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Sample records for 11th high-tech plasma

  1. EDITORIAL: Special issue featuring articles arising from the 11th High-Tech Plasma Processes Conference Special issue featuring articles arising from the 11th High-Tech Plasma Processes Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Peter; Degrez, Gérard; Delplancke, Marie-Paule; Gleizes, Alain

    2011-05-01

    The 11th High-Tech Plasma Processes Conference (HTPP) was held in Brussels, Belgium, 27 June-2 July, 2010. HTPP started as a thermal plasma conference and gradually expanded to include low-temperature plasmas. The conference was founded by Jacques Amouroux and Pierre Fauchais, and aims to bring together different scientific communities to facilitate contacts between science, technology and industry, providing a platform for the exploration of elementary processes and applications in and by plasmas. The first HTPP was held in Odeillo, France, in 1990. Since then it has been held every other year in different European cities: Paris, Aachen, Athens, Strasbourg, Saint-Petersburg, Patras and Brussels. The 11th HTPP conference was attended by 125 participants from 19 countries. The program involved 14 invited talks, 34 contributed talks, 72 posters and a software demonstration and hands-on session for plasma modelling. The 12th HTPP conference will be held 24-28 June 2012, in Bologna, Italy. A larger part of the contributions to the 11th HTPP has been published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS) volume 275, 2011. All invited speakers and other contributors, as selected by the Steering, Scientific and Organizing Committee, were invited to submit a paper based on their contributions for this special issue which is peer reviewed by the journal. Both this special issue and the JPCS volume aim to bring the 11th HTPP to a wider audience. The publications are a nice example of the broad topic range of the conference. The JPCS volume contains papers covering fundamental aspects on radiative processes of thermal plasmas, modelling of thermal arcs and non-thermal RF plasma jets, plasma diagnostics including flow and heat flux measurements of thermal plasmas, radical density measurements and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. The applications-oriented contributions of the JPCS volume include plasma spraying, synthesis of (nano-sized) materials, surface

  2. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT: Request for support of the 11th Workshop on the Physics of Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Thomas

    2009-05-21

    This grant supported the publication of student papers that were presented at the 11th Workshop on the Physics of Dusty Plasmas. Papers were published in a Special Issue of the IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, Vol. 32, Issue 2 in April, 2007.

  3. PREFACE: 13th High-Tech Plasma Processes Conference (HTPP-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    The High-Tech Plasma Processes - 13th European Plasma Conference (HTPP-2014) was held in Toulouse (France) on 22-27 June 2014. The conference series started in 1990 as a thermal plasma conference and has gradually expanded to include other related topics. Now the High-Tech Plasma Processes - European Plasma Conference (HTPP) is an international conference organised in Europe every two years with topics encompassing the whole field of plasma processing science. The aim of the conference is to bring different scientific communities together, to facilitate contacts between science, technology and industry and to provide a platform for the exploration of both the fundamental topics and new applications of plasmas. For this edition of HTPP, as was the case for the last, we have acheived a well balanced participation from the communities of both thermal and non-thermal plasma researchers. 142 people from 17 countries attended the conference with the total number of contributions being 155, consisting of 8 plenary and 8 invited talks plus 51 oral and 88 poster contributions. We have received numerous papers corresponding to the contributions of HTPP-2014 that have been submitted for publication in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Each submitted contribution has been peer reviewed (60 referees with at least two reviewing each paper) and the Editors are very grateful to the referees for their careful support in improving the original manuscripts. In total, 52 manuscripts have been accepted for publication covering a range of topics of plasma processing science from plasma fundamentals to process applications through to experiments, diagnostics and modelling. We have grouped the papers into the following 5 topics: - Arc-Materials Interaction and Metallurgy - Plasma Torches and Spraying - Synthesis of Powders and Nanomaterials - Deposition and Surface Treatment - Non-Equilibrium Plasmas We deeply thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high

  4. PREFACE: 12th High-Tech Plasma Processes Conference (HTPP-12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleizes, Alain; Ghedini, Emanuele; Gherardi, Matteo; Sanibondi, Paolo; Dilecce, Giorgio

    2012-12-01

    The High-Tech Plasma Processes - 12th European Plasma Conference (HTPP-12) was held in Bologna (Italy) on 24-29 June 2012. The conference series started in 1990 as a thermal plasma conference and gradually expanded to include other topic fields as well. Now the High-Tech Plasma Processes - European Plasma Conference (HTPP) is a bi-annual international conference based in Europe with topics encompassing the whole area of plasma processing science. The aim of the conference is to bring different scientific communities together, facilitate the contacts between science, technology and industry and provide a platform for the exploration of both fundamental topics and new applications of plasmas. Thanks to the efforts of the conference chairman, Professor Vittorio Colombo and of the co-chair, Professor Piero Favia, a well balanced participation from both the communities of thermal and nonthermal plasma researchers was achieved; this resulted in just about 196 attendees from 39 countries, with 8 plenary and 15 invited talks, plus 50 oral and 140 poster contributions. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series gathers papers from regular contributions of HTPP-12; each contribution submitted for publication has been peer reviewed and the Editors are very grateful to the referees for their careful support in improving the original manuscripts. In the end, 39 manuscripts were accepted for publication, covering different topics of plasma processing science: from plasma fundamentals and modelling to source design and process diagnostics, from nanomaterial synthesis to surface modification, from waste treatment to plasma applications in a liquid environment. It is an honour to present this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series and we deeply thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contribution. Finally, we would like to thank the conference chairmen, the members of the steering committee, the international scientific committee, the local

  5. PREFACE: 11th Asia-Pacific Conference on Plasma Science and Technology (APCPST-11) and 25th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-25)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Takayuki; Kaneko, Toshio; Sekine, Makoto; Tanaka, Yasunori

    2013-06-01

    The 11th Asia-Pacific Conference on Plasma Science and Technology (APCPST-11) was held in Kyoto, Japan on 2-5 October 2012 with the 25th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-25). SPSM has been held annually since 1988 under the sponsorship of The 153rd Committee on Plasma Materials Science, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS). This symposium is one of the major activities of the Committee, which is organized by researchers in academia and industry for the purpose of advancing intersectional scientific information exchange and discussion of science and technology of plasma materials processing. APCPST and SPSM are jointly held biennially to survey the current status of low temperature and thermal plasma physics and chemistry for industrial applications. The whole area of plasma processing was covered from fundamentals to applications. Previous meetings were held in China, Japan, Korea, and Australia, attended by scientists from the Asia-Pacific and other countries. The joint conference was organized in plenary lectures, invited, contributed oral presentations and poster sessions. At this meeting, we had 386 participants from 10 countries and 398 presentations, including 26 invited presentations. This year, we arranged special topical sessions that covered green innovation, life innovation, and technical reports from industry. This conference seeks to bring the plasma community together and to create a forum for discussing the latest developments and issues, the challenges ahead in the field of plasma research and applications among engineers and scientists in Asia, the Pacific Rim, as well as Europe. This volume presents 44 papers that were selected via a strict peer-review process from full papers submitted for the proceedings of the conference. The topics range from the basic physics and chemistry of plasma processing to a broad variety of materials processing and environmental applications. This volume offers an overview of recent

  6. US-Japan workshop on field-reversed configurations with steady-state high-temperature fusion plasmas and the 11th US-Japan workshop on compact toroids

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.C.; Fernandez, J.C.; Rej, D.J.

    1990-05-01

    The US-Japan Workshop on Field-Reversed Configurations with Steady-State High-Temperature Fusion Plasma and the 11th US-Japan Workshop on Compact Toroids were held at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico on November 7--9, 1989. These proceedings contain the papers presented at the workshops as submitted by the authors. These papers have been indexed separately.

  7. Directions: Future Planner for 11th Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana Career and Postsecondary Advancement Center, Bloomington.

    This booklet is intended to help Indiana 11th graders plan their futures by identifying their career and educational goals and available employment and educational opportunities. The following are among the topics discussed in sections 1-4: (1) identifying goals (planning ahead, using class schedules to chart one's course, developing career and…

  8. Considering High-Tech Exhibits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Routman, Emily

    1994-01-01

    Discusses a variety of high-tech exhibit media used in The Living World, an educational facility operated by The Saint Louis Zoo. Considers the strengths and weaknesses of holograms, video, animatronics, video-equipped microscopes, and computer interactives. Computer interactives are treated with special attention. (LZ)

  9. High-Tech Security Help.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanigan, Robin L.

    2000-01-01

    Advocates embrace high-tech security measures as necessary to avoid Columbine-style massacres. Critics contend that school systems can go overboard, making students feel less safe and too closely scrutinized. Current electronic, biometric, and computer-mapping devices and school applications are discussed. Vendors are listed. (MLH)

  10. High Tech Educators Network Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Shea, Dan

    A process evaluation was conducted to assess the High Tech Educators Network's (HTEN's) activities. Four basic components to the evaluation approach were documentation review, program logic model, written survey, and participant interviews. The model mapped the basic goals and objectives, assumptions, activities, outcome expectations, and…

  11. 11th International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, H. J. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings from the 11th International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity (ICAE 99), held June 7-11, 1999. This conference was attended by scientists and researchers from around the world. The subjects covered included natural and artificially initiated lightning, lightning in the middle and upper atmosphere (sprites and jets), lightning protection and safety, lightning detection techniques (ground, airborne, and space-based), storm physics, electric fields near and within thunderstorms, storm electrification, atmospheric ions and chemistry, shumann resonances, satellite observations of lightning, global electrical processes, fair weather electricity, and instrumentation.

  12. MEETING SUMMARY: 11TH AMS Education Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. R.; Ramamurthy, M. K.; Croft, P. J.; Hayes, M. J.; Murphy, K. A.; Mcdonnell, J. D.; Johnson, R. M.; Friedman, H. A.

    2004-03-01

    The 11th American Meteorological Society (AMS) Education Symposium was held from 13 to 15 January 2002 in Orlando, Florida, as part of the 82nd Annual Meeting of the AMS. The theme of the symposium was “creating opportunities in educational outreach in the atmospheric and related sciences.” Drawing from traditional strengths in meteorology and numerous national recommendations, the presentations and posters of the symposium highlighted three opportunities for reform. These opportunities build on partnerships between diverse educational stakeholders, efforts to make science education more like scientific practice, and strategies that place the atmospheric sciences within a larger, multi-disciplinary context that includes oceanography, hydrology, and earth-system science.

  13. 11th International Congress of Endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Fuller, P J

    2001-03-01

    The Olympics of endocrinology, the 11th International Congress of Endocrinolgy was held rather appropriately in Sydney, four weeks after the summer games of the XXWIIth Modern Olympiad. Both occasions were a great success and whilst it may be tempting to extend the analogy to the pool or the track or heaven forbid, digress into 'drugs in sport', this review will focus on endocrinology. There were over 3000 participants with ten plenary lectures, 20 meet-the-expert sessions, 41 symposia, 128 oral free communications and 1500 posters. Sydney post-Olympics provided a vibrant, exciting and picturesque setting with outstanding convention facilities. The Congress Party was held at Campbells Cove in the lee of the Harbour Bridge looking toward the Opera House which provided an opportunity for delegates to view the two architectural icons that had become so familiar in the preceding months. Credit must be given both to the Local Organising Committee of Sydney endocrinologists who made it all happen and to the International Program Organising Committee who crafted a pageant of first rate endocrinology. It is self-evident that this report can only hope to give the reader a flavour of a Congress such as this with the choice of topics being largely idiosyncratic. With five concurrent symposia and two concurrent orals each morning and afternoon of the four days, any omissions reflect not on the topic or its importance but on this reviewer's inability to be in more than one place at once!

  14. 11th International Congress of Endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Fuller, P J

    2001-03-01

    The Olympics of endocrinology, the 11th International Congress of Endocrinolgy was held rather appropriately in Sydney, four weeks after the summer games of the XXWIIth Modern Olympiad. Both occasions were a great success and whilst it may be tempting to extend the analogy to the pool or the track or heaven forbid, digress into 'drugs in sport', this review will focus on endocrinology. There were over 3000 participants with ten plenary lectures, 20 meet-the-expert sessions, 41 symposia, 128 oral free communications and 1500 posters. Sydney post-Olympics provided a vibrant, exciting and picturesque setting with outstanding convention facilities. The Congress Party was held at Campbells Cove in the lee of the Harbour Bridge looking toward the Opera House which provided an opportunity for delegates to view the two architectural icons that had become so familiar in the preceding months. Credit must be given both to the Local Organising Committee of Sydney endocrinologists who made it all happen and to the International Program Organising Committee who crafted a pageant of first rate endocrinology. It is self-evident that this report can only hope to give the reader a flavour of a Congress such as this with the choice of topics being largely idiosyncratic. With five concurrent symposia and two concurrent orals each morning and afternoon of the four days, any omissions reflect not on the topic or its importance but on this reviewer's inability to be in more than one place at once! PMID:11424899

  15. Project Georgia High School/High Tech

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Georgia High School/High Tech has been developing a suggested curriculum for use in its programs. The purpose of this instructional material is to provide a basic curriculum format for teachers of High School/High Tech students. The curriculum is designed to implement QCC classroom instruction that encourages career development in technological fields through post-secondary education, paid summer internships, and exposure to experiences in high technology.

  16. NORTH GATE AT 11TH AVENUE (490 NORTH & 900 EAST), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH GATE AT 11TH AVENUE (490 NORTH & 900 EAST), SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT CEMETERY'S NORTH GATE (WPA PROJECT, 1938-1941). - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  17. Project Georgia High School/High Tech

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The High School/High Tech initiative of the President's Committee on Employment of Disabilities, Georgia's application of the collaborative "Georgia Model" and NASA's commitment of funding have shown that opportunities for High School/High Tech students are unlimited. In Georgia, the partnership approach to meeting the needs of this program has opened doors previously closed. As the program grows and develops, reflecting the needs of our students and the marketplace, more opportunities will be available. Our collaboratives are there to provide these opportunities and meet the challenge of matching our students with appropriate education and career goals. Summing up the activities and outcomes of Project Georgia High School/High Tech is not difficult. Significant outcomes have already occurred in the Savannah area as a result of NASA's grant. The support of NASA has enabled Georgia Committee to "grow" High School/High Tech throughout the region-and, by example, the state. The success of the Columbus pilot project has fostered the proliferation of projects, resulting in more than 30 Georgia High School High Tech programs-with eight in the Savannah area.

  18. Red Flags in High-Tech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Patricia M.

    2007-01-01

    The United States has long been a world leader in education, innovation, high-tech employment, and research and development (R&D). Its future status, however, is not secure. This is the conclusion of more than two dozen reports in recent years from a variety of groups of business leaders, educators and government officials. In this article, the…

  19. Development of High-Tech Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theuerkauf, Walter E.

    High tech systems not only generate new structures in the production process, but also involve profound changes in job organization, which in turn imply that job qualifications must be modified. In view of the changes within engineering systems and the relevant technologies, it seems expedient to choose a curricular approach based on the concepts…

  20. Islamophobia Pre- and Post-September 11th, 2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, Lorraine P.

    2006-01-01

    Although much academic research has addressed racism, religious discrimination has been largely ignored. The current study investigates levels of self reported racial and religious discrimination in a sample of 222 British Muslims. Respondents indicate that following September 11th, 2001, levels of implicit or indirect discrimination rose by 82.6%…

  1. Islamophobia pre- and post-September 11th, 2001.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Lorraine P

    2006-03-01

    Although much academic research has addressed racism, religious discrimination has been largely ignored. The current study investigates levels of self-reported racial and religious discrimination in a sample of 222 British Muslims. Respondents indicate that following September 11th, 2001, levels of implicit or indirect discrimination rose by 82.6% and experiences of overt discrimination by 76.3%. Thus, the current work demonstrates that major world events may affect not only stereotypes of minority groups but also prejudice toward minorities. Results suggest that religious affiliation may be a more meaningful predictor of prejudice than race or ethnicity. General Health Questionnaire scores indicate that 35.6% of participants likely suffered mental health problems, with significant associations between problem-indicative scores and reports of experiencing a specific abusive incident of September 11th-related abuse by respondents. The dearth of empirical work pertaining to religious discrimination and its effects is a cause for concern. PMID:16443594

  2. Islamophobia pre- and post-September 11th, 2001.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Lorraine P

    2006-03-01

    Although much academic research has addressed racism, religious discrimination has been largely ignored. The current study investigates levels of self-reported racial and religious discrimination in a sample of 222 British Muslims. Respondents indicate that following September 11th, 2001, levels of implicit or indirect discrimination rose by 82.6% and experiences of overt discrimination by 76.3%. Thus, the current work demonstrates that major world events may affect not only stereotypes of minority groups but also prejudice toward minorities. Results suggest that religious affiliation may be a more meaningful predictor of prejudice than race or ethnicity. General Health Questionnaire scores indicate that 35.6% of participants likely suffered mental health problems, with significant associations between problem-indicative scores and reports of experiencing a specific abusive incident of September 11th-related abuse by respondents. The dearth of empirical work pertaining to religious discrimination and its effects is a cause for concern.

  3. Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis conference.

    PubMed

    Lee, Violet; Liu, Ang; Groeber, Elizabeth; Moghaddam, Mehran; Schiller, James; Tweed, Joseph A; Walker, Gregory S

    2016-02-01

    Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis conference, Hyatt Regency Hotel, Cambridge, MA, USA, 14-16 September 2015 The Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis (APA) conference took place at the Hyatt Regency hotel in Cambridge, MA, on 14-16 September 2015. The 3-day conference affords pharmaceutical professionals, academic researchers and industry regulators the opportunity to collectively participate in meaningful and relevant discussions impacting the areas of pharmaceutical drug development. The APA conference was organized in three workshops encompassing the disciplines of regulated bioanalysis, discovery bioanalysis (encompassing new and emerging technologies) and biotransformation. The conference included a short course titled 'Bioanalytical considerations for the clinical development of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs)', an engaging poster session, several panel and round table discussions and over 50 diverse talks from leading industry and academic scientists. PMID:26853375

  4. Roots of terrorism: a reassessment after September 11th

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Joseph F.

    2002-01-01

    The brutal terrorist attacks of September 11th, the anthrax attacks that followed and growing knowledge of al Qaeda's pursuit of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons have not only intensified concerns about terrorism but also created doubts about our understanding of terrorism. These attacks were in many ways unprecedented, and ultimately raise the question of the roots or causes of terrorism. Historically and today, there have been divergent views on this question, which reflect philosophical, religious, political, sociological and other differences. These differences are not merely academic, as they can affect our understanding of both the threat and of responses to terrorism in the aftermath of September 11th, Terrorism is too complex and diverse a phenomenon to speak easily of causes. But we may be able to discern the causes of specific acts. Our response to 9/11 and other acts of terrorism will be affected by our understanding of their causes. If 9/11 was caused by US Middle East policies, the response must involve a review of these policies. If it is a backlash against globalization, the response must address the realities underlying anti-globalization sentiments. Addressing causes will not in any case end terrorism, and addressing the wrong causes will be counterproductive. Actions to reduce those conditions that create support for terrorism and aid its recruitment, which need to be clearly identified, are critical in any counterterrorism strategy. So we must understand the reasons for terrorism and, in particular, for the attacks of September 11th.T his paper will look at the question of the roots of terrorism and then look to the specific case of 911 and its aftermath, with a special view to the impact of globalization.

  5. Minimizing Security Vulnerabilities in High-Tech Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozkan, Betul C.; Gunay, Vedat

    2004-01-01

    Emerging technologies are quickly becoming part of daily learning and teaching endeavors in academia. Due to the access to certain high-tech tools educators must learn how to integrate these tools in educational settings. However, many also encounter problems and weaknesses in the same high-tech environment that uses and delivers information…

  6. Technology's Covert Socialization of Children: High-Tech Toys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kritt, David W.

    2001-01-01

    Child's play may be at risk in today's technologically-oriented society. The limited interactive capacities of high-tech toys constrain the possibilities for cognitive development, interpersonal learning, and the quality of relationships that can be formed. Current high-tech toys change the nature of play, so that the object, rather than the…

  7. PREFACE: 11th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinon, Stefania; Pallecchi, Ilaria; Malagoli, Andrea; Lamura, Gianrico

    2014-05-01

    During the 11th edition of the European Conference on Applied Superconductivity, successfully held in Genoa from 15-19 September 2013, more than one thousand participants from over 40 countries were registered and contributions of 7 plenary lectures, 23 invited talks, 203 oral talks and 550 posters were presented. The present issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS) collects the 218 submitted papers that were peer reviewed and accepted in the Conference Proceedings. Similarly to the Superconductor Science and Technology Special issue: ''EUCAS 11th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity'' which contains some plenary and invited contributions, as well as some selected contributions, in this issue the papers are sorted according to the four traditional topics of interest of EUCAS, namely Materials (56 papers), Wires and Tapes (47 papers), Large Scale Applications (64 papers) and Electronics (51 papers). While the it Superconductors Science and Technology special issue focuses on the scientific and technological highlights of the conference, this collection provides an overall view of the worldwide research activity on applied superconductivity, mirroring the main guidelines and the hottest issues, which range from basic studies on newly discovered superconducting compounds to the state-of-the-art advances in large scale applications, wires and tapes fabrication and electronics. We would like to point out that, among the JPCS contributions, six papers present works financed by ongoing EU-Japan projects, three papers belong to the session on junctions and SQUIDs dedicated to the memory of Antonio Barone and one paper belongs to the session on pinning and flux dynamics dedicated to the memory of John Clem. Finally, we would like to thank all the people whose careful work contributed to the preparation of this JPCS issue, in particular the session chairs as well as the peer reviewers. The Editors Stefania Farinon (Editor in Chief, Large Scale

  8. Allina Health System's approach to high tech and high touch.

    PubMed

    Tam, T A

    1997-01-01

    All health care providers, regardless of their integration status, must meet customer expectations to maintain market share and viability. The balance between high tech and high touch customer interactions is not a fad or trend. For integrated health systems with the full continuum of medical care, additional challenges are presented by the organization's competing health care delivery and financing components. Allina Health System describes its integrated health system approach to satisfying customer high tech and high touch needs.

  9. The roots of terrorism: A reassessment after September 11th

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Joseph F.

    2002-01-01

    The brutal terrorist attacks of September 11th, the anthrax attacks that followed and growing knowledge of al Qaeda's pursuit of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons have not only intensified concerns about terrorism but also created doubts about our understanding of terrorism. These attacks were in many ways unprecedented, and ultimately raise the question of the roots or causes of terrorism. Historically and today, there have been divergent views on this question, which reflect philosophical, religious, political and other differences. These differences are not merely academic, as they can affect our understanding of both the threat and of responses to terrorism in the aftermath of September 1 1 th. Terrorism is too complex and diverse a phenomenon to speak easily of causes. But we may be able to discern the causes of specific acts. Our response to 9/11 and other acts of terrorism will be affected by our understanding of their causes, as well as by possible political requirements to address widespread perceptions of causes. If 9/11 was caused by Islamic radicalism, the near-term response must be to ensure the terrorists are defeated and pose no fiuther danger. In the longer term, education is critical. If the attacks were caused by US Middle East policies, the response should involve a review of those policies. This may or may not result in changes to policy, public diplomacy, etc. If the attacks were a backlash against globalization, the response must address the realities underlying anti-globalization sentiments. Addressing causes (real and perceived) will not in any case end terrorism, and addressing the wrong causes can be counterproductive. Actions to reduce those conditions that create support for terrorism and aid its recruitment effort are critical to any counterterrorism strategy. For this reason alone, we must do everything possible to understand the reasons terrorism may be undertaken, including the attacks of September 1 1 th. This paper will look

  10. PREFACE: The 11th International Superconductive Electronics Conference (ISEC 07)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Donald L.; Wellstood, Fred; Donaldson, Gordon

    2007-11-01

    The 11th International Superconductive Electronics Conference (ISEC 07) was held in June 2007 in Washington, DC, USA. This special issue is a compendium of selected papers based on the technology presented at that meeting. ISEC, held on a biennial basis, traditionally rotates from Japan to Europe to the United States. The single exception to this rotation has been the 2003 conference which was held in Australia. This conference brings together the world's experts in superconductive electronics in a forum which is conducive to interaction among the participants with maximal interchange between the various topics. The conference this year was truly an international event with participation from 13 countries over six continents. The quality of presentations was also high. The conference witnessed the continued maturation of both digital/mixed signal electronics and SQUID-based instrumentation along with a number of novel devices. Of particular note was the transition of superconducting quantum computing research from a novel abstract concept to a broad-based research activity. The organizing committee was able to gather an exemplary group of invited speakers to share their results and visions for future progress. These presentations spanned both the subtopics of superconductor electronics and the history of the field. As I reflect on the efforts which went into making this conference a success, I must express my appreciation to many individuals and organizations, in no particular order. I would like to thank Northrop Grumman for their support for my activities as chair of the conference, both in terms of making my time available and for direct financial considerations. Centennial Conferences, as the conference organizer, provided invaluable guidance and administrative support. I would also like to acknowledge the support of the IEEE Council on Superconductivity, in particular in the persons of Moises Levy and John Spargo. I would be remiss if I did not thank John

  11. 77 FR 5056 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: September 11th...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: September 11th Victim Compensation Fund Claimant Eligibility and Compensation Form ACTION: 60-Day Notice of information collection under review. The Department of Justice (DOJ), Civil Division, September 11th Victim Compensation Fund, will...

  12. High-tech, high-touch recruitment: an oxymoron?

    PubMed

    Hart, Karen A

    2008-01-01

    A combination of factors has diluted the recruitment experience and created a confluence of elements similar to a perfect storm. Recruitment has morphed from a high-touch experience to a high-tech process. Though we can't go back to those halcyon pre-Internet days, we do need to find a better approach than our current technology-based, fragmented recruitment process. The ideal recruitment scenario would be a marriage of high tech and high touch. We must drive the technology, not let the technology dictate our process.

  13. Asia's New High-Tech Competitors: An SRS Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rausch, Lawrence M.

    This report profiles nine economies linked by Asian identity, yet marked by great economic and technological disparity, in order to project which economies will be full-fledged participants and competitors in tomorrow's high-tech product markets. Based on the various indicators of technological activity and competitiveness presented in this…

  14. High Touch in a High-Tech World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Cindy L.

    2009-01-01

    In a world of high tech and low touch, it is easy for public relations programs to stray from tried-and-true interpersonal strategies long associated with solid communication planning. New technologies allow communications professionals to quickly send e-mails and telephone calls to selected groups. Social media sites provide users immediate…

  15. Project Synopsis for High School/High Tech

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    To help increase the diversity of workers at NASA centers it is necessary to provide students with disabilities the opportunities to explore careers in high technology. HIGH SCHOOL/HIGH TECH, an enrichment program, pioneered at Goddard Space Flight Center, successfully introduces students with disabilities to high tech careers. This community-based partnership serves as a model for three additional NASA sites-Ames Research Center, Johnson Space Flight Center, and Lewis Research Center. For a three year period beginning August 15, 1995, provide financial and technical support to a local agency in each NASA center area which serves persons with disabilities to enable a High School/High Tech program to develop and stand alone. Each project will develop a basis of cooperation with Ames, Johnson, and Lewis as well as a variety of community groups including the public schools, high tech employers, post-secondary education and training programs, rehabilitation agencies, and community economic development organizations. Throughout the startup period and thereafter, local youths with disabilities will have early exposure to professions in mathematics, science, and technology-related fields. This exposure will be multifaceted to insure adequate opportunity for realistic career exploration so these youths have an opportunity to test their interests and abilities. The exposure will be presented in the most supportive environment that is feasible.

  16. Another Innovation from High Tech High--Embedded Teacher Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, Janie; Riordan, Rob

    2016-01-01

    High Tech High School's teaching internship program blends on-the-job work with classroom theory. Interns spend two years working as full teachers as they take courses. The program serves three large purposes: Train new teachers and build capacity in the HTH organization; train teachers in and beyond HTH for success in a wide range of contexts;…

  17. Employment and Earnings in High-Tech Ethnic Niches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jennifer C.

    2013-01-01

    The increase in high-skilled immigrants to the United States coincided with the expansion of the high-technology sector, and now a large share of Asian immigrants concentrate in high-tech industries. Despite much research on the relationship between ethnic concentration and labor market outcomes, the association between ethnic niche employment and…

  18. A new partnership: joint ventures and high-tech imaging.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, R M

    1987-01-01

    Today joint ventures are a viable option for acquiring high-tech, high-priced imaging equipment. In this article based on his RSNA Associated Sciences presentation, Mr. Rutherford discusses a variety of issues concerning joint ventures: planning, tax considerations, structure and the ethics question.

  19. Perceptions of Diversity Training Needs in High Tech Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Devorah A.; Gurtov, Ellene

    A study questioned 12 human resource personnel, corporation managers, and diversity trainers about their perceptions of diversity training needs in Pacific Northwest high tech organizations. The overarching research questions for the study were as follows: (1) What are the most frequently reported diversity training needs among human resource…

  20. The Effects of 11th Graders' Opinions on Their Interpretation of Conflicting Arguments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Wayne H.

    1998-01-01

    Examines how individual differences in epistemological beliefs, strength of beliefs, and need for cognition affected the written conclusions that 11th graders constructed after reading a passage presenting arguments opposing and supporting gun control. (SR)

  1. 16. NORTHEAST CORNER VIEW OF 10TH AND 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. NORTHEAST CORNER VIEW OF 10TH AND 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. CORNER SHOWS THE DIAGONALLY FLUTED SPIRAL DESIGN OF THE RELIEF COLUMN. - Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company Building, 1519 Franklin Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  2. E SERIES MAGAZINES, OVERVIEW OF REAR OF MAGAZINES FROM 11TH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    E SERIES MAGAZINES, OVERVIEW OF REAR OF MAGAZINES FROM 11TH ST. E 106 IN THE FOREGROUND. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Magazine Type, Eleventh, Thirteenth, Fifteenth, Sixteenth, & Seventeenth Streets, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. VIEW OF COMPANY HOUSES ON 11TH STREET AT THE RAILROAD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF COMPANY HOUSES ON 11TH STREET AT THE RAILROAD TRACKS. No. 401 to right (asbestos siding). House on left has retained the original clapboard siding. - Town of Windber, Windber, Somerset County, PA

  4. 14. CLOSEUP VIEW OF THE 10TH AND 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. CLOSE-UP VIEW OF THE 10TH AND 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. WINDOWS HAVE WHITE TERRA COTTA SILLS, HEADS AND MULLIONS. ARCHES ARE OF TERRA COTTA INCLUDING ORNAMENTATION ABOVE THE 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. CIRCULAR ORNAMENTATIONS BETWEEN ARCHES ARE TERRA COTTA PAINTED IN BRONZE COLOR. LOUVERS ON THE WINDOWS ARE NOT PART OF THE ORIGINAL DESIGN. THIS IS THE FRONT ELEVATION. - Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company Building, 1519 Franklin Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  5. Wearable high-tech gear for homeland security personnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswarlu, Ronda; Hui Wei, Choo; Li Lian, Ngiam; Lim, E. T.; Zhu, Zijian; Yang, Mingjiang

    2006-05-01

    Recent homeland security problems in various countries indicate that fixed surveillance systems at important places are not adequate enough. As the security threats take new dimensions in future, mobile smart security personnel wearing high-tech gear will form the basic infrastructure. See first, listen first, detect first, track first, communicate first with peers, assess the threat and coordinate with security head-quarters are the functions of high-tech gear. This paper proposes a high-tech gear involving (i) hands-free and obtrusion-free textile-based wearable microphone array to capture users voice and interface with body-worn computer, (ii) microphone arrays embedded in textiles to listen and record others voices from a distance, (iii) miniature cameras embedded in the shirt to provide the user with omni vision (iv) wireless personal display as GUI hidden in textile or natural glasses, (v) GPS and body area network for positional awareness for information in the form of text or textile integrated, (vi) reconfigurable HW/SW for all the above functions configured in the form of a usual belt. The main focus of this paper is how to configure the high-tech gear with all these sophisticated functions to disappear into the natural wearables of the user giving him normal look in the public. This project is sponsored by Defence Science & Technology Agency, Ministry of Defence, Singapore. This paper covers multi-discipline technologies at system level, hence not possible to go into details of any subsystem. The main objective of this paper is to share our thoughts and get feedback. Progress and some critical design issues are discussed in this paper.

  6. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Cervix Cancer: High-Tech External Beam Therapy Versus High-Tech Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Georg, Dietmar Kirisits, Christian; Hillbrand, Martin; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Poetter, Richard

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: Many studies comparing external-beam therapy (EBT) and brachytherapy (BT) are biased because advanced EBT is compared with conventional BT. This study compares high-tech EBT against high-tech BT. Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected with locally advanced cervix cancer, representing typical clinical situations according to initial tumor extension and response after EBT. Patients were treated either with intracavitary, combined interstitial/intracavitary, or complex interstitial BT. Gross tumor volume, high-risk clinical target volume (CTV), intermediate-risk CTV, bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were delineated. Magnetic resonance-guided BT planning was manually optimized with respect to organ dose limits. Margins (3 and 5 mm) were added to BT CTVs to construct planning target volumes (PTVs) for EBT. Inversely planned EBT with photons (IMRT) and protons (IMPT) was challenged to deliver the highest possible doses to PTVs while respecting D{sub 1cc} and D{sub 2cc} limits from BT, assuming the same fractionation (4 x 7 Gy). The D90 for target structures and normal tissue volumes receiving fractionated doses between 3 and 7 Gy were compared. Results: High-risk CTV doses depended on the clinical situation and radiation quality. If IMRT was limited to D{sub 2cc} and D{sub 1cc} from BT, the D90 for high-risk PTV and intermediate-risk PTV was mostly lower. Volumes receiving 60 Gy (in equivalent dose in 20 Gy fractions) were approximately twice as large for IMRT compared with BT. For IMPT, this volume ratio was lower. Planning target volume doses of IMPT plans with 3-mm margins were comparable to those with BT. Gross tumor volume doses were mostly lower for both IMRT and IMPT. Conclusion: For benchmarking high-tech EBT, high-tech BT techniques have to be used. For cervix cancer boost treatments, both IMRT and IMPT seem to be inferior to advanced BT.

  7. Emotional Intelligence as a Predictor of Leadership of Kuwaiti High and Low Achieving 11th Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alnabhan, Mousa

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined the association between emotional intelligence (EI) and the Leadership components (L) of high school students in the state of Kuwait. The possibility of predicting each leadership component via emotional intelligence components was investigated for high and low achievers. A sample of 11th grade students from Kuwaiti…

  8. Asian Studies: Experimental Course of Study, 11th or 12th Year Elective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fryberg, Carl

    This experimental course of study has a twofold purpose. Primarily, it is intended to serve as basis for an elective for the 11th or 12th year student. Openended in organization, it encourages teachers and students to add new dimensions. It provides a comprehensive bibliography and detailed information with which to develop an elective in the area…

  9. 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NIH Pain Consortium will convene the 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research, featuring keynote speakers and expert panel sessions on Innovative Models and Methods. The first keynote address will be delivered by David J. Clark, MD, PhD, Stanford University entitled “Challenges of Translational Pain Research: What Makes a Good Model?” |

  10. Court Says 11th Amendment Does Not Bar All Lawsuits against Public Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaschik, Scott

    1994-01-01

    A federal appeals court decision suggests that public colleges may not be covered by the Constitution's 11th amendment prohibiting state governments from being sued in federal court. By the ruling, the institution loses immunity by having funds other than state appropriations with which to pay damages in the lawsuits. (MSE)

  11. Labor Market Effects of September 11th on Arab and Muslim Residents of the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaushal, Neeraj; Kaestner, Robert; Reimers, Cordelia

    2007-01-01

    We investigated whether the September 11, 2001 terrorists' attacks had any effect on employment, earnings, and residential mobility of first- and second-generation Arab and Muslim men in the United States. We find that September 11th did not significantly affect employment and hours of work of Arab and Muslim men, but was associated with a 9-11…

  12. 77 FR 43823 - Filing Dates for the Michigan Special Election in the 11th Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION Filing Dates for the Michigan Special Election in the 11th Congressional District AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special election. SUMMARY: Michigan has...

  13. Impact of the September 11th Terrorist Attacks on Teenagers' Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Madelyn S.; Munfakh, Jimmie Lou Harris; Kleinman, Marjorie; Lubell, Keri; Provenzano, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    The impact of the September 11th terrorist attacks on adolescents' mental health is reported. Two successive cohorts of students in 6 New York state high schools, identified from health courses, completed an in-school self-report baseline assessment of hopelessness, impairment, and help-seeking behavior. One year later, these students completed a…

  14. 77 FR 21107 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: September 11th...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: September 11th Victim Compensation Fund Claimant Eligibility and Compensation Form ACTION: 30-Day Notice of Information Collection Under Review. The Department of Justice...

  15. Review of "The September 11th Education Program: A National Interdisciplinary Curriculum"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterson, Robert A.; Jenne, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    A review of "The September 11th Education Program: A National Interdisciplinary Curriculum" reveals a sensitive and well-created program for the 5-12 social studies teacher to use in teaching about the challenging subject of 9/11. This program provides an opportunity for teachers to find a balance among understanding, critical analysis,…

  16. Education Scholars' Reflections on the Implications of September 11th for Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pace, Judith L.

    2002-01-01

    Presents the reflections of five educational scholars on the potential impact of the events of September 11th on curriculum and how to address it. Edited excerpts are featured from Maxine Greene, Nel Noddings, Jesse Goodman, Michael Apple, and Gloria Ladson-Billings. Respondents address such issues as cultural awareness, moral education, and…

  17. Agreement on Use of 11th Grade Smarter Balanced Assessment Results for Student Placement. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This issue brief lists the agreement principles relating to the use of 11th grade career and college readiness assessment results for student placement in Washington community and technical colleges. As part of the Washington implementation of the new Common Core State Standards for college- and career-readiness, the agreement described herein has…

  18. September 11th, the Internet, and the Affects on Information Provision in Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Stuart

    The September 11th terrorist attacks on the United States have contributed greatly to a change in the information environment around the world. The weeks following the attacks saw governments around the world rush to pass legislation designed to prevent future acts of terrorism. Much of this legislation targeted information flow, especially on the…

  19. Expertise, Argumentation and Scientific Practice: A Case Study about Environmental Education in the 11th Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez Alexandre, Maria Pilar; Pereiro Munoz, Cristina; Aznar Cuadrado, Virginia

    This paper reports a case study about argumentation and scientific practice in the 11th grade. The objectives of the study are to identify argument patterns and dimensions of the scientific practice in students' conversations and actions while engaged in an environmental management project in a wetland. The focus are the warrants that students…

  20. Adolescent Vulnerability Following the September 11th Terrorist Attacks: A Study of Parents and Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gil-Rivas, Virginia; Holman, E. Alison; Silver, Roxane Cohen

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 2 weeks after September 11th, adolescents from a national sample of households who were indirectly exposed to the terrorist attacks through the media completed a Web-based survey that assessed event-related acute stress symptoms. One year later, these adolescents (N = 142) and a randomly selected parent from their household completed…

  1. State Education & Environment Roundtable (SEER) Seminar (11th, Des Moines, Iowa, May 20-24, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Gerald A.; Hoody, Linda L.

    This document reports on the 11th seminar of the State Education and Environment Roundtable (SEER). It consists of brief overviews of the daily discussions and presentations that were made at the seminar. Topics discussed include potential partnerships with national language arts organizations and associations, how environmental justice issues…

  2. The Federal Forecasters Conference--2000. Papers and Proceedings (11th, Washington, DC, September 14, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerald, Debra, E., Ed.

    The 11th Federal Forecasters Conference provided a forum where 180 forecasters from different federal agencies and other organizations could meet and discuss forecasting in the United States. The theme for this conference was "Forecasting, Policy, and the Internet." In the morning session, a panel presentation featured three speakers. Neilson C.…

  3. "Size Matters": Women in High Tech Start-Ups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackritz, Hilary

    2001-03-01

    For those who want constant excitement, change, and rapid opportunities to have an impact in the technical world, start-up companies offer wonderful challenges. This talk will focus realistically on rewards and risks in the start-up world. An outline of the differences between the high tech start-ups and the academic and consulting worlds from a personal viewpoint will be presented. Size usually does matter, and in this case, small size can equal independence, entrepreneurship, and other advantages that are hard to come by in Dilbert’s corporate world.

  4. The Reporting of the September 11th Terrorist Attacks in American Social Studies Textbooks: A Muslim Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleem, Mohammed M.; Thomas, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the reporting of the September 11th terrorist attacks in social studies textbooks from a Muslim perspective and reports on findings from a study of the responses of American Muslim children to the treatment of the events of September 11th in social studies textbooks. Constructivist grounded theory was used to centralize the…

  5. High-Tech Means High-Efficiency: The Business Case for EnergyManagement in High-Tech Industries

    SciTech Connect

    Shanshoian, Gary; Blazek, Michele; Naughton, Phil; Seese, RobertS.; Mills, Evan; Tschudi, William

    2005-11-15

    In the race to apply new technologies in ''high-tech'' facilities such as data centers, laboratories, and clean rooms, much emphasis has been placed on improving service, building capacity, and increasing speed. These facilities are socially and economically important, as part of the critical infrastructure for pharmaceuticals,electronics, communications, and many other sectors. With a singular focus on throughput, some important design issues can be overlooked, such as the energy efficiency of individual equipment (e.g., lasers, routers and switches) as well as the integration of high-tech equipment into the power distribution system and the building envelope. Among technology-based businesses, improving energy efficiency presents an often untapped opportunity to increase profits, enhance process control,maximize asset value, improve the work place environment, and manage a variety of business risks. Oddly enough, the adoption of energy efficiency improvements in this sector lags behind many others. As a result, millions of dollars are left on the table with each year ofoperation.

  6. Lille takes lead in high-tech French recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Larane, A.

    1995-11-01

    Lille, capital of the Nord region of northern France, believes in the virtues of selective sorting. To assure that its recycling efforts are successful, the city has appointed specialist French companies to develop high-tech solutions. As waste sorting in the city becomes more mechanized, refuse is now being collected by using refuse bins fitted with a silicon chip to aid in the collection and recycling process. The city of Lille has a population of 1 million residents.Suburban residents are now being supplied with two recycling bins--each with two compartments--manufactured by the French company Plastic Ominum (Paris). The first bin, which is blue, has one compartment for paper and cardboard and one for glass, plastic bottles, and other types of containers. The second bin, brown in color has one compartment for biodegradable waste and the other for non-recoverable waste.

  7. The enduring mental health impact of the September 11th terrorist attacks: challenges and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Ozbay, Fatih; Auf der Heyde, Tanja; Reissman, Dori; Sharma, Vansh

    2013-09-01

    The authors review the existing literature on the mental health impact of the September 11th attacks and the implications for disaster mental health clinicians and policy makers. The authors discuss the demographic characteristics of those affected and the state of mental health needs and existing mental health delivery services; the nature of the disaster and primary impacts on lives, infrastructure, and socioeconomic factors; the acute aftermath in the days and weeks after the attacks; the persistent mental health impact and evolution of services of the postacute aftermath; and the implications for future disaster mental health practitioners and policy makers. PMID:23954056

  8. The enduring mental health impact of the September 11th terrorist attacks: challenges and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Ozbay, Fatih; Auf der Heyde, Tanja; Reissman, Dori; Sharma, Vansh

    2013-09-01

    The authors review the existing literature on the mental health impact of the September 11th attacks and the implications for disaster mental health clinicians and policy makers. The authors discuss the demographic characteristics of those affected and the state of mental health needs and existing mental health delivery services; the nature of the disaster and primary impacts on lives, infrastructure, and socioeconomic factors; the acute aftermath in the days and weeks after the attacks; the persistent mental health impact and evolution of services of the postacute aftermath; and the implications for future disaster mental health practitioners and policy makers.

  9. [The development of strategic management of high-tech surgical medical care].

    PubMed

    Nechaev, V S; Krasnov, A V

    2013-01-01

    The high-tech surgical medical care is one of the most effective types of medical care in Russia. However high-tech surgical treatment very often is inaccessible for patients. The development of basics of strategic management of high-tech surgical care makes it possible to enhance availability of this type of care and to shorten the gap between volumes of rendered care and population needs. This approach can be resulted in decrease of disability and mortality of the most prevalent diseases of cardio-vascular diseases, malignant neoplasms, etc. The prerequisites can be developed to enhance life quality and increase longevity of population.

  10. PREFACE: 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizuka, Tomonori

    2008-07-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains papers based on invited talks and contributed posters presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers. This meeting was held at the Tsukuba International Congress Center in Tsukuba, Japan, on 26-28 September 2007, and was organized jointly by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency and the University of Tsukuba. The previous ten meetings in this series were held in San Diego (USA) 1987, Gut Ising (Germany) 1989, Abingdon (UK) 1991, Naka (Japan) 1993, Princeton (USA) 1995, Kloster Seeon (Germany) 1997, Oxford (UK) 1999, Toki (Japan) 2001, San Diego (USA) 2003, and St Petersburg (Russia) 2005. The purpose of the eleventh meeting was to present and discuss new results on H-mode (edge transport barrier, ETB) and internal transport barrier, ITB, experiments, theory and modeling in magnetic fusion research. It was expected that contributions give new and improved insights into the physics mechanisms behind high confinement modes of H-mode and ITBs. Ultimately, this research should lead to improved projections for ITER. As has been the tradition at the recent meetings of this series, the program was subdivided into six topics. The topics selected for the eleventh meeting were: H-mode transition and the pedestal-width Dynamics in ETB: ELM threshold, non-linear evolution and suppression, etc Transport relations of various quantities including turbulence in plasmas with ITB: rotation physics is especially highlighted Transport barriers in non-axisymmetric magnetic fields Theory and simulation on transport barriers Projections of transport barrier physics to ITER For each topic there was an invited talk presenting an overview of the topic, based on contributions to the meeting and on recently published external results. The six invited talks were: A Leonard (GA, USA): Progress in characterization of the H-mode pedestal and L-H transition N Oyama (JAEA, Japan): Progress and issues in

  11. High-touch or high-tech marketing? Which way are we going? Both!

    PubMed

    Botvin, J D

    2001-01-01

    Concurrent trends are promoting two different approaches to healthcare marketing. Some organizations are showcasing their "tender loving care," while others are emphasizing their high-tech capabilities. Read about some examples of each, and then discover what's next!

  12. Problems and Countermeasures of Zhejiang High-Tech Enterprises Industry-University-Institute Cooperation in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qing; Mao, Chong-Feng; Hou, Lin

    Industry-university-institute cooperation is an important means to accelerate technical development and achievements for high-tech enterprises. Considering that Zhejiang high-tech enterprises existed some problems which included low cooperative level, single distribution, weak secondary R&D ability, obvious risk and so on, government should play an guiding role on improving information service system, enhancing cooperative level, promoting scientific intermediary service organization system construction, and building better environment for Industry-university-institute cooperation.

  13. High tech. High touch. John Naisbett's world view.

    PubMed

    Naisbett, John

    2002-04-01

    History will record that 20 years ago, a man named John Naisbett made a contribution which literally changed the world, with his book Megatrends. It changed the way that we think about the world. It changed the way that we think about ourselves. A distinguished scholar, John Naisbett has worked in many different settings, including at the White House under Lyndon B. Johnson. He spent many years at Harvard University, and is best known for introducing a quantitative analysis of the major trends affecting America. One of those, of course, was demographics. Another was the aging of the planet. Another was technology. He recently authored a new book, High Tech, High Touch. Home care has "high touch" down to a science: that's the kind of care for which home care is famous. It is also important, however, that we introduce technology. As technology changes and offers the ability to provide new and more efficient ways of providing care, we need to embrace that opportunity. History will record that 20 years ago, a man named John Naisbett made a contribution which literally changed the world, with his book Megatrends. It changed the way that we think about the world. It changed the way that we think about ourselves. He delivered the following speech at the 2001 National Association for Home Care Annual Meeting.

