity for N1b was associated with 3.2-point loss in non-verbal IQ (p-value = 0.0006). The three alleles strongly correlated with expression levels of MAN2C1 and SNUPN in blood and brain. Homozygosity for N2 correlated with over-expression of MAN2C1 over many brain areas but the occipital cortex where N1b homozygous highly under-expressed. Our population-based analyses suggest that MAN2C1 may contribute to the verbal difficulties observed in microduplications and to the intellectual disability of microdeletion syndromes, whose characteristic dosage increment and removal may affect different brain areas. PMID:27355585

  11. Ancient Haplotypes at the 15q24.2 Microdeletion Region Are Linked to Brain Expression of MAN2C1 and Children's Intelligence.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, Alejandro; Esko, Tõnu; Pappa, Irene; Gutiérrez, Armand; Lopez-Espinosa, Maria-Jose; Llop, Sabrina; Bustamante, Mariona; Tiemeier, Henning; Metspalu, Andres; Joshi, Peter K; Wilsonx, James F; Reina-Castillón, Judith; Shin, Jean; Pausova, Zdenka; Paus, Tomáš; Sunyer, Jordi; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; González, Juan R

    2016-01-01

    The chromosome bands 15q24.1-15q24.3 contain a complex region with numerous segmental duplications that predispose to regional microduplications and microdeletions, both of which have been linked to intellectual disability, speech delay and autistic features. The region may also harbour common inversion polymorphisms whose functional and phenotypic manifestations are unknown. Using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data, we detected four large contiguous haplotype-genotypes at 15q24 with Mendelian inheritance in 2,562 trios, African origin, high population stratification and reduced recombination rates. Although the haplotype-genotypes have been most likely generated by decreased or absent recombination among them, we could not confirm that they were the product of inversion polymorphisms in the region. One of the blocks was composed of three haplotype-genotypes (N1a, N1b and N2), which significantly correlated with intelligence quotient (IQ) in 2,735 children of European ancestry from three independent population cohorts. Homozygosity for N2 was associated with lower verbal IQ (2.4-point loss, p-value = 0.01), while homozygosity for N1b was associated with 3.2-point loss in non-verbal IQ (p-value = 0.0006). The three alleles strongly correlated with expression levels of MAN2C1 and SNUPN in blood and brain. Homozygosity for N2 correlated with over-expression of MAN2C1 over many brain areas but the occipital cortex where N1b homozygous highly under-expressed. Our population-based analyses suggest that MAN2C1 may contribute to the verbal difficulties observed in microduplications and to the intellectual disability of microdeletion syndromes, whose characteristic dosage increment and removal may affect different brain areas. PMID:27355585

  12. A 6q14.1-q15 microdeletion in a male patient with severe autistic disorder, lack of oral language, and dysmorphic features with concomitant presence of a maternally inherited Xp22.31 copy number gain.

    PubMed

    Quintela, Ines; Fernandez-Prieto, Montse; Gomez-Guerrero, Lorena; Resches, Mariela; Eiris, Jesus; Barros, Francisco; Carracedo, Angel

    2015-06-01

    We report on a male patient with severe autistic disorder, lack of oral language, and dysmorphic features who carries a rare interstitial microdeletion of 4.96 Mb at chromosome 6q14.1-q15. The patient also harbors a maternally inherited copy number gain of 1.69 Mb at chromosome Xp22.31, whose pathogenicity is under debate. PMID:26185640

  13. A 6q14.1-q15 microdeletion in a male patient with severe autistic disorder, lack of oral language, and dysmorphic features with concomitant presence of a maternally inherited Xp22.31 copy number gain

    PubMed Central

    Quintela, Ines; Fernandez-Prieto, Montse; Gomez-Guerrero, Lorena; Resches, Mariela; Eiris, Jesus; Barros, Francisco; Carracedo, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We report on a male patient with severe autistic disorder, lack of oral language, and dysmorphic features who carries a rare interstitial microdeletion of 4.96 Mb at chromosome 6q14.1-q15. The patient also harbors a maternally inherited copy number gain of 1.69 Mb at chromosome Xp22.31, whose pathogenicity is under debate. PMID:26185640

  14. Paternal Uniparental Disomy 11p15.5 in the Pancreatic Nodule of an Infant With Costello Syndrome: Shared Mechanism for Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia in Neonates With Costello and Beckwith–Wiedemann Syndrome and Somatic Loss of Heterozygosity in Costello Syndrome Driving Clonal Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Gripp, Karen W.; Robbins, Katherine M.; Sheffield, Brandon S.; Lee, Anna F.; Patel, Millan S.; Yip, Stephen; Doyle, Daniel; Stabley, Deborah; Sol-Church, Katia

    2016-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) entails a cancer predisposition and is caused by activating HRAS mutations, typically arising de novo in the paternal germline. Hypoglycemia is common in CS neonates. A previously reported individual with the rare HRAS p.Gln22Lys had hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. Autopsy showed a discrete pancreatic nodule. The morphologic and immunohistochemistry findings, including loss of p57Kip2 protein, were identical to a focal lesion of congenital hyperinsulinism, however, no KCNJ11 or ABCC8 mutation was identified and germline derived DNA showed no alternation of the maternal or paternal 11p15 alleles. Here we report paternal uniparental disomy (pUPD) within the lesion, similar to the pUPD11p15.5 in Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). The similar extent of the pUPD suggests a similar mechanism driving hyperinsulinemia in both conditions. After coincidental somatic LOH and pUPD, the growth promoting effects of the paternally derived HRAS mutation, in combination with the increased function of the adjacent paternally expressed IGF2, may together result in clonal expansion. Although this somatic LOH within pancreatic tissue resulted in hyperinsulinism, similar LOH in mesenchymal cells may drive embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS). Interestingly, biallelic IGF2 expression has been linked to rhabdomyosarcoma tumorigenesis and pUPD11 occurred in all 8 ERMS samples from CS individuals. Somatic KRAS and HRAS mutations occur with comparable frequency in isolated malignancies. Yet, the malignancy risk in CS is notably higher than in Noonan syndrome with a KRAS mutation. It is conceivable that HRAS co-localization with IGF2 and the combined effect of pUPD 11p15.5 on both genes contributes to the oncogenic potential. PMID:26572961

  15. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    SciTech Connect

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  16. Replication of KCNJ11 (p.E23K) and ABCC8 (p.S1369A) Association in Russian Diabetes Mellitus 2 Type Cohort and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sokolova, Ekaterina Alekseevna; Bondar, Irina Arkadievna; Shabelnikova, Olesya Yurievna; Pyankova, Olga Vladimirovna; Filipenko, Maxim Leonidovich

    2015-01-01

    The genes ABCC8 and KCNJ11 have received intense focus in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) research over the past two decades. It has been hypothesized that the p.E23K (KCNJ11) mutation in the 11p15.1 region may play an important role in the development of T2DM. In 2009, Hamming et al. found that the p.1369A (ABCC8) variant may be a causal factor in the disease; therefore, in this study we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), including our original data on the Siberian population (1384 T2DM and 414 controls). We found rs5219 and rs757110 were not associated with T2DM in this population, and that there was linkage disequilibrium in Siberians (D’=0.766, r2= 0.5633). In addition, the haplotype rs757110[T]-rs5219[C] (p.23K/p.S1369) was associated with T2DM (OR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.04-2.24). We included 44 original studies published by June 2014 in a meta-analysis of the p.E23K association with T2DM. The total OR was 1.14 (95% CI: 1.11-1.17) for p.E23K for a total sample size of 137,298. For p.S1369A, a meta-analysis was conducted on a total of 10 studies with a total sample size of 14,136 and pooled OR of 1.14 [95% CI (1.08-1.19); p = 2 x 10-6]. Our calculations identified causal genetic variation within the ABCC8/KCNJ11 region for T2DM with an OR of approximately 1.15 in Caucasians and Asians. Moreover, the OR value was not dependent on the frequency of p.E23K or p.S1369A in the populations. PMID:25955821

  17. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  18. Novel Y-chromosomal microdeletions associated with non-obstructive azoospermia uncovered by high throughput sequencing of sequence-tagged sites (STSs)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Li, Zesong; Su, Zheng; Zhang, Junjie; Li, Honggang; Xie, Jun; Xu, Hanshi; Jiang, Tao; Luo, Liya; Zhang, Ruifang; Zeng, Xiaojing; Xu, Huaiqian; Huang, Yi; Mou, Lisha; Hu, Jingchu; Qian, Weiping; Zeng, Yong; Zhang, Xiuqing; Xiong, Chengliang; Yang, Huanming; Kristiansen, Karsten; Cai, Zhiming; Wang, Jun; Gui, Yaoting

    2016-01-01

    Y-chromosomal microdeletion (YCM) serves as an important genetic factor in non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA). Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is routinely used to detect YCMs by tracing sequence-tagged sites (STSs) in the Y chromosome. Here we introduce a novel methodology in which we sequence 1,787 (post-filtering) STSs distributed across the entire male-specific Y chromosome (MSY) in parallel to uncover known and novel YCMs. We validated this approach with 766 Chinese men with NOA and 683 ethnically matched healthy individuals and detected 481 and 98 STSs that were deleted in the NOA and control group, representing a substantial portion of novel YCMs which significantly influenced the functions of spermatogenic genes. The NOA patients tended to carry more and rarer deletions that were enriched in nearby intragenic regions. Haplogroup O2* was revealed to be a protective lineage for NOA, in which the enrichment of b1/b3 deletion in haplogroup C was also observed. In summary, our work provides a new high-resolution portrait of deletions in the Y chromosome. PMID:26907467

  19. PIAS4 is associated with macro/microcephaly in the novel interstitial 19p13.3 microdeletion/microduplication syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nevado, Julián; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Mena, Rocío; Palomares-Bralo, María; Vallespín, Elena; Ángeles Mori, María; Tenorio, Jair A; Gripp, Karen W; Denenberg, Elizabeth; Del Campo, Miguel; Plaja, Alberto; Martín-Arenas, Rubén; Santos-Simarro, Fernando; Armengol, Lluis; Gowans, Gordon; Orera, María; Sanchez-Hombre, M Carmen; Corbacho-Fernández, Esther; Fernández-Jaén, Alberto; Haldeman-Englert, Chad; Saitta, Sulagna; Dubbs, Holly; Bénédicte, Duban B; Li, Xia; Devaney, Lani; Dinulos, Mary Beth; Vallee, Stephanie; Crespo, M Carmen; Fernández, Blanca; Fernández-Montaño, Victoria E; Rueda-Arenas, Inmaculada; de Torres, María Luisa; Ellison, Jay W; Raskin, Salmo; Venegas-Vega, Carlos A; Fernández-Ramírez, Fernando; Delicado, Alicia; García-Miñaúr, Sixto; Lapunzina, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is a powerful genetic tool that has enabled the identification of novel imbalances in individuals with intellectual disability (ID), autistic disorders and congenital malformations. Here we report a 'genotype first' approach using aCGH on 13 unrelated patients with 19p13.3 submicroscopic rearrangement (11 deletions and 2 duplications) and review cases in the literature and in public databases. Shared phenotypic features suggest that these patients represent an interstitial microdeletion/microduplication syndrome at 19p13.3. Common features consist of abnormal head circumference in most patients (macrocephaly with the deletions and microcephaly with the duplications), ID with developmental delay (DD), hypotonia, speech delay and common dysmorphic features. The phenotype is associated with at least a ~0.113 Mb critical region harboring three strong candidate genes probably associated with DD, ID, speech delay and other dysmorphic features: MAP2K2, ZBTB7A and PIAS4, an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in the ubiquitin signaling pathways, which we hypothesize for the first time to be associated with head size in humans.

  20. Complex chromosome rearrangements related 15q14 microdeletion plays a relevant role in phenotype expression and delineates a novel recurrent syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roberti, Maria Cristina; Surace, Cecilia; Digilio, Maria Cristina; D'Elia, Gemma; Sirleto, Pietro; Capolino, Rossella; Lombardo, Antonietta; Tomaiuolo, Anna Cristina; Petrocchi, Stefano; Angioni, Adriano

    2011-04-19

    Complex chromosome rearrangements are constitutional structural rearrangements involving three or more chromosomes or having more than two breakpoints. These are rarely seen in the general population but their frequency should be much higher due to balanced states with no phenotypic presentation. These abnormalities preferentially occur de novo during spermatogenesis and are transmitted in families through oogenesis.Here, we report a de novo complex chromosome rearrangement that interests eight chromosomes in eighteen-year-old boy with an abnormal phenotype consisting in moderate developmental delay, cleft palate, and facial dysmorphisms.Standard G-banding revealed four apparently balanced translocations [corrected] involving the chromosomes 1;13, 3;19, 9;15 and 14;18 that appeared to be reciprocal. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis showed no imbalances at all the breakpoints observed except for an interstitial microdeletion on chromosome 15. This deletion is 1.6 Mb in size and is located at chromosome band 15q14, distal to the Prader-Willi/Angelman region. Comparing the features of our patient with published reports of patients with 15q14 deletion this finding corresponds to the smallest genomic region of overlap. The deleted segment at 15q14 was investigated for gene content.

  1. Complex chromosome rearrangements related 15q14 microdeletion plays a relevant role in phenotype expression and delineates a novel recurrent syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements are constitutional structural rearrangements involving three or more chromosomes or having more than two breakpoints. These are rarely seen in the general population but their frequency should be much higher due to balanced states with no phenotypic presentation. These abnormalities preferentially occur de novo during spermatogenesis and are transmitted in families through oogenesis. Here, we report a de novo complex chromosome rearrangement that interests eight chromosomes in eighteen-year-old boy with an abnormal phenotype consisting in moderate developmental delay, cleft palate, and facial dysmorphisms. Standard G-banding revealed four apparently balanced traslocations involving the chromosomes 1;13, 3;19, 9;15 and 14;18 that appeared to be reciprocal. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis showed no imbalances at all the breakpoints observed except for an interstitial microdeletion on chromosome 15. This deletion is 1.6 Mb in size and is located at chromosome band 15q14, distal to the Prader-Willi/Angelman region. Comparing the features of our patient with published reports of patients with 15q14 deletion this finding corresponds to the smallest genomic region of overlap. The deleted segment at 15q14 was investigated for gene content. PMID:21504564

  2. Novel Y-chromosomal microdeletions associated with non-obstructive azoospermia uncovered by high throughput sequencing of sequence-tagged sites (STSs).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Li, Zesong; Su, Zheng; Zhang, Junjie; Li, Honggang; Xie, Jun; Xu, Hanshi; Jiang, Tao; Luo, Liya; Zhang, Ruifang; Zeng, Xiaojing; Xu, Huaiqian; Huang, Yi; Mou, Lisha; Hu, Jingchu; Qian, Weiping; Zeng, Yong; Zhang, Xiuqing; Xiong, Chengliang; Yang, Huanming; Kristiansen, Karsten; Cai, Zhiming; Wang, Jun; Gui, Yaoting

    2016-01-01

    Y-chromosomal microdeletion (YCM) serves as an important genetic factor in non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA). Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is routinely used to detect YCMs by tracing sequence-tagged sites (STSs) in the Y chromosome. Here we introduce a novel methodology in which we sequence 1,787 (post-filtering) STSs distributed across the entire male-specific Y chromosome (MSY) in parallel to uncover known and novel YCMs. We validated this approach with 766 Chinese men with NOA and 683 ethnically matched healthy individuals and detected 481 and 98 STSs that were deleted in the NOA and control group, representing a substantial portion of novel YCMs which significantly influenced the functions of spermatogenic genes. The NOA patients tended to carry more and rarer deletions that were enriched in nearby intragenic regions. Haplogroup O2* was revealed to be a protective lineage for NOA, in which the enrichment of b1/b3 deletion in haplogroup C was also observed. In summary, our work provides a new high-resolution portrait of deletions in the Y chromosome. PMID:26907467

  3. AB039. Novel Y-chromosomal microdeletions associated with non-obstructive azoospermia uncovered by high throughput sequencing of sequence-tagged sites (STSs)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zesong

    2016-01-01

    Y-chromosomal microdeletion (YCM) serves as an important genetic factor in non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA). Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is routinely used to detect YCMs by tracing sequence-tagged sites (STSs) in the Y chromosome. Here we introduce a novel methodology in which we sequence 1,787 (post-filtering) STSs distributed across the entire male-specific Y chromosome (MSY) in parallel to uncover known and novel YCMs. We validated this approach with 766 Chinese men with NOA and 683 ethnically matched healthy individuals and detected 481 and 98 STSs that were deleted in the NOA and control group, representing a substantial portion of novel YCMs which significantly influenced the functions of spermatogenic genes. The NOA patients tended to carry more and rarer deletions that were enriched in nearby intragenic regions. Haplogroup O2* was revealed to be a protective lineage for NOA, in which the enrichment of b1/b3 deletion in haplogroup C was also observed. In summary, our work provides a new high-resolution portrait of deletions in the Y chromosome.

  4. A 2.5-Mb transcript map of a tumor-suppressing subchromosomal transferable fragment from 11p15.5, and isolation and sequence analysis of three novel genes.

    PubMed

    Hu, R J; Lee, M P; Connors, T D; Johnson, L A; Burn, T C; Su, K; Landes, G M; Feinberg, A P

    1997-11-15

    11p15.5 is an important tumor-suppressor gene region, showing loss of heterozygosity in Wilms tumor, rhabdomyosarcoma, adrenocortical carcinoma, and lung, ovarian, and breast cancer. We previously mapped directly by genetic complementation a subtransferable fragment (STF) harboring an embryonal tumor-suppressor gene and spanning about 2.5 Mb. We have now mapped the centromeric end of this STF between D11S988 and D11S12 and its telomeric end between D11S1318 and TH. We have isolated a complete contig of PAC, P1, BAC, and cosmid genomic clones spanning the entire 2.5-Mb region defined by this STF, as well as more than 200 exons from these genomic clones using exon trapping. We have isolated genes in this region by directly screening DNA libraries as well as by database searching for ESTs. Nine of these genes have been reported previously by us and by others. However, the initial mapping of most of those genes was based on FISH or somatic cell hybrid analysis, and here we precisely define their physical location. These genes include RRM1, GOK (D11S4896E), Nup98, CARS, hNAP2 (NAP1L4), p57KIP2 (CDKN1C), KVLQT1 (KCNA9), TAPA-1, and ASCL2. In addition, we have identified several novel genes in this region, three of which, termed TSSC1, TSSC2, and TSSC3, are reported here. TSSC1 shows homology to Rb-associated protein p48 and chromatin assembly factor CAF1, and it is located between GOK and Nup98. TSSC2 is homologous to Caenorhabditis elegans beta-mannosyl transferase, and it lies between Nup98 and CARS. TSSC3 shows homology to mouse TDAG51, which is implicated in FasL-mediated apoptosis, and it is located between hNAP2 and p57KIP2. Thus, these genes may play a role in malignancies that involve this region.

  5. Listening to Include

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veck, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts to make important connections between listening and inclusive education and the refusal to listen and exclusion. Two lines of argument are advanced. First, if educators and learners are to include each other within their educational institutions as unique individuals, then they will need to listen attentively to each other.…

  6. Duplication and deletion of chromosome band 2(p21p22) resulting from a familial interstitial insertion (2;11)(p21;p15)

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, J.R.; Jones, E.; Hawks, F.F.; Quirk, J.G. Jr.; Cunniff, C.

