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Sample records for 11th international architecture

  1. 11th International Congress of Endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Fuller, P J

    2001-03-01

    The Olympics of endocrinology, the 11th International Congress of Endocrinolgy was held rather appropriately in Sydney, four weeks after the summer games of the XXWIIth Modern Olympiad. Both occasions were a great success and whilst it may be tempting to extend the analogy to the pool or the track or heaven forbid, digress into 'drugs in sport', this review will focus on endocrinology. There were over 3000 participants with ten plenary lectures, 20 meet-the-expert sessions, 41 symposia, 128 oral free communications and 1500 posters. Sydney post-Olympics provided a vibrant, exciting and picturesque setting with outstanding convention facilities. The Congress Party was held at Campbells Cove in the lee of the Harbour Bridge looking toward the Opera House which provided an opportunity for delegates to view the two architectural icons that had become so familiar in the preceding months. Credit must be given both to the Local Organising Committee of Sydney endocrinologists who made it all happen and to the International Program Organising Committee who crafted a pageant of first rate endocrinology. It is self-evident that this report can only hope to give the reader a flavour of a Congress such as this with the choice of topics being largely idiosyncratic. With five concurrent symposia and two concurrent orals each morning and afternoon of the four days, any omissions reflect not on the topic or its importance but on this reviewer's inability to be in more than one place at once!

  2. The 11th International Congress on Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, C.; Blackstock, D.

    1983-09-01

    This report provides an overview of trends in acoustics research, based on the subject matter of the 11th International Congress on Acoustics. The report includes an appendix, written by David Blackstock (Applied Research Laboratories, The University of Texas). The appendix deals with nonlinear acoustics at the congress.

  3. 11th International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, H. J. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings from the 11th International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity (ICAE 99), held June 7-11, 1999. This conference was attended by scientists and researchers from around the world. The subjects covered included natural and artificially initiated lightning, lightning in the middle and upper atmosphere (sprites and jets), lightning protection and safety, lightning detection techniques (ground, airborne, and space-based), storm physics, electric fields near and within thunderstorms, storm electrification, atmospheric ions and chemistry, shumann resonances, satellite observations of lightning, global electrical processes, fair weather electricity, and instrumentation.

  4. International Conference (11th) on Applied Military Psychology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-01

    use the test in the selection of blacks, or women, or those for whom English is not the first language ? Carpenter suggested that the hard way of...English version of the test, as appropriate, with separate norms and validation data for the two language groups. This Is not a final answer, either...national sub-groups.) 8 C-15-75 Looking at language differences from an international rather than an intra- national perspective, Bremond (France

  5. France 2017 welcomes the 11th International Earth Science Olympiad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berenguer, Jean Luc

    2017-04-01

    The International Earth Science Olympiad (IESO) is the latest of the great scientific olympics. It offers high-school students from all around the world the possibility of participating in a competition in a different country every year. About 30 countries took part in the last edition of IESO in Japan. France has participated in this event for the past four years with a certain amount of success, with many students winning medals. In 2017, the IESO will take place in France for the first time in the technopole of Sophia- Antipolis, under the watchful eyes and responsibility of the " Université Côte d'Azur ". The IESO typically lasts for about a week. Each country sends a maximum of four student participants, accompanied by two mentors. Guest students and observers may also form part of the national team. Outer space, atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere… The Olympiad programme highlights the cross-curricular dimensions of geoscience, mainly in English. The candidates participate in a written test in every focus area of the programme as well as in several practical tests. A last activity brings candidates of different nationalities together for team fieldwork, followed by an oral presentation of their findings. The IESO is the perfect opportunity for young people to discover the culture of the host country. With this in mind, the agenda includes trips to cultural or natural sites of interest, and festive events. The participants would also get a flavour of their peers' cultures. The spirit of this competition is to promote discussion and exchange to find collective solutions to the planet's problems.

  6. The 11th Annual International Congress of Pediatric Hepatology, Gastroenterology and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    A-Kader, H Hesham

    2009-02-01

    The 11th Annual International Congress of Pediatric Hepatology, Gastroenterology and Nutrition, hosted by the Egyptian Pediatric Association in collaboration with the International Association for the Study of The Liver, provided a comprehensive review of different subjects related to pediatric hepatology, gastroenterology and nutrition. The meeting was chaired by Professor Mortada El-Shabrawi from Cairo University Children's Hospital and Professor Talal Abdel Aziz Farrag from the Military Medical Academy, Cairo, Egypt.

  7. Special Section dedicated to the 11th International Conference on Vibration Problems (ICOVP-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrovová, Zuzana; Gonçalves, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    This section contains the first set of selected papers from the 11th edition of the biennial International Conference series on Vibration Problems (ICOVP-2013), which was held at the Instituto Superior Técnico in Lisbon, Portugal, on 9-12 September 2013, and was jointly organized by the Civil Engineering Department of the Universidade Nova de Lisboa and the Institute of Mechanical Engineering at the Instituto Superior Técnico. A second set of papers will be included in a forthcoming issue.

  8. Pachyonychia congenita cornered: report on the 11th Annual International Pachyonychia Congenita Consortium Meeting.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, E A; Kaspar, R L; Sprecher, E; Schwartz, M E; Rittié, L

    2014-11-01

    This is a report of the research presented at the 11th Annual Meeting of the International Pachyonychia Congenita Consortium, held on 6 May 2014 in Albuquerque, NM, U.S.A. This year's meeting was divided into five corners concerning pachyonychia congenita (PC) research: (i) 'PC Pathogenesis Cornered', an overview of recent keratin research, for PC and other skin disorders; (ii) 'From All Corners of …', an outline of other genetic disorders that we can learn from; (iii) 'Fighting For Our Corner', an outline of National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases programmes and U.S. funding opportunities applicable to rare skin disorders; (iv) 'The PC Corner', focusing on recent clinical studies related to PC; and (v) 'Clinical Corners: Turning the Corner?', an update on ongoing PC clinical trials.

  9. Highlights of the 11th International Bordetella Symposium: from Basic Biology to Vaccine Development.

    PubMed

    Carbonetti, Nicholas H; Wirsing von König, Carl Heinz; Lan, Ruiting; Jacob-Dubuisson, Francoise; Cotter, Peggy A; Deora, Rajendar; Merkel, Tod J; van Els, Cécile A; Locht, Camille; Hozbor, Daniela; Rodriguez, Maria E

    2016-11-01

    Pertussis is a severe respiratory disease caused by infection with the bacterial pathogen Bordetella pertussis The disease affects individuals of all ages but is particularly severe and sometimes fatal in unvaccinated young infants. Other Bordetella species cause diseases in humans, animals, and birds. Scientific, clinical, public health, vaccine company, and regulatory agency experts on these pathogens and diseases gathered in Buenos Aires, Argentina from 5 to 8 April 2016 for the 11th International Bordetella Symposium to discuss recent advances in our understanding of the biology of these organisms, the diseases they cause, and the development of new vaccines and other strategies to prevent these diseases. Highlights of the meeting included pertussis epidemiology in developing nations, genomic analysis of Bordetella biology and evolution, regulation of virulence factor expression, new model systems to study Bordetella biology and disease, effects of different vaccines on immune responses, maternal immunization as a strategy to prevent newborn disease, and novel vaccine development for pertussis. In addition, the group approved the formation of an International Bordetella Society to promote research and information exchange on bordetellae and to organize future meetings. A new Bordetella.org website will also be developed to facilitate these goals. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. PREFACE: 11th International Workshop on Positron and Positronium Chemistry (PPC-11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujari, P. K.; Sudarshan, K.; Dutta, D.

    2015-06-01

    The International Workshop on Positron and Positronium Chemistry (PPC) is a prestigious triennial conference series with a rich history. The 11th meeting in the series (PPC-11) was held at Cidade de Goa, Goa, India during 9-14, November, 2014. It was organized by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai. The co-organizers were Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics (SINP), Kolkata, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam and Indian Association of Nuclear Chemists and Allied Scientists (IANCAS), Mumbai. PPC-11 attracted participants both from academic institutions and industries. About 120 participants from 20 countries representing all continents participated in the conference. The conference continued the tradition of excellence in terms of quality of presentations and discussions. There were 33 plenary and invited talks, 39 oral presentations and 40 posters. The conference stood true to its multidisciplinary tag with papers presented in the fields of fundamentals of positron and positronium chemistry, applications in polymers, porous materials, metals/alloys, studies in liquids, biological applications as well as developments in theory and experimental techniques. The enthusiastic participation of senior researchers and young students made the scientific program a grand success. In order to encourage the student participants (twenty) and promote excellence, a committee of senior members evaluated their presentations and the top three contributions were awarded. The positron and positronium community paid homage to the memory of late Profs. J. Kristiak and A.T. Stewart. A brief sketch of their life and work was presented by Profs. Jan Kuriplach and Toshio Hyodo, respectively. All the papers published in these proceedings have been peer reviewed by the participants of PPC-11. Editors thank all the reviewers for sparing their valuable time and helping us in bringing out the proceedings with 43 contributed articles in the scheduled time. We are

  11. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Electrorheological Fluids and Magnetorheological Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odenbach, Stefan; Borin, Dmitry

    2009-07-01

    Materials with properties controllable by external fields become more and more important for modern product design. Magnetorheological suspensions, electrorheological fluids and ferrofluids are classical examples for such smart materials exhibiting magnetic or electric field dependent properties. Their development over the past 60 years has shown how complex research and development of fluids with tailored properties can be. The demands of potential applications are the driving force for the synthesis of new fluids. The changes in the synthetic process and the composition of the fluids based on an increasing understanding of the relevant microscopic processes leads to certain macroscopic properties of the material. Only intense cooperation between basic and application oriented research, synthesis, characterisation, theory and application design can finally lead to fluids suitable for the envisaged use. The International Conferences on Electrorheological Fluids and Magnetorheological Suspensions have provided over more than 20 years a platform for interdisciplinary discussions strengthening the scientific progress in the field. Besides being a forum for scientific exchange about recent developments in electro- and magnetorheological fluids. The 11th International Conference on Electrorheological Fluids and Magnetorheological Suspensions (ERMR08) which has been organized by the chair of Magnetofluiddynamics at the Technische Universität Dresden in August 2008 in Dresden has continued this fruitful tradition. With more than 180 participants from 24 different countries it has been the largest ERMR meeting during the last decade - a tendency showing the high potential and promising development of the field of electrically and magnetically controllable fluids. A significant proportion of the participants were PhD students, a fact that also highlights the sustainability of the field. In total 85 oral presentations - including 8 plenary talks - and 81 posters were

  12. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Damage Assessment of Structures (DAMAS 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Damage Assessment of Structures (DAMAS) 2015. DAMAS has a long history of almost 20 years. The first DAMAS conference took place in 1995 (Pescara, Italy), followed by a biannual meeting in 1997 (Sheffield, UK), 1999 (Dublin, Ireland), 2001 (Cardiff, UK), 2003 (Southampton, UK), 2005 (Gdansk, Poland), 2007 (Torino, Italy), 2009 (Beijing, China), 2011 (Oxford, UK) and 2013 (Dublin, Ireland). The eleventh edition of DAMAS conference series, DAMAS 2015, is hosted by Ghent University, Belgium, and is held at the congress center Het Pand in Ghent city. Ghent is the capital and the largest city of the East Flanders province of the Flemish region of Belgium. Het Pand is the culture and congress center of Ghent University and is a historical monument. The conference is established as a major international forum for research topics relevant to damage assessment of engineering structures and systems including numerical simulations, signal processing of sensor measurements and theoretical techniques as well as experimental case studies. The presentations of DAMAS 2015 are divided into 6 main sessions, namely 1) Structural Health and Condition Monitoring, 2) Damage in Civil Engineering, 3) Damage in Machineries, 4) Damage in Composite Materials, 5) Sensing and Sensors and 6) Signal Processing. The organising committee is grateful to keynote speakers; Professor Guido De Roeck, Head of Structural Mechanics Division, KULeuven, Belgium, for his keynote lecture entitled 'Structural Health Monitoring: highlights and challenges', Professor Weidong Zhu, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, USA, for his keynote lecture entitled 'Vibration-based Structural Damage Detection: Theory and Applications' and Professor Wieslaw Ostachowicz, Head of the Laboratory of Active Materials and Smart Structures, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland, for his keynote lecture entitled 'Damage Assessment and

  13. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bao-An; Natowitz, Joseph B.

    2013-03-01

    The 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012) was held from 27 May to 1 June 2012, in San Antonio, Texas, USA. It was jointly organized and hosted by The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University, College Station and The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Texas A&M University-Commerce. Among the approximately 300 participants were a large number of graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. The Keynote Talk of the conference, 'The State of Affairs of Present and Future Nucleus-Nucleus Collision Science', was given by Dr Robert Tribble, University Distinguished Professor and Director of the TAMU Cyclotron Institute. During the conference a very well-received public lecture on neutrino astronomy, 'The ICEcube project', was given by Dr Francis Halzen, Hilldale and Gregory Breit Distinguished Professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The Scientific program continued in the general spirit and intention of this conference series. As is typical of this conference a broad range of topics including fundamental areas of nuclear dynamics, structure, and applications were addressed in 42 plenary session talks, 150 parallel session talks, and 21 posters. The high quality of the work presented emphasized the vitality and relevance of the subject matter of this conference. Following the tradition, the NN2012 International Advisory Committee selected the host and site of the next conference in this series. The 12th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2015) will be held 21-26 June 2015 in Catania, Italy. It will be hosted by The INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania and the Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia of the University of Catania. The NN2012 Proceedings contains the conference program and 165 articles organized into the following 10 sections 1. Heavy and Superheavy Elements 2. QCD and Hadron Physics 3. Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions 4. Nuclear Structure 5. Nuclear Energy and Applications of

  14. Proceedings of the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) International Conference on Mobile Learning (11th, Madeira, Portugal, March 14-16, 2015)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sánchez, Inmaculada Arnedillo, Ed.; Isaías, Pedro, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers and posters of the 11th International Conference on Mobile Learning 2015, which was organised by the International Association for Development of the Information Society, in Madeira, Portugal, March 14-16, 2015. The Mobile Learning 2015 Conference seeks to provide a forum for the presentation and discussion of…

  15. Selected scientific topics of the 11th International Isotope Symposium on the Synthesis and Applications of Isotopes and Isotopically Labeled Compounds.

    PubMed

    Atzrodt, Jens; Derdau, Volker

    2013-01-01

    This micro-review describes hot topics and new trends in isotope science discussed at the 11th International Isotope Symposium on the Synthesis and Applications of Isotopes and Isotopically Labeled Compounds from a personal perspective.

  16. Selected Papers from the 11th International Conference on College Teaching and Learning (11th, Jacksonville, Florida, April 12-15, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jack A., Ed.

    This collection of papers from an international conference on higher education teaching and learning includes: "Fostering Scientific Thinking with New Technologies: A Socio-Cognitive Approach" (Michel Aube); "The 'Classroom Flip': Using Web Course Management Tools to Become the Guide by the Side" (J. Wesley Baker);…

  17. Selected Papers from the 11th International Conference on College Teaching and Learning (11th, Jacksonville, Florida, April 12-15, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jack A., Ed.

    This collection of papers from an international conference on higher education teaching and learning includes: "Fostering Scientific Thinking with New Technologies: A Socio-Cognitive Approach" (Michel Aube); "The 'Classroom Flip': Using Web Course Management Tools to Become the Guide by the Side" (J. Wesley Baker);…

  18. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on X-ray Microscopy (XRM2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongjie; Wu, Ziyu; Tai, Renzhong

    2013-10-01

    The Eleventh International Conference on X-ray Microscopy (XRM2012) was held on 5-10 August 2012 at the Hope hotel in Shanghai. Historically, for the first time the XRM conference took place in China. The conference was jointly hosted by the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) and the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The series of XRM conferences dates back to 1983 in Göttingen, Germany. Since the Zürich conference, XRM2008, it has been held every two years, showing its increasing popularity among the x-ray microscopy communities around the world. Research in the area of x-ray microscopy is advancing very fast with the development of synchrotron radiation techniques, especially the emergence of third generation light sources with low natural emittance which has significantly pushed forward the development of technologies and applications in this area. This has been fully demonstrated in presentations from this and previous XRM conferences. XRM2012 was attended by 295 people including 21 invited speakers, 53 contributing speakers, 55 students, and 13 industry exhibitors. Over 232 abstracts were submitted for oral or poster presentation and 56 original, peer-reviewed papers are published in these proceedings. The conference was sponsored by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11210301016/A0802), and three gold sponsors active in industrial and technological fields related to x-ray microscopy. An exhibition booth was offered free to Australia synchrotron, the host for XRM2014, to promote the next conference which will be held in Melbourne, Australia in 2014. An unforgettable memory for most conference participants might be the charming night cruise along Pujiang river which was part of the welcome reception on the first evening. The Werner Meyer-Ilse Award (WMIA) prize this year was awarded to Irene Zanette (TU-München) and Stephan Werner (HZB-Berlin), the former for her pioneering

  19. Personalized integrative oncology: targeted approaches for optimal outcomes: the 11th International Conference of the Society for Integrative Oncology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Richard T; Yang, Peiying; Greenlee, Heather; Bauer-Wu, Susan; Balneaves, Lynda G; Zick, Suzanna

    2015-01-01

    The 11th International Conference of the Society for Integrative Oncology (SIO) brought together more than 300 clinicians, researchers, patients, and advocates to hear and interact with world-leading experts about the latest research in the areas of nutrition, exercise, acupuncture, health services research, meditation, and other integrative disciplines. The conference theme, "Personalized Integrative Oncology: Targeted Approaches for Optimal Outcomes," highlighted innovations in personalized medicine and ways this growing field will advance the evolution of individualized integrative cancer care to the next level. This year's conference also featured a clinical track focusing on clinical information for the practicing health care professional. The conference's rigorous schedule included 3 keynotes, 4 plenary sessions, 2 interdisciplinary tumor boards, 5 workshops, 45 concurrent oral sessions, and 106 posters. In addition to the conference theme, keynote and plenary sessions presented topics on stress and cancer, the importance of sleep for cancer patients, epigenetic mechanisms of lifestyle and natural products, recently published Journal of the National Cancer Institute monograph on integrative oncology, SIO's clinical practice guidelines for breast cancer survivors, and a joint session of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine and SIO about supportive care and symptom management. This highly successful conference helped further the mission of the SIO to advance evidence-based, comprehensive, integrative health care to improve the lives of people affected by cancer.

  20. PREFACE: 11th International Spring Seminar on Nuclear Physics: Shell Model and Nuclear Structure - achievements of the past two decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-02-01

    The 11th International Seminar on Nuclear Physics was held in Ischia from May 12 to May 16, 2014. This Seminar was dedicated to Aldo Covello, who has been the promoter of this series of meetings, which started in Sorrento in 1986 and continued with meetings held every two or three years in the Naples area. Aldo's idea was to offer to a group of researchers, actively working in selected fields of Nuclear Physics, the opportunity to confront their points of view in a lively and informal way. The choice for the period of the year, Spring, as well as the sites chosen reflected this intent. The first meeting was of a purely theoretical nature, but it was immediately clear that the scope of these conferences needed to be enlarged calling into play the experimental community. Then, starting from the second meeting, all the following ones have been characterized by fruitful discussion between theoretical and experimental researchers on current achievements and future developments of nuclear structure. This may be read, in fact, as one of the motivating factors for Aldo's election as Fellow of the American Physical Society in 2008 "... for his outstanding contributions to the international nuclear physics community by providing, for over two decades, a venue for theorists and experimentalists to share their latest ideas." The present meeting, organized by Aldo's former students and with the benefit of his suggestions, has maintained this tradition. The title "Shell model and nuclear structure: achievements of the past two decades" recalls that of the 2nd International Spring Seminar "Shell Model and Nuclear Structure: where do we stand?". The main aim of this 11th Seminar was, in fact, to discuss the changes of the past two decades on our view of nuclei in terms of shell structure as well as the perspectives of the shell model, which has been one of the key points in Aldo's research. This point is well accounted by the Opening Speech of Igal Talmi, one of the fathers of the

  1. STI. DE-FG02-00ER1505 [Brief summary of 11th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research

    SciTech Connect

    2000-06-24

    The 11th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research was held in Madison, Wisconsin, June 24 through June 28, 2000. Arabidopsis thaliana has been the subject of genetic study for many years. However, during the last decade, the number of research laboratories using Arabidopsis as a model system has increased tremendously, and Arabidopsis is currently being used to study all aspects of plant biology. The rapid rate of progress in Arabidopsis research, including the completion of the genomic sequence, underscores the usefulness of holding a meeting every year. These conferences provide an important opportunity for the Arabidopsis community to interact and exchange information. The meeting opened with an evening keynote address on the global impact of plant biology, delivered by Richard Jefferson, the Executive Director of CAMBIA (Center for the Application of Molecular Biology to International Agriculture). This was followed by short updates from each of the NSF-funded Plant Genome groups. Many of these groups are carrying out projects that impact the Arabidopsis community. Each of the 17 platform sessions consisted of talks from two invited speakers followed by two short talks that were chosen from the submitted poster abstracts. A concerted effort was made to invite junior investigators, including graduate students and postdocs, to give these talks. Posters were available for viewing during three formal sessions, and, because the poster session was adjacent to the lecture hall, it was easy for participants to go back and forth between posters and lectures. Finally, a mixer and an informal banquet provided opportunities for participants to meet new people and renew acquaintances. Furthermore, the registration package included all lunches and dinners together in a cafeteria next to the posters and lecture hall, thus encouraging the meeting of established investigators with students and postdocs. The North American Arabidopsis Steering Committee (elected by

  2. Proceedings of the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age (CELDA) (11th, Porto, Portugal, October 25-27, 2014)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Demetrios G., Ed.; Spector, J. Michael, Ed.; Ifenthaler, Dirk, Ed.; Isaias, Pedro, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers of the 11th International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age (CELDA 2014), October 25-27, 2014, which has been organized by the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) and endorsed by the Japanese Society for Information and Systems in…

  3. 'Coalition-In-Iraq' countries 'internal' civil violent deaths compared to the USA 'external' violence of September 11th 2001.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Stephen; Pritchard, Colin

    2004-05-01

    The atrocity of 9/11 exemplified 'external' caused civil violent deaths, which have major policy implications for the countries contributing armed forces to the 'Coalition-In-Iraq' [C.I.I]. C.I.I Government's resources for perennial 'internal' violent deaths (suicide, homicide and road), are likely to be threatened by alternative priorities. C.I.I 'internal' deaths are compared with those of 9/11 to provide information to determine relative risks. To uniformly compare mortality between countries we utilise the most recent WHO mortality data, taking the latest three years 1997-1999 and calculating an average annual number and rate of 'internal' deaths in each country, these are compared with the 9/11 fatalities, calculating a proportional ratio, as an indicator of differential damage to families and society. USA 'external' deaths were 3,074 people and annual average suicides were 30,966. Total 'internal' deaths exceeded 'external' more than 30 times. Every fortnight there are more USA 'internal' violent deaths than on 9/11. Except Australia and Bulgaria, every country had more suicides than died on 9/11. Apart from Bulgaria, total 'internal' deaths exceeded the 'external' toll in all other CAI countries- by 14 times in Japan; 6 in Republic of Korea, 4 in Italy, 3 in Spain and the UK, twice in Canada and 1.5 times in Australia. The extent of 'internal' civil violent deaths, such as suicide, highlight the perennial pressures upon psychiatric services and the need to defend resources at a time of competing priorities.

  4. Proceedings: 11th International Symposium on use and management of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Tyson, S.S.; Blackstock, T.H.; Hunger, J.; Marshall, A.

    1995-01-01

    Topics discussed at the llth symposium on CCB use and management included fundamental CCB use research, product marketing, applied research, CCB management and the environment, and commercial uses. There is a continuing, international research interest in CCB use because of the prospects of avoiding disposal costs and generating revenue from CCB sales. Volume two contains the following sections on: Flowable fill; handling systems and equipment; international and regional perspectives; manufactured aggregate; mine reclamation; physical and chemical properties; structural fill and stabilized base; and waste management. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  5. Alzheimer's Disease Drug Discovery--11th International Conference--Promising New Therapeutic Approaches. 27-28 September 2010, Jersey City, NJ, USA.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Michael S

    2010-12-01

    The 11th Alzheimer's Disease Drug Discovery International Conference, held in Jersey City, NJ, USA, included topics covering new therapeutic developments in the field of Alzheimer's disease. This conference report highlights selected presentations on the use of patient-specific stem cells, and neuroprotection, regeneration and cognitive enhancement strategies for the prevention or treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Investigational approaches discussed include allopregnanolone for neuron protection and regeneration, PDE5 inhibitors as therapeutics, upregulating the protein Klotho to prevent cognitive decline, targeting memory deficits induced by Aβ42 oligomers, inhibiting striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) for treating neuropsychiatric disorders, and agonism of GABA-A receptors to treat age-related cognitive deficits.

  6. GNU debugger internal architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.; Nessett, D.; Pizzi, R.

    1993-12-16

    This document describes the internal and architecture and implementation of the GNU debugger, gdb. Topics include inferior process management, command execution, symbol table management and remote debugging. Call graphs for specific functions are supplied. This document is not a complete description but offers a developer an overview which is the place to start before modification.

  7. The next three decades of the comet assay: a report of the 11th International Comet Assay Workshop.

    PubMed

    Koppen, Gudrun; Azqueta, Amaya; Pourrut, Bertrand; Brunborg, Gunnar; Collins, Andrew R; Langie, Sabine A S

    2017-03-04

    The International Comet Assay Workshops are a series of scientific conferences dealing with practical and theoretical aspects of the Comet Assay (single-cell gel electrophoresis)-a simple method for detecting DNA strand breaks. The first paper describing such an assay was published over 30 years ago in 1984 by Swedish researchers O. Ostling and K. J. Johanson. Appropriately, the theme for the 2015 meeting was looking to the future: 'The Next 3 Decades of the Comet Assay'. The programme included 25 oral and 43 poster presentations depicting the latest advances in technical developments as well as applications of the comet assay in genotoxicity testing (in vitro and in vivo) and biomonitoring of both humans and the environment. Open discussion sessions based on questions from the participants allowed exchange of practical details on current comet assay protocols. This report summarises technical issues of high importance which were discussed during the sessions. We provide information on ways to improve the assay performance, by testing for cytotoxicity, by using reference samples to reduce or allow for inter-experimental variation, and by standardising quantification of the damage, including replicates and scoring enough comets to ensure statistical validity. After 30 years of experimentation with the comet assay, we are in a position to control the important experimental parameters and make the comet assay a truly reliable method with a wealth of possible applications.

  8. Did Osler suffer from "paranoia antitherapeuticum baltimorensis"?: A comparative content analysis of The Principles and Practice of Medicine and Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 11th edition

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, D B

    1999-01-01

    One of the most important legacies of Sir William Osler was his textbook The Principles and Practice of Medicine. A common criticism of the book when it was first published was its deficiency in the area of therapeutics. In this article, the 1st edition of The Principles and Practice of Medicine is compared with the 11th edition of Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. The analysis focuses on the treatment recommendations for 4 conditions that were covered in both books (diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, pneumonia and typhoid fever). Osler's textbook dealt with typhoid fever and pneumonia at greater length, whereas Harrison's placed more emphasis on diabetes mellitus and ischemic heart disease. Notwithstanding Osler's reputation as a therapeutic nihilist, the 2 books devoted equivalent space to treatment (in terms of proportion of total sentences for the conditions). For all conditions except ischemic heart disease, Osler concentrated on general measures and symptomatic care. Throughout Osler's textbook numerous negative comments are made about the medicinal treatment of various conditions. A more accurate statement about Osler's therapeutic approach was that he was a "medicinal nihilist." His demand for proof of efficacy before use of a medication remains relevant. PMID:10530304

  9. Did Osler suffer from "paranoia antitherapeuticum baltimorensis"? A comparative content analysis of The Principles and Practice of Medicine and Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 11th edition.

    PubMed

    Hogan, D B

    1999-10-05

    One of the most important legacies of Sir William Osler was his textbook The Principles and Practice of Medicine. A common criticism of the book when it was first published was its deficiency in the area of therapeutics. In this article, the 1st edition of The Principles and Practice of Medicine is compared with the 11th edition of Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. The analysis focuses on the treatment recommendations for 4 conditions that were covered in both books (diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, pneumonia and typhoid fever). Osler's textbook dealt with typhoid fever and pneumonia at greater length, whereas Harrison's placed more emphasis on diabetes mellitus and ischemic heart disease. Notwithstanding Osler's reputation as a therapeutic nihilist, the 2 books devoted equivalent space to treatment (in terms of proportion of total sentences for the conditions). For all conditions except ischemic heart disease, Osler concentrated on general measures and symptomatic care. Throughout Osler's textbook numerous negative comments are made about the medicinal treatment of various conditions. A more accurate statement about Osler's therapeutic approach was that he was a "medicinal nihilist." His demand for proof of efficacy before use of a medication remains relevant.

  10. Enhanced capture of healthcare-related harms and injuries in the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11).

    PubMed

    Southern, Danielle A; Pincus, Harold A; Romano, Patrick S; Burnand, Bernard; Harrison, James; Forster, Alan J; Moskal, Lori; Quan, Hude; Droesler, Saskia E; Sundararajan, Vijaya; Colin, Cyrille; Gurevich, Yana; Brien, Susan E; Kostanjsek, Nenad; Üstün, Bedirhan; Ghali, William A

    2016-02-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) plans to submit the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) to the World Health Assembly in 2018. The WHO is working toward a revised classification system that has an enhanced ability to capture health concepts in a manner that reflects current scientific evidence and that is compatible with contemporary information systems. In this paper, we present recommendations made to the WHO by the ICD revision's Quality and Safety Topic Advisory Group (Q&S TAG) for a new conceptual approach to capturing healthcare-related harms and injuries in ICD-coded data. The Q&S TAG has grouped causes of healthcare-related harm and injuries into four categories that relate to the source of the event: (a) medications and substances, (b) procedures, (c) devices and (d) other aspects of care. Under the proposed multiple coding approach, one of these sources of harm must be coded as part of a cluster of three codes to depict, respectively, a healthcare activity as a 'source' of harm, a 'mode or mechanism' of harm and a consequence of the event summarized by these codes (i.e. injury or harm). Use of this framework depends on the implementation of a new and potentially powerful code-clustering mechanism in ICD-11. This new framework for coding healthcare-related harm has great potential to improve the clinical detail of adverse event descriptions, and the overall quality of coded health data. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  11. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (11th, New Brunswick, New Jersey, September 20-23, 1989), Volume 2: Plenary Lectures and Symposia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Carolyn A., Ed.; Goldin, Gerald A., Ed.; Davis, Robert B., Ed.

    This document reports on the 11th annual conference of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME-NA). Plenary and response lectures and speakers include: "The Description and Analysis of Mathematical Processes" (Nicolas Herscovics); "To Know Mathematics is to Go Beyond Thinking That…

  12. Preface: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Magnetic Fluids (ICMF 11) (Košice, Slovakia, 23 27 July 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopčanský, Peter; Timko, Milan; Kováč, Josef; Václavíková, Miroslava; Odenbach, Stefan

    2008-05-01

    The 11th International Conference on Magnetic Fluids (ICMF 11) was held in Košice, Slovakia between 23-27 July 2007. Attendance at the conference was high and its motivation was in line with the ten previous ICMF conferences organized in Udine, Orlando, Bangor, Sendai-Tokyo, Riga, Paris, Bhavnagar, Timisoara, Bremen and Guarujá. The conference in Slovakia reflected the scientific community's enthusiasm and worldwide support, with 256 participants, from 30 countries attending.The main objective of ICMF 11 was to promote progress and knowledge in the field of magnetic fluids regarding their chemistry, physical and magnetic properties, heat and mass transfer, surface phenomena, as well as their technological and biomedical applications. As research on magnetic fluids is essentially interdisciplinary, experts from related areas were invited to present their contributions with a view to increasing knowledge in the field and highlighting new trends. Submitted communications were refereed by members of the Scientific Organizing Committee and abstracts were assembled in a book of abstracts. Participants presented 180 posters in two poster sessions and 56 oral presentations. All presentations contributed to a greater understanding of the area, and helped to bridge the gap between physics, chemistry, technology, biology and medical sciences. Contributions to this conference are presented in 115 scientific papers, with some published in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter and the rest in Magnetohydrodynamics. The organization of the conference was made possible by generous support from the Institute of Experimental Physics and Institute of Geotechnics of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, the University of Pavol Jozef Šafárik and the Slovak Physical Society. Financial support from Ferrotec, Cryosoft Ltd, Mikrochem, Liquids Research Ltd, Askony and US Steel Košice, is also gratefully acknowledged.

  13. EDITORIAL: Selected papers from the 11th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2011) Selected papers from the 11th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young-Ho

    2012-09-01

    This special section of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering features papers selected from the 11th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2011), held at Sejong Hotel in Seoul, Korea during 15-18 November 2011. Since the first PowerMEMS workshop held in Sendai, Japan in 2000, the workshop has developed as the premier forum for reporting research results in micro and nanotechnology for power generation, energy conversion, harvesting and processing applications, including in-depth technical issues on nanostructures and materials for small-scale high-density energy and thermal management. Potential PowerMEMS applications cover not only portable power devices for consumer electronics and remote sensors, but also micro engines, impulsive thrusters and fuel cells for systems ranging from the nanometer to the millimeter scale. The 2011 technical program consists of 1 plenary talk, 4 invited talks and 118 contributed presentations. The 48 oral and 70 poster presentations, selected by 27 Technical Program Committee Members from 131 submitted abstracts, have stimulated lively discussion maximizing the interaction between participants. Among them, this special section includes 9 papers covering micro-scale power generators, energy converters, harvesters, thrusters and thermal coolers. Finally, we are grateful to the members of the International Steering Committee, the Technical Program Committee, and the Local Organizing Committee for their efforts and contributions to PowerMEMS 2011. We also thank the two companies Samsung Electro-Mechanics and LG Elite for technical tour arrangements. Special thanks go to Dr Ian Forbes, the editorial staff of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, as well as to the staff of IOP Publishing for making this special section possible.

  14. Improving University Teaching. Volume I: Abstracts of Contributed Papers, Seminars, Workshops, Index of Presenters. International Conference (11th, Utrecht, The Netherlands, July 2-5, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland Univ., College Park. Univ. Coll.

    Workshop and seminar summaries and abstracts of papers from the eleventh international conference on improving university teaching are presented. Topics addressed by theme and seminar presentations include: quality control in higher education, institutional approach to academic improvement, interactive video, international evaluation and an…

  15. Aventuras en Mexico: Proceedings of the International Conference on Outdoor Recreation and Education (ICORE) (11th, Merida, Mexico, November 6-8, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Rob, Comp.; Wilkinson, Brian, Comp.

    This proceedings contains 21 papers and panel summaries from the 1997 International Conference on Outdoor Recreation and Education. Introductory items include conference highlights, history, and schedule overview. Entries are: "Outdoor Leadership 2000" (Simon Priest); "Permits To Operate: Doing What We Do with the Proper…

  16. Aventuras en Mexico: Proceedings of the International Conference on Outdoor Recreation and Education (ICORE) (11th, Merida, Mexico, November 6-8, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Rob, Comp.; Wilkinson, Brian, Comp.

    This proceedings contains 21 papers and panel summaries from the 1997 International Conference on Outdoor Recreation and Education. Introductory items include conference highlights, history, and schedule overview. Entries are: "Outdoor Leadership 2000" (Simon Priest); "Permits To Operate: Doing What We Do with the Proper…

  17. A creative approach to the development of an agenda for knowledge utilization: outputs from the 11th international knowledge utilization colloquium (KU 11).

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Joyce E; Rycroft-Malone, Jo; Davies, Huw T O; McCormack, Brendan

    2012-12-01

    A group of researchers and practitioners interested in advancing knowledge utilization met as a colloquium in Belfast (KU 11) and used a "world café" approach to exploit the social capital and shared understanding built up over previous events to consider the research and practice agenda. We considered three key areas of relevance to knowledge use: (1) understanding the nature of research use, influence and impact; (2) blended and collaborative approaches to knowledge production and use; and (3) supporting sustainability and spread of evidence-informed innovations. The approach enabled the development of artifacts that reflected the three areas and these were analyzed using a creative hermeneutic approach. The themes that emerged and which are outlined in this commentary are not mutually exclusive. There was much overlap in the discussions and therefore of the themes, reflecting the complex nature of knowledge translation work. The agenda that has emerged from KU 11 also reflects the participatory and creative approach in which the meeting was structured and focused, and therefore emphasizes the processual, relational and contingent nature of some of the challenges we face. The past 20 years has seen an explosion in activity around understanding KU, and we have learned much about the difficulties. Whilst the agenda for the next decade may be becoming clearer, colloquia such as KU 11, using creative and engaging approaches, have a key role to play in dissecting, articulating and sharing that agenda. In this way, we also build an ever-expanding international community that is dedicated to working towards increasing the chances of success for better patient care. © 2012 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  18. 11th International Conference of Radiation Research

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-18

    Topics discussed in the conference included the following: Radiation Physics, Radiation Chemistry and modelling--Radiation physics and dosimetry; Electron transfer in biological media; Radiation chemistry; Biophysical and biochemical modelling; Mechanisms of DNA damage; Assays of DNA damage; Energy deposition in micro volumes; Photo-effects; Special techniques and technologies; Oxidative damage. Molecular and cellular effects-- Photobiology; Cell cycle effects; DNA damage: Strand breaks; DNA damage: Bases; DNA damage Non-targeted; DNA damage: other; Chromosome aberrations: clonal; Chromosomal aberrations: non-clonal; Interactions: Heat/Radiation/Drugs; Biochemical effects; Protein expression; Gene induction; Co-operative effects; ``Bystander'' effects; Oxidative stress effects; Recovery from radiation damage. DNA damage and repair -- DNA repair genes; DNA repair deficient diseases; DNA repair enzymology; Epigenetic effects on repair; and Ataxia and ATM.

  19. Protocol for a qualitative study exploring perspectives on the INternational CLassification of Diseases (11th revision); Using lived experience to improve mental health Diagnosis in NHS England: INCLUDE study

    PubMed Central

    Hackmann, Corinna; Green, Amanda; Notley, Caitlin; Perkins, Amorette; Reed, Geoffrey M; Ridler, Joseph; Wilson, Jon; Shakespeare, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Developed in dialogue with WHO, this research aims to incorporate lived experience and views in the refinement of the International Classification of Diseases Mental and Behavioural Disorders 11th Revision (ICD-11). The validity and clinical utility of psychiatric diagnostic systems has been questioned by both service users and clinicians, as not all aspects reflect their lived experience or are user friendly. This is critical as evidence suggests that diagnosis can impact service user experience, identity, service use and outcomes. Feedback and recommendations from service users and clinicians should help minimise the potential for unintended negative consequences and improve the accuracy, validity and clinical utility of the ICD-11. Methods and analysis The name INCLUDE reflects the value of expertise by experience as all aspects of the proposed study are co-produced. Feedback on the planned criteria for the ICD-11 will be sought through focus groups with service users and clinicians. The data from these groups will be coded and inductively analysed using a thematic analysis approach. Findings from this will be used to form the basis of co-produced recommendations for the ICD-11. Two service user focus groups will be conducted for each of these diagnoses: Personality Disorder, Bipolar I Disorder, Schizophrenia, Depressive Disorder and Generalised Anxiety Disorder. There will be four focus groups with clinicians (psychiatrists, general practitioners and clinical psychologists). Ethics and dissemination This study has received ethical approval from the Coventry and Warwickshire HRA Research Ethics Committee (16/WM/0479). The output for the project will be recommendations that reflect the views and experiences of experts by experience (service users and clinicians). The findings will be disseminated via conferences and peer-reviewed publications. As the ICD is an international tool, the aim is for the methodology to be internationally disseminated for

  20. Section 619 Profile. 11th Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danaher, Joan, Ed.; Kraus, Robert, Ed.

    The 11th edition of the Section 619 Profile describes services provided under the Preschool Grants Program for Children with Disabilities (Section 619 of Part B) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). It presents current and/or historical information for all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, which are all…

  1. How Did September 11th Affect Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    There has been much speculation about how terrorist attacks on September 11th affected everyone, including students on college campuses. At Michigan State University, the assistant director of residence life assessment, research and technology decided to investigate. This article presents results of her department's survey. (Author)

  2. 11th Annual Legislative Summit, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Education Association, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Several papers were presented during the 11th Annual National Indian Education Association (NIEA) Legislative Summit. This volume contains the following briefing papers presented during the summit: (1) Reauthorization of No Child Left Behind Strengthen Native American Education; (2) The Johnson O'Malley Program; (3) Legislation to Address…

  3. Protocol for a qualitative study exploring perspectives on the INternational CLassification of Diseases (11th revision); Using lived experience to improve mental health Diagnosis in NHS England: INCLUDE study.

    PubMed

    Hackmann, Corinna; Green, Amanda; Notley, Caitlin; Perkins, Amorette; Reed, Geoffrey M; Ridler, Joseph; Wilson, Jon; Shakespeare, Tom

    2017-09-03

    Developed in dialogue with WHO, this research aims to incorporate lived experience and views in the refinement of the International Classification of Diseases Mental and Behavioural Disorders 11th Revision (ICD-11). The validity and clinical utility of psychiatric diagnostic systems has been questioned by both service users and clinicians, as not all aspects reflect their lived experience or are user friendly. This is critical as evidence suggests that diagnosis can impact service user experience, identity, service use and outcomes. Feedback and recommendations from service users and clinicians should help minimise the potential for unintended negative consequences and improve the accuracy, validity and clinical utility of the ICD-11. The name INCLUDE reflects the value of expertise by experience as all aspects of the proposed study are co-produced. Feedback on the planned criteria for the ICD-11 will be sought through focus groups with service users and clinicians. The data from these groups will be coded and inductively analysed using a thematic analysis approach. Findings from this will be used to form the basis of co-produced recommendations for the ICD-11. Two service user focus groups will be conducted for each of these diagnoses: Personality Disorder, Bipolar I Disorder, Schizophrenia, Depressive Disorder and Generalised Anxiety Disorder. There will be four focus groups with clinicians (psychiatrists, general practitioners and clinical psychologists). This study has received ethical approval from the Coventry and Warwickshire HRA Research Ethics Committee (16/WM/0479). The output for the project will be recommendations that reflect the views and experiences of experts by experience (service users and clinicians). The findings will be disseminated via conferences and peer-reviewed publications. As the ICD is an international tool, the aim is for the methodology to be internationally disseminated for replication by other groups. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT03131505

  4. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (11th, New Brunswick, New Jersey, September 20-23, 1989), Volume 1: Research Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Carolyn A., Ed.; Goldin, Gerald A., Ed.; Davis, Robert B., Ed.

    This conference proceedings from annual conference of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME-NA) contains the following research papers: "The Interactive Nature of Cognition and Affect in the Learning of Mathematics: Two Case Studies" (T.J. Bassarear); "The Value of Concept Forming in…

  5. The Rise of Netpolitik: How the Internet Is Changing International Politics and Diplomacy. A Report of the Annual Aspen Institute Roundtable on Information Technology (11th, Aspen, Colorado, August 1-4, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollier, David

    This document is an interpretive synthesis of the discussion at a conference sponsored by the Aspen Institute that sought to develop new ways to understand how the Internet is changing the powers of the nation-state, the conduct of international relations, and the definitions of nation security. This report examines how the Internet and other…

  6. NORTH GATE AT 11TH AVENUE (490 NORTH & 900 EAST), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH GATE AT 11TH AVENUE (490 NORTH & 900 EAST), SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT CEMETERY'S NORTH GATE (WPA PROJECT, 1938-1941). - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  7. Internally architectured materials with directionally asymmetric friction.

    PubMed

    Bafekrpour, Ehsan; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena; Molotnikov, Andrey; Estrin, Yuri

    2015-06-04

    Internally Architectured Materials (IAMs) that exhibit different friction forces for sliding in the opposite directions are proposed. This is achieved by translating deformation normal to the sliding plane into a tangential force in a manner that is akin to a toothbrush with inclined bristles. Friction asymmetry is attained by employing a layered material or a structure with parallel 'ribs' inclined to the direction of sliding. A theory of directionally asymmetric friction is presented, along with prototype IAMs designed, fabricated and tested. The friction anisotropy (the ξ-coefficient) is characterised by the ratio of the friction forces for two opposite directions of sliding. It is further demonstrated that IAM can possess very high levels of friction anisotropy, with ξ of the order of 10. Further increase in ξ is attained by modifying the shape of the ribs to provide them with directionally dependent bending stiffness. Prototype IAMs produced by 3D printing exhibit truly giant friction asymmetry, with ξ in excess of 20. A novel mechanical rectifier, which can convert oscillatory movement into unidirectional movement by virtue of directionally asymmetric friction, is proposed. Possible applications include locomotion in a constrained environment and energy harvesting from oscillatory noise and vibrations.

  8. Internally architectured materials with directionally asymmetric friction

    PubMed Central

    Bafekrpour, Ehsan; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena; Molotnikov, Andrey; Estrin, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Internally Architectured Materials (IAMs) that exhibit different friction forces for sliding in the opposite directions are proposed. This is achieved by translating deformation normal to the sliding plane into a tangential force in a manner that is akin to a toothbrush with inclined bristles. Friction asymmetry is attained by employing a layered material or a structure with parallel ‘ribs’ inclined to the direction of sliding. A theory of directionally asymmetric friction is presented, along with prototype IAMs designed, fabricated and tested. The friction anisotropy (the ξ-coefficient) is characterised by the ratio of the friction forces for two opposite directions of sliding. It is further demonstrated that IAM can possess very high levels of friction anisotropy, with ξ of the order of 10. Further increase in ξ is attained by modifying the shape of the ribs to provide them with directionally dependent bending stiffness. Prototype IAMs produced by 3D printing exhibit truly giant friction asymmetry, with ξ in excess of 20. A novel mechanical rectifier, which can convert oscillatory movement into unidirectional movement by virtue of directionally asymmetric friction, is proposed. Possible applications include locomotion in a constrained environment and energy harvesting from oscillatory noise and vibrations. PMID:26040634

  9. CisLunar Habitat Internal Architecture Design Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R.; Kennedy, K.; Howard, R.; Whitmore, M.; Martin, C.; Garate, J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In preparation for human exploration to Mars, there is a need to define the development and test program that will validate deep space operations and systems. In that context, a Proving Grounds CisLunar habitat spacecraft is being defined as the next step towards this goal. This spacecraft will operate differently from the ISS or other spacecraft in human history. The performance envelope of this spacecraft (mass, volume, power, specifications, etc.) is being defined by the Future Capabilities Study Team. This team has recognized the need for a human-centered approach for the internal architecture of this spacecraft and has commissioned a CisLunar Phase-1 Habitat Internal Architecture Study Team to develop a NASA reference configuration, providing the Agency with a "smart buyer" approach for future acquisition. THE CISLUNAR HABITAT INTERNAL ARCHITECTURE STUDY: Overall, the CisLunar Habitat Internal Architecture study will address the most significant questions and risks in the current CisLunar architecture, habitation, and operations concept development. This effort is achieved through definition of design criteria, evaluation criteria and process, design of the CisLunar Habitat Phase-1 internal architecture, and the development and fabrication of internal architecture concepts combined with rigorous and methodical Human-in-the-Loop (HITL) evaluations and testing of the conceptual innovations in a controlled test environment. The vision of the CisLunar Habitat Internal Architecture Study is to design, build, and test a CisLunar Phase-1 Habitat Internal Architecture that will be used for habitation (e.g. habitability and human factors) evaluations. The evaluations will mature CisLunar habitat evaluation tools, guidelines, and standards, and will interface with other projects such as the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Program integrated Power, Avionics, Software (iPAS), and Logistics for integrated human-in-the-loop testing. The mission of the Cis

  10. Surgical anatomy of the 10th and 11th intercostal, and subcostal nerves: prevention of damage during lumbotomy.

    PubMed

    van der Graaf, Teunette; Verhagen, Paul C M S; Kerver, Anton L A; Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan

    2011-08-01

    In a descriptive, inventorial anatomical study we mapped the course of the 10th and 11th intercostal nerves, and the subcostal nerve in the abdominal wall to determine a safe zone for lumbotomy. We dissected 11 embalmed cadavers, of which 10 were analyzed. The 10th and 11th intercostal nerves, and the subcostal nerve were dissected from the intercostal space to the rectus sheath. Analysis was done using computer assisted surgical anatomy mapping. A safe zone and an incision line with a minimum of nerve crossings were determined. The 10th and 11th intercostal nerves were invariably positioned subcostally. The subcostal nerve lay subcostally but caudal to the rib in 4 specimens. The main branches were located between the internal oblique and transverse abdominal muscles. The nerves branched and extensively varied in the abdominal wall. A straight line extended from the superior surface of the 11th and 12th ribs indicated a zone with lower nerve density. In 5 specimens the 10th and 11th intercostal nerves crossed this line from the superior surface of the 11th rib. In 5 specimens neither the 11th intercostal nerve nor the subcostal nerve crossed this extended line from the superior surface of the 12th rib up to 15 cm from the tip of the rib. Damage is inevitable to branches of the 10th or 11th intercostal nerve, or the subcostal nerve during lumbotomy. However, an incision extending from the superior surface of the 11th or 12th rib is less prone to damage these nerves. Closing the abdominal wall in 3 layers with the transverse abdominal muscle separately might prevent damage to neighboring nerves. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Islamophobia Pre- and Post-September 11th, 2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, Lorraine P.

    2006-01-01

    Although much academic research has addressed racism, religious discrimination has been largely ignored. The current study investigates levels of self reported racial and religious discrimination in a sample of 222 British Muslims. Respondents indicate that following September 11th, 2001, levels of implicit or indirect discrimination rose by 82.6%…

  12. Islamophobia Pre- and Post-September 11th, 2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, Lorraine P.

    2006-01-01

    Although much academic research has addressed racism, religious discrimination has been largely ignored. The current study investigates levels of self reported racial and religious discrimination in a sample of 222 British Muslims. Respondents indicate that following September 11th, 2001, levels of implicit or indirect discrimination rose by 82.6%…

  13. September 11th Survivors and the Refugee Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myer, Rick A.; Moore, Holly; Hughes, Tammy L.