  14. 11th National Conference on Science, Policy, and the Environment: Our Changing Oceans

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Saundry

    2012-04-17

    On January 19-21, 2011, The National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE) successfully convened its 11th National Conference on Science, Policy and the Environment: Our Changing Oceans in Washington, DC at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center. Over 1,247 participants attended the conference, representing federal, state and local governments, university and colleges across the US, civil society organizations, the business community, and international entities. In addition, the conference was webcast to an audience across several states. The conference provided a forum to examine the profound changes our ocean will undergo over the next 25-50 years and share various perspectives on the new research, tools, and policy initiatives to protect and sustain our ocean. Conference highlights and recommendations are available to the public on NCSE's conference website, www.OurChangingOceans.org.

  15. September 11th--ripples across the ocean: perspectives from Tripler Army Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Staudenmeier, James J; Hill, Jeffrey V

    2002-09-01

    The events of September 11, 2001, or 9-11 as called by the media, will live in United States' memory forever. Even far-flung Hawaii shuddered with the rest of the United States. This brief article describes the September 11th experiences and fallout of three individuals living in Hawaii. One is a description of how the events worsened a client's illness. Two others are psychiatrists' accounts: one staff, another child fellow. These accounts describe how even those living in remote locales may be affected by significant world events. Even though individuals may not appear to be at risk to have much risk of psychopathology, they may experience subclinical symptoms. Individuals who do have mental illness may risk worsening of their symptoms. PMID:12363156

  16. Forgiving the September 11th terrorists: associations with coping, psychological distress, and religiosity.

    PubMed

    Rhoades, Galena Kline; McIntosh, Daniel N; Wadsworth, Martha E; Ahlkvist, Jarl A; Burwell, Rebecca A; Gudmundsen, Gretchen R; Raviv, Tali; Rea, Jacqueline G

    2007-06-01

    Two studies examined how non-interpersonal forgiveness (when there is no social relationship between the transgressor and forgiver) related to coping and involuntary responses to stress, psychological distress, and religiosity. Three to six weeks after September 11th, 2001, forgiveness had non-linear associations with other responses to the terrorist attacks. Among college students (N=488), those who were trying or had forgiven (pro-forgiveness) the terrorists reported less involuntary engagement, more primary and secondary control coping, and more meaning finding than those who were unsure about forgiveness (ambivalent) and those who did not believe the perpetrators should be forgiven (anti-forgiveness). Ambivalent students reported the most distress, even after controlling for religion. Anti-forgiveness students reported less religiosity than ambivalent and pro-forgiveness students. Most findings were consistent among middle schoolers (N=154), particularly regarding psychological distress and responses to stress. Also, forgiveness of strangers for acts against one's community functioned separately from religion.

  17. Wake of September 11th attacks: implications for research, policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Darden, Madeline Lyles

    2002-02-01

    The National Consortium for African American Children (NCAAC) held a National Forum on Bioterrorism and Children on November 6, 2001 in Washington, DC. Convened in the wake of the September 11th attacks on New York City and the Pentagon, this unprecedented conference assembled a cross-section of professionals in child advocacy, health, mental health, insurance, economics, law enforcement, and media technology. The ensuing discussion focused on issues surrounding biological agents, their impact on children and youth, and the strategies needed to protect the health and mental health of children and families in the event of a large-scale bioterrorist crisis. Lessons learned as well as the implications of the terrorist acts from the tragic events of September 11th formed the backdrop for engaging dialogue among various industry executives and professionals. Accounts of personal experiences during the unprecedented tragedy of 9-11 were shared and provided a context for heightened preparedness planning for children and adults. A collaborative statement was also presented by NCAAC, the National Medical Association, the Association of Black Psychologists, and the National Black Media Coalition. This forum was hailed as a model for communities of color to join and help bolster broad-based coalition building to ensure the availability of culturally and linguistically appropriate messages, services, and support. As intended, the forum devoted significant attention to the special needs of children, their caregivers and families and provided for an invaluable interchange which is slated to evolve into a national action plan to address the imminent dangers facing our nation's children.

  18. Wake of September 11th attacks: implications for research, policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Darden, Madeline Lyles

    2002-02-01

    The National Consortium for African American Children (NCAAC) held a National Forum on Bioterrorism and Children on November 6, 2001 in Washington, DC. Convened in the wake of the September 11th attacks on New York City and the Pentagon, this unprecedented conference assembled a cross-section of professionals in child advocacy, health, mental health, insurance, economics, law enforcement, and media technology. The ensuing discussion focused on issues surrounding biological agents, their impact on children and youth, and the strategies needed to protect the health and mental health of children and families in the event of a large-scale bioterrorist crisis. Lessons learned as well as the implications of the terrorist acts from the tragic events of September 11th formed the backdrop for engaging dialogue among various industry executives and professionals. Accounts of personal experiences during the unprecedented tragedy of 9-11 were shared and provided a context for heightened preparedness planning for children and adults. A collaborative statement was also presented by NCAAC, the National Medical Association, the Association of Black Psychologists, and the National Black Media Coalition. This forum was hailed as a model for communities of color to join and help bolster broad-based coalition building to ensure the availability of culturally and linguistically appropriate messages, services, and support. As intended, the forum devoted significant attention to the special needs of children, their caregivers and families and provided for an invaluable interchange which is slated to evolve into a national action plan to address the imminent dangers facing our nation's children. PMID:11853055

  19. PREFACE: 11th Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffari, Nader; Lhémery, Alain; Lowe, Mike

    2013-08-01

    The 11th Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC) was held in Brighton, UK on 18-20 January 2012. This event, which is an annual collaboration between the Physical Acoustics Group (PAG) of the Institute of Physics and the Groupe d'Acoustique Physique, Sous-marine et UltraSonore (GAPSUS) of the Société Française d'Acoustique, successfully achieved its main aim of being a small, friendly meeting of high scientific quality, welcoming younger researchers and PhD students and covering a broad range of subjects in Acoustics. The participants heard 44 excellent presentations covering an exciting and diverse range of subjects, from audio acoustics to guided waves in composites and from phononic crystals to ultrasound surgery. As is the custom at these meetings, four prominent invited speakers set the pace for the event; these were Keith Attenborough (The Open University, UK), Claire Prada (Institut Langevin, France), David Moore (University of Nottingham, UK) and Philippe Roux (IS Terre, France). The submission of manuscripts for publication in the proceedings was, as in previous years, on a voluntary basis and in these proceedings we present 11 peer reviewed papers. Due to some unforeseen problems there has been a longer than planned delay in preparing these proceedings, for which the Editors sincerely apologise to the authors and the community. Nader Saffari, Mike Lowe and Alain Lhémery

  20. Nasal dorsum reconstruction with 11th rib cartilage and auricular cartilage grafts.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Pietro; Cervelli, Valerio

    2009-01-01

    We present a review of international literature on the topic of nasal dorsum reconstruction with 11th rib cartilage and auricular cartilage grafts, analyzing 123 patients selected from 653 cases of rhinoplasties performed between January 1990 and October 2007 at the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery of the University of Rome "Tor Vergata." We present our experience with the correction of deformities of the nasal dorsum using rib cartilage and auricular cartilage grafts. The majority of the time, nasal dorsum deformities are complicated defects to correct surgically. They can be a consequence of naso-ethmoid-orbital fractures and of surgical procedures in the nasal area where a loss of bone or septal cartilaginous support has occurred. After a review of the techniques employed in the reconstruction, we describe the advantage of the use of rib cartilage and our experience using this procedure. In the sample examined, 84% of treated patients showed cosmetic improvements, with satisfactory results to both surgeon and patient. A functional improvement has been achieved in 94% of the operated cases. PMID:19131722

  1. Gut Microbiome of an 11th Century A.D. Pre-Columbian Andean Mummy

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Fornaciari, Gino; Luciani, Stefania; Dowd, Scot E.; Toranzos, Gary A.; Marota, Isolina; Cano, Raul J.

    2015-01-01

    The process of natural mummification is a rare and unique process from which little is known about the resulting microbial community structure. In the present study, we characterized the microbiome of paleofeces, and ascending, transverse and descending colon of an 11th century A.D. pre-Columbian Andean mummy by 16S rRNA gene high-throughput sequencing and metagenomics. Firmicutes were the most abundant bacterial group, with Clostridium spp. comprising up to 96.2% of the mummified gut, while Turicibacter spp. represented 89.2% of the bacteria identified in the paleofeces. Microbiome profile of the paleofeces was unique when compared to previously characterized coprolites that did not undergo natural mummification. We identified DNA sequences homologous to Clostridium botulinum, Trypanosoma cruzi and human papillomaviruses (HPVs). Unexpectedly, putative antibiotic-resistance genes including beta-lactamases, penicillin-binding proteins, resistance to fosfomycin, chloramphenicol, aminoglycosides, macrolides, sulfa, quinolones, tetracycline and vancomycin, and multi-drug transporters, were also identified. The presence of putative antibiotic-resistance genes suggests that resistance may not necessarily be associated with a selective pressure of antibiotics or contact with European cultures. Identification of pathogens and antibiotic-resistance genes in ancient human specimens will aid in the understanding of the evolution of pathogens as a way to treat and prevent diseases caused by bacteria, microbial eukaryotes and viruses. PMID:26422376

  2. Gut Microbiome of an 11th Century A.D. Pre-Columbian Andean Mummy.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Fornaciari, Gino; Luciani, Stefania; Dowd, Scot E; Toranzos, Gary A; Marota, Isolina; Cano, Raul J

    2015-01-01

    The process of natural mummification is a rare and unique process from which little is known about the resulting microbial community structure. In the present study, we characterized the microbiome of paleofeces, and ascending, transverse and descending colon of an 11th century A.D. pre-Columbian Andean mummy by 16S rRNA gene high-throughput sequencing and metagenomics. Firmicutes were the most abundant bacterial group, with Clostridium spp. comprising up to 96.2% of the mummified gut, while Turicibacter spp. represented 89.2% of the bacteria identified in the paleofeces. Microbiome profile of the paleofeces was unique when compared to previously characterized coprolites that did not undergo natural mummification. We identified DNA sequences homologous to Clostridium botulinum, Trypanosoma cruzi and human papillomaviruses (HPVs). Unexpectedly, putative antibiotic-resistance genes including beta-lactamases, penicillin-binding proteins, resistance to fosfomycin, chloramphenicol, aminoglycosides, macrolides, sulfa, quinolones, tetracycline and vancomycin, and multi-drug transporters, were also identified. The presence of putative antibiotic-resistance genes suggests that resistance may not necessarily be associated with a selective pressure of antibiotics or contact with European cultures. Identification of pathogens and antibiotic-resistance genes in ancient human specimens will aid in the understanding of the evolution of pathogens as a way to treat and prevent diseases caused by bacteria, microbial eukaryotes and viruses. PMID:26422376

  3. Highlights and summaries of the 11th International Workshops on Opportunistic Protists.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Edna S; Cushion, Melanie T; Marciano-Cabral, Francine; Weiss, Louis M; Xiao, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    The 11th in the series of International Workshops on Opportunistic Protists (IWOP-11) was held in August 2010 on the Big Island of Hawaii. These meetings are devoted to agents of infections that cause serious problems in AIDS patients and other individuals with defective immune systems. International Workshops on Opportunistic Protists serves as a forum for exchange of current research information on Pneumocystis, Cryptosporidium and the Microsporidia, Toxoplasma, free-living amoebae, kinetoplastid flagellates and other pathogens that are particularly pathogenic in immunodeficient hosts. Studies on interactions between host and pathogen, especially host responses, were highlighted in this year's symposium. The lack of in vitro cultivation methods for luxuriant growth of Pneumocystis, Cryptosporidium and the Enterocytozoon bieneusi remains a major hindrance to understanding the basic biology of these organisms and precludes genetic manipulations. However, slow but steady progress is being achieved by hard work including data mining of some completed or partially completed genome sequencing of several IWOP organisms. Of great concern is evidence for dramatic decline in research funding for these pathogens and the lack of appreciation by the larger scientific community concerning the state of art and challenges faced by researchers working on these organisms that can provide critical insight into emerging and reemerging pathogens.

  4. Examining Scientific and Technical Writing Strategies in the 11th Century Chinese Science Book "Brush Talks from Dream Brook"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Yuejiao

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the influential Chinese science book "Brush Talks from Dream Brook," written by Shen Kuo in the 11th century. I suggest that "Brush Talks" reveals a tension between institutionalized science and science in the public, and a gap between the making of scientific knowledge and the communication of such…

  5. Your Reading: An Annotated Booklist for Middle School and Junior High. 11th Edition. NCTE Bibliography Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jean E., Ed.; Stephens, Elaine C., Ed.

    Organized around the theme of "challenges," the 11th edition of "Your Reading" offers annotations of more than 1,200 books for young adults. Intended for teachers, librarians, parents, and students, this booklist presents recently published books that can be read for many purposes--for sheer enjoyment of the story, to pique curiosity or satisfy…

  6. The Effects of Conceptual Change Texts Accompanied with Animations on Overcoming 11th Grade Students' Alternative Conceptions of Chemical Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozmen, Haluk; Demircioglu, Hulya; Demircioglu, Gokhan

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to determine the effect of conceptual change texts accompanied with computer animations on 11th grade students' understanding and alternative conceptions related to chemical bonding. One experimental group (EG; N = 28) and one comparison group (CG; N = 30) were used in the study. While the comparison group taught traditional…

  7. Using ARCS Model to Promote 11th Graders' Motivation and Achievement in Learning about Acids and Bases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feng, Sung-Lin; Tuan, Hsiao-Lin

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of this study are: to apply the ARCS model in designing an acid and bases unit, and to assess a single class of 11th graders for motivation and achievement outcomes before and after ARCS instruction. Four essential strategies for designing motivation instruction in the ARCS model were: Attention, Relevance, Confidence, and…

  8. Investigating Community Factors as Predictors of Rural 11th-Grade Agricultural Science Students' Choice of Careers in Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adedokun, Omolola A.; Balschweid, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the links between community contexts/factors and rural 11th-grade agricultural science students' choice of careers in agriculture. A logistic regression model was developed and tested to examine the extent to which nine measures of community contexts (i.e., membership in FFA, membership in 4-H, community attachment,…

  9. The Effects of Cardio-Syntactic Analysis Instruction on Writing Scores in a 11th Grade High School Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kariuki, Patrick N.; Blair, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the effects of Cardio-Syntactic Analysis instruction on writing scores in an 11th grade English class. The sample consisted of 35 students enrolled in an Honor's English 11 class at Volunteer high School, in Church Hill, TN. The class was randomly assigned into an experimental group of 17 students and…

  10. PREFACE: The 11th General Conference of the Condensed Matter Division of the European Physical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeby, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    The 11th General Conference of the Condensed Matter Division of the European Physical Society was held in Exeter from 8-11 April 1991. The annual Condensed Matter meeting of the UK Institute of Physics, which would have been held in December 1990, was not scheduled in order that there should not be two similar meetings too close together. The Exeter EPS conference followed the traditional pattern for Condensed Matter Division conference by covering a very broad range of topics and including several plenary lectures. In addition, there was a lecture from one of the joint Hewlett-Packard prizewinners, Professor D Jerome, and the annual Mott Lecture was presented by Professor R G Clark. The invited lectures were divided into 5 parallel sessions, in part because of lecture theatre sizes, in which the topics roughly divided into semiconductors (2 sessions), metals and magnetism, high Tc superconductivity and heavy fermions, and soft matter and polymers. A number of contributors of abstracts for poster presentation were offered the opportunity of oral presentation. The three, very full poster sessions, were of a high standard and generated much interest and discussion. One can conclude that condensed matter physics is strong and active in Europe. The papers of the invited talks contained in this volume will allow conference participants the opportunity for further study of the work presented and will also allow those unable to attent the meeting to learn of the interesting results presented. With such a broad subject coverage it is difficult to order the papers in a wholly rational way; according they have been brought together under five broad headings. It is a pleasure to thank all those involved in the Organising and Programme Committees (see PDF file for detail) for their contributions to the Conference. The generosity of the Sponsors (see PDF file for list of sponsors) is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Percutaneous coronary intervention for coronary bifurcation disease: 11th consensus document from the European Bifurcation Club.

    PubMed

    Lassen, Jens Flensted; Holm, Niels Ramsing; Banning, Adrian; Burzotta, Francesco; Lefèvre, Thierry; Chieffo, Alaide; Hildick-Smith, David; Louvard, Yves; Stankovic, Goran

    2016-05-17

    Coronary bifurcations are involved in 15-20% of all percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) and remain one of the most challenging lesions in interventional cardiology in terms of procedural success rate as well as long-term cardiac events. The optimal management of bifurcation lesions is, despite a fast growing body of scientific literature, the subject of considerable debate. The European Bifurcation Club (EBC) was initiated in 2004 to support a continuous overview of the field, and aims to facilitate a scientific discussion and an exchange of ideas on the management of bifurcation disease. The EBC hosts an annual, compact meeting, dedicated to bifurcations, which brings together physicians, engineers, biologists, physicists, epidemiologists and statisticians for detailed discussions. Every meeting is finalised with a consensus statement which reflects the unique opportunity of combining the opinions of interventional cardiologists with the opinions of a large variety of other scientists on bifurcation management. The present 11th EBC consensus document represents the summary of the up-to-date EBC consensus and recommendations. It points to the fact that there is a multitude of strategies and approaches to bifurcation stenting within the provisional strategy and in the different two-stent strategies. The main EBC recommendation for PCI of bifurcation lesions remains to use main vessel (MV) stenting with a proximal optimisation technique (POT) and provisional side branch (SB) stenting as a preferred approach. The consensus document covers a moving target. Much more scientific work is needed in non-left main (LM) and LM bifurcation lesions for continuous improvement of the outcome of our patients. PMID:27173860

  12. Iowa High School High Tech: Promoting Careers in Technology for Students with Disabilities. Final Report and Implementation Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuillen, Terry; Nietupski, John; Berg, Deana Duncan; Daugherty, Vicki; Bildstein, Stephanie

    This final report and implementation manual describes the activities and outcomes of Iowa's High School High Tech (HSHT) program, a joint effort of Grant Wood Area Education Agency and Goodwill Industries of Southeast Iowa to inspire students with disabilities to pursue high tech careers. The program provides opportunities for students to learn…

  13. [Analysis of the definitive statistics of the 11th General Population and Housing Census].

    PubMed

    Aguayo Hernandez, J R

    1992-01-01

    The 11th General Census of Population and Housing conducted in March 1990 enumerated 2,204,054 inhabitants in Sinaloa, for a density of 37.9 per sq. km. Sinaloa's population thus increased sevenfold from 297,000 in 1900. The proportion of Sinalioans in Mexico's population increased from 2.2% in 1900 to 2.7% in 1990. 38.4% of the population was under age 14, 57.0% was 14064, and 4.6% as over 65. The greatest challenge for the year 2010 will be to meet the demand for educational facilities, employment, and services for the growing elderly population. Sinaloa's population grew at an annual rate of 1.1 between 1980-90. 17 of its 18 municipios showed slowing growth rates between 1980-90, with only Escuinapa increasing its rate. Sinaloa's growth rate of 1.8% is still relatively high, and the population in the year 2000 is projected at 2.6 million. Population distribution and migration present problems that should be more actively addressed. Urban-urban migration is increasing in importance. In 1990, Sinaloa had 5247 localities of which only 85 had more than 2500 inhabitants and 4717 had fewer than 500. Growth of midsize localities with 500-2499 inhabitants may constitute an alternative allowing the demographic deconcentration and decentralization that Sinaloa urgently requires. The lack of jobs, infrastructure, educational and health services, housing, and food in the dispersed 4717 communities with fewer than 500 inhabitants makes them sources of emigration. Sinaloa's population is concentrated along the coast and in the 3 valleys of the north and central regions, which contain 80.8% of the population. One-third of the population lives on 12.1% of the territory in 2 municipios, while 12 municipios covering 67% of the territory contain just 24% of the population. Sinaloa's growth rate has declined from 4.3% between 1960-70 to 3.7% from 1970-80 and 1.8% in 1980-90.

  14. Selected papers from the 11th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdeghini, Carlo; Putti, Marina

    2014-04-01

    The 11th edition of the European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS) was held in Genoa (15-19 September 2013) and registered the participation of more than one thousand attendants from over 40 countries. During the conference seven plenary lectures, 23 invited, and 203 oral contributions and 550 posters have been presented, all focused on recent developments in the field of superconductivity applications. This issue of Superconductor Science Technology is a collection of some of the plenary and invited contributions. Moreover, the winners of the EUCAS prizes (the electronics prize dedicated to the memory of Antonio Barone), and the most significant oral contributions selected by the 125 chairs involved in the organization, have been invited to submit their papers. The remaining papers presented at the conference will be published in the Journal Physics Conference Series, edited by S Farinon, G Lamura, A Malagoli and I Pallecchi. The papers have been organized into the four traditional topics of interest of EUCAS, namely materials, wires and tapes, large scale applications, and electronics. The plenary lectures on these four topics have been collected: Potential of iron-based superconductors for practical materials in the future (J Shimoyama), Coated conductors for power applications: materials challenges (J Obradors), Challenges and status of ITER conductor production (A Devred), and the Impact of superconducting devices in imaging in neuroscience (G L Romani). We hope that this issue will let you taste the flavours, hear the sounds and see the colours of this exciting EUCAS edition. The very large participation in EUCAS 2013 has allowed debates on a wide range of topics, starting from the most basic studies on emergent materials up to the new developments in electronics and large scale applications. A round table on HTS Conductors was experimented for the first time gathering material scientists, wire manufacturers and device builders in a stimulating

  15. PREFACE: 11th International Workshop on Positron and Positronium Chemistry (PPC-11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujari, P. K.; Sudarshan, K.; Dutta, D.

    2015-06-01

    The International Workshop on Positron and Positronium Chemistry (PPC) is a prestigious triennial conference series with a rich history. The 11th meeting in the series (PPC-11) was held at Cidade de Goa, Goa, India during 9-14, November, 2014. It was organized by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai. The co-organizers were Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics (SINP), Kolkata, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam and Indian Association of Nuclear Chemists and Allied Scientists (IANCAS), Mumbai. PPC-11 attracted participants both from academic institutions and industries. About 120 participants from 20 countries representing all continents participated in the conference. The conference continued the tradition of excellence in terms of quality of presentations and discussions. There were 33 plenary and invited talks, 39 oral presentations and 40 posters. The conference stood true to its multidisciplinary tag with papers presented in the fields of fundamentals of positron and positronium chemistry, applications in polymers, porous materials, metals/alloys, studies in liquids, biological applications as well as developments in theory and experimental techniques. The enthusiastic participation of senior researchers and young students made the scientific program a grand success. In order to encourage the student participants (twenty) and promote excellence, a committee of senior members evaluated their presentations and the top three contributions were awarded. The positron and positronium community paid homage to the memory of late Profs. J. Kristiak and A.T. Stewart. A brief sketch of their life and work was presented by Profs. Jan Kuriplach and Toshio Hyodo, respectively. All the papers published in these proceedings have been peer reviewed by the participants of PPC-11. Editors thank all the reviewers for sparing their valuable time and helping us in bringing out the proceedings with 43 contributed articles in the scheduled time. We are

  16. Assessment of China's Energy-Saving and Emission-Reduction Accomplishments and Opportunities During the 11th Five Year Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, Mark D.; Price, Lynn; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; Aden, Nathaniel; Lu, Hongyou; McNeil, Michael; Zheng, Nina; Yining, Qin; Yowargana, Ping

    2010-04-28

    During the period 1980 to 2002, China experienced a 5% average annual reduction in energy consumption per unit of gross domestic product (GDP). The period 2002-2005 saw a dramatic reversal of the historic relationship between energy use and GDP growth: energy use per unit of GDP increased an average of 3.8% per year during this period (NBS, various years). China's 11th Five Year Plan (FYP), which covers the period 2006-2010, required all government divisions at different levels to reduce energy intensity by 20% in five years in order to regain the relationship between energy and GDP growth experienced during the 1980s and 1990s. This report provides an assessment of selected policies and programs that China has instituted in its quest to fulfill the national goal of a 20% reduction in energy intensity by 2010. The report finds that China has made substantial progress toward its goal of achieving 20% energy intensity reduction from 2006 to 2010 and that many of the energy-efficiency programs implemented during the 11th FYP in support of China's 20% energy/GDP reduction goal appear to be on track to meet - or in some cases even exceed - their energy-saving targets. It appears that most of the Ten Key Projects, the Top-1000 Program, and the Small Plant Closure Program are on track to meet or surpass the 11th FYP savings goals. China's appliance standards and labeling program, which was established prior to the 11th FYP, has become very robust during the 11th FYP period. China has greatly enhanced its enforcement of new building energy standards but energy-efficiency programs for buildings retrofits, as well as the goal of adjusting China's economic structure to reduce the share of energy consumed by industry, do not appear to be on track to meet the stated goals. With the implementation of the 11th FYP now bearing fruit, it is important to maintain and strengthen the existing energy-saving policies and programs that are successful while revising programs or adding new

  17. Are You What You Eat? An inside Look at High-Tech Food

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Roxanne Greitz

    2007-01-01

    If we abide by the familiar saying "you are what you eat," it is understandable that people may be concerned with the incredible advances in food science technology and their possible impacts on human health. For example, in recent years high-tech scientific processes such as genetic modification, irradiation, and cloning have all been used to…

  18. A World of Competitors: Assessing the US High-Tech Advantage and the Process of Globalisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglass, John Aubrey

    2008-01-01

    Research universities throughout the world are part of a larger effort by countries to bolster science and technological innovation and compete economically. The United States remains highly competitive as a source of high-tech innovation because of a number of market positions, many the results of long-term investments in institutions (such as…

  19. High Tech and the Upward Mobility of Non-Technical People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kammire, Linda L.

    The social and psychological effects of rapid technological advancement in the computer industry is the subject of this paper, which focuses on the concerns of people with non-technical backgrounds. It describes the career series, High Tech for Non-Technical People, created by the Georgia State University Career Development Center. The three…

  20. Spaces of Innovation: Experiences from Two Small High-Tech Firms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiskanen, Tuula; Heiskanen, Hannu

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: By comparing two small high-tech firms specialising in medical technology this article seeks to answer the following questions: What are the key characteristics of innovation processes in the case firms? How do the mutual relationships between mental, social and physical spaces explain the different pathways in the innovation processes in…

  1. Technicians and Interpersonal Dynamics: Instilling High Touch in High Tech Departments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodrill, Earl R.

    The 1990s saw a significant increase in the amount of technology used in the classroom and an increased need for individuals with high-tech skills. However, while this mass technology was being integrated, the human skills of instruction and advisement were being lost. Technology seemed to be negatively influencing the learning process. As a…

  2. Organizational Attributes and Learning beyond the Boundaries: Comparative Case Studies of Two High-Tech Firms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhong, Jing; Wu, Sizong; Li, Jun

    2008-01-01

    This study compares two high-tech firms in terms of their differences in organizational characteristics and learning activities beyond the boundaries. It finds that the larger company continuously develops new technology to achieve long-term survival through a balance between exploration and exploitation while the smaller enterprise grows quickly…

  3. Women and Minorities in High-Tech Careers. ERIC Digest No. 226.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Bettina Lankard

    Women and minorities are underrepresented in technology-related careers for many reasons, including lack of access, level of math and science achievement, and emotional and social attitudes about computer capabilities. Schools and teachers can use the following strategies to attract women and minorities to high-tech careers and prepare them for…

  4. University-Industry Partnerships: Meeting the Challenge with a High-Tech Partner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimtz, Lynn E.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Cultural and organizational issues arising in university-industry partnerships are explored, outlining benefits and risks to both parties. A short-term partnership between Southern Illinois University and the high-tech Hewlett Packard Company is examined, including its origins, the nature of the contract, communication between cultures, time…

  5. Re-conceptualsing Learning Spaces: Developing Capabilities in a High-Tech Small Firm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macpherson, Allan; Jones, Ossie; Zhang, Michael; Wilson, Alison

    2003-01-01

    A case study of a small high-tech business explains how they created a virtual cluster of innovation through supply networks, enhancing their own learning and facilitating integration of knowledge. This process overcomes limitations to management learning for small companies in isolated regions. (Contains 66 references.) (SK)

  6. Human Resource Blueprints in Irish High-Tech Start-Up Firms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keating, Mary A.; Olivares, Mariabrisa

    2006-01-01

    Focusing on Irish high-tech start-ups, this paper reports on the results of an empirical study of organization building by entrepreneurial firms, specifically in relation to human resource practices. The research findings are benchmarked with findings from SPEC, the Stanford Project of Emerging Companies (Baron and Hannan, 2002). Human resources…

  7. Campus Computing, 2000: The 11th National Survey of Computing and Information Technology in American Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kenneth C.

    The 2000 Campus Computing Survey, the 11th such survey, was sent to the chief academic officer at 1,176 two-year and four-year colleges and universities across the United States. By October 2000, 506 responses had been received, a response rate of 43%. New data reveal that the growing demand for technology talent across all sectors of the U.S.…

  8. Estimating the Effects of September 11th and Other Forms of Violence on the Mental Health and Social Development of New York City's Youth: A Matter of Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aber, J. Lawrence; Gershoff, Elizabeth T.; Ware, Angelica; Kotler, Jennifer A.

    2004-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines the effects of exposure to the terrorist attack of September 11th as well as exposure to other forms of community violence on change in the mental health and social attitudes of youths in New York City. Three quarters of the youths reported some form of direct exposure to the events of September 11th, and 80%…

  9. Psychological sequelae of remote exposure to the September 11th terrorist attacks in Canadians with and without panic.

    PubMed

    Asmundson, Gordon J G; Carleton, R Nicholas; Wright, Kristi D; Taylor, Steven

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the psychological impact of remote exposure to the events and aftermath of the terrorist attacks in the USA on September 11th, 2001, and to assess what differences, if any, exist between individuals classified with probable panic disorder and those without. Telephone interviews were conducted with 122 residents of the capital city of the Canadian prairie province of Saskatchewan in spring 2002 in order to gather information regarding current mood, fears and avoidance behaviours as well as current post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms specific to September 11th. Consistent with previous findings and despite the remote nature of exposure, results indicated that the psychological well-being and behaviour of participants with probable panic disorder was more adversely affected by the events and aftermath of September 11th than those without panic disorder. These results suggest that remote viewing of traumatic events can have a significant and lingering impact on psychological well-being and behaviour and that these effects are more pronounced in those with panic disorder. Implications of the findings and future research directions are discussed.

  10. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Electrorheological Fluids and Magnetorheological Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odenbach, Stefan; Borin, Dmitry

    2009-07-01

    Materials with properties controllable by external fields become more and more important for modern product design. Magnetorheological suspensions, electrorheological fluids and ferrofluids are classical examples for such smart materials exhibiting magnetic or electric field dependent properties. Their development over the past 60 years has shown how complex research and development of fluids with tailored properties can be. The demands of potential applications are the driving force for the synthesis of new fluids. The changes in the synthetic process and the composition of the fluids based on an increasing understanding of the relevant microscopic processes leads to certain macroscopic properties of the material. Only intense cooperation between basic and application oriented research, synthesis, characterisation, theory and application design can finally lead to fluids suitable for the envisaged use. The International Conferences on Electrorheological Fluids and Magnetorheological Suspensions have provided over more than 20 years a platform for interdisciplinary discussions strengthening the scientific progress in the field. Besides being a forum for scientific exchange about recent developments in electro- and magnetorheological fluids. The 11th International Conference on Electrorheological Fluids and Magnetorheological Suspensions (ERMR08) which has been organized by the chair of Magnetofluiddynamics at the Technische Universität Dresden in August 2008 in Dresden has continued this fruitful tradition. With more than 180 participants from 24 different countries it has been the largest ERMR meeting during the last decade - a tendency showing the high potential and promising development of the field of electrically and magnetically controllable fluids. A significant proportion of the participants were PhD students, a fact that also highlights the sustainability of the field. In total 85 oral presentations - including 8 plenary talks - and 81 posters were

  11. PREFACE 11th Europhysical Conference on Defects in Insulating Materials (EURODIM 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, László; Corradi, Gábor

    2010-11-01

    The Europhysical Conference on Defects in Insulating Materials, organized in the period 12-16 July 2010 in Pécs, Hungary by the Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Budapest and the Institute of Physics of the University of Pécs, was the 11th European conference in the alternate series of EURODIM and ICDIM. The first meeting in Argonne, USA in 1956 was dedicated to the field of color centers in alkali halide crystals. Since then the topic has been gradually extended to the real structure of oxides, halides, nitrides and other more complex insulators, and also to less ordered materials like glasses, ceramics and low-dimensional systems, as well as applications e.g. in radiology, non-linear optics, photonics and electronics. Recently the field covered includes the research and technology of defect-related phenomena in crystalline and amorphous wide band-gap bulk, layered and nano-materials. More than 200 colleagues from 31 countries in Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas have participated in the conference. The program contained in addition to seven invited and three keynote talks 67 further oral presentations as well as some 200 poster contributions. The city of Pécs, a pearl of the Southern Danubia region, was proud of hosting the conference as one of the 2010 European Capitals of Culture, this status crowning a long urban history dating back to paleochristian times in the Roman province Pannonia. On behalf of the Organizing Committee signature László Kovács Conference Chair Conference Chair László Kovács Crystal Physics Department Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics Budapest, Hungary e-mail: eurodim2010@optics.szfki.kfki.hu Program Committee Gábor Corradi (Hungary) István Földvári (Hungary) Rob A. Jackson (UK) László Kovács (Hungary) Martin Nikl (Czech Republic) Anna Vedda (Italy) Andrea Watterich (Hungary) International Advisory Committee M.G. Blanchin (France)A. Lushchik (Estonia) F. Bridges (USA

  12. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Damage Assessment of Structures (DAMAS 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Damage Assessment of Structures (DAMAS) 2015. DAMAS has a long history of almost 20 years. The first DAMAS conference took place in 1995 (Pescara, Italy), followed by a biannual meeting in 1997 (Sheffield, UK), 1999 (Dublin, Ireland), 2001 (Cardiff, UK), 2003 (Southampton, UK), 2005 (Gdansk, Poland), 2007 (Torino, Italy), 2009 (Beijing, China), 2011 (Oxford, UK) and 2013 (Dublin, Ireland). The eleventh edition of DAMAS conference series, DAMAS 2015, is hosted by Ghent University, Belgium, and is held at the congress center Het Pand in Ghent city. Ghent is the capital and the largest city of the East Flanders province of the Flemish region of Belgium. Het Pand is the culture and congress center of Ghent University and is a historical monument. The conference is established as a major international forum for research topics relevant to damage assessment of engineering structures and systems including numerical simulations, signal processing of sensor measurements and theoretical techniques as well as experimental case studies. The presentations of DAMAS 2015 are divided into 6 main sessions, namely 1) Structural Health and Condition Monitoring, 2) Damage in Civil Engineering, 3) Damage in Machineries, 4) Damage in Composite Materials, 5) Sensing and Sensors and 6) Signal Processing. The organising committee is grateful to keynote speakers; Professor Guido De Roeck, Head of Structural Mechanics Division, KULeuven, Belgium, for his keynote lecture entitled 'Structural Health Monitoring: highlights and challenges', Professor Weidong Zhu, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, USA, for his keynote lecture entitled 'Vibration-based Structural Damage Detection: Theory and Applications' and Professor Wieslaw Ostachowicz, Head of the Laboratory of Active Materials and Smart Structures, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland, for his keynote lecture entitled 'Damage Assessment and

  13. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bao-An; Natowitz, Joseph B.

    2013-03-01

    The 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012) was held from 27 May to 1 June 2012, in San Antonio, Texas, USA. It was jointly organized and hosted by The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University, College Station and The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Texas A&M University-Commerce. Among the approximately 300 participants were a large number of graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. The Keynote Talk of the conference, 'The State of Affairs of Present and Future Nucleus-Nucleus Collision Science', was given by Dr Robert Tribble, University Distinguished Professor and Director of the TAMU Cyclotron Institute. During the conference a very well-received public lecture on neutrino astronomy, 'The ICEcube project', was given by Dr Francis Halzen, Hilldale and Gregory Breit Distinguished Professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The Scientific program continued in the general spirit and intention of this conference series. As is typical of this conference a broad range of topics including fundamental areas of nuclear dynamics, structure, and applications were addressed in 42 plenary session talks, 150 parallel session talks, and 21 posters. The high quality of the work presented emphasized the vitality and relevance of the subject matter of this conference. Following the tradition, the NN2012 International Advisory Committee selected the host and site of the next conference in this series. The 12th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2015) will be held 21-26 June 2015 in Catania, Italy. It will be hosted by The INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania and the Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia of the University of Catania. The NN2012 Proceedings contains the conference program and 165 articles organized into the following 10 sections 1. Heavy and Superheavy Elements 2. QCD and Hadron Physics 3. Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions 4. Nuclear Structure 5. Nuclear Energy and Applications of

  14. Using a Mixed Model to Evaluate Job Satisfaction in High-Tech Industries.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sang-Bing; Huang, Chih-Yao; Wang, Cheng-Kuang; Chen, Quan; Pan, Jingzhou; Wang, Ge; Wang, Jingan; Chin, Ta-Chia; Chang, Li-Chung

    2016-01-01

    R&D professionals are the impetus behind technological innovation, and their competitiveness and capability drive the growth of a company. However, high-tech industries have a chronic shortage of such indispensable professionals. Accordingly, reducing R&D personnel turnover has become a major human resource management challenge facing innovative companies. This study combined importance-performance analysis (IPA) with the decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL) method to propose an IPA-DEMATEL model. Establishing this model involved three steps. First, an IPA was conducted to measure the importance of and satisfaction gained from job satisfaction criteria. Second, the DEMATEL method was used to determine the causal relationships of and interactive influence among the criteria. Third, a criteria model was constructed to evaluate job satisfaction of high-tech R&D personnel. On the basis of the findings, managerial suggestions are proposed. PMID:27139697

  15. Stakeholder engagement in patient-centered outcomes research: high-touch or high-tech?

    PubMed

    Lavallee, Danielle C; Wicks, Paul; Alfonso Cristancho, Rafael; Mullins, C Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Patient and stakeholder engagement enhances the meaningfulness of patient-centered outcomes research. Continuous engagement of diverse patients helps to achieve representativeness and to avoid tokenism, but is perceived as challenging due to resource and time constraints. The widespread availability of the internet, mobile phones, and electronic devices makes 'high-tech' solutions appealing, but such approaches may trade-off larger sample sizes for shallower engagement and/or skewed perspectives if most participants reflect users of technology. More traditional 'high-touch' solutions such as in-person interviews, focus groups, and town hall meetings can provide qualitative and sociological context and potentially more in-depth insights from small numbers of patients, but such approaches are also prone to selection bias as well. We compare and contrast high-tech and high-touch approaches to engaging stakeholders and suggest hybrid processes.

  16. Using a Mixed Model to Evaluate Job Satisfaction in High-Tech Industries.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sang-Bing; Huang, Chih-Yao; Wang, Cheng-Kuang; Chen, Quan; Pan, Jingzhou; Wang, Ge; Wang, Jingan; Chin, Ta-Chia; Chang, Li-Chung

    2016-01-01

    R&D professionals are the impetus behind technological innovation, and their competitiveness and capability drive the growth of a company. However, high-tech industries have a chronic shortage of such indispensable professionals. Accordingly, reducing R&D personnel turnover has become a major human resource management challenge facing innovative companies. This study combined importance-performance analysis (IPA) with the decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL) method to propose an IPA-DEMATEL model. Establishing this model involved three steps. First, an IPA was conducted to measure the importance of and satisfaction gained from job satisfaction criteria. Second, the DEMATEL method was used to determine the causal relationships of and interactive influence among the criteria. Third, a criteria model was constructed to evaluate job satisfaction of high-tech R&D personnel. On the basis of the findings, managerial suggestions are proposed.

  17. Challenges to achievement of metal sustainability in our high-tech society

    SciTech Connect

    Izatt, Reed M.; Izatt, Steven R.; Bruening, Ronald L.; Izatt, Neil; Moyer, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Achievement of sustainability in metal life cycles from mining of virgin ore to consumer and industrial devices to end-of-life products requires greatly increased recycling and improved processing of metals. Electronic and other high-tech products containing precious, toxic, and specialty metals usually have short lifetimes and low recycling rates. Products containing these metals generally are incinerated, discarded as waste in landfills, or dismantled in informal recycling using crude and environmentally irresponsible procedures. Low metal recycling rates coupled with increasing demand for products containing them necessitate increased mining with attendant environmental, health, energy, water, and carbon-footprint consequences. In this tutorial review, challenges to achieving metal sustainability in present high-tech society are presented; health, environmental, and economic incentives for various stakeholders to improve metal sustainability are discussed; a case for technical improvements in separations technology, especially employing molecular recognition, is given; and global consequences of continuing on the present path are examined.

  18. A Concept of Constructing a Common Information Space for High Tech Programs Using Information Analytical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, Alexandra A.; Kolegova, Olga A.; Nekrasova, Maria E.

    2016-04-01

    The paper deals with the issues in program management used for engineering innovative products. The existing project management tools were analyzed. The aim is to develop a decision support system that takes into account the features of program management used for high-tech products: research intensity, a high level of technical risks, unpredictable results due to the impact of various external factors, availability of several implementing agencies. The need for involving experts and using intelligent techniques for information processing is demonstrated. A conceptual model of common information space to support communication between members of the collaboration on high-tech programs has been developed. The structure and objectives of the information analysis system “Geokhod” were formulated with the purpose to implement the conceptual model of common information space in the program “Development and production of new class mining equipment – “Geokhod”.

  19. Using a Mixed Model to Evaluate Job Satisfaction in High-Tech Industries

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Sang-Bing; Huang, Chih-Yao; Wang, Cheng-Kuang; Chen, Quan; Pan, Jingzhou; Wang, Ge; Wang, Jingan; Chin, Ta-Chia; Chang, Li-Chung

    2016-01-01

    R&D professionals are the impetus behind technological innovation, and their competitiveness and capability drive the growth of a company. However, high-tech industries have a chronic shortage of such indispensable professionals. Accordingly, reducing R&D personnel turnover has become a major human resource management challenge facing innovative companies. This study combined importance–performance analysis (IPA) with the decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL) method to propose an IPA–DEMATEL model. Establishing this model involved three steps. First, an IPA was conducted to measure the importance of and satisfaction gained from job satisfaction criteria. Second, the DEMATEL method was used to determine the causal relationships of and interactive influence among the criteria. Third, a criteria model was constructed to evaluate job satisfaction of high-tech R&D personnel. On the basis of the findings, managerial suggestions are proposed. PMID:27139697

  20. A Concept of Constructing a Common Information Space for High Tech Programs Using Information Analytical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, Alexandra A.; Kolegova, Olga A.; Nekrasova, Maria E.

    2016-04-01

    The paper deals with the issues in program management used for engineering innovative products. The existing project management tools were analyzed. The aim is to develop a decision support system that takes into account the features of program management used for high-tech products: research intensity, a high level of technical risks, unpredictable results due to the impact of various external factors, availability of several implementing agencies. The need for involving experts and using intelligent techniques for information processing is demonstrated. A conceptual model of common information space to support communication between members of the collaboration on high-tech programs has been developed. The structure and objectives of the information analysis system “Geokhod” were formulated with the purpose to implement the conceptual model of common information space in the program “Development and production of new class mining equipment - “Geokhod”.

  1. High-tech equipment--present and future options for rental operators.

    PubMed

    Harris, E E

    1992-01-01

    U.S. and European laundry equipment manufacturers are striving to gain efficiencies with high technology. They are well aware that operators want to use resources--including energy, water, labor, and merchandise--better. Also, meaningful information about plant operations is becoming a top priority. Many high-tech options are available now and others are in the works to carry this industry into the next century.

  2. Supracostal Approach for PCNL: Is 10th and 11th Intercostal Space Safe According to Clavien Classification System?

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Cengiz; Değirmenci, Tansu; Kozacioglu, Zafer; Gunlusoy, Bulent; Koras, Omer; Minareci, Suleyman

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the success and morbidity of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) performed through the 11th and 10th intercostal space. Between March 2005 and February 2012, 612 patients underwent PCNL, 243 of whom had a supracostal access. The interspace between the 11th and 12th rib was used in 204 cases (group 1) and between the 10th and 11th interspaces in 39 cases (group 2). PCNL was performed using standard supracostal technique in all patients. The operative time, success rate, hospital stay, and complications according to the modified Clavien classification were compared between group 1 and group 2. The stone-free rate was 86.8% in group 1 and 84.6% in group 2 after one session of PCNL. Auxiliary procedures consisting of ureterorenoscopy (URS) and shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) were required in 5 and 7 patients, respectively, in group 1; and in 1 patient each in group 2 . After the auxiliary procedures, stone-free rates increased to 92.6% in group 1 and 89.7% in group 2. A total of 74 (30.4%) complications were documented in the 2 groups according to modified Clavien classification. Grade-I complications were recorded in 20 (8.2%), grade-II in 38 (15.6%), grade-IIIa in 13 (5.3%), and grade-IIIb in 2 (0.8%) patients; grade-IVa was recorded in 1 (0.4%) patient. There were no grade-IVb or grade-V complications. Overall complication rate was 30.9% in group 1 and 28.2% in group 2. Supracostal PCNL in selected cases is effective and safe with acceptable complications. The modified Clavien system provides a standardized grading system for complications of PCNL. PMID:25437600

  3. Is the 10th and 11th intercostal space a safe approach for percutaneous nephrostomy and nephrolithotomy?

    PubMed

    Muzrakchi, Ahmed Al; Szmigielski, W; Omar, Ahmed J S; Younes, Nagy M

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the rate of complications in percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) and nephrolithotomy (PCNL) performed through the 11th and 10th intercostal spaces using our monitoring technique and to discuss the safety of the procedure. Out of 398 PCNs and PCNLs carried out during a 3-year period, 56 patients had 57 such procedures performed using an intercostal approach. The 11th intercostal route was used in 42 and the 10th in 15 cases. One patient had two separate nephrostomies performed through the 10th and 11th intercostal spaces. The technique utilizes bi-planar fluoroscopy with a combination of a conventional angiographic machine to provide anterior-posterior fluoroscopy and a C-arm mobile fluoroscopy machine to give a lateral view, displayed on two separate monitors. None of the patients had clinically significant thoracic or abdominal complications. Two patients had minor chest complications. Only one developed changes (plate atelectasis, elevation of the hemi-diaphragm) directly related to the nephrostomy (2%). The second patient had bilateral plate atelectasis and unilateral congestive lung changes after PCNL. These changes were not necessarily related to the procedure but rather to general anesthesia during nephrolithotomy. The authors consider PCN or PCNL through the intercostal approach a safe procedure with a negligible complication rate, provided that it is performed under bi-planar fluoroscopy, which allows determination of the skin entry point just below the level of pleural reflection and provides three-dimensional monitoring of advancement of the puncturing needle toward the target entry point. PMID:15383855

  4. Is the 10th and 11th Intercostal Space a Safe Approach for Percutaneous Nephrostomy and Nephrolithotomy?

    SciTech Connect

    Muzrakchi, Ahmed Al; Szmigielski, W. Omar, Ahmed J.S.; Younes, Nagy M.