    1994-02-15

    Routine amniocentesis for advanced maternal age led to the prenatal diagnosis of a fetus with a karyotype of a 46,XX,del(2)(p21p22). At delivery the baby had holopresencephaly as the major clinical finding, which has been associated with a deletion of band 2p21 in several other case reports. Chromosome studies of the parents showed a normal 46,XY karyotype in the father, and a balanced interstitial insertion 46,XX dir ins (11;2)(p15.1;p21p22) in the mother. Subsequent chromosome studies of other relatives documented a 23-year-old half-brother of the proposita with a partial trisomy for the segment deleted in the proposita. The half-brother showed the derivative chromosome 11 from the mother, resulting in a 46,XY,der(11)dup(2)(p21p22) karyotype. Major clinical findings include short stature, mild development delay, and behavior abnormalities. A half-sister of the proposita is also a balanced carrier of the dir ins (11;2)(p15.1;p21p22.2). The association of the deletion chromosome band 2p21 and the clinical finding of holoprosencephaly is further supported by the findings in this family. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  7. The t(10;11)(p13;q14) in the U937 cell line results in the fusion of the AF10 gene and CALM, encoding a new member of the AP-3 clathrin assembly protein family.

    PubMed Central

    Dreyling, M H; Martinez-Climent, J A; Zheng, M; Mao, J; Rowley, J D; Bohlander, S K

    1996-01-01

    The translocation t(10;11)(p13;q14) is a recurring chromosomal abnormality that has been observed in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia as well as acute myeloid leukemia. We have recently reported that the monocytic cell line U937 has a t(10;11)(p13;q14) translocation. Using a combination of positional cloning and candidate gene approach, we cloned the breakpoint and were able to show that AF10 is fused to a novel gene that we named CALM (Clathrin Assembly Lymphoid Myeloid leukemia gene) located at 11q14. AF10, a putative transcription factor, had recently been cloned as one of the fusion partners of MLL. CALM has a very high homology in its N-terminal third to the murine ap-3 gene which is one of the clathrin assembly proteins. The N-terminal region of ap-3 has been shown to bind to clathrin and to have a high-affinity binding site for phosphoinositols. The identification of the CALM/AF10 fusion gene in the widely used U937 cell line will contribute to our understanding of the malignant phenotype of this line. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8643484

  8. Female patient with autistic disorder, intellectual disability, and co-morbid anxiety disorder: Expanding the phenotype associated with the recurrent 3q13.2-q13.31 microdeletion.

    PubMed

    Quintela, Ines; Gomez-Guerrero, Lorena; Fernandez-Prieto, Montse; Resches, Mariela; Barros, Francisco; Carracedo, Angel

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the advent of comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and its use as a first genetic test for the diagnosis of patients with neurodevelopmental phenotypes has allowed the identification of novel submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities (namely, copy number variants or CNVs), imperceptible by conventional cytogenetic techniques. The 3q13.31 microdeletion syndrome (OMIM #615433) has been defined as a genomic disorder mainly characterized by developmental delay, postnatal overgrowth, hypotonia, genital abnormalities in males, and characteristic craniofacial features. Although the 3q13.31 CNVs are variable in size, a 3.4 Mb recurrently altered region at 3q13.2-q13.31 has been recently described and non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) mediated by flanking human endogenous retrovirus (HERV-H) elements has been suggested as the mechanism of deletion formation. We expand the phenotypic spectrum associated with this recurrent deletion performing the clinical description of a 9-year-old female patient with autistic disorder, total absence of language, intellectual disability, anxiety disorder and disruptive, and compulsive eating behaviors. The array-based molecular karyotyping allowed the identification of a de novo recurrent 3q13.2-q13.31 deletion encompassing 25 genes. In addition, we compare her clinical phenotype with previous reports of patients with neurodevelopmental and behavioral disorders and proximal 3q microdeletions. Finally, we also review the candidate genes proposed so far for these phenotypes.

  9. Molecular characterization and gene content of breakpoint boundaries in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 with 17q11.2 microdeletions.

    PubMed

    Jenne, D E; Tinschert, S; Reimann, H; Lasinger, W; Thiel, G; Hameister, H; Kehrer-Sawatzki, H

    2001-09-01

    Homologous recombination between poorly characterized regions flanking the NF1 locus causes the constitutional loss of approximately 1.5 Mb from 17q11.2 covering > or =11 genes in 5%-20% of patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). To elucidate the extent of microheterogeneity at the deletion boundaries, we used single-copy DNA fragments from the extreme ends of the deleted segment to perform FISH on metaphase chromosomes from eight patients with NF1 who had large deletions. In six patients, these probes were deleted, suggesting that breakage and fusions occurred within the adjacent highly homologous sequences. Reexamination of the deleted region revealed two novel functional genes FLJ12735 (AK022797) and KIAA0653-related (WI-12393 and AJ314647), the latter of which is located closest to the distal boundary and is partially duplicated. We defined the complete reading frames for these genes and two expressed-sequence tag (EST) clusters that were reported elsewhere and are associated with the markers SHGC-2390 and WI-9521. Hybrid cell lines carrying only the deleted chromosome 17 were generated from two patients and used to identify the fusion sequences by junction-specific PCRs. The proximal breakpoints were found between positions 125279 and 125479 in one patient and within 4 kb of position 143000 on BAC R-271K11 (AC005562) in three patients, and the distal breakpoints were found at the precise homologous position on R-640N20 (AC023278). The interstitial 17q11.2 microdeletion arises from unequal crossover between two highly homologous WI-12393-derived 60-kb duplicons separated by approximately 1.5 Mb. Since patients with the NF1 large-deletion syndrome have a significantly increased risk of neurofibroma development and mental retardation, hemizygosity for genes from the deleted region around the neurofibromin locus (CYTOR4, FLJ12735, FLJ22729, HSA272195 (centaurin-alpha2), NF1, OMGP, EVI2A, EVI2B, WI-9521, HSA272196, HCA66, KIAA0160, and WI-12393) may

  10. Molecular confirmation of t(6;11)(p21;q12) renal cell carcinoma in archival paraffin-embedded material using a break-apart TFEB FISH assay expands its clinicopathologic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Argani, Pedram; Yonescu, Raluca; Morsberger, Laura; Morris, Kerry; Netto, George J; Smith, Nathan; Gonzalez, Nilda; Illei, Peter B; Ladanyi, Marc; Griffin, Constance A

    2012-10-01

    A subset of renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) is characterized by t(6;11)(p21;q12), which results in fusion of the untranslated Alpha (MALAT1) gene to the TFEB gene. Only 21 genetically confirmed cases of t(6;11) RCCs have been reported. This neoplasm typically demonstrates a distinctive biphasic morphology, comprising larger epithelioid cells and smaller cells clustered around basement membrane material; however, the full spectrum of its morphologic appearances is not known. The t(6;11) RCCs differ from most conventional RCCs in that they consistently express melanocytic immunohistochemical (IHC) markers such as HMB45 and Melan A and the cysteine protease cathepsin K but are often negative for epithelial markers such as cytokeratins. TFEB IHC has been proven to be useful to confirm the diagnosis of t(6;11) RCCs in archival material, because native TFEB is upregulated through promoter substitution by the gene fusion. However, IHC is highly fixation dependent and has been proven to be particularly difficult for TFEB. A validated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay for molecular confirmation of the t(6;11) RCC in archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material has not been previously reported. We report herein the development of a break-apart TFEB FISH assay for the diagnosis of t(6;11)(p21;q12) RCCs. We validated the assay on 4 genetically confirmed cases and 76 relevant expected negative control cases and used the assay to report 8 new cases that expand the clinicopathologic spectrum of t(6;11) RCCs. An additional previously reported TFEB IHC-positive case was confirmed by TFEB FISH in 46-year-old archival material. In conclusion, TFEB FISH is a robust, clinically validated assay that can confirm the diagnosis of t(6;11) RCC in archival material and should allow a more comprehensive clinicopathologic delineation of this recently recognized neoplastic entity.

  11. A maternally inherited 16p13.11-p12.3 duplication concomitant with a de novo SOX5 deletion in a male patient with global developmental delay, disruptive and obsessive behaviors and minor dysmorphic features.

    PubMed

    Quintela, Ines; Barros, Francisco; Lago-Leston, Ramon; Castro-Gago, Manuel; Carracedo, Angel; Eiris, Jesus

    2015-06-01

    We detail here the clinical description and the family genetic study of a male patient with global developmental delay, disruptive and obsessive behaviors and minor dysmorphic features and a combination of two rare genetic variants: a maternally inherited 16p13.11-p12.3 duplication and a de novo 12p12.1 deletion affecting SOX5. The 16p13.11 microduplication has been implicated in several neurodevelopmental and behavioral disorders and is characterized by variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance. The causes of this variation in phenotypic expression are not fully clear, representing a challenge in genetic diagnosis and counseling. However, several authors have proposed the two-hit model as one of the underlying mechanisms for this phenotypic heterogeneity. Our data could also support this two-hit model in which the 16p13.11-p12.3 duplication might contribute to the phenotype, not only as a single event but also in association with the SOX5 deletion. The SOX5 gene plays important roles in various developmental processes and has been associated with several neurodevelopmental disorders, mainly intellectual disability, developmental delay and language and/or speech delay as well as with behavior problems and dysmorphic features. However, many of the physical features and behavioral manifestations as well as language deficiencies present in our patient are consistent with those previously reported for SOX5 deletions. Patients carrying multiple genomic variants, as the one presented here, illustrate the difficulty in analyzing genotypes when the contribution of each variant results in overlapping phenotypes and/or, alternatively, in the modification of the clinical manifestations defined by the coexisting variant.

  12. Congenital thrombocytopenia in a neonate with an interstitial microdeletion of 3q26.2q26.31.

    PubMed

    Bouman, Arjan; Knegt, Lia; Gröschel, Stefan; Erpelinck, Claudia; Sanders, Mathijs; Delwel, Ruud; Kuijpers, Taco; Cobben, Jan Maarten

    2016-02-01

    Interstitial deletions encompassing the 3q26.2 region are rare. Only one case-report was published this far describing a patient with an interstitial deletion of 3q26.2 (involving the MDS1-EVI1 complex (MECOM)) and congenital thrombocytopenia. In this report we describe a case of a neonate with congenital thrombocytopenia and a constitutional 4.52 Mb deletion of 3q26.2q26.31 including TERC and the first 2 exons of MECOM, involving MDS1 but not EVI1. The deletion was demonstrated by array-CGH on lymphocytes. Our report confirms that congenital thrombocytopenia can be due to a constitutional deletion of 3q26.2 involving MECOM. We suggest that in case of unexplained neonatal thrombocytopenia, with even just slight facial dysmorphism, DNA microarray on peripheral blood should be considered early in the diagnostic work-up.

  13. Ebstein anomaly: Genetic heterogeneity and association with microdeletions 1p36 and 8p23.1.

    PubMed

    Digilio, Maria Cristina; Bernardini, Laura; Lepri, Francesca; Giuffrida, Maria Grazia; Guida, Valentina; Baban, Anwar; Versacci, Paolo; Capolino, Rossella; Torres, Barbara; De Luca, Alessandro; Novelli, Antonio; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2011-09-01

    Ebstein anomaly is an uncommon congenital heart defect (CHD), characterized by downward displacement of the tricuspid valve into the right ventricle. To uncover the genetic associations with Ebstein anomaly, we have searched chromosomal imbalances using standard cytogenetic and array-CGH analysis, and single gene conditions associated with syndromic Ebstein anomaly (with extracardiac anomalies), and screened GATA4 and NKX2.5 mutations in nonsyndromic patients (without extracardiac anomalies). Between January 1997 and September 2009, 44 consecutive patients with Ebstein anomaly were evaluated in two centers of Pediatric Cardiology. Ebstein anomaly was syndromic in 12 (27%) patients, and nonsyndromic in 32 (73%). A recognizable syndrome or complex was diagnosed by clinical criteria in seven patients. In one syndromic patient an 18q deletion was diagnosed by standard cytogenetic analysis. Array-CGH analysis performed in 10 of the 12 syndromic patients detected an interstitial deletion of about 4 Mb at 8p23.1 in one patient, and a deletion 1pter > 1p36.32/dup Xpter- > Xp22.32 in another patient. In the 28 of 32 nonsyndromic patients who underwent molecular testing, no mutation in GATA4 and NKX2.5 genes were detected. We conclude that Ebstein anomaly is a genetically heterogeneous defect, and that deletion 1p36 and deletion 8p23.1 are the most frequent chromosomal imbalances associated with Ebstein anomaly. Candidate genes include the GATA4 gene (in patients with del 8p23.1), NKX2.5 (based on published patients with isolated Ebstein anomaly) and a hypothetical gene in patients with del 1p36).

  14. NF1 Microdeletion Syndrome: Refined FISH Characterization of Sporadic and Familial Deletions with Locus-Specific Probes

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Paola; Corrado, Lucia; Natacci, Federica; Castorina, Pierangela; Wu, Bai-Li; Schneider, Gretchen H.; Clementi, Maurizio; Tenconi, Romano; Korf, Bruce R.; Larizza, Lidia

    2000-01-01

    Summary Two familial and seven sporadic patients with neurofibromatosis 1—who showed dysmorphism, learning disabilities/mental retardation, and additional signs and carried deletions of the NF1 gene—were investigated by use of a two-step FISH approach to characterize the deletions. With FISH of YAC clones belonging to a 7-Mb 17q11.2 contig, we estimated the extension of all of the deletions and identified the genomic regions harboring the breakpoints. Mosaicism accounted for the mild phenotype in two patients. In subsequent FISH experiments, performed with locus-specific probes generated from the same YACs by means of a novel procedure, we identified the smallest region of overlapping (SRO), mapped the deletion breakpoints, and identified the genes that map to each deletion interval. From centromere to telomere, the ∼0.8-Mb SRO includes sequence-tagged site 64381, the SUPT6H gene (encoding a transcription factor involved in chromatin structure), and NF1. Extending telomerically from the SRO, two additional genes—BLMH, encoding a hydrolase involved in bleomycin resistance, and ACCN1, encoding an amiloride-sensitive cation channel expressed in the CNS—were located in the deleted intervals of seven and three patients, respectively. An apparently common centromeric deletion breakpoint was shared by all of the patients, whereas a different telomeric breakpoint defined a deletion interval of 0.8–3 Mb. There was no apparent correlation between the extent of the deletion and the phenotype. This characterization of gross NF1 deletions provides the premise for addressing correctly any genotype-phenotype correlation in the subset of patients with NF1 deletions. PMID:10631140

  15. Leucémie aiguë myéloblastique et translocation (8;16) (p11;p13), premier cas marocain d'une entité clinico- biologique distinct

    PubMed Central

    Bakkali, Adiba; Lemchaheb, Mouna; Had, Nezha; Dehbi, Hind; Benchekroun, Said; Quessar, Asma

    2015-01-01

    La cytogénétique constitue un outil indispensable pour le diagnostic et le pronostic de la leucémie aigue myéloïde (LAM). La t(8;16)(p11;p13) est rare au cours de cette pathologie. Nous décrivons le cas d'une patiente de 22 ans, admise pour un syndrome d'insuffisance médullaire complet associé à une altération de l’état général. L'examen clinique initial montrait un purpura ecchymotique diffus et des adénopathies latérocérvicales centimétriques bilatérales. L'hémogramme avait montré une anémie à 7,6g /dl normochrome normocytaire, des globules blancs à 87,8×109/L, 15% de polynucléaires neutrophiles, 60% de blastes, 24% de lymphocytes, 1% de Monocytes et 65×109/L de plaquettes. Le myélogramme avait objectivé une LAM1. Sur l'immunophenotypage les marqueurs positifs étaient le CD33 (99%), le CD15 (73%), le CD38 (95%) et l'HLA-DR (88%), les marqueurs monocytoïdes CD14 et CD64 étaient positifs, le CD34, les marqueurs lymphopïdes, la MPO (26%) et le CD13 (2%) étaient négatifs. Le caryotype avait montré: t(8,16)(p11, p13) add16 (20/20). L'inversion du chromosome 16 recherchée par FISH était négative. Le traitement avait consisté en 2 cures d'induction et 2 cures de consolidation selon le protocole national de traitement des LAM (Cytarabine, daunorubicine, etoposide), la rémission complète avait été obtenue en fin d'induction I, maintenue 9 mois suivie d'une rechute; Vu l'absence de possibilité d'une allogreffe, un traitement palliatif a été instauré, la malade est décédée de sa maladie un mois après la rechute. Notre cas se présente comme les cas décrits dans la littérature avec des données clinico- biologiques particulières. PMID:26327984

  16. A cryptic three-way translocation t(10;19;11)(p12.31;q13.31;q23.3) with a derivative Y-chromosome in an infant with acute myeloblastic leukemia (M5b).

    PubMed

    Othman, Moneeb A K; Vujić, Dragana; Zecević, Zeljko; Đurišić, Marina; Slavković, Bojana; Meyer, Britta; Liehr, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease characterized by the malignant transformation of hematopoietic precursors to a pathogenic cell clone. Chromosomal band 11q23 harboring MLL (=mixed lineage leukemia) gene is known to be involved in rearrangements with variety of genes as activating partners of MLL in different AML subtypes. Overall, an unfavorable prognosis is associated with MLL abnormalities. Here we investigated an 11-month-old male presenting with hyperleukocytosis being diagnosed with AML subtype FAB-M5b. In banding cytogenetics a der(19)t(19;?)(q13.3;?) and del(Y)(q11.23) were found as sole aberrations. Molecular cytogenetics revealed that the MLL gene was disrupted and even partially lost due to a t(10;19;11)(p12.31;q13.31;q23.3), an MLL/MLLT10 fusion appeared, and the der(Y) was an asymmetric inverted duplication with breakpoints in Yp11.2 and Yq11.23. The patient got hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from his haploidentical mother. Still three months afterwards 15% of blasts were detected in bone marrow and later the patient was lost during follow-up. The present case highlights the necessity to exclude MLL rearrangements, even when there seems to be no actual hint from banding cytogenetics.

  17. Including Conflict in Creative Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litvin, Martin

    Conflict is the basis of all stories and thus should appear in some form in the first sentence. There are three kinds of conflict: people vs. people; people vs. nature; and people vs. themselves. Conflict must be repeated in all the various elements of the story's structure, including the plot, which is the plan of action telling what happens to…

  18. Family Living, Including Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forlano, George

    This volume describes and evaluates 21 selected New York City Board of Education Umbrella Programs for the 1974-1975 school year. The programs include: (1) the parent resource center, (2) the teacher self-help program, (3) the East Harlem pre-kindergarten center, (4) the Brooklyn College volunteer tutoring program, (5) the parent education for…

  19. Cryptic microdeletion of the CREBBP gene from t(1;16) (p36.2;p13.3) as a novel genetic defect causing Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suk Ran; Kim, Hee-Jin; Kim, Yae-Jean; Kwon, Jeong-Yi; Kim, Jong-Won; Kim, Sun-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by facial abnormalities, broad thumbs and toes, and mental retardation. RTS is known to be caused by the disruption, either by point mutations or microdeletions, of the human CREB-binding protein (CREBBP) gene on 16p13.3. Gross rearrangements involving 16p13.3, such as translocations or inversions, have rarely been reported in RTS. A 3-month-old boy with a phenotype typical of RTS was referred for genetic diagnosis. Cytogenetic analysis revealed a novel reciprocal translocation: t(1;16)(p36.2;p13.3). Gene dosage analysis for the CREBBP gene was performed using multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and revealed heterozygous deletion of the whole CREBBP gene. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-array confirmed the deletion and also indicated large genomic deletions in both 1p36.2 and 16p13.3. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of characterization of the genomic dosage imbalances in RTS by SNP-array.