    2003-01-01

    This article compares the experience of people working in the area of the World Trade Centers on September 11th to the experience of refugees. Positive and negative aspects of diagnosing victims of disasters are discussed both in general and specifically related to post-traumatic stress disorder. Information regarding the refugee experience is…

  14. September 11th Survivors and the Refugee Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myer, Rick A.; Moore, Holly; Hughes, Tammy L.

    2003-01-01

    This article compares the experience of people working in the area of the World Trade Centers on September 11th to the experience of refugees. Positive and negative aspects of diagnosing victims of disasters are discussed both in general and specifically related to post-traumatic stress disorder. Information regarding the refugee experience is…

  15. Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis conference.

    PubMed

    Lee, Violet; Liu, Ang; Groeber, Elizabeth; Moghaddam, Mehran; Schiller, James; Tweed, Joseph A; Walker, Gregory S

    2016-02-01

    Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis conference, Hyatt Regency Hotel, Cambridge, MA, USA, 14-16 September 2015 The Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis (APA) conference took place at the Hyatt Regency hotel in Cambridge, MA, on 14-16 September 2015. The 3-day conference affords pharmaceutical professionals, academic researchers and industry regulators the opportunity to collectively participate in meaningful and relevant discussions impacting the areas of pharmaceutical drug development. The APA conference was organized in three workshops encompassing the disciplines of regulated bioanalysis, discovery bioanalysis (encompassing new and emerging technologies) and biotransformation. The conference included a short course titled 'Bioanalytical considerations for the clinical development of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs)', an engaging poster session, several panel and round table discussions and over 50 diverse talks from leading industry and academic scientists.

  16. Effects of september 11th terrorism stress on estimated duration.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Matthew J; Reis-Costa, Kathleen; Misanin, James R

    2007-06-01

    Previous research has suggested that the duration of stressful video material is estimated to be longer than one containing less stressful material. The current study sought to examine what effects viewing news coverage of the September 11th 2001 terrorist attacks might have on estimated duration of exposure. 16 participants were recruited from Saint Joseph's College of Maine psychology courses and viewed two 3-min. video clips. One clip contained coverage of the 9-11 terrorist attacks; the other, a nonstressful control, was taken from a familiar segment of The Wizard of Oz. Participants estimated the length of the clip and rated stress experienced while viewing the clip. Analysis showed the September 11th footage was rated as more stressful and was estimated as longer than the control clip.

  17. Islamophobia pre- and post-September 11th, 2001.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Lorraine P

    2006-03-01

    Although much academic research has addressed racism, religious discrimination has been largely ignored. The current study investigates levels of self-reported racial and religious discrimination in a sample of 222 British Muslims. Respondents indicate that following September 11th, 2001, levels of implicit or indirect discrimination rose by 82.6% and experiences of overt discrimination by 76.3%. Thus, the current work demonstrates that major world events may affect not only stereotypes of minority groups but also prejudice toward minorities. Results suggest that religious affiliation may be a more meaningful predictor of prejudice than race or ethnicity. General Health Questionnaire scores indicate that 35.6% of participants likely suffered mental health problems, with significant associations between problem-indicative scores and reports of experiencing a specific abusive incident of September 11th-related abuse by respondents. The dearth of empirical work pertaining to religious discrimination and its effects is a cause for concern.

  18. Proceedings: EPRI 11th Annual NDE Issues Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    2001-10-01

    For the past 10 years, EPRI has transferred research and applications solutions to its subscribing members during this annual event. At this meeting, members are invited to provide important feedback on emergent issues, solutions needed, and desired direction of the EPRI Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Center. The 11th Annual NDE Issues Meeting was held July 16-18, 2001, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and was hosted by Ontario Power Generation.

  19. Drug discovery summit: 11(th) Swiss Course on Medicinal Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Frei, Priska; Navarra, Giulio; Sager, Christoph P; Silbermann, Marleen; Varga, Norbert; Wamhoff, Eike-Christian

    2015-03-01

    A summit amongst the summits: The 11(th) Swiss Course on Medicinal Chemistry was held in October 2014, again in the scenic setting of the Alps in Leysin, Switzerland. One hundred participants, mostly from industry, experienced a week of expert talks about numerous aspects of drug discovery and medicinal chemistry. In this conference report, we briefly summarize the essential topics of this event, while the most inspiring lectures are described in greater detail.

  20. Roots of terrorism: a reassessment after September 11th

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Joseph F.

    2002-01-01

    The brutal terrorist attacks of September 11th, the anthrax attacks that followed and growing knowledge of al Qaeda's pursuit of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons have not only intensified concerns about terrorism but also created doubts about our understanding of terrorism. These attacks were in many ways unprecedented, and ultimately raise the question of the roots or causes of terrorism. Historically and today, there have been divergent views on this question, which reflect philosophical, religious, political, sociological and other differences. These differences are not merely academic, as they can affect our understanding of both the threat and of responses to terrorism in the aftermath of September 11th, Terrorism is too complex and diverse a phenomenon to speak easily of causes. But we may be able to discern the causes of specific acts. Our response to 9/11 and other acts of terrorism will be affected by our understanding of their causes. If 9/11 was caused by US Middle East policies, the response must involve a review of these policies. If it is a backlash against globalization, the response must address the realities underlying anti-globalization sentiments. Addressing causes will not in any case end terrorism, and addressing the wrong causes will be counterproductive. Actions to reduce those conditions that create support for terrorism and aid its recruitment, which need to be clearly identified, are critical in any counterterrorism strategy. So we must understand the reasons for terrorism and, in particular, for the attacks of September 11th.T his paper will look at the question of the roots of terrorism and then look to the specific case of 911 and its aftermath, with a special view to the impact of globalization.

  1. Self-organized internal architectures of chiral micro-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Provenzano, Clementina; Mazzulla, Alfredo; Desiderio, Giovanni; Pagliusi, Pasquale; De Santo, Maria P.; Cipparrone, Gabriella; Perrotta, Ida

    2014-02-01

    The internal architecture of polymeric self-assembled chiral micro-particles is studied by exploring the effect of the chirality, of the particle sizes, and of the interface/surface properties in the ordering of the helicoidal planes. The experimental investigations, performed by means of different microscopy techniques, show that the polymeric beads, resulting from light induced polymerization of cholesteric liquid crystal droplets, preserve both the spherical shape and the internal self-organized structures. The method used to create the micro-particles with controlled internal chiral architectures presents great flexibility providing several advantages connected to the acquired optical and photonics capabilities and allowing to envisage novel strategies for the development of chiral colloidal systems and materials.

  2. PREFACE: 11th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinon, Stefania; Pallecchi, Ilaria; Malagoli, Andrea; Lamura, Gianrico

    2014-05-01

    During the 11th edition of the European Conference on Applied Superconductivity, successfully held in Genoa from 15-19 September 2013, more than one thousand participants from over 40 countries were registered and contributions of 7 plenary lectures, 23 invited talks, 203 oral talks and 550 posters were presented. The present issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS) collects the 218 submitted papers that were peer reviewed and accepted in the Conference Proceedings. Similarly to the Superconductor Science and Technology Special issue: ''EUCAS 11th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity'' which contains some plenary and invited contributions, as well as some selected contributions, in this issue the papers are sorted according to the four traditional topics of interest of EUCAS, namely Materials (56 papers), Wires and Tapes (47 papers), Large Scale Applications (64 papers) and Electronics (51 papers). While the it Superconductors Science and Technology special issue focuses on the scientific and technological highlights of the conference, this collection provides an overall view of the worldwide research activity on applied superconductivity, mirroring the main guidelines and the hottest issues, which range from basic studies on newly discovered superconducting compounds to the state-of-the-art advances in large scale applications, wires and tapes fabrication and electronics. We would like to point out that, among the JPCS contributions, six papers present works financed by ongoing EU-Japan projects, three papers belong to the session on junctions and SQUIDs dedicated to the memory of Antonio Barone and one paper belongs to the session on pinning and flux dynamics dedicated to the memory of John Clem. Finally, we would like to thank all the people whose careful work contributed to the preparation of this JPCS issue, in particular the session chairs as well as the peer reviewers. The Editors Stefania Farinon (Editor in Chief, Large Scale

  3. 11th European VLBI Network Symposium & Users Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Bordeaux (LAB) at the University of Bordeaux (France), on behalf of the European VLBI Consortium, hosted the 11th European VLBI Network (EVN) Symposium and EVN Users Meeting on October 9-12, 2012. The Symposium was held at the "Chambre de Commerce et d'Industrie de Bordeaux", located in the "Palais de la Bourse", in the center of Bordeaux. The conference highlighted the latest scientific results and technical developments from VLBI, space VLBI and e-VLBI. All fields of astrophysics were concerned - stellar, galactic and extragalactic - as well as astrometry and planetary science. Presentations addressing synergy between (e-)VLBI and other new or planned radio facilities (ALMA, LOFAR, e-MERLIN,...) or instruments at other wavelengths (Fermi, CTA, Gaia,...) were also an integral part of the program. The scientific program was organized in 11 sessions including 71 oral presentations, with an additional 43 posters available for viewing during the entire length of the conference. An EVN Users Meeting was also held during one of the evening to foster interaction between the EVN users and the EVN organization. The symposium was attended by a total of 122 delegates originating from 47 institutes world-wide, sharing new VLBI science and innovations while also building links with other communities. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no 283393 (RadioNet3).

  4. 11th National Conference on Science, Policy, and the Environment: Our Changing Oceans

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Saundry

    2012-04-17

    On January 19-21, 2011, The National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE) successfully convened its 11th National Conference on Science, Policy and the Environment: Our Changing Oceans in Washington, DC at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center. Over 1,247 participants attended the conference, representing federal, state and local governments, university and colleges across the US, civil society organizations, the business community, and international entities. In addition, the conference was webcast to an audience across several states. The conference provided a forum to examine the profound changes our ocean will undergo over the next 25-50 years and share various perspectives on the new research, tools, and policy initiatives to protect and sustain our ocean. Conference highlights and recommendations are available to the public on NCSE's conference website, www.OurChangingOceans.org.

  5. International travel as medical research: architecture and the modern hospital.

    PubMed

    Logan, Cameron; Willis, Julie

    2010-01-01

    The design and development of the modern hospital in Australia had a profound impact on medical practice and research at a variety of levels. Between the late 1920s and the 1950s hospital architects, administrators, and politicians travelled widely in order to review the latest international developments in the hospital field They were motivated by Australia's geographic isolation and a growing concern with how to govern the population at the level of physical health. While not 'medical research' in the conventional sense of the term, this travel was a powerful generator of medical thinking in Australia and has left a rich archival legacy. This paper draws on that archive to demonstrate the ways in which architectural research and international networks of hospital specialists profoundly shaped the provision of medical infrastructure in Australia.

  6. Otoacoustic Emissions and Cochlear Architecture: Measurements and Modeling—A Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neely, Stephen T.; Puria, Sunil

    2011-11-01

    This paper is a lightly edited transcript of the discussion devoted to the topics "Otoacoustic Emissions" and "Cochlear Architecture: Measurements and Modeling." Moderated by the authors, the discussion took place at the 11th International Mechanics of Hearing Workshop in Williamstown, Massachusetts, July 2011.

  7. The roots of terrorism: A reassessment after September 11th

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Joseph F.

    2002-01-01

    The brutal terrorist attacks of September 11th, the anthrax attacks that followed and growing knowledge of al Qaeda's pursuit of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons have not only intensified concerns about terrorism but also created doubts about our understanding of terrorism. These attacks were in many ways unprecedented, and ultimately raise the question of the roots or causes of terrorism. Historically and today, there have been divergent views on this question, which reflect philosophical, religious, political and other differences. These differences are not merely academic, as they can affect our understanding of both the threat and of responses to terrorism in the aftermath of September 1 1 th. Terrorism is too complex and diverse a phenomenon to speak easily of causes. But we may be able to discern the causes of specific acts. Our response to 9/11 and other acts of terrorism will be affected by our understanding of their causes, as well as by possible political requirements to address widespread perceptions of causes. If 9/11 was caused by Islamic radicalism, the near-term response must be to ensure the terrorists are defeated and pose no fiuther danger. In the longer term, education is critical. If the attacks were caused by US Middle East policies, the response should involve a review of those policies. This may or may not result in changes to policy, public diplomacy, etc. If the attacks were a backlash against globalization, the response must address the realities underlying anti-globalization sentiments. Addressing causes (real and perceived) will not in any case end terrorism, and addressing the wrong causes can be counterproductive. Actions to reduce those conditions that create support for terrorism and aid its recruitment effort are critical to any counterterrorism strategy. For this reason alone, we must do everything possible to understand the reasons terrorism may be undertaken, including the attacks of September 1 1 th. This paper will look

  8. Computer modeling the internal architecture of carbonate platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Bosence, D.; Waltham, D. )

    1990-01-01

    A numerical computer model is described that calculates the internal architecture of carbonate platforms in response to varying values of carbonate production, subaerial and submarine erosion, sediment redeposition, and sea-level changes. The computer-generated sections closely resemble large-scale outcrops and interpreted seismic profiles through carbonate platforms. Stillstand and transgressive sequences have prograding and downlapping platform geometries with lagoons developing in transgressive systems. Regressive sequences have downlapping clinoforms and erosional upper surfaces. Glacioeustatic scale cycles have a major control on platform geometry with erosional sequence boundaries developing during low stands and platform drowning occurring during transgressive periods. Lowstand downlapping wedges are minor features when compared with clastic systems, and major progradation and downlap of slope deposits develop with transgressions and flooding of platform tops.

  9. Common Ada Missile Packages. Phase 2. (CAMP-2). Volume 2. 11th Missile Demonstration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    bii t Ui< «i > i martial Sanaor Aaaaaibly 11th Miaaila Syatam Figure 1. 11th Missile Hardware Design TABLE 2. PROCESSORS AND THEIR FUNCTIONS...ualng Two Value Aretangant Coaputa Wander Ailauth Angle ualng Two Value Aretangant SUBTOTALS 132 14» 20 »003 North »olntlng HaTlgatlon » arta Coaputa

  10. Case Studies in Policy Making. 11th Edition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Not all administration officials were opposed to increased aid to Colombia. Rand Beers , the assistant secretary of state, International Narcotics and...Pickering and Beers traveled to Colombia to caution Pastrana that he risked weakening U.S. support if he made any more concessions to the guerrillas...1999 before the Senate Caucus on International Narcotics Con- trol, Rand Beers stated: “We have no intention of becoming involved in Colombia’s

  11. A changed America? The effects of September 11th on depressive symptoms and alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Hannah K; Roman, Paul M; Johnson, J Aaron; Ducharme, Lori J

    2005-09-01

    In the weeks following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, social commentators argued that America had profoundly "changed." In light of these arguments and the literature on disasters, we examine the immediate and longer-term mental health consequences of September 11th using a national sample of full-time American workers. We model the effects of temporal proximity to the attacks on depressive symptoms and alcohol consumption, while controlling for demographic characteristics. Our data revealed a significant increase in the number of depressive symptoms reported during the 4 weeks after the attacks. In the subsequent weeks, levels of depressive symptoms returned to pre-September 11th levels. Contrary to expectations, there was some indication of decreased alcohol consumption after September 11th, although these effects were modest. These analyses provide little support for popular assertions that September 11th resulted in lasting and measurable impacts on Americans' well-being.

  12. The Effects of 11th Graders' Opinions on Their Interpretation of Conflicting Arguments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Wayne H.

    1998-01-01

    Examines how individual differences in epistemological beliefs, strength of beliefs, and need for cognition affected the written conclusions that 11th graders constructed after reading a passage presenting arguments opposing and supporting gun control. (SR)

  13. The Effects of 11th Graders' Opinions on Their Interpretation of Conflicting Arguments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Wayne H.

    1998-01-01

    Examines how individual differences in epistemological beliefs, strength of beliefs, and need for cognition affected the written conclusions that 11th graders constructed after reading a passage presenting arguments opposing and supporting gun control. (SR)

  14. 16. NORTHEAST CORNER VIEW OF 10TH AND 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. NORTHEAST CORNER VIEW OF 10TH AND 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. CORNER SHOWS THE DIAGONALLY FLUTED SPIRAL DESIGN OF THE RELIEF COLUMN. - Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company Building, 1519 Franklin Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  15. Work Values of 5th, 8th, and 11th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hales, Loyde W.; Fenner, Bradford

    1972-01-01

    Self Realization, Job Security, Money, and Altruism were found to be the most important work values, with 5th and 8th grade students differing from 11th grade students on Altruism and Self Realization. (Author)

  16. VIEW OF COMPANY HOUSES ON 11TH STREET AT THE RAILROAD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF COMPANY HOUSES ON 11TH STREET AT THE RAILROAD TRACKS. No. 401 to right (asbestos siding). House on left has retained the original clapboard siding. - Town of Windber, Windber, Somerset County, PA

  17. Proceedings of the 11th Central Hardwood forest conference; 1997 March 23-26; Columbia, MO.

    Treesearch

    Stephen G. Pallardy; Robert A. Cecich; H. Eugene Garrett; Paul S. Johnson

    1997-01-01

    Four invited papers, 46 volunteer papers, and 11 volunteer poster summaries presented at the 11th Central Hardwood Forest Conference. Presentation topics included harvesting, economics, forest health, silviculture, ecology, genetics, physiology, and regeneration.

  18. E SERIES MAGAZINES, OVERVIEW OF REAR OF MAGAZINES FROM 11TH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    E SERIES MAGAZINES, OVERVIEW OF REAR OF MAGAZINES FROM 11TH ST. E 106 IN THE FOREGROUND. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Magazine Type, Eleventh, Thirteenth, Fifteenth, Sixteenth, & Seventeenth Streets, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. Proceedings of the 11th Symposium on Gas Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-09-01

    This book, prepared by F. Vecchiocattivi and F. Pirani, contains the abstracts of the papers (invited talks, oral presentations, poster contributions) presented at the Eleventh International Symposium on Gas Kinetics. The Symposium is held at La Cittadella, Assisi, Italy, organized by the Gas Kinetics Group of the Royal Society of Chemistry, London, and the Molecular Beams and dynamics Group of the Department of Chemistry of the University of Perugia. The programme includes contributions on new, as well as traditional, themes in Gas Phase Kinetics. Highlighted topics include: (1) Atmospheric Chemistry; (2) Theory of Reactive, Inelastic, and Photodissociative Processes; (3) Combustion Chemistry; (4) Elementary Reactions of Neutral and Ionic Species; E) Reaction Dynamics and State-to-State Chemistry; (5) Photodissociation Dynamics; (6) Gas-Surface Interactions.

  20. 11th Symposium on Nuclei in the Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuclei in the Cosmos is the most important international meeting in the field of nuclear astrophysics. It brings together nuclear experimentalists, nuclear theorists, astronomers, theoretical astrophysicists, cosmochemists, and others interested in the scientific questions at the interface of nuclear physics and astrophysics. These questions concern, for example, the origin of the elements in the cosmos and the nuclear reactions that occur in the big bang, in stars, and in stellar explosions. Past meetings have been held in Mackinac Island - USA (2008), Geneva - Switzerland (2006), Vancouver - Canada (2004), Fuji-Yoshida - Japan (2002), Aarhus - Denmark (2000), Volos - Greece (1998), Notre Dame - USA (1996), Gran Sasso - Italy (1994), Karlsruhe - Germany (1992), Baden bei Wien - Austria (1990).

  1. 14. CLOSEUP VIEW OF THE 10TH AND 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. CLOSE-UP VIEW OF THE 10TH AND 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. WINDOWS HAVE WHITE TERRA COTTA SILLS, HEADS AND MULLIONS. ARCHES ARE OF TERRA COTTA INCLUDING ORNAMENTATION ABOVE THE 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. CIRCULAR ORNAMENTATIONS BETWEEN ARCHES ARE TERRA COTTA PAINTED IN BRONZE COLOR. LOUVERS ON THE WINDOWS ARE NOT PART OF THE ORIGINAL DESIGN. THIS IS THE FRONT ELEVATION. - Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company Building, 1519 Franklin Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  2. The Japanese version of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, 11th version (BIS-11): its reliability and validity.

    PubMed

    Someya, T; Sakado, K; Seki, T; Kojima, M; Reist, C; Tang, S W; Takahashi, S

    2001-04-01

    No instrument for assessing impulsiveness has been developed in Japan. After translating the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale 11th version (BIS-11) into Japanese, we investigated reliability and validity in student (n = 34) and worker (n = 416) samples. To assess test-retest reliability, the intraclass coefficient between test and retest was calculated in the student sample. Internal consistency was examined by calculating Cronbach's alpha in the worker sample. To see factor validity, we examined by confirmatory factor analysis whether the three-factor model, proposed by a previous report, fit the data. The results showed that the Japanese version of the BIS-11 had excellent test-retest reliability and acceptable internal consistency reliability. In addition, the Japanese version was judged to have similar factor structure to the original one. The Japanese version of the BIS-11 is a reliable and valid measure and has possible utility for assessing impulsiveness.

  3. Modelling of internal architecture of kinesin nanomotor as a machine language.

    PubMed

    Khataee, H R; Ibrahim, M Y

    2012-09-01

    Kinesin is a protein-based natural nanomotor that transports molecular cargoes within cells by walking along microtubules. Kinesin nanomotor is considered as a bio-nanoagent which is able to sense the cell through its sensors (i.e. its heads and tail), make the decision internally and perform actions on the cell through its actuator (i.e. its motor domain). The study maps the agent-based architectural model of internal decision-making process of kinesin nanomotor to a machine language using an automata algorithm. The applied automata algorithm receives the internal agent-based architectural model of kinesin nanomotor as a deterministic finite automaton (DFA) model and generates a regular machine language. The generated regular machine language was acceptable by the architectural DFA model of the nanomotor and also in good agreement with its natural behaviour. The internal agent-based architectural model of kinesin nanomotor indicates the degree of autonomy and intelligence of the nanomotor interactions with its cell. Thus, our developed regular machine language can model the degree of autonomy and intelligence of kinesin nanomotor interactions with its cell as a language. Modelling of internal architectures of autonomous and intelligent bio-nanosystems as machine languages can lay the foundation towards the concept of bio-nanoswarms and next phases of the bio-nanorobotic systems development.

  4. Evaluation of 11th Grade Students' Cognitive Behaviour on Some Subjects of Analysis According to Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevin, Orhun

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate students' cognitive behaviour in the subjects of function, limit, and derivative according to gender. The research was conducted with the participation of 67 female and 58 male 11th grade students of Gazi High School in Eskisehir in the academic year 2000/2001. The data were obtained through a test…

  5. State Education & Environment Roundtable (SEER) Seminar (11th, Des Moines, Iowa, May 20-24, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Gerald A.; Hoody, Linda L.

    This document reports on the 11th seminar of the State Education and Environment Roundtable (SEER). It consists of brief overviews of the daily discussions and presentations that were made at the seminar. Topics discussed include potential partnerships with national language arts organizations and associations, how environmental justice issues…

  6. 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NIH Pain Consortium will convene the 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research, featuring keynote speakers and expert panel sessions on Innovative Models and Methods. The first keynote address will be delivered by David J. Clark, MD, PhD, Stanford University entitled “Challenges of Translational Pain Research: What Makes a Good Model?” |

  7. Expertise, Argumentation and Scientific Practice: A Case Study about Environmental Education in the 11th Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez Alexandre, Maria Pilar; Pereiro Munoz, Cristina; Aznar Cuadrado, Virginia

    This paper reports a case study about argumentation and scientific practice in the 11th grade. The objectives of the study are to identify argument patterns and dimensions of the scientific practice in students' conversations and actions while engaged in an environmental management project in a wetland. The focus are the warrants that students…

  8. 77 FR 43823 - Filing Dates for the Michigan Special Election in the 11th Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION Filing Dates for the Michigan Special Election in the 11th Congressional District AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special election. SUMMARY: Michigan has...

  9. Emotional Intelligence as a Predictor of Leadership of Kuwaiti High and Low Achieving 11th Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alnabhan, Mousa

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined the association between emotional intelligence (EI) and the Leadership components (L) of high school students in the state of Kuwait. The possibility of predicting each leadership component via emotional intelligence components was investigated for high and low achievers. A sample of 11th grade students from Kuwaiti…

  10. Phoenix Ranks 11th on EPAs Energy Star Top Cities List

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released its seventh-annual list of the top 25 U.S. metropolitan areas with the most Energy Star certified buildings in 2014. This year, Phoenix ranks 11 th with 165 bui

  11. Asian Studies: Experimental Course of Study, 11th or 12th Year Elective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fryberg, Carl

    This experimental course of study has a twofold purpose. Primarily, it is intended to serve as basis for an elective for the 11th or 12th year student. Openended in organization, it encourages teachers and students to add new dimensions. It provides a comprehensive bibliography and detailed information with which to develop an elective in the area…

  12. Review of "The September 11th Education Program: A National Interdisciplinary Curriculum"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterson, Robert A.; Jenne, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    A review of "The September 11th Education Program: A National Interdisciplinary Curriculum" reveals a sensitive and well-created program for the 5-12 social studies teacher to use in teaching about the challenging subject of 9/11. This program provides an opportunity for teachers to find a balance among understanding, critical analysis,…

  13. The Federal Forecasters Conference--2000. Papers and Proceedings (11th, Washington, DC, September 14, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerald, Debra, E., Ed.

    The 11th Federal Forecasters Conference provided a forum where 180 forecasters from different federal agencies and other organizations could meet and discuss forecasting in the United States. The theme for this conference was "Forecasting, Policy, and the Internet." In the morning session, a panel presentation featured three speakers. Neilson C.…

  14. Adolescent Vulnerability Following the September 11th Terrorist Attacks: A Study of Parents and Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gil-Rivas, Virginia; Holman, E. Alison; Silver, Roxane Cohen

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 2 weeks after September 11th, adolescents from a national sample of households who were indirectly exposed to the terrorist attacks through the media completed a Web-based survey that assessed event-related acute stress symptoms. One year later, these adolescents (N = 142) and a randomly selected parent from their household completed…

  15. Agreement on Use of 11th Grade Smarter Balanced Assessment Results for Student Placement. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This issue brief lists the agreement principles relating to the use of 11th grade career and college readiness assessment results for student placement in Washington community and technical colleges. As part of the Washington implementation of the new Common Core State Standards for college- and career-readiness, the agreement described herein has…

  16. Labor Market Effects of September 11th on Arab and Muslim Residents of the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaushal, Neeraj; Kaestner, Robert; Reimers, Cordelia

    2007-01-01

    We investigated whether the September 11, 2001 terrorists' attacks had any effect on employment, earnings, and residential mobility of first- and second-generation Arab and Muslim men in the United States. We find that September 11th did not significantly affect employment and hours of work of Arab and Muslim men, but was associated with a 9-11…

  17. Review of "The September 11th Education Program: A National Interdisciplinary Curriculum"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterson, Robert A.; Jenne, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    A review of "The September 11th Education Program: A National Interdisciplinary Curriculum" reveals a sensitive and well-created program for the 5-12 social studies teacher to use in teaching about the challenging subject of 9/11. This program provides an opportunity for teachers to find a balance among understanding, critical analysis,…

  18. Adolescent Vulnerability Following the September 11th Terrorist Attacks: A Study of Parents and Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gil-Rivas, Virginia; Holman, E. Alison; Silver, Roxane Cohen

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 2 weeks after September 11th, adolescents from a national sample of households who were indirectly exposed to the terrorist attacks through the media completed a Web-based survey that assessed event-related acute stress symptoms. One year later, these adolescents (N = 142) and a randomly selected parent from their household completed…

  19. Motivating Low-Performing 11th Graders through Blogging: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sad, Ahmad F.

    2012-01-01

    As low-achieving students face difficult time at school and usually experience low motivation to learn, blogging in the classroom might be used as a possible way of motivating them through its use as an e-portfolio (show-case blog) for students to show their work. The researcher used case study approach to examine 11th grade class (n = 22) Arab…

  20. Impact of the September 11th Terrorist Attacks on Teenagers' Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Madelyn S.; Munfakh, Jimmie Lou Harris; Kleinman, Marjorie; Lubell, Keri; Provenzano, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    The impact of the September 11th terrorist attacks on adolescents' mental health is reported. Two successive cohorts of students in 6 New York state high schools, identified from health courses, completed an in-school self-report baseline assessment of hopelessness, impairment, and help-seeking behavior. One year later, these students completed a…

  1. High/Scope Buyer's Guide to Children's Software. 11th Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohmann, Charles; And Others

    This 11th edition of the High/Scope Buyer's Guide to Children's Software was designed to help teachers, caregivers, and parents make good choices when purchasing software to enhance children's learning. The book consists of an introduction, a chapter on finding the best software, software reviews for 48 different software products. The…

  2. September 11th, the Internet, and the Affects on Information Provision in Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Stuart

    The September 11th terrorist attacks on the United States have contributed greatly to a change in the information environment around the world. The weeks following the attacks saw governments around the world rush to pass legislation designed to prevent future acts of terrorism. Much of this legislation targeted information flow, especially on the…

  3. Impact of the September 11th Terrorist Attacks on Teenagers' Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Madelyn S.; Munfakh, Jimmie Lou Harris; Kleinman, Marjorie; Lubell, Keri; Provenzano, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    The impact of the September 11th terrorist attacks on adolescents' mental health is reported. Two successive cohorts of students in 6 New York state high schools, identified from health courses, completed an in-school self-report baseline assessment of hopelessness, impairment, and help-seeking behavior. One year later, these students completed a…

  4. A network architecture for International Business Satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahata, Fumio; Nohara, Mitsuo; Takeuchi, Yoshio

    Demand Assignment (DA) control is expected to be introduced in the International Business Satellte communications (IBS) network in order to cope with a growing international business traffic. The paper discusses the DA/IBS network from the viewpoints of network configuration, satellite channel configuration and DA control. The network configuration proposed here consists of one Central Station with network management function and several Network Coordination Stations with user management function. A satellite channel configuration is also presented along with a tradeoff study on transmission bit rate, high power amplifier output power requirement, and service quality. The DA control flow and protocol based on CCITT Signalling System No. 7 are also proposed.

  5. Selected papers from the 11th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdeghini, Carlo; Putti, Marina

    2014-04-01

    The 11th edition of the European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS) was held in Genoa (15-19 September 2013) and registered the participation of more than one thousand attendants from over 40 countries. During the conference seven plenary lectures, 23 invited, and 203 oral contributions and 550 posters have been presented, all focused on recent developments in the field of superconductivity applications. This issue of Superconductor Science Technology is a collection of some of the plenary and invited contributions. Moreover, the winners of the EUCAS prizes (the electronics prize dedicated to the memory of Antonio Barone), and the most significant oral contributions selected by the 125 chairs involved in the organization, have been invited to submit their papers. The remaining papers presented at the conference will be published in the Journal Physics Conference Series, edited by S Farinon, G Lamura, A Malagoli and I Pallecchi. The papers have been organized into the four traditional topics of interest of EUCAS, namely materials, wires and tapes, large scale applications, and electronics. The plenary lectures on these four topics have been collected: Potential of iron-based superconductors for practical materials in the future (J Shimoyama), Coated conductors for power applications: materials challenges (J Obradors), Challenges and status of ITER conductor production (A Devred), and the Impact of superconducting devices in imaging in neuroscience (G L Romani). We hope that this issue will let you taste the flavours, hear the sounds and see the colours of this exciting EUCAS edition. The very large participation in EUCAS 2013 has allowed debates on a wide range of topics, starting from the most basic studies on emergent materials up to the new developments in electronics and large scale applications. A round table on HTS Conductors was experimented for the first time gathering material scientists, wire manufacturers and device builders in a stimulating

  6. Report of the 11th World Congress of Pediatric Dermatology in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pruksachatkun, Chulabhorn

    2010-01-01

    The 11th World Congress of Pediatric Dermatology took place at the Queen Sirikit National Convention Center, Bangkok, Thailand on 17 to 19 November 2009. The theme was "Health and Beauty in Pediatric Dermatology." This report highlights several presentations discussing hemangiomas, infections, and novel and future diagnostic methods and treatment of pediatric dermatologic conditions. This report is not intended as a substitute for reading the conference educational handouts, online updates and related references quoted in this article.

  7. CONFERENCE REPORT: 11th EU-US Transport Task Force workshop on transport in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, J. W.; Angioni, C.; Diamond, P. H.; Hammett, G. W.; Hidalgo, C.; Loarte, A.; Mantica, P.

    2007-04-01

    This report summarizes the contributions presented at the 11th EU-US Transport Task Force workshop on transport in fusion plasmas, held in Marseilles, France, 4-7 September, 20068The present workshop: http://www-fusion-magnetique.cea.fr/ttf2006.. There were sessions on momentum transport, multi-scale physics, electron transport, particle transport and transport in the scrape-off layer.

  8. Help Seeking Attitudes and Behaviors of International Students at Architectural Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Cary J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the help-seeking attitudes and behaviors of international students at architectural schools of higher education. A review of the academic literature revealed no earlier research on this specific population. However, there was a moderate body of literature regarding help seeking attitudes and behavior…

  9. Help Seeking Attitudes and Behaviors of International Students at Architectural Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Cary J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the help-seeking attitudes and behaviors of international students at architectural schools of higher education. A review of the academic literature revealed no earlier research on this specific population. However, there was a moderate body of literature regarding help seeking attitudes and behavior…

  10. The Historical Influence of International Trade and Religion on the Arts, Crafts and Architecture of Indonesia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brissette, Paul

    This document outlines a slide presentation on Southeast Asia with primary emphasis on Indonesia. How international trade has influenced the design and development of Indonesian arts, crafts, and architecture are main points of interest. A geographical overview of Indonesia is described along with its natural resources, population, and religious…

  11. 11th International Workshop on Learning Software Organizations (LSO 2009) New Media in Transfer and Innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedlitschka, Andreas; Vegas, Sira

    Software is one of the most important drivers of innovation. As organizations are becoming more dependent on software, the improvement of software quality and productivity becomes of essential importance for the competitiveness of an organization. Continuing the success of the LSO Workshop series since 1999, this workshop will provide a communication forum bringing together academia and industry for discussing the advancements made and addressing the challenges faced by continuous learning in software-intensive organizations.

  12. International Workshop on Finite Elements for Microwave Engineering (11th) - FEM2012 Student Support Grants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-22

    to the magnetic thin film structure. A tightly focused incident optical beam with a wide angular spectrum is formulated using Richards -Wolf vector...restrictions since the time-step size allowable in order to maintain numerical stability due to the Courant stability limit is dictated by the most...electric field throughout the FDTD grid was calculated and recorded. As the figure above shows, for the proper choice of Courant limit, the mean discrete

  13. 11th International Conference on Malignancies in AIDS and Other Acquired Immunodeficiencies (ICMAOI)

    Cancer.gov

    Summary of speakers and events from the 2008 ICMAOI conference, focused on presenting basic, epidemiologic, and clinical aspects of research on malignancies in HIV-infected and other immunosuppressed individuals.

  14. The 11th international workshop on Campylobacter, Helicobacter and related Organisms (CHRO), 2001.

    PubMed

    Takkinen, J; Ammon, A

    2003-11-01

    Over 700 participants from 54 countries attended the eleventh Campylobacter, Helicobacter and Related Organisms (CHRO) meeting in September 2001. This meeting was an opportunity to update and better understand the microbiological and epidemiological complexities of Campylobacter. The mechanism of pathogenesis of this bacteria is not yet fully understood and important progress was made in the microbiological characterisation. The availability of over 100 different strain characteristics from various locations all over Europe, brought together by Campynet, is an invaluable tool for achieving this aim. There is increasing evidence to suggest that different risk factors exist for different species of Campylobacter. The link between antibiotic use in farm animals and increased resistance to some antimicrobials for humans still needs to be proved and some contradictory results reported on this issue.

  15. The Reporting of the September 11th Terrorist Attacks in American Social Studies Textbooks: A Muslim Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleem, Mohammed M.; Thomas, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the reporting of the September 11th terrorist attacks in social studies textbooks from a Muslim perspective and reports on findings from a study of the responses of American Muslim children to the treatment of the events of September 11th in social studies textbooks. Constructivist grounded theory was used to centralize the…

  16. The Reporting of the September 11th Terrorist Attacks in American Social Studies Textbooks: A Muslim Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleem, Mohammed M.; Thomas, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the reporting of the September 11th terrorist attacks in social studies textbooks from a Muslim perspective and reports on findings from a study of the responses of American Muslim children to the treatment of the events of September 11th in social studies textbooks. Constructivist grounded theory was used to centralize the…

  17. New paradigms in internal architecture design and freeform fabrication of tissue engineering porous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Dongjin

    2012-07-01

    Advanced additive manufacture (AM) techniques are now being developed to fabricate scaffolds with controlled internal pore architectures in the field of tissue engineering. In general, these techniques use a hybrid method which combines computer-aided design (CAD) with computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) tools to design and fabricate complicated three-dimensional (3D) scaffold models. The mathematical descriptions of micro-architectures along with the macro-structures of the 3D scaffold models are limited by current CAD technologies as well as by the difficulty of transferring the designed digital models to standard formats for fabrication. To overcome these difficulties, we have developed an efficient internal pore architecture design system based on triply periodic minimal surface (TPMS) unit cell libraries and associated computational methods to assemble TPMS unit cells into an entire scaffold model. In addition, we have developed a process planning technique based on TPMS internal architecture pattern of unit cells to generate tool paths for freeform fabrication of tissue engineering porous scaffolds.

  18. WDS Knowledge Network Architecture in Support of International Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokrane, M.; Minster, J. B. H.; Hugo, W.

    2014-12-01

    ICSU (International Council for Science) created the World Data System (WDS) as an interdisciplinary body at its General Assembly in Maputo in 2008, and since then the membership of the WDS has grown to include 86 members, of whom 56 are institutions or data centers focused on providing quality-assured data and services to the scientific community, and 10 more are entire networks of such data facilities and services. In addition to its objective of providing universal and equitable access to scientific data and services, WDS is also active in promoting stewardship, standards and conventions, and improved access to products derived from data and services. Whereas WDS is in process of aggregating and harmonizing the metadata collections of its membership, it is clear that additional benefits can be obtained by supplementing such traditional metadata sources with information about members, authors, and the coverages of the data, as well as metrics such as citation indices, quality indicators, and usability. Moreover, the relationships between the actors and systems that populate this metadata landscape can be seen as a knowledge network that describes a subset of global scientific endeavor. Such a knowledge network is useful in many ways, supporting both machine-based and human requests for contextual information related to a specific data set, institution, author, topic, or other entities in the network. Specific use cases that can be realized include decision and policy support for funding agencies, identification of collaborators, ranking of data sources, availability of data for specific coverages, and many more. The paper defines the scope of and conceptual background to such a knowledge network, discusses some initial work done by WDS to establish the network, and proposes an implementation model for rapid operationalization. In this model, established interests such as DataCite, ORCID, and CrossRef have well-defined roles, and the standards, services, and

  19. Knowledge Network Architecture in Support of International Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugo, Wim

    2015-04-01

    ICSU (The International Council for Science) created the World Data System (WDS) as an interdisciplinary body at its General Assembly in Maputo in 2008, and since then the membership of the WDS has grown to include 86 members, of whom 56 are institutions or data centres focused on providing quality-assured data and services to the scientific community. In addition to its objective of providing universal and equitable access to such data and services, WDS is also active in promoting stewardship, standards and conventions, and improved access to products derived from data and services. Whereas WDS is in process of aggregating and harmonizing the meta-data collections of its membership, it is clear that additional benefits can be obtained by supplementing such traditional meta-data sources with information about members, authors, and the coverages of the data, as well as metrics such as citation indices, quality indicators, and usability. Moreover, the relationships between the actors and systems that populate this meta-data landscape can be seen as a knowledge network that describes a sub-set of global scientific endeavor. Such a knowledge network is useful in many ways, supporting both machine-based and human requests for contextual information related to a specific data set, institution, author, topic, or other entities in the network. Specific use cases that can be realised include decision and policy support for funding agencies, identification of collaborators, ranking of data sources, availability of data for specific coverages, and many more. The paper defines the scope of and conceptual background to such a knowledge network, discusses some initial work done by WDS to establish the network, and proposes an implementation model for rapid operationalisation. In this model, established interests such as DataCITE, ORCID, and CrossRef have well-defined roles, and the standards, services, and registries required to build a community-maintained, scalable knowledge

  20. Architecting Ourselves: Schema to Facilitate Growth of the International Space Architecture Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Brent

    2006-01-01

    This paper develops a conceptual model, adapted from the way research and development non-profits and universities tend to be organized, that could help amplify the reach and effectiveness of the international space architecture community. The model accommodates current activities and published positions, and increases involvement by allocating accountability for necessary professional and administrative activities. It coordinates messaging and other outreach functions to improve brand management. It increases sustainability by balancing volunteer workload. And it provides an open-ended structure that can be modified gracefully as needs, focus, and context evolve. Over the past 20 years, Space Architecture has attained some early signs of legitimacy as a discipline: an active, global community of practicing and publishing professionals; university degree programs; a draft undergraduate curriculum; and formal committee establishment within multiple professional organizations. However, the nascent field has few outlets for expression in built architecture, which exacerbates other challenges the field is experiencing in adolescence: obtaining recognition and inclusion as a unique contributor by the established aerospace profession; organizing and managing outreach by volunteers; striking a balance between setting admittance or performance credentials and attaining a critical mass of members; and knowing what to do, beyond sharing common interests, to actually increase the market demand for space architecture. This paper develops a conceptual model, adapted from the way research-anddevelopment non-profits and universities tend to be organized, that could help amplify the reach and effectiveness of the international space architecture community. The model accommodates current activities and published positions, and increases involvement by allocating accountability for necessary professional and administrative activities. It coordinates messaging and other outreach

  1. Habitability constraints/objectives for a Mars manned mission: internal architecture considerations.

    PubMed

    Winisdoerffer, F; Soulez-Larivière, C

    1992-01-01

    It is generally accepted that high quality internal environment shall strongly support crew's adaptation and acceptance to situation of long isolation and confinement. Thus, this paper is an attempt to determine to which extent the resulting stress corresponding to the anticipated duration of a trip to Mars (1 and a half years to 2 and a half years) could be decreased when internal architecture of the spacecraft is properly designed. It is assumed that artificial gravity shall be available on board the Mars spacecraft. This will of course have a strong impact on internal architecture as far as a 1-g oriented design will become mandatory, at least in certain inhabited parts of the spacecraft. The review of usual Habitability functions is performed according to the peculiarities of such an extremely long mission. A particular attention is paid to communications issues and the need for privacy. The second step of the paper addresses internal architecture issues through zoning analyses. Common, Service and Personal zones need to be adapted to the constraints associated with the extremely long duration of the mission. Furthermore, due to the nature of the mission itself (relative autonomy, communication problems, monotony) and the type of selected crew (personalities, group structure) the implementation of a "fourth zone", so-called "recreational" zone, seems to be needed. This zoning analysis is then translated into some internal architecture proposals, which are discussed and illustrated. This paper is concluded by a reflection on habitability and recommendations on volumetric requirements. Some ideas to validate proposed habitability items through simulation are also discussed.

  2. Habitability constraints/objectives for a mars manned mission: Internal architecture considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winisdoerffer, F.; Soulez-Larivière, C.

    1992-08-01

    It is generally accepted that high quality internal environment shall strongly support crew's adaptation and acceptance to situation of long isolation and confinement. Thus, this paper is an attempt to determine to which extent the resulting stress corresponding to the anticipated duration of a trip to Mars (1 and a half years to 2 and a half years) could be decreased when internal architecture of the spacecraft is properly designed. It is assumed that artificial gravity shall be available on board the Mars spacecraft. This will of course have a strong impact on internal architecture as far as a 1-g oriented design will become mandatory, at least in certain inhabited parts of the spacecraft. The review of usual Habitability functions is performed according to the peculiarities of such an extremely long mission. A particular attention is paid to communications issues and the need for privacy. The second step of the paper addresses internal architecture issues through zoning analyses. Common, Service and Personal zones need to be adapted to the constraints associated with the extremely long duration of the mission. Furthermore, due to the nature of the mission itself (relative autonomy, communication problems, monotony) and the type of selected crew (personalities, group structure) the implementation of a ``fourth zone'', so-called ``recreational'' zone, seems to be needed. This zoning analysis is then translated into some internal architecture proposals, which are discussed and illustrated. This paper is concluded by a reflection on habitability and recommendations on volumetric requirements. Some ideas to validate proposed habitability items through simulation are also discussed.

  3. PREFACE 11th Europhysical Conference on Defects in Insulating Materials (EURODIM 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, László; Corradi, Gábor

    2010-11-01

    The Europhysical Conference on Defects in Insulating Materials, organized in the period 12-16 July 2010 in Pécs, Hungary by the Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Budapest and the Institute of Physics of the University of Pécs, was the 11th European conference in the alternate series of EURODIM and ICDIM. The first meeting in Argonne, USA in 1956 was dedicated to the field of color centers in alkali halide crystals. Since then the topic has been gradually extended to the real structure of oxides, halides, nitrides and other more complex insulators, and also to less ordered materials like glasses, ceramics and low-dimensional systems, as well as applications e.g. in radiology, non-linear optics, photonics and electronics. Recently the field covered includes the research and technology of defect-related phenomena in crystalline and amorphous wide band-gap bulk, layered and nano-materials. More than 200 colleagues from 31 countries in Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas have participated in the conference. The program contained in addition to seven invited and three keynote talks 67 further oral presentations as well as some 200 poster contributions. The city of Pécs, a pearl of the Southern Danubia region, was proud of hosting the conference as one of the 2010 European Capitals of Culture, this status crowning a long urban history dating back to paleochristian times in the Roman province Pannonia. On behalf of the Organizing Committee signature László Kovács Conference Chair Conference Chair László Kovács Crystal Physics Department Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics Budapest, Hungary e-mail: eurodim2010@optics.szfki.kfki.hu Program Committee Gábor Corradi (Hungary) István Földvári (Hungary) Rob A. Jackson (UK) László Kovács (Hungary) Martin Nikl (Czech Republic) Anna Vedda (Italy) Andrea Watterich (Hungary) International Advisory Committee M.G. Blanchin (France)A. Lushchik (Estonia) F. Bridges (USA

  4. The 11th INTEGRAL Conference: Gamma-Ray Astrophysics in Multi-Wavelength Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research and the Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy of the University of Amsterdam have organised the 11th INTEGRAL Conference. The meeting focused on the astrophysics of highly energetic phenomena that are observed with INTEGRAL, taking into account advanced modelling and observational constraints from all wavelengths (and other cosmic messengers). The programme provided a broad perspective of the findings of INTEGRAL in synergy with other space observatories (XMM-Newton, Chandra, NuStar, Swift, ASTROSAT, Hitomi, Fermi, etc.) and ground-based facilities (LOFAR, H.E.S.S., Veritas, MAGIC, etc.). It addressed key open questions in the field and novel ideas to resolve them.

  5. The enduring mental health impact of the September 11th terrorist attacks: challenges and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Ozbay, Fatih; Auf der Heyde, Tanja; Reissman, Dori; Sharma, Vansh

    2013-09-01

    The authors review the existing literature on the mental health impact of the September 11th attacks and the implications for disaster mental health clinicians and policy makers. The authors discuss the demographic characteristics of those affected and the state of mental health needs and existing mental health delivery services; the nature of the disaster and primary impacts on lives, infrastructure, and socioeconomic factors; the acute aftermath in the days and weeks after the attacks; the persistent mental health impact and evolution of services of the postacute aftermath; and the implications for future disaster mental health practitioners and policy makers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mental health needs in New York state following the September 11th attacks.

    PubMed

    Herman, Daniel; Felton, Chip; Susser, Ezra

    2002-09-01

    In October 2001, the New York State Office of Mental Health and the Department of Epidemiology of the Mailman School of Public Health of Columbia University conducted a rapid assessment of the nature and magnitude of mental health needs in the state resulting from the September 11th terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center. This effort was carried out during a period of great turmoil and uncertainty as New Yorkers responded to the shocking events of this unprecedented disaster. Using the limited data available at the time, we estimated that over 520,000 persons in New York City and the surrounding counties would experience posttraumatic stress disorder resulting from exposure to the attacks, and that more than 129,000 would seek treatment for this disorder during 2002. This assessment is part of an ongoing collaborative process between public and academic partners; the effort is designed to strengthen the capacity of the mental health system to respond to current and future terrorism. Estimates from this initial assessment will be refined over time as further data concerning the impact of the September 11th attacks become available.

  7. Posttraumatic stress disorder in Manhattan, New York City, after the September 11th terrorist attacks.

    PubMed

    Galea, Sandro; Resnick, Heidi; Ahern, Jennifer; Gold, Joel; Bucuvalas, Michael; Kilpatrick, Dean; Stuber, Jennifer; Vlahov, David

    2002-09-01

    Estimates of acute mental health symptoms in the general population after disasters are scarce. We assessed the prevalence and correlates of acute posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in residents of Manhattan 5-8 weeks after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. We used random-digit dialing to contact a representative sample of adults living in Manhattan below 110th Street. Participants were interviewed about prior life events, personal characteristics, exposure to the events of September 11th, and psychological symptoms after the attack. Among 988 eligible adults, 19.3% reported symptoms consistent with PTSD at some point in their life, and 8.8% reported symptoms consistent with a diagnosis of current (within the past 30 days) PTSD. Overall, 57.8% of respondents reported at least one PTSD symptom in the past month. The most common past-month symptoms were intrusive memories (27.4%) and insomnia (24.5%). Predictors of current PTSD in a multivariable model were residence below Canal Street, low social support, life stressors 12 months prior to September 11th, perievent panic attack, losing possessions in the attacks, and involvement in the rescue efforts. These findings can help guide resource planning for future disasters in densely populated urban areas.