    2004-09-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the rate of complications in percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) and nephrolithotomy (PCNL) performed through the 11th and 10th intercostal spaces using our monitoring technique and to discuss the safety of the procedure. Out of 398 PCNs and PCNLs carried out during a 3-year period, 56 patients had 57 such procedures performed using an intercostal approach. The 11th intercostal route was used in 42 and the 10th in 15 cases. One patient had two separate nephrostomies performed through the 10th and 11th intercostal spaces. The technique utilizes bi-planar fluoroscopy with a combination of a conventional angiographic machine to provide anterior-posterior fluoroscopy and a C-arm mobile fluoroscopy machine to give a lateral view, displayed on two separate monitors. None of the patients had clinically significant thoracic or abdominal complications. Two patients had minor chest complications. Only one developed changes (plate atelectasis, elevation of the hemi-diaphragm) directly related to the nephrostomy (2%). The second patient had bilateral plate atelectasis and unilateral congestive lung changes after PCNL. These changes were not necessarily related to the procedure but rather to general anesthesia during nephrolithotomy. The authors consider PCN or PCNL through the intercostal approach a safe procedure with a negligible complication rate, provided that it is performed under bi-planar fluoroscopy, which allows determination of the skin entry point just below the level of pleural reflection and provides three-dimensional monitoring of advancement of the puncturing needle toward the target entry point.

  5. Mineral resources of high-tech metals in Russia: State of the art and outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortnikov, N. S.; Volkov, A. V.; Galyamov, A. L.; Vikent'ev, I. V.; Aristov, V. V.; Lalomov, A. V.; Murashov, K. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    Seven main ore-forming systems—porphyry and epithermal; orogenic related to granitic intrusions; magmatic ultramafic; volcanic-hosted massive sulfide and volcanic-sedimentary; sedimentary basins; related to alkaline magmatic activity; and placers and weathering mantles—are sources of high-tech critical metals. The following promising types of ore deposits containing high-tech critical metals as by-products are recognized: Cu-Mo porphyry, Fe-Cu-Au and Pb-Zn skarn, base-metal epithermal, volcanic-hosted massive sulfide, base-metal stratiform, various tin deposits, and placers containing rare metals including REE. The mineral resources of critical metals in Russia are compared with those known in other countries. The contents of high-tech critical metals in ores of some noble-metal deposits of the Russian Northeast are reported. It is shown that the subsurface of Russia possesses considerable mineral resource potential for hightech critical metals, which allows new enterprises to be created or production of operating enterprises to increase.

  6. Selected scientific topics of the 11th International Isotope Symposium on the Synthesis and Applications of Isotopes and Isotopically Labeled Compounds.

    PubMed

    Atzrodt, Jens; Derdau, Volker

    2013-01-01

    This micro-review describes hot topics and new trends in isotope science discussed at the 11th International Isotope Symposium on the Synthesis and Applications of Isotopes and Isotopically Labeled Compounds from a personal perspective.

  7. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Fridley, David

    2007-07-01

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target for energy-efficiency improvement: energy intensity of the country's gross domestic product (GDP) should be reduced by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). This is the first time that a quantitative and binding target has been set for energy efficiency, and signals a major shift in China's strategic thinking about its long-term economic and energy development. The 20% energy intensity target also translates into an annual reduction of over 1.5 billion tons of CO2 by 2010, making the Chinese effort one of most significant carbon mitigation effort in the world today. While it is still too early to tell whether China will achieve this target, this paper attempts to understand the trend in energy intensity in China and to explore a variety of options toward meeting the 20% target using a detailed end-use energy model.

  8. Taking out one billion tones of carbon: the magic of China's 11thFive-Year Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiang; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark D.; Fridley, David

    2007-05-01

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious targetfor energy-efficiency improvement: energy intensity of the country sgross domestic product (GDP) should be reduced by 20 percent from 2005 to2010 (NDRC, 2006). This is the first time that a quantitative and bindingtarget has been set for energy efficiency, and signals a major shift inChina's strategic thinking about its long-term economic and energydevelopment. The 20 percent energy intensity target also translates intoan annual reduction of over one billion tons of CO2 by 2010, making theChinese effort one of most significant carbon mitigation effort in theworld today. While it is still too early to tell whether China willachieve this target, this paper attempts to understand the trend inenergy intensity in China and to explore a variety of options towardmeeting the 20 percent target using a detailed endues energymodel.

  9. Rapid Economic Growth and Natural Gas Consumption Nexus: Looking forward from Perspective of 11th Malaysian Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekhet, H. A.; Yasmin, T.

    2016-03-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between economic growth and energy consumption by incorporating CO2 emissions, natural gas consumption and population in Malaysia. Annual data and F-bound test and granger causality have applied to test the existence of long run relationship between the series. The results show that variables are cointegrated for long run relationship. The results also indicate that natural gas consumption is an important contributing factor to energy demand and hence economic growth in case of Malaysia. The causality analysis highlights that the feedback hypothesis exists between economic growth and energy consumption. While, conservative hypothesis is validated between natural gas consumption and economic growth which implies that economic growth will push natural gas consumption policies in future. This study opens up new direction for policy makers to formulate a comprehensive natural gas policy to sustain environment for long span of time in case to achieve 11th MP targets.

  10. ROAD BRIDGES IN MINAMI-SANRIKU WASHED AWAY IN THE MARCH 11th 2011 GREAT EAST JAPAN EARTHQUAKE AND TSUNAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglipay, Mary Roxanne I.; Konagai, Kazuo; Kyokawa, Hiroyuki; Keshab, Sharma

    On March 11th, 2011, Minami-Sanriku, located in the northeastern coast of Japan was severely inundated by the tsunami that followed the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011. Road bridges near the coastlines in this area have been extensively damaged with their decks being overturned or carried over long distances. An attempt was made to deduce as rational scenarios as possible before remaining debris was cleaned up. Though the reasons for the washout of bridges can be many and complex, it is to be noted that bridge decks have hollows for the optimum light-weight solution, which fact eventually allowed the bridge decks to be carried over remarkable distances. Poor connection details and cavities, hollows between deck beams, are considered to have facilitated overturning due to uplift forces.

  11. Construction of a high-tech operating room for image-guided surgery using VR.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Naoki; Hattori, Asaki; Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Otake, Yoshito; Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro; Kobayashi, Susumu; Nezu, Takehiko; Sakai, Haruo; Umezawa, Yuji

    2005-01-01

    This project aimed to construct an operating room to implement high dimensional (3D, 4D) medical imaging and medical virtual reality techniques that would enable clinical tests for new surgical procedures. We designed and constructed such an operating room at Dai-san Hospital, the Jikei Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. The room was equipped with various facilities for image-guided, robot and tele- surgery. In this report, we describe an outline of our "high-tech operating room" and future plans. PMID:15718793

  12. Forecasting Ecological Genomics: High-Tech Animal Instrumentation Meets High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Aaron B. A.; Northrup, Joseph M.; Wikelski, Martin; Wittemyer, George; Wolf, Jochen B. W.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancements in animal tracking technology and high-throughput sequencing are rapidly changing the questions and scope of research in the biological sciences. The integration of genomic data with high-tech animal instrumentation comes as a natural progression of traditional work in ecological genetics, and we provide a framework for linking the separate data streams from these technologies. Such a merger will elucidate the genetic basis of adaptive behaviors like migration and hibernation and advance our understanding of fundamental ecological and evolutionary processes such as pathogen transmission, population responses to environmental change, and communication in natural populations. PMID:26745372

  13. Forecasting Ecological Genomics: High-Tech Animal Instrumentation Meets High-Throughput Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Shafer, Aaron B A; Northrup, Joseph M; Wikelski, Martin; Wittemyer, George; Wolf, Jochen B W

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancements in animal tracking technology and high-throughput sequencing are rapidly changing the questions and scope of research in the biological sciences. The integration of genomic data with high-tech animal instrumentation comes as a natural progression of traditional work in ecological genetics, and we provide a framework for linking the separate data streams from these technologies. Such a merger will elucidate the genetic basis of adaptive behaviors like migration and hibernation and advance our understanding of fundamental ecological and evolutionary processes such as pathogen transmission, population responses to environmental change, and communication in natural populations.

  14. Why farming with high tech methods should integrate elements of organic agriculture.

    PubMed

    Ammann, Klaus

    2009-09-01

    In the previous article [Ammann, K. (2008) Feature: integrated farming: why organic farmers should use transgenic crops. New Biotechnol. 25, 101-107], in a plea for the introduction of transgenic crops into organic and integrated farming, it was announced that the complementary topic, namely that high tech farmers should integrate elements of organic agriculture, will be a follow up. Some selected arguments for such a view are summarised here. Basically, they comprise a differentiated view on agro-biodiversity outside the field of production; landscape management methods to enhance biodiversity levels. Both elements are compatible with basic ideas of organic farming. First, Precision Farming is given as one example of the many ways to support agricultural production through high technology, with the aim of reducing energy input, maintaining excellent soil conditions and enhancing yield. It is clear from this analysis that modern agriculture and certain elements of organic-integrated agriculture are compatible. There are sectors of high tech farming, such as the introduction of a better recycling scheme and also a better focus on socio-economic aspects, which need to be taken up seriously from organic-integrated farming, a system which puts a lot of emphasis on those elements and for which important research data are available. In the final part a new concept of dynamic sustainability is presented.

  15. Determinants of the Price of High-Tech Metals: An Event Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wanner, Markus Gaugler, Tobias; Gleich, Benedikt; Rathgeber, Andreas

    2015-06-15

    The growing demand for high-tech products has resulted in strong growth in demand for certain minor metals. In combination with production concentrated in China, this caused strong and unpredicted price movements in recent years. As a result, manufacturing companies have to cope with additional risks. However, the detailed reasons for the price development are only partially understood. Therefore, we analyzed empirically which determinants can be assigned to price movements and performed an event study on the high-tech metals neodymium, indium, and gallium. Based on our dataset of news items, we were able to find coinciding events to almost 90% of all price jumps (recall). We showed that if any information about these events occurred with a probability of over 50% there would also be a price jump within 10 days (precision). However, the classical set of price determinants has to be extended for these specific markets, as we found unorthodox factors like holidays or weather that may be indicators for price movements. Therefore, we hope that our study supports industry for instance in performing more informed short-term planning of metals purchasing based on information about specific events.

  16. Integrative Laser Medicine and High-Tech Acupuncture at the Medical University of Graz, Austria, Europe

    PubMed Central

    Litscher, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    At the moment, modernization of acupuncture has a high priority. On the traditional side, acupuncture has only recently been awarded the status of Intangible Cultural Heritage by the UNESCO. On the innovative side, high-tech acupuncture is a registered trademark in Austria. Acupuncture has been used for medical treatment for thousands of years. A large number of empirical data are available but the technical quantification of effects was not possible up to now. Using electroacupuncture, needle, or laser stimulation and modern biomedical techniques, it was possible for the first time to quantify changes in biological activities caused by acupuncture. This paper which serves as introduction for the special issue “High-Tech Acupuncture and Integrative Laser Medicine” of the present journal, focuses on the latest innovative aspects that underline the further enhancement and development of acupuncture. Special emphasis is given to new methodological and technical investigations, for example, results obtained from all kinds of acupuncture innovations (e.g., teleacupuncture) and integrative laser medicine. PMID:22570669

  17. Integrative laser medicine and high-tech acupuncture at the medical university of graz, austria, europe.

    PubMed

    Litscher, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    At the moment, modernization of acupuncture has a high priority. On the traditional side, acupuncture has only recently been awarded the status of Intangible Cultural Heritage by the UNESCO. On the innovative side, high-tech acupuncture is a registered trademark in Austria. Acupuncture has been used for medical treatment for thousands of years. A large number of empirical data are available but the technical quantification of effects was not possible up to now. Using electroacupuncture, needle, or laser stimulation and modern biomedical techniques, it was possible for the first time to quantify changes in biological activities caused by acupuncture. This paper which serves as introduction for the special issue "High-Tech Acupuncture and Integrative Laser Medicine" of the present journal, focuses on the latest innovative aspects that underline the further enhancement and development of acupuncture. Special emphasis is given to new methodological and technical investigations, for example, results obtained from all kinds of acupuncture innovations (e.g., teleacupuncture) and integrative laser medicine.

  18. Economic Migrants in a Global Labour Market: A Report on the Recruitment and Retention of Asian Computer Professionals by Canadian High Tech Firms. CPRN Discussion Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Badrinath

    The recruitment and retention of Asian computer professionals by Canadian high-tech companies was examined by interviewing 8 Canadian-born information technology (IT) workers, 47 Asian-born IT workers, and 8 human resource (HR) professionals employed by high-tech companies in Ottawa. Of the 47 Asians, 33 stated that they did not know much about…

  19. Engineering English and the High-Tech Industry: A Case Study of an English Needs Analysis of Process Integration Engineers at a Semiconductor Manufacturing Company in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spence, Paul; Liu, Gi-Zen

    2013-01-01

    The global high-tech industry is characterized by extreme competitiveness, innovation, and widespread use of English. Consequently, Taiwanese high-tech companies require engineers that are talented in both their engineering and English abilities. In response to the lack of knowledge regarding the English skills needed by engineers in Taiwan's…

  20. Using Guided Notes to Increase the Understanding of Anatomy and Physiology in 11th Grade Science Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariano, Jay

    A survey of over 500 science teachers reported that two thirds of their science classes were lecture based lessons where students were required to listen and take notes (Boyle, 2010). In addition to taking notes from lectures, note taking is a necessary skill to possess to record scientific observations and procedures and record information during class. Guided notes is a pedagogical method in which the instructor prepares and provides students with a modified form of lecture information to guide students (Neef, McCord, & Ferreri, 2006). This study examined the extent to which the use of guided notes in a unit of study of the muscular system of anatomy and physiology positively affected the mastery on content-based assessments for 11 th grade students. The data collection methods included quiz and test scores, a 4-point Likert scale survey, and an open-ended questionnaire. Results of the data revealed that guided notes was one factor that led to mastery in learning content. Additionally, students in this study preferred this method as it helped them to distinguish relevant information allowing more time to listen and focus on the teacher.

  1. Unfolding the complexities of ER chaperones in health and disease: report on the 11th international calreticulin workshop.

    PubMed

    Gold, Leslie; Williams, David; Groenendyk, Jody; Michalak, Marek; Eggleton, Paul

    2015-11-01

    The 11th International Calreticulin workshop was held May 15-18, 2015 at New York University School of Medicine-Langone Medical Center, New York. The meeting highlighted many of the new discoveries in the past 2 years involving the important role of molecular chaperones in physiological and pathological processes. Crucial to the understanding of these disease processes was the role of chaperones in maintaining quality control of protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum, the importance of Ca(2) regulation acting through its action in stress-related diseases, and the trafficking of glycoproteins to the cell surface. Central to maintaining healthy cell physiology is the correct ER-associated protein degradation of specific misfolded proteins. Information on different mechanisms involved in the degradation of misfolded proteins was revealed. This was a landmark meeting for the chaperone field in terms of new insights into their roles in physiology. These insights included the unfolded protein response, innate/adaptive immunity, tissue repair, the functions of calreticulin/chaperones from the cell surface, and extracellular environment. Diseases included neurodegenerative disorders, prion disease, autoimmunity, fibrosis-related disease, the host immune response to cancer, and hematologic diseases associated with calreticulin mutations. The 12th calreticulin workshop is planned for the spring of 2017 in Delphi, Greece. PMID:26395641

  2. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; Mcneil, Michael; Levine, Mark

    2011-03-01

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target to reduce the energy intensity per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). In the building sector, the primary energy-saving target allocated during the 11 FYP period is 100 Mtce. Savings are expected to be achieved through the strengthening of enforcement of building energy efficiency codes, existing building retrofits and heat supply system reform, followed by energy management of government office buildings and large scale public buildings, adoption of renewable energy sources. To date, China has reported that it achieved the half of the 20% intensity reduction target by the end of 2008, however, little has been made clear on the status and the impact of the building programs. There has also been lack of description on methodology for calculating the savings and baseline definition, and no total savings that have been officially reported to date. This paper intends to provide both quantitative and qualitative assessment of the key policies and programs in building sector that China has instituted in its quest to fulfill the national goal. Overall, this paper concludes that the largest improvement for building energy efficiency were achieved in new buildings; the program to improve the energy management in government and large scale public buildings are in line with the target; however the progress in the area of existing building retrofits, particularly heating supply system reform lags behind the stated goal by a large amount.

  3. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael; Levine, Mark

    2010-06-07

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target to reduce the energy intensity per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). In the building sector, the primary energy-saving target allocated during the 11 FYP period is 100 Mtce. Savings are expected to be achieved through the strengthening of enforcement of building energy efficiency codes, existing building retrofits and heat supply system reform, followed by energy management of government office buildings and large scale public buildings, adoption of renewable energy sources. To date, China has reported that it achieved the half of the 20% intensity reduction target by the end of 2008, however, little has been made clear on the status and the impact of the building programs. There has also been lack of description on methodology for calculating the savings and baseline definition, and no total savings that have been officially reported to date. This paper intend to provide both quantitative and qualitative assessment of the key policies and programs in building sector that China has instituted in its quest to fulfill the national goal. Overall, this paper concludes that the largest improvement for building energy efficiency were achieved in new buildings; the program to improve the energy management in government and large scale public buildings are in line with the target; however the progress in the area of existing building retrofit particularly heat supply system reform lags the stated goal by a large amount.

  4. Increased use of cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana among Manhattan, New York, residents after the September 11th terrorist attacks.

    PubMed

    Vlahov, David; Galea, Sandro; Resnick, Heidi; Ahern, Jennifer; Boscarino, Joseph A; Bucuvalas, Michael; Gold, Joel; Kilpatrick, Dean

    2002-06-01

    The September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks were the largest human-made disaster in the United States since the Civil War. Studies after earlier disasters have reported rates of psychological disorders in the acute postdisaster period. However, data on postdisaster increases in substance use are sparse. A random digit dial telephone survey was conducted to estimate the prevalence of increased cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and marijuana use among residents of Manhattan, New York City, 5-8 weeks after the attacks. Among 988 persons included, 28.8% reported an increase in use of any of these three substances, 9.7% reported an increase in smoking, 24.6% reported an increase in alcohol consumption, and 3.2% reported an increase in marijuana use. Persons who increased smoking of cigarettes and marijuana were more likely to experience posttraumatic stress disorder than were those who did not (24.2% vs. 5.6% posttraumatic stress disorder for cigarettes; 36.0% vs. 6.6% for marijuana). Depression was more common among those who increased than for those who did not increase cigarette smoking (22.1 vs. 8.2%), alcohol consumption (15.5 vs. 8.3%), and marijuana smoking (22.3 vs. 9.4%). The results of this study suggest a substantial increase in substance use in the acute postdisaster period after the September 11th attacks. Increase in use of different substances may be associated with the presence of different comorbid psychiatric conditions.

  5. Physical activity participation by parental language use in 4th, 8th, and 11th grade students in Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Springer, Andrew E; Lewis, Kayan; Kelder, Steven H; Fernandez, Maria E; Barroso, Cristina S; Hoelscher, Deanna M

    2010-10-01

    Research on physical activity (PA) by level of acculturation in Hispanic children is limited and findings have been mixed. We examined PA participation by primary language used with parents in a representative sample of 4th, 8th, and 11th grade Texas public school students. Mixed-effects regression models were conducted using cross-sectional data from the 2004-2005 School Physical Activity and Nutrition Study (n = 22,049). Self-reported PA was compared among three language-ethnic groups: Spanish-Hispanic (SH) (referent); English-Hispanic (EH); and English-Other (EO). EH and/or EO girls were generally between 1.25 and 2.58 [OR] times more likely to participate in PA across grade levels, with the largest differences found for school sports in 8th grade girls. EH and EO 8th grade boys were 1.71 (CI: 1.40, 2.10) and 2.06 (CI: 1.68, 2.51) times, respectively, more likely to participate in school sports. Findings indicate important disparities in Spanish-speaking Hispanic children's PA participation. PMID:19365728

  6. Personalized integrative oncology: targeted approaches for optimal outcomes: the 11th International Conference of the Society for Integrative Oncology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Richard T; Yang, Peiying; Greenlee, Heather; Bauer-Wu, Susan; Balneaves, Lynda G; Zick, Suzanna

    2015-01-01

    The 11th International Conference of the Society for Integrative Oncology (SIO) brought together more than 300 clinicians, researchers, patients, and advocates to hear and interact with world-leading experts about the latest research in the areas of nutrition, exercise, acupuncture, health services research, meditation, and other integrative disciplines. The conference theme, "Personalized Integrative Oncology: Targeted Approaches for Optimal Outcomes," highlighted innovations in personalized medicine and ways this growing field will advance the evolution of individualized integrative cancer care to the next level. This year's conference also featured a clinical track focusing on clinical information for the practicing health care professional. The conference's rigorous schedule included 3 keynotes, 4 plenary sessions, 2 interdisciplinary tumor boards, 5 workshops, 45 concurrent oral sessions, and 106 posters. In addition to the conference theme, keynote and plenary sessions presented topics on stress and cancer, the importance of sleep for cancer patients, epigenetic mechanisms of lifestyle and natural products, recently published Journal of the National Cancer Institute monograph on integrative oncology, SIO's clinical practice guidelines for breast cancer survivors, and a joint session of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine and SIO about supportive care and symptom management. This highly successful conference helped further the mission of the SIO to advance evidence-based, comprehensive, integrative health care to improve the lives of people affected by cancer.

  7. Universities, the US High Tech Advantage, and the Process of Globalization. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.8.2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglass, John Aubrey

    2008-01-01

    Research universities throughout the world are part of a larger effort by nation-states to bolster science and technological innovation and compete economically. The US remains highly competitive as a source of High Tech (HT) innovation because of a number of market positions, many the result of long term investments in institutions such as…

  8. CAD/CAM Helps Build Better Bots: High-Tech Design and Manufacture Draws Engineering-Oriented Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Name, Barry

    2012-01-01

    There is a battlefield where no quarter is given, no mercy shown, but not a single drop of blood is spilled. It is an arena that witnesses the bringing together of high-tech design and manufacture with the outpouring of brute force, under the remotely accessed command of some of today's brightest students. This is the world of battling robots, or…

  9. Skill Acquisition in "High Tech" Export Agriculture: A Case Study of Lifelong Learning in Peru's Asparagus Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnoy, Martin; Luschei, Thomas F.

    2008-01-01

    As one of the world's largest exporters of asparagus, Peru has developed a high-tech system of asparagus production, processing and delivery that requires well-trained and responsive workers. In this study we examine the role of both private and public sectors in preparing workers for the asparagus industry and the implications of this skill…

  10. Impacts of Academic R&D on High-Tech Manufacturing Products: Tentative Evidence from Supercomputer Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Thanh; Tang, Kam Ki

    2015-01-01

    This paper empirically examines the impact of academic research on high-tech manufacturing growth of 28 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and emerging countries over the 1991-2005 period. A standard research and development (R&D) expenditure based measure is found to be too general to capture the input in high-tech…

  11. Proceedings of the International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in Digital Age (CELDA) (11th, Porto, Portugal, October 25-27, 2014)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Demetrios G., Ed.; Spector, J. Michael, Ed.; Ifenthaler, Dirk, Ed.; Isaias, Pedro, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers of the 11th International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age (CELDA 2014), October 25-27, 2014, which has been organized by the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) and endorsed by the Japanese Society for Information and Systems in…

  12. Post-September 11Th Perspectives on Religion, Spirituality, and Philosophy in the Personal and Professional Lives of Selected Rebt Cognoscenti: A Response to My Colleagues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Albert

    2004-01-01

    This is a discussion and evaluation of the views of the authors of the article "Post-September 11th Perspectives on Religion, Spirituality, and Philosophy in the Personal and Professional Lives of Selected REBT Cognoscenti." Several of the authors are shown to endorse most of the main principles and practices of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy…

  13. Post-September 11Th Perspectives on Religion, Spirituality, and Philosophy in the Personal and Professional Lives of Selected REBT Cognoscenti

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinrach, Stephen G.; Dryden, Windy; DiMattia, Dominic J.; Doyle, Kristene A.; MacLaren, Catherine; O'Kelly, Monica; Malkinson, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article was for selected Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) cognoscenti to examine the impact of the events of September 11th, 2001, on their beliefs about religion, spirituality and their personal philosophy--including the role of evil in the universe and the implications of these issues on their use of REBT. The degree…

  14. Proceedings of the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) International Conference on Mobile Learning (11th, Madeira, Portugal, March 14-16, 2015)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sánchez, Inmaculada Arnedillo, Ed.; Isaías, Pedro, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers and posters of the 11th International Conference on Mobile Learning 2015, which was organised by the International Association for Development of the Information Society, in Madeira, Portugal, March 14-16, 2015. The Mobile Learning 2015 Conference seeks to provide a forum for the presentation and discussion of…

  15. Relationships among Four Learner Variables and the Performance of Selected Jamaican 11th-Graders on Some Structured Questions on the Mole Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis-Hall, Nadine; Soyibo, Kola

    2004-01-01

    This study sought to find out if (a) the performance of 113 Jamaican 11th-graders on a mole concept test was satisfactory or not; (b) there were significant differences in their performance linked to their chemical and mathematical abilities, gender and socioeconomic background (SEB); and, (c) there were significant relationships among the four…

  16. Correlations among Five Demographic Variables and the Performance of Selected Jamaican 11th-Graders on Some Numerical Problems on Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emepue, Nicholas; Soyibo, Kola

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to assess whether the level of performance of selected Jamaican 11th-grade physics students on some numerical problems on the energy concept was satisfactory and if there were significant differences in their performance linked to their gender, socioeconomic background (SEB), school location, English language and…

  17. The Advanced Program of Vocational Agriculture in Louisiana. Ag III and Ag IV (11th and 12th Grades). Volume II. Bulletin No. 1725.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide consists of materials for use in teaching an advanced course in agricultural mechanics designed for 11th and 12th grade students. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are arc welding; oxy-acetylene welding; soldering; electricity; tractor maintenance, operation, and safety; small engines; farm structures; and cold…

  18. Vitamin D Status and Quality of Life in Healthy Male High-Tech Employees.

    PubMed

    Tepper, Sigal; Dabush, Yael; Shahar, Danit R; Endevelt, Ronit; Geva, Diklah; Ish-Shalom, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    While low vitamin D status has been shown to be associated with decreased quality of life in unhealthy populations and women, only limited data are available regarding healthy adult men. Our aim was to evaluate the associations between health-related quality of life (QoL) and vitamin D status in adult men. High-tech employees aged 25-65 year were recruited from an occupational periodic examination clinic at Rambam Health Campus. QoL was assessed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Health-related quality of life questionnaire (HRQOL-4). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and Body Mass Index (BMI) were measured; further information was collected about physical activity, education, sun exposure, sick-days, and musculoskeletal pain severity (visual analog scale). Three hundred and fifty-eight men were enrolled in the study; mean serum 25(OH)D level was 22.1 ± 7.9 ng/mL (range 4.6-54.5 ng/mL). In a multivariate logistic regression model, 25(OH)D was a significant independent determinant of self-rated health; Odds Ratio (OR) for self-rated health was 0.91 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.85-0.97, p = 0.004), adjusted for age, BMI, pain severity, physical activity, and sun exposure. Every 1 ng/mL increase of 25(OH)D was associated with 9% reduction in the odds of reporting self-rated health as fair or poor. Poisson regression model demonstrated an association between physically unhealthy days and 25(OH)D levels (rate ratio 0.95, p < 0.001). In conclusion, serum levels of 25(OH)D were associated with self-rated health and with physically unhealthy days of HRQOL in healthy high-tech male workers. Future intervention studies are required to test the impact of vitamin D supplementation on QoL. PMID:27314386

  19. Vitamin D Status and Quality of Life in Healthy Male High-Tech Employees.

    PubMed

    Tepper, Sigal; Dabush, Yael; Shahar, Danit R; Endevelt, Ronit; Geva, Diklah; Ish-Shalom, Sofia

    2016-06-15

    While low vitamin D status has been shown to be associated with decreased quality of life in unhealthy populations and women, only limited data are available regarding healthy adult men. Our aim was to evaluate the associations between health-related quality of life (QoL) and vitamin D status in adult men. High-tech employees aged 25-65 year were recruited from an occupational periodic examination clinic at Rambam Health Campus. QoL was assessed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Health-related quality of life questionnaire (HRQOL-4). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and Body Mass Index (BMI) were measured; further information was collected about physical activity, education, sun exposure, sick-days, and musculoskeletal pain severity (visual analog scale). Three hundred and fifty-eight men were enrolled in the study; mean serum 25(OH)D level was 22.1 ± 7.9 ng/mL (range 4.6-54.5 ng/mL). In a multivariate logistic regression model, 25(OH)D was a significant independent determinant of self-rated health; Odds Ratio (OR) for self-rated health was 0.91 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.85-0.97, p = 0.004), adjusted for age, BMI, pain severity, physical activity, and sun exposure. Every 1 ng/mL increase of 25(OH)D was associated with 9% reduction in the odds of reporting self-rated health as fair or poor. Poisson regression model demonstrated an association between physically unhealthy days and 25(OH)D levels (rate ratio 0.95, p < 0.001). In conclusion, serum levels of 25(OH)D were associated with self-rated health and with physically unhealthy days of HRQOL in healthy high-tech male workers. Future intervention studies are required to test the impact of vitamin D supplementation on QoL.

  20. PREFACE: 11th International Spring Seminar on Nuclear Physics: Shell Model and Nuclear Structure - achievements of the past two decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-02-01

    The 11th International Seminar on Nuclear Physics was held in Ischia from May 12 to May 16, 2014. This Seminar was dedicated to Aldo Covello, who has been the promoter of this series of meetings, which started in Sorrento in 1986 and continued with meetings held every two or three years in the Naples area. Aldo's idea was to offer to a group of researchers, actively working in selected fields of Nuclear Physics, the opportunity to confront their points of view in a lively and informal way. The choice for the period of the year, Spring, as well as the sites chosen reflected this intent. The first meeting was of a purely theoretical nature, but it was immediately clear that the scope of these conferences needed to be enlarged calling into play the experimental community. Then, starting from the second meeting, all the following ones have been characterized by fruitful discussion between theoretical and experimental researchers on current achievements and future developments of nuclear structure. This may be read, in fact, as one of the motivating factors for Aldo's election as Fellow of the American Physical Society in 2008 "... for his outstanding contributions to the international nuclear physics community by providing, for over two decades, a venue for theorists and experimentalists to share their latest ideas." The present meeting, organized by Aldo's former students and with the benefit of his suggestions, has maintained this tradition. The title "Shell model and nuclear structure: achievements of the past two decades" recalls that of the 2nd International Spring Seminar "Shell Model and Nuclear Structure: where do we stand?". The main aim of this 11th Seminar was, in fact, to discuss the changes of the past two decades on our view of nuclei in terms of shell structure as well as the perspectives of the shell model, which has been one of the key points in Aldo's research. This point is well accounted by the Opening Speech of Igal Talmi, one of the fathers of the

  1. Utilization of mental health services following the September 11th terrorist attacks in Manhattan, New York City.

    PubMed

    Boscarino, Joseph A; Galea, Sandro; Ahern, Jennifer; Resnick, Heidi; Vlahov, David

    2002-01-01

    To assess mental health utilization in Manhattan following the September 11th terrorist attacks, a random-digit-dial telephone survey was conducted 5 to 8 weeks afterwards, among 988 randomly selected adult householders over 17 years old (females = 52%; whites = 72%; mean age = 42). 16.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 14.4-19.5) of residents reported using mental health services 30 days before the attacks and 19.4% (95% CI = 16.7-22.2) reported using these services 30 days afterwards (pre/post NcMemar's chi2 = 8.0, df = 1, p = 0.005, odds ratio[OR] = 2.0). 10.0% (95% CI = 7.9-12.0) increased mental health utilization 30 days after the attacks, compared to 30 days before and 5.3% (95% CI = 3.7-6.9) decreased utilization. Risk factors associated with increased mental health utilization in multivariate analyses included: being 45-64 years of age (vs. 65+; OR = 8.3, p = 0.011) female gender (OR = 2.3, p = 0.004), experiencing 4+ lifetime traumatic events (vs. none; OR = 3.5, p = 0.002), experiencing 2+ stressful life events in the past 12 months (vs. none; OR = 3.3, p < 0.001), and experiencing an acute panic attack during the disaster (OR = 3.3, p < 0.001). Neither current post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) nor current depression was predictive of increased post-disaster utilization when panic attack was included in the multivariate analysis. While we did find a statistically significant increase in pre- vs. post-disaster utilization among the general population in Manhattan this increase was not substantial, except among specific subgroups, including those who had a perievent panic attack, among those exposed to previous stressors, among women, and among those less than 65 years old.

  2. STI. DE-FG02-00ER1505 [Brief summary of 11th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research

    SciTech Connect

    2000-06-24

    The 11th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research was held in Madison, Wisconsin, June 24 through June 28, 2000. Arabidopsis thaliana has been the subject of genetic study for many years. However, during the last decade, the number of research laboratories using Arabidopsis as a model system has increased tremendously, and Arabidopsis is currently being used to study all aspects of plant biology. The rapid rate of progress in Arabidopsis research, including the completion of the genomic sequence, underscores the usefulness of holding a meeting every year. These conferences provide an important opportunity for the Arabidopsis community to interact and exchange information. The meeting opened with an evening keynote address on the global impact of plant biology, delivered by Richard Jefferson, the Executive Director of CAMBIA (Center for the Application of Molecular Biology to International Agriculture). This was followed by short updates from each of the NSF-funded Plant Genome groups. Many of these groups are carrying out projects that impact the Arabidopsis community. Each of the 17 platform sessions consisted of talks from two invited speakers followed by two short talks that were chosen from the submitted poster abstracts. A concerted effort was made to invite junior investigators, including graduate students and postdocs, to give these talks. Posters were available for viewing during three formal sessions, and, because the poster session was adjacent to the lecture hall, it was easy for participants to go back and forth between posters and lectures. Finally, a mixer and an informal banquet provided opportunities for participants to meet new people and renew acquaintances. Furthermore, the registration package included all lunches and dinners together in a cafeteria next to the posters and lecture hall, thus encouraging the meeting of established investigators with students and postdocs. The North American Arabidopsis Steering Committee (elected by

  3. Vitamin D Status and Quality of Life in Healthy Male High-Tech Employees

    PubMed Central

    Tepper, Sigal; Dabush, Yael; Shahar, Danit R.; Endevelt, Ronit; Geva, Diklah; Ish-Shalom, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    While low vitamin D status has been shown to be associated with decreased quality of life in unhealthy populations and women, only limited data are available regarding healthy adult men. Our aim was to evaluate the associations between health-related quality of life (QoL) and vitamin D status in adult men. High-tech employees aged 25–65 year were recruited from an occupational periodic examination clinic at Rambam Health Campus. QoL was assessed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Health-related quality of life questionnaire (HRQOL-4). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and Body Mass Index (BMI) were measured; further information was collected about physical activity, education, sun exposure, sick-days, and musculoskeletal pain severity (visual analog scale). Three hundred and fifty-eight men were enrolled in the study; mean serum 25(OH)D level was 22.1 ± 7.9 ng/mL (range 4.6–54.5 ng/mL). In a multivariate logistic regression model, 25(OH)D was a significant independent determinant of self-rated health; Odds Ratio (OR) for self-rated health was 0.91 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.85–0.97, p = 0.004), adjusted for age, BMI, pain severity, physical activity, and sun exposure. Every 1 ng/mL increase of 25(OH)D was associated with 9% reduction in the odds of reporting self-rated health as fair or poor. Poisson regression model demonstrated an association between physically unhealthy days and 25(OH)D levels (rate ratio 0.95, p < 0.001). In conclusion, serum levels of 25(OH)D were associated with self-rated health and with physically unhealthy days of HRQOL in healthy high-tech male workers. Future intervention studies are required to test the impact of vitamin D supplementation on QoL. PMID:27314386

  4. Three High-Tech High Seniors Join the Alia Expedition to Samoa: Science and Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, B.; Delaney, R.; Staudigel, D.; Staudigel, H.; Koppers, A.; Hart, S.

    2005-12-01

    Three high school seniors from High Tech High (HTH) participated in the ALIA expedition that explored the Samoan hot spot track through seafloor mapping, rock sampling and the study of the water column above an active submarine volcano. The primary responsibility of the HTH participants focused on outreach and education, but they also were substantively involved in all scientific aspects of the cruise. Education and outreach activities included: maintaining the cruise website,the creation of ERESE digital library resources for earth science education, live video-conferences with students half a world away in San Diego, and offering tours of the Research Vessel Kilo Moana during an open house event organized with the Samoa Department of Eduation. At this occasion, the HTH seniors shared experiences and knowledge with the visiting Samoan elementary and high school students. Science involvement of the high school seniors included deck and laboratory work, by assisting with dredging, piston coring, rock cataloguing, casting CTDs, and computer programming. Three major computer programming efforts by the HTH seniors substantively supported the outreach activities and the science operations during ALIA. (1) The development of "CustomHTMLExport", a utility that allows for the export of photographs and their metadata into web pages and digital library collection. (2) The "CruiseWatch" featureson the ALIA website (http://earthref.org/ERESE/projects/ALIA/) that displays in near - real time key shipboard data such as the location on a map, geographic coordinates, ship speed, direction and wind speed and dredging data. (3) A dredge location simulator to predict the location of the dredge with respect to the ship and the seafloor which was made necessary for the safety of dredging due to the failure of pingers that normally are used to provide critical data for the location of the dredge with respect to the seafloor. The dredge location model is based a fluid dynamics approach

  5. Two Different Maintenance Strategies in the Hospital Environment: Preventive Maintenance for Older Technology Devices and Predictive Maintenance for Newer High-Tech Devices.

    PubMed

    Sezdi, Mana

    2016-01-01

    A maintenance program generated through the consideration of characteristics and failures of medical equipment is an important component of technology management. However, older technology devices and newer high-tech devices cannot be efficiently managed using the same strategies because of their different characteristics. This study aimed to generate a maintenance program comprising two different strategies to increase the efficiency of device management: preventive maintenance for older technology devices and predictive maintenance for newer high-tech devices. For preventive maintenance development, 589 older technology devices were subjected to performance verification and safety testing (PVST). For predictive maintenance development, the manufacturers' recommendations were used for 134 high-tech devices. These strategies were evaluated in terms of device reliability. This study recommends the use of two different maintenance strategies for old and new devices at hospitals in developing countries. Thus, older technology devices that applied only corrective maintenance will be included in maintenance like high-tech devices.

  6. Two Different Maintenance Strategies in the Hospital Environment: Preventive Maintenance for Older Technology Devices and Predictive Maintenance for Newer High-Tech Devices.

    PubMed

    Sezdi, Mana

    2016-01-01

    A maintenance program generated through the consideration of characteristics and failures of medical equipment is an important component of technology management. However, older technology devices and newer high-tech devices cannot be efficiently managed using the same strategies because of their different characteristics. This study aimed to generate a maintenance program comprising two different strategies to increase the efficiency of device management: preventive maintenance for older technology devices and predictive maintenance for newer high-tech devices. For preventive maintenance development, 589 older technology devices were subjected to performance verification and safety testing (PVST). For predictive maintenance development, the manufacturers' recommendations were used for 134 high-tech devices. These strategies were evaluated in terms of device reliability. This study recommends the use of two different maintenance strategies for old and new devices at hospitals in developing countries. Thus, older technology devices that applied only corrective maintenance will be included in maintenance like high-tech devices. PMID:27195666

  7. Increased Risk of Respiratory Mortality Associated with the High-Tech Manufacturing Industry: A 26-Year Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ro-Ting; Christiani, David C; Kawachi, Ichiro; Chan, Ta-Chien; Chiang, Po-Huang; Chan, Chang-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Global high-tech manufacturers are mainly located in newly industrialized countries, raising concerns about adverse health consequences from industrial pollution for people living nearby. We investigated the ecological association between respiratory mortality and the development of Taiwan's high-tech manufacturing, taking into account industrialization and socioeconomic development, for 19 cities and counties-6 in the science park group and 13 in the control group-from 1982 to 2007. We applied a linear mixed-effects model to analyze how science park development over time is associated with age-adjusted and sex-specific mortality rates for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Asthma and female COPD mortality rates decreased in both groups, but they decreased 9%-16% slower in the science park group. Male COPD mortality rates increased in both groups, but the rate increased 10% faster in the science park group. Science park development over time was a significant predictor of death from asthma (p ≤ 0.0001) and COPD (p = 0.0212). The long-term development of clustered high-tech manufacturing may negatively affect nearby populations, constraining health advantages that were anticipated, given overall progress in living standards, knowledge, and health services. National governments should incorporate the long-term health effects on local populations into environmental impact assessments. PMID:27271647

  8. Increased Risk of Respiratory Mortality Associated with the High-Tech Manufacturing Industry: A 26-Year Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ro-Ting; Christiani, David C; Kawachi, Ichiro; Chan, Ta-Chien; Chiang, Po-Huang; Chan, Chang-Chuan

    2016-06-03

    Global high-tech manufacturers are mainly located in newly industrialized countries, raising concerns about adverse health consequences from industrial pollution for people living nearby. We investigated the ecological association between respiratory mortality and the development of Taiwan's high-tech manufacturing, taking into account industrialization and socioeconomic development, for 19 cities and counties-6 in the science park group and 13 in the control group-from 1982 to 2007. We applied a linear mixed-effects model to analyze how science park development over time is associated with age-adjusted and sex-specific mortality rates for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Asthma and female COPD mortality rates decreased in both groups, but they decreased 9%-16% slower in the science park group. Male COPD mortality rates increased in both groups, but the rate increased 10% faster in the science park group. Science park development over time was a significant predictor of death from asthma (p ≤ 0.0001) and COPD (p = 0.0212). The long-term development of clustered high-tech manufacturing may negatively affect nearby populations, constraining health advantages that were anticipated, given overall progress in living standards, knowledge, and health services. National governments should incorporate the long-term health effects on local populations into environmental impact assessments.

  9. Increased Risk of Respiratory Mortality Associated with the High-Tech Manufacturing Industry: A 26-Year Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ro-Ting; Christiani, David C.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Chan, Ta-Chien; Chiang, Po-Huang; Chan, Chang-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Global high-tech manufacturers are mainly located in newly industrialized countries, raising concerns about adverse health consequences from industrial pollution for people living nearby. We investigated the ecological association between respiratory mortality and the development of Taiwan’s high-tech manufacturing, taking into account industrialization and socioeconomic development, for 19 cities and counties—6 in the science park group and 13 in the control group—from 1982 to 2007. We applied a linear mixed-effects model to analyze how science park development over time is associated with age-adjusted and sex-specific mortality rates for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Asthma and female COPD mortality rates decreased in both groups, but they decreased 9%–16% slower in the science park group. Male COPD mortality rates increased in both groups, but the rate increased 10% faster in the science park group. Science park development over time was a significant predictor of death from asthma (p ≤ 0.0001) and COPD (p = 0.0212). The long-term development of clustered high-tech manufacturing may negatively affect nearby populations, constraining health advantages that were anticipated, given overall progress in living standards, knowledge, and health services. National governments should incorporate the long-term health effects on local populations into environmental impact assessments. PMID:27271647

  10. From high tech to high touch: integrating community voices in mobile mammography outreach.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Stephenie; Stephens, Sheila; Tephabock, Kevin; Brown, Pamela; Davis, Patty; Keresztury, James; Narsavage, Georgia

    2009-10-01

    Providing mobile screening mammography services across the state of West Virginia (WV) presents unique challenges. The ability of new machines to screen for breast cancer is modern medicine at its best. The use of the mobile unit, "Bonnie's Bus", holds promise for getting this high tech equipment to women in rural areas of West Virginia where it is most needed. Cancer detected in early stages is more treatable and women have a better chance of becoming survivors. The key to the program's success resides with the women who come for the screening, the extension network of community members who help set up and assist women to access the screening system, and community health care providers who care for the women if cancer is found. Linking "community voices" with the programs funded under the WV Komen grant screening programs provides a winning solution for West Virginia and the women served by Bonnie's Bus. Information obtained from five focus groups of 58 community leaders and women residing in rural WV was used to develop the mobile program. Building upon established relationships with the West Virginia Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Program (WV BCCSP) coordinators and providers, outreach and information gleaned from WV communities, is being used to develop community partnerships based on mutual trust and respect to advance the common goal of decreasing breast cancer related illness and death in West Virginia women. PMID:19999271

  11. Ecological network analysis for a low-carbon and high-tech industrial park.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Su, Meirong; Liu, Gengyuan; Chen, Bin; Zhou, Shiyi; Jiang, Meiming

    2012-01-01

    Industrial sector is one of the indispensable contributors in global warming. Even if the occurrence of ecoindustrial parks (EIPs) seems to be a good improvement in saving ecological crises, there is still a lack of definitional clarity and in-depth researches on low-carbon industrial parks. In order to reveal the processes of carbon metabolism in a low-carbon high-tech industrial park, we selected Beijing Development Area (BDA) International Business Park in Beijing, China as case study, establishing a seven-compartment- model low-carbon metabolic network based on the methodology of Ecological Network Analysis (ENA). Integrating the Network Utility Analysis (NUA), Network Control Analysis (NCA), and system-wide indicators, we compartmentalized system sectors into ecological structure and analyzed dependence and control degree based on carbon metabolism. The results suggest that indirect flows reveal more mutuality and exploitation relation between system compartments and they are prone to positive sides for the stability of the whole system. The ecological structure develops well as an approximate pyramidal structure, and the carbon metabolism of BDA proves self-mutualistic and sustainable. Construction and waste management were found to be two active sectors impacting carbon metabolism, which was mainly regulated by internal and external environment.

  12. An Integrated Model for Supplier Selection for a High-Tech Manufacturer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Amy H. I.; Kang, He-Yau; Lin, Chun-Yu

    2011-11-01

    Global competitiveness has become the biggest concern of manufacturing companies, especially in high-tech industries. Improving competitive edges in an environment with rapidly changing technological innovations and dynamic customer needs is essential for a firm to survive and to acquire a decent profit. Thus, the introduction of successful new products is a source of new sales and profits and is a necessity in the intense competitive international market. After a product is developed, a firm needs the cooperation of upstream suppliers to provide satisfactory components and parts for manufacturing final products. Therefore, the selection of suitable suppliers has also become a very important decision. In this study, an analytical approach is proposed to select the most appropriate critical-part suppliers in order to maintain a high reliability of the supply chain. A fuzzy analytic network process (FANP) model, which incorporates the benefits, opportunities, costs and risks (BOCR) concept, is constructed to evaluate various aspects of suppliers. The proposed model is adopted in a TFT-LCD manufacturer in Taiwan in evaluating the expected performance of suppliers with respect to each important factor, and an overall ranking of the suppliers can be generated as a result.