  20. Lavoisierite, Mn2+ 8[Al10(Mn3+Mg)][Si11P]O44(OH)12, a new mineral from Piedmont, Italy: the link between "ardennite" and sursassite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandi, Paolo; Biagioni, Cristian; Pasero, Marco; Mellini, Marcello

    2013-03-01

    The new mineral species lavoisierite, ideally Mn2+ 8[Al10(Mn3+Mg)][Si11P]O44(OH)12, has been discovered in piemontite-bearing micaschists belonging to the Piedmontese Nappe from Punta Gensane, Viù Valley, Western Alps, Italy. It occurs as yellow-orange acicular to prismatic-tabular crystals up to a few millimeters in length, with white streak and vitreous luster, elongated along [010] and flattened on {001}. Lavoisierite is associated with quartz, "mica," sursassite, piemontite, spessartine, braunite, and "tourmaline." Calculated density is 3.576 g cm-3. In plane-polarized light, it is transparent, pleochroic, with pale yellow parallel to [010] and yellow-orange normal to this direction; extinction is parallel and elongation is positive. Birefringence is moderate; the calculated average refraction index n is 1.750. Lavoisierite is orthorhombic, space group Pnmm, with a 8.6891(10), b 5.7755(3), c 36.9504(20) Å, V 1854.3(2) Å3, Z = 2. Calculated main diffraction lines of the X-ray powder diffraction pattern are [ d in Å, ( I), ( hkl); relative intensities are visually estimated]: 4.62 (m) (112), 2.931 (vs) (11 10), 2.765 (s) (11 11), 2.598 (s) (310), 2.448 (ms) (028). Chemical analyses by electron microprobe give (in wt%) P2O5 2.08, V2O5 0.37, SiO2 34.81, TiO2 0.13, Al2O3 22.92, Cr2O3 0.32, Fe2O3 0.86, Mn2O3 6.92, MnO 19.09, MgO 5.73, CaO 1.94, Na2O 0.01, H2O 5.44, sum 100.62 wt%. H2O content was calculated from structure refinement. The empirical formula, based on 56 anions, is (Mn{5.340/2+}Mg1.810Ca0.686Na0.006)Σ=7.852(Al8.921Mn{1.739/3+}Mg1.010Fe{0.214/3+}Cr0.084Ti0.032)Σ=12.000(Si11.496P0.582V0.081)Σ=12.159O43.995(OH)12.005. The crystal structure of lavoisierite was solved by direct methods and refined on the basis of 1743 observed reflections to R 1 = 4.6 %. The structure is characterized by columns of edge-sharing octahedra running along [010] and linked to each other by means of [SiO4], [Si2O7], and [Si3O10] groups. Lavoisierite, named after the French

  1. Neoclassical Transport Including Collisional Nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.; Belli, E. A.

    2011-06-10

    In the standard {delta}f theory of neoclassical transport, the zeroth-order (Maxwellian) solution is obtained analytically via the solution of a nonlinear equation. The first-order correction {delta}f is subsequently computed as the solution of a linear, inhomogeneous equation that includes the linearized Fokker-Planck collision operator. This equation admits analytic solutions only in extreme asymptotic limits (banana, plateau, Pfirsch-Schlueter), and so must be solved numerically for realistic plasma parameters. Recently, numerical codes have appeared which attempt to compute the total distribution f more accurately than in the standard ordering by retaining some nonlinear terms related to finite-orbit width, while simultaneously reusing some form of the linearized collision operator. In this work we show that higher-order corrections to the distribution function may be unphysical if collisional nonlinearities are ignored.

  2. Including Magnetostriction in Micromagnetic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conbhuí, Pádraig Ó.; Williams, Wyn; Fabian, Karl; Nagy, Lesleis

    2016-04-01

    The magnetic anomalies that identify crustal spreading are predominantly recorded by basalts formed at the mid-ocean ridges, whose magnetic signals are dominated by iron-titanium-oxides (Fe3-xTixO4), so called "titanomagnetites", of which the Fe2.4Ti0.6O4 (TM60) phase is the most common. With sufficient quantities of titanium present, these minerals exhibit strong magnetostriction. To date, models of these grains in the pseudo-single domain (PSD) range have failed to accurately account for this effect. In particular, a popular analytic treatment provided by Kittel (1949) for describing the magnetostrictive energy as an effective increase of the anisotropy constant can produce unphysical strains for non-uniform magnetizations. I will present a rigorous approach based on work by Brown (1966) and by Kroner (1958) for including magnetostriction in micromagnetic codes which is suitable for modelling hysteresis loops and finding remanent states in the PSD regime. Preliminary results suggest the more rigorously defined micromagnetic models exhibit higher coercivities and extended single domain ranges when compared to more simplistic approaches.

  3. Detection of an activated JAK3 variant and a Xq26.3 microdeletion causing loss of PHF6 and miR-424 expression in myelodysplastic syndromes by combined targeted next generation sequencing and SNP array analysis.

    PubMed

    Kunze, Kristin; Gamerdinger, Ulrike; Leßig-Owlanj, Jacqueline; Sorokina, Marina; Brobeil, Alexander; Tur, Mehmet Kemal; Blau, Wolfgang; Burchardt, Alexander; Käbisch, Andreas; Schliesser, Georg; Kiehl, Michael; Rosenwald, Andreas; Rummel, Mathias; Grimminger, Friedrich; Hain, Torsten; Chakraborty, Trinad; Bräuninger, Andreas; Gattenlöhner, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are hematopoietic disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and progression to acute leukemia. In patients ineligible for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, azacitidine is the only treatment shown to prolong survival. However, with the availability of a growing compendium of cancer biomarkers and related drugs, analysis of relevant genetic alterations for individual MDS patients might become part of routine evaluation. Therefore and in order to cover the entire bone marrow microenvironment involved in the pathogenesis of MDS, SNP array analysis and targeted next generation sequencing (tNGS) for the mostly therapy relevant 46 onco- and tumor-suppressor genes were performed on bone marrow biopsies from 29 MDS patients. In addition to the detection of mutations known to be associated with MDS in NRAS, KRAS, MPL, NPM1, IDH1, PTPN11, APC and MET, single nucleotide variants so far unrelated to MDS in STK11 (n=1), KDR (n=3), ATM (n=1) and JAK3 (n=2) were identified. Moreover, a recurrent microdeletion was detected in Xq26.3 (n=2), causing loss of PHF6 expression, a potential tumor suppressor gene, and the miR-424, which is involved in the development of acute myeloid leukemia. Finally, combined genetic aberrations affecting the VEGF/VEGFR pathway were found in the majority of cases demonstrating the diversity of mutations affecting different nodes of a particular signaling network as an intrinsic feature in MDS patients. We conclude that combined SNP array analyses and tNGS can identify established and novel therapy relevant genomic aberrations in MDS patients and track them in a clinical setting for individual therapy selection.

  4. Identification of Unique, Heterozygous Germline Mutation, STK11 (p.F354L), in a Child with an Encapsulated Follicular Variant of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma within Six Months of Completing Treatment for Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Buryk, Melissa A; Picarsic, Jennifer L; Creary, Susan E; Shaw, Peter H; Simons, Jeffrey P; Deutsch, Melvin; Monaco, Sara E; Nikiforov, Yuri E; Witchel, Selma Feldman

    2015-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is rare in children, although it is a known secondary malignancy after treatment for neuroblastoma (NB). The interval between NB treatment completion and PTC is usually more than 5 years. A 4-year-old, female patient with a high risk adrenal NB was found to have a 2.9-cm, right thyroid nodule on surveillance chest computed tomography (CT) 6 months after completion of her NB treatment (induction chemotherapy, tumor resection, autologous stem cell transplantation, external beam radiation to the abdominal tumor site, immunotherapy, and retinoic acid). Posttreatment surveillance included iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine scans and CT scans. Fine-needle aspiration of the thyroid nodule diagnosed a follicular neoplasm, which was negative for BRAF, NRAS, KRAS, HRAS, PAX8/PPARg, and RET/PTC mutations, without evidence of metastatic NB. Nodule histology demonstrated an encapsulated follicular variant of PTC (FVPTC). Next-generation sequence analysis for a 46 cancer-gene profile was performed on both tumors with subsequent peripheral blood DNA testing. A heterozygous missense mutation in STK11 (F354L) was identified in both the NB and FVPTC. This mutation was also detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Two additional heterozygous somatic missense mutations of uncertain significance were identified: KDR/VEGF receptor 2 (Q472H) on chromosome 4 and MET (N375S) on chromosome 7. To our knowledge, this is the shortest reported duration from completion of NB treatment to detection of thyroid cancer. The association of the STK11 gene with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, lung adenocarcinomas, and medullary thyroid cancer leads to a possible association between this genetic variant and our patient's tumors.

  5. 2q23.1 microdeletion of the MBD5 gene in a female with seizures, developmental delay and distinct dysmorphic features.

    PubMed

    Noh, Grace J; Graham, John M

    2012-01-01

    We report a 2-year-old female who initially presented with seizures, developmental delay and dysmorphic features and was found to have a 0.3 Mb deletion at chromosome 2q23.1 encompassing the critical seizure gene, MBD5. Her distinct physical features include bifrontal narrowing with brachycephaly, low anterior hairline, hypotonic facial features with short upturned nose, flat nasal bridge, hypertelorism, tented upper lip with everted lower lip, downturned corners of her mouth, and relatively coarse facial features including thickened tongue. She also had a short neck, brachytelephalangy, clinodactyly, and hypertrichosis. At 3½ years she developed progressive ataxia and lost vocabulary at the age of 4. Regression has been reported in one other case of MBD5 deletion. MBD5 is a member of the methyl binding gene family and appears to be responsible for regulating DNA methylation in the central nervous system. Our patient was entirely deleted for the MBD5 gene with partial loss of the EPC2 gene, which suggests that haploinsufficiency of MBD5 is responsible for the distinct phenotype observed. This supports the hypothesis that MBD5 is indeed the critical gene implicated for the findings seen in patients with deletions of chromosome 2q23.1. Further studies are necessary to delineate the role that the MBD5 gene plays in the development of the brain and these specific physical characteristics.

  6. 2q23.1 microdeletion of the MBD5 gene in a female with seizures, developmental delay and distinct dysmorphic features.

    PubMed

    Noh, Grace J; Graham, John M

    2012-05-01

    We report a 2-year-old female who initially presented with seizures, developmental delay and dysmorphic features and was found to have a 0.3 Mb deletion at chromosome 2q23.1 encompassing the critical seizure gene, MBD5. Her distinct physical features include bifrontal narrowing with brachycephaly, low anterior hairline, hypotonic facial features with short upturned nose, flat nasal bridge, hypertelorism, tented upper lip with everted lower lip, downturned corners of her mouth, and relatively coarse facial features including thickened tongue. She also had a short neck, brachytelephalangy, clinodactyly, and hypertrichosis. At 3½ years she developed progressive ataxia and lost vocabulary at the age of 4. Regression has been reported in one other case of MBD5 deletion. MBD5 is a member of the methyl binding gene family and appears to be responsible for regulating DNA methylation in the central nervous system. Our patient was entirely deleted for the MBD5 gene with partial loss of the EPC2 gene, which suggests that haploinsufficiency of MBD5 is responsible for the distinct phenotype observed. This supports the hypothesis that MBD5 is indeed the critical gene implicated for the findings seen in patients with deletions of chromosome 2q23.1. Further studies are necessary to delineate the role that the MBD5 gene plays in the development of the brain and these specific physical characteristics.

  7. Microdeletion on 17p11.2 in a Smith-Magenis syndrome patient with mental retardation and congenital heart defect: first report from China.

    PubMed

    Huang, C; Yang, Y-F; Zhang, H; Xie, L; Chen, J-L; Wang, J; Tan, Z-P; Luo, H

    2012-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a rare syndrome with multiple congenital malformations, including development and mental retardation, behavioral problems and a distinct facial appearance. SMS is caused by haploinsufficiency of RAI1 (deletion or mutation of RAI1). We describe an eight-year-old female Chinese patient with multiple malformations, congenital heart defect, mental retardation, and behavioral problems (self hugging, sleeping disturbance). High-resolution genome wide single nucleotide polymorphism array revealed a 3.7-Mb deletion in chromosome region 17p11.2. This chromosome region contains RAI1, a critical gene involved in SMS. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an SMS patient in mainland China. PMID:22911601

  8. Recurrent distal 7q11.23 deletion including HIP1 and YWHAG identified in patients with intellectual disabilities, epilepsy, and neurobehavioral problems.

    PubMed

    Ramocki, Melissa B; Bartnik, Magdalena; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Kołodziejska, Katarzyna E; Xia, Zhilian; Bravo, Jaclyn; Miller, G Steve; Rodriguez, Diana L; Williams, Charles A; Bader, Patricia I; Szczepanik, Elżbieta; Mazurczak, Tomasz; Antczak-Marach, Dorota; Coldwell, James G; Akman, Cigdem I; McAlmon, Karen; Cohen, Melinda P; McGrath, James; Roeder, Elizabeth; Mueller, Jennifer; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Bacino, Carlos A; Patel, Ankita; Bocian, Ewa; Shaw, Chad A; Cheung, Sau Wai; Mazurczak, Tadeusz; Stankiewicz, Paweł

    2010-12-10

    We report 26 individuals from ten unrelated families who exhibit variable expression and/or incomplete penetrance of epilepsy, learning difficulties, intellectual disabilities, and/or neurobehavioral abnormalities as a result of a heterozygous microdeletion distally adjacent to the Williams-Beuren syndrome region on chromosome 7q11.23. In six families with a common recurrent ∼1.2 Mb deletion that includes the Huntingtin-interacting protein 1 (HIP1) and tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein gamma (YWHAG) genes and that is flanked by large complex low-copy repeats, we identified sites for nonallelic homologous recombination in two patients. There were no cases of this ∼1.2 Mb distal 7q11.23 deletion copy number variant identified in over 20,000 control samples surveyed. Three individuals with smaller, nonrecurrent deletions (∼180-500 kb) that include HIP1 but not YWHAG suggest that deletion of HIP1 is sufficient to cause neurological disease. Mice with targeted mutation in the Hip1 gene (Hip1⁻(/)⁻) develop a neurological phenotype characterized by failure to thrive, tremor, and gait ataxia. Overall, our data characterize a neurodevelopmental and epilepsy syndrome that is likely caused by recurrent and nonrecurrent deletions, including HIP1. These data do not exclude the possibility that YWHAG loss of function is also sufficient to cause neurological phenotypes. Based on the current knowledge of Hip1 protein function and its proposed role in AMPA and NMDA ionotropic glutamate receptor trafficking, we believe that HIP1 haploinsufficiency in humans will be amenable to rational drug design for improved seizure control and cognitive and behavioral function.

  9. Recurrent Distal 7q11.23 Deletion Including HIP1 and YWHAG Identified in Patients with Intellectual Disabilities, Epilepsy, and Neurobehavioral Problems

    PubMed Central

    Ramocki, Melissa B.; Bartnik, Magdalena; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Kołodziejska, Katarzyna E.; Xia, Zhilian; Bravo, Jaclyn; Miller, G. Steve; Rodriguez, Diana L.; Williams, Charles A.; Bader, Patricia I.; Szczepanik, Elżbieta; Mazurczak, Tomasz; Antczak-Marach, Dorota; Coldwell, James G.; Akman, Cigdem I.; McAlmon, Karen; Cohen, Melinda P.; McGrath, James; Roeder, Elizabeth; Mueller, Jennifer; Kang, Sung-Hae L.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Patel, Ankita; Bocian, Ewa; Shaw, Chad A.; Cheung, Sau Wai; Mazurczak, Tadeusz; Stankiewicz, Paweł

    2010-01-01

    We report 26 individuals from ten unrelated families who exhibit variable expression and/or incomplete penetrance of epilepsy, learning difficulties, intellectual disabilities, and/or neurobehavioral abnormalities as a result of a heterozygous microdeletion distally adjacent to the Williams-Beuren syndrome region on chromosome 7q11.23. In six families with a common recurrent ∼1.2 Mb deletion that includes the Huntingtin-interacting protein 1 (HIP1) and tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein gamma (YWHAG) genes and that is flanked by large complex low-copy repeats, we identified sites for nonallelic homologous recombination in two patients. There were no cases of this ∼1.2 Mb distal 7q11.23 deletion copy number variant identified in over 20,000 control samples surveyed. Three individuals with smaller, nonrecurrent deletions (∼180–500 kb) that include HIP1 but not YWHAG suggest that deletion of HIP1 is sufficient to cause neurological disease. Mice with targeted mutation in the Hip1 gene (Hip1−/−) develop a neurological phenotype characterized by failure to thrive, tremor, and gait ataxia. Overall, our data characterize a neurodevelopmental and epilepsy syndrome that is likely caused by recurrent and nonrecurrent deletions, including HIP1. These data do not exclude the possibility that YWHAG loss of function is also sufficient to cause neurological phenotypes. Based on the current knowledge of Hip1 protein function and its proposed role in AMPA and NMDA ionotropic glutamate receptor trafficking, we believe that HIP1 haploinsufficiency in humans will be amenable to rational drug design for improved seizure control and cognitive and behavioral function. PMID:21109226

  10. Copy Number Variants in Schizophrenia: Confirmation of Five Previous Findings and New Evidence for 3q29 Microdeletions and VIPR2 Duplications

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, Douglas F.; Duan, Jubao; Oh, Sang; Wang, Kai; Sanders, Alan R.; Shi, Jianxin; Zhang, Nancy; Mowry, Bryan J.; Olincy, Ann; Amin, Farooq; Cloninger, C. Robert; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Buccola, Nancy G.; Byerley, William F.; Black, Donald W.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Freedman, Robert; Dudbridge, Frank; Pe’er, Itsik; Hakonarson, Hakon; Bergen, Sarah E.; Fanous, Ayman H.; Holmans, Peter A.; Gejman, Pablo V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate previously reported associations of copy number variants (CNVs) with schizophrenia and to identify additional associations, the authors analyzed CNVs in the Molecular Genetics of Schizophrenia study (MGS) and additional available data. Method After quality control, MGS data for 3,945 subjects with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 3,611 screened comparison subjects were available for analysis of rare CNVs (<1% frequency). CNV detection thresholds were chosen that maximized concordance in 151 duplicate assays. Pointwise and gene-wise analyses were carried out, as well as analyses of previously reported regions. Selected regions were visually inspected and confirmed with quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results In analyses of MGS data combined with other available data sets, odds ratios of 7.5 or greater were observed for previously reported deletions in chromosomes 1q21.1, 15q13.3, and 22q11.21, duplications in 16p11.2, and exon-disrupting deletions in NRXN1. The most consistently supported candidate associations across data sets included a 1.6-Mb deletion in chromosome 3q29 (21 genes, TFRC to BDH1) that was previously described in a mild-moderate mental retardation syndrome, exonic duplications in the gene for vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 2 (VIPR2), and exonic duplications in C16orf72. The case subjects had a modestly higher genome-wide number of gene-containing deletions (>100 kb and >1 Mb) but not duplications. Conclusions The data strongly confirm the association of schizophrenia with 1q21.1, 15q13.3, and 22q11.21 deletions, 16p11.2 duplications, and exonic NRXN1 deletions. These CNVs, as well as 3q29 deletions, are also associated with mental retardation, autism spectrum disorders, and epilepsy. Additional candidate genes and regions, including VIPR2, were identified. Study of the mechanisms underlying these associations should shed light on the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. PMID:21285140

  11. Environmental Sustainability - Including Land and Water Use

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessments of environmental sustainability can be conducted in many ways with one of the most quantitative methods including Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA). While historically LCIA has included a comprehensive list of impact categories including: ozone depletion, global c...