  8. The impact of the September 11th terrorist attacks on psychiatric patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Franz, Victoria A; Glass, Carol R; Arnkoff, Diane B; Dutton, Mary Ann

    2009-06-01

    Studies of the general population have shown that the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 had a well-documented psychological effect, regardless of whether or not individuals were directly exposed to the events. In light of findings that pre-existing mental illness and prior exposure to trauma are associated with vulnerability to PTSD following a subsequent traumatic event, this article reviews research on the impact of the September 11th terrorist attacks on psychiatric patients. Findings suggest that, in general, psychiatric patients experienced immediate and long-term posttraumatic symptoms at levels greater than normal controls, although there were differential effects by diagnostic group and symptoms as observed did not always match complaints of subjective impairment. Studies sampling inpatients and outpatients, as well as research regarding service utilization, are evaluated. Assessment and treatment implications for clinicians responsible for the care of psychiatric patients following a national trauma are discussed, and recommendations for future research are presented.

  9. Forgiving the September 11th terrorists: associations with coping, psychological distress, and religiosity.

    PubMed

    Rhoades, Galena Kline; McIntosh, Daniel N; Wadsworth, Martha E; Ahlkvist, Jarl A; Burwell, Rebecca A; Gudmundsen, Gretchen R; Raviv, Tali; Rea, Jacqueline G

    2007-06-01

    Two studies examined how non-interpersonal forgiveness (when there is no social relationship between the transgressor and forgiver) related to coping and involuntary responses to stress, psychological distress, and religiosity. Three to six weeks after September 11th, 2001, forgiveness had non-linear associations with other responses to the terrorist attacks. Among college students (N=488), those who were trying or had forgiven (pro-forgiveness) the terrorists reported less involuntary engagement, more primary and secondary control coping, and more meaning finding than those who were unsure about forgiveness (ambivalent) and those who did not believe the perpetrators should be forgiven (anti-forgiveness). Ambivalent students reported the most distress, even after controlling for religion. Anti-forgiveness students reported less religiosity than ambivalent and pro-forgiveness students. Most findings were consistent among middle schoolers (N=154), particularly regarding psychological distress and responses to stress. Also, forgiveness of strangers for acts against one's community functioned separately from religion.

  10. Total solar eclipse on August 11th 1999, observed at Kelebija

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Božić, N.

    2003-10-01

    The observing results of the total solar eclipse on 11th August 1999 are presented. The observation has been made by the Astronomical Division of the Research Society "Vladimir Mandic - Manda" from Valjevo at the village Kelebija (Yugoslavia). The following projects were handled: the photometry of the whole sky, the variability of the magnetic field, atmospheric changes, attendant changes in plants' and animals' behaviour during the eclipse. During the eclipse the decrease of intensity of the local magnetic field was estimated. The temperature dropped by 5.2°C, the humidity has increased, while the atmospheric pressure didn't show any tendency of change. All the plants and animals showed some reaction to the eclipse. A rich photo, video and audio documentary material has been collected.

  11. September 11th--ripples across the ocean: perspectives from Tripler Army Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Staudenmeier, James J; Hill, Jeffrey V

    2002-09-01

    The events of September 11, 2001, or 9-11 as called by the media, will live in United States' memory forever. Even far-flung Hawaii shuddered with the rest of the United States. This brief article describes the September 11th experiences and fallout of three individuals living in Hawaii. One is a description of how the events worsened a client's illness. Two others are psychiatrists' accounts: one staff, another child fellow. These accounts describe how even those living in remote locales may be affected by significant world events. Even though individuals may not appear to be at risk to have much risk of psychopathology, they may experience subclinical symptoms. Individuals who do have mental illness may risk worsening of their symptoms.

  12. Wake of September 11th attacks: implications for research, policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Darden, Madeline Lyles

    2002-02-01

    The National Consortium for African American Children (NCAAC) held a National Forum on Bioterrorism and Children on November 6, 2001 in Washington, DC. Convened in the wake of the September 11th attacks on New York City and the Pentagon, this unprecedented conference assembled a cross-section of professionals in child advocacy, health, mental health, insurance, economics, law enforcement, and media technology. The ensuing discussion focused on issues surrounding biological agents, their impact on children and youth, and the strategies needed to protect the health and mental health of children and families in the event of a large-scale bioterrorist crisis. Lessons learned as well as the implications of the terrorist acts from the tragic events of September 11th formed the backdrop for engaging dialogue among various industry executives and professionals. Accounts of personal experiences during the unprecedented tragedy of 9-11 were shared and provided a context for heightened preparedness planning for children and adults. A collaborative statement was also presented by NCAAC, the National Medical Association, the Association of Black Psychologists, and the National Black Media Coalition. This forum was hailed as a model for communities of color to join and help bolster broad-based coalition building to ensure the availability of culturally and linguistically appropriate messages, services, and support. As intended, the forum devoted significant attention to the special needs of children, their caregivers and families and provided for an invaluable interchange which is slated to evolve into a national action plan to address the imminent dangers facing our nation's children.

  13. PREFACE: 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizuka, Tomonori

    2008-07-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains papers based on invited talks and contributed posters presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers. This meeting was held at the Tsukuba International Congress Center in Tsukuba, Japan, on 26-28 September 2007, and was organized jointly by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency and the University of Tsukuba. The previous ten meetings in this series were held in San Diego (USA) 1987, Gut Ising (Germany) 1989, Abingdon (UK) 1991, Naka (Japan) 1993, Princeton (USA) 1995, Kloster Seeon (Germany) 1997, Oxford (UK) 1999, Toki (Japan) 2001, San Diego (USA) 2003, and St Petersburg (Russia) 2005. The purpose of the eleventh meeting was to present and discuss new results on H-mode (edge transport barrier, ETB) and internal transport barrier, ITB, experiments, theory and modeling in magnetic fusion research. It was expected that contributions give new and improved insights into the physics mechanisms behind high confinement modes of H-mode and ITBs. Ultimately, this research should lead to improved projections for ITER. As has been the tradition at the recent meetings of this series, the program was subdivided into six topics. The topics selected for the eleventh meeting were: H-mode transition and the pedestal-width Dynamics in ETB: ELM threshold, non-linear evolution and suppression, etc Transport relations of various quantities including turbulence in plasmas with ITB: rotation physics is especially highlighted Transport barriers in non-axisymmetric magnetic fields Theory and simulation on transport barriers Projections of transport barrier physics to ITER For each topic there was an invited talk presenting an overview of the topic, based on contributions to the meeting and on recently published external results. The six invited talks were: A Leonard (GA, USA): Progress in characterization of the H-mode pedestal and L-H transition N Oyama (JAEA, Japan): Progress and issues in

  14. Current status, architecture, and future directions for the international space station electric power system

    SciTech Connect

    Gholdston, E.; Hartung, J.; Friefeld, J.

    1995-12-31

    The Electric Power System (EPS) on the International Space Station Alpha has undergone several significant changes over the last year, as major design decisions have been made for the overall station. While the basic topology and system elements have remained as they were under the Freedom program, there are important differences in connectivity, assembly sequence, and start-up. The key drivers for these changes in architecture have been the goal to simplify verification, and most significantly, the introduction of extensive Russian participation in the program. Having the Russians join the international community in this project has resulted in an expanded station size, larger crew, and almost doubled the observable surface of the earth covered by the station. For the power system it has meant additional interfaces for power transfer, and new challenges for solar tracking at the higher inclination orbit. This paper reviews the current architecture and emphasizes the new features that have evolved, as the design for the new, larger station has developed. Additionally, the possible application of developing technology to the station, and other future missions is considered.

  15. Prenatal diagnosis of the Meckel-Gruber syndrome from 11th to 20th gestational week.

    PubMed

    Mittermayer, C; Lee, A; Brugger, P C

    2004-08-01

    The Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that is characterized by typical sonographical findings: occipital encephalocele, postaxial polydactyly and cystic enlargement of the kidneys. Its recurrence risk of 25 % demands an exact diagnosis. Retrospective analysis of the sonographic characteristics in relation to the gestational age in eight cases with the pathologic diagnosis of MKS. The sonographic characteristics depend on the gestational age. The classic trias was solely seen in the case diagnosed before 14 (th) week of gestation. In the other seven cases, diagnosed between the 17 (th) and 20 (th) week of gestational age, only two of three characteristic signs of MKS could be visualised by US. Polydactyly was missed by ultrasound in all seven cases due to the marked oligohydramnion. The Meckel-Gruber syndrome can be confidently detected and diagnosed by sonography at the 11th to 14th gestational week. Later in the pregnancy, severe oligohydramnion makes it more difficult to establish the diagnosis by US alone. In these cases a meticulous autopsy is necessary to establish the diagnosis of MKS.

  16. Gut Microbiome of an 11th Century A.D. Pre-Columbian Andean Mummy

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Fornaciari, Gino; Luciani, Stefania; Dowd, Scot E.; Toranzos, Gary A.; Marota, Isolina; Cano, Raul J.

    2015-01-01

    The process of natural mummification is a rare and unique process from which little is known about the resulting microbial community structure. In the present study, we characterized the microbiome of paleofeces, and ascending, transverse and descending colon of an 11th century A.D. pre-Columbian Andean mummy by 16S rRNA gene high-throughput sequencing and metagenomics. Firmicutes were the most abundant bacterial group, with Clostridium spp. comprising up to 96.2% of the mummified gut, while Turicibacter spp. represented 89.2% of the bacteria identified in the paleofeces. Microbiome profile of the paleofeces was unique when compared to previously characterized coprolites that did not undergo natural mummification. We identified DNA sequences homologous to Clostridium botulinum, Trypanosoma cruzi and human papillomaviruses (HPVs). Unexpectedly, putative antibiotic-resistance genes including beta-lactamases, penicillin-binding proteins, resistance to fosfomycin, chloramphenicol, aminoglycosides, macrolides, sulfa, quinolones, tetracycline and vancomycin, and multi-drug transporters, were also identified. The presence of putative antibiotic-resistance genes suggests that resistance may not necessarily be associated with a selective pressure of antibiotics or contact with European cultures. Identification of pathogens and antibiotic-resistance genes in ancient human specimens will aid in the understanding of the evolution of pathogens as a way to treat and prevent diseases caused by bacteria, microbial eukaryotes and viruses. PMID:26422376

  17. Remembering September 11th: the role of retention interval and rehearsal on flashbulb and event memory.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Lauren R

    2006-02-01

    Retention interval and rehearsal effects on flashbulb and event memory for 11th September 2001 (9/11) were examined. In Experiment 1, college students were assessed three times (Groups 1 and 2) or once (Group 3) over 11 weeks. In Experiment 2, three new groups assessed initially at 23 weeks (Group 4), 1 year (Group 5), or 2 years (Group 6) were compared at 1 year and at 2 years with subsamples of those assessed previously. No effects of retention interval length or rehearsal were found for flashbulb memory, which contained details at each assessment. Event memory, but not consistency, was detrimentally affected by long retention intervals, but improved with rehearsal. Recall was higher for the reception event than for the main events. Also, consistency from 1 day to 11 weeks, but not 1 year to 2 years, was higher for flashbulb memory than for event memory. Event recall was enhanced when respondents conceived of their memory as vivid, frozen, and encompassing a longer period of time. Positive correlations were found for event memory with confidence in accuracy and with rehearsal through discussion at 2 years.

  18. NLEP--current situation and strategy during the 11th plan period (2007-2012).

    PubMed

    Dhillon, G P S

    2006-12-01

    National Leprosy Control Programme was established in 1955 based on dapsone domiciliary treatment. The multidrug therapy came into wide use from 1982. Based on the recommendations of the high power committee established by the Government of India, the NLEP was launched in 1983 with the objective to arrest the disease activity in all the known cases of leprosy. In order to strengthen the process of elimination of the disease in this country, the first World Bank supported project was introduced in 1993. The 2nd phase of the elimination project was started in 2001-02 and ended in December 2004. The prevalence rate of leprosy was found to be 0.95/10,000 population by December 2005, a success in the elimination of leprosy. On 30th September 2006 the rate on record is 0.89/10,000 population, a further decline. During 2005-06 the annual new case detection rate was 14.27 per 100,000 population which was 23.4 during 2004-05, a reduction of 39.0%. During the 11th plan period (April 2007 to March 2012) the government proposes to carry on the leprosy programme with the same intensity further to achieve annual new case detection rate less than 10 cases per 100,000 population.

  19. Gut Microbiome of an 11th Century A.D. Pre-Columbian Andean Mummy.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Fornaciari, Gino; Luciani, Stefania; Dowd, Scot E; Toranzos, Gary A; Marota, Isolina; Cano, Raul J

    2015-01-01

    The process of natural mummification is a rare and unique process from which little is known about the resulting microbial community structure. In the present study, we characterized the microbiome of paleofeces, and ascending, transverse and descending colon of an 11th century A.D. pre-Columbian Andean mummy by 16S rRNA gene high-throughput sequencing and metagenomics. Firmicutes were the most abundant bacterial group, with Clostridium spp. comprising up to 96.2% of the mummified gut, while Turicibacter spp. represented 89.2% of the bacteria identified in the paleofeces. Microbiome profile of the paleofeces was unique when compared to previously characterized coprolites that did not undergo natural mummification. We identified DNA sequences homologous to Clostridium botulinum, Trypanosoma cruzi and human papillomaviruses (HPVs). Unexpectedly, putative antibiotic-resistance genes including beta-lactamases, penicillin-binding proteins, resistance to fosfomycin, chloramphenicol, aminoglycosides, macrolides, sulfa, quinolones, tetracycline and vancomycin, and multi-drug transporters, were also identified. The presence of putative antibiotic-resistance genes suggests that resistance may not necessarily be associated with a selective pressure of antibiotics or contact with European cultures. Identification of pathogens and antibiotic-resistance genes in ancient human specimens will aid in the understanding of the evolution of pathogens as a way to treat and prevent diseases caused by bacteria, microbial eukaryotes and viruses.

  20. PREFACE: 11th Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffari, Nader; Lhémery, Alain; Lowe, Mike

    2013-08-01

    The 11th Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC) was held in Brighton, UK on 18-20 January 2012. This event, which is an annual collaboration between the Physical Acoustics Group (PAG) of the Institute of Physics and the Groupe d'Acoustique Physique, Sous-marine et UltraSonore (GAPSUS) of the Société Française d'Acoustique, successfully achieved its main aim of being a small, friendly meeting of high scientific quality, welcoming younger researchers and PhD students and covering a broad range of subjects in Acoustics. The participants heard 44 excellent presentations covering an exciting and diverse range of subjects, from audio acoustics to guided waves in composites and from phononic crystals to ultrasound surgery. As is the custom at these meetings, four prominent invited speakers set the pace for the event; these were Keith Attenborough (The Open University, UK), Claire Prada (Institut Langevin, France), David Moore (University of Nottingham, UK) and Philippe Roux (IS Terre, France). The submission of manuscripts for publication in the proceedings was, as in previous years, on a voluntary basis and in these proceedings we present 11 peer reviewed papers. Due to some unforeseen problems there has been a longer than planned delay in preparing these proceedings, for which the Editors sincerely apologise to the authors and the community. Nader Saffari, Mike Lowe and Alain Lhémery

  1. Using ARCS Model to Promote 11th Graders' Motivation and Achievement in Learning about Acids and Bases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feng, Sung-Lin; Tuan, Hsiao-Lin

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of this study are: to apply the ARCS model in designing an acid and bases unit, and to assess a single class of 11th graders for motivation and achievement outcomes before and after ARCS instruction. Four essential strategies for designing motivation instruction in the ARCS model were: Attention, Relevance, Confidence, and…

  2. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT: Request for support of the 11th Workshop on the Physics of Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Thomas

    2009-05-21

    This grant supported the publication of student papers that were presented at the 11th Workshop on the Physics of Dusty Plasmas. Papers were published in a Special Issue of the IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, Vol. 32, Issue 2 in April, 2007.

  3. The Effects of Conceptual Change Texts Accompanied with Animations on Overcoming 11th Grade Students' Alternative Conceptions of Chemical Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozmen, Haluk; Demircioglu, Hulya; Demircioglu, Gokhan

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to determine the effect of conceptual change texts accompanied with computer animations on 11th grade students' understanding and alternative conceptions related to chemical bonding. One experimental group (EG; N = 28) and one comparison group (CG; N = 30) were used in the study. While the comparison group taught traditional…

  4. The Effects of Cardio-Syntactic Analysis Instruction on Writing Scores in a 11th Grade High School Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kariuki, Patrick N.; Blair, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the effects of Cardio-Syntactic Analysis instruction on writing scores in an 11th grade English class. The sample consisted of 35 students enrolled in an Honor's English 11 class at Volunteer high School, in Church Hill, TN. The class was randomly assigned into an experimental group of 17 students and…

  5. The Effect of Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) on 11th Graders' Conceptual Understanding of Electrochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sen, Senol; Yilmaz, Ayhan; Geban, Ömer

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) method compared to traditional teaching method on 11th grade students' conceptual understanding of electrochemistry concepts. Participants were 115 students from a public school in Turkey. Nonequivalent control group design was used. Two…

  6. Examining Scientific and Technical Writing Strategies in the 11th Century Chinese Science Book "Brush Talks from Dream Brook"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Yuejiao

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the influential Chinese science book "Brush Talks from Dream Brook," written by Shen Kuo in the 11th century. I suggest that "Brush Talks" reveals a tension between institutionalized science and science in the public, and a gap between the making of scientific knowledge and the communication of such…

  7. Examining Scientific and Technical Writing Strategies in the 11th Century Chinese Science Book "Brush Talks from Dream Brook"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Yuejiao

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the influential Chinese science book "Brush Talks from Dream Brook," written by Shen Kuo in the 11th century. I suggest that "Brush Talks" reveals a tension between institutionalized science and science in the public, and a gap between the making of scientific knowledge and the communication of such…

  8. Your Reading: An Annotated Booklist for Middle School and Junior High. 11th Edition. NCTE Bibliography Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jean E., Ed.; Stephens, Elaine C., Ed.

    Organized around the theme of "challenges," the 11th edition of "Your Reading" offers annotations of more than 1,200 books for young adults. Intended for teachers, librarians, parents, and students, this booklist presents recently published books that can be read for many purposes--for sheer enjoyment of the story, to pique…

  9. Avionics architecture for the U.S. segment of the international space station alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph F.; Mcdonald, Mark; Suchting, Steve; Schikner, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    The International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) is a joint project between the United States, European Space Agency, Japan, Canada and Russia to develop and fly a space station in the later part of the 1990s. The United States will be the largest hardware contributor to this project, and this paper will describe the avionics architecture for the U.S. provided pressurized modules and truss segments. The avionics contained within these U.S. modules and segments will perform many of the core engineering and payload support functions for the ISSA. These functions include: the command and data handling, communications and tracking, guidance navigation and control (in partnership with the Russian elements), and electrical power generation and distribution. This paper will describe the architecture of the avionics systems that will perform these core engineering avionics functions, as well as provide a discussion on the avionics necessary for the proper functioning of the core engineering avionics supported functions such as thermal control, life support, and mechanisms.

  10. Avionics architecture for the U.S. segment of the international space station alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph F.; Mcdonald, Mark; Suchting, Steve; Schikner, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    The International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) is a joint project between the United States, European Space Agency, Japan, Canada and Russia to develop and fly a space station in the later part of the 1990s. The United States will be the largest hardware contributor to this project, and this paper will describe the avionics architecture for the U.S. provided pressurized modules and truss segments. The avionics contained within these U.S. modules and segments will perform many of the core engineering and payload support functions for the ISSA. These functions include: the command and data handling, communications and tracking, guidance navigation and control (in partnership with the Russian elements), and electrical power generation and distribution. This paper will describe the architecture of the avionics systems that will perform these core engineering avionics functions, as well as provide a discussion on the avionics necessary for the proper functioning of the core engineering avionics supported functions such as thermal control, life support, and mechanisms.

  11. Avionics architecture for the U.S. segment of the international space station alpha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Joseph F.; McDonald, Mark; Suchting, Steve; Schikner, Jeff

    The International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) is a joint project between the United States, European Space Agency, Japan, Canada and Russia to develop and fly a space station in the later part of the 1990s. The United States will be the largest hardware contributor to this project, and this paper will describe the avionics architecture for the U.S. provided pressurized modules and truss segments. The avionics contained within these U.S. modules and segments will perform many of the core engineering and payload support functions for the ISSA. These functions include: the command and data handling, communications and tracking, guidance navigation and control (in partnership with the Russian elements), and electrical power generation and distribution. This paper will describe the architecture of the avionics systems that will perform these core engineering avionics functions, as well as provide a discussion on the avionics necessary for the proper functioning of the core engineering avionics supported functions such as thermal control, life support, and mechanisms.

  12. Construction of biofilms with defined internal architecture using dielectrophoresis and flocculation.

    PubMed

    Verduzco-Luque, Cynthia E; Alp, Burçak; Stephens, Gillian M; Markx, Gerard H

    2003-07-05

    A novel approach was developed for the construction of biofilms with defined internal architecture using AC electrokinetics and flocculation. Artificial structured microbial consortia (ASMC) consisting of localized layered microcolonies of different cell types were formed by sequentially attracting different cell types to high field regions near microelectrodes using dielectrophoresis. Stabilization of the microbial consortia on the electrode surface was achieved by crosslinking the cells using the flocculant polyethyleneimine (PEI). Consortia of Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were made as model systems. Also, more natural consortia were made of the bacteria Pseudomonas putida, Clavibacter michiganense, and Methylobacterium mesophilum, which are found together in consortia during biodegradation of metal-cutting waste fluids. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 83: 39-44, 2003.

  13. Adherence to HIV medications in a cohort of men who have sex with men: impact of September 11th.

    PubMed

    Halkitis, Perry N; Kutnick, Alexandra H; Rosof, Elana; Slater, Simon; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2003-03-01

    Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimens remains a challenge for people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Severe traumas like that of September 11, 2001, can exacerbate the difficulties already associated with adherence. A community-based sample of 68 HIV-seropositive men who have sex with men (MSM) living in New York City who were on protease inhibitor HAART regimens completed quantitative assessments to examine adherence in the aftermath of September 11th. Data were drawn from a larger study of drug use and HIV medication adherence. Assessments conducted from September 24, 2001 to October 24, 2001 were compared to assessments taken 2-4 months prior to September 11th. Repeated measures analyses of variance were used to analyze the number of missed and suboptimal doses (doses taken outside the prescribed time by +/-4 hours) reported in the 2 weeks prior to each respective assessment. The results indicated a significant increase in the number of missed doses and the number of suboptimal doses immediately after the events of September 11th. Differences in adherence were not influenced, however, by sociodemographic characteristics. These results suggest that the events of September 11th had an impact on adherence to HIV medications among MSM in New York City and provide further support for the notion that the events of September 11th may have adversely impacted the lives of seropositive individuals. Attention should be paid by clinicians working with HIV-positive individuals on how this event has been incorporated into lives of individuals already burdened by a chronic and demanding disease.

  14. Internal architecture of foredunes and their dynamics resolved by GPR (Regneville inlet, Normandy, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliette, Baumann; Dujardin, Jean-Rémi; Duringer, Philippe; Robin, Nicolas; Schuster, Mathieu; Bano, Maksim

    2014-05-01

    Foredunes are the foremost dunes formed on the backshore of beaches by aeolian sand deposition trapped by vegetation. They are classical large scale features that develop along a large part of sandy coasts of the world. There are many papers covering various aspects of foredune (initiation, evolution, dynamics) but their internal architecture which reflects their dynamics is still not well known. Active and relic foredunes from the Regneville inlet have been surveyed with Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR). GPR is a non-invasive geophysical method based on high frequency electromagnetic wave propagation which can provide very detailed and continuous images of the subsurface. One of the goals of GPR measurements is to determine the geometries of fine structures by imaging the structures of sedimentary deposits. The GPR profiles have been obtained by using the 100, 250, 500 and 800 MHz shielded antenna and the acquisition mode was a constant offset. Direct field observations (natural outcrops and trenches) along modern foredunes during different hydrodynamic conditions complete their sedimentary/architectural characterization and bring a strong control for the interpretation of the GPR profiles. GPR allowed here to identify buried erosional surfaces and depositional stratifications. A conceptual model developing their formation and evolution can then be proposed: it starts with a phase of wave erosion followed by a more complex phase of eolian sand accumulation (vertical aggradation, lateral accretion). Shore-perpendicular GPR profiles reveal that the internal architecture of foredunes is marked by several sharp and seaward concave truncations which correspond to ancient marine scarps. They are the result of the erosion by waves of a foredune during storms or high-tides. Some of these scarps can be detected from the geomorphology (steps in the topographic profile, change in vegetation type), others not because they are sealed by blown sands accumulation (smoothed

  15. Assessment of China's Energy-Saving and Emission-Reduction Accomplishments and Opportunities During the 11th Five Year Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, Mark D.; Price, Lynn; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; Aden, Nathaniel; Lu, Hongyou; McNeil, Michael; Zheng, Nina; Yining, Qin; Yowargana, Ping

    2010-04-28

    During the period 1980 to 2002, China experienced a 5% average annual reduction in energy consumption per unit of gross domestic product (GDP). The period 2002-2005 saw a dramatic reversal of the historic relationship between energy use and GDP growth: energy use per unit of GDP increased an average of 3.8% per year during this period (NBS, various years). China's 11th Five Year Plan (FYP), which covers the period 2006-2010, required all government divisions at different levels to reduce energy intensity by 20% in five years in order to regain the relationship between energy and GDP growth experienced during the 1980s and 1990s. This report provides an assessment of selected policies and programs that China has instituted in its quest to fulfill the national goal of a 20% reduction in energy intensity by 2010. The report finds that China has made substantial progress toward its goal of achieving 20% energy intensity reduction from 2006 to 2010 and that many of the energy-efficiency programs implemented during the 11th FYP in support of China's 20% energy/GDP reduction goal appear to be on track to meet - or in some cases even exceed - their energy-saving targets. It appears that most of the Ten Key Projects, the Top-1000 Program, and the Small Plant Closure Program are on track to meet or surpass the 11th FYP savings goals. China's appliance standards and labeling program, which was established prior to the 11th FYP, has become very robust during the 11th FYP period. China has greatly enhanced its enforcement of new building energy standards but energy-efficiency programs for buildings retrofits, as well as the goal of adjusting China's economic structure to reduce the share of energy consumed by industry, do not appear to be on track to meet the stated goals. With the implementation of the 11th FYP now bearing fruit, it is important to maintain and strengthen the existing energy-saving policies and programs that are successful while revising programs or adding new

  16. An International Strategy for Human Exploration of the Moon: The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) Reference Architecture for Human Lunar Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurini, Kathleen C.; Hufenbach, Bernhard; Junichiro, Kawaguchi; Piedboeuf, Jean-Claude; Schade, Britta; Lorenzoni, Andrea; Curtis, Jeremy; Hae-Dong, Kim

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) was established in response to The Global Exploration Strategy: The Framework for Coordination developed by fourteen space agencies and released in May 2007. Several ISECG participating space agencies have been studying concepts for human exploration of the moon that allow individual and collective goals and objectives to be met. This 18 month study activity culminated with the development of the ISECG Reference Architecture for Human Lunar Exploration. The reference architecture is a series of elements delivered over time in a flexible and evolvable campaign. This paper will describe the reference architecture and how it will inform near-term and long-term programmatic planning within interested agencies. The reference architecture is intended to serve as a global point of departure conceptual architecture that enables individual agency investments in technology development and demonstration, International Space Station research and technology demonstration, terrestrial analog studies, and robotic precursor missions to contribute towards the eventual implementation of a human lunar exploration scenario which reflects the concepts and priorities established to date. It also serves to create opportunities for partnerships that will support evolution of this concept and its eventual realization. The ISECG Reference Architecture for Human Lunar Exploration (commonly referred to as the lunar gPoD) reflects the agency commitments to finding an effective balance between conducting important scientific investigations of and from the moon, as well as demonstrating and mastering the technologies and capabilities to send humans farther into the Solar System. The lunar gPoD begins with a robust robotic precursor phase that demonstrates technologies and capabilities considered important for the success of the campaign. Robotic missions will inform the human missions and buy down risks. Human exploration will start

  17. An International Strategy for Human Exploration of the Moon: The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) Reference Architecture for Human Lunar Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurini, Kathleen C.; Hufenbach, Bernhard; Junichiro, Kawaguchi; Piedboeuf, Jean-Claude; Schade, Britta; Lorenzoni, Andrea; Curtis, Jeremy; Hae-Dong, Kim

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) was established in response to The Global Exploration Strategy: The Framework for Coordination developed by fourteen space agencies and released in May 2007. Several ISECG participating space agencies have been studying concepts for human exploration of the moon that allow individual and collective goals and objectives to be met. This 18 month study activity culminated with the development of the ISECG Reference Architecture for Human Lunar Exploration. The reference architecture is a series of elements delivered over time in a flexible and evolvable campaign. This paper will describe the reference architecture and how it will inform near-term and long-term programmatic planning within interested agencies. The reference architecture is intended to serve as a global point of departure conceptual architecture that enables individual agency investments in technology development and demonstration, International Space Station research and technology demonstration, terrestrial analog studies, and robotic precursor missions to contribute towards the eventual implementation of a human lunar exploration scenario which reflects the concepts and priorities established to date. It also serves to create opportunities for partnerships that will support evolution of this concept and its eventual realization. The ISECG Reference Architecture for Human Lunar Exploration (commonly referred to as the lunar gPoD) reflects the agency commitments to finding an effective balance between conducting important scientific investigations of and from the moon, as well as demonstrating and mastering the technologies and capabilities to send humans farther into the Solar System. The lunar gPoD begins with a robust robotic precursor phase that demonstrates technologies and capabilities considered important for the success of the campaign. Robotic missions will inform the human missions and buy down risks. Human exploration will start

  18. Self-enhancement among high-exposure survivors of the September 11th terrorist attack: resilience or social maladjustment?

    PubMed

    Bonanno, George A; Rennicke, Courtney; Dekel, Sharon

    2005-06-01

    The authors examined self-enhancing bias as a predictor of adjustment among individuals in or near the World Trade Center during the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Resilience was defined from categorical and continuous analyses of both participant self-report and friend and relative ratings of adjustment. Self-enhancement was associated with a resilient outcome, ratings of better adjustment prior to September 11th, greater positive affect, and reduced perceptions of social constraints. Additional analyses indicated that self-enhancers' reduced symptom levels were fully mediated by their low perceived social constraints. However, consistent with previous evidence suggesting a social cost to self-enhancement, at 18 months post-September 11th, self-enhancers' friends and relatives also rated them as decreasing in social adjustment and as being less honest.

  19. Campus Computing, 2000: The 11th National Survey of Computing and Information Technology in American Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kenneth C.

    The 2000 Campus Computing Survey, the 11th such survey, was sent to the chief academic officer at 1,176 two-year and four-year colleges and universities across the United States. By October 2000, 506 responses had been received, a response rate of 43%. New data reveal that the growing demand for technology talent across all sectors of the U.S.…

  20. Psychological sequelae of remote exposure to the September 11th terrorist attacks in Canadians with and without panic.

    PubMed

    Asmundson, Gordon J G; Carleton, R Nicholas; Wright, Kristi D; Taylor, Steven

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the psychological impact of remote exposure to the events and aftermath of the terrorist attacks in the USA on September 11th, 2001, and to assess what differences, if any, exist between individuals classified with probable panic disorder and those without. Telephone interviews were conducted with 122 residents of the capital city of the Canadian prairie province of Saskatchewan in spring 2002 in order to gather information regarding current mood, fears and avoidance behaviours as well as current post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms specific to September 11th. Consistent with previous findings and despite the remote nature of exposure, results indicated that the psychological well-being and behaviour of participants with probable panic disorder was more adversely affected by the events and aftermath of September 11th than those without panic disorder. These results suggest that remote viewing of traumatic events can have a significant and lingering impact on psychological well-being and behaviour and that these effects are more pronounced in those with panic disorder. Implications of the findings and future research directions are discussed.

  1. Estimating the Effects of September 11th and Other Forms of Violence on the Mental Health and Social Development of New York City's Youth: A Matter of Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aber, J. Lawrence; Gershoff, Elizabeth T.; Ware, Angelica; Kotler, Jennifer A.

    2004-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines the effects of exposure to the terrorist attack of September 11th as well as exposure to other forms of community violence on change in the mental health and social attitudes of youths in New York City. Three quarters of the youths reported some form of direct exposure to the events of September 11th, and 80%…

  2. Estimating the Effects of September 11th and Other Forms of Violence on the Mental Health and Social Development of New York City's Youth: A Matter of Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aber, J. Lawrence; Gershoff, Elizabeth T.; Ware, Angelica; Kotler, Jennifer A.

    2004-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines the effects of exposure to the terrorist attack of September 11th as well as exposure to other forms of community violence on change in the mental health and social attitudes of youths in New York City. Three quarters of the youths reported some form of direct exposure to the events of September 11th, and 80%…

  3. Hippocampal internal architecture and postoperative seizure outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy due to hippocampal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Elkommos, Samia; Weber, Bernd; Niehusmann, Pitt; Volmering, Elisa; Richardson, Mark P; Goh, Yen Y; Marson, Anthony G; Elger, Christian; Keller, Simon S

    2016-02-01

    Semi-quantitative analysis of hippocampal internal architecture (HIA) on MRI has been shown to be a reliable predictor of the side of seizure onset in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In the present study, we investigated the relationship between postoperative seizure outcome and preoperative semi-quantitative measures of HIA. We determined HIA on high in-plane resolution preoperative T2 short tau inversion recovery MR images in 79 patients with presumed unilateral mesial TLE (mTLE) due to hippocampal sclerosis (HS) who underwent amygdalohippocampectomy and postoperative follow up. HIA was investigated with respect to postoperative seizure freedom, neuronal density determined from resected hippocampal specimens, and conventionally acquired hippocampal volume. HIA ratings were significantly related to some neuropathological features of the resected hippocampus (e.g. neuronal density of selective CA regions, Wyler grades), and bilaterally with preoperative hippocampal volume. However, there were no significant differences in HIA ratings of the to-be-resected or contralateral hippocampus between patients rendered seizure free (ILAE 1) compared to those continuing to experience seizures (ILAE 2-5). This work indicates that semi-quantitative assessment of HIA on high-resolution MRI provides a surrogate marker of underlying histopathology, but cannot prospectively distinguish between patients who will continue to experience postoperative seizures and those who will be rendered seizure free. The predictive power of HIA for postoperative seizure outcome in non-lesional patients with TLE should be explored. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Heterogeneity in maize starch granule internal architecture deduced from diffusion of fluorescent dextran probes.

    PubMed

    Dhital, Sushil; Shelat, Kinnari J; Shrestha, Ashok K; Gidley, Michael J

    2013-04-02

    Heterogeneity in maize starch granules was investigated by studying the diffusion of fluorescent dextran probes (20, 70 and 150kDa) inside granules using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching combined with confocal microscopy. Access of probes to the interior of granules was greatly enhanced by limited (2.4%) amylolysis. The diffusion of probes within granules was found to be either 'fast' with diffusion coefficients in the order of 10(-6)cm(2)s(-1) or 'slow' with diffusion coefficients in the order of 10(-7)cm(2)s(-1), independent of the size of dextran probes or prior treatment of the granules by α-amylase. Results were compared with observations of pores and channels in granules by electron microscopy and by confocal microscopy after labelling with 8-amino-1,3,6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid. It is proposed that there is an inherent heterogeneity of internal architecture in maize starch granules due to the presence or absence in individual granules of (a) pores leading to a central cavity, resulting in 'fast' diffusion of dextran probes and (b) accessibility of the starch polymer matrix to dextran probes, leading to 'slow' diffusion behaviour. The observed heterogeneity of maize starch granule porosity has implications for chemical modification reactions and the kinetics of digestion with amylases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The application of product architecture in determining the concept of mini hydrogen cell for petrol powered internal combustion engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nidzamuddin, M. Y.; Nadzirah, T. S.; Juffrizal, K.; Zulfattah, Z. M.; Tan, C. F.; Taha, M. M.; Hidayah, I.; Hilwa, M. Z.

    2015-05-01

    Product architecture is a method to translate the physical element of the functional requirement within the product system and describe the connection between these physical elements. Physical element will be interpreted through parts, component or subassemblies. Method of product architecture is an effective way in determined the conceptual design because it is not only considered the way of the product to be designed but it also focused on how the product will be made, used and even maintaining the product. This paper presents the methodology of the design and development of mini hydrogen cell for petrol powered internal combustion engine through the product architecture method. This method is applied based on the four stages of the product concept development process which is product element, product cluster, product geometry and the morphological chart. From this method, the best option of the concept is selected.

  6. FOREWORD: The 11th International Conference on New Developments and Applications in Optical Radiometry (NEWRAD 2011) The 11th International Conference on New Developments and Applications in Optical Radiometry (NEWRAD 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikonen, Erkki

    2012-04-01

    The NEWRAD Conferences bring together people from the National Metrology Institutes and the principal user communities of advanced radiometry, including Earth observation and climate communities. The eleventh NEWRAD Conference was held in Hawaii, USA, between 18 and 23 September 2011. The Conference was organized by the Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, Maui, at the Grand Wailea resort. The organization was a joint Pacific effort, where handling of the submitted abstracts and website administration were taken care of by KRISS (Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science) and NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology), respectively. As satellite activities, the working groups of CCPR (Consultative Committee for Photometry and Radiometry) and the MOBY project arranged meetings at the Grand Wailea before and after the Conference. The Conference was attended by more than a hundred registered participants from five continents, which matches the number of foreign participants of NEWRAD 2008 at KRISS. A total of 153 papers were presented at NEWRAD 2011, of which 10 were invited talks and 100 posters. The poster sessions during the extended lunch breaks created a stimulating atmosphere for lively discussions and exchange of ideas. A technical visit was arranged to the astronomical observatory at the summit of Haleakala volcano, where some of the world's most advanced telescope systems are operated. The relaxed Hawaiian life, nearby ocean and excellent weather conditions gave an unprecedented flavour to this NEWRAD Conference. The abstract classification system was renewed for NEWRAD 2011, consisting of the following categories: EAO: Earth observation SSR: Solar/stellar radiometry SBR: Source-based radiometry OPM: Optical properties of materials/components DBR: Detector-based radiometry SFR: Single/few-photon radiometry. The new system worked well for refereeing and program purposes. Conference proceedings containing two-page extended abstracts were distributed to the participants on a USB memory stick. These proceedings are also available on the internet at newrad2011.org/program.php and/or newrad2011.aalto.fi. The authors of selected contributions were invited to submit a full paper to this special issue. The submitted papers were handled by the normal reviewing procedures of Metrologia. Two important new topics in radiometry were emphasized in the planning of the scientific program: special sessions of half a day of contributed talks on Earth observation (EAO) and on single/few-photon radiometry (SFR) were included in NEWRAD 2011. The remaining abstract categories listed above are more traditional, but the related contributions contain equally important results, such as analysis of array spectroradiometer data [1], a pulsed laser method for responsivity calibrations [2] and a predictable quantum efficient detector [3], to mention just a few of those. On behalf of the Scientific Committee and all the participants, I thank Mark Yarbrough and his colleagues at the Moss Landing Marine Laboratories for arranging an excellent conference on Maui, Seongchong Park (KRISS) for invaluable help in abstract management, and Benjamin Tsai (NIST) for professional website maintenance. I am deeply grateful to the reviewers and editorial staff of Metrologia for careful processing of the manuscripts of this special issue. It is evident that the special issue will serve as an important reference for radiometry. The next NEWRAD Conference will be organized by Aalto University and MIKES (Centre for Metrology and Accreditation) in Finland during the week 23-27 June 2014. The Chairman of the Local Organizing Committee is Petri Kärhä, who can be contacted at petri.karha@aalto.fi. References [1] Nevas S, Wübbeler G, Sperling A, Elster C and Teuber A 2012 Simultaneous correction of bandpass and stray-light effects in array spectroradiometer data Metrologia 49 S43-7 [2] Zong Y, Brown S W, Eppeldauer G P, Lykke K R and Ohno Y 2012 A new method for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using kilohertz pulsed tunable optical parametric oscillators Metrologia 49 S124-9 [3] Gran J, Kübarsepp T, Sildoja M, Manoocheri F, Ikonen E and Müller I 2012 Simulations of predictable quantum efficient detector with PC1D Metrologia 49 S130-4

  7. Communication Satellite Systems Conference, 11th, San Diego, CA, March 17-20, 1986, Technical Papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-03-01

    User-oriented satellite systems for the 1990's are considered along with a satellite system for aeronautical data communications, the colocation of geostationary communication satellites, an application of intersatellite links to domestic satellite systems, global interconnectivity in the next two decades, an analysis of the Geostar position determination system, and possible architectures for a European data relay satellite system. Attention is given to optimum antenna beam pointing for communication satellites, communications satellites versus fiber optics, spread spectrum-based synchronization of digital satellite transmissions, the Geostationary Satellite Orbit Analysis Program (GSOAP), technology achievements and projections for communication satellites of the future, and trends and development of low noise amplifiers using new FET device. Other topics explored are related to the Omninet mobile satellite system, the Space Transportation System, Japan's launch vehicles, the French military satellite system, and geostationary communications platform payload concepts.

  8. A Scalable, Out-of-Band Diagnostics Architecture for International Space Station Systems Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Daryl P.; Alena, Rick; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The computational infrastructure of the International Space Station (ISS) is a dynamic system that supports multiple vehicle subsystems such as Caution and Warning, Electrical Power Systems and Command and Data Handling (C&DH), as well as scientific payloads of varying size and complexity. The dynamic nature of the ISS configuration coupled with the increased demand for payload support places a significant burden on the inherently resource constrained computational infrastructure of the ISS. Onboard system diagnostics applications are hosted on computers that are elements of the avionics network while ground-based diagnostic applications receive only a subset of available telemetry, down-linked via S-band communications. In this paper we propose a scalable, out-of-band diagnostics architecture for ISS systems support that uses a read-only connection for C&DH data acquisition, which provides a lower cost of deployment and maintenance (versus a higher criticality readwrite connection). The diagnostics processing burden is off-loaded from the avionics network to elements of the on-board LAN that have a lower overall cost of operation and increased computational capacity. A superset of diagnostic data, richer in content than the configured telemetry, is made available to Advanced Diagnostic System (ADS) clients running on wireless handheld devices, affording the crew greater mobility for troubleshooting and providing improved insight into vehicle state. The superset of diagnostic data is made available to the ground in near real-time via an out-of band downlink, providing a high level of fidelity between vehicle state and test, training and operational facilities on the ground.

  9. Is the 10th and 11th Intercostal Space a Safe Approach for Percutaneous Nephrostomy and Nephrolithotomy?

    SciTech Connect

    Muzrakchi, Ahmed Al; Szmigielski, W. Omar, Ahmed J.S.; Younes, Nagy M.

    2004-09-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the rate of complications in percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) and nephrolithotomy (PCNL) performed through the 11th and 10th intercostal spaces using our monitoring technique and to discuss the safety of the procedure. Out of 398 PCNs and PCNLs carried out during a 3-year period, 56 patients had 57 such procedures performed using an intercostal approach. The 11th intercostal route was used in 42 and the 10th in 15 cases. One patient had two separate nephrostomies performed through the 10th and 11th intercostal spaces. The technique utilizes bi-planar fluoroscopy with a combination of a conventional angiographic machine to provide anterior-posterior fluoroscopy and a C-arm mobile fluoroscopy machine to give a lateral view, displayed on two separate monitors. None of the patients had clinically significant thoracic or abdominal complications. Two patients had minor chest complications. Only one developed changes (plate atelectasis, elevation of the hemi-diaphragm) directly related to the nephrostomy (2%). The second patient had bilateral plate atelectasis and unilateral congestive lung changes after PCNL. These changes were not necessarily related to the procedure but rather to general anesthesia during nephrolithotomy. The authors consider PCN or PCNL through the intercostal approach a safe procedure with a negligible complication rate, provided that it is performed under bi-planar fluoroscopy, which allows determination of the skin entry point just below the level of pleural reflection and provides three-dimensional monitoring of advancement of the puncturing needle toward the target entry point.

  10. International Conference on Numerical Methods in Fluid Dynamics, 11th, Williamsburg, VA, June 27-July 1, 1988, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwoyer, D. L. (Editor); Hussaini, M. Y. (Editor); Voigt, R. G. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are discussed in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include CFD models in plasma dynamics, parallel computation for simulation studies, CFD for hypersonic airbreathing aircraft, multigrid methods for the steady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, upwind differencing techniques, TV stable schemes for shock-interacting flows, Euler models of hypersonic vortex flows, parallel multilevel adaptive methods, and vortex methods for slightly viscous three-dimensional flows. Consideration is given to the accuracy of node-based solutions on irregular meshes, multigrid calculations for cascades, a finite-volume-element method for planar cavity flow, parallel heterogeneous mesh refinement for advection-diffusion equations, the convergence of the spectral-viscosity method for nonlinear conservation laws, and numerical simulations of Taylor vortices in a spherical gap.

  11. International Conference on Numerical Methods in Fluid Dynamics, 11th, Williamsburg, VA, June 27-July 1, 1988, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwoyer, D. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Voigt, R. G.

    Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are discussed in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include CFD models in plasma dynamics, parallel computation for simulation studies, CFD for hypersonic airbreathing aircraft, multigrid methods for the steady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, upwind differencing techniques, TV stable schemes for shock-interacting flows, Euler models of hypersonic vortex flows, parallel multilevel adaptive methods, and vortex methods for slightly viscous three-dimensional flows. Consideration is given to the accuracy of node-based solutions on irregular meshes, multigrid calculations for cascades, a finite-volume-element method for planar cavity flow, parallel heterogeneous mesh refinement for advection-diffusion equations, the convergence of the spectral-viscosity method for nonlinear conservation laws, and numerical simulations of Taylor vortices in a spherical gap.

  12. The International Congress on Acoustics (11th) Held at Paris, France on 19-27 July 1983.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-21

    Proceedings) 1. "How We Hear," N.Y.S. Kiang US (paper not published) 2. "The Acoustics of Quantum Liquid Helium Near Absolute Zero," 1. Rudnick US 3...Ripoche (France) 15 22.6 Shock waves in deformable piezoelectric mater- ials B. Collet (France) 22.7 The non-linear interactions in the liquid with K.A...Giminez (France) 22.9 Non-linear acoustic diagnostics of discrete L. Ostrovskii, A. Sutin inhomogeneities in liquids and solids (USSR) 22.10

  13. International Conference on Free Electron Lasers (11th) Conference Digest Held in Naples, Florida on 28 August-1 September 1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    conservative: E(electrons) + E(laser) = constant * Guiding effect are qualitatively recovered for a cost comparable to I D models * Mode competition...R.EFED.ENCES I. J. Murphy and C. Pellegrini, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B2 , 259 Example of a dispersive section is (1985). B0 0< ~2. C. Pellegrini, Nucl...SMALL-PERIOD WIGGLER WORSHOP SUMMARY OF SMALL-PERIOD Permanent magnet wigglers: WIGGLER WORSHOP initially more expensive; no operating costs compatable

  14. Image Understanding. Proceedings of a Workshop (11th) Held at College Park, Maryland, April 30, 1980

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-30

    the Viking Lander Imaging Team. This paper was first presented at l\\K Sixth International Joint Conference on Artificial Intellegence , held in...B.K.P. Horn; MIT Artificial Intell-’ ;nce Laboratory 58 "Random Sample Consensus: A Paradigm for Model Fitting with Applications to Image...on ^ Artificial In[eMjguerire, 197"/, W. L. Eversole, and D. J, Mayer, "Programmable Sum of Products Operator," in this volume. M. S. FOX, and A, J

  15. Studies of the vicarious traumatization of college students by the September 11th attacks: effects of proximity, exposure and connectedness.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Edward B; Kuhn, Eric; Rowell, Dianna L; Hickling, Edward J; Wittrock, David; Rogers, Rebecca L; Johnson, Michelle R; Steckler, Debra C

    2004-02-01

    From mid-October 2001 through the end of November 2001, we collected fairly large sets of questionnaires from undergraduates at three public universities (Albany, NY, n = 507, Augusta, GA, n = 336, Fargo, ND, n = 526 ) to assess rate of acute stress disorder (ASD) and level of ASD symptoms following the September 11th attacks, rate of current posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and level of PTSD symptoms, and current level of depressive symptoms resulting from the September 11th attacks. We also gathered information on exposure to media coverage of the attacks, connectedness to the World Trade Center (WTC) and personnel there, and degree of engagement in reparative acts such as giving blood, attending vigils. We found higher levels of ASD, ASD symptoms, PTSD and PTSD symptoms as a function of geographical proximity to New York City (and within the Albany site, proximity of students' homes) and gender. Exposure (hours of TV watched) was a predictor in some instances as was connectedness to WTC victims. ASD symptoms were the strongest predictor of subsequent PTSD symptoms. Path models accounted for over 60% of the variance in PTSD symptoms.

  16. [Impact of the Activity-Based Financing (11th Version) on glaucoma surgery payment in hospital resources].

    PubMed

    Muselier, A; Mathieu, B; Aube, H; Creuzot-Garcher, C; Bron, A

    2009-12-01

    In this study, the potential impact of 11(th) version of the National Health System's Activity-Based Financing on the income of a University Hospital department was evaluated for glaucoma surgeries. The number of glaucoma surgeries in 2008 was analyzed based on the Medicalization Program of Information Systems. Using the 11(th) version of the Activity-Based Financing for Diagnosis-Related Groups (DRG), we compared the income of these surgical procedures on both an inpatient and an outpatient setting. One hundred and forty-nine patients undergoing glaucoma surgery between January and December 2008 were included, 94% of whom were treated on an outpatient basis. The lower reimbursement for outpatient surgery resulted in a loss of euro 100,000 or 64% of revenues compared to an inpatient procedure. Ambulatory glaucoma surgery is feasible but requires rigorous organization. Nonetheless, while department incomes are related to activity, ambulatory care seems financially disadvantageous. Many departments are trying to develop an ambulatory structure, but the apparent contradiction between the objectives of public health insurance and the hospital's need to balance its budget requires further clarification.