  13. Rodent and germplasm trafficking: risks of microbial contamination in a high-tech biomedical world.

    PubMed

    Mahabir, Esther; Bauer, Beth; Schmidt, Jörg

    2008-01-01

    High-tech biomedical advances have led to increases both in the number of mice used for research and in exchanges of mice and/or their tissues between institutions. The latter are associated with the risk of dissemination of infectious agents. Because of the lack of international standardization of health surveillance programs, health certificates for imported rodents may be informative but may not address the needs of the importing facility. Preservation of mouse germplasm is achieved by cryopreservation of spermatozoa, embryos, or ovaries, and embryonic stem cells are used for the production of genetically engineered mice. After embryo transfer, recipients and rederived pups that test negative in microbiological screening for relevant microorganisms are released into full barrier holding areas. However, current research shows that embryos may also transmit microorganisms, especially viruses, to the recipient mice. In this article, we discuss regulations and practical issues in the shipping of live mice and mouse tissues, including spermatozoa, embryos, ovaries, and embryonic stem cells, and review work on microbial contamination of these biological materials. In addition, we present ways to reduce the risk of transmission of pathogens to mice under routine conditions. PMID:18506068

  14. Screening procedure for airborne pollutants emitted from a high-tech industrial complex in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, John H C; Tsai, Ching-Tsan; Chiang, Chow-Feng

    2015-11-01

    Despite the modernization of computational techniques, atmospheric dispersion modeling remains a complicated task as it involves the use of large amounts of interrelated data with wide variability. The continuously growing list of regulated air pollutants also increases the difficulty of this task. To address these challenges, this study aimed to develop a screening procedure for a long-term exposure scenario by generating a site-specific lookup table of hourly averaged dispersion factors (χ/Q), which could be evaluated by downwind distance, direction, and effective plume height only. To allow for such simplification, the average plume rise was weighted with the frequency distribution of meteorological data so that the prediction of χ/Q could be decoupled from the meteorological data. To illustrate this procedure, 20 receptors around a high-tech complex in Taiwan were selected. Five consecutive years of hourly meteorological data were acquired to generate a lookup table of χ/Q, as well as two regression formulas of plume rise as functions of downwind distance, buoyancy flux, and stack height. To calculate the concentrations for the selected receptors, a six-step Excel algorithm was programmed with four years of emission records and 10 most critical toxics were screened out. A validation check using Industrial Source Complex (ISC3) model with the same meteorological and emission data showed an acceptable overestimate of 6.7% in the average concentration of 10 nearby receptors. The procedure proposed in this study allows practical and focused emission management for a large industrial complex and can therefore be integrated into an air quality decision-making system.

  15. High Tech High School Interns Develop a Mid-Ocean Ridge Database for Research and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudigel, D.; Delaney, R.; Staudigel, H.; Koppers, A. A.; Miller, S. P.

    2004-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridges (MOR) represent one of the most important geographical and geological features on planet Earth. MORs are the locations where plates spread apart, they are the locations of the majority of the Earths' volcanoes that harbor some of the most extreme life forms. These concepts attract much research, but mid-ocean ridges are still effectively underrepresented in the Earth science class rooms. As two High Tech High School students, we began an internship at Scripps to develop a database for mid-ocean ridges as a resource for science and education. This Ridge Catalog will be accessible via http://earthref.org/databases/RC/ and applies a similar structure, design and data archival principle as the Seamount Catalog under EarthRef.org. Major research goals of this project include the development of (1) an archival structure for multibeam and sidescan data, standard bathymetric maps (including ODP-DSDP drill site and dredge locations) or any other arbitrary digital objects relating to MORs, and (2) to compile a global data set for some of the most defining characteristics of every ridge segment including ridge segment length, depth and azimuth and half spreading rates. One of the challenges included the need of making MOR data useful to the scientist as well as the teacher in the class room. Since the basic structure follows the design of the Seamount Catalog closely, we could move our attention to the basic data population of the database. We have pulled together multibeam data for the MOR segments from various public archives (SIOExplorer, SIO-GDC, NGDC, Lamont), and pre-processed it for public use. In particular, we have created individual bathymetric maps for each ridge segment, while merging the multibeam data with global satellite bathymetry data from Smith & Sandwell (1997). The global scale of this database will give it the ability to be used for any number of applications, from cruise planning to data

  16. EDITORIAL: Special issue containing papers presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems Special issue containing papers presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnichenko, Ya.

    2010-08-01

    The history of fusion research resembles the way in which one builds skyscrapers: laying the first foundation stone, one thinks about the top of the skyscraper. At the early stages of fusion, when it became clear that the thermonuclear reactor would operate with DT plasma confined by the magnetic field, the study of the `top item'—the physics of 3.5 MeV alpha particles produced by the DT fusion reaction—was initiated. The first publications on this topic appeared as long ago as the 1960s. At that time, because the physics of alpha particles was far from the experimental demand, investigations were carried out by small groups of theoreticians who hoped to discover important and interesting phenomena in this new research area. Soon after the beginning of the work, theoreticians discovered that alpha particles could excite various instabilities in fusion plasmas. In particular, at the end of the 1960s an Alfvén instability driven by alpha particles was predicted. Later it turned out that a variety of Alfvén instabilities with very different features does exist. Instabilities with perturbations of the Alfvénic type play an important role in current experiments; it is likely that they will affect plasma performance in ITER and future reactors. The first experimental manifestation of instabilities excited by superthermal particles in fusion devices was observed in the PDX tokamak in 1983. In this device a large-scale instability—the so called `fishbone instability'—associated with ions produced by the neutral beam injection resulted in a loss of a large fraction of the injected energy. Since then, the study of energetic-ion-driven instabilities and the effects produced by energetic ions in fusion plasmas has attracted the growing attention of both experimentalists and theorists. Recognizing the importance of this topic, the first conference on fusion alpha particles was held in 1989 in Kyiv under the auspices of the IAEA. The meeting in Kyiv and several

  17. Ibn Jazlah and his 11th century accounts (Taqwim al-abdan fi tadbir al-insan) of disease of the brain and spinal cord. Historical vignette.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Ardalan, Mohammad; Oakes, W Jerry

    2008-09-01

    The 11th century was culturally and medicinally one of the most exciting periods in the history of Islam. Medicine of this day was influenced by the Greeks, Indians, Persians, Coptics, and Syriacs. One of the most prolific writers of this period was Ibn Jazlah, who resided in Baghdad in the district of Karkh. Ibn Jazlah made many important observations regarding diseases of the brain and spinal cord. These contributions and a review of the life and times of this early Muslim physician are presented. PMID:18928231

  18. SURFACE RUPTURE OF THE NORMAL SEISMIC FAULTS AND SLOPE FAILURES APPEARED IN APRIL 11th, 2011 FUKUSHIMA-PREFECTURE HAMADOORI EARTHQUAKE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazmi, Zaheer Abbas; Konagai, Kazuo; Kyokawa, Hiroyuki; Tetik, Cigdem

    On April 11th, 2011, Iwaki region of Fukushima prefecture was jolted by Fukushima-Prefecture Hamadoori Earthquake. Surface ruptures were observed along causative Idosawa and Yunotake normal faults. In addition to numerous small slope failures, a coherent landslide and building structures of Tabito Junior High School, bisected by Idosawa Fault, were found along the causative faults. A precise digital elevation model of the coherent landslide was obtained through the ground and air-born LiDAR surveys. The measurements of perimeters of the gymnasium building and the swimming pool of Tabito Junior High School have shown that ground undergoes a slow and steady/continual deformation.

  19. Decision Making In A High-Tech World: Automation Bias and Countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosier, Kathleen L.; Skitka, Linda J.; Burdick, Mark R.; Heers, Susan T.; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Automated decision aids and decision support systems have become essential tools in many high-tech environments. In aviation, for example, flight management systems computers not only fly the aircraft, but also calculate fuel efficient paths, detect and diagnose system malfunctions and abnormalities, and recommend or carry out decisions. Air Traffic Controllers will soon be utilizing decision support tools to help them predict and detect potential conflicts and to generate clearances. Other fields as disparate as nuclear power plants and medical diagnostics are similarly becoming more and more automated. Ideally, the combination of human decision maker and automated decision aid should result in a high-performing team, maximizing the advantages of additional cognitive and observational power in the decision-making process. In reality, however, the presence of these aids often short-circuits the way that even very experienced decision makers have traditionally handled tasks and made decisions, and introduces opportunities for new decision heuristics and biases. Results of recent research investigating the use of automated aids have indicated the presence of automation bias, that is, errors made when decision makers rely on automated cues as a heuristic replacement for vigilant information seeking and processing. Automation commission errors, i.e., errors made when decision makers inappropriately follow an automated directive, or automation omission errors, i.e., errors made when humans fail to take action or notice a problem because an automated aid fails to inform them, can result from this tendency. Evidence of the tendency to make automation-related omission and commission errors has been found in pilot self reports, in studies using pilots in flight simulations, and in non-flight decision making contexts with student samples. Considerable research has found that increasing social accountability can successfully ameliorate a broad array of cognitive biases and

  20. [State-of-the-art and prospects of high-tech medical aid to patients with cardiac arrhythmia based at military medical facilities].

    PubMed

    Steklov, V I

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of provision of high-tech medical aid to patients with cardiac arrhythmia based at military medical facilities showed that the available means and workforce are sufficient for the purpose. In order to facilitate access to high-tech medical aid it is necessary to equip arrhythmologic departments with up-to-date-instruments and set up cabinets of electrocardiostimulation in regional (naval) hospitals for implantation of temporary and permanent pacemakers. A program is pending for education (primary specialization) and advanced training of specialists in clinical cardiac electrophysiology, interventional and surgical arrhythmology.

  1. [Hygienic assessment of lifestyle and health status in 10th-11th-form pupils directed to have a higher medical education].

    PubMed

    Timoshenko, K T

    2008-01-01

    Ninety-seven pupils from the 10th-to-11th classes formed on a competitive basis for intensive education, for forming motivation for future medical profession were examined using a set of psychophysiological tests that could evaluate the central nervous and cardiovascular systems, psychophysiological adaptation, task performance, and personality traits. The vast majority of the examinees were found to follow the hygienic recommendation of the day regimen, which corresponded to the principles of healthy lifestyle. In 99% of the pupils, mental capacity was rated as fair (66%) and high (33%), as evidenced by psychophysiological testing. Fifty-six per cent of the examinees were observed to have mental adaptive disorders that might reflect age-related psychological immaturity in them at the completing stage of schooling.

  2. [Hygienic assessment of lifestyle and health status in 10th-11th-form pupils directed to have a higher medical education].

    PubMed

    Timoshenko, K T

    2008-01-01

    Ninety-seven pupils from the 10th-to-11th classes formed on a competitive basis for intensive education, for forming motivation for future medical profession were examined using a set of psychophysiological tests that could evaluate the central nervous and cardiovascular systems, psychophysiological adaptation, task performance, and personality traits. The vast majority of the examinees were found to follow the hygienic recommendation of the day regimen, which corresponded to the principles of healthy lifestyle. In 99% of the pupils, mental capacity was rated as fair (66%) and high (33%), as evidenced by psychophysiological testing. Fifty-six per cent of the examinees were observed to have mental adaptive disorders that might reflect age-related psychological immaturity in them at the completing stage of schooling. PMID:19097437

  3. [Review of the proceedings of the 11th Conference of the European Venous Forum (June 24-26, 2010, Antwerp, Belgium)].

    PubMed

    Sapelkin, S B; Bogachev, V Iu

    2010-01-01

    The authors reviewed herein the proceedings of the 11th Conference of the European Venous Forum held under the badge of a more and more significant effect of the positions and principles of evidence-based medicine on the life of the European Phlebological Community. This concerned both the representative reports and special subject lectures dedicated to the statistical analysis in surgery and phlebology, as well as assessment of the remote outcomes of surgical management of venous chronic diseases. Also analysed herein are the materials devoted to the modern minimally invasive techniques aimed at obliterating major veins and used in randomized studies. Presented at the Congress were initial results of employing a novel technique of thermoregulation using steam. Also analysed are the reports concerning interrelationship between phlebology as a science and mass media including the World Wide Web.

  4. Understanding Stress-Related Behavioral Phenotypes: Report from the 1st International Neuroscience Summer School and the 11th International “Stress and Behavior” Conference

    PubMed Central

    LaPorte, J. L.; Klimenko, V. M.; Kalueff, A. V.

    2008-01-01

    The 1st International Neuroscience Summer School and the 11th International Multidisciplinary Neuroscience and Biopsychiatry Conference on Stress and Behavior were held in St. Petersburg, Russia, during May 9–20, 2008. The summer school gathered 30 talented young scientists from 15 countries worldwide, and was dedicated to different topics of behavioral neuroscience. Many interactive courses were provided on neuropharmacology, animal phenotyping, and biopsychology. The conference's excellent scientific and social program attracted almost 500 delegates from 40 countries from many areas of stress research. The eclectic interaction between medical doctors, basic scientists, psychologists, and students made for a productive and collaborative environment, which contributed greatly to the success of the school and conference.

  5. Generation of the 11th order rational harmonic mode-locked pulses with an arbitrary numerator in fiber-ring lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P. H.; Zhan, L.; Gu, Z. C.; Ye, Q. H.; Xia, Y. X.

    2004-08-01

    We report for the first time the generation of 5th, 10th and 11th order rational harmonic mode-locked pulse trains with the numerator of the detuning fraction be an arbitrary integer instead of unity used to date in conventional rational harmonic mode-locked fiber-ring lasers. Results show that the amplitude envelopes of these pulse trains are strongly modulated by some lower order rational harmonic mode locking with numerator equals to unity. This result makes it possible to generate dual- or multiple-pulse train when the detuning of the modulation frequency is close to the half of the cavity frequency. Choosing a proper numerator is also helpful in equalizing the amplitude distribution of the pulse train generated by high order rational harmonic mode locking.

  6. Identification of ground motion features for high-tech facility under far field seismic waves using wavelet packet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shieh-Kung; Loh, Chin-Hsiung; Chen, Chin-Tsun

    2016-04-01

    Seismic records collected from earthquake with large magnitude and far distance may contain long period seismic waves which have small amplitude but with dominant period up to 10 sec. For a general situation, the long period seismic waves will not endanger the safety of the structural system or cause any uncomfortable for human activity. On the contrary, for those far distant earthquakes, this type of seismic waves may cause a glitch or, furthermore, breakdown to some important equipments/facilities (such as the high-precision facilities in high-tech Fab) and eventually damage the interests of company if the amplitude becomes significant. The previous study showed that the ground motion features such as time-variant dominant frequencies extracted using moving window singular spectrum analysis (MWSSA) and amplitude characteristics of long-period waves identified from slope change of ground motion Arias Intensity can efficiently indicate the damage severity to the high-precision facilities. However, embedding a large hankel matrix to extract long period seismic waves make the MWSSA become a time-consumed process. In this study, the seismic ground motion data collected from broadband seismometer network located in Taiwan were used (with epicenter distance over 1000 km). To monitor the significant long-period waves, the low frequency components of these seismic ground motion data are extracted using wavelet packet transform (WPT) to obtain wavelet coefficients and the wavelet entropy of coefficients are used to identify the amplitude characteristics of long-period waves. The proposed method is a timesaving process compared to MWSSA and can be easily implemented for real-time detection. Comparison and discussion on this method among these different seismic events and the damage severity to the high-precision facilities in high-tech Fab is made.

  7. Did Osler suffer from "paranoia antitherapeuticum baltimorensis"? A comparative content analysis of The Principles and Practice of Medicine and Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 11th edition.

    PubMed

    Hogan, D B

    1999-10-01

    One of the most important legacies of Sir William Osler was his textbook The Principles and Practice of Medicine. A common criticism of the book when it was first published was its deficiency in the area of therapeutics. In this article, the 1st edition of The Principles and Practice of Medicine is compared with the 11th edition of Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. The analysis focuses on the treatment recommendations for 4 conditions that were covered in both books (diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, pneumonia and typhoid fever). Osler's textbook dealt with typhoid fever and pneumonia at greater length, whereas Harrison's placed more emphasis on diabetes mellitus and ischemic heart disease. Notwithstanding Osler's reputation as a therapeutic nihilist, the 2 books devoted equivalent space to treatment (in terms of proportion of total sentences for the conditions). For all conditions except ischemic heart disease, Osler concentrated on general measures and symptomatic care. Throughout Osler's textbook numerous negative comments are made about the medicinal treatment of various conditions. A more accurate statement about Osler's therapeutic approach was that he was a "medicinal nihilist." His demand for proof of efficacy before use of a medication remains relevant.

  8. Possible impacts of early-11th-, middle-12th-, and late-13th-century droughts on western Native Americans and the Mississippian Cahokians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, L.V.; Berry, M.S.; Jolie, E.A.; Spangler, J.D.; Stahle, D.W.; Hattori, E.M.

    2007-01-01

    One or more of three intense and persistent droughts impacted some Native American cultures in the early-11th, middle-12th and late-13th centuries, including the Anasazi, Fremont, Lovelock, and Mississippian (Cahokian) prehistorical cultures. Tree-ring-based reconstructions of precipitation and temperature indicate that warm drought periods occurred between AD 990 and 1060, AD 1135 and 1170, and AD 1276 and 1297. These droughts occurred during minima in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and may have been associated with positive values of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. Each of the Native American cultures was supported, to a greater or lesser degree, by precipitation-dependent resources. Both the Four Corners region and Cahokia were sites of intense growth between about AD 1050 and 1130, and by AD 1150, cultures in both regions were undergoing stress. By AD 1300 the Anasazi and Fremont cultures had collapsed and their residual populations had either left their homelands or withered. In the case of Fremont populations, the AD 990-1060 drought may have had the greatest impact. This drought also may have affected the Anasazi, for it was at the end of this drought that some people from Chaco migrated to the San Juan River valley and founded the Salmon Ruin great house. Detailed data do not exist on the number of Lovelock habitation sites or populations over time; however, Lovelock populations appear to have retreated from the western Great Basin to California by AD 1300 or shortly thereafter.

  9. Enhanced syndromic surveillance for mass gatherings in the Pacific: a case study of the 11th Festival of Pacific Arts in Solomon Islands, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Hoy, Damian; Saketa, Salanieta T; Maraka, Roy Roger; Sio, Alison; Wanyeki, Ian; Frison, Pascal; Ogaoga, Divi; Iniakawala, Dennie; Joshua, Cynthia; Duituturaga, Sala; Lepers, Christelle; Roth, Adam; White, Paul; Souares, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    Mass gatherings pose public health challenges to host countries, as they can cause or exacerbate disease outbreaks within the host location or elsewhere. In July 2012, the 11th Festival of Pacific Arts (FOPA), a mass gathering event involving 22 Pacific island states and territories, was hosted by Solomon Islands. An enhanced syndromic surveillance (ESS) system was implemented for the event. Throughout the capital city, Honiara, 15 sentinel sites were established and successfully took part in the ESS system, which commenced one week before the FOPA (25 June) and concluded eight days after the event (22 July). The ESS involved expanding on the existing syndromic surveillance parameters: from one to 15 sentinel sites, from four to eight syndromes, from aggregated to case-based reporting and from weekly to daily reporting. A web-based system was developed to enable data entry, data storage and data analysis. Towards the end of the ESS period, a focus group discussion and series of key informant interviews were conducted. The ESS was considered a success and played an important role in the early detection of possible outbreaks. For the period of the ESS, 1668 patients with syndrome presentations were received across the 15 sentinel sites. There were no major events of public health significance. Several lessons were learnt that are relevant to ESS in mass gathering scenarios, including the importance of having adequate lead in time for engagement and preparation to ensure appropriate policy and institutional frameworks are put in place. PMID:27766181

  10. Hepatic encephalopathy--definition, nomenclature, diagnosis, and quantification: final report of the working party at the 11th World Congresses of Gastroenterology, Vienna, 1998.

    PubMed

    Ferenci, Peter; Lockwood, Alan; Mullen, Kevin; Tarter, Ralph; Weissenborn, Karin; Blei, Andres T

    2002-03-01

    Research on hepatic encephalopathy is hampered by the imprecise definition of this disabling complication of liver disease. Under this light, the Organisation Mondiale de Gastroentérologie commissioned a Working Party to reach a consensus in this area and to present it at the 11th World Congress of Gastroenterology in Vienna (1998). The Working Party continued its work thereafter and now present their final report. In summary, the Working Party has suggested a modification of current nomenclature for clinical diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy; proposed guidelines for the performance of future clinical trials in hepatic encephalopathy; and felt the need for a large study to redefine neuropsychiatric abnormalities in liver disease, which would allow the diagnosis of minimal (subclinical) encephalopathy to be made on firm statistical grounds. In the interim, it proposes the use of a psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score, based on the result of 5 neuropsychologic tests. Finally, the need for a careful evaluation of the newer neuroimaging modalities for the diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy was stressed.

  11. Possible impacts of early-11th-, middle-12th-, and late-13th-century droughts on western Native Americans and the Mississippian Cahokians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Larry V.; Berry, Michael S.; Jolie, Edward A.; Spangler, Jerry D.; Stahle, David W.; Hattori, Eugene M.

    2007-02-01

    One or more of three intense and persistent droughts impacted some Native American cultures in the early-11th, middle-12th and late-13th centuries, including the Anasazi, Fremont, Lovelock, and Mississippian (Cahokian) prehistorical cultures. Tree-ring-based reconstructions of precipitation and temperature indicate that warm drought periods occurred between AD 990 and 1060, AD 1135 and 1170, and AD 1276 and 1297. These droughts occurred during minima in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and may have been associated with positive values of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. Each of the Native American cultures was supported, to a greater or lesser degree, by precipitation-dependent resources. Both the Four Corners region and Cahokia were sites of intense growth between about AD 1050 and 1130, and by AD 1150, cultures in both regions were undergoing stress. By AD 1300 the Anasazi and Fremont cultures had collapsed and their residual populations had either left their homelands or withered. In the case of Fremont populations, the AD 990-1060 drought may have had the greatest impact. This drought also may have affected the Anasazi, for it was at the end of this drought that some people from Chaco migrated to the San Juan River valley and founded the Salmon Ruin great house. Detailed data do not exist on the number of Lovelock habitation sites or populations over time; however, Lovelock populations appear to have retreated from the western Great Basin to California by AD 1300 or shortly thereafter.

  12. Enhanced capture of healthcare-related harms and injuries in the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11).

    PubMed

    Southern, Danielle A; Pincus, Harold A; Romano, Patrick S; Burnand, Bernard; Harrison, James; Forster, Alan J; Moskal, Lori; Quan, Hude; Droesler, Saskia E; Sundararajan, Vijaya; Colin, Cyrille; Gurevich, Yana; Brien, Susan E; Kostanjsek, Nenad; Üstün, Bedirhan; Ghali, William A

    2016-02-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) plans to submit the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) to the World Health Assembly in 2018. The WHO is working toward a revised classification system that has an enhanced ability to capture health concepts in a manner that reflects current scientific evidence and that is compatible with contemporary information systems. In this paper, we present recommendations made to the WHO by the ICD revision's Quality and Safety Topic Advisory Group (Q&S TAG) for a new conceptual approach to capturing healthcare-related harms and injuries in ICD-coded data. The Q&S TAG has grouped causes of healthcare-related harm and injuries into four categories that relate to the source of the event: (a) medications and substances, (b) procedures, (c) devices and (d) other aspects of care. Under the proposed multiple coding approach, one of these sources of harm must be coded as part of a cluster of three codes to depict, respectively, a healthcare activity as a 'source' of harm, a 'mode or mechanism' of harm and a consequence of the event summarized by these codes (i.e. injury or harm). Use of this framework depends on the implementation of a new and potentially powerful code-clustering mechanism in ICD-11. This new framework for coding healthcare-related harm has great potential to improve the clinical detail of adverse event descriptions, and the overall quality of coded health data.

  13. Increasing Receipt of High-Tech/High-Cost Imaging and Its Determinants in the Last Month of Taiwanese Patients With Metastatic Cancer, 2001–2010

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tsang-Wu; Hung, Yen-Ni; Soong, Thomas C.; Tang, Siew Tzuh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract One strategy for controlling the skyrocketing costs of cancer care may be to target high-tech/high-cost imaging at the end of life (EOL). This population-based study investigated receipt of high-tech/high-cost imaging and its determinants for Taiwanese patients with metastatic cancer in their last month of life. Individual patient-level data were linked with encrypted identification numbers from computerized administrative data in Taiwan, that is, the National Register of Deaths Database, Cancer Registration System database, and National Health Insurance claims datasets, Database of Medical Care Institutions Status, and national census statistics (population/household income). We identified receipt of computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and radionuclide bone scans (BSs) for 236,911 Taiwanese cancer decedents with metastatic disease, 2001 to 2010. Associations of patient, physician, hospital, and regional factors with receiving CT, MRI, and bone scan in the last month of life were evaluated by multilevel generalized linear-mixed models. Over one-third (average [range]: 36.11% [33.07%–37.31%]) of patients with metastatic cancer received at least 1 high-tech/high-cost imaging modality in their last month (usage rates for CT, MRI, PET, and BS were 31.05%, 5.81%, 0.25%, and 8.15%, respectively). In 2001 to 2010, trends of receipt increased for CT (27.96–32.22%), MRI (4.34–6.70%), and PET (0.00–0.62%), but decreased for BS (9.47–6.57%). Facilitative determinants with consistent trends for at least 2 high-tech/high-cost imaging modalities were male gender, younger age, married, rural residence, lung cancer diagnosis, dying within 1 to 2 years of diagnosis, not under medical oncology care, and receiving care at a teaching hospital with a larger volume of terminally ill cancer patients and greater EOL care intensity. Undergoing high-tech/high-cost imaging at EOL generally was not associated

  14. Building on Family Strengths: Research and Services in Support of Children and Their Families. Proceedings of the Building on Family Strengths Annual Conference (11th, Portland, Oregon, May 6-8, 2004)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Lynwood J., Ed.; Tullis, Kathryn, Ed.; Hanson, Andrea, Ed.; Sowders, Stacey, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The 11th Annual Building on Family Strengths Conference was held from May 6th through May 8th, 2004, in Portland, Oregon. Highlights included: (1) The revival of a pre-conference training session; this year featured "Understanding Research and Evaluation in Relation to Social Change," presented by Elaine Slaton and Shannon CrossBear of the…

  15. Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Magnetic Fluids (ICMF 11) (Košice, Slovakia, 23-27 July 2007).

    PubMed

    Kopčanský, Peter; Timko, Milan; Kováč, Josef; Václavíková, Miroslava; Odenbach, Stefan

    2008-05-21

    The 11th International Conference on Magnetic Fluids (ICMF 11) was held in Košice, Slovakia between 23-27 July 2007. Attendance at the conference was high and its motivation was in line with the ten previous ICMF conferences organized in Udine, Orlando, Bangor, Sendai-Tokyo, Riga, Paris, Bhavnagar, Timisoara, Bremen and Guarujá. The conference in Slovakia reflected the scientific community's enthusiasm and worldwide support, with 256 participants, from 30 countries attending.The main objective of ICMF 11 was to promote progress and knowledge in the field of magnetic fluids regarding their chemistry, physical and magnetic properties, heat and mass transfer, surface phenomena, as well as their technological and biomedical applications. As research on magnetic fluids is essentially interdisciplinary, experts from related areas were invited to present their contributions with a view to increasing knowledge in the field and highlighting new trends. Submitted communications were refereed by members of the Scientific Organizing Committee and abstracts were assembled in a book of abstracts. Participants presented 180 posters in two poster sessions and 56 oral presentations. All presentations contributed to a greater understanding of the area, and helped to bridge the gap between physics, chemistry, technology, biology and medical sciences. Contributions to this conference are presented in 115 scientific papers, with some published in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter and the rest in Magnetohydrodynamics. The organization of the conference was made possible by generous support from the Institute of Experimental Physics and Institute of Geotechnics of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, the University of Pavol Jozef Šafárik and the Slovak Physical Society. Financial support from Ferrotec, Cryosoft Ltd, Mikrochem, Liquids Research Ltd, Askony and US Steel Košice, is also gratefully acknowledged. PMID:21694229

  16. Preface: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Magnetic Fluids (ICMF 11) (Košice, Slovakia, 23 27 July 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopčanský, Peter; Timko, Milan; Kováč, Josef; Václavíková, Miroslava; Odenbach, Stefan

    2008-05-01

    The 11th International Conference on Magnetic Fluids (ICMF 11) was held in Košice, Slovakia between 23-27 July 2007. Attendance at the conference was high and its motivation was in line with the ten previous ICMF conferences organized in Udine, Orlando, Bangor, Sendai-Tokyo, Riga, Paris, Bhavnagar, Timisoara, Bremen and Guarujá. The conference in Slovakia reflected the scientific community's enthusiasm and worldwide support, with 256 participants, from 30 countries attending.The main objective of ICMF 11 was to promote progress and knowledge in the field of magnetic fluids regarding their chemistry, physical and magnetic properties, heat and mass transfer, surface phenomena, as well as their technological and biomedical applications. As research on magnetic fluids is essentially interdisciplinary, experts from related areas were invited to present their contributions with a view to increasing knowledge in the field and highlighting new trends. Submitted communications were refereed by members of the Scientific Organizing Committee and abstracts were assembled in a book of abstracts. Participants presented 180 posters in two poster sessions and 56 oral presentations. All presentations contributed to a greater understanding of the area, and helped to bridge the gap between physics, chemistry, technology, biology and medical sciences. Contributions to this conference are presented in 115 scientific papers, with some published in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter and the rest in Magnetohydrodynamics. The organization of the conference was made possible by generous support from the Institute of Experimental Physics and Institute of Geotechnics of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, the University of Pavol Jozef Šafárik and the Slovak Physical Society. Financial support from Ferrotec, Cryosoft Ltd, Mikrochem, Liquids Research Ltd, Askony and US Steel Košice, is also gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Magnetic Fluids (ICMF 11) (Košice, Slovakia, 23-27 July 2007).

    PubMed

    Kopčanský, Peter; Timko, Milan; Kováč, Josef; Václavíková, Miroslava; Odenbach, Stefan

    2008-05-21

    The 11th International Conference on Magnetic Fluids (ICMF 11) was held in Košice, Slovakia between 23-27 July 2007. Attendance at the conference was high and its motivation was in line with the ten previous ICMF conferences organized in Udine, Orlando, Bangor, Sendai-Tokyo, Riga, Paris, Bhavnagar, Timisoara, Bremen and Guarujá. The conference in Slovakia reflected the scientific community's enthusiasm and worldwide support, with 256 participants, from 30 countries attending.The main objective of ICMF 11 was to promote progress and knowledge in the field of magnetic fluids regarding their chemistry, physical and magnetic properties, heat and mass transfer, surface phenomena, as well as their technological and biomedical applications. As research on magnetic fluids is essentially interdisciplinary, experts from related areas were invited to present their contributions with a view to increasing knowledge in the field and highlighting new trends. Submitted communications were refereed by members of the Scientific Organizing Committee and abstracts were assembled in a book of abstracts. Participants presented 180 posters in two poster sessions and 56 oral presentations. All presentations contributed to a greater understanding of the area, and helped to bridge the gap between physics, chemistry, technology, biology and medical sciences. Contributions to this conference are presented in 115 scientific papers, with some published in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter and the rest in Magnetohydrodynamics. The organization of the conference was made possible by generous support from the Institute of Experimental Physics and Institute of Geotechnics of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, the University of Pavol Jozef Šafárik and the Slovak Physical Society. Financial support from Ferrotec, Cryosoft Ltd, Mikrochem, Liquids Research Ltd, Askony and US Steel Košice, is also gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Plasma Particle Lofting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijmans, Lucas; Nijdam, Sander

    2015-09-01

    In plasma particle lofting, macroscopic particles are picked up from a surface by an electric force. This force originates from a plasma that charges both the surface and any particle on it, leading to an electric force that pushes particles off the surface. This process has been suggested as a novel cleaning technique in modern high-tech applications, because it has intrinsic advantages over more traditional methods. Its development is, however, limited by a lack of knowledge of the underlying physics. Although the lofting has been demonstrated before, there are neither numerical nor experimental quantitative measures of it. Especially determining the charge deposited by a plasma on a particle on a surface proves difficult. We have developed a novel experimental method using a ``probe force.'' This allows us to, for the first time, quantitatively measure the plasma lofting force. By applying this method to different plasma conditions we can identify the important plasma parameters, allowing us to tailor a plasma for specific cleaning applications. Additionally, the quantitative result can help in the development of new models for the electron and ion currents through a plasma sheath.

  19. A strategy to assist management in workforce engagement and employee retention in the high tech engineering environment.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Elizabeth; Daim, Tugrul U

    2010-11-01

    Many companies use survey methods in an attempt to gauge employees' attitudes and opinions toward the company. These attitudes and opinions are directly related to an employee's engagement within the company. In many instances, employees wait in vain for the survey response and the subsequent employer actions, but the truth is sometimes management does not know what to do with the results. For this reason, we theorize that this type of survey, typically utilizing the Likert-scale, is not adequately assisting management in addressing employee engagement and retention issues. For instance, in many occasions, once the survey results are tabulated, companies are doing little or nothing to address the issues. In fact, far too many companies make the mistake of conducting employee engagement surveys, and then ignore the answers. Thus, we propose that a company should take advantage of the survey results, and utilize them to provide data to bridge employees' needs and goals with stakeholders' responsibilities and goals by refining and incorporating them into a hierarchical decision model (HDM). Thus, this would essentially be utilizing the quantitative data to determine what to measure qualitatively. We use a case from the high tech industry, specifically focusing on the engineering environment. Engineering environments are known to be more creative and such approaches would be more beneficial. PMID:20116102

  20. Trigone ventricular meningiomas: Is it possible to achieve good results even in the absence of high tech tools?

    PubMed Central

    Faquini, Igor; Fonseca, Ricardo Brandão; Vale de Melo, Sérgio Luís; Negri, Herika; Vieira, Eduardo; Saboia, Tammy; Azevedo-Filho, Hildo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intraventricular meningiomas constitute 2% of intracranial meningiomas, representing a challenging disease for neurosurgeons; we report our experience through a case series, emphasizing surgical approaches and results. Methods: Between 2009 and 2012, four patients underwent microsurgical resection in our department. Clinical and imaging findings, surgical approaches, outcomes, and follow-up were analyzed. Results: Four patients (three females and one male) were included and the signs of intracranial hypertension were the main clinical presentation in all cases. The parietal approach through intraparietal sulcus was performed in 3 cases and parieto-occipital interhemispheric surgical route in 1 case. Gross total resection was achieved in all the patients without additional deficits and without the aid of neuronavigation, intraoperative monitoring, and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusion: Gross total resection is the gold standard treatment for such tumors and the intraparietal sulcus approach is an excellent choice for most of the cases. Careful anatomical knowledge contributes to a safer procedure even in the absence of high tech equipment assistance. PMID:26674002

  1. The 11th Century Collapse of Aqaba on the North Coast of the Gulf of Aqaba, Dead Sea Fault System, Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Tina; Allison, Alivia; Rucker, John

    2010-05-01

    The city of Aqaba is situated at the northern end of the Gulf of Aqaba along the southern part of the Dead Sea Transform Fault. Based both on the historical accounts and archaeological excavations, it is clear that earthquakes have played a significant role in the history of the region. The early Islamic city of Ayla was probably founded around 650 A.D., suffered some damage as a result of the 748 A.D. earthquake, and saw extensive reconstruction around the beginning of the Abbasid period (Whitcomb, 1994). Among other evidence of earthquake destruction at the Islamic city of Ayla is the leaning city Sea wall. Stratified pottery collections from our February 2009 excavation of the buttress of the city wall of Ayla strongly suggest a date for revetment construction in the early 11th Century. Based on the fact that the most recent pottery from sealed loci inside the buttress wall is late Abbasid - Fatimid and the absence of handmade pottery often found in the abandonment phases, the buttress was likely constructed after liquefaction damage from the 1033 earthquake. Damage from distant source earthquakes (748 and 1033) in the ancient city was repaired in antiquity. The destruction and loss of life (accounts claim that all but 12 residents who had been out fishing were killed) caused by the 1068 earthquake may account for the relative ease with which Baldwin I of Jerusalem took over when he arrived with a small retinue in 1116 A.D. Paleoseismic trenches in the modern city of Aqaba indicate that at least two earthquakes have occurred after deposits dated to 1045-1278 A.D. A preliminary analysis of the stratigraphy in new trenches in the Taba sabkha north of Aqaba shows at least three separate faulting events, with the most recent event located at a depth of 70 cm below the ground surface. This finding supports the initial ground penetrating radar survey conducted at the southern end of the Taba sabkha by Abueladas (2005). These data document a long period of quiescence

  2. [A modified retroperitoneal approach to the kidney in patients with a highly deformed thorax: obtaining a wide operative field through subperiosteal resection of the 10th, 11th and 12th ribs].

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yuji; Kanou, Takehiro; Takagi, Norito; Tokuda, Yuji; Uozumi, Jiro; Masaki, Zenjiro

    2005-07-01

    We herein report a technique which facilitates a retroperitoneal approach to the kidney in cases of highly deformed thorax due to kyphoscoliosis. The operation consists of a lumbar oblique incision with removal of the 11th rib, combined with the additional removal of the 12th and 10th ribs. Resection of the upper two ribs was performed subperiosteally, leaving the periosteum of the deep side untouched. However, the deep side periosteum of the 12th rib was incised caudal from the pleural margin in order to facilitate exposure of the diaphragm. The retroperitoneal space was entered through the tip of the 11th rib bed. The diaphragm was incised dorso-medially at a level 1 cm caudal from the lower margin of the pleura, to an extent necessary to enable the pleura together with the cranial diaphragm to be manoeuvred in an upward direction. Two cases with renal tuberculosis associated with high-grade kyphosis and one case with staghorn calculi accompanied with lordosis were operated on utilizing this technique. In the former two cases, the thoracic cage was in direct contact with the iliac bone and there was practically no space between the rib border and the iliac crest. This was also true of the third case, but the grade of deformity was not as extensive as in the former two cases. Removal of the 10th, 11th and 12th ribs could be achieved without injuring the pleura and a satisfactorily large operating field could thus be developed which enabled a simple nephrectomy to be performed without difficulty. The characteristic feature of the described approach is that resection of the 10th and 11th ribs is simply to facilitate manoevrability of the wound margin, without going through the rib bed. The technique could be advantageous in selected cases where there is a highly deformed thorax. PMID:16083038

  3. Fourier and Wavelet Based Characterisation of the Ionospheric Response to the Solar Eclipse of August, the 11th, 1999, Measured Through 1-minute Vertical Ionospheric Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauli, P.; Abry, P.; Boska, J.

    2004-05-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the ionospheric response induced by the solar eclipse of August, the 11th, 1999. We provide Fourier and wavelet based characterisations of the propagation of the acoustic-gravity waves induced by the solar eclipse. The analysed data consist of profiles of electron concentration. They are derived from 1-minute vertical incidence ionospheric sounding measurements, performed at the Pruhonice observatory (Czech republic, 49.9N, 14.5E). The chosen 1-minute high sampling rate aims at enabling us to specifically see modes below acoustic cut-off period. The August period was characterized by Solar Flux F10.7 = 128, steady solar wind, quiet magnetospheric conditions, a low geomagnetic activity (Dst index varies from -10 nT to -20 nT, Σ Kp index reached value of 12+). The eclipse was notably exceptional in uniform solar disk. These conditions and fact that the culmination of the solar eclipse over central Europe occurred at local noon are such that the observed ionospheric response is mainly that of the solar eclipse. We provide a full characterization of the propagation of the waves in terms of times of occurrence, group and phase velocities, propagation direction, characteristic period and lifetime of the particular wave structure. However, ionospheric vertical sounding technique enables us to deal with vertical components of each characteristic. Parameters are estimated combining Fourier and wavelet analysis. Our conclusions confirm earlier theoretical and experimental findings, reported in [Altadill et al., 2001; Farges et al., 2001; Muller-Wodarg et al.,1998] regarding the generation and propagation of gravity waves and provide complementary characterisation using wavelet approaches. We also report a new evidence for the generation and propagation of acoustic waves induced by the solar eclipse through the ionospheric F region. Up to our knowledge, this is the first time that acoustic waves can be demonstrated based on ionospheric

  4. Where High-Tech Meets High-Touch: an example of effective cross-disciplinary collaboration in education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzhauer, B.; Mooney, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    How can non-formal education programs effectively blend hands-on, place-based field science lessons with technology and digital media to teach abstract global concepts in a local setting? Using climate change as an overarching concept, the Aldo Leopold Nature Center (ALNC) in Madison, WI, is developing exhibits and digital curricula, strengthened through partnerships with local and national experts from scientific and education fields, to effectively increase the public's interest in and understanding of science and technology, how the world works, and what we can do to adapt, mitigate, and innovate sustainable solutions. The exhibits and multimedia content, centered on topics such as climate, energy, weather, and phenology, have been developed in consultation with partners like the National Academy of Sciences and various departments at the University of Wisconsin (UW). Outdoor "high-touch" programs are complemented with "high-tech" exhibits and media, including touchscreen kiosks and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Science On a Sphere® global display system, tying together multimedia experiences with peer-reviewed cutting-edge science to ensure maximum comprehension by appealing and connecting to learners of all ages and learning modalities. The curriculum is being developed in alignment with local and national education standards and science and climate literacy frameworks (such as "The Essential Principles of Climate Sciences," U.S. Global Change Research Program / U.S. Climate Change Science Program). Its digital format allows it to be easily adapted to visitors' learning styles and cognitive levels and updated with relevant new content such as real-time climate data or current visualizations from the UW Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies. Drawing upon ALNC's award-winning environmental education experiences, professional development networks such as NOAA's Climate Stewards Education Program, and existing

  5. PREFACE: Proceedings of the 11th European Workshop of the European Microbeam Analysis Society (EMAS) on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    This volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering contains papers from the 11th Workshop of the European Microbeam Analysis Society (EMAS) on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis which took place from 10-14 May 2009 in the Hotel Faltom, Gdynia, Poland. The primary aim of this series of workshops is to assess the state-of-the-art and reliability of microbeam analysis techniques. The workshops also provide a forum where students and young scientists starting out on careers in microbeam analysis can meet and discuss with the established experts. The workshops have a very distinct format comprising invited plenary lectures by internationally recognized experts, poster presentations by the participants and round table discussions on the key topics led by specialists in the field. For this workshop EMAS invited speakers on the following topics: EPMA, EBSD, fast energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, three-dimensional microanalysis, and micro-and nanoanalysis in the natural resources industry. The continuing relevance of the EMAS workshops and the high regard in which they are held internationally can be seen from the fact that 69 posters from 16 countries were on display at the meeting and that the participants came from as far away as Japan and the USA. A number of participants with posters were invited to give short oral presentations of their work in two dedicated sessions. As at previous workshops there was also a special oral session for young scientists. Small cash prizes were awarded for the three best posters and for the best oral presentation by a young scientist. The prize for the best poster went to the contribution by G Tylko, S Dubchak, Z Banach and K Turnau, entitled Monte Carlo simulation for an assessment of standard validity and quantitative X-ray microanalysis in plant. Joanna Wojewoda-Budka of the Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Krakow, received the prize for the best oral presentation by a

  6. PREFACE: Proceedings of the 11th European Workshop of the European Microbeam Analysis Society (EMAS) on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    This volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering contains papers from the 11th Workshop of the European Microbeam Analysis Society (EMAS) on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis which took place from 10-14 May 2009 in the Hotel Faltom, Gdynia, Poland. The primary aim of this series of workshops is to assess the state-of-the-art and reliability of microbeam analysis techniques. The workshops also provide a forum where students and young scientists starting out on careers in microbeam analysis can meet and discuss with the established experts. The workshops have a very distinct format comprising invited plenary lectures by internationally recognized experts, poster presentations by the participants and round table discussions on the key topics led by specialists in the field. For this workshop EMAS invited speakers on the following topics: EPMA, EBSD, fast energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, three-dimensional microanalysis, and micro-and nanoanalysis in the natural resources industry. The continuing relevance of the EMAS workshops and the high regard in which they are held internationally can be seen from the fact that 69 posters from 16 countries were on display at the meeting and that the participants came from as far away as Japan and the USA. A number of participants with posters were invited to give short oral presentations of their work in two dedicated sessions. As at previous workshops there was also a special oral session for young scientists. Small cash prizes were awarded for the three best posters and for the best oral presentation by a young scientist. The prize for the best poster went to the contribution by G Tylko, S Dubchak, Z Banach and K Turnau, entitled Monte Carlo simulation for an assessment of standard validity and quantitative X-ray microanalysis in plant. Joanna Wojewoda-Budka of the Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Krakow, received the prize for the best oral presentation by a

  7. EDITORIAL: Selected papers from the 11th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2011) Selected papers from the 11th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young-Ho

    2012-09-01

    This special section of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering features papers selected from the 11th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2011), held at Sejong Hotel in Seoul, Korea during 15-18 November 2011. Since the first PowerMEMS workshop held in Sendai, Japan in 2000, the workshop has developed as the premier forum for reporting research results in micro and nanotechnology for power generation, energy conversion, harvesting and processing applications, including in-depth technical issues on nanostructures and materials for small-scale high-density energy and thermal management. Potential PowerMEMS applications cover not only portable power devices for consumer electronics and remote sensors, but also micro engines, impulsive thrusters and fuel cells for systems ranging from the nanometer to the millimeter scale. The 2011 technical program consists of 1 plenary talk, 4 invited talks and 118 contributed presentations. The 48 oral and 70 poster presentations, selected by 27 Technical Program Committee Members from 131 submitted abstracts, have stimulated lively discussion maximizing the interaction between participants. Among them, this special section includes 9 papers covering micro-scale power generators, energy converters, harvesters, thrusters and thermal coolers. Finally, we are grateful to the members of the International Steering Committee, the Technical Program Committee, and the Local Organizing Committee for their efforts and contributions to PowerMEMS 2011. We also thank the two companies Samsung Electro-Mechanics and LG Elite for technical tour arrangements. Special thanks go to Dr Ian Forbes, the editorial staff of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, as well as to the staff of IOP Publishing for making this special section possible.

  8. High-Tech Comfort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Explains why the influx of computers into classrooms means that schools need to pay more attention to ergonomic furnishings. The health risks of poorly designed furniture are discussed as are the kings of furniture that work best ergonomically for computer use. (GR)

  9. A High Tech Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nettle, Audrey

    The new vocationalism in education could be said to be an effect of changes in the greater society--arriving after the changes have already happened. There has been a shift in the nature of the advanced capitalist countries, such as the United States. Giant companies have, through advances in communications technology, become able to control…

  10. High-Tech Cruelty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinduja, Sameer; Patchin, Justin W.

    2011-01-01

    Cyberbullying is a growing problem because increasing numbers of young people use computers, cell phones, and other interactive devices as their main form of social interaction. Cyberbullies use technology to harass, threaten, or humiliate their peers. Online aggression isn't just traditional bullying with new tools. It's widespread, devastating,…

  11. High Tech Counseling: Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layne, Christina Mann; Hohenshil, Thomas H.

    2005-01-01

    This article includes a discussion of technology's use in counseling. It contains reviews and implications of 4 articles that appeared in the Journal of Technology in Counseling (JTC) and provides a discussion of the future of technology in the counseling profession.