  12. A de novo 163 kb interstitial 1q44 microdeletion in a boy with thin corpus callosum, psychomotor delay and seizures.

    PubMed

    Selmer, Kaja K; Bryne, Einar; Rødningen, Olaug K; Fannemel, Madeleine

    2012-12-01

    The 1q44 deletion syndrome has shown to be a recognizable phenotype with developmental delay, short stature and corpus callosum abnormalities as relatively consistent features. However, the disorder is still clinically heterogeneous and a genotype-phenotype correlation has been challenging to establish. In particular, a delineation of a critical region for the corpus callosum development has turned out to be difficult, and many candidate genes have been proposed. We present here a patient boy with a clinical picture of the 1q44 deletion syndrome, including a thin corpus callosum, and a small de novo 1q44 deletion. The deletion spans a maximum of 163 kb, a region which only contains the two genes FAM36A and HNRNPU. This finding supports the previously suggested hypothesis that the HNRNPU is an essential gene to the development of corpus callosum. However, as patients with deletions outside this interval also have been reported to have corpus callosum abnormalities, other mechanisms are probably also involved. We also identified two conserved non-coding regions in the deleted region of the patient, and speculate that also other elements interfere with the complex interplay and spatiotemporal gene expression during embryonic development. PMID:22975012

  13. Microdeletion of the escape genes KDM5C and IQSEC2 in a girl with severe intellectual disability and autistic features.

    PubMed

    Fieremans, Nathalie; Van Esch, Hilde; de Ravel, Thomy; Van Driessche, Jozef; Belet, Stefanie; Bauters, Marijke; Froyen, Guy

    2015-05-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a very heterogeneous disorder with over 100 ID genes located on the X chromosome alone. Of these, KDM5C and IQSEC2 are located adjacent to each other at the Xp11.22 locus. While mutations in either of these genes are associated with severe ID in males, female carriers are mostly unaffected. Here, we report on a female patient with severe ID and autistic features carrying a de novo 0.4 Mb deletion containing six coding genes including KDM5C and IQSEC2. X-inactivation analysis revealed skewing in a lymphocyte-derived cell line from this patient with preferential inactivation of the mutant X chromosome. As the brain-expressed KDM5C and IQSEC2 genes escape X-inactivation, deletion of these alleles could still be detrimental despite skewing of X-inactivation. Indeed, mutations in either of both genes have been reported in a few female ID patients. Expression analysis in the patients' cell line revealed decreased KDM5C mRNA levels compared to female controls. IQSEC2 levels could not be compared due to very low expression in blood. Overall, our data suggest that heterozygous loss-of-function of the escape genes KDM5C and/or IQSEC2 can contribute to severe ID in female patients and should be taken into account in diagnostics.

  14. Identification of a microdeletion at the 7q33-q35 disrupting the CNTNAP2 gene in a Brazilian stuttering case.

    PubMed

    Petrin, Aline L; Giacheti, Célia M; Maximino, Luciana P; Abramides, Dagma V M; Zanchetta, Sthella; Rossi, Natalia F; Richieri-Costa, Antônio; Murray, Jeffrey C

    2010-12-01

    Speech and language disorders are some of the most common referral reasons to child development centers accounting for approximately 40% of cases. Stuttering is a disorder in which involuntary repetition, prolongation, or cessation of the sound precludes the flow of speech. About 5% of individuals in the general population have a stuttering problem, and about 80% of the affected children recover naturally. The causal factors of stuttering remain uncertain in most cases; studies suggest that genetic factors are responsible for 70% of the variance in liability for stuttering, whereas the remaining 30% is due to environmental effects supporting a complex cause of the disorder. The use of high-resolution genome wide array comparative genomic hybridization has proven to be a powerful strategy to narrow down candidate regions for complex disorders. We report on a case with a complex set of speech and language difficulties including stuttering who presented with a 10 Mb deletion of chromosome region 7q33-35 causing the deletion of several genes and the disruption of CNTNAP2 by deleting the first three exons of the gene. CNTNAP2 is known to be involved in the cause of language and speech disorders and autism spectrum disorder and is in the same pathway as FOXP2, another important language gene, which makes it a candidate gene for causal studies speech and language disorders such as stuttering. PMID:21108403

  15. De novo 2.3 Mb microdeletion of 1q32.2 involving the Van der Woude Syndrome locus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Van der Woude syndrome is the most common among syndromes which include cleft lip and/or cleft palate as one of the presentations. It is usually caused by mutations in the interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) gene. Case presentation We previously reported on a patient with suspected deletion of the IRF6 gene. Using the Affymetrix Human SNP 6.0 Array, the interstitial deletion has been confirmed and found to be approximately 2.327–2.334 Mb within the 1q32.2 region. Although several known genes were deleted, the patient has no other phenotype apart from the orofacial presentations typical of VWS. The same deletion was not present in either parent and his two siblings were also phenotypically normal. Conclusions Other than IRF6, the genes which are deleted in this patient appear to be insensitive to copy number and haploinsufficiency. We compared the deletion in this patient with another case which was also mapped by high resolution array but had additional phenotypic features. PMID:23915469

  16. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  17. Composite Pressure Vessel Including Crack Arresting Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A pressure vessel includes a ported fitting having an annular flange formed on an end thereof and a tank that envelopes the annular flange. A crack arresting barrier is bonded to and forming a lining of the tank within the outer surface thereof. The crack arresting barrier includes a cured resin having a post-curing ductility rating of at least approximately 60% through the cured resin, and further includes randomly-oriented fibers positioned in and throughout the cured resin.

  18. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... below 470 MHz, including those licensed pursuant to 47 CFR 90.187(b)(2)(v)); (z) The 218-219 MHz band... Spectrum Leasing Scope and Authority § 1.9005 Included services. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 48533, August 15, 2014. The spectrum leasing policies and rules of this subpart apply to the...

  19. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record information maintained in the III System and the FIRS shall include serious and/or significant adult...

  20. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record information maintained in the III System and the FIRS shall include serious and/or significant adult...

  1. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record information maintained in the III System and the FIRS shall include serious and/or significant adult...

  2. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record information maintained in the III System and the FIRS shall include serious and/or significant adult...

  3. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record... by a § 20.32(a) offense. These exclusions may not be applicable to criminal history records maintained in state criminal history record repositories, including those states participating in the NFF....

  4. Include Passive Solar in Your Renovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Gerald F.; Probasco, Jack F.

    1981-01-01

    A checklist covers potential energy saving modifications in a building scheduled for renovation, and includes suggestions for room utilization, landscaping, and building envelope, solar control, and active system modifications. (Author)

  5. Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... is considered invasive. Symptoms of pneumonia usually include: Fever and chills Cough Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing Sweating ... the blood. It can cause symptoms such as: Fever and chills Excessive tiredness Pain in the belly Nausea with ...

  6. Lung Disease Including Asthma and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthcare Professionals Lung Disease including Asthma and Adult Vaccination Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  7. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... create difficulties in communication. (e) Respiratory therapy services. (1) Respiratory therapy services... cardiopulmonary function. (2) Respiratory therapy services include the following: (i) Application of...

  8. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... create difficulties in communication. (e) Respiratory therapy services. (1) Respiratory therapy services... cardiopulmonary function. (2) Respiratory therapy services include the following: (i) Application of...

  9. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... create difficulties in communication. (e) Respiratory therapy services. (1) Respiratory therapy services... cardiopulmonary function. (2) Respiratory therapy services include the following: (i) Application of...

  10. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  11. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  12. Communications circuit including a linear quadratic estimator

    DOEpatents

    Ferguson, Dennis D.

    2015-07-07

    A circuit includes a linear quadratic estimator (LQE) configured to receive a plurality of measurements a signal. The LQE is configured to weight the measurements based on their respective uncertainties to produce weighted averages. The circuit further includes a controller coupled to the LQE and configured to selectively adjust at least one data link parameter associated with a communication channel in response to receiving the weighted averages.

  13. A novel acquired cryptic three-way translocation t(2;11;5)(p21.3;q13.5;q23.2) with a submicroscopic deletion at 11p14.3 in an adult with hypereosinophilic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, Eigil

    2015-08-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a clinically and pathologically heterogeneous disease entity. It is characterized by persistent eosinophilia and organ damage after excluding other causes. Clonal eosinophilia is distinguished from idiopathic eosinophilia by the presence of histologic, cytogenetic, or molecular evidence of an underlying malignancy. There are two distinct subcategories of clonal eosinophilia: chronic eosinophilic leukemia, not otherwise specified and myeloid/lymphoid neoplasms with eosinophilia and mutations involving platelet-derived growth factor receptor α/β or fibroblast growth factor receptor 1. More than 50% of HES are without knowledge of underlying pathogenic molecular pathways. Here we examined a HES patient by oligo-based aCGH analysis and molecular cytogenetic methods. Examination for the common eosinophilia-related cytogenetic abnormalities involving the genes PDGFRA, PDGFRB, and FGFR1 together with BCR-ABL fusion gene was negative. Cytogenetic analysis and multi-color FISH analysis revealed a novel cryptic three-way translocation t(2;11;5)(p21.3;q13.5;q23.2). By oaCGH analysis we could not find any copy number changes related to the cytogenetic breakpoints but instead detected a 0.9Mb submicroscopic deletion at 11p14.3. The deleted region involved the 5'-upstream sequences and exons 1-4 of the LUZP2 gene, which encodes a leucine zipper protein. Analysis of surrogate germ-line cells revealed a normal result showing that the detected chromosomal aberrations were acquired. This is the first report on a HES patient associated with a novel complex three-way translocation t(2;11;5)(p21.3;q13.5;q23.2) and a submicroscopic deletion in chromosome band 11p14.3. The study also demonstrates the benefits of oligo-based aCGH analysis in detecting hidden disease related chromosomal abnormalities. The present findings provide additional clues to unravel important molecular pathways in HES to obtain the full spectrum of acquired chromosomal and

  14. Weather information network including graphical display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, Daniel R. (Inventor); Burdon, David (Inventor); Son, Robert S. (Inventor); Martin, Kevin D. (Inventor); Harrison, John (Inventor); Hughes, Keith R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An apparatus for providing weather information onboard an aircraft includes a processor unit and a graphical user interface. The processor unit processes weather information after it is received onboard the aircraft from a ground-based source, and the graphical user interface provides a graphical presentation of the weather information to a user onboard the aircraft. Preferably, the graphical user interface includes one or more user-selectable options for graphically displaying at least one of convection information, turbulence information, icing information, weather satellite information, SIGMET information, significant weather prognosis information, and winds aloft information.

  15. Transmission line including support means with barriers

    DOEpatents

    Cookson, Alan H.

    1982-01-01

    A gas insulated transmission line includes an elongated outer sheath, a plurality of inner conductors disposed within and extending along the outer sheath, and an insulating gas which electrically insulates the inner conductors from the outer sheath. A support insulator insulatably supports the inner conductors within the outer sheath, with the support insulator comprising a main body portion including a plurality of legs extending to the outer sheath, and barrier portions which extend between the legs. The barrier portions have openings therein adjacent the main body portion through which the inner conductors extend.

  16. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  17. 34 CFR 300.20 - Include.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include. 300.20 Section 300.20 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH...

  18. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... to 47 CFR 90.187(b)(2)(v)); (z) The 218-219 MHz band (part 95 of this chapter); (aa) The Local... Spectrum Leasing Scope and Authority § 1.9005 Included services. The spectrum leasing policies and rules of... (part 27 of this chapter); (j) The Wireless Communications Service in the 698-746 MHz band (part 27...

  19. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to 47 CFR 90.187(b)(2)(v)); (z) The 218-219 MHz band (part 95 of this chapter); (aa) The Local... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Spectrum Leasing Scope and Authority § 1.9005 Included services. The spectrum leasing policies and rules of this subpart apply to...

  20. Nuclear Chemistry: Include It in Your Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwood, Charles H.; Sheline, R. K.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the topics that might be included in a nuclear chemistry section are explored. Offers radioactivity, closed shells in nuclei, energy of nuclear processes, nuclear reactions, and fission and fusion as topics of interest. Provided are ideas and examples for each. (MVL)

  1. 46 CFR 289.2 - Vessels included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the Merchant Marine Act, 1936, as amended; (c) All vessels which have previously been constructed with... Merchant Marine Act of 1936, as amended, and later adjusted in price pursuant to section 9 of the Merchant... ADJUSTED UNDER THE MERCHANT SHIP SALES ACT 1946 § 289.2 Vessels included. Vessels subject to the...

  2. Multicultural Resources: Including Technology and the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Bryan

    2004-01-01

    In the fourteen years since the 1990 MENC pre-conference symposium on Multicultural Approaches to Music Education in Washington, D.C., music educators have come to recognize the need to include a variety of world musics in all music curricula, from elementary classrooms to advanced performing ensembles. Accordingly, a significant increase in the…

  3. 13 CFR 125.1 - Programs included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 125.1 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING PROGRAMS § 125.1 Programs included. The regulations in this part relate to the Government contracting assistance... businesses in obtaining a fair share of Federal Government contracts, subcontracts, and property sales....

  4. 13 CFR 125.1 - Programs included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 125.1 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING PROGRAMS § 125.1 Programs included. The regulations in this part relate to the Government contracting assistance... businesses in obtaining a fair share of Federal Government contracts, subcontracts, and property sales....

  5. 13 CFR 125.1 - Programs included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 125.1 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING PROGRAMS § 125.1 Programs included. The regulations in this part relate to the Government contracting assistance... businesses in obtaining a fair share of Federal Government contracts, subcontracts, and property sales....

  6. 13 CFR 125.1 - Programs included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 125.1 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING PROGRAMS § 125.1 Programs included. The regulations in this part relate to the Government contracting assistance... businesses in obtaining a fair share of Federal Government contracts, subcontracts, and property sales....

  7. Including Children Dependent on Ventilators in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Jack M.

    1996-01-01

    Guidelines for including ventilator-dependent children in school are offered, based on experience with six such students at a New York State school. Guidelines stress adherence to the medical management plan, the school-family partnership, roles of the social worker and psychologist, orientation, transportation, classroom issues, and steps toward…

  8. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... body organ or external body member (including contiguous tissue) or replace all or part of the...

  9. Including Students with Visual Impairments: Softball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brian, Ali; Haegele, Justin A.

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that while students with visual impairments are likely to be included in general physical education programs, they may not be as active as their typically developing peers. This article provides ideas for equipment modifications and game-like progressions for one popular physical education unit, softball. The purpose of these…

  10. PAX5-positive plasma cell myeloma with t(9;14;11)(p13;q32;q13), a novel complex variant translocation of t(11;14)(q13;q32) and t(9;14)(p13;q32).

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuyuki; Sakai, Hirotaka; Kato, Masayuki; Nishio, Yuji; Tsuruoka, Yuka; Uemura, Yu; Yokoi, Satoshi; Saito, Tasuku; Matsunawa, Manabu; Suzuki, Yoshinori; Isobe, Yasushi; Inoue, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Masatomo; Miura, Ikuo

    2015-06-01

    We describe herein the case of a 64-year-old man with a diagnosis of plasma cell myeloma (PCM). A chromosome analysis based on G-banding and spectral karyotyping revealed the following complex karyotype: 46,XY,del(3)(p?), t(4;15)(q31;q24),t(9;14;11)(p13;q32;q13),add(15)(q24),add(18)(q21). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) detected one signal each for the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) and cyclin D1 (CCND1) genes, and three fusion signals of IGH and CCND1. FISH analysis of metaphase spreads revealed fusion signals on the derivative chromosomes 9, 11, and 14. Immunohistochemical analysis identified abnormal expression of CCND1 and PAX5. PAX5-positive PCM is rare because the down-regulation of PAX5 is essential for the terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a novel complex variant translocation of t(11;14)(q13;q32) and t(9;14)(p13;q32).

  11. [Biophysical Characterization of Biopharmaceuticals, Including Antibody Drugs].

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals, including antibody drugs, are now popular because of their high specificity with low adverse effects, especially in the treatment of cancer and autoimmune diseases. However, because the active pharmaceutical ingredients of biopharmaceuticals are proteins, biophysical characterization of these therapeutic proteins should be required. In this manuscript, methods of chemical and physical characterization of therapeutic proteins are described. In terms of chemical characterization, analysis of chemical modifications of the constituent amino acids is explained. Physical characterization includes higher order structural analysis and assessment of protein aggregates. Quantification methods of aggregates with different sizes, recently encouraged by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), are introduced. As for the stability of therapeutic proteins, the importance of chemical and physical stability is explained. Finally, the contribution of colloidal and structural stability to the production of an antibody drug less prone to aggregation is introduced.

  12. Subterranean barriers including at least one weld

    DOEpatents

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Sloan, Paul A.; Richardson, John G.; Walsh, Stephanie; Kostelnik, Kevin M.

    2007-01-09

    A subterranean barrier and method for forming same are disclosed, the barrier including a plurality of casing strings wherein at least one casing string of the plurality of casing strings may be affixed to at least another adjacent casing string of the plurality of casing strings through at least one weld, at least one adhesive joint, or both. A method and system for nondestructively inspecting a subterranean barrier is disclosed. For instance, a radiographic signal may be emitted from within a casing string toward an adjacent casing string and the radiographic signal may be detected from within the adjacent casing string. A method of repairing a barrier including removing at least a portion of a casing string and welding a repair element within the casing string is disclosed. A method of selectively heating at least one casing string forming at least a portion of a subterranean barrier is disclosed.

  13. Photoactive devices including porphyrinoids with coordinating additives

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Yu, Eric K; Thompson, Mark E; Trinh, Cong; Whited, Matthew; Diev, Vlacheslav

    2015-05-12

    Coordinating additives are included in porphyrinoid-based materials to promote intermolecular organization and improve one or more photoelectric characteristics of the materials. The coordinating additives are selected from fullerene compounds and organic compounds having free electron pairs. Combinations of different coordinating additives can be used to tailor the characteristic properties of such porphyrinoid-based materials, including porphyrin oligomers. Bidentate ligands are one type of coordinating additive that can form coordination bonds with a central metal ion of two different porphyrinoid compounds to promote porphyrinoid alignment and/or pi-stacking. The coordinating additives can shift the absorption spectrum of a photoactive material toward higher wavelengths, increase the external quantum efficiency of the material, or both.

  14. Power generation method including membrane separation

    DOEpatents

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

  15. New STD recommendations include HIV management.

    PubMed

    1998-03-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has updated its 1993 guidelines for STDs, adding new recommendations for treating primary and recurrent genital warts and for managing patients with asymptomatic HIV infection. The guidelines grew out of research into microbiologic cures, alleviating signs and symptoms, preventing sequelae, and preventing transmission. The guidelines recommend that people seeking treatment for STDs should be offered HIV testing and counseling. Results of a recent Alan Guttmacher Institute study of STD public health programs are included.

  16. Temporary agency contracts: what should they include?

    PubMed

    Sferrella, Sheila M

    2002-01-01

    The AHRA Board committed to provide some tools to help our members with agency contracts. This article provides the sections for a contract and what they should include. Of course, the language will have to comply with your organization's requirements. To comply with HIPAA regulations for contracts, I've also included language for business associates. JCAHO requires that the following documentation be on file for all contracted personnel: 1. Hospital job description or formal contract outlining the job responsibilities. 2. All licenses, certifications and registrations are reviewed and a process is developed to ensure that they remain current. 3. Competency is evaluated and maintained. 4. Evidence that personnel received a general orientation. 5. Evidence that personnel received a departmental orientation. 6. Safety and infection control standards must be met. In order to aid with compliance when utilizing contracted personnel, my organization developed a Contractor Personnel Administrative Compliance Checklist, which identifies requirements for compliance, a reference for assistance, and places to record that the requirement has been met for each of the areas listed in the previous item. Our standard contract includes sections on general definition of engagement, credentials and work experience; health, including immunization and drug testing; corporation; JCAHO; terms of the contract; and, non-disclosure of information. A business associate agreement may be necessary to comply with HIPAA regulations. Using the template has made my job much easier than trying to read each contract that crosses my desk. If an agency refuses to sign our contract, then we do not conduct business with that company. If an agency requests changes to the contract, depending on the language, we may or may not agree to it. This information is not intended to be legal advice, but rather an educational overview. As with any contract, the reader should consult with legal counsel at his or her

  17. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  18. Temporary agency contracts: what should they include?