  17. The Development of Learning Model Based on Problem Solving to Construct High-Order Thinking Skill on the Learning Mathematics of 11th Grade in SMA/MA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syahputra, Edi; Surya, Edy

    2017-01-01

    This paper is a summary study of team Postgraduate on 11th grade. The objective of this study is to develop a learning model based on problem solving which can construct high-order thinking on the learning mathematics in SMA/MA. The subject of dissemination consists of Students of 11th grade in SMA/MA in 3 kabupaten/kota in North Sumatera, namely:…

  18. EDITORIAL: Special issue featuring articles arising from the 11th High-Tech Plasma Processes Conference Special issue featuring articles arising from the 11th High-Tech Plasma Processes Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Peter; Degrez, Gérard; Delplancke, Marie-Paule; Gleizes, Alain

    2011-05-01

    The 11th High-Tech Plasma Processes Conference (HTPP) was held in Brussels, Belgium, 27 June-2 July, 2010. HTPP started as a thermal plasma conference and gradually expanded to include low-temperature plasmas. The conference was founded by Jacques Amouroux and Pierre Fauchais, and aims to bring together different scientific communities to facilitate contacts between science, technology and industry, providing a platform for the exploration of elementary processes and applications in and by plasmas. The first HTPP was held in Odeillo, France, in 1990. Since then it has been held every other year in different European cities: Paris, Aachen, Athens, Strasbourg, Saint-Petersburg, Patras and Brussels. The 11th HTPP conference was attended by 125 participants from 19 countries. The program involved 14 invited talks, 34 contributed talks, 72 posters and a software demonstration and hands-on session for plasma modelling. The 12th HTPP conference will be held 24-28 June 2012, in Bologna, Italy. A larger part of the contributions to the 11th HTPP has been published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS) volume 275, 2011. All invited speakers and other contributors, as selected by the Steering, Scientific and Organizing Committee, were invited to submit a paper based on their contributions for this special issue which is peer reviewed by the journal. Both this special issue and the JPCS volume aim to bring the 11th HTPP to a wider audience. The publications are a nice example of the broad topic range of the conference. The JPCS volume contains papers covering fundamental aspects on radiative processes of thermal plasmas, modelling of thermal arcs and non-thermal RF plasma jets, plasma diagnostics including flow and heat flux measurements of thermal plasmas, radical density measurements and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. The applications-oriented contributions of the JPCS volume include plasma spraying, synthesis of (nano-sized) materials, surface

  19. [Analysis on research projects for acupuncture and moxibustion supported by NSFC during the 11th 5-year-plan].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chang-Long; Jing, Xiang-Hong; Li, Yu-Qing; Li, Liang; Rong, Pei-Jing; Wang, Chang-En

    2012-08-01

    In the present paper, the authors introduce the approved and finished research projects for acupuncture and moxibustion therapies supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) during the 11th 5-year-plan. A total of 194 research projects were subsidized by NSFC from 2006 to 2010. These projects include 6 aspects: meridian-collaterals, acupoint theory, acupuncture analgesia, mechanisms underlying improvement of different clinical problems, clinical trials, and moxibustion therapy. The research on acupoints has been becoming a new hotspot in recent years. Majority of the research projects focus on the mechanism of acu-moxibustion underlying improvement of different clinical problems, while fewer projects on clinical trials. During the 11th 5-year-plan, 119 projects were completed; most of them involved meridian-collateral theory, acupoint theory, mechanism of acu-moxibustion underlying improvement of clinical problems and acupuncture manipulations. Following analysis of the finished research projects, we find that 1) many neurobiological methods and techniques are commonly used in the research on meridian-collateral theory; 2) the research on acupoint theory is changing from observing the local morphological structure to identifying characteristics of the regional activated receptors, particularly under the circumstances of visceral pathological conditions and efficacies of acupoints; 3) researches on the underlying mechanism of acu-moxibusiton for improving clinical disorders mainly focused on its cerebral protective effects against cerebral ischemia, in addition, researches about other diseases on clinical conditions have been also carried out, but the related mechanisms are far from understanding; 4) In many research projects, various new methods and techniques, such as fMRI, position emission tomography, genomics, proteomics, molecular biology, nerve stem cell, etc. were widely used; 5) Randomized controlled multi-center clinical trials are

  20. Coastal Impacts of the March 11th Tsunami in the Galapagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynett, P. J.; Weiss, R.; Renteria, W.

    2011-12-01

    On March 11, 2011 at 5:46:23 UTC (March 10 11:46:23 PM Local Time, Galapagos), the magnitude 9.0 Mw Great East Japan Earthquake occurred near the Tohoku region off the east coast of Japan. The purpose of this presentation is to provide the results of a tsunami field survey in the Galapagos Islands performed by an International Tsunami Survey Team (ITST) with great assistance from INOCAR, the oceanographic service of the Ecuadorian Navy, and the Galapagos National Park. The Galapagos Islands are a volcanic chain composed of many islands of various sizes. The four largest islands are the focus of this survey, and are, from west to east, Isabela, Santiagio, Santa Cruz, and San Cristobal. Aside from approximately 10 sandy beaches that are open to tourists, all other shoreline locations are strictly off limits to anyone without a research permit. All access to the shoreline is coordinated through the Galapagos National Park, and any landing requires a chaperone, a Park Ranger. While a few of the visited areas in this survey were tourist sites, the vast majority were not. Due to time constraints and a generally inaccessibility of the coastline, the survey locations were strongly guided by numerical computations performed previous to the surveys. This numerical guidance accurately predicted the regions of highest impact, as well as regions of relatively low impact. Tide-corrected maximum flow elevations were generally in the range of 3-4 meters, while Isabela experienced the largest flow elevation of 6 m in a small pocket beach. The largest harbor in the Islands, Puerto Ayora, experienced moderate damage, with significant flooding and some structural damage. Currents in the Baltra Channel, a small waterway between Santa Cruz and Baltra, were strong enough to transport navigation buoys distances greater than 800 m. Extreme dune erosion, and the associated destruction of sea turtle nesting habit, was widespread and noted on all of the islands visited.

  1. 11th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Materials and Processes, Extended Abstracts and Papers, 19-22 August 2001, Estes Park, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.

    2001-08-16

    The 11th Workshop will provide a forum for an informal exchange of technical and scientific information between international researchers in the photovoltaic and non-photovoltaic fields. Discussions will include the various aspects of impurities and defects in silicon--their properties, the dynamics during device processing, and their application for developing low-cost processes for manufacturing high-efficiency silicon solar cells. Sessions and panel discussions will review impurities and defects in crystalline-silicon PV, advanced cell structures, new processes and process characterization techniques, and future manufacturing demands. The workshop will emphasize some of the promising new technologies in Si solar cell fabrication that can lower PV energy costs and meet the throughput demands of the future. The three-day workshop will consist of presentations by invited speakers, followed by discussion sessions. Topics to be discussed are: Si Mechanical properties and Wafer Handling, Advanced Topics in PV Fundamentals, Gettering and Passivation, Impurities and Defects, Advanced Emitters, Crystalline Silicon Growth, and Solar Cell Processing. The workshop will also include presentations by NREL subcontractors who will review the highlights of their research during the current subcontract period. In addition, there will be two poster sessions presenting the latest research and development results. Some presentations will address recent technologies in the microelectronics field that may have a direct bearing on PV.

  2. Report on the Second International Workshop on Development and Evolution of Software Architectures for Product Families

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-05-01

    evolved to a new ADL called Koala . The group working on analysis from the Polytechnical University of Madrid used various tools including the...Sligte, An Integral Hierarchy and Diversity Model for Describing Product Family Architecture 4. Rob van Ommering, Koala , a Component Model for Consumer

  3. Sensation seeking needs among 8th and 11th graders: characteristics associated with cigarette and marijuana use.

    PubMed

    Kopstein, A N; Crum, R M; Celentano, D D; Martin, S S

    2001-05-01

    This cross-sectional school-based study explored the relationship between adolescent use of cigarettes and marijuana and the sensation seeking personality factors of (1) Disinhibition and (2) Thrill and Adventure Seeking. The study population included a representative sample of both male and female 8th and 11th graders in the state of Delaware. Analytic methods utilized included correlational analysis and multivariate logistic regression. In the multivariate logistic regression models, the Disinhibition personality factor accounted for cigarette and marijuana using behaviors with odds ratios ranging between 2 and 3. Thrill and Adventure Seeking was not a significant explanatory variable in any of the final multivariate models. Potential confounders (age, gender and race) were considered in all analyses. Of all the two-way interactions assessed, none was significant. The findings from this study utilizing a large general community sample indicate that sensation seeking needs are a potential risk factor for adolescent substance use.

  4. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Fridley, David

    2007-07-01

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target for energy-efficiency improvement: energy intensity of the country's gross domestic product (GDP) should be reduced by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). This is the first time that a quantitative and binding target has been set for energy efficiency, and signals a major shift in China's strategic thinking about its long-term economic and energy development. The 20% energy intensity target also translates into an annual reduction of over 1.5 billion tons of CO2 by 2010, making the Chinese effort one of most significant carbon mitigation effort in the world today. While it is still too early to tell whether China will achieve this target, this paper attempts to understand the trend in energy intensity in China and to explore a variety of options toward meeting the 20% target using a detailed end-use energy model.

  5. Rapid Economic Growth and Natural Gas Consumption Nexus: Looking forward from Perspective of 11th Malaysian Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekhet, H. A.; Yasmin, T.

    2016-03-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between economic growth and energy consumption by incorporating CO2 emissions, natural gas consumption and population in Malaysia. Annual data and F-bound test and granger causality have applied to test the existence of long run relationship between the series. The results show that variables are cointegrated for long run relationship. The results also indicate that natural gas consumption is an important contributing factor to energy demand and hence economic growth in case of Malaysia. The causality analysis highlights that the feedback hypothesis exists between economic growth and energy consumption. While, conservative hypothesis is validated between natural gas consumption and economic growth which implies that economic growth will push natural gas consumption policies in future. This study opens up new direction for policy makers to formulate a comprehensive natural gas policy to sustain environment for long span of time in case to achieve 11th MP targets.

  6. CONFERENCE REPORT: Report on the 11th European Fusion Physics Workshop (Heraklion, Crete, 8 10 December 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, D. J.; Bécoulet, A.; Counsell, G.; Federici, G.; Imbeaux, F.; Kirschner, A.; Krieger, K.; Ortolani, S.; Pitts, R.; Philipps, V.; Zastrow, K.-D.

    2005-08-01

    The 11th EFPW took place in December 2003 at Heraklion in Crete, hosted by the Association EURATOM-Greece and the FORTH Institute, Heraklion and sponsored by the European Commission. Within the overall theme of 'plasma-wall interactions (PWI) and their implications for impurity generation and transport', four topics of importance to the future development of magnetically confined fusion were discussed in detail. Key PWI issues for ITER were also reviewed, the programmes of the two European physics task forces, on PWI and on integrated tokamak modelling, were discussed, and several topical reviews on key physics R&D issues for ITER were presented. The main issues discussed and the areas identified as requiring further study are summarized here.

  7. Taking out one billion tones of carbon: the magic of China's 11thFive-Year Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiang; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark D.; Fridley, David

    2007-05-01

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious targetfor energy-efficiency improvement: energy intensity of the country sgross domestic product (GDP) should be reduced by 20 percent from 2005 to2010 (NDRC, 2006). This is the first time that a quantitative and bindingtarget has been set for energy efficiency, and signals a major shift inChina's strategic thinking about its long-term economic and energydevelopment. The 20 percent energy intensity target also translates intoan annual reduction of over one billion tons of CO2 by 2010, making theChinese effort one of most significant carbon mitigation effort in theworld today. While it is still too early to tell whether China willachieve this target, this paper attempts to understand the trend inenergy intensity in China and to explore a variety of options towardmeeting the 20 percent target using a detailed endues energymodel.

  8. The 11th August 2009 Andaman earthquake (Mw 7.6): A plausible cause of its genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, O. P.; Ghosh, D.

    2009-12-01

    The occurrence of a strong sub-oceanic earthquake of Mw 7.6 at Centroid depth of about 20 km in the North Andaman Arc (Latitude: 14.096N; Longitude: 92.926) at 01:25:39 IST has created panic in the most parts of eastern and northern India. The genesis of this mainshock is very much intriguing from scientific point of view due to following reasons: i) The occurrence of the 11th August 2009 North Andaman Mainshock hypocenter (Mw 7.6) is related to the 2004 Sumatra - Andaman megathrust tsunamigenic mainshock (Mw 9.3) [here referred to as SAMTE 9.3] rupture zone that falls in very complicated tectonic settings of the North Andaman Arc where subduction complex and accretionary prism exist very near to the North Andaman trench. ii) The 11th August 2009 North Andaman Mainshock hypocenter (Mw 7.6) falls in the area of earlier demarcated seismically active zone by Geological Survey of India during extensive aftershock monitoring (2004 - 2005) of the SAMTE 9.3 as reported through a series of publications by GSI scientists e.g., Mishra et al., 2005 (GSI Special Publication); Mishra et al. 2006 (Bulletin Seismological Society of America Special Issue, U.S.A); Mishra et al., 2007 (Seismological Research Letters, U.S.A); Mishra and Ghosh, 2008 (Specl. Issue, Indian Minerals). The aftershocks of the 2004 mega-thrust earthquake also located at depths varying from 12 km to 20 km (sP-phase relocation method, Zhao and Mishra et al., 2002; Mishra et al., 2003) where the 11th August 2009 mainshock earthquake (Mw 7.6) rocked.It is, inferred that the 11th August 2009 Andaman earthquake occurred in the previous ruptured zones of the 2004 SAMTE 9.3. iii) The mainshock hypocenter is confined to the zone where north Andaman trench starts bending, which in turn indicates a stressed zone that might have triggered brittle failure by normal faulting. The brittle failure through normal faulting represents a down deep tension, which may be related to the tearing of the subducted Indian plate as

  9. Processing bias for terror-related stimuli and September 11th-related distress in college students.

    PubMed

    Waters, Andrew J; Parrott, W Gerrod; Mogg, Karin; Bradley, Brendan P; Fuller, Mary C; Wertz, Joan M

    2007-12-01

    The psychological sequelae of the September 11th terrorist attacks were examined in 249 college students at three sites in the USA and one site in the UK in the year following the attacks. Participants completed questionnaires tapping 9/ 11-related exposure and distress, and completed a modified Stroop task assessing time to color-name cards containing terror-related and neutral words. Geographical location and amount of exposure to the attacks were significant predictors of self-reported 9/11-related distress, but were not associated with processing bias for terror-related stimuli. Self-reported 9/11-related distress was significantly associated with processing bias, but only in the group (n = 124) which performed the neutral card first. Processing biases for terror-related stimuli are dependent on method of assessment and appear to be more closely tied to self-reported distress than to amount of objective exposure to the attacks.

  10. ROAD BRIDGES IN MINAMI-SANRIKU WASHED AWAY IN THE MARCH 11th 2011 GREAT EAST JAPAN EARTHQUAKE AND TSUNAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglipay, Mary Roxanne I.; Konagai, Kazuo; Kyokawa, Hiroyuki; Keshab, Sharma

    On March 11th, 2011, Minami-Sanriku, located in the northeastern coast of Japan was severely inundated by the tsunami that followed the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011. Road bridges near the coastlines in this area have been extensively damaged with their decks being overturned or carried over long distances. An attempt was made to deduce as rational scenarios as possible before remaining debris was cleaned up. Though the reasons for the washout of bridges can be many and complex, it is to be noted that bridge decks have hollows for the optimum light-weight solution, which fact eventually allowed the bridge decks to be carried over remarkable distances. Poor connection details and cavities, hollows between deck beams, are considered to have facilitated overturning due to uplift forces.

  11. The effect of trade books on the environmental literacy of 11th and 12th graders in aquatic science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Ann S.

    The purpose of this study was to compare the environmental literacy of 11th and 12th graders who participated in an eighteen-week environmental education program using trade books versus 11 th- and 12th-graders who participated in an eighteen-week, traditional environmental education program without the use of trade books. This study was conducted using a quasi-experimental research technique. Four high school aquatic science classes at two suburban high schools were used in the research. One teacher at each high school taught one control class and one experimental class of aquatic science. In the experimental classes, four trade books were read to the classes during the eighteen-week semester. These four books were selected by the participating teachers before the semester began. The books used were A Home by the Sea, Sea Otter Rescue, There's a Hair in My Dirt, and The Missing Gator of Gumbo Limbo. The instrument used to measure environmental literacy was the Children's Environmental Attitude and Knowledge Scale. This test was given at the beginning of the semester and at the end of the semester. The scores at the end of the semester were analyzed by 2 x 2 mixed model ANOVA with the teacher as the random effect and the condition (trade books) as the fixed effect. The statistical analysis of this study showed that the students in the experimental classes did not score higher than the control classes on the Children's Environmental Attitude and Knowledge Scale or on a subset of "water" questions. Several limitations were placed on this research. These limitations included the following: (1) a small number of classes and a small number of teachers, (2) change from the original plan of using environmental science classes to aquatic science classes, (3) possible indifference of the students, and (4) restrictive teaching strategies of the teachers.

  12. Study of the 11th July, 1915, Portuguese offshore earthquake, in the Atlantic from contemporary seismograms and bulletins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batllo-Ortiz, J.; Custodio, S.; Macia, R.; Teves-Costa, P.

    2012-12-01

    The seismicity rate in the contact of the Nubian and Euro-Asiatic plates along the Azores-Gibraltar region can be considered moderate. Nevertheless, large earthquakes do occur, as is well known from historical records. The sensibility of seismographic networks to earthquakes with oceanic origin has been extremely low until recent times. Oceanic M5 earthquakes have not been consistently recorded up to the second third of the XX century, precluding a proper knowledge of seismicity rates and other parameters of interest for earthquake hazard. Nevertheless, information for some events does exist, most of which remains to be properly studied. In this paper we analyze historical data for the 11th July, 1915 earthquake, which occurred offshore and was felt over the whole mainland Portugal. This event is one of the largest occurred during the instrumental period in the region of diffuse seismicity around the Gorringe bank. However it has been little studied, probably because it did not cause serious damage. The 11th July, 1915 earthquake is of great interest due to its size, estimated on the order of M6, and to its unique location with respect to the regions of large earthquakes in the Atlantic. In this paper, we present source parameters for this earthquake based on the analysis of the available contemporary seismograms and related documents. After throughout collection and selection, 23 seismograms obtained at 11 different European stations were digitized and processed. The event was relocated and its magnitude recalculated. Its focal mechanism has also been studied through waveform modeling and first motion polarity. We present the results of this analysis, compare the source of the 1915 earthquake with that of present earthquakes in the same region, and interpret the new results in light of the regional seismicity and seismo-tectonics.

  13. Method for producing components with internal architectures, such as micro-channel reactors, via diffusion bonding sheets

    DOEpatents

    Alman, David E.; Wilson, Rick D.; Davis, Daniel L.

    2011-03-08

    This invention relates to a method for producing components with internal architectures, and more particularly, this invention relates to a method for producing structures with microchannels via the use of diffusion bonding of stacked laminates. Specifically, the method involves weakly bonding a stack of laminates forming internal voids and channels with a first generally low uniaxial pressure and first temperature such that bonding at least between the asperites of opposing laminates occurs and pores are isolated in interfacial contact areas, followed by a second generally higher isostatic pressure and second temperature for final bonding. The method thereby allows fabrication of micro-channel devices such as heat exchangers, recuperators, heat-pumps, chemical separators, chemical reactors, fuel processing units, and combustors without limitation on the fin aspect ratio.

  14. Évolution temporelle et architecture interne d'un banc sableux estuarien : la Longe de Boyard (littoral atlantique, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaumillon, Éric; Gillet, Hervé; Weber, Nicolas; Tesson, Michel

    The evolution and the internal architecture of an estuary type sand ridge has been studied with a set of bathymetric data recorded during the last two centuries and with a dense grid of recent very high resolution seismic profiles. Bathymetric data of the so-called, Longe de Boyard sand ridge, displays sand losts due to wave and tide erosion. Internal geometry, through seismic profile analysis, indicates two main phases of deposition recording both, a recent high energy environment and an older low energy one, respectively. Such an evolution is believed to record changes in sedimentation processes mainly related to the end of the Holocene transgression (8 000-5 000 yr BP). To cite this article: É. Chaumillon et al., C. R. Geoscience 334 (2002) 119-126.

  15. Threat appraisals, distress and the development of positive life changes after September 11th in a Canadian sample.

    PubMed

    Davis, Christopher G; Macdonald, Stephanie L

    2004-01-01

    Several surveys have reported the negative psychological impact on the general public of the terrorist attacks in the USA of September 11th, 2001. Yet the attacks also led many people to make positive changes in their relationships, values and priorities. A survey of 80 adults in Ottawa, Canada demonstrated that greater perceived threat and greater initial distress reactions significantly predicted the extent to which people reported positive changes in their lives (e.g. closer to family, refocused priorities). Initial distress and greater perceived threat also correlated positively with whether people provided help after the disaster. Follow-up data on 40 of these participants 11 months later revealed significant stability over time for the extent of positive life changes reported, and demonstrated that degree of initial distress and perceived threat continued to correlate positively with life change reports at this later point in time. The data are consistent with the argument that the perception of growth may develop out of one's personal experience of emotional pain.

  16. Increased use of cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana among Manhattan, New York, residents after the September 11th terrorist attacks.

    PubMed

    Vlahov, David; Galea, Sandro; Resnick, Heidi; Ahern, Jennifer; Boscarino, Joseph A; Bucuvalas, Michael; Gold, Joel; Kilpatrick, Dean

    2002-06-01

    The September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks were the largest human-made disaster in the United States since the Civil War. Studies after earlier disasters have reported rates of psychological disorders in the acute postdisaster period. However, data on postdisaster increases in substance use are sparse. A random digit dial telephone survey was conducted to estimate the prevalence of increased cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and marijuana use among residents of Manhattan, New York City, 5-8 weeks after the attacks. Among 988 persons included, 28.8% reported an increase in use of any of these three substances, 9.7% reported an increase in smoking, 24.6% reported an increase in alcohol consumption, and 3.2% reported an increase in marijuana use. Persons who increased smoking of cigarettes and marijuana were more likely to experience posttraumatic stress disorder than were those who did not (24.2% vs. 5.6% posttraumatic stress disorder for cigarettes; 36.0% vs. 6.6% for marijuana). Depression was more common among those who increased than for those who did not increase cigarette smoking (22.1 vs. 8.2%), alcohol consumption (15.5 vs. 8.3%), and marijuana smoking (22.3 vs. 9.4%). The results of this study suggest a substantial increase in substance use in the acute postdisaster period after the September 11th attacks. Increase in use of different substances may be associated with the presence of different comorbid psychiatric conditions.

  17. Using Guided Notes to Increase the Understanding of Anatomy and Physiology in 11th Grade Science Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariano, Jay

    A survey of over 500 science teachers reported that two thirds of their science classes were lecture based lessons where students were required to listen and take notes (Boyle, 2010). In addition to taking notes from lectures, note taking is a necessary skill to possess to record scientific observations and procedures and record information during class. Guided notes is a pedagogical method in which the instructor prepares and provides students with a modified form of lecture information to guide students (Neef, McCord, & Ferreri, 2006). This study examined the extent to which the use of guided notes in a unit of study of the muscular system of anatomy and physiology positively affected the mastery on content-based assessments for 11 th grade students. The data collection methods included quiz and test scores, a 4-point Likert scale survey, and an open-ended questionnaire. Results of the data revealed that guided notes was one factor that led to mastery in learning content. Additionally, students in this study preferred this method as it helped them to distinguish relevant information allowing more time to listen and focus on the teacher.

  18. Use of skills learned in CBT for fear of flying: managing flying anxiety after September 11th.

    PubMed

    Kim, Simon; Palin, Frances; Anderson, Page; Edwards, Shannan; Lindner, Gretchen; Rothbaum, Barbara Olisov

    2008-01-01

    Although there is evidence that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is effective in the treatment for fear of flying (FOF), there are no studies that specifically examine which skills taught in treatment are being used by clients after treatment is completed. This study examines whether participants report using skills taught in treatment for FOF after treatment is completed and whether the reported use of these skills is associated with reduced flying anxiety in the face of fear-relevant event, the September 11th terrorist attacks, and over the long-term. One hundred fifteen participants were randomly assigned to and completed eight sessions of individual CBT treatment for FOF. Fifty-five participants were reassessed in June 2002, an average of 2.3 years after treatment. Surveys were also collected from 33 individuals who did not receive treatment for FOF. Results indicated that treatment completers were more likely to report using skills taught in treatment than individuals who had not received treatment. In addition, self-reported use of skills among previously treated individuals was associated with lower levels of flying anxiety. These findings suggest that use of skills taught in CBT treatment is associated with reduced flying anxiety in the face of a fear-relevant event and over the long term.

  19. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; Mcneil, Michael; Levine, Mark

    2011-03-01

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target to reduce the energy intensity per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). In the building sector, the primary energy-saving target allocated during the 11 FYP period is 100 Mtce. Savings are expected to be achieved through the strengthening of enforcement of building energy efficiency codes, existing building retrofits and heat supply system reform, followed by energy management of government office buildings and large scale public buildings, adoption of renewable energy sources. To date, China has reported that it achieved the half of the 20% intensity reduction target by the end of 2008, however, little has been made clear on the status and the impact of the building programs. There has also been lack of description on methodology for calculating the savings and baseline definition, and no total savings that have been officially reported to date. This paper intends to provide both quantitative and qualitative assessment of the key policies and programs in building sector that China has instituted in its quest to fulfill the national goal. Overall, this paper concludes that the largest improvement for building energy efficiency were achieved in new buildings; the program to improve the energy management in government and large scale public buildings are in line with the target; however the progress in the area of existing building retrofits, particularly heating supply system reform lags behind the stated goal by a large amount.

  20. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael; Levine, Mark

    2010-06-07

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target to reduce the energy intensity per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). In the building sector, the primary energy-saving target allocated during the 11 FYP period is 100 Mtce. Savings are expected to be achieved through the strengthening of enforcement of building energy efficiency codes, existing building retrofits and heat supply system reform, followed by energy management of government office buildings and large scale public buildings, adoption of renewable energy sources. To date, China has reported that it achieved the half of the 20% intensity reduction target by the end of 2008, however, little has been made clear on the status and the impact of the building programs. There has also been lack of description on methodology for calculating the savings and baseline definition, and no total savings that have been officially reported to date. This paper intend to provide both quantitative and qualitative assessment of the key policies and programs in building sector that China has instituted in its quest to fulfill the national goal. Overall, this paper concludes that the largest improvement for building energy efficiency were achieved in new buildings; the program to improve the energy management in government and large scale public buildings are in line with the target; however the progress in the area of existing building retrofit particularly heat supply system reform lags the stated goal by a large amount.

  1. The behavioral impacts of firm-level energy-conservation goals in China's 11th five-year plan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Xu, Yuan; Leung, Yee; Yung, Chor Wing

    2015-01-06

    Energy efficiency is one of the most effective means of curbing energy consumption and associated pollutant emissions. However, energy-saving opportunities at negative net costs, or an energy-efficiency gap, widely exist and they defy an entirely rational explanation. This paper examines the significant overperformance of energy-intensive firms against their assigned energy-conservation goals in a national program in China's 11th Five-Year plan (2006-2010). Higher energy prices can be only partially responsible for more active energy saving. Behavioral constraints are explained to cause the bounded rationality of firms on energy-efficiency investment. As our theoretical and empirical studies show, energy-conservation goals could overcome such behavioral constraints to accelerate the commercialization of energy-efficiency technologies, reduce uncertainty and hesitancy of relevant investment, facilitate the enrichment of information, and concentrate the attention of firms on energy conservation. We conclude that goal-setting could provide an effective complementary policy instrument in dealing with energy conservation in China and possibly in other parts of the world.

  2. A novel method for biomaterial scaffold internal architecture design to match bone elastic properties with desired porosity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng Yu; Kikuchi, Noboru; Hollister, Scott J

    2004-05-01

    An often-proposed tissue engineering design hypothesis is that the scaffold should provide a biomimetic mechanical environment for initial function and appropriate remodeling of regenerating tissue while concurrently providing sufficient porosity for cell migration and cell/gene delivery. To provide a systematic study of this hypothesis, the ability to precisely design and manufacture biomaterial scaffolds is needed. Traditional methods for scaffold design and fabrication cannot provide the control over scaffold architecture design to achieve specified properties within fixed limits on porosity. The purpose of this paper was to develop a general design optimization scheme for 3D internal scaffold architecture to match desired elastic properties and porosity simultaneously, by introducing the homogenization-based topology optimization algorithm (also known as general layout optimization). With an initial target for bone tissue engineering, we demonstrate that the method can produce highly porous structures that match human trabecular bone anisotropic stiffness using accepted biomaterials. In addition, we show that anisotropic bone stiffness may be matched with scaffolds of widely different porosity. Finally, we also demonstrate that prototypes of the designed structures can be fabricated using solid free-form fabrication (SFF) techniques.

  3. Internal architecture of a raised beach ridge system (Anholt, Denmark) resolved by ground-penetrating radar investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemmensen, Lars B.; Nielsen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The internal architecture of raised beach ridge and associated swale deposits on Anholt records an ancient sea level. The Holocene beach ridges form part of a progradational beach ridge plain, which has been interpreted to have formed during an isostatic uplift and a relative fall in the sea level over the past 7700 years. The ridges are covered by pebbles and cobbles and commonly show evidence of deflation. Material presumably removed from the beach ridges and adjacent swales form the present dune forms on Anholt. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) reflection lines have been collected with 250 MHz shielded antennae across the fossil ridge and swale structures. The signals penetrate the subsurface to a maximum depth of ˜ 10 m below the fossil features. The GPR data resolve the internal architecture of the beach ridges and swales with a vertical resolution of about 0.1 m. GPR mapping indicates that the Holocene beach ridges are composed of seaward-dipping beachface deposits as well as minor amounts of inland dipping deposits of wash-over origin. The beachface deposits downlap on underlying shoreface deposits, and we use these surfaces as markers of a relative palaeo-sea level. The new data indicate that the highest relative sea level at about 8.5 m was reached 6500 years ago; 700 years later the relative sea level had dropped 0.7 m indicating a change in the relative sea level around 1 mm/year. This fall in the relative sea level most likely records the influence of an isostatic rebound causing younger beach ridge deposits to indicate lower sea levels.

  4. The Advanced Program of Vocational Agriculture in Louisiana. Ag III and Ag IV (11th and 12th Grades). Volume II. Bulletin No. 1725.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide consists of materials for use in teaching an advanced course in agricultural mechanics designed for 11th and 12th grade students. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are arc welding; oxy-acetylene welding; soldering; electricity; tractor maintenance, operation, and safety; small engines; farm structures; and cold…

  5. Empowering the CBE Practitioner. Proceedings of the Annual CBAE National Conference (11th, Washington, D.C., October 20-21, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Adult and Continuing Education, Washington, DC. Adult Competency Education Unit.

    These proceedings include a brief overview of the 11th Competency-Based Adult Education (CBAE) Conference along with the texts of the following conference presentations: "National Legislative Update" (Patricia M. Keeton); "Adult School/High-Risk Youth Connection--Is There One?" (Joellen Bruce); "Overview of Adult ESL Programs: A National…

  6. Post-September 11Th Perspectives on Religion, Spirituality, and Philosophy in the Personal and Professional Lives of Selected REBT Cognoscenti

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinrach, Stephen G.; Dryden, Windy; DiMattia, Dominic J.; Doyle, Kristene A.; MacLaren, Catherine; O'Kelly, Monica; Malkinson, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article was for selected Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) cognoscenti to examine the impact of the events of September 11th, 2001, on their beliefs about religion, spirituality and their personal philosophy--including the role of evil in the universe and the implications of these issues on their use of REBT. The degree…

  7. Post-September 11Th Perspectives on Religion, Spirituality, and Philosophy in the Personal and Professional Lives of Selected Rebt Cognoscenti: A Response to My Colleagues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Albert

    2004-01-01

    This is a discussion and evaluation of the views of the authors of the article "Post-September 11th Perspectives on Religion, Spirituality, and Philosophy in the Personal and Professional Lives of Selected REBT Cognoscenti." Several of the authors are shown to endorse most of the main principles and practices of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy…

  8. The Advanced Program of Vocational Agriculture in Louisiana. Ag III and Ag IV (11th and 12th Grades). Volume I. Bulletin No. 1725.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide consists of materials for use in teaching an advanced course in vocational agriculture designed for 11th and 12th grade students. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: farm and agribusiness planning, employment-seeking skills, agricultural chemicals, and conservation. Each unit includes a…

  9. Correlations among Five Demographic Variables and the Performance of Selected Jamaican 11th-Graders on Some Numerical Problems on Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emepue, Nicholas; Soyibo, Kola

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to assess whether the level of performance of selected Jamaican 11th-grade physics students on some numerical problems on the energy concept was satisfactory and if there were significant differences in their performance linked to their gender, socioeconomic background (SEB), school location, English language and…

  10. Post-September 11Th Perspectives on Religion, Spirituality, and Philosophy in the Personal and Professional Lives of Selected REBT Cognoscenti

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinrach, Stephen G.; Dryden, Windy; DiMattia, Dominic J.; Doyle, Kristene A.; MacLaren, Catherine; O'Kelly, Monica; Malkinson, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article was for selected Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) cognoscenti to examine the impact of the events of September 11th, 2001, on their beliefs about religion, spirituality and their personal philosophy--including the role of evil in the universe and the implications of these issues on their use of REBT. The degree…

  11. Post-September 11Th Perspectives on Religion, Spirituality, and Philosophy in the Personal and Professional Lives of Selected Rebt Cognoscenti: A Response to My Colleagues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Albert

    2004-01-01

    This is a discussion and evaluation of the views of the authors of the article "Post-September 11th Perspectives on Religion, Spirituality, and Philosophy in the Personal and Professional Lives of Selected REBT Cognoscenti." Several of the authors are shown to endorse most of the main principles and practices of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy…

  12. Healthcare Coverage and Disability Evaluation for Reserve Component Personnel: Research for the 11th Quadrennial Review of Military Compensation.

    PubMed

    Hosek, Susan D

    2012-01-01

    Because Reserve Component (RC) members have been increasingly used in an operational capacity, among the policy issues being addressed by the 11th Quadrennial Review of Military Compensation (QRMC) is compensation and benefits for the National Guard and Reserve. As part of the review, RAND was asked to analyze healthcare coverage and disability benefits for RC members, including participation in the TRICARE Reserve Select (TRS) program, the potential effects of national health reform on coverage rates, and disability evaluation outcomes for RC members. This article summarizes the results of RAND's analysis. The author finds that 30 percent of RC members lack health insurance to cover care for non-service-related conditions. The TRS program offers the option of purchasing health insurance through the military on terms that are superior to typical employer benefits. Although program participation has increased, it remains low and TRS does not appear to be effectively targeting those most likely to be uninsured. TRS premiums are also lower than the premiums for the new options that will be available under health reform and the same as the penalty for not being insured. So health reform is likely to increase TRS enrollment. Finally, previously deployed RC members are referred to the Disability Evaluation System at a much lower rate than Active Component (AC) members, even for deployment-related conditions, but those who are referred receive dispositions (and thus benefits) similar to those for AC members. These findings suggest that the Department of Defense may want to consider ways to better coordinate TRS with other insurance options that will be available to RC members and that the identification of RC members who experience health consequences from deployment leading to disability merits further investigation.

  13. AN INTERNAL CONVECTIVE HEATING TECHNIQUE FOR DIFFUSION BONDING ARRAYED MICROCHANNEL ARCHITECTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Brian; Bose, Sumantra; Palo, Daniel R.

    2010-01-08

    Diffusion bonding cycle times can be a large factor in the production cost of metal microchannel devices. The challenge is to significantly minimize bonding cycle times through rapid heating and cooling within the bonding process. A novel method is described which takes advantage of the internal flow passages within microchannel devices for convective heat transfer during the bonding process. The internal convective heating (ICH) technique makes use of heated inert gas to provide the microchannel assembly with rapid and uniform heat input. Results demonstrate that the ICH technique is feasible, capable of producing microchannels with higher dimensional integrity and shorter bonding cycle times than traditional vacuum hot press methods. Results suggest that this may be due to smaller thermal gradients within microchannel devices during the ICH bonding cycle.

  14. An Internal Model Architecture for Novelty Detection: Implications for Cerebellar and Collicular Roles in Sensory Processing

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Sean R.; Porrill, John; Pearson, Martin J.; Pipe, Anthony G.; Prescott, Tony J.; Dean, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum is thought to implement internal models for sensory prediction, but details of the underlying circuitry are currently obscure. We therefore investigated a specific example of internal-model based sensory prediction, namely detection of whisker contacts during whisking. Inputs from the vibrissae in rats can be affected by signals generated by whisker movement, a phenomenon also observable in whisking robots. Robot novelty-detection can be improved by adaptive noise-cancellation, in which an adaptive filter learns a forward model of the whisker plant that allows the sensory effects of whisking to be predicted and thus subtracted from the noisy sensory input. However, the forward model only uses information from an efference copy of the whisking commands. Here we show that the addition of sensory information from the whiskers allows the adaptive filter to learn a more complex internal model that performs more robustly than the forward model, particularly when the whisking-induced interference has a periodic structure. We then propose a neural equivalent of the circuitry required for adaptive novelty-detection in the robot, in which the role of the adaptive filter is carried out by the cerebellum, with the comparison of its output (an estimate of the self-induced interference) and the original vibrissal signal occurring in the superior colliculus, a structure noted for its central role in novelty detection. This proposal makes a specific prediction concerning the whisker-related functions of a region in cerebellar cortical zone A2 that in rats receives climbing fibre input from the superior colliculus (via the inferior olive). This region has not been observed in non-whisking animals such as cats and primates, and its functional role in vibrissal processing has hitherto remained mysterious. Further investigation of this system may throw light on how cerebellar-based internal models could be used in broader sensory, motor and cognitive contexts. PMID

  15. Unmet need for counseling services by children in New York City after the September 11th attacks on the World Trade Center: implications for pediatricians.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, Gerry; Stuber, Jennifer; Galea, Sandro; Pfefferbaum, Betty; Fleischman, Alan R

    2004-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the prevalence of counseling services, contrasted with the need after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the types of counseling received, and the predictors of receipt of counseling services. A cross-sectional, random-digit-dial survey was conducted in New York City (NYC) of parents (N = 434) of children who were 4 to 17 years of age 4 months after the September 11th terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center. Overall, 10% of NYC children received some type of counseling after the September 11th attacks, according to parental report. Among these, 44% received counseling in schools, 36% received counseling from medical or professional providers, and 20% received counseling from other sources. However, only 27% of the children who had severe/very severe posttraumatic stress reactions (PTSR) after the attacks received counseling services. In a multivariate model, receipt of counseling before the September 11th attacks (odds ratio: 4.44) and having severe/very severe PTSR (odds ratio: 3.59) were the most important predictors of use of counseling services after the September 11th attacks. Minority status and having a parent who experienced the loss of a friend or a relative were also associated with receipt of services. There was substantial disparity between apparent need (as indicated by severe/very severe PTSR) for and receipt of mental health services for children after the September 11th attacks. There is need for intensified efforts to identify, refer, and treat children in need, especially for children who are not already in a therapeutic relationship. An enhanced role for pediatricians is indicated.

  16. The internal architecture of leukocyte lipid body organelles captured by three-dimensional electron microscopy tomography.

    PubMed

    Melo, Rossana C N; Paganoti, Guillherme F; Dvorak, Ann M; Weller, Peter F

    2013-01-01

    Lipid bodies (LBs), also known as lipid droplets, are complex organelles of all eukaryotic cells linked to a variety of biological functions as well as to the development of human diseases. In cells from the immune system, such as eosinophils, neutrophils and macrophages, LBs are rapidly formed in the cytoplasm in response to inflammatory and infectious diseases and are sites of synthesis of eicosanoid lipid mediators. However, little is known about the structural organization of these organelles. It is unclear whether leukocyte LBs contain a hydrophobic core of neutral lipids as found in lipid droplets from adipocytes and how diverse proteins, including enzymes involved in eicosanoid formation, incorporate into LBs. Here, leukocyte LB ultrastructure was studied in detail by conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immunogold EM and electron tomography. By careful analysis of the two-dimensional ultrastructure of LBs from human blood eosinophils under different conditions, we identified membranous structures within LBs in both resting and activated cells. Cyclooxygenase, a membrane inserted protein that catalyzes the first step in prostaglandin synthesis, was localized throughout the internum of LBs. We used fully automated dual-axis electron tomography to study the three-dimensional architecture of LBs in high resolution. By tracking 4 nm-thick serial digital sections we found that leukocyte LBs enclose an intricate system of membranes within their "cores". After computational reconstruction, we showed that these membranes are organized as a network of tubules which resemble the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Our findings explain how membrane-bound proteins interact and are spatially arranged within LB "cores" and support a model for LB formation by incorporating cytoplasmic membranes of the ER, instead of the conventional view that LBs emerge from the ER leaflets. This is important to understand the functional capabilities of leukocyte LBs in health and

  17. The Internal Architecture of Leukocyte Lipid Body Organelles Captured by Three-Dimensional Electron Microscopy Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Rossana C. N.; Paganoti, Guillherme F.; Dvorak, Ann M.; Weller, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    Lipid bodies (LBs), also known as lipid droplets, are complex organelles of all eukaryotic cells linked to a variety of biological functions as well as to the development of human diseases. In cells from the immune system, such as eosinophils, neutrophils and macrophages, LBs are rapidly formed in the cytoplasm in response to inflammatory and infectious diseases and are sites of synthesis of eicosanoid lipid mediators. However, little is known about the structural organization of these organelles. It is unclear whether leukocyte LBs contain a hydrophobic core of neutral lipids as found in lipid droplets from adipocytes and how diverse proteins, including enzymes involved in eicosanoid formation, incorporate into LBs. Here, leukocyte LB ultrastructure was studied in detail by conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immunogold EM and electron tomography. By careful analysis of the two-dimensional ultrastructure of LBs from human blood eosinophils under different conditions, we identified membranous structures within LBs in both resting and activated cells. Cyclooxygenase, a membrane inserted protein that catalyzes the first step in prostaglandin synthesis, was localized throughout the internum of LBs. We used fully automated dual-axis electron tomography to study the three-dimensional architecture of LBs in high resolution. By tracking 4 nm-thick serial digital sections we found that leukocyte LBs enclose an intricate system of membranes within their “cores”. After computational reconstruction, we showed that these membranes are organized as a network of tubules which resemble the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Our findings explain how membrane-bound proteins interact and are spatially arranged within LB “cores” and support a model for LB formation by incorporating cytoplasmic membranes of the ER, instead of the conventional view that LBs emerge from the ER leaflets. This is important to understand the functional capabilities of leukocyte LBs in

  18. Multinomial logistic functions in markov chain models of sleep architecture: internal and external validation and covariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Bizzotto, Roberto; Zamuner, Stefano; Mezzalana, Enrica; De Nicolao, Giuseppe; Gomeni, Roberto; Hooker, Andrew C; Karlsson, Mats O

    2011-09-01

    Mixed-effect Markov chain models have been recently proposed to characterize the time course of transition probabilities between sleep stages in insomniac patients. The most recent one, based on multinomial logistic functions, was used as a base to develop a final model combining the strengths of the existing ones. This final model was validated on placebo data applying also new diagnostic methods and then used for the inclusion of potential age, gender, and BMI effects. Internal validation was performed through simplified posterior predictive check (sPPC), visual predictive check (VPC) for categorical data, and new visual methods based on stochastic simulation and estimation and called visual estimation check (VEC). External validation mainly relied on the evaluation of the objective function value and sPPC. Covariate effects were identified through stepwise covariate modeling within NONMEM VI. New model features were introduced in the model, providing significant sPPC improvements. Outcomes from VPC, VEC, and external validation were generally very good. Age, gender, and BMI were found to be statistically significant covariates, but their inclusion did not improve substantially the model's predictive performance. In summary, an improved model for sleep internal architecture has been developed and suitably validated in insomniac patients treated with placebo. Thereafter, covariate effects have been included into the final model.

  19. Investigating internal architecture effect in plastic deformation and failure for TPMS-based scaffolds using simulation methods and experimental procedure.

    PubMed

    Kadkhodapour, J; Montazerian, H; Raeisi, S

    2014-10-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) has been a promising technique for producing tissue engineering scaffolds which mimic the behavior of host tissue as properly as possible. Biodegradability, agreeable feasibility of cell growth, and migration parallel to mechanical properties, such as strength and energy absorption, have to be considered in design procedure. In order to study the effect of internal architecture on the plastic deformation and failure pattern, the architecture of triply periodic minimal surfaces which have been observed in nature were used. P and D surfaces at 30% and 60% of volume fractions were modeled with 3∗3∗ 3 unit cells and imported to Objet EDEN 260 3-D printer. Models were printed by VeroBlue FullCure 840 photopolymer resin. Mechanical compression test was performed to investigate the compressive behavior of scaffolds. Deformation procedure and stress-strain curves were simulated by FEA and exhibited good agreement with the experimental observation. Current approaches for predicting dominant deformation mode under compression containing Maxwell's criteria and scaling laws were also investigated to achieve an understanding of the relationships between deformation pattern and mechanical properties of porous structures. It was observed that effect of stress concentration in TPMS-based scaffolds resultant by heterogeneous mass distribution, particularly at lower volume fractions, led to a different behavior from that of typical cellular materials. As a result, although more parameters are considered for determining dominant deformation in scaling laws, two mentioned approaches could not exclusively be used to compare the mechanical response of cellular materials at the same volume fraction.

  20. Internal architecture of the Tuxtla volcanic field, Veracruz, Mexico, inferred from gravity and magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espindola, Juan Manuel; Lopez-Loera, Hector; Mena, Manuel; Zamora-Camacho, Araceli

    2016-09-01

    The Tuxtla Volcanic Field (TVF) is a basaltic volcanic field emerging from the plains of the western margin of the Gulf of Mexico in the Mexican State of Veracruz. Separated by hundreds of kilometers from the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt to the NW and the Chiapanecan Volcanic Arc to the SE, it stands detached not only in location but also in the composition of its rocks, which are predominantly alkaline. These characteristics make its origin somewhat puzzling. Furthermore, one of the large volcanoes of the field, San Martin Tuxtla, underwent an eruptive period in historical times (CE 1793). Such volcanic activity conveys particular importance to the study of the TVF from the perspective of volcanology and hazard assessment. Despite the above circumstances, few investigations about its internal structure have been reported. In this work, we present analyses of gravity and aeromagnetic data obtained from different sources. We present the complete Bouguer anomaly of the area and its separation into regional and residual components. The aeromagnetic data were processed to yield the reduction to the pole, the analytic signal, and the upward continuation to complete the interpretation of the gravity analyses. Three-dimensional density models of the regional and residual anomalies were obtained by inversion of the gravity signal adding the response of rectangular prisms at the nodes of a regular grid. We obtained a body with a somewhat flattened top at 16 km below sea level from the inversion of the regional. Three separate slender bodies with tops 6 km deep were obtained from the inversion of the residual. The gravity and magnetic anomalies, as well as the inferred source bodies that produce those geophysical anomalies, lie between the Sontecomapan and Catemaco faults, which are proposed as flower structures associated with an inferred deep-seated fault termed the Veracruz Fault. These fault systems along with magma intrusion at the lower crust are necessary features to

  1. Plantar aponeurosis and internal architecture of the ball of the foot.

    PubMed Central

    Bojsen-Moller, F; Flagstad, K E

    1976-01-01

    On the basis of its internal structure, the ball of the foot can be divided into three transverse areas, each with a different mechanical function: (1) an area proximal to the heads of the metatarsals in which the retinacula cutis are developed into a series of transverse bands, and in which the deep fibres of the plantar aponeurosis form ten sagittal septa connected to the deep transverse metatarsal ligament and through this the proximal phalanges of the toes, (2) an area below the heads of the metatarsals in which vertical fibres from the joint capsules and the sides of the fibrous flexor sheaths form a cushion below each metatarsal head, and in which fat bodies cover the digital nerves and vessels in their passage between the cushions, and (3) a distal area which comprises the interdigital web. The superficial fibres of the plantar aponeurosis are inserted into the skin of this distal area, and deep to them the plantar interdigital ligament forms a series of transverse lamellae connected to the proximal phalanges by a mooring ligament which arches from one fibrous flexor sheath to the next. When the metatarsophalangeal joints are extended, the fibres of the three areas are tensed and the skin is anchored firmly to the skeleton. The direction of the fibres in the distal and proximal area promotes the transfer of forces exerted on the skin during push-off and braking respectively, while the intermediate area is adapted to bear the weight of the body. A concentration of Pacinian corpuscles is found along the digital nerves in the weight-bearing area below the transverse metatarsal ligament. The nerves for the second, and especially for the third, interstice are close to or in contact with the sharp proximal edges of the sagittal septa. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:1018010

  2. Plantar aponeurosis and internal architecture of the ball of the foot.

    PubMed

    Bojsen-Moller, F; Flagstad, K E

    1976-07-01

    On the basis of its internal structure, the ball of the foot can be divided into three transverse areas, each with a different mechanical function: (1) an area proximal to the heads of the metatarsals in which the retinacula cutis are developed into a series of transverse bands, and in which the deep fibres of the plantar aponeurosis form ten sagittal septa connected to the deep transverse metatarsal ligament and through this the proximal phalanges of the toes, (2) an area below the heads of the metatarsals in which vertical fibres from the joint capsules and the sides of the fibrous flexor sheaths form a cushion below each metatarsal head, and in which fat bodies cover the digital nerves and vessels in their passage between the cushions, and (3) a distal area which comprises the interdigital web. The superficial fibres of the plantar aponeurosis are inserted into the skin of this distal area, and deep to them the plantar interdigital ligament forms a series of transverse lamellae connected to the proximal phalanges by a mooring ligament which arches from one fibrous flexor sheath to the next. When the metatarsophalangeal joints are extended, the fibres of the three areas are tensed and the skin is anchored firmly to the skeleton. The direction of the fibres in the distal and proximal area promotes the transfer of forces exerted on the skin during push-off and braking respectively, while the intermediate area is adapted to bear the weight of the body. A concentration of Pacinian corpuscles is found along the digital nerves in the weight-bearing area below the transverse metatarsal ligament. The nerves for the second, and especially for the third, interstice are close to or in contact with the sharp proximal edges of the sagittal septa.