  12. Using online modules is a multi-modality teaching system: a high-touch high-tech approach to geriatric education.

    PubMed

    Gainor, Sara Jane; Goins, R Turner; Miller, Lee Ann

    2004-01-01

    Making geriatric education available to rural faculty/preceptors, students, and practitioners presents many challenges. Often the only options considered for educating those in the health professions about geriatrics are either traditional face-to-face courses or distance education programs. The purpose of this paper was to examine the use of Web-based modules or courses and other distance learning technology in concert with traditional learning modalities. The Mountain State Geriatric Education Center explored the use of a multi-modal approach within a high-touch, high-tech framework. Our findings indicate the following: it is important to start where participants are ready to begin; flexibility and variety are needed; soliciting evaluative feedback from participants is valuable; there is a need to integrate distance learning with more traditional modalities; and a high-tech, high-touch approach provides a format which participants find acceptable, accessible, and attractive. This assertion does not rule out the use of technology for distance education but rather encourages educators to take advantage of a wide range of modalities, traditional and technological, to reach rural practitioners, faculty, and students.

  13. Not just smoking and high-tech medicine: socioeconomic inequities in US mortality rates, overall and by race/ethnicity, 1960–2006

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Nancy; Chen, Jarvis T.; Kosheleva, Anna; Waterman, Pamela D.

    2011-01-01

    Recent research on the post-1980 widening of US socioeconomic mortality inequalities has emphasized the contribution of smoking and high-tech medicine, with some studies treating the growing inequalities as effectively inevitable. No studies, however, have analyzed long-term trends in US mortality rates and inequities unrelated to smoking or due to lack of basic medical care, even as a handful have shown that US socioeconomic inequalities in overall mortality shrank between the mid-1960s and 1980. We accordingly analyzed US mortality data for 1960–2006, stratified by county income quintile and race/ethnicity, for mortality unrelated to smoking and preventable by 1960s standards of medical care. Key findings were that relative and absolute socioeconomic inequalities in US mortality unrelated to smoking and preventable by 1960s medical care standards shrank between the 1960s and 1980 and then increased and stagnated, with absolute rates on par with several leading causes of death, and with the burden worst for US populations of color. None of these findings can be attributed to trends in smoking-related deaths and access to high-tech medicine, and they also demonstrate that socioeconomic inequities in mortality can shrink and need not inevitably rise. PMID:22611656

  14. The impact of teacher assigned but not graded compared to teacher assigned and graded chemistry homework on the formative and summative chemistry assessment scores of 11th-grade students with varying chemistry potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jennifer L.

    The study analyzed 2005 posttest data compared to 2008 posttest data to determine student end of school year academic achievement outcomes across three academic levels (above average, average, and below average chemistry potential) and two teacher homework evaluation methods (assigned but not graded and assigned and graded) on teacher prepared 11th-grade assessments, district prepared 11th-grade assessment, and district graduation requirement physical science strand 11th-grade science Essential Learner Outcome assessment. Overall, results indicated that students with above average (n = 16), average, (n = 17) and below average (n = 14) chemistry potential whom were given teacher assigned and graded chemistry homework compared to students with above average (n = 17), average (n = 15), and below average (n = 19) chemistry potential whom were given teacher assigned but not graded chemistry homework had statistically significantly higher independent t test matter homework scores while atoms, naming, and reactions homework scores were generally in the direction of higher but not significant scores for students given graded homework regardless of their chemistry potential. Furthermore, students of above average and below average chemistry potential who were given assigned and graded chemistry homework performed statistically significantly better on the 11th-grade district prepared chemistry final and the district prepared physical science strand Essential Learner Outcome assessment t test results compared to students with the same chemistry potential given assigned but not graded chemistry homework, suggesting that the graded chemistry condition may have contributed to improved long term learning and retention of chemistry knowledge. Finally, the coefficient of determination (r2 = .95) measure of strength of relationship between not completing, not graded chemistry homework and a corresponding drop in chemistry assessment scores for all students was 95% and the

  15. International Union of Physiological Sciences Commission on Gravitational Physiology, Annual Meeting, 11th, Lyons, France, Sept. 25-27, 1989, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Orr E. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Topics discussed include recent space flight results in gravitational physiology, cardiovascular changes, current concepts in gravitational physiology, musculoskeletal changes, gravity and the cardiovascular system, hypergravic conditions, and head-down tilt. Papers are presented on the effect of space flight on the ultrastructure of the rat cerebellar and hemisphere cortex, a comparative study of cardiovascular responses in primates exposed to tilt test and lower body positive pressure, catecholamines during short- and long-term head-down bedrest, and effects of a 40-day tail-suspension on rat weight-bearing bones. Attention is also given to otolith versus vertical semicircular canal input in the inhibition of horizontal postrotatory nystagmus, cardiovascular responses to sustained acceleration, effects of high sustained hypergravity on plasma catecholamines, and the carotid baroreceptor cardiac-vagal reflex responses during 10 days of head-down tilt.

  16. Pencil lead plasma for generating multimicrojoule high-order harmonics with a broad spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Pertot, Y.; Elouga Bom, L. B.; Ozaki, T.; Bhardwaj, V. R.

    2011-03-07

    Using the plasma harmonic method, we show the generation of efficient and intense high-order harmonics from plasma of pencil lead. We demonstrate multimicrojoule energy in each harmonic order for the 11th to the 17th order of a Ti:sapphire laser. By analyzing the target morphology and the plasma composition, we conclude that these intense harmonics are generated from nanoparticles of graphitic carbon.

  17. Korean Pharmacopuncture Meets Austrian High- Tech Acupuncture - A Short Review Article Including a Bibliometric Analysis of Pharmacopuncture over the Last 15 Years - Pharmacopuncture and Europe

    PubMed Central

    Litscher, Daniela; Litscher, Gerhard; Kang, Dae-In

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Pharmacopuncture, a new therapy in traditional medicine, has attracted significant attention since its introduction to the Western world. This short review article employs a database analysis to examine the profile of publication activity related to pharmacopuncture. Methods: Three databases were searched: PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane. About 300 papers related to the topic "pharmacopuncture" were found in these three most-commonly-used databases. Results: Fourteen papers are described in detail and are discussed in the context of the research performed at the Medical University of Graz, especially by the Frank Bahr Research Group "Auriculomedicine and Pharmacopuncture." Conclusion: High-tech research methods concerning future pharmacopuncture studies are briefly discussed. PMID:25780656

  18. An Empirical Study of the Relationship Between Total Quality Management Activities and Business Operational Performance among Taiwan`s High-Tech Manufacturers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Yi-Chan; Hsu, Yau-Wen; Chen, Ching-Piao; Tsai, Chih-Hung

    This research studies the impact of critical success factors of Total Quality Management (TQM) activities implementation and the impact of TQM activities implementation on business operational performance. The two intermediate variables, industry group and enterprise scale are considered. Through literature review, this research developed a theoretical model of the factors influencing the relations. The empirical analysis results on Taiwan`s high-tech firms in the Hsinchu Science-Based Industrial Park show that the degree of executive involvement in TQM success factors revealed significant influence on the degree of TQM activities execution. Furthermore, the research hypothesis the degree of executive involvement in TQM activities revealed significant influence on business operational performance was statistically tested and proven in this research. The two intermediate variables, industry group and enterprise scale do not show noticeable impact on TQM activities implementation and business operational performance.

  19. A User and Their Family's Perspective of The Use of a Low-Tech Vs A High-Tech AAC System.

    PubMed

    Borg, S; Agius, M; Agius, L

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative case study describes a 9-year-old child, diagnosed with homonymous hemianopia, left side weakness and seizures that has been followed by Access to Communication and Technology Unit in Malta for 5 years. The child previously used a communication book and now uses an iPad as a speech generating device. A semi-structured interview was utilised with the parent to explore preference for each AAC system and the reasons for it. The impact of each AAC system on the family and on the child's communication skills, and perceived barriers in the implementation of the AACs were also explored. The child's own experience using the AAC systems was also investigated using a structured interview format. Talking Mats was used to support the child's understanding of the questions and to explore her perspectives on the two AAC systems using Yes-No responses. The parent interview was analysed thematically and represented visually using a thematic network. This was compared with child responses. Four organising themes emerged including barriers, benefits, facilitators, and expectations. Specific barriers included self-funding in order to provide the child with the best fit high-tech AAC. Perceived benefits for both AAC systems were that it increased her communicative intent. The child's mother perceived access to increased vocabulary and capacity for sentence building, operational autonomy as well as voice output as a benefit of the SGD. The child's results indicated a preference for the high-tech AAC because she found it easier to navigate than the low-tech AAC. PMID:26294568

  20. 11th International Conference of Radiation Research

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-18

    Topics discussed in the conference included the following: Radiation Physics, Radiation Chemistry and modelling--Radiation physics and dosimetry; Electron transfer in biological media; Radiation chemistry; Biophysical and biochemical modelling; Mechanisms of DNA damage; Assays of DNA damage; Energy deposition in micro volumes; Photo-effects; Special techniques and technologies; Oxidative damage. Molecular and cellular effects-- Photobiology; Cell cycle effects; DNA damage: Strand breaks; DNA damage: Bases; DNA damage Non-targeted; DNA damage: other; Chromosome aberrations: clonal; Chromosomal aberrations: non-clonal; Interactions: Heat/Radiation/Drugs; Biochemical effects; Protein expression; Gene induction; Co-operative effects; ``Bystander'' effects; Oxidative stress effects; Recovery from radiation damage. DNA damage and repair -- DNA repair genes; DNA repair deficient diseases; DNA repair enzymology; Epigenetic effects on repair; and Ataxia and ATM.

  1. 11th Annual School Construction Report, 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Paul

    2006-01-01

    "School Planning & Management"'s annual survey of school construction statistics including projects completed during 2005, projected completions for 2006, and projects that will begin construction during 2006. In addition to national figures, statistics are broken down to provide detail for 12 regions of the nation, as well as the…

  2. An Economic Analysis of September 11th

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langelett, George L.; Schug, Mark C.

    2004-01-01

    To many Western observers, the behavior of people in the Middle East is a mystery. The area is the scene of brutality and seemingly senseless acts of violence. Why has there been so much turmoil there for so long? This article contains a brief review of past events in the Middle East, which helps to establish the context of the problem. Sections…

  3. Part C Updates. 11th Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danaher, Joan; Goode, Sue; Lazara, Alex

    2010-01-01

    "Part C Updates" is a compilation of information on various aspects of the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). This is the eleventh volume in a series of compilations, which included two editions of Part H Updates, the former name of the program.…

  4. The 11th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Various mechanisms in aerospace engineering were presented at this conference. Specifications, design, and use of spacecraft and missile components are discussed, such as tail assemblies, radiometers, magnetormeters, pins, reaction wheels, ball bearings, actuators, mirrors, nutation dampers, airfoils, solar arrays, etc.

  5. The 11th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Mechanical devices and drives developed for aerospace applications are described. Satellite flywheels, magnetic bearings, a missile umbilical system, a cartridge firing device, and an oiler for satellite bearing lubrication are among the topics discussed.

  6. The 11th Space Simulation Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Subject areas range from specialized issues dealing with the space and entry environments to the environmental testing of systems and complete spacecraft of present-day vintage. Various papers consider: the test and development of several key systems of the orbiter vehicle; integrated tests of complete satellites; new and unique test facilities developed to meet the demanding requirements of high fidelity simulation of test environments; and contamination species, including the instrumentation for detection and measurement of such. Special topics include improved thermal protection methodologies and approaches, sophisticated sensor developments, and other related testing and development areas.

  7. Understanding transferable supply chain lessons and practices to a "high-tech" industry using guidelines from a primary sector industry: a case study in the food industry supply chain.

    PubMed

    Coronado Mondragon, Adrian E; Coronado Mondragon, Christian E; Coronado, Etienne S

    2015-01-01

    Flexibility and innovation at creating shapes, adapting processes, and modifying materials characterize composites materials, a "high-tech" industry. However, the absence of standard manufacturing processes and the selection of materials with defined properties hinder the configuration of the composites materials supply chain. An interesting alternative for a "high-tech" industry such as composite materials would be to review supply chain lessons and practices in "low-tech" industries such as food. The main motivation of this study is to identify lessons and practices that comprise innovations in the supply chain of a firm in a perceived "low-tech" industry that can be used to provide guidelines in the design of the supply chain of a "high-tech" industry, in this case composite materials. This work uses the case study/site visit with analogy methodology to collect data from a Spanish leading producer of fresh fruit juice which is sold in major European markets and makes use of a cold chain. The study highlights supply base management and visibility/traceability as two elements of the supply chain in a "low-tech" industry that can provide guidelines that can be used in the configuration of the supply chain of the composite materials industry.

  8. Understanding transferable supply chain lessons and practices to a "high-tech" industry using guidelines from a primary sector industry: a case study in the food industry supply chain.

    PubMed

    Coronado Mondragon, Adrian E; Coronado Mondragon, Christian E; Coronado, Etienne S

    2015-01-01

    Flexibility and innovation at creating shapes, adapting processes, and modifying materials characterize composites materials, a "high-tech" industry. However, the absence of standard manufacturing processes and the selection of materials with defined properties hinder the configuration of the composites materials supply chain. An interesting alternative for a "high-tech" industry such as composite materials would be to review supply chain lessons and practices in "low-tech" industries such as food. The main motivation of this study is to identify lessons and practices that comprise innovations in the supply chain of a firm in a perceived "low-tech" industry that can be used to provide guidelines in the design of the supply chain of a "high-tech" industry, in this case composite materials. This work uses the case study/site visit with analogy methodology to collect data from a Spanish leading producer of fresh fruit juice which is sold in major European markets and makes use of a cold chain. The study highlights supply base management and visibility/traceability as two elements of the supply chain in a "low-tech" industry that can provide guidelines that can be used in the configuration of the supply chain of the composite materials industry. PMID:25821848

  9. Sino-European transcontinental basic and clinical high-tech acupuncture studies-part 1: auricular acupuncture increases heart rate variability in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin-Yan; Liu, Kun; Zhu, Bing; Litscher, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based research concerning the effects of high-tech acupuncture on autonomic function was performed by two research teams from China and Austria. This study describes the first transcontinental teleacupuncture measurements in animals. Heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) recordings in 10 male Sprague-Dawley anesthetized rats were performed under stable conditions in Beijing, China, and the data analysis was completed in Graz, Austria. The electrocardiograms (ECGs) were recorded by an HRV Medilog AR12 system during acupuncture of the ear and body (PC6 Neiguan, CV12 Zhongwan, ST36 Zusanli). The data were analyzed using specially adapted novel Austrian software. HR did not change significantly during any acupuncture stimulation in anesthetized rats (ear acupuncture, PC6, CV12, or ST36). Total HRV only changed significantly (P = 0.025) during auricular acupuncture (acupoint heart). The low-frequency/high-frequency ratio parameter decreased significantly (P = 0.03) during stimulation of ST36. This change was based on intensification of the related mechanism of blood pressure regulation that has been demonstrated in previous studies in humans. Modernization of acupuncture research performed as a collaboration between China and Austria has also been demonstrated.

  10. Beyond and between academia and business: How Austrian biotechnology researchers describe high-tech startup companies as spaces of knowledge production.

    PubMed

    Fochler, Maximilian

    2016-04-01

    Research and innovation policy has invested considerable effort in creating new institutional spaces at the interface of academia and business. High-tech startups founded by academic entrepreneurs have been central to these policy imaginaries. These companies offer researchers new possibilities beyond and between academia and larger industry. However, the field of science and technology studies has thus far shown only limited interest in understanding these companies as spaces of knowledge production. This article analyses how researchers working in small and medium-sized biotechnology companies in Vienna, Austria, describe the cultural characteristics of knowledge production in this particular institutional space. It traces how they relate these characteristics to other institutional spaces they have experienced in their research biographies, such as in academia or larger corporations. It shows that the reasons why researchers decide to work in biotechnology companies and how they organize their work are deeply influenced by their perception of deficiencies in the conditions for epistemic work in contemporary academia and, to a lesser degree, in industry. PMID:27263239

  11. Beyond and between academia and business: How Austrian biotechnology researchers describe high-tech startup companies as spaces of knowledge production.

    PubMed

    Fochler, Maximilian

    2016-04-01

    Research and innovation policy has invested considerable effort in creating new institutional spaces at the interface of academia and business. High-tech startups founded by academic entrepreneurs have been central to these policy imaginaries. These companies offer researchers new possibilities beyond and between academia and larger industry. However, the field of science and technology studies has thus far shown only limited interest in understanding these companies as spaces of knowledge production. This article analyses how researchers working in small and medium-sized biotechnology companies in Vienna, Austria, describe the cultural characteristics of knowledge production in this particular institutional space. It traces how they relate these characteristics to other institutional spaces they have experienced in their research biographies, such as in academia or larger corporations. It shows that the reasons why researchers decide to work in biotechnology companies and how they organize their work are deeply influenced by their perception of deficiencies in the conditions for epistemic work in contemporary academia and, to a lesser degree, in industry.

  12. Entheseal changes and sexual division of labor in a North-African population: The case of the pre-Hispanic period of the Gran Canaria Island (11th-15th c. CE).

    PubMed

    Santana-Cabrera, J; Velasco-Vázquez, J; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, A

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the relationship between entheseal changes and sexual division of labor in the pre-Hispanic population of Gran Canaria Island (Spain). Ethnohistorical records from the period of contact between Europeans and the Canarian indigenous population provide rich information about the different activities performed by men and women. For this purpose, entheseal changes in a sample of 138 individuals (82 males and 56 females) buried in ten pre-Hispanic cemeteries (11th and 15th centuries cal. CE) were analyzed. Forty-one entheses located in the clavicle, humerus, ulna and radius were analyzed (fibrous and fibro-cartilaginous attachment sites). Entheses were graded using a visual and descriptive standard which summarized the entheseal changes. This method interprets the changes as a sign of robustness on a scale from low to high development and includes enthesopathies. The intra- and inter-observer error of this method was minimal. Sex differences in the degree of robustness, bilateral asymmetry, sexual dimorphism and principal components analyses were tested in this sample. The results indicate significant variance in the entheseal robustness between males and females. They also suggest the impact of certain biomechanical chains (pronosupination, shoulder rotation, etc.) in entheseal changes. These results contribute to an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the sexual division of labor in the pre-Hispanic society of Gran Canaria.

  13. Acoustics of early music spaces from the 11th to 18th century: Rediscovery of the acoustical excellence of medium-sized rooms and new perspectives for modern concert hall design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassuet, Alban

    2001-05-01

    The acoustical characteristics of 50 rooms that played a prominent role in the history of music between the 11th and 18th centuries were studied. The rooms include basilicas, oratorios, organ churches, and the great halls and courts of the European palaces. The research provides an understanding of the acoustical features that suit the early music repertoire, and how these rooms achieved an enhanced emotional engagement through their unique acoustical characteristics. This paper provides a summary of the acoustic measurements, which include binaural and B-format recordings in each of the rooms, and presents a unique new approach to understanding their subjective characteristics through detailed analysis and auralization of their 3-D impulse response. The study shows that the timing and direction of reflections in three dimensions is critically important to defining the subjective characteristic of a room. The results emphasize the importance of developing techniques to understand the 3-D impulse response and using auralization techniques for interpreting results and making subjective judgments. The enhanced musical experience that is achieved in these early rooms offers an invitation to rethink modern acoustics and to develop a new design approach that focuses more strongly on the subjective response and emotional engagement of the music.

  14. Measurement of vibrational populations in hydrogen plasma by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pealat, M.; Taran, J. P.; Taillet, J.; Bacal, M.; Bruneteau, A. M.

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) has been applied to the measurement of vibrational populations in a low-pressure H2 plasma. For an electron density of 2 x 10 to the 11th/cu cm and a total pressure of 0.13 mbar, the rotational temperature is found to be 475 K. The population of vibrational states 0, 1 and 2 has a non-Boltzmann distribution.

  15. High Tech Art: Chameleon Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Dichroic Glass is a technology wherein extremely thin films of metal are vacuum deposited on a glass surface. The coated glass shields spacecraft instruments from cosmic radiation and protects human vision from unfiltered sunlight in space. Because the coating process allows some wavelengths of light and color to reflect and others to pass through, a chameleon effect is produced. Murray Schwartz, a former aerospace engineer, has based his business KROMA on this NASA optical technology. He produces dichroic stained glass windows, mobiles and jewelry. The technique involves deposition of super thin layers of metal oxides applied one layer at a time in a specific order and thickness for the desired effect. His product line is unique and has been very successful.

  16. A High-Tech Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pournelle, Jerry

    1985-01-01

    Discusses several ways computers, software, and peripheral equipment may aid in teaching dyslexic children to read, i.e., using voice synthesizers and speech software; employing human readers to translate what's on the screen; utilizing word processing functions; using microcomputers to control tape recorders; and utilizing "creativity software."…

  17. High Tech for Milady's Makeup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    "Elizabeth," a computerized beauty analysis system marketed by Elizabeth Arden, is based upon an ARAC data base search of technologies measuring skin profiles. * "Elizabeth" is no longer commercially available.

  18. Summer Reading Goes High Tech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Jennifer L. W.

    2012-01-01

    Not long ago, "summer reading" meant settling under a shady tree with a hefty book. Shady trees are still around, but books with pages can seem as out-of-date as vinyl records to many kids, especially older ones. Today, they scroll through content online, swipe pages on tablets, and manage a near-constant stream of media. Teachers can take…

  19. High Tech in Small Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Nirvi

    2010-01-01

    Across a giant swath of desert and mountain terrain southeast of Tucson, one yellow school bus has been carrying an extra passenger since last fall. Along with dozens of students, the bus rolls through the Vail School District's most far-flung portions equipped with a wireless router. It delivers the Internet to students for as many as three hours…

  20. High-Tech Roof Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benzie, Tim

    1997-01-01

    Describes the use of a computerized roof management system (CRMS) for school districts to foster multiple roof maintenance efficiency and cost effectiveness. Highlights CRMS software manufacturer choices, as well as the types of nondestructive testing equipment tools that can be used to evaluate roof conditions. (GR)

  1. High-Tech College Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric

    2012-01-01

    In this digital age, teaching has transcended the classroom. So why should school walls confine college counseling? The question is driving innovation that could change the way students prepare for college and careers. Just as learning is now a hybrid of face-to-face and virtual interactions, the transmission of college know-how is fast becoming a…

  2. High Tech Breakthrough: Interactive Videodisc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturm, Rebecca

    1985-01-01

    Explores use of interactive videodisc, which combines videotape in disc format, with its various video and audio information, and the computer, either as part of disc player or external interface. Examples of a variety of industrial/educational applications are cited: Library of Congress, inventory, physician instruction, University of Iowa. (8…

  3. High Resolution Telesesimic P-wave Back-Projection Imaging Using Variable Travel Time Corrections: Characterizing Sub-Events of the Great April 11th 2012 Indian Ocean Intraplate Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, K. B.; Koper, K. D.; Yue, H.; Lay, T.

    2012-12-01

    Two of the largest strike-slip earthquakes ever recorded occurred off the coast of northern Sumatra on April 11th 2012. The Mw 8.7 mainshock and Mw 8.2 aftershock occurred east of the NinetyEast Ridge in the Wharton Basin, a region of intraplate deformation with prominent fracture zones striking NNE-SSW. The relative lack of geodetic and local seismic data compared to other recent great earthquakes make teleseismic data especially important for understanding the rupture properties of these events. We performed short-period P-wave back-projection imaging using independent networks of stations in Europe and Japan. Preliminary images from the two networks showed similarly complex multi-event sources for the mainshock that indicate rupture occurred along both nodal planes of the gCMT solution, consistent with the locations of early aftershocks. Back-projection images of the Mw 8.2 aftershock showed a single, compact, bilateral rupture corresponding to the NNE-SSW nodal plane of the CMT solution [Yue et al., 2012]. Here we improve upon the resolution and accuracy of our initial back-projection images by estimating station specific travel time corrections that vary across the source region [e.g., Ishii et al., 2007]. These corrections are used to compensate for 3D variations in Earth structure that occur between the source region and the seismometers, and act to focus the array beams. We perform multi-channel cross-correlations of P waves recorded for 7 aftershocks that were (1) distributed broadly around the source region and (2) well-observed at seismometers in Europe. For each seismometer in the array, the 8 measured static corrections are smoothly interpolated over the entire source region with a Kriging method to form a travel time correction surface. These surfaces are then used with an otherwise conventional back-projection approach [Xu et al., 2009] to image the ruptures. Our new images are broadly consistent with our original results, indicating that the

  4. The study of a plasma jet injected by an on-board plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebnev, I. A.; Ivanov, G. V.; Khodnenko, V. P.; Morozov, A. I.; Perkov, I. A.; Pertsev, A. A.; Romanovskii, Iu. A.; Rylov, Iu. P.; Shishkin, G. G.; Trifonov, Iu. V.

    The injection of a steady plasma jet into the ionosphere results in interactions which were studied in experiments conducted onboard two Meteor satellites in 1977-1979. The jet parameters at the propulsion system output were as follows: propulsive mass: Xe; Xe (+) ion density at the nozzle section; 3 x 10 to the 11th per cu cm; plasma stream divergence: 20 degrees; jet velocity: 10-12 km/cm; ion energy: 130 eV; electron temperature: 1 + 3 eV. A Bennett-type modified radio-frequency mass-spectrometer and a two-channel electromagnetic wave analyzer were used for the measurements. It was found that (1) the injected plasma jet propagation depends on the jet injection pitch angle; (2) when the plasma jet was injected along the magnetic field, impactless jet spreading took place without considerable interaction with the ionospheric plasma; (3) when the plasma jet was injected across the magnetic field, considerable interaction was observed between the plasma jet/ionospheric plasma and the earth's magnetic field; and (4) electromagnetic fields were generated near the satellite by plasma jet interaction.

  5. Medium-tech industries may be of greater importance to a local economy than 'High-tech' firms: new methods for measuring the knowledge base of an economic system.

    PubMed

    Dolfsma, Wilfred; Leydesdorff, Loet

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we offer a way to measure the knowledge base of an economy in terms of probabilistic entropy. This measure, we hypothesize, is an indication of the extent to which a system, including the economic system, self-organizes. In a self-organizing system, interactions between dimensions or subsystems will unintentionally give rise to anticipations that are properly aligned. The potential reduction of uncertainty can be measured as negative entropy in the mutual information among three (or more) dimensions. For a knowledge-based economy, three dimensions can be considered as key: the distribution of firm sizes, the geographical locations, and the technological classifications of firms. Based on statistics of these three dimensions and drawing on a unique dataset of all Dutch firms registered with the Chambers of Commerce, we are able to refine well-known empirical findings for the geographical dimension. Counter-intuitive, however, are our empirical findings for the dimension of technology. Knowledge diffusion through medium-tech industry is much more important for a localized economy than knowledge creation in high-tech industry. Knowledge-intensive services tend to uncouple economic activities from the regional dimension.

  6. Potential and Challenges of Low-Cost and High-Tech Crowd-sensing Approaches in Hydrometeorology for Better Water Resources Management - Insights and Learnings from the Global iMoMo Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegfried, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    In developing and transition countries and despite significant global investments in hydrometeorology, data on water remain scarce/fragmented. One key reason is that traditional sensing in hydrology, hydro- and agro-meteorology does not scale because of high investment costs and difficult maintenance of traditional technology, esp. in remote and/or poor regions. Even where there are data, these are often difficult to access and interpret for local stakeholders due outdated data transmission and the lack of access to modern tools for data management/analysis/synthesis and exchange. In recent years, there have been substantial technology developments in environmental sensing and mobile communication technology that enable the application and deployment of affordable and scalable high-tech solutions for better water monitoring at different scales (local to transboundary levels). The WMO is acknowledging and promoting the potential for application of these technologies. One key aspect is to anchor these technologies in local communities that perform crowd-sensing tasks on a regular basis. The merits as well as challenges (including introduction of human factor, less accuracy as compared to traditional sensing, intermittency of data, …) of such approaches will be discussed in the context of the WMO-led Global iMoMo Initiative and its numerous activities on the ground in Eastern and Southern Africa as well as in Central Asia.

  7. Plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Hu, G.

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates.

  8. SITE TECHNOLOGY PROFILES - 11TH EDITION - DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM, VOLUME 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, now in its eleventh year is an integral part of EPA's research into alternative cleanup methods for hazardous waste sites around the nation. The SITE Program was created to encourage the development and routine use o...

  9. 11th Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology 2003 (ISMB 2003)

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    This report profiles the keynote talks given at ISMB03 in Brisbane, Australia by Ron Shamir, David Haussler, John Mattick, Yoshihide Hayashizaki, Sydney Brenner, the Overton Prize winner, Jim Kent, and the ISCB Senior Accomplishment Awardee, David Sankov. PMID:18629025

  10. Technical Progress Report (11th Semi-Annual)

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-31

    The objective of this proposed program is to ensure reliable supply of high-quality natural gas by reducing the cost of treating subquality natural gas containing H2O, CO2, H2S and/or trace quantities of other gaseous impurities by applying high-efficiency contractors with structured packing using physical solvent N-Formyl Morpholine and morpholine additives.

  11. Executive summary of the 11th HHT international scientific conference.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Helen; Geisthoff, Urban; Gossage, James R; Hughes, Christopher C W; Lacombe, Pascal; Meek, Mary E; Oh, Paul; Roman, Beth L; Trerotola, Scott O; Velthuis, Sebastiaan; Wooderchak-Donahue, Whitney

    2015-10-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a hereditary condition that results in vascular malformations throughout the body, which have a proclivity to rupture and bleed. HHT has a worldwide incidence of about 1:5000 and approximately 80 % of cases are due to mutations in ENG, ALK1 (aka activin receptor-like kinase 1 or ACVRL1) and SMAD4. Over 200 international clinicians and scientists met at Captiva Island, Florida from June 11-June 14, 2015 to present and discuss the latest research on HHT. 156 abstracts were accepted to the meeting and 60 were selected for oral presentations. The first two sections of this article present summaries of the basic science and clinical talks. Here we have summarized talks covering key themes, focusing on areas of agreement, disagreement, and unanswered questions. The final four sections summarize discussions in the Workshops, which were theme-based topical discussions led by two moderators. We hope this overview will educate as well as inspire those within the field and from outside, who have an interest in the science and treatment of HHT. PMID:26391603

  12. Indiana's Academic Standards: 11th Grade English/Language Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis.

    This booklet of academic standards spells out what students should know and be able to do in Grade 11 English/Language Arts. The booklet gives examples to help students understand what is required to meet the standards and provides a list of 10 things parents can do to help their child get a good education. It outlines the following seven…

  13. Vocational Agriculture III. A Curriculum Guide, 11th Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Bob; Cox, Cecil

    Designed to provide a basic core of instruction for the third year of agriculture in Oklahoma, this guide is for use by teachers and their eleventh grade students. Instructional content is in five sections, each with four or more units: soil science, leadership, animal science, farm business management, and agricultural mechanics. Each unit…

  14. Proceedings of the 11th JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.

    2002-01-01

    This publication contains the proceedings of the JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop forum held to report science research and applications results with spectral images measured by the NASA Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). These papers were presented at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory from March 5-8, 2001. Electronic versions of these papers may be found at the A VIRIS Web http://popo.jpl.nasa.gov/pub/docs/workshops/aviris.proceedings.html

  15. PLASMA GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Foster, J.S. Jr.

    1958-03-11

    This patent describes apparatus for producing an electricity neutral ionized gas discharge, termed a plasma, substantially free from contamination with neutral gas particles. The plasma generator of the present invention comprises a plasma chamber wherein gas introduced into the chamber is ionized by a radiofrequency source. A magnetic field is used to focus the plasma in line with an exit. This magnetic field cooperates with a differential pressure created across the exit to draw a uniform and uncontaminated plasma from the plasma chamber.

  16. Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroussi, M.; Kong, M. G.; Morfill, G.; Stolz, W.

    2012-05-01

    Foreword R. Satava and R. J. Barker; Part I. Introduction to Non-equilibrium Plasma, Cell Biology, and Contamination: 1. Introduction M. Laroussi; 2. Fundamentals of non-equilibrium plasmas M. Kushner and M. Kong; 3. Non-equilibrium plasma sources M. Laroussi and M. Kong; 4. Basic cell biology L. Greene and G. Shama; 5. Contamination G. Shama and B. Ahlfeld; Part II. Plasma Biology and Plasma Medicine: 6. Common healthcare challenges G. Isbary and W. Stolz; 7. Plasma decontamination of surfaces M. Kong and M. Laroussi; 8. Plasma decontamination of gases and liquids A. Fridman; 9. Plasma-cell interaction: prokaryotes M. Laroussi and M. Kong; 10. Plasma-cell interaction: eukaryotes G. Isbary, G. Morfill and W. Stolz; 11. Plasma based wound healing G. Isbary, G. Morfill and W. Stolz; 12. Plasma ablation, surgery, and dental applications K. Stalder, J. Woloszko, S. Kalghatgi, G. McCombs, M. Darby and M. Laroussi; Index.

  17. Plasma Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, D. H. E.

    This chapter explores several aspects of the linear electrostatic normal modes of oscillation for a single-species non-neutral plasma in a Penning trap. Linearized fluid equations of motion are developed, assuming the plasma is cold but collisionless, which allow derivation of the cold plasma dielectric tensor and the electrostatic wave equation. Upper hybrid and magnetized plasma waves in an infinite uniform plasma are described. The effect of the plasma surface in a bounded plasma system is considered, and the properties of surface plasma waves are characterized. The normal modes of a cylindrical plasma column are discussed, and finally, modes of spheroidal plasmas, and finite temperature effects on the modes, are briefly described.

  18. High-tech buildings - Market transformation project

    SciTech Connect

    Applications Team

    2001-10-01

    Facility managers and designers know their buildings are energy intensive yet have few techniques to quantify cleanroom energy performance. Benchmarking identifies the energy end uses in a cleanroom. As expected, besides the process loads, which are often very intense, the mechanical systems are the most energy intensive in these buildings. Benchmarking the mechanical systems and components can provide useful information on system and component performance and provide a basis to identify energy-saving opportunities in cleanrooms. HVAC systems in cleanrooms are dramatically different from their counterparts in commercial buildings in terms of reliability, safety requirements, and scale. The design of cleanroom HVAC systems is a specialty area requiring unique understanding of cleanliness guidelines, airflow quantities, room pressurization, code requirements, specialty equipment, tight control, and many more details. The HVAC systems must also operate reliably and safely. Since recirculation air systems use large amounts of fan power in moving large amounts of conditioned air through HEPA filters, the cleanroom, and return pathways they represent one of the largest energy end uses in a cleanroom. In addition, many processes requiring cleanrooms also have large make-up and exhaust airflow needs requiring huge amounts of energy to move and condition the displaced air. Energy intensity for mechanical systems in cleanrooms ranges between 4 to 100 times that of commercial buildings. There is, however, a lack of comparative data on the performance of cleanroom mechanical systems. To better understand existing cleanroom systems in high technology industries, and to better enable building owners, operators, and designers to compare energy use for a given cleanroom to others, it is necessary to benchmark energy performance in such facilities.

  19. The High Tech Challenge to Voc Ed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, David E.

    1982-01-01

    The author describes how vocational educators, with the support of the federal government, have adapted a highly successful job-training program to meet the specific high technology training needs of Illinois firms. The importance of education/business cooperation and of the federal government's role are stressed. (CT)

  20. A School that's Really High Tech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindroth, Linda; Raymond, Allen; Broderick, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how Edythe J. Hayes Middle School, a Lexington, KY, middle school is successfully preparing students for the technological world of the 21st Century. The mission statement for this three-year-old school includes these carefully crafted words: "...to engage all students in a safe and nurturing environment." "Engage" is…

  1. Special Feature: Teaching about High Tech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopf, Michael; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes four articles: "Virtual Reality" (Kopf), description of its uses in computer-assisted design, architecture, and technical training; "SME (Society of Manufacturing Engineers) Robotics Contest Opens Doors to Future" (Wagner); "Superconductivity" (Canady), description of classroom demonstrations and experiments; and "Factories of the Future"…

  2. High Tech Schools: The Principal's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromer, Janis

    This report offers the conclusions of a 1983 EPCOT symposium on education and the Information Age involving distinguished national experts and 46 secondary school principals from across the country. Discussed in the first section on "The Demands of an Information Age" are a number of transitions, including current shifts from an industrial to an…

  3. From Batteries and Bulbs to High Tech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Maurice L.; Schwartz, Ivan C.

    1986-01-01

    Presents a new, high-technology approach to making bulbs light in series and parallel circuits. Contains diagrams that illustrate the circuit patterns. Provides suggestions for applying the electronic principles that were addressed in the activities. (ML)

  4. High-Tech, High-Touch Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raiford, Regina

    1998-01-01

    Describes how university interior design is responding to increased student demands for wide-ranging services, technological capabilities, and accessibility. Design concepts for dining areas, auditoriums, residential halls, libraries, and computer-friendly classrooms are discussed. (GR)

  5. High-Tech Simulations Linked to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Katie

    2009-01-01

    To build on classroom experiments and lectures, Daniel Sweeney has his 9th grade earth science students act out scientific concepts on a 15-by-15-foot mat on the floor of the room. Object-tracking cameras mounted on scaffolding around the space collect data based on the students' movements while immersing them in the experience through a video…

  6. Safety Awareness in High Tech Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Gordon L.

    1987-01-01

    The author introduces a simple three-step formula for teaching safety awareness in technology education classes and in industry. The steps are (1) understand the hazard, (2) recognize the defense, and (3) act in time. (CH)

  7. High Tech High: Cruising on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Thomas F.

    1995-01-01

    A "driver's license" at one suburban Minnesota high school is a free round-trip ticket to the world. The Internet allows students to stroll through the Louvre, tour the White House, or examine current satellite weather photos at NASA's computer center. Students are developing friendships, exploring different cultures, and learning foreign…

  8. High Touch Wilderness and High Tech Campers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiltens, James S.

    1986-01-01

    Explores value areas in which wilderness experiences can provide youth with a counterbalance to technology's narrow categorization of what we should strive to be: our concept of intelligence, an "I need vs. I want" lifestyle, spectator vs. participant, and insulation from perceived risks. (NEC)

  9. Low-Tech High-Tech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Tom

    1997-01-01

    Outlines how Compact Disc-interactive (CD-i)--software that looks like a CD-ROM but operates independently using a television set--can be used in elementary, secondary, and vocational education. Discusses the cost effectiveness of CD-i and compares costs and operational issues with CD-ROM. Describes special features of one CD-i program, "Titanic."…

  10. Wider Access to High-Tech World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swaine, Chris

    2001-01-01

    The Southcote IT [Information Technology] Experience is an initiative in Reading, England, designed to widen access to learning opportunities and technology for all age groups. Free modular training courses, informal learning, and intense local marketing have proven to be effective practices. (SK)

  11. Teaching with Technology: High Tech Sleuthing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Denise

    1993-01-01

    Reviews three videodisc programs that enhance content integration with real-world skills: (1) "The Adventures of Jasper Woodbury," a math program for middle schoolers; (2) "Channel R.E.A.D.," a reading skills program for third through eighth graders; and (3) "Perfect Copy," a copy-editing program for grade four and up. (MDM)

  12. High-Tech Partnerships Mean Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schachter, Ron

    2013-01-01

    It's not news that public school districts have maintained productive relationships with the business community over the years. In Ohio, Cincinnati Bell recently helped a failing high school in the Cincinnati Public Schools transform itself into an information technology academy by providing student internships, a fleet of volunteer mentors, and…

  13. High-Tech, Low-Temp Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Under an SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) contract with Ames, S.D. Miller & Associates developed new manufacturing methods for multi-layer metal spacecraft insulation that could significantly reduce launch weight and launch costs. The new honeycomb structure is more efficient than fibers for insulation. Honeycombs can be made from metals for high temperature uses, even plastic insulation from recycled milk bottles. Under development are blankets made from recycled milk bottles which will be field tested by the Red Cross and ambulance companies. Currently available are honeycomb mittens based on the same technology.

  14. Where High Tech Meets High Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monaghan, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Shawn Brixey's "Altimira" is a decidedly strange work of art--so strange that he has not, to date, put it on public display. He turns on a device, housed in a basketball-size glass chamber, and it converts rapidly pulsating radio signals emanating from pulsars--collapsed stars that spin violently, sweeping their poles like lighthouses through…

  15. Simulating the charging of a particle on a surface in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijmans, Lucas; Nijdam, Sander

    2015-09-01

    It is common knowledge that a floating surface will charge negative when a plasma is applied over it. One can imagine that any macroscopic dust particle on the surface will also get charged. The theory that describes this charging is, however, underdeveloped. It has been suggested that the particle will share its charge with the surface, leading to roughly the same surface charge density. This is, however, only valid when both the surface and the particle are electrically conductive. In this contribution, we show a novel model to simulate the charge on a non-conducting particle on a surface in a plasma. It is based on balancing the ion and electron fluxes through the plasma sheath towards the particle. With this, we show that the charge on a particle on a surface can be five orders of magnitude higher than what was previously assumed. Knowledge of the charge on a particle on a surface is important, because it, combined with the plasma sheath electric field, will lead to an electric force on the particle. It has been proposed that this force is important in the lofting of dust from the surface of extra-terrestrial bodies. Additionally, it has been suggested, that it can be used for cleaning in high-tech applications, such as lithography machines and spacecrafts.

  16. Dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.E.; Winske, D.; Keinigs, R.; Lemons, D.

    1996-05-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of dusty plasmas at the Laboratory. While dusty plasmas are found in space in galactic clouds, planetary rings, and cometary tails, and as contaminants in plasma enhanced fabrication of microelectronics, many of their properties are only partially understood. Our work has involved both theoretical analysis and self-consistent plasma simulations to understand basic properties of dusty plasmas related to equilibrium, stability, and transport. Such an understanding can improve the control and elimination of plasma dust in industrial applications and may be important in the study of planetary rings and comet dust tails. We have applied our techniques to the study of charging, dynamics, and coagulation of contaminants in plasma processing reactors for industrial etching and deposition processes and to instabilities in planetary rings and other space plasma environments. The work performed in this project has application to plasma kinetics, transport, and other classical elementary processes in plasmas as well as to plasma waves, oscillations, and instabilities.

  17. Analysis of Data From Z-Pinch MTF Target-Plasma Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taccetti, J. M.; Wysocki, F. J.; Benage, J. F.; Idzorek, G.; Oona, H.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Lindemuth, I. R.; Sheehey, P. T.

    1999-11-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) target-plasma experiments have been performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory Colt facility for roughly three years(F. J. Wysocki et al., Digest of Technical Papers for the 11th IEEE International Pulsed Power Conference, Baltimore, Maryland, June 29 to July 2, 1997, G. Cooperstein and I. Vitkovitsky editors, p. 1393.). The capacitor bank has a max output voltage of 120 kV, max energy store of 0.25 MJ, and can deliver at least 2 MA of current to a load in 2.5 μs. The MTF target plasma is generated by driving a z-directed current through a plasma which is contained by a 2 cm radius by 2 cm high cylindrical metal wall. The initial mass for the target plasma comes from either a static uniform fill of hydrogen or deuterium gas, or from a polyethylene fiber mounted along the central axis. The diagnostic set includes an array of 12 B-dot probes, optical framing camera, gated OMA visible spectrometer, time-resolved monochrometer, filtered silicon photodiodes, neutron yield, and a laser interferometer. Measurements of the plasma temperature and impurity content obtained to date with a transmission grating spectrometer will also be presented. The data obtained allows an assessment of the plasma temperature, density, magnetization, and decay time.

  18. Plasma valve

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Sharma, Sushil; Noonan, John; Rotela, Elbio; Khounsary, Ali

    2003-01-01

    A plasma valve includes a confinement channel and primary anode and cathode disposed therein. An ignition cathode is disposed adjacent the primary cathode. Power supplies are joined to the cathodes and anode for rapidly igniting and maintaining a plasma in the channel for preventing leakage of atmospheric pressure through the channel.

  19. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  20. PLASMA ENERGIZATION

    DOEpatents

    Furth, H.P.; Chambers, E.S.

    1962-03-01

    BS>A method is given for ion cyclotron resonance heatthg of a magnetically confined plasma by an applied radio-frequency field. In accordance with the invention, the radiofrequency energy is transferred to the plasma without the usual attendent self-shielding effect of plasma polarlzatlon, whereby the energy transfer is accomplished with superior efficiency. More explicitly, the invention includes means for applying a radio-frequency electric field radially to an end of a plasma column confined in a magnetic mirror field configuration. The radio-frequency field propagates hydromagnetic waves axially through the column with the waves diminishing in an intermediate region of the column at ion cyclotron resonance with the fleld frequency. In such region the wave energy is converted by viscous damping to rotational energy of the plasma ions. (AEC)

  1. PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1961-08-22

    A device is described for establishing and maintaining a high-energy, rotational plasma for use as a fast discharge capacitor. A disc-shaped, current- conducting plasma is formed in an axinl magnetic field and a crossed electric field, thereby creating rotational kinetic enengy in the plasma. Such energy stored in the rotation of the plasma disc is substantial and is convertible tc electrical energy by generator action in an output line electrically coupled to the plasma volume. Means are then provided for discharging the electrical energy into an external circuit coupled to the output line to produce a very large pulse having an extremely rapid rise time in the waveform thereof. (AE C)

  2. Plasma universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfven, H.

    1986-01-01

    Traditionally the views on the cosmic environent have been based on observations in the visual octave of the electromagnetic spectrum, during the last half-century supplemented by infrared and radio observations. Space research has opened the full spectrum. Of special importance are the X-ray-gamma-ray regions, in which a number of unexpected phenomena have been discovered. Radiations in these regions are likely to originate mainly from magnetised cosmic plasmas. Such a medium may also emit synchrotron radiation which is observable in the radio region. If a model of the universe is based on the plasma phenomena mentioned it is found that the plasma universe is drastically different from the traditional visual universe. Information about the plasma universe can also be obtained by extrapolation of laboratory experiments and magnetospheric in situ measurements of plasmas. This approach is possible because it is likely that the basic properties of plasmas are the same everywhere. In order to test the usefulness of the plasma universe model it is applied to cosmogony. Such an approach seems to be rather successful. For example, the complicated structure of the Saturnian C ring can be accounted for. It is possible to reconstruct certain phenomena 4 to 5 billions of years ago with an accuracy of better than 1%.

  3. Measurement of vibrational populations in low-pressure hydrogen plasma by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pealat, M.; Taran, J. P. E.; Taillet, J.; Bacal, M.; Bruneteau, A. M.

    1981-04-01

    Vibrational populations in a low-pressure H2 plasma have been measured by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). The plasma generator is described, and some particulars of the optical arrangement are given. The CARS system is a commercial spectrometer, whose original optical system has been slightly modified for this study, by eliminating the Polarex arrangement for the YAG laser oscillator and by adding a YAG amplifier stage. This has resulted in improved beam quality and enhanced peak power. For an electron density of 2 x 10 to the 11th cm to the 0.001 and a total pressure of 0.13 m bar, the rotational temperature was found to be 475 K. The populations of the vibrational states v equals 0, 1, and 2 have also been measured. Their distribution is non-Boltzmann. The influence of pressure and discharge parameters is discussed.

  4. Plasma Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintze, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center has developed two solvent-free precision cleaning techniques: plasma cleaning and supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2), that has equal performance, cost parity, and no environmental liability, as compared to existing solvent cleaning methods.

  5. Plasma Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristiansen, M.; Guenther, A. H.

    Plasmas have numerous applications for civilian as well as defense purposes. However, technical development is still in its infancy. Many new important applications depend only upon the imagination of engineers and scientists. In contrast to other develping technologies, applications from the fields of plasma science and engineering can only evolve through a multidisciplinary synergism. Research in plasma chemistry and physics together with gaseous electronics, fluid dynamics and thermodynamics, particularly mass and heat transfer, must be coupled with electro-chemistry and material science research particularly those aspects dealing with surfaces. In this paper we attempt to evaluate the importance of plasma applications. Obviously, it is impossible to do justice to all the important areas. The selection of topics is, therefore, influenced by the authors' interests and background. We will outline most of the applications rather briefly and concentrate in some detail on those areas in which we are interested.

  6. Plasma Rain

    NASA Video Gallery

    On April 19, 2010 AIA observed one of the largest prominence eruptions in years. The huge structure erupts, but a great deal of the plasma (hundreds of millions of tons) is unable to escape the gra...

  7. The N III and O IV intersystem multiplets as density indicators for solar plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    The usefulness of the relative intensities of lines within the N III intersystem multiplet near 1750 A as an electron density indicator for solar plasmas is discussed. Although the relative intensities of lines in the multiplet are density sensitive, the intensity ratios should at present be used with caution. Errors of the order of 20% in transition probabilities and excitation rate coefficients can lead to order of magnitude errors in density determinations. It is demonstrated that the intensity ratio of one of the N III intersystem lines and an allowed line from a different ion may also be used as a density indicator in the 10 to the 9th to 10 to the 11th per cu cm regime.

  8. PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Brathenahl, A.; Furth, H.P.

    1962-04-10

    A device for producing a confined high temperature plasma is described. In the device the concave inner surface of an outer annular electrode is disposed concentrically about and facing the convex outer face of an inner annular electrode across which electrodes a high potential is applied to produce an electric field there between. Means is provided to create a magnetic field perpendicular to the electric field and a gas is supplied at reduced pressure in the area therebetween. Upon application of the high potential, the gas between the electrodes is ionized, heated, and under the influence of the electric and magnetic fields there is produced a rotating annular plasma disk. The ionized plasma has high dielectric constant properties. The device is useful as a fast discharge rate capacitor, in controlled thermonuclear research, and other high temperature gas applications. (AEC)

  9. Plasma Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Radio communication with space probes requires sending signals through the Earth's ionosphere and usually the solar wind. During planetary flybys, the signal may also pass through the ionosphere of another planet. These ionized media can perturb the radio signal in a variety of ways. Examples of these perturbations are variations in the electrical length between the spacecraft and the ground station, Faraday rotation of linearly polarized signals, amplitude and phase scintillations, and spectral and angular broadening. These plasma effects can have undesirable influences on telemetry performance and thus need to be understood from a communications engineering viewpoint. The plasma effects are, however, useful from a scientific viewpoint, since the effects on the communications link can often be inverted to estimate the physical conditions in the plasma.

  10. PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Gow, J.D.; Wilcox, J.M.

    1961-12-26

    A device is designed for producing and confining highenergy plasma from which neutrons are generated in copious quantities. A rotating sheath of electrons is established in a radial electric field and axial magnetic field produced within the device. The electron sheath serves as a strong ionizing medium to gas introdueed thereto and also functions as an extremely effective heating mechanism to the resulting plasma. In addition, improved confinement of the plasma is obtained by ring magnetic mirror fields produced at the ends of the device. Such ring mirror fields are defined by the magnetic field lines at the ends of the device diverging radially outward from the axis of the device and thereafter converging at spatial annular surfaces disposed concentrically thereabout. (AFC)

  11. Plasma separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steurer, Wolfgang

    1992-01-01

    This process employs a thermal plasma for the separation and production of oxygen and metals. It is a continuous process that requires no consumables and relies entirely on space resources. The almost complete absence of waste renders it relatively clean. It can be turned on or off without any undesirable side effects or residues. The prime disadvantage is its high power consumption.

  12. Feeding milk replacer instead of whole milk affects blood plasma proteome and lipid profile in preruminant calves.

    PubMed

    Lepczyński, A; Herosimczyk, A; Ożgo, M; Skrzypczak, W F

    2015-01-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the effect of feeding milk or milk-replacer on the blood plasma proteome and lipid profile in calves during the second week of life. Feeding milk-replacer significantly decreased the expression of plasma apoA-I. Age of calves affected apoA-I expression, which was higher on the 8th than on the 11th and 14th day of life. A significant effect of interaction between diet and age was also observed. The expression of apoA-IV, was significantly affected by diet and was lower in calves fed milk replacer. Expression of this protein was significantly lower at the 8th day of life and was up-regulated in the calves fed milk-replacer at the second week of life. Calves fed milk-replacer had greater expression of haptoglobin, which differed significantly between days of blood sampling, being higher on the 8th than on the 11th and 14th day. The interactive effect of diet and age affected haptoglobin expression, which was successively down-regulated in calves fed milk re- placer. Diet had a significant effect on the plasma lipid profile. Animals fed milk had a greater concentration of TC, HDLC and LDLC. The composition of milk-replacer, especially fat source, is probably the main factor that affects expression of proteins involved in cholesterol metabolism and level of components of lipid profile in calves fed formula. We claim that the initially increased level of haptoglobin, followed by its decrease during the second week of life in calves fed milk-replacer may indicate the presence of short-term stress induced by changes in the feeding system. PMID:25928915

  13. PLASMA GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, J.M.; Baker, W.R.

    1963-09-17

    This invention is a magnetohydrodynamic device for generating a highly ionized ion-electron plasma at a region remote from electrodes and structural members, thus avoiding contamination of the plasma. The apparatus utilizes a closed, gas-filled, cylindrical housing in which an axially directed magnetic field is provided. At one end of the housing, a short cylindrical electrode is disposed coaxially around a short axial inner electrode. A radial electrical discharge is caused to occur between the inner and outer electrodes, creating a rotating hydromagnetic ionization wave that propagates aiong the magnetic field lines toward the opposite end of the housing. A shorting switch connected between the electrodes prevents the wave from striking the opposite end of the housing. (AEC)

  14. High-tech breakthrough DNA scanner for reading sequence and detecting gene mutation: A powerful 1 lb, 20 {mu}m resolution, 16-bit personal scanner (PS) that scans 17inch x 14inch x-ray film in 48 s, with laser, uv and white light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zeineh, J.A.; Zeineh, M.M.; Zeineh, R.A.

    1993-06-01

    The 17inch x 14inch X-ray film, gels, and blots are widely used in DNA research. However, DNA laser scanners are costly and unaffordable for the majority of surveyed biotech scientists who need it. The high-tech breakthrough analytical personal scanner (PS) presented in this report is an inexpensive 1 lb hand-held scanner priced at 2-4% of the bulky and costly 30-95 lb conventional laser scanners. This PS scanner is affordable from an operation budget and biotechnologists, who originate most science breakthroughs, can acquire it to enhance their speed, accuracy, and productivity. Compared to conventional laser scanners that are currently available only through hard-to-get capital-equipment budgets, the new PS scanner offers improved spatial resolution of 20 {mu}m, higher speed (scan up to 17inch x 14inch molecular X-ray film in 48 s), 1-32,768 gray levels (16-bits), student routines, versatility, and, most important, affordability. Its programs image the film, read DNA sequences automatically, and detect gene mutation. In parallel to the wide laboratory use of PC computers instead of mainframes, this PS scanner might become an integral part of a PC-PS powerful and cost-effective system where the PS performs the digital imaging and the PC acts on the data.

  15. Selected Papers from the 11th International Conference on College Teaching and Learning (11th, Jacksonville, Florida, April 12-15, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jack A., Ed.

    This collection of papers from an international conference on higher education teaching and learning includes: "Fostering Scientific Thinking with New Technologies: A Socio-Cognitive Approach" (Michel Aube); "The 'Classroom Flip': Using Web Course Management Tools to Become the Guide by the Side" (J. Wesley Baker); "Embracing Information and…

  16. Improved plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  17. Plasma Free Metanephrines

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Plasma Free Metanephrines Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... known as: Plasma Metanephrines Formal name: Fractionated Plasma Free Metanephrines (Metanephrine and Normetanephrine) Related tests: Catecholamines ; Urine ...

  18. Applications of atmospheric plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Christopher John

    Surface modification techniques using plasmas have historically been completed in a low pressure environment due to Pd (pressure x gap distance) considerations influencing the behavior of plasma generation. Generally, plasmas produced in a low pressure environment are of a non-thermal or cold nature. The basic feature of non-thermal plasmas is the majority of electrical energy used to generate the plasma is primarily used to produce energetic electrons for generating chemical species. Low pressure plasmas serve many purposes for materials processing. Since the plasma environment is contained within a closed vessel, the plasma can be controlled very easily. Low pressure plasmas have been used in many industries but the complexity associated with the large pumping stations and limitation to batch processing has motivated new work in the area of atmospheric plasmas. Atmospheric plasmas offer both economic and technical justification for use over low pressure plasmas. Since atmospheric plasmas can be operated at ambient conditions, lower costs associated with continuous processing and a decrease in the complexity of equipment validate atmospheric plasma processing as a next generation plasma-aided manufacturing process. In an effort to advance acceptance of atmospheric plasma processing into industry, a process was developed, the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), in order to generate a homogeneous and non-thermal plasma discharge at ambient conditions. The discharge was applied to the reduction of known food borne pathogens, deposition of thin film materials, and modification of lignocellulosic biomass.

  19. International movement of plasma and plasma contracting.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, A

    2005-01-01

    Plasma fractionation is a global business characterised by technological stability, increasing consolidation and a high level of regulatory oversight. All these factors affect the ease with which plasma derivatives can be accessed in the world market. As domestic regulatory measures in the first world blood economies become increasingly resonant to the precautionary approach, the availability of plasma as a raw material, as well as its cost, become an increasingly significant component in the cost of the final product. This decreases the amount of plasma which fractionators are able to allocate for export activities. Also, regulatory standards in the country of manufacture will reflect priorities in that country which may not be similar to those in export markets, but which will affect entry to those markets. While many countries possess a fractionation capacity, the limiting factor in supply worldwide is the amount of plasma available, and nationalistic drivers for each country to have its own plant are inimical to product safety and supply. Rather, the provision of sufficient supplies of domestic plasma should be the focus of resource allocation, with a choice of an appropriate contract fractionator. However, contract fractionation too may be affected by domestic considerations unrelated to the needs of the country of plasma origin. This chapter will review the global plasma market and the influences on plasma and plasma product movement across national borders. Problems in ensuring adequate safety and supply will be identified, and some tentative approaches to the amelioration of current barriers to the provision of plasma derivatives will be outlined.

  20. Communication through plasma sheaths

    SciTech Connect

    Korotkevich, A. O.; Newell, A. C.; Zakharov, V. E.

    2007-10-15

    We wish to transmit messages to and from a hypersonic vehicle around which a plasma sheath has formed. For long distance transmission, the signal carrying these messages must be necessarily low frequency, typically 2 GHz, to which the plasma sheath is opaque. The idea is to use the plasma properties to make the plasma sheath appear transparent.

  1. Dust-Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Marelene Rosenberg

    2005-02-22

    Our theoretical research on dust-plasma interactions has concentrated on three main areas: a)studies of grain charging and applications; b) waves and instabilities in weakly correlated dusty plasma with applications to space and laboratory plasmas; c) waves in strongly coupled dusty plasmas.

  2. Plasma sweeper. [Patents

    DOEpatents

    Motley, R.W.; Glanz, J.

    1982-10-25

    A device is described for coupling RF power (a plasma sweeper) from RF power introducing means to a plasma having a magnetic field associated therewith comprises at least one electrode positioned near the plasma and near the RF power introducing means. Means are described for generating a static electric field at the electrode directed into the plasma and having a component substantially perpendicular to the plasma magnetic field such that a non-zero vector cross-product of the electric and magnetic fields exerts a force on the plasma causing the plasma to drift.

  3. Thermal plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Boulos, M.I. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1991-12-01

    This paper is a review of the fundamental aspects involved in material processing using thermal plasma technology. The description of plasma-generating devices covers dc plasma torches, dc transferred arcs, radio-frequency (RF) inductively coupled plasma torches, and hybrid combinations of them. Emphasis is given to the identification of the basic energy-coupling mechanism in each case and the principal characteristics of the flow and temperature fields in the plasma. Materials-processing techniques using thermal plasmas are grouped in two broad categories, depending on the role played by the plasma in the process. Only typical examples are given in this review of each type of processes. The simplest and most widely used processes such as spheroidization, melting, deposition, and spray-coating make use of the plasma only as a high-temperature energy source. Thermal plasma technology is also used in applications involving chemical synthesis in which the plasma acts as a source of chemically active species.

  4. Industrial plasmas in academia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenstein, Ch; Howling, AA; Guittienne, Ph; Furno, I.

    2015-01-01

    The present review, written at the occasion of the 2014 EPS Innovation award, will give a short overview of the research and development of industrial plasmas within the last 30 years and will also provide a first glimpse into future developments of this important topic of plasma physics and plasma chemistry. In the present contribution, some of the industrial plasmas studied at the CRPP/EPFL at Lausanne are highlighted and their influence on modern plasma physics and also discharge physics is discussed. One of the most important problems is the treatment of large surfaces, such as that used in solar cells, but also in more daily applications, such as the packaging industry. In this contribution, the advantages and disadvantages of some of the most prominent plasmas such as capacitively- and inductively-coupled plasmas are discussed. Electromagnetic problems due to the related radio frequency and its consequences on the plasma reactor performance, and also dust formation due to chemical reactions in plasma, are highlighted. Arcing and parasitic discharges occurring in plasma reactors can lead to plasma reactor damages. Some specific problems, such as the gas supply of a large area reactor, are discussed in more detail. Other topics of interest have been dc discharges such as those used in plasma spraying where thermal plasmas are applied for advanced material processing. Modern plasma diagnostics make it possible to investigate sparks in electrical discharge machining, which surprisingly show properties of weakly-coupled plasmas. Nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge plasmas have been applied to more speculative topics such as applications in aerodynamics and will surely be important in the future for ignition and combustion. Most of the commonly-used plasma sources have been shown to be limited in their performance. Therefore new, more effective plasma sources are urgently required. With the recent development of novel resonant network antennas for new

  5. Nonlinear plasma wave in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, Sergei V.; Zh. Esirkepov, Timur; Kando, Masaki; Koga, James K.; Hosokai, Tomonao; Zhidkov, Alexei G.; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2013-08-01

    Nonlinear axisymmetric cylindrical plasma oscillations in magnetized collisionless plasmas are a model for the electron fluid collapse on the axis behind an ultrashort relativisically intense laser pulse exciting a plasma wake wave. We present an analytical description of the strongly nonlinear oscillations showing that the magnetic field prevents closing of the cavity formed behind the laser pulse. This effect is demonstrated with 3D PIC simulations of the laser-plasma interaction. An analysis of the betatron oscillations of fast electrons in the presence of the magnetic field reveals a characteristic "Four-Ray Star" pattern.

  6. Fundamentals of Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellan, Paul M.

    2008-07-01

    Preface; 1. Basic concepts; 2. The Vlasov, two-fluid, and MHD models of plasma dynamics; 3. Motion of a single plasma particle; 4. Elementary plasma waves; 5. Streaming instabilities and the Landau problem; 6. Cold plasma waves in a magnetized plasma; 7. Waves in inhomogeneous plasmas and wave energy relations; 8. Vlasov theory of warm electrostatic waves in a magnetized plasma; 9. MHD equilibria; 10. Stability of static MHD equilibria; 11. Magnetic helicity interpreted and Woltjer-Taylor relaxation; 12. Magnetic reconnection; 13. Fokker-Planck theory of collisions; 14. Wave-particle nonlinearities; 15. Wave-wave nonlinearities; 16. Non-neutral plasmas; 17. Dusty plasmas; Appendix A. Intuitive method for vector calculus identities; Appendix B. Vector calculus in orthogonal curvilinear coordinates; Appendix C. Frequently used physical constants and formulae; Bibliography; References; Index.

  7. Experiments with nonneutral plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neil, T. M.

    2016-03-01

    Selected experiments with nonneutral plasmas are discussed. These include the laser cooling of a pure ion plasma to a crystalline state, a measurement of the Salpeter enhancement factor for fusion in a strongly correlated plasma and the measurement of thermally excited plasma waves. Also, discussed are experiments that demonstrate Landau damping, trapping and plasma wave echoes in the 2D ExB drift flow of a pure electron plasma, which is isomorphic to the 2D ideal flow (incompressible and inviscid flow) of a neutral fluid.

  8. International movement of plasma and plasma contracting.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, A

    2005-01-01

    Plasma fractionation is a global business characterised by technological stability, increasing consolidation and a high level of regulatory oversight. All these factors affect the ease with which plasma derivatives can be accessed in the world market. As domestic regulatory measures in the first world blood economies become increasingly resonant to the precautionary approach, the availability of plasma as a raw material, as well as its cost, become an increasingly significant component in the cost of the final product. This decreases the amount of plasma which fractionators are able to allocate for export activities. Also, regulatory standards in the country of manufacture will reflect priorities in that country which may not be similar to those in export markets, but which will affect entry to those markets. While many countries possess a fractionation capacity, the limiting factor in supply worldwide is the amount of plasma available, and nationalistic drivers for each country to have its own plant are inimical to product safety and supply. Rather, the provision of sufficient supplies of domestic plasma should be the focus of resource allocation, with a choice of an appropriate contract fractionator. However, contract fractionation too may be affected by domestic considerations unrelated to the needs of the country of plasma origin. This chapter will review the global plasma market and the influences on plasma and plasma product movement across national borders. Problems in ensuring adequate safety and supply will be identified, and some tentative approaches to the amelioration of current barriers to the provision of plasma derivatives will be outlined. PMID:16050160

  9. Union Learning Reps in a High Tech Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Steve

    2008-01-01

    This article examines moves towards the creation of a Union Learning Rep (ULR) network within Connect, the union for UK communications sector management and professional staff. Focusing on a large communications company (CommCo), the article argues that ULRs need not be limited to campaigning for basic skills training. They also have a role in a…

  10. The Robots Are Coming! Training Tomorrow's High-Tech Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemke, Ron

    1983-01-01

    The United States, running second to Japan in the robot race, is employing 19 percent of the world's robots. This article presents six classes of robots that were defined by the Japanese trade association. All are multifunctional, equipped with a memory device, capable of rotation, and able to replace human workers. (SSH)

  11. Using High-Tech Tools for Student Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plati, Thomas

    1988-01-01

    Discusses incorporating high technology research tools into the curriculum for grades 5 through 12 in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, public schools. The use of CD-ROM and online databases is described, teacher training is discussed, and steps to integrate this new technology are listed, including budget proposals and evaluation. (LRW)

  12. High Tech and Smart Construction Distinguish This Maryland High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rist, Marilee C.

    1989-01-01

    Quince Orchard High School in Gaithersburg, Maryland, is designed to invite, encourage, and support learning. Natural daylight, earth sheltering, and siting conserve energy. Virtually every classroom and office has at least one computer. (MLF)

  13. When Are High-Tech Communicators Effective in Parkinson's Disease?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferriero, Giorgio; Caligari, Marco; Ronconi, Gianpaolo; Franchignoni, Franco

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a 63-year-old woman with Parkinson's disease showing loss of intelligibility of speech and severely impaired handwriting, despite undergoing physical and speech therapies. As the patient had sufficient residual motor abilities and adequate cognitive function and motivation, a computer-based communication aid with a software…

  14. High-Tech Approaches to Breeching Examination Security. Espionage 101.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colton, Gregg D.

    Technology has provided the public with the ability to steal the contents of multiple examinations in a short time period and at minimal cost. No examination is safe from compromise, and the only variable is the extent and sophistication used to bring about the compromise or theft. With the easy availability of micro-video equipment, audio…

  15. Global High-Tech Economy Futures in the Information Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Earl C.

    It has become necessary to understand the expected trends and forces-of-change behind the global realities of technological advancement and the information age. The emergence of a new information age societal framework is rapidly altering the way in which social, business, economic, educational, and political exchanges are conducted. Motivating…

  16. MAG ONE novel energy storage for high tech sports car

    SciTech Connect

    Siuru, B.

    1993-03-01

    A solar-powered car, the MAG ONE, is discussed. Photovoltaic cells would cover 100 square feet of the car`s body. Solar cells would cover the entire vehicle to intake as much solar energy as possible. By using computerized series-parallel switching of the solar cell system should yield 2-3 horsepower per-hour on a sunny day. An important concept is the proprietary continuously variable hydrostatic transmission capable of 90 percent efficiency.

  17. Performing Cities: Engaging the High-Tech Flaneur

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Karen; Rink, Bradley

    2011-01-01

    As international educators, the overwhelmingly urban context of study abroad requires not only a more intense querying of "the city" as a concept, but also more attention to how students could engage with and learn from the urban landscape. In this article, the authors begin with a theoretical flanerie through a range of ideas related to the city…

  18. High-tech, high-touch perinatal home care.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, N L; Blazek, D; Wikoff, B; Tuckwell, B L; Koloroutis, M

    1995-05-01

    Perinatal home care for women experiencing a high-risk pregnancy often requires the use of technologies for safe home management. Home care professionals need to integrate high technology with high touch to ensure the best results.

  19. High Tech, Low Tech and Education. Sociology of the School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Peter

    Designed to provide a link between academic thought and research and the practice of teaching, this monograph explores the appropriate educational response to technological change. The central argument of this study is that future job opportunities will lie essentially with low tech jobs, i.e., traditional, basic, industrial jobs, rather than the…

  20. Customer Friendly Libraries in a High-Tech Age. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltimore County Public Library, Towson, MD.

    This videotape discusses how technology is rapidly changing the roles of information providers. It is important that information professionals continue to provide good customer service while helping the public feel comfortable with new technology. This videotape covers issues common in libraries today: making time for adequate staff training;…

  1. Hagerstown Community College: Building a High Tech Base.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Technology Strategies, Inc., Carrboro, NC.

    This document describes the Advanced Technology Center (ATC) at Hagerstown Community College (HCC) (Maryland), created in 1990 as a response to the region's economic decline. The ATC is a partnership between the College, industry, and government to help promote industrial modernization and regional competitiveness through training, demonstration,…

  2. Asynchronous Learning Sources in a High-Tech Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouhnik, Dan; Giat, Yahel; Sanderovitch, Yafit

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to characterize learning from asynchronous sources among research and development (R&D) personnel. It aims to examine four aspects of asynchronous source learning: employee preferences regarding self-learning; extent of source usage; employee satisfaction with these sources and the effect of the sources on the…

  3. Inexpensive Options for a High-Tech Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Marissa L.; Cline, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Radford University was recently configured with a campus-wide wireless local area network. Using these new capabilities, a classroom-based Honors section of Concepts of Biology was conducted solely using electronic technologies (paper was never transferred from professor to student). To accomplish this, students used common software and freeware.…

  4. High-Tech School Bus Teaches Students on the Road

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katims, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Last year, kindergarten through high school students in the rural Hector, Arkansas, School District barely had the technology resources that keep kids interested in math and science. This year, they potentially have the most advanced resources in the country--before they even step into the classroom. One school bus in Arkansas' Pope County has…

  5. Intellectual property issues in holography and high tech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reingand, Nadya

    2004-06-01

    The author with technical education background (Ph.D. in holography) shares her 3+ years of experience working on intellectual property (IP) issues that includes patents, trademarks, and copyrights. A special attention is paid to the patent issues: the application procedure, the patent requirements, the databases for prior art search, how to make the cost efficient filing.

  6. Managing the Legal Risks of High-Tech Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nenych, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    When professors and students utilize the Internet, course web pages, and other online learning tools, much of the material that they make use of is protected by copyright law. A blend of case law and legislation governs the use of online materials and how technology can be used in the classroom and in school-related activities, often creating…

  7. Employee Retention and Performance Improvement in High-Tech Companies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, B. Lynn

    2001-01-01

    Considers the benefits of employee retention and performance improvement in high technology, new economy companies. Discusses attracting and retaining top talent in information technology companies; targeted recruiting and hiring; employee achievement; learning and professional growth; recognition; nurturing careers; team collaboration; the TALENT…

  8. High-Tech Inspires the Read/Write Website

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Will; Mancabelli, Rob

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses a group of new technologies--blogs, wikis, podcasts, social bookmarking, online photo galleries, and RSS (Real Simple Syndication)--collectively referred to as the Read/Write web. These tools allow users to easily create and publish online content, and are beginning to have a profound impact on curriculum, classroom…

  9. Online Classes See Cheating Go High-Tech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Easy A's may be even easier to score these days, with the growing popularity of online courses. Tech-savvy students are finding ways to cheat that let them ace online courses with minimal effort, in ways that are difficult to detect. The issue of online cheating may rise in prominence, as more and more institutions embrace online courses, and as…

  10. Fabricating VCSELs in a high-tech start-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabherr, Martin; Jaeger, Roland; King, Roger; Schneider, Burghard; Wiedenmann, Dieter

    2003-04-01

    U-L-M photonics GmbH has been set up to develop next-generation vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) products and to exploit the full potential of these industry-leading devices in terms of performance and application areas. Reliability is important for all application areas for VCSELs. This paper presents the excellent reliability characteristics of U-L-M"s VCSEL technology. Accumulation of all advantageous properties VCSELs are famous for, like low power consumption, circular low divergent beam profile, high modulation bandwidth, and scalability of monolithic arrangements, results in two-dimensional (2D) VCSEL arrays that appear as key components to reach highest aggregate bandwidths of tomorrow"s parallel optical transceivers. We report on 2D VCSEL arrays, substrate emitting although operating at 850 nm and prepared for flip-chip bonding, that are well suited for the customer"s needs in terms of speed, power consumption, and compact integration. Up to now, in most single channel transceivers, the VCSEL is packaged in a TO can and connected to the driver via a printed circuit board. We investigate the performance of a high speed VCSEL in a TO 46 package and demonstrate 10 Gbps transmission. The potential of VCSEL technology in other areas of application than datacom or telecom is just going to be exploited. We present a 760 nm single-mode VCSELs for gas monitoring applications.

  11. Sonnets, High Tech, Haiku: Teaching Poetry in the CAI Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Cynthia; Nichols, Chloe

    This report emphasizes the techniques required today for effective slide construction and contains suggestions about the nuts and bolts of slide preparation. Two instructors developed a presentation at Utah Valley State College to enhance their teaching of the sonnet and the Japanese haiku. Their premise: since poetry is a highly visual art form,…

  12. Independent pushes high-tech frontier through partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Tippee, B.

    1995-11-20

    State-of-the-art geophysical technology, requiring access to the biggest and best computer systems in the world, is not beyond the reach of independent oil and gas producers. Working with partners from academia and the US government, Oryx Energy Co. This year completed a seismic procedure that tested the limits of one of the world`s larger computer systems. The procedure, 3D prestack depth migration (PSDM), is the best technique developed so far for imaging salt bodies and subsalt structures. Because it requires massive data processing capacity, PSDM is sometimes seen as an exclusive tool of major oil companies. But Oryx thought that only 3D PSDM could answer questions it had about a recent Garden Banks discovery in the Gulf of Mexico. So the company in 1992 began searching for an alliance through which to make use of then newly commercial 3D PSDM technology. In May 1994, the company signed a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) with University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) and Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque. The CRADA brought together Oryx`s modeling and programming expertise, a PSDM computer code developed by UTD, Sandia`s Intel Paragon massively parallel processing (MPP) computer, and people and expertise from all three groups. By the time the final migration was completed last May 21, Oryx had not only answered many of its geological questions but also tested a pioneering migration technique, become one of the first companies to apply 3D PSDM technology to output a full data volume, worked with its partners to solve several computing problems, and found a way to apply MPP technology without owning an MPP machine. This article describes the computing challenges to be met, the project, and PSDM results.

  13. Low-Tech Education Threatens the High-Tech Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Business Week, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Indicating that the quality of scientific/technical education in the United States has been slipping since the brief surge of attention in the decade following Sputnik, discusses the need for upgrading science/technical education. Includes efforts currently under way, including financial support by industry and donations of equipment and computers…

  14. A High-Tech Oasis in the Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-03-01

    For hundreds of years, probably even longer, astronomers have sought the solitude, far from the disturbing influence of other human activities. Not without reason, their remote observatories have sometimes been likened with monasteries, sacred sites where man is closer to the skies and himself. Imagine the incredible silence of the desert, only now and then broken by feeble wind gusts. Sense the fading light as the sun sinks towards the distant horizon behind the enormous expanse of the Pacific Ocean. Rich colours develop in the clear and dry desert atmosphere while deep shadows move across the empty land. Marvel at the soft and subtle shades reflected by the layers of clouds above the ocean, far below. The sun sets fast at this low latitude and when the last rays are gone, you feel the chill of the evening air. Slowly, you become aware of increased activity in the distance - now is the moment when another hard night's work is about to begin. This is the place where ESO operates the VLT - the Paranal Observatory. CD-ROM with the original file available To allow optimal reproduction, also for professional use, a new CD-ROM is now available from the EPR Dept., with the full data set of this panoramic photo (23457 x 3496 pix, or 497 x 74 cm at 120 ppi; RGB TIFF; 235 Mb). It also contains a similar photo of the ESO La Silla Observatory ( PR Photo 39/99 ; 17500 x 1983 pix; or 440 x 50 cm at 100 ppi; RGB TIFF; 99 Mb). Photographer's note This panoramic view has been assembled in the classical way from 8 individual exposures, taken with an overlap of approximately 30% on either side. This is necessary to achieve a smooth blending of the sky and to correct the different perspective projections in each image frame. The resulting field-of-view is approximately 190°. The exposures were taken in rapid succession from a site near the water tanks at the time of the setting sun, beginning from the East (to the right), in order to compensate for the huge differences in contrast while shooting in the direction of and against the sunlight. KODAK Ektachrome Professional 200 roll film was used with a Linhof Super Technika 6 x 9 camera, fitted with a Schneider-Kreuznach S-Symmar 5.6/100mm lens. The selected frames were scanned by a Polaroid Sprintscan 45i and composed on a G3 Power Macintosh computer in Adobe Photoshop, supported with 1 GB of RAM. My special thanks go to the Engineering Department at Paranal for moving the four telescopes into a photogenic position, to the astronomers who donated some precious minutes of calibration time and also to the safety officer who drove me and my bulky equipment uphill to this site. Hans Hermann Heyer (ESO EPR Dept.) ESO PR Photo 11/01 may be reproduced, if credit is given to the European Southern Observatory (ESO).

  15. Responding to Industry: Writing in a High Tech World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durfee, Patricia Bernadt

    1984-01-01

    Research on the communication demands that local industries require of technicians and the writing responsibilities of the technicians are described. Responses from a questionnaire and information from personal interviews are included. (MLW)

  16. How a High-Tech Training System Crashed and Burned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bovier, Connie

    1993-01-01

    SimuFlite Co. nearly went under when a state-of-the-art computer-based training simulation for airplane pilots took too long to develop and was not liked by participants. The revamped program emphasized live instructors, technical manuals, and videotapes. The program's failure illustrates the disadvantages of computer-based training. (SK)

  17. Laser Holography. High Tech with High Potential for Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlegel, Ronald D.

    1986-01-01

    This article discusses the procedure, historical development, and applications of holography, and discusses the feasibility and value of implementing a unit or course of study of laser holography into an existing photography laboratory and curriculum. An equipment and supplies list, giving supplies and cost, is included. (CT)

  18. Maximizing Library Storage with High-Tech Robotic Shelving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrhein, Rick; Resetar, Donna

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a plan of having a new facility for the library of Valparaiso University. The authors, as dean of library services and assistant university librarian for access services at Valpo, discuss their plan of building a Center for Library and Information Resources that would house more books while also providing computing centers,…

  19. High Tech and Library Access for People with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roatch, Mary A.

    1992-01-01

    Describes tools that enable people with disabilities to access print information, including optical character recognition, synthetic voice output, other input devices, Braille access devices, large print displays, television and video, TDD (Telecommunications Devices for the Deaf), and Telebraille. Use of technology by libraries to meet mandates…

  20. High-tech controls for energy and environment. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Biondo, S.J.; Drummond, C.J.

    1995-05-01

    This document contains reports which were presented at a symposium for adaptive control systems. Topics were concerned with fuzzy logic, genetic algorithms, adaptive processes control, nonlinear component analysis, and processes control and efficiency applied to reducing nitrogen oxides emissions and to a column flotation unit. Individual reports (22 reports) are processed separately for the data bases.

  1. The High Tech Director of the '90s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    1994-01-01

    Examines the myths and realities of technology use in day-care centers, countering the notion that the mostly female child care profession is intimidated by technology. Discusses a survey of center directors, which found that nearly all centers used computers in administration, and the majority used computers in the classroom, fax machines, and…

  2. New and Improved: Security Goes High-Tech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Cheryl

    2002-01-01

    Explains the technology of biometrics, the science of identifying a person by unique physical characteristics, and its application in the fight against terrorism. Argues that biometrics, such as hand readers, fingerprint readers, and eye scans, are reliable and efficient. Also describes proximity cards, digital tracking systems, and smart cards.…

  3. High-Tech Service Unlocks Books for Pupils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Nirvi

    2011-01-01

    This article features Bookshare, a nonprofit that provides free electronic copies of traditional books to students with certain disabilities. Inspired by Napster, the music-sharing service, Bookshare turns books into a format that can be read aloud by computers, magnified, and spaced differently so that students with vision problems or learning…

  4. A High-Tech Makeover for School Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marowitz, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Because people today are accustomed to listening to electronic instruments, school music ensembles need to rise to the challenge of reflecting present-day culture by doing a "contemporary makeover". This is all-important if ensembles are to command student respect and attract new members. With a creative mindset and openness to innovation, one can…

  5. New tools. A new breed of high-tech detectives.

    PubMed

    Watson, A

    2000-08-11

    Forensic scientists are equipping police investigators with powerful tools for collecting and analyzing evidence. But as detection techniques become increasingly sensitive, the problem of sifting the wheat from the chaff at a crime scene mushrooms, guaranteeing a role for the human investigator despite all the gadgetry. Moreover, some developments are also raising civil liberties concerns.

  6. The High Tech Road to Making an Oral Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirths, Claudine G.; Bowman-Kruhm, Mary

    Using the "3 R's of Reporting" (Research, Reinforce, Rehearse) provides the process secondary students need to overcome their fear of making oral presentations. Much of this anxiety can be reduced by teaching students to use electronic supports for the research, preparation, and delivery of oral reports. Online bulletin board systems, electronic…

  7. Special Report: Vocational Training in the High-Tech Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansnerus, Laura; And Others

    1994-01-01

    "New Pressures on Vocational Education" (Mansnerus) describes new forms (tech prep, career academies, apprenticeship, school enterprises); "Biotechnology Goes to High School" (Quinn) describes Berkeley High's Biotech Academy created by industry; and "Votech That Works" (Holusha) stresses the importance of specialized training for non-college-bound…

  8. India's pharmaceutical industry: hype or high tech take-off?

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Prabodh; Lofgren, Hans

    2004-11-01

    India has built a large pharmaceutical industry through an array of measures in support of domestic firms. The absence of product patents enabled Indian companies to become world leading producers of generic versions of patented drugs. Low costs and a strong engineering tradition continue to sustain competitive strength. The implementation of the World Trade Organization patent regime in 2005 is driving a transformation of the industry. Key elements of the present shake-up include the return of 'big pharma' companies on a large scale and the emergence of several Indian firms that aim to become fully-fledged research-based multinationals. This article provides a description of the development and structure of the Indian pharmaceutical industry and explores questions and challenges arising from its integration into global markets.

  9. The creation and integration of the high tech operatory.

    PubMed

    Farr, C

    1996-09-01

    Dentistry is in the early stages of a major technological transformation. For the most part, however, computers and many of the other technological tools dentists use to gather or display clinical information, including intraoral cameras, digital radiography, and multimedia systems, have been less productive then they could be. This paper examines several offices where this technology is currently in use to provide working models of how integrated technology can be implemented into operatories to make them more flexible, productive, and resourceful environments for clinicians, and assist the clinician in creating a corresponding improvement in patient care.

  10. High-tech tools transform the operating room.

    PubMed

    Haugh, Richard

    2005-01-01

    This installment of our quarterly Clinical Management series examines how the hospital operating room is becoming a safer place for patients. Thanks to such technological breakthroughs as 3-D images, virtual patients and robots, surgeons can operate with more accuracy and efficiency.

  11. Plasma and magnetospheric research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, R. H.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Research and development in plasmas and magnetospheric environments is reported. Topics discussed include: analysis and techniques of software development; data analysis and modeling; spacecraft sheath effects; laboratory plasma flow studies; instrument development.

  12. Numerical simulations of plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dnestrovskii, Y.N.; Kostomarov, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents a modern, consistent, and systematic development of numerical computer simulation of plasmas in controlled thermonuclear fusion. The authors focus on recent Soviet research in mathematical modeling of Tokomak plasmas and present kinetic hydrodynamic and transport models.

  13. Plasma diagnostics for FED

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.D.

    1981-01-01

    An overview of the plasma diagnostic instruments recommended for the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) is described. First the role and need for plasma diagnostics is discussed. This is followed by an identification of particles and radiation eminating from the plasma. Next some design considerations are presented for the overall set of diagnostic instruments. Finally, instruments used for control and for plasma performance measurements are included in separate lists.

  14. Proceedings of the National Technological Literacy Conference (11th, Arlington, VA, February 8-11, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Dennis W., Ed.; Cheek, Kim A., Ed.

    The papers in this volume represent a sampling of the perspectives shared at the 1996 National Technological Literacy Conference. The papers are divided into two sections. Section 1, "STS [science, technology, and society]: Philosophical and Sociological Perspectives," includes: (1) "Relevant Science: STS-Oriented Science Courses for All Students"…

  15. Kent and Riegel's Handbook of industrial chemistry and biotechnology. 11th ed.

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, James A.

    2007-07-01

    This handbook provides extensive information on plastics, rubber, adhesives, textile fibers, pharmaceutical chemistry, synthetic organic chemicals, soaps and detergents, as well as various other major classes of industrial chemistry. There is detailed coverage of coal utilization technology, dyes and dye intermediates, chlor-alkali and heavy chemicals, paints and pigments, chemical explosives, propellants, petroleum and petrochemicals, natural gas, industrial gases, synthetic nitrogen products, fats and oils, sulfur and sulfuric acid, phosphorous and phosphates, wood products, and sweeteners. The chapter on coal is entitled: coal technology for power, liquid fuels and chemicals. 100 ills.

  16. Regional School Design Workshop. (11th, Windsor, Ontario, March 10-11, 1970).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Dept. of Education, Toronto. School Planning and Building Research Section.

    This report contains speeches and notes of workshop participants meeting to discuss school planning. Participants included educators, architects, engineers, and contractors. Twenty-two selections cover such topics as open plan schools, instructional materials centers, site selection, fire protection, environmental control, the school as a…

  17. SITE TECHNOLOGY PROFILES - 11TH EDITION, EMERGING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM, VOLUME 2

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, now in its eleventh year is an integral part of EPA's research into alternative cleanup methods for hazardous waste sites around the nation. The SITE Program was created to encourage the development and routine use o...

  18. SITE TECHNOLOGY PROFILES - 11TH EDITION, MEASUREMENT AND MONITORING PROGRAM, VOLUME 3

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, now in its eleventh year is an integral part of EPA's research into alternative cleanup methods for hazardous waste sites around the nation. The SITE Program was created to encourage the development and routine use o...

  19. 11(th) National Meeting of Organic Chemistry and 4(th) Meeting of Therapeutic Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Maria Emília; Araújo, Maria João; do Vale, Maria Luísa; Andrade, Paula B; Branco, Paula; Gomes, Paula; Moreira, Rui; Pinho E Melo, Teresa M V D; Freitas, Victor

    2016-03-17

    For the first time under the auspices of Sociedade Portuguesa de Química, the competences of two important fields of Chemistry are brought together into a single event, the 11st National Organic Chemistry Meeting and the the 4th National Medicinal Chemistry Meeting, to highlight complementarities and to promote new synergies. Abstracts of plenary lectures, oral communications, and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report.

  20. What Is Found There: Literature in the Wake of September 11th.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masini, Donna; Schwartz-Simon, Marisa; Gaitskill, Mary; Wolff, Rebecca; Olds, Sharon; Brown, Wesley; Willis, Meredith Sue; Nye, Naomi Shihab; Gamalinda, Eric; Pinsky, Robert; Sleigh, Tom; Karp, Gail

    2001-01-01

    Notes that teachers and writers across the country were called upon to share poems and prose that they had turned to in the days following the attacks of September 11, 2001. Notes that the response was a testament to literature's ability to transform experience of events as well as its capacity to be transformed, to be rendered anew by tragedy.…

  1. The Effects of Clickers on Math Achievement in 11th Grade Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Lucinda Ann

    2013-01-01

    Due to the increased access of Pods, Internet, games and communication devices, teachers are finding that students are less receptive to traditional teaching methods. One rural Northeast Georgia high school purchased a wireless student response system, "clickers," for teachers to use to engage students. The purpose of this study was to…

  2. The 11th Annual Salary Survey: They Work Hard for the Money

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Marion

    2011-01-01

    On June 8, News Corp., a media company owned by Rupert Murdoch, snatched two leading school district administrators to head its new education division. Peter Gorman, former superintendent of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg (N.C.) Schools, is the unit's new senior vice president, and Kristen Kane, the former chief operating officer of the New York City…

  3. Proceedings from the Intermountain Leisure Symposium (11th, Provo, Utah, November 15, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Gary K., Ed.; And Others

    This conference proceedings report includes papers submitted by 19 presenters addressing current trends, critical issues, and emerging perspectives. Titles of the papers are as follows: (1) "Envisioning Your Own Destiny: The Case for Strategic Planning in the Park and Recreation Movement" (H. Gray, D. McLean, and E. Crook); (2) "Academic…

  4. Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report (11th Edition)

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, L.; Kreycik, C.; Friedman, B.

    2008-10-01

    This report documents green power marketing activities and trends in the United States. It presents aggregate green power sales data for all voluntary purchase markets across the United States. It also provides summary data on utility green pricing programs offered in regulated electricity markets and green power marketing activity in competitive electricity markets, as well as green power sold to voluntary purchasers in the form of renewable energy certificates. Key market trends and issues are also discussed.

  5. Green Power Marketing in the United States. A Status Report (11th Edition)

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, Lori; Kreycik, Claire; Friedman, Barry

    2008-10-01

    This report documents green power marketing activities and trends in the United States. It presents aggregate green power sales data for all voluntary purchase markets across the United States. It also provides summary data on utility green pricing programs offered in regulated electricity markets and green power marketing activity in competitive electricity markets, as well as green power sold to voluntary purchasers in the form of renewable energy certificates. Key market trends and issues are also discussed.

  6. Coastal Impacts of the March 11th Tsunami in the Galapagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynett, P. J.; Weiss, R.; Renteria, W.

    2011-12-01

    On March 11, 2011 at 5:46:23 UTC (March 10 11:46:23 PM Local Time, Galapagos), the magnitude 9.0 Mw Great East Japan Earthquake occurred near the Tohoku region off the east coast of Japan. The purpose of this presentation is to provide the results of a tsunami field survey in the Galapagos Islands performed by an International Tsunami Survey Team (ITST) with great assistance from INOCAR, the oceanographic service of the Ecuadorian Navy, and the Galapagos National Park. The Galapagos Islands are a volcanic chain composed of many islands of various sizes. The four largest islands are the focus of this survey, and are, from west to east, Isabela, Santiagio, Santa Cruz, and San Cristobal. Aside from approximately 10 sandy beaches that are open to tourists, all other shoreline locations are strictly off limits to anyone without a research permit. All access to the shoreline is coordinated through the Galapagos National Park, and any landing requires a chaperone, a Park Ranger. While a few of the visited areas in this survey were tourist sites, the vast majority were not. Due to time constraints and a generally inaccessibility of the coastline, the survey locations were strongly guided by numerical computations performed previous to the surveys. This numerical guidance accurately predicted the regions of highest impact, as well as regions of relatively low impact. Tide-corrected maximum flow elevations were generally in the range of 3-4 meters, while Isabela experienced the largest flow elevation of 6 m in a small pocket beach. The largest harbor in the Islands, Puerto Ayora, experienced moderate damage, with significant flooding and some structural damage. Currents in the Baltra Channel, a small waterway between Santa Cruz and Baltra, were strong enough to transport navigation buoys distances greater than 800 m. Extreme dune erosion, and the associated destruction of sea turtle nesting habit, was widespread and noted on all of the islands visited.

  7. CASDA Annual School Law Conference. Proceedings (11th, Latham, New York, July 16, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capital Area School Development Association, Albany, NY.

    The Capital Area School Development Association's (CASDA) School Law Conference assists school board members and administrators in the Greater Capital Region of Albany, New York, in improving their knowledge in the area of school law. In Chapter 1, "Recent Decisions of the Commissioner of Education," examines the substance and outcome of recent…

  8. Coastal Impacts of the March 11th Tohoku, Japan Tsunami in the Galapagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynett, Patrick; Weiss, Robert; Renteria, Willington; De La Torre Morales, Giorgio; Son, Sangyoung; Arcos, Maria Elizabeth Martin; MacInnes, Breanyn Tiel

    2013-06-01

    On March 11, 2011 at 5:46:23 UTC (March 10 11:46:23 PM Galapagos Local Time), the Mw 9.0 Great East Japan Earthquake occurred near the Tohoku region off the east coast of Japan, spawning a Pacific-wide tsunami. Approximately 12,000 km away, the Galapagos Islands experienced moderate tsunami impacts, including flooding, structural damage, and strong currents. In this paper, we present observations and measurements of the tsunami effects in the Galapagos, focusing on the four largest islands in the archipelago; (from west to east) Isabela, Santiagio, Santa Cruz, and San Cristobal. Access to the tsunami affected areas was one of the largest challenges of the field survey. Aside from approximately ten sandy beaches open to tourists, all other shoreline locations are restricted to anyone without a research permit; open cooperation with the Galapagos National Park provided the survey team complete access to the Islands coastlines. Survey locations were guided by numerical simulations of the tsunami performed prior to the field work. This numerical guidance accurately predicted the regions of highest impact, as well as regions of relatively low impact. Tide-corrected maximum tsunami heights were generally in the range of 3-4 m with the highest runup of 6 m measured in a small pocket beach on Isla Isabela. Puerto Ayora, on Santa Cruz Island, the largest harbor in the Galapagos experienced significant flooding and damage to structures located at the shoreline. A current meter moored inside the harbor recorded relatively weak tsunami currents of less than 0.3 m/s (0.6 knot) during the event. Comparisons with detailed numerical simulations suggest that these low current speed observations are most likely the result of data averaging at 20-min intervals and that maximum instantaneous current speeds were considerably larger. Currents in the Canal de Itabaca, a natural waterway between Santa Cruz Island and a smaller island offshore, were strong enough to displace multiple 5.5-ton navigation buoys. Numerical simulations indicate that currents in the Canal de Itabaca exceeded 4 m/s (~8 knots), a very large flow speed for a navigational waterway.

  9. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on X-ray Microscopy (XRM2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongjie; Wu, Ziyu; Tai, Renzhong

    2013-10-01

    The Eleventh International Conference on X-ray Microscopy (XRM2012) was held on 5-10 August 2012 at the Hope hotel in Shanghai. Historically, for the first time the XRM conference took place in China. The conference was jointly hosted by the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) and the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The series of XRM conferences dates back to 1983 in Göttingen, Germany. Since the Zürich conference, XRM2008, it has been held every two years, showing its increasing popularity among the x-ray microscopy communities around the world. Research in the area of x-ray microscopy is advancing very fast with the development of synchrotron radiation techniques, especially the emergence of third generation light sources with low natural emittance which has significantly pushed forward the development of technologies and applications in this area. This has been fully demonstrated in presentations from this and previous XRM conferences. XRM2012 was attended by 295 people including 21 invited speakers, 53 contributing speakers, 55 students, and 13 industry exhibitors. Over 232 abstracts were submitted for oral or poster presentation and 56 original, peer-reviewed papers are published in these proceedings. The conference was sponsored by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11210301016/A0802), and three gold sponsors active in industrial and technological fields related to x-ray microscopy. An exhibition booth was offered free to Australia synchrotron, the host for XRM2014, to promote the next conference which will be held in Melbourne, Australia in 2014. An unforgettable memory for most conference participants might be the charming night cruise along Pujiang river which was part of the welcome reception on the first evening. The Werner Meyer-Ilse Award (WMIA) prize this year was awarded to Irene Zanette (TU-München) and Stephan Werner (HZB-Berlin), the former for her pioneering new work in high-sensitivity phase-contrast and dark-field (small-angle x-ray scattering) images, the latter for his outstanding accomplishments in the field of on-chip zone plate stacking. The location for the XRM2016 conference was voted for by all conference attendees, and Diamond Light Source in the United Kingdom was chosen. A tour of SSRF was attended by nearly 100 participants who got a close look at the seven beamlines in operation before the close of the meeting. We would like to thank all the participants for their active involvement and excellent contributions during the conference and poster session, and the International Program Committee for their guidance, and outstanding support of local organizating committee for a successful XRM2012. Hongjie Xu, Ziyu Wu and Renzhong Tai Proceeding Editors Logos Conference photograph The PDF file also contains a number of photographs taken at the conference and lists of committes and participants.

  10. The 11th international workshop on Campylobacter, Helicobacter and related Organisms (CHRO), 2001.

    PubMed

    Takkinen, J; Ammon, A

    2003-11-01

    Over 700 participants from 54 countries attended the eleventh Campylobacter, Helicobacter and Related Organisms (CHRO) meeting in September 2001. This meeting was an opportunity to update and better understand the microbiological and epidemiological complexities of Campylobacter. The mechanism of pathogenesis of this bacteria is not yet fully understood and important progress was made in the microbiological characterisation. The availability of over 100 different strain characteristics from various locations all over Europe, brought together by Campynet, is an invaluable tool for achieving this aim. There is increasing evidence to suggest that different risk factors exist for different species of Campylobacter. The link between antibiotic use in farm animals and increased resistance to some antimicrobials for humans still needs to be proved and some contradictory results reported on this issue.

  11. 11(th) National Meeting of Organic Chemistry and 4(th) Meeting of Therapeutic Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Maria Emília; Araújo, Maria João; do Vale, Maria Luísa; Andrade, Paula B; Branco, Paula; Gomes, Paula; Moreira, Rui; Pinho E Melo, Teresa M V D; Freitas, Victor

    2016-01-01

    For the first time under the auspices of Sociedade Portuguesa de Química, the competences of two important fields of Chemistry are brought together into a single event, the 11st National Organic Chemistry Meeting and the the 4th National Medicinal Chemistry Meeting, to highlight complementarities and to promote new synergies. Abstracts of plenary lectures, oral communications, and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report. PMID:27102166

  12. Food Services and Hospitality for 10th, 11th, and 12th Grades. Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucks County Technical School, Fairless Hills, PA.

    The outline describes the food services and hospitality course offered to senior high school students at the Bucks County Technical School. Specifically, the course seeks to provide students with a workable knowledge of food services and foster in them a sense of personal pride for quality workmanship. In addition to a statement of the philosophy…

  13. Project Probase: Engaging Technology for 11th and 12th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse-Fisher, Dustin J.; Daugherty, Michael K.; Satchwell, Richard E.; Custer, Rodney L.

    2005-01-01

    Journal manuscripts and national reports published during the last 20 years (Bensen, 1993; DeVries, 1996; AAAS, 1989; National Academy of Engineering, 2002; ITEA, 1996; Zuga, 1989) presented a defensible rationale for the technology education profession and focused on the delivery of technological literacy for the nation's youth. This call for…

  14. Deformation analysis of Aceh April 11th 2012 earthquake using GPS observation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulida, Putra; Meilano, Irwan; Sarsito, Dina A.; Susilo

    2015-04-01

    This research tries to estimate the co-seismic deformation of intraplate earthquake occurred off northern Sumatra coast which is about 100-200 km southwest of Sumatrasubduction zone. The earthquake mechanism was strike-slip with magnitude 8.6 and triggering aftershock with magnitude 8.2 two hours later. We estimated the co-seismic deformation by using the GPS (Global Positioning System) continuous data along western Sumatra coast. The GPS observation derived from Sumatran GPS Array (SuGAr) and Geospatial Information Agency (BIG). For data processing we used GPS Analyze at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (GAMIT) software and Global Kalman Filter (GLOBK) to estimate the co-seismic deformation. From the GPS daily solution, the result shows that the earthquake caused displacement for the GPS stations in Sumatra. GPS stations in northern Sumatra showed the displacement to the northeast with the average displacement was 15 cm. The biggest displacement was found at station BSIM which is located at Simeuleu Island off north west Sumatra coast. GPS station in middle part of Sumatra, the displacement was northwest. The earthquake also caused subsidence for stations in northern Sumatra, but from the time series there was not sign of subsidence was found at middle part of Sumatra. In addition, the effect of the earthquake was worldwide and affected the other GPS Stations around Hindia oceanic.

  15. 11th National Meeting of Organic Chemistry and 4th Meeting of Therapeutic Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Maria Emília; Araújo, Maria João; do Vale, Maria Luísa; Andrade, Paula B.; Branco, Paula; Gomes, Paula; Moreira, Rui; Pinho e Melo, Teresa M.V.D.; Freitas, Victor

    2016-01-01

    For the first time under the auspices of Sociedade Portuguesa de Química, the competences of two important fields of Chemistry are brought together into a single event, the 11st National Organic Chemistry Meeting and the the 4th National Medicinal Chemistry Meeting, to highlight complementarities and to promote new synergies. Abstracts of plenary lectures, oral communications, and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report. PMID:27102166

  16. Teaching about September 11th and Its Aftermath. C-SPAN in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    C-SPAN, Washington, DC.

    The events of and since September 11, 2001 have had an immeasurable impact on all facets of people's lives, especially in the United States. The loss of human life, threatened public safety, and the impact of a military response are just some of the issues concerning U.S. citizens and public officials. This C-SPAN in the Classroom series offers…

  17. 11th International Conference on Large Scale Applications and Radiation Hardness of Semiconductor Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The primary goal of the Conference is to review the present status of the Semiconductor Detector apparatuses in the field of High Energy or Astroparticle Physics. In both cases the requests on the detector systems are very demanding: very large instrumented surface, radiation hardness and high reliability. Part of the talks will be devoted to describe the pixel and microstrip silicon-based detectors presently operated at the LHC experiments. The operational experience and the detector performance with the p-p runs 2009-2012 will be discussed. Another fraction of the talks will be devoted to plans for upgrading the LHC tracker detectors for the next runs of the LHC and on strategies for future high luminosity upgrades of the LHC. Studies on radiation hardness of silicon materials, diamond-based detectors, innovative solutions for optical links and power device components will be reported. The astroparticle detectors activity will also be reviewed. Semiconductor applications in different fields, like medical imaging, radioactive monitoring and one quantum-physics experiment will be rapidly touched.

  18. Nebraska Vocational Agribusiness Curriculum for City Schools. Horticulture. Agricultural Mechanics. A Curriculum Guide. 11th Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    Designed for use with high school juniors, this agribusiness curriculum for city schools contains thirty-two units of instruction in the areas of horticulture and agricultural mechanics. Among the units included in the curriculum are (1) Planting Media, (2) Fertilizer, (3) Plant Classification, (4) Turf Grass Management, (5) Landscape Design, (6)…

  19. Saudi Arabia, Cyprus, America and the World: September 11th from Another Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christodoulou, Niki

    This paper employs an autobiographical method using biographical elements from narrated experiences from Cyprus, Saudi Arabia, and the United States, where she has come to study. The paper offers perspectives on the September 11, 2001 tragedy and other acts of terrorism, violence, and mass destruction. It describes how the author's Cyprus…

  20. On Campus with Women, Volume 12, Number 2, Fall 1982. 11th Anniversary Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    On Campus with Women, 1982

    1982-01-01

    News concerning developments at colleges and universities that affect women is presented, along with an interview with the Executive Director of the Project on the Status and Education of Women, Bernice R. Sandler, regarding the project's major accomplishments and activities over the past 11 years and insights into the changing status of women at…

  1. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation (SRI2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumas, Paul; Susini, Jean

    2013-03-01

    These proceedings are a recollection of the articles presented at the Eleventh International Conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation (SRI22012), held in Lyon (France), on 9-13 July 2012. SRI2012, co-organized by ESRF and SOLEIL, was the eleventh in a series of conferences bringing together the foremost x-ray scientists from around the world. This triennial conference is the prime forum to highlight connections between synchrotron radiation instrumentation, science, and society. SRI2012 hosted more than 1000 delegates, including 72 exhibitors. The 2012 edition has seen the emergence of new avenues in the synchrotron technique and in related research areas, and has emphasized the complementarities between synchrotron centers and new x-ray sources such as Free Electron Lasers. The program was structured around 20 topics, and each of the articles in these proceedings refers to one of these topics namely, Instrumentation for Macromolecular Crystallography, Biomedical Experiments, Insertion Device Developments, Storage Ring Performances and Limits on Beam Stability, Advances in Hard X-ray Optics, New Developments in Area Detectors, New Facilities, New Developments in Spectroscopy Detectors, Time-Resolved Applications, Magnetism, SR Experiments under Extreme Conditions, VUV Instrumentation and Applications, Advances in Materials Science Experiments, IR and THz Generation and Applications, Advances in Soft-X-ray Optics, Modelling Tools and Optical Design, Scattering Experiments, High Energy Application, X-ray Microscopy and Nanoprobes, X-ray Imaging Techniques and, Instrumentation and Enabling Technologies. This proceedings series aims to be an essential reference work for practitioners in the field. It primarily documents the evolution and development of techniques, but also recent scientific advances, that were presented during the 4 days of the conference. We are extremely thankful to all the authors who contributed to making these proceedings a volume of reference as well as the reviewers for their careful reading and constructive recommendations for improving the articles. We are looking forward to a successful and exciting next conference in this series, which will be hosted by Brookhaven National Laboratory in 2015. The co-Editors: Jean Susini (ESRF) Paul Dumas (SOLEIL)

  2. Texas Symposium on Relativistic Astrophysics, 11th, Austin, TX, December 12-17, 1982, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. S. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Various papers on relativistic astrophysics are presented. The general subjects addressed include: particle physics and astrophysics, general relativity, large-scale structure, big bang cosmology, new-generation telescopes, pulsars, supernovae, high-energy astrophysics, and active galaxies.

  3. Digital video technology - today and tomorrow: 11th office information technology conference

    SciTech Connect

    Liberman, J.

    1994-10-01

    Digital video is probably computing`s fastest moving technology today. Just three years ago, the zenith of digital video technology on the PC was the successful marriage of digital text and graphics with analog audio and video by means of expensive analog laser disc players and video overlay boards. The state of the art involves two different approaches to fully digital video on computers: hardware-assisted and software-only solutions.

  4. Biennial Conference on Chemical Education, Abstracts (11th, Atlanta, Georgia, August 5-9, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, E. K.; Pulliam, E. J.

    This publication includes more than 470 abstracts of papers scheduled to be presented at a chemical education conference. Topics of the papers include: (1) human impact on the environment; (2) technology; (3) forensic science; (4) paper chemistry; (5) computer interfacing, software, videodisc and graphics; (6) faculty enhancement programs; (7)…

  5. Understanding of Pollution among 4th, 8th, and 11th Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    Utilizing student interviews, this study assessed fourth, eighth, and eleventh graders (n=105) in 11 Maine schools concerning their understanding of 4 natural and social science concepts related to pollution. The results hold direct implications for teaching strategies and curriculum design within the environmental and science education domains.…

  6. Proceedings of the 11th Annual DARPA/AFGL Seismic Research symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewkowicz, James F.; McPhetres, Jeanne M.

    1990-11-01

    The following subjects are covered: near source observations of quarry explosions; small explosion discrimination and yield estimation; Rg as a depth discriminant for earthquakes and explosions: a case study in New England; a comparative study of high frequency seismic noise at selected sites in the USSR and USA; chemical explosions and the discrimination problem; application of simulated annealing to joint hypocenter determination; frequency dependence of Q(sub Lg) and Q in the continental crust; statistical approaches to testing for compliance with a threshold test ban treaty; broad-band studies of seismic sources at regional and teleseismic distances using advanced time series analysis methods; effects of depth of burial and tectonic release on regional and teleseismic explosion waveforms; finite difference simulations of seismic wave excitation at Soviet test sites with deterministic structures; stochastic geologic effects on near-field ground motions; the damage mechanics of porous rock; nonlinear attenuation mechanism in salt at moderate strain; compressional- and shear-wave polarizations at the Anza seismic array; and a generalized beamforming approach to real time network detection and phase association.

  7. Plasma sheath driven targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownell, J. H.; Freeman, B. L.

    1980-02-01

    Plasma focus driven target implosions are simulated using hydrodynamic-burn codes. Support is given to the idea that the use of a target in a plasma focus should allow 'impedance matching' between the fuel and gun, permitting larger fusion yields from a focus-target geometry than the scaling laws for a conventional plasma focus would predict.

  8. Plasma Cell Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... microorganisms to which the body is exposed. In plasma cell disorders, one clone of plasma cells multiplies uncontrollably. As a result, this clone ... a light chain and heavy chain). These abnormal plasma cells and the ... produce are limited to one type, and levels of other types of antibodies ...

  9. The Plasma Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suplee, Curt

    2009-09-01

    Preface; 1. The fourth state of matter; 2. The music and dance of plasmas; 3. The Sun-Earth connection; 4. Bringing the Sun to Earth: the story of controlled thermonuclear fusion; 5. The cosmic plasma theater: galaxies, stars, and accretion disks; 6. Putting plasmas to work; Index.

  10. Aerospatiale industrial thermal plasma activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrot, Maxime

    Details of nontransferred arc torches, plasma systems in industrial use and operational plasma applications are listed. A plasma application on a foundry cupola is detailed. The setting up of a plasma system is described. Research and development activities are summarized.

  11. Mirror plasma apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Moir, Ralph W.

    1981-01-01

    A mirror plasma apparatus which utilizes shielding by arc discharge to form a blanket plasma and lithium walls to reduce neutron damage to the wall of the apparatus. An embodiment involves a rotating liquid lithium blanket for a tandem mirror plasma apparatus wherein the first wall of the central mirror cell is made of liquid lithium which is spun with angular velocity great enough to keep the liquid lithium against the first material wall, a blanket plasma preventing the lithium vapor from contaminating the plasma.

  12. Afterglow Complex Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Samarian, A. A.; Boufendi, L.; Mikikian, M.

    2008-09-07

    The review of the first detailed experimental and theoretical studies of complex plasma in RF discharge afterglow is presented. The studies have been done in a frame of FAST collaborative research project between Complex Plasma Laboratory of the University of Sydney and the GREMI laboratory of Universite d'Orleans. We examined the existing models of plasma decay, presents experimental observations of dust dynamics under different afterglow complex plasma conditions, presents the experimental data obtained (in particular the presence of positively charged particles in discharge afterglow), discusses the use of dust particles as a probe to study the diffusion losses in afterglow plasmas.

  13. Plasma contactor research, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, John D.

    1990-01-01

    The characteristics of double layers observed by researchers investigating magnetospheric phenomena are contrasted to those observed in plasma contacting experiments. Experiments in the electron collection mode of the plasma contacting process were performed and the results confirm a simple model of this process for current levels ranging to 3 A. Experimental results were also obtained in a study of the process of electron emission from a hollow cathode plasma contactor. High energy ions are observed coming from the cathode in addition to the electrons and a phenomenological model that suggests a mechanism by which this could occur is presented. Experimental results showing the effects of the design parameters of the ambient plasma simulator on the plasma potential, electron temperature, electron density and plasma noise levels induced in plasma contacting experiments are presented. A preferred simulator design is selected on the basis of these results.

  14. Plasmas for medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Woedtke, Th.; Reuter, S.; Masur, K.; Weltmann, K.-D.

    2013-09-01

    Plasma medicine is an innovative and emerging field combining plasma physics, life science and clinical medicine. In a more general perspective, medical application of physical plasma can be subdivided into two principal approaches. (i) “Indirect” use of plasma-based or plasma-supplemented techniques to treat surfaces, materials or devices to realize specific qualities for subsequent special medical applications, and (ii) application of physical plasma on or in the human (or animal) body to realize therapeutic effects based on direct interaction of plasma with living tissue. The field of plasma applications for the treatment of medical materials or devices is intensively researched and partially well established for several years. However, plasma medicine in the sense of its actual definition as a new field of research focuses on the use of plasma technology in the treatment of living cells, tissues, and organs. Therefore, the aim of the new research field of plasma medicine is the exploitation of a much more differentiated interaction of specific plasma components with specific structural as well as functional elements or functionalities of living cells. This interaction can possibly lead either to stimulation or inhibition of cellular function and be finally used for therapeutic purposes. During recent years a broad spectrum of different plasma sources with various names dedicated for biomedical applications has been reported. So far, research activities were mainly focused on barrier discharges and plasma jets working at atmospheric pressure. Most efforts to realize plasma application directly on or in the human (or animal) body for medical purposes is concentrated on the broad field of dermatology including wound healing, but also includes cancer treatment, endoscopy, or dentistry. Despite the fact that the field of plasma medicine is very young and until now mostly in an empirical stage of development yet, there are first indicators of its enormous

  15. Plasma Biomedicine in Orthopedics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Satsohi

    2012-10-01

    Various effects of plasmas irradiation on cells, tissues, and biomaterials relevant for orthopedic applications have been examined. For direct application of plasmas to living cells or tissues, dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) with helium flows into ambient air were used. For biomaterial processing, on the other hand, either helium DBDs mentioned above or low-pressure discharges generated in a chamber were used. In this presentation, plasma effects on cell proliferation and plasma treatment for artificial bones will be discussed. First, the conditions for enhanced cell proliferation in vitro by plasma applications have been examined. The discharge conditions for cell proliferation depend sensitively on cell types. Since cell proliferation can be enhanced even when the cells are cultured in a plasma pre-treated medium, long-life reactive species generated in the medium by plasma application or large molecules (such as proteins) in the medium modified by the plasma are likely to be the cause of cell proliferation. It has been found that there is strong correlation between (organic) hydroperoxide generation and cell proliferation. Second, effects of plasma-treated artificial bones made of porous hydroxyapatite (HA) have been examined in vitro and vivo. It has been found that plasma treatment increases hydrophilicity of the surfaces of microscopic inner pores, which directly or indirectly promotes differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells introduced into the pores and therefore causes faster bone growth. The work has been performed in collaboration with Prof. H. Yoshikawa and his group members at the School of Medicine, Osaka University.

  16. Plasma Physics: An Introductory Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendy, R. O.

    1995-03-01

    Preface; Introduction R. O. Dendy; 1. Plasma particle dynamics R. J. Hastie; 2. Plasma kinetic theory J. A. Elliott; 3. Waves in plasmas J. P. Doughtery; 4. Magnetohydrodynamics K. I. Hopcraft; 5. Turbulence in fluids and fusion plasmas F. A. Haas; 6. Finite-dimensional dynamics and chaos T. J. Mullin; 7. Computational plasma physics J. W. Eastwood; 8. Tokomak experiments D. C. Robinson and M. R. O'Brien; 9. Magnetospheric plasmas: Part I Basic processes in the solar system D. A. Bryant; Part II Microprocesses R. L. Bingham; 10. Solar plasmas R. A. Hood; 11. Gravitational plasmas J. J. Binney; 12. Laser plasmas A. R. Bell; 13. Industrial plasmas P. C. Johnson; 14. Transport in magnetically confined plasmas T. E. Stringer; 15. Radio-frequency plasma heating R. A. Cairns; 16. Boundary plasmas G. McCracken; 17. How to build a tokomak T. N. Todd; 18. Survey of fusion plasma physics R. S. Pease; Index.

  17. Plasma in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Seunghee; Park, Young-Seok

    2016-01-01

    This review describes the contemporary aspects of plasma application in dentistry. Previous studies on plasma applications were classified into two categories, surface treatment and direct applications, and were reviewed, respectively according to the approach. The current review discussed modification of dental implant surface, enhancing of adhesive qualities, enhancing of polymerization, surface coating and plasma cleaning under the topics of surface treatment. Microbicidal activities, decontamination, root canal disinfection and tooth bleaching were reviewed as direct applications with other miscellaneous ones. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma was of particular focus since it is gaining considerable attention due to the possibility for its use in living tissues. Future perspectives have also been discussed briefly. Although it is still not popular among dentists, plasma has shown promises in several areas of dentistry and is now opening a new era of plasma dentistry. PMID:27030818

  18. Divertor plasma detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Pshenov, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    Regime with the plasma detached from the divertor targets (detached divertor regime) is a natural continuation of the high recycling conditions to higher density and stronger impurity radiation loss. Both the theoretical considerations and experimental data show clearly that the increase of the impurity radiation loss and volumetric plasma recombination causes the rollover of the plasma flux to the target when the density increases, which is the manifestation of detachment. Plasma-neutral friction (neutral viscosity effects), although important for the sustainment of high density/pressure plasma upstream and providing the conditions for efficient recombination and power loss, is not directly involved in the reduction of the plasma flux to the targets. The stability of detachment is also discussed.

  19. What is a plasma?

    SciTech Connect

    Intrator, Thomas P.

    2012-08-30

    This introduction will define the plasma fourth state of matter, where we find plasmas on earth and beyond, and why they are useful. There are applications to many consumer items, fusion energy, scientific devices, satellite communications, semiconductor processing, spacecraft propulsion, and more. Since 99% of our observable universe is ionized gas, plasma physics determines many important features of astrophysics, space physics, and magnetosphere physics in our solar system. We describe some plasma characteristics, examples in nature, some useful applications, how to create plasmas. A brief introduction to the theoretical framework includes the connection between kinetic and fluid descriptions, quasi neutrality, Debye shielding, ambipolar electric fields, some plasma waves. Hands-on demonstrations follow. More complete explanations will follow next week.

  20. Leo space plasma interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    1991-01-01

    Photovoltaic arrays interact with the low earth orbit (LEO) space plasma in two fundamentally different ways. One way is the steady collection of current from the plasma onto exposed conductors and semiconductors. The relative currents collected by different parts of the array will then determine the floating potential of the spacecraft. In addition, these steady state collected currents may lead to sputtering or heating of the array by the ions or electrons collected, respectively. The second kind of interaction is the short time scale arc into the space plasma, which may deplete the array and/or spacecraft of stored charge, damage solar cells, and produce EMI. Such arcs only occur at high negative potentials relative to the space plasma potential, and depend on the steady state ion currents being collected. New high voltage solar arrays being incorporated into advanced spacecraft and space platforms may be endangered by these plasma interactions. Recent advances in laboratory testing and current collection modeling promise the capability of controlling, and perhaps even using, these space plasma interactions to enable design of reliable high voltage space power systems. Some of the new results may have an impact on solar cell spacing and/or coverslide design. Planned space flight experiments are necessary to confirm the models of high voltage solar array plasma interactions. Finally, computerized, integrated plasma interactions design tools are being constructed to place plasma interactions models into the hands of the spacecraft designer.

  1. Plasma Processing Of Hydrocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Grandy, Jon D; Peter C. Kong; Brent A. Detering; Larry D. Zuck

    2007-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed several patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon processing. The INL patents include nonthermal and thermal plasma technologies for direct natural gas to liquid conversion, upgrading low value heavy oil to synthetic light crude, and to convert refinery bottom heavy streams directly to transportation fuel products. Proof of concepts has been demonstrated with bench scale plasma processes and systems to convert heavy and light hydrocarbons to higher market value products. This paper provides an overview of three selected INL patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon conversion or upgrade.

  2. COUNTERROTATING PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Halbach, K.; Baker, W.R.; Veron, D.

    1963-07-01

    An ion-electron plasma device having a conductive, cylindrical casing provided with an axially directed magneticmirror-type field is described. An axially aligned tubular electrode is disposed at each end of the casing with oppositely directed radial electric fields provided between each electrode and the casing. Simultaneous pulses of gas, injected from the inner end of each of the electrodes, become ionized and oppositely rotating plasma bodies are formed. The magnetic mirrors repel the plasma bodies and cause them to collide in the region between the mirrors. The opposite directions of rotation of the plasma bodies cause very high currents to flow therebetween and consequent heating occurs. (AEC)

  3. [Therapeutic plasmas available worldwide].

    PubMed

    Martinaud, C; Cauet, A; Sailliol, A

    2013-05-01

    Therapeutic plasma is a current product; French guidelines were reviewed in 2012. Connections between more or less closed countries are frequent, during relief disasters as well as in war settings. This is associated with the increasing use of plasma in the management of casualties. Additionally, The real possibility of lack of plasma supply in some countries provides a fundamental interest of the knowledge of foreign blood supply organizations. We present here the main divergences and mutual point between plasmas available worldwide. We present the main characteristics of each product.

  4. Planetary plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    1993-01-01

    The primary types of plasma waves observed in the vicinity of the planets Venus, Mars, Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are described. The observations are organized according to the various types of plasma waves observed, ordered according to decreasing distance from the planet, starting from the sunward side of the planet, and ending in the region near the closest approach. The plasma waves observed include: electron plasma oscillations and ion acoustic waves; trapped continuum radiation; electron cyclotron and upper hybrid waves; whistler-mode emissions; electrostatic ion cyclotron waves; and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves.

  5. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  6. Solid expellant plasma generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Nobie H. (Inventor); Poe, Garrett D. (Inventor); Rood, Robert (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved solid expellant plasma generator has been developed. The plasma generator includes a support housing, an electrode rod located in the central portion of the housing, and a mass of solid expellant material that surrounds the electrode rod within the support housing. The electrode rod and the solid expellant material are made of separate materials that are selected so that the electrode and the solid expellant material decompose at the same rate when the plasma generator is ignited. This maintains a point of discharge of the plasma at the interface between the electrode and the solid expellant material.

  7. EDITORIAL: Plasma jets and plasma bullets Plasma jets and plasma bullets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, M. G.; Ganguly, B. N.; Hicks, R. F.

    2012-06-01

    Plasma plumes, or plasma jets, belong to a large family of gas discharges whereby the discharge plasma is extended beyond the plasma generation region into the surrounding ambience, either by a field (e.g. electromagnetic, convective gas flow, or shock wave) or a gradient of a directionless physical quantity (e.g. particle density, pressure, or temperature). This physical extension of a plasma plume gives rise to a strong interaction with its surrounding environment, and the interaction alters the properties of both the plasma and the environment, often in a nonlinear and dynamic fashion. The plasma is therefore not confined by defined physical walls, thus extending opportunities for material treatment applications as well as bringing in new challenges in science and technology associated with complex open-boundary problems. Some of the most common examples may be found in dense plasmas with very high dissipation of externally supplied energy (e.g. in electrical, optical or thermal forms) and often in or close to thermal equilibrium. For these dense plasmas, their characteristics are determined predominantly by strong physical forces of different fields, such as electrical, magnetic, thermal, shock wave, and their nonlinear interactions [1]. Common to these dense plasma plumes are significant macroscopic plasma movement and considerable decomposition of solid materials (e.g. vaporization). Their applications are numerous and include detection of elemental traces, synthesis of high-temperature materials and welding, laser--plasma interactions, and relativistic jets in particle accelerators and in space [2]-[4]. Scientific challenges in the understanding of plasma jets are exciting and multidisciplinary, involving interweaving transitions of all four states of matter, and their technological applications are wide-ranging and growing rapidly. Using the Web of Science database, a search for journal papers on non-fusion plasma jets reveals that a long initial phase up

  8. Beam plasma interaction in strongly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Marlene; Kalman, Gabor J.; Kyrkos, Stamatios; Donko, Zoltan

    2006-04-01

    The well-known problem of beam-plasma instability acquires new aspects when one or both of the two components (the beam and the plasma) are strongly interacting. We have now theoretically considered the case when the plasma is in the solid phase and forms a lattice. In this situation, the inherent anisotropy of the lattice leads to a coupling between the longitudinal and transverse polarizations. One of the novel features of the beam-plasma instability in this scenario is the possible excitation of transverse modes, which should be an experimentally observable signature of the instability. We have initially concentrated on a 2D toy model with the beam lying in the lattice plane. At the same time, we have initiated a molecular dynamics simulation program for studying various aspects of the penetration of a beam into a plasma lattice. The beam parameters can be adjusted in order to see the effects of increasing coupling strength within the beam and to distinguish between collective phenomena and scattering on individual particles. When both components are strongly interacting, a number of remarkable phenomena—trapping of beam particles, creation of dislocations, local melting of the lattice—may be observed.

  9. British-Romanian-Hungarian N+N+N Workshop for Young Researchers on Plasma- and Astrophysics: from laboratory to outer space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballai, I.; Forgács-Dajka, E.; Marcu, A.; Petrovay, K.

    2005-06-01

    The International Networking for Young Scientists (INYS), initiated and funded by the British Council, models itself on the N+N concept, where N+N refers to a workshop involving a number of researchers from the UK and an equal number of local researchers; ideally eight or more from each country. INYS is an initiative that supports the British Council's purpose of "nurturing mutually beneficial relationships with other countries", by encouraging and facilitating the mobility of, and direct contact between, young researchers (and their supervisors). It supports face-to-face meetings between young scientists and engineers from the UK and other countries, for the exchange of ideas, knowledge and information and the building of international connections that assist the innovation process. The meeting was an extended N+N workshop, where young scientist from UK, Romania and Hungary (N+N+N) got together to discuss their results, to initiate further real and virtual networking and to identy common research areas. It was the first time that Babes-Bolyai University (Cluj, Romania) has hosted such a meeting and the support by the University (Department of Physics, in particular) gives us hope that there will be other events to follow. The topic of the meeting was "Plasma- and astrophysics: from laboratory to outer space". Plasma is a gaseous state, commonly known as the fourth state of matter and it is made of electrically charged particles where the dynamics of particles is controlled by ambient magnetic fields. Plasmas make up almost 99 per cent of astrophysical objects such as galaxies, stars and supernovae. On Earth, plasmas exist naturally as lightning bolts and the bath of charged particles in the Earth's upper atmosphere. In the high-tech electronics industry, beams of artificially created plasmas engrave sophisticated patterns on computer chips. In an attempt to provide mankind with an abundant source of cheap clean energy, scientists work hard to make artificial suns

  10. Self-energized plasma compressor. [for compressing plasma discharged from coaxial plasma generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shriver, E. L.; Igenbergs, E. B. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The self-energized plasma compressor is described which compresses plasma discharged from a coaxial plasma generator. The device includes a helically shaped coil which is coaxially aligned with the center axis of the coaxial plasma generator. The plasma generator creates a current through the helical coil which, in turn, generates a time varying magnetic field that creates a force which acts radially upon the plasma. The coaxial plasma generator and helical coil move the plasma under high pressure and temperature to the narrow end of the coil. Positioned adjacent to the narrow end of the coil are beads which are engaged by the plasma to be accelerated to hypervelocities for simulating meteoroids.

  11. EDITORIAL: Plasma jets and plasma bullets Plasma jets and plasma bullets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, M. G.; Ganguly, B. N.; Hicks, R. F.

    2012-06-01

    Plasma plumes, or plasma jets, belong to a large family of gas discharges whereby the discharge plasma is extended beyond the plasma generation region into the surrounding ambience, either by a field (e.g. electromagnetic, convective gas flow, or shock wave) or a gradient of a directionless physical quantity (e.g. particle density, pressure, or temperature). This physical extension of a plasma plume gives rise to a strong interaction with its surrounding environment, and the interaction alters the properties of both the plasma and the environment, often in a nonlinear and dynamic fashion. The plasma is therefore not confined by defined physical walls, thus extending opportunities for material treatment applications as well as bringing in new challenges in science and technology associated with complex open-boundary problems. Some of the most common examples may be found in dense plasmas with very high dissipation of externally supplied energy (e.g. in electrical, optical or thermal forms) and often in or close to thermal equilibrium. For these dense plasmas, their characteristics are determined predominantly by strong physical forces of different fields, such as electrical, magnetic, thermal, shock wave, and their nonlinear interactions [1]. Common to these dense plasma plumes are significant macroscopic plasma movement and considerable decomposition of solid materials (e.g. vaporization). Their applications are numerous and include detection of elemental traces, synthesis of high-temperature materials and welding, laser--plasma interactions, and relativistic jets in particle accelerators and in space [2]-[4]. Scientific challenges in the understanding of plasma jets are exciting and multidisciplinary, involving interweaving transitions of all four states of matter, and their technological applications are wide-ranging and growing rapidly. Using the Web of Science database, a search for journal papers on non-fusion plasma jets reveals that a long initial phase up

  12. Triggered plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, Clifford W.

    1988-01-01

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  13. Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Dr. Tom Markusic, a propulsion research engineer at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), adjusts a diagnostic laser while a pulsed plasma thruster (PPT) fires in a vacuum chamber in the background. NASA/MSFC's Propulsion Research Center (PRC) is presently investigating plasma propulsion for potential use on future nuclear-powered spacecraft missions, such as human exploration of Mars.

  14. Plasma technology directory

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, P.P.; Dybwad, G.L.

    1995-03-01

    The Plasma Technology Directory has two main goals: (1) promote, coordinate, and share plasma technology experience and equipment within the Department of Energy; and (2) facilitate technology transfer to the commercial sector where appropriate. Personnel are averaged first by Laboratory and next by technology area. The technology areas are accelerators, cleaning and etching deposition, diagnostics, and modeling.

  15. Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostadinova, Evdokiya; Forest, C.; Cooper, C.; Coquerel, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX) is investigating the self-generation of magnetic fields and related processes in a large, weakly magnetized, fast flowing, and hot (conducting) plasma. The dynamo re-creates conditions highly similar to many astrophysical plasmas. Stars and other planets have dynamos, and so do galaxies and clusters of galaxies, which makes it extremely crucial for researchers in the field to carry out experiments in this previously uninvestigated plasma regime, which will help for the development of a comprehensive theory of how magnetic fields are generated in planets, the Sun and other stars. MPDX is a laboratory astrophysical experiment where 200,000-degree Fahrenheit plasma is confined within a three-meter diameter spherical aluminum vacuum chamber with the help of multiple tracks of cusp magnets covering the inside shell. The dynamo utilizes six robotic insertion sweep probes that are programmed to find any point inside the sphere by given radial and angular coordinates. This innovative mechanical system allows us to take measurements of the state variables in key points in the plasma flow and to better investigate its cosmic-like plasma behavior. The probes are able to autonomously calculate coordinate transformations, move in a two dimensional plane, and return information about their relative position. This makes them an extremely useful, highly accurate, and easily controlled tool for plasma analysis.

  16. Plasma engineering for MARS

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, G.A.; Baldwin, D.E.; Barr, W.L.

    1983-03-24

    The two-year Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) has resulted in the conceptual design of a commercial, electricity-producing fusion reactor based on tandem mirror confinement. The physics basis for the MARS reactor was developed through work in two highly coupled areas of plasma engineering: magnetics and plasma performance.

  17. Plasma thrusters from Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, E.J.

    1992-09-01

    A report on the Russian stationary plasma thrusters having plasma accelerated to high velocities by electrical and magnetic forces is described. For specific impulses of 15-20 km/sec, optimal for such applications as satellite station keeping and orbital transfer, a unit supplying 0.05 N from a 2-kW input has a 30-cm-diameter nozzle.

  18. Atoms in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    More, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent experiments with high-power pulsed lasers have strongly encouraged the development of improved theoretical understanding of highly charged ions in a dense plasma environment. This work examines the theory of dense plasmas with emphasis on general rules which govern matter at extreme high temperature and density. 106 refs., 23 figs.

  19. The origins of 'plasma'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braithwaite, Nicholas

    2008-12-01

    I agree with Raoul Franklin (November p22) that although the quest for controlled thermonuclear fusion opened up a new branch of plasma physics, the field itself is considerably older, dating back at least as far as 1928 when Irving Langmuir coined the term "plasma" to describe a neutral, ionized gas.

  20. Plasma gasification of coals

    SciTech Connect

    Kruzhilin, G.I.; Khudyakov, G.N.; Tselishchev, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    To avoid problems of transporting coal from Siberia to the European part of the Soviet Union, plasma gasification could be used to give methane and liquid methyl fuel which could be transported by pipeline. Plasma-assisted gasification is particularly effective in the case of brown coals. (11 refs.)

  1. Triggered plasma opening switch

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C W

    1988-02-23

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  2. Partially ionized plasmas, including the Third Symposium on Uranium Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, M.

    1976-01-01

    Fundamentals of both electrically and fission generated plasmas are discussed. Research in gaseous fuel reactors using uranium hexafluoride is described and other partially ionized plasma applications are discussed.

  3. Plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Savage, Mark E.; Mendel, Jr., Clifford W.

    2001-01-01

    A command triggered plasma opening switch assembly using an amplification stage. The assembly surrounds a coaxial transmission line and has a main plasma opening switch (POS) close to the load and a trigger POS upstream from the main POS. The trigger POS establishes two different current pathways through the assembly depended on whether it has received a trigger current pulse. The initial pathway has both POS's with plasma between their anodes and cathodes to form a short across the transmission line and isolating the load. The final current pathway is formed when the trigger POS receives a trigger current pulse which energizes its fast coil to push the conductive plasma out from between its anode and cathode, allowing the main transmission line current to pass to the fast coil of the main POS, thus pushing its plasma out the way so as to establish a direct current pathway to the load.

  4. SHEET PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, O.A.

    1962-07-17

    An ion-electron plasma heating apparatus of the pinch tube class was developed wherein a plasma is formed by an intense arc discharge through a gas and is radially constricted by the magnetic field of the discharge. To avoid kink and interchange instabilities which can disrupt a conventional arc shortiy after it is formed, the apparatus is a pinch tube with a flat configuration for forming a sheet of plasma between two conductive plates disposed parallel and adjacent to the plasma sheet. Kink instabilities are suppressed by image currents induced in the conductive plates while the interchange instabilities are neutrally stable because of the flat plasma configuration wherein such instabilities may occur but do not dynamically increase in amplitude. (AEC)

  5. SUPERFAST THERMALIZATION OF PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Chang, C.C.

    1962-06-12

    A method is given for the superfast thermalization of plasma by shock conversion of the kinetic energy stored in rotating plasma rings or plasmoids colliding at near supersonic speeds in a containment field to heat energy in the resultant confined plasma mass. The method includes means for generating rotating plasmoids at the opposite ends of a Pyrotron or Astron containment field. The plasmoids are magnetically accelerated towards each other into the opposite ends of time containment field. During acceleration of the plasmoids toward the center of the containment field, the intensity of the field is sequentially increased to adiabatically compress the plasmoids and increase the plasma energy. The plasmoids hence collide with a violent shock at the eenter of the containment field, causing the substantial kinetic energy stored in the plasmoids to be converted to heat in the resultant plasma mass. (AEC)

  6. Helical plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2015-10-15

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR{sup ®} rocket engine.

  7. Helical plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2015-10-01

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR® rocket engine.

  8. Weakly relativistic plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Fermous, Rachid Djebli, Mourad

    2015-04-15

    Plasma expansion is an important physical process that takes place in laser interactions with solid targets. Within a self-similar model for the hydrodynamical multi-fluid equations, we investigated the expansion of both dense and under-dense plasmas. The weakly relativistic electrons are produced by ultra-intense laser pulses, while ions are supposed to be in a non-relativistic regime. Numerical investigations have shown that relativistic effects are important for under-dense plasma and are characterized by a finite ion front velocity. Dense plasma expansion is found to be governed mainly by quantum contributions in the fluid equations that originate from the degenerate pressure in addition to the nonlinear contributions from exchange and correlation potentials. The quantum degeneracy parameter profile provides clues to set the limit between under-dense and dense relativistic plasma expansions at a given density and temperature.

  9. Solar system plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    1995-01-01

    An overview is given of spacecraft observations of plasma waves in the solar system. In situ measurements of plasma phenomena have now been obtained at all of the planets except Mercury and Pluto, and in the interplanetary medium at heliocentric radial distances ranging from 0.29 to 58 AU. To illustrate the range of phenomena involved, we discuss plasma waves in three regions of physical interest: (1) planetary radiation belts, (2) planetary auroral acceleration regions and (3) the solar wind. In each region we describe examples of plasma waves that are of some importance, either due to the role they play in determining the physical properties of the plasma, or to the unique mechanism involved in their generation.

  10. Plasma sheath criterion in thermal electronegative plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ghomi, Hamid; Khoramabadi, Mansour; Ghorannevis, Mahmod; Shukla, Padma Kant

    2010-09-15

    The sheath formation criterion in electronegative plasma is examined. By using a multifluid model, it is shown that in a collisional sheath there will be upper as well as lower limits for the sheath velocity criterion. However, the parameters of the negative ions only affect the lower limit.

  11. Waves in Space Plasmas Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredricks, R. W.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1981-01-01

    The Waves in Space Plasmas (WISP) program is a joint international effort involving instrumentation to be designed and fabricated by funding from NASA and the National Research Council of Canada. The instrumentation, with a tentatively planned payload for 1986, can be used to perturb the plasma with radio waves to solve problems in ionospheric, atmospheric, magnetospheric, and plasma physics. Among the ionospheric and plasma phenomena to be investigated using WISP instrumentation are VLF wave-particle interactions; ELF/VLF propagation; traveling ionospheric disturbances and gravity wave coupling; equatorial plasma bubble phenomena; plasma wave physics such as mode-coupling, dispersion, and instabilities; and plasma physics of the antenna-plasma interactions.

  12. Origins of magnetospheric plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, T.E. )

    1991-01-01

    A review is given of recent (1987-1990) progress in understanding of the origins of plasmas in the earth's magnetosphere. In counterpoint to the early supposition that geomagnetic phenomena are produced by energetic plasmas of solar origin, 1987 saw the publication of a provocative argument that accelerated ionospheric plasma could supply all magnetospheric auroral and ring current particles. Significant new developments of existing data sets, as well as the establishment of entirely new data sets, have improved the ability to identify plasma source regions and to track plasma through the magnetospheric system of boundary layers and reservoirs. These developments suggest that the boundary between ionospheric and solar plasmas, once taken to lie at the plasmapause, actually lies much nearer to the magnetopause. Defining this boundary as the surface where solar wind and ionosphere contribute equally to the plasma, it is referred to herein as the 'geopause'. It is now well established that the infusion of ionospheric O(+) plays a major role in the storm-time distention of the magnetotail and inflation of the inner magnetosphere. After more than two decades of observation and debate, the question remains whether magnetosheric are protons of solar or terrestrial origin. 161 refs.

  13. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Andrew; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael; van Doren, David; Elton, Raymond; Uzun-Kaymak, Ilker

    2007-11-01

    We are developing high velocity dense plasma jets for fusion and HEDP applications. Traditional coaxial plasma accelerators suffer from the blow-by instability which limits the mass accelerated to high velocity. In the current design blow-by is delayed by a combination of electrode shaping and use of a tailored plasma armature created by injection of a high density plasma at a few eV generated by arrays of capillary discharges or sparkgaps. Experimental data will be presented for a complete 32 injector gun system built for driving rotation in the Maryland MCX experiment, including data on penetration of the plasma jet through a magnetic field. We present spectroscopic measurements of plasma velocity, temperature, and density, as well as total momentum measured using a ballistic pendulum. Measurements are in agreement with each other and with time of flight data from photodiodes and a multichannel PMT. Plasma density is above 10^15 cm-3, velocities range up to about 100 km/s. Preliminary results from a quadrature heterodyne HeNe interferometer are consistent with these results.

  14. Plasma stabilization experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sziklas, E. A.; Fader, W. J.; Jong, R. A.; Stufflebeam, J. H.

    1980-07-01

    The plasma stabilization experiment is an effort to enhance stability in a mirror-confined plasma by trapping cold ions with rf fields applied near the mirror throats. Nagoya Type 3 antennas, coupled to a 60 kW rf power supply are mounted in the throats of the UTRC baseball magnet. An external washer gun provides a source of plasma for both streaming and confined plasma tests. Results show a strong stoppering effect on streaming plasmas and a marginal effect on confined plasmas. Theoretical calculations provide an explanation for the experimental observations. The field generates a ponderomotive force acting on the electrons. The resultant improvement in electron confinement changes the ambipolar potential and inhibits the flow of ions through the mirror throat. Criteria are derived for the validity of this trapping concept. The requisite field strengths are significantly lower than those required to trap ions directly. Scaling laws are developed for application of cold ion trapping to large mirror devices containing dense plasmas. The use of slow-wave antenna structures operated at frequencies above the lower hybrid frequency is recommended for these applications.

  15. Plasma physics. Proceedings. 7th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (VII LAWPP 97), Caracas (Venezuela), 20 - 31 Jan 1997.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, P.; Puerta, J.

    The following topics were dealt with: general plasma theory, plasma confinement, shock waves and instabilities in plasma, plasma spectroscopy, astrophysical and space plasmas, pulse power experiments, plasma processing.

  16. Global Core Plasma Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) provides, empirically derived, core plasma density as a function of geomagnetic and solar conditions throughout the inner magnetosphere. It is continuous in value and gradient and is composed of separate models for the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, the plasmapause, the trough, and the polar cap. The relative composition of plasmaspheric H+, He+, and O+ is included in the GCPM. A blunt plasmaspheric bulge and rotation of the bulge with changing geomagnetic conditions is included. The GCPM is an amalgam of density models, intended to serve as a framework for continued improvement as new measurements become available and are used to characterize core plasma density, composition, and temperature.

  17. Measurements of plasma zinc

    PubMed Central

    Davies, I. J. T.; Musa, M.; Dormandy, T. L.

    1968-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element. Previous methods of measuring zinc in clinical material have been difficult and reported findings must be treated with caution. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy it has been established that plasma zinc is one of the most uniform biochemical characteristics of normal adult blood. Sex and age differences in adult life are insignificant. Increased metabolic activity, on the other hand, induces a marked, immediate fall in plasma zinc level. The possible implications of this are discussed. Zinc levels in patients with diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and anaemia due to acute blood loss have been within normal limits. Plasma zinc is low in certain types of liver disease. PMID:5303355

  18. Plasma for cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keidar, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that grew from research in application of low-temperature (or cold) atmospheric plasmas in bioengineering. One of the most promising applications of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is cancer therapy. Convincing evidence of CAP selectivity towards the cancer cells has been accumulated. This review summarizes the state of the art of this emerging field, presenting various aspects of CAP application in cancer such as the role of reactive species (reactive oxygen and nitrogen), cell cycle modification, in vivo application, CAP interaction with cancer cells in conjunction with nanoparticles, and computational oncology applied to CAP.

  19. Plasma control and utilization

    DOEpatents

    Ensley, Donald L.

    1976-12-28

    A plasma is confined and heated by a microwave field resonant in a cavity excited in a combination of the TE and TM modes while responding to the resonant frequency of the cavity as the plasma dimensions change to maintain operation at resonance. The microwave field is elliptically or circularly polarized as to prevent the electromagnetic confining field from going to zero. A high Q chamber having superconductive walls is employed to minimize wall losses while providing for extraction of thermonuclear energy produced by fusion of nuclei in the plasma.

  20. Plasma Chemical Aspects Of Dust Formation In Hydrocarbon Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, J.; Kovacevic, E.; Stepanovic, O.; Stefanovic, I.; Winter, J.

    2008-09-07

    This contribution deals with some plasma chemical aspects of dust formation in hydrocarbon plasmas. The interplay between dust formation and plasma chemistry will be discussed by means of different experimental results. One specific example concerns the formation of benzene and the role of atomic hydrogen for plasma chemical processes and dust formation in hydrocarbon discharges.

  1. Arc plasma jets of a nontransferred plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, K.D.; Hong, S.H.

    1996-02-01

    The dc plasma torches have been widely used as clean plasma sources for plasma processings such as plasma spraying and synthesis. The plasma flow of a nontransferred plasma torch used for thermal plasma processings is produced by the arc-gas interactions between a cathode tip and an anode nozzle and expands as a jet through the nozzle. In this work, numerically calculated images of the arc plasma characteristics are found over the entire plasma region, including both an arc-gas interacting region inside the torch and a jet expanding region outside the torch. A numerical model used assumes a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) with near-electrode phenomena and compressible flow effects. The computational system is described by a two-dimensional (2-D) axisymmetric model which is solved for plasma temperature and velocity by a control volume approach with the modified SIMPLER algorithm in a real torch geometry.

  2. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  3. Plasma isotope separation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, M.W. ); Shepp, T.A. )

    1991-12-01

    Isotope separation has many important industrial, medical, and research applications. Large-scale processes have typically utilized complex cascade systems; for example, the gas centrifuge. Alternatively, high single-stage enrichment processes (as in the case of the calutron) are very energy intensive. Plasma-based methods being developed for the past 15 to 20 years have attempted to overcome these two drawbacks. In this review, six major types of isotope separation methods which involve plasma phenomena are discussed. These methods are: plasma centrifuge, AVLIS (atomic vapor laser isotope separation), ion wave, ICR (ion-cyclotron resonance), calutron, and gas discharge. The emphasis of this paper is to describe the plasma phenomena in these major categories. An attempt was made to include enough references so that more detailed study or evaluation of a particular method could readily be pursued. A brief discussion of isotope separation using mass balance concepts is also carried out.

  4. Simulation of Fusion Plasmas

    ScienceCinema

    Holland, Chris [UC San Diego, San Diego, California, United States

    2016-07-12

    The upcoming ITER experiment (www.iter.org) represents the next major milestone in realizing the promise of using nuclear fusion as a commercial energy source, by moving into the “burning plasma” regime where the dominant heat source is the internal fusion reactions. As part of its support for the ITER mission, the US fusion community is actively developing validated predictive models of the behavior of magnetically confined plasmas. In this talk, I will describe how the plasma community is using the latest high performance computing facilities to develop and refine our models of the nonlinear, multiscale plasma dynamics, and how recent advances in experimental diagnostics are allowing us to directly test and validate these models at an unprecedented level.

  5. CRRES plasma wave experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Roger R.; Gurnett, Donald A.; Odem, Daniel L.

    1992-01-01

    The CRRES plasma wave experiment is designed to provide information on the plasma wave environment and the total plasma density in the Earth's radiation belts and throughout the CRRES orbit. This information is valuable both for studying the naturally occurring wave-particle interactions affecting the plasma and particle environment in the plasmasphere and magnetosphere as well as for studying the chemical releases. The electric field sensors for this instrument consist of two long electric dipole antennas (about 100 m tip-to-tip), and the magnetic field sensor is a search coil magnetometer mounted at the end of a 6-m boom. The instrument has a 14-channel spectrum analyzer covering the frequency range from 5.6 Hz to 10 kHz, and a 128-step sweep frequency receiver covering the frequency range from 100 Hz to 400 kHz.

  6. Induction plasma tube

    DOEpatents

    Hull, D.E.

    1982-07-02

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  7. Saturn's Hot Plasma Explosions

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation based on data obtained by NASA's Cassini Spacecraft shows how the "explosions" of hot plasma on the night side (orange and white) periodically inflate Saturn's magnetic field (white ...

  8. Magnetospheric Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, Barry H.

    Magnetospheric Plasma Physics is volume 4 of an ongoing series of review books entitled Developments in Earth and Planetary Sciences organized by the Center for Academic Publications Japan. The series is intended to stress Japanese work; however, the present volume was written by seven internationally selected authors who have reviewed works from a broad range of sources. This volume is composed of articles drawn from five lecture series presented at the Autumn College o f Plasma Physics, International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy, October-November 1979. The audiences for these lecture series were plasma and/or space plasma physicists, or students of the same, and the level and tone of this volume clearly reflect that condition.

  9. Relativistic spherical plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Maksimchuk, A.; Schroeder, C. B.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-02-01

    Tightly focused laser pulses that diverge or converge in underdense plasma can generate wake waves, having local structures that are spherical waves. Here we study theoretically and numerically relativistic spherical wake waves and their properties, including wave breaking.

  10. Induction plasma tube

    DOEpatents

    Hull, Donald E.

    1984-01-01

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  11. Measuring the Plasma Density of a Ferroelectric Plasma Source in an Expanding Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    A. Dunaevsky; N.J. Fisch

    2003-10-02

    The initial density and electron temperature at the surface of a ferroelectric plasma source were deduced from floating probe measurements in an expanding plasma. The method exploits negative charging of the floating probe capacitance by fast flows before the expanding plasma reaches the probe. The temporal profiles of the plasma density can be obtained from the voltage traces of the discharge of the charged probe capacitance by the ion current from the expanding plasma. The temporal profiles of the plasma density, at two different distances from the surface of the ferroelectric plasma source, could be further fitted by using the density profiles for the expanding plasma. This gives the initial values of the plasma density and electron temperature at the surface. The method could be useful for any pulsed discharge, which is accompanied by considerable electromagnetic noise, if the initial plasma parameters might be deduced from measurements in expanding plasma.

  12. Plasma Screen Floating Mount

    DOEpatents

    Eakle, Robert F.; Pak, Donald J.

    2004-10-26

    A mounting system for a flat display screen, particularly a plasma display screen, suspends the screen separately in each of the x-, y- and z-directions. A series of frames located by linear bearings and isolated by springs and dampers allows separate controlled movement in each axis. The system enables the use of relatively larger display screens in vehicles in which plasma screen are subject to damage from vibration.

  13. Plasmas in Saturn's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, L. A.; Burek, B. G.; Ackerson, K. L.; Wolfe, J. H.; Mihalov, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The solar wind plasma analyzer on board Pioneer 2 provides first observations of low-energy positive ions in the magnetosphere of Saturn. Measurable intensities of ions within the energy-per-unit charge (E/Q) range 100 eV to 8 keV are present over the planetocentric radial distance range about 4 to 16 R sub S in the dayside magnetosphere. The plasmas are found to be rigidly corotating with the planet out to distances of at least 10 R sub S. At radial distances beyond 10 R sub S, the bulk flows appear to be in the corotation direction but with lesser speeds than those expected from rigid corotation. At radial distances beyond the orbit of Rhea at 8.8 R sub S, the dominant ions are most likely protons and the corresponding typical densities and temperatures are 0.5/cu cm and 1,000,000 K, respectively, with substantial fluctuations. It is concluded that the most likely source of these plasmas in the photodissociation of water frost on the surface of the ring material with subsequent ionization of the products and radially outward diffusion. The presence of this plasma torus is expected to have a large influence on the dynamics of Saturn's magnetosphere since the pressure ratio beta of these plasmas approaches unity at radial distances as close to the planet as 6.5 R sub S. On the basis of these observational evidences it is anticipated that quasi-periodic outward flows of plasma, accompanied with a reconfiguration of the magnetosphere beyond about 6.5 R sub S, will occur in the local night sector in order to relieve the plasma pressure from accretion of plasma from the rings.

  14. Inductively coupled helium plasma torch

    DOEpatents

    Montaser, Akbar; Chan, Shi-Kit; Van Hoven, Raymond L.

    1989-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma torch including a base member, a plasma tube and a threaded insert member within the plasma tube for directing the plasma gas in a tangential flow pattern. The design of the torch eliminates the need for a separate coolant gas tube. The torch can be readily assembled and disassembled with a high degree of alignment accuracy.

  15. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.

    1999-12-01

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas.

  16. Plasma surface modification of polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirotsu, T.

    1980-01-01

    Thin plasma polymerization films are discussed from the viewpoint of simplicity in production stages. The application of selective, absorbent films and films used in selective permeability was tested. The types of surface modification of polymers discussed are: (1) plasma etching, (2) surface coating by plasma polymerized thin films, and (3) plasma activation surface graft polymerization.

  17. Magnetospheric space plasma investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, Richard H.; Horwitz, James L.

    1995-01-01

    Topics and investigations covering this period of this semiannual report period (August 1994 - January 1995) are as follows: (1) Generalized SemiKinetic (GSK) modeling of the synergistic interaction of transverse heating of ionospheric ions and magnetospheric plasma-driven electric potentials on the auroral plasma transport. Also, presentations of GSK modeling of auroral electron precipitation effects on ionospheric plasma outflows, of ExB effects on such outflow, and on warm plasma thermalization and other effects during refilling with pre-existing warm plasmas; (2) Referees' reports received on the statistical study of the latitudinal distributions of core plasmas along the L = 4.6 field line using DE-1/RIMS data. Other work is concerned in the same field, field-aligned flows and trapped ion distributions; and (3) A short study has been carried out on heating processes in low density flux tubes in the outer plasmasphere. The purpose was to determine whether the high ion temperatures observed in these flux tubes were due to heat sources operating through the thermal electrons or directly to the ions. Other investigations center along the same area of plasmasphere-ionosphere coupling. The empirical techniques and model, the listing of hardware calibrated, and/or tested, and a description of notable meetings attended is included in this report, along with a list of all present publication in submission or accepted and those reference papers that have resulted from this work thus far.

  18. Plasma contactor research - 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchholtz, Brett; Williams, John D.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1992-01-01

    A report describing the operating principles of hollow-cathode-based plasma contactors emitting or collecting electrons from an ambient plasma is summarized. Preliminary experiments conducted to determine the noise generated by these plasma contactors in the emission-current return line and in the plasma near it are described. These noise data are measured as current fluctuations in the return line and to the Langmuir probe and then analyzed using a fast Fourier transform technique. The spectral compositions of the data are characterized using power spectral density plots which are examined to identify possible noise source(s) and production mechanism(s). The precautions taken in the construction and calibration of the instrumentation to assure adequate frequency response are described. Experimental results show that line-current noise levels are typically 2 percent of the electron current being emitted or collected. However, noise levels increase to as much as 20 percent of the electron current at a few electron-collection operating conditions. The frequencies associated with most of the noise were harmonics of the 60 Hz input to system power supplies. Plasma noise had characteristics similar in magnitude and frequency to those for the return-line noise, but they contained additional features at frequencies considered to be related to ion-acoustic instabilities. Also discussed is a new probe positioning system built to facilitate future plasma-contractor research.

  19. Understanding helicon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tarey, R. D.; Sahu, B. B.; Ganguli, A.

    2012-07-15

    This paper presents a comprehensive overview of work on the helicon plasmas and also discusses various aspects of RF power deposition in such plasmas. Some of the work presented here is a review of earlier work on theoretical [A. Ganguli et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 113503 (2007)] and experimental [A. Ganguli et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 20(1), 015021 (2011)] investigations on helicon plasmas in a conducting cylindrical waveguide for m = -1 mode. This work also presents an approach to investigate the mechanisms by which the helicon and associated Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) waves are responsible for RF power deposition in Helicon discharges. Experiment design adopts the recent theory of damping and absorption of Helicon modes in conducting waveguides [A. Ganguli et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 113503 (2007)]. The effort has also been made to detect the warm electrons, which are necessary for ionization, because Helicon discharges are of high density, low T{sub e} discharges and the tail of the bulk electron population may not have sufficient high-energy electrons. Experimental set up also comprises of the mirror magnetic field. Measurements using RF compensated Langmuir probes [A. Ganguli et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 17, 015003 (2008)], B-dot probe and computations based on the theory shows that the warm electrons at low pressure (0.2-0.3 mTorr) Helicon discharges, are because of the Landau damping of TG waves. In collisional environment, at a pressure Almost-Equal-To 10 mTorr, these high-energy electrons are due to the acceleration of bulk electrons from the neighboring regions across steep potential gradients possibly by the formation of double layers.

  20. Plasma confinement at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, I.; JET Contributors

    2016-01-01

    Operation with a Be/W wall at JET (JET-ILW) has an impact on scenario development and energy confinement with respect to the carbon wall (JET-C). The main differences observed were (1) strong accumulation of W in the plasma core and (2) the need to mitigate the divertor target temperature to avoid W sputtering by Be and other low Z impurities and (3) a decrease of plasma energy confinement. A major difference is observed on the pedestal pressure, namely a reduction of the pedestal temperature which, due to profile stiffness the plasma core temperature is also reduced leading to a degradation of the global confinement. This effect is more pronounced in low β N scenarios. At high β N, the impact of the wall on the plasma energy confinement is mitigated by the weaker plasma energy degradation with power relative to the IPB98(y, 2) scaling calculated empirically for a CFC first wall. The smaller tolerable impurity concentration for tungsten (<10-5) compared to that of carbon requires the use of electron heating methods to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core region as well as gas puffing to avoid W entering the plasma core by ELM flushing and reduction of the W source by decreasing the target temperature. W source and the target temperature can also be controlled by impurity seeding. Nitrogen and Neon have been used and with both gases the reduction of the W source and the target temperature is observed. Whilst more experiments with Neon are necessary to assess its impact on energy confinement, a partial increase of plasma energy confinement is observed with Nitrogen, through the increase of edge temperature. The challenge for scenario development at JET is to extend the pulse length curtailed by its transient behavior (W accumulation or MHD), but more importantly by the divertor target temperature limits. Re-optimisation of the scenarios to mitigate the effect of the change of wall materials maintaining high global energy confinement similar to JET-C is

  1. Pulsed Plasma Electron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasik, Yakov

    2008-11-01

    Pulsed (˜10-7 s) electron beams with high current density (>10^2 A/cm^2) are generated in diodes with electric field of E > 10^6 V/cm. The source of electrons in these diodes is explosive emission plasma, which limits pulse duration; in the case E < 10^5 V/cm this plasma is not uniform and there is a time delay in its formation. Thus, there is a continuous interest in research of electron sources which can be used for generation of uniform electron beams produced at E <= 10^5 V/cm. In the present report, several types of plasma electron source (PES) will be considered. The first type of PES is fiber-based cathodes, with and without CsI coating. The operation of these cathodes is governed by the formation of the flashover plasma which serves as a source of electrons. The second type of PES is the ferroelectric plasma source (FPS). The operation of FPS, characterized by the formation of dense surface flashover plasma is accompanied also by the generation of fast microparticles and energetic neutrals. The latter was explained by Coulomb micro-explosions of the ferroelectric surface due to an large time-varying electric field at the front of the expanding plasma. A short review of recent achievements in the operation of a multi-FPS-assisted hollow anode to generate a large area electron beam will be presented as well. Finally, parameters of the plasma produced by a multi-capillary cathode with FPS and velvet igniters will be discussed. Ya. E. Krasik, J. Z. Gleizer, D. Yarmolich, A. Krokhmal, V. Ts. Gurovich, S.Efimov, J. Felsteiner V. Bernshtam, and Yu. M. Saveliev, J. Appl. Phys. 98, 093308 (2005). Ya. E. Krasik, A. Dunaevsky, and J. Felsteiner, Phys. Plasmas 8, 2466 (2001). D. Yarmolich, V. Vekselman, V. Tz. Gurovich, and Ya. E. Krasik, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 075004 (2008). J. Z. Gleizer, Y. Hadas and Ya. E. Krasik, Europhysics Lett. 82, 55001 (2008).

  2. Plasma coal reprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messerle, V. E.; Ustimenko, A. B.

    2013-12-01

    Results of many years of investigations of plasma-chemical technologies for pyrolysis, hydrogenation, thermochemical preparation for combustion, gasification, and complex reprocessing of solid fuels and hydrocarbon gas cracking are represented. Application of these technologies for obtaining the desired products (hydrogen, industrial carbon, synthesis gas, valuable components of the mineral mass of coal) corresponds to modern ecological and economical requirements to the power engineering, metallurgy, and chemical industry. Plasma fuel utilization technologies are characterized by the short-term residence of reagents within a reactor and the high degree of the conversion of source substances into the desired products without catalyst application. The thermochemical preparation of the fuel to combustion is realized in a plasma-fuel system presenting a reaction chamber with a plasmatron; and the remaining plasma fuel utilization technologies, in a combined plasma-chemical reactor with a nominal power of 100 kW, whose zone of the heat release from an electric arc is joined with the chemical reaction zone.

  3. Instabilities in counterstreaming plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye-Sook

    2013-10-01

    We are performing high power laser experiments showing large, stable, reproducible electromagnetic field structures that arise in counter-streaming interpenetrating supersonic plasma flows in the laboratory. Self organization, whereby energy progressively transfers from smaller to larger scales in an inverse cascade, is widely observed in fluid flows, such as in the nonlinear evolution of multimode Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. There are many scenarios in astrophysics where self organization involving magnetic or electric fields in collisionless settings is observed. These surprising structures, predominantly oriented transverse to the primary flow direction, extend for much larger distances than the intrinsic plasma spatial scales, and persist for much longer than the plasma kinetic timescales. Their origin may be magnetic field advection from the recompression of the Biermann battery fields in the midplane. Understanding interactions of high velocity plasma flows is interests to the ICF and astrophysics. This paper will present experimental results and interpretation of these counterstreaming plasma experiments. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Plasma jet ignition device

    DOEpatents

    McIlwain, Michael E.; Grant, Jonathan F.; Golenko, Zsolt; Wittstein, Alan D.

    1985-01-15

    An ignition device of the plasma jet type is disclosed. The device has a cylindrical cavity formed in insulating material with an electrode at one end. The other end of the cylindrical cavity is closed by a metal plate with a small orifice in the center which plate serves as a second electrode. An arc jumping between the first electrode and the orifice plate causes the formation of a highly-ionized plasma in the cavity which is ejected through the orifice into the engine cylinder area to ignite the main fuel mixture. Two improvements are disclosed to enhance the operation of the device and the length of the plasma plume. One improvement is a metal hydride ring which is inserted in the cavity next to the first electrode. During operation, the high temperature in the cavity and the highly excited nature of the plasma breaks down the metal hydride, liberating hydrogen which acts as an additional fuel to help plasma formation. A second improvement consists of a cavity insert containing a plurality of spaced, metal rings. The rings act as secondary spark gap electrodes reducing the voltage needed to maintain the initial arc in the cavity.

  5. Plasma treatment of onychomycosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Zilan; Roe, Jeff; Grammer, Tim; Him, Yeon-Ho; Graves, David B.

    2015-09-01

    Onychomycosis or fungal infection of the toenail or fingernail is a common affliction. Approximately 10% of the world's adult population is estimated to suffer from onychomycosis. Current treatment options such as topical creams, oral drugs, or laser treatments are generally limited by a variety of problems. We present results for an alternative onychomycosis treatment scheme using atmospheric pressure cold air plasmas. Using thinned cow hoof as a model nail material, we tested the ability of various plasma sources to act through the model nail to eradicate either bacteria or fungus deposited on the opposite side. Following 20 minute exposure to a surface microdischarge (SMD) device operating in room air, we observed a ~ 2 log reduction of E. coli. A similar result was obtained against T. rubrum after 45 min plasma treatment. NOx species concentration penetrating through the model nail as well as uptake into the nail were measured as a function of nail thickness. We propose that these plasma-generated species, or perhaps their reaction products, are responsible for at least part of the observed anti-microbial effect. We also explore the use of ultraviolet light acting in synergy with plasma-generated chemical species.

  6. Antimatter plasmas and antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Greaves, R.G.; Surko, C.M.

    1997-05-01

    Recent successes in confining antimatter in the form of positron and antiproton plasmas have created new scientific and technological opportunities. Plasma techniques have been the cornerstone of experimental work in this area, and this is likely to be true for the foreseeable future. Work by a number of groups on trapping antimatter plasmas is summarized, and an overview of the promises and challenges in this field is presented. Topics relating to positron plasmas include the use of positrons to study the unique properties of electron{endash}positron plasmas, the interaction between positrons and ordinary matter, and the laboratory modeling of positron-annihilation processes in interstellar media. The availability of cold, trapped antiprotons and positrons makes possible the production of neutral antimatter in the form of antihydrogen. This is expected to enable precise comparisons of the properties of matter and antimatter, including tests of fundamental symmetries and the measurement of the interaction of antimatter with gravity. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Mechanisms of Plasma Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, David

    2015-09-01

    In this talk, I address research directed towards biomedical applications of atmospheric pressure plasma such as sterilization, surgery, wound healing and anti-cancer therapy. The field has seen remarkable growth in the last 3-5 years, but the mechanisms responsible for the biomedical effects have remained mysterious. It is known that plasmas readily create reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). ROS and RNS (or RONS), in addition to a suite of other radical and non-radical reactive species, are essential actors in an important sub-field of aerobic biology termed ``redox'' (or oxidation-reduction) biology. It is postulated that cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) can trigger a therapeutic shielding response in tissue in part by creating a time- and space-localized, burst-like form of oxy-nitrosative stress on near-surface exposed cells through the flux of plasma-generated RONS. RONS-exposed surface layers of cells communicate to the deeper levels of tissue via a form of the ``bystander effect,'' similar to responses to other forms of cell stress. In this proposed model of CAP therapeutics, the plasma stimulates a cellular survival mechanism through which aerobic organisms shield themselves from infection and other challenges.

  8. Optical plasma torch electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, G.; Karger, O.; Knetsch, A.; Xi, Y.; Deng, A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Smith, J.; Manahan, G. G.; Sheng, Z.-M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Hidding, B.

    2015-08-01

    A novel, flexible method of witness electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators is described. A quasistationary plasma region is ignited by a focused laser pulse prior to the arrival of the plasma wave. This localized, shapeable optical plasma torch causes a strong distortion of the plasma blowout during passage of the electron driver bunch, leading to collective alteration of plasma electron trajectories and to controlled injection. This optically steered injection is more flexible and faster when compared to hydrodynamically controlled gas density transition injection methods.

  9. Plasma Colloquium Travel Grant Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1998-09-14

    OAK B188 Plasma Colloquium Travel Grant Program. The purpose of the Travel Grant Program is to increase the awareness of plasma research. The new results and techniques of plasma research in fusion plasmas, plasma processing space plasmas, basic plasma science, etc, have broad applicability throughout science. The benefits of these results are limited by the relatively low awareness and appreciation of plasma research in the larger scientific community. Whereas spontaneous interactions between plasma scientists and other scientists are useful, a focused effort in education and outreach to other scientists is efficient and is needed. The academic scientific community is the initial focus of this effort, since that permits access to a broad cross-section of scientists and future scientists including undergraduates, graduate students, faculty, and research staff.

  10. Pulsed Plasma Accelerator Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, M.; Kazeminezhad, F.; Owens, T.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the main results of the modeling task of the PPA project. The objective of this task is to make major progress towards developing a new computational tool with new capabilities for simulating cylindrically symmetric 2.5 dimensional (2.5 D) PPA's. This tool may be used for designing, optimizing, and understanding the operation of PPA s and other pulsed power devices. The foundation for this task is the 2-D, cylindrically symmetric, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code PCAPPS (Princeton Code for Advanced Plasma Propulsion Simulation). PCAPPS was originally developed by Sankaran (2001, 2005) to model Lithium Lorentz Force Accelerators (LLFA's), which are electrode based devices, and are typically operated in continuous magnetic field to the model, and implementing a first principles, self-consistent algorithm to couple the plasma and power circuit that drives the plasma dynamics.

  11. Deflagration plasma thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y.; Chang, C. N.

    1984-01-01

    This paper introduces the application of the magnetized plasma deflagration process to space propulsion. The deflagration process has the unique capability of efficiently converting input energy into kinetic energy in the accelerating direction. To illustrate the totally divergent characters of 'snowplow' detonation and deflagration discharges, examples of the differences between deflagration and detonation 'snowplow' discharges are expressed in terms of current densities, temperature, and particle velocities. Magnetic field profiles of the deflagration mode of discharges are measured. Typical attainable plasma characteristics are described in terms of velocity, electron temperature, and density, as well as measurement techniques. Specific impulses measured by piezo-electric probe and pendulum methods are presented. The influence of the transmission line in the discharge circuits on plasma velocity is measured by means of a microwave time-of-flight method. The results for the deflagration thruster are compared with other space thrusters. Further research areas are identified.

  12. Large area plasma source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John (Inventor); Patterson, Michael (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An all permanent magnet Electron Cyclotron Resonance, large diameter (e.g., 40 cm) plasma source suitable for ion/plasma processing or electric propulsion, is capable of producing uniform ion current densities at its exit plane at very low power (e.g., below 200 W), and is electrodeless to avoid sputtering or contamination issues. Microwave input power is efficiently coupled with an ionizing gas without using a dielectric microwave window and without developing a throat plasma by providing a ferromagnetic cylindrical chamber wall with a conical end narrowing to an axial entrance hole for microwaves supplied on-axis from an open-ended waveguide. Permanent magnet rings are attached inside the wall with alternating polarities against the wall. An entrance magnet ring surrounding the entrance hole has a ferromagnetic pole piece that extends into the chamber from the entrance hole to a continuing second face that extends radially across an inner pole of the entrance magnet ring.

  13. Cooking strongly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clérouin, Jean

    2015-09-01

    We present the orbital-free method for dense plasmas which allows for efficient variable ionisation molecular dynamics. This approach is a literal application of density functional theory where the use of orbitals is bypassed by a semi-classical estimation of the electron kinetic energy through the Thomas-Fermi theory. Thanks to a coherent definition of ionisation, we evidence a particular regime in which the static structure no longer depends on the temperature: the Γ-plateau. With the help of the well-known Thomas-Fermi scaling laws, we derive the conditions required to obtain a plasma at a given value of the coupling parameter and deduce useful fits. Static and dynamical properties are predicted as well as a a simple equation of state valid on the Γ-plateau. We show that the one component plasma model can be helpful to describe the correlations in real systems.

  14. Plasma Simulation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwald, Martin

    2011-10-04

    Many others in the fusion energy and advanced scientific computing communities participated in the development of this plan. The core planning team is grateful for their important contributions. This summary is meant as a quick overview the Fusion Simulation Program's (FSP's) purpose and intentions. There are several additional documents referenced within this one and all are supplemental or flow down from this Program Plan. The overall science goal of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) research and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. [1]. Initial FSP research will focus on two critical Integrated Science Application (ISA) areas: ISA1, the plasma edge; and ISA2, whole device modeling (WDM) including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a critical

  15. The 2012 Plasma Roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samukawa, Seiji; Hori, Masaru; Rauf, Shahid; Tachibana, Kunihide; Bruggeman, Peter; Kroesen, Gerrit; Whitehead, J. Christopher; Murphy, Anthony B.; Gutsol, Alexander F.; Starikovskaia, Svetlana; Kortshagen, Uwe; Boeuf, Jean-Pierre; Sommerer, Timothy J.; Kushner, Mark J.; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Mason, Nigel

    2012-06-01

    Low-temperature plasma physics and technology are diverse and interdisciplinary fields. The plasma parameters can span many orders of magnitude and applications are found in quite different areas of daily life and industrial production. As a consequence, the trends in research, science and technology are difficult to follow and it is not easy to identify the major challenges of the field and their many sub-fields. Even for experts the road to the future is sometimes lost in the mist. Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics is addressing this need for clarity and thus providing guidance to the field by this special Review article, The 2012 Plasma Roadmap. Although roadmaps are common in the microelectronic industry and other fields of research and development, constructing a roadmap for the field of low-temperature plasmas is perhaps a unique undertaking. Realizing the difficulty of this task for any individual, the plasma section of the Journal of Physics D Board decided to meet the challenge of developing a roadmap through an unusual and novel concept. The roadmap was divided into 16 formalized short subsections each addressing a particular key topic. For each topic a renowned expert in the sub-field was invited to express his/her individual visions on the status, current and future challenges, and to identify advances in science and technology required to meet these challenges. Together these contributions form a detailed snapshot of the current state of the art which clearly shows the lifelines of the field and the challenges ahead. Novel technologies, fresh ideas and concepts, and new applications discussed by our authors demonstrate that the road to the future is wide and far reaching. We hope that this special plasma science and technology roadmap will provide guidance for colleagues, funding agencies and government institutions. If successful in doing so, the roadmap will be periodically updated to continue to help in guiding the field.

  16. Plasma contactor research, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, John D.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1991-01-01

    Emissive and Langmuir probes were used to measure plasma potential profiles, plasma densities, electron energy distributions, and plasma noise levels near a hollow cathode-based plasma contactor emitting electrons. The effects of electron emission current (100 to 1500 mA) and contactor flowrate (2 to 10 sccm (Xenon)) on these data are examined. Retarding potential analyzer (RPA) measurements showing that high energy ions generally stream from a contactor along with the electrons being emitted are also presented, and a mechanism by which this occurs is postulated. This mechanism, which involves a high rate of ionization induced between electrons and atoms flowing together from the hollow cathode orifice, results in a region of high positive space charge and high positive potential. Langmuir and RPA probe data suggests that both electrons and ions expand spherically from this potential hill region. In addition to experimental observations, a simple one-dimensional model which describes the electron emission process and predicts the phenomena just mentioned is presented and is shown to agree qualitatively with these observations. Experimental results of the first stage of bilateral cooperation with the Italian Institute of Interplanetary Space Physics (IFSI CNR) are presented. Sharp, well-defined double layers were observed downstream of a contactor collecting electrons from an ambient plasma created in the IFSI Facility. The voltage drop across these double layers was observed to increase with the current drawn from the ambient plasma. This observation, which was not as clear in previous IFSI tests conducted at higher neutral pressures, is in agreement with previous experimental observations made at both Colorado State University and NASA Lewis Research Center. Greater double layer voltage drops, multiple double layers, and higher noise levels in the region near the double layers were also observed when a magnetic field was imposed and oriented perpendicular to the

  17. Plasma effects on subcellular structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gweon, Bomi; Kim, Dan Bee; Jung, Heesoo; Choe, Wonho; Kim, Daeyeon; Shin, Jennifer H.

    2010-03-08

    Atmospheric pressure helium plasma treated human hepatocytes exhibit distinctive zones of necrotic and live cells separated by a void. We propose that plasma induced necrosis is attributed to plasma species such as oxygen radicals, charged particles, metastables and/or severe disruption of charged cytoskeletal proteins. Interestingly, uncharged cytoskeletal intermediate filaments are only minimally disturbed by plasma, elucidating the possibility of plasma induced electrostatic effects selectively destroying charged proteins. These bona fide plasma effects, which inflict alterations in specific subcellular structures leading to necrosis and cellular detachment, were not observed by application of helium flow or electric field alone.

  18. Partial pressure analysis of plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.

    1984-11-01

    The application of partial pressure analysis for plasma diagnostic measurements is reviewed. A comparison is made between the techniques of plasma flux analysis and partial pressure analysis for mass spectrometry of plasmas. Emphasis is given to the application of quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMS). The interface problems associated with the coupling of a QMS to a plasma device are discussed including: differential-pumping requirements, electromagnetic interferences from the plasma environment, the detection of surface-active species, ion source interactions, and calibration procedures. Example measurements are presented from process monitoring of glow discharge plasmas which are useful for cleaning and conditioning vacuum vessels.

  19. Plasma physics in Latin America.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, A. B.

    1995-02-01

    The status of plasma physics in Latin America is reviewed. The review surveys the history and present situation of the regional activities in high-temperature plasma research, plasma astrophysics, and technological applications of plasma physics. In particular, it presents data on the trends of evolution of scientific staff, annual operating budget, and publication rate for the major Latin American plasma groups during the decade 1983 - 1992. On this basis, the prospects for further growth and the potential for regional contribution to the mainstream of international plasma research and development are discussed.

  20. Fission induced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of creating a plasma from fission fragments was investigated, as well as the probability of utilizing the energy of these particles to create population inversion leading to laser action. Eventually, it is hoped that the same medium could be used for both fissioning and lasing, thus avoiding inefficiences in converting one form of energy to the other. A central problem in understanding a fission induced plasma is to obtain an accurate model of the electron behavior; some calculations are presented to this end. The calculations are simple, providing a compendium of processes for reference.

  1. Solar flares. [plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with explosions in a magnetized solar plasma, known as flares, whose effects are seen throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma-rays through the visible and to the radio band. The diverse phenomena associated with flares are discussed, along with the physical mechanisms that have been advanced to explain them. The impact of solar flare research on the development of plasma physics and magnetohydrodynamics is noted. The rapid development of solar flare research during the past 20 years, owing to the availability of high-resolution images, detailed magnetic field measurements, and improved spectral data, is illustrated.

  2. BOUndary Plasma Turbulence

    2008-01-25

    BOUT is a parallelized 3D nonlocal electromagnetic turbulence code. The principal calculations are the boundary plasma turbulence in a realistic magnetic geometry. BOUT uses fluid Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density, electron and ion temperature and Parallel mementum. With sources added in the core-edge region and sinks in the scrape-off-layer (SOL), BOUT follows the self-consistent profile evolution together with turbulence. BOUT also includes coupling to a magnetohyfrodynamic equlibrium (EFIT package) and a two-dimensional hydrodynamic edgemore » transport model (UEDGE package).« less

  3. PINCHED PLASMA REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, J.A.; Suydam, R.; Tuck, J.L.

    1961-07-01

    BS>A plasma confining and heating reactor is described which has the form of a torus with a B/sub 2/ producing winding on the outside of the torus and a helical winding of insulated overlapping tunns on the inside of the torus. The inner helical winding performs the double function of shielding the plasma from the vitreous container and generating a second B/sub z/ field in the opposite direction to the first B/sub z/ field after the pinch is established.

  4. Plasma diagnostic reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I.; Afeyan, B.B.; Garrison, J.C.; Kaiser, T.B.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Domier, C.W.; Chou, A.E.; Baang, S.

    1996-02-26

    Theoretical and experimental studies of plasma diagnostic reflectometry have been undertaken as a collaborative research project between the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California Department of Applied Science Plasma Diagnostics Group under the auspices of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at LLNL. Theoretical analyses have explored the basic principles of reflectometry to understand its limitations, to address specific gaps in the understanding of reflectometry measurements in laboratory experiments, and to explore extensions of reflectometry such as ultra-short-pulse reflectometry. The theory has supported basic laboratory reflectometry experiments where reflectometry measurements can be corroborated by independent diagnostic measurements.

  5. Plasma enhanced microwave joining

    SciTech Connect

    Yiin, T.; Barmatz, M.; Sayir, A.

    1995-12-31

    A new method for plasma enhanced microwave joining of high purity (99.8%) alumina has been developed. The controlled application of a plasma between the adjoining surfaces of two rods initially heats the microwave-low-absorbing alumina rods to temperatures high enough for them to absorb microwave energy efficiently. With this technology, the adjacent surfaces of alumina rods can be melted and welded together in less than three minutes using approximately 400 watts of microwave energy. Four point bending tests measured fracture strengths of up to 130 MPa at the joined interface. Optical and SEM micrographs indicated that exaggerated grain growth prevailed for all joints studied.

  6. Condensed Plasmas under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Thomas, H. M.; Konopka, U.; Rothermel, H.; Zuzic, M.; Ivlev, A.; Goree, J.; Rogers, Rick (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Experiments under microgravity conditions were carried out to study 'condensed' (liquid and crystalline) states of a colloidal plasma (ions, electrons, and charged microspheres). Systems with approximately 10(exp 6) microspheres were produced. The observed systems represent new forms of matter--quasineutral, self-organized plasmas--the properties of which are largely unexplored. In contrast to laboratory measurements, the systems under microgravity are clearly three dimensional (as expected); they exhibit stable vortex flows, sometimes adjacent to crystalline regions, and a central 'void,' free of microspheres.

  7. Some plasma aspects and plasma diagnostics of ion sources (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesemann, Klaus

    2008-02-15

    We consider plasma properties in the most advanced type of plasma ion sources, electron cyclotron resonance ion sources for highly charged ions. Depending on the operation conditions the plasma in these sources may be highly ionized, which completely changes its transport properties. The most striking difference to weakly ionized plasma is that diffusion will become intrinsically ambipolar. We further discuss means of plasma diagnostics. As noninvasive diagnostic methods we will discuss analysis of the ion beam, optical spectroscopy, and measurement of the x-ray bremsstrahlung continuum. From beam analysis and optical spectroscopy one may deduce ion densities, and electron densities and distribution functions as a mean over the line of sight along the axis (optical spectroscopy) or at the plasma edge (ion beam). From x-ray spectra one obtains information about the population of highly energetic electrons and the energy transfer from the driving electromagnetic waves to the plasma--basic data for plasma modeling.

  8. Some plasma aspects and plasma diagnostics of ion sources.

    PubMed

    Wiesemann, Klaus

    2008-02-01

    We consider plasma properties in the most advanced type of plasma ion sources, electron cyclotron resonance ion sources for highly charged ions. Depending on the operation conditions the plasma in these sources may be highly ionized, which completely changes its transport properties. The most striking difference to weakly ionized plasma is that diffusion will become intrinsically ambipolar. We further discuss means of plasma diagnostics. As noninvasive diagnostic methods we will discuss analysis of the ion beam, optical spectroscopy, and measurement of the x-ray bremsstrahlung continuum. From beam analysis and optical spectroscopy one may deduce ion densities, and electron densities and distribution functions as a mean over the line of sight along the axis (optical spectroscopy) or at the plasma edge (ion beam). From x-ray spectra one obtains information about the population of highly energetic electrons and the energy transfer from the driving electromagnetic waves to the plasma -- basic data for plasma modeling.

  9. Design of a Plasma Injector for a Pulsed Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassibry, J. T.; Thio, Y. C. F.; Markusic, T. E.; Sommers, J.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, a pulsed plasma accelerator has been proposed as a candidate stand-off driver for the formation of an imploding liner in magnetized target fusion. For a near-term physics exploratory experiment to study the feasibility of this standoff approach, a plasma accelerator has been proposed that requires the controlled introduction and preparation of the initial plasma for acceleration. This includes uniform injection of the propellant downstream of the breech with a high degree of ionization. The design of a plasma feed is presented, which injects a high conductivity, highly collisional propellant transverse to the conductor. The plasma injector is designed to establish an initial plasma with a moderate Hall parameter at the trailing edge of the plasma slug, high Hall parameter behind the slug for magnetic insulation, and a short diffusion length in comparison with characteristic dimensions of the plasma slug to avoid propellant loss at the trailing edge.

  10. Laser-plasma-based linear collider using hollow plasma channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2016-09-01

    A linear electron-positron collider based on laser-plasma accelerators using hollow plasma channels is considered. Laser propagation and energy depletion in the hollow channel is discussed, as well as the overall efficiency of the laser-plasma accelerator. Example parameters are presented for a 1-TeV and 3-TeV center-of-mass collider based on laser-plasma accelerators.

  11. Plasma heating power dissipation in low temperature hydrogen plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Komppula, J. Tarvainen, O.

    2015-10-15

    A theoretical framework for power dissipation in low temperature plasmas in corona equilibrium is developed. The framework is based on fundamental conservation laws and reaction cross sections and is only weakly sensitive to plasma parameters, e.g., electron temperature and density. The theory is applied to low temperature atomic and molecular hydrogen laboratory plasmas for which the plasma heating power dissipation to photon emission, ionization, and chemical potential is calculated. The calculated photon emission is compared to recent experimental results.

  12. Thermal plasma processing of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pfender, E.; Heberlein, J.

    1992-02-01

    Emphasis has been on plasma synthesis of fine powders, plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD), on related diagnostics, and on modeling work. Since plasma synthesis as well as plasma CVD make frequent use of plasma jets, the beginning has been devoted of plasma jets and behavior of particulates injected into such plasma jets. Although most of the construction of the Triple-Torch Plasma Reactor (TTPR) has already been done, modifications have been made in particular modifications required for plasma CVD of diamond. A new reactor designed for Counter-Flow Liquid Injection Plasma Synthesis (CFLIPS) proved to be an excellent tool for synthesis of fine powders as well as for plasma CVD. An attempt was made to model flow and temperature fields in this reactor. Substantial efforts were made to single out those parameters which govern particle size, size distribution, and powder quality in our plasma synthesis experiments. This knowledge is crucial for controlling the process and for meaningful diagnostics and modeling work. Plasma CVD of diamond films using both reactors has been very successful and we have been approached by a number of companies interested in using this technology for coating of tools.

  13. Magnetized Plasma Experiments Using Thermionic- Thermoelectronic Plasma Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Cheng, C. Z.; Fujikawa, Nobuko; Lee, Jyun-Yi; Peng, Albert

    2008-11-01

    We are developing a magnetic mirror device, which is the first magnetized plasma device in Taiwan, to explore basic plasma sciences relevant to fusion, space and astrophysical plasmas. Our research subjects include electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), Alfven wave physics, and plasma turbulence. A large diameter (> 200 mm) plasma emitter1, which utilizes thermionic- thermoelectronic emission from a mixture of LaB6 (Lanthanum-hexaboride) and beta-eucryptite (lithium type aluminosylicate) powders, is employed as a plasma source because of its production ability of fully ionized plasma and controllability of plasma emission rate. The plasma emitter has been installed recently and investigation of its characteristics will be started. The employment of beta-eucryptite in plasma emitter is the first experimental test because such investigation of beta-eucryptite has previously been used only for Li+-ion source2. Our plan for magnetized plasma experiments and results of the plasma emitter investigation will be presented. 1. K. Saeki, S. Iizuka, N. Sato, and Y. Hatta, Appl. Phys. Lett., 37, 1980, pp. 37-38. 2. M. Ueda, R. R. Silva, R. M. Oliveira, H. Iguchi, J. Fujita and K. Kadota, J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 30 1997, pp. 2711--2716.

  14. Modelling the Plasma Jet in Multi-Arc Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Schein, J.; Zimmermann, S.; Möhwald, K.; Lummer, C.

    2016-08-01

    Particle in-flight characteristics in atmospheric plasma spraying process are determined by impulse and heat energy transferred between the plasma jet and injected powder particles. One of the important factors for the quality of the plasma-sprayed coatings is thus the distribution of plasma gas temperatures and velocities in plasma jet. Plasma jets generated by conventional single-arc plasma spraying systems and their interaction with powder particles were subject matter of intensive research. However, this does not apply to plasma jets generated by means of multi-arc plasma spraying systems yet. In this study, a numerical model has been developed which is designated to dealing with the flow characteristics of the plasma jet generated by means of a three-cathode spraying system. The upstream flow conditions, which were calculated using a priori conducted plasma generator simulations, have been coupled to the plasma jet simulations. The significances of the relevant numerical assumptions and aspects of the models are analyzed. The focus is placed on to the turbulence and diffusion/demixing modelling. A critical evaluation of the prediction power of the models is conducted by comparing the numerical results to the experimental results determined by means of emission spectroscopic computed tomography. It is evident that the numerical models exhibit a good accuracy for their intended use.

  15. Implicit plasma simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Langdon, A.B.

    1985-03-03

    Implicit time integration methods have been used extensively in numerical modelling of slowly varying phenomena in systems that also support rapid variation. Examples include diffusion, hydrodynamics and reaction kinetics. This article discussed implementation of implicit time integration in plasma codes of the ''particle-in-cell'' family, and the benefits to be gained.

  16. Laser Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malka, Victor

    The continuing development of powerful laser systems has permitted to extend the interaction of laser beams with matter far into the relativistic domain, and to demonstrate new approaches for producing energetic particle beams. The extremely large electric fields, with amplitudes exceeding the TV/m level, that are produced in plasma medium are of relevance particle acceleration. Since the value of this longitudinal electric field, 10,000 times larger than those produced in conventional radio-frequency cavities, plasma accelerators appear to be very promising for the development of compact accelerators. The incredible progresses in the understanding of laser plasma interaction physic, allows an excellent control of electron injection and acceleration. Thanks to these recent achievements, laser plasma accelerators deliver today high quality beams of energetic radiation and particles. These beams have a number of interesting properties such as shortness, brightness and spatial quality, and could lend themselves to applications in many fields, including medicine, radio-biology, chemistry, physics and material science,security (material inspection), and of course in accelerator science.

  17. Plasma cell gingivitis

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Chandershekhar; Shukla, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the article is to present a report on the clinical presentation of plasma cell gingivitis with the use of herbal toothpowder. Plasma cell gingivitis [PCG] is a rare benign condition of the gingiva characterized by sharply demarcated erythematous and edematous gingivitis often extending to the mucogingival junction. As the name suggests it is diffuse and massive infiltration of plasma cells into the sub-epithelial gingival tissue. It is a hypersensitivity reaction to some antigen, often flavouring agents or spices found in chewing gums, toothpastes and lorenzes. A 27-yr old male with a chief complaint of painful, bleeding swollen mass in his lower front teeth region with prolong use of herbal toothpowder. The gingiva bled readily on probing. Patient was advised to refrain from the use of herbal toothpowder and along with periodontal treatment, no further reoccurrence was found. as more and more herbal products are gaining popularity, clinicians should be aware of effects of these products. Early diagnosis is essential as plasma cell gingivitis has similar pathologic changes seen clinically as in leukemia, HIV infection, discoid lupus erythematosis, atrophic lichen planus, desquamative gingivitis, or cicatrical pemphigoid which must be differentiated through hematologic and serologic testing. PMID:26015677

  18. Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Aston, Graeme

    1989-01-01

    The Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) is a thruster concept which promises specific impulse levels between low power arcjets and those of the ion engine while retaining the relative simplicity of the arcjet. The EPA thruster produces thrust through the electrostatic acceleration of a moderately dense plasma. No accelerating electrodes are used and the specific impulse is a direct function of the applied discharge voltage and the propellant atomic mass. The goal of the present program is to demonstrate feasibility of the EPA thruster concept through experimental and theoretical investigations of the EPA acceleration mechanism and discharge chamber performance. Experimental investigations will include operating the test bed ion (TBI) engine as an EPA thruster and parametrically varying the thruster geometry and operating conditions to quantify the electrostatic plasma acceleration effect. The theoretical investigations will include the development of a discharge chamber model which describes the relationships between the engine size, plasma properties, and overall performance. For the EPA thruster to be a viable propulsion concept, overall thruster efficiencies approaching 30% with specific impulses approaching 1000 s must be achieved.

  19. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  20. Microscopic plasma Hamiltonian

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Y.-K. M.

    1974-01-01

    A Hamiltonian for the microscopic plasma model is derived from the Low Lagrangian after the dual roles of the generalized variables are taken into account. The resulting Hamilton equations are shown to agree with the Euler-Lagrange equations of the Low Lagrangian.