    PubMed

    Sferrella, Sheila M

    2002-01-01

    The AHRA Board committed to provide some tools to help our members with agency contracts. This article provides the sections for a contract and what they should include. Of course, the language will have to comply with your organization's requirements. To comply with HIPAA regulations for contracts, I've also included language for business associates. JCAHO requires that the following documentation be on file for all contracted personnel: 1. Hospital job description or formal contract outlining the job responsibilities. 2. All licenses, certifications and registrations are reviewed and a process is developed to ensure that they remain current. 3. Competency is evaluated and maintained. 4. Evidence that personnel received a general orientation. 5. Evidence that personnel received a departmental orientation. 6. Safety and infection control standards must be met. In order to aid with compliance when utilizing contracted personnel, my organization developed a Contractor Personnel Administrative Compliance Checklist, which identifies requirements for compliance, a reference for assistance, and places to record that the requirement has been met for each of the areas listed in the previous item. Our standard contract includes sections on general definition of engagement, credentials and work experience; health, including immunization and drug testing; corporation; JCAHO; terms of the contract; and, non-disclosure of information. A business associate agreement may be necessary to comply with HIPAA regulations. Using the template has made my job much easier than trying to read each contract that crosses my desk. If an agency refuses to sign our contract, then we do not conduct business with that company. If an agency requests changes to the contract, depending on the language, we may or may not agree to it. This information is not intended to be legal advice, but rather an educational overview. As with any contract, the reader should consult with legal counsel at his or her

  19. Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide

    DOEpatents

    Rouse, Carl A.; Simnad, Massoud T.

    1981-01-01

    An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

  20. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Snitchler, Gregory L.; Gamble, Bruce B.; Voccio, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  1. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Izarzugaza, Isabel; Jaal, Jana; Treasure, Tom; Foschi, Roberto; Ricardi, Umberto; Groen, Harry; Tavilla, Andrea; Ardanaz, Eva

    2012-05-01

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002, registered in 89 population-based cancer registries (CRs) and followed-up to 31st December 2003. Over 17,688 cases of rare thoracic cancers were selected based on the list of the RACECARE project. Mesothelioma was the most common tumour (19 per million per year) followed by epithelial tumours of the trachea and thymus (1.3 and 1.7, respectively). The age standardised incidence rates of epithelial tumours of the trachea was double in Eastern and Southern Europe versus the other European regions: 2 per million per year. Epithelial tumours of the thymus had the lowest incidence in Northern and Eastern Europe and UK and Ireland(1) and somewhat higher incidence in Central and Southern Europe.(2) Highest incidence in mesothelioma was seen in UK and Ireland(23) and lowest in Eastern Europe.(4) Patients with tumours of the thymus had the best prognosis (1-year survival 85%, 66% at 5 years). Five year survival was lowest for the mesothelioma 5% compared to 14% of patients with tumours of the trachea. Mesothelioma was the most prevalent rare cancer (12,000 cases), followed by thymus (7000) and trachea (1400). Cancer Registry (CR) data play an important role in revealing the burden of rare thoracic cancers and monitoring the effect of regulations on asbestos use and smoking related policies.

  2. [Two cases of anaerobic empyema including Actinomyces].

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yukiko; Ishikawa, Satoru; Takiguchi, Yasuo

    2009-03-01

    We report 2 cases of empyema including Actinomyces spp. Case 1 was a 66-year-old man with fever and left pleural effusion, Actinomyces israelii and 2 other microbes were isolated. Case 2 was a 52-year-old male inpatient who developed empyema during treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Actinomyces odontolyticus and 3 other microbes were cultured in pleural effusion. Empyema caused by Actinomyces spp. is rare, in particular Actinomyces odontolyticus is rarely isolated and only 4 cases have been reported in Japan.

  3. Inverse transonic airfoil design including viscous interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical technique was developed for the analysis of specified transonic airfoils or for the design of airfoils having a prescribed pressure distribution, including the effect of weak viscous interaction. The method uses the full potential equation, a stretched Cartesian coordinate system, and the Nash-MacDonald turbulent boundary layer method. Comparisons with experimental data for typical transonic airfoils show excellent agreement. An example shows the application of the method to design a thick aft-cambered airfoil, and the effects of viscous interaction on its performance are discussed.

  4. View of northeastern Italy including Venice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A near vertical view of northeastern Italy including the Venice (Venezia) area is seen in this Skylab 3 Earth Resources Experiments Package S190-B (five-inch earth terrain camera) infrared photograph taken from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. The mountainous area is the Dolomite Alps. The most conspicuous stream northeast of Venice is the Piave River. The city near the center of the picture on the Brenta River is Bassano del Grappa. The large city of Padua (Padova) is on the western bank of the Grenta near the clock.

  5. Multiverse rate equation including bubble collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Michael P.

    2013-03-01

    The volume fractions of vacua in an eternally inflating multiverse are described by a coarse-grain rate equation, which accounts for volume expansion and vacuum transitions via bubble formation. We generalize the rate equation to account for bubble collisions, including the possibility of classical transitions. Classical transitions can modify the details of the hierarchical structure among the volume fractions, with potential implications for the staggering and Boltzmann-brain issues. Whether or not our vacuum is likely to have been established by a classical transition depends on the detailed relationships among transition rates in the landscape.

  6. Ocean management plan includes array of recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    When U.S. President Bill Clinton and Vice President Al Gore appeared in Monterey, California in June 1998 for a National Oceans Conference, some of the salt water spray from the Pacific Ocean must have clung to them.As a follow-up to the conference, the Clinton Administration on September 2 issued an interagency report to help guide federal efforts in establishing a comprehensive ocean policy.The report, which touches upon a number of global issues including the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, contains nearly 150 recommendations.

  7. Fuel delivery system including heat exchanger means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffinberry, G. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A fuel delivery system is presented wherein first and second heat exchanger means are each adapted to provide the transfer of heat between the fuel and a second fluid such as lubricating oil associated with the gas turbine engine. Valve means are included which are operative in a first mode to provide for flow of the second fluid through both first and second heat exchange means and further operative in a second mode for bypassing the second fluid around the second heat exchanger means.

  8. Inlet Guide Vane Wakes Including Rotor Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, R. T.; Fleeter, S.

    2001-02-01

    Fundamental experiments are described directed at the investigation of forcing functions generated by an inlet guide vane (IGV) row, including interactions with the downstream rotor, for application to turbomachine forced response design systems. The experiments are performed in a high-speed research fan facility comprised of an IGV row upstream of a rotor. IGV-rotor axial spacing is variable, with the IGV row able to be indexed circumferentially, thereby allowing measurements to be made across several IGV wakes. With an IGV relative Mach number of 0.29, measurements include the IGV wake pressure and velocity fields for three IGV-rotor axial spacings. The decay characteristics of the IGV wakes are compared to the Majjigi and Gliebe empirical correlations. After Fourier decomposition, a vortical-potential gust splitting analysis is implemented to determine the vortical and potential harmonic wake gust forcing functions both upstream and downstream of the rotor. Higher harmonics of the vortical gust component of the IGV wakes are found to decay at a uniform rate due to viscous diffusion.

  9. Models of bovine babesiosis including juvenile cattle.

    PubMed

    Saad-Roy, C M; Shuai, Zhisheng; van den Driessche, P

    2015-03-01

    Bovine Babesiosis in cattle is caused by the transmission of protozoa of Babesia spp. by ticks as vectors. Juvenile cattle (<9 months of age) have resistance to Bovine Babesiosis, rarely show symptoms, and acquire immunity upon recovery. Susceptibility to the disease varies between breeds of cattle. Models of the dynamics of Bovine Babesiosis transmitted by the cattle tick that include these factors are formulated as systems of ordinary differential equations. Basic reproduction numbers are calculated, and it is proved that if these numbers are below the threshold value of one, then Bovine Babesiosis dies out. However, above the threshold number of one, the disease may approach an endemic state. In this case, control measures are suggested by determining target reproduction numbers. The percentage of a particular population (for example, the adult bovine population) needed to be controlled to eradicate the disease is evaluated numerically using Columbia data from the literature. PMID:25715822

  10. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOEpatents

    DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

    2007-03-06

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  11. Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter

    DOEpatents

    Baldasaro, Paul F.

    1999-01-01

    A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

  12. Education Program on Fossil Resources Including Coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usami, Masahiro

    Fossil fuels including coal play a key role as crucial energies in contributing to economic development in Asia. On the other hand, its limited quantity and the environmental problems causing from its usage have become a serious global issue and a countermeasure to solve such problems is very much demanded. Along with the pursuit of sustainable development, environmentally-friendly use of highly efficient fossil resources should be therefore, accompanied. Kyushu-university‧s sophisticated research through long years of accumulated experience on the fossil resources and environmental sectors together with the advanced large-scale commercial and empirical equipments will enable us to foster cooperative research and provide internship program for the future researchers. Then, this program is executed as a consignment business from the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry from 2007 fiscal year to 2009 fiscal year. The lecture that uses the textbooks developed by this program is scheduled to be started a course in fiscal year 2010.

  13. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

    2007-11-20

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  14. Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Nannan, N. R.; Guardone, A.; Colonna, P.

    2014-02-15

    From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

  15. Including eddies in global ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semtner, Albert J.; Chervin, Robert M.

    The ocean is a turbulent fluid that is driven by winds and by surface exchanges of heat and moisture. It is as important as the atmosphere in governing climate through heat distribution, but so little is known about the ocean that it remains a “final frontier” on the face of the Earth. Many ocean currents are truly global in extent, such as the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the “conveyor belt” that connects the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans by flows around the southern tips of Africa and South America. It has long been a dream of some oceanographers to supplement the very limited observational knowledge by reconstructing the currents of the world ocean from the first principles of physics on a computer. However, until very recently, the prospect of doing this was thwarted by the fact that fluctuating currents known as “mesoscale eddies” could not be explicitly included in the calculation.

  16. Analysis of Smart Composite Structures Including Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Seeley, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    Smart composite structures with distributed sensors and actuators have the capability to actively respond to a changing environment while offering significant weight savings and additional passive controllability through ply tailoring. Piezoelectric sensing and actuation of composite laminates is the most promising concept due to the static and dynamic control capabilities. Essential to the implementation of these smart composites are the development of accurate and efficient modeling techniques and experimental validation. This research addresses each of these important topics. A refined higher order theory is developed to model composite structures with surface bonded or embedded piezoelectric transducers. These transducers are used as both sensors and actuators for closed loop control. The theory accurately captures the transverse shear deformation through the thickness of the smart composite laminate while satisfying stress free boundary conditions on the free surfaces. The theory is extended to include the effect of debonding at the actuator-laminate interface. The developed analytical model is implemented using the finite element method utilizing an induced strain approach for computational efficiency. This allows general laminate geometries and boundary conditions to be analyzed. The state space control equations are developed to allow flexibility in the design of the control system. Circuit concepts are also discussed. Static and dynamic results of smart composite structures, obtained using the higher order theory, are correlated with available analytical data. Comparisons, including debonded laminates, are also made with a general purpose finite element code and available experimental data. Overall, very good agreement is observed. Convergence of the finite element implementation of the higher order theory is shown with exact solutions. Additional results demonstrate the utility of the developed theory to study piezoelectric actuation of composite

  17. Full potential unsteady computations including aeroelastic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, Vijaya; Ide, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    A unified formulation is presented based on the full potential framework coupled with an appropriate structural model to compute steady and unsteady flows over rigid and flexible configurations across the Mach number range. The unsteady form of the full potential equation in conservation form is solved using an implicit scheme maintaining time accuracy through internal Newton iterations. A flux biasing procedure based on the unsteady sonic reference conditions is implemented to compute hyperbolic regions with moving sonic and shock surfaces. The wake behind a trailing edge is modeled using a mathematical cut across which the pressure is satisfied to be continuous by solving an appropriate vorticity convection equation. An aeroelastic model based on the generalized modal deflection approach interacts with the nonlinear aerodynamics and includes both static as well as dynamic structural analyses capability. Results are presented for rigid and flexible configurations at different Mach numbers ranging from subsonic to supersonic conditions. The dynamic response of a flexible wing below and above its flutter point is demonstrated.

  18. Engine lubrication circuit including two pumps

    DOEpatents

    Lane, William H.

    2006-10-03

    A lubrication pump coupled to the engine is sized such that the it can supply the engine with a predetermined flow volume as soon as the engine reaches a peak torque engine speed. In engines that operate predominately at speeds above the peak torque engine speed, the lubrication pump is often producing lubrication fluid in excess of the predetermined flow volume that is bypassed back to a lubrication fluid source. This arguably results in wasted power. In order to more efficiently lubricate an engine, a lubrication circuit includes a lubrication pump and a variable delivery pump. The lubrication pump is operably coupled to the engine, and the variable delivery pump is in communication with a pump output controller that is operable to vary a lubrication fluid output from the variable delivery pump as a function of at least one of engine speed and lubrication flow volume or system pressure. Thus, the lubrication pump can be sized to produce the predetermined flow volume at a speed range at which the engine predominately operates while the variable delivery pump can supplement lubrication fluid delivery from the lubrication pump at engine speeds below the predominant engine speed range.

  19. Future ultraviolet experiments, including FUSE/COLUMBUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggess, A.

    1984-01-01

    Several new facilities for ultraviolet astronomy are under construction or study for launch within the coming decade. These include the Hubble Space Telescope to be launched in 1986 with instruments for spectroscopy, imaging, and photopolarimetry in the ultraviolet; the ASTRO Spacelab payload, also to be launched in 1986 with a similar range of instrumentation; STARLAB, a combined Canadian, Australian and U.S. mission concentrating primarily on imagery; and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), which was renamed COLUMBUS. COLUMBUS is currently under study by NASA and ESA as a future joint mission for spectroscopic studies of astrophysical plasmas covering a temperature range from approximately 10 to the 3rd power to approximately 10 to the 7th power k. In order to achieve this objective, the optics should be optimized for wavelengths below 1200 Angstroms, with a total wavelength range from approximately 2000 to approximately 100 Angstroms. The operational concept will be based on experience with IUE, but changes in communications techniques since IUE was designed suggest some interesting new approaches to observing.

  20. [Contracts including performance and management of uncertainty].

    PubMed

    Duru, G; Garassus, P; Auray, J-P

    2013-09-01

    Since many decades in France, the most important part of ambulatory health care expenditure is represented by drug consumption. By the fact, French patient is indeed the greatest world consumer of pharmaceuticals treatments. Therefore, the regulation authorities by successive strategies, attempt to limit or even restrict market access for new drugs in the health care sector secured by public social insurance coverage. Common objectives are to assess the reimbursement to scientific studies and to fix the price of therapeutics at an acceptable level for both industries and government. New trends try then to determine recently the drug price in a dual approach, as a component of global and effective contract, including performance and outcome. The first diffusion authorization is diffusion concerned, but this concept takes into account the eventual success of new produces in long-term survey. Signed for a fixed period as reciprocal partnership between regulation authorities and pharmaceutics industries, the contract integrates two dimensions of incertitude. The first one is represented by the strategy of new treatments development according to efficacy and adapted price, and the second one is linked to the result of diffusion and determines adapted rules if eventual non-respects of the previous engagement are registered. This paper discusses problems related to this new dimension of incertitude affected by conditional drug prices in market access strategy and the adapted follow-up of new treatment diffusion fixed by "outcome" contract between French regulation administration and pharmaceutics industries in our recent economic context. PMID:24075704

  1. [Contracts including performance and management of uncertainty].

    PubMed

    Duru, G; Garassus, P; Auray, J-P

    2013-09-01

    Since many decades in France, the most important part of ambulatory health care expenditure is represented by drug consumption. By the fact, French patient is indeed the greatest world consumer of pharmaceuticals treatments. Therefore, the regulation authorities by successive strategies, attempt to limit or even restrict market access for new drugs in the health care sector secured by public social insurance coverage. Common objectives are to assess the reimbursement to scientific studies and to fix the price of therapeutics at an acceptable level for both industries and government. New trends try then to determine recently the drug price in a dual approach, as a component of global and effective contract, including performance and outcome. The first diffusion authorization is diffusion concerned, but this concept takes into account the eventual success of new produces in long-term survey. Signed for a fixed period as reciprocal partnership between regulation authorities and pharmaceutics industries, the contract integrates two dimensions of incertitude. The first one is represented by the strategy of new treatments development according to efficacy and adapted price, and the second one is linked to the result of diffusion and determines adapted rules if eventual non-respects of the previous engagement are registered. This paper discusses problems related to this new dimension of incertitude affected by conditional drug prices in market access strategy and the adapted follow-up of new treatment diffusion fixed by "outcome" contract between French regulation administration and pharmaceutics industries in our recent economic context.

  2. Articles including thin film monolayers and multilayers

    DOEpatents

    Li, DeQuan; Swanson, Basil I.

    1995-01-01

    Articles of manufacture including: (a) a base substrate having an oxide surface layer, and a multidentate ligand, capable of binding a metal ion, attached to the oxide surface layer of the base substrate, (b) a base substrate having an oxide surface layer, a multidentate ligand, capable of binding a metal ion, attached to the oxide surface layer of the base substrate, and a metal species attached to the multidentate ligand, (c) a base substrate having an oxide surface layer, a multidentate ligand, capable of binding a metal ion, attached to the oxide surface layer of the base substrate, a metal species attached to the multidentate ligand, and a multifunctional organic ligand attached to the metal species, and (d) a base substrate having an oxide surface layer, a multidentate ligand, capable of binding a metal ion, attached to the oxide surface layer of the base substrate, a metal species attached to the multidentate ligand, a multifunctional organic ligand attached to the metal species, and a second metal species attached to the multifunctional organic ligand, are provided, such articles useful in detecting the presence of a selected target species, as nonliear optical materials, or as scavengers for selected target species.

  3. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    The dilemma of designing an advanced undergraduate laboratory lies in the desire to teach and reinforce basic principles and techniques while at the same time exposing students to the excitement of research. We report here on a one-semester, project-based biochemistry laboratory that combines the best features of a cookbook approach (high success rate, achievement of defined goals) with those of an investigative, discovery-based approach (student involvement in the experimental design, excitement of real research). Individual modules may be selected and combined to meet the needs of different courses and different institutions. The central theme of this lab is protein purification and design. This laboratory accompanies the first semester of biochemistry (Structure and Function of Macromolecules, a course taken mainly by junior and senior chemistry and biological chemistry majors). The protein chosen as the object of study is the enzyme lysozyme, which is utilized in all projects. It is suitable for a student lab because it is easily and inexpensively obtained from egg white and is extremely stable, and its high isoelectric point (pI = 11) allows for efficient separation from other proteins by ion-exchange chromatography. Furthermore, a literature search conducted by the resourceful student reveals a wealth of information, since lysozyme has been the subject of numerous studies. It was the first enzyme whose structure was determined by crystallography (1). Hendrickson et al. (2) have previously described an intensive one-month laboratory course centered around lysozyme, although their emphasis is on protein stability rather than purification and engineering. Lysozyme continues to be the focus of much exciting new work on protein folding and dynamics, structure and activity (3 - 5). This lab course includes the following features: (i) reinforcement of basic techniques, such as preparation of buffers, simple enzyme kinetics, and absorption spectroscopy; (ii

  4. SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    C. Tsang

    2004-09-22

    The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to

  5. Bone-targeting radiopharmaceuticals including radium-223.

    PubMed

    Brady, Darren; Parker, Chris C; O'Sullivan, Joe M

    2013-01-01

    Bone-seeking radionuclides including samarium-153 ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate and strontium-89 have been used for decades in the palliation of pain from bone metastases especially from prostate cancer. Emerging evidence of improved survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) with the first-in-class α-radionuclide, radium-223 (Ra) has rekindled interest in the role of bone-seeking radionuclide therapy.We review the literature for randomized controlled trials of bone-seeking radionuclides and explore some of the issues regarding the optimal use of these agents. In particular, we discuss dose, dose rate, radiobiology, and quality of radiation and postulate on potential future directions in particular combination schedules. β-Emitting, bone-seeking radionuclides have proven ability to control pain in prostate cancer metastatic to bone with pain response rates in the order of 60% to 70% when used as single agents. Most of the published trials were underpowered to detect differences in survival; however, there is evidence of the potential for disease modification when these agents are used in combination with chemotherapy or in multiple cycles.Data from the recent phase III ALSYMPCA trial that compared Ra to placebo in symptomatic CRPC demonstrate a significant improvement in median overall survival of 3.6 months for patients with symptomatic CRPC metastatic to bone treated with 6 cycles of the α-emitting radionuclide Ra compared with placebo. The success of Ra in improving survival in CRPC will lead this agent to become part of the treatment paradigm for this disease, and with such an excellent safety profile, Ra has huge potential in combination strategies as well as for use earlier in the natural history of metastatic prostate cancer.