  3. Subsurface Investigation of the Internal Architecture of Massawepie Esker-Mire Complex, Gale, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupp, J. R.; Davis, J. L.; Robinson, S. D.

    2005-05-01

    The retreat of the Laurentide Ice Sheet from the Adirondack Highlands of northern New York approximately 12,500 yr. B.P. led to the development of a landscape marked by glaciofluvial landforms such as kames, outwash, kettles and eskers. The Gale, New York study site (44o 15'N, 74o38'W) contains a prominent esker approximately 30 m high that trends northeast/southwest for 12 km. A 364 ha ombrotrophic peatland underlain by outwash lies adjacent to the esker along a portion of its length. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) surveys were conducted on the esker and peatland areas, as well as at the contact between these landforms in an attempt to establish possible linkages between their environmental, developmental and topographic settings. Using 50 and 100 MHz antennas, the esker profiles yielded a signal penetration of approximately 20 m through primarily sand. Interpreted facies showed reflector beds of variable continuity indicative of both turbulent and laminar flow, chute and pool structures, erosional unconformities, random boulder distribution and diagenetic failure planes. On the peatland, the surveys were successful in mapping internal structure and development of the peat, and delineation of a relatively flat basal outwash unit dated at 5,600 yr. B.P. at approximately 3 m depth. The basal unit consists of medium to coarse grained sand, with discrete portions of the bed raised 2 m above the high amplitude basal reflectors suggesting possible channelization. The preliminary interpretation of a channelized base suggests that there is a link between the esker and peatland. The sinuous form of the infilled subglacial network suggests that the rise in the peatland base may be a remnant of an esker branch. This smaller remnant branch bounded by shallow stagnant ice depressions could create a landscape that would encourage peatland development. The peatland currently has three different floral zones showing different levels of wetland maturation possibly reflective of

  4. Analysis of physics textbooks for 10th and 11th grades in accordance with the 2013 secondary school physics curriculum from the perspective of project-based learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavcar, Nevzat; Erdem, Aytekin

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to investigate the 10th and 11th grade Physics textbooks in accordance with the 2013 Secondary School Physics Curriculum from the perspective of project-based learning method and to share the results with the physics education public. The research was carried out in the 2015-2016 academic year as part of an undergraduate course taught in physics teaching program at a faculty of education; and 10 senior students of physics teachercandidates participated in the study. The research method is the survey model based on qualitative research approach. Data collection tools consist of the reports written by the participants who examined the curriculum and textbooks for project-based learning problems. According to research findings, most of the educational gains in the 10th and 11th grade physics textbooks were supported with experimental activities; however, project-based assignments are needed.

  5. Tailoring bulk mechanical properties of 3D printed objects of polylactic acid varying internal micro-architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinauskas, Mangirdas; Skliutas, Edvinas; Jonušauskas, Linas; Mizeras, Deividas; Šešok, Andžela; Piskarskas, Algis

    2015-05-01

    Herein we present 3D Printing (3DP) fabrication of structures having internal microarchitecture and characterization of their mechanical properties. Depending on the material, geometry and fill factor, the manufactured objects mechanical performance can be tailored from "hard" to "soft." In this work we employ low-cost fused filament fabrication 3D printer enabling point-by-point structuring of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) with~̴400 µm feature spatial resolution. The chosen architectures are defined as woodpiles (BCC, FCC and 60 deg rotating). The period is chosen to be of 1200 µm corresponding to 800 µm pores. The produced objects structural quality is characterized using scanning electron microscope, their mechanical properties such as flexural modulus, elastic modulus and stiffness are evaluated by measured experimentally using universal TIRAtest2300 machine. Within the limitation of the carried out study we show that the mechanical properties of 3D printed objects can be tuned at least 3 times by only changing the woodpile geometry arrangement, yet keeping the same filling factor and periodicity of the logs. Additionally, we demonstrate custom 3D printed µ-fluidic elements which can serve as cheap, biocompatible and environmentally biodegradable platforms for integrated Lab-On-Chip (LOC) devices.

  6. EDITORIAL: Proceedings of the 11th Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop, Potsdam, Germany, 18 21 December 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, B.; Papa, M. A.; Schutz, B. F.

    2007-10-01

    The 11th Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop (GWDAW11) comes in the middle of the fifth science run (S5) of the LIGO detectors, after a full year of data-taking at design sensitivity. LIGO is starting to probe astrophysically plausible scenarios for the emission of detectable gravitational wave signals. In the absence of a detection, the upper limits on the strength of gravitational waves are beginning to add information to what was previously known from electromagnetic observations. One of the highlights of this workshop was the presentation by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration of a search for continuous waves from the Crab pulsar. Gravitational wave emission is constrained by the measured spindown measurements for the object: no more energy can go into gravitational waves than that which is lost by pulsar spindown. For most known pulsars this spindown upper limit on the strength of gravitational radiation is orders of magnitude higher than the upper limits that can be set with current gravitational wave observations. However for the Crab pulsar the gravitational wave observations which coherently combine about 9 months of data from the network of S5 LIGO detectors constrain the gravitational wave emission more strongly than the electromagnetic observations do. The gravitational wave upper limit also constrains the tri-axial ellipticity that this young pulsar could have supported since its crust solidified a thousand years ago. The Virgo detector is in the final stages of commissioning with several engineering runs completed. The TAMA detector's low frequency performance is being enhanced and another data run is foreseen by the end of 2007. The IGEC2 Collaboration presents results from the analysis of 131 days of data in coincidence among the three bar detectors EXPLORER, AURIGA and NAUTILUS. Studies are underway to analyze data in coincidence among bar and interferometer networks. Space-based detectors are receiving more attention, with the LISA Pathfinder

  7. Psychological and health problems in a geographically proximate population time-sampled continuously for three months after the September 11th, 2001 terrorist incidents.

    PubMed

    Ford, Julian D; Adams, Mary L; Dailey, Wayne F

    2007-06-01

    This study assessed the mental and physical health status and psychological problems related to the September 11th terrorist incidents among a representative sample of adults living near New York City, using continuously time-sampled data collected throughout 2001. Prevalence estimates for poor mental or physical health after September 11th (October through December) were comparable to those for the entire year of 2001 (i.e. approximately 33%). Psychological problems related to the terrorist incidents were reported by more than half of the respondents, and appeared to peak in prevalence approximately two to three months following the incidents, followed by a decline in the next month and subsequent year. Poor mental health, female gender, media re-exposure, and ongoing or increased alcohol use were risk factors for psychological problems, while older age (65+ years old) and being married were protective factors. Risk factors for poor physical and mental health or psychological problems were generally stable over the three-month period following September 11th, but some changes were identified consistent with stage models of post-disaster psychological adjustment. Implications are discussed for using continuous time-sampling as a strategy to research patterns of relatively acute stress-related sequelae of terrorism in populations whose members are affected despite primarily not having been at the disaster epicenter.

  8. Streamlined subglacial bedforms on the Närke plain, south-central Sweden - Areal distribution, morphometrics, internal architecture and formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Per; Dowling, Thomas P. F.

    2016-08-01

    A flow set of close to 1000 drumlins has been mapped by means of LiDAR-derived digital elevation models and investigated by trenching. The area is situated on the SW part of the Närke plain and its surrounding uplands in south-central Sweden, which was deglaciated in the early Preboreal in a glacioaquatic setting. We find that there is considerable morphological difference in drumlin distribution patterns over crystalline basement areas compared to streamlined terrain over Palaeozoic sedimentary rock basement. The former area is characterized by thin Quaternary drift and the drumlins are all of the rock-cored type, built due to active deposition of sediment around obstacles to glacier flow. The latter area is characterized by deep Quaternary drift and the drumlins are more elongate and also larger in all dimensions, as compared to rock-cored drumlins. Irrespective of these geomorphological differences on local landscape scale we find that drumlin morphometric values remain part of a morphological continuum at the regional scale. Based on the internal sediment architecture as revealed in two cross-drumlin sections we find that the soft-cored drumlins were formed by compressional constructive deformation, along with excavational deformation along the flanks of the emerging drumlins, which shaped the separating troughs. Intermediate-type drumlins are those that demonstrate a coupling between underlying Palaeozoic sediment strata in areas of shallow drift sheet. These are the result of differing rheological response between incorporated sedimentary rock and a deforming bed below the ice-bed interface. An overall conclusion is that we find geomorphic and architectural compositional differences between the drumlins and the flowset they form. We can closely relate these differences to contextual geological variations with respect to basement type and drift depth. We argue that drumlin formation is better explained not by one single 'unifying' process but rather a set of

  9. Internal architecture of the proto-Kern Canyon Fault at Engineer's Point, Lake Isabella Dam site, Kern County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martindale, Z. S.; Andrews, G. D.; Brown, S. R.; Krugh, W. C.

    2014-12-01

    The core of the Cretaceous (?) proto-Kern Canyon Fault (KCF) is exposed continuously for 1.25 km along Engineer's Point at Lake Isabella, Kern County, California. The proto-KCF is notable for (1) its long and complex history within, and perhaps preceding the Sierra Nevada batholith, and (2) hosting the Quaternary Kern Canyon Fault, an active fault that threatens the integrity of the Lake Isabella auxiliary dam and surrounding communities. We are investigating the internal architecture of the proto-KCF to explore its control on the likely behavior of the modern KCF. The proto-KCF is developed in the Alta Sierra biotite-granodiorite pluton. A traverse across Engineer's Point, perpendicular to the proto-KCF trace, reveals gradational increases in fracture density, fracture length, bulk alteration, and decreases in fracture spacing and grain size toward the fault core. Mapping of the fault core reveals two prominent and laterally extensive zones: (1) continuous foliated blastomylonitic granodiorite with steeply-dipping, anastomosing shear bands and minor mylonite planes, and (2) foliated orange and green fault breccia with intergranular gouge, strong C/S fabric, and a central gouge plane. The fault breccia zone is intruded by a lensoidal, post-deformation dacite dike, probably ca. 105 - 102 Ma (Nadin & Saleeby, 2008) and is weakly overprinted by a set of cross-cutting spaced, short, brittle fractures, often coated in calcite, which we infer to be genetically related to the modern KCF. We present our structural and lithological data that will be supported by mineralogical and geochemical analyses. E. Nadin & J. Saleeby (2008) Disruption of regional primary structure of the Sierra Nevada batholith by the Kern Canyon fault system, California: Geological Society of America Special Paper 438, p. 429-454.

  10. SURFACE RUPTURE OF THE NORMAL SEISMIC FAULTS AND SLOPE FAILURES APPEARED IN APRIL 11th, 2011 FUKUSHIMA-PREFECTURE HAMADOORI EARTHQUAKE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazmi, Zaheer Abbas; Konagai, Kazuo; Kyokawa, Hiroyuki; Tetik, Cigdem

    On April 11th, 2011, Iwaki region of Fukushima prefecture was jolted by Fukushima-Prefecture Hamadoori Earthquake. Surface ruptures were observed along causative Idosawa and Yunotake normal faults. In addition to numerous small slope failures, a coherent landslide and building structures of Tabito Junior High School, bisected by Idosawa Fault, were found along the causative faults. A precise digital elevation model of the coherent landslide was obtained through the ground and air-born LiDAR surveys. The measurements of perimeters of the gymnasium building and the swimming pool of Tabito Junior High School have shown that ground undergoes a slow and steady/continual deformation.

  11. A Study of Grade Level and Gender Differences in Divergent Thinking among 8th and 11th Graders in a Mid-Western School District

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roue, Leah Christine

    This research study compared gender and grade level differences in divergent thinking among middle school and high school students in the Midwest, in an attempt to determine whether gender or grade level-based differences exist in divergent thinking. The instrument used was based on the Wallach and Kogan Creativity Test (WKCT). There were 166 public school students in the study from the 8th and 11th grades. The results were analyzed in an effort to answer two research questions: Are there gender differences in fluency, flexibility, or originality of a response? Are there grade level (age) differences in fluency, flexibility, or originality of a response? Quantitative and qualitative reporting is used.

  12. Past storminess recorded in the internal architecture of coastal formations of Estonia in the NE Baltic Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tõnisson, Hannes; Vilumaa, Kadri; Kont, Are; Sugita, Shinya; Rosentau, Alar; Muru, Merle; Anderson, Agnes

    2016-04-01

    Over the past 50 years, storminess has increased in northern Europe because of the changes in cyclonic activity. The cyclone season in the Baltic Sea area has shifted from autumn to winter; this has led to intensification of shore processes (erosion, sediment transport and accumulation) and has increased pressure to the economy (land use, coastal protection measures) of the coastal regions in the Baltic states. Therefore, studing the effects of such changes on shore processes in the past is critical for prediction of the future changes along the Baltic coasts. Beach ridge plains are found worldwide, where cyclones and storm surges affect accumulation forms. These sandy shores are highly susceptible to erosion. Due to the isostatic uplift on the NE coast of the Baltic Sea, the signs of major past events are well-preserved in the internal architecture of old coastal formations (dune ridge-swale complexes). Wave-eroded scarps in beach deposits are visible in subsurface ground-penetrating radar (GPR) records, indicating the past high-energy events. Several study areas and transects were selected on the NW coast of Estonia, using high-resolution topographic maps (LiDAR). Shore-normal subsurface surveys have been conducted with a digital GSSI SIR-3000 georadar with a 270 MHz antenna at each transect. Interpretation of GPR facies was based on hand auger and window sampler coring, which provided accurate depths of key stratigraphic boundaries and bounding surfaces. Several samples for luminescence and 14C dating were collected to determine the approximate chronology of the coastal formations along the Estonian coast. We have found that changes in storminess, including the periods of high and low intensity of storms in late Holocene, are clearly reflected in the internal patterns of ancient coastal formations. The sections with small ridges with short seaward-dipped layers (interface between wave-built and aeolian deposits) in deeper horizons are probably formed during

  13. A House Comes Tumbling Down: Internal Divisions at an Architecture School Lead to the Ousting of a Dean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smallwood, Scott

    2003-01-01

    Describes the controversy in the school of architecture of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, over the dismissal of the dean of the school and the influence wielded by four senior professors who did not agree with the dean's policies. Also describes complaints by younger faculty members about the work environment. (SLD)

  14. EDITORIAL: Special issue containing papers presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems Special issue containing papers presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnichenko, Ya.

    2010-08-01

    subsequent meetings (Aspenäs (1991), Trieste (1993), Princeton (1995), and JET/Abingdon (1997)) were entitled `Alpha Particles in Fusion Research'. During the JET/Abingdon meeting in 1997 it was decided to extend the topic by including other suprathermal particles, in particular accelerated electrons, and rename the meetings accordingly. The subsequent meetings with the current name `Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems' were held in Naka (1999), Gothenburg (2001), San Diego (2003), Takayama (2005) and Kloster Seeon (2007). The most recent meeting in this series was held in Kyiv, Ukraine, in September 2009. This was an anniversary meeting, 20 years after the first meeting. Like the first meeting, it was hosted by the Institute for Nuclear Research, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. It was attended by about 80 researchers from 18 countries, ITER, and EC. The program of the meeting consisted of 78 presentations, including 12 invited talks, 16 oral contributed talks, and 50 posters, which were selected by the International Advisory Committee (IAC). The IAC consisted of 11 people representing EC (L.-G. Eriksson), Germany (S. Günter), Italy (F. Zonca), Japan (K. Shinohara and K. Toi), Switzerland (A. Fasoli), UK (S. Sharapov), Ukraine (Ya. Kolesnichenko—IAC Chair), USA (H. Berk, W. Heidbrink, and R. Nazikian). The meeting program covered a wide range of physics issues concerning energetic ions in toroidal fusion facilities—tokamaks, stellarators, and spherical tori. Many new interesting and practically important results of both experimental and theoretical studies were reported. The research presented covered topics such as instabilities driven by energetic ions, transport of energetic ions caused by plasma microturbulence and destabilized eigenmodes, non-linear phenomena induced by the instabilities, classical transport processes, effects of runaway electrons, diagnostics of energetic ions and plasmas, and aspects of ITER physics. In addition to these

  15. PREFACE: Proceedings of the 11th European Workshop of the European Microbeam Analysis Society (EMAS) on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    This volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering contains papers from the 11th Workshop of the European Microbeam Analysis Society (EMAS) on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis which took place from 10-14 May 2009 in the Hotel Faltom, Gdynia, Poland. The primary aim of this series of workshops is to assess the state-of-the-art and reliability of microbeam analysis techniques. The workshops also provide a forum where students and young scientists starting out on careers in microbeam analysis can meet and discuss with the established experts. The workshops have a very distinct format comprising invited plenary lectures by internationally recognized experts, poster presentations by the participants and round table discussions on the key topics led by specialists in the field. For this workshop EMAS invited speakers on the following topics: EPMA, EBSD, fast energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, three-dimensional microanalysis, and micro-and nanoanalysis in the natural resources industry. The continuing relevance of the EMAS workshops and the high regard in which they are held internationally can be seen from the fact that 69 posters from 16 countries were on display at the meeting and that the participants came from as far away as Japan and the USA. A number of participants with posters were invited to give short oral presentations of their work in two dedicated sessions. As at previous workshops there was also a special oral session for young scientists. Small cash prizes were awarded for the three best posters and for the best oral presentation by a young scientist. The prize for the best poster went to the contribution by G Tylko, S Dubchak, Z Banach and K Turnau, entitled Monte Carlo simulation for an assessment of standard validity and quantitative X-ray microanalysis in plant. Joanna Wojewoda-Budka of the Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Krakow, received the prize for the best oral presentation by a

  16. The International Cytokine Conference (11th) Held in Dublin (Ireland) on September 20-24 2003 (European Cytokine Network, Volume 14, Number 3, September 2003)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    remission has depended upon both initial thrombopoietin ( TPO ) and FLT-3 ligand (FL). Both lytic and latent condition of cellular immunity and dynamic...protein responses (APR), are susceptible ously shown that pretreatment of mice with CpG-motifs of bacterial for acquiring pneumonia. In mice, turpentine...level. Pretreatment of A549 cells with IFN-a (100 IU/ml, 24 h) lead to a dramatic increase in influenza A virus-induced IFN, IL-28, IL-29 and chemokine

  17. International Symposium on Gas Kinetics (11th) Held in Assisi (Perugia), Italy on 2-7 September 1990. Book of Abstracts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-07

    reaction thle bending of the system give rise to ’A’ amid ’A" si rfares. 011 * lv the SeCOn(I- one is relevant. ror the study or the above reaction...A -3 ( lv ) The very different lifetimes of R02N02 (-0.3 s for R=C2H5 vs. -1.5 h for R-CClO at 298 K, 1013 mbar N2) are thus mainly due to different...4 Effect of methane-oxygen mixtures contetit and of ethane addition on methanol formation. Moshkina R.I., Polyak S.S., Romanovich L.B., Vedeneev V.I

  18. International Conference on the Application of Accelerators in Research and Industry (11th) Held in Denton, Texas on November 5-8, 1990. Volume 35, Number 8

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-30

    charged that an article comparing cost which fat-es big defense -uts. In Senate testimon) last effectiveness of physics journals was in fact comparative...the regular lows. The cost of the tutorials in- program is 30 November 1990. All cludes a continental breakfast and Condensed Matter Physics 40...Sreenivasan (Yale). proximate cost is S6- 10) and several through Thursday, 15 November. car rental agencies are located at the Contributed papers

  19. Proceedings of the International Conference on the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME) (11th, Montreal, Canada, July 19-25, 1987). Volumes I-III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergeron, Jacques C., Ed.; And Others

    The Proceedings of PME-XI has been published in three separate volumes because of the large total of 161 individual conference papers reported. Volume I contains four plenary papers, all on the subject of "constructivism," and 44 commented papers arranged under 4 themes. Volume II contains 56 papers (39 commented; 17 uncommented)…

  20. Proceedings of the Pacific Rim International Conference on Artificial Intelligence (11th) held in Daegu, Korea, August/September 2010. PRICAI 2010: Trends in Artificial Intelligence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Settings Preliminary evaluations were conducted over several UCI datasets [11|. The utilized datasets were: Zoo (101 data, 7 labels). Teaching ...ARCTIC database was con- structed as a phonetically balanced. US English single speaker database designed for unit selection speech synthesis... teaching method using a self-organizing map for reinforcement learning. Artificial Life and Robotics 7(4), 193 197 (200(>) 444 H. Handa 4

  1. Proceedings of the Annual Conference, Association for Population/Family Planning Libraries and Information Centers-International (11th, Atlanta, Georgia, April 11-13, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Rita F., Ed.

    The major sections of these conference proceedings are (1) what's new worldwide in population information activities; (2) management and libraries; (3) the Select Committee on Population; (4) workshop reports; (5) contributed papers; (6) APLIC-PAA (Association for Population/Family Planning Libraries and Information Centers-Population Association…

  2. The Individualized Reading Program: A Guide for Classroom Teaching. Proceedings of the Annual Convention of the International Reading Assn. (11th, Dallas, May 4-7, 1966).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Lyman C., Jr., Ed.

    This publication is designed to aid teachers and school personnel who are seeking ways to individualize reading instruction. The chapters include: "The Individualized Reading Program: A Perspective" by Lyman C. Hunt, Jr.; "Initiating the Individualized Reading Program: Various Transitional Plans" by Lorraine Harvilla; "The Conference in IRP: The…

  3. What Good Are Positive Emotions in Crises? A Prospective Study of Resilience and Emotions Following the Terrorist Attacks on the United States on September 11th, 2001

    PubMed Central

    Fredrickson, Barbara L.; Tugade, Michele M.; Waugh, Christian E.; Larkin, Gregory R.

    2009-01-01

    Extrapolating from B. L. Fredrickson's (1998, 2001) broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions, the authors hypothesized that positive emotions are active ingredients within trait resilience. U.S. college students (18 men and 28 women) were tested in early 2001 and again in the weeks following the September 11th terrorist attacks. Mediational analyses showed that positive emotions experienced in the wake of the attacks— gratitude, interest, love, and so forth—fully accounted for the relations between (a) precrisis resilience and later development of depressive symptoms and (b) precrisis resilience and postcrisis growth in psychological resources. Findings suggest that positive emotions in the aftermath of crises buffer resilient people against depression and fuel thriving, consistent with the broaden-and-build theory. Discussion touches on implications for coping. PMID:12585810

  4. Langerhans cell histiocytosis or tuberculosis on a medieval child (Oppidum de la Granède, Millau, France - 10th-11th centuries AD).

    PubMed

    Colombo, Antony; Saint-Pierre, Christophe; Naji, Stephan; Panuel, Michel; Coqueugniot, Hélène; Dutour, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    In 2008, a skeleton of a 1 - 2.5-year-old child radiocarbon dated from the 10th - 11th century AD was discovered on the oppidum of La Granède (Millau, France). It presents multiple cranial osteolytic lesions having punched-out or geographical map-like aspects associated with sequestrum and costal osteitis. A multi 3D digital approach (CT, μCT and virtual reconstruction) enabled us to refine the description and identify the diploic origin of the lytic process. Furthermore, precise observation of the extent of the lesions and associated reorganization of the skeletal micro-structure were possible. From these convergent pieces of evidence, the differential diagnosis led to three possibilities: Langerhans cell histiocytosis, tuberculosis, or Langerhans cell histiocytosis and tuberculosis.

  5. What good are positive emotions in crises? A prospective study of resilience and emotions following the terrorist attacks on the United States on September 11th, 2001.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, Barbara L; Tugade, Michele M; Waugh, Christian E; Larkin, Gregory R

    2003-02-01

    Extrapolating from B. L. Fredrickson's (1998, 2001) broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions, the authors hypothesized that positive emotions are active ingredients within trait resilience. U.S. college students (18 men and 28 women) were tested in early 2001 and again in the weeks following the September 11th terrorist attacks. Mediational analyses showed that positive emotions experienced in the wake of the attacks--gratitude, interest, love, and so forth--fully accounted for the relations between (a) precrisis resilience and later development of depressive symptoms and (b) precrisis resilience and postcrisis growth in psychological resources. Findings suggest that positive emotions in the aftermath of crises buffer resilient people against depression and fuel thriving, consistent with the broaden-and-build theory. Discussion touches on implications for coping.

  6. [Hygienic assessment of lifestyle and health status in 10th-11th-form pupils directed to have a higher medical education].

    PubMed

    Timoshenko, K T

    2008-01-01

    Ninety-seven pupils from the 10th-to-11th classes formed on a competitive basis for intensive education, for forming motivation for future medical profession were examined using a set of psychophysiological tests that could evaluate the central nervous and cardiovascular systems, psychophysiological adaptation, task performance, and personality traits. The vast majority of the examinees were found to follow the hygienic recommendation of the day regimen, which corresponded to the principles of healthy lifestyle. In 99% of the pupils, mental capacity was rated as fair (66%) and high (33%), as evidenced by psychophysiological testing. Fifty-six per cent of the examinees were observed to have mental adaptive disorders that might reflect age-related psychological immaturity in them at the completing stage of schooling.

  7. Brief communication: co-detection of Bartonella quintana and Yersinia pestis in an 11th-15th burial site in Bondy, France.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thi-Nguyen-Ny; Forestier, Cyrille Le; Drancourt, Michel; Raoult, Didier; Aboudharam, Gérard

    2011-07-01

    Historical and anthropological data suggest that skeletons excavated from an 11th to 15th century mass grave in Bondy, France, may be those of victims of the Great Plague. Using high-throughput real-time PCR investigation of the dental pulp collected from 14 teeth from five such skeletons, we detected Bartonella quintana DNA in three individuals and Yersinia pestis DNA in two individuals. DNA from five other deadly pathogens was not found. Suicide PCR genotyping confirmed Y. pestis DNA belonging to the Orientalis biotype. One individual had co-infection. These data suggest a plague epidemic in a population already infected by the body louse-transmitted B. quintana or a body louse-driven transmission of the plague that drove a medieval epidemic in inland Europe. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. The internal architecture of dendritic spines revealed by super-resolution imaging: What did we learn so far?

    SciTech Connect

    MacGillavry, Harold D. Hoogenraad, Casper C.

    2015-07-15

    The molecular architecture of dendritic spines defines the efficiency of signal transmission across excitatory synapses. It is therefore critical to understand the mechanisms that control the dynamic localization of the molecular constituents within spines. However, because of the small scale at which most processes within spines take place, conventional light microscopy techniques are not adequate to provide the necessary level of resolution. Recently, super-resolution imaging techniques have overcome the classical barrier imposed by the diffraction of light, and can now resolve the localization and dynamic behavior of proteins within small compartments with nanometer precision, revolutionizing the study of dendritic spine architecture. Here, we highlight exciting new findings from recent super-resolution studies on neuronal spines, and discuss how these studies revealed important new insights into how protein complexes are assembled and how their dynamic behavior shapes the efficiency of synaptic transmission.

  9. How China achieved its 11th Five-Year Plan emissions reduction target: A structural decomposition analysis of industrial SO2 and chemical oxygen demand.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiaoling; Wang, Qi

    2017-01-01

    To curb the increasing pollutant emissions that have accompanied rapid economic growth, China implemented a mandatory emissions control system since the 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) period, and the emission reduction targets have been met and even exceeded. This article explores how China achieved its emissions reduction targets by systematically identifying the main emission reduction pathways, including both the environmental and economic factors, and evaluates the contribution of each factor using structure decomposition analysis. A study of the two key controlled pollutants, industrial sulfur dioxide (SO2) and chemical oxygen demand (COD), during the 11th FYP period showed that (i) changes in the end-of-pipe treatment and pollutant generation coefficient were the dominant contributors to emissions reduction. The power and metal smelting sectors played important roles in SO2 abatement, while the paper products and food products sectors were important in COD reduction; (ii) changes to the input coefficient increased overall emissions although there was a decrease in SO2 emissions in 2007-2010 mainly due to input structure improvements in the construction sector; (iii) the trade effect largely offset the domestic emission reduction effects, although the trade effect declined during the study period; (iv) domestic demand was the main factor increasing domestic emissions; domestic investment changes (especially in the construction sector) were the major contributor to increases in SO2 emissions, and final consumption changes (especially consumption in the food production sector) were the main contributor to the increase in COD emissions. The results yield important implications for China's pollution emissions control policies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Justice after September 11th

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Stanley N.

    2004-01-01

    Like many of us, Stanley Katz will always remember exactly where he was and what he was doing on the morning of 9-11 as we all watched American life as we had known it implode before our eyes. Here, Katz reflects upon his experiences of the day and how difficult it was to know what students were thinking or feeling about the events. He writes that…

  11. Justice after September 11th

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Stanley N.

    2004-01-01

    Like many of us, Stanley Katz will always remember exactly where he was and what he was doing on the morning of 9-11 as we all watched American life as we had known it implode before our eyes. Here, Katz reflects upon his experiences of the day and how difficult it was to know what students were thinking or feeling about the events. He writes that…

  12. External and internal bone micro-architecture in normal and Kienböck's lunates: a whole-bone micro-computed tomography study.

    PubMed

    Low, Stephanie C; Bain, Gregory I; Findlay, David M; Eng, Kevin; Perilli, Egon

    2014-06-01

    Kienböck's disease is idiopathic osteonecrosis of the lunate, leading to its fracture and collapse. This study compares internal and external bone micro-architecture of normal and fractured lunates (Kienböck's), by using high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) on the whole bone of the two lunate types, and histology. Fractured Kienböck-diseased lunates were obtained from patients undergoing proximal-row-carpectomy, while normal cadaveric lunates served as controls. 3D-micro-CT-imaging of control lunates revealed an encircling cortex surrounding trabecular bone. Trabeculae were arranged in a radial pattern, spanning from the distal to the proximal subchondral plate. Kienböck's lunates exhibited clear fracture lines, with fragmented bone, both proximally and distally, in areas the radially-patterned trabeculae and enveloping cortex were absent, producing height loss. In trabecular bone, Kienböck's lunates revealed increased bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness and number, and decreased trabecular separation and structure model index. Histologically, Kienböck's lunates revealed osteonecrosis, as well as remodeling fronts with osteoblasts and osteoid surrounding bone marrow. Whole-bone high-resolution 3D examination of normal and Kienböck's diseased lunates contributes to a better understanding of micro-architectural changes occurring in the pathology.

  13. Effect of September 11th terrorist attacks on the self-reported health status of Department of Defense health care beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Linton, Andrea; Hartzell, Michael C; Peterson, Michael R

    2004-11-01

    This study examined the changes in the self-reported health status of Department of Defense health care beneficiaries associated with the September 11th terrorist attacks. Responses to a single-item, general health measure from pre- and post-September 11 quarterly survey events for the calendar year 2001 were analyzed to compare the unfavorable health response rates before and after the attacks. Increases in rates of unfavorable health status following the terrorist attacks were reported by the total population and 39 of 44 subgroups examined. Statistically significant increases in unfavorable health were reported by active duty personnel and dependents of active duty personnel; beneficiaries under the age of 44 years; beneficiaries affiliated with the Army and Marines; and beneficiaries in the Mid-Atlantic, Mid-West/Central, and Pacific Rim regions. These findings suggest that stress associated with the likelihood of being deployed or having a family member deployed following the terrorist attacks significantly contributed to the increase in unfavorable health response reported on the post-September 11 survey.

  14. Factor structure of posttraumatic stress among Western New York undergraduates following the September 11th terrorist attack on the World Trade Center.

    PubMed

    Baschnagel, Joseph S; O'Connor, Roisin M; Colder, Craig R; Hawk, Larry W

    2005-12-01

    The structure of posttraumatic stress is of both theoretical and clinical interest. In the present study, seven models of posttraumatic stress were compared using confirmatory factor analysis. A sample of 528 Western New York undergraduate students was assessed 1 and 3 months after the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks. At the Month 1 assessment, the current three-factor Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) model, which consists of Intrusions, Avoidance/Numbing, and Hyperarousal, did not provide a good fit to the data; however, a four-factor model consisting of factors labeled Intrusions, Avoidance, Dysphoria, and Hyperarousal did fit the data well and provided better fit than the three-factor model and other competing models. Importantly, Dysphoria spans symptoms from the traditional DSM Numbing and Hyperarousal clusters. The four-factor model continued to fit the data well at Month 3. These findings parallel the results of earlier studies which suggest that a four-factor model better reflects the nature of posttraumatic stress than do simpler models, including the DSM. The present work is consistent with a dimensional model of stress responses and calls for further longitudinal work in this area.

  15. Possible impacts of early-11th-, middle-12th-, and late-13th-century droughts on western Native Americans and the Mississippian Cahokians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Larry V.; Berry, Michael S.; Jolie, Edward A.; Spangler, Jerry D.; Stahle, David W.; Hattori, Eugene M.

    2007-02-01

    One or more of three intense and persistent droughts impacted some Native American cultures in the early-11th, middle-12th and late-13th centuries, including the Anasazi, Fremont, Lovelock, and Mississippian (Cahokian) prehistorical cultures. Tree-ring-based reconstructions of precipitation and temperature indicate that warm drought periods occurred between AD 990 and 1060, AD 1135 and 1170, and AD 1276 and 1297. These droughts occurred during minima in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and may have been associated with positive values of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. Each of the Native American cultures was supported, to a greater or lesser degree, by precipitation-dependent resources. Both the Four Corners region and Cahokia were sites of intense growth between about AD 1050 and 1130, and by AD 1150, cultures in both regions were undergoing stress. By AD 1300 the Anasazi and Fremont cultures had collapsed and their residual populations had either left their homelands or withered. In the case of Fremont populations, the AD 990-1060 drought may have had the greatest impact. This drought also may have affected the Anasazi, for it was at the end of this drought that some people from Chaco migrated to the San Juan River valley and founded the Salmon Ruin great house. Detailed data do not exist on the number of Lovelock habitation sites or populations over time; however, Lovelock populations appear to have retreated from the western Great Basin to California by AD 1300 or shortly thereafter.

  16. Possible impacts of early-11th-, middle-12th-, and late-13th-century droughts on western Native Americans and the Mississippian Cahokians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, L.V.; Berry, M.S.; Jolie, E.A.; Spangler, J.D.; Stahle, D.W.; Hattori, E.M.

    2007-01-01

    One or more of three intense and persistent droughts impacted some Native American cultures in the early-11th, middle-12th and late-13th centuries, including the Anasazi, Fremont, Lovelock, and Mississippian (Cahokian) prehistorical cultures. Tree-ring-based reconstructions of precipitation and temperature indicate that warm drought periods occurred between AD 990 and 1060, AD 1135 and 1170, and AD 1276 and 1297. These droughts occurred during minima in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and may have been associated with positive values of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. Each of the Native American cultures was supported, to a greater or lesser degree, by precipitation-dependent resources. Both the Four Corners region and Cahokia were sites of intense growth between about AD 1050 and 1130, and by AD 1150, cultures in both regions were undergoing stress. By AD 1300 the Anasazi and Fremont cultures had collapsed and their residual populations had either left their homelands or withered. In the case of Fremont populations, the AD 990-1060 drought may have had the greatest impact. This drought also may have affected the Anasazi, for it was at the end of this drought that some people from Chaco migrated to the San Juan River valley and founded the Salmon Ruin great house. Detailed data do not exist on the number of Lovelock habitation sites or populations over time; however, Lovelock populations appear to have retreated from the western Great Basin to California by AD 1300 or shortly thereafter.

  17. Enhanced syndromic surveillance for mass gatherings in the Pacific: a case study of the 11th Festival of Pacific Arts in Solomon Islands, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Hoy, Damian; Saketa, Salanieta T; Maraka, Roy Roger; Sio, Alison; Wanyeki, Ian; Frison, Pascal; Ogaoga, Divi; Iniakawala, Dennie; Joshua, Cynthia; Duituturaga, Sala; Lepers, Christelle; Roth, Adam; White, Paul; Souares, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    Mass gatherings pose public health challenges to host countries, as they can cause or exacerbate disease outbreaks within the host location or elsewhere. In July 2012, the 11th Festival of Pacific Arts (FOPA), a mass gathering event involving 22 Pacific island states and territories, was hosted by Solomon Islands. An enhanced syndromic surveillance (ESS) system was implemented for the event. Throughout the capital city, Honiara, 15 sentinel sites were established and successfully took part in the ESS system, which commenced one week before the FOPA (25 June) and concluded eight days after the event (22 July). The ESS involved expanding on the existing syndromic surveillance parameters: from one to 15 sentinel sites, from four to eight syndromes, from aggregated to case-based reporting and from weekly to daily reporting. A web-based system was developed to enable data entry, data storage and data analysis. Towards the end of the ESS period, a focus group discussion and series of key informant interviews were conducted. The ESS was considered a success and played an important role in the early detection of possible outbreaks. For the period of the ESS, 1668 patients with syndrome presentations were received across the 15 sentinel sites. There were no major events of public health significance. Several lessons were learnt that are relevant to ESS in mass gathering scenarios, including the importance of having adequate lead in time for engagement and preparation to ensure appropriate policy and institutional frameworks are put in place. PMID:27766181

  18. Tectonic and seismic implications of an intersegment rupture. The damaging May 11th 2011 Mw 5.2 Lorca, Spain, earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Díaz, José J.; Bejar-Pizarro, Marta; Álvarez-Gómez, José A.; Mancilla, Flor de Lis; Stich, Daniel; Herrera, Gerardo; Morales, Jose

    2012-06-01

    On May 11th 2011, a Mw 5.2 earthquake stroke the city of Lorca in the SE Spain. This event caused 9 fatalities, 300 injuries and serious damage on the city and the surrounding areas. The Lorca earthquake occurred in the vicinity of a region bounding two well-known segments of a large active fault, the Alhama de Murcia fault (AMF). The Lorca earthquake offers a unique opportunity to study how strain is accommodated in an intersegment region of a large strike slip fault. We map recent tectonic structures in the epicentral region and we use radar interferometry to analyze the coseismic deformation. Combining these data with seismological observations of Lorca seismic sequence we first model the source of the earthquake. Then we analyze the influence of our preferred model in the adjacent segments by Coulomb failure stress modeling. The proposed earthquake source model suggests that this event ruptured an area of ~ 4 × 3 km within the complex structure that limits the Goñar-Lorca and Lorca-Totana segments of the AMF. The induced static stress change on the adjacent segments of the fault represents a seismic cycle advance equivalent to 200 to 1000 years of tectonic loading.

  19. Identification of couple-stress moduli of vertebral trabecular bone based on the 3D internal architectures.

    PubMed

    Goda, Ibrahim; Ganghoffer, Jean-François

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a homogeneous, orthotropic couple-stress continuum model as a substitute of the 3D periodic heterogeneous cellular solid model of vertebral trabecular bone. Vertebral trabecular bone is modeled as a porous material with an idealized periodic structure made of 3D open cubic cells, which is effectively orthotropic. The chosen architecture is based on studies of samples taken from the central part of vertebral bodies. The effective properties are obtained based on the response of the representative volume element under prescribed boundary conditions. Mixed boundary conditions comprising both traction and displacement boundary conditions are applied on the structure boundaries. In this contribution, the effective mechanical constants of the effective couple-stress continuum are deduced by an equivalent strain energy method. The characteristic lengths for bending and torsion are identified from the resulting homogenized orthotropic moduli. We conduct this study computationally using a finite element approach. Vertebral trabecular bone is modeled either as a cellular solid or as a two-phase material consisting of bone tissue (stiff phase) forming a trabecular network, and a surrounding soft tissue referring to the bone marrow present in the pores. Both the bone tissue forming the network and the pores are assumed to be homogeneous linear elastic, and isotropic media. The scale effects on the predicted couple stress moduli of these networks are investigated by varying the size of the bone specimens over which the boundary conditions are applied. The analysis using mixed boundary conditions gives results that are independent of unit cell size when computing the first couple stress tensor, while it is dependent on the cell size as to the second couple stress tensor moduli. This study provides overall guidance on how the size of the trabecular specimen influence couple stresses elastic moduli of cellular materials, with focus on bones

  20. Vizantin inhibits bacterial adhesion without affecting bacterial growth and causes Streptococcus mutans biofilm to detach by altering its internal architecture.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Shoji; Oda, Masataka; Domon, Hisanori; Ohsumi, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Yuki; Ohshima, Hayato; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Terao, Yutaka; Noiri, Yuichiro

    2016-11-11

    An ideal antibiofilm strategy is to control both in the quality and quantity of biofilm while maintaining the benefits derived from resident microflora. Vizantin, a recently developed immunostimulating compound, has also been found to have antibiofilm property. This study evaluated the influence on biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans in the presence of sulfated vizantin and biofilm development following bacterial adhesion on a hydroxyapatite disc coated with sulfated vizantin. Supplementation with sulfated vizantin up to 50 μM did not affect either bacterial growth or biofilm formation, whereas 50 μM sulfated vizantin caused the biofilm to readily detach from the surface. Sulfated vizantin at the concentration of 50 μM upregulated the expression of the gtfB and gtfC genes, but downregulated the expression of the gtfD gene, suggesting altered architecture in the biofilm. Biofilm development on the surface coated with sulfated vizantin was inhibited depending on the concentration, suggesting prevention from bacterial adhesion. Among eight genes related to bacterial adherence in S. mutans, expression of gtfB and gtfC was significantly upregulated, whereas the expression of gtfD, GbpA and GbpC was downregulated according to the concentration of vizantin, especially with 50 μM vizantin by 0.8-, 0.4-, and 0.4-fold, respectively. These findings suggest that sulfated vizantin may cause structural degradation as a result of changing gene regulation related to bacterial adhesion and glucan production of S. mutans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Building on Family Strengths: Research and Services in Support of Children and Their Families. Proceedings of the Building on Family Strengths Annual Conference (11th, Portland, Oregon, May 6-8, 2004)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Lynwood J., Ed.; Tullis, Kathryn, Ed.; Hanson, Andrea, Ed.; Sowders, Stacey, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The 11th Annual Building on Family Strengths Conference was held from May 6th through May 8th, 2004, in Portland, Oregon. Highlights included: (1) The revival of a pre-conference training session; this year featured "Understanding Research and Evaluation in Relation to Social Change," presented by Elaine Slaton and Shannon CrossBear of…

  2. Homestead and Gardening Skills. A Guide for Providing Instruction for 11th and 12th Grade Students Enrolled in North Carolina's Secondary Schools [and] Vocational Education Competency Test-Item Bank. Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Ward R.

    This document consists of a teacher's guide for a competency-based course on homestead and gardening skills designed for North Carolina's 11th- and 12th-grade students, and a list of competency test items applicable to the course. The teacher's guide contains course specifications, a list of competency statements, a sheet describing each unit of…

  3. Building on Family Strengths: Research and Services in Support of Children and Their Families. Proceedings of the Building on Family Strengths Annual Conference (11th, Portland, Oregon, May 6-8, 2004)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Lynwood J., Ed.; Tullis, Kathryn, Ed.; Hanson, Andrea, Ed.; Sowders, Stacey, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The 11th Annual Building on Family Strengths Conference was held from May 6th through May 8th, 2004, in Portland, Oregon. Highlights included: (1) The revival of a pre-conference training session; this year featured "Understanding Research and Evaluation in Relation to Social Change," presented by Elaine Slaton and Shannon CrossBear of…

  4. Comparison of problematic behaviours of 10th and 11th year Southern English adolescents. Part 2: Current drink, drug and sexual activity of children with smoking parents.

    PubMed

    Cox, Malcolm; Pritchard, Colin

    2007-01-01

    To determine parental and school influences upon the behaviour and attitudes of adolescents of smoking versus non-smoking parents and of those "liking and disliking" school. Utilising a self-administered confidential standardised questionnaire, a representative sample of Southern English 10th and 11th year secondary school pupils was obtained. Current drink, drug and sexual behaviour were explored and data on adolescents whose parents smoked was extrapolated and compared against adolescents of non-smoking parents. Pupils reporting "liking school" were compared against those "not liking school" and all results statistically analysed. There were 17% smoking mothers [SM] and 23% smoking fathers [SF]. The focus is upon students of SF whose adolescents are significantly more often engaged in substance misuse (38-18%), drinking in pubs (31%-15%), binge drinking (32%-18%), and under-age sexual activity (27%-14%) plus smoking (51%-32%), truanting (43%-23%), vandalism (32%-22%) and stealing (19%-11%). SM students had higher incidence of sexual behaviour (33%-13%) and unprotected sex (21%-6%). Students of smoking parents were less well informed and had significantly more negative attitudes about social behaviour and responsibility. "Liking school" was associated to significantly lower rates of problematic behaviour, which predominately was not related to the social background of the pupils. The smoking father criteria carries a social class bias, nonetheless these parents need to be aware of the particular behaviour of their children and their increased risk. SF do not "cause" the behaviour rather it reflects something of the nature of the adolescent's relationship to parents, school and society.

  5. Effectiveness of SO2 emission control policy on power plants in the Yangtze River Delta, China-post-assessment of the 11th Five-Year Plan.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jiani; Fu, Joshua S; Huang, Kan; Yang, Cheng-En; Zhuang, Guoshun; Sun, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Facing the air pollution problems in China, emission control strategies have been implemented within the framework of national Five-Year Plan (FYP). According to the lack of post-assessment studies in the literature, this study assessed the effectiveness of the SO2 emission control policies on power plants after the 11th FYP (2006-2010) by modeling emission control scenarios. The idealized emission control policy (the PS90 scenario with assumption of 90% SO2 emission reduction from power plants) could reduce the SO2 and SO4(2-) concentrations by about 51 and 14%, respectively, over the Yangtze River Delta region. While the actual emission control condition (the P2010 scenario based on the actual emissions from power plants in 2010) demonstrated that the actual reduction benefits were 30% of SO2 and 9% of SO4(2-). On the city scale, the P2010 scenario imposed positive benefits on Shanghai, Nanjing, Nantong, and Hangzhou with SO2 reductions of about 55, 12, 30, and 21%, respectively, while an 11% increase of SO2 concentration was found in Ningbo. The number of days exceeding China's National Ambient Air Quality Standard of Class I daily SO2 concentration was estimated to be 75, 52, 7, 77, and 40 days for Shanghai, Nanjing, Nantong, Ningbo, and Hangzhou under the real SO2 control condition (P2010). The numbers could be decreased by 16, 11, 2, 21, and 11% if the control effect reaches the level of the PS90 scenario. This study serves as a scientific basis to design capable enforcement of emission control strategies in China in the future national plans.

  6. Seismic and tectonic implications of an intersegment rupture. The damaging May 11th 2011 MW 5.2 Lorca, Spain, earthquake.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Díaz, J. J.; Béjar-Pizarro, M.; Álvarez-Gómez, J. A.; Mancilla, F. L.; Stich, D.; Herrera, G.; Morales, J.

    2012-04-01

    On May 11th 2011 an Mw 5.2 earthquake stroke the city of Lorca in the SE Spain. This caused 9 fatalities, 300 injuries, serious damage on the city and surrounding area. The Lorca earthquake occurred in the vicinity of a region bounding two well-known segments of a large active fault, the Alhama de Murcia fault (AMF). The Lorca earthquake offers a unique opportunity to study how strain is accommodated in an intersegment region of a large strike slip fault. We map recent tectonic structures in the epicentral region and we use radar interferometry to analyze the coseismic deformation. Combining these data with seismological data of the seismic sequence of Lorca we model the source of the earthquake and we analyze the influence of our preferred model in the adjacent segments by Coulomb failure stress modeling. We finally compare our results with topography and fault structure close to the rupture area and discuss the implications for strain accommodation, fault behavior and seismic hazard in the region. The proposed source model of the Lorca earthquake suggest that this event ruptured an area of ~ 4 x 3 km within the complex structure that limits the Goñar-Lorca and Lorca-Totana segments of the AMF. The influence of this earthquake in the stress state of the surrounding segments indicate that the Goñar - Lorca segment is charged at its northern tip and the Lorca - Totana segment is charged at its southern tip. Considering the low slip rate of these faults (between 0.1 and 0.6 mm / yr) the stress change calculated represents a seismic cycle advance equivalent to 200 to 1000 years of tectonic loading. From our results, we propose a hypothesis for the long-term seismogenic behavior of the Lorca intersegment zone in which it behaves like a structural barrier capable of arresting earthquakes that rupture the adjacent segments.

  7. The Joint NSF/JISC International Digital Libraries Initiative [and] Personalized Information Environments: An Architecture for Customizable Access to Distributed Digital Libraries [and] A Report on the PEAK Experiment: Context and Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Norman; Rusbridge, Chris; Griffin, Stephen M.; French, James C.; Viles, Charles L.; Bonn, Maria S.; Lougee, Wendy P.; MacKie-Mason, Jeffrey K.; Riveros, Juan F.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the joint NSF/JISC (National Science Foundation/UK Joint Information Systems Committee) International Digital Libraries Initiative. Discusses JISC funding criteria and procedures; personalized information environment (PIE), a conceptual architecture that allows unified, highly customizable access to distributed information resources; and…

  8. Gateway Architecture: A Major "Flexible Path" Step to the Moon and Mars After the International Space Station?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley; Talay, Ted

    2010-01-01

    With NASA's commitment to the International Space Station (ISS) now all but certain for at least through the coming decade, serious consideration may be given to extended US in-space operations in the 2020s, when presumably the ISS will exceed its sell by date. Indeed, both ESA and Roscosmos, in addition to their unambiguous current commitment to ISS, have published early concept studies for extended post-ISS habitation (e.g., http://www.esa.int/esaHS/index.html, http://www.russianspaceweb.com/opsek.html and references therein). In the US, engineers and scientists have for a decade been working both within and outside NASA to assess one consistent candidate for long-term post-ISS habitation and operations, although interrupted by changing priorities for human space flight, Congressional direction, and constrained budgets. The evolving work of these groups is described here, which may have renewed relevance with the recent completion of a major review of the nation s human space flight program.

  9. New contributions to the debate on the cause of the January 11th, 1693 tsunami in eastern Sicily (Italy): earthquake or offshore landslide source (or may be both)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armigliato, A.; Tinti, S.; Zaniboni, F.; Pagnoni, G.; Argnani, A.

    2007-12-01

    Eastern Sicily is among the most exposed regions in Italy and in the whole Mediterranean to tsunami hazard and risk. The historical tsunamis recorded here were generally associated to moderate-to-large magnitude earthquakes. The largest tsunami documented in the area occurred on January 11th, 1693. It followed the highest-magnitude earthquake (7.4) of the Italian seismic history. The tsunami, whose first significant motion was a retreat along the entire eastern Sicily coastline, produced the most devastating effects at Augusta (15 meters run-up) and Catania, being relevant at Siracusa and Messina too. A lively debate exists on whether the earthquake was the only source of the tsunami, or other causes (such as submarine landslides, possibly triggered by the earthquake) contributed to the tsunami generation. In the framework of the EC funded project TRANSFER, we investigate both hypotheses, starting from suitable onshore and offshore faults as well as from offshore landslide bodies, and hence simulating numerically the ensuing tsunami and comparing the results with the available historical information. We base on the results obtained during recent offshore surveys, in particular the multichannel seismic survey MESC2001, carried out in year 2001 on board the R/V Urania of the Italian National Council of Researches (CNR), which mapped both active normal faults and a number of possible landslide bodies along the Hyblaean-Malta escarpment, the most prominent tectonic structure found just few kilometres offshore eastern Sicily. From the modelling point of view, the initial condition for the earthquake- generated tsunamis coincides with the vertical coseismic deformation of the seafloor. Instead, the landslide motion is simulated through the Lagrangian block model UBO-BLOCK2, developed at the University of Bologna. Finally, the finite-element code UBO-TSUFE, implemented by the same research team, is used to simulate the tsunami generation and propagation. The main

  10. The 11th Century Collapse of Aqaba on the North Coast of the Gulf of Aqaba, Dead Sea Fault System, Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Tina; Allison, Alivia; Rucker, John

    2010-05-01

    The city of Aqaba is situated at the northern end of the Gulf of Aqaba along the southern part of the Dead Sea Transform Fault. Based both on the historical accounts and archaeological excavations, it is clear that earthquakes have played a significant role in the history of the region. The early Islamic city of Ayla was probably founded around 650 A.D., suffered some damage as a result of the 748 A.D. earthquake, and saw extensive reconstruction around the beginning of the Abbasid period (Whitcomb, 1994). Among other evidence of earthquake destruction at the Islamic city of Ayla is the leaning city Sea wall. Stratified pottery collections from our February 2009 excavation of the buttress of the city wall of Ayla strongly suggest a date for revetment construction in the early 11th Century. Based on the fact that the most recent pottery from sealed loci inside the buttress wall is late Abbasid - Fatimid and the absence of handmade pottery often found in the abandonment phases, the buttress was likely constructed after liquefaction damage from the 1033 earthquake. Damage from distant source earthquakes (748 and 1033) in the ancient city was repaired in antiquity. The destruction and loss of life (accounts claim that all but 12 residents who had been out fishing were killed) caused by the 1068 earthquake may account for the relative ease with which Baldwin I of Jerusalem took over when he arrived with a small retinue in 1116 A.D. Paleoseismic trenches in the modern city of Aqaba indicate that at least two earthquakes have occurred after deposits dated to 1045-1278 A.D. A preliminary analysis of the stratigraphy in new trenches in the Taba sabkha north of Aqaba shows at least three separate faulting events, with the most recent event located at a depth of 70 cm below the ground surface. This finding supports the initial ground penetrating radar survey conducted at the southern end of the Taba sabkha by Abueladas (2005). These data document a long period of quiescence

  11. International.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Linn

    1979-01-01

    The International Geological Correlation Project has attained scientific maturity and broad support and participation by geologists world wide. Its purpose is to provide a mechanism for international cooperation and information exchange about geological problems that transcend national boundaries. (Author/BB)

  12. Architecture & Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Mary; Delahunt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Most art teachers would agree that architecture is an important form of visual art, but they do not always include it in their curriculums. In this article, the authors share core ideas from "Architecture and Environment," a teaching resource that they developed out of a long-term interest in teaching architecture and their fascination with the…

  13. Architecture & Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Mary; Delahunt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Most art teachers would agree that architecture is an important form of visual art, but they do not always include it in their curriculums. In this article, the authors share core ideas from "Architecture and Environment," a teaching resource that they developed out of a long-term interest in teaching architecture and their fascination with the…

  14. Anatomy of a diffuse cryptic suture zone exemplified by European Variscan belt: a new view on the internal architecture of collisional orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lexa, O.; Schulmann, K.; Janousek, V.; Lardeaux, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The plate tectonics has offered a currently accepted link between the horizontal movement of lithospheric plates, closure of intervening oceanic basin and formation of oceanic suture zone preserved in continental collision zones. The Paleozoic Bohemian Massif is a classical collisional orogen evolving through Andean type convergence and for which a modified view on the internal architecture of collisional orogens was recently proposed. The characteristic feature of the new model is the convergence of two contrasting lithospheric domains related to subduction of an attenuated felsic metaigneous crust under thehigh density metabasite dominated rifted (Gondwana) margin. The relamination of refractory light material rich in radioactive elements underneath the relatively dense upper plate is responsible for the gravitational instabilities that lead to the overturns in the thickened crust. Such a process results in the formation of a diffuse cryptic suture zone, i.e., a wide zone in which materials from the lower and upper plates are mixed to form a hybrid continental crust. The diffuse cryptic suture zone remains the only evidence of the original plate boundary repeatedly re-appearing within the orogen.

  15. Project Integration Architecture: Application Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William Henry

    2005-01-01

    The Project Integration Architecture (PIA) implements a flexible, object-oriented, wrapping architecture which encapsulates all of the information associated with engineering applications. The architecture allows the progress of a project to be tracked and documented in its entirety. Additionally, by bringing all of the information sources and sinks of a project into a single architectural space, the ability to transport information between those applications is enabled.

  16. US-Japan workshop on field-reversed configurations with steady-state high-temperature fusion plasmas and the 11th US-Japan workshop on compact toroids

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.C.; Fernandez, J.C.; Rej, D.J.

    1990-05-01

    The US-Japan Workshop on Field-Reversed Configurations with Steady-State High-Temperature Fusion Plasma and the 11th US-Japan Workshop on Compact Toroids were held at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico on November 7--9, 1989. These proceedings contain the papers presented at the workshops as submitted by the authors. These papers have been indexed separately.

  17. Fourier and Wavelet Based Characterisation of the Ionospheric Response to the Solar Eclipse of August, the 11th, 1999, Measured Through 1-minute Vertical Ionospheric Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauli, P.; Abry, P.; Boska, J.

    2004-05-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the ionospheric response induced by the solar eclipse of August, the 11th, 1999. We provide Fourier and wavelet based characterisations of the propagation of the acoustic-gravity waves induced by the solar eclipse. The analysed data consist of profiles of electron concentration. They are derived from 1-minute vertical incidence ionospheric sounding measurements, performed at the Pruhonice observatory (Czech republic, 49.9N, 14.5E). The chosen 1-minute high sampling rate aims at enabling us to specifically see modes below acoustic cut-off period. The August period was characterized by Solar Flux F10.7 = 128, steady solar wind, quiet magnetospheric conditions, a low geomagnetic activity (Dst index varies from -10 nT to -20 nT, Σ Kp index reached value of 12+). The eclipse was notably exceptional in uniform solar disk. These conditions and fact that the culmination of the solar eclipse over central Europe occurred at local noon are such that the observed ionospheric response is mainly that of the solar eclipse. We provide a full characterization of the propagation of the waves in terms of times of occurrence, group and phase velocities, propagation direction, characteristic period and lifetime of the particular wave structure. However, ionospheric vertical sounding technique enables us to deal with vertical components of each characteristic. Parameters are estimated combining Fourier and wavelet analysis. Our conclusions confirm earlier theoretical and experimental findings, reported in [Altadill et al., 2001; Farges et al., 2001; Muller-Wodarg et al.,1998] regarding the generation and propagation of gravity waves and provide complementary characterisation using wavelet approaches. We also report a new evidence for the generation and propagation of acoustic waves induced by the solar eclipse through the ionospheric F region. Up to our knowledge, this is the first time that acoustic waves can be demonstrated based on ionospheric

  18. PREFACE: 11th Asia-Pacific Conference on Plasma Science and Technology (APCPST-11) and 25th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-25)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Takayuki; Kaneko, Toshio; Sekine, Makoto; Tanaka, Yasunori

    2013-06-01

    The 11th Asia-Pacific Conference on Plasma Science and Technology (APCPST-11) was held in Kyoto, Japan on 2-5 October 2012 with the 25th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-25). SPSM has been held annually since 1988 under the sponsorship of The 153rd Committee on Plasma Materials Science, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS). This symposium is one of the major activities of the Committee, which is organized by researchers in academia and industry for the purpose of advancing intersectional scientific information exchange and discussion of science and technology of plasma materials processing. APCPST and SPSM are jointly held biennially to survey the current status of low temperature and thermal plasma physics and chemistry for industrial applications. The whole area of plasma processing was covered from fundamentals to applications. Previous meetings were held in China, Japan, Korea, and Australia, attended by scientists from the Asia-Pacific and other countries. The joint conference was organized in plenary lectures, invited, contributed oral presentations and poster sessions. At this meeting, we had 386 participants from 10 countries and 398 presentations, including 26 invited presentations. This year, we arranged special topical sessions that covered green innovation, life innovation, and technical reports from industry. This conference seeks to bring the plasma community together and to create a forum for discussing the latest developments and issues, the challenges ahead in the field of plasma research and applications among engineers and scientists in Asia, the Pacific Rim, as well as Europe. This volume presents 44 papers that were selected via a strict peer-review process from full papers submitted for the proceedings of the conference. The topics range from the basic physics and chemistry of plasma processing to a broad variety of materials processing and environmental applications. This volume offers an overview of recent

  19. Military Planning in the Twentieth Century, Proceedings of the Military History Symposium (11th) Held on 10-12 October 1984,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    ten years the University’s Program for International Relations and Area Studies. Subsequently, he was a member of the faculty at the National War...factors that led to international stress would have been at work in any event. But the reality of Germany’s existence largely determined the nature and...affairs. Its armed forces were restricted so severely that they had meaning only for internal order or, conceivably, domestic turnover. The condition and

  20. Architectural Analysis of Dynamically Reconfigurable Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindvall, Mikael; Godfrey, Sally; Ackermann, Chris; Ray, Arnab; Yonkwa, Lyly

    2010-01-01

    oTpics include: the problem (increased flexibility of architectural styles decrease analyzability, behavior emerges and varies depending on the configuration, does the resulting system run according to the intended design, and architectural decisions can impede or facilitate testing); top down approach to architecture analysis, detection of defects and deviations, and architecture and its testability; currently targeted projects GMSEC and CFS; analyzing software architectures; analyzing runtime events; actual architecture recognition; GMPUB in Dynamic SAVE; sample output from new approach; taking message timing delays into account; CFS examples of architecture and testability; some recommendations for improved testablity; and CFS examples of abstract interfaces and testability; CFS example of opening some internal details.

  1. Internal prostatic architecture on transrectal ultrasonography predicts future prostatic growth: natural history of prostatic hyperplasia in a 15-year longitudinal community-based study.

    PubMed

    Fukuta, Fumimasa; Masumori, Naoya; Mori, Mitsuru; Tsukamoto, Taiji

    2011-05-01

    From 1992 to 1993, we conducted a cross-sectional community-based study to clarify the prevalence of benign prostatic hyperplasia in Japanese men aged 40-79. Based on the results, we hypothesized that the internal prostatic architecture (IPA) on transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) would predict future prostatic growth. We investigated the changes in prostate volume (PV) over time and validated our hypothesis on predictors for future prostatic growth. Of 319 participants in the initial study, the PV of 104 men was evaluated by TRUS with approximately a 15-year follow-up in the current study. We categorized prostates into three groups based on the IPA: group 1, invisible transition zone (TZ); group 2, visible TZ with an unclear border; and group 3, visible TZ with a clear border. Overall PV significantly increased from 17.4  ml to 23.9  ml (P  <  0.001). The median PV changes by age decade (40s, 50s, 60s, and 70s) were 5.5, 5.6, 8.6, and 11.1  ml, respectively. Those by baseline PV < 20  ml, 20-25  ml, and ≥ 25  ml were 5.3, 9.8, and 14.7  ml, respectively. Those by baseline IPA for group 1, group 2, and group 3 were 4.7, 6.5, and 17.3  ml, respectively. Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that PV (P  =  0.027) and the IPA (P  <  0.001) at baseline were independent predictors for future prostatic growth. This was the first study by longitudinal community-based study that the PV in Japanese men increased during 15 years. The IPA on TRUS is useful for predicting future prostatic growth. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Eleventh International Congress on Obesity: news and prospects.

    PubMed

    Pavlík, Vladimír; Fajfrová, Jana

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the 11th International Congress on Obesity which took place in Stockholm in July 2010. The delegates discussed recommended diagnostics and treatments in obesitology. A large number of presentations focused on nutrition and dietary management. The 11th International Congress on Obesity had a high professional standard. Active participants as well as almost 50 producers who exhibited drugs and medical equipment from the areas of nutrition, obesity, metabolism, and metabolic surgery contributed to this. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Dynamic Weather Routes Architecture Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eslami, Hassan; Eshow, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic Weather Routes Architecture Overview, presents the high level software architecture of DWR, based on the CTAS software framework and the Direct-To automation tool. The document also covers external and internal data flows, required dataset, changes to the Direct-To software for DWR, collection of software statistics, and the code structure.

  4. 1989 Architectural Exhibition Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Winners of the 1989 Architectural Exhibition sponsored annually by the ASBO International's School Facilities Research Committee include the Brevard Performing Arts Center (Melbourne, Florida), the Capital High School (Santa Fe, New Mexico), Gage Elementary School (Rochester, Minnesota), the Lakewood (Ohio) High School Natatorium, and three other…

  5. 1989 Architectural Exhibition Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Winners of the 1989 Architectural Exhibition sponsored annually by the ASBO International's School Facilities Research Committee include the Brevard Performing Arts Center (Melbourne, Florida), the Capital High School (Santa Fe, New Mexico), Gage Elementary School (Rochester, Minnesota), the Lakewood (Ohio) High School Natatorium, and three other…

  6. Capital Architecture: Situating symbolism parallel to architectural methods and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daoud, Bassam

    Capital Architecture is a symbol of a nation's global presence and the cultural and social focal point of its inhabitants. Since the advent of High-Modernism in Western cities, and subsequently decolonised capitals, civic architecture no longer seems to be strictly grounded in the philosophy that national buildings shape the legacy of government and the way a nation is regarded through its built environment. Amidst an exceedingly globalized architectural practice and with the growing concern of key heritage foundations over the shortcomings of international modernism in representing its immediate socio-cultural context, the contextualization of public architecture within its sociological, cultural and economic framework in capital cities became the key denominator of this thesis. Civic architecture in capital cities is essential to confront the challenges of symbolizing a nation and demonstrating the legitimacy of the government'. In today's dominantly secular Western societies, governmental architecture, especially where the seat of political power lies, is the ultimate form of architectural expression in conveying a sense of identity and underlining a nation's status. Departing with these convictions, this thesis investigates the embodied symbolic power, the representative capacity, and the inherent permanence in contemporary architecture, and in its modes of production. Through a vast study on Modern architectural ideals and heritage -- in parallel to methodologies -- the thesis stimulates the future of large scale governmental building practices and aims to identify and index the key constituents that may respond to the lack representation in civic architecture in capital cities.

  7. Project Integration Architecture: Architectural Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William Henry

    2001-01-01

    The Project Integration Architecture (PIA) implements a flexible, object-oriented, wrapping architecture which encapsulates all of the information associated with engineering applications. The architecture allows the progress of a project to be tracked and documented in its entirety. By being a single, self-revealing architecture, the ability to develop single tools, for example a single graphical user interface, to span all applications is enabled. Additionally, by bringing all of the information sources and sinks of a project into a single architectural space, the ability to transport information between those applications becomes possible, Object-encapsulation further allows information to become in a sense self-aware, knowing things such as its own dimensionality and providing functionality appropriate to its kind.

  8. The impact of teacher assigned but not graded compared to teacher assigned and graded chemistry homework on the formative and summative chemistry assessment scores of 11th-grade students with varying chemistry potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jennifer L.

    The study analyzed 2005 posttest data compared to 2008 posttest data to determine student end of school year academic achievement outcomes across three academic levels (above average, average, and below average chemistry potential) and two teacher homework evaluation methods (assigned but not graded and assigned and graded) on teacher prepared 11th-grade assessments, district prepared 11th-grade assessment, and district graduation requirement physical science strand 11th-grade science Essential Learner Outcome assessment. Overall, results indicated that students with above average (n = 16), average, (n = 17) and below average (n = 14) chemistry potential whom were given teacher assigned and graded chemistry homework compared to students with above average (n = 17), average (n = 15), and below average (n = 19) chemistry potential whom were given teacher assigned but not graded chemistry homework had statistically significantly higher independent t test matter homework scores while atoms, naming, and reactions homework scores were generally in the direction of higher but not significant scores for students given graded homework regardless of their chemistry potential. Furthermore, students of above average and below average chemistry potential who were given assigned and graded chemistry homework performed statistically significantly better on the 11th-grade district prepared chemistry final and the district prepared physical science strand Essential Learner Outcome assessment t test results compared to students with the same chemistry potential given assigned but not graded chemistry homework, suggesting that the graded chemistry condition may have contributed to improved long term learning and retention of chemistry knowledge. Finally, the coefficient of determination (r2 = .95) measure of strength of relationship between not completing, not graded chemistry homework and a corresponding drop in chemistry assessment scores for all students was 95% and the

  9. Experimental Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alter, Kevin

    2003-01-01

    Describes the design of the Centre for Architectural Structures and Technology at the University of Manitoba, including the educational context and design goals. Includes building plans and photographs. (EV)

  10. International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-08-12

    In this photograph, Astronaut Susan Helms, Expedition Two flight engineer, is positioned near a large amount of water temporarily stored in the Unity Node aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Astronaut Helms accompanied the STS-105 crew back to Earth after having spent five months with two crewmates aboard the ISS. The 11th ISS assembly flight, the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery STS-105 mission was launched on August 10, 2001, and landed on August 22, 2001 at the Kennedy Space Center after the completion of the successful 12-day mission.

  11. PICNIC Architecture.

    PubMed

    Saranummi, Niilo

    2005-01-01

    The PICNIC architecture aims at supporting inter-enterprise integration and the facilitation of collaboration between healthcare organisations. The concept of a Regional Health Economy (RHE) is introduced to illustrate the varying nature of inter-enterprise collaboration between healthcare organisations collaborating in providing health services to citizens and patients in a regional setting. The PICNIC architecture comprises a number of PICNIC IT Services, the interfaces between them and presents a way to assemble these into a functioning Regional Health Care Network meeting the needs and concerns of its stakeholders. The PICNIC architecture is presented through a number of views relevant to different stakeholder groups. The stakeholders of the first view are national and regional health authorities and policy makers. The view describes how the architecture enables the implementation of national and regional health policies, strategies and organisational structures. The stakeholders of the second view, the service viewpoint, are the care providers, health professionals, patients and citizens. The view describes how the architecture supports and enables regional care delivery and process management including continuity of care (shared care) and citizen-centred health services. The stakeholders of the third view, the engineering view, are those that design, build and implement the RHCN. The view comprises four sub views: software engineering, IT services engineering, security and data. The proposed architecture is founded into the main stream of how distributed computing environments are evolving. The architecture is realised using the web services approach. A number of well established technology platforms and generic standards exist that can be used to implement the software components. The software components that are specified in PICNIC are implemented in Open Source.

  12. Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Examination Results in Texas, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Office of Policy Planning and Research.

    The participation and performance of 11th- and 12th-grade Texas public school district students on the College Entrance Examination Board's Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Organisation's programs during the 1999-2000 school year were studied. Results show the largest 1-year gains to date in the number of Texas Advanced Placement…

  13. The validity and diagnostic efficiency of the Davidson Trauma Scale in military veterans who have served since September 11th, 2001.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Scott D; Beckham, Jean C; Morey, Rajendra A; Calhoun, Patrick S

    2009-03-01

    The present study examined the psychometric properties and diagnostic efficiency of the Davidson Trauma Scale (DTS), a self-report measure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Participants included 158 U.S. military veterans who have served since September 11, 2001 (post-9/11). Results support the DTS as a valid self-report measure of PTSD symptoms. The DTS demonstrated good internal consistency, concurrent validity, and convergent and divergent validity. Diagnostic efficiency was excellent when discriminating between veterans with PTSD and veterans with no Axis I diagnosis. However, although satisfactory by conventional standards, efficiency was substantially attenuated when discriminating between PTSD and other Axis I diagnoses. Thus, results illustrate that potency of the DTS as a diagnostic aid was highly dependent on the comparison group used for analyses. Results are discussed in terms of applications to clinical practice and research.

  14. Problem-Solving Correlates of New Assessment Forms in Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Michael E.

    1993-01-01

    Figural response (FR) items in architecture were compared with multiple-choice (MC) counterparts for their ability to predict architectural problem-solving proficiency of 33 practicing architects, 34 architecture interns, and 53 architecture students. Although both FR and MC predicted verbal design problem solving, only FR scores predicted…

  15. Architectural Drafting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Ronald; Yancey, Bruce

    Designed to be used as a supplement to a two-book course in basic drafting, these instructional materials consisting of 14 units cover the process of drawing all working drawings necessary for residential buildings. The following topics are covered in the individual units: introduction to architectural drafting, lettering and tools, site…

  16. Box Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ham, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Project offers grades 3-8 students hands-on design practice creating built environments to solve a society-based architectural problem. Students plan buildings, draw floor plans, and make scale models of the structures that are then used in related interdisciplinary activities. (Author)

  17. Architectural Tops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The development of the skyscraper is an American story that combines architectural history, economic power, and technological achievement. Each city in the United States can be identified by the profile of its buildings. The design of the tops of skyscrapers was the inspiration for the students in the author's high-school ceramic class to develop…

  18. Architectural Tops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The development of the skyscraper is an American story that combines architectural history, economic power, and technological achievement. Each city in the United States can be identified by the profile of its buildings. The design of the tops of skyscrapers was the inspiration for the students in the author's high-school ceramic class to develop…

  19. Architectural Illusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doornek, Richard R.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan developed around the work of architectural muralist Richard Haas. Discusses the significance of mural painting and gives key concepts for the lesson. Lists class activities for the elementary and secondary grades. Provides a photograph of the Haas mural on the Fountainbleau Hilton Hotel, 1986. (GG)

  20. Architecture? Absolutely!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Progressive Architecture, 1973

    1973-01-01

    By designing processes to translate social needs into physical terms, the Urban Center at the University of Louisville is turning out its own unique brand of architecture -- one that produces no buildings but that has a real effect on the future of the physical environment. (Author)

  1. The 11th Space Simulation Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Subject areas range from specialized issues dealing with the space and entry environments to the environmental testing of systems and complete spacecraft of present-day vintage. Various papers consider: the test and development of several key systems of the orbiter vehicle; integrated tests of complete satellites; new and unique test facilities developed to meet the demanding requirements of high fidelity simulation of test environments; and contamination species, including the instrumentation for detection and measurement of such. Special topics include improved thermal protection methodologies and approaches, sophisticated sensor developments, and other related testing and development areas.

  2. The 11th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Various mechanisms in aerospace engineering were presented at this conference. Specifications, design, and use of spacecraft and missile components are discussed, such as tail assemblies, radiometers, magnetormeters, pins, reaction wheels, ball bearings, actuators, mirrors, nutation dampers, airfoils, solar arrays, etc.

  3. The 11th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Mechanical devices and drives developed for aerospace applications are described. Satellite flywheels, magnetic bearings, a missile umbilical system, a cartridge firing device, and an oiler for satellite bearing lubrication are among the topics discussed.

  4. Part C Updates. 11th Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danaher, Joan; Goode, Sue; Lazara, Alex

    2010-01-01

    "Part C Updates" is a compilation of information on various aspects of the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). This is the eleventh volume in a series of compilations, which included two editions of Part H Updates, the former name of the…

  5. An Economic Analysis of September 11th

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langelett, George L.; Schug, Mark C.

    2004-01-01

    To many Western observers, the behavior of people in the Middle East is a mystery. The area is the scene of brutality and seemingly senseless acts of violence. Why has there been so much turmoil there for so long? This article contains a brief review of past events in the Middle East, which helps to establish the context of the problem. Sections…

  6. An Economic Analysis of September 11th

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langelett, George L.; Schug, Mark C.

    2004-01-01

    To many Western observers, the behavior of people in the Middle East is a mystery. The area is the scene of brutality and seemingly senseless acts of violence. Why has there been so much turmoil there for so long? This article contains a brief review of past events in the Middle East, which helps to establish the context of the problem. Sections…

  7. 11th Annual Systems Engineering Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-23

    Estimation y = 0.45 x + 1349.3 R² = 0.125 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 4500 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 4500 Ac tu al...Savings 0.0% 100.0% 200.0% 300.0% 400.0% 500.0% 600.0% 700.0% 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 % FY2010 Goal % of Projected LC Costs X 10 9 UH-60M...utilizing a 3 X 3 matrix Previous example Larger examples do not exhibit such a dramatic edge effect  25 X 25 model used most commonly Use

  8. 11th Annual School Construction Report, 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Paul

    2006-01-01

    "School Planning & Management"'s annual survey of school construction statistics including projects completed during 2005, projected completions for 2006, and projects that will begin construction during 2006. In addition to national figures, statistics are broken down to provide detail for 12 regions of the nation, as well as the…

  9. More About Architecture For Intelligent Robotic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorini, Paolo; Chang, Jeffrey

    1992-01-01

    Boolean neural networks proposed to implement part of intermediate level of hierarchical architecture of control system for artificially intelligent control of robot hand. Concept described in "Architecture for Intelligent Control of Robotic Tasks" (NPO-17871). Rule level of architecture implemented in two Boolean neural networks operated and updated in alternation. No explicit programming of network. Internal configuration not unique but, depends on initial state and history of previous adaptations. Accepts new rules sequentially presented by external controller.

  10. IGARSS '91; Proceedings of the 11th Annual International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo, Finland, June 3-6, 1991. Vols. 1, 2, 3, & 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The papers presented at the symposium focus on global monitoring of the earth with emphasis on the solution of environmental problems and utilization of natural resources. Topics discussed include radar forestry modeling, hydrological remote sensing, polarimetric SAR observations of sea ice, optical and IR oceanography, and satellite remote sensing of precipitation and related phenomena. Other subject areas covered are microwave sensing of trace gases; atmospheric pressure, temperature, and humidity; spaceborne sensor technology; geodynamic and geophysical remote sensing; space radar missions; remote sensing of vegetation and crops; and remote sensing of weather systems.

  11. National Information Policies for the Asia Oceania Region. Proceedings of the General Assembly and Congress of the International Federation for Information and Documentation Commission for Asia and Oceania (11th, Seoul, Korea, October 29-31, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Ian, Ed.; Dwyer, Lisa, Ed.

    The 18 papers presented at this conference address national information policies, information for industry, and electronic publishing. The titles of the papers are as follows: (1) "Industrial Information Policies of Developing Countries" (keynote address, Sung Jin Choi); (2) "National Information Policy. Current Trends and…

  12. The Impact of CD-ROM on Library Operations and Universal Availability of Information: Festschrift in Honour of Maurice B. Line. International Essen Symposium (11th, Essen, Germany, September 26-29, 1988). Publications of Essen University Library 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helal, Ahmed H., Ed.; Weiss, Joachim W., Ed.

    This festschrift contains 17 papers on the impact of CD-ROM technology: (1) "CD-ROM and Access to Information in the South" (Abdelaziz Abid); (2) "CD-ROM and Bridging of Cultural and Technological Gaps in Developing Countries" (Shmuel Sever); (3) "Electronic Publishing Developments and Opportunities from OCLC" (Janet…

  13. International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-08-20

    This image of the International Space Station (ISS) was photographed by one of the crewmembers of the STS-105 mission from the Shuttle Orbiter Discovery after separating from the ISS. The STS-105 mission was the 11th ISS assembly flight and its goals were the rotation of the ISS Expedition Two crew with Expedition Three crew, and the delivery of supplies utilizing the Italian-built Multipurpose Logistic Module (MPLM) Leonardo. Aboard Leonardo were six resupply stowage racks, four resupply stowage supply platforms, and two new scientific experiment racks, EXPRESS (Expedite the Processing of Experiments to the Space Station) Racks 4 and 5, which added science capabilities to the ISS. Another payload was the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE), which included materials and other types of space exposure experiments mounted on the exterior of the ISS.

  14. Enhancements to PVM's BEOLIN architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, Paul L.

    2005-01-01

    .4.3 of PVM had previously been enhanced by the addition of a new architecture, BEOLIN, which allowed a PVM user to abstract a Beowulf class computer with a private network to appear as a single system, visible to the outside world, which could spawn tasks on different internal nodes.

  15. Enhancements to PVM's BEOLIN architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, Paul L.

    2005-01-01

    .4.3 of PVM had previously been enhanced by the addition of a new architecture, BEOLIN, which allowed a PVM user to abstract a Beowulf class computer with a private network to appear as a single system, visible to the outside world, which could spawn tasks on different internal nodes.

  16. Exploring being: an international dialogue.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Steven L

    2005-04-01

    Nurses and other health professionals are in a privileged position in that they are called to be with people and their families at some of the most important moments in persons' lives. In order to better prepare nurses for this awesome and challenging responsibility, a session of the 11th International Human Becoming Conference held in Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada, on November 6, 2004, reflected on famous quotations on Being and related Being to nursing practice. The human becoming school of thought is unique in its willingness to face the important but difficult question, what is Being?

  17. Entheseal changes and sexual division of labor in a North-African population: The case of the pre-Hispanic period of the Gran Canaria Island (11th-15th c. CE).

    PubMed

    Santana-Cabrera, J; Velasco-Vázquez, J; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, A

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the relationship between entheseal changes and sexual division of labor in the pre-Hispanic population of Gran Canaria Island (Spain). Ethnohistorical records from the period of contact between Europeans and the Canarian indigenous population provide rich information about the different activities performed by men and women. For this purpose, entheseal changes in a sample of 138 individuals (82 males and 56 females) buried in ten pre-Hispanic cemeteries (11th and 15th centuries cal. CE) were analyzed. Forty-one entheses located in the clavicle, humerus, ulna and radius were analyzed (fibrous and fibro-cartilaginous attachment sites). Entheses were graded using a visual and descriptive standard which summarized the entheseal changes. This method interprets the changes as a sign of robustness on a scale from low to high development and includes enthesopathies. The intra- and inter-observer error of this method was minimal. Sex differences in the degree of robustness, bilateral asymmetry, sexual dimorphism and principal components analyses were tested in this sample. The results indicate significant variance in the entheseal robustness between males and females. They also suggest the impact of certain biomechanical chains (pronosupination, shoulder rotation, etc.) in entheseal changes. These results contribute to an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the sexual division of labor in the pre-Hispanic society of Gran Canaria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Acoustics of early music spaces from the 11th to 18th century: Rediscovery of the acoustical excellence of medium-sized rooms and new perspectives for modern concert hall design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassuet, Alban

    2004-05-01

    The acoustical characteristics of 50 rooms that played a prominent role in the history of music between the 11th and 18th centuries were studied. The rooms include basilicas, oratorios, organ churches, and the great halls and courts of the European palaces. The research provides an understanding of the acoustical features that suit the early music repertoire, and how these rooms achieved an enhanced emotional engagement through their unique acoustical characteristics. This paper provides a summary of the acoustic measurements, which include binaural and B-format recordings in each of the rooms, and presents a unique new approach to understanding their subjective characteristics through detailed analysis and auralization of their 3-D impulse response. The study shows that the timing and direction of reflections in three dimensions is critically important to defining the subjective characteristic of a room. The results emphasize the importance of developing techniques to understand the 3-D impulse response and using auralization techniques for interpreting results and making subjective judgments. The enhanced musical experience that is achieved in these early rooms offers an invitation to rethink modern acoustics and to develop a new design approach that focuses more strongly on the subjective response and emotional engagement of the music.

  19. International Mars Architecture for the Return of Samples (iMARS) Phase II Science Subteam Report - Science Management of Returned Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haltigin, T.; Smith, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    The International Mars Exploration Working Group (IMEWG) chartered an iMARS working group in 2007 to develop a plan for an international Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission potentially occurring in the timeframe 2018-2023. In early 2014, IMEWG reconstituted iMARS with the objectives of elaborating on the scientific management aspects of returned martian samples and incorporating technical developments since 2008 including NASA's Mars Science Laboratory and planned Mars2020 mission and ESA's partnership and progress with Roscosmos on ExoMars. In this discussion, the iMARS science subteam describe their approach and some preliminary organizational and operational models for a fully international sample-science management paradigm.Scientific management of the samples - from reception on Earth to distribution amongst the scientific community and through to long-term curation for many decades hence - is a diverse and complex issue. Samples returned from Mars would be amongst the most scientifically interesting and valuable materials ever recovered and would be the focus of intensive study and investigation for decades to come. Future MSR mission(s) would be international in nature, and a key driver for our discussions is to ensure that any processes we suggest enable internationally collaborative research. A further constraint is the issue of planetary protection, whereby samples must remain in containment until proven non-hazardous to Earth's biosphere and environment. However, a genuine concern is that the samples become "stuck in containment" and unavailable for wider scientific study. A wide range of geobiological analyses would be carried out, and an important part of planning for MSR is deciding which analyses must be carried out within containment and what could or should be done outside of containment. In addition, the nature and type of geobiological investigations carried out in situ by future missions would have an important influence on activities carried out

  20. A Nondestructive Method to Distinguish the Internal Constituent Architecture of the Intervertebral Discs Using 9.4 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wijayathunga, Vithanage N.; Ridgway, John P.; Ingham, Eileen; Treanor, Darren; Carey, Duane; Bulpitt, Andy; Magee, Derek; Damion, Robin; Wilcox, Ruth K.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design. An in vitro study of the intervertebral disc (IVD) structure using 9.4T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Objective. Investigate the potential of ultrahigh-field strength MRI for higher quality 3-dimensional (3D) volumetric MRI datasets of the IVD to better distinguish structural details. Summary of Background Data. MRI has the advantages of being nondestructive and 3D in comparison to most techniques used to obtain the structural details of biological tissues, however, its poor image quality at higher resolution is a limiting factor. Ultrahigh-field MRI could improve the imaging of biological tissues but the current understanding of its application for spinal tissue is limited. Methods. 2 ovine spinal segments (C7–T1, T2–T3) containing the IVD were separately imaged using 2 sequences; 3D spin echo (multislice-multiecho) pulse sequence for the C7–T1 sample and 3D gradient echo (fast-low-angle-shot) pulse sequence for the T2–T3 sample. The C7–T1 sample was subsequently decalcified and imaged again using the same scanning parameters. Histological sections obtained from the decalcified sample were stained followed by digital scanning. Observations from corresponding MRI slices and histological sections were compared as a method of confirmation of morphology captured under MRI. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and relative-contrast values were calculated for quantitative evaluation of image quality. Results. Measurements from histology sections and corresponding MRI slices matched well. Both sequences revealed finer details of the IVD structure. Under the spin echo sequence, the annulus lamellae architecture was distinguishable and the SNR and CNR values were higher. The relative contrast was considerably higher between high (nucleus) and low (bone) signal constituents, but between the nucleus and the annulus the relative contrast was low. Under the gradient echo sequence, although the relative contrasts between

  1. Architecture Synthesis and Reduced-Cost Architectures for Human Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, Gordon

    2004-01-01

    Development of architectures for human exploration missions has been pursued in the international aerospace community for a long time. This paper attempts a different approach and way of looking at architectures. Most of the emphasis is on lunar architectures with a brief look at Mars. The first step is to set forth overarching gods in order to understand origins of requirements. Then, principles and guidelines are developed for architecture formulation. It is argued that safety and cost are the primary factors. Alternative mission profiles are examined for adherence to the principles, and specific architectures formulated according to the guidelines. The guidelines themselves indicate preferred evolution paths from lunar to Mars architectures. Results of example calculations are given to illustrate the process, and an evolution path is recommended. Safety and cost criteria tend to conflict, but it is shown that cost-efficient architectures can be enhanced for good safety ratings at modest cost.

  2. Lunar architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Shahin

    The climatic conditions of Earth and human trends for discover the space, make these questions that how we can design a camp on the moon as a base for traveling in space or how we can live on that condition and what kind of camp we can have on the moon?!The first step in this way was creating the International Space Station on earth's orbit. (International Space Station, 2001) Settlement on moon was proposed since knowledge about it growth. Regarding to new technologies, architects parallel to engineers are trying to design and invent new ways for human settlement on moon because of its suitable conditions. Proposed habitats range from the actual spacecraft lander or their used fuel tanks, to inflatable modules of various shapes. Due to the researches until now, the first requirement for the living on other planets is water existence for human breath and fuel and after that we need to solve air pressure and gravity difference. (Colonization of the Moon, 2004) The Goal of this research is to answer to the question which is designing a camp on the Moon. But for this goal, there is need to think and study more about the subject and its factors. With qualitative and comparative methodology, the conditions of the Earth and the Moon will be comparing in different categories such as nature, human and design. I think that after water discovery, with using local materials and appropriate building design which can be on surface or underground, along with new sciences, we can plan for long period living on Moon. The important point is to consider Function, Form and Structure together in designing on the Moon. References: Colonization of the Moon. (2004). Retrieved December 14, 2009, from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colonizationo ft heM oonStructure, InternationalSpaceStation.(2001).Retrie http : //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/InternationalS paceS tation

  3. Design, Development and Pre-Flight Testing of the Communications, Navigation, and Networking Reconfigurable Testbed (Connect) to Investigate Software Defined Radio Architecture on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Over, Ann P.; Barrett, Michael J.; Reinhart, Richard C.; Free, James M.; Cikanek, Harry A., III

    2011-01-01

    The Communication Navigation and Networking Reconfigurable Testbed (CoNNeCT) is a NASA-sponsored mission, which will investigate the usage of Software Defined Radios (SDRs) as a multi-function communication system for space missions. A softwaredefined radio system is a communication system in which typical components of the system (e.g., modulators) are incorporated into software. The software-defined capability allows flexibility and experimentation in different modulation, coding and other parameters to understand their effects on performance. This flexibility builds inherent redundancy and flexibility into the system for improved operational efficiency, real-time changes to space missions and enhanced reliability/redundancy. The CoNNeCT Project is a collaboration between industrial radio providers and NASA. The industrial radio providers are providing the SDRs and NASA is designing, building and testing the entire flight system. The flight system will be integrated on the Express Logistics Carrier (ELC) on the International Space Station (ISS) after launch on the H-IIB Transfer Vehicle in 2012. This paper provides an overview of the technology research objectives, payload description, design challenges and pre-flight testing results.

  4. Primary sedimentary structures and the internal architecture of a Martian sand body in search of evidence for sand transport and deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, Abhijit

    1988-01-01

    Lunar experiences show that unmanned sample return missions, despite limitations on sample size, can produce invaluable data to infer crustal processes, regolith processes, regolith-atmosphere/ionosphere interaction processes, etc. Drill cores provide a record of regolith evolution as well as a more complete sample of the regolith than small scoops and/or rakes. It is proposed that: (1) a hole be drilled in a sand body to obtain continuous oriented cores; a depth of about 10 m would be compatible with what we know of bed form hierarchy of terrestrial stream deposits; (2) two trenches, at right angles to each other and close to the drill-hole, be dug and the walls scraped lightly such that primary/internal sedimentary structures of the sand body become visible; (3) the walls of the trenches be made gravitationally stable by impregnation techniques; (4) acetate or other peels of a strip on each wall be taken; and (5) appropriately scaled photographs of the walls be taken at different sun-angles to ensure maximum ease of interpretation of sedimentary structures; and, to correlate these structural features with those in the core at different depth levels of the core.

  5. Architecture and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Anne; Campbell, Leslie

    1988-01-01

    Describes "Architecture and Children," a traveling exhibition which visually involves children in architectural principles and historic styles. States that it teaches children about architecture, and through architecture it instills the basis for aesthetic judgment. Argues that "children learn best by concrete examples of ideas, not…

  6. Architecture as Design Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauppinen, Heta

    1989-01-01

    Explores the use of analogies in architectural design, the importance of Gestalt theory and aesthetic cannons in understanding and being sensitive to architecture. Emphasizes the variation between public and professional appreciation of architecture. Notes that an understanding of architectural process enables students to improve the aesthetic…

  7. Architecture and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Anne; Campbell, Leslie

    1988-01-01

    Describes "Architecture and Children," a traveling exhibition which visually involves children in architectural principles and historic styles. States that it teaches children about architecture, and through architecture it instills the basis for aesthetic judgment. Argues that "children learn best by concrete examples of ideas, not…

  8. Protocol Architecture Model Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhas, Chris

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Glenn Research Center (GRC) defines and develops advanced technology for high priority national needs in communications technologies for application to aeronautics and space. GRC tasked Computer Networks and Software Inc. (CNS) to examine protocols and architectures for an In-Space Internet Node. CNS has developed a methodology for network reference models to support NASA's four mission areas: Earth Science, Space Science, Human Exploration and Development of Space (REDS), Aerospace Technology. This report applies the methodology to three space Internet-based communications scenarios for future missions. CNS has conceptualized, designed, and developed space Internet-based communications protocols and architectures for each of the independent scenarios. The scenarios are: Scenario 1: Unicast communications between a Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) spacecraft inspace Internet node and a ground terminal Internet node via a Tracking and Data Rela Satellite (TDRS) transfer; Scenario 2: Unicast communications between a Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) International Space Station and a ground terminal Internet node via a TDRS transfer; Scenario 3: Multicast Communications (or "Multicasting"), 1 Spacecraft to N Ground Receivers, N Ground Transmitters to 1 Ground Receiver via a Spacecraft.

  9. Internal architecture of mixed tide- and storm-influenced deposits: an example from the Alcántara Formation, northern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Fátima Rossetti, Dilce

    1997-12-01

    The uppermost portion of the Itapecuru Group is exposed in the eastern margin of the Sao Luis Basin, northern Brazil, where it consists of two units: the Alcantara Formation (Cenomanian) and the Cujupe Formation (Late Cretaceous-early Tertiary? [Rossetti, D.F., Truckenbrodt, W., 1997. Revisão estratigrdfica para os depósitos do Albiano-Terciário Inferior (?) na Bacia de Sao Luis (MA), norte do Brasil. Bol. Mus. Paraense Emílio Goeldi (Sér. Ciênc. Terra), in press]). The Alcântara Formation, which contains the large-scale structures discussed in this paper, consists of deposits attributed to mid- to upper-shoreface, foreshore, tidal channel, and lagoon/washover environments attributed to a regressive, barred shoreline. Several types of large-scale cross bedding (i.e., simple foreset, compound, mixed, undulatory, and intricately bounded) were recognized in the shoreface facies association. These structures are interpreted to record the interaction of storm and tidal processes. The storm influence is suggested by a combination of factors, mostly including: (a) the genetic association with other storm-generated sedimentary structures (i.e., swaley cross stratification and undulating parallel lamination with internal truncations); (b) the deposition on prominent surfaces formed by storm erosion, which are defined by large-scale, either symmetrical or asymmetrical scours arranged in a regular, repeating pattern; (c) the sedimentary features formed under combined (unidirectional and oscillatory) flow processes (e.g., compound/mixed bedding with superimposed either swaley cross sets or complexly truncating cross sets with highly undulating boundaries; large-scale, undulatory and intricately bounded cross beddings); and (d) the lateral change in structural styles within short distances, which records frequent modification from asymmetrical to symmetrical/nearly symmetrical bedform profiles (more likely to occur under storm-generated combined flows). The tidal

  10. Five Libraries Capture Architectural Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Libraries, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents detailed look at University of Michigan Law, Folger Shakespeare, Vail Public, San Francisco University High School, and New York University Graduate School of Business Libraries, winners of 11th Library Buildings Award Program which included two renovations, two additions, and one new facility. Other notable library design projects are…

  11. Hardware Architecture Study for NASA's Space Software Defined Radios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Mortensen, Dale J.; Kacpura, Thomas J.; Andro, Monty; Smith, Carl; Liebetreu, John

    2008-01-01

    This study defines a hardware architecture approach for software defined radios to enable commonality among NASA space missions. The architecture accommodates a range of reconfigurable processing technologies including general purpose processors, digital signal processors, field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), and application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) in addition to flexible and tunable radio frequency (RF) front-ends to satisfy varying mission requirements. The hardware architecture consists of modules, radio functions, and and interfaces. The modules are a logical division of common radio functions that comprise a typical communication radio. This paper describes the architecture details, module definitions, and the typical functions on each module as well as the module interfaces. Trade-offs between component-based, custom architecture and a functional-based, open architecture are described. The architecture does not specify the internal physical implementation within each module, nor does the architecture mandate the standards or ratings of the hardware used to construct the radios.

  12. Avionic Architectures for Space Exploration Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramutola, Antonio; Martelli, Andrea; Caramia, Maurizio

    2011-08-01

    The paper presents the activities which are in progress in Thales Alenia Space Italia, founded by the internal research, in parallel with several ESA studies, and related to the definition and characterization of an avionic architecture suitable for the future space exploration missions. A significant capability is required both in term of computing power and of communication bandwidth among all the remote terminals belonging to the on-board avionic. The paper focuses on the on-board computer architecture and on the communication links and introduces the avionic demonstrator that has been set up in TAS-I to explore and test the different architectural solutions.

  13. Hydroxyapatite implants with designed internal architecture.

    PubMed

    Chu, T M; Halloran, J W; Hollister, S J; Feinberg, S E

    2001-06-01

    Porous hydroxyapatite (HA) has been used as a bone graft material in the clinics for decades. Traditionally, the pores in these HAs are either obtained from the coralline exoskeletal patterns or from the embedded organic particles in the starting HA powder. Both processes offer very limited control on the pore structure. A new method for manufacturing porous HA with designed pore channels has been developed. This method is essentially a lost-mold technique with negative molds made with Stereolithography and a highly loaded curable HA suspension as the ceramic carrier. Implants with designed channels and connection patterns were first generated from a Computer-Aided-Design (CAD) software and Computer Tomography (CT) data. The negative images of the designs were used to build the molds on a stereolithography apparatus with epoxy resins. A 40 vol% HA suspension in propoxylated neopentyl glycol diacrylate (PNPGDA) and iso-bornyl acrylate (IBA) was formulated. HA suspension was cast into the epoxy molds and cured into solid at 85 degrees C. The molds and acrylate binders were removed by pyrolysis, followed by HA green body sintering. With this method, implants with six different channel designs were built successfully and the designed channels were reproduced in the sintered HA implants. The channels created in the sintered HA implants were between 366 microm and 968 microm in diameter with standard deviations of 50 microm or less. The porosity created by the channels were between 26% and 52%. The results show that HA implants with designed connection pattern and well controlled channel size can be built with the technique developed in this study. Copyright 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers

  14. International Graduate Students Studying Architecture in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryson, Barbara White

    2012-01-01

    Flying into China is both exhilarating and daunting. The great cities of this country confront each visitor with modernity and antiquity, sparkling skyscrapers and hazy pollution, growing consumerism and extensive poverty, as well as the opportunities and challenges of a built environment, expanding at a rate exceeding that of any other country in…

  15. International Graduate Students Studying Architecture in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryson, Barbara White

    2012-01-01

    Flying into China is both exhilarating and daunting. The great cities of this country confront each visitor with modernity and antiquity, sparkling skyscrapers and hazy pollution, growing consumerism and extensive poverty, as well as the opportunities and challenges of a built environment, expanding at a rate exceeding that of any other country in…

  16. International Space Station in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image of the International Space Station (ISS) was photographed by one of the crewmembers of the STS-105 mission from the Shuttle Orbiter Discovery after deparating from the ISS. The STS-105 mission was the 11th ISS assembly flight and its goals were the rotation of the ISS Expedition Two crew with the Expedition Three crew, and the delivery of supplies utilizing the Italian-built Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Leonardo. Aboard Leonardo were six resupply stowage racks, four resupply stowage supply platforms, and two new scientific experiment racks, EXPRESS (Expedite the Processing of Experiments to the Space Station) Racks 4 and 5, which added science capabilities to the ISS. Another payload was the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE), which included materials and other types of space exposure experiments mounted on the exterior of the ISS.

  17. International Space Station in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image of the International Space Station (ISS) was photographed by one of the crewmembers of the STS-105 mission from the Shuttle Orbiter Discovery after separating from the ISS. The STS-105 mission was the 11th ISS assembly flight and its goals were the rotation of the ISS Expedition Two crew with Expedition Three crew, and the delivery of supplies utilizing the Italian-built Multipurpose Logistic Module (MPLM) Leonardo. Aboard Leonardo were six resupply stowage racks, four resupply stowage supply platforms, and two new scientific experiment racks, EXPRESS (Expedite the Processing of Experiments to the Space Station) Racks 4 and 5, which added science capabilities to the ISS. Another payload was the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE), which included materials and other types of space exposure experiments mounted on the exterior of the ISS.

  18. Distributed multiport memory architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, W. H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A multiport memory architecture is diclosed for each of a plurality of task centers connected to a command and data bus. Each task center, includes a memory and a plurality of devices which request direct memory access as needed. The memory includes an internal data bus and an internal address bus to which the devices are connected, and direct timing and control logic comprised of a 10-state ring counter for allocating memory devices by enabling AND gates connected to the request signal lines of the devices. The outputs of AND gates connected to the same device are combined by OR gates to form an acknowledgement signal that enables the devices to address the memory during the next clock period. The length of the ring counter may be effectively lengthened to any multiple of ten to allow for more direct memory access intervals in one repetitive sequence. One device is a network bus adapter which serially shifts onto the command and data bus, a data word (8 bits plus control and parity bits) during the next ten direct memory access intervals after it has been granted access. The NBA is therefore allocated only one access in every ten intervals, which is a predetermined interval for all centers. The ring counters of all centers are periodically synchronized by DMA SYNC signal to assure that all NBAs be able to function in synchronism for data transfer from one center to another.

  19. Software Architecture Technology Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    2007 Carnegie Mellon University Software Architecture Technology Initiative Mark Klein Third Annual SATURN Workshop May 2007 Report Documentation...3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2007 to 00-00-2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Software Architecture Technology Initiative 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES presented at the SEI Software Architecture Technology User

  20. High performance parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.E. )

    1989-09-01

    In this paper the author describes current high performance parallel computer architectures. A taxonomy is presented to show computer architecture from the user programmer's point-of-view. The effects of the taxonomy upon the programming model are described. Some current architectures are described with respect to the taxonomy. Finally, some predictions about future systems are presented. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Williams, Randall; McLaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This analysis is a survey of control center architectures of the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures have similarities in basic structure, and differences in functional distribution of responsibilities for the phases of operations: (a) Launch vehicles in the international community vary greatly in configuration and process; (b) Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific configurations; (c) Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site, however the flight operations may be a different control center than the launch center; and (d) The engineering support centers are primarily located at the design center with a small engineering support team at the launch site.

  2. Proceedings of the XVIIth International Conference on Electromagnetic Isotope Separators and Related Topics (EMIS2015), Grand Rapids, MI, U.S.A., 11-15 May 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollen, Georg; Mittig, Wolfgang; Morrissey, Dave; Schwarz, Stefan; Villari, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    The 17th International Conference on Electromagnetic Isotope Separators and Related Topics (EMIS-2015) was held in Grand Rapids, Michigan, in the United States, from May 11th to 15th, 2015. The EMIS-2015 conference was hosted by Michigan State University. The present volume contains the proceedings of the event.

  3. A Summary of NASA Architecture Studies Utilizing Fission Surface Power Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.; Poston, David I.

    2011-01-01

    Beginning with the Exploration Systems Architecture Study in 2005, NASA has conducted various mission architecture studies to evaluate implementation options for the U.S. Space Policy. Several of the studies examined the use of Fission Surface Power (FSP) systems for human missions to the lunar and Martian surface. This paper summarizes the FSP concepts developed under four different NASA-sponsored architecture studies: Lunar Architecture Team, Mars Architecture Team, Lunar Surface Systems/Constellation Architecture Team, and International Architecture Working Group-Power Function Team.

  4. Advanced high-performance computer system architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, V. I.

    2007-02-01

    Convergence of computer systems and communication technologies are moving to switched high-performance modular system architectures on the basis of high-speed switched interconnections. Multi-core processors become more perspective way to high-performance system, and traditional parallel bus system architectures (VME/VXI, cPCI/PXI) are moving to new higher speed serial switched interconnections. Fundamentals in system architecture development are compact modular component strategy, low-power processor, new serial high-speed interface chips on the board, and high-speed switched fabric for SAN architectures. Overview of advanced modular concepts and new international standards for development high-performance embedded and compact modular systems for real-time applications are described.

  5. Module Architecture for in Situ Space Laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Brent

    2010-01-01

    The paper analyzes internal outfitting architectures for space exploration laboratory modules. ISS laboratory architecture is examined as a baseline for comparison; applicable insights are derived. Laboratory functional programs are defined for seven planet-surface knowledge domains. Necessary and value-added departures from the ISS architecture standard are defined, and three sectional interior architecture options are assessed for practicality and potential performance. Contemporary guidelines for terrestrial analytical laboratory design are found to be applicable to the in-space functional program. Densepacked racks of system equipment, and high module volume packing ratios, should not be assumed as the default solution for exploration laboratories whose primary activities include un-scriptable investigations and experimentation on the system equipment itself.

  6. Module Architecture for in Situ Space Laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Brent

    2010-01-01

    The paper analyzes internal outfitting architectures for space exploration laboratory modules. ISS laboratory architecture is examined as a baseline for comparison; applicable insights are derived. Laboratory functional programs are defined for seven planet-surface knowledge domains. Necessary and value-added departures from the ISS architecture standard are defined, and three sectional interior architecture options are assessed for practicality and potential performance. Contemporary guidelines for terrestrial analytical laboratory design are found to be applicable to the in-space functional program. Densepacked racks of system equipment, and high module volume packing ratios, should not be assumed as the default solution for exploration laboratories whose primary activities include un-scriptable investigations and experimentation on the system equipment itself.

  7. Long term evolution and internal architecture of high-energy banner ridges of Mer d'Iroise (Western Brittany, France) : interplay of sea-level, basement morphology, biogenic productivity and hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roy, P., Sr.; Le Dantec, N.; Franzetti, M.; Delacourt, C.; Ehrhold, A.

    2016-12-01

    The recent completion of a coupled seismic and swath bathymetric survey, conducted across the Mer d'Iroise (Atlantic continental shelf, France), provided new data for the study of the long term evolution of deep tidal sand ridges. Three major banner sand ridges composed of biogenic sands were investigated: the Banc du Four, the Haut Fond d'Ouessant and the Banc d'Ar Men. Seismic interpretation reveals a compound internal architecture of these sand ridges with a sedimentary core forming the lower units interpreted to be shoreface deposits and overlain by sandwaves. Sandwave climbing, which combines progradation and accretion, is the major process controlling the growth of the ridges. The elevation of the preserved dune foresets reaches values of about 20 to 30 m and indicate a combination of giant dunes characterized by numerous steep (up to 20°) clinoforms corresponding to a high-energy depositional environment. All of the radiocarbon ages of the biogenic surficial deposits of the Banc du Four range from 10,036 to 2,748 cal years B.P. and suggest it has grown during the last sea-level rise. The apparent absence of recent surface deposits could be caused by a change in benthic biogenic productivity or the non-conservation of recent deposits. The multiphase accretion of the ridge is closely linked to the progressive flooding of the coastal promontories and straits that structured the igneous basement. A comparable evolutionary scheme is observed for the Haut-Fond d'Ouessant where a counter-clock wise migration of dunes characterizes the surface of the ridge. In contrast, the Banc d'Ar Men located above a regular basement displays a simpler structure with a consistent Northwestward migration of steep clinoforms. Therefore, the sand ridges of the Mer d'Iroise should be thought of as a representative example of large-scale high-energy banner banks controlled by interaction of sea-level, basement morphology, biogenic productivity, tidal and wave hydrodynamics.

  8. Utility communications architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    Integrating communications helps utilities realize the full potential of communications facilities for providing deversified new business opportunities, increasing operational efficiency, improving productivity, and enhancing customer service. This volume, the forth of six volumes, serves as the standard reference for the development and acquisition of communications systems and services that are intended to be compliant with EPRI's Utility Communications Architecture (UCA). The project team identified electric utility information requirements and conducted a series of interviews with 14 diverse US utilities. The work was reviewed and modified based on an EPRI workshop. Two host utilities, Houston Lighting Power Company and Pacific Gas Electric Company, confirmed information requirements and provided associated communications requirements. Teams of industry experts in each of six defined utility functional areas reviewed the communications requirements and broadened them to reflect an industrywide perspective. In subsequent project phases, the team assessed open communication standards in light of the communications requirements and selected standards for inclusion in this specification. They also incorporated feedback from briefings and several workshops. This specification provides a standard reference for the development and acquisition of UCA-compliant communication systems, equipment, and services. It specifies international communications standards that meet the industry's communications requirements. It assumes a high degree of familiarity with standards documentation.

  9. OS Friendly Microprocessor Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-01

    writes a cache bank block of data to USB controller .......34 Fig. 29 Process stack example...Architecture Block Diagram Data Bus Program Address Bus Data Address Bus Read/ Write Program Memory Extended Harvard Processor Architecture Program...Bus Data Memory Data Address Bus Read/ Write Data Address Bus Read/ Write Register Mem Pipeline State Mem OS Friendly Architecture B us se s B us se

  10. Software Architecture Technology Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    2008 Carnegie Mellon University 2008 PLS March 2008 © 2008 Carnegie Mellon University Software Architecture Technology Initiative SATURN 2008...SUBTITLE Software Architecture Technology Initiative 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES presented at the SEI Software Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) Workshop, 30 Apr ? 1 May 2008, Pittsburgh, PA. 14

  11. Mexican Art and Architecture Databases: Needs, Achievements, Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barberena, Elsa

    At the international level, a lack of diffusion of Mexican art and architecture in indexes and abstracts has been detected. Reasons for this could be lack of continuity in publications, the use of the Spanish language, lack of interest in Mexican art and architecture, and sporadic financial resources. Nevertheless, even though conditions are not…

  12. Pi: A Parallel Architecture Interface for Multi-Model Execution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    Directory Schemes for Cache Coherence. In The 15th Annual Interna- tional Symposium on Computer Architecture. IEEE Computer Society and ACM, June 1988. [3...Annual International Symposium on Computer Architecture. IEEE Computer Society and ACM, June 1986. [5] Arvind and Rishiyur S. Nikhil. A Dataflow...Overview, 1987. [9] Roberto Bisiani and Alessandro Forin. Multilanguage Parallel Programming of Heterogeneous Machines. IEEE Transactions on Computers

  13. RAINBOW: Architecture-Based Adaptation of Complex Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    2 This is the core architectural representation scheme adopted by a number of ADLs, including Acme [8], xArch [3], xADL [5], ADML [15], and SADL...International, Mar. 1997. 15. The OpenGroup. Architecture Description Markup Language ( ADML ) Version 1. Apr. 2000. Available at http

  14. Versatile Tiled-Processor Architectures: The Raw Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-30

    efforts such as the Tarantula [1] extension to Alpha, have proposed architectures that organize silicon resources more effectively and as tiled...Mattina, and A. Seznec”. Tarantula : A Vector Extension to the Alpha Architecture. In Proceedings of the 29th International Symposium on Computer

  15. Grid Architecture 2

    SciTech Connect

    Taft, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    The report describes work done on Grid Architecture under the auspices of the Department of Electricity Office of Electricity Delivery and Reliability in 2015. As described in the first Grid Architecture report, the primary purpose of this work is to provide stakeholder insight about grid issues so as to enable superior decision making on their part. Doing this requires the creation of various work products, including oft-times complex diagrams, analyses, and explanations. This report provides architectural insights into several important grid topics and also describes work done to advance the science of Grid Architecture as well.

  16. Software architecture design domain

    SciTech Connect

    White, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    Software architectures can provide a basis for the capture and subsequent reuse of design knowledge. The goal of software architecture is to allow the design of a system to take place at a higher level of abstraction; a level concerned with components, connections, constraints, rationale. This architectural view of software adds a new layer of abstraction to the traditional design phase of software development. It has resulted in a flurry of activity towards techniques, tools, and architectural design languages developed specifically to assist with this activity. An analysis of architectural descriptions, even though they differ in notation, shows a common set of key constructs that are present across widely varying domains. These common aspects form a core set of constructs that should belong to any ADL in order to for the language to offer the ability to specify software systems at the architectural level. This analysis also revealed a second set of constructs which served to expand the first set thereby improving the syntax and semantics. These constructs are classified according to whether they provide representation and analysis support for architectures belonging to many varying application domains (domain-independent construct class) or to a particular application domain (domain-dependent constructs). This paper presents the constructs of these two classes, their placement in the architecture design domain and shows how they may be used to classify, select, and analyze proclaimed architectural design languages (ADLs).

  17. Architecture interne d'une vallée incisée sur une côte à forte énergie de houle et de marée (vallée de la Leyre, côte aquitaine, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Féniès, Hugues; Lericolais, Gilles

    2005-10-01

    The Leyre incised valley shows a specific strata architecture related to its wave- and tide-dominated depositional environment. The low-stand systems tract has been totally eroded by the tidal ravinement surface and the valley is entirely filled by the transgressive systems tract. The Leyre and the Gironde incised valleys have been formed within the same depositional environment and the same stratigraphic framework. Consequently, the description of the internal architecture of the Leyre incised valley enables to complete the stratigraphic model of the wave- and tide-dominated incised valleys set up by Allen et Posamentier and Lericolais et al. To cite this article: H. Féniès, G. Lericolais, C. R. Geoscience 337 (2005).

  18. Utility communication architecture application to plant communications

    SciTech Connect

    Nordell, D.E.

    1995-03-01

    EPRI`s Utility Communication Architecture (UCA) is a profile specification outlining international standards to be used in providing interconnection of utility process-control and business information systems, both within a facility and at the enterprise level. This paper provides an overview of the UCA and its application to power plant information and control systems.

  19. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Levesque, Marl; Williams, Randall; Mclaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Launch vehicles within the international community vary greatly in their configuration and processing. Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific launch vehicle configuration. Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site. Each launch site has a control center for launch operations; however flight operations support varies from being co-located with the launch site to being shared with the space vehicle control center. There is also a nuance of some having an engineering support center which may be co-located with either the launch or flight control center, or in a separate geographical location altogether. A survey of control center architectures is presented for various launch vehicles including the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures shares some similarities in basic structure while differences in functional distribution also exist. The driving functions which lead to these factors are considered and a model of control center architectures is proposed which supports these commonalities and variations.

  20. Workflow automation architecture standard

    SciTech Connect

    Moshofsky, R.P.; Rohen, W.T.

    1994-11-14

    This document presents an architectural standard for application of workflow automation technology. The standard includes a functional architecture, process for developing an automated workflow system for a work group, functional and collateral specifications for workflow automation, and results of a proof of concept prototype.

  1. ESPC Common Model Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    support for the Intel MIC architecture, the Apple Clang/LLVM C++ compiler is supported on both Linux and Darwin , and ESMF’s dependency on the NetCDF C...compiler on both Linux and Darwin systems. • Support was added to compile the ESMF library for the Intel MIC architecture under Linux. This allows

  2. Architectural Physics: Lighting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkinson, R. G.

    The author coordinates the many diverse branches of knowledge which have dealt with the field of lighting--physiology, psychology, engineering, physics, and architectural design. Part I, "The Elements of Architectural Physics", discusses the physiological aspects of lighting, visual performance, lighting design, calculations and measurements of…

  3. Applying neuroscience to architecture.

    PubMed

    Eberhard, John P

    2009-06-25

    Architectural practice and neuroscience research use our brains and minds in much the same way. However, the link between neuroscience knowledge and architectural design--with rare exceptions--has yet to be made. The concept of linking these two fields is a challenge worth considering.

  4. Generic POCC architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This document describes a generic POCC (Payload Operations Control Center) architecture based upon current POCC software practice, and several refinements to the architecture based upon object-oriented design principles and expected developments in teleoperations. The current-technology generic architecture is an abstraction based upon close analysis of the ERBS, COBE, and GRO POCC's. A series of three refinements is presented: these may be viewed as an approach to a phased transition to the recommended architecture. The third refinement constitutes the recommended architecture, which, together with associated rationales, will form the basis of the rapid synthesis environment to be developed in the remainder of this task. The document is organized into two parts. The first part describes the current generic architecture using several graphical as well as tabular representations or 'views.' The second part presents an analysis of the generic architecture in terms of object-oriented principles. On the basis of this discussion, refinements to the generic architecture are presented, again using a combination of graphical and tabular representations.

  5. Robotic Intelligence Kernel: Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-16

    The INL Robotic Intelligence Kernel Architecture (RIK-A) is a multi-level architecture that supports a dynamic autonomy structure. The RIK-A is used to coalesce hardware for sensing and action as well as software components for perception, communication, behavior and world modeling into a framework that can be used to create behaviors for humans to interact with the robot.

  6. Software Architecture Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Many software systems eventually undergo changes to their basic architectural structure. Such changes may be prompted by new feature requests, new quality attribute requirements, changing technology, or other reasons. Whatever the causes, architecture evolution is commonplace in real-world software projects. Today's software architects, however,…

  7. Architectural Physics: Lighting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkinson, R. G.

    The author coordinates the many diverse branches of knowledge which have dealt with the field of lighting--physiology, psychology, engineering, physics, and architectural design. Part I, "The Elements of Architectural Physics", discusses the physiological aspects of lighting, visual performance, lighting design, calculations and measurements of…

  8. Architecture--a Celebration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ivor

    1976-01-01

    The relationship of architecture to society and the quality of life is explored in these areas: context, routes, environment, groupings, and interface. Architecture that grows out of interrelationships imposes order on a confused world and makes possible effective problem solving. (LBH)

  9. Emerging supercomputer architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Messina, P.C.

    1987-01-01

    This paper will examine the current and near future trends for commercially available high-performance computers with architectures that differ from the mainstream ''supercomputer'' systems in use for the last few years. These emerging supercomputer architectures are just beginning to have an impact on the field of high performance computing. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  10. VLSI and computer architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, R.; Fernandez, E.B. )

    1989-01-01

    This book provides a sense of realism concerning the potential of actual design principles and techniques for computer systems implemented in VLSI. With the knowledge gained from this book, the reader will be better able to understand and utilize the architectures that have been produced by the use of these techniques. Topics covered include Superconductive electronics, Multiprocessing, and Object-oriented architectures.

  11. The Technology of Architecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses how career and technical education is helping students draw up plans for success in architectural technology. According to the College of DuPage (COD) in Glen Ellyn, Illinois, one of the two-year schools offering training in architectural technology, graduates have a number of opportunities available to them. They may work…

  12. The Technology of Architecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses how career and technical education is helping students draw up plans for success in architectural technology. According to the College of DuPage (COD) in Glen Ellyn, Illinois, one of the two-year schools offering training in architectural technology, graduates have a number of opportunities available to them. They may work…

  13. Teaching American Indian Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchell, Dick

    1991-01-01

    Reviews "Native American Architecture," by Nabokov and Easton, an encyclopedic work that examines technology, climate, social structure, economics, religion, and history in relation to house design and the "meaning" of space among tribes of nine regions. Describes this book's use in a college course on Native American architecture. (SV)

  14. De-Architecturization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wines, James

    1975-01-01

    De-architecturization is art about architecture, a catalyst suggesting that public art does not have to respond to formalist doctrine; but rather, may evolve from the informational reservoirs of the city environment, where phenomenology and structure become the fabric of its existence. (Author/RK)

  15. Teaching American Indian Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchell, Dick

    1991-01-01

    Reviews "Native American Architecture," by Nabokov and Easton, an encyclopedic work that examines technology, climate, social structure, economics, religion, and history in relation to house design and the "meaning" of space among tribes of nine regions. Describes this book's use in a college course on Native American architecture. (SV)

  16. Software Architecture Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Many software systems eventually undergo changes to their basic architectural structure. Such changes may be prompted by new feature requests, new quality attribute requirements, changing technology, or other reasons. Whatever the causes, architecture evolution is commonplace in real-world software projects. Today's software architects, however,…

  17. Can architecture be barbaric?

    PubMed

    Hürol, Yonca

    2009-06-01

    The title of this article is adapted from Theodor W. Adorno's famous dictum: 'To write poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric.' After the catastrophic earthquake in Kocaeli, Turkey on the 17th of August 1999, in which more than 40,000 people died or were lost, Necdet Teymur, who was then the dean of the Faculty of Architecture of the Middle East Technical University, referred to Adorno in one of his 'earthquake poems' and asked: 'Is architecture possible after 17th of August?' The main objective of this article is to interpret Teymur's question in respect of its connection to Adorno's philosophy with a view to make a contribution to the politics and ethics of architecture in Turkey. Teymur's question helps in providing a new interpretation of a critical approach to architecture and architectural technology through Adorno's philosophy. The paper also presents a discussion of Adorno's dictum, which serves for a better understanding of its universality/particularity.

  18. The Simulation Intranet Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, V.P.; Linebarger, J.M.; Miller, D.J.; Vandewart, R.L.

    1998-12-02

    The Simdarion Infranet (S1) is a term which is being used to dcscribc one element of a multidisciplinary distributed and distance computing initiative known as DisCom2 at Sandia National Laboratory (http ct al. 1998). The Simulation Intranet is an architecture for satisfying Sandia's long term goal of providing an end- to-end set of scrviccs for high fidelity full physics simu- lations in a high performance, distributed, and distance computing environment. The Intranet Architecture group was formed to apply current distributed object technologies to this problcm. For the hardware architec- tures and software models involved with the current simulation process, a CORBA-based architecture is best suited to meet Sandia's needs. This paper presents the initial desi-a and implementation of this Intranct based on a three-tier Network Computing Architecture(NCA). The major parts of the architecture include: the Web Cli- ent, the Business Objects, and Data Persistence.

  19. Architecture for Survivable System Processing (ASSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    The Architecture for Survivable System Processing (ASSP) Program is a multi-phase effort to implement Department of Defense (DOD) and commercially developed high-tech hardware, software, and architectures for reliable space avionics and ground based systems. System configuration options provide processing capabilities to address Time Dependent Processing (TDP), Object Dependent Processing (ODP), and Mission Dependent Processing (MDP) requirements through Open System Architecture (OSA) alternatives that allow for the enhancement, incorporation, and capitalization of a broad range of development assets. High technology developments in hardware, software, and networking models, address technology challenges of long processor life times, fault tolerance, reliability, throughput, memories, radiation hardening, size, weight, power (SWAP) and security. Hardware and software design, development, and implementation focus on the interconnectivity/interoperability of an open system architecture and is being developed to apply new technology into practical OSA components. To insure for widely acceptable architecture capable of interfacing with various commercial and military components, this program provides for regular interactions with standardization working groups (e.g.) the International Standards Organization (ISO), American National Standards Institute (ANSI), Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), and Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). Selection of a viable open architecture is based on the widely accepted standards that implement the ISO/OSI Reference Model.

  20. Architecture for Survivable System Processing (ASSP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Richard J.

    1991-11-01

    The Architecture for Survivable System Processing (ASSP) Program is a multi-phase effort to implement Department of Defense (DOD) and commercially developed high-tech hardware, software, and architectures for reliable space avionics and ground based systems. System configuration options provide processing capabilities to address Time Dependent Processing (TDP), Object Dependent Processing (ODP), and Mission Dependent Processing (MDP) requirements through Open System Architecture (OSA) alternatives that allow for the enhancement, incorporation, and capitalization of a broad range of development assets. High technology developments in hardware, software, and networking models, address technology challenges of long processor life times, fault tolerance, reliability, throughput, memories, radiation hardening, size, weight, power (SWAP) and security. Hardware and software design, development, and implementation focus on the interconnectivity/interoperability of an open system architecture and is being developed to apply new technology into practical OSA components. To insure for widely acceptable architecture capable of interfacing with various commercial and military components, this program provides for regular interactions with standardization working groups (e.g.) the International Standards Organization (ISO), American National Standards Institute (ANSI), Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), and Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). Selection of a viable open architecture is based on the widely accepted standards that implement the ISO/OSI Reference Model.

  1. The IVOA Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arviset, C.; Gaudet, S.; IVOA Technical Coordination Group

    2012-09-01

    Astronomy produces large amounts of data of many kinds, coming from various sources: science space missions, ground based telescopes, theoretical models, compilation of results, etc. These data and associated processing services are made available via the Internet by "providers", usually large data centres or smaller teams (see Figure 1). The "consumers", be they individual researchers, research teams or computer systems, access these services to do their science. However, inter-connection amongst all these services and between providers and consumers is usually not trivial. The Virtual Observatory (VO) is the necessary "middle layer" framework enabling interoperability between all these providers and consumers in a seamless and transparent manner. Like the web which enables end users and machines to access transparently documents and services wherever and however they are stored, the VO enables the astronomy community to access data and service resources wherever and however they are provided. Over the last decade, the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) has been defining various standards to build the VO technical framework for the providers to share their data and services ("Sharing"), and to allow users to find ("Finding") these resources, to get them ("Getting") and to use them ("Using"). To enable these functionalities, the definition of some core astronomically-oriented standards ("VO Core") has also been necessary. This paper will present the official and current IVOA Architecture[1], describing the various building blocks of the VO framework (see Figure 2) and their relation to all existing and in-progress IVOA standards. Additionally, it will show examples of these standards in action, connecting VO "consumers" to VO "providers".

  2. 26 CFR 1.190-3 - Election to deduct architectural and transportation barrier removal expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Election to deduct architectural and... Individuals and Corporations (continued) § 1.190-3 Election to deduct architectural and transportation barrier... architectural and transportation barriers provided by section 190(a) shall be made by claiming the deduction as...

  3. An Integrated Hybrid Transportation Architecture for Human Mars Expeditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, Raymond G.; Chai, Patrick R.; Qu, Min

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Human Spaceflight Architecture Team is developing a reusable hybrid transportation architecture that uses both chemical and electric propulsion systems on the same vehicle to send crew and cargo to Mars destinations such as Phobos, Deimos, the surface of Mars, and other orbits around Mars. By applying chemical and electrical propulsion where each is most effective, the hybrid architecture enables a series of Mars trajectories that are more fuel-efficient than an all chemical architecture without significant increases in flight times. This paper presents an integrated Hybrid in-space transportation architecture for piloted missions and delivery of cargo. A concept for a Mars campaign including orbital and Mars surface missions is described in detail including a system concept of operations and conceptual design. Specific constraints, margin, and pinch points are identified for the architecture and opportunities for critical path commercial and international collaboration are discussed.

  4. Trends in Microfabrication Capabilities & Device Architectures.

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Todd; Jones, Adam; Lentine, Anthony L.; Mudrick, John; Okandan, Murat; Rodrigues, Arun F.

    2015-06-01

    The last two decades have seen an explosion in worldwide R&D, enabling fundamentally new capabilities while at the same time changing the international technology landscape. The advent of technologies for continued miniaturization and electronics feature size reduction, and for architectural innovations, will have many technical, economic, and national security implications. It is important to anticipate possible microelectronics development directions and their implications on US national interests. This report forecasts and assesses trends and directions for several potentially disruptive microfabrication capabilities and device architectures that may emerge in the next 5-10 years.

  5. ATCA for Machines-- Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.S.; /SLAC

    2008-04-22

    The Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture is a new industry open standard for electronics instrument modules and shelves being evaluated for the International Linear Collider (ILC). It is the first industrial standard designed for High Availability (HA). ILC availability simulations have shown clearly that the capabilities of ATCA are needed in order to achieve acceptable integrated luminosity. The ATCA architecture looks attractive for beam instruments and detector applications as well. This paper provides an overview of ongoing R&D including application of HA principles to power electronics systems.

  6. Advanced control architecture for autonomous vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Markus; Dickmanns, Ernst D.

    1997-06-01

    An advanced control architecture for autonomous vehicles is presented. The hierarchical architecture consists of four levels: a vehicle level, a control level, a rule-based level and a knowledge-based level. A special focus is on forms of internal representation, which have to be chosen adequately for each level. The control scheme is applied to VaMP, a Mercedes passenger car which autonomously performs missions on German freeways. VaMP perceives the environment with its sense of vision and conventional sensors. It controls its actuators for locomotion and attention focusing. Modules for perception, cognition and action are discussed.

  7. Trends in Microfabrication Capabilities & Device Architectures.

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Todd; Jones, Adam; Lentine, Tony; Mudrick, John; Okandan, Murat; Rodrigues, Arun

    2015-06-01

    The last two decades have seen an explosion in worldwide R&D, enabling fundamentally new capabilities while at the same time changing the international technology landscape. The advent of technologies for continued miniaturization and electronics feature size reduction, and for architectural innovations, will have many technical, economic, and national security implications. It is important to anticipate possible microelectronics development directions and their implications on US national interests. This report forecasts and assesses trends and directions for several potentially disruptive microfabrication capabilities and device architectures that may emerge in the next 5-10 years.

  8. Fractal Geometry of Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Wolfgang E.

    In Fractals smaller parts and the whole are linked together. Fractals are self-similar, as those parts are, at least approximately, scaled-down copies of the rough whole. In architecture, such a concept has also been known for a long time. Not only architects of the twentieth century called for an overall idea that is mirrored in every single detail, but also Gothic cathedrals and Indian temples offer self-similarity. This study mainly focuses upon the question whether this concept of self-similarity makes architecture with fractal properties more diverse and interesting than Euclidean Modern architecture. The first part gives an introduction and explains Fractal properties in various natural and architectural objects, presenting the underlying structure by computer programmed renderings. In this connection, differences between the fractal, architectural concept and true, mathematical Fractals are worked out to become aware of limits. This is the basis for dealing with the problem whether fractal-like architecture, particularly facades, can be measured so that different designs can be compared with each other under the aspect of fractal properties. Finally the usability of the Box-Counting Method, an easy-to-use measurement method of Fractal Dimension is analyzed with regard to architecture.

  9. Architecture for Verifiable Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinholtz, William; Dvorak, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Verifiable MDS Architecture (VMA) is a software architecture that facilitates the construction of highly verifiable flight software for NASA s Mission Data System (MDS), especially for smaller missions subject to cost constraints. More specifically, the purpose served by VMA is to facilitate aggressive verification and validation of flight software while imposing a minimum of constraints on overall functionality. VMA exploits the state-based architecture of the MDS and partitions verification issues into elements susceptible to independent verification and validation, in such a manner that scaling issues are minimized, so that relatively large software systems can be aggressively verified in a cost-effective manner.

  10. Microcomponent sheet architecture

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, R.S.; Drost, M.K..; McDonald, C.E.

    1997-03-18

    The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation. 14 figs.

  11. Microcomponent sheet architecture

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Drost, M. Kevin; McDonald, Carolyn E.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation.

  12. Construct a Management Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-23

    Task: Consider management architecture options that better align functional and budget responsibility consistent with comprehensive strategic ... planning . Scope the leadership hierarchy to the appropriate management responsibilities, reduce layers of management and move decision making closer to issue identification.

  13. Robot Electronics Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Michael; Magnone, Lee; Aghazarian, Hrand; Baumgartner, Eric; Kennedy, Brett

    2008-01-01

    An electronics architecture has been developed to enable the rapid construction and testing of prototypes of robotic systems. This architecture is designed to be a research vehicle of great stability, reliability, and versatility. A system according to this architecture can easily be reconfigured (including expanded or contracted) to satisfy a variety of needs with respect to input, output, processing of data, sensing, actuation, and power. The architecture affords a variety of expandable input/output options that enable ready integration of instruments, actuators, sensors, and other devices as independent modular units. The separation of different electrical functions onto independent circuit boards facilitates the development of corresponding simple and modular software interfaces. As a result, both hardware and software can be made to expand or contract in modular fashion while expending a minimum of time and effort.

  14. Architectural Knowledge in an SOA Infrastructure Reference Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Olaf; Kopp, Petra; Pappe, Stefan

    In this chapter, we present an industrial case study for the creation and usage of architectural knowledge. We first introduce the business domain, service portfolio, and knowledge management approach of the company involved in the case. Next, we introduce a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) infrastructure reference architecture as a primary carrier of architectural knowledge in this company. Moreover, we present how we harvested architectural knowledge from industry projects to create this reference architecture. We also present feedback from early reference architecture users. Finally, we conclude and give an outlook to future work.

  15. Embedded Instrumentation Systems Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    and continuous test and evaluation. The architecture can also be useful in monitoring, diagnostics, and health management, as well as protection in...section describes the demonstration platform used in the effort to validate the first reference instantiation of the architecture. It included...advantage of the IEEE 1451 family of standards for smart sensors and transducers (Lee and Song 2003; Song and Lee 2006). The EI Node uses the IEEE 1451.X

  16. A Modular Robotic Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    DATES COVERED AD-A232 007 Januar 1991 professional paper5 FUNOING NUMBERS A MODULAR ROBOTIC ARCHITECTURE PR: ZE92 WU: DN300029 PE: 0602936N - S. AUTHOR...mobile robots will help alleviate these problems, and, if made widely available, will promote standardization and compatibility among systems throughout...the industry. The Modular Robotic Architecture (MRA) is a generic control system that meets the above needs by providing developers with a standard set

  17. Dynamic Architecture Computer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    of Engineering of the Air Force Institute of Tecnology Air University In Partial Fulfillment of Master of Science in Electrical Engineering Accession...architecture. The review assured that this study did not duplicate previous studies and provided the background information for this study. 4 Analysis of...a dynamic architecture computer based on the information obtained from the analysis outlined in the steps above. Analysis of Results. This concluding

  18. Languages for parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents mathematical methods for modelling parallel computer architectures, based on the results of ESPRIT's project 415 on computer languages for parallel architectures. Presented are investigations incorporating a wide variety of programming styles, including functional,logic, and object-oriented paradigms. Topics cover include Philips's parallel object-oriented language POOL, lazy-functional languages, the languages IDEAL, K-LEAF, FP2, and Petri-net semantics for the AADL language.

  19. Generic Distributed Simulation Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, C.P.

    1999-05-14

    A Generic Distributed Simulation Architecture is described that allows a simulation to be automatically distributed over a heterogeneous network of computers and executed with very little human direction. A prototype Framework is presented that implements the elements of the Architecture and demonstrates the feasibility of the concepts. It provides a basis for a future, improved Framework that will support legacy models. Because the Framework is implemented in Java, it may be installed on almost any modern computer system.

  20. Architecture Adaptive Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorband, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Architecture Adaptive Computing Environment (aCe) is a software system that includes a language, compiler, and run-time library for parallel computing. aCe was developed to enable programmers to write programs, more easily than was previously possible, for a variety of parallel computing architectures. Heretofore, it has been perceived to be difficult to write parallel programs for parallel computers and more difficult to port the programs to different parallel computing architectures. In contrast, aCe is supportable on all high-performance computing architectures. Currently, it is supported on LINUX clusters. aCe uses parallel programming constructs that facilitate writing of parallel programs. Such constructs were used in single-instruction/multiple-data (SIMD) programming languages of the 1980s, including Parallel Pascal, Parallel Forth, C*, *LISP, and MasPar MPL. In aCe, these constructs are extended and implemented for both SIMD and multiple- instruction/multiple-data (MIMD) architectures. Two new constructs incorporated in aCe are those of (1) scalar and virtual variables and (2) pre-computed paths. The scalar-and-virtual-variables construct increases flexibility in optimizing memory utilization in various architectures. The pre-computed-paths construct enables the compiler to pre-compute part of a communication operation once, rather than computing it every time the communication operation is performed.

  1. A Software Architecture for Semiautonomous Robot Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kortenkamp, David

    2004-01-01

    A software architecture has been developed to increase the safety and effectiveness with which tasks are performed by robots that are capable of functioning autonomously but sometimes are operated under control by humans. The control system of such a robot designed according to a prior software architecture has no way of taking account of how the environment has changed or what parts of a task were performed during an interval of control by a human, so that errors can occur (and, hence, safety and effectiveness jeopardized) when the human relinquishes control. The present architecture incorporates the control, task-planning, and sensor-based-monitoring features of typical prior autonomous-robot software architectures, plus features for updating information on the environment and planning of tasks during control by a human operator in order to enable the robot to track the actions taken by the operator and to be ready to resume autonomous operation with minimal error. The present architecture also provides a user interface that presents, to the operator, a variety of information on the internal state of the robot and the status of the task.

  2. Enregistrement de la dernière remontée du niveau marin dans l'architecture interne d'une vallée incisée : le pertuis Breton (Charente-Maritime)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Nicolas; Chaumillon, Éric; Tesson, Michel

    2004-11-01

    Recent very high-resolution seismic profiles ground-truthed by vibrocores allow us to evidence an atypical incised valley fill in a drowned valley segment, the 'Pertuis Breton' (Bay of Biscay, France). The sedimentary valley-fill architecture mainly includes five superimposed progradational wedges composed by marine sands. Sandbodies show a landward migration of their depocentres upward and are topped by almost flat unconformities extended by submarine terraces. This sedimentary infill pattern is similar to backstepping wedges, described on continental shelfs. It suggests that this valley fill records sea-level rise during the last transgression. To cite this article: N. Weber et al., C. R. Geoscience 336 (2004).

  3. Neural Architectures for Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, James K.

    1991-01-01

    The cerebellar model articulated controller (CMAC) neural architectures are shown to be viable for the purposes of real-time learning and control. Software tools for the exploration of CMAC performance are developed for three hardware platforms, the MacIntosh, the IBM PC, and the SUN workstation. All algorithm development was done using the C programming language. These software tools were then used to implement an adaptive critic neuro-control design that learns in real-time how to back up a trailer truck. The truck backer-upper experiment is a standard performance measure in the neural network literature, but previously the training of the controllers was done off-line. With the CMAC neural architectures, it was possible to train the neuro-controllers on-line in real-time on a MS-DOS PC 386. CMAC neural architectures are also used in conjunction with a hierarchical planning approach to find collision-free paths over 2-D analog valued obstacle fields. The method constructs a coarse resolution version of the original problem and then finds the corresponding coarse optimal path using multipass dynamic programming. CMAC artificial neural architectures are used to estimate the analog transition costs that dynamic programming requires. The CMAC architectures are trained in real-time for each obstacle field presented. The coarse optimal path is then used as a baseline for the construction of a fine scale optimal path through the original obstacle array. These results are a very good indication of the potential power of the neural architectures in control design. In order to reach as wide an audience as possible, we have run a seminar on neuro-control that has met once per week since 20 May 1991. This seminar has thoroughly discussed the CMAC architecture, relevant portions of classical control, back propagation through time, and adaptive critic designs.

  4. Comparing root architectural models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Javaux, Mathieu; Vanderborght, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Plant roots play an important role in several soil processes (Gregory 2006). Root architecture development determines the sites in soil where roots provide input of carbon and energy and take up water and solutes. However, root architecture is difficult to determine experimentally when grown in opaque soil. Thus, root architectural models have been widely used and been further developed into functional-structural models that are able to simulate the fate of water and solutes in the soil-root system (Dunbabin et al. 2013). Still, a systematic comparison of the different root architectural models is missing. In this work, we focus on discrete root architecture models where roots are described by connected line segments. These models differ (a) in their model concepts, such as the description of distance between branches based on a prescribed distance (inter-nodal distance) or based on a prescribed time interval. Furthermore, these models differ (b) in the implementation of the same concept, such as the time step size, the spatial discretization along the root axes or the way stochasticity of parameters such as root growth direction, growth rate, branch spacing, branching angles are treated. Based on the example of two such different root models, the root growth module of R-SWMS and RootBox, we show the impact of these differences on simulated root architecture and aggregated information computed from this detailed simulation results, taking into account the stochastic nature of those models. References Dunbabin, V.M., Postma, J.A., Schnepf, A., Pagès, L., Javaux, M., Wu, L., Leitner, D., Chen, Y.L., Rengel, Z., Diggle, A.J. Modelling root-soil interactions using three-dimensional models of root growth, architecture and function (2013) Plant and Soil, 372 (1-2), pp. 93 - 124. Gregory (2006) Roots, rhizosphere and soil: the route to a better understanding of soil science? European Journal of Soil Science 57: 2-12.

  5. The architectural relevance of cybernetics

    SciTech Connect

    Frazer, J.H.

    1993-12-31

    This title is taken from an article by Gordon Pask in Architectural Design September 1969. It raises a number of questions which this article attempts to answer. How did Gordon come to be writing for an architectural publication? What was his contribution to architecture? How does he now come to be on the faculty of a school of architecture? And what indeed is the architectural relevance of cybernetics? 12 refs.

  6. Space Elevator Base Leg Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, C.; Swan, P. A.

    While the Space Elevator stretches for 104,000 kilometers, the region of most concern, from the survival perspective, is 2,500 kms and below. The threats inside this dangerous arena include debris, spacecraft, meteorites, lightening, winds, rogue waves, aircraft, and intentional human acts. Two major questions will be addressed that will influence the overall systems architecture of a Space Elevator. While the deployment phase of the development of the Space Elevator will only have a single ribbon from the surface of the Earth to well beyond the Geosynchronous altitude, a mature Space Elevator must never allow a complete sever of the system. Design approaches, materials selections, international policy development and assembly must ensure that the integrity of the Space Elevator be maintained. The trade space analysis will address the probability of an individual ribbon being severed, the length of time to repair, and the potential for a catastrophic Space Elevator cut. The architecture proposed for the base leg portion will address two questions: Shall there be multiple base legs to 2,500 kms altitude? And Should the anchor be based on land or at sea?

  7. NASA evolution of exploration architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barney B.

    1991-01-01

    A series of charts and diagrams is used to provide a detailed overview of the evolution of NASA space exploration architectures. The pre-Apollo programs including the Werner von Braun feasibility study are discussed and the evolution of the Apollo program itself is treated in detail. The post-Apollo era is reviewed and attention is given to the resurgence of strategic planning exemplified by both ad hoc and formal efforts at planning. Results of NASA's study of the main elements of the Space Exploration Initiative which examined technical scenarios, science opportunities, required technologies, international considerations, institutional strengths and needs, and resource estimates are presented. The 90-day study concludes that, among other things, major investments in challenging technologies are required, the scientific opportunities provided by the program are considerable, current launch capabilities are inadequate, and Space Station Freedom is essential.

  8. Color education in architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unver, Rengin

    2002-06-01

    Architecture is an interdisciplinary profession that combines and uses the elements of various major fields such as humanities, social and physical sciences, technology and creative arts. The main aim of architectural education is to enable students acquire the skills to create designs sufficient both aesthetically and technically. The goals of the under graduate program can be summarized as; the information transfer on subjects and problems related to the application of the profession, the acquisition of relevant skills, and information on specialist subjects. Color is one of the most important design parameters every architect has to use. Architect candidates should be equipped in the field of color just as they are in other relevant subjects. This paper deals with the significance, goals, methods and the place of color education in the undergraduate program of architectural education.

  9. Avionics System Architecture Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chau, Savio; Hall, Ronald; Traylor, marcus; Whitfield, Adrian

    2005-01-01

    Avionics System Architecture Tool (ASAT) is a computer program intended for use during the avionics-system-architecture- design phase of the process of designing a spacecraft for a specific mission. ASAT enables simulation of the dynamics of the command-and-data-handling functions of the spacecraft avionics in the scenarios in which the spacecraft is expected to operate. ASAT is built upon I-Logix Statemate MAGNUM, providing a complement of dynamic system modeling tools, including a graphical user interface (GUI), modeling checking capabilities, and a simulation engine. ASAT augments this with a library of predefined avionics components and additional software to support building and analyzing avionics hardware architectures using these components.

  10. Advanced ground station architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zillig, David; Benjamin, Ted

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a new station architecture for NASA's Ground Network (GN). The architecture makes efficient use of emerging technologies to provide dramatic reductions in size, operational complexity, and operational and maintenance costs. The architecture, which is based on recent receiver work sponsored by the Office of Space Communications Advanced Systems Program, allows integration of both GN and Space Network (SN) modes of operation in the same electronics system. It is highly configurable through software and the use of charged coupled device (CCD) technology to provide a wide range of operating modes. Moreover, it affords modularity of features which are optional depending on the application. The resulting system incorporates advanced RF, digital, and remote control technology capable of introducing significant operational, performance, and cost benefits to a variety of NASA communications and tracking applications.

  11. Agent Architectures for Compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgemeestre, Brigitte; Hulstijn, Joris; Tan, Yao-Hua

    A Normative Multi-Agent System consists of autonomous agents who must comply with social norms. Different kinds of norms make different assumptions about the cognitive architecture of the agents. For example, a principle-based norm assumes that agents can reflect upon the consequences of their actions; a rule-based formulation only assumes that agents can avoid violations. In this paper we present several cognitive agent architectures for self-monitoring and compliance. We show how different assumptions about the cognitive architecture lead to different information needs when assessing compliance. The approach is validated with a case study of horizontal monitoring, an approach to corporate tax auditing recently introduced by the Dutch Customs and Tax Authority.

  12. Information architecture. Volume 3: Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this document, as presented in Volume 1, The Foundations, is to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in developing and promulgating information architecture guidance. This guidance is aimed at increasing the development of information architecture as a Departmentwide management best practice. This document describes departmental information architecture principles and minimum design characteristics for systems and infrastructures within the DOE Information Architecture Conceptual Model, and establishes a Departmentwide standards-based architecture program. The publication of this document fulfills the commitment to address guiding principles, promote standard architectural practices, and provide technical guidance. This document guides the transition from the baseline or defacto Departmental architecture through approved information management program plans and budgets to the future vision architecture. This document also represents another major step toward establishing a well-organized, logical foundation for the DOE information architecture.

  13. Processor architecture and data buffering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulder, Hans; Flynn, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    A set of architectures from three major architecture families: stack, register, and memory-to-memory is discussed. It is shown that scalable architectures are not applicable for low-density technologies because they require at least 32 words of local memory. Software support is shown to be capable of bridging the performance gap between scalable and nonscalable architectures. A register architecture with 32 words of local memory allocated interprocedurally outperforms scalable architectures with equal sizes local memories and even some with larger size local memories. The performance advantage of unscalable architectures becomes significant when in addition to quality compile-time support, a small cache is added to an unscalable architecture. A 32-register architecture with 512 byte cache executes 20 percent less cycles when compared with an 8-set multiple overlapping set organization.

  14. Lunar architecture and urbanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Brent

    1992-01-01

    Human civilization and architecture have defined each other for over 5000 years on Earth. Even in the novel environment of space, persistent issues of human urbanism will eclipse, within a historically short time, the technical challenges of space settlement that dominate our current view. By adding modern topics in space engineering, planetology, life support, human factors, material invention, and conservation to their already renaissance array of expertise, urban designers can responsibly apply ancient, proven standards to the exciting new opportunities afforded by space. Inescapable facts about the Moon set real boundaries within which tenable lunar urbanism and its component architecture must eventually develop.

  15. Synergetics and architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, V. P.; Maslova, T. V.

    2008-03-01

    A series of phenomena pertaining to economics, quantum physics, language, literary criticism, and especially architecture is studied from the standpoint of synergetics (the study of self-organizing complex systems). It turns out that a whole series of concrete formulas describing these phenomena is identical in these different situations. This is the case of formulas relating to the Bose-Einstein distribution of particles and the distribution of words from a frequency dictionary. This also allows to apply a "quantized" from of the Zipf law to the problem of the authorship of Quiet Flows the Don and to the "blending in" of new architectural structures in an existing environment.

  16. Adaptive Neuromorphic Architecture (ANA).

    PubMed

    Wang, Frank Zhigang; Chua, Leon O; Yang, Xiao; Helian, Na; Tetzlaff, Ronald; Schmidt, Torsten; Li, Caroline; Carrasco, Jose Manuel Garcia; Chen, Wanlong; Chu, Dominique

    2013-09-01

    We designed Adaptive Neuromorphic Architecture (ANA) that self-adjusts its inherent parameters (for instance, the resonant frequency) naturally following the stimuli frequency. Such an architecture is required for brain-like engineered systems because some parameters of the stimuli (for instance, the stimuli frequency) are not known in advance. Such adaptivity comes from a circuit element with memory, namely mem-inductor or mem-capacitor (memristor's sisters), which is history-dependent in its behavior. As a hardware model of biological systems, ANA can be used to adaptively reproduce the observed biological phenomena in amoebae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hadl: HUMS Architectural Description Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Adavi, V.; Agarwal, N.; Gullapalli, S.; Kumar, P.; Sundaram, P.

    2004-01-01

    Specification of architectures is an important prerequisite for evaluation of architectures. With the increase m the growth of health usage and monitoring systems (HUMS) in commercial and military domains, the need far the design and evaluation of HUMS architectures has also been on the increase. In this paper, we describe HADL, HUMS Architectural Description Language, that we have designed for this purpose. In particular, we describe the features of the language, illustrate them with examples, and show how we use it in designing domain-specific HUMS architectures. A companion paper contains details on our design methodology of HUMS architectures.

  18. Space Telecommunications Radio Systems (STRS) Hardware Architecture Standard: Release 1.0 Hardware Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas J.; Smith, Carl R.; Liebetreu, John; Hill, Gary; Mortensen, Dale J.; Andro, Monty; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Farrington, Allen

    2008-01-01

    This report defines a hardware architecture approach for software-defined radios to enable commonality among NASA space missions. The architecture accommodates a range of reconfigurable processing technologies including general-purpose processors, digital signal processors, field programmable gate arrays, and application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) in addition to flexible and tunable radiofrequency front ends to satisfy varying mission requirements. The hardware architecture consists of modules, radio functions, and interfaces. The modules are a logical division of common radio functions that compose a typical communication radio. This report describes the architecture details, the module definitions, the typical functions on each module, and the module interfaces. Tradeoffs between component-based, custom architecture and a functional-based, open architecture are described. The architecture does not specify a physical implementation internally on each module, nor does the architecture mandate the standards or ratings of the hardware used to construct the radios.

  19. Space Mobile Network: A Near Earth Communication and Navigation Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israel, Dave J.; Heckler, Greg; Menrad, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a Space Mobile Network architecture, the result of a recently completed NASA study exploring architectural concepts to produce a vision for the future Near Earth communications and navigation systems. The Space Mobile Network (SMN) incorporates technologies, such as Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN) and optical communications, and new operations concepts, such as User Initiated Services, to provide user services analogous to a terrestrial smartphone user. The paper will describe the SMN Architecture, envisioned future operations concepts, opportunities for industry and international collaboration and interoperability, and technology development areas and goals.

  20. Digital transversal filter architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberger, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    A fast and efficient architecture is described for the realization of a pipelined, fully parallel digital transversal filter in VLSI. The order of summation is changed such that no explicit multiplication is seen, gated accumulators are used, and the coefficients are circulated. Estimates for the number of transistors needed for a CMOS implementation are given.

  1. Information network architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, N. D.

    1985-01-01

    Graphs, charts, diagrams and outlines of information relative to information network architectures for advanced aerospace missions, such as the Space Station, are presented. Local area information networks are considered a likely technology solution. The principle needs for the network are listed.

  2. Symbolic Architectures for Cognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    on the communitie- in which the are raised and reside (von Cranach, Foppa , Lepinie,. and Ploog 1070). Fhe addtiLunal capabilities tor low-level...Learning. Los Altos. CA: Morgan Kaufm X_ VanLehn. K., ed. 1989 Architectures for Inteligence. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. von Cranach. M., Foppa , K

  3. [Architecture, budget and dignity].

    PubMed

    Morel, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on its dynamic strengths, a psychiatric unit develops various projects and care techniques. In this framework, the institute director must make a number of choices with regard to architecture. Why renovate the psychiatry building? What financial investments are required? What criteria should be followed? What if the major argument was based on the respect of the patient's dignity?

  4. [Architecture and movement].

    PubMed

    Rivallan, Armel

    2012-01-01

    Leading an architectural project means accompanying the movement which it induces within the teams. Between questioning, uncertainty and fear, the organisational changes inherent to the new facility must be subject to constructive and ongoing exchanges. Ethics, safety and training are revised and the unit projects are sometimes modified.

  5. INL Generic Robot Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    2005-03-30

    The INL Generic Robot Architecture is a generic, extensible software framework that can be applied across a variety of different robot geometries, sensor suites and low-level proprietary control application programming interfaces (e.g. mobility, aria, aware, player, etc.).

  6. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  7. Can Architecture Be Taught?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroll, Lucien; Mikellides, Byron

    1981-01-01

    The academic world is seen as remote from day-to-day reality. A practicing architect's experiences teaching architecture students at the Saint-Luc School in Brussels are described, in which role playing was used to bring reality to the classroom. (MLW)

  8. Emulating an MIMD architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Su Bogong; Grishman, R.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a research effort in parallel processor architecture and programming, the ultracomputer group at New York University has performed extensive simulation of parallel programs. To speed up these simulations, a parallel processor emulator, using the microprogrammable Puma computer system previously designed and built at NYU, has been developed. 8 references.

  9. Test Architecture, Test Retrofit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Glenn; Davidson, Fred

    2009-01-01

    Just like buildings, tests are designed and built for specific purposes, people, and uses. However, both buildings and tests grow and change over time as the needs of their users change. Sometimes, they are also both used for purposes other than those intended in the original designs. This paper explores architecture as a metaphor for language…

  10. The logic of architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, W.J. )

    1989-01-01

    This book features a discussion of languages of architectural form, their specification by means of formal grammars, their interpretation and their role in structuring design reasoning. The author re-examines central issues of design theory in the light of recent advances in artificial intelligence, cognitive science, and the theory of computation.

  11. Decentralized Software Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    to describe software. Thus, the essential anthropocentrism of the term’s tradi- tional definition suggests exploring a social process that illustrates...and disagreement outside it. The anthropocentrism of the concept may seem irrelevant to the concerns of software architecture, but the missing link

  12. ACOUSTICS IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOELLE, LESLIE L.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS WAS--(1) TO COMPILE A CLASSIFIED BIBLIOGRAPHY, INCLUDING MOST OF THOSE PUBLICATIONS ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS, PUBLISHED IN ENGLISH, FRENCH, AND GERMAN WHICH CAN SUPPLY A USEFUL AND UP-TO-DATE SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR THOSE ENCOUNTERING ANY ARCHITECTURAL-ACOUSTIC DESIGN…

  13. 11. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from National Archives Architectural and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from National Archives Architectural and Cartographic Branch Alexandria, Va.) 'Non-Com-Officers Qrs.' Quartermaster General's Office Standard Plan 82, sheet 1. Lithograph on linen architectural drawing. April 1893 3 ELEVATIONS, 3 PLANS AND A PARTIAL SECTION - Fort Myer, Non-Commissioned Officers Quarters, Washington Avenue between Johnson Lane & Custer Road, Arlington, Arlington County, VA

  14. 12. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from National Archives Architectural and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from National Archives Architectural and Cartographic Branch, Alexandria, Va.) 'Non-Com-Officers Qrs.' Quartermaster Generals Office Standard Plan 82, sheet 2, April 1893. Lithograph on linen architectural drawing. DETAILS - Fort Myer, Non-Commissioned Officers Quarters, Washington Avenue between Johnson Lane & Custer Road, Arlington, Arlington County, VA

  15. Shaping plant architecture

    PubMed Central

    Teichmann, Thomas; Muhr, Merlin

    2015-01-01

    Plants exhibit phenotypical plasticity. Their general body plan is genetically determined, but plant architecture and branching patterns are variable and can be adjusted to the prevailing environmental conditions. The modular design of the plant facilitates such morphological adaptations. The prerequisite for the formation of a branch is the initiation of an axillary meristem. Here, we review the current knowledge about this process. After its establishment, the meristem can develop into a bud which can either become dormant or grow out and form a branch. Many endogenous factors, such as photoassimilate availability, and exogenous factors like nutrient availability or shading, have to be integrated in the decision whether a branch is formed. The underlying regulatory network is complex and involves phytohormones and transcription factors. The hormone auxin is derived from the shoot apex and inhibits bud outgrowth indirectly in a process termed apical dominance. Strigolactones appear to modulate apical dominance by modification of auxin fluxes. Furthermore, the transcription factor BRANCHED1 plays a central role. The exact interplay of all these factors still remains obscure and there are alternative models. We discuss recent findings in the field along with the major models. Plant architecture is economically significant because it affects important traits of crop and ornamental plants, as well as trees cultivated in forestry or on short rotation coppices. As a consequence, plant architecture has been modified during plant domestication. Research revealed that only few key genes have been the target of selection during plant domestication and in breeding programs. Here, we discuss such findings on the basis of various examples. Architectural ideotypes that provide advantages for crop plant management and yield are described. We also outline the potential of breeding and biotechnological approaches to further modify and improve plant architecture for economic needs

  16. An Experiment in Architectural Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dvorak, Robert W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the application of the PLATO IV computer-based educational system to a one-semester basic drawing course for freshman architecture, landscape architecture, and interior design students and relates student reactions to the experience. (RAO)

  17. The MDS autonomous control architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, E.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the autonomous control architecture for the JPL Mission Data System (MDS). MDS is a comprehensive new software infrastructure for supporting unmanned space exploration. The autonomous control architecture is one component of MDS designed to enable autonomous operations.

  18. The MDS autonomous control architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, E.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the autonomous control architecture for the JPL Mission Data System (MDS). MDS is a comprehensive new software infrastructure for supporting unmanned space exploration. The autonomous control architecture is one component of MDS designed to enable autonomous operations.

  19. Compositional Specification of Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penix, John; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes our experience using parameterized algebraic specifications to model properties of software architectures. The goal is to model the decomposition of requirements independent of the style used to implement the architecture. We begin by providing an overview of the role of architecture specification in software development. We then describe how architecture specifications are build up from component and connector specifications and give an overview of insights gained from a case study used to validate the method.

  20. Controlling Material Reactivity Using Architecture

    DOE PAGES

    Sullivan, Kyle T.; Zhu, Cheng; Duoss, Eric B.; ...

    2015-12-16

    3D-printing methods are used to generate reactive material architectures. We observed several geometric parameters in order to influence the resultant flame propagation velocity, indicating that the architecture can be utilized to control reactivity. Two different architectures, channels and hurdles, are generated, and thin films of thermite are deposited onto the surface. Additionally, the architecture offers a route to control, at will, the energy release rate in reactive composite materials.

  1. Memory performance of Prolog architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Tick, E.

    1988-01-01

    Memory Performance of Prolog Architectures addresses these problems and reports dynamic data and instruction referencing characteristics of both sequential and parallel prolog architectures and corresponding uni-processor and multi-processor memory-hierarchy performance tradeoffs. Computer designers and logic programmers will find this work to be a valuable reference with many practical applications. Memory Performance of Prolog Architectures will also serve as an important textbook for graduate level courses in computer architecture and/or performance analysis.

  2. Space Architecture: The Role, Work and Aptitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Brand

    2014-01-01

    Space architecture has been an emerging discipline for at least 40 years. Has it arrived? Is space architecture a legitimate vocation or an avocation? If it leads to a job, what do employers want? In 2002, NASA Headquarters created a management position for a space architect whose job was to "lead the development of strategic architectures and identify high level requirements for systems that will accomplish the Nation's space exploration vision." This is a good job description with responsibility at the right level in NASA, but unfortunately, the office was discontinued two years later. Even though there is no accredited academic program or professional licensing for space architecture, there is a community of practitioners. They are civil servants, contractors and academicians supporting International Space Station and space exploration programs. In various ways, space architects currently contribute to human spaceflight, but there is a way for the discipline to be more effective in developing solutions to large scale complex problems. This paper organizes contributions from engineers, architects and psychologists into recommendations on the role of space architects in the organization, the process of creating and selecting options, and intrinsic personality traits including why they must have a high tolerance for ambiguity.

  3. Standardizing the information architecture for spacecraft operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easton, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an information architecture developed for the Space Station Freedom as a model from which to derive an information architecture standard for advanced spacecraft. The information architecture provides a way of making information available across a program, and among programs, assuming that the information will be in a variety of local formats, structures and representations. It provides a format that can be expanded to define all of the physical and logical elements that make up a program, add definitions as required, and import definitions from prior programs to a new program. It allows a spacecraft and its control center to work in different representations and formats, with the potential for supporting existing spacecraft from new control centers. It supports a common view of data and control of all spacecraft, regardless of their own internal view of their data and control characteristics, and of their communications standards, protocols and formats. This information architecture is central to standardizing spacecraft operations, in that it provides a basis for information transfer and translation, such that diverse spacecraft can be monitored and controlled in a common way.

  4. A space transportation architecture for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Douglas

    2000-07-01

    This paper summarizes the results of recent studies by Orbital to significantly reduce NASA's future launch costs and improve crew safety through the implementation of a low-risk, evolutionary space transportation architecture. These studies were performed as a part of NASA's Space Transportation Architecture Studies (STAS). The STA studies were commissioned by NASA Headquarters to advise NASA and the Executive Office of the President on the future direction of U.S space transportation. A large number of vehicles and architecture approaches were examined and evaluated. Orbital's recommended architecture includes a small, multifunctional vehicle, referred to as a Space Taxi TM, which would serve as: an emergency crew return vehicle for the International Space Station (ISS), a two-way human space transportation system, a small cargo delivery and return vehicle, and a passenger module for a future Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). The Space Taxi would initially be launched on a heavy-lift Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV), currently under development by U.S. industry and the U.S. Air Force. Together with a small cargo carrier located behind the Space Taxi, this combination of vehicles would be used to meet future ISS servicing requirements. Later, a two-stage, commercially developed RLV would replace the EELV in launching the Space Taxi system at a significantly lower cost. This RLV system will provide NASA and other customers with unprecedented reductions in cost and improvements in reliability, safety, and performance.

  5. Modeling Operations Costs for Human Exploration Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shishko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Operations and support (O&S) costs for human spaceflight have not received the same attention in the cost estimating community as have development costs. This is unfortunate as O&S costs typically comprise a majority of life-cycle costs (LCC) in such programs as the International Space Station (ISS) and the now-cancelled Constellation Program. Recognizing this, the Constellation Program and NASA HQs supported the development of an O&S cost model specifically for human spaceflight. This model, known as the Exploration Architectures Operations Cost Model (ExAOCM), provided the operations cost estimates for a variety of alternative human missions to the moon, Mars, and Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) in architectural studies. ExAOCM is philosophically based on the DoD Architecture Framework (DoDAF) concepts of operational nodes, systems, operational functions, and milestones. This paper presents some of the historical background surrounding the development of the model, and discusses the underlying structure, its unusual user interface, and lastly, previous examples of its use in the aforementioned architectural studies.

  6. Architectural Adventures in Your Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2007-01-01

    Due to architecture's complexity, it can be challenging to develop lessons for the students, and consequently, the teaching of architecture is frequently overlooked. Every community has an architectural history. For example, the community in which the author's students live has a variety of historic houses from when the community originated (the…

  7. Cognitive Architectures for Multimedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Stephen K.

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a tutorial overview of cognitive architectures that can form a theoretical foundation for designing multimedia instruction. Cognitive architectures include a description of memory stores, memory codes, and cognitive operations. Architectures that are relevant to multimedia learning include Paivio's dual coding theory,…

  8. SITE TECHNOLOGY PROFILES - 11TH EDITION - DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM, VOLUME 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, now in its eleventh year is an integral part of EPA's research into alternative cleanup methods for hazardous waste sites around the nation. The SITE Program was created to encourage the development and routine use o...

  9. Proceedings of the 11th JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.

    2002-01-01

    This publication contains the proceedings of the JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop forum held to report science research and applications results with spectral images measured by the NASA Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). These papers were presented at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory from March 5-8, 2001. Electronic versions of these papers may be found at the A VIRIS Web http://popo.jpl.nasa.gov/pub/docs/workshops/aviris.proceedings.html

  10. 11th Annual CMMI Technology Conference and User Group

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-17

    what will be checked, how and why (answer questions and concerns) • Perform the mini-assessment (interviewing with questionnaire ) • Communicate... questionnaire (emphasize intent and remove ambiguity) • Take corrective action © Copyright 2002-2007 The Process Group. All rights reserved. 137 THE...idea! What? Competing Commitments Chronic Improvement Use a Schedule Esterline Control Systems Prescription for PIF If All Else Fails Esterline

  11. SITE TECHNOLOGY PROFILES - 11TH EDITION - DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM, VOLUME 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, now in its eleventh year is an integral part of EPA's research into alternative cleanup methods for hazardous waste sites around the nation. The SITE Program was created to encourage the development and routine use o...

  12. A catalogue of quasars and active nuclei: 11th edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Véron-Cetty, M.-P.; Véron, P.

    2003-12-01

    The recent release of the final installement of the 2dF quasar catalogue and of the first part of the Sloan catalogue, almost doubling the number of known QSOs, led us to prepare an updated version of our Catalogue of quasars and active nuclei which now contains 48 921 quasars, 876 BL Lac objects and 15 069 active galaxies (including 11 777 Seyfert 1s). Like the tenth edition, it includes position and redshift as well as photometry (U, B, V) and 6 and 11 cm flux densities when available. We also give a list of all known lensed and double quasars. The catalogue (Table_QSO, Table_BL, Table_AGN and Table_reject) and the list of references are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anomymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/412/399 or at the Observatoire de Haute Provence (http://www.obs-hp.fr/).

  13. 11th Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology 2003 (ISMB 2003).

    PubMed

    Abbott, Catherine A

    2003-01-01

    This report profiles the keynote talks given at ISMB03 in Brisbane, Australia by Ron Shamir, David Haussler, John Mattick, Yoshihide Hayashizaki, Sydney Brenner, the Overton Prize winner, Jim Kent, and the ISCB Senior Accomplishment Awardee, David Sankov.

  14. Proceedings of the 11th Space Surveillance Workshop, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. W.; Sridharan, R.

    1993-04-01

    This report of Proceedings of the 1993 Space Surveillance Workshop includes the following topics: the Maui space surveillance site infrared calibration sources; infrared detection of geosynchronous objects at AMOS; LWIR observations of geosynchronous satellites; LAGEOS-2 launch support navigation at JPL; space surveillance network sensor contribution analysis; NMD-GBR: new X-band sensors at sites in CONUS and USAKA for space surveillance; recent improvements at ALTAIR; enhancements to the ALCOR imaging radar; fiber optic phase control of the like Kickapoo NAVSPASUR transmitter; coherent data recording and signal processing capabilities at Ascension FPQ-15 radar for space surveillance applications; forecasting trans-ionospheric effects to improve space surveillance.

  15. SITE TECHNOLOGY PROFILES - 11TH EDITION, COMPACT DISC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, now in its eleventh year is an integral part of EPA's research into alternative cleanup methods for hazardous waste sites around the nation. The SITE Program was created to encourage the development and routine use o...

  16. Technical Progress Report (11th Semi-Annual)

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-31

    The objective of this proposed program is to ensure reliable supply of high-quality natural gas by reducing the cost of treating subquality natural gas containing H2O, CO2, H2S and/or trace quantities of other gaseous impurities by applying high-efficiency contractors with structured packing using physical solvent N-Formyl Morpholine and morpholine additives.

  17. Architecture for autonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broten, Gregory S.; Monckton, Simon P.; Collier, Jack; Giesbrecht, Jared

    2006-05-01

    In 2002 Defence R&D Canada changed research direction from pure tele-operated land vehicles to general autonomy for land, air, and sea craft. The unique constraints of the military environment coupled with the complexity of autonomous systems drove DRDC to carefully plan a research and development infrastructure that would provide state of the art tools without restricting research scope. DRDC's long term objectives for its autonomy program address disparate unmanned ground vehicle (UGV), unattended ground sensor (UGS), air (UAV), and subsea and surface (UUV and USV) vehicles operating together with minimal human oversight. Individually, these systems will range in complexity from simple reconnaissance mini-UAVs streaming video to sophisticated autonomous combat UGVs exploiting embedded and remote sensing. Together, these systems can provide low risk, long endurance, battlefield services assuming they can communicate and cooperate with manned and unmanned systems. A key enabling technology for this new research is a software architecture capable of meeting both DRDC's current and future requirements. DRDC built upon recent advances in the computing science field while developing its software architecture know as the Architecture for Autonomy (AFA). Although a well established practice in computing science, frameworks have only recently entered common use by unmanned vehicles. For industry and government, the complexity, cost, and time to re-implement stable systems often exceeds the perceived benefits of adopting a modern software infrastructure. Thus, most persevere with legacy software, adapting and modifying software when and wherever possible or necessary -- adopting strategic software frameworks only when no justifiable legacy exists. Conversely, academic programs with short one or two year projects frequently exploit strategic software frameworks but with little enduring impact. The open-source movement radically changes this picture. Academic frameworks

  18. Science Driven Supercomputing Architectures: AnalyzingArchitectural Bottlenecks with Applications and Benchmark Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kamil, S.; Yelick, K.; Kramer, W.T.; Oliker, L.; Shalf, J.; Shan,H.; Strohmaier, E.

    2005-09-26

    There is a growing gap between the peak speed of parallel computing systems and the actual delivered performance for scientific applications. In general this gap is caused by inadequate architectural support for the requirements of modern scientific applications, as commercial applications and the much larger market they represent, have driven the evolution of computer architectures. This gap has raised the importance of developing better benchmarking methodologies to characterize and to understand the performance requirements of scientific applications, to communicate them efficiently to influence the design of future computer architectures. This improved understanding of the performance behavior of scientific applications will allow improved performance predictions, development of adequate benchmarks for identification of hardware and application features that work well or poorly together, and a more systematic performance evaluation in procurement situations. The Berkeley Institute for Performance Studies has developed a three-level approach to evaluating the design of high end machines and the software that runs on them: (1) A suite of representative applications; (2) A set of application kernels; and (3) Benchmarks to measure key system parameters. The three levels yield different type of information, all of which are useful in evaluating systems, and enable NSF and DOE centers to select computer architectures more suited for scientific applications. The analysis will further allow the centers to engage vendors in discussion of strategies to alleviate the present architectural bottlenecks using quantitative information. These may include small hardware changes or larger ones that may be out interest to non-scientific workloads. Providing quantitative models to the vendors allows them to assess the benefits of technology alternatives using their own internal cost-models in the broader marketplace, ideally facilitating the development of future computer

  19. Architecture and Monumental (Study About form in Architecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pane, I. F.; Suwantoro, H.; Zahrah, W.; Sianipar, R. A.

    2017-03-01

    The architecture develops along with the development of human history. So architecture is the field of study related to human physically and non-physically. The development of architecture is a long process within the culture the architecture develops. Physically, architecture has different shape from every historical phase. The different shape has different historical background. The important building on one period is always impressed. This impression still remains until now, in this postmodern era. From the phenomena appear in architecture so this study focused on the monumental buildings by analyzing the form of the building in this era. The objects of the study are the buildings in Medan which represent the monumental impression (Maimun Palace). The qualitative approach is applied to give more knowledge in history, theory, and criticsm of architecture. The results of this study described that the monumental impression of the object of study and forms of building support that impression.

  20. Augmenting cognitive architectures to support diagrammatic imagination.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Balakrishnan; Banerjee, Bonny; Kurup, Unmesh; Lele, Omkar

    2011-10-01

    Diagrams are a form of spatial representation that supports reasoning and problem solving. Even when diagrams are external, not to mention when there are no external representations, problem solving often calls for internal representations, that is, representations in cognition, of diagrammatic elements and internal perceptions on them. General cognitive architectures--Soar and ACT-R, to name the most prominent--do not have representations and operations to support diagrammatic reasoning. In this article, we examine some requirements for such internal representations and processes in cognitive architectures. We discuss the degree to which DRS, our earlier proposal for such an internal representation for diagrams, meets these requirements. In DRS, the diagrams are not raw images, but a composition of objects that can be individuated and thus symbolized, while, unlike traditional symbols, the referent of the symbol is an object that retains its perceptual essence, namely, its spatiality. This duality provides a way to resolve what anti-imagists thought was a contradiction in mental imagery: the compositionality of mental images that seemed to be unique to symbol systems, and their support of a perceptual experience of images and some types of perception on them. We briefly review the use of DRS to augment Soar and ACT-R with a diagrammatic representation component. We identify issues for further research. Copyright © 2011 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  1. Consistent model driven architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niepostyn, Stanisław J.

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the MDA is to produce software systems from abstract models in a way where human interaction is restricted to a minimum. These abstract models are based on the UML language. However, the semantics of UML models is defined in a natural language. Subsequently the verification of consistency of these diagrams is needed in order to identify errors in requirements at the early stage of the development process. The verification of consistency is difficult due to a semi-formal nature of UML diagrams. We propose automatic verification of consistency of the series of UML diagrams originating from abstract models implemented with our consistency rules. This Consistent Model Driven Architecture approach enables us to generate automatically complete workflow applications from consistent and complete models developed from abstract models (e.g. Business Context Diagram). Therefore, our method can be used to check practicability (feasibility) of software architecture models.

  2. Instrumented Architectural Simulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delagi, B. A.; Saraiya, N.; Nishimura, S.; Byrd, G.

    1987-01-01

    Simulation of systems at an architectural level can offer an effective way to study critical design choices if (1) the performance of the simulator is adequate to examine designs executing significant code bodies, not just toy problems or small application fragements, (2) the details of the simulation include the critical details of the design, (3) the view of the design presented by the simulator instrumentation leads to useful insights on the problems with the design, and (4) there is enough flexibility in the simulation system so that the asking of unplanned questions is not suppressed by the weight of the mechanics involved in making changes either in the design or its measurement. A simulation system with these goals is described together with the approach to its implementation. Its application to the study of a particular class of multiprocessor hardware system architectures is illustrated.

  3. Generic robot architecture

    DOEpatents

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-09-21

    The present invention provides methods, computer readable media, and apparatuses for a generic robot architecture providing a framework that is easily portable to a variety of robot platforms and is configured to provide hardware abstractions, abstractions for generic robot attributes, environment abstractions, and robot behaviors. The generic robot architecture includes a hardware abstraction level and a robot abstraction level. The hardware abstraction level is configured for developing hardware abstractions that define, monitor, and control hardware modules available on a robot platform. The robot abstraction level is configured for defining robot attributes and provides a software framework for building robot behaviors from the robot attributes. Each of the robot attributes includes hardware information from at least one hardware abstraction. In addition, each robot attribute is configured to substantially isolate the robot behaviors from the at least one hardware abstraction.

  4. Open architecture CNC system

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, J.; Lopez, A.; Edwards, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    In this paper, an alternative solution to the traditional CNC machine tool controller has been introduced. Software and hardware modules have been described and their incorporation in a CNC control system has been outlined. This type of CNC machine tool controller demonstrates that technology is accessible and can be readily implemented into an open architecture machine tool controller. Benefit to the user is greater controller flexibility, while being economically achievable. PC based, motion as well as non-motion features will provide flexibility through a Windows environment. Up-grading this type of controller system through software revisions will keep the machine tool in a competitive state with minimal effort. Software and hardware modules are mass produced permitting competitive procurement and incorporation. Open architecture CNC systems provide diagnostics thus enhancing maintainability, and machine tool up-time. A major concern of traditional CNC systems has been operator training time. Training time can be greatly minimized by making use of Windows environment features.

  5. Architectural-acoustics consulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Anthony K.

    2004-05-01

    Consulting involves both the science of acoustics and the art of communication, requiring an array of inherent and created skills. Perhaps because consulting on architectural acoustics is a relatively new field, there is a remarkable variety of career paths, all influenced by education, interest, and experience. Many consultants juggle dozens of chargeable projects at a time, not to mention proposals, seminars, teaching, articles, business concerns, and professional-society activities. This paper will discuss various aspects of career paths, projects, and clients as they relate to architectural-acoustics consulting. The intended emphasis will be considerations for those who may be interested in such a career, noting that consultants generally seem to thrive on the numerous challenges.

  6. Parallel Subconvolution Filtering Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Andrew A.

    2003-01-01

    These architectures are based on methods of vector processing and the discrete-Fourier-transform/inverse-discrete- Fourier-transform (DFT-IDFT) overlap-and-save method, combined with time-block separation of digital filters into frequency-domain subfilters implemented by use of sub-convolutions. The parallel-processing method implemented in these architectures enables the use of relatively small DFT-IDFT pairs, while filter tap lengths are theoretically unlimited. The size of a DFT-IDFT pair is determined by the desired reduction in processing rate, rather than on the order of the filter that one seeks to implement. The emphasis in this report is on those aspects of the underlying theory and design rules that promote computational efficiency, parallel processing at reduced data rates, and simplification of the designs of very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits needed to implement high-order filters and correlators.

  7. Architectural compendium for environmental education

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.J.; Rigdon, B.

    1996-10-01

    This paper presents educational resources being developed at the College of Architecture and Urban Planning, University of Michigan, for teaching environmental sustainability and pollution prevention in architecture. The educational resources consist of a collection of modularized units, called building blocks, in the areas of Building Materials, Sustainable Building Design, Case-Studies of Sustainable Design, Environmental Cost of Building, and Recycling and Reuse of Architectural Resources. The assembly of these building blocks is called an Architectural Compendium for Environmental Education (ACEE). The conceptual framework for the educational resources are outlined. The objectives and the scope of the architectural compendium are discussed.

  8. Robust Software Architecture for Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aghazanian, Hrand; Baumgartner, Eric; Garrett, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Robust Real-Time Reconfigurable Robotics Software Architecture (R4SA) is the name of both a software architecture and software that embodies the architecture. The architecture was conceived in the spirit of current practice in designing modular, hard, realtime aerospace systems. The architecture facilitates the integration of new sensory, motor, and control software modules into the software of a given robotic system. R4SA was developed for initial application aboard exploratory mobile robots on Mars, but is adaptable to terrestrial robotic systems, real-time embedded computing systems in general, and robotic toys.

  9. Survivable Loosely Coupled Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    Verlag Lecture Notes in Computer Science, pages 291–303, Pune, India, September 2000. [6] Saddek Bensalem, Marius Bozga, Jean - Claude Fernandez, Lucian...IEEE Computer Society. [5] John Rushby. An overview of formal verification for the time-triggered architecture. In Werner Damm and Ernst-Rüdiger...Agathe Merceron. Parametric verification of a group membership algo- rithm. In Werner Damm and Ernst-Rüdiger Olderog, editors, Formal Techniques in Real

  10. The PARTI Architecture Assurance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    example safety critical system, 2, Issues Guidance Papers ( IGPs ) that further explain key concepts or requirements of the STAN- DARD, The guidance...Organisation (2009) IGP -OOl: Guidance Notes for Project Offices. Published as part of [20]. 4. Defence Material Organisation (2009) IGP -002: Methodsfor Safety...Architecture Analysis. Published as part of [20]. 5. Defence Material Organisation (2009) IGP -003: Methods for Design Assurance. Published as part of

  11. Enterprise Information Technology Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    ARCHITECTURES OPR: HQ AFCA/ ITAI (Mr. Kenneth Fore) Certified by: HQ USAF/SCXX (Lt Col Terry G. Pricer, Sr.) Pages: 15 Distribution: F This...coordinating their drafts with Headquarters Air Force Communications Agency (HQ AFCA/ ITAI ), 203 W. Losey Street, Room 1065, Scott AFB IL 62225-5224. Send...Communications and Information Center (HQ AFCIC/ ITAI ), 1250 Air Force Pentagon, Washington DC 20330-1250. Use AF Form 847, Recommendation for Change

  12. Information systems definition architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Calapristi, A.J.

    1996-06-20

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Information Systems Definition architecture evaluated information Management (IM) processes in several key organizations. The intent of the study is to identify improvements in TWRS IM processes that will enable better support to the TWRS mission, and accommodate changes in TWRS business environment. The ultimate goals of the study are to reduce IM costs, Manage the configuration of TWRS IM elements, and improve IM-related process performance.

  13. Architectural Methodology Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhas, Chris

    2000-01-01

    The establishment of conventions between two communicating entities in the end systems is essential for communications. Examples of the kind of decisions that need to be made in establishing a protocol convention include the nature of the data representation, the for-mat and the speed of the date representation over the communications path, and the sequence of control messages (if any) which are sent. One of the main functions of a protocol is to establish a standard path between the communicating entities. This is necessary to create a virtual communications medium with certain desirable characteristics. In essence, it is the function of the protocol to transform the characteristics of the physical communications environment into a more useful virtual communications model. The final function of a protocol is to establish standard data elements for communications over the path; that is, the protocol serves to create a virtual data element for exchange. Other systems may be constructed in which the transferred element is a program or a job. Finally, there are special purpose applications in which the element to be transferred may be a complex structure such as all or part of a graphic display. NASA's Glenn Research Center (GRC) defines and develops advanced technology for high priority national needs in communications technologies for application to aeronautics and space. GRC tasked Computer Networks and Software Inc. (CNS) to describe the methodologies used in developing a protocol architecture for an in-space Internet node. The node would support NASA:s four mission areas: Earth Science; Space Science; Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS); Aerospace Technology. This report presents the methodology for developing the protocol architecture. The methodology addresses the architecture for a computer communications environment. It does not address an analog voice architecture.

  14. Instrumented Architectural Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    architectural level can offer an effective way to study critical design choices if (1) the performance of the simulator is adequate to examine designs...attribute of the underlying Lisp base of the simulation system that changes in these definitions have immediate effect even during a simulation run...methods for a component, the concerns surrounding component design are effectively partitioned from component instrumentation. Panels are put together

  15. En-Gauging Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    publication. APPROVED: /s/ RAYMOND A. LIUZZI Project Engineer FOR THE DIRECTOR: /s/ JAMES A. COLLINS...raise an implementation-level “port access failed exception” in the latter case. Notice that nothing about the architecture itself changed during...Crane et al] Crane, S., Dulay, N., Fossa, H., Kramer, J., Magee, J., Sloman , M., and Twidle, K.: “Configuration Management for Distributed Systems

  16. Aerobot Autonomy Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elfes, Alberto; Hall, Jeffery L.; Kulczycki, Eric A.; Cameron, Jonathan M.; Morfopoulos, Arin C.; Clouse, Daniel S.; Montgomery, James F.; Ansar, Adnan I.; Machuzak, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    An architecture for autonomous operation of an aerobot (i.e., a robotic blimp) to be used in scientific exploration of planets and moons in the Solar system with an atmosphere (such as Titan and Venus) is undergoing development. This architecture is also applicable to autonomous airships that could be flown in the terrestrial atmosphere for scientific exploration, military reconnaissance and surveillance, and as radio-communication relay stations in disaster areas. The architecture was conceived to satisfy requirements to perform the following functions: a) Vehicle safing, that is, ensuring the integrity of the aerobot during its entire mission, including during extended communication blackouts. b) Accurate and robust autonomous flight control during operation in diverse modes, including launch, deployment of scientific instruments, long traverses, hovering or station-keeping, and maneuvers for touch-and-go surface sampling. c) Mapping and self-localization in the absence of a global positioning system. d) Advanced recognition of hazards and targets in conjunction with tracking of, and visual servoing toward, targets, all to enable the aerobot to detect and avoid atmospheric and topographic hazards and to identify, home in on, and hover over predefined terrain features or other targets of scientific interest. The architecture is an integrated combination of systems for accurate and robust vehicle and flight trajectory control; estimation of the state of the aerobot; perception-based detection and avoidance of hazards; monitoring of the integrity and functionality ("health") of the aerobot; reflexive safing actions; multi-modal localization and mapping; autonomous planning and execution of scientific observations; and long-range planning and monitoring of the mission of the aerobot. The prototype JPL aerobot (see figure) has been tested extensively in various areas in the California Mojave desert.

  17. Irregular Applications: Architectures & Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Feo, John T.; Villa, Oreste; Tumeo, Antonino; Secchi, Simone

    2012-02-06

    Irregular applications are characterized by irregular data structures, control and communication patterns. Novel irregular high performance applications which deal with large data sets and require have recently appeared. Unfortunately, current high performance systems and software infrastructures executes irregular algorithms poorly. Only coordinated efforts by end user, area specialists and computer scientists that consider both the architecture and the software stack may be able to provide solutions to the challenges of modern irregular applications.

  18. Vetronics Reference Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Model 4 Captures system intelligence such that computational processes can be allocated to system processing components (e.g. human, robotic, man in the...loop) • Systems Architecture (Cross product of RA, TA, and Intelligent Domain Model ) 4 Defines interconnected systems components organized to...iterate iterate Requirements System Intelligent Domain Model Use Cases Need to focus on refining RA, TA, and Intelligent Domain Model to derive a

  19. The EOSDIS Reference Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofinowski, E. J.; Behnke, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is a comprehensive distributed system designed to support NASA's Earth Science missions. Designed in the early 1990’s, EOSDIS has been archiving, managing, and distributing Earth science data since 1994. During that time the system has evolved and adapted with new technology, additional data sources, and expanded services and products. EOSDIS supports the collection and management of a variety of Earth science data within a single system. We present the EOSDIS as a reference architecture for managing Earth science data. The EOSDIS Reference Architecture identifies areas of functionality, their interactions, and how they collectively serve to make Earth science data and data products available to users. It establishes a common terminology to identify the system elements, connections, styles and processes with which to discuss the variety of implementations across EOSDIS. Many of the system and subsystem elements used in EOSDIS are candidates for re-use by other existing or planned applications. Scenarios based on the diversity of data collection are presented and are used to describe representative implementations of the current system. The EOSDIS Reference Architecture serves as a template to facilitate future implementations of science data system functions and the incorporation of additional data providers (e.g., missions, instruments, or campaigns) into EOSDIS.

  20. Complex Event Recognition Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, William A.; Firby, R. James

    2009-01-01

    Complex Event Recognition Architecture (CERA) is the name of a computational architecture, and software that implements the architecture, for recognizing complex event patterns that may be spread across multiple streams of input data. One of the main components of CERA is an intuitive event pattern language that simplifies what would otherwise be the complex, difficult tasks of creating logical descriptions of combinations of temporal events and defining rules for combining information from different sources over time. In this language, recognition patterns are defined in simple, declarative statements that combine point events from given input streams with those from other streams, using conjunction, disjunction, and negation. Patterns can be built on one another recursively to describe very rich, temporally extended combinations of events. Thereafter, a run-time matching algorithm in CERA efficiently matches these patterns against input data and signals when patterns are recognized. CERA can be used to monitor complex systems and to signal operators or initiate corrective actions when anomalous conditions are recognized. CERA can be run as a stand-alone monitoring system, or it can be integrated into a larger system to automatically trigger responses to changing environments or problematic situations.

  1. Technology and international climate policy

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Leon; Calvin, Kate; Edmonds, James A.; Kyle, Page; Wise, Marshall

    2009-05-01

    Both the nature of international climate policy architectures and the development and diffusion of new energy technologies could dramatically influence future costs of reducing global emissions of greenhouse gases. This paper explores the implications of interactions between technology availability and performance and international policy architectures for technology choice and the social cost of limiting atmospheric CO2 concentrations to 500 ppm by the year 2095. Key issues explored in the paper include the role of bioenergy production with CO2 capture and storage (CCS), overshoot concentration pathways, and the sensitivity of mitigation costs to policy and technology.

  2. Detail in architecture: Between arts & crafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulencin, Juraj

    2016-06-01

    Architectural detail represents an important part of architecture. Not only can it be used as an identifier of a specific building but at the same time enhances the experience of the realized project. Within it lie the signs of a great architect and clues to understanding his or her way of thinking. It is therefore the central topic of a seminar offered to architecture students at the Brno University of Technology. During the course of the semester-long class the students acquaint themselves with atypical architectural details of domestic and international architects by learning to read them, understand them and subsequently draw them by creating architectural blueprints. In other words, by general analysis of a detail the students learn theoretical thinking of its architect who, depending on the nature of the design, had to incorporate a variety of techniques and crafts. Students apply this analytical part to their own architectural detail design. The methodology of the seminar consists of experiential learning by project management and is complemented by a series of lectures discussing a diversity of details as well as materials and technologies required to implement it. The architectural detail design is also part of students' bachelors thesis, therefore, the realistic nature of their blueprints can be verified in the production process of its physical counterpart. Based on their own documentation the students choose the most suitable manufacturing process whether it is supplied by a specific technology or a craftsman. Students actively participate in the production and correct their design proposals in real scale with the actual material. A student, as a future architect, stands somewhere between a client and an artisan, materializes his or her idea and adjusts the manufacturing process so that the final detail fulfills aesthetic consistency and is in harmony with its initial concept. One of the very important aspects of the design is its economic cost, an

  3. The flight telerobotic servicer: From functional architecture to computer architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumia, Ronald; Fiala, John

    1989-01-01

    After a brief tutorial on the NASA/National Bureau of Standards Standard Reference Model for Telerobot Control System Architecture (NASREM) functional architecture, the approach to its implementation is shown. First, interfaces must be defined which are capable of supporting the known algorithms. This is illustrated by considering the interfaces required for the SERVO level of the NASREM functional architecture. After interface definition, the specific computer architecture for the implementation must be determined. This choice is obviously technology dependent. An example illustrating one possible mapping of the NASREM functional architecture to a particular set of computers which implements it is shown. The result of choosing the NASREM functional architecture is that it provides a technology independent paradigm which can be mapped into a technology dependent implementation capable of evolving with technology in the laboratory and in space.

  4. A Ground Systems Architecture Transition for a Distributed Operations System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, Donna; Pitts, Lee; Bryant, Barry

    2003-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Ground Systems Department (GSD) recently undertook an architecture change in the product line that serves the ISS program. As a result, the architecture tradeoffs between data system product lines that serve remote users versus those that serve control center flight control teams were explored extensively. This paper describes the resulting architecture that will be used in the International Space Station (ISS) payloads program, and the resulting functional breakdown of the products that support this architecture. It also describes the lessons learned from the path that was followed, as a migration of products cause the need to reevaluate the allocation of functions across the architecture. The result is a set of innovative ground system solutions that is scalable so it can support facilities of wide-ranging sizes, from a small site up to large control centers. Effective use of system automation, custom components, design optimization for data management, data storage, data transmissions, and advanced local and wide area networking architectures, plus the effective use of Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) products, provides flexible Remote Ground System options that can be tailored to the needs of each user. This paper offers a description of the efficiency and effectiveness of the Ground Systems architectural options that have been implemented, and includes successful implementation examples and lessons learned.

  5. A Summary of NASA Architecture Studies Utilizing Fission Surface Power Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee; Poston, Dave

    2010-01-01

    Beginning with the Exploration Systems Architecture Study in 2005, NASA has conducted various mission architecture studies to evaluate implementation options for the U.S. Space Policy (formerly the Vision for Space Exploration). Several of the studies examined the use of Fission Surface Power (FSP) systems for human missions to the lunar and Martian surface. This paper summarizes the FSP concepts developed under four different NASA-sponsored architecture studies: Lunar Architecture Team, Mars Architecture Team, Lunar Surface Systems/Constellation Architecture team, and International Architecture Working Group-Power Function team. The results include a summary of FSP design characteristics, a compilation of mission-compatible FSP configuration options, and an FSP concept-of-operations that is consistent with the overall mission objectives.

  6. Biologically relevant neural network architectures for support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Jändel, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Neural network architectures that implement support vector machines (SVM) are investigated for the purpose of modeling perceptual one-shot learning in biological organisms. A family of SVM algorithms including variants of maximum margin, 1-norm, 2-norm and ν-SVM is considered. SVM training rules adapted for neural computation are derived. It is found that competitive queuing memory (CQM) is ideal for storing and retrieving support vectors. Several different CQM-based neural architectures are examined for each SVM algorithm. Although most of the sixty-four scanned architectures are unconvincing for biological modeling four feasible candidates are found. The seemingly complex learning rule of a full ν-SVM implementation finds a particularly simple and natural implementation in bisymmetric architectures. Since CQM-like neural structures are thought to encode skilled action sequences and bisymmetry is ubiquitous in motor systems it is speculated that trainable pattern recognition in low-level perception has evolved as an internalized motor programme.

  7. Surface Buildup Scenarios and Outpost Architectures for Lunar Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazanek, Daniel D.; Troutman, Patrick A.; Culbert, Christopher J.; Leonard, Matthew J.; Spexarth, Gary R.

    2009-01-01

    The Constellation Program Architecture Team and the Lunar Surface Systems Project Office have developed an initial set of lunar surface buildup scenarios and associated polar outpost architectures, along with preliminary supporting element and system designs in support of NASA's Exploration Strategy. The surface scenarios are structured in such a way that outpost assembly can be suspended at any time to accommodate delivery contingencies or changes in mission emphasis. The modular nature of the architectures mitigates the impact of the loss of any one element and enhances the ability of international and commercial partners to contribute elements and systems. Additionally, the core lunar surface system technologies and outpost operations concepts are applicable to future Mars exploration. These buildup scenarios provide a point of departure for future trades and assessments of alternative architectures and surface elements.

  8. The EPOS ICT Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, Keith; Harrison, Matt; Bailo, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    The EPOS-PP Project 2010-2014 proposed an architecture and demonstrated feasibility with a prototype. Requirements based on use cases were collected and an inventory of assets (e.g. datasets, software, users, computing resources, equipment/detectors, laboratory services) (RIDE) was developed. The architecture evolved through three stages of refinement with much consultation both with the EPOS community representing EPOS users and participants in geoscience and with the overall ICT community especially those working on research such as the RDA (Research Data Alliance) community. The architecture consists of a central ICS (Integrated Core Services) consisting of a portal and catalog, the latter providing to end-users a 'map' of all EPOS resources (datasets, software, users, computing, equipment/detectors etc.). ICS is extended to ICS-d (distributed ICS) for certain services (such as visualisation software services or Cloud computing resources) and CES (Computational Earth Science) for specific simulation or analytical processing. ICS also communicates with TCS (Thematic Core Services) which represent European-wide portals to national and local assets, resources and services in the various specific domains (e.g. seismology, volcanology, geodesy) of EPOS. The EPOS-IP project 2015-2019 started October 2015. Two work-packages cover the ICT aspects; WP6 involves interaction with the TCS while WP7 concentrates on ICS including interoperation with ICS-d and CES offerings: in short the ICT architecture. Based on the experience and results of EPOS-PP the ICT team held a pre-meeting in July 2015 and set out a project plan. The first major activity involved requirements (re-)collection with use cases and also updating the inventory of assets held by the various TCS in EPOS. The RIDE database of assets is currently being converted to CERIF (Common European Research Information Format - an EU Recommendation to Member States) to provide the basis for the EPOS-IP ICS Catalog. In

  9. The Influence of Study and Travel Abroad on the Personal and Professional Development of Students in Architecture Design Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culver, Lyle D.

    2011-01-01

    International travel has significant implications on the study of architecture. This study analyzed ways in which undergraduate and graduate students benefited from the experience of international travel and study abroad. Taken from the perspective of 15 individuals who were currently or had been architecture students at the University of Miami…

  10. 1993 architectural design awards.

    PubMed

    1993-06-01

    The 10th annual architectural design awards sponsored by Contemporary Long Term Care salute nursing homes and retirement communities that combine a flair for innovative living environments with a sensitivity to the needs of aging residents. These facilities represent the very best in elderly housing that prolongs independence while enhancing efficient operation. The 1993 winners are: King Health Center, U.S. Soldiers' and Airmen's Home, Washington, DC; The Terrace of Los Gatos, Los Gatos, CA; Walker Elder Suites, Edina, MN; The Jefferson, Ballston, VA; The Forum at Rancho San Antonio, Cupertino, CA.

  11. Architecture, constraints, and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, John C.; Csete, Marie

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to bridge progress in neuroscience involving sophisticated quantitative analysis of behavior, including the use of robust control, with other relevant conceptual and theoretical frameworks from systems engineering, systems biology, and mathematics. Familiar and accessible case studies are used to illustrate concepts of robustness, organization, and architecture (modularity and protocols) that are central to understanding complex networks. These essential organizational features are hidden during normal function of a system but are fundamental for understanding the nature, design, and function of complex biologic and technologic systems. PMID:21788505

  12. TROPIX Power System Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manner, David B.; Hickman, J. Mark

    1995-01-01

    This document contains results obtained in the process of performing a power system definition study of the TROPIX power management and distribution system (PMAD). Requirements derived from the PMADs interaction with other spacecraft systems are discussed first. Since the design is dependent on the performance of the photovoltaics, there is a comprehensive discussion of the appropriate models for cells and arrays. A trade study of the array operating voltage and its effect on array bus mass is also presented. A system architecture is developed which makes use of a combination of high efficiency switching power convertors and analog regulators. Mass and volume estimates are presented for all subsystems.

  13. Architecture, Design, Implementatio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-05-01

    of data on its inputs and produces streams of data on its outputs.” Dean and Cordy [6] present a visual formalism defined as a context- free...cles represent tasks, arrows represent streams. The plus sign is the BNF symbol for “one or more.” 4 1 . . . . . . . . . . . .4 2 4 341 3 15 1 3...guages of Program Design. Reading, MA: Addison- Wesley. [6] T. R. Dean, J. R. Cordy . "A Syntactic Theory of Software Architecture." IEEE Trans. on

  14. Architecture for Teraflop Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Breckenridge, A.R.; Haynes, R.A.

    1999-04-09

    Sandia Laboratories' computational scientists are addressing a very important question: How do we get insight from the human combined with the computer-generated information? The answer inevitably leads to using scientific visualization. Going one technology leap further is teraflop visualization, where the computing model and interactive graphics are an integral whole to provide computing for insight. In order to implement our teraflop visualization architecture, all hardware installed or software coded will be based on open modules and dynamic extensibility principles. We will illustrate these concepts with examples in our three main research areas: (1) authoring content (the computer), (2) enhancing precision and resolution (the human), and (3) adding behaviors (the physics).

  15. Agility: Agent - Ility Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    support time-constrained publish-and- subscribe messaging consistent with the Joint Battlespace Infosphere (JBI) architecture. eGents should run on any...Java platform; it was tested on NT/2000 machines; it connects to garden variety SMTP/POP3 email servers. A ported eGents runs on KVM (J2ME CLDC 1.0...applet that runs in IE and Netscape; its server uses Apache web server and Thunderstone’s Webinator 2.5 search engine, and can interface to other search

  16. Mind and Language Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Robert K

    2010-01-01

    A distinction is made between the brain and the mind. The architecture of the mind and language is then described within a neo-dualistic framework. A model for the origin of language based on emergence theory is presented. The complexity of hominid existence due to tool making, the control of fire and the social cooperation that fire required gave rise to a new level of order in mental activity and triggered the simultaneous emergence of language and conceptual thought. The mind is shown to have emerged as a bifurcation of the brain with the emergence of language. The role of language in the evolution of human culture is also described. PMID:20922045

  17. Etruscan Divination and Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magli, Giulio

    The Etruscan religion was characterized by divination methods, aimed at interpreting the will of the gods. These methods were revealed by the gods themselves and written in the books of the Etrusca Disciplina. The books are lost, but parts of them are preserved in the accounts of later Latin sources. According to such traditions divination was tightly connected with the Etruscan cosmovision of a Pantheon distributed in equally spaced, specific sectors of the celestial realm. We explore here the possible reflections of such issues in the Etruscan architectural remains.

  18. TROPIX power system architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manner, David B.; Hickman, J. Mark

    1995-09-01

    This document contains results obtained in the process of performing a power system definition study of the TROPIX power management and distribution system (PMAD). Requirements derived from the PMADs interaction with other spacecraft systems are discussed first. Since the design is dependent on the performance of the photovoltaics, there is a comprehensive discussion of the appropriate models for cells and arrays. A trade study of the array operating voltage and its effect on array bus mass is also presented. A system architecture is developed which makes use of a combination of high efficiency switching power convertors and analog regulators. Mass and volume estimates are presented for all subsystems.

  19. Mind and language architecture.

    PubMed

    Logan, Robert K

    2010-07-08

    A distinction is made between the brain and the mind. The architecture of the mind and language is then described within a neo-dualistic framework. A model for the origin of language based on emergence theory is presented. The complexity of hominid existence due to tool making, the control of fire and the social cooperation that fire required gave rise to a new level of order in mental activity and triggered the simultaneous emergence of language and conceptual thought. The mind is shown to have emerged as a bifurcation of the brain with the emergence of language. The role of language in the evolution of human culture is also described.

  20. Architecture for robot intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, II, Richard Alan (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An architecture for robot intelligence enables a robot to learn new behaviors and create new behavior sequences autonomously and interact with a dynamically changing environment. Sensory information is mapped onto a Sensory Ego-Sphere (SES) that rapidly identifies important changes in the environment and functions much like short term memory. Behaviors are stored in a DBAM that creates an active map from the robot's current state to a goal state and functions much like long term memory. A dream state converts recent activities stored in the SES and creates or modifies behaviors in the DBAM.