  6. Compact Radar Transceiver with Included Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLinden, Matthew; Rincon, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    The Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Radar (DBSAR) is an eight-channel phased array radar system that employs solid-state radar transceivers, a microstrip patch antenna, and a reconfigurable waveform generator and processor unit. The original DBSAR transceiver design utilizes connectorized electronic components that tend to be physically large and heavy. To achieve increased functionality in a smaller volume, PCB (printed circuit board) transceivers were designed to replace the large connectorized transceivers. One of the most challenging problems designing the transceivers in a PCB format was achieving proper performance in the calibration path. For a radar loop-back calibration path, a portion of the transmit signal is coupled out of the antenna feed and fed back into the receiver. This is achieved using passive components for stability and repeatability. Some signal also leaks through the receive path. As these two signal paths are correlated via an unpredictable phase, the leakage through the receive path during transmit must be 30 dB below the calibration path. For DBSAR s design, this requirement called for a 100-dB isolation in the receiver path during transmit. A total of 16 solid-state L-band transceivers on a PCB format were designed. The transceivers include frequency conversion stages, T/R switching, and a calibration path capable of measuring the transmit power-receiver gain product during transmit for pulse-by-pulse calibration or matched filtering. In particular, this calibration path achieves 100-dB isolation between the transmitted signal and the low-noise amplifier through the use of a switching network and a section of physical walls achieving attenuation of radiated leakage. The transceivers were designed in microstrip PCBs with lumped elements and individually packaged components for compactness. Each transceiver was designed on a single PCB with a custom enclosure providing interior walls and compartments to isolate transceiver

  7. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    The dilemma of designing an advanced undergraduate laboratory lies in the desire to teach and reinforce basic principles and techniques while at the same time exposing students to the excitement of research. We report here on a one-semester, project-based biochemistry laboratory that combines the best features of a cookbook approach (high success rate, achievement of defined goals) with those of an investigative, discovery-based approach (student involvement in the experimental design, excitement of real research). Individual modules may be selected and combined to meet the needs of different courses and different institutions. The central theme of this lab is protein purification and design. This laboratory accompanies the first semester of biochemistry (Structure and Function of Macromolecules, a course taken mainly by junior and senior chemistry and biological chemistry majors). The protein chosen as the object of study is the enzyme lysozyme, which is utilized in all projects. It is suitable for a student lab because it is easily and inexpensively obtained from egg white and is extremely stable, and its high isoelectric point (pI = 11) allows for efficient separation from other proteins by ion-exchange chromatography. Furthermore, a literature search conducted by the resourceful student reveals a wealth of information, since lysozyme has been the subject of numerous studies. It was the first enzyme whose structure was determined by crystallography (1). Hendrickson et al. (2) have previously described an intensive one-month laboratory course centered around lysozyme, although their emphasis is on protein stability rather than purification and engineering. Lysozyme continues to be the focus of much exciting new work on protein folding and dynamics, structure and activity (3 - 5). This lab course includes the following features: (i) reinforcement of basic techniques, such as preparation of buffers, simple enzyme kinetics, and absorption spectroscopy; (ii

  8. 76 FR 35026 - Hutchinson Technology, Inc., Including On-Site Workers Leased From Doherty, Including Workers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... Doherty, Plymouth, Minnesota. The notice was published in the Federal Register on November 5, 2009 (74 FR... Doherty, Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are Paid Through Aramark Business Facilities, LLC, Hutchinson, MN; Hutchinson Technology, Inc., Including On-Site Workers Leased From...

  9. Ionic liquids, electrolyte solutions including the ionic liquids, and energy storage devices including the ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Gering, Kevin L.; Harrup, Mason K.; Rollins, Harry W.

    2015-12-08

    An ionic liquid including a phosphazene compound that has a plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units and at least one pendant group bonded to each phosphorus atom of the plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units. One pendant group of the at least one pendant group comprises a positively charged pendant group. Additional embodiments of ionic liquids are disclosed, as are electrolyte solutions and energy storage devices including the embodiments of the ionic liquid.

  10. The Utility of Including the Strengths of Underage Drinking Laws in Determining Their Effect on Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Fell, James C.; Scherer, Michael; Voas, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background To control underage drinking in the United States, which has been associated with an estimated 5,000 deaths and 2.6 million injuries or other harm annually, each state has developed a unique set of laws. Previous research examining these laws’ effectiveness has frequently focused on the laws’ existence without considering variance in sanctions, enforcement, or exemptions. Methods We scored 20 minimum legal drinking age 21 (MLDA-21) laws for their strengths and weaknesses based on (1) sanctions for violating the law, (2) exceptions or exemptions affecting application, and (3) provisions affecting the law or enforcement. We then replicated a 2009 study of the effects of six MLDA-21 laws in three different ways (using identical structural equation modeling): Study 1—eight additional years of data, no law strengths; Study 2—years from the original study, added law strengths; Study 3—additional years, law strengths, serving as an update of the six laws’ effects. Results In all three studies—and the original study—keg registration laws were associated with both an unexpected significant increase (+11%, p < .001) in underage drinking-driver ratios and a notable 25% reduction in per capita beer consumption—opposing results that are difficult to explain. In Study 3, possession and purchase laws were associated with a significant decrease in underage drinking-driver fatal crash ratios (−4.9%, p < .001; −3.6%, p < .001, respectively). Similarly, zero tolerance and use and lose laws were associated with reductions in underage drinking-driver ratios (−2.8%, p < .001; −5.3%, p < .001, respectively). Conclusions Including strengths and weaknesses of underage drinking laws is important when examining their effects on various outcomes as the model fit statistics indicated. We suggest that this will result in more accurate and more reliable estimates of the impact of the laws on various outcome measures. PMID:26148047

  11. Consistent chromosome abnormalities including double minutes (dms) in adenocarcinoma of the pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, C.A.; Morsberger, L.; Ellingham, T.

    1994-09-01

    Little is known about the somatic genetic changes which characterize pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PA), and identification of acquired genomic alterations would further our understanding of the biology of this neoplasm. We have studied 62 primary specimens of PA using classical and FISH methods. Clonally abnormal karyotypes were observed in 44 neoplasms. Karyotypes were generally complex (greater than 3 abnormalities) including both numerical and structural chromosome changes. Many tumors contained at least one marker chromosome. The most frequent whole chromosomal gains were chromosomes 20 (7 tumors) and 7 (5 tumors). Losses were much more frequent: chromosome 18 was lost in 22 tumors, followed by chromosomes 13 (15 tumors), 12 (13 tumors), and 6 (12 tumors). Structural abnormalities were common. 200 chromosome breakpoints were identified. Excluding Robertsonian translocations, chromosomal arms most frequently involved were 6q (12 chromosomes), 1p and 3p (10 each), 11p and 17p (9 each), 1q (8), 8p and 19q (7 each). Of particular interest, we found dms in 6 cases. These represent the first PAs with cytogenetic evidence of gene amplification, and are under investigation using chromosome microdissection. To begin to define the smallest region of 6q which is deleted, 5 tumors with 6q deletions were hybridized with a biotin-labeled probe, made by microdissection of 6q24-qter. Loss of one copy of this region was verified in 4/5 tumors; additional probes are being made. Our results are similar to those of 34 other reported PAs, and the combined data suggest that gains of chromosomes 7 and 20 and deletions and rearrangements of 1p and 6q may be particularly important in the biology of adenocarcinoma of the pancreas.

  12. Launch Lock Assemblies Including Axial Gap Amplification Devices and Spacecraft Isolation Systems Including the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, Tim Daniel (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor); Young, Ken (Inventor); Davis, Torey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments of a launch lock assembly are provided, as are embodiments of a spacecraft isolation system including one or more launch lock assemblies. In one embodiment, the launch lock assembly includes first and second mount pieces, a releasable clamp device, and an axial gap amplification device. The releasable clamp device normally maintains the first and second mount pieces in clamped engagement; and, when actuated, releases the first and second mount pieces from clamped engagement to allow relative axial motion there between. The axial gap amplification device normally residing in a blocking position wherein the gap amplification device obstructs relative axial motion between the first and second mount pieces. The axial gap amplification device moves into a non-blocking position when the first and second mount pieces are released from clamped engagement to increase the range of axial motion between the first and second mount pieces.

  13. Retinoic Acid Induced 1, RAI1: A Dosage Sensitive Gene Related to Neurobehavioral Alterations Including Autistic Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Mora, Paulina; Walz, Katherina

    2010-01-01

    Genomic structural changes, such as gene Copy Number Variations (CNVs) are extremely abundant in the human genome. An enormous effort is currently ongoing to recognize and catalogue human CNVs and their associations with abnormal phenotypic outcomes. Recently, several reports related neuropsychiatric diseases (i.e. autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, mental retardation, behavioral problems, epilepsy) with specific CNV. Moreover, for some conditions, both the deletion and duplication of the same genomic segment are related to the phenotype. Syndromes associated with CNVs (microdeletion and microduplication) have long been known to display specific neurobehavioral traits. It is important to note that not every gene is susceptible to gene dosage changes and there are only a few dosage sensitive genes. Smith-Magenis (SMS) and Potocki-Lupski (PTLS) syndromes are associated with a reciprocal microdeletion and microduplication within chromosome 17p11.2. in humans. The dosage sensitive gene responsible for most phenotypes in SMS has been identified: the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1). Studies on mouse models and humans suggest that RAI1 is likely the dosage sensitive gene responsible for clinical features in PTLS. In addition, the human RAI1 gene has been implicated in several neurobehavioral traits as spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA2), schizophrenia and non syndromic autism. In this review we discuss the evidence of RAI1 as a dosage sensitive gene, its relationship with different neurobehavioral traits, gene structure and mutations, and what is known about its molecular and cellular function, as a first step in the elucidation of the mechanisms that relate dosage sensitive genes with abnormal neurobehavioral outcomes. PMID:21629438

  14. Reduced Dietary Sodium Intake Increases Heart Rate. A Meta-Analysis of 63 Randomized Controlled Trials Including 72 Study Populations

    PubMed Central

    Graudal, Niels A.; Hubeck-Graudal, Thorbjørn; Jürgens, Gesche

    2016-01-01

    Reduced dietary sodium intake (sodium reduction) increases heart rate in some studies of animals and humans. As heart rate is independently associated with the development of heart failure and increased risk of premature death a potential increase in heart rate could be a harmful side-effect of sodium reduction. The purpose of the present meta-analysis was to investigate the effect of sodium reduction on heart rate. Relevant studies were retrieved from an updated pool of 176 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in the period 1973–2014. Sixty-three of the RCTs including 72 study populations reported data on heart rate. In a meta-analysis of these data sodium reduction increased heart rate with 1.65 beats per minute [95% CI: 1.19, 2.11], p < 0.00001, corresponding to 2.4% of the baseline heart rate. This effect was independent of baseline blood pressure. In conclusion sodium reduction increases heart rate by as much (2.4%) as it decreases blood pressure (2.5%). This side-effect, which may cause harmful health effects, contributes to the need for a revision of the present dietary guidelines. PMID:27047393

  15. Reduced Dietary Sodium Intake Increases Heart Rate. A Meta-Analysis of 63 Randomized Controlled Trials Including 72 Study Populations.

    PubMed

    Graudal, Niels A; Hubeck-Graudal, Thorbjørn; Jürgens, Gesche

    2016-01-01

    Reduced dietary sodium intake (sodium reduction) increases heart rate in some studies of animals and humans. As heart rate is independently associated with the development of heart failure and increased risk of premature death a potential increase in heart rate could be a harmful side-effect of sodium reduction. The purpose of the present meta-analysis was to investigate the effect of sodium reduction on heart rate. Relevant studies were retrieved from an updated pool of 176 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in the period 1973-2014. Sixty-three of the RCTs including 72 study populations reported data on heart rate. In a meta-analysis of these data sodium reduction increased heart rate with 1.65 beats per minute [95% CI: 1.19, 2.11], p < 0.00001, corresponding to 2.4% of the baseline heart rate. This effect was independent of baseline blood pressure. In conclusion sodium reduction increases heart rate by as much (2.4%) as it decreases blood pressure (2.5%). This side-effect, which may cause harmful health effects, contributes to the need for a revision of the present dietary guidelines.

  16. A child with an inherited 0.31 Mb microdeletion of chromosome 14q32.33: further delineation of a critical region for the 14q32 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Holder, J Lloyd; Lotze, Timothy E; Bacino, Carlos; Cheung, Sau-Wai

    2012-08-01

    Chromosome 14q32.3 deletions are uncommon, with most described patients harboring a ring chromosome 14. Only 15 deletions have been described not associated with ring formation or other complex chromosomal rearrangements. Here, we describe a child with the smallest deletion of chromosome 14q32.3 reported in the literature. This child's deletion encompasses at most 0.305 Mb and six genes including NUDT14, BRF1, BTBD6, PACS2, MTA1, and TEX22. He has similar clinical findings, including mild facial dysmorphisms and intellectual disability, as other individuals with much larger deletions of the terminus of the long arm of chromosome 14. This suggests that the genes deleted in our patient contribute to the 14q32 deletion syndrome.

  17. A 1 Mb-sized microdeletion Xq26.2 encompassing the GPC3 gene in a fetus with Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome Report, antenatal findings and review.

    PubMed

    Weichert, Jan; Schröer, Andreas; Amari, Feriel; Siebert, Reiner; Caliebe, Almuth; Nagel, Inga; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Mohrmann, Inga; Hellenbroich, Yorck

    2011-01-01

    Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) is a rare X-linked recessive disorder encompassing pre- and postnatal overgrowth and a variety of additional anomalies including craniofacial dysmorphism, macrocephaly, congenital heart defects and genitourinary anomalies. There is little published information regarding the prenatal presentation of SGBS in pregnancy. In the present report we describe the antenatal features of an affected fetus from 12 gestational weeks onwards, subsequently diagnosed with SGBS by molecular testing positive for GPC3 gene mutation.

  18. The human homologue of the Drosophila melanogaster flightless-I gene (fliI) maps within the Smith-Magenis microdeletion critical region in 17p11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.S.; Gunaratne, P.H.; Greenberg, F.; Shaffer, L.G.; Lupski, J.R.; Hoheisel, J.D.; Young, I.G.; Miklos, G.L.G.; Campbell, H.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) appears to be a contiguous-gene-deletion syndrome associated with a proximal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 17 in band p11.2. The spectrum of clinical findings includes short stature, brachydactyly, developmental delay, dysmorphic features, sleep disturbances, and behavioral problems. The complex phenotypic features suggest deletion of several contiguous genes. However, to date, no protein-encoding gene has been mapped to the SMS critical region. Recently, the Drosophila melanogaster flightless-I gene, fliI, and the homologous human cDNA have been isolated. Mutations in fliI result in loss of flight ability and, when severe, cause lethality due to incomplete cellularization with subsequent abnormal gastrulation. Here, we demonstrate that the human homologue (FLI) maps within the SMS critical region. Genomic cosmids were used as probes for FISH, which localized this gene to the 17p11.2 region. Somatic-cell hybrid-panel mapping further localized this gene to the SMS critical region. Southern blot analysis of somatic-cell hybrids and/or FISH analysis of lymphoblastoid cell lines from 12 SMS patients demonstrates the deletion of one copy of FLI in all SMS patients analyzed. 47 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. The human homologue of the Drosophila melanogaster flightless-I gene (fliI) maps within the Smith-Magenis microdeletion critical region in 17p11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.S.; Nguyen, D.; Greenberg, F.

    1994-09-01

    The Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) appears to be a contiguous gene deletion syndrome associated with a proximal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 17 in band p11.2. The spectrum of clinical findings includes short stature, brachydactyly, developmental delay, dysmorphic features, sleep disturbances and behavioral problems. The complex phenotypic features suggest deletion of several contiguous genes. However, to date no protein encoding gene has been mapped to the SMS critical region. Recently, Campbell described the cloning and characterization of D. melanogaster fli cDNAs and of homologous cDNAs from caenorhabditis elegans and from humans. Mutations in fliI result in loss of flight ability and, when severe, cause lethality due to incomplete cellularization with subsequent abnormal gastrulation. The amino acid sequence deduced from the FLI cDNA has 52% similarity to the human gelsolin protein and also has a N-terminal leucine-rich domain with 16 consecutive leucine-rich repeats (LRR). Here, we demonstrate that the human homologue (FLI) maps within the SMS critical region. Genomic cosmids were used as probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and localized this gene to the 17p11.2 region. Somatic cell hybrids and/or FISH analysis of lymphoblastoid cell lines form 12 SMS patients demonstrate that one copy of the FLI gene is deleted in all SMS patients analyzed with the common deletion. Further studies are required to determine if haploinsufficiency of FLI or other as yet unidentified genes is important for the expression of the SMS phenotype.

  20. Should Relational Aggression Be Included in DSM-V?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, Kate; Coyne, Claire; Lahey, Benjamin B.

    2008-01-01

    The study examines whether relational aggression should be included in DSM-V disruptive behavior disorders. The results conclude that some additional information is gathered from assessing relational aggression but not enough to be included in DSM-V.

  1. Emerging Contaminant Issues, Including Management Of Emerging Contaminants In Wastewater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emerging contaminants are receiving increasing media and scientific attention. These chemicals are sometimes referred to as compounds of emerging concern or trace organic compounds, and include several groups of chemicals including endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), and pha...

  2. 7 CFR 46.38 - Sundays and holidays included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sundays and holidays included. 46.38 Section 46.38 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Holidays § 46.38 Sundays and holidays included. Sundays and holidays shall be included in the...

  3. 7 CFR 46.38 - Sundays and holidays included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sundays and holidays included. 46.38 Section 46.38 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Holidays § 46.38 Sundays and holidays included. Sundays and holidays shall be included in the...

  4. 7 CFR 46.38 - Sundays and holidays included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sundays and holidays included. 46.38 Section 46.38 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Holidays § 46.38 Sundays and holidays included. Sundays and holidays shall be included in the...

  5. 7 CFR 46.38 - Sundays and holidays included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sundays and holidays included. 46.38 Section 46.38 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Holidays § 46.38 Sundays and holidays included. Sundays and holidays shall be included in the...

  6. 7 CFR 46.38 - Sundays and holidays included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sundays and holidays included. 46.38 Section 46.38 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Holidays § 46.38 Sundays and holidays included. Sundays and holidays shall be included in the...

  7. 20 CFR 220.114 - Evaluation of symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Evaluation of symptoms, including pain. 220... RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.114 Evaluation of symptoms, including pain...'s symptoms, including pain, and the extent to which the claimant's symptoms can reasonably...

  8. 20 CFR 220.114 - Evaluation of symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Evaluation of symptoms, including pain. 220... RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.114 Evaluation of symptoms, including pain...'s symptoms, including pain, and the extent to which the claimant's symptoms can reasonably...

  9. 20 CFR 220.114 - Evaluation of symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Evaluation of symptoms, including pain. 220... RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.114 Evaluation of symptoms, including pain...'s symptoms, including pain, and the extent to which the claimant's symptoms can reasonably...

  10. 20 CFR 220.114 - Evaluation of symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Evaluation of symptoms, including pain. 220... RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.114 Evaluation of symptoms, including pain...'s symptoms, including pain, and the extent to which the claimant's symptoms can reasonably...

  11. 20 CFR 220.114 - Evaluation of symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evaluation of symptoms, including pain. 220... RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.114 Evaluation of symptoms, including pain...'s symptoms, including pain, and the extent to which the claimant's symptoms can reasonably...

  12. Identification of Multiple DNA Copy Number Alterations Including Frequent 8p11.22 Amplification in Conjunctival Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Asnaghi, Laura; Alkatan, Hind; Mahale, Alka; Othman, Maha; Alwadani, Saeed; Al-Hussain, Hailah; Jastaneiah, Sabah; Yu, Wayne; Maktabi, Azza; Edward, Deepak P.; Eberhart, Charles G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Little is known about the molecular alterations that drive formation and growth of conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). We therefore sought to identify genetic changes that could be used as diagnostic markers or therapeutic targets. Methods. The DNA extracted from 10 snap-frozen cSCC tumor specimens and 2 in situ carcinomas was analyzed using array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), and further examined with NanoString and quantitative PCR. Results. The number of regions of DNA loss ranged from 1 to 23 per tumor, whereas gains and amplifications ranged from 1 to 15 per tumor. Most large regions of chromosomal gain and loss were confirmed by NanoString karyotype analysis. The commonest alteration was amplification of 8p11.22 in 9 tumors (75%), and quantitative PCR analysis revealed 100-fold or greater overexpression of ADAM3A mRNA from 8p11.22 locus. In addition, recurring losses were observed at 14q13.2 and 22q11.23, both lost in 5 (42%) of the 12 tumors, and at 12p13.31, lost in 4 (33%) of the 12 samples. Of the eight loci associated with the DNA damage repair syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum, three showed loss of at least one allele in our aCGH analysis, including XPA (9q22.33, one tumor), XPE/DDB2 (11p11.2, one tumor) and XPG/ERCC5 (13q33.1, three tumors). Conclusions. Conjunctival SCC contains a range of chromosomal alterations potentially important in tumor formation and growth. Amplification of 8p11.22 and overexpression of ADAM3A suggests a potential role for this protease. Our findings also suggest that defects in DNA repair loci are important in sporadic cSCC. PMID:25491297

  13. 21. DETAIL VIEW OF MARSICAL WORKS CONDENSERS INCLUDING QUICKSILVER COLLECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. DETAIL VIEW OF MARSICAL WORKS CONDENSERS INCLUDING QUICKSILVER COLLECTION CHANNEL AND COLLECTION BOX, CENTER FOREGROUND, LOOKING SOUTH, SOUTHEAST. - Mariscal Quicksilver Mine & Reduction Works, Terlingua, Brewster County, TX

  14. South side elevation view includes small buildings for communications equipment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South side elevation view includes small buildings for communications equipment and cellular communications tower in background. - Chelan Butte Lookout, Summit of Chelan Butte, Chelan, Chelan County, WA

  15. West side elevation view includes small buildings for communications equipment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West side elevation view includes small buildings for communications equipment and cellular communications tower in background. - Chelan Butte Lookout, Summit of Chelan Butte, Chelan, Chelan County, WA

  16. VIEW OF MARISCAL WORKS INCLUDING (POSSIBLE SOOT FURNACE), FOREGROUND, CONDENSERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF MARISCAL WORKS INCLUDING (POSSIBLE SOOT FURNACE), FOREGROUND, CONDENSERS AND ORE BIN FOUNDATION ABOVE, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Mariscal Quicksilver Mine & Reduction Works, Terlingua, Brewster County, TX

  17. 18. VIEW OF MARISCAL WORKS INCLUDING (POSSIBLE SOOT FURNACE), FOREGROUND, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VIEW OF MARISCAL WORKS INCLUDING (POSSIBLE SOOT FURNACE), FOREGROUND, CONDENSERS, AND ORE BIN FOUNDATION ABOVE, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Mariscal Quicksilver Mine & Reduction Works, Terlingua, Brewster County, TX

  18. 142. ARAIII General plan of GCRE area, including electrical distribution ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    142. ARA-III General plan of GCRE area, including electrical distribution plan for power and lighting. Includes detail of floodlight and security lighting poles and fixtures. Aerojet-general 880-area/GCRE-406-1. Date: February 1958. Ineel index code no. 063-0406-00-013-102539. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. 30 CFR 550.211 - What must the EP include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....211 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND... Exploration Plans (ep) § 550.211 What must the EP include? Your EP must include the following: (a) Description... completion) of the exploration activities that you propose to undertake. Examples of exploration...

  20. 30 CFR 250.211 - What must the EP include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....211 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF... Information Contents of Exploration Plans (ep) § 250.211 What must the EP include? Your EP must include the... tentative schedule (from start to completion) of the exploration activities that you propose to...

  1. 30 CFR 550.211 - What must the EP include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....211 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND... Exploration Plans (ep) § 550.211 What must the EP include? Your EP must include the following: (a) Description... completion) of the exploration activities that you propose to undertake. Examples of exploration...

  2. 30 CFR 550.211 - What must the EP include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....211 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND... Exploration Plans (ep) § 550.211 What must the EP include? Your EP must include the following: (a) Description... completion) of the exploration activities that you propose to undertake. Examples of exploration...

  3. 7 CFR 1437.303 - Aquaculture, including ornamental fish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aquaculture, including ornamental fish. 1437.303... ASSISTANCE PROGRAM Determining Coverage Using Value § 1437.303 Aquaculture, including ornamental fish. (a... human consumption as determined by CCC. (2) Fish raised as feed for other fish that are consumed...

  4. 7 CFR 1437.303 - Aquaculture, including ornamental fish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aquaculture, including ornamental fish. 1437.303... ASSISTANCE PROGRAM Determining Coverage Using Value § 1437.303 Aquaculture, including ornamental fish. (a... human consumption as determined by CCC. (2) Fish raised as feed for other fish that are consumed...

  5. Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths

    DOEpatents

    Hatch, Anson V; Sommer, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih; Abhyankar, Vinay V

    2014-04-22

    Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths are described. Polymerization techniques may be used to generate porous polymer monoliths having pores defined by a liquid component of a fluid mixture. The fluid mixture may contain iniferters and the resulting porous polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores.

  6. 40 CFR 1502.14 - Alternatives including the proposed action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alternatives including the proposed action. 1502.14 Section 1502.14 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT § 1502.14 Alternatives including the proposed action. This section is the heart of...

  7. 40 CFR 1502.14 - Alternatives including the proposed action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alternatives including the proposed action. 1502.14 Section 1502.14 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT § 1502.14 Alternatives including the proposed action. This section is the heart of...

  8. 10 CFR 905.11 - What must an IRP include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... The customer must note this concurrence in the IRP. (5) Load forecasting. An IRP must include a statement that the customer conducted load forecasting. Load forecasting should include data that reflects... customer must make the load forecasting data available to Western upon request. (6) Measurement...

  9. 10 CFR 905.11 - What must an IRP include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... The customer must note this concurrence in the IRP. (5) Load forecasting. An IRP must include a statement that the customer conducted load forecasting. Load forecasting should include data that reflects... customer must make the load forecasting data available to Western upon request. (6) Measurement...

  10. 10 CFR 905.11 - What must an IRP include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... The customer must note this concurrence in the IRP. (5) Load forecasting. An IRP must include a statement that the customer conducted load forecasting. Load forecasting should include data that reflects... customer must make the load forecasting data available to Western upon request. (6) Measurement...

  11. 10 CFR 905.11 - What must an IRP include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... The customer must note this concurrence in the IRP. (5) Load forecasting. An IRP must include a statement that the customer conducted load forecasting. Load forecasting should include data that reflects... customer must make the load forecasting data available to Western upon request. (6) Measurement...

  12. 10 CFR 905.11 - What must an IRP include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... The customer must note this concurrence in the IRP. (5) Load forecasting. An IRP must include a statement that the customer conducted load forecasting. Load forecasting should include data that reflects... customer must make the load forecasting data available to Western upon request. (6) Measurement...

  13. 25 CFR 20.403 - What do protective services include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... for assistance in solving the social problems of individuals, families, and children. (5) Coordinating.../services, including Child Protection, and/or establishing Multi-Disciplinary Teams. (b) Must include, where... account holder; (ii) Developing, as necessary and as permitted under 25 CFR 115, a one-time or an...

  14. 40 CFR 1502.14 - Alternatives including the proposed action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alternatives including the proposed action. 1502.14 Section 1502.14 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT § 1502.14 Alternatives including the proposed action. This section is the heart of...

  15. 40 CFR 1502.14 - Alternatives including the proposed action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alternatives including the proposed action. 1502.14 Section 1502.14 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT § 1502.14 Alternatives including the proposed action. This section is the heart of...

  16. Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, Anson V.; Sommer, Gregory j.; Singh, Anup K.; Wang, Ying-Chih; Abhyankar, Vinay

    2015-12-01

    Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths are described. Polymerization techniques may be used to generate porous polymer monoliths having pores defined by a liquid component of a fluid mixture. The fluid mixture may contain iniferters and the resulting porous polymer monolith may include surfaces terminated with iniferter species. Capture molecules may then be grafted to the monolith pores.

  17. 30 CFR 250.1007 - What to include in applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Pipelines and Pipeline Rights-of-Way § 250.1007 What to include in applications. (a) Applications to install a lease term pipeline or for a pipeline right-of-way grant must be submitted in quadruplicate to the... pipeline. Each application must include the following: (1) Plat(s) drawn to a scale specified by...

  18. 2 CFR 200.470 - Taxes (including Value Added Tax).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Taxes (including Value Added Tax). 200.470... Cost § 200.470 Taxes (including Value Added Tax). (a) For states, local governments and Indian tribes: (1) Taxes that a governmental unit is legally required to pay are allowable, except for...

  19. Including Siblings in the Treatment of Child Sexual Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Juanita N.; Tanis, Heyley J.; Rice, Jennifer B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the necessity of including siblings in the treatment of victims of child sexual abuse. Theoretical and practical reasons to include siblings in treatment are discussed. Case examples using a particular intervention approach and results of client satisfaction surveys are described. (Contains 18 references.) (GCP)

  20. 7 CFR 201.7 - Purity (including variety).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Records for Agricultural and Vegetable Seeds § 201.7 Purity (including variety). The complete record for any lot of seed shall include (a) records of analyses, tests, and examinations...

  1. 7 CFR 201.7 - Purity (including variety).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Records for Agricultural and Vegetable Seeds § 201.7 Purity (including variety). The complete record for any lot of seed shall include (a) records of analyses, tests, and examinations...

  2. 7 CFR 201.7 - Purity (including variety).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Records for Agricultural and Vegetable Seeds § 201.7 Purity (including variety). The complete record for any lot of seed shall include (a) records of analyses, tests, and examinations...

  3. 7 CFR 201.7 - Purity (including variety).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Records for Agricultural and Vegetable Seeds § 201.7 Purity (including variety). The complete record for any lot of seed shall include (a) records of analyses, tests, and examinations...

  4. 7 CFR 201.7 - Purity (including variety).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Records for Agricultural and Vegetable Seeds § 201.7 Purity (including variety). The complete record for any lot of seed shall include (a) records of analyses, tests, and examinations...

  5. 26 CFR 1.1013-1 - Property included in inventory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Property included in inventory. 1.1013-1 Section... inventory. The basis of property required to be included in inventory is the last inventory value of such property in the hands of the taxpayer. The requirements with respect to the valuation of an inventory...

  6. 43 CFR 3902.24 - Associations, including partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Associations, including partnerships. 3902... Qualification Requirements § 3902.24 Associations, including partnerships. Associations that are applicants must... members of the association who own or control 10 percent or more of the association or partnership,...

  7. Making Way and Making Sense: Including Newcomers in Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillet-Shore, Danielle

    2010-01-01

    In our everyday interactions as they unfold in real time, how do we do including? This article examines a specific set of interactional moments when the potential to be included (or not) recurs: when a newcomer arrives to some social scene where two or more already-present persons are actively engaged in some activity and that newcomer displays…

  8. 20 CFR 404.1312 - World War II service included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false World War II service included. 404.1312... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1312 World War II service included. Your service was in the active service of the...

  9. 20 CFR 408.710 - What must your report include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What must your report include? 408.710 Section 408.710 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Reporting Requirements § 408.710 What must your report include? When you make a...

  10. 20 CFR 404.1312 - World War II service included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false World War II service included. 404.1312... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1312 World War II service included. Your service was in the active service of the...

  11. 20 CFR 408.710 - What must your report include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What must your report include? 408.710 Section 408.710 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Reporting Requirements § 408.710 What must your report include? When you make a...

  12. 20 CFR 404.1312 - World War II service included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false World War II service included. 404.1312... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1312 World War II service included. Your service was in the active service of the...

  13. 20 CFR 408.710 - What must your report include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What must your report include? 408.710 Section 408.710 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Reporting Requirements § 408.710 What must your report include? When you make a...

  14. 20 CFR 408.710 - What must your report include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What must your report include? 408.710 Section 408.710 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Reporting Requirements § 408.710 What must your report include? When you make a...

  15. 20 CFR 404.1312 - World War II service included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false World War II service included. 404.1312... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1312 World War II service included. Your service was in the active service of the...

  16. 20 CFR 408.710 - What must your report include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What must your report include? 408.710 Section 408.710 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Reporting Requirements § 408.710 What must your report include? When you make a...

  17. 20 CFR 404.1312 - World War II service included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false World War II service included. 404.1312... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1312 World War II service included. Your service was in the active service of the...

  18. 26 CFR 1.642(g)-2 - Deductions included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deductions included. 1.642(g)-2 Section 1.642(g... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.642(g)-2 Deductions included. It is not required that the total deductions, or the total amount of any deduction, to which section 642(g)...

  19. 26 CFR 1.642(g)-2 - Deductions included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Deductions included. 1.642(g)-2 Section 1.642(g... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.642(g)-2 Deductions included. It...(g) is applicable be treated in the same way. One deduction or portion of a deduction may be...

  20. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

  1. Articles which include chevron film cooling holes, and related processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bunker, Ronald Scott; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2014-12-09

    An article is described, including an inner surface which can be exposed to a first fluid; an inlet; and an outer surface spaced from the inner surface, which can be exposed to a hotter second fluid. The article further includes at least one row or other pattern of passage holes. Each passage hole includes an inlet bore extending through the substrate from the inlet at the inner surface to a passage hole-exit proximate to the outer surface, with the inlet bore terminating in a chevron outlet adjacent the hole-exit. The chevron outlet includes a pair of wing troughs having a common surface region between them. The common surface region includes a valley which is adjacent the hole-exit; and a plateau adjacent the valley. The article can be an airfoil. Related methods for preparing the passage holes are also described.

  2. SNP-based Microdeletion and Aneuploidy RegisTry (SMART)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    22q11 Deletion Syndrome; DiGeorge Syndrome; Trisomy 21; Trisomy 18; Trisomy 13; Monosomy X; Sex Chromosome Abnormalities; Cri-du-Chat Syndrome; Angelman Syndrome; Prader-Willi Syndrome; 1p36 Deletion Syndrome

  3. Private inherited microdeletion/microduplications: implications in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Katzaki, Eleni; Papa, Filomena Tiziana; Sampieri, Katia; Caselli, Rossella; Uliana, Vera; Pollazzon, Marzia; Canitano, Roberto; Mostardini, Rosa; Grosso, Salvatore; Longo, Ilaria; Ariani, Francesca; Meloni, Ilaria; Hayek, Josef; Balestri, Paolo; Mari, Francesca; Renieri, Alessandra

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of array-CGH analysis is allowing the identification of novel genomic disorders. However, this new high-resolution technique is also opening novel diagnostic challenges when inherited private CNVs of unclear clinical significance are found. Oligo array-CGH analysis of 84 patients with mild to severe mental retardation associated with multiple congenital anomalies revealed 10 private CNVs inherited from a healthy parent. Three were deletions (7q31, 14q21.1, Xq25) and seven duplications (12p11.22, 12q21.31, 13q31.1, 17q12, Xp22.31, Xq28) ranging between 0.1 and 3.8Mb. Six rearrangements were not polymorphic. Four overlapped polymorphic regions to the extent of 10-61%. In one case the size was different between the proband and the healthy relative. Three small rearrangements were gene deserts. The remaining seven had a mean gene content of five (ranging from 1 to 18). None of the rearranged genes is known to be imprinted. Three disease-genes were found in three different cases: KAL1 in dupXp22.31, STS in another dupXp22.31 and TCF2 in dup17q12. The patient carrying the last duplication presents sex reversal, Peters' anomaly and renal cysts and the duplication is located 4Mb away from the HSD17B1 gene, coding a key enzyme of testosterone biosynthesis. Considering the overlap with polymorphic regions, size-identity within the family, gene content, kind of rearrangement and size of rearrangement we suggest that at least in five cases the relationship to the phenotype has not to be excluded. We recommend to maintain caution when asserting that chromosomal abnormalities inherited from a healthy parent are benign. A more complex mechanism may in fact be involved, such as a concurrent variation in the other allele or in another chromosome that influences the phenotype.

  4. Experimental Validation of Multi-Epitope Peptides Including Promising MHC Class I- and II-Restricted Epitopes of Four Known Leishmania infantum Proteins.

    PubMed

    Agallou, Maria; Athanasiou, Evita; Koutsoni, Olga; Dotsika, Eleni; Karagouni, Evdokia

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a significant worldwide health problem for which no vaccine exists. Activation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells is crucial for the generation of protective immunity against parasite. Recent trend in vaccine design has been shifted to epitope-based vaccines that are more specific, safe, and easy to produce. In the present study, four known antigenic Leishmania infantum proteins, cysteine peptidase A (CPA), histone H1, KMP-11, and Leishmania eukaryotic initiation factor (LeIF) were analyzed for the prediction of binding epitopes to H2(d) MHC class I and II molecules, using online available algorithms. Based on in silico analysis, eight peptides including highly scored MHC class I- and II-restricted epitopes were synthesized. Peptide immunogenicity was validated in MHC compatible BALB/c mice immunized with each synthetic peptide emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant/incomplete Freund's adjuvant. CPA_p2, CPA_p3, H1_p1, and LeIF_p6 induced strong spleen cell proliferation upon in vitro peptide re-stimulation. In addition, the majority of the peptides, except of LeIF_p1 and KMP-11_p1, induced IFN-γ secretion, while KMP-11_p1 indicated a suppressive effect on IL-10 production. CPA_p2, CPA_p3, LeIF_p3, and LeIF_p6 induced IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) T cells indicating a TH1-type response. In addition, CPA_p2, CPA_p3, and H1_p1 induced also the induction of CD8(+) T cells. The induction of peptide-specific IgG in immunized mice designated also the existence of B cell epitopes in peptide sequences. Combining immunoinformatic tools and experimental validation, we demonstrated that CPA_p2, CPA_p3, H1_p1, H1_p3, CPA_p2, LeIF_p3, and LeIF_p6 are likely to include potential epitopes for the induction of protective cytotoxic and/or TH1-type immune responses supporting the feasibility of peptide-based vaccine development for leishmaniasis. PMID:24959167

  5. 13. EQUIPMENT USED IN CLEAN ROOM (102), INCLUDING ROYCO PARTICLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. EQUIPMENT USED IN CLEAN ROOM (102), INCLUDING ROYCO PARTICLE COUNTER (LEFT) AND STEREOSCOPE FOR MANUAL PARTICLE COUNTING (RIGHT) - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Vehicle Support Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  6. View of North End of Oxide Building Interior Including Roof ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of North End of Oxide Building Interior Including Roof and Wall Juncture and Crane Trolley - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Oxide Building & Oxide Loading Dock, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  7. 4. GENERAL VIEW, CLOSEUP, INCLUDING NORTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS (4 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. GENERAL VIEW, CLOSE-UP, INCLUDING NORTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS (4 x 5 NEGATIVE) - U.S. General Services Administration, Central Heating Plant, C & D Streets between Twelfth & Thirteenth Streets Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. 4. DECK VIEW, FROM NORTH, INCLUDING PARAPETS WITH METAL LIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DECK VIEW, FROM NORTH, INCLUDING PARAPETS WITH METAL LIGHT STANDARDS, AND SINGLE SIDEWALK, AT EAST SIDE OF DECK - Fifth Street Viaduct, Spanning Bacon's Quarter Branch Valley on Fifth Street, Richmond, Independent City, VA

  9. 41. OPERATING CORRIDOR PLAN AND SECTIONS, INCLUDING SOME ISOMETRIC DETAILS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. OPERATING CORRIDOR PLAN AND SECTIONS, INCLUDING SOME ISOMETRIC DETAILS. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106455. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-P-60 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. Curtain Fabric Detail and Designed Furniture including Dining Table, Dining ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Curtain Fabric Detail and Designed Furniture including Dining Table, Dining Chair, Coffee Table, End Table, and Ottoman - Cedric & Patricia Boulter House, 1 Rawson Woods Circle, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, OH

  11. Reduced Toxicity Fuel Satellite Propulsion System Including Plasmatron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A reduced toxicity fuel satellite propulsion system including a reduced toxicity propellant supply for consumption in an axial class thruster and an ACS class thruster. The system includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying the reduced toxicity propellant to the ACS decomposing element of an ACS thruster. The ACS decomposing element is operative to decompose the reduced toxicity propellant into hot propulsive gases. In addition the system includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying the reduced toxicity propellant to an axial decomposing element of the axial thruster. The axial decomposing element is operative to decompose the reduced toxicity propellant into hot gases. The system further includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying a second propellant to a combustion chamber of the axial thruster. whereby the hot gases and the second propellant auto-ignite and begin the combustion process for producing thrust.

  12. General Information about Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma Cell Neoplasms Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  13. 4. Band Wheel and Walking Beam Mechanism, Including Remains of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Band Wheel and Walking Beam Mechanism, Including Remains of Frame Belt House, Looking Southeast - David Renfrew Oil Rig, East side of Connoquenessing Creek, 0.4 mile North of confluence with Thorn Creek, Renfrew, Butler County, PA

  14. 7. PARTIAL ELEVATION, FROM SOUTHEAST, SHOWING STRUCTURAL CONFIGURATION, INCLUDING DOUBLESPAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. PARTIAL ELEVATION, FROM SOUTHEAST, SHOWING STRUCTURAL CONFIGURATION, INCLUDING DOUBLE-SPAN REINFORCED CONCRETE RIGID FRAME AS BASIC STRUCTURAL UNIT OF BRIDGE - Fifth Street Viaduct, Spanning Bacon's Quarter Branch Valley on Fifth Street, Richmond, Independent City, VA

  15. 24 CFR 266.648 - Items included in total loss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Contract Rights and Obligations Claim Procedures § 266.648 Items included in total loss. In computing the... assessments, and water bills that are liens before the Mortgage; and (2) Fire and hazard insurance on...

  16. When Should Zero Be Included on a Scale Showing Magnitude?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozak, Marcin

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses an important problem of graphing quantitative data: should one include zero on the scale showing magnitude? Based on a real time series example, the problem is discussed and some recommendations are proposed.

  17. Contact Dermatitis (Including Latex Dermatitis) (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Terms of Use ©2016 UpToDate, Inc. Patient education: Contact dermatitis (including latex dermatitis) (Beyond the Basics) Authors ... defined as an inflammation of the skin [ 1 ]. Contact dermatitis refers to dermatitis that is caused by ...

  18. 32 CFR 165.7 - Waivers (including reductions).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... RECOUPMENT OF NONRECURRING COSTS ON SALES OF U.S. ITEMS § 165.7 Waivers (including reductions). (a) The “Arms... information on the extent of standardization to be derived as a result of the waiver. (c) Blanket...

  19. 32 CFR 165.7 - Waivers (including reductions).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... RECOUPMENT OF NONRECURRING COSTS ON SALES OF U.S. ITEMS § 165.7 Waivers (including reductions). (a) The “Arms... information on the extent of standardization to be derived as a result of the waiver. (c) Blanket...

  20. 17. View of disassembled reduction gear parts including bull and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. View of disassembled reduction gear parts including bull and intermediate gears and pedestal bearing. - Hacienda Azucarera La Esperanza, Steam Engine & Mill, 2.65 Mi. N of PR Rt. 2 Bridge over Manati River, Manati, Manati Municipio, PR

  1. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1.5 MB] More Data Age-adjusted death rates for selected causes of death, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin (chronic lower respiratory disease includes chronic bronchitis, emphysema, asthma, and other ...

  2. Elevation view of front (east) side of milk barn includes ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation view of front (east) side of milk barn includes portion of creamery on left and main barn on right. - Kosai Farm, Milk Barn, B Street north of Northwest Twenty-ninth Street, Auburn, King County, WA

  3. INTERIOR VIEW WITH STOCK INCLUDING THESE GATE AND GLOBE VALVES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH STOCK INCLUDING THESE GATE AND GLOBE VALVES FOR THE PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRIES READY FOR SHIPPING - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Warehouse, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  4. Looking West From rear (East) End of Office Building Including ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking West From rear (East) End of Office Building Including Recycle Storage Area, Loading Docks, and Decontamination Zone - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Office, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  5. Looking South at south End of Green Room Including Scrubber ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking South at south End of Green Room Including Scrubber for Incinerator within Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  6. 1. AERIAL VIEW OF BRIDGE IN CONTEXT INCLUDING VICTORY CIRCLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. AERIAL VIEW OF BRIDGE IN CONTEXT INCLUDING VICTORY CIRCLE FROM SOUTH. LOOKING NORTH. - Rue Road Bridge, Rue Road, spanning Matchaponix Brook, .35 mile east of intersection with Route 613, Jamesburg, Middlesex County, NJ

  7. Contextual view including south (rear) of building 925, exercise in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view including south (rear) of building 925, exercise in foreground, and modern buildings in background. Facing northwest. - Travis Air Force Base, Building No. 925, W Street, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  8. 4. DETAIL VIEW FIXED SPAN INCLUDING TRUSS, MOVEABLE SPAN WHICH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL VIEW FIXED SPAN INCLUDING TRUSS, MOVEABLE SPAN WHICH THE NEXT UNIT TO THE RIGHT, AND FIRST UNIT OF PONTOON FLOATING SPAN. - Lacey V. Murrow Memorial Floating Bridge, Spanning Lake Washington at I-90, Seattle, King County, WA

  9. 2. Building 9 north elevation oblique including elevator shaft. View ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Building 9 north elevation oblique including elevator shaft. View looking west. - John & James Dobson Carpet Mill (West Parcel), Building No. 9, 4041-4055 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  10. 21 CFR 870.5300 - DC-defribrillator (including paddles).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... heart or to terminate other cardiac arrhythmias. This generic type of device includes low energy... defibrillating the atria or ventricles of the heart or to terminate other cardiac arrhythmias. The device...

  11. 21 CFR 870.5300 - DC-defribrillator (including paddles).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... heart or to terminate other cardiac arrhythmias. This generic type of device includes low energy... defibrillating the atria or ventricles of the heart or to terminate other cardiac arrhythmias. The device...

  12. 21 CFR 870.5300 - DC-defibrillator (including paddles).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... heart or to terminate other cardiac arrhythmias. This generic type of device includes low energy... defibrillating the atria or ventricles of the heart or to terminate other cardiac arrhythmias. The device...

  13. 21 CFR 870.5300 - DC-defribrillator (including paddles).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... heart or to terminate other cardiac arrhythmias. This generic type of device includes low energy... defibrillating the atria or ventricles of the heart or to terminate other cardiac arrhythmias. The device...

  14. 21 CFR 870.5300 - DC-defibrillator (including paddles).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... heart or to terminate other cardiac arrhythmias. This generic type of device includes low energy... defibrillating the atria or ventricles of the heart or to terminate other cardiac arrhythmias. The device...

  15. 12. SW corner of seating in Original Grandstand, including TV ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. SW corner of seating in Original Grandstand, including TV Center booth and reserved seating areas. Stairway above booth leads to turret on roof. Camera pointed SW. (May 1993) - Longacres, Original Grandstand, 1621 Southwest Sixteenth Street, Renton, King County, WA

  16. Modeling Emergent Macrophyte Distributions: Including Sub-dominant Species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mixed stands of emergent vegetation are often present following drawdowns but models of wetland plant distributions fail to include subdominant species when predicting distributions. Three variations of a spatial plant distribution cellular automaton model were developed to explo...

  17. POWERHOUSE MAIN FLOOR INCLUDING WORKBENCH AND ARC WELDER IN RIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    POWERHOUSE MAIN FLOOR INCLUDING WORKBENCH AND ARC WELDER IN RIGHT FOREGROUND. PHOTO BY JET LOWE, HAER, 1995. - Elwha River Hydroelectric System, Glines Hydroelectric Dam & Plant, Port Angeles, Clallam County, WA

  18. Crane 55 at Drydock No. 2. View includes entire bone. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Crane 55 at Drydock No. 2. View includes entire bone. Building 43 is in background - Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Portal Gantry Crane No. 55, Central Industrial Area, Farragut Avenue, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  19. "Voices from the Fields": Including Migrant Farmworkers in the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittaker, Catharine R.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Presents and explains resources and strategies for creating a curriculum that reflects and affirms the experiences of migrant children. Includes a 27-item annotated bibliography of fiction and nonfiction on migrant farm workers. (SR)

  20. 8. VIEW OF RADIOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS INCLUDED RADIOGRAPHY AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF RADIOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS INCLUDED RADIOGRAPHY AND BETA BACKSCATTERING. (7/13/56) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  1. 5. EAST SPAN, FROM SOUTH, SHOWING STRUCTURAL CONFIGURATION, INCLUDING POLYGONAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. EAST SPAN, FROM SOUTH, SHOWING STRUCTURAL CONFIGURATION, INCLUDING POLYGONAL TOP CHORD, TRUSS PANELS, EAST ABUTMENT, AND CENTRAL PIER - Glendale Road Bridge, Spanning Deep Creek Lake on Glendale Road, McHenry, Garrett County, MD

  2. Interior view looking SW includes map hanging from ceiling and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view looking SW includes map hanging from ceiling and edge of fire finder stand on right. - Badger Mountain Lookout, .125 mile northwest of Badger Mountain summit, East Wenatchee, Douglas County, WA

  3. View of west end of Childs Powerhouse, including transformer station ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of west end of Childs Powerhouse, including transformer station and associated sheds. Looking downstream (east) - Childs-Irving Hydroelectric Project, Childs System, Childs Powerhouse, Forest Service Road 708/502, Camp Verde, Yavapai County, AZ

  4. GENERAL VIEW OF WESTERN PART OF PLANT INCLUDING (LEFT TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF WESTERN PART OF PLANT INCLUDING (LEFT TO RIGHT) BETHLEHEM RAIL MILL, GENERAL OFFICE BUILDING, MACHINE SHOP, BAR MILL, BLOOMING MILL & OPEN HEARTH PLANT. - Pittsburgh Steel Company, Monessen Works, Open Hearth Plant, Donner Avenue, Monessen, Westmoreland County, PA

  5. 76 FR 61741 - Bmc Software, Inc. Including On-Site Leased Workers From COMSYS ITS Including Remote Workers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Bmc Software, Inc. Including On-Site Leased Workers From COMSYS ITS Including Remote Workers Located Throughout the United States; Houston, TX; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker...

  6. Inverse wing design in transonic flow including viscous interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.; Ratcliff, Robert R.; Gally, Thomas A.; Campbell, Richard L.

    1989-01-01

    Several inverse methods were compared and initial results indicate that differences in results are primarily due to coordinate systems and fuselage representations and not to design procedures. Further, results from a direct-inverse method that includes 3-D wing boundary layer effects, wake curvature, and wake displacement are represented. These results show that boundary layer displacements must be included in the design process for accurate results.

  7. Hybrid powertrain system including smooth shifting automated transmission

    DOEpatents

    Beaty, Kevin D.; Nellums, Richard A.

    2006-10-24

    A powertrain system is provided that includes a prime mover and a change-gear transmission having an input, at least two gear ratios, and an output. The powertrain system also includes a power shunt configured to route power applied to the transmission by one of the input and the output to the other one of the input and the output. A transmission system and a method for facilitating shifting of a transmission system are also provided.

  8. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems, including potable hot water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, D.; Oonk, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Progress made in the development, delivery, and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water is reported. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition. A comparison of the proposed Solaron Heat Pump and Solar Desiccant Heating and Cooling Systems, installation drawings, data on the Akron House at Akron, Ohio, and other program activities are included.

  9. A sonic boom propagation model including mean flow atmospheric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamone, Joe; Sparrow, Victor W.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a time domain formulation of nonlinear lossy propagation in onedimension that also includes the effects of non-collinear mean flow in the acoustic medium. The model equation utilized is an augmented Burgers equation that includes the effects of nonlinearity, geometric spreading, atmospheric stratification, and also absorption and dispersion due to thermoviscous and molecular relaxation effects. All elements of the propagation are implemented in the time domain and the effects of non-collinear mean flow are accounted for in each term of the model equation. Previous authors have presented methods limited to showing the effects of wind on ray tracing and/or using an effective speed of sound in their model equation. The present work includes the effects of mean flow for all terms included in the augmented Burgers equation with all of the calculations performed in the time-domain. The capability to include the effects of mean flow in the acoustic medium allows one to make predictions more representative of real-world atmospheric conditions. Examples are presented for nonlinear propagation of N-waves and shaped sonic booms. [Work supported by Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation.

  10. A Framework for Including Family Health Spillovers in Economic Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Al-Janabi, Hareth; van Exel, Job; Brouwer, Werner; Coast, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    Health care interventions may affect the health of patients' family networks. It has been suggested that these "health spillovers" should be included in economic evaluation, but there is not a systematic method for doing this. In this article, we develop a framework for including health spillovers in economic evaluation. We focus on extra-welfarist economic evaluations where the objective is to maximize health benefits from a health care budget (the "health care perspective"). Our framework involves adapting the conventional cost-effectiveness decision rule to include 2 multiplier effects to internalize the spillover effects. These multiplier effects express the ratio of total health effects (for patients and their family networks) to patient health effects. One multiplier effect is specified for health benefit generated from providing a new intervention, one for health benefit displaced by funding this intervention. We show that using multiplier effects to internalize health spillovers could change the optimal funding decisions and generate additional health benefits to society.

  11. Metal vapor laser including hot electrodes and integral wick

    DOEpatents

    Ault, Earl R.; Alger, Terry W.

    1995-01-01

    A metal vapor laser, specifically one utilizing copper vapor, is disclosed herein. This laser utilizes a plasma tube assembly including a thermally insulated plasma tube containing a specific metal, e.g., copper, and a buffer gas therein. The laser also utilizes means including hot electrodes located at opposite ends of the plasma tube for electrically exciting the metal vapor and heating its interior to a sufficiently high temperature to cause the metal contained therein to vaporize and for subjecting the vapor to an electrical discharge excitation in order to lase. The laser also utilizes external wicking arrangements, that is, wicking arrangements located outside the plasma tube.

  12. Impact of Including Higher Actinides in Fast Reactor Transmutation Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    B. Forget; M. Asgari; R. Ferrer; S. Bays

    2007-09-01

    Previous fast reactor transmutation studies generally disregarded higher mass minor actinides beyond Cm-246 due to various considerations including deficiencies in nuclear cross-section data. Although omission of these higher mass actinides does not significantly impact the neutronic calculations and fuel cycle performance parameters follow-on neutron dose calculations related to fuel recycling, transportation and handling are significantly impacted. This report shows that including the minor actinides in the equilibrium fast reactor calculations will increase the predicted neutron emission by about 30%. In addition a sensitivity study was initiated by comparing the impact of different cross-section evaluation file for representing these minor actinides.

  13. Tunable cavity resonator including a plurality of MEMS beams

    DOEpatents

    Peroulis, Dimitrios; Fruehling, Adam; Small, Joshua Azariah; Liu, Xiaoguang; Irshad, Wasim; Arif, Muhammad Shoaib

    2015-10-20

    A tunable cavity resonator includes a substrate, a cap structure, and a tuning assembly. The cap structure extends from the substrate, and at least one of the substrate and the cap structure defines a resonator cavity. The tuning assembly is positioned at least partially within the resonator cavity. The tuning assembly includes a plurality of fixed-fixed MEMS beams configured for controllable movement relative to the substrate between an activated position and a deactivated position in order to tune a resonant frequency of the tunable cavity resonator.

  14. Metal vapor laser including hot electrodes and integral wick

    DOEpatents

    Ault, E.R.; Alger, T.W.

    1995-03-07

    A metal vapor laser, specifically one utilizing copper vapor, is disclosed herein. This laser utilizes a plasma tube assembly including a thermally insulated plasma tube containing a specific metal, e.g., copper, and a buffer gas therein. The laser also utilizes means including hot electrodes located at opposite ends of the plasma tube for electrically exciting the metal vapor and heating its interior to a sufficiently high temperature to cause the metal contained therein to vaporize and for subjecting the vapor to an electrical discharge excitation in order to lase. The laser also utilizes external wicking arrangements, that is, wicking arrangements located outside the plasma tube. 5 figs.

  15. Estimation of nonlinear pilot model parameters including time delay.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiess, J. R.; Roland, V. R.; Wells, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation of the feasibility of using a Kalman filter estimator for the identification of unknown parameters in nonlinear dynamic systems with a time delay. The problem considered is the application of estimation theory to determine the parameters of a family of pilot models containing delayed states. In particular, the pilot-plant dynamics are described by differential-difference equations of the retarded type. The pilot delay, included as one of the unknown parameters to be determined, is kept in pure form as opposed to the Pade approximations generally used for these systems. Problem areas associated with processing real pilot response data are included in the discussion.

  16. Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide

    DOEpatents

    Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

    2014-03-04

    Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

  17. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

  18. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

    1993-02-16

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

  19. Assessing the Doctoral Thesis When It Includes Published Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharmini, Sharon; Spronken-Smith, Rachel; Golding, Clinton; Harland, Tony

    2015-01-01

    In this article we explore how examiners assess a thesis that includes published work. An online survey was used to gather data on approaches to assessing publication-based theses (PBTs). The respondents were 62 supervisors who had experience examining PBTs across a range of disciplines at a research-intensive university in New Zealand. Nearly…

  20. 2. GENERAL VIEW, CLOSEUP, INCLUDING SOUTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS (CROPPED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GENERAL VIEW, CLOSE-UP, INCLUDING SOUTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS (CROPPED PRINT FROM 2-1/4 x 2-3/4 NEGATIVE) - U.S. General Services Administration, Central Heating Plant, C & D Streets between Twelfth & Thirteenth Streets Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC