Science.gov

Sample records for 11th power watt

  1. Development of over 300-watts average power excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Kazuhiro; Kawamura, Joichi; Katou, Hiroyuki; Sajiki, Kazuaki; Okada, Makoto

    2004-05-01

    The high power excimer laser was developed. We have supplied the 240 watts (800 mJ, 300 Hz) average power excimer laser for industrial use, mainly for TFT LCD annealing. We are going to add the 300 watts (1 J, 300 Hz) average power laser for our line-up. This 300 watts new laser is based on the 240 watts laser, but improved some points. The electrodes size is longer and the electrical power circuit is reinforcement. Laser gas recipe is changed to be good for new system. In our test, we could oscillate over 300 watts average power operation. 310 watts servo operation is able to oscillate over 40 million pulses with less than 1.0 per cent for σ output stability. 330 watts servo operation is able to oscillate over 30 million pulses with almost less than 1.0 per cent for σ output stability. Experimental and theoretical studies of various parameters influencing the laser performance will be continued with further investigations and future improvements. We have confidence that it will be possible for this laser to produce higher power with long gas life.

  2. Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report (11th Edition)

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, L.; Kreycik, C.; Friedman, B.

    2008-10-01

    This report documents green power marketing activities and trends in the United States. It presents aggregate green power sales data for all voluntary purchase markets across the United States. It also provides summary data on utility green pricing programs offered in regulated electricity markets and green power marketing activity in competitive electricity markets, as well as green power sold to voluntary purchasers in the form of renewable energy certificates. Key market trends and issues are also discussed.

  3. Green Power Marketing in the United States. A Status Report (11th Edition)

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, Lori; Kreycik, Claire; Friedman, Barry

    2008-10-01

    This report documents green power marketing activities and trends in the United States. It presents aggregate green power sales data for all voluntary purchase markets across the United States. It also provides summary data on utility green pricing programs offered in regulated electricity markets and green power marketing activity in competitive electricity markets, as well as green power sold to voluntary purchasers in the form of renewable energy certificates. Key market trends and issues are also discussed.

  4. 300-Watt Power Source Development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas I.

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the JPL program to develop a 300 Watt direct methanol fuel cell. The immediate use of the fuel cell is to power test instrumentation on armored vehicles. It reviews the challenges, the system design and the system demonstration.

  5. 500 Watt Diesel Fueled TPV Portable Power Supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, W. E.; Morgan, M. D.; Sundaram, V. S.; Butcher, T.

    2003-01-01

    A test-bed 500 watt diesel fueled thermophotovoltaic (TPV) portable power supply is described. The goal of the design is a compact, rugged field portable unit weighing less than 15 pounds without fuel. The conversion efficiency goal is set at 15% fuel energy to electric energy delivered to an external load at 24 volts. A burner/recuperator system has been developed to meet the objectives of high combustion air preheat temperatures with a compact heat exchanger, low excess air operation, and high convective heat transfer rates to the silicon carbide emitter surface. The burner incorporates a air blast atomizer with 100% of the combustion air passing through the nozzle. Designed firing rate of 2900 watts at 0.07 gallons of oil per hour. This incorporates a single air supply dc motor/fan set and avoids the need for a system air compressor. The recuperator consists of three annular, concentric laminar flow passages. Heat from the combustion of the diesel fuel is both radiantly and convectively coupled to the inside wall of a cylindrical silicon carbide emitter. The outer wall of the emitter then radiates blackbody energy at the design temperature of 1400°C. The cylindrical emitter is enclosed in a quartz envelope that separates it from the photovoltaic (PV) cells. Spectral control is accomplished by a resonant mesh IR band-pass filter placed between the emitter and the PV array. The narrow band of energy transmitted by the filter is intercepted and converted to electricity by an array of GaSb PV cells. The array consists of 216 1-cm × 1-cm GaSb cells arranged into series and parallel arrays. An array of heat pipes couple the PV cell arrays to a heat exchanger which is cooled by forced air convection. A brief status of the key TPV technologies is presented followed by data characterizing the performance of the 500 watt TPV system.

  6. Small Stirling dynamic isotope power system for multihundred-watt robotic missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, David J.

    1991-01-01

    Free Piston Stirling Engine (FPSE) and linear alternator (LA) technology is combined with radioisotope heat sources to produce a compact dynamic isotope power system (DIPS) suitable for multihundred watt space application which appears competitive with advance radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). The small Stirling DIPS is scalable to multihundred watt power levels or lower. The FPSE/LA is a high efficiency convertor in sizes ranging from tens of kilowatts down to only a few watts. At multihundred watt unit size, the FPSE can be directly integrated with the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) via radiative coupling; the resulting dynamic isotope power system has a size and weight that compares favorably with the advanced modular (Mod) RTG, but requires less than a third the amount of isotope fuel. Thus the FPSE extends the high efficiency advantage of dynamic systems into a power range never previously considered competitive for DIPS. This results in lower fuel cost and reduced radiological hazard per delivered electrical watt.

  7. Small Stirling dynamic isotope power system for multihundred-watt robotic missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, David J.

    1991-01-01

    Free piston Stirling Engine (FPSE) and linear alternator (LA) technology is combined with radioisotope heat sources to produce a compact dynamic isotope power system (DIPS) suitable for multihundred watt space application which appears competitive with advanced radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). The small Stirling DIPS is scalable to multihundred watt power levels or lower. The FPSE/LA is a high efficiency convertor in sizes ranging from tens of kilowatts down to only a few watts. At multihundred watt unit size, the FPSE can be directly integrated with the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) via radiative coupling; the resulting dynamic isotope power system has a size and weight that compares favorably with the advanced modular (Mod) RTG, but requires less than a third the amount of isotope fuel. Thus the FPSE extends the high efficiency advantage of dynamic systems into a power range never previously considered competitive for DIPS. This results in lower fuel cost and reduced radiological hazard per delivered electrical watt.

  8. Small Stirling dynamic isotope power system for multihundred-watt robotic missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bents, David J.

    Free Piston Stirling Engine (FPSE) and linear alternator (LA) technology is combined with radioisotope heat sources to produce a compact dynamic isotope power system (DIPS) suitable for multihundred watt space application which appears competitive with advance radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). The small Stirling DIPS is scalable to multihundred watt power levels or lower. The FPSE/LA is a high efficiency convertor in sizes ranging from tens of kilowatts down to only a few watts. At multihundred watt unit size, the FPSE can be directly integrated with the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) via radiative coupling; the resulting dynamic isotope power system has a size and weight that compares favorably with the advanced modular (Mod) RTG, but requires less than a third the amount of isotope fuel. Thus the FPSE extends the high efficiency advantage of dynamic systems into a power range never previously considered competitive for DIPS. This results in lower fuel cost and reduced radiological hazard per delivered electrical watt.

  9. Small stirling dynamic isotope power systems for multihundred-watt robotic missions

    SciTech Connect

    Bents, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    Free piston Stirling Engine (FPSE) and linear alternator (LA) technology is combined with radioisotope heat sources to produce a compact dynamic isotope power system (DIPS) suitable for multihundred watt space application which appears competitive with advanced radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). The small Stirling DIPS is scalable to multihundred watt power levels or lower. The FPSE/LA is a high efficiency convertor in sizes ranging from tens of kilowatts down to only a few watts. At multihundred watt unit size, the FPSE can be directly integrated with the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) via radiative coupling; the resulting dynamic isotope power system has a size and weight that compares favorably with the advanced modular (Mod) RTG, but requires less than a third the amount of isotope fuel. Thus the FPSE extends the high efficiency advantage of dynamic systems into a power range never previously considered competitive for DIPS. This results in lower fuel cost and reduced radiological hazard per delivered electrical watt.

  10. EDITORIAL: Selected papers from the 11th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2011) Selected papers from the 11th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young-Ho

    2012-09-01

    This special section of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering features papers selected from the 11th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2011), held at Sejong Hotel in Seoul, Korea during 15-18 November 2011. Since the first PowerMEMS workshop held in Sendai, Japan in 2000, the workshop has developed as the premier forum for reporting research results in micro and nanotechnology for power generation, energy conversion, harvesting and processing applications, including in-depth technical issues on nanostructures and materials for small-scale high-density energy and thermal management. Potential PowerMEMS applications cover not only portable power devices for consumer electronics and remote sensors, but also micro engines, impulsive thrusters and fuel cells for systems ranging from the nanometer to the millimeter scale. The 2011 technical program consists of 1 plenary talk, 4 invited talks and 118 contributed presentations. The 48 oral and 70 poster presentations, selected by 27 Technical Program Committee Members from 131 submitted abstracts, have stimulated lively discussion maximizing the interaction between participants. Among them, this special section includes 9 papers covering micro-scale power generators, energy converters, harvesters, thrusters and thermal coolers. Finally, we are grateful to the members of the International Steering Committee, the Technical Program Committee, and the Local Organizing Committee for their efforts and contributions to PowerMEMS 2011. We also thank the two companies Samsung Electro-Mechanics and LG Elite for technical tour arrangements. Special thanks go to Dr Ian Forbes, the editorial staff of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, as well as to the staff of IOP Publishing for making this special section possible.

  11. Two-watt radioisotope power generators for underwater applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caputo, R. S.; Truscello, V. C.

    1974-01-01

    Materials and design considerations are discussed for a low-cost, reliable radio-isotope-fueled thermoelectric generator for use in an undersea application. Plutonium has been selected as fuel, and the generator has to meet design goals of 2 watts after 20 years with a direct output voltage of 6-8 volts. The pressed and sintered form of Bi2Te3 appears to be the most appropriate thermoelectric material. Both fibrous and multilayer foil insulation could be used with proper processing and quality control, but there is less risk with fibrous type insulation. Min-K 1400 is recommended with a nitrogen cover gas. The heat source recommended is a three-layer capsule using T-111 for both the liner and strength member with an outer liner of Hastelloy-C.

  12. High efficiency Tm:YAG slab laser with hundred-watts-level output power.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pian; Jin, Lin; Liu, Xuan; Huang, Haitao; Shen, Deyuan

    2016-04-01

    We report on a hundred-watts-level high power Tm:YAG slab laser system operating at room temperature. The laser has a threshold pump power of 46.7 W, benefiting from the good mode matching of an end-pumping scheme and the excellent heat-dissipation capability of our cooling system. At 350 W of incident pump power, 100 W of output power at ∼2015  nm has been generated, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 33.6% with respect to the incident pump power and an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 28.6%. As far as we know, this is the highest optical-to-optical conversion efficiency so far achieved in a high power Tm:YAG laser system operating at a hundred-watts level. PMID:27139649

  13. X-Band, 17-Watt Solid-State Power Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittskus, Anthony; Stone, Ernest; Boger, William; Burgess, David; Honda, Richard; Nuckolls, Carl

    2005-01-01

    An advanced solid-state power amplifier that can generate an output power of as much as 17 W at a design operating frequency of 8.4 GHz has been designed and constructed as a smaller, lighter, less expensive alternative to traveling-wave-tube X-band amplifiers and to prior solid-state X-band power amplifiers of equivalent output power. This amplifier comprises a monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifier module and a power-converter module integrated into a compact package (see Figure 1). The amplifier module contains an input variable-gain amplifier (VGA), an intermediate driver stage, a final power stage, and input and output power monitors (see Figure 2). The VGA and the driver amplifier are 0.5-m GaAs-based metal semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFETs). The final power stage contains four parallel high-efficiency, GaAs-based pseudomorphic high-electron-mobility transistors (PHEMTs). The gain of the VGA is voltage-variable over a range of 10 to 24 dB. To provide for temperature compensation of the overall amplifier gain, the gain-control voltage is generated by an operational-amplifier circuit that includes a resistor/thermistor temperature-sensing network. The driver amplifier provides a gain of 14 dB to an output power of 27 dBm to drive the four parallel output PHEMTs, each of which is nominally capable of putting out as much as 5 W. The driver output is sent to the input terminals of the four parallel PHEMTs through microstrip power dividers; the outputs of these PHEMTs are combined by microstrip power combiners (which are similar to the microstrip power dividers) to obtain the final output power of 17 W.

  14. Design of multihundred-watt dynamic isotope power system for robotic space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bents, D. J.; Geng, S. M.; Schreiber, J. G.; Withrow, C. A.; Schmitz, P. C.; McComas, T. J.

    The design of a multihundred-watt dynamic isotope power system (DIPS) based on the US Department of Energy (DOE) general-purpose heat source (GPHS) and small (multihundred-watt) free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE) is described as a potential lower cost alternative to radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). The design is targeted at the power needs of future unmanned deep space and planetary surface exploration missions. Since the competitive potential of FPSE as an isotope convertor was first identified, work has focused on the feasibility of directly integrating GPHS with the Stirling heater head. Thermal modeling of various radiatively coupled heat source/heater head geometries has been performed using data furnished by the developers of FPSE and GPHS. The analysis indicates that, for the 1050 K heater head configurations considered, GPHS fuel clad temperatures remain safe operating limits under all conditions including shutdown of one engine on a twin engine unit. Based on these results, preliminary characterizations of multihundred-watt units have been established. They indicate that, per electrical watt, the GPHS/small Stirling DIPS will be roughly equivalent to MOD RTG in size and mass but will require about a third the amount of isotope fuel.

  15. Design of multihundred-watt dynamic isotope power system for robotic space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, D. J.; Geng, S. M.; Schreiber, J. G.; Withrow, C. A.; Schmitz, P. C.; Mccomas, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    The design of a multihundred-watt dynamic isotope power system (DIPS) based on the US Department of Energy (DOE) general-purpose heat source (GPHS) and small (multihundred-watt) free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE) is described as a potential lower cost alternative to radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). The design is targeted at the power needs of future unmanned deep space and planetary surface exploration missions. Since the competitive potential of FPSE as an isotope convertor was first identified, work has focused on the feasibility of directly integrating GPHS with the Stirling heater head. Thermal modeling of various radiatively coupled heat source/heater head geometries has been performed using data furnished by the developers of FPSE and GPHS. The analysis indicates that, for the 1050 K heater head configurations considered, GPHS fuel clad temperatures remain safe operating limits under all conditions including shutdown of one engine on a twin engine unit. Based on these results, preliminary characterizations of multihundred-watt units have been established. They indicate that, per electrical watt, the GPHS/small Stirling DIPS will be roughly equivalent to MOD RTG in size and mass but will require about a third the amount of isotope fuel.

  16. Design point characteristics of a 500 - 2500 watt isotope-Brayton power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, G. J.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to investigate the potential performance characteristics of an isotope-Brayton space power system at electric power levels from 500 - 2500 watts. Utilization of the Pu(238) heat source, or capsule, was assumed. A single-loop system design concept was selected. The design concept and results of first-order trade-off studies of the effects of major system parameters on system performance are presented. Results of the study indicate the potential for high system efficiency and high specific power over the entire power range.

  17. Microcombustor-thermoelectric power generator for 10-50 watt applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Daniel S.; Cho, Steve T.

    2010-04-01

    Fuel-based portable power systems, including combustion and fuel cell systems, take advantage of the 80x higher energy density of fuel over lithium battery technologies and offer the potential for much higher energy density power sources - especially for long-duration applications, such as unattended sensors. Miniaturization of fuel-based systems poses significant challenges, including processing of fuel in small channels, catalyst poisoning, and coke and soot formation. Recent advances in micro-miniature combustors in the 200Watt thermal range have enabled the development of small power sources that use the chemical energy of heavy fuel to drive thermal-to-electric converters for portable applications. CUBE Technology has developed compact Micro-Furnace combustors that efficiently deliver high-quality heat to optimized thermal-to-electric power converters, such as advanced thermoelectric power modules and Stirling motors, for portable power generation at the 10-50Watt scale. Key innovations include a compact gas-gas recuperator, innovative heavy fuel processing, coke- & soot-free operation, and combustor optimization for low balance-of-plant power use while operating at full throttle. This combustor enables the development of robust, high energy density, miniature power sources for portable applications.

  18. Narrow linewidth picosecond pulsed laser with mega-watt peak power at UV wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yun; Huang, Chunning; Deibele, Craig Edmond

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) burst mode laser system to generate 66 ps/402.5 MHz pulses with mega-watt peak power at 355 nm. The seed laser is based on a direct electro-optic modulation of a fiber laser output. A very high extinction ratio (45 dB) has been achieved by using an adaptive bias control. The multi-stage Nd:YAG amplifier system allows a uniformly temporal shaping of macropulses with tunable pulse duration. The light output form the amplifier is converted to 355 nm and over 1 MW UV peak power is obtained when the laser is operating in a 5- s/10-Hz macropulse mode. The laser output has a transform limited spectrum bandwidth with a very narrow linewidth of individual laser mode. The immediate application of the laser system is the laser assisted hydrogen ion beam stripping for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS).

  19. Sub-watt Power Using an Integrated Fuel Processor and Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Evan O. ); Holladay, Jamie D. ); Perry, Steven T. ); Orth, Rick J. ); Rozmiarek, Robert T. ); Hu, Jianli ); Phelps, Max R.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E. ); M. Matlosz, W. Ehrfield, et al.

    2002-01-01

    A sub-watt power system is being developed as an alternative to conventional battery technology to better meet energy and power densities needed for operating wireless electronic devices, such as microsensors and microelectromechanical systems. This system integrates a microscale fuel processor, which produces a hydrogen-rich stream from liquid fuels, such as methanol and butane, and a microscale fuel cell, which uses the hydrogen as fuel to produce electric power. Battelle, Pacific Northwest Division and Case Western Reserve University are developing and demonstrating this technology for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. This paper describes work being performed by Battelle on the fuel processor, in particular, catalyst and reactor design and testing. The microscale fuel processor (integrated vaporizer/steam reformer/combustor) assembled, fabricated, and tested during this study generated an equivalent power level of 10 to 500 mWe. This steam reformer test system has a reactor volume of less than 0.5 mm3. Catalyst testing achieved a near-maximum theoretical conversion for methanol with <1% CO in product H2 gas. High conversion and H2 selectivity was also achieved during catalyst testing with butane, but at higher temperatures.

  20. Development and performance of power processor system for 2-gigahertz, 200-watt amplifier for communications technology satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegert, C. E.; Gourash, F.; Vasicek, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The electrical and environmental requirements for a power processor system (PPS) designed to supply the appropriate voltages and currents to a 200-watt traveling wave tube (TWT) for a communication technology satellite is described. A block diagram of the PPS, the interface requirements between the PPS and spacecraft, the interface requirements between the PPS and 200-watt TWT, and the environmental requirements of the PPS are presented. Also included are discussions of protection circuits, interlocking sequences, and transient requirements. Predictions of the flight performance, based on ground test data, are provided.

  1. Conceptual Design of 500 watt portable thermophotovoltaic power supply using JP-8 fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBellis, Crispin L.; Scotto, Mark V.; Scoles, Stephen W.; Fraas, Lewis

    1997-03-01

    Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) and JX Crystals (JXC) have developed an innovative design for a compact, 500 watt net electric (We), 24-VDC thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power supply using JP-8 fuel. As currently envisioned, the TPV generator will be approximately 20 cm (8 inches) in diameter and 50 cm (20 inches) high, not including a fuel tank and controls. The total system may weigh as little as 7.5 kg (16.5 lb) without fuel. This system will achieve high efficiency and high power density relative to its size through the use of low bandgap gallium antimonide (GaSb) PV cells and a matched emitter. A thermally integrated fuel vaporizer and recuperator will boost system efficiency by transferring the unused energy in the exhaust stream to the incoming fuel and combustion air. At rated conditions and 500 We output, the system is expected to have an overall efficiency of 8% to 10%. This paper examines the trade-offs between system efficiency, power density, and weight required in the selection and configuration of the major system components.

  2. Component development for 500 watt diesel fueled portable thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBellis, Crispin L.; Scotto, Mark V.; Fraas, Lewis; Samaras, John; Watson, Ron C.; Scoles, Stephen W.

    1999-03-01

    McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) and JX Crystals have developed an innovative design for a compact, 500-watt, thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power supply using diesel fuel. Under a contract with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and managed by the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command (CECOM), this design is being reduced to hardware. Prototypes of the two main subsystems, the power converter assembly (PCA) and the burner/emitter/recuperator (BER), have been designed, fabricated, and tested. The PCA uses low-band-gap gallium antimonide (GaSb) photovoltaic (PV) cells for high efficiency and power density. The prototype PCA will be air cooled for system simplicity and portability. However, initial testing was performed on a water-cooled PCA. The BER uses a thermal vaporizer to produce a stable, high-intensity, low-emissions combustion zone inside an impervious emitter. A thermally integrated recuperator is utilized to boost system efficiency by transferring the unused energy in the exhaust stream to the incoming fuel and combustion air. This paper describes the design, testing and performance of the first-generation PCA and BER along with model predictions used for design and evaluation.

  3. Watts Bar Unit 1 Cycle Zero Power Physics Tests Analysis with VERA-CS

    SciTech Connect

    Gehin, Jess C; Godfrey, Andrew T; Evans, Thomas M; Hamilton, Steven P; Francheschini, F.

    2014-01-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is developing a collection of methods and software products known as VERA, the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications, including a core simulation capability called VERA-CS. A key milestone for this endeavor is to validate VERA against measurements from operating nuclear power reactors. The first step in validation against plant data is to determine the ability of VERA to accurately simulate the initial startup physics tests for Watts Bar Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1 (WBN1) cycle 1. VERA-CS calculations were performed with the Insilico code developed at ORNL using cross section processing from the SCALE system and the transport capabilities within the Denovo transport code using the SPN method. The calculations were performed with ENDF/B-VII.0 cross sections in 252 groups (collapsed to 23 groups for the 3D transport solution). The key results of the comparison of calculations with measurements include initial criticality, control rod worth critical configurations, control rod worth, differential boron worth, and isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient (ITC). The VERA results for these parameters show good agreement with measurements, with the exception of the ITC, which requires additional investigation. Results are also compared to those obtained with Monte Carlo methods and a current industry core simulator.

  4. Quantum cascade laser in a master oscillator power amplifier configuration with Watt-level optical output power.

    PubMed

    Hinkov, Borislav; Beck, Mattias; Gini, Emilio; Faist, Jérôme

    2013-08-12

    We present the design and realization of short-wavelength (λ = 4.53 μm) and buried-heterostructure quantum cascade lasers in a master oscillator power amplifier configuration. Watt-level, singlemode peak optical output power is demonstrated for typical non-tapered 4 μm wide and 5.25 mm long devices. Farfield measurements prove a symmetric, single transverse-mode emission in TM(00)-mode with typical divergences of 25° and 27° in and perpendicular to growth direction, respectively. We demonstrate singlemode tuning over a range of 7.9 cm(-1) for temperatures between 263K and 313K and also singlemode emission for different driving currents. The side mode suppression ratio is measured to be higher than 20 dB. PMID:23938833

  5. Development and Demonstration of a 25 Watt Thermophotovoltaic Power Source for a Hybrid Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Edward; Shukla, Kailash; Metcalfe, Christopher

    2001-01-01

    The development of a propane-fueled, 25 W thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power source for use in a hybrid power system is described. The TPV power source uses a platinum emitting surface with an anti-reflective coating to radiate to gallium antimonide photocells, which converts the radiation to electric power. The development program started with the design and fabrication of an engineering prototype system. This was used as a component development vehicle to develop the technologies for the various components. A 25 W demonstration prototype was then designed and fabricated using the most advanced component approaches. The designs and test results from this development program are discussed.

  6. Directions: Future Planner for 11th Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana Career and Postsecondary Advancement Center, Bloomington.

    This booklet is intended to help Indiana 11th graders plan their futures by identifying their career and educational goals and available employment and educational opportunities. The following are among the topics discussed in sections 1-4: (1) identifying goals (planning ahead, using class schedules to chart one's course, developing career and…

  7. Difference between the maximum empirical and field measured peak Watt values of thermal power system under highly sufficient solar conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhussain, O. A.; Abdel-Magid, T. I. M.

    2016-08-01

    Mono-Crystalline solar cell module is experimentally conducted in Khartoum, Sudan to study the difference between maximum empirical value of peak Watt and maximum value of thermal power produced in field under highly sufficient solar conditions. Field measurements are recorded for incident solar radiation, produced voltage, current and temperature at several time intervals during sun shine period. The thermal power system has been calculated using fundamental principles of heat transfer. The study shows that solar power for considered module could not attain the empirical peak power irrespective to maximum value of direct incident solar radiation and maximum temperature gained. A loss of about 6% of power can be considered as the difference between field measurements and the manufacturer's indicated empirical value. Solar cell exhibits 94% efficiency in comparison with manufacturer's provided data, and is 3'% more efficient in thermal energy production than in electrical power extraction for hot-dry climate conditions.

  8. 11th International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, H. J. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings from the 11th International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity (ICAE 99), held June 7-11, 1999. This conference was attended by scientists and researchers from around the world. The subjects covered included natural and artificially initiated lightning, lightning in the middle and upper atmosphere (sprites and jets), lightning protection and safety, lightning detection techniques (ground, airborne, and space-based), storm physics, electric fields near and within thunderstorms, storm electrification, atmospheric ions and chemistry, shumann resonances, satellite observations of lightning, global electrical processes, fair weather electricity, and instrumentation.

  9. MEETING SUMMARY: 11TH AMS Education Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. R.; Ramamurthy, M. K.; Croft, P. J.; Hayes, M. J.; Murphy, K. A.; Mcdonnell, J. D.; Johnson, R. M.; Friedman, H. A.

    2004-03-01

    The 11th American Meteorological Society (AMS) Education Symposium was held from 13 to 15 January 2002 in Orlando, Florida, as part of the 82nd Annual Meeting of the AMS. The theme of the symposium was “creating opportunities in educational outreach in the atmospheric and related sciences.” Drawing from traditional strengths in meteorology and numerous national recommendations, the presentations and posters of the symposium highlighted three opportunities for reform. These opportunities build on partnerships between diverse educational stakeholders, efforts to make science education more like scientific practice, and strategies that place the atmospheric sciences within a larger, multi-disciplinary context that includes oceanography, hydrology, and earth-system science.

  10. On-chip power-combining techniques for watt-level linear power amplifiers in 0.18 μm CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhixiong, Ren; Kefeng, Zhang; Lanqi, Liu; Cong, Li; Xiaofei, Chen; Dongsheng, Liu; Zhenglin, Liu; Xuecheng, Zou

    2015-09-01

    Three linear CMOS power amplifiers (PAs) with high output power (more than watt-level output power) for high data-rate mobile applications are introduced. To realize watt-level output power, there are two 2.4 GHz PAs using an on-chip parallel combining transformer (PCT) and one 1.95 GHz PA using an on-chip series combining transformer (SCT) to combine output signals of multiple power stages. Furthermore, some linearization techniques including adaptive bias, diode linearizer, multi-gated transistors (MGTR) and the second harmonic control are applied in these PAs. Using the proposed power combiner, these three PAs are designed and fabricated in TSMC 0.18 μm RFCMOS process. According to the measurement results, the proposed two linear 2.4 GHz PAs achieve a gain of 33.2 dB and 34.3 dB, a maximum output power of 30.7 dBm and 29.4 dBm, with 29% and 31.3% of peak PAE, respectively. According to the simulation results, the presented linear 1.95 GHz PA achieves a gain of 37.5 dB, a maximum output power of 34.3 dBm with 36.3% of peak PAE. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61076030).

  11. 11th International Congress of Endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Fuller, P J

    2001-03-01

    The Olympics of endocrinology, the 11th International Congress of Endocrinolgy was held rather appropriately in Sydney, four weeks after the summer games of the XXWIIth Modern Olympiad. Both occasions were a great success and whilst it may be tempting to extend the analogy to the pool or the track or heaven forbid, digress into 'drugs in sport', this review will focus on endocrinology. There were over 3000 participants with ten plenary lectures, 20 meet-the-expert sessions, 41 symposia, 128 oral free communications and 1500 posters. Sydney post-Olympics provided a vibrant, exciting and picturesque setting with outstanding convention facilities. The Congress Party was held at Campbells Cove in the lee of the Harbour Bridge looking toward the Opera House which provided an opportunity for delegates to view the two architectural icons that had become so familiar in the preceding months. Credit must be given both to the Local Organising Committee of Sydney endocrinologists who made it all happen and to the International Program Organising Committee who crafted a pageant of first rate endocrinology. It is self-evident that this report can only hope to give the reader a flavour of a Congress such as this with the choice of topics being largely idiosyncratic. With five concurrent symposia and two concurrent orals each morning and afternoon of the four days, any omissions reflect not on the topic or its importance but on this reviewer's inability to be in more than one place at once!

  12. 11th International Congress of Endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Fuller, P J

    2001-03-01

    The Olympics of endocrinology, the 11th International Congress of Endocrinolgy was held rather appropriately in Sydney, four weeks after the summer games of the XXWIIth Modern Olympiad. Both occasions were a great success and whilst it may be tempting to extend the analogy to the pool or the track or heaven forbid, digress into 'drugs in sport', this review will focus on endocrinology. There were over 3000 participants with ten plenary lectures, 20 meet-the-expert sessions, 41 symposia, 128 oral free communications and 1500 posters. Sydney post-Olympics provided a vibrant, exciting and picturesque setting with outstanding convention facilities. The Congress Party was held at Campbells Cove in the lee of the Harbour Bridge looking toward the Opera House which provided an opportunity for delegates to view the two architectural icons that had become so familiar in the preceding months. Credit must be given both to the Local Organising Committee of Sydney endocrinologists who made it all happen and to the International Program Organising Committee who crafted a pageant of first rate endocrinology. It is self-evident that this report can only hope to give the reader a flavour of a Congress such as this with the choice of topics being largely idiosyncratic. With five concurrent symposia and two concurrent orals each morning and afternoon of the four days, any omissions reflect not on the topic or its importance but on this reviewer's inability to be in more than one place at once! PMID:11424899

  13. Powering a Home with Just 25 Watts of Solar PV. Super-Efficient Appliances Can Enable Expanded Off-Grid Energy Service Using Small Solar Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Phadke, Amol A.; Jacobson, Arne; Park, Won Young; Lee, Ga Rick; Alstone, Peter; Khare, Amit

    2015-04-01

    Highly efficient direct current (DC) appliances have the potential to dramatically increase the affordability of off-grid solar power systems used for rural electrification in developing countries by reducing the size of the systems required. For example, the combined power requirement of a highly efficient color TV, four DC light emitting diode (LED) lamps, a mobile phone charger, and a radio is approximately 18 watts and can be supported by a small solar power system (at 27 watts peak, Wp). Price declines and efficiency advances in LED technology are already enabling rapidly increased use of small off-grid lighting systems in Africa and Asia. Similar progress is also possible for larger household-scale solar home systems that power appliances such as lights, TVs, fans, radios, and mobile phones. When super-efficient appliances are used, the total cost of solar home systems and their associated appliances can be reduced by as much as 50%. The results vary according to the appliances used with the system. These findings have critical relevance for efforts to provide modern energy services to the 1.2 billion people worldwide without access to the electrical grid and one billion more with unreliable access. However, policy and market support are needed to realize rapid adoption of super-efficient appliances.

  14. Fractional Watt AMTEC Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, T. K.; Rasmussen, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    We report here the long term performance of a small, multi-tube AMTEC converter. This converter was designed to operate and produce approximately 12 watt of electrical output from a small, 4 to 6 watt radioisotope heat source for remote power applications. It was built and put on test in 1999 using electrical heaters as stand-ins for the radioisotope capsule. Since that time it has accumulated more than 5 years of run time at an input heater temperature of 700 °C, with numerous thermal cycles to ambient that were generally related to grid power failures or physical moves of the test apparatus. The power output has remained, with variations due to orientation changes and minor variations due to small temperature changes, essentially constant at 0.40 W to 0.60 W over the test period and operation is ongoing. The converter casing and mechanical structure was fabricated from 316 SS and the electrodes are sputtered titanium nitride films. Separate static tests of a multilayer insulation package suitable for use with the converter showed the capability to reach 700 °C with a thermal input of < 4 watts.

  15. Multi-Watt femtosecond optical parametric master oscillator power amplifier at 43 MHz.

    PubMed

    Mörz, Florian; Steinle, Tobias; Steinmann, Andy; Giessen, Harald

    2015-09-01

    We present a high repetition rate mid-infrared optical parametric master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) scheme, which is tunable from 1370 to 4120nm. Up to 4.3W average output power are generated at 1370nm, corresponding to a photon conversion efficiency of 78%. Bandwidths of 6 to 12nm with pulse durations between 250 and 400fs have been measured. Strong conversion saturation over the whole signal range is observed, resulting in excellent power stability. The system consists of a fiber-feedback optical parametric oscillator that seeds an optical parametric power amplifier. Both systems are pumped by the same Yb:KGW femtosecond oscillator.

  16. NORTH GATE AT 11TH AVENUE (490 NORTH & 900 EAST), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH GATE AT 11TH AVENUE (490 NORTH & 900 EAST), SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT CEMETERY'S NORTH GATE (WPA PROJECT, 1938-1941). - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  17. Nano watt power rail-to-rail CMOS amplifier with adaptive biasing circuits for ultralow-power analog LSIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Toshihiro; Hirose, Tetsuya; Tsubaki, Keishi; Kuroki, Nobutaka; Numa, Masahiro

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we present a rail-to-rail folded-cascode amplifier (AMP) with adaptive biasing circuits (ABCs). The circuit uses a nano ampere current reference circuit to achieve ultralow-power and ABCs to achieve high-speed operation. The ABCs are based on conventional circuits and modified to be suitable for rail-to-rail operation. The measurement results demonstrated that the AMP with the proposed ABCs can operate with an ultralow-power of 384 nA when the input voltage was 0.9 V and achieve high speeds of 0.162 V/µs at the rise time and 0.233 V/µs at the fall time when the input pulse frequency and the amplitude were 10 kHz and 1.5 Vpp, respectively.

  18. Islamophobia Pre- and Post-September 11th, 2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, Lorraine P.

    2006-01-01

    Although much academic research has addressed racism, religious discrimination has been largely ignored. The current study investigates levels of self reported racial and religious discrimination in a sample of 222 British Muslims. Respondents indicate that following September 11th, 2001, levels of implicit or indirect discrimination rose by 82.6%…

  19. Type-II vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser with Watt level output powers at 1.2 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, C.; Fuchs, C.; Berger, C.; Ruiz Perez, A.; Koch, M.; Hader, J.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, S. W.; Stolz, W.

    2016-02-01

    Semiconductor laser characteristics based on type-II band-aligned quantum well heterostructures for the emission at 1.2 μm are presented. Ten "W"-quantum wells consisting of GaAs/(GaIn)As/Ga(AsSb)/(GaIn)As/GaAs are arranged as resonant periodic gain in a vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser. Its structure is analyzed by X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and reflectance measurements. The laser's power curves and spectra are investigated. Output powers at Watt level are achieved, with a maximum output power of 4 W. It is confirmed that laser operation only involves the type-II transition. A blue shift of the material gain is observed while the modal gain exhibits a red shift.

  20. Reducing Leaking Electricity to 1 Watt

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, A.K.; Huber, Wolfgang; Rosen, Karen

    1998-08-01

    In this study we examine some specific opportunities toreduce standby losses in electronic appliances. A review of powerconsumption levels for the major components responsible for standbyfunctions indicates that nearly all standby functions can be performedwith a total appliance standby power consumption of one watt or less. Wetherefore propose that standby losses be limited to one watt perappliance, a significant reduction from current levels for manyappliances. This target could be achieved with little or no extra cost tomanufacturers and could save over $2 billion in annual U.S. energy costs.Globally, a one-watt plan would lead to a significant reduction in carbonemissions.

  1. Islamophobia pre- and post-September 11th, 2001.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Lorraine P

    2006-03-01

    Although much academic research has addressed racism, religious discrimination has been largely ignored. The current study investigates levels of self-reported racial and religious discrimination in a sample of 222 British Muslims. Respondents indicate that following September 11th, 2001, levels of implicit or indirect discrimination rose by 82.6% and experiences of overt discrimination by 76.3%. Thus, the current work demonstrates that major world events may affect not only stereotypes of minority groups but also prejudice toward minorities. Results suggest that religious affiliation may be a more meaningful predictor of prejudice than race or ethnicity. General Health Questionnaire scores indicate that 35.6% of participants likely suffered mental health problems, with significant associations between problem-indicative scores and reports of experiencing a specific abusive incident of September 11th-related abuse by respondents. The dearth of empirical work pertaining to religious discrimination and its effects is a cause for concern. PMID:16443594

  2. Islamophobia pre- and post-September 11th, 2001.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Lorraine P

    2006-03-01

    Although much academic research has addressed racism, religious discrimination has been largely ignored. The current study investigates levels of self-reported racial and religious discrimination in a sample of 222 British Muslims. Respondents indicate that following September 11th, 2001, levels of implicit or indirect discrimination rose by 82.6% and experiences of overt discrimination by 76.3%. Thus, the current work demonstrates that major world events may affect not only stereotypes of minority groups but also prejudice toward minorities. Results suggest that religious affiliation may be a more meaningful predictor of prejudice than race or ethnicity. General Health Questionnaire scores indicate that 35.6% of participants likely suffered mental health problems, with significant associations between problem-indicative scores and reports of experiencing a specific abusive incident of September 11th-related abuse by respondents. The dearth of empirical work pertaining to religious discrimination and its effects is a cause for concern.

  3. Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis conference.

    PubMed

    Lee, Violet; Liu, Ang; Groeber, Elizabeth; Moghaddam, Mehran; Schiller, James; Tweed, Joseph A; Walker, Gregory S

    2016-02-01

    Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis conference, Hyatt Regency Hotel, Cambridge, MA, USA, 14-16 September 2015 The Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis (APA) conference took place at the Hyatt Regency hotel in Cambridge, MA, on 14-16 September 2015. The 3-day conference affords pharmaceutical professionals, academic researchers and industry regulators the opportunity to collectively participate in meaningful and relevant discussions impacting the areas of pharmaceutical drug development. The APA conference was organized in three workshops encompassing the disciplines of regulated bioanalysis, discovery bioanalysis (encompassing new and emerging technologies) and biotransformation. The conference included a short course titled 'Bioanalytical considerations for the clinical development of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs)', an engaging poster session, several panel and round table discussions and over 50 diverse talks from leading industry and academic scientists. PMID:26853375

  4. Roots of terrorism: a reassessment after September 11th

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Joseph F.

    2002-01-01

    The brutal terrorist attacks of September 11th, the anthrax attacks that followed and growing knowledge of al Qaeda's pursuit of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons have not only intensified concerns about terrorism but also created doubts about our understanding of terrorism. These attacks were in many ways unprecedented, and ultimately raise the question of the roots or causes of terrorism. Historically and today, there have been divergent views on this question, which reflect philosophical, religious, political, sociological and other differences. These differences are not merely academic, as they can affect our understanding of both the threat and of responses to terrorism in the aftermath of September 11th, Terrorism is too complex and diverse a phenomenon to speak easily of causes. But we may be able to discern the causes of specific acts. Our response to 9/11 and other acts of terrorism will be affected by our understanding of their causes. If 9/11 was caused by US Middle East policies, the response must involve a review of these policies. If it is a backlash against globalization, the response must address the realities underlying anti-globalization sentiments. Addressing causes will not in any case end terrorism, and addressing the wrong causes will be counterproductive. Actions to reduce those conditions that create support for terrorism and aid its recruitment, which need to be clearly identified, are critical in any counterterrorism strategy. So we must understand the reasons for terrorism and, in particular, for the attacks of September 11th.T his paper will look at the question of the roots of terrorism and then look to the specific case of 911 and its aftermath, with a special view to the impact of globalization.

  5. Watt and joule balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ian A.

    2014-04-01

    The time is fast approaching when the SI unit of mass will cease to be based on a single material artefact and will instead be based upon the defined value of a fundamental constant—the Planck constant—h . This change requires that techniques exist both to determine the appropriate value to be assigned to the constant, and to measure mass in terms of the redefined unit. It is important to ensure that these techniques are accurate and reliable to allow full advantage to be taken of the stability and universality provided by the new definition and to guarantee the continuity of the world's mass measurements, which can affect the measurement of many other quantities such as energy and force. Up to now, efforts to provide the basis for such a redefinition of the kilogram were mainly concerned with resolving the discrepancies between individual implementations of the two principal techniques: the x-ray crystal density (XRCD) method [1] and the watt and joule balance methods which are the subject of this special issue. The first three papers report results from the NRC and NIST watt balance groups and the NIM joule balance group. The result from the NRC (formerly the NPL Mk II) watt balance is the first to be reported with a relative standard uncertainty below 2 × 10-8 and the NIST result has a relative standard uncertainty below 5 × 10-8. Both results are shown in figure 1 along with some previous results; the result from the NIM group is not shown on the plot but has a relative uncertainty of 8.9 × 10-6 and is consistent with all the results shown. The Consultative Committee for Mass and Related Quantities (CCM) in its meeting in 2013 produced a resolution [2] which set out the requirements for the number, type and quality of results intended to support the redefinition of the kilogram and required that there should be agreement between them. These results from NRC, NIST and the IAC may be considered to meet these requirements and are likely to be widely debated

  6. Loss of power output and laser fibre degradation during 120 watt lithium-triborate HPS laser vaporisation of the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, Thomas; Sulser, Tullio; Hefermehl, Lukas J.; Strebel, Daniel; Michel, Maurice-Stephan; Müntener, Michael; Meier, Alexander H.; Seifert, Hans-Helge

    2009-02-01

    It has recently been shown that laser fibre deterioration leads to a significant decrease of power output during 80 W potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser vaporisation (LV) of the prostate. This decrease results in inefficient vaporisation especially towards the end of the procedure. For the new 120 W lithium-triborate (LBO) High Performance System (HPS) laser not only higher power but also changes in beam characteristics and improved fibre quality have been advertised. However, high laser power has been identified as a risk factor for laser fibre degradation. Between July and September 2008 25 laser fibres were investigated during routine 120 W LBO-LV in 20 consecutive patients. Laser beam power was measured at baseline and after the application of every 25 kJ during the LV procedure. Postoperatively, the surgeon subjectively rated the performance of the respective fibre on a scale from 1 to 4 (1 indicating perfect and 4 insufficient performance). Additionally, microscopic examination of the fibre tip was performed. Median energy applied was 212 kJ. Changes of power output were similar for all fibres. Typically, a steep decrease of power output within the first 50 kJ was followed by a continuous mild decrease until the end of the procedure. After the application of 50 kJ the median power output was 63% (58-73% interquartile range) of the baseline value. The median power output at the end of the 275 kJ-lifespan of the fibres was 42% (40-47%). The median surgeons' rating of the overall performance of the laser fibres was 2 and the median estimated final decrease of power output 60%. Some degree of degradation at the emission window was microscopically detectable in all cases after the procedure. However, even after the application of 275 kJ, these structural changes were only moderate. Minor degradation of the laser fibre was associated with a significant decrease of power output during 120 W LBO-LV. However, following an early, steep decrease, power output

  7. Multi-watt power blue light generation by intracavity sum- frequency-mixing in KTiOPO4 crystal.

    PubMed

    Haiyong, Zhu; Ge, Zhang; Chenghui, Huang; Yong, Wei; Lingxiong, Huang; Zhenqiang, Chen

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, a high power blue laser at 447 nm was obtained by intracavity sum-frequency-mixing of a diode-side-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAlO(3)(Nd:YAP) laser operating at 1341.4 nm. A type-I critical phase matching LiB(3)O(5) (LBO) crystal and type-II critical phase matching KTiOPO(4) (KTP) crystal were used for second harmonic generation and third harmonic generation, respectively. The phase matching condition of the KTP crystal was researched. The results show that the KTP has superiority in intracavity sum-frequency-mixing blue light generation. 4.76 W blue light output was achieved at 4.6 kHz with the pulse width of 190ns. The fluctuation of output power was better than 3% at the output power of 4.76 W during half an hour.

  8. PREFACE: 11th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinon, Stefania; Pallecchi, Ilaria; Malagoli, Andrea; Lamura, Gianrico

    2014-05-01

    During the 11th edition of the European Conference on Applied Superconductivity, successfully held in Genoa from 15-19 September 2013, more than one thousand participants from over 40 countries were registered and contributions of 7 plenary lectures, 23 invited talks, 203 oral talks and 550 posters were presented. The present issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS) collects the 218 submitted papers that were peer reviewed and accepted in the Conference Proceedings. Similarly to the Superconductor Science and Technology Special issue: ''EUCAS 11th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity'' which contains some plenary and invited contributions, as well as some selected contributions, in this issue the papers are sorted according to the four traditional topics of interest of EUCAS, namely Materials (56 papers), Wires and Tapes (47 papers), Large Scale Applications (64 papers) and Electronics (51 papers). While the it Superconductors Science and Technology special issue focuses on the scientific and technological highlights of the conference, this collection provides an overall view of the worldwide research activity on applied superconductivity, mirroring the main guidelines and the hottest issues, which range from basic studies on newly discovered superconducting compounds to the state-of-the-art advances in large scale applications, wires and tapes fabrication and electronics. We would like to point out that, among the JPCS contributions, six papers present works financed by ongoing EU-Japan projects, three papers belong to the session on junctions and SQUIDs dedicated to the memory of Antonio Barone and one paper belongs to the session on pinning and flux dynamics dedicated to the memory of John Clem. Finally, we would like to thank all the people whose careful work contributed to the preparation of this JPCS issue, in particular the session chairs as well as the peer reviewers. The Editors Stefania Farinon (Editor in Chief, Large Scale

  9. Reproduction of a unit of power of the laser radiation in compliance with the redefinition of the optical watt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owsik, Jan; Liberman, Anatoly A.; Kovalev, Anatoly A.; Moskalyuk, Sergey A.; Rembielinska, Anna

    2012-03-01

    The fast development of laser technology requires creating a specialistic resource base for laser production certification together with radiant power (energy) measuring devices [1, 2]. This need becomes of special importance at the time when commencement of laser production at quantum points, holes and wires, whose dynamic scope of power and energy starts from counting individual photons up to tens of kilowatts (kilojoules), and the spectrum from ultraviolet to a near infrared [3]. Such are the characteristics of currently accessible laser radiation sources, used both for laser position finding and in other spheres of laser construction. Scattered radiation receivers, which are used in conditions of registering extremely low levels of radiant power, require examining of their metrological characteristics in order to define the value of their uncertainty. Elaborating such a laser set will constitute a basis for further improvement of a system for securing uniformity of measurements of basic energy parameters, characteristic for laser radiation. A set of standards now under elaboration will allow for the certification of all kinds of lasers. Choosing the optimum scheme for the elaboration of a new standard would enable the creation of a standard encompassing: a complete relation to ISO 11554- 2008 norms; with high accuracy of reproducibility of the volume of power unit (relative expanded uncertainty ~0,02%) and transmitting its volume; with an expanded power range P=1,0•10-2÷2,0[W] and with an expanded spectrum range λ=0,3÷10,6[μm] with repeatability of measurements' results.

  10. Phosphate single mode large mode area all-solid photonic crystal fiber with multi-watt output power

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Longfei; He, Dongbing; Yu, Chunlei; Hu, Lili; Chen, Danping; Liu, Hui; Qiu, Jianrong

    2014-03-31

    An index-depressed active core, single-mode phosphate all-solid large-mode-area photonic crystal fiber (PCF) is theoretically investigated using full-vectorial finite difference approach and experimentally realized. The PCF has a maximum output power of 5.4 W and 31% slope efficiency. Single-mode operation is realized through PCFs with core diameters of 30, 35, and 40 μm, respectively. The beam quality is not degraded even at maximum output power. Our simulations and experiments reveal that the laser performance is significantly affected by the center-to-center distance between the two nearest rods Λ, the rod diameter d, and their ratio d/Λ, implying that much attention should be given in employing optimal parameters to achieve excellent laser performance.

  11. Duration-tunable picosecond source at 560  nm with watt-level average power.

    PubMed

    Runcorn, T H; Murray, R T; Kelleher, E J R; Popov, S V; Taylor, J R

    2015-07-01

    A pulse source at 560 nm that is tunable in duration between 50 ps and 2.7 ns with >1  W of average power and near diffraction-limited beam quality is demonstrated. The source is based on efficient (up to 50%) second-harmonic generation in a periodically poled lithium tantalate crystal of a linearly polarized fiber-integrated Raman amplifier operating at 1120 nm. A duration-tunable ytterbium master-oscillator power-fiber amplifier is used to pulse-pump the Raman amplifier, which is seeded by a continuous-wave distributed-feedback laser diode at 1120 nm. The performance of the system using two different master oscillator schemes is compared. A pulse energy of up to 765 nJ is achieved with a conversion efficiency of 25% from the ytterbium fiber pump, demonstrating a compact and turn-key architecture for obtaining high peak-power radiation at 560 nm. PMID:26125373

  12. Development of a 500-Watt portable generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knochenhauer, Robert John

    In many commercial and recreational environments where power is unavailable, there is a need for lightweight, efficient, reasonably priced and quiet power sources that can recharge batteries for various portable devices. The current benchmark device is the Honda EU1000i, a 1000-Watt (peak) generator that weighs only 29 pounds (dry) and has a respectable noise level of 59 dB (at 7 meters) under peak power loading. The intent of this thesis study is to focus on the thermal management of a novel generator design that develops peak power of 500-Watts, weighs in at less than 20 pounds (dry) and has a reasonably low noise level at peak power loading. Through the course of this assessment, two key lessons are learned: • Liquid cooling at this scale is possible, but not practical • Renewable power sources (wind turbines and/or solar panels) are viable alternatives when used in environments that offer suitable conditions.

  13. The roots of terrorism: A reassessment after September 11th

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Joseph F.

    2002-01-01

    The brutal terrorist attacks of September 11th, the anthrax attacks that followed and growing knowledge of al Qaeda's pursuit of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons have not only intensified concerns about terrorism but also created doubts about our understanding of terrorism. These attacks were in many ways unprecedented, and ultimately raise the question of the roots or causes of terrorism. Historically and today, there have been divergent views on this question, which reflect philosophical, religious, political and other differences. These differences are not merely academic, as they can affect our understanding of both the threat and of responses to terrorism in the aftermath of September 1 1 th. Terrorism is too complex and diverse a phenomenon to speak easily of causes. But we may be able to discern the causes of specific acts. Our response to 9/11 and other acts of terrorism will be affected by our understanding of their causes, as well as by possible political requirements to address widespread perceptions of causes. If 9/11 was caused by Islamic radicalism, the near-term response must be to ensure the terrorists are defeated and pose no fiuther danger. In the longer term, education is critical. If the attacks were caused by US Middle East policies, the response should involve a review of those policies. This may or may not result in changes to policy, public diplomacy, etc. If the attacks were a backlash against globalization, the response must address the realities underlying anti-globalization sentiments. Addressing causes (real and perceived) will not in any case end terrorism, and addressing the wrong causes can be counterproductive. Actions to reduce those conditions that create support for terrorism and aid its recruitment effort are critical to any counterterrorism strategy. For this reason alone, we must do everything possible to understand the reasons terrorism may be undertaken, including the attacks of September 1 1 th. This paper will look

  14. PREFACE: The 11th International Superconductive Electronics Conference (ISEC 07)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Donald L.; Wellstood, Fred; Donaldson, Gordon

    2007-11-01

    The 11th International Superconductive Electronics Conference (ISEC 07) was held in June 2007 in Washington, DC, USA. This special issue is a compendium of selected papers based on the technology presented at that meeting. ISEC, held on a biennial basis, traditionally rotates from Japan to Europe to the United States. The single exception to this rotation has been the 2003 conference which was held in Australia. This conference brings together the world's experts in superconductive electronics in a forum which is conducive to interaction among the participants with maximal interchange between the various topics. The conference this year was truly an international event with participation from 13 countries over six continents. The quality of presentations was also high. The conference witnessed the continued maturation of both digital/mixed signal electronics and SQUID-based instrumentation along with a number of novel devices. Of particular note was the transition of superconducting quantum computing research from a novel abstract concept to a broad-based research activity. The organizing committee was able to gather an exemplary group of invited speakers to share their results and visions for future progress. These presentations spanned both the subtopics of superconductor electronics and the history of the field. As I reflect on the efforts which went into making this conference a success, I must express my appreciation to many individuals and organizations, in no particular order. I would like to thank Northrop Grumman for their support for my activities as chair of the conference, both in terms of making my time available and for direct financial considerations. Centennial Conferences, as the conference organizer, provided invaluable guidance and administrative support. I would also like to acknowledge the support of the IEEE Council on Superconductivity, in particular in the persons of Moises Levy and John Spargo. I would be remiss if I did not thank John

  15. Watt and joule balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ian A.

    2014-04-01

    The time is fast approaching when the SI unit of mass will cease to be based on a single material artefact and will instead be based upon the defined value of a fundamental constant—the Planck constant—h . This change requires that techniques exist both to determine the appropriate value to be assigned to the constant, and to measure mass in terms of the redefined unit. It is important to ensure that these techniques are accurate and reliable to allow full advantage to be taken of the stability and universality provided by the new definition and to guarantee the continuity of the world's mass measurements, which can affect the measurement of many other quantities such as energy and force. Up to now, efforts to provide the basis for such a redefinition of the kilogram were mainly concerned with resolving the discrepancies between individual implementations of the two principal techniques: the x-ray crystal density (XRCD) method [1] and the watt and joule balance methods which are the subject of this special issue. The first three papers report results from the NRC and NIST watt balance groups and the NIM joule balance group. The result from the NRC (formerly the NPL Mk II) watt balance is the first to be reported with a relative standard uncertainty below 2 × 10-8 and the NIST result has a relative standard uncertainty below 5 × 10-8. Both results are shown in figure 1 along with some previous results; the result from the NIM group is not shown on the plot but has a relative uncertainty of 8.9 × 10-6 and is consistent with all the results shown. The Consultative Committee for Mass and Related Quantities (CCM) in its meeting in 2013 produced a resolution [2] which set out the requirements for the number, type and quality of results intended to support the redefinition of the kilogram and required that there should be agreement between them. These results from NRC, NIST and the IAC may be considered to meet these requirements and are likely to be widely debated

  16. 77 FR 5056 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: September 11th...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: September 11th Victim Compensation Fund Claimant Eligibility and Compensation Form ACTION: 60-Day Notice of information collection under review. The Department of Justice (DOJ), Civil Division, September 11th Victim Compensation Fund, will...

  17. Specification for strontium-90 500-watt(e) radioisotopic thermoelectric generator. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, T.; Himes, J.; Lieberman, A.; McGrew, J.; Owings, D.; Schumann, F.

    1983-04-01

    A conceptual design for a demonstration 500-watt(e) radioisotopic thermoelectric generator has been created for the Department of Energy. The design effort was divided into two tasks, viz., create a design specification for a capsule strength member that utilizes a standard Strontium-90 fluoride-filled WESF inner liner, and create a conceptual design for a 500-watt(e) RTG. Both tasks have been accomplished. The strength-member specification was designed to survive an external pressure of 24,500 psi and meet the requirements of special-form radioisotope heat sources. Therefore the capsule can, if desired, be licensed for domestic and international transport. The design for the RTG features a radioisotopic heat source, an array of nine capsules in a tungsten biological shield, four current-technology series-connected thermoelectric-conversion modules, low-conductivity thermal insulation, and a passive finned-housing radiator for waste-heat dissipation. The preliminary RTG specification formulated previous to contract award has been met or exceeded. The power source will generate the required power for the required service period at 28 volts dc with a conversion efficiency of 8%, provided the existing in-pool capsules at WESF meet the assumed thermal-inventory requirements.

  18. The Effects of 11th Graders' Opinions on Their Interpretation of Conflicting Arguments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Wayne H.

    1998-01-01

    Examines how individual differences in epistemological beliefs, strength of beliefs, and need for cognition affected the written conclusions that 11th graders constructed after reading a passage presenting arguments opposing and supporting gun control. (SR)

  19. 16. NORTHEAST CORNER VIEW OF 10TH AND 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. NORTHEAST CORNER VIEW OF 10TH AND 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. CORNER SHOWS THE DIAGONALLY FLUTED SPIRAL DESIGN OF THE RELIEF COLUMN. - Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company Building, 1519 Franklin Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  20. E SERIES MAGAZINES, OVERVIEW OF REAR OF MAGAZINES FROM 11TH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    E SERIES MAGAZINES, OVERVIEW OF REAR OF MAGAZINES FROM 11TH ST. E 106 IN THE FOREGROUND. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Magazine Type, Eleventh, Thirteenth, Fifteenth, Sixteenth, & Seventeenth Streets, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. VIEW OF COMPANY HOUSES ON 11TH STREET AT THE RAILROAD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF COMPANY HOUSES ON 11TH STREET AT THE RAILROAD TRACKS. No. 401 to right (asbestos siding). House on left has retained the original clapboard siding. - Town of Windber, Windber, Somerset County, PA

  2. 14. CLOSEUP VIEW OF THE 10TH AND 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. CLOSE-UP VIEW OF THE 10TH AND 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. WINDOWS HAVE WHITE TERRA COTTA SILLS, HEADS AND MULLIONS. ARCHES ARE OF TERRA COTTA INCLUDING ORNAMENTATION ABOVE THE 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. CIRCULAR ORNAMENTATIONS BETWEEN ARCHES ARE TERRA COTTA PAINTED IN BRONZE COLOR. LOUVERS ON THE WINDOWS ARE NOT PART OF THE ORIGINAL DESIGN. THIS IS THE FRONT ELEVATION. - Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company Building, 1519 Franklin Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  3. Coil motion effects in watt balances: a theoretical check

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shisong; Schlamminger, Stephan; Haddad, Darine; Seifert, Frank; Chao, Leon; Pratt, Jon R.

    2016-04-01

    A watt balance is a precision apparatus for the measurement of the Planck constant that has been proposed as a primary method for realizing the unit of mass in a revised International System of Units. In contrast to an ampere balance, which was historically used to realize the unit of current in terms of the kilogram, the watt balance relates electrical and mechanical units through a virtual power measurement and has far greater precision. However, because the virtual power measurement requires the execution of a prescribed motion of a coil in a fixed magnetic field, systematic errors introduced by horizontal and rotational deviations of the coil from its prescribed path will compromise the accuracy. We model these potential errors using an analysis that accounts for the fringing field in the magnet, creating a framework for assessing the impact of this class of errors on the uncertainty of watt balance results.

  4. Emotional Intelligence as a Predictor of Leadership of Kuwaiti High and Low Achieving 11th Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alnabhan, Mousa

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined the association between emotional intelligence (EI) and the Leadership components (L) of high school students in the state of Kuwait. The possibility of predicting each leadership component via emotional intelligence components was investigated for high and low achievers. A sample of 11th grade students from Kuwaiti…

  5. Asian Studies: Experimental Course of Study, 11th or 12th Year Elective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fryberg, Carl

    This experimental course of study has a twofold purpose. Primarily, it is intended to serve as basis for an elective for the 11th or 12th year student. Openended in organization, it encourages teachers and students to add new dimensions. It provides a comprehensive bibliography and detailed information with which to develop an elective in the area…

  6. 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NIH Pain Consortium will convene the 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research, featuring keynote speakers and expert panel sessions on Innovative Models and Methods. The first keynote address will be delivered by David J. Clark, MD, PhD, Stanford University entitled “Challenges of Translational Pain Research: What Makes a Good Model?” |

  7. Court Says 11th Amendment Does Not Bar All Lawsuits against Public Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaschik, Scott

    1994-01-01

    A federal appeals court decision suggests that public colleges may not be covered by the Constitution's 11th amendment prohibiting state governments from being sued in federal court. By the ruling, the institution loses immunity by having funds other than state appropriations with which to pay damages in the lawsuits. (MSE)

  8. Labor Market Effects of September 11th on Arab and Muslim Residents of the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaushal, Neeraj; Kaestner, Robert; Reimers, Cordelia

    2007-01-01

    We investigated whether the September 11, 2001 terrorists' attacks had any effect on employment, earnings, and residential mobility of first- and second-generation Arab and Muslim men in the United States. We find that September 11th did not significantly affect employment and hours of work of Arab and Muslim men, but was associated with a 9-11…

  9. 77 FR 43823 - Filing Dates for the Michigan Special Election in the 11th Congressional District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION Filing Dates for the Michigan Special Election in the 11th Congressional District AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of filing dates for special election. SUMMARY: Michigan has...

  10. Impact of the September 11th Terrorist Attacks on Teenagers' Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Madelyn S.; Munfakh, Jimmie Lou Harris; Kleinman, Marjorie; Lubell, Keri; Provenzano, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    The impact of the September 11th terrorist attacks on adolescents' mental health is reported. Two successive cohorts of students in 6 New York state high schools, identified from health courses, completed an in-school self-report baseline assessment of hopelessness, impairment, and help-seeking behavior. One year later, these students completed a…

  11. 77 FR 21107 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: September 11th...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: September 11th Victim Compensation Fund Claimant Eligibility and Compensation Form ACTION: 30-Day Notice of Information Collection Under Review. The Department of Justice...

  12. Review of "The September 11th Education Program: A National Interdisciplinary Curriculum"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterson, Robert A.; Jenne, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    A review of "The September 11th Education Program: A National Interdisciplinary Curriculum" reveals a sensitive and well-created program for the 5-12 social studies teacher to use in teaching about the challenging subject of 9/11. This program provides an opportunity for teachers to find a balance among understanding, critical analysis,…

  13. Education Scholars' Reflections on the Implications of September 11th for Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pace, Judith L.

    2002-01-01

    Presents the reflections of five educational scholars on the potential impact of the events of September 11th on curriculum and how to address it. Edited excerpts are featured from Maxine Greene, Nel Noddings, Jesse Goodman, Michael Apple, and Gloria Ladson-Billings. Respondents address such issues as cultural awareness, moral education, and…

  14. Agreement on Use of 11th Grade Smarter Balanced Assessment Results for Student Placement. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This issue brief lists the agreement principles relating to the use of 11th grade career and college readiness assessment results for student placement in Washington community and technical colleges. As part of the Washington implementation of the new Common Core State Standards for college- and career-readiness, the agreement described herein has…

  15. September 11th, the Internet, and the Affects on Information Provision in Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Stuart

    The September 11th terrorist attacks on the United States have contributed greatly to a change in the information environment around the world. The weeks following the attacks saw governments around the world rush to pass legislation designed to prevent future acts of terrorism. Much of this legislation targeted information flow, especially on the…

  16. Expertise, Argumentation and Scientific Practice: A Case Study about Environmental Education in the 11th Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez Alexandre, Maria Pilar; Pereiro Munoz, Cristina; Aznar Cuadrado, Virginia

    This paper reports a case study about argumentation and scientific practice in the 11th grade. The objectives of the study are to identify argument patterns and dimensions of the scientific practice in students' conversations and actions while engaged in an environmental management project in a wetland. The focus are the warrants that students…

  17. Adolescent Vulnerability Following the September 11th Terrorist Attacks: A Study of Parents and Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gil-Rivas, Virginia; Holman, E. Alison; Silver, Roxane Cohen

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 2 weeks after September 11th, adolescents from a national sample of households who were indirectly exposed to the terrorist attacks through the media completed a Web-based survey that assessed event-related acute stress symptoms. One year later, these adolescents (N = 142) and a randomly selected parent from their household completed…

  18. State Education & Environment Roundtable (SEER) Seminar (11th, Des Moines, Iowa, May 20-24, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Gerald A.; Hoody, Linda L.

    This document reports on the 11th seminar of the State Education and Environment Roundtable (SEER). It consists of brief overviews of the daily discussions and presentations that were made at the seminar. Topics discussed include potential partnerships with national language arts organizations and associations, how environmental justice issues…

  19. The Federal Forecasters Conference--2000. Papers and Proceedings (11th, Washington, DC, September 14, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerald, Debra, E., Ed.

    The 11th Federal Forecasters Conference provided a forum where 180 forecasters from different federal agencies and other organizations could meet and discuss forecasting in the United States. The theme for this conference was "Forecasting, Policy, and the Internet." In the morning session, a panel presentation featured three speakers. Neilson C.…

  20. Solid state watt-hour meter

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.R.; Gilker, C.S.

    1984-08-21

    A watt-hour meter is disclosed which includes: a microprocessor coupled to a solid-state Hall-Effect sensor; an electrically alterable ROM coupled to the microprocessor; a power supply; a power outage timing means using the discharge characteristic of a capacitor; apparatus for supplying a 60 Hz clock signal to the microprocessor; a readout device coupled to the microprocessor to provide an indication of the power consumed; an output on the microprocessor for controlling a circuit breaker; and a switch for overriding the microprocessor controlled circuit breaker. The microprocessor and the electrically alterable ROM are connected and programmed: to sense the time of day as determined from an initial time of day and setting the 60 Hz clock signal; to sense and compute the power used by the consumer; to automatically open the circuit breaker when power demand on the electric power source is high and/or the cost per kilowatt hour is high; to automatically close the circuit breaker when the power demand on the source of electric power is low and/or the cost per kilowatt power is low; and to allow a consumer to override the microprocessor's control of the circuit breaker.

  1. One watt initiative: A global effort to reduce leaking electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan K.; LeBot, Benoit

    1999-05-30

    Many domestic appliances and commercial equipment consume some electric power when they are switched off or not performing their primary purpose. The typical loss per appliance is low (from 1 to 25 W) but, when multiplied by the billions of appliances in houses and in commercial buildings, standby losses represent a significant fraction of total electricity use. Several initiatives to reduce standby losses have appeared in different parts of the world. One proposal, the 1-watt plan, seeks to harmonize these initiatives by establishing a single target for all appliances. This paper explains the background to the 1-watt plan, identifies some unresolved aspects, and gives some estimates of energy savings.

  2. High-efficiency, 200 watt, 12-gigahertz traveling wave tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G.; Mcnary, B. D.; Sauseng, O.

    1974-01-01

    Design and performance of a highly efficient experimental 200-watt traveling wave tube for space communications are described. The tube uses a coupled cavity slow wave structure with periodic permanent magnet focusing. A two-step velocity taper is incorporated in the slow wave structure for velocity resynchronization with the modulated beam. The spent beam is reconditioned in a refocusing section before it is collected in a novel multistage depressed collector. The collector is radiation cooled and heat insulated from the tube body. At saturation the tube provides peak output power of 240 watts with a 35-db gain and an overall maximum efficiency of 56 percent.

  3. A 20 GHz, 75 watt helix TWT for space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heney, J. F.; Tamashiro, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    A space-qualified, helix-type traveling wave tube is being developed for satellite communication systems in the frequency band of 17.7 to 21.2 GHz. The design approach stresses very high efficiency operation, but with very low distortion. The tube provides multi-mode operation, permitting CW saturated power output levels of 75 watts, 40 watt and 7.5 watts. Operation is also anticipated at 5 dB below these saturation levels to achieve the required low distortion levels. Advanced construction features include a 5 stage depressed collector, a diamond supported helix slow-wave circuit, and a type M dispenser cathode. High reliability and long life (10 years) are objectives of the tube design. The status of the development and recent experimental results are presented.

  4. Increased power of broad-area lasers (808nm/980nm) and applicability to 10-mm bars with up to 1000Watt QCW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, D.; Meusel, J.; Hennig, P.; Lorenzen, D.; Schröder, M.; Hülsewede, R.; Sebastian, J.

    2007-02-01

    The new packaging technology from JENOPTIK Laserdiode GmbH and the new chip technology from JENOPTIK Diode Lab GmbH increases the output power, the quality and durability of new broad area lasers. Tests with different pulse widths and duty cycles have been conducted. A maximum linear power density of 213mW/μm has been found for 808nm and 980nm laser, limited by thermal rollover. The tests were performed for duty cycles from 0.1% to 5% and pulse widths of 50μs and 100μm. Over 32W output power was reached for 150μm emitter at a 0.1 % duty cycle and 50μs pulse length. With the new diode laser technology 10mm bars with a 44% filling factor were produced. These laser bars, mounted on micro channel coolers, reached a maximum output power of 1000W. To our knowledge this is the highest power reported up to now for 980nm material with 100μs pulses and 0.1% duty cycle.

  5. Selected papers from the 11th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdeghini, Carlo; Putti, Marina

    2014-04-01

    The 11th edition of the European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS) was held in Genoa (15-19 September 2013) and registered the participation of more than one thousand attendants from over 40 countries. During the conference seven plenary lectures, 23 invited, and 203 oral contributions and 550 posters have been presented, all focused on recent developments in the field of superconductivity applications. This issue of Superconductor Science Technology is a collection of some of the plenary and invited contributions. Moreover, the winners of the EUCAS prizes (the electronics prize dedicated to the memory of Antonio Barone), and the most significant oral contributions selected by the 125 chairs involved in the organization, have been invited to submit their papers. The remaining papers presented at the conference will be published in the Journal Physics Conference Series, edited by S Farinon, G Lamura, A Malagoli and I Pallecchi. The papers have been organized into the four traditional topics of interest of EUCAS, namely materials, wires and tapes, large scale applications, and electronics. The plenary lectures on these four topics have been collected: Potential of iron-based superconductors for practical materials in the future (J Shimoyama), Coated conductors for power applications: materials challenges (J Obradors), Challenges and status of ITER conductor production (A Devred), and the Impact of superconducting devices in imaging in neuroscience (G L Romani). We hope that this issue will let you taste the flavours, hear the sounds and see the colours of this exciting EUCAS edition. The very large participation in EUCAS 2013 has allowed debates on a wide range of topics, starting from the most basic studies on emergent materials up to the new developments in electronics and large scale applications. A round table on HTS Conductors was experimented for the first time gathering material scientists, wire manufacturers and device builders in a stimulating

  6. The Reporting of the September 11th Terrorist Attacks in American Social Studies Textbooks: A Muslim Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleem, Mohammed M.; Thomas, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the reporting of the September 11th terrorist attacks in social studies textbooks from a Muslim perspective and reports on findings from a study of the responses of American Muslim children to the treatment of the events of September 11th in social studies textbooks. Constructivist grounded theory was used to centralize the…

  7. Feasibility study of a 200 watt per kilogram lightweight solar array system. [for interplanetary spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanhouse, R.; Cokonis, J.; Rayl, G.

    1976-01-01

    Progress in an investigation of the feasibility of designing a lightweight solar array with a power-to-weight ratio of 200 watts per kilogram is described. This solar array will produce 10,000 watts of electrical power at 1 A.U. at its beginning of life (BOL), and degrade less than 20% over a three year period in interplanetary flight. A review of existing lightweight solar array system concepts is presented along with discussion pertaining to their applicable technology as it relates to a 200 watt/kilogram array. Also presented is a discussion of the candidate development solar cells being considered, and various deployable boom concepts under investigation.

  8. The enduring mental health impact of the September 11th terrorist attacks: challenges and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Ozbay, Fatih; Auf der Heyde, Tanja; Reissman, Dori; Sharma, Vansh

    2013-09-01

    The authors review the existing literature on the mental health impact of the September 11th attacks and the implications for disaster mental health clinicians and policy makers. The authors discuss the demographic characteristics of those affected and the state of mental health needs and existing mental health delivery services; the nature of the disaster and primary impacts on lives, infrastructure, and socioeconomic factors; the acute aftermath in the days and weeks after the attacks; the persistent mental health impact and evolution of services of the postacute aftermath; and the implications for future disaster mental health practitioners and policy makers. PMID:23954056

  9. The enduring mental health impact of the September 11th terrorist attacks: challenges and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Ozbay, Fatih; Auf der Heyde, Tanja; Reissman, Dori; Sharma, Vansh

    2013-09-01

    The authors review the existing literature on the mental health impact of the September 11th attacks and the implications for disaster mental health clinicians and policy makers. The authors discuss the demographic characteristics of those affected and the state of mental health needs and existing mental health delivery services; the nature of the disaster and primary impacts on lives, infrastructure, and socioeconomic factors; the acute aftermath in the days and weeks after the attacks; the persistent mental health impact and evolution of services of the postacute aftermath; and the implications for future disaster mental health practitioners and policy makers.

  10. Two-watt, 4-Kelvin closed cycle refrigerator performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcliffe, M.

    1987-01-01

    A 2-watt, 4-K helium refrigerator using the Gifford-McMahon/Joule Thomson cycle is described. The unit features a removable displacer cylinder and high-efficiency, low-pressure drop heat exchangers. These improvements result in a 100 percent increase in cooling power over the existing Deep Space Network system. The effects of the heat exchanger efficiency and Gifford-McMahon expander performance on refrigerator capacity are also discussed.

  11. Construction of a new watt balance with the goal to realize the kilogram in the US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlamminger, Stephan; Haddad, Darine; Seifert, Frank; Chao, Leon; Newell, David; Pratt, Jon

    2015-04-01

    A watt balance is a mechanical device that compares mechanical power to electrical power. Since electrical power is measured using quantum physics by employing the Josephson effect and the Quantum Hall effect, electrical power can be measured as a product of a known factor, two frequencies, and the Planck constant h. Mechanical power is given by mgv , where m is the mass of a weight, g the local acceleration, and v the velocity. Hence, the watt balance provides a link between mass and Planck's constant. Currently several watt balances worldwide are employed to measure h. A redefinition of the international system of units (SI) is currently in discussion and may become reality as early as 2018. In the new SI, the numerical value of the Planck constant will be fixed and the watt balance is a means to realize the unit of mass. Researchers at NIST are preparing for a new SI and we have started in 2011 with plans to design a new watt balance capable of realizing the kilogram with relative uncertainties of a few parts in 108. Construction of the new watt balance has started in 2014. In my talk, I will show some of the latest results achieved with this apparatus.

  12. 11th National Conference on Science, Policy, and the Environment: Our Changing Oceans

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Saundry

    2012-04-17

    On January 19-21, 2011, The National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE) successfully convened its 11th National Conference on Science, Policy and the Environment: Our Changing Oceans in Washington, DC at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center. Over 1,247 participants attended the conference, representing federal, state and local governments, university and colleges across the US, civil society organizations, the business community, and international entities. In addition, the conference was webcast to an audience across several states. The conference provided a forum to examine the profound changes our ocean will undergo over the next 25-50 years and share various perspectives on the new research, tools, and policy initiatives to protect and sustain our ocean. Conference highlights and recommendations are available to the public on NCSE's conference website, www.OurChangingOceans.org.

  13. September 11th--ripples across the ocean: perspectives from Tripler Army Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Staudenmeier, James J; Hill, Jeffrey V

    2002-09-01

    The events of September 11, 2001, or 9-11 as called by the media, will live in United States' memory forever. Even far-flung Hawaii shuddered with the rest of the United States. This brief article describes the September 11th experiences and fallout of three individuals living in Hawaii. One is a description of how the events worsened a client's illness. Two others are psychiatrists' accounts: one staff, another child fellow. These accounts describe how even those living in remote locales may be affected by significant world events. Even though individuals may not appear to be at risk to have much risk of psychopathology, they may experience subclinical symptoms. Individuals who do have mental illness may risk worsening of their symptoms. PMID:12363156

  14. Forgiving the September 11th terrorists: associations with coping, psychological distress, and religiosity.

    PubMed

    Rhoades, Galena Kline; McIntosh, Daniel N; Wadsworth, Martha E; Ahlkvist, Jarl A; Burwell, Rebecca A; Gudmundsen, Gretchen R; Raviv, Tali; Rea, Jacqueline G

    2007-06-01

    Two studies examined how non-interpersonal forgiveness (when there is no social relationship between the transgressor and forgiver) related to coping and involuntary responses to stress, psychological distress, and religiosity. Three to six weeks after September 11th, 2001, forgiveness had non-linear associations with other responses to the terrorist attacks. Among college students (N=488), those who were trying or had forgiven (pro-forgiveness) the terrorists reported less involuntary engagement, more primary and secondary control coping, and more meaning finding than those who were unsure about forgiveness (ambivalent) and those who did not believe the perpetrators should be forgiven (anti-forgiveness). Ambivalent students reported the most distress, even after controlling for religion. Anti-forgiveness students reported less religiosity than ambivalent and pro-forgiveness students. Most findings were consistent among middle schoolers (N=154), particularly regarding psychological distress and responses to stress. Also, forgiveness of strangers for acts against one's community functioned separately from religion.

  15. Wake of September 11th attacks: implications for research, policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Darden, Madeline Lyles

    2002-02-01

    The National Consortium for African American Children (NCAAC) held a National Forum on Bioterrorism and Children on November 6, 2001 in Washington, DC. Convened in the wake of the September 11th attacks on New York City and the Pentagon, this unprecedented conference assembled a cross-section of professionals in child advocacy, health, mental health, insurance, economics, law enforcement, and media technology. The ensuing discussion focused on issues surrounding biological agents, their impact on children and youth, and the strategies needed to protect the health and mental health of children and families in the event of a large-scale bioterrorist crisis. Lessons learned as well as the implications of the terrorist acts from the tragic events of September 11th formed the backdrop for engaging dialogue among various industry executives and professionals. Accounts of personal experiences during the unprecedented tragedy of 9-11 were shared and provided a context for heightened preparedness planning for children and adults. A collaborative statement was also presented by NCAAC, the National Medical Association, the Association of Black Psychologists, and the National Black Media Coalition. This forum was hailed as a model for communities of color to join and help bolster broad-based coalition building to ensure the availability of culturally and linguistically appropriate messages, services, and support. As intended, the forum devoted significant attention to the special needs of children, their caregivers and families and provided for an invaluable interchange which is slated to evolve into a national action plan to address the imminent dangers facing our nation's children.

  16. Wake of September 11th attacks: implications for research, policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Darden, Madeline Lyles

    2002-02-01

    The National Consortium for African American Children (NCAAC) held a National Forum on Bioterrorism and Children on November 6, 2001 in Washington, DC. Convened in the wake of the September 11th attacks on New York City and the Pentagon, this unprecedented conference assembled a cross-section of professionals in child advocacy, health, mental health, insurance, economics, law enforcement, and media technology. The ensuing discussion focused on issues surrounding biological agents, their impact on children and youth, and the strategies needed to protect the health and mental health of children and families in the event of a large-scale bioterrorist crisis. Lessons learned as well as the implications of the terrorist acts from the tragic events of September 11th formed the backdrop for engaging dialogue among various industry executives and professionals. Accounts of personal experiences during the unprecedented tragedy of 9-11 were shared and provided a context for heightened preparedness planning for children and adults. A collaborative statement was also presented by NCAAC, the National Medical Association, the Association of Black Psychologists, and the National Black Media Coalition. This forum was hailed as a model for communities of color to join and help bolster broad-based coalition building to ensure the availability of culturally and linguistically appropriate messages, services, and support. As intended, the forum devoted significant attention to the special needs of children, their caregivers and families and provided for an invaluable interchange which is slated to evolve into a national action plan to address the imminent dangers facing our nation's children. PMID:11853055

  17. God, James Watt, and the public's land

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, R.

    1981-05-01

    The political career of James Watt, Secretary of the Interior, is chronicled. His current reputation as archenemy of the environmental movement is largely the outgrowth of three and a half years of activity on behalf of the Mountain States Legal Foundation. Since taking office in January 1981, Watt has moved swiftly to impose his individual standards on USDI. Various programs and agencies are being terminated, and public lands may soon be open for mineral and energy exploitation. (7 drawings, 1 photo)

  18. PREFACE: 11th Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffari, Nader; Lhémery, Alain; Lowe, Mike

    2013-08-01

    The 11th Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC) was held in Brighton, UK on 18-20 January 2012. This event, which is an annual collaboration between the Physical Acoustics Group (PAG) of the Institute of Physics and the Groupe d'Acoustique Physique, Sous-marine et UltraSonore (GAPSUS) of the Société Française d'Acoustique, successfully achieved its main aim of being a small, friendly meeting of high scientific quality, welcoming younger researchers and PhD students and covering a broad range of subjects in Acoustics. The participants heard 44 excellent presentations covering an exciting and diverse range of subjects, from audio acoustics to guided waves in composites and from phononic crystals to ultrasound surgery. As is the custom at these meetings, four prominent invited speakers set the pace for the event; these were Keith Attenborough (The Open University, UK), Claire Prada (Institut Langevin, France), David Moore (University of Nottingham, UK) and Philippe Roux (IS Terre, France). The submission of manuscripts for publication in the proceedings was, as in previous years, on a voluntary basis and in these proceedings we present 11 peer reviewed papers. Due to some unforeseen problems there has been a longer than planned delay in preparing these proceedings, for which the Editors sincerely apologise to the authors and the community. Nader Saffari, Mike Lowe and Alain Lhémery

  19. Nasal dorsum reconstruction with 11th rib cartilage and auricular cartilage grafts.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Pietro; Cervelli, Valerio

    2009-01-01

    We present a review of international literature on the topic of nasal dorsum reconstruction with 11th rib cartilage and auricular cartilage grafts, analyzing 123 patients selected from 653 cases of rhinoplasties performed between January 1990 and October 2007 at the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery of the University of Rome "Tor Vergata." We present our experience with the correction of deformities of the nasal dorsum using rib cartilage and auricular cartilage grafts. The majority of the time, nasal dorsum deformities are complicated defects to correct surgically. They can be a consequence of naso-ethmoid-orbital fractures and of surgical procedures in the nasal area where a loss of bone or septal cartilaginous support has occurred. After a review of the techniques employed in the reconstruction, we describe the advantage of the use of rib cartilage and our experience using this procedure. In the sample examined, 84% of treated patients showed cosmetic improvements, with satisfactory results to both surgeon and patient. A functional improvement has been achieved in 94% of the operated cases. PMID:19131722

  20. Gut Microbiome of an 11th Century A.D. Pre-Columbian Andean Mummy

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Fornaciari, Gino; Luciani, Stefania; Dowd, Scot E.; Toranzos, Gary A.; Marota, Isolina; Cano, Raul J.

    2015-01-01

    The process of natural mummification is a rare and unique process from which little is known about the resulting microbial community structure. In the present study, we characterized the microbiome of paleofeces, and ascending, transverse and descending colon of an 11th century A.D. pre-Columbian Andean mummy by 16S rRNA gene high-throughput sequencing and metagenomics. Firmicutes were the most abundant bacterial group, with Clostridium spp. comprising up to 96.2% of the mummified gut, while Turicibacter spp. represented 89.2% of the bacteria identified in the paleofeces. Microbiome profile of the paleofeces was unique when compared to previously characterized coprolites that did not undergo natural mummification. We identified DNA sequences homologous to Clostridium botulinum, Trypanosoma cruzi and human papillomaviruses (HPVs). Unexpectedly, putative antibiotic-resistance genes including beta-lactamases, penicillin-binding proteins, resistance to fosfomycin, chloramphenicol, aminoglycosides, macrolides, sulfa, quinolones, tetracycline and vancomycin, and multi-drug transporters, were also identified. The presence of putative antibiotic-resistance genes suggests that resistance may not necessarily be associated with a selective pressure of antibiotics or contact with European cultures. Identification of pathogens and antibiotic-resistance genes in ancient human specimens will aid in the understanding of the evolution of pathogens as a way to treat and prevent diseases caused by bacteria, microbial eukaryotes and viruses. PMID:26422376

  1. Gut Microbiome of an 11th Century A.D. Pre-Columbian Andean Mummy.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Fornaciari, Gino; Luciani, Stefania; Dowd, Scot E; Toranzos, Gary A; Marota, Isolina; Cano, Raul J

    2015-01-01

    The process of natural mummification is a rare and unique process from which little is known about the resulting microbial community structure. In the present study, we characterized the microbiome of paleofeces, and ascending, transverse and descending colon of an 11th century A.D. pre-Columbian Andean mummy by 16S rRNA gene high-throughput sequencing and metagenomics. Firmicutes were the most abundant bacterial group, with Clostridium spp. comprising up to 96.2% of the mummified gut, while Turicibacter spp. represented 89.2% of the bacteria identified in the paleofeces. Microbiome profile of the paleofeces was unique when compared to previously characterized coprolites that did not undergo natural mummification. We identified DNA sequences homologous to Clostridium botulinum, Trypanosoma cruzi and human papillomaviruses (HPVs). Unexpectedly, putative antibiotic-resistance genes including beta-lactamases, penicillin-binding proteins, resistance to fosfomycin, chloramphenicol, aminoglycosides, macrolides, sulfa, quinolones, tetracycline and vancomycin, and multi-drug transporters, were also identified. The presence of putative antibiotic-resistance genes suggests that resistance may not necessarily be associated with a selective pressure of antibiotics or contact with European cultures. Identification of pathogens and antibiotic-resistance genes in ancient human specimens will aid in the understanding of the evolution of pathogens as a way to treat and prevent diseases caused by bacteria, microbial eukaryotes and viruses. PMID:26422376

  2. Highlights and summaries of the 11th International Workshops on Opportunistic Protists.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Edna S; Cushion, Melanie T; Marciano-Cabral, Francine; Weiss, Louis M; Xiao, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    The 11th in the series of International Workshops on Opportunistic Protists (IWOP-11) was held in August 2010 on the Big Island of Hawaii. These meetings are devoted to agents of infections that cause serious problems in AIDS patients and other individuals with defective immune systems. International Workshops on Opportunistic Protists serves as a forum for exchange of current research information on Pneumocystis, Cryptosporidium and the Microsporidia, Toxoplasma, free-living amoebae, kinetoplastid flagellates and other pathogens that are particularly pathogenic in immunodeficient hosts. Studies on interactions between host and pathogen, especially host responses, were highlighted in this year's symposium. The lack of in vitro cultivation methods for luxuriant growth of Pneumocystis, Cryptosporidium and the Enterocytozoon bieneusi remains a major hindrance to understanding the basic biology of these organisms and precludes genetic manipulations. However, slow but steady progress is being achieved by hard work including data mining of some completed or partially completed genome sequencing of several IWOP organisms. Of great concern is evidence for dramatic decline in research funding for these pathogens and the lack of appreciation by the larger scientific community concerning the state of art and challenges faced by researchers working on these organisms that can provide critical insight into emerging and reemerging pathogens.

  3. Examining Scientific and Technical Writing Strategies in the 11th Century Chinese Science Book "Brush Talks from Dream Brook"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Yuejiao

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the influential Chinese science book "Brush Talks from Dream Brook," written by Shen Kuo in the 11th century. I suggest that "Brush Talks" reveals a tension between institutionalized science and science in the public, and a gap between the making of scientific knowledge and the communication of such…

  4. Your Reading: An Annotated Booklist for Middle School and Junior High. 11th Edition. NCTE Bibliography Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jean E., Ed.; Stephens, Elaine C., Ed.

    Organized around the theme of "challenges," the 11th edition of "Your Reading" offers annotations of more than 1,200 books for young adults. Intended for teachers, librarians, parents, and students, this booklist presents recently published books that can be read for many purposes--for sheer enjoyment of the story, to pique curiosity or satisfy…

  5. The Effects of Conceptual Change Texts Accompanied with Animations on Overcoming 11th Grade Students' Alternative Conceptions of Chemical Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozmen, Haluk; Demircioglu, Hulya; Demircioglu, Gokhan

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to determine the effect of conceptual change texts accompanied with computer animations on 11th grade students' understanding and alternative conceptions related to chemical bonding. One experimental group (EG; N = 28) and one comparison group (CG; N = 30) were used in the study. While the comparison group taught traditional…

  6. Using ARCS Model to Promote 11th Graders' Motivation and Achievement in Learning about Acids and Bases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feng, Sung-Lin; Tuan, Hsiao-Lin

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of this study are: to apply the ARCS model in designing an acid and bases unit, and to assess a single class of 11th graders for motivation and achievement outcomes before and after ARCS instruction. Four essential strategies for designing motivation instruction in the ARCS model were: Attention, Relevance, Confidence, and…

  7. Investigating Community Factors as Predictors of Rural 11th-Grade Agricultural Science Students' Choice of Careers in Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adedokun, Omolola A.; Balschweid, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the links between community contexts/factors and rural 11th-grade agricultural science students' choice of careers in agriculture. A logistic regression model was developed and tested to examine the extent to which nine measures of community contexts (i.e., membership in FFA, membership in 4-H, community attachment,…

  8. The Effects of Cardio-Syntactic Analysis Instruction on Writing Scores in a 11th Grade High School Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kariuki, Patrick N.; Blair, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the effects of Cardio-Syntactic Analysis instruction on writing scores in an 11th grade English class. The sample consisted of 35 students enrolled in an Honor's English 11 class at Volunteer high School, in Church Hill, TN. The class was randomly assigned into an experimental group of 17 students and…

  9. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT: Request for support of the 11th Workshop on the Physics of Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Thomas

    2009-05-21

    This grant supported the publication of student papers that were presented at the 11th Workshop on the Physics of Dusty Plasmas. Papers were published in a Special Issue of the IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, Vol. 32, Issue 2 in April, 2007.

  10. PREFACE: The 11th General Conference of the Condensed Matter Division of the European Physical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeby, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    The 11th General Conference of the Condensed Matter Division of the European Physical Society was held in Exeter from 8-11 April 1991. The annual Condensed Matter meeting of the UK Institute of Physics, which would have been held in December 1990, was not scheduled in order that there should not be two similar meetings too close together. The Exeter EPS conference followed the traditional pattern for Condensed Matter Division conference by covering a very broad range of topics and including several plenary lectures. In addition, there was a lecture from one of the joint Hewlett-Packard prizewinners, Professor D Jerome, and the annual Mott Lecture was presented by Professor R G Clark. The invited lectures were divided into 5 parallel sessions, in part because of lecture theatre sizes, in which the topics roughly divided into semiconductors (2 sessions), metals and magnetism, high Tc superconductivity and heavy fermions, and soft matter and polymers. A number of contributors of abstracts for poster presentation were offered the opportunity of oral presentation. The three, very full poster sessions, were of a high standard and generated much interest and discussion. One can conclude that condensed matter physics is strong and active in Europe. The papers of the invited talks contained in this volume will allow conference participants the opportunity for further study of the work presented and will also allow those unable to attent the meeting to learn of the interesting results presented. With such a broad subject coverage it is difficult to order the papers in a wholly rational way; according they have been brought together under five broad headings. It is a pleasure to thank all those involved in the Organising and Programme Committees (see PDF file for detail) for their contributions to the Conference. The generosity of the Sponsors (see PDF file for list of sponsors) is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Percutaneous coronary intervention for coronary bifurcation disease: 11th consensus document from the European Bifurcation Club.

    PubMed

    Lassen, Jens Flensted; Holm, Niels Ramsing; Banning, Adrian; Burzotta, Francesco; Lefèvre, Thierry; Chieffo, Alaide; Hildick-Smith, David; Louvard, Yves; Stankovic, Goran

    2016-05-17

    Coronary bifurcations are involved in 15-20% of all percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) and remain one of the most challenging lesions in interventional cardiology in terms of procedural success rate as well as long-term cardiac events. The optimal management of bifurcation lesions is, despite a fast growing body of scientific literature, the subject of considerable debate. The European Bifurcation Club (EBC) was initiated in 2004 to support a continuous overview of the field, and aims to facilitate a scientific discussion and an exchange of ideas on the management of bifurcation disease. The EBC hosts an annual, compact meeting, dedicated to bifurcations, which brings together physicians, engineers, biologists, physicists, epidemiologists and statisticians for detailed discussions. Every meeting is finalised with a consensus statement which reflects the unique opportunity of combining the opinions of interventional cardiologists with the opinions of a large variety of other scientists on bifurcation management. The present 11th EBC consensus document represents the summary of the up-to-date EBC consensus and recommendations. It points to the fact that there is a multitude of strategies and approaches to bifurcation stenting within the provisional strategy and in the different two-stent strategies. The main EBC recommendation for PCI of bifurcation lesions remains to use main vessel (MV) stenting with a proximal optimisation technique (POT) and provisional side branch (SB) stenting as a preferred approach. The consensus document covers a moving target. Much more scientific work is needed in non-left main (LM) and LM bifurcation lesions for continuous improvement of the outcome of our patients. PMID:27173860

  12. Nathan Watt: A True American Idol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Diana

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author profiles her son Nathan Watt, a 14-year-old who was born with Spina Bifida, who does not allow setbacks to keep him from achieving his goals and dreams in the areas of writing, recording, and performing his own music. He has also opened a business website and turned his story, "Anything is Possible," into a color story…

  13. 1-watt composite-slab Er:YAG laser. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R.H.; Bartels, R.A.; Beach, R.J.; Sutton, S.B.; Furu, L.H.; LaSala, J.E.

    1997-02-13

    A diode-side-pumped discrete-optic Er{sup 3+} :YAG laser employs pump-light coupling through a sapphire plate diffusion-bonded to the laser slab, removing heat directly at the pump face of the slab instead of requiring conduction through to its far side. This lowers the temperature in the gain region and gives reduced thermal lensing, which produces exceptional beam quality (M{sup 2} {approx} 1.3) at output powers {approx} 0.3 Watt. Powers above 1 Watt have been demonstrated with peak slope efficiencies {approx}20%. The novel architecture is also applicable to other side-pumped lasers.

  14. [Analysis of the definitive statistics of the 11th General Population and Housing Census].

    PubMed

    Aguayo Hernandez, J R

    1992-01-01

    The 11th General Census of Population and Housing conducted in March 1990 enumerated 2,204,054 inhabitants in Sinaloa, for a density of 37.9 per sq. km. Sinaloa's population thus increased sevenfold from 297,000 in 1900. The proportion of Sinalioans in Mexico's population increased from 2.2% in 1900 to 2.7% in 1990. 38.4% of the population was under age 14, 57.0% was 14064, and 4.6% as over 65. The greatest challenge for the year 2010 will be to meet the demand for educational facilities, employment, and services for the growing elderly population. Sinaloa's population grew at an annual rate of 1.1 between 1980-90. 17 of its 18 municipios showed slowing growth rates between 1980-90, with only Escuinapa increasing its rate. Sinaloa's growth rate of 1.8% is still relatively high, and the population in the year 2000 is projected at 2.6 million. Population distribution and migration present problems that should be more actively addressed. Urban-urban migration is increasing in importance. In 1990, Sinaloa had 5247 localities of which only 85 had more than 2500 inhabitants and 4717 had fewer than 500. Growth of midsize localities with 500-2499 inhabitants may constitute an alternative allowing the demographic deconcentration and decentralization that Sinaloa urgently requires. The lack of jobs, infrastructure, educational and health services, housing, and food in the dispersed 4717 communities with fewer than 500 inhabitants makes them sources of emigration. Sinaloa's population is concentrated along the coast and in the 3 valleys of the north and central regions, which contain 80.8% of the population. One-third of the population lives on 12.1% of the territory in 2 municipios, while 12 municipios covering 67% of the territory contain just 24% of the population. Sinaloa's growth rate has declined from 4.3% between 1960-70 to 3.7% from 1970-80 and 1.8% in 1980-90.

  15. PREFACE: 11th International Workshop on Positron and Positronium Chemistry (PPC-11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujari, P. K.; Sudarshan, K.; Dutta, D.

    2015-06-01

    The International Workshop on Positron and Positronium Chemistry (PPC) is a prestigious triennial conference series with a rich history. The 11th meeting in the series (PPC-11) was held at Cidade de Goa, Goa, India during 9-14, November, 2014. It was organized by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai. The co-organizers were Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics (SINP), Kolkata, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam and Indian Association of Nuclear Chemists and Allied Scientists (IANCAS), Mumbai. PPC-11 attracted participants both from academic institutions and industries. About 120 participants from 20 countries representing all continents participated in the conference. The conference continued the tradition of excellence in terms of quality of presentations and discussions. There were 33 plenary and invited talks, 39 oral presentations and 40 posters. The conference stood true to its multidisciplinary tag with papers presented in the fields of fundamentals of positron and positronium chemistry, applications in polymers, porous materials, metals/alloys, studies in liquids, biological applications as well as developments in theory and experimental techniques. The enthusiastic participation of senior researchers and young students made the scientific program a grand success. In order to encourage the student participants (twenty) and promote excellence, a committee of senior members evaluated their presentations and the top three contributions were awarded. The positron and positronium community paid homage to the memory of late Profs. J. Kristiak and A.T. Stewart. A brief sketch of their life and work was presented by Profs. Jan Kuriplach and Toshio Hyodo, respectively. All the papers published in these proceedings have been peer reviewed by the participants of PPC-11. Editors thank all the reviewers for sparing their valuable time and helping us in bringing out the proceedings with 43 contributed articles in the scheduled time. We are

  16. Assessment of China's Energy-Saving and Emission-Reduction Accomplishments and Opportunities During the 11th Five Year Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, Mark D.; Price, Lynn; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; Aden, Nathaniel; Lu, Hongyou; McNeil, Michael; Zheng, Nina; Yining, Qin; Yowargana, Ping

    2010-04-28

    During the period 1980 to 2002, China experienced a 5% average annual reduction in energy consumption per unit of gross domestic product (GDP). The period 2002-2005 saw a dramatic reversal of the historic relationship between energy use and GDP growth: energy use per unit of GDP increased an average of 3.8% per year during this period (NBS, various years). China's 11th Five Year Plan (FYP), which covers the period 2006-2010, required all government divisions at different levels to reduce energy intensity by 20% in five years in order to regain the relationship between energy and GDP growth experienced during the 1980s and 1990s. This report provides an assessment of selected policies and programs that China has instituted in its quest to fulfill the national goal of a 20% reduction in energy intensity by 2010. The report finds that China has made substantial progress toward its goal of achieving 20% energy intensity reduction from 2006 to 2010 and that many of the energy-efficiency programs implemented during the 11th FYP in support of China's 20% energy/GDP reduction goal appear to be on track to meet - or in some cases even exceed - their energy-saving targets. It appears that most of the Ten Key Projects, the Top-1000 Program, and the Small Plant Closure Program are on track to meet or surpass the 11th FYP savings goals. China's appliance standards and labeling program, which was established prior to the 11th FYP, has become very robust during the 11th FYP period. China has greatly enhanced its enforcement of new building energy standards but energy-efficiency programs for buildings retrofits, as well as the goal of adjusting China's economic structure to reduce the share of energy consumed by industry, do not appear to be on track to meet the stated goals. With the implementation of the 11th FYP now bearing fruit, it is important to maintain and strengthen the existing energy-saving policies and programs that are successful while revising programs or adding new

  17. Campus Computing, 2000: The 11th National Survey of Computing and Information Technology in American Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kenneth C.

    The 2000 Campus Computing Survey, the 11th such survey, was sent to the chief academic officer at 1,176 two-year and four-year colleges and universities across the United States. By October 2000, 506 responses had been received, a response rate of 43%. New data reveal that the growing demand for technology talent across all sectors of the U.S.…

  18. Estimating the Effects of September 11th and Other Forms of Violence on the Mental Health and Social Development of New York City's Youth: A Matter of Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aber, J. Lawrence; Gershoff, Elizabeth T.; Ware, Angelica; Kotler, Jennifer A.

    2004-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines the effects of exposure to the terrorist attack of September 11th as well as exposure to other forms of community violence on change in the mental health and social attitudes of youths in New York City. Three quarters of the youths reported some form of direct exposure to the events of September 11th, and 80%…

  19. Psychological sequelae of remote exposure to the September 11th terrorist attacks in Canadians with and without panic.

    PubMed

    Asmundson, Gordon J G; Carleton, R Nicholas; Wright, Kristi D; Taylor, Steven

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the psychological impact of remote exposure to the events and aftermath of the terrorist attacks in the USA on September 11th, 2001, and to assess what differences, if any, exist between individuals classified with probable panic disorder and those without. Telephone interviews were conducted with 122 residents of the capital city of the Canadian prairie province of Saskatchewan in spring 2002 in order to gather information regarding current mood, fears and avoidance behaviours as well as current post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms specific to September 11th. Consistent with previous findings and despite the remote nature of exposure, results indicated that the psychological well-being and behaviour of participants with probable panic disorder was more adversely affected by the events and aftermath of September 11th than those without panic disorder. These results suggest that remote viewing of traumatic events can have a significant and lingering impact on psychological well-being and behaviour and that these effects are more pronounced in those with panic disorder. Implications of the findings and future research directions are discussed.

  20. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Electrorheological Fluids and Magnetorheological Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odenbach, Stefan; Borin, Dmitry

    2009-07-01

    Materials with properties controllable by external fields become more and more important for modern product design. Magnetorheological suspensions, electrorheological fluids and ferrofluids are classical examples for such smart materials exhibiting magnetic or electric field dependent properties. Their development over the past 60 years has shown how complex research and development of fluids with tailored properties can be. The demands of potential applications are the driving force for the synthesis of new fluids. The changes in the synthetic process and the composition of the fluids based on an increasing understanding of the relevant microscopic processes leads to certain macroscopic properties of the material. Only intense cooperation between basic and application oriented research, synthesis, characterisation, theory and application design can finally lead to fluids suitable for the envisaged use. The International Conferences on Electrorheological Fluids and Magnetorheological Suspensions have provided over more than 20 years a platform for interdisciplinary discussions strengthening the scientific progress in the field. Besides being a forum for scientific exchange about recent developments in electro- and magnetorheological fluids. The 11th International Conference on Electrorheological Fluids and Magnetorheological Suspensions (ERMR08) which has been organized by the chair of Magnetofluiddynamics at the Technische Universität Dresden in August 2008 in Dresden has continued this fruitful tradition. With more than 180 participants from 24 different countries it has been the largest ERMR meeting during the last decade - a tendency showing the high potential and promising development of the field of electrically and magnetically controllable fluids. A significant proportion of the participants were PhD students, a fact that also highlights the sustainability of the field. In total 85 oral presentations - including 8 plenary talks - and 81 posters were

  1. PREFACE 11th Europhysical Conference on Defects in Insulating Materials (EURODIM 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, László; Corradi, Gábor

    2010-11-01

    The Europhysical Conference on Defects in Insulating Materials, organized in the period 12-16 July 2010 in Pécs, Hungary by the Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Budapest and the Institute of Physics of the University of Pécs, was the 11th European conference in the alternate series of EURODIM and ICDIM. The first meeting in Argonne, USA in 1956 was dedicated to the field of color centers in alkali halide crystals. Since then the topic has been gradually extended to the real structure of oxides, halides, nitrides and other more complex insulators, and also to less ordered materials like glasses, ceramics and low-dimensional systems, as well as applications e.g. in radiology, non-linear optics, photonics and electronics. Recently the field covered includes the research and technology of defect-related phenomena in crystalline and amorphous wide band-gap bulk, layered and nano-materials. More than 200 colleagues from 31 countries in Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas have participated in the conference. The program contained in addition to seven invited and three keynote talks 67 further oral presentations as well as some 200 poster contributions. The city of Pécs, a pearl of the Southern Danubia region, was proud of hosting the conference as one of the 2010 European Capitals of Culture, this status crowning a long urban history dating back to paleochristian times in the Roman province Pannonia. On behalf of the Organizing Committee signature László Kovács Conference Chair Conference Chair László Kovács Crystal Physics Department Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics Budapest, Hungary e-mail: eurodim2010@optics.szfki.kfki.hu Program Committee Gábor Corradi (Hungary) István Földvári (Hungary) Rob A. Jackson (UK) László Kovács (Hungary) Martin Nikl (Czech Republic) Anna Vedda (Italy) Andrea Watterich (Hungary) International Advisory Committee M.G. Blanchin (France)A. Lushchik (Estonia) F. Bridges (USA

  2. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Damage Assessment of Structures (DAMAS 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Damage Assessment of Structures (DAMAS) 2015. DAMAS has a long history of almost 20 years. The first DAMAS conference took place in 1995 (Pescara, Italy), followed by a biannual meeting in 1997 (Sheffield, UK), 1999 (Dublin, Ireland), 2001 (Cardiff, UK), 2003 (Southampton, UK), 2005 (Gdansk, Poland), 2007 (Torino, Italy), 2009 (Beijing, China), 2011 (Oxford, UK) and 2013 (Dublin, Ireland). The eleventh edition of DAMAS conference series, DAMAS 2015, is hosted by Ghent University, Belgium, and is held at the congress center Het Pand in Ghent city. Ghent is the capital and the largest city of the East Flanders province of the Flemish region of Belgium. Het Pand is the culture and congress center of Ghent University and is a historical monument. The conference is established as a major international forum for research topics relevant to damage assessment of engineering structures and systems including numerical simulations, signal processing of sensor measurements and theoretical techniques as well as experimental case studies. The presentations of DAMAS 2015 are divided into 6 main sessions, namely 1) Structural Health and Condition Monitoring, 2) Damage in Civil Engineering, 3) Damage in Machineries, 4) Damage in Composite Materials, 5) Sensing and Sensors and 6) Signal Processing. The organising committee is grateful to keynote speakers; Professor Guido De Roeck, Head of Structural Mechanics Division, KULeuven, Belgium, for his keynote lecture entitled 'Structural Health Monitoring: highlights and challenges', Professor Weidong Zhu, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, USA, for his keynote lecture entitled 'Vibration-based Structural Damage Detection: Theory and Applications' and Professor Wieslaw Ostachowicz, Head of the Laboratory of Active Materials and Smart Structures, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland, for his keynote lecture entitled 'Damage Assessment and

  3. Stephen H. Watts: A disciple of Halsted.

    PubMed

    Chitwood, W R

    1976-03-01

    Stephen Watts was one of Dr. William S. Halsted's 17 resident surgeons. He contributed much to experimental, clinical, and didactic surgery during his lifetime. Primarily, his experimental work was in vascular and transplant surgery modeled after Alexis Carrel's efforts. Clinically, he maintained the diversity and expertise propagated by Dr. Halsted. As a teacher he continued the education of young surgeons in the spirit of a true academician. PMID:769215

  4. Recent progress on the BIPM watt balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hao; Kiss, Adrien; Robertsson, Lennart; de Mirandés, Estefania; Solve, Stéphane; Lavergne, Thomas; Picard, Alain; Stock, Michael

    2014-08-01

    We present the recent progress on the BIPM (Bureau International des Poids et Mesures) watt balance. The existing apparatus was transferred to the dedicated new laboratory with better thermal and vibrational conditions. The apparatus is fully operational in air. An improvement by a factor of three was achieved on the S/N ratio of both the voltage-to-velocity and force-to-current ratios. The fabrication of the parts of the new magnet is completed and its assembly is finished.

  5. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bao-An; Natowitz, Joseph B.

    2013-03-01

    The 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012) was held from 27 May to 1 June 2012, in San Antonio, Texas, USA. It was jointly organized and hosted by The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University, College Station and The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Texas A&M University-Commerce. Among the approximately 300 participants were a large number of graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. The Keynote Talk of the conference, 'The State of Affairs of Present and Future Nucleus-Nucleus Collision Science', was given by Dr Robert Tribble, University Distinguished Professor and Director of the TAMU Cyclotron Institute. During the conference a very well-received public lecture on neutrino astronomy, 'The ICEcube project', was given by Dr Francis Halzen, Hilldale and Gregory Breit Distinguished Professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The Scientific program continued in the general spirit and intention of this conference series. As is typical of this conference a broad range of topics including fundamental areas of nuclear dynamics, structure, and applications were addressed in 42 plenary session talks, 150 parallel session talks, and 21 posters. The high quality of the work presented emphasized the vitality and relevance of the subject matter of this conference. Following the tradition, the NN2012 International Advisory Committee selected the host and site of the next conference in this series. The 12th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2015) will be held 21-26 June 2015 in Catania, Italy. It will be hosted by The INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania and the Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia of the University of Catania. The NN2012 Proceedings contains the conference program and 165 articles organized into the following 10 sections 1. Heavy and Superheavy Elements 2. QCD and Hadron Physics 3. Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions 4. Nuclear Structure 5. Nuclear Energy and Applications of

  6. Toolkits for Automatic Service Generation: WATT and Kill-A-WATT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Y.; Bollig, E. F.; Erlebacher, G.

    2007-12-01

    As part of the NSF funded VLab consortium [1], we have been involved in the automatic generation of visualization web services using the Web Automation and Translation Toolkit (WATT) compiler. The WATT compiler converts VTK Tcl input scripts into equivalent yet more efficient C++ web services by interpreting code structure, translating and then integrating bindings to the gSOAP library. WATT seeks to completely automate code distribution, integration of transport protocols and interface generation. Ideally, developers should concentrate on writing core applications, and let WATT transform them into web services in the background. Currently, the WATT compiler is limited to converting known Tcl commands and types to C++. For VTK a simple one to one mapping between Tcl and C++ is enforced, but Tcl commands without direct mappings slow the compilation process and require new mappings to be created. Loops and conditional statements are not yet implemented. In an effort to move forward with automation and not get caught up in the details of cross-language compilation, we developed a new application: Kill-A-WATT (KWATT). KWATT is a C++ application that utilizes the C++/Tcl library [2] to evaluate Tcl input scripts using the official Tcl interpreter. During evaluation of the input script, KWATT interprets code structure, integrating communication details via a Tcl-specific SOAP library [3]. Since KWATT drives the Tcl interpreter, the application has access to the full Tcl command base plus the ability to load new commands from other packages. KWATT is not a compiler; instead, it is a stand-alone application that is itself a web service. When KWATT consumes Tcl input, the generated web methods extend the list of previously available commands. This implies that C++ web methods statically defined in KWATT provide a set of standard methods available to every service. Also, since KWATT uses the Tcl interpreter, it has the potential to accept additional Tcl at any time while

  7. Supracostal Approach for PCNL: Is 10th and 11th Intercostal Space Safe According to Clavien Classification System?

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Cengiz; Değirmenci, Tansu; Kozacioglu, Zafer; Gunlusoy, Bulent; Koras, Omer; Minareci, Suleyman

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the success and morbidity of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) performed through the 11th and 10th intercostal space. Between March 2005 and February 2012, 612 patients underwent PCNL, 243 of whom had a supracostal access. The interspace between the 11th and 12th rib was used in 204 cases (group 1) and between the 10th and 11th interspaces in 39 cases (group 2). PCNL was performed using standard supracostal technique in all patients. The operative time, success rate, hospital stay, and complications according to the modified Clavien classification were compared between group 1 and group 2. The stone-free rate was 86.8% in group 1 and 84.6% in group 2 after one session of PCNL. Auxiliary procedures consisting of ureterorenoscopy (URS) and shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) were required in 5 and 7 patients, respectively, in group 1; and in 1 patient each in group 2 . After the auxiliary procedures, stone-free rates increased to 92.6% in group 1 and 89.7% in group 2. A total of 74 (30.4%) complications were documented in the 2 groups according to modified Clavien classification. Grade-I complications were recorded in 20 (8.2%), grade-II in 38 (15.6%), grade-IIIa in 13 (5.3%), and grade-IIIb in 2 (0.8%) patients; grade-IVa was recorded in 1 (0.4%) patient. There were no grade-IVb or grade-V complications. Overall complication rate was 30.9% in group 1 and 28.2% in group 2. Supracostal PCNL in selected cases is effective and safe with acceptable complications. The modified Clavien system provides a standardized grading system for complications of PCNL. PMID:25437600

  8. Is the 10th and 11th intercostal space a safe approach for percutaneous nephrostomy and nephrolithotomy?

    PubMed

    Muzrakchi, Ahmed Al; Szmigielski, W; Omar, Ahmed J S; Younes, Nagy M

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the rate of complications in percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) and nephrolithotomy (PCNL) performed through the 11th and 10th intercostal spaces using our monitoring technique and to discuss the safety of the procedure. Out of 398 PCNs and PCNLs carried out during a 3-year period, 56 patients had 57 such procedures performed using an intercostal approach. The 11th intercostal route was used in 42 and the 10th in 15 cases. One patient had two separate nephrostomies performed through the 10th and 11th intercostal spaces. The technique utilizes bi-planar fluoroscopy with a combination of a conventional angiographic machine to provide anterior-posterior fluoroscopy and a C-arm mobile fluoroscopy machine to give a lateral view, displayed on two separate monitors. None of the patients had clinically significant thoracic or abdominal complications. Two patients had minor chest complications. Only one developed changes (plate atelectasis, elevation of the hemi-diaphragm) directly related to the nephrostomy (2%). The second patient had bilateral plate atelectasis and unilateral congestive lung changes after PCNL. These changes were not necessarily related to the procedure but rather to general anesthesia during nephrolithotomy. The authors consider PCN or PCNL through the intercostal approach a safe procedure with a negligible complication rate, provided that it is performed under bi-planar fluoroscopy, which allows determination of the skin entry point just below the level of pleural reflection and provides three-dimensional monitoring of advancement of the puncturing needle toward the target entry point. PMID:15383855

  9. Is the 10th and 11th Intercostal Space a Safe Approach for Percutaneous Nephrostomy and Nephrolithotomy?

    SciTech Connect

    Muzrakchi, Ahmed Al; Szmigielski, W. Omar, Ahmed J.S.; Younes, Nagy M.

    2004-09-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the rate of complications in percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) and nephrolithotomy (PCNL) performed through the 11th and 10th intercostal spaces using our monitoring technique and to discuss the safety of the procedure. Out of 398 PCNs and PCNLs carried out during a 3-year period, 56 patients had 57 such procedures performed using an intercostal approach. The 11th intercostal route was used in 42 and the 10th in 15 cases. One patient had two separate nephrostomies performed through the 10th and 11th intercostal spaces. The technique utilizes bi-planar fluoroscopy with a combination of a conventional angiographic machine to provide anterior-posterior fluoroscopy and a C-arm mobile fluoroscopy machine to give a lateral view, displayed on two separate monitors. None of the patients had clinically significant thoracic or abdominal complications. Two patients had minor chest complications. Only one developed changes (plate atelectasis, elevation of the hemi-diaphragm) directly related to the nephrostomy (2%). The second patient had bilateral plate atelectasis and unilateral congestive lung changes after PCNL. These changes were not necessarily related to the procedure but rather to general anesthesia during nephrolithotomy. The authors consider PCN or PCNL through the intercostal approach a safe procedure with a negligible complication rate, provided that it is performed under bi-planar fluoroscopy, which allows determination of the skin entry point just below the level of pleural reflection and provides three-dimensional monitoring of advancement of the puncturing needle toward the target entry point.

  10. PREFACE: 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizuka, Tomonori

    2008-07-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains papers based on invited talks and contributed posters presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers. This meeting was held at the Tsukuba International Congress Center in Tsukuba, Japan, on 26-28 September 2007, and was organized jointly by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency and the University of Tsukuba. The previous ten meetings in this series were held in San Diego (USA) 1987, Gut Ising (Germany) 1989, Abingdon (UK) 1991, Naka (Japan) 1993, Princeton (USA) 1995, Kloster Seeon (Germany) 1997, Oxford (UK) 1999, Toki (Japan) 2001, San Diego (USA) 2003, and St Petersburg (Russia) 2005. The purpose of the eleventh meeting was to present and discuss new results on H-mode (edge transport barrier, ETB) and internal transport barrier, ITB, experiments, theory and modeling in magnetic fusion research. It was expected that contributions give new and improved insights into the physics mechanisms behind high confinement modes of H-mode and ITBs. Ultimately, this research should lead to improved projections for ITER. As has been the tradition at the recent meetings of this series, the program was subdivided into six topics. The topics selected for the eleventh meeting were: H-mode transition and the pedestal-width Dynamics in ETB: ELM threshold, non-linear evolution and suppression, etc Transport relations of various quantities including turbulence in plasmas with ITB: rotation physics is especially highlighted Transport barriers in non-axisymmetric magnetic fields Theory and simulation on transport barriers Projections of transport barrier physics to ITER For each topic there was an invited talk presenting an overview of the topic, based on contributions to the meeting and on recently published external results. The six invited talks were: A Leonard (GA, USA): Progress in characterization of the H-mode pedestal and L-H transition N Oyama (JAEA, Japan): Progress and issues in

  11. Selected scientific topics of the 11th International Isotope Symposium on the Synthesis and Applications of Isotopes and Isotopically Labeled Compounds.

    PubMed

    Atzrodt, Jens; Derdau, Volker

    2013-01-01

    This micro-review describes hot topics and new trends in isotope science discussed at the 11th International Isotope Symposium on the Synthesis and Applications of Isotopes and Isotopically Labeled Compounds from a personal perspective.

  12. Kent and Riegel's Handbook of industrial chemistry and biotechnology. 11th ed.

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, James A.

    2007-07-01

    This handbook provides extensive information on plastics, rubber, adhesives, textile fibers, pharmaceutical chemistry, synthetic organic chemicals, soaps and detergents, as well as various other major classes of industrial chemistry. There is detailed coverage of coal utilization technology, dyes and dye intermediates, chlor-alkali and heavy chemicals, paints and pigments, chemical explosives, propellants, petroleum and petrochemicals, natural gas, industrial gases, synthetic nitrogen products, fats and oils, sulfur and sulfuric acid, phosphorous and phosphates, wood products, and sweeteners. The chapter on coal is entitled: coal technology for power, liquid fuels and chemicals. 100 ills.

  13. ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Randy M; Gross, Ian G; Smith, Cyrus M; Hill, David E

    2011-11-01

    Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor

  14. EDITORIAL: Special issue featuring articles arising from the 11th High-Tech Plasma Processes Conference Special issue featuring articles arising from the 11th High-Tech Plasma Processes Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Peter; Degrez, Gérard; Delplancke, Marie-Paule; Gleizes, Alain

    2011-05-01

    The 11th High-Tech Plasma Processes Conference (HTPP) was held in Brussels, Belgium, 27 June-2 July, 2010. HTPP started as a thermal plasma conference and gradually expanded to include low-temperature plasmas. The conference was founded by Jacques Amouroux and Pierre Fauchais, and aims to bring together different scientific communities to facilitate contacts between science, technology and industry, providing a platform for the exploration of elementary processes and applications in and by plasmas. The first HTPP was held in Odeillo, France, in 1990. Since then it has been held every other year in different European cities: Paris, Aachen, Athens, Strasbourg, Saint-Petersburg, Patras and Brussels. The 11th HTPP conference was attended by 125 participants from 19 countries. The program involved 14 invited talks, 34 contributed talks, 72 posters and a software demonstration and hands-on session for plasma modelling. The 12th HTPP conference will be held 24-28 June 2012, in Bologna, Italy. A larger part of the contributions to the 11th HTPP has been published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS) volume 275, 2011. All invited speakers and other contributors, as selected by the Steering, Scientific and Organizing Committee, were invited to submit a paper based on their contributions for this special issue which is peer reviewed by the journal. Both this special issue and the JPCS volume aim to bring the 11th HTPP to a wider audience. The publications are a nice example of the broad topic range of the conference. The JPCS volume contains papers covering fundamental aspects on radiative processes of thermal plasmas, modelling of thermal arcs and non-thermal RF plasma jets, plasma diagnostics including flow and heat flux measurements of thermal plasmas, radical density measurements and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. The applications-oriented contributions of the JPCS volume include plasma spraying, synthesis of (nano-sized) materials, surface

  15. 11th International Conference on Large Scale Applications and Radiation Hardness of Semiconductor Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The primary goal of the Conference is to review the present status of the Semiconductor Detector apparatuses in the field of High Energy or Astroparticle Physics. In both cases the requests on the detector systems are very demanding: very large instrumented surface, radiation hardness and high reliability. Part of the talks will be devoted to describe the pixel and microstrip silicon-based detectors presently operated at the LHC experiments. The operational experience and the detector performance with the p-p runs 2009-2012 will be discussed. Another fraction of the talks will be devoted to plans for upgrading the LHC tracker detectors for the next runs of the LHC and on strategies for future high luminosity upgrades of the LHC. Studies on radiation hardness of silicon materials, diamond-based detectors, innovative solutions for optical links and power device components will be reported. The astroparticle detectors activity will also be reviewed. Semiconductor applications in different fields, like medical imaging, radioactive monitoring and one quantum-physics experiment will be rapidly touched.

  16. Enhanced capture of healthcare-related harms and injuries in the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11).

    PubMed

    Southern, Danielle A; Pincus, Harold A; Romano, Patrick S; Burnand, Bernard; Harrison, James; Forster, Alan J; Moskal, Lori; Quan, Hude; Droesler, Saskia E; Sundararajan, Vijaya; Colin, Cyrille; Gurevich, Yana; Brien, Susan E; Kostanjsek, Nenad; Üstün, Bedirhan; Ghali, William A

    2016-02-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) plans to submit the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) to the World Health Assembly in 2018. The WHO is working toward a revised classification system that has an enhanced ability to capture health concepts in a manner that reflects current scientific evidence and that is compatible with contemporary information systems. In this paper, we present recommendations made to the WHO by the ICD revision's Quality and Safety Topic Advisory Group (Q&S TAG) for a new conceptual approach to capturing healthcare-related harms and injuries in ICD-coded data. The Q&S TAG has grouped causes of healthcare-related harm and injuries into four categories that relate to the source of the event: (a) medications and substances, (b) procedures, (c) devices and (d) other aspects of care. Under the proposed multiple coding approach, one of these sources of harm must be coded as part of a cluster of three codes to depict, respectively, a healthcare activity as a 'source' of harm, a 'mode or mechanism' of harm and a consequence of the event summarized by these codes (i.e. injury or harm). Use of this framework depends on the implementation of a new and potentially powerful code-clustering mechanism in ICD-11. This new framework for coding healthcare-related harm has great potential to improve the clinical detail of adverse event descriptions, and the overall quality of coded health data.

  17. Registration error study of digital watt-hour meters under distorted conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reta-Hernandez, Manuel

    The increasing application of non-linear loads based on the use of converters, uninterruptible power supplies, and other solid-state switching devices has increased the harmonic content in voltage and current at metering points. One of many problems caused by the voltage and current distortion is the effect on the watt-hour meter performance. The digital watt-hour meter is replacing the old induction meter for measuring electric energy, obtaining additional flexibility and functionality. However, the digital meter performance can be deeply affected when a dc current component is added to the distorted conditions. This dissertation presents a study of the digital watt-hour meter's performance under different nonsinusoidal conditions, including a dc current component. The work is divided into two sections: experimental and analytical. The experimental section consists of accuracy testing on several models of digital meters, both single-phase and three-phase units, subjected to computer-controlled distortion. The system setup used for the measurements was designed by using 12-bits data acquisition hardware (DAQ) and virtual-instrument software (VI) installed in a personal computer. Additional testing on electromechanical watt-hour meters is included for comparison purposes.

  18. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Fridley, David

    2007-07-01

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target for energy-efficiency improvement: energy intensity of the country's gross domestic product (GDP) should be reduced by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). This is the first time that a quantitative and binding target has been set for energy efficiency, and signals a major shift in China's strategic thinking about its long-term economic and energy development. The 20% energy intensity target also translates into an annual reduction of over 1.5 billion tons of CO2 by 2010, making the Chinese effort one of most significant carbon mitigation effort in the world today. While it is still too early to tell whether China will achieve this target, this paper attempts to understand the trend in energy intensity in China and to explore a variety of options toward meeting the 20% target using a detailed end-use energy model.

  19. Taking out one billion tones of carbon: the magic of China's 11thFive-Year Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiang; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark D.; Fridley, David

    2007-05-01

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious targetfor energy-efficiency improvement: energy intensity of the country sgross domestic product (GDP) should be reduced by 20 percent from 2005 to2010 (NDRC, 2006). This is the first time that a quantitative and bindingtarget has been set for energy efficiency, and signals a major shift inChina's strategic thinking about its long-term economic and energydevelopment. The 20 percent energy intensity target also translates intoan annual reduction of over one billion tons of CO2 by 2010, making theChinese effort one of most significant carbon mitigation effort in theworld today. While it is still too early to tell whether China willachieve this target, this paper attempts to understand the trend inenergy intensity in China and to explore a variety of options towardmeeting the 20 percent target using a detailed endues energymodel.

  20. Rapid Economic Growth and Natural Gas Consumption Nexus: Looking forward from Perspective of 11th Malaysian Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekhet, H. A.; Yasmin, T.

    2016-03-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between economic growth and energy consumption by incorporating CO2 emissions, natural gas consumption and population in Malaysia. Annual data and F-bound test and granger causality have applied to test the existence of long run relationship between the series. The results show that variables are cointegrated for long run relationship. The results also indicate that natural gas consumption is an important contributing factor to energy demand and hence economic growth in case of Malaysia. The causality analysis highlights that the feedback hypothesis exists between economic growth and energy consumption. While, conservative hypothesis is validated between natural gas consumption and economic growth which implies that economic growth will push natural gas consumption policies in future. This study opens up new direction for policy makers to formulate a comprehensive natural gas policy to sustain environment for long span of time in case to achieve 11th MP targets.

  1. ROAD BRIDGES IN MINAMI-SANRIKU WASHED AWAY IN THE MARCH 11th 2011 GREAT EAST JAPAN EARTHQUAKE AND TSUNAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglipay, Mary Roxanne I.; Konagai, Kazuo; Kyokawa, Hiroyuki; Keshab, Sharma

    On March 11th, 2011, Minami-Sanriku, located in the northeastern coast of Japan was severely inundated by the tsunami that followed the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011. Road bridges near the coastlines in this area have been extensively damaged with their decks being overturned or carried over long distances. An attempt was made to deduce as rational scenarios as possible before remaining debris was cleaned up. Though the reasons for the washout of bridges can be many and complex, it is to be noted that bridge decks have hollows for the optimum light-weight solution, which fact eventually allowed the bridge decks to be carried over remarkable distances. Poor connection details and cavities, hollows between deck beams, are considered to have facilitated overturning due to uplift forces.

  2. 60-watt isotopic heat source for terrestrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brittain, Wayne M.

    1995-01-01

    A sealed isotopic heat source (IHS) with a nominal thermal inventory of 60 watts is being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for use in remote terrestrial applications that require isotopic power for electrical power generation. Emphasis is on use in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and dynamic cycle power units. The selected IHS design incorporates technologies developed for prior space and terrestrial IHSs to minimize development cost and span time. A General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) Fueled Clad (FC), comprised of a plutonium-238 enriched pressed-plutonia pellet contained within a vented iridium clad, is the source for thermal energy. The GPHS FC technology was developed by DOE for use in space RTGs. The GPHS FC is, in turn, enclosed within a three-layer cladding system similar to that developed by DOE for earlier terrestrial heat sources. The cladding system provides for retention of the helium gas generated by the decay of the isotopic fuel and containment of the isotopic fuel under normal operating and accident conditions. Test hardware is currently being fabricated and safety demonstration testing is scheduled to be completed in early 1995.

  3. Multi-Watt Small Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Conceptual Design Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Determan, William R.; Otting, William; Frye, Patrick; Abelson, Robert; Ewell, Richard; Miyake, Bob; Synder, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    A need has been identified for a small, light-weight, reliable power source using a radioisotope heat source, to power the next generation of NASA's small surface rovers and exploration probes. Unit performance, development costs, and technical risk are key criteria to be used to select the best design approach. Because safety can be a major program cost and schedule driver, RTG designs should utilize the DOE radioisotope safety program's data base to the maximum extent possible. Other aspects important to the conceptual design include: 1) a multi-mission capable design for atmospheric and vacuum environments, 2) a module size based on one GPHS Step 2 module, 3) use of flight proven thermoelectric converter technologies, 4) a long service lifetime of up to 14 years, 5) maximize unit specific power consistent with all other requirements, and 6) be ready by 2013. Another critical aspect of the design is the thermal integration of the RTG with the rover or probe's heat rejection subsystem and the descent vehicle's heat rejection subsystem. This paper describes two multi-watt RTG design concepts and their integration with a MER-class rover.

  4. 47 CFR 95.855 - Transmitter effective radiated power limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Transmitter effective radiated power limitation. The effective radiated power (ERP) of each CTS and RTU shall... with an ERP exceeding 20 watts. No mobile RTU may transmit with an ERP exceeding 4 watts....

  5. Monolithic watt-level millimeter-wave diode-grid frequency tripler array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwu, R. J.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Rutledge, D. B.; Hancock, B.; Lieneweg, U.

    1988-01-01

    In order to provide watt-level CW output power throughout the millimeter and submillimeter wave region, thousands of solid-state diodes have been monolithically integrated using a metal grid to produce a highly efficient frequency multiplier. Devices considered include GaAs Schottky diodes, thin MOS diodes, and GaAs Barrier-Intrinsic-N(+)diodes. The performance of the present compact low-cost device has been theoretically and experimentally validated.

  6. Thermal vacuum tests of a five watt pseudo chip in a SEM-X electronic module clamped in a satellite box

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, W.H.; Akau, R.L.

    1995-09-01

    A five watt pseudo chip in the middle of a SEM-X circuit card was tested with various heat conduction paths in a satellite type electronic box while mounted in a vacuum chamber. Previous tests showed low temperature differentials with the use of circuit board clamps. Flight hardware with thin box walls, low mass module frames, and thin heat covers were tested to determine the temperature differential at 5.0 watts as well as at lower powers. The smallest temperature differential was 23 degrees Celsius between the 5 watt pseudo chip and the cold plate.

  7. Using Guided Notes to Increase the Understanding of Anatomy and Physiology in 11th Grade Science Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariano, Jay

    A survey of over 500 science teachers reported that two thirds of their science classes were lecture based lessons where students were required to listen and take notes (Boyle, 2010). In addition to taking notes from lectures, note taking is a necessary skill to possess to record scientific observations and procedures and record information during class. Guided notes is a pedagogical method in which the instructor prepares and provides students with a modified form of lecture information to guide students (Neef, McCord, & Ferreri, 2006). This study examined the extent to which the use of guided notes in a unit of study of the muscular system of anatomy and physiology positively affected the mastery on content-based assessments for 11 th grade students. The data collection methods included quiz and test scores, a 4-point Likert scale survey, and an open-ended questionnaire. Results of the data revealed that guided notes was one factor that led to mastery in learning content. Additionally, students in this study preferred this method as it helped them to distinguish relevant information allowing more time to listen and focus on the teacher.

  8. Unfolding the complexities of ER chaperones in health and disease: report on the 11th international calreticulin workshop.

    PubMed

    Gold, Leslie; Williams, David; Groenendyk, Jody; Michalak, Marek; Eggleton, Paul

    2015-11-01

    The 11th International Calreticulin workshop was held May 15-18, 2015 at New York University School of Medicine-Langone Medical Center, New York. The meeting highlighted many of the new discoveries in the past 2 years involving the important role of molecular chaperones in physiological and pathological processes. Crucial to the understanding of these disease processes was the role of chaperones in maintaining quality control of protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum, the importance of Ca(2) regulation acting through its action in stress-related diseases, and the trafficking of glycoproteins to the cell surface. Central to maintaining healthy cell physiology is the correct ER-associated protein degradation of specific misfolded proteins. Information on different mechanisms involved in the degradation of misfolded proteins was revealed. This was a landmark meeting for the chaperone field in terms of new insights into their roles in physiology. These insights included the unfolded protein response, innate/adaptive immunity, tissue repair, the functions of calreticulin/chaperones from the cell surface, and extracellular environment. Diseases included neurodegenerative disorders, prion disease, autoimmunity, fibrosis-related disease, the host immune response to cancer, and hematologic diseases associated with calreticulin mutations. The 12th calreticulin workshop is planned for the spring of 2017 in Delphi, Greece. PMID:26395641

  9. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; Mcneil, Michael; Levine, Mark

    2011-03-01

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target to reduce the energy intensity per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). In the building sector, the primary energy-saving target allocated during the 11 FYP period is 100 Mtce. Savings are expected to be achieved through the strengthening of enforcement of building energy efficiency codes, existing building retrofits and heat supply system reform, followed by energy management of government office buildings and large scale public buildings, adoption of renewable energy sources. To date, China has reported that it achieved the half of the 20% intensity reduction target by the end of 2008, however, little has been made clear on the status and the impact of the building programs. There has also been lack of description on methodology for calculating the savings and baseline definition, and no total savings that have been officially reported to date. This paper intends to provide both quantitative and qualitative assessment of the key policies and programs in building sector that China has instituted in its quest to fulfill the national goal. Overall, this paper concludes that the largest improvement for building energy efficiency were achieved in new buildings; the program to improve the energy management in government and large scale public buildings are in line with the target; however the progress in the area of existing building retrofits, particularly heating supply system reform lags behind the stated goal by a large amount.

  10. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael; Levine, Mark

    2010-06-07

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target to reduce the energy intensity per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). In the building sector, the primary energy-saving target allocated during the 11 FYP period is 100 Mtce. Savings are expected to be achieved through the strengthening of enforcement of building energy efficiency codes, existing building retrofits and heat supply system reform, followed by energy management of government office buildings and large scale public buildings, adoption of renewable energy sources. To date, China has reported that it achieved the half of the 20% intensity reduction target by the end of 2008, however, little has been made clear on the status and the impact of the building programs. There has also been lack of description on methodology for calculating the savings and baseline definition, and no total savings that have been officially reported to date. This paper intend to provide both quantitative and qualitative assessment of the key policies and programs in building sector that China has instituted in its quest to fulfill the national goal. Overall, this paper concludes that the largest improvement for building energy efficiency were achieved in new buildings; the program to improve the energy management in government and large scale public buildings are in line with the target; however the progress in the area of existing building retrofit particularly heat supply system reform lags the stated goal by a large amount.

  11. Increased use of cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana among Manhattan, New York, residents after the September 11th terrorist attacks.

    PubMed

    Vlahov, David; Galea, Sandro; Resnick, Heidi; Ahern, Jennifer; Boscarino, Joseph A; Bucuvalas, Michael; Gold, Joel; Kilpatrick, Dean

    2002-06-01

    The September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks were the largest human-made disaster in the United States since the Civil War. Studies after earlier disasters have reported rates of psychological disorders in the acute postdisaster period. However, data on postdisaster increases in substance use are sparse. A random digit dial telephone survey was conducted to estimate the prevalence of increased cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and marijuana use among residents of Manhattan, New York City, 5-8 weeks after the attacks. Among 988 persons included, 28.8% reported an increase in use of any of these three substances, 9.7% reported an increase in smoking, 24.6% reported an increase in alcohol consumption, and 3.2% reported an increase in marijuana use. Persons who increased smoking of cigarettes and marijuana were more likely to experience posttraumatic stress disorder than were those who did not (24.2% vs. 5.6% posttraumatic stress disorder for cigarettes; 36.0% vs. 6.6% for marijuana). Depression was more common among those who increased than for those who did not increase cigarette smoking (22.1 vs. 8.2%), alcohol consumption (15.5 vs. 8.3%), and marijuana smoking (22.3 vs. 9.4%). The results of this study suggest a substantial increase in substance use in the acute postdisaster period after the September 11th attacks. Increase in use of different substances may be associated with the presence of different comorbid psychiatric conditions.

  12. Physical activity participation by parental language use in 4th, 8th, and 11th grade students in Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Springer, Andrew E; Lewis, Kayan; Kelder, Steven H; Fernandez, Maria E; Barroso, Cristina S; Hoelscher, Deanna M

    2010-10-01

    Research on physical activity (PA) by level of acculturation in Hispanic children is limited and findings have been mixed. We examined PA participation by primary language used with parents in a representative sample of 4th, 8th, and 11th grade Texas public school students. Mixed-effects regression models were conducted using cross-sectional data from the 2004-2005 School Physical Activity and Nutrition Study (n = 22,049). Self-reported PA was compared among three language-ethnic groups: Spanish-Hispanic (SH) (referent); English-Hispanic (EH); and English-Other (EO). EH and/or EO girls were generally between 1.25 and 2.58 [OR] times more likely to participate in PA across grade levels, with the largest differences found for school sports in 8th grade girls. EH and EO 8th grade boys were 1.71 (CI: 1.40, 2.10) and 2.06 (CI: 1.68, 2.51) times, respectively, more likely to participate in school sports. Findings indicate important disparities in Spanish-speaking Hispanic children's PA participation. PMID:19365728

  13. Personalized integrative oncology: targeted approaches for optimal outcomes: the 11th International Conference of the Society for Integrative Oncology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Richard T; Yang, Peiying; Greenlee, Heather; Bauer-Wu, Susan; Balneaves, Lynda G; Zick, Suzanna

    2015-01-01

    The 11th International Conference of the Society for Integrative Oncology (SIO) brought together more than 300 clinicians, researchers, patients, and advocates to hear and interact with world-leading experts about the latest research in the areas of nutrition, exercise, acupuncture, health services research, meditation, and other integrative disciplines. The conference theme, "Personalized Integrative Oncology: Targeted Approaches for Optimal Outcomes," highlighted innovations in personalized medicine and ways this growing field will advance the evolution of individualized integrative cancer care to the next level. This year's conference also featured a clinical track focusing on clinical information for the practicing health care professional. The conference's rigorous schedule included 3 keynotes, 4 plenary sessions, 2 interdisciplinary tumor boards, 5 workshops, 45 concurrent oral sessions, and 106 posters. In addition to the conference theme, keynote and plenary sessions presented topics on stress and cancer, the importance of sleep for cancer patients, epigenetic mechanisms of lifestyle and natural products, recently published Journal of the National Cancer Institute monograph on integrative oncology, SIO's clinical practice guidelines for breast cancer survivors, and a joint session of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine and SIO about supportive care and symptom management. This highly successful conference helped further the mission of the SIO to advance evidence-based, comprehensive, integrative health care to improve the lives of people affected by cancer.

  14. Stable 1.25 watts CW far infrared laser radiation at the 119 micron methanol line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam; Pickett, Herbert M.

    1987-01-01

    Far-infrared CW radiation of 1.25 watts has been obtained at the 119 micron methanol line with a CO2 pump power of 125 watts, and the maximum frequency fluctuation of the free running laser is measured to be less than + or - 100 kHz per hour. Reflecting optics have been used, when possible, to minimize CO2 degradation, and the frequency stability is ensured by cooling the input and output couplers. The input and output assemblies within the lasing medium are enclosed to minimize the external effects on the cavity length and to eliminate the mechanical instabilities associated with the use of bellows. The vibrational bottle-neck is broken by cooling the resonator wall to 5 deg and adding He as the buffer gas.

  15. Proceedings of the International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in Digital Age (CELDA) (11th, Porto, Portugal, October 25-27, 2014)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Demetrios G., Ed.; Spector, J. Michael, Ed.; Ifenthaler, Dirk, Ed.; Isaias, Pedro, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers of the 11th International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age (CELDA 2014), October 25-27, 2014, which has been organized by the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) and endorsed by the Japanese Society for Information and Systems in…

  16. Post-September 11Th Perspectives on Religion, Spirituality, and Philosophy in the Personal and Professional Lives of Selected Rebt Cognoscenti: A Response to My Colleagues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Albert

    2004-01-01

    This is a discussion and evaluation of the views of the authors of the article "Post-September 11th Perspectives on Religion, Spirituality, and Philosophy in the Personal and Professional Lives of Selected REBT Cognoscenti." Several of the authors are shown to endorse most of the main principles and practices of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy…

  17. Post-September 11Th Perspectives on Religion, Spirituality, and Philosophy in the Personal and Professional Lives of Selected REBT Cognoscenti

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinrach, Stephen G.; Dryden, Windy; DiMattia, Dominic J.; Doyle, Kristene A.; MacLaren, Catherine; O'Kelly, Monica; Malkinson, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article was for selected Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) cognoscenti to examine the impact of the events of September 11th, 2001, on their beliefs about religion, spirituality and their personal philosophy--including the role of evil in the universe and the implications of these issues on their use of REBT. The degree…

  18. Proceedings of the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) International Conference on Mobile Learning (11th, Madeira, Portugal, March 14-16, 2015)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sánchez, Inmaculada Arnedillo, Ed.; Isaías, Pedro, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers and posters of the 11th International Conference on Mobile Learning 2015, which was organised by the International Association for Development of the Information Society, in Madeira, Portugal, March 14-16, 2015. The Mobile Learning 2015 Conference seeks to provide a forum for the presentation and discussion of…

  19. Relationships among Four Learner Variables and the Performance of Selected Jamaican 11th-Graders on Some Structured Questions on the Mole Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis-Hall, Nadine; Soyibo, Kola

    2004-01-01

    This study sought to find out if (a) the performance of 113 Jamaican 11th-graders on a mole concept test was satisfactory or not; (b) there were significant differences in their performance linked to their chemical and mathematical abilities, gender and socioeconomic background (SEB); and, (c) there were significant relationships among the four…

  20. Correlations among Five Demographic Variables and the Performance of Selected Jamaican 11th-Graders on Some Numerical Problems on Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emepue, Nicholas; Soyibo, Kola

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to assess whether the level of performance of selected Jamaican 11th-grade physics students on some numerical problems on the energy concept was satisfactory and if there were significant differences in their performance linked to their gender, socioeconomic background (SEB), school location, English language and…

  1. The Advanced Program of Vocational Agriculture in Louisiana. Ag III and Ag IV (11th and 12th Grades). Volume II. Bulletin No. 1725.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide consists of materials for use in teaching an advanced course in agricultural mechanics designed for 11th and 12th grade students. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are arc welding; oxy-acetylene welding; soldering; electricity; tractor maintenance, operation, and safety; small engines; farm structures; and cold…

  2. PREFACE: 11th International Spring Seminar on Nuclear Physics: Shell Model and Nuclear Structure - achievements of the past two decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-02-01

    The 11th International Seminar on Nuclear Physics was held in Ischia from May 12 to May 16, 2014. This Seminar was dedicated to Aldo Covello, who has been the promoter of this series of meetings, which started in Sorrento in 1986 and continued with meetings held every two or three years in the Naples area. Aldo's idea was to offer to a group of researchers, actively working in selected fields of Nuclear Physics, the opportunity to confront their points of view in a lively and informal way. The choice for the period of the year, Spring, as well as the sites chosen reflected this intent. The first meeting was of a purely theoretical nature, but it was immediately clear that the scope of these conferences needed to be enlarged calling into play the experimental community. Then, starting from the second meeting, all the following ones have been characterized by fruitful discussion between theoretical and experimental researchers on current achievements and future developments of nuclear structure. This may be read, in fact, as one of the motivating factors for Aldo's election as Fellow of the American Physical Society in 2008 "... for his outstanding contributions to the international nuclear physics community by providing, for over two decades, a venue for theorists and experimentalists to share their latest ideas." The present meeting, organized by Aldo's former students and with the benefit of his suggestions, has maintained this tradition. The title "Shell model and nuclear structure: achievements of the past two decades" recalls that of the 2nd International Spring Seminar "Shell Model and Nuclear Structure: where do we stand?". The main aim of this 11th Seminar was, in fact, to discuss the changes of the past two decades on our view of nuclei in terms of shell structure as well as the perspectives of the shell model, which has been one of the key points in Aldo's research. This point is well accounted by the Opening Speech of Igal Talmi, one of the fathers of the

  3. Utilization of mental health services following the September 11th terrorist attacks in Manhattan, New York City.

    PubMed

    Boscarino, Joseph A; Galea, Sandro; Ahern, Jennifer; Resnick, Heidi; Vlahov, David

    2002-01-01

    To assess mental health utilization in Manhattan following the September 11th terrorist attacks, a random-digit-dial telephone survey was conducted 5 to 8 weeks afterwards, among 988 randomly selected adult householders over 17 years old (females = 52%; whites = 72%; mean age = 42). 16.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 14.4-19.5) of residents reported using mental health services 30 days before the attacks and 19.4% (95% CI = 16.7-22.2) reported using these services 30 days afterwards (pre/post NcMemar's chi2 = 8.0, df = 1, p = 0.005, odds ratio[OR] = 2.0). 10.0% (95% CI = 7.9-12.0) increased mental health utilization 30 days after the attacks, compared to 30 days before and 5.3% (95% CI = 3.7-6.9) decreased utilization. Risk factors associated with increased mental health utilization in multivariate analyses included: being 45-64 years of age (vs. 65+; OR = 8.3, p = 0.011) female gender (OR = 2.3, p = 0.004), experiencing 4+ lifetime traumatic events (vs. none; OR = 3.5, p = 0.002), experiencing 2+ stressful life events in the past 12 months (vs. none; OR = 3.3, p < 0.001), and experiencing an acute panic attack during the disaster (OR = 3.3, p < 0.001). Neither current post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) nor current depression was predictive of increased post-disaster utilization when panic attack was included in the multivariate analysis. While we did find a statistically significant increase in pre- vs. post-disaster utilization among the general population in Manhattan this increase was not substantial, except among specific subgroups, including those who had a perievent panic attack, among those exposed to previous stressors, among women, and among those less than 65 years old.

  4. A 200 watt traveling wave-tube for the communications technology satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    The results of the design, development, and test of experimental and production units of PPM focused traveling wave tube that produces 225 watts of CW RF power over 85 MHz centered at 12.080 GHz are presented. The tube uses a coupled cavity RF circuit with a velocity taper for greater than 26 percent basic efficiency. Overall efficiency of 50 percent is achieved by the incorporation of a multistage depressed collector designed at NASA Lewis Research Center. The collector is cooled by direct radiation to deep space. The tube was designed to be used for broadcasting power transmission from a satellite.

  5. Towards ten-watt-level 3-5 µm Raman lasers using tellurite fiber.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Gongwen; Geng, Lixiang; Zhu, Xiushan; Li, Li; Chen, Qian; Norwood, R A; Manzur, T; Peyghambarian, N

    2015-03-23

    Raman lasers based on mid-infrared fibers operating at 3-5 µm atmospheric transparency window are attractive sources for several applications. Compared to fluoride and chalcogenide fibers, tellurite fibers are more advantageous for high power Raman fiber laser sources at 3-5 µm because of their broader Raman gain bandwidth, much larger Raman shift and better physical and chemical properties. Here we report on our simulations for the development of 10-watt-level 3-5 µm Raman lasers using tellurite fibers as the nonlinear gain medium and readily available continuous-wave (cw) and Q-switched erbium-doped fluoride fiber lasers at 2.8 µm as the pump sources. Our results show that a watt-level or even ten-watt-level fiber laser source in the 3-5 µm atmospheric transparency window can be achieved by utilizing the 1st- and 2nd-order Raman scattering in the tellurite fiber. The presented numerical study provides valuable guidance for future 3-5 um Raman fiber laser development. PMID:25837094

  6. Feasibility study of a 110 watt per kilogram lightweight solar array system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. F.; Stahle, C. V.; Hanson, K. L.; Schneider, A.; Blomstrom, L. E.; Hansen, W. T.; Kirpich, A.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of a 10,000 watt solar array panel which has a minimum power-to-mass ratio of 110 watt/kg is discussed. The application of this ultralightweight solar array to three possible missions was investigated. With the interplanetary mission as a baseline, the constraining requirements for a geosynchronous mission and for a manned space station mission are presented. A review of existing lightweight solar array system concepts revealed that changes in the system approach are necessary to achieve the specified 110 watt/kg goal. A comprehensive review of existing component technology is presented in the areas of thin solar cells, solar cell covers, welded interconnectors, substrates and deployable booms. Advances in the state-of-the-art of solar cell and deployable boom technology were investigated. System level trade studies required to select the optimum boom bending stiffness, system aspect ratio, bus voltage level, and solar cell circuit arrangement are reported. Design analysis tasks included the thermal analysis of the solar cell blanket, thermal stress analysis of the solar cell interconnectors/substrate, and the thermostructural loading of the deployed boom.

  7. 47 CFR 73.840 - Operating power and mode tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ten watts must be maintained as near as practicable to its authorized TPO and may not be less than 90... authorized TPO of ten watts or less may operate with less than the authorized power, but not more than...

  8. 47 CFR 73.840 - Operating power and mode tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ten watts must be maintained as near as practicable to its authorized TPO and may not be less than 90... authorized TPO of ten watts or less may operate with less than the authorized power, but not more than...

  9. Automating Visualization Service Generation with the WATT Compiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollig, E. F.; Lyness, M. D.; Erlebacher, G.; Yuen, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    As tasks and workflows become increasingly complex, software developers are devoting increasing attention to automation tools. Among many examples, the Automator tool from Apple collects components of a workflow into a single script, with very little effort on the part of the user. Tasks are most often described as a series of instructions. The granularity of the tasks dictates the tools to use. Compilers translate fine-grained instructions to assembler code, while scripting languages (ruby, perl) are used to describe a series of tasks at a higher level. Compilers can also be viewed as transformational tools: a cross-compiler can translate executable code written on one computer to assembler code understood on another, while transformational tools can translate from one high-level language to another. We are interested in creating visualization web services automatically, starting from stand-alone VTK (Visualization Toolkit) code written in Tcl. To this end, using the OCaml programming language, we have developed a compiler that translates Tcl into C++, including all the stubs, classes and methods to interface with gSOAP, a C++ implementation of the Soap 1.1/1.2 protocols. This compiler, referred to as the Web Automation and Translation Toolkit (WATT), is the first step towards automated creation of specialized visualization web services without input from the user. The WATT compiler seeks to automate all aspects of web service generation, including the transport layer, the division of labor and the details related to interface generation. The WATT compiler is part of ongoing efforts within the NSF funded VLab consortium [1] to facilitate and automate time-consuming tasks for the science related to understanding planetary materials. Through examples of services produced by WATT for the VLab portal, we will illustrate features, limitations and the improvements necessary to achieve the ultimate goal of complete and transparent automation in the generation of web

  10. STI. DE-FG02-00ER1505 [Brief summary of 11th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research

    SciTech Connect

    2000-06-24

    The 11th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research was held in Madison, Wisconsin, June 24 through June 28, 2000. Arabidopsis thaliana has been the subject of genetic study for many years. However, during the last decade, the number of research laboratories using Arabidopsis as a model system has increased tremendously, and Arabidopsis is currently being used to study all aspects of plant biology. The rapid rate of progress in Arabidopsis research, including the completion of the genomic sequence, underscores the usefulness of holding a meeting every year. These conferences provide an important opportunity for the Arabidopsis community to interact and exchange information. The meeting opened with an evening keynote address on the global impact of plant biology, delivered by Richard Jefferson, the Executive Director of CAMBIA (Center for the Application of Molecular Biology to International Agriculture). This was followed by short updates from each of the NSF-funded Plant Genome groups. Many of these groups are carrying out projects that impact the Arabidopsis community. Each of the 17 platform sessions consisted of talks from two invited speakers followed by two short talks that were chosen from the submitted poster abstracts. A concerted effort was made to invite junior investigators, including graduate students and postdocs, to give these talks. Posters were available for viewing during three formal sessions, and, because the poster session was adjacent to the lecture hall, it was easy for participants to go back and forth between posters and lectures. Finally, a mixer and an informal banquet provided opportunities for participants to meet new people and renew acquaintances. Furthermore, the registration package included all lunches and dinners together in a cafeteria next to the posters and lecture hall, thus encouraging the meeting of established investigators with students and postdocs. The North American Arabidopsis Steering Committee (elected by

  11. Sub-microWatt threshold nanoisland lasers

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hoon; Karnadi, Indra; Pramudita, Putu; Song, Jung-Hwan; Soo Kim, Ki; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Ultralow threshold nanolasers have been sought after as power efficient light sources in photonic integrated circuits. Here a single-cell nanobeam laser with a nanoisland quantum well is proposed and demonstrated. Continuous operation at 1.5 μm is achieved at room temperature with an ultralow lasing threshold of 210 nW in absorbed power. The size of the active medium is reduced to 0.7 × 0.25 × 0.02 μm3 by removing the absorptive quantum well region surrounding the central cavity. Relatively thick (420 nm) InP slabs are employed to improve the thermal and mechanical characteristics. The nanoisland-based structures will provide a new platform to engineer fundamental light–matter interactions by controlling the size and the location of the nanoemitters, allowing the realization of highly efficient nanophotonic devices. PMID:26391800

  12. Sub-microWatt threshold nanoisland lasers.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hoon; Karnadi, Indra; Pramudita, Putu; Song, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Ki Soo; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Ultralow threshold nanolasers have been sought after as power efficient light sources in photonic integrated circuits. Here a single-cell nanobeam laser with a nanoisland quantum well is proposed and demonstrated. Continuous operation at 1.5 μm is achieved at room temperature with an ultralow lasing threshold of 210 nW in absorbed power. The size of the active medium is reduced to 0.7 × 0.25 × 0.02 μm(3) by removing the absorptive quantum well region surrounding the central cavity. Relatively thick (420 nm) InP slabs are employed to improve the thermal and mechanical characteristics. The nanoisland-based structures will provide a new platform to engineer fundamental light-matter interactions by controlling the size and the location of the nanoemitters, allowing the realization of highly efficient nanophotonic devices. PMID:26391800

  13. A Simple Watt Balance for the Absolute Determination of Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Terry; Quinn, Lucas; Davis, Richard

    2013-01-01

    A watt balance is an electromechanical device that allows a mass to be determined in terms of measurable electrical and mechanical quantities, themselves traceable to the fundamental constants of physics. International plans are well advanced to redefine the unit of mass, the kilogram, in terms of a fixed numerical value for the Planck constant. A…

  14. An Interview with Toni Watt, 2004 Award Winner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Toni Austin Watt, the winner of the 2004 James Bryant Conant Award in High School Chemistry Teaching says that she was always an average student and had to invest more time in improving her skills and getting experiences, thus she is exhilarated that her efforts have received such acclaim and is honored that people thought her efforts were…

  15. Fishery status assessment of Watts Bar Reservoir with management recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, C.M.

    1987-09-01

    Watts Bar Reservior was impounded in 1942 and has been inventoried 16 of the following 44 years. The previous inventory was 1980. Fish biomass has increased over the years, most noticeably in prey and commercial species. Sport fish biomass has been the most stable overall. However, creel data indicate some important sport species numbers have had extreme fluctuations. 21 refs., 20 figs., 9 tabs.

  16. Early performance of the 12-GHz, 200-watt transmitter experiment package in the communications technology satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Measured performance characteristics of the transmitter experiment package (TEP) aboard the Communications Technology Satellite for the first 90 operating days in orbit are presented. The TEP consists of a nominal 200-watt output stage tube (OST), a supporting power processing system (PPS), and a variable-conductance heat pipe system (VCHPS). The OST, a traveling-wave tube augmented with a 10-stage depressed collector, has an overall saturated average efficiency of 51.5 percent and an average saturated radiofrequency (RF) output power at center-band frequency of 240 watts. The PPS operated with a measured efficiency of 86.5 percent to 88.5 percent. The VCHPS, using three pipes to conduct heat from the PPS and the body of the OST to a 52-centimeter by 124-centimeter (20.5-in. by 48.75-in.) radiator fin, maintained by the PPS baseplate temperature below 50 C for all operating conditions. The TEP performance characteristics presented include frequency response, RF output power, efficiency, and distortions. Communications characteristics were evaluated by using both video and audio modulated signals.

  17. 70-Watt green laser with near diffraction-limited beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dan; Eisenberg, Eric; Madasamy, Pratheepan; Mead, Roy; Honea, Eric

    2009-02-01

    A 70-Watt green laser with M2<1.4 has been demonstrated. This green laser consists of an all-fiber-based IR pump laser at 1064 nm and a frequency-conversion module in a compact and flexible configuration. The IR laser produces up to 150 Watts in a polarized diffraction-limited output beam with high spectral brightness for frequency conversion. The IR laser is operating under QCW mode, e.g. 10 MHz with 3~5 ns pulse width or 700 MHz with 50 ps pulse width, to generate sufficient peak power for frequency doubling in the converter module. The IR laser and conversion module are connected via a 5-mm stainless-steel protected delivery fiber for optical beam delivery and an electrical cable harness for electrical power delivery and system control. Both the IR laser and converter module are run through embedded software that controls laser operations such as warm up and shut down. System overview and full characterization results will be presented. Such a high power green laser with near diffraction-limited output in a compact configuration will enable various scientific as well as industrial applications.

  18. Initial clinical results of laser prostatectomy procedure for symptomatic BPH using a new 50-watt diode laser (wavelength 1000 nm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatta, Krishna M.

    1995-05-01

    Lasers have been used for symptomatic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) in both contact and non-contact modes with reported success rates equivalent to that of Transurethral Resection of Prostate (TURP). A new high power diode laser (Phototome), capable of delivering up to 50 watts of 1000 nm wavelength laser power via a 1 mm quartz fiber, was used to treat 15 patients with symptomatic BPH. Five patients had acute retention, 3 had long term catheter (7 - 48 months), and 8 had severe prostatism. Spinal anesthesia was used in 11 patients, and 4 patients had local anesthesia and intravenous sedation. Four quadrant coagulation with an angle firing probe delivering 50 watts of laser power for 60 seconds in one quadrant was used as the core of the treatment in 11 patients, contact vaporization of BPH tissue was performed in one patient using a 4.5 mm ball tip was used in one patient and three patients with bladder neck stenosis had bladder neck incision performed using a 1 mm quartz fiber delivering 30 watts of laser power. A foley catheter was left indwelling and removed after 5 - 7 days. All patients except one were catheter free after a mean of 8 days. One patient continued to have severe prostatism and had a TURP performed with good results after 3 months of his laser prostatectomy procedure. AUA symptom scores available in 11 patients was found to be 4 after 1 - 3 months of the initial procedure.

  19. Performance of the 12GHz, 200 watt transmitter experiment package for the Hermes satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexovich, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Performance characteristics from on-orbit tests of the Transmitter Experiment Package (TEP) for the Hermes Satellite are presented. The TEP consists of a Power Processing System (PPS), an Output Stage Tube (OST) and a Variable Conductance Heat Pipe System (VCHPS), all of which are described. The OST is a coupled-cavity Traveling Wave Tube (TWT) with a Multistage Depressed Collector (MDC) and a stepped velocity-tapered slow wave structure for efficiency enhancement. It has an RF output power of 233 watts and overall efficiency of 50.75 percent at a center band frequency of 12.080 GHz. The PPS provides the required operating voltages, regulation, control and protection for the OST. The VCHPS consists of a fin radiator and three dual-artery stainless steel heat pipes using methanol and a mixture of inert gases. Test results presented include efficiencies, RF output power and body current. A discussion of thermal anomalies which occurred is presented.

  20. Over 10 Watt, collinear blue and green vertical external cavity surface emitting laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukowski, Michal L.; Hessenius, Chris; Meyer, Jason T.; Fallahi, Mahmoud

    2016-03-01

    A high power, two color, collinear, blue and green vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) is demonstrated. Two different InGaAs/GaAs VECSEL chips operating with gain centers near 970 nm and 1070 nm are used to make two separate V-folded laser cavities. Two critically phase-matched intracavity lithium triborate nonlinear crystals are used to generate blue and green outputs which are then combined in a polarizing beam splitter. This results in a single beam which contains over 10 watts of combined blue and green output power. This concept can be expanded upon by adding a red output for the creation of a high power, white laser source.

  1. Ibn Jazlah and his 11th century accounts (Taqwim al-abdan fi tadbir al-insan) of disease of the brain and spinal cord. Historical vignette.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Ardalan, Mohammad; Oakes, W Jerry

    2008-09-01

    The 11th century was culturally and medicinally one of the most exciting periods in the history of Islam. Medicine of this day was influenced by the Greeks, Indians, Persians, Coptics, and Syriacs. One of the most prolific writers of this period was Ibn Jazlah, who resided in Baghdad in the district of Karkh. Ibn Jazlah made many important observations regarding diseases of the brain and spinal cord. These contributions and a review of the life and times of this early Muslim physician are presented. PMID:18928231

  2. SURFACE RUPTURE OF THE NORMAL SEISMIC FAULTS AND SLOPE FAILURES APPEARED IN APRIL 11th, 2011 FUKUSHIMA-PREFECTURE HAMADOORI EARTHQUAKE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazmi, Zaheer Abbas; Konagai, Kazuo; Kyokawa, Hiroyuki; Tetik, Cigdem

    On April 11th, 2011, Iwaki region of Fukushima prefecture was jolted by Fukushima-Prefecture Hamadoori Earthquake. Surface ruptures were observed along causative Idosawa and Yunotake normal faults. In addition to numerous small slope failures, a coherent landslide and building structures of Tabito Junior High School, bisected by Idosawa Fault, were found along the causative faults. A precise digital elevation model of the coherent landslide was obtained through the ground and air-born LiDAR surveys. The measurements of perimeters of the gymnasium building and the swimming pool of Tabito Junior High School have shown that ground undergoes a slow and steady/continual deformation.

  3. Alignment of the magnetic circuit of the BIPM watt balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielsa, F.; Lu, Y. F.; Lavergne, T.; Kiss, A.; Fang, H.; Stock, M.

    2015-12-01

    The International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM) is developing a watt balance for the forthcoming redefinition of the kilogram. An improved version of the apparatus, based on a new closed magnetic circuit is now being assembled. The new apparatus will significantly reduce the type B uncertainty due to misalignment of the magnetic circuit as this work demonstrates. We present two techniques recently developed to accurately align the magnetic field of the circuit perpendicular to the direction defined by the local acceleration of gravity. Uncertainty below 30 μrad was achieved for both techniques which fulfils the requirements for the BIPM watt balance to enable a Planck constant determination at the 1  ×  10-8 level.

  4. Feasibility study of a 110 watt per kilogram lightweight solar array system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. F.; Stahle, C. V.; Schneider, A.; Hanson, K. L.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of the feasibility of a solar array panel subsystem which will produce 10,000 watts of electrical output at 1 A.U. with an overall beginning-of-life power-to-weight ratio of at least 110 watt/kg is reported. A description of the current baseline configuration which meets these requirements is presented. A parametric analysis of the single boom, two blanket planar solar array system was performed to arrive at the optimum system aspect ratio. A novel concept for the stiffening of a lightweight solar array by canting the solar cell blankets at a small angle to take advantage of the inherent in-plane stiffness to increase the symmetric out-of-plane frequency is introduced along with a preliminary analysis of the stiffening effect. A comparison of welded and soldered solar cell interconnections leads to the conclusion that welding is required on this ultralightweight solar array. The use of a boron/aluminum composite material in a BI-STEM type deployable boom is investigated as a possible advancement in the state-of-the-art.

  5. The watt balance: determination of the Planck constant and redefinition of the kilogram.

    PubMed

    Stock, M

    2011-10-28

    Since 1889, the international prototype of the kilogram has served as the definition of the unit of mass in the International System of Units (SI). It is the last material artefact to define a base unit of the SI, and it influences several other base units. This situation is no longer acceptable in a time of ever-increasing measurement precision. It is therefore planned to redefine the unit of mass by fixing the numerical value of the Planck constant. At the same time three other base units, the ampere, the kelvin and the mole, will be redefined. As a first step, the kilogram redefinition requires a highly accurate determination of the Planck constant in the present SI system, with a relative uncertainty of the order of 1 part in 10(8). The most promising experiment for this purpose, and for the future realization of the kilogram, is the watt balance. It compares mechanical and electrical power and makes use of two macroscopic quantum effects, thus creating a relationship between a macroscopic mass and the Planck constant. In this paper, the operating principle of watt balance experiments is explained and the existing experiments are reviewed. An overview is given of all available experimental determinations of the Planck constant, and it is shown that further investigation is needed before the redefinition of the kilogram can take place. Independent of this requirement, a consensus has been reached on the form that future definitions of the SI base units will take.

  6. Static phase improvements in the LNE watt balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinot, P.; Espel, P.; Liu, Y.; Thomas, M.; Ziane, D.; Palacios-Restrepo, M.-A.; Piquemal, F.

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the mechanical and electrical modifications carried out on the LNE watt balance to reduce the noise level associated with the static phase. The mechanical improvements concern the home-made balance beam using flexure hinges as pivots of the force comparator. The electrical improvements involve the source used to servo-control the equilibrium position of the beam during the static phase. All these modifications have led to a significant improvement of the repeatability and reproducibility of the results of static phase measurements.

  7. [Hygienic assessment of lifestyle and health status in 10th-11th-form pupils directed to have a higher medical education].

    PubMed

    Timoshenko, K T

    2008-01-01

    Ninety-seven pupils from the 10th-to-11th classes formed on a competitive basis for intensive education, for forming motivation for future medical profession were examined using a set of psychophysiological tests that could evaluate the central nervous and cardiovascular systems, psychophysiological adaptation, task performance, and personality traits. The vast majority of the examinees were found to follow the hygienic recommendation of the day regimen, which corresponded to the principles of healthy lifestyle. In 99% of the pupils, mental capacity was rated as fair (66%) and high (33%), as evidenced by psychophysiological testing. Fifty-six per cent of the examinees were observed to have mental adaptive disorders that might reflect age-related psychological immaturity in them at the completing stage of schooling.

  8. [Hygienic assessment of lifestyle and health status in 10th-11th-form pupils directed to have a higher medical education].

    PubMed

    Timoshenko, K T

    2008-01-01

    Ninety-seven pupils from the 10th-to-11th classes formed on a competitive basis for intensive education, for forming motivation for future medical profession were examined using a set of psychophysiological tests that could evaluate the central nervous and cardiovascular systems, psychophysiological adaptation, task performance, and personality traits. The vast majority of the examinees were found to follow the hygienic recommendation of the day regimen, which corresponded to the principles of healthy lifestyle. In 99% of the pupils, mental capacity was rated as fair (66%) and high (33%), as evidenced by psychophysiological testing. Fifty-six per cent of the examinees were observed to have mental adaptive disorders that might reflect age-related psychological immaturity in them at the completing stage of schooling. PMID:19097437

  9. [Review of the proceedings of the 11th Conference of the European Venous Forum (June 24-26, 2010, Antwerp, Belgium)].

    PubMed

    Sapelkin, S B; Bogachev, V Iu

    2010-01-01

    The authors reviewed herein the proceedings of the 11th Conference of the European Venous Forum held under the badge of a more and more significant effect of the positions and principles of evidence-based medicine on the life of the European Phlebological Community. This concerned both the representative reports and special subject lectures dedicated to the statistical analysis in surgery and phlebology, as well as assessment of the remote outcomes of surgical management of venous chronic diseases. Also analysed herein are the materials devoted to the modern minimally invasive techniques aimed at obliterating major veins and used in randomized studies. Presented at the Congress were initial results of employing a novel technique of thermoregulation using steam. Also analysed are the reports concerning interrelationship between phlebology as a science and mass media including the World Wide Web.

  10. Understanding Stress-Related Behavioral Phenotypes: Report from the 1st International Neuroscience Summer School and the 11th International “Stress and Behavior” Conference

    PubMed Central

    LaPorte, J. L.; Klimenko, V. M.; Kalueff, A. V.

    2008-01-01

    The 1st International Neuroscience Summer School and the 11th International Multidisciplinary Neuroscience and Biopsychiatry Conference on Stress and Behavior were held in St. Petersburg, Russia, during May 9–20, 2008. The summer school gathered 30 talented young scientists from 15 countries worldwide, and was dedicated to different topics of behavioral neuroscience. Many interactive courses were provided on neuropharmacology, animal phenotyping, and biopsychology. The conference's excellent scientific and social program attracted almost 500 delegates from 40 countries from many areas of stress research. The eclectic interaction between medical doctors, basic scientists, psychologists, and students made for a productive and collaborative environment, which contributed greatly to the success of the school and conference.

  11. Generation of the 11th order rational harmonic mode-locked pulses with an arbitrary numerator in fiber-ring lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P. H.; Zhan, L.; Gu, Z. C.; Ye, Q. H.; Xia, Y. X.

    2004-08-01

    We report for the first time the generation of 5th, 10th and 11th order rational harmonic mode-locked pulse trains with the numerator of the detuning fraction be an arbitrary integer instead of unity used to date in conventional rational harmonic mode-locked fiber-ring lasers. Results show that the amplitude envelopes of these pulse trains are strongly modulated by some lower order rational harmonic mode locking with numerator equals to unity. This result makes it possible to generate dual- or multiple-pulse train when the detuning of the modulation frequency is close to the half of the cavity frequency. Choosing a proper numerator is also helpful in equalizing the amplitude distribution of the pulse train generated by high order rational harmonic mode locking.

  12. A watt-class 1-THz backward-wave oscillator based on sine waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Xiong; Wei Yanyu; Shen Fei; Yin Hairong; Xu Jin; Gong Yubin; Wang Wenxiang

    2012-01-15

    A novel backward wave oscillator was proposed by utilizing a concise sine waveguide slow-wave structure combined with sheet electron beam to operate at terahertz frequency band. First, the design method was described, and the dispersion curve and interaction impedance of the sine waveguide were calculated, then the device oscillation frequency and operating voltage were determined. Next, the circuit transmission losses were learned over the tunable frequency range. Finally, the particle-in-cell simulation method was applied to predict its signal generation performance. The investigation results show that, the backward wave oscillator can produce over 1.9 -W peak power output at the central operating frequency of 1-THz under 27-kV operating voltage and 5-mA beam current. And the interaction efficiency at 1-THz is more than 1.4% with a circuit length of 7.2-mm. It, therefore, will be considered as a promising watt-class terahertz radiation source.

  13. Watt-level passively Q-switched heavily Er3+-doped ZBLAN fiber laser with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yanlong; Wang, Yishan; Luan, Kunpeng; Huang, Ke; Tao, Mengmeng; Chen, Hongwei; Yi, Aiping; Feng, Guobin; Si, Jinhai

    2016-01-01

    A diode-cladding pumped mid-infrared passively Q-switched Er3+-doped ZBLAN fiber laser with an average output power of watt-level based on a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) is demonstrated. Stable pulse train was produced at a slope efficiency of 17.8% with respect to launched pump power. The maximum average power of 1.01 W at a repetition rate of 146.3 kHz was achieved with a corresponding pulse energy of 6.9 μJ, from which the maximum peak power was calculated to be 21.9 W. To the best of our knowledge, the average power and the peak power are the highest in 3 μm region passively Q-switched fiber lasers. The influence of gain fiber length on the operation regime of the fiber laser has been investigated in detail. PMID:27225029

  14. Watt-level passively Q-switched heavily Er(3+)-doped ZBLAN fiber laser with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yanlong; Wang, Yishan; Luan, Kunpeng; Huang, Ke; Tao, Mengmeng; Chen, Hongwei; Yi, Aiping; Feng, Guobin; Si, Jinhai

    2016-01-01

    A diode-cladding pumped mid-infrared passively Q-switched Er(3+)-doped ZBLAN fiber laser with an average output power of watt-level based on a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) is demonstrated. Stable pulse train was produced at a slope efficiency of 17.8% with respect to launched pump power. The maximum average power of 1.01 W at a repetition rate of 146.3 kHz was achieved with a corresponding pulse energy of 6.9 μJ, from which the maximum peak power was calculated to be 21.9 W. To the best of our knowledge, the average power and the peak power are the highest in 3 μm region passively Q-switched fiber lasers. The influence of gain fiber length on the operation regime of the fiber laser has been investigated in detail. PMID:27225029

  15. Watt-level passively Q-switched heavily Er3+-doped ZBLAN fiber laser with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanlong; Wang, Yishan; Luan, Kunpeng; Huang, Ke; Tao, Mengmeng; Chen, Hongwei; Yi, Aiping; Feng, Guobin; Si, Jinhai

    2016-05-01

    A diode-cladding pumped mid-infrared passively Q-switched Er3+-doped ZBLAN fiber laser with an average output power of watt-level based on a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) is demonstrated. Stable pulse train was produced at a slope efficiency of 17.8% with respect to launched pump power. The maximum average power of 1.01 W at a repetition rate of 146.3 kHz was achieved with a corresponding pulse energy of 6.9 μJ, from which the maximum peak power was calculated to be 21.9 W. To the best of our knowledge, the average power and the peak power are the highest in 3 μm region passively Q-switched fiber lasers. The influence of gain fiber length on the operation regime of the fiber laser has been investigated in detail.

  16. A Temporal Network Version of Watts's Cascade Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Fariba; Holme, Petter

    Threshold models of cascades in the social and economical sciences explain the spread of opinion and innovation as an effect of social influence. In threshold cascade models, fads or innovation spread between agents as determined by their interactions to other agents and their personal threshold of resistance. Typically, these models do not account for structure in the timing of interaction between the units. In this work, we extend a model of social cascades by Duncan Watts to temporal interaction networks. In our model, we assume agents are influenced by their friends and acquaintances at certain time into the past. That is, the influence of the past ages and becomes unimportant. Thus, our modified cascade model has an effective time window of influence. We explore two types of thresholds—thresholds to fractions of the neighbors, or absolute numbers. We try our model on six empirical datasets and compare them with null models.

  17. Watt balance experiments for the determination of the Planck constant and the redefinition of the kilogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, M.

    2013-02-01

    Since 1889 the international prototype of the kilogram has served as the definition of the unit of mass in the International System of Units (SI). It is the last material artefact to define a base unit of the SI, and it influences several other base units. This situation is no longer acceptable in a time of ever increasing measurement precision. It is therefore planned to redefine the unit of mass by fixing the numerical value of the Planck constant. At the same time three other base units, the ampere, the kelvin and the mole, will be redefined. As a first step, the kilogram redefinition requires a highly accurate determination of the Planck constant in the present SI system, with a relative uncertainty of the order of 1 part in 108. The most promising experiment for this purpose, and for the future realization of the kilogram, is the watt balance. It compares mechanical and electrical power and makes use of two macroscopic quantum effects, thus creating a relationship between a macroscopic mass and the Planck constant. In this paper the background for the choice of the Planck constant for the kilogram redefinition is discussed and the role of the Planck constant in physics is briefly reviewed. The operating principle of watt balance experiments is explained and the existing experiments are reviewed. An overview is given of all presently available experimental determinations of the Planck constant, and it is shown that further investigation is needed before the redefinition of the kilogram can take place. This article is based on a lecture given at the International School of Physics ‘Enrico Fermi’, Course CLXXXV: Metrology and Physical Constants, held in Varenna on 17-27 July 2012. It will also be published in the proceedings of the school, edited by E Bava, M Kühne and A M Rossi (IOS Press, Amsterdam and SIF, Bologna).

  18. The Cabinet Member as a Representative of the President: The Case of James Watt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renz, Mary Ann

    1987-01-01

    Compares the environmental rhetoric of former U.S. Interior Secretary James Watt and U.S. President Ronald Reagan, explaining that Watt's political value outweighed his political liability. Notes that cabinet members extend a President's influence by reaching issue-specific audiences while maintaining philosophical consistency, and serve as…

  19. 78 FR 53494 - Dam Safety Modifications at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... Dam Safety Modifications at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams AGENCY: Tennessee... preferred alternative in its final environmental impact statement (EIS) for the dam safety modifications at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams. The notice of availability (NOA) of the...

  20. Request for One-Time Shipment of 32 Watt PU-328 Source in 9968 Packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, W.M.

    1998-11-25

    The 9968 package is designed for surface shipment of fissile and other radioactive materials where a high degree of double containment is required. The use of the 9968 radioactive material package for a one time shipment of a 32 watt heat source versus the SARP approved maximum 30 watt heat source is addressed in this report. The analyses show that the small increase in heat load from 30 watts to 32 watts does not substantially increase internal temperatures or pressures that would approach limits for the package. Also, the weight of the content is within the current 9968 package limits. It is concluded that the 32-watt heat source can be safely shipped in the 9968 package and therefore a waiver to ship the source is justified.

  1. Did Osler suffer from "paranoia antitherapeuticum baltimorensis"? A comparative content analysis of The Principles and Practice of Medicine and Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 11th edition.

    PubMed

    Hogan, D B

    1999-10-01

    One of the most important legacies of Sir William Osler was his textbook The Principles and Practice of Medicine. A common criticism of the book when it was first published was its deficiency in the area of therapeutics. In this article, the 1st edition of The Principles and Practice of Medicine is compared with the 11th edition of Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. The analysis focuses on the treatment recommendations for 4 conditions that were covered in both books (diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, pneumonia and typhoid fever). Osler's textbook dealt with typhoid fever and pneumonia at greater length, whereas Harrison's placed more emphasis on diabetes mellitus and ischemic heart disease. Notwithstanding Osler's reputation as a therapeutic nihilist, the 2 books devoted equivalent space to treatment (in terms of proportion of total sentences for the conditions). For all conditions except ischemic heart disease, Osler concentrated on general measures and symptomatic care. Throughout Osler's textbook numerous negative comments are made about the medicinal treatment of various conditions. A more accurate statement about Osler's therapeutic approach was that he was a "medicinal nihilist." His demand for proof of efficacy before use of a medication remains relevant.

  2. Possible impacts of early-11th-, middle-12th-, and late-13th-century droughts on western Native Americans and the Mississippian Cahokians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, L.V.; Berry, M.S.; Jolie, E.A.; Spangler, J.D.; Stahle, D.W.; Hattori, E.M.

    2007-01-01

    One or more of three intense and persistent droughts impacted some Native American cultures in the early-11th, middle-12th and late-13th centuries, including the Anasazi, Fremont, Lovelock, and Mississippian (Cahokian) prehistorical cultures. Tree-ring-based reconstructions of precipitation and temperature indicate that warm drought periods occurred between AD 990 and 1060, AD 1135 and 1170, and AD 1276 and 1297. These droughts occurred during minima in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and may have been associated with positive values of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. Each of the Native American cultures was supported, to a greater or lesser degree, by precipitation-dependent resources. Both the Four Corners region and Cahokia were sites of intense growth between about AD 1050 and 1130, and by AD 1150, cultures in both regions were undergoing stress. By AD 1300 the Anasazi and Fremont cultures had collapsed and their residual populations had either left their homelands or withered. In the case of Fremont populations, the AD 990-1060 drought may have had the greatest impact. This drought also may have affected the Anasazi, for it was at the end of this drought that some people from Chaco migrated to the San Juan River valley and founded the Salmon Ruin great house. Detailed data do not exist on the number of Lovelock habitation sites or populations over time; however, Lovelock populations appear to have retreated from the western Great Basin to California by AD 1300 or shortly thereafter.

  3. Enhanced syndromic surveillance for mass gatherings in the Pacific: a case study of the 11th Festival of Pacific Arts in Solomon Islands, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Hoy, Damian; Saketa, Salanieta T; Maraka, Roy Roger; Sio, Alison; Wanyeki, Ian; Frison, Pascal; Ogaoga, Divi; Iniakawala, Dennie; Joshua, Cynthia; Duituturaga, Sala; Lepers, Christelle; Roth, Adam; White, Paul; Souares, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    Mass gatherings pose public health challenges to host countries, as they can cause or exacerbate disease outbreaks within the host location or elsewhere. In July 2012, the 11th Festival of Pacific Arts (FOPA), a mass gathering event involving 22 Pacific island states and territories, was hosted by Solomon Islands. An enhanced syndromic surveillance (ESS) system was implemented for the event. Throughout the capital city, Honiara, 15 sentinel sites were established and successfully took part in the ESS system, which commenced one week before the FOPA (25 June) and concluded eight days after the event (22 July). The ESS involved expanding on the existing syndromic surveillance parameters: from one to 15 sentinel sites, from four to eight syndromes, from aggregated to case-based reporting and from weekly to daily reporting. A web-based system was developed to enable data entry, data storage and data analysis. Towards the end of the ESS period, a focus group discussion and series of key informant interviews were conducted. The ESS was considered a success and played an important role in the early detection of possible outbreaks. For the period of the ESS, 1668 patients with syndrome presentations were received across the 15 sentinel sites. There were no major events of public health significance. Several lessons were learnt that are relevant to ESS in mass gathering scenarios, including the importance of having adequate lead in time for engagement and preparation to ensure appropriate policy and institutional frameworks are put in place. PMID:27766181

  4. Hepatic encephalopathy--definition, nomenclature, diagnosis, and quantification: final report of the working party at the 11th World Congresses of Gastroenterology, Vienna, 1998.

    PubMed

    Ferenci, Peter; Lockwood, Alan; Mullen, Kevin; Tarter, Ralph; Weissenborn, Karin; Blei, Andres T

    2002-03-01

    Research on hepatic encephalopathy is hampered by the imprecise definition of this disabling complication of liver disease. Under this light, the Organisation Mondiale de Gastroentérologie commissioned a Working Party to reach a consensus in this area and to present it at the 11th World Congress of Gastroenterology in Vienna (1998). The Working Party continued its work thereafter and now present their final report. In summary, the Working Party has suggested a modification of current nomenclature for clinical diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy; proposed guidelines for the performance of future clinical trials in hepatic encephalopathy; and felt the need for a large study to redefine neuropsychiatric abnormalities in liver disease, which would allow the diagnosis of minimal (subclinical) encephalopathy to be made on firm statistical grounds. In the interim, it proposes the use of a psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score, based on the result of 5 neuropsychologic tests. Finally, the need for a careful evaluation of the newer neuroimaging modalities for the diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy was stressed.

  5. Possible impacts of early-11th-, middle-12th-, and late-13th-century droughts on western Native Americans and the Mississippian Cahokians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Larry V.; Berry, Michael S.; Jolie, Edward A.; Spangler, Jerry D.; Stahle, David W.; Hattori, Eugene M.

    2007-02-01

    One or more of three intense and persistent droughts impacted some Native American cultures in the early-11th, middle-12th and late-13th centuries, including the Anasazi, Fremont, Lovelock, and Mississippian (Cahokian) prehistorical cultures. Tree-ring-based reconstructions of precipitation and temperature indicate that warm drought periods occurred between AD 990 and 1060, AD 1135 and 1170, and AD 1276 and 1297. These droughts occurred during minima in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and may have been associated with positive values of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. Each of the Native American cultures was supported, to a greater or lesser degree, by precipitation-dependent resources. Both the Four Corners region and Cahokia were sites of intense growth between about AD 1050 and 1130, and by AD 1150, cultures in both regions were undergoing stress. By AD 1300 the Anasazi and Fremont cultures had collapsed and their residual populations had either left their homelands or withered. In the case of Fremont populations, the AD 990-1060 drought may have had the greatest impact. This drought also may have affected the Anasazi, for it was at the end of this drought that some people from Chaco migrated to the San Juan River valley and founded the Salmon Ruin great house. Detailed data do not exist on the number of Lovelock habitation sites or populations over time; however, Lovelock populations appear to have retreated from the western Great Basin to California by AD 1300 or shortly thereafter.

  6. Watt-level self-frequency-doubling Nd:GdCOB lasers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiyang; Zhang, Huaijin; Wang, Zhengping; Yu, Haohai; Zong, Nan; Ma, Changqin; Xu, Zuyan; Jiang, Minhua

    2010-05-24

    Laser-diode (LD) pumped self-frequency doubling (SFD) Nd:GdCa4O(BO3)3 (Nd:GdCOB) miniature laser was demonstrated. The output power as high as 1.35 W was achieved which is over than five times than previous values for Nd:LnCa4O(BO3)3 (Ln=Y or Gd) SFD lasers and becomes the highest continuous-wave output power in this field to our knowledge. The maximum optical conversion efficiency is 17%. By comparison, we found that the cutting direction along its optimal phase-matching direction out of the principal planes is the determining factor resulting in this watt-level efficient output power. Different with previous studies, the emission wavelength is centered at about 545 nm. We believed that this efficient laser will become the most competitive one in the existing commercial green lasers, especially in the laser display, medical treatment and spectroscopic analysis etc.

  7. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement No. 17

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, P.S.

    1995-10-01

    This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (SER), NUREG-0847 (June 1982), Supplement No. 1 (September 1982), Supplement No. 2 (January 1984), Supplement No. 3 (January 1985), Supplement No. 4 (March 1985), Supplement No. 5 (November 1990), Supplement No. 6 (April 1991), Supplement No. 7 (September 1991), 1991), Supplement No. 8 (January 1992), Supplement No. 9 (June 1992), Supplement No. 10 (October 1992), Supplement No. 11 (April.1993), Supplement No. 12 (October 1993), Supplement No. 13 (April 1994), Supplement No. 14 (December 1994), Supplement No. 15 (June 1995), and Supplement No. 16 (September 1995) issued by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority, as applicant and owner, for licenses to operate the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50--390 and 50--391). The facility is located in Rhea county, Tennessee, near the Watts Bar Dam on the Tennessee River. In this supplement, NRC examines the significant problems of construction quality and quality assurance effectiveness that led TVA to withdraw its certification in 1985 that Watts Bar Unit I was ready to load fuel. Also discussed are the extensive corrective actions performed by TVA according to its nuclear performance plans and other supplemental programs, and NRC`s extensive oversight to determine whether the Watts Bar Unit 1 construction quality and TVA`s operational readiness and quality assurance effectiveness are adequate for a low-power operating license to be issued. SSER 17 does not address Watts Bar Unit 2, except for the systems which are necessary to support Unit 1 operation.

  8. Building on Family Strengths: Research and Services in Support of Children and Their Families. Proceedings of the Building on Family Strengths Annual Conference (11th, Portland, Oregon, May 6-8, 2004)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Lynwood J., Ed.; Tullis, Kathryn, Ed.; Hanson, Andrea, Ed.; Sowders, Stacey, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The 11th Annual Building on Family Strengths Conference was held from May 6th through May 8th, 2004, in Portland, Oregon. Highlights included: (1) The revival of a pre-conference training session; this year featured "Understanding Research and Evaluation in Relation to Social Change," presented by Elaine Slaton and Shannon CrossBear of the…

  9. Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Magnetic Fluids (ICMF 11) (Košice, Slovakia, 23-27 July 2007).

    PubMed

    Kopčanský, Peter; Timko, Milan; Kováč, Josef; Václavíková, Miroslava; Odenbach, Stefan

    2008-05-21

    The 11th International Conference on Magnetic Fluids (ICMF 11) was held in Košice, Slovakia between 23-27 July 2007. Attendance at the conference was high and its motivation was in line with the ten previous ICMF conferences organized in Udine, Orlando, Bangor, Sendai-Tokyo, Riga, Paris, Bhavnagar, Timisoara, Bremen and Guarujá. The conference in Slovakia reflected the scientific community's enthusiasm and worldwide support, with 256 participants, from 30 countries attending.The main objective of ICMF 11 was to promote progress and knowledge in the field of magnetic fluids regarding their chemistry, physical and magnetic properties, heat and mass transfer, surface phenomena, as well as their technological and biomedical applications. As research on magnetic fluids is essentially interdisciplinary, experts from related areas were invited to present their contributions with a view to increasing knowledge in the field and highlighting new trends. Submitted communications were refereed by members of the Scientific Organizing Committee and abstracts were assembled in a book of abstracts. Participants presented 180 posters in two poster sessions and 56 oral presentations. All presentations contributed to a greater understanding of the area, and helped to bridge the gap between physics, chemistry, technology, biology and medical sciences. Contributions to this conference are presented in 115 scientific papers, with some published in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter and the rest in Magnetohydrodynamics. The organization of the conference was made possible by generous support from the Institute of Experimental Physics and Institute of Geotechnics of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, the University of Pavol Jozef Šafárik and the Slovak Physical Society. Financial support from Ferrotec, Cryosoft Ltd, Mikrochem, Liquids Research Ltd, Askony and US Steel Košice, is also gratefully acknowledged. PMID:21694229

  10. Preface: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Magnetic Fluids (ICMF 11) (Košice, Slovakia, 23 27 July 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopčanský, Peter; Timko, Milan; Kováč, Josef; Václavíková, Miroslava; Odenbach, Stefan

    2008-05-01

    The 11th International Conference on Magnetic Fluids (ICMF 11) was held in Košice, Slovakia between 23-27 July 2007. Attendance at the conference was high and its motivation was in line with the ten previous ICMF conferences organized in Udine, Orlando, Bangor, Sendai-Tokyo, Riga, Paris, Bhavnagar, Timisoara, Bremen and Guarujá. The conference in Slovakia reflected the scientific community's enthusiasm and worldwide support, with 256 participants, from 30 countries attending.The main objective of ICMF 11 was to promote progress and knowledge in the field of magnetic fluids regarding their chemistry, physical and magnetic properties, heat and mass transfer, surface phenomena, as well as their technological and biomedical applications. As research on magnetic fluids is essentially interdisciplinary, experts from related areas were invited to present their contributions with a view to increasing knowledge in the field and highlighting new trends. Submitted communications were refereed by members of the Scientific Organizing Committee and abstracts were assembled in a book of abstracts. Participants presented 180 posters in two poster sessions and 56 oral presentations. All presentations contributed to a greater understanding of the area, and helped to bridge the gap between physics, chemistry, technology, biology and medical sciences. Contributions to this conference are presented in 115 scientific papers, with some published in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter and the rest in Magnetohydrodynamics. The organization of the conference was made possible by generous support from the Institute of Experimental Physics and Institute of Geotechnics of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, the University of Pavol Jozef Šafárik and the Slovak Physical Society. Financial support from Ferrotec, Cryosoft Ltd, Mikrochem, Liquids Research Ltd, Askony and US Steel Košice, is also gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Magnetic Fluids (ICMF 11) (Košice, Slovakia, 23-27 July 2007).

    PubMed

    Kopčanský, Peter; Timko, Milan; Kováč, Josef; Václavíková, Miroslava; Odenbach, Stefan

    2008-05-21

    The 11th International Conference on Magnetic Fluids (ICMF 11) was held in Košice, Slovakia between 23-27 July 2007. Attendance at the conference was high and its motivation was in line with the ten previous ICMF conferences organized in Udine, Orlando, Bangor, Sendai-Tokyo, Riga, Paris, Bhavnagar, Timisoara, Bremen and Guarujá. The conference in Slovakia reflected the scientific community's enthusiasm and worldwide support, with 256 participants, from 30 countries attending.The main objective of ICMF 11 was to promote progress and knowledge in the field of magnetic fluids regarding their chemistry, physical and magnetic properties, heat and mass transfer, surface phenomena, as well as their technological and biomedical applications. As research on magnetic fluids is essentially interdisciplinary, experts from related areas were invited to present their contributions with a view to increasing knowledge in the field and highlighting new trends. Submitted communications were refereed by members of the Scientific Organizing Committee and abstracts were assembled in a book of abstracts. Participants presented 180 posters in two poster sessions and 56 oral presentations. All presentations contributed to a greater understanding of the area, and helped to bridge the gap between physics, chemistry, technology, biology and medical sciences. Contributions to this conference are presented in 115 scientific papers, with some published in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter and the rest in Magnetohydrodynamics. The organization of the conference was made possible by generous support from the Institute of Experimental Physics and Institute of Geotechnics of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, the University of Pavol Jozef Šafárik and the Slovak Physical Society. Financial support from Ferrotec, Cryosoft Ltd, Mikrochem, Liquids Research Ltd, Askony and US Steel Košice, is also gratefully acknowledged.

  12. The 11th Century Collapse of Aqaba on the North Coast of the Gulf of Aqaba, Dead Sea Fault System, Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Tina; Allison, Alivia; Rucker, John

    2010-05-01

    The city of Aqaba is situated at the northern end of the Gulf of Aqaba along the southern part of the Dead Sea Transform Fault. Based both on the historical accounts and archaeological excavations, it is clear that earthquakes have played a significant role in the history of the region. The early Islamic city of Ayla was probably founded around 650 A.D., suffered some damage as a result of the 748 A.D. earthquake, and saw extensive reconstruction around the beginning of the Abbasid period (Whitcomb, 1994). Among other evidence of earthquake destruction at the Islamic city of Ayla is the leaning city Sea wall. Stratified pottery collections from our February 2009 excavation of the buttress of the city wall of Ayla strongly suggest a date for revetment construction in the early 11th Century. Based on the fact that the most recent pottery from sealed loci inside the buttress wall is late Abbasid - Fatimid and the absence of handmade pottery often found in the abandonment phases, the buttress was likely constructed after liquefaction damage from the 1033 earthquake. Damage from distant source earthquakes (748 and 1033) in the ancient city was repaired in antiquity. The destruction and loss of life (accounts claim that all but 12 residents who had been out fishing were killed) caused by the 1068 earthquake may account for the relative ease with which Baldwin I of Jerusalem took over when he arrived with a small retinue in 1116 A.D. Paleoseismic trenches in the modern city of Aqaba indicate that at least two earthquakes have occurred after deposits dated to 1045-1278 A.D. A preliminary analysis of the stratigraphy in new trenches in the Taba sabkha north of Aqaba shows at least three separate faulting events, with the most recent event located at a depth of 70 cm below the ground surface. This finding supports the initial ground penetrating radar survey conducted at the southern end of the Taba sabkha by Abueladas (2005). These data document a long period of quiescence

  13. Noisy probability judgment, the conjunction fallacy, and rationality: Comment on Costello and Watts (2014).

    PubMed

    Crupi, Vincenzo; Tentori, Katya

    2016-01-01

    According to Costello and Watts (2014), probability theory can account for key findings in human judgment research provided that random noise is embedded in the model. We concur with a number of Costello and Watts's remarks, but challenge the empirical adequacy of their model in one of their key illustrations (the conjunction fallacy) on the basis of recent experimental findings. We also discuss how our argument bears on heuristic and rational thinking. PMID:26709413

  14. Simulation of Watts Bar Unit 1 Initial Startup Tests with Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, Andrew T; Gehin, Jess C; Bekar, Kursat B; Celik, Cihangir

    2014-01-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors* is developing a collection of methods and software products known as VERA, the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications. One component of the testing and validation plan for VERA is comparison of neutronics results to a set of continuous energy Monte Carlo solutions for a range of pressurized water reactor geometries using the SCALE component KENO-VI developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Recent improvements in data, methods, and parallelism have enabled KENO, previously utilized predominately as a criticality safety code, to demonstrate excellent capability and performance for reactor physics applications. The highly detailed and rigorous KENO solutions provide a reliable nu-meric reference for VERAneutronics and also demonstrate the most accurate predictions achievable by modeling and simulations tools for comparison to operating plant data. This paper demonstrates the performance of KENO-VI for the Watts Bar Unit 1 Cycle 1 zero power physics tests, including reactor criticality, control rod worths, and isothermal temperature coefficients.

  15. A Mars 1 Watt vortex wind energy machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ralston, Michael; Crowley, Christopher; Thomson, Ronald; Gwynne, Owen

    1992-01-01

    A Martian wind power generator capable of surviving impact and fulfilling the long-term (2-5 yr) low-level power requirements (1-2 W) of an unmanned surface probe is presented. Attention is given to a tornado vortex generator that was chosen on the basis of its capability to theoretically augment the available power that may be extracted for average Martian wind speeds of about 7.5 m/s. The generator offers comparable mass-to-power ratios with solar power sources.

  16. A Mars 1 Watt vortex wind energy machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralston, Michael; Crowley, Christopher; Thomson, Ronald; Gwynne, Owen

    A Martian wind power generator capable of surviving impact and fulfilling the long-term (2-5 yr) low-level power requirements (1-2 W) of an unmanned surface probe is presented. Attention is given to a tornado vortex generator that was chosen on the basis of its capability to theoretically augment the available power that may be extracted for average Martian wind speeds of about 7.5 m/s. The generator offers comparable mass-to-power ratios with solar power sources.

  17. [A modified retroperitoneal approach to the kidney in patients with a highly deformed thorax: obtaining a wide operative field through subperiosteal resection of the 10th, 11th and 12th ribs].

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yuji; Kanou, Takehiro; Takagi, Norito; Tokuda, Yuji; Uozumi, Jiro; Masaki, Zenjiro

    2005-07-01

    We herein report a technique which facilitates a retroperitoneal approach to the kidney in cases of highly deformed thorax due to kyphoscoliosis. The operation consists of a lumbar oblique incision with removal of the 11th rib, combined with the additional removal of the 12th and 10th ribs. Resection of the upper two ribs was performed subperiosteally, leaving the periosteum of the deep side untouched. However, the deep side periosteum of the 12th rib was incised caudal from the pleural margin in order to facilitate exposure of the diaphragm. The retroperitoneal space was entered through the tip of the 11th rib bed. The diaphragm was incised dorso-medially at a level 1 cm caudal from the lower margin of the pleura, to an extent necessary to enable the pleura together with the cranial diaphragm to be manoeuvred in an upward direction. Two cases with renal tuberculosis associated with high-grade kyphosis and one case with staghorn calculi accompanied with lordosis were operated on utilizing this technique. In the former two cases, the thoracic cage was in direct contact with the iliac bone and there was practically no space between the rib border and the iliac crest. This was also true of the third case, but the grade of deformity was not as extensive as in the former two cases. Removal of the 10th, 11th and 12th ribs could be achieved without injuring the pleura and a satisfactorily large operating field could thus be developed which enabled a simple nephrectomy to be performed without difficulty. The characteristic feature of the described approach is that resection of the 10th and 11th ribs is simply to facilitate manoevrability of the wound margin, without going through the rib bed. The technique could be advantageous in selected cases where there is a highly deformed thorax. PMID:16083038

  18. US-Japan workshop on field-reversed configurations with steady-state high-temperature fusion plasmas and the 11th US-Japan workshop on compact toroids

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.C.; Fernandez, J.C.; Rej, D.J.

    1990-05-01

    The US-Japan Workshop on Field-Reversed Configurations with Steady-State High-Temperature Fusion Plasma and the 11th US-Japan Workshop on Compact Toroids were held at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico on November 7--9, 1989. These proceedings contain the papers presented at the workshops as submitted by the authors. These papers have been indexed separately.

  19. Fourier and Wavelet Based Characterisation of the Ionospheric Response to the Solar Eclipse of August, the 11th, 1999, Measured Through 1-minute Vertical Ionospheric Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauli, P.; Abry, P.; Boska, J.

    2004-05-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the ionospheric response induced by the solar eclipse of August, the 11th, 1999. We provide Fourier and wavelet based characterisations of the propagation of the acoustic-gravity waves induced by the solar eclipse. The analysed data consist of profiles of electron concentration. They are derived from 1-minute vertical incidence ionospheric sounding measurements, performed at the Pruhonice observatory (Czech republic, 49.9N, 14.5E). The chosen 1-minute high sampling rate aims at enabling us to specifically see modes below acoustic cut-off period. The August period was characterized by Solar Flux F10.7 = 128, steady solar wind, quiet magnetospheric conditions, a low geomagnetic activity (Dst index varies from -10 nT to -20 nT, Σ Kp index reached value of 12+). The eclipse was notably exceptional in uniform solar disk. These conditions and fact that the culmination of the solar eclipse over central Europe occurred at local noon are such that the observed ionospheric response is mainly that of the solar eclipse. We provide a full characterization of the propagation of the waves in terms of times of occurrence, group and phase velocities, propagation direction, characteristic period and lifetime of the particular wave structure. However, ionospheric vertical sounding technique enables us to deal with vertical components of each characteristic. Parameters are estimated combining Fourier and wavelet analysis. Our conclusions confirm earlier theoretical and experimental findings, reported in [Altadill et al., 2001; Farges et al., 2001; Muller-Wodarg et al.,1998] regarding the generation and propagation of gravity waves and provide complementary characterisation using wavelet approaches. We also report a new evidence for the generation and propagation of acoustic waves induced by the solar eclipse through the ionospheric F region. Up to our knowledge, this is the first time that acoustic waves can be demonstrated based on ionospheric

  20. PREFACE: 11th Asia-Pacific Conference on Plasma Science and Technology (APCPST-11) and 25th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-25)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Takayuki; Kaneko, Toshio; Sekine, Makoto; Tanaka, Yasunori

    2013-06-01

    The 11th Asia-Pacific Conference on Plasma Science and Technology (APCPST-11) was held in Kyoto, Japan on 2-5 October 2012 with the 25th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-25). SPSM has been held annually since 1988 under the sponsorship of The 153rd Committee on Plasma Materials Science, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS). This symposium is one of the major activities of the Committee, which is organized by researchers in academia and industry for the purpose of advancing intersectional scientific information exchange and discussion of science and technology of plasma materials processing. APCPST and SPSM are jointly held biennially to survey the current status of low temperature and thermal plasma physics and chemistry for industrial applications. The whole area of plasma processing was covered from fundamentals to applications. Previous meetings were held in China, Japan, Korea, and Australia, attended by scientists from the Asia-Pacific and other countries. The joint conference was organized in plenary lectures, invited, contributed oral presentations and poster sessions. At this meeting, we had 386 participants from 10 countries and 398 presentations, including 26 invited presentations. This year, we arranged special topical sessions that covered green innovation, life innovation, and technical reports from industry. This conference seeks to bring the plasma community together and to create a forum for discussing the latest developments and issues, the challenges ahead in the field of plasma research and applications among engineers and scientists in Asia, the Pacific Rim, as well as Europe. This volume presents 44 papers that were selected via a strict peer-review process from full papers submitted for the proceedings of the conference. The topics range from the basic physics and chemistry of plasma processing to a broad variety of materials processing and environmental applications. This volume offers an overview of recent

  1. 47 CFR 22.867 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Effective radiated power limits. The effective radiated power (ERP) of ground and airborne stations... peak ERP of airborne mobile station transmitters must not exceed 12 Watts. (b) The peak ERP of...

  2. Thermal control of power supplies with electronic packaging techniques. [using low cost heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The integration of low-cost commercial heat pipes in the design of a NASA candidate standard modular power supply with a 350 watt output resulted in a 44% weight reduction. Part temperatures were also appreciably reduced, increasing the environmental capability of the unit. A complete 350- watt modular power converter was built and tested to evaluate thermal performance of the redesigned supply.

  3. PREFACE: Proceedings of the 11th European Workshop of the European Microbeam Analysis Society (EMAS) on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    This volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering contains papers from the 11th Workshop of the European Microbeam Analysis Society (EMAS) on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis which took place from 10-14 May 2009 in the Hotel Faltom, Gdynia, Poland. The primary aim of this series of workshops is to assess the state-of-the-art and reliability of microbeam analysis techniques. The workshops also provide a forum where students and young scientists starting out on careers in microbeam analysis can meet and discuss with the established experts. The workshops have a very distinct format comprising invited plenary lectures by internationally recognized experts, poster presentations by the participants and round table discussions on the key topics led by specialists in the field. For this workshop EMAS invited speakers on the following topics: EPMA, EBSD, fast energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, three-dimensional microanalysis, and micro-and nanoanalysis in the natural resources industry. The continuing relevance of the EMAS workshops and the high regard in which they are held internationally can be seen from the fact that 69 posters from 16 countries were on display at the meeting and that the participants came from as far away as Japan and the USA. A number of participants with posters were invited to give short oral presentations of their work in two dedicated sessions. As at previous workshops there was also a special oral session for young scientists. Small cash prizes were awarded for the three best posters and for the best oral presentation by a young scientist. The prize for the best poster went to the contribution by G Tylko, S Dubchak, Z Banach and K Turnau, entitled Monte Carlo simulation for an assessment of standard validity and quantitative X-ray microanalysis in plant. Joanna Wojewoda-Budka of the Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Krakow, received the prize for the best oral presentation by a

  4. PREFACE: Proceedings of the 11th European Workshop of the European Microbeam Analysis Society (EMAS) on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    This volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering contains papers from the 11th Workshop of the European Microbeam Analysis Society (EMAS) on Modern Developments and Applications in Microbeam Analysis which took place from 10-14 May 2009 in the Hotel Faltom, Gdynia, Poland. The primary aim of this series of workshops is to assess the state-of-the-art and reliability of microbeam analysis techniques. The workshops also provide a forum where students and young scientists starting out on careers in microbeam analysis can meet and discuss with the established experts. The workshops have a very distinct format comprising invited plenary lectures by internationally recognized experts, poster presentations by the participants and round table discussions on the key topics led by specialists in the field. For this workshop EMAS invited speakers on the following topics: EPMA, EBSD, fast energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, three-dimensional microanalysis, and micro-and nanoanalysis in the natural resources industry. The continuing relevance of the EMAS workshops and the high regard in which they are held internationally can be seen from the fact that 69 posters from 16 countries were on display at the meeting and that the participants came from as far away as Japan and the USA. A number of participants with posters were invited to give short oral presentations of their work in two dedicated sessions. As at previous workshops there was also a special oral session for young scientists. Small cash prizes were awarded for the three best posters and for the best oral presentation by a young scientist. The prize for the best poster went to the contribution by G Tylko, S Dubchak, Z Banach and K Turnau, entitled Monte Carlo simulation for an assessment of standard validity and quantitative X-ray microanalysis in plant. Joanna Wojewoda-Budka of the Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Krakow, received the prize for the best oral presentation by a

  5. A discussion of Bl conservation on a two dimensional magnetic field plane in watt balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shisong; Zhao, Wei; Huang, Songling

    2016-05-01

    The watt balance is an experiment being pursued in national metrology institutes for precision determination of the Planck constant h. In watt balances, the 1/r magnetic field, expected to generate a geometrical factor Bl independent to any coil horizontal displacement, can be created by a strict two dimensional, symmetric (horizontal r and vertical z) construction of the magnet system. In this paper, we present an analytical understanding of magnetic field distribution when the r symmetry of the magnet is broken and the establishment of the Bl conservation is shown. By using either Gauss’s law on magnetism with monopoles or conformal transformations, we extend the Bl conservation to arbitrary two dimensional magnetic planes where the vertical magnetic field component equals zero. The generalized Bl conservation allows a relaxed physical alignment criteria for watt balance magnet systems.

  6. A LEGO Watt balance: An apparatus to determine a mass based on the new SI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, L. S.; Schlamminger, S.; Newell, D. B.; Pratt, J. R.; Seifert, F.; Zhang, X.; Sineriz, G.; Liu, M.; Haddad, D.

    2015-11-01

    A global effort to redefine our International System of Units (SI) is underway, and the change to the new system is expected to occur in 2018. Within the newly redefined SI, the present base units will still exist but be derived from fixed numerical values of seven reference constants. In particular, the unit of mass (the kilogram) will be realized through a fixed value of the Planck constant h. A so-called watt balance, for example, can then be used to realize the kilogram unit of mass within a few parts in 108. Such a balance has been designed and constructed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. For educational outreach and to demonstrate the principle, we have constructed a LEGO tabletop watt balance capable of measuring a gram-level masses to 1% relative uncertainty. This article presents the design, construction, and performance of the LEGO watt balance and its ability to determine h.

  7. 47 CFR 74.534 - Power limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Power limitations. 74.534 Section 74.534... § 74.534 Power limitations. (a) Transmitter output power. (1) Transmitter output power shall be limited..., transmitter output power shall not exceed 10 watts. (b) In no event shall the average equivalent...

  8. 47 CFR 74.534 - Power limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Power limitations. 74.534 Section 74.534... § 74.534 Power limitations. (a) Transmitter output power. (1) Transmitter output power shall be limited..., transmitter output power shall not exceed 10 watts. (b) In no event shall the average equivalent...

  9. 47 CFR 74.534 - Power limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Power limitations. 74.534 Section 74.534... § 74.534 Power limitations. (a) Transmitter output power. (1) Transmitter output power shall be limited..., transmitter output power shall not exceed 10 watts. (b) In no event shall the average equivalent...

  10. Performance of one hundred watt HVM LPP-EUV source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, Hakaru; Nakarai, Hiroaki; Abe, Tamotsu; Nowak, Krzysztof M.; Kawasuji, Yasufumi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yukio; Hori, Tsukasa; Kodama, Takeshi; Shiraishi, Yutaka; Yanagida, Tatsuya; Soumagne, Georg; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Taku; Okazaki, Shinji; Saitou, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    We have been developing CO2-Sn-LPP EUV light source which is the most promising solution as the 13.5nm high power light source for HVM EUVL. Unique and original technologies such as: combination of pulsed CO2 laser and Sn droplets, dual wavelength laser pulses shooting, and mitigation with magnetic field, have been developed in Gigaphoton Inc. The theoretical and experimental data have clearly showed the advantage of our proposed strategy. Based on these data we are developing first practical source for HVM - "GL200E". This data means 250W EUV power will be able to realize around 20kW level pulsed CO2 laser. We have reported engineering data from our recent test such around 43W average clean power, CE=2.0%, with 100kHz operation and other data 19). We have already finished preparation of higher average power CO2 laser more than 20kW at output power cooperate with Mitsubishi Electric Corporation 14). Recently we achieved 92W with 50kHz, 50% duty cycle operation 20). We have reported component technology progress of EUV light source system. We report promising experimental data and result of simulation of magnetic mitigation system in Proto #1 system. We demonstrated several data with Proto #2 system: (1) emission data of 140W in burst under 70kHz 50% duty cycle during 10 minutes. (2) emission data of 118W in burst under 60kHz 70% duty cycle during 10 minutes. (3) emission data of 42W in burst under 20kHz 50% duty cycle (10000pls/0.5ms OFF) during 3 hours (110Mpls). Also we report construction of Pilot #1 system. Final target is week level operation with 250W EUV power with CE=4%, more than 27kW CO2 laser power by the end of Q2 of 2015.

  11. Life test result of Ricor K529N 1watt linear cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachman, Ilan; Veprik, Alexander; Pundak, Nachman

    2007-04-01

    The authors summarize the results of the accelerated life testing of the Ricor type K529N 1 Watt linear split Stirling cooler. The test was conducted in the period 2003-2006, during which the cooler accumulated in excess of 27,500 working hours at an elevated ambient temperature, which is equivalent to 45,000 hours at normal ambient conditions, and performed about 7,500 operational cycles including cooldown and steady-state phases. The cryocooler performances were assessed through the cooldown time and power consumption; no visible degradation in performances was observed. After the cooler failure and the compressor disassembling, an electrical short was discovered in the driving coil. The analysis has shown that the wire insulating varnish was not suitable for such elevated temperatures. It is important to note that the cooler under test was taken from the earliest engineering series; in the later manufacturing line military grade wire with high temperature insulation was used, no customer complaints have been recorded in this instance Special attention was paid to the thorough examination of the technical condition of the critical components of the cooler interior. In particular, dynamic piston-cylinder seal, flying leads, internal O-rings and driving coil were examined in the compressor. As to the cold head, we focused on studying the conditions of the dynamic bushing-plunger seal, O-rings and displacer-regenerator. In addition, a leak test was performed to assess the condition of the metallic crushed seals. From the analysis, the authors draw the conclusion that the cooler design is adequate for long life performance (in excess of 20,000 working hours) applications.

  12. Assessment of Pellet-Clad Interaction Indicators in Watts Bar Unit 1 using the VERA Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Stimpson, Shane G; Powers, Jeffrey J; Clarno, Kevin T; Pawlowski, Roger; Bratton, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) aims to provide high-fidelity, multiphysics simulations of light water reactors (LWRs) by coupling a variety of codes within the Virtual Environment for Reactor Analysis (VERA). One of the primary goals of CASL is to predict local cladding failure through pellet-clad interaction (PCI). This capability is currently being pursued through several different approaches, such as with Tiamat, which is a simulation tool within VERA that more tightly couples the MPACT neutron transport solver, the CTF thermal hydraulics solver, and the MOOSE-based Bison-CASL fuel performance code. However, the process in this paper focuses on running fuel performance calculations with Bison-CASL to predict PCI using the multicycle output data from coupled neutron transport/thermal hydraulics simulations. In recent work within CASL, Watts Bar Unit 1 has been simulated over 12 cycles using the VERA core simulator capability based on MPACT and CTF. Using the output from these simulations, Bison-CASL results can be obtained without rerunning all 12 cycles, while providing some insight into PCI indicators. Multi-cycle Bison-CASL results are presented and compared against results from the FRAPCON fuel performance code. There are several quantities of interest in considering PCI and subsequent fuel rod failures, such as the clad hoop stress and maximum centerline fuel temperature, particularly as a function of time. Bison-CASL performs single-rod simulations using representative power and temperature distributions, providing high-resolution results for these and a number of other quantities. This will assist in identifying fuels rods as potential failure locations for use in further analyses.

  13. The experimental verification of metrological properties of direct current Watt-hour meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otomański, P.; Zazula, P.

    2013-09-01

    The paper presents a method for evaluating the accuracy of indications of the direct current Watt-hour meters in a designed and constructed measuring system. Such measuring system is composed of two multi-function calibrators, and a specialised high-voltage attachment dedicated for this system, which makes it possible to generate direct voltages in a required range up to 4 kV with a suitably high precision. The authors described in detail particular elements of the measuring system together with the results of its calibration. They showed the results of experiments carried out on a large and representative number of LE3000plus Watt-hour meter items.

  14. High intensity discharge 400-watt sodium ballast. Phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Felper, G.

    1980-06-01

    The results of a research and development program directed toward design, test, and evaluation of energy efficient High Intensity Discharge (HID) Solid State 400-Watt Ballast lighting system are reported. Phase I of the project which was designed to modify the existing Datapower ballast to LBL configuration, measure performance characteristics, and compare efficiency with a core/coil ballast including energy loss analysis is covered. In addition, Datapower was tasked to build six (6) prototype 400-Watt High Pressure Sodium Ballasts for verification tests by an independent test facility and follow-on performance and life tests at LBL.

  15. Subsea thermoelectric generators. 1- 10-watt peltier effect prototypes - a step towards autonomous electrical control units at subsea wellheads

    SciTech Connect

    Weid, J.P. von der; Silva, J.A.P. da; Gama, A.L.; Sant'Anna, A.C.

    1994-05-01

    Offshore oil production activities require the operation of underwater hydraulic or electric equipment. The high cost of acquisition and installation of umbilical cables to supply power is leading to the development of independently powered cableless equipment, connected to the surface by the transmission and reception of control signals through the water. As a first step toward these autonomous wellhead control systems, the authors designed and successfully tested in laboratory conditions a thermoelectric generator able to supply at least 10 watts of electric power, extracting it from the temperature difference between the oil and the surrounding water. Hydraulic pumps and pressure accumulators, control electronics, and valve actuators for wellhead control units are all technically solved problems, even for seafloors as deep as 1,000 meters. However, an autonomous underwater wellhead control unit can only be conceived if an energy source is available at the seafloor. The development of a reliable and compact power source is indeed a fundamental step towards autonomous wet Christmas tree valve actuators.

  16. How to "Kill a Watt" and Save Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massiha, G. H.; Houston, Shelton; Rawat, Kuldeep S.

    2011-01-01

    Many technology students--and especially those interested in environmental and energy issues--can benefit from learning about power ratings and the energy usage of electrical systems like the electrical equipment and appliances found in most homes. Students enrolled in electronics and construction technology courses learn to determine the power…

  17. The impact of teacher assigned but not graded compared to teacher assigned and graded chemistry homework on the formative and summative chemistry assessment scores of 11th-grade students with varying chemistry potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jennifer L.

    The study analyzed 2005 posttest data compared to 2008 posttest data to determine student end of school year academic achievement outcomes across three academic levels (above average, average, and below average chemistry potential) and two teacher homework evaluation methods (assigned but not graded and assigned and graded) on teacher prepared 11th-grade assessments, district prepared 11th-grade assessment, and district graduation requirement physical science strand 11th-grade science Essential Learner Outcome assessment. Overall, results indicated that students with above average (n = 16), average, (n = 17) and below average (n = 14) chemistry potential whom were given teacher assigned and graded chemistry homework compared to students with above average (n = 17), average (n = 15), and below average (n = 19) chemistry potential whom were given teacher assigned but not graded chemistry homework had statistically significantly higher independent t test matter homework scores while atoms, naming, and reactions homework scores were generally in the direction of higher but not significant scores for students given graded homework regardless of their chemistry potential. Furthermore, students of above average and below average chemistry potential who were given assigned and graded chemistry homework performed statistically significantly better on the 11th-grade district prepared chemistry final and the district prepared physical science strand Essential Learner Outcome assessment t test results compared to students with the same chemistry potential given assigned but not graded chemistry homework, suggesting that the graded chemistry condition may have contributed to improved long term learning and retention of chemistry knowledge. Finally, the coefficient of determination (r2 = .95) measure of strength of relationship between not completing, not graded chemistry homework and a corresponding drop in chemistry assessment scores for all students was 95% and the

  18. High Resolution Telesesimic P-wave Back-Projection Imaging Using Variable Travel Time Corrections: Characterizing Sub-Events of the Great April 11th 2012 Indian Ocean Intraplate Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, K. B.; Koper, K. D.; Yue, H.; Lay, T.

    2012-12-01

    Two of the largest strike-slip earthquakes ever recorded occurred off the coast of northern Sumatra on April 11th 2012. The Mw 8.7 mainshock and Mw 8.2 aftershock occurred east of the NinetyEast Ridge in the Wharton Basin, a region of intraplate deformation with prominent fracture zones striking NNE-SSW. The relative lack of geodetic and local seismic data compared to other recent great earthquakes make teleseismic data especially important for understanding the rupture properties of these events. We performed short-period P-wave back-projection imaging using independent networks of stations in Europe and Japan. Preliminary images from the two networks showed similarly complex multi-event sources for the mainshock that indicate rupture occurred along both nodal planes of the gCMT solution, consistent with the locations of early aftershocks. Back-projection images of the Mw 8.2 aftershock showed a single, compact, bilateral rupture corresponding to the NNE-SSW nodal plane of the CMT solution [Yue et al., 2012]. Here we improve upon the resolution and accuracy of our initial back-projection images by estimating station specific travel time corrections that vary across the source region [e.g., Ishii et al., 2007]. These corrections are used to compensate for 3D variations in Earth structure that occur between the source region and the seismometers, and act to focus the array beams. We perform multi-channel cross-correlations of P waves recorded for 7 aftershocks that were (1) distributed broadly around the source region and (2) well-observed at seismometers in Europe. For each seismometer in the array, the 8 measured static corrections are smoothly interpolated over the entire source region with a Kriging method to form a travel time correction surface. These surfaces are then used with an otherwise conventional back-projection approach [Xu et al., 2009] to image the ruptures. Our new images are broadly consistent with our original results, indicating that the

  19. Productive Resources in Students' Ideas about Energy: An Alternative Analysis of Watts' Original Interview Transcripts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrer, Benedikt W.; Flood, Virginia J.; Wittmann, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    For over 30 years, researchers have investigated students' ideas about energy with the intent of reforming instructional practice. In this pursuit, Watts contributed an influential study with his 1983 paper "Some alternative views of energy" ["Phys. Educ." 18, 213 (1983)]. Watts' "alternative frameworks"…

  20. 77 FR 71454 - Notice of Atomic Safety And Licensing Board Reconstitution, Tennessee Valley Authority (Watts Bar...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... COMMISSION Notice of Atomic Safety And Licensing Board Reconstitution, Tennessee Valley Authority (Watts Bar, Unit 2) Pursuant to 10 CFR 2.313(c) and 2.321(b), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board (Board) in the... 16th day of November 2012. E. Roy Hawkens, Chief Administrative Judge, Atomic Safety and...

  1. Rock the Watt: An Energy Conservation Campaign at Pacific Northwest National Lab

    SciTech Connect

    2016-01-01

    Case study describes Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) three-month Rock the Watt campaign to reduce energy use at its main campus in Richland, Washington. The campaign objectives were to educate PNNL employees about energy conservation opportunities in their workplace and to motivate them to help PNNL save energy and costs and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  2. Heuristics can produce surprisingly rational probability estimates: Comment on Costello and Watts (2014).

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Håkan; Juslin, Peter; Winman, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Costello and Watts (2014) present a model assuming that people's knowledge of probabilities adheres to probability theory, but that their probability judgments are perturbed by a random noise in the retrieval from memory. Predictions for the relationships between probability judgments for constituent events and their disjunctions and conjunctions, as well as for sums of such judgments were derived from probability theory. Costello and Watts (2014) report behavioral data showing that subjective probability judgments accord with these predictions. Based on the finding that subjective probability judgments follow probability theory, Costello and Watts (2014) conclude that the results imply that people's probability judgments embody the rules of probability theory and thereby refute theories of heuristic processing. Here, we demonstrate the invalidity of this conclusion by showing that all of the tested predictions follow straightforwardly from an account assuming heuristic probability integration (Nilsson, Winman, Juslin, & Hansson, 2009). We end with a discussion of a number of previous findings that harmonize very poorly with the predictions by the model suggested by Costello and Watts (2014). PMID:26709414

  3. Results of metallographical diagnostic examination of Navy half-watt thermoelectric converters degraded by accelerated tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosell, F. E., Jr.; Rouklove, P. G.

    1977-01-01

    To verify the 15-year reliability of the Navy half-watt radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG), bismuth-telluride thermoelectric converters were submitted to testing at high temperatures which accelerated the degradation and caused failure of the converters. Metallographic diagnostic examination of failed units verified failure mechanisms. Results of diagnostic examinations are presented.

  4. Electrodes from carbon nanotubes/NiO nanocomposites synthesized in modified Watts bath for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakamada, Masataka; Abe, Tatsuhiko; Mabuchi, Mamoru

    2016-09-01

    A modified Watts bath coupled with pulsed current electroplating is used to uniformly deposit ultrafine nickel oxide particles (diameter < 4 nm) on multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The capacitance of the multiwalled carbon nanotubes/nickel oxide electrodes was as high as 2480 F g-1 (per mass of nickel oxide), which is close to the theoretical capacitance of NiO.

  5. The Voyager spacecraft /James Watt International Gold Medal Lecture/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heacock, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The Voyager Project background is reviewed with emphasis on selected features of the Voyager spacecraft. Investigations by the Thermo-electric Outer Planets Spacecraft Project are discussed, including trajectories, design requirements, and the development of a Self Test and Repair computer, and a Computer Accessed Telemetry System. The design and configuration of the spacecraft are described, including long range communications, attitude control, solar independent power, sequencing and control data handling, and spacecraft propulsion. The development program, maintained by JPL, experienced a variety of problems such as design deficiencies, and process control and manufacturing problems. Finally, the spacecraft encounter with Jupiter is discussed, and expectations for the Saturn encounter are expressed.

  6. Multi-watt 589nm fiber laser source

    SciTech Connect

    DAWSON, J W; DROBSHOFF, A D; BEACH, R J; MESSERLY, M J; PAYNE, S A; BROWN, A; PENNINGTON, D M; BAMFORD, D J; SHARPE, S J; COOK, D J

    2006-01-19

    We have demonstrated 3.5W of 589nm light from a fiber laser using periodically poled stoichiometric Lithium Tantalate (PPSLT) as the frequency conversion crystal. The system employs 938nm and 1583nm fiber lasers, which were sum-frequency mixed in PPSLT to generate 589nm light. The 938nm fiber laser consists of a single frequency diode laser master oscillator (200mW), which was amplified in two stages to >15W using cladding pumped Nd{sup 3+} fiber amplifiers. The fiber amplifiers operate at 938nm and minimize amplified spontaneous emission at 1088nm by employing a specialty fiber design, which maximizes the core size relative to the cladding diameter. This design allows the 3-level laser system to operate at high inversion, thus making it competitive with the competing 1088nm 4-level laser transition. At 15W, the 938nm laser has an M{sup 2} of 1.1 and good polarization (correctable with a quarter and half wave plate to >15:1). The 1583nm fiber laser consists of a Koheras 1583nm fiber DFB laser that is pre-amplified to 100mW, phase modulated and then amplified to 14W in a commercial IPG fiber amplifier. As a part of our research efforts we are also investigating pulsed laser formats and power scaling of the 589nm system. We will discuss the fiber laser design and operation as well as our results in power scaling at 589nm.

  7. A 20 GHz, 75 watt, helix TWT for space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heney, J. F.; Tamashiro, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    A space-qualified, helix-type traveling wave tube is being developed for satellite communication systems in the frequency band of 17.7 to 21.2 GHz. The design approach stresses very high efficiency operation, but with very low distortion. The tube provides multi-mode operation, permitting CW saturated power output levels of 75, 40, and 7.5 W. Operation is also anticipated at 5 dB below these saturation levels to achieve the required low distortion levels. Advanced construction features include a five-stage depressed collector, a diamond supported helix slow-wave circuit, and a type M dispenser cathode. High reliability and long life (10 yr) are objectives of the tube design. Preliminary test results on early developmental models of this tube are very encouraging. An output power of 75 to 90 W has been achieved over the full bandwidth with about 40 dB of saturated gain. More importantly, the basic electronic efficiency of the interaction process has been increased from about 7.5-11 percent by the use of the diamond helix support compared to earlier tubes using BeO support rods. This effort is supported by NASA Lewis Research Center and is aimed toward application in the NASA Advanced Communications Satellite Technology Program.

  8. Computer Power: Part 1: Distribution of Power (and Communications).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Bennett J.

    1988-01-01

    Discussion of the distribution of power to personal computers and computer terminals addresses options such as extension cords, perimeter raceways, and interior raceways. Sidebars explain: (1) the National Electrical Code; (2) volts, amps, and watts; (3) transformers, circuit breakers, and circuits; and (4) power vs. data wiring. (MES)

  9. 75 FR 51987 - Birch Power Company and Sorenson Engineering; Birch Power Company and Sorenson Leasing L.L.C...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... Sorenson Leasing L.L.C.; Notice of Application for Transfer of License, and Soliciting Comments and Motions... (transferors) and Birch Power Company and Sorenson Leasing, L.L.C. (transferees) filed an application for..., Birch Power Company, Sorenson Engineering, and Sorenson Leasing L.L.C., 5203 South 11th East,...

  10. 47 CFR 22.593 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MOBILE SERVICES Paging and Radiotelephone Service Point-To-Point Operation § 22.593 Effective radiated....591 must not exceed 150 Watts. The equivalent isotropically radiated power of existing fixed...

  11. The Jefferson Lab High Power THz User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    John Klopf; Amelia Greer; Joseph Gubeli; George Neil; Michelle D. Shinn; Timothy Siggins; David W. Waldman; Gwyn Williams; Alan Todd; Vincent Christina; Oleg Chubar

    2007-04-27

    We describe here, a high power (100 Watt average, 10 MW peak) broadband THz facility based on emission from sub-picosecond bunches of relativistic electrons and the beam transport system that delivers this beam in to a user laboratory.

  12. Optimization of solar cell contacts by system cost-per-watt minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redfield, D.

    1977-01-01

    New, and considerably altered, optimum dimensions for solar-cell metallization patterns are found using the recently developed procedure whose optimization criterion is the minimum cost-per-watt effect on the entire photovoltaic system. It is also found that the optimum shadow fraction by the fine grid is independent of metal cost and resistivity as well as cell size. The optimum thickness of the fine grid metal depends on all these factors, and in familiar cases it should be appreciably greater than that found by less complete analyses. The optimum bus bar thickness is much greater than those generally used. The cost-per-watt penalty due to the need for increased amounts of metal per unit area on larger cells is determined quantitatively and thereby provides a criterion for the minimum benefits that must be obtained in other process steps to make larger cells cost effective.

  13. Zinc and cadmium residues in striped bass from Cherokee, Norris, and Watts Bar reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Tisa, M.S.; Strange, R.J.

    1981-10-01

    Zinc and cadmium concentrations in muscle, liver, and kidney were measured in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) from Cherokee, Norris, and Watts Bar reservoirs in East Tennessee to determine if these metals had contributed to fish kills observed in Cherokee during the 1970's. The range of mean concentrations of zinc from collections of Cherokee striped bass (muscle 11-14, liver 98-106, kidney 88-105 mg Zn/kg dry weight) were comparable to ranges in fish from Norris and Watts Bar (muscle 12-13, liver 83-132, kidney 96-108 mg/kg dry weight). With the exception of concentrations in the kidneys of one collection, cadmium residues from Cherokee striped bass (muscle 0.02-0.09, liver 0.3-0.7, kidney 0.2-4.0 mg Cd/kg dry weight) were also similar to residues from Norris and Watts Bar fish (muscle 0.05-0.13, liver 0.3-2.1, kidney 0.3-0.5 mg Cd/kg dry weight). There were significant differences in tissue residues among seasons (summer 1979, spring 1980, summer 1980) in Cherokee Reservoir, as well as significant differences among the three reservoirs (Cherokee, Norris, Watts Bar) during the same season (spring 1980). All concentrations, however, were well below those reported for fish exposed to the maximum non-harmful concentrations of zinc and the lowest potentially harmful concentration of cadmium and moreover, were within the range typically reported for fish tissues. It is, therefore, believed that in at least the last two years, zinc and cadmium in the tissues of striped bass from Cherokee Reservoir have not been harmful to the fish.

  14. Fractional watt Vuillemier cryogenic refrigerator program engineering notebook. Volume 2: Stress analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W. S.

    1974-01-01

    A structural analysis performed on the 1/4-watt cryogenic refrigerator. The analysis covered the complete assembly except for the cooling jacket and mounting brackets. Maximum stresses, margin of safety, and natural frequencies were calculated for structurally loaded refrigerator components shown in assembly drawings. The stress analysis indicates that the design is satisfactory for the specified vibration environment, and the proof, burst, and normal operating loads.

  15. Intermittent watt-level ultrasonication facilitates vancomycin release from therapeutic acrylic bone cement.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xun-Zi; Chen, Xian-Zhen; Yan, Shi-Gui; Ruan, Zou-Rong; Yan, Rui-Jian; Ji, Kang; Xu, Jia

    2009-07-01

    Ultrasound holds promise for enhancing the vancomycin release from cement though the length of time when local drug level exceeded the minimum inhibitory concentration (T(>MIC)) was not prolonged by the previous protocol of milliwatt-level ultrasonication. Here vancomycin-loaded cements were subjected to continuous watt-level ultrasonication (CUG), intermittent watt-level ultrasonication (IUG) or no ultrasonication (NUG) for 14 d during immersion in 40-ml phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for 28 d. The T(>MIC) for IUG was more than three times that for NUG. In contrast, T(>MIC) for CUG was slightly shortened. The subtherapeutic release of vancomycin between 15 d and 28 d for IUG was one-ninth that for NUG. The fitting equations indicated a significant enhancement on the burst release and the slow release for IUG; however, the continuous ultrasonication hampered the slow release. SEM images exhibited denser craters and pores with larger diameters and less residual drug in specimens from IUG relative to those from both CUG and NUG. Intermittent watt-level ultrasonication improved the ultrasound-enhanced vancomycin release from cement in view of the prolonged T(>MIC) and the inhibited subtherapeutic release compared with continuous ultrasonication. The mechanisms may be associated with the distinctive effects of detaching forces and pushing forces by acoustic microstreams. PMID:19090490

  16. Monitoring bald eagles using lists of nests: Response to Watts and Duerr

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauer, John R.; Otto, Mark C.; Kendall, William L.; Zimmerman, Guthrie

    2011-01-01

    The post-delisting monitoring plan for bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) roposed use of a dual-frame sample design, in which sampling of known nest sites in combination with additional area-based sampling is used to estimate total number of nesting bald eagle pairs. Watts and Duerr (2010) used data from repeated observations of bald eagle nests in Virginia, USA to estimate a nest turnover rate and used this rate to simulate decline in number of occupied nests in list nests over time. Results of Watts and Duerr suggest that, given the rates of loss of nests from the list of known nest sites in Virginia, the list information will be of little value to sampling unless lists are constantly updated. Those authors criticize the plan for not placing sufficient emphasis on updating and maintaining lists of bald eagle nests. Watts and Duerr's metric of turnover rate does not distinguish detectability or temporary nonuse of nests from permanent loss of nests and likely overestimates turnover rate. We describe a multi-state capture–recapture model that allows appropriate estimation of rates of loss of nests, and we use the model to estimate rates of loss from a sample of nests from Maine, USA. The post-delisting monitoring plan addresses the need to maintain and update the lists of nests, and we show that dual frame sampling is an effective approach for sampling nesting bald eagle populations.

  17. Monitoring bald eagles using lists of nests: Response to Watts and Duerr

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauer, J.R.; Otto, M.C.; Kendall, W.L.; Zimmerman, G.S.

    2011-01-01

    The post-delisting monitoring plan for bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) roposed use of a dual-frame sample design, in which sampling of known nest sites in combination with additional area-based sampling is used to estimate total number of nesting bald eagle pairs. Watts and Duerr (2010) used data from repeated observations of bald eagle nests in Virginia, USA to estimate a nest turnover rate and used this rate to simulate decline in number of occupied nests in list nests over time. Results of Watts and Duerr suggest that, given the rates of loss of nests from the list of known nest sites in Virginia, the list information will be of little value to sampling unless lists are constantly updated. Those authors criticize the plan for not placing sufficient emphasis on updating and maintaining lists of bald eagle nests. Watts and Duerr's metric of turnover rate does not distinguish detectability or temporary nonuse of nests from permanent loss of nests and likely overestimates turnover rate. We describe a multi-state capture-recapture model that allows appropriate estimation of rates of loss of nests, and we use the model to estimate rates of loss from a sample of nests from Maine, USA. The post-delisting monitoring plan addresses the need to maintain and update the lists of nests, and we show that dual frame sampling is an effective approach for sampling nesting bald eagle populations. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  18. One-Watt level mid-IR output, singly resonant, continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator pumped by a monolithic diode laser.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuis, Ab F; Lee, Chris J; Sumpf, Bernd; van der Slot, Peter J M; Erbert, Götz; Boller, Klaus-J

    2010-05-24

    We report more than 1.1 Watt of idler power at 3373 nm in a singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (SRO), directly pumped by a single-frequency monolithic tapered diode laser. The SRO is based on a periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3 crystal in a four mirror cavity and is excited by 8.05 W of 1062 nm radiation. The SRO pump power at threshold is 4 W. The internal slope-efficiency and conversion efficiency reach 89% and 44% respectively. The signal and idler waves are temperature tuned in the range of 1541 to 1600 nm and 3154 to 3415 nm respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest output obtained for a diode pumped optical parametric oscillator (OPO), and the first time a SRO is directly pumped by a monolithic tapered diode laser. PMID:20588971

  19. Realistic Specific Power Expectations for Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.

    2006-01-01

    Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) are being considered for a wide range of future NASA space science and exploration missions. Generally, RPS offer the advantages of high reliability, long life, and predictable power production regardless of operating environment. Previous RPS, in the form of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG), have been used successfully on many NASA missions including Apollo, Viking, Voyager, and Galileo. NASA is currently evaluating design options for the next generation of RPS. Of particular interest is the use of advanced, higher efficiency power conversion to replace the previous thermoelectric devices. Higher efficiency reduces the quantity of radioisotope fuel and potentially improves the RPS specific power (watts per kilogram). Power conversion options include Segmented Thermoelectric (STE), Stirling, Brayton, and Thermophotovoltaic (TPV). This paper offers an analysis of the advanced 100 watt-class RPS options and provides credible projections for specific power. Based on the analysis presented, RPS specific power values greater than 10 W/kg appear unlikely.

  20. Results of Performance Tests Performed on the John Watts WW Casing Connection on 7" Pipe

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Watts

    2000-02-01

    Stress Engineering Services (SES) was contracted by Mr. John Watts to test his ''WW'' threaded connection developed for oilfield oil and gas service. This work was a continuation of testing performed by SES as reported in August of 1999. The connection design tested was identified as ''WW''. The samples were all integral (no coupled connections) and contained a wedge thread form with 90{sup o} flank angles relative to the pipe centerline. The wedge thread form is a variable width thread that primarily engages on the flanks. This thread form provides very high torque capacity and good stabbing ability and makeup. The test procedure selected for one of the samples was the newly written ISO 13679 procedure for full scale testing of casing and tubing connections, which is currently going through the ISO acceptance process. The ISO procedure requires a variety of tests that includes makeup/breakout testing, internal gas sealability/external water sealability testing with axial tension, axial compression, bending, internal gas thermal cycle tests and limit load (failure) tests. This test procedure was performed with one sample. Four samples were tested to failure. Table 1 contains a summary of the tasks performed by SES. The project started with the delivery of test samples by Mr. Watts. Pipe from the previous round of tests was used for the new samples. Figure 1 shows the structural and sealing results relative to the pipe body. Sample 1 was used to determine the torque capacity of the connection. Torque was applied to the capacity of SES's equipment which was 28,424 ft-lbs. From this, an initial recommended torque range of 7,200 to 8,800 ft-lbs. was selected. The sample was disassembled and while there was no galling observed in the threads, the end of the pin had collapsed inward. Sample 2 received three makeups. Breakouts 1 and 2 also had collapsing of the pin end, with no thread galling. From these make/breaks, it was decided to reduce the amount of lubricant

  1. 11th International Conference of Radiation Research

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-18

    Topics discussed in the conference included the following: Radiation Physics, Radiation Chemistry and modelling--Radiation physics and dosimetry; Electron transfer in biological media; Radiation chemistry; Biophysical and biochemical modelling; Mechanisms of DNA damage; Assays of DNA damage; Energy deposition in micro volumes; Photo-effects; Special techniques and technologies; Oxidative damage. Molecular and cellular effects-- Photobiology; Cell cycle effects; DNA damage: Strand breaks; DNA damage: Bases; DNA damage Non-targeted; DNA damage: other; Chromosome aberrations: clonal; Chromosomal aberrations: non-clonal; Interactions: Heat/Radiation/Drugs; Biochemical effects; Protein expression; Gene induction; Co-operative effects; ``Bystander'' effects; Oxidative stress effects; Recovery from radiation damage. DNA damage and repair -- DNA repair genes; DNA repair deficient diseases; DNA repair enzymology; Epigenetic effects on repair; and Ataxia and ATM.

  2. 11th Annual School Construction Report, 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Paul

    2006-01-01

    "School Planning & Management"'s annual survey of school construction statistics including projects completed during 2005, projected completions for 2006, and projects that will begin construction during 2006. In addition to national figures, statistics are broken down to provide detail for 12 regions of the nation, as well as the…

  3. An Economic Analysis of September 11th

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langelett, George L.; Schug, Mark C.

    2004-01-01

    To many Western observers, the behavior of people in the Middle East is a mystery. The area is the scene of brutality and seemingly senseless acts of violence. Why has there been so much turmoil there for so long? This article contains a brief review of past events in the Middle East, which helps to establish the context of the problem. Sections…

  4. Part C Updates. 11th Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danaher, Joan; Goode, Sue; Lazara, Alex

    2010-01-01

    "Part C Updates" is a compilation of information on various aspects of the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). This is the eleventh volume in a series of compilations, which included two editions of Part H Updates, the former name of the program.…

  5. The 11th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Various mechanisms in aerospace engineering were presented at this conference. Specifications, design, and use of spacecraft and missile components are discussed, such as tail assemblies, radiometers, magnetormeters, pins, reaction wheels, ball bearings, actuators, mirrors, nutation dampers, airfoils, solar arrays, etc.

  6. The 11th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Mechanical devices and drives developed for aerospace applications are described. Satellite flywheels, magnetic bearings, a missile umbilical system, a cartridge firing device, and an oiler for satellite bearing lubrication are among the topics discussed.

  7. The 11th Space Simulation Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Subject areas range from specialized issues dealing with the space and entry environments to the environmental testing of systems and complete spacecraft of present-day vintage. Various papers consider: the test and development of several key systems of the orbiter vehicle; integrated tests of complete satellites; new and unique test facilities developed to meet the demanding requirements of high fidelity simulation of test environments; and contamination species, including the instrumentation for detection and measurement of such. Special topics include improved thermal protection methodologies and approaches, sophisticated sensor developments, and other related testing and development areas.

  8. Limits to wind power utilization.

    PubMed

    Gustavson, M R

    1979-04-01

    As wind energy receives increasing attention it is important to understand the noneconomic factors limiting the total power that can be extracted from the wind. These factors are examined here with a macroscopic approach. An upper global limit of 1.3 x 10(14) watts is arrived at with a sublimit of 2 x 10(12) watts for the continental United States. Some general conclusions are also reached regarding the sites that would have to be utilized to achieve these levels. Even within these limits, wind energy is seen to offer a potential far larger than many other self-renewing energy sources.

  9. 3-D model of a radial flow sub-watt methanol fuel processor

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, J. D.; Wang, Y.

    2015-10-01

    A 3-D model is presented for a novel sub-watt packed bed reactor. The reactor uses an annular inlet flow combined with a radial flow packed bed reactor. The baseline reactor is compared to a reactor with multiple outlets and a reactor with 3 internal fins. Increasing the outlets from 1 to 4 did improve the flow distribution, but did not increase the performance in the simulation. However, inserting fins allowed a decrease in temperature with same inlet flow of approximately 35K. Or the inlet flow rate could be increased by a factor of 2.8x while maintaining >99% conversion.

  10. Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to confirm the viability of using a commercial light water reactor (CLWR) as a potential source for maintaining the nation`s supply of tritium. The Proposed Action discussed in this environmental assessment is a limited scale confirmatory test that would provide DOE with information needed to assess that option. This document contains the environmental assessment results for the Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis for the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee, and the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington.

  11. Productive resources in students' ideas about energy: An alternative analysis of Watts' original interview transcripts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrer, Benedikt W.; Flood, Virginia J.; Wittmann, Michael C.

    2013-12-01

    For over 30 years, researchers have investigated students’ ideas about energy with the intent of reforming instructional practice. In this pursuit, Watts contributed an influential study with his 1983 paper “Some alternative views of energy” [Phys. Educ. 18, 213 (1983)]. Watts’ “alternative frameworks” continue to be used for categorizing students’ non-normative ideas about energy. Using a resources framework, we propose an alternate analysis of student responses from Watts’ interviews. In our analysis, we show how students’ activated resources about energy are disciplinarily productive. We suggest that fostering seeds of scientific understandings in students’ ideas about energy may play an important role in their development of scientific literacy.

  12. Long term spectral irradiance measurements of a 1000-watt xenon arc lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    Spectral irradiance measurements over the range of 200 to 1060 nm were made on a 1000-watt xenon arc lamp over a period of 1500 hours. Four sets of measurements were made after periods of 70, 525, 1000, and 1500 hours of operation. The lamp (Hanovia Compact Xenon Arc Lamp) was mounted in the NASA Solar Irradiation System. When used in the System, the lamp is used as the radiating source for six test stations. Measurements were made of both the longterm stability (or variation of spectral irradiance as a function of time) and the actual spectral irradiance incident on the test specimen.

  13. Lumen Maintenance Testing of the Philips 60-Watt Replacement Lamp L Prize Entry

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Kelly L.; Hafen, Ryan P.; Hathaway, John E.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes testing conducted to evaluate the Philips' L Prize award winning 60-watt LED replacement product's ability to meet the lifetime/lumen maintenance requirement of the competition, which was: "having 70 percent of the lumen value under subparagraph (A) [producing a luminous flux greater than 900 lumens] exceeding 25,000 hours under typical conditions expected in residential use." A custom test apparatus was designed and constructed for this testing and a statistical approach was developed for use in evaluating the test results. This will be the only publicly available, third-party data set of long-term LED product operation.

  14. 47 CFR 22.593 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effective radiated power limits. 22.593 Section... power limits. The effective radiated power of fixed stations operating on the channels listed in § 22.591 must not exceed 150 Watts. The equivalent isotropically radiated power of existing fixed...

  15. 47 CFR 87.131 - Power and emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., F9D, F7D 25 watts. 3 HF H2B, J3E, J7D, J9W 6.0 kw. Aviation support VHF A3E 50 watts. Airport control... and antenna height are restricted to the minimum necessary to achieve the required service. 3... to the antenna. 4 Frequency, emission, and maximum power will be determined after coordination...

  16. Entheseal changes and sexual division of labor in a North-African population: The case of the pre-Hispanic period of the Gran Canaria Island (11th-15th c. CE).

    PubMed

    Santana-Cabrera, J; Velasco-Vázquez, J; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, A

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the relationship between entheseal changes and sexual division of labor in the pre-Hispanic population of Gran Canaria Island (Spain). Ethnohistorical records from the period of contact between Europeans and the Canarian indigenous population provide rich information about the different activities performed by men and women. For this purpose, entheseal changes in a sample of 138 individuals (82 males and 56 females) buried in ten pre-Hispanic cemeteries (11th and 15th centuries cal. CE) were analyzed. Forty-one entheses located in the clavicle, humerus, ulna and radius were analyzed (fibrous and fibro-cartilaginous attachment sites). Entheses were graded using a visual and descriptive standard which summarized the entheseal changes. This method interprets the changes as a sign of robustness on a scale from low to high development and includes enthesopathies. The intra- and inter-observer error of this method was minimal. Sex differences in the degree of robustness, bilateral asymmetry, sexual dimorphism and principal components analyses were tested in this sample. The results indicate significant variance in the entheseal robustness between males and females. They also suggest the impact of certain biomechanical chains (pronosupination, shoulder rotation, etc.) in entheseal changes. These results contribute to an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the sexual division of labor in the pre-Hispanic society of Gran Canaria.

  17. Acoustics of early music spaces from the 11th to 18th century: Rediscovery of the acoustical excellence of medium-sized rooms and new perspectives for modern concert hall design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassuet, Alban

    2001-05-01

    The acoustical characteristics of 50 rooms that played a prominent role in the history of music between the 11th and 18th centuries were studied. The rooms include basilicas, oratorios, organ churches, and the great halls and courts of the European palaces. The research provides an understanding of the acoustical features that suit the early music repertoire, and how these rooms achieved an enhanced emotional engagement through their unique acoustical characteristics. This paper provides a summary of the acoustic measurements, which include binaural and B-format recordings in each of the rooms, and presents a unique new approach to understanding their subjective characteristics through detailed analysis and auralization of their 3-D impulse response. The study shows that the timing and direction of reflections in three dimensions is critically important to defining the subjective characteristic of a room. The results emphasize the importance of developing techniques to understand the 3-D impulse response and using auralization techniques for interpreting results and making subjective judgments. The enhanced musical experience that is achieved in these early rooms offers an invitation to rethink modern acoustics and to develop a new design approach that focuses more strongly on the subjective response and emotional engagement of the music.

  18. A five-watt G-M/J-T refrigerator for LHe target at BNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, L. X.; Wang, L.; Addessi, L.; Miglionico, G.; Martin, D.; Leskowicz, J.; McNeill, M.; Yatauro, B.; Tallerico, T.

    2002-05-01

    A five-watts G-M/J-T refrigerator was built and installed for the high-energy physics research at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 2001. A liquid helium target of 8.25 liters was required for an experiment in the proton beam line at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) of BNL. The large radiation heat load towards the target requires a five-watts refrigerator at 4.2 K to support a liquid helium flask of 0.2 meter in diameter and 0.3 meter in length, which is made of Mylar film of 0.35 mm in thickness. The liquid helium flask is thermally exposed to the vacuum windows that are also made of 0.35 mm thickness Mylar film at room temperature. The refrigerator uses a two-stage Gifford-McMahon cryocooler for precooling the Joule-Thomson circuit that consists of five Linde-type heat exchangers. A mass flow rate of 0.8˜1.0 grams per second at 17.7 atm is applied to the refrigerator cold box. The two-phase helium flows between the liquid target and liquid/gas separator by means of a thermosyphon. This paper presents the system design as well as the test results including the control of the thermal oscillation.

  19. A FIVE-WATTS G-M/J-T REFRIGERATOR FOR LHE TARGET AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    JIA,L.X.; WANG,L.; ADDESSI,L.; MIGLIONICO,G.; MARTIN,D.; LESKOWICZ,J.; MCNEILL,M.; YATAURO,B.; TALLERICO,T.

    2001-07-16

    A five-watts G-M/J-T refrigerator was built and installed for the high-energy physics research at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 2001. A liquid helium target of 8.25 liters was required for an experiment in the proton beam line at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) of BNL. The large radiation heat load towards the target requires a five-watts refrigerator at 4.2 K to support a liquid helium flask of 0.2 meter in diameter and 0.3 meter in length which is made of Mylar film of 0.35 mm in thickness. The liquid helium flask is thermally exposed to the vacuum windows that are also made of 0.35 mm thickness Mylar film at room temperature. The refrigerator uses a two-stage Gifford-McMahon cryocooler for precooling the Joule-Thomson circuit that consists of five Linde-type heat exchangers. A mass flow rate of 0.8 {approx} 1.0 grams per second at 17.7 atm is applied to the refrigerator cold box. The two-phase helium flows between the liquid target and liquid/gas separator by means of thermosyphon. The paper presents the system design as well as the test results including the control of thermal oscillation.

  20. Effects of choline chloride on electrodeposited Ni coating from a Watts-type bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yurong; Yang, Caihong; He, Jiawei; Wang, Wenchang; Mitsuzak, Naotoshi; Chen, Zhidong

    2016-05-01

    Electrodeposition of bright nickel (Ni) was carried out in a Watts-type bath. Choline chloride (ChCl) was applied as a multifunctional additive and substitute for nickel chloride (NiCl2) in a Watts-type bath. The function of ChCl was investigated through conductivity tests, anodic polarization, and cathodic polarization experiments. The studies revealed that ChCl performed well as a conducting salt, anodic activator, and cathodic inhibitor. The effects of ChCl on deposition rate, preferred orientation, grain size, surface morphology, and microhardness of Ni coatings were also studied. The deposition rate reached a maximum value of greater than 27 μm h-1 when 20 g L-1 ChCl was introduced to the bath. Using X-ray diffraction, it was confirmed that progressive addition of ChCl promoted the preferred crystal orientation modification from (2 0 0) and (2 2 0) to (1 1 1), refined grain size, and enhanced microhardness. The presence of ChCl lowered the roughness of the coating.

  1. Hysteresis and Related Error Mechanisms in the NIST Watt Balance Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Joshua P.; Liu, Ruimin; Newell, David B.; Steiner, Richard L.; Williams, Edwin R.; Smith, Douglas; Erdemir, Ali; Woodford, John

    2001-01-01

    The NIST watt balance experiment is being completely rebuilt after its 1998 determination of the Planck constant. That measurement yielded a result with an approximately 1×10−7 relative standard uncertainty. Because the goal of the new incarnation of the experiment is a ten-fold decrease in uncertainty, it has been necessary to reexamine many sources of systematic error. Hysteresis effects account for a substantial portion of the projected uncertainty budget. They arise from mechanical, magnetic, and thermal sources. The new experiment incorporates several improvements in the apparatus to address these issues, including stiffer components for transferring the mass standard on and off the balance, better servo control of the balance, better pivot materials, and the incorporation of erasing techniques into the mass transfer servo system. We have carried out a series of tests of hysteresis sources on a separate system, and apply their results to the watt apparatus. The studies presented here suggest that our improvements can be expected to reduce hysteresis signals by at least a factor of 10—perhaps as much as a factor of 50—over the 1998 experiment. PMID:27500039

  2. Remedial investigation/feasibility study report for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR) Operable Unit (OU). The LWBR is located in Roane, Rhea, and Meigs counties, Tennessee, and consists of Watts Bar Reservoir downstream of the Clinch river. This area has received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). As required by this law, the ORR and all off-site areas that have received contaminants, including LWBR, must be investigated to determine the risk to human health and the environment resulting from these releases, the need for any remedial action to reduce these risks, and the remedial actions that are most feasible for implementation in this OU. Contaminants from the ORR are primarily transported to the LWBR via the Clinch River. There is little data regarding the quantities of most contaminants potentially released from the ORR to the Clinch River, particularly for the early years of ORR operations. Estimates of the quantities released during this period are available for most radionuclides and some inorganic contaminants, indicating that releases 30 to 50 years ago were much higher than today. Since the early 1970s, the release of potential contaminants has been monitored for compliance with environmental law and reported in the annual environmental monitoring reports for the ORR.

  3. Final Project Report on Arsenic Biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir, Volume 1: Main Text

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    This study was conducted as a special project of the Clinch River Remedial Investigation, which is tasked with conducting a remedial investigation of the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program is funded by the U. S. Department of Energy to investigate the possible corrective actions required to rectify the historic releases of hazardous waste and radioactive contaminants into the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir system. The arsenic study was undertaken after preliminary screening of existing data from the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir. As a result of nonconservative screening, arsenic was assigned as a definitely high priority substance for further human health consideration, and the data showed that arsenic concentrations exceeded benchmark criteria for ecological risk assessment. This study investigated the speciation, distribution, and mobility of arsenic in the sediment, pore water, and the water column seasonally over a 3-year period (1990-1992).

  4. TVA sediment-disturbing activities within the Watts Bar Reservoir and Melton Hill Reservoir areas of the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    The objectives of Task 5 were to review: (1) the extent of dredging, construction, and other sediment-disturbing activities conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in potentially contaminated areas of Watts Bar Reservoir; and (2) the disposition of the materials from these activities. This memorandum is the final report for Task 5. This memorandum describes major activities in the Watts Bar Reservoir and Melton Hill Reservoir areas of the Clinch River that possibly resulted in significant disturbance of potentially contaminated sediments. TVA records from the construction of Watts Bar Dam, Kingston Fossil Plant, and Melton Hill Dam were reviewed to facilitate qualitative description of the effect of these activities in disturbing potentially contaminated sediments. The critical period for these activities in disturbing contaminated sediments was during or after 1956 when the peak releases of radioactive contaminants occurred from the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  5. Spectrophotovoltaic orbital power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onffroy, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibilty of a spectrophotovoltaic orbital power generation system that optically concentrates solar energy is demonstrated. A dichroic beam-splitting mirror is used to divide the solar spectrum into two wavebands. Absorption of these wavebands by GaAs and Si solar cell arrays with matched energy bandgaps increases the cell efficiency while decreasing the amount of heat that must be rejected. The projected cost per peak watt if this system is $2.50/W sub p.

  6. Low power, CMOS digital autocorrelator spectrometer for spaceborne applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, Kumar; Wilson, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A 128-channel digital autocorrelator spectrometer using four 32 channel low power CMOS correlator chips was built and tested. The CMOS correlator chip uses a 2-bit multiplication algorithm and a full-custom CMOS VLSI design to achieve low DC power consumption. The digital autocorrelator spectrometer has a 20 MHz band width, and the total DC power requirement is 6 Watts.

  7. 47 CFR 87.131 - Power and emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Power and emissions. 87.131 Section 87.131... Technical Requirements § 87.131 Power and emissions. The following table lists authorized emissions and... Authorized emission(s) 9 Maximum power 1 Aeronautical advisory VHF A3E 10 watts. 10 Aeronautical multicom...

  8. Watt-level millimeter-wave monolithic diode-grid frequency multipliers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwu, J. R.; Jou, C. F.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Lam, W. W.; Rutledge, D. B.; Hancock, B.; Lieneweg, U.; Maserjian, J.

    1988-01-01

    Wall-level CW solid-state sources in the millimeter-wave region are needed for plasma diagnostics. Monolithic metal-grid arrays containing in excess of 1000 Schottky diodes have produced watt-level output at 66 GHz in a doubler configuration, in excellent agreement with the large-signal predictions of the frequency multiplication. Current efforts are concentrated on fabricating and developing arrays of a novel barrier-intrinsic-N+ (BIN) diode which promise increased performance in a tripler configuration. Initial tests will be made for a configuration where a tripling efficiency of 35 percent at an output frequency of 100 GHz is predicted. Eventual goals are monolithic BIN diode grids operating at 1 THz.

  9. Spatial prisoner's dilemma game with volunteering in Newman-Watts small-world networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhi-Xi; Xu, Xin-Jian; Chen, Yong; Wang, Ying-Hai

    2005-03-01

    A modified spatial prisoner’s dilemma game with voluntary participation in Newman-Watts small-world networks is studied. Some reasonable ingredients are introduced to the game evolutionary dynamics: each agent in the network is a pure strategist and can only take one of three strategies (cooperator, defector, and loner); its strategical transformation is associated with both the number of strategical states and the magnitude of average profits, which are adopted and acquired by its coplayers in the previous round of play; a stochastic strategy mutation is applied when it gets into the trouble of local commons that the agent and its neighbors are in the same state and get the same average payoffs. In the case of very low temptation to defect, it is found that agents are willing to participate in the game in typical small-world region and intensive collective oscillations arise in more random region.

  10. Development of a 75-watt 60-GHz traveling-wave tube for intersatellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseau, A. L.; Tammaru, I.; Vaszari, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    This program covers the initial design and development of a 75 watt, 60 GHz traveling-wave tube for intersatellite communications. The objective frequency band was 59 to 64 GHz, with a minimum tube gain of 35 dB. The objective overall efficiency at saturation was 40 percent. The tube, designated the 961H, used a coupled-cavity interaction circuit with periodic permanent magnet beam focusing to minimize the weight. For efficiency enhancement, it incorporated a four-stage depressed collector capable of radiation cooling in space. The electron gun had a low-temperature (type-M) cathode and an isolated anode. Two tubes were built and tested; one feasibility model with a single-stage collector and one experimental model that incorporated the multistage collector.

  11. Examination of frit vent from Sixty-Watt Heat Source simulant fueled clad vent set

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, G.B.

    1995-11-01

    The flow rate and the metallurgical condition of a frit vent from a simulant-fueled clad vent set (CVS) that had been hot isostatically pressed (HIP) for the Sixty-Watt Heat Source program were evaluated. The flow rate form the defueled vent cup subassembly was reduced approximately 25% from the original flow rate. No obstructions were found to account for the reduced flow rate. Measurements indicate that the frit vent powder thickness was reduced about 30%. Most likely, the powder was compressed during the HIP operation, which increased the density of the powder layer and thus reduced the flow rate of the assembly. All other observed manufacturing attributes appeared to be normal, but the vent hole activation technique needs further refinement before it is used in applications requiring maximum CVS integrity.

  12. First Passage Percolation on the Newman-Watts Small World Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komjáthy, Júlia; Vadon, Viktória

    2016-02-01

    The Newman-Watts model is given by taking a cycle graph of n vertices and then adding each possible edge (i,j), |i-j|≠ 1 mod n with probability ρ /n for some ρ >0 constant. In this paper we add i.i.d. exponential edge weights to this graph, and investigate typical distances in the corresponding random metric space given by the least weight paths between vertices. We show that typical distances grow as 1/λ log n for a λ >0 and determine the distribution of smaller order terms in terms of limits of branching process random variables. We prove that the number of edges along the shortest weight path follows a Central Limit Theorem, and show that in a corresponding epidemic spread model the fraction of infected vertices follows a deterministic curve with a random shift.

  13. Cascading failures with local load redistribution in interdependent Watts-Strogatz networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Chen; Zhang, Jun; Du, Wen-Bo; Sallan, Jose Maria; Lordan, Oriol

    2016-05-01

    Cascading failures of loads in isolated networks have been studied extensively over the last decade. Since 2010, such research has extended to interdependent networks. In this paper, we study cascading failures with local load redistribution in interdependent Watts-Strogatz (WS) networks. The effects of rewiring probability and coupling strength on the resilience of interdependent WS networks have been extensively investigated. It has been found that, for small values of the tolerance parameter, interdependent networks are more vulnerable as rewiring probability increases. For larger values of the tolerance parameter, the robustness of interdependent networks firstly decreases and then increases as rewiring probability increases. Coupling strength has a different impact on robustness. For low values of coupling strength, the resilience of interdependent networks decreases with the increment of the coupling strength until it reaches a certain threshold value. For values of coupling strength above this threshold, the opposite effect is observed. Our results are helpful to understand and design resilient interdependent networks.

  14. Evolutionary prisoner's dilemma on Newman-Watts social networks with an asymmetric payoff distribution mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Wen-Bo; Cao, Xian-Bin; Yang, Han-Xin; Hu, Mao-Bin

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce an asymmetric payoff distribution mechanism into the evolutionary prisoner's dilemma game (PDG) on Newman-Watts social networks, and study its effects on the evolution of cooperation. The asymmetric payoff distribution mechanism can be adjusted by the parameter α: if α > 0, the rich will exploit the poor to get richer; if α < 0, the rich are forced to offer part of their income to the poor. Numerical results show that the cooperator frequency monotonously increases with α and is remarkably promoted when α > 0. The effects of updating order and self-interaction are also investigated. The co-action of random updating and self-interaction can induce the highest cooperation level. Moreover, we employ the Gini coefficient to investigate the effect of asymmetric payoff distribution on the the system's wealth distribution. This work may be helpful for understanding cooperative behaviour and wealth inequality in society.

  15. Details of the 1998 Watt Balance Experiment Determining the Planck Constant

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Richard; Newell, David; Williams, Edwin

    2005-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) watt balance experiment completed a determination of Planck constant in 1998 with a relative standard uncertainty of 87 × 10−9 (k = 1), concurrently with an upper limit on the drift rate of the SI kilogram mass standard. A number of other fundamental physical constants with uncertainties dominated by this result are also calculated. This paper focuses on the details of the balance apparatus, the measurement and control procedures, and the reference calibrations. The alignment procedures are also described, as is a novel mutual inductance measurement procedure. The analysis summary discusses the data noise sources and estimates for the Type B uncertainty contributions to the uncertainty budget. Much of this detail, some historical progression, and a few recent findings have not been included in previous papers reporting the results of this experiment. PMID:27308100

  16. Watts linkage based large band low frequency sensors for scientific applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, F.; Giordano, G.; Acernese, F.; Romano, R.

    2016-07-01

    The UNISA Folded Pendulum class of horizontal and vertical sensors, based on an innovative configuration of the classical Watt's linkage mechanical architecture, allows the design and implementation of very large band monolithic sensors (10-7 Hz to102 Hz), whose sensitivities for the most common applications are defined by the noise introduced by their readouts (e.g. <10-12 m /√{ Hz } with classical LVDT readouts). These unique features, coupled other relevant properties like scalability, compactness, lightness, high directivity, frequency tunability (typical resonance frequencies in the band 10-1 Hz to102 Hz), very high immunity to environmental noises and low cost make this class of sensors very effective for the implementation of uniaxial (horizontal and/or vertical) and triaxial seismometers and accelerometers for ground, space and underwater applications, including UHV and cryogenics ones.

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT - PHYSICAL REMOVAL OF MICROBIAL CONTAMINATION AGENTS IN DRINKING WATER, WATTS P{REMIER ULTRA 5 REVERSE OSMOSIS DRINKING WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM (POU)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Watts Premier Ultra 5 system was tested for removal of bacteria and viruses at NSF International's Laboratory. Watts Premier submitted ten units, which were split into two groups of five. One group received 25 days of conditioning prior to challenge testing, while the secon...

  18. ETV REPORT: REMOVAL OF CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS IN DRINKING WATER – WATTS PREMIER INC. WP-4V DRINKING WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Watts Premier WP-4V POU drinking water treatment system was tested for removal of aldicarb, benzene, cadmium, carbofuran, cesium, chloroform, dichlorvos, dicrotophos, fenamiphos, mercury, mevinphos, oxamyl, strontium, and strychnine. The WP-4V employs a reverse osmosis (RO) m...

  19. 76 FR 34799 - Permanent Dam Safety Modification at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams, TN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... Alternatives: permanent modifications to dam structures and removal of the temporary HESCO baskets before the... Permanent Dam Safety Modification at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams, TN AGENCY... various alternatives for permanent modifications to the existing dam facilities at Cherokee, Fort...

  20. PHYSICAL REMOVAL OF MICROBIAL CONTAMINANTS IN DRINKING WATER – WATTS PREMIER INC. WP-4V DRINKING WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Watts Premier WP-4V four-stage POU RO system was tested for removal of bacteria and viruses at NSF’s Drinking Water Treatment Systems Laboratory. Five systems were challenged with the bacteriophage viruses fr and MS2, and the bacteria Brevundimonas diminutaEM. The ...

  1. Design of polarizers for a mega-watt long-pulse millimeter-wave transmission line on the large helical device.

    PubMed

    Ii, T; Kubo, S; Shimozuma, T; Kobayashi, S; Okada, K; Yoshimura, Y; Igami, H; Takahashi, H; Ito, S; Mizuno, Y; Okada, K; Makino, R; Kobayashi, K; Goto, Y; Mutoh, T

    2015-02-01

    The polarizer is one of the critical components in a high-power millimeter-wave transmission line. It requires full and highly efficient coverage of any polarization states, high-power tolerance, and low-loss feature. Polarizers with rounded shape at the edge of the periodic groove surface are designed and fabricated by the machining process for a mega-watt long-pulse millimeter-wave transmission line of the electron cyclotron resonance heating system in the large helical device. The groove shape of λ/8- and λ/4-type polarizers for an 82.7 GHz transmission line is optimally designed in an integral method developed in the vector theories of diffraction gratings so that the efficiency to realize any polarization state can be maximized. The dependence of the polarization states on the combination of the two polarizer rotation angles (Φλ/8, Φλ/4) is examined experimentally in a low-power test with the newly developed polarization monitor. The results show that the measured polarization characteristics are in good agreement with the calculated ones.

  2. Design of polarizers for a mega-watt long-pulse millimeter-wave transmission line on the large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Ii, T. Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Kobayashi, S.; Okada, K.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Ito, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Mutoh, T.; Makino, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Goto, Y.

    2015-02-15

    The polarizer is one of the critical components in a high-power millimeter-wave transmission line. It requires full and highly efficient coverage of any polarization states, high-power tolerance, and low-loss feature. Polarizers with rounded shape at the edge of the periodic groove surface are designed and fabricated by the machining process for a mega-watt long-pulse millimeter-wave transmission line of the electron cyclotron resonance heating system in the large helical device. The groove shape of λ/8- and λ/4-type polarizers for an 82.7 GHz transmission line is optimally designed in an integral method developed in the vector theories of diffraction gratings so that the efficiency to realize any polarization state can be maximized. The dependence of the polarization states on the combination of the two polarizer rotation angles (Φ{sub λ/8}, Φ{sub λ/4}) is examined experimentally in a low-power test with the newly developed polarization monitor. The results show that the measured polarization characteristics are in good agreement with the calculated ones.

  3. Thermal control of power supplies with electronic packaging techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The analysis, design, and development work to reduce the weight and size of a standard modular power supply with a 350 watt output was summarized. By integrating low cost commercial heat pipes in the redesign of this power supply, weight was reduced by 30% from that of the previous design. The temperature was also appreciably reduced, increasing the environmental capability of the unit. A demonstration unit with a 100 watt output and a 15 volt regulator module, plus simulated output modules, was built and tested to evaluate the thermal performance of the redesigned power supply.

  4. Modeling Seasons in the Outer Solar System: Enabling EPIC to Roar on 1 Watt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, Timothy E.; Sussman, M. G.; Greathouse, T. K.; Chanover, N. J.

    2012-10-01

    We describe solutions to key technical problems that arise in GCMs when modeling the circulations of Uranus and Neptune, and provide an update to the EPIC model radiative transfer (RT) package, with application to seasonal forcing of Saturn and Uranus. The primary challenges in ice-giant circulation modeling stem from the low value of the solar insolation ( 1 Wm-2), which results in slow ( 10-3 ms-1) meridional-plane circulations that are coupled to fast ( 102 ms-1) zonal winds. Computational modes that are negligible for inner solar-system atmospheric modeling because of high insolation are not negligible for Uranus and Neptune, and hence must be reduced or eliminated. We describe a new, high-order hyperviscosity algorithm that is non-dimensional, efficient, and has well-behaved boundary conditions at the poles. A 12th-order application to Uranus permits EPIC to run for multiple Uranus years without degrading the 11th-order zonal-wind model of Sromovsky et al. (2009). Additional EPIC (Ver. 5.0) improvements include a runtime RT package based on the Greathouse et al. (2010 EGU) Saturn seasonal model that employs our fast and accurate DISORT c_twostr rewrite, a pressure vertical-coordinate option, a dynamic convective adjustment scheme which incorporates improvements to the turbulent Prandtl number by Zilitinkevich et al. (2007), and an accurate analemma, or Sun-in-sky position as a function of time and location on the planet, for Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. These improvements make EPIC a versatile tool for dynamic 3D modeling of stratospheric temperatures and hydrocarbon distributions. This research is funded by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program, Grant NNX08AEG4G.

  5. Optimal power settings of aluminum gallium arsenide lasers in caries inhibition — An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sonali; Hegde, Mithra N; Sadananda, Vandana; Mathews, Blessen

    2016-01-01

    Context: Incipient carious lesions are characterized by subsurface dissolution due to more fluoride ions in the 50-100 microns of the tooth's outer surface. Aims: To determine an optimal power setting for 810 nm aluminum gallium arsenide laser for caries inhibition. Materials and Methods: Fifty-four caries-free extracted teeth were sectioned mesiodistally. The samples were divided into 18 groups for each power setting being evaluated. Each group had six samples. The laser used is 810 nm aluminum gallium arsenide laser with power setting from 0.1 watts to 5 watts. Laser fluorescence based device was used to evaluate the effect of irradiation. Statistical Analysis Used: Paired “t” test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey's post hoc test, and the Pearson's correlation test. Results: The paired t-test showed that there is minimum divergence from the control for 3.5 watts. Tukey's post hoc test also showed statistically significantly results for 3.5 watts. The Pearson's correlation test showed that there was negative correlation between the watts and irradiation. Conclusions: The power setting that gave statistically significant results was 3.5 watts. PMID:27099427

  6. The Planck Constant, the International System of Units, and the 2012 North American Watt Balance Absolute Gravity Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    As outlined in Resolution 1 of the 24th Meeting of the General Conference on Weights and Measures (CGPM) on the future revision of the International System of Units (SI) [1], the current four SI base units the kilogram, the ampere, the kelvin and the mole, will be redefined in terms of invariants of nature. The new definitions will be based on fixed numerical values of the Planck constant (h), the elementary charge (e), the Boltzmann constant (k), and the Avogadro constant (NA), respectively. While significant progress has been made towards providing the necessary experimental results for the redefinition, some disagreement among the relevant data remain. Among the set of discrepant data towards the redefinition of the SI are the determinations of the Planck constant from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) watt balance [2] and the recent result from the National Research Council Canada (NRC) watt balance [3], with the discrepancy of roughly 2.5 parts in 107 being significantly outside the reported uncertainties. Of major concern is that the watt balance experiment is seen as a key component of a mise en pratique for the new kilogram definition, once such a redefinition takes place. The basic operational principle of a watt balance relates the Planck constant to mass, length, and time through h = mgvC, where m is the mass of an artifact mass standard, g is the local acceleration of gravity, v is a velocity, and C is a combination of frequencies and scalar constants. With the total uncertainty goal for the watt balance on the order of a few parts in 108, g needs to be determined at the location of the mass standard to parts in 109 such that its uncertainty is negligible in the final watt balance result. NIST and NRC have formed a collaborative effort to reconcile the relevant discrepant data and provide further progress towards preparing and testing a mise en pratique for the new kilogram definition. As an initial step, direct comparisons of

  7. Computer Aided Design of Ka-Band Waveguide Power Combining Architectures for Interplanetary Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaden, Karl R.

    2006-01-01

    Communication systems for future NASA interplanetary spacecraft require transmitter power ranging from several hundred watts to kilowatts. Several hybrid junctions are considered as elements within a corporate combining architecture for high power Ka-band space traveling-wave tube amplifiers (TWTAs). This report presents the simulated transmission characteristics of several hybrid junctions designed for a low loss, high power waveguide based power combiner.

  8. Venus Surface Power and Cooling System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Mellott, Kenneth D.

    2004-01-01

    A radioisotope power and cooling system is designed to provide electrical power for the a probe operating on the surface of Venus. Most foreseeable electronics devices and sensors simply cannot operate at the 450 C ambient surface temperature of Venus. Because the mission duration is substantially long and the use of thermal mass to maintain an operable temperature range is likely impractical, some type of active refrigeration may be required to keep certain components at a temperature below ambient. The fundamental cooling requirements are comprised of the cold sink temperature, the hot sink temperature, and the amount of heat to be removed. In this instance, it is anticipated that electronics would have a nominal operating temperature of 300 C. Due to the highly thermal convective nature of the high-density atmosphere, the hot sink temperature was assumed to be 50 C, which provided a 500 C temperature of the cooler's heat rejecter to the ambient atmosphere. The majority of the heat load on the cooler is from the high temperature ambient surface environment on Venus. Assuming 5 cm radial thickness of ceramic blanket insulation, the ambient heat load was estimated at approximately 77 watts. With an estimated quantity of 10 watts of heat generation from electronics and sensors, and to accommodate some level of uncertainty, the total heat load requirement was rounded up to an even 100 watts. For the radioisotope Stirling power converter configuration designed, the Sage model predicts a thermodynamic power output capacity of 478.1 watts, which slightly exceeds the required 469.1 watts. The hot sink temperature is 1200 C, and the cold sink temperature is 500 C. The required heat input is 1740 watts. This gives a thermodynamic efficiency of 27.48 %. The maximum theoretically obtainable efficiency is 47.52 %. It is estimated that the mechanical efficiency of the power converter design is on the order of 85 %, based on experimental measurements taken from 500 watt power

  9. Power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Gitsevich, Aleksandr

    2001-01-01

    An oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, and an impedance transformation network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to protect the input of the amplifier from a destructive feedback signal. One example of the oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  10. Suppression of spurious mode oscillation in mega-watt 77-GHz gyrotron as a high quality probe beam source for the collective Thomson scattering in LHD

    SciTech Connect

    Ogasawara, S.; Kubo, S.; Nishiura, M.; Tanaka, K.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Ito, S.; Takita, Y.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Tatematsu, Y.; Saito, T.; Minami, R.; Kariya, T.; Imai, T.

    2012-10-15

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic requires a strong probing beam to diagnose a bulk and fast ion distribution function in fusion plasmas. A mega-watt gyrotron for electron cyclotron resonance heating is used as a probing beam in the large helical device. Spurious mode oscillations are often observed during the turning on/off phase of the modulation. The frequency spectra of the 77-GHz gyrotron output power have been measured, and then one of the spurious modes, which interferes with the CTS receiver system, is identified as the TE{sub 17,6} mode at the frequency of 74.7 GHz. The mode competition calculation indicates that the increase of the magnetic field strength at the gyrotron resonator can avoid such a spurious mode and excite only the main TE{sub 18,6} mode. The spurious radiation at the 74.7 GHz is experimentally demonstrated to be suppressed in the stronger magnetic field than that optimized for the high-power operation.

  11. Suppression of spurious mode oscillation in mega-watt 77-GHz gyrotron as a high quality probe beam source for the collective Thomson scattering in LHD.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, S; Kubo, S; Nishiura, M; Tatematsu, Y; Saito, T; Tanaka, K; Shimozuma, T; Yoshimura, Y; Igami, H; Takahashi, H; Ito, S; Takita, Y; Kobayashi, S; Mizuno, Y; Okada, K; Minami, R; Kariya, T; Imai, T

    2012-10-01

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic requires a strong probing beam to diagnose a bulk and fast ion distribution function in fusion plasmas. A mega-watt gyrotron for electron cyclotron resonance heating is used as a probing beam in the large helical device. Spurious mode oscillations are often observed during the turning on/off phase of the modulation. The frequency spectra of the 77-GHz gyrotron output power have been measured, and then one of the spurious modes, which interferes with the CTS receiver system, is identified as the TE(17,6) mode at the frequency of 74.7 GHz. The mode competition calculation indicates that the increase of the magnetic field strength at the gyrotron resonator can avoid such a spurious mode and excite only the main TE(18,6) mode. The spurious radiation at the 74.7 GHz is experimentally demonstrated to be suppressed in the stronger magnetic field than that optimized for the high-power operation.

  12. Annual radiological environmental monitoring report: Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, 1992. Operations Services/Technical Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This report describes the preoperational environmental radiological monitoring program conducted by TVA in the vicinity of the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant (WBN) in 1992. The program includes the collection of samples from the environment and the determination of the concentrations of radioactive materials in the samples. Samples are taken from stations in the general area of the plant and from areas that will not be influenced by plant operations. Material sampled includes air, water, milk, foods, vegetation, soil, fish, sediment, and direct radiation levels. During plant operations, results from stations near the plant will be compared with concentrations from control stations and with preoperational measurements to determine potential impacts to the public. Exposures calculated from environmental samples were contributed by naturally occurring radioactive materials, from materials commonly found in the environment as a result of atmospheric fallout, or from the operation of other nuclear facilities in the area. Since WBN has not operated, there has been no contribution of radioactivity from the plant to the environment.

  13. Distribution and habitat selection of adult striped bass, Morone saxatilis (Walbaum), in Watts Bar Reservoir, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Cheek, T.E.; Van den Avyle, M.J.; Coutant, C.C.

    1983-09-01

    Biotelemetry was used to determine seasonal distribution patterns and habitat preferences and to evaluate factors affecting movements of adult striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in Watts Bar Reservoir, Tennessee. Distribution and movement of striped bass were strongly influenced by water temperature. Mean distances moved per day during spring and winter were similar but significantly higher than rates for summer and fall. During spring, striped bass moved into headwater areas as water temperatures approached those associated with spawning (15/sup 0/ to 19/sup 0/C). Brief habitation of the main body of the reservoir was noted during summer prior to movement to cool-water refuges located in the Clinch River and Tennessee River arms. No striped bass were located in the main body of the reservoir in early fall when temperatures ranged from 24/sup 0/ to 25/sup 0/C. Fish were located in thermal refuges during this period and occupied water temperatures averaging 20.5/sup 0/C. The only extended period of striped bass habitation of the main body of the reservoir occurred in winter, when the fish occupied a mean water temperature of 11/sup 0/C. Although distribution was restricted during warmer seasons, individual fish moved freely throughout the 116-km-long reservoir at other times, indicating that subpopulations did not exist. 64 references.

  14. Watt-linkage based sensors for low frequency motion measurement and control of spacecrafts and satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acernese, F.; Giordano, G.; Romano, R.; Barone, F.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a new mechanical application of the Watt-linkage for the development and implementation of mono-axial sensors aimed to low frequency motion measurement and control of spacecrafts and satellites. The basic component of these sensors is the one dimensional UNISA Folded Pendulum mechanical sensor, developed for ground-based applications, whose unique features are due to a very effective optimization of the effects of gravitational force on the folded pendulum mechanical components, that allowed the design and implementation of FP sensors compact (< 10 cm), light (< 200 g), scalable, tunable resonance frequency < 100mHz), with large band (10-7 Hz - 10Hz), high quality factor (Q > 15000 in vacuum at 1Hz), with good immunity to environmental noises and sensitivity, guaranteed by an integrated laser optical readout, and fully adaptable to the specific requirements of the application. In this paper we show how to extend the application of ground-based FP also to space, in absence of gravity, still keeping all the above interesting features and characteristics that make this class of sensors very effective in terms of large band, especially in the low frequency, sensitivity and long term reliability. Preliminary measurements on a prototype confirm the feasibility, showing also that very good performances can be relatively easily obtained.

  15. Quantum transport with long-range steps on Watts-Strogatz networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Xu, Xin-Jian

    2016-07-01

    We study transport dynamics of quantum systems with long-range steps on the Watts-Strogatz network (WSN) which is generated by rewiring links of the regular ring. First, we probe physical systems modeled by the discrete nonlinear schrödinger (DNLS) equation. Using the localized initial condition, we compute the time-averaged occupation probability of the initial site, which is related to the nonlinearity, the long-range steps and rewiring links. Self-trapping transitions occur at large (small) nonlinear parameters for coupling ɛ=-1 (1), as long-range interactions are intensified. The structure disorder induced by random rewiring, however, has dual effects for ɛ=-1 and inhibits the self-trapping behavior for ɛ=1. Second, we investigate continuous-time quantum walks (CTQW) on the regular ring ruled by the discrete linear schrödinger (DLS) equation. It is found that only the presence of the long-range steps does not affect the efficiency of the coherent exciton transport, while only the allowance of random rewiring enhances the partial localization. If both factors are considered simultaneously, localization is greatly strengthened, and the transport becomes worse.

  16. Quantification of degeneracy in Hodgkin-Huxley neurons on Newman-Watts small world network.

    PubMed

    Man, Menghua; Zhang, Ya; Ma, Guilei; Friston, Karl; Liu, Shanghe

    2016-08-01

    Degeneracy is a fundamental source of biological robustness, complexity and evolvability in many biological systems. However, degeneracy is often confused with redundancy. Furthermore, the quantification of degeneracy has not been addressed for realistic neuronal networks. The objective of this paper is to characterize degeneracy in neuronal network models via quantitative mathematic measures. Firstly, we establish Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks with Newman-Watts small world network architectures. Secondly, in order to calculate the degeneracy, redundancy and complexity in the ensuing networks, we use information entropy to quantify the information a neuronal response carries about the stimulus - and mutual information to measure the contribution of each subset of the neuronal network. Finally, we analyze the interdependency of degeneracy, redundancy and complexity - and how these three measures depend upon network architectures. Our results suggest that degeneracy can be applied to any neuronal network as a formal measure, and degeneracy is distinct from redundancy. Qualitatively degeneracy and complexity are more highly correlated over different network architectures, in comparison to redundancy. Quantitatively, the relationship between both degeneracy and redundancy depends on network coupling strength: both degeneracy and redundancy increase with complexity for small coupling strengths; however, as coupling strength increases, redundancy decreases with complexity (in contrast to degeneracy, which is relatively invariant). These results suggest that the degeneracy is a general topologic characteristic of neuronal networks, which could be applied quantitatively in neuroscience and connectomics.

  17. Quantification of degeneracy in Hodgkin-Huxley neurons on Newman-Watts small world network.

    PubMed

    Man, Menghua; Zhang, Ya; Ma, Guilei; Friston, Karl; Liu, Shanghe

    2016-08-01

    Degeneracy is a fundamental source of biological robustness, complexity and evolvability in many biological systems. However, degeneracy is often confused with redundancy. Furthermore, the quantification of degeneracy has not been addressed for realistic neuronal networks. The objective of this paper is to characterize degeneracy in neuronal network models via quantitative mathematic measures. Firstly, we establish Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks with Newman-Watts small world network architectures. Secondly, in order to calculate the degeneracy, redundancy and complexity in the ensuing networks, we use information entropy to quantify the information a neuronal response carries about the stimulus - and mutual information to measure the contribution of each subset of the neuronal network. Finally, we analyze the interdependency of degeneracy, redundancy and complexity - and how these three measures depend upon network architectures. Our results suggest that degeneracy can be applied to any neuronal network as a formal measure, and degeneracy is distinct from redundancy. Qualitatively degeneracy and complexity are more highly correlated over different network architectures, in comparison to redundancy. Quantitatively, the relationship between both degeneracy and redundancy depends on network coupling strength: both degeneracy and redundancy increase with complexity for small coupling strengths; however, as coupling strength increases, redundancy decreases with complexity (in contrast to degeneracy, which is relatively invariant). These results suggest that the degeneracy is a general topologic characteristic of neuronal networks, which could be applied quantitatively in neuroscience and connectomics. PMID:27155043

  18. Medium power voltage multipliers with a large number of stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrigill, W. T.; Myers, I. T.

    1978-01-01

    Voltage multiplier techniques are extended at medium power levels to larger multiplication ratios. A series of dc-dc converters were built, with from 20 to 45 stages and with power levels up to 100 watts. Maximum output voltages were about 10,000 volts.

  19. 10 CFR 429.37 - Class A external power supplies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... basic model or the output current in amperes (A) of the highest- and lowest-voltage models within the... current in amperes (A) of the highest- and lowest-voltage models within the external power supply design... and highest selectable output voltage, nameplate output power in watts (W), and, if missing from...

  20. 10 CFR 429.37 - Class A external power supplies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... basic model or the output current in amperes (A) of the highest- and lowest-voltage models within the... current in amperes (A) of the highest- and lowest-voltage models within the external power supply design... and highest selectable output voltage, nameplate output power in watts (W), and, if missing from...

  1. Assessing the toxicity to fish embryos of surface water from the Watts Bar Lake/Clinch River system

    SciTech Connect

    Ivey, L.J.; Niemela, S.L.; McCracken, M.K.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Successful reproduction of fish populations requires the successful development of offspring into new reproductive cohorts. In order to evaluate the ability of fish offspring to survive and develop properly in the Watts Bar Lake/Clinch River system downstream of the Department of Energy facilities in Oak Ridge, TN, a series of fish embryo-larval toxicity tests were conducted on surface water samples from Poplar Creek and the Clinch River adjacent to the Oak Ridge Reservation. Quarterly tests were conducted over an eighteen-month interval with embryos from laboratory stocks of the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). Eggs obtained from largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and redbreast sunfish (Lepomis auritus) collected from reference sites during their respective breeding seasons were fertilized in vitro for additional embryo-larval tests utilizing fish species indigenous to the Watts Bar/Clinch River system. Average survival of medaka embryos decreased significantly in water from Poplar Creek sites within the Oak Ridge Reservation, coincident with an increase in the prevalence of certain developmental abnormalities. Similar but less pronounced results were also obtained with redbreast sunfish embryos. Development of largemouth bass eggs was not adversely affected by any of the tested water samples. These findings suggest that the development of fish eggs and fry in certain reaches of the Watts Bar Lake/Clinch River system may be negatively impacted by activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  2. Time Delay and Long-Range Connection Induced Synchronization Transitions in Newman-Watts Small-World Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The synchronization transitions in Newman-Watts small-world neuronal networks (SWNNs) induced by time delay and long-range connection (LRC) probability have been investigated by synchronization parameter and space-time plots. Four distinct parameter regions, that is, asynchronous region, transition region, synchronous region, and oscillatory region have been discovered at certain LRC probability as time delay is increased. Interestingly, desynchronization is observed in oscillatory region. More importantly, we consider the spatiotemporal patterns obtained in delayed Newman-Watts SWNNs are the competition results between long-range drivings (LRDs) and neighboring interactions. In addition, for moderate time delay, the synchronization of neuronal network can be enhanced remarkably by increasing LRC probability. Furthermore, lag synchronization has been found between weak synchronization and complete synchronization as LRC probability is a little less than 1.0. Finally, the two necessary conditions, moderate time delay and large numbers of LRCs, are exposed explicitly for synchronization in delayed Newman-Watts SWNNs. PMID:24810595

  3. Time delay and long-range connection induced synchronization transitions in Newman-Watts small-world neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The synchronization transitions in Newman-Watts small-world neuronal networks (SWNNs) induced by time delay τ and long-range connection (LRC) probability P have been investigated by synchronization parameter and space-time plots. Four distinct parameter regions, that is, asynchronous region, transition region, synchronous region, and oscillatory region have been discovered at certain LRC probability P = 1.0 as time delay is increased. Interestingly, desynchronization is observed in oscillatory region. More importantly, we consider the spatiotemporal patterns obtained in delayed Newman-Watts SWNNs are the competition results between long-range drivings (LRDs) and neighboring interactions. In addition, for moderate time delay, the synchronization of neuronal network can be enhanced remarkably by increasing LRC probability. Furthermore, lag synchronization has been found between weak synchronization and complete synchronization as LRC probability P is a little less than 1.0. Finally, the two necessary conditions, moderate time delay and large numbers of LRCs, are exposed explicitly for synchronization in delayed Newman-Watts SWNNs.

  4. Low cost high power GaSB photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraas, Lewis M.; Huang, Han X.; Ye, Shi-Zhong; Hui, She; Avery, James; Ballantyne, Russell

    1997-03-01

    High power density and high capacity factor are important attributes of a thermophotovoltaics (TPV) system and GaSb cells are enabling for TPV systems. A TPV cogeneration unit at an off grid site will compliment solar arrays producing heat and electricity on cloudy days with the solar arrays generating electricity on sunny days. Herein, we project that GaSb cells generating 2 Watts each can be made in 1 MW quantities at 4 per cell. This will allow TPV circuits to be made at 2 per Watt. At this cost, the off-grid cogeneration and self-powered furnace markets will be viable.

  5. Low cost high power GaSb thermophotovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraas, Lewis M.; Huang, Han X.; Ye, Shi-Zhong; Avery, James; Ballantyne, Russell

    1997-04-01

    High power density and high capacity factor are important attributes of a TPV system and GaSb cells are enabling for TPV systems. A TPV cogeneration unit at an off grid site will compliment solar arrays producing heat and electricity on cloudy days with the solar arrays generating electricity on sunny days. Herein, we project that GaSb cells generating 2 Watts each can be made in 1 MW quantities at 4 per cell. This will allow TPV circuits to be made at 2 per Watt. At this cost, the off-grid cogeneration and self-powered furnace markets will be viable.

  6. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing of Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt to Identify Disease-Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    He, Bin; Gu, Yinghong; Tao, Xiang; Cheng, Xiaojie; Wei, Changhe; Fu, Jian; Cheng, Zaiquan; Zhang, Yizheng

    2015-12-10

    Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt is one of the most important wild relatives of cultivated rice and exhibits high resistance to many diseases. It has been used as a source of genes for introgression into cultivated rice. However, there are limited genomic resources and little genetic information publicly reported for this species. To better understand the pathways and factors involved in disease resistance and accelerating the process of rice breeding, we carried out a de novo transcriptome sequencing of O. officinalis. In this research, 137,229 contigs were obtained ranging from 200 to 19,214 bp with an N50 of 2331 bp through de novo assembly of leaves, stems and roots in O. officinalis using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Based on sequence similarity searches against a non-redundant protein database, a total of 88,249 contigs were annotated with gene descriptions and 75,589 transcripts were further assigned to GO terms. Candidate genes for plant-pathogen interaction and plant hormones regulation pathways involved in disease-resistance were identified. Further analyses of gene expression profiles showed that the majority of genes related to disease resistance were all expressed in the three tissues. In addition, there are two kinds of rice bacterial blight-resistant genes in O. officinalis, including two Xa1 genes and three Xa26 genes. All 2 Xa1 genes showed the highest expression level in stem, whereas one of Xa26 was expressed dominantly in leaf and other 2 Xa26 genes displayed low expression level in all three tissues. This transcriptomic database provides an opportunity for identifying the genes involved in disease-resistance and will provide a basis for studying functional genomics of O. officinalis and genetic improvement of cultivated rice in the future.

  7. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing of Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt to Identify Disease-Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    He, Bin; Gu, Yinghong; Tao, Xiang; Cheng, Xiaojie; Wei, Changhe; Fu, Jian; Cheng, Zaiquan; Zhang, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt is one of the most important wild relatives of cultivated rice and exhibits high resistance to many diseases. It has been used as a source of genes for introgression into cultivated rice. However, there are limited genomic resources and little genetic information publicly reported for this species. To better understand the pathways and factors involved in disease resistance and accelerating the process of rice breeding, we carried out a de novo transcriptome sequencing of O. officinalis. In this research, 137,229 contigs were obtained ranging from 200 to 19,214 bp with an N50 of 2331 bp through de novo assembly of leaves, stems and roots in O. officinalis using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Based on sequence similarity searches against a non-redundant protein database, a total of 88,249 contigs were annotated with gene descriptions and 75,589 transcripts were further assigned to GO terms. Candidate genes for plant–pathogen interaction and plant hormones regulation pathways involved in disease-resistance were identified. Further analyses of gene expression profiles showed that the majority of genes related to disease resistance were all expressed in the three tissues. In addition, there are two kinds of rice bacterial blight-resistant genes in O. officinalis, including two Xa1 genes and three Xa26 genes. All 2 Xa1 genes showed the highest expression level in stem, whereas one of Xa26 was expressed dominantly in leaf and other 2 Xa26 genes displayed low expression level in all three tissues. This transcriptomic database provides an opportunity for identifying the genes involved in disease-resistance and will provide a basis for studying functional genomics of O. officinalis and genetic improvement of cultivated rice in the future. PMID:26690414

  8. Results of Performance Tests Performed on the John Watts Casing Connection on 7" Pipe

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Watts

    1999-08-01

    Stress Engineering Services (SES) was contracted by Mr. John Watts to test his threaded connection developed for oilfield oil and gas service. This particular test required the application of a variety of loads including axial tension and compression, internal pressure (gas), external pressure (water), bending and both low and elevated temperature. These loads were used to determine the sealing and structural limits of the connection. The connection design tested had tapered threads with 10 threads per inch. A square thread form and a round thread form were tested. The square thread form had a 2{sup o} load flank and 15{sup o} stab flank. The round thread had a 0{sup o} load flank and 20{sup o} stab flank. Most of the testing was performed on the round thread form. Both a coupled connection design and an integral connection design were tested. The coupling was a pin by pin (male) thread, with the pipe having a box (female) thread. Both designs have outside and inside diameters that are flush with the pipe body. Both designs also contain a small external shoulder. The test procedure selected for this evaluation was the newly written ISO 13679 procedure for full scale testing of casing and tubing connections. The ISO procedure requires a variety of tests that includes makeup/breakout testing, internal gas sealability/external water sealability testing with axial tension, axial compression, bending, internal gas thermal cycle tests and limit load (failure) tests. This test was performed with four coupled samples and included most of these loads. Two integral samples were also included for limit load testing ISO makeup/breakout tests are divided into three types--initial makeup, IML1, repeated makeup within the same sample, MBL, and repeated makeup using several samples called round robin, RR. IMU and MBL were performed in this project. The ISO sealing and structural procedure is divided into four primary tests and identified as Series A, B, C and Limit Load (failure

  9. Watt-level second-harmonic generation at 589  nm with a PPMgO:LN ridge waveguide crystal pumped by a DBR tapered diode laser.

    PubMed

    Bege, R; Jedrzejczyk, D; Blume, G; Hofmann, J; Feise, D; Paschke, K; Tränkle, G

    2016-04-01

    A DBR tapered diode laser in continuous wave operation was used to generate second-harmonic radiation at 589 nm in a PPMgO:LN ridge waveguide crystal. An optical output power of 0.86 W at an optical-to-optical and an electrical-to-optical efficiency of 42% and 11%, respectively, was achieved. The visible radiation was characterized by a spectral bandwidth ΔνFWHM of 230 MHz and a beam propagation parameter M1/e22 better than 1.1. The integration of such a system into a housing of a small footprint will enable a portable and highly efficient module featuring a visible output power in the watt-level range. PMID:27192279

  10. Ultra-compact Watt-level flat supercontinuum source pumped by noise-like pulse from an all-fiber oscillator.

    PubMed

    Chen, He; Zhou, Xuanfeng; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Jiang, Zong-Fu; Hou, Jing

    2015-12-28

    We demonstrate Watt-level flat visible supercontinuum (SC) generation in photonic crystal fibers, which is directly pumped by broadband noise-like pulses from an Yb-doped all-fiber oscillator. The novel SC generator is featured with elegant all-fiber-integrated architecture, high spectral flatness and high efficiency. Wide optical spectrum spanning from 500 nm to 2300 nm with 1.02 W optical power is obtained under the pump of 1.4 W noise-like pulse. The flatness of the spectrum in the range of 700 nm~1600 nm is less than 5 dB (including the pump residue). The exceptional simplicity, economical efficiency and the comparable performances make the noise-like pulse oscillator a competitive candidate to the widely used cascade amplified coherent pulse as the pump source of broadband SC. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of SC generation which is directly pumped by an all-fiber noise-like pulse oscillator. PMID:26831958

  11. Ultra-compact Watt-level flat supercontinuum source pumped by noise-like pulse from an all-fiber oscillator.

    PubMed

    Chen, He; Zhou, Xuanfeng; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Jiang, Zong-Fu; Hou, Jing

    2015-12-28

    We demonstrate Watt-level flat visible supercontinuum (SC) generation in photonic crystal fibers, which is directly pumped by broadband noise-like pulses from an Yb-doped all-fiber oscillator. The novel SC generator is featured with elegant all-fiber-integrated architecture, high spectral flatness and high efficiency. Wide optical spectrum spanning from 500 nm to 2300 nm with 1.02 W optical power is obtained under the pump of 1.4 W noise-like pulse. The flatness of the spectrum in the range of 700 nm~1600 nm is less than 5 dB (including the pump residue). The exceptional simplicity, economical efficiency and the comparable performances make the noise-like pulse oscillator a competitive candidate to the widely used cascade amplified coherent pulse as the pump source of broadband SC. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of SC generation which is directly pumped by an all-fiber noise-like pulse oscillator.

  12. Assessing ecological risks to the fish community from residual coal fly ash in Watts Bar Reservoir, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Rigg, David K.; Wacksman, Mitch N.; Iannuzzi, Jacqueline; Baker, Tyler F.; Adams, Marshall; Greeley, Jr., Mark Stephen

    2014-12-18

    For this research, extensive site-specific biological and environmental data were collected to support an evaluation of risks to the fish community in Watts Bar Reservoir from residual ash from the December 2008 Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston ash release. This paper describes the approach used and results of the risk assessment for the fish community, which consists of multiple measurement endpoints (measures of exposure and effects) for fish. The lines of evidence included 1) comparing postspill annual fish community assessments with nearby prespill data and data from other TVA reservoirs, 2) evaluating possible effects of exposures of fish eggs and larval fish to ash in controlled laboratory toxicity tests, 3) evaluating reproductive competence of field-exposed fish, 4) assessing individual fish health through physical examination, histopathology, and blood chemistry, 5) comparing fish tissue concentrations with literature-based critical body residues, and 6) comparing concentrations of ash-related contaminants in surface waters with US Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Ambient Water Quality Standards for Fish and Aquatic Life. These measurement endpoints were treated as independent lines of evidence that were integrated into an overall weight-of-evidence estimate of risk to the fish community. Collectively, the data and analysis presented here indicate that ash and ash-related constituents pose negligible risks to the fish communities in Watts Bar Reservoir. This conclusion contradicts the predictions by some researchers immediately following the ash release of devastating effects on the aquatic ecology of Watts Bar Reservoir. The information presented in this article reaffirms the wisdom of carefully evaluating the evidence before predicting probable ecological effects of a major event such as the TVA Kingston ash release. Lastly, this study demonstrates that a thorough and detailed investigation using multiple measurement endpoints is needed

  13. Assessing ecological risks to the fish community from residual coal fly ash in Watts Bar Reservoir, Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Rigg, David K; Wacksman, Mitch N; Iannuzzi, Jacqueline; Baker, Tyler F; Adams, Marshall; Greeley, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    Extensive site-specific biological and environmental data were collected to support an evaluation of risks to the fish community in Watts Bar Reservoir from residual ash from the December 2008 Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston ash release. This article describes the approach used and results of the risk assessment for the fish community, which consists of multiple measurement endpoints (measures of exposure and effects) for fish. The lines of evidence included 1) comparing postspill annual fish community assessments with nearby prespill data and data from other TVA reservoirs, 2) evaluating possible effects of exposures of fish eggs and larval fish to ash in controlled laboratory toxicity tests, 3) evaluating reproductive competence of field-exposed fish, 4) assessing individual fish health through physical examination, histopathology, and blood chemistry, 5) comparing fish tissue concentrations with literature-based critical body residues, and 6) comparing concentrations of ash-related contaminants in surface waters with US Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Ambient Water Quality Standards for Fish and Aquatic Life. These measurement endpoints were treated as independent lines of evidence that were integrated into an overall weight-of-evidence estimate of risk to the fish community. Collectively, the data and analysis presented here indicate that ash and ash-related constituents pose negligible risks to the fish communities in Watts Bar Reservoir. This conclusion contradicts the predictions by some researchers immediately following the ash release of devastating effects on the aquatic ecology of Watts Bar Reservoir. The information presented in this article reaffirms the wisdom of carefully evaluating the evidence before predicting probable ecological effects of a major event such as the TVA Kingston ash release. This study demonstrates that a thorough and detailed investigation using multiple measurement endpoints is needed to properly evaluate

  14. Assessing ecological risks to the fish community from residual coal fly ash in Watts Bar Reservoir, Tennessee

    DOE PAGES

    Rigg, David K.; Wacksman, Mitch N.; Iannuzzi, Jacqueline; Baker, Tyler F.; Adams, Marshall; Greeley, Jr., Mark Stephen

    2014-12-18

    For this research, extensive site-specific biological and environmental data were collected to support an evaluation of risks to the fish community in Watts Bar Reservoir from residual ash from the December 2008 Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston ash release. This paper describes the approach used and results of the risk assessment for the fish community, which consists of multiple measurement endpoints (measures of exposure and effects) for fish. The lines of evidence included 1) comparing postspill annual fish community assessments with nearby prespill data and data from other TVA reservoirs, 2) evaluating possible effects of exposures of fish eggs andmore » larval fish to ash in controlled laboratory toxicity tests, 3) evaluating reproductive competence of field-exposed fish, 4) assessing individual fish health through physical examination, histopathology, and blood chemistry, 5) comparing fish tissue concentrations with literature-based critical body residues, and 6) comparing concentrations of ash-related contaminants in surface waters with US Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Ambient Water Quality Standards for Fish and Aquatic Life. These measurement endpoints were treated as independent lines of evidence that were integrated into an overall weight-of-evidence estimate of risk to the fish community. Collectively, the data and analysis presented here indicate that ash and ash-related constituents pose negligible risks to the fish communities in Watts Bar Reservoir. This conclusion contradicts the predictions by some researchers immediately following the ash release of devastating effects on the aquatic ecology of Watts Bar Reservoir. The information presented in this article reaffirms the wisdom of carefully evaluating the evidence before predicting probable ecological effects of a major event such as the TVA Kingston ash release. Lastly, this study demonstrates that a thorough and detailed investigation using multiple measurement endpoints

  15. The Rise of Netpolitik: How the Internet Is Changing International Politics and Diplomacy. A Report of the Annual Aspen Institute Roundtable on Information Technology (11th, Aspen, Colorado, August 1-4, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollier, David

    This document is an interpretive synthesis of the discussion at a conference sponsored by the Aspen Institute that sought to develop new ways to understand how the Internet is changing the powers of the nation-state, the conduct of international relations, and the definitions of nation security. This report examines how the Internet and other…

  16. POWER (power optimization for wireless energy requirements): A MATLAB based algorithm for design of hybrid energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, K. A.; Albano, F.; Nevius, P. E.; Sastry, A. M.

    We have expanded and implemented an algorithm for selecting power supplies into a turnkey MATLAB code, "POWER" (power optimization for wireless energy requirements). Our algorithm uses three approaches to system design, specifying either: (1) a single, aggregate power profile; (2) a power system designed to satisfy several power ranges (micro-, milli- and Watt); or (3) a power system designed to be housed within specified spaces within the system. POWER was verified by conducting two case studies on hearing prosthetics: the TICA (LZ 3001) (Baumann group at the Tübingen University) and Amadeus cochlear implant (CI) (WIMS-ERC at the University of Michigan) based on a volume constraint of 2 cm 3. The most suitable solution identified by POWER for the TICA device came from Approach 1, wherein one secondary cell provided 26,000 cycles of 16 h operation. POWER identified Approach 2 as the solution for the WIMS-ERC Amadeus CI, which consisted of 1 cell for the microWatt power range and 1 cell for the milliWatt range (4.43 cm 3, ∼55% higher than the target volume), and provided 3280 cycles of 16 h operation (including re-charge of the batteries). Future work will be focused on continuously improving our present tool.

  17. High specific energy and specific power aluminum/air battery for micro air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindler, A.; Matthies, L.

    2014-06-01

    Micro air vehicles developed under the Army's Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology program generally need a specific energy of 300 - 550 watt-hrs/kg and 300 -550 watts/kg to operate for about 1 hour. At present, no commercial cell can fulfill this need. The best available commercial technology is the Lithium-ion battery or its derivative, the Li- Polymer cell. This chemistry generally provides around 15 minutes flying time. One alternative to the State-of-the Art is the Al/air cell, a primary battery that is actually half fuel cell. It has a high energy battery like aluminum anode, and fuel cell like air electrode that can extract oxygen out of the ambient air rather than carrying it. Both of these features tend to contribute to a high specific energy (watt-hrs/kg). High specific power (watts/kg) is supported by high concentration KOH electrolyte, a high quality commercial air electrode, and forced air convection from the vehicles rotors. The performance of this cell with these attributes is projected to be 500 watt-hrs/kg and 500 watts/kg based on simple model. It is expected to support a flying time of approximately 1 hour in any vehicle in which the usual limit is 15 minutes.

  18. Solar-Powered Supply Is Light and Reliable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, A. E.; Garrett, H.; Matheney, J.

    1982-01-01

    DC supply originally intended for use in solar-powered spacecraft propulsion is lightweight and very reliable. Operates from 100-200 volt output of solar panels to produce 11 different dc voltages, with total demand of 3,138 watts. With exception of specially wound inductors and transformers, system uses readily available components.

  19. 47 CFR 90.1321 - Power and antenna limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Power and antenna limits. 90.1321 Section 90... and antenna limits. (a) Base and fixed stations are limited to 25 watts/25 MHz equivalent... receiver. (2) If the transmitter employs an antenna system that emits multiple directional beams but...

  20. 47 CFR 90.1321 - Power and antenna limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Power and antenna limits. 90.1321 Section 90... and antenna limits. (a) Base and fixed stations are limited to 25 watts/25 MHz equivalent... receiver. (2) If the transmitter employs an antenna system that emits multiple directional beams but...

  1. 47 CFR 90.1321 - Power and antenna limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Power and antenna limits. 90.1321 Section 90... and antenna limits. (a) Base and fixed stations are limited to 25 watts/25 MHz equivalent... receiver. (2) If the transmitter employs an antenna system that emits multiple directional beams but...

  2. 47 CFR 90.1321 - Power and antenna limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Power and antenna limits. 90.1321 Section 90... and antenna limits. (a) Base and fixed stations are limited to 25 watts/25 MHz equivalent... receiver. (2) If the transmitter employs an antenna system that emits multiple directional beams but...

  3. 47 CFR 74.1235 - Power limitations and antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... limited such that the predicted service contour of the booster station, computed in accordance with § 73... contour of the primary FM station that the booster rebroadcasts. In no event shall the ERP of the booster... than 50 watts effective radiated power in any direction or have a 34 dBu interference...

  4. 47 CFR 74.1235 - Power limitations and antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... limited such that the predicted service contour of the booster station, computed in accordance with § 73... contour of the primary FM station that the booster rebroadcasts. In no event shall the ERP of the booster... than 50 watts effective radiated power in any direction or have a 34 dBu interference...

  5. Calculation of guaranteed mean power from wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    A method for calculating the 'guaranteed mean' power output of a wind turbine generator is proposed. The term 'mean power' refers to the average power generated at specified wind speeds during short-term tests. Correlation of anemometers, the method of bins for analyzing non-steady data, the PROP Code for predicting turbine power, and statistical analysis of deviations in test data from theory are discussed. Guaranteed mean power density for the Clayton Mod-OA system was found to be 8 watts per square meter less than theoretical power density at all power levels, with a confidence level of 0.999. This amounts to 4 percent of rated power.

  6. Present and future mass standards for the LNE watt balance and the future dissemination of the mass unit in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinot, Patrick; Beaudoux, Florian; Bentouati, Djilali; Espel, Patrick; Madec, Tanguy; Thomas, Matthieu; Silvestri, Zaccari; Ziane, Djamel; Piquemal, François

    2016-08-01

    The value of the Planck constant h was determined in 2014 by means of the LNE watt balance experiment. The relative standard uncertainty was 31 parts in 108. This first determination was performed in air with a 500 g mass standard made from XSH Alacrite. The main uncertainty components in air associated with the mass involve the calibration, the mass stability, the buoyancy correction and the magnetic interaction correction. The combined relative uncertainty due to the mass is 7.2 parts in 108. The use in 2016 of a mass standard made from platinum iridium alloy significantly reduces the component of uncertainty arising from the mass standard for a Planck constant measurement either in air or under vacuum. The relative uncertainty due to this contribution is estimated to be about 3 parts in 108 in air and one part in 108 under vacuum. The future system for the dissemination of the mass unit using the LNE watt balance will be based on a primary realization with three 500 g mass standards made from platinum–iridium alloy, pure iridium and Udimet 720 respectively, coupled with a pool of kilograms made from different materials. Pure iridium and Udimet 720 are new materials to make reference mass standards proposed by CNAM and LNE respectively and have never been used by any NMI for manufacturing mass standards until now. Some new results concerning their surface behavior are given.

  7. Development testing of the two-watt RTG heat source and Hastelloy-S/T-111 alloy compatibility studies

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, E.I.; Teaney, P.E.

    1993-09-29

    The two-watt radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source capsules were tested to determine their survivability under extreme environmental conditions: high external pressure, high impact, and high internal pressure. Test results showed that the capsules could withstand external pressures of 1,000 bars and impacts at velocities near 150 meters per second. However, the results of the internal pressure tests (stress-rupture) were not so favorable, possibly because of copper contamination, leading to a recommendation for additional testing. A material compatibility study examined the use of Hastelloy-S as a material to clad the tantalum strength member of the two-watt radioisotopic heat source. Test capsules were subjected to high temperatures for various lengths of time, then cross sectioned and examined with a scanning electron microscope. Results of the study indicate that Hastelloy-S would be compatible with the underlying alloy, not only at the normal operating temperatures of the heat source, but also when exposed to the much higher temperatures of a credible accident scenario.

  8. Present and future mass standards for the LNE watt balance and the future dissemination of the mass unit in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinot, Patrick; Beaudoux, Florian; Bentouati, Djilali; Espel, Patrick; Madec, Tanguy; Thomas, Matthieu; Silvestri, Zaccari; Ziane, Djamel; Piquemal, François

    2016-08-01

    The value of the Planck constant h was determined in 2014 by means of the LNE watt balance experiment. The relative standard uncertainty was 31 parts in 108. This first determination was performed in air with a 500 g mass standard made from XSH Alacrite. The main uncertainty components in air associated with the mass involve the calibration, the mass stability, the buoyancy correction and the magnetic interaction correction. The combined relative uncertainty due to the mass is 7.2 parts in 108. The use in 2016 of a mass standard made from platinum iridium alloy significantly reduces the component of uncertainty arising from the mass standard for a Planck constant measurement either in air or under vacuum. The relative uncertainty due to this contribution is estimated to be about 3 parts in 108 in air and one part in 108 under vacuum. The future system for the dissemination of the mass unit using the LNE watt balance will be based on a primary realization with three 500 g mass standards made from platinum-iridium alloy, pure iridium and Udimet 720 respectively, coupled with a pool of kilograms made from different materials. Pure iridium and Udimet 720 are new materials to make reference mass standards proposed by CNAM and LNE respectively and have never been used by any NMI for manufacturing mass standards until now. Some new results concerning their surface behavior are given.

  9. 10-watt, pure continuous-wave, polycrystalline Cr2+:ZnS laser.

    PubMed

    Moskalev, I S; Fedorov, V V; Mirov, S B

    2009-02-16

    We demonstrate, for the first time, 10 W, Er-fiber laser pumped, pure CW, thermally diffusion doped, polycrystalline Cr(2+):ZnS laser operating at 2380 nm. We also show Littrow-grating, "single-knob", wavelength tuning of the laser spanning 1940-2780 nm spectral range with the maximum output power of 7.4 W near the central wavelength of 2400 nm and above 2 W over 1970-2760 nm wavelength range. The laser performs with 40% real optical- and 43% slope efficiency, and shows no output power roll-off up to the highest available incident pump power of 27 W.

  10. Watts Happening with the Sun in Massachusetts, in Maryland, in Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Solar energy is ideal for supplemental applications with electric heating systems. Looks at what the National Science Foundation, in conjunction with major manufacturers, is doing about solar power for school systems. (Author)

  11. Watt-level red-emitting diode lasers and modules for display applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschke, Katrin; Blume, Gunnar; Feise, David; Pohl, Johannes; Sumpf, Bernd

    2016-02-01

    Red-emitting lasers for display applications require high output powers and a high visibility. We demonstrate diode lasers and modules in the red spectral range based on AlGaInP with optical output powers up to 1 W and a nearly diffraction limited beam. These high-luminance light sources based on tapered lasers are well suited for laser TVs and projectors for virtual reality simulators based on the flying spot technology. Additionally, we developed diode lasers with internal distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) surface gratings. These DBR tapered lasers and master-oscillator power-amplifiers based on DBR ridge-waveguide lasers and tapered amplifiers feature high power, single mode emission with coherence lengths up to several meters, which are suitable for the next-generation 3D displays based on holography.

  12. On-orbit performance of the 12 GHz, 200 watt transmitter experiment package for CTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexovich, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Performance characteristics from on-orbit tests of the transmitter experiment package (TEP) for the Communications Technology Satellite (CTS) are presented. The TEP consists of a power processing system (PPS), an output stage tube (OST) and a variable conductance heat pipe system (VCHPS), all of which are described. Test results presented include efficiencies, RF output power, frequency response, and performance with single and multiple (two) carriers, frequency-modulated by video signals.

  13. 325 Watts from 1-cm wide 9xx laser bars for DPSSL and FL applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenstein, Norbert; Manz, Yvonne; Mauron, Pascal; Fily, Arnaud; Schmidt, Berthold E.; Mueller, Juergen; Arlt, Sebastian; Weiss, Stefan; Thies, Achim; Troger, Joerg; Harder, Christoph S.

    2005-03-01

    Reliable power scaling by stretching the cavity length of the laser bars ranging from 1.2 mm to 3.6 mm at constant filling factor of 50% is demonstrated. While a relatively short cavity length of 1.2 mm allows for thermally limited CW output powers in excess of 180 W, extremely high 325 W at 420 A (CW, 16°C) have been achieved by leveraging the enhanced thermal properties of a 3.6 mm cavity length on standard micro-channel coolers. A high electro-optical conversion efficiency of 62% and 51% respectively is attributed to the low internal losses from an optimized waveguide design and the excellent properties of the AlGaAs-material system accounting for low thermal and electrical resistance. Multi-cell lifetest data at various operation conditions show extremely low wear-out rates even at harsh intermittent operation conditions (1-Hz type, 50% duty-cycle, 100% modulation). At 100 W output power 300 Mshots corresponding to 64000 h mean-time-to-failure (MTTF) have been extrapolated for 20% power drop from initial 2000 h and 4000 h lifetest readouts of a 1.2 mm cavity design. Similar results have been obtained for our next generation of ultra high power laser bars enabling reliable operation at 120 W output power and beyond. From 2.4 mm cavity length bars we have obtained 250 W of CW output power at 25°C while extrapolated reliability data at 120 W and 140 W power levels of up to 2000 h duration indicates that such devices are able to fulfill the requirements for lifetimes in the 20 - 30 kh range.

  14. Task 5: TVA sediment-disturbing activities within the Watts Bar Reservoir and Melton Hill Reservoir areas of the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The objectives of Task 5 of the Interagency Agreement No. DE-AI05-91OR22007 were to review: (1) the extent of dredging, construction, and other sediment-disturbing activities conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in potentially contaminated areas of Watts Bar Reservoir, and (2) the disposition of the materials from these activities. This memorandum is the final report for Task 5. This memorandum describes major activities in the Watts Bar Reservoir and Melton Hill Reservoir areas of the Clinch River that possibly resulted in significant disturbance of potentially contaminated sediments. TVA records from the construction of Watts Bar Dam, Kingston Fossil Plant, and Melton Hill Dam were reviewed to facilitate qualitative description of the effect of these activities in disturbing potentially contaminated sediments. The critical period for these activities in disturbing contaminated sediments was during or after 1956 when the peak releases of radioactive contaminants occurred from the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  15. 47 CFR 90.729 - Limitations on power and antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2 Antenna height above average terrain (HAAT), meters Effective radiated power, watts 1 Up to 150... antennas that are higher than 7 meters above average terrain, except that transmissions from antennas that are higher than 7 meters above average terrain will be permitted if the effective radiated power...

  16. 47 CFR 90.729 - Limitations on power and antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2 Antenna height above average terrain (HAAT), meters Effective radiated power, watts 1 Up to 150... antennas that are higher than 7 meters above average terrain, except that transmissions from antennas that are higher than 7 meters above average terrain will be permitted if the effective radiated power...

  17. 47 CFR 90.729 - Limitations on power and antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2 Antenna height above average terrain (HAAT), meters Effective radiated power, watts 1 Up to 150... antennas that are higher than 7 meters above average terrain, except that transmissions from antennas that are higher than 7 meters above average terrain will be permitted if the effective radiated power...

  18. 47 CFR 90.729 - Limitations on power and antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2 Antenna height above average terrain (HAAT), meters Effective radiated power, watts 1 Up to 150... antennas that are higher than 7 meters above average terrain, except that transmissions from antennas that are higher than 7 meters above average terrain will be permitted if the effective radiated power...

  19. 47 CFR 90.729 - Limitations on power and antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2 Antenna height above average terrain (HAAT), meters Effective radiated power, watts 1 Up to 150... antennas that are higher than 7 meters above average terrain, except that transmissions from antennas that are higher than 7 meters above average terrain will be permitted if the effective radiated power...

  20. The design of a linear L-band high power amplifier for mobile communication satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittaker, N.; Brassard, G.; Li, E.; Goux, P.

    1990-01-01

    A linear L-band solid state high power amplifier designed for the space segment of the Mobile Satellite (MSAT) mobile communication system is described. The amplifier is capable of producing 35 watts of RF power with multitone signal at an efficiency of 25 percent and with intermodulation products better than 16 dB below carrier.

  1. Mobile electric power

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, V.J.; Bloomfield, D.P.; Johnson, B.Q.

    1992-01-30

    Analytic Power has proven the feasibility of a mobile electric power unit in the form of a hydride fueled ion-exchange membrane (IEM) fuel cell stack. We have over 5 years experience building and testing IEM fuel cells. The power section of a 350 watt fuel cell stack weighs 4.65 pounds based on our five cell sub-stack component weights. The composite stack structure is fabricated from two components; a unitized flow field and catalyzed membrane. The lightweight unitized flow field concept was proven in the first three months of the contract. A single unit flow field weighs 0.155 pounds and can seal to 60 psi. The single cell catalyzed Nafion membrane exceeded our performance goal of 0.6 volts at 100 ASF. Stack performance points were 0.42 volts at 113 ASF and .75 volts at 96 asf.

  2. Parametric design study of ``power stick'' and its derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schock, Alfred; Or, Chuen T.

    1995-01-01

    The paper addresses some major concerns about the Power Stick concept proposed by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) personnel, and describes parametric studies of derivative designs to determine to what extent those concerns can be alleviated. The Power Stick and its derivatives are based on the use of the 1-watt(t) Radioisotope Heater Unit (RHU) to power a thermoelectric multicouple. Our study concludes that: (a) while the RHU has been safety-qualified as a low-temperature heater, additional reentry analyses and test would be needed to qualify it as a higher temperature heat source for the Power Stick, (b) even after parametric design optimization, the efficiency of the Power Stick and its derivatives is only 2.2%, and, (c) all generators based on the 1-watt heat source require a thermoelectric multicouple with a large number of extremely thin legs, of very doubtful fabricability.

  3. Parametric design study of ``power stick`` and its derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, A.; Or, C.T.

    1995-01-20

    The paper addresses some major concerns about the Power Stick concept proposed by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) personnel, and describes parametric studies of derivative designs to determine to what extent those concerns can be alleviated. The Power Stick and its derivatives are based on the use of the 1-watt(t) Radioisotope Heater Unit (RHU) to power a thermoelectric multicouple. Our study concludes that: (a) while the RHU has been safety-qualified as a low-temperature heater, additional reentry analyses and test would be needed to qualify it as a higher temperature heat source for the Power Stick, (b) even after parametric design optimization, the efficiency of the Power Stick and its derivatives is only 2.2%, and, (c) all generators based on the 1-watt heat source require a thermoelectric multicouple with a large number of extremely thin legs, of very doubtful fabricability. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  4. Environmental test report on the CTI-Cryogenics 1-watt integral Stirling cooler (long-life HD-1033d). Final report, 16 June-24 July 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Doggett, G.; Dunmire, H.; Samuels, R.; Shaffer, J.

    1989-04-01

    This final report describes and provides the data on the environmental testing of the CTI-Cryogenics 1-Watt Integral Stirling Cooler (Long-Life HD-1033D). The 1-Watt Integral Cooler (HD-1033B/C) is currently used in the M1 FLIR, M60 FLIR, and the Advanced Attack Helicopter FLIR. The long life cooler (clearance seal) improves life of the cooler by approximately two and one half times. C2NVEO evaluated the cooler performance at environmental extremes per the purchase description, PD-0182-001(CR). The cooler successfully passed all the environmental tests with no failures.

  5. Performance characteristics of the 12 GHz, 200 watt transmitter experiment package for CTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. F.; Fiala, J. L.; Hansen, I. G.

    1975-01-01

    The experiment package consists of a 200 W output stage tube (OST) powered by a power processing system (PPS). Descriptions of both the PPS and OST are given. The PPS provides the necessary voltages with a measured dc/dc conversion efficiency of 89 percent. The OST, a traveling wave tube with multiple collectors, has a saturated rf output power of 224 W and operates at an overall efficiency exceeding 40 percent over an 85 MHz bandwidth at 12 GHz. OST performance given includes frequency response, saturation characteristics, group delay, AM to PM conversion, inter-modulation distortion, and two channel gain suppression. Single and dual channel FM video performance is presented. It was determined that for 12 MHz peak to peak frequency deviation on each channel, dual channel FM television signals can be transmitted through the TEP at 60 W, each channel, with 40 MHz channel spacing (center to center).

  6. 120 Watt Split-Mount 30 GHz Amplifier for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazar, John; Jacquez, Andrew

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes an amplifier for a Ka-band communication system. The amplifier consists of two units. The radio frequency (RF) unit is mounted at the antenna to provide power to the antenna, while the power supply unit is located 12 meters away in a control station. The two units are connected by a waveguide run and a set of umbilical cables to provide all the necessary inputs for the operation and protection of the RF unit. Specifications and actual performance data are presented and discussed. Special features of each unit to meet the specifications are described in detail.

  7. DESIGN STUDY OF COMPACT MEGA-WATT CLASS FEL AMPLIFIER BASED ON THE VISA UNDULATOR.

    SciTech Connect

    WATANABE, T.; LIU, D.; MURPHY, J.B.; PINAYEV, I.; ROSE, J.; SHAFTAN, T.; SKARITKA, J.; TANABE, T.; TSANG, T.; WANG, X.J.; YU, L.H.

    2005-08-21

    The strong focusing VISA undulator is presented in this report. The proposed FEL will operate at the 1 {micro}m water window. Extensive simulations were performed to optimize an FEL amplifier based on the two-meter long VISA undulator which has a period of 1.8 cm and an undulator parameter K = 1.26. The betatron function inside the VISA undulator is about 30 cm. For an electron beam with a peak current {approx}1 kA and a normalized emittance of 5 mm-mrad, the FEL peak power can exceed 1 GW within the 2 m VISA undulator using a 5 kW peak power seed laser. Such a device can produce a megawatt of average power for a 700 MHz rep rate. The transverse distribution of the FEL radiation along the undulator, as well as after the undulator, is explored by numerical simulation. The FEL power density at 5 m downstream from the undulator is less than 100 kW/cm{sup 2} for this MW-class FEL. We will also discuss the feasibility of an experimental demonstration of the laser seeded FEL amplifier based on the 2-m VISA undulator at the NSLS Source Development Lab (SDL).

  8. Conceptual approach study of a 200 watt per kilogram solar array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanhouse, R. W.; Fox, D.; Wilson, W.

    1976-01-01

    Solar array candidate configurations (flexible rollup, flexible flat-pact, semi-rigid panel, semi-rigid flat-pack) were analyzed with particular attention to the specific power (W/kg) requirement. Two of these configurations (flexible rollup and flexible flat-pack) are capable of delivering specific powers equal to or exceeding the baseline requirement of 200 W/kg. Only the flexible rollup is capable of in-flight retraction and subsequent redeployment. The wrap-around contact photovoltaic cell configuration has been chosen over the conventional cell. The demand for ultra high specific power forces the selection of ultra-thin cells and cover material. Based on density and mass range considerations, it was concluded that 13 micrometers of FEP Teflon is sufficient to protect the cell from a total proton fluency of 2(10 to the 12th power) particles/sq cm over a three-year interplanetary mission. The V-stiffened, lattice boom deployed, flexible substrate rollup array holds the greatest promise of meeting the baseline requirements set for this study.

  9. Simple, distance-dependent formulation of the Watts-Strogatz model for directed and undirected small-world networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, H. Francis; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2014-12-01

    Small-world networks—complex networks characterized by a combination of high clustering and short path lengths—are widely studied using the paradigmatic model of Watts and Strogatz (WS). Although the WS model is already quite minimal and intuitive, we describe an alternative formulation of the WS model in terms of a distance-dependent probability of connection that further simplifies, both practically and theoretically, the generation of directed and undirected WS-type small-world networks. In addition to highlighting an essential feature of the WS model that has previously been overlooked, namely the equivalence to a simple distance-dependent model, this alternative formulation makes it possible to derive exact expressions for quantities such as the degree and motif distributions and global clustering coefficient for both directed and undirected networks in terms of model parameters.

  10. Simple, distance-dependent formulation of the Watts-Strogatz model for directed and undirected small-world networks.

    PubMed

    Song, H Francis; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2014-12-01

    Small-world networks-complex networks characterized by a combination of high clustering and short path lengths-are widely studied using the paradigmatic model of Watts and Strogatz (WS). Although the WS model is already quite minimal and intuitive, we describe an alternative formulation of the WS model in terms of a distance-dependent probability of connection that further simplifies, both practically and theoretically, the generation of directed and undirected WS-type small-world networks. In addition to highlighting an essential feature of the WS model that has previously been overlooked, namely the equivalence to a simple distance-dependent model, this alternative formulation makes it possible to derive exact expressions for quantities such as the degree and motif distributions and global clustering coefficient for both directed and undirected networks in terms of model parameters.

  11. Ecological risk assessment for residual coal fly ash at Watts Bar Reservoir, Tennessee: Site setting and problem formulation.

    PubMed

    Walls, Suzanne J; Jones, Daniel S; Stojak, Amber R; Carriker, Neil E

    2015-01-01

    A baseline ecological risk assessment (BERA) was performed for residual ash in the Watts Bar Reservoir following a release of fly ash from the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant. The site consists of parts of 3 rivers in eastern Tennessee comprising over 32 river kilometers. The purpose of the assessment was to determine if residual ash negatively impacts maintenance and reproduction of balanced communities or populations of potentially exposed ecological receptor groups in these rivers. This introductory article summarizes the site and environmental setting, assessment and measurement endpoints, risk characterization methods, and the study approach. Subsequent articles describe ecological risks to fish, benthic invertebrates, aquatic- and riparian-feeding wildlife, and aerial-feeding insectivores; and the role ecological risk characterization played in determining the most effective management of the residual ash, setting project remediation objectives and targets, and designing long-term monitoring to measure the effectiveness of the selected removal action. PMID:25234753

  12. The watt or Kibble balance: a technique for implementing the new SI definition of the unit of mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ian A.; Schlamminger, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    The redefinition of the SI unit of mass in terms of a fixed value of the Planck constant has been made possible by the Kibble balance, previously known as the watt balance. Once the new definition has been adopted, the Kibble balance technique will permit the realisation of the mass unit over a range from milligrams to kilograms. We describe the theory underlying the Kibble balance and practical techniques required to construct such an instrument to relate a macroscopic physical mass to the Planck constant with an uncertainty, which is achievable at present, in the region of 2 parts in 108. A number of Kibble balances have either been built or are under construction and we compare the principal features of these balances.

  13. Electric-bicycle propulsion power

    SciTech Connect

    Oman, H.; Morchin, W.C.; Jamerson, F.E.

    1995-12-31

    In a human-powered hybrid electric vehicle (HPHEV) the travel distance available from a single battery charge can be lengthened with power from another source, the cyclist`s leg muscles. In a battery-powered electric bicycle the propulsion power goes mostly into overcoming aerodynamic drag. For example, at 18 km per hour (11 miles per hour) this drag represents 200 watts at the tire-to-road interface for a typical cyclist`s shape and clothing. Today`s typical electrical bicycle is propelled by a high-speed dc motor which is powered from a lead-acid battery. The combined efficiency of the motor and its speed-reducing gears is 50 to 65 percent. In this paper we calculate available travel distances, as a function of speed, grade, and the battery energy-content as measured in watt-hours per kg. We show the effect of battery cost and charge/discharge cycle-life on travel cost in terms of cents per kilometer travelled. Designs used in today`s electric bicycles are illustrated.

  14. High-power CW diode-laser-array-pumped solid-state lasers and efficient nonlinear optical frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shine, Robert J.; Byer, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    During the interim period of this bridging contract, we have continued to work on the development of high-power cw diode-laser-array-pumped solid-state lasers. Towards that end, we have built lower power lasers in order to test individual components needed for the high-power laser, specifically we have built a 1 watt ring laser and a 5 watt slab laser. The 1 watt laser was used to study the injection locking process while assembling all the necessary electronics. We have demonstrated that it is possible to injection lock a diode-pumped laser using a single piezo-mounted mirror due to the lower intrinsic laser noise compared to an arc-lamp-pumped system. This allows us to optimize the injection locking servo loop and build a more stable locking system. The 5 watt laser was used as a test bed to find a practical way to mount the slab laser while minimizing the losses that occur at the total internal reflection (TIR) points in the slab. After trying many different means of protecting the TIR surfaces, we found that a new product from DuPont, Teflon AF 1600, has all the properties needed to provide a low loss protective coating. Using this material, the laser had a cavity loss of below 2%, which allowed for efficient operation of the laser in a side-pumped design. This laser produced 5 watts of output power with a slope efficiency near 20%.

  15. Small Stirling dynamic isotope power system for robotic space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bents, D. J.

    1992-08-01

    The design of a multihundred-watt Dynamic Isotope Power System (DIPS), based on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) and small (multihundred-watt) free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE), is being pursued as a potential lower cost alternative to radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's). The design is targeted at the power needs of future unmanned deep space and planetary surface exploration missions ranging from scientific probes to Space Exploration Initiative precursor missions. Power level for these missions is less than a kilowatt. The incentive for any dynamic system is that it can save fuel and reduce costs and radiological hazard. Unlike DIPS based on turbomachinery conversion (e.g. Brayton), this small Stirling DIPS can be advantageously scaled to multihundred-watt unit size while preserving size and mass competitiveness with RTG's. Stirling conversion extends the competitive range for dynamic systems down to a few hundred watts--a power level not previously considered for dynamic systems. The challenge for Stirling conversion will be to demonstrate reliability and life similar to RTG experience. Since the competitive potential of FPSE as an isotope converter was first identified, work has focused on feasibility of directly integrating GPHS with the Stirling heater head. Thermal modeling of various radiatively coupled heat source/heater head geometries has been performed using data furnished by the developers of FPSE and GPHS. The analysis indicates that, for the 1050 K heater head configurations considered, GPHS fuel clad temperatures remain within acceptable operating limits. Based on these results, preliminary characterizations of multihundred-watt units have been established.

  16. Sub-hundred Watt operation demonstration of HVM LPP-EUV source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, Hakaru; Nakarai, Hiroaki; Abe, Tamotsu; Ohta, Takeshi; Nowak, Krzysztof M.; Kawasuji, Yasufumi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yukio; Hori, Tsukasa; Kodama, Takeshi; Shiraishi, Yutaka; Yanagida, Tatsuya; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Taku; Okazaki, Shinji; Saitou, Takashi

    2014-04-01

    Since 2002, we have been developing a CO2-Sn-LPP EUV light source, the most promising solution as the 13.5 nm high power (>200 W) light source for HVM EUV lithography. Because of its high efficiency, power scalability and spatial freedom around plasma. Our group has proposed several unique original technologies; 1) CO2 laser driven Sn plasma generation, 2) Double laser pulse shooting for higher Sn ionization rate and higher CE. 3) Sn debris mitigation with a magnetic field, 4) Hybrid CO2 laser system that is scalable with a combination of a short pulse oscillator and commercial cw-CO2 amplifiers. 5) High efficient out of band light reduction with grating structured C1 mirror. In past paper we demonstrated in small size (2Hz) experimental device, this experiment shoed the advantage of combining a laser beam at a wavelength of the CO2 laser system with Sn plasma to achieve high CE>4.7% (in maximum) from driver laser pulse energy to EUV in-band energy 1). In this paper we report the further updated results from last paper. (1) 20um droplets at 100kHz operation was successfully ejected by downsized nozzle and demonstrated dramatical improvement of debris on the collector mirror. We have been developing extension of high CE operation condition at 20kHz range, We have reported component technology progress of EUV light source system. (2)New generation collector mirror with IR reduction technology is equipped in mirror maker. (3)20kW CO2 laser amplifier system is demonstrated cooperate with Mitsubishi electric. (4) We develop new Proto #2 EUV LPP source system and demonstrated 200W EUV plasma power (43W EUV clean power at I/F ) at 100kHz operation was confirmed. (5) High conversion efficiency (CE) of 3.9% at 20kHz operation was confirmed in using pico-second pre-pulse laser. (6)Improvement of CO2 laser power from 8kW to 12kW is now on going by installation of new pre-amplifier. (7)Power-up scenario of HVM source is reported, target shipment of first customer beta LPP

  17. Performance characteristics of the 12 GHz, 200 watt Transmitter Experiment Package for CTS. [Communication Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. F.; Fiala, J. L.; Hansen, I. G.

    1975-01-01

    Measured performance characteristics from ground test of the Transmitter Experiment Package (TEP) for the Communications Technology Satellite are presented. The experiment package consists of a 200 W Output Stage Tube (OST) powered by a Power Processing System (PPS). Descriptions of both the PPS and OST are given. The PPS provides the necessary voltages with a measured dc/dc conversion efficiency of 89 per cent. The OST, a traveling wave tube with multiple collectors, has a saturated rf output power of 224 W and operates at an overall efficiency exceeding 40 per cent over an 85 MHz bandwidth at 12 GHz. OST performance given includes frequency response, saturation characteristics, group delay, AM to PM conversion, intermodulation distortion, and two channel gain suppression. Single and dual channel FM video performance is presented. It was determined that for 12 MHz peak to peak frequency deviation on each channel, dual channel FM television signals can be transmitted through the TEP at 60 W, each channel, with 40 MHz channel spacing (center to center).

  18. On-orbit performance of the 12 GHz, 200 watt transmitter experiment package for CTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexovich, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Performance characteristics from on-orbit tests of the Transmitter Experiment Package (TEP) for the Communications Technology Satellite (CTS) are presented. The TEP consists of a Power Processing System (PPS), an Output Stage Tube (OST), and a Variable Conductance Heat Pipe System (VCHPS), all of which are described. The OST is a coupled-cavity traveling-wave tube with a multistage depressed collector and a stepped velocity-tapered slow-wave structure for efficiency enhancement. It has an RF output power of 240 W and an overall efficiency of 51.5% at a center band frequency of 12.080 GHz. The PPS provides the required operating voltages, regulation, control, and protection for the OST. It has a measured dc-dc conversion efficiency of 86.5% to 88.5%. The VCHPS consists of a fin radiator and three dual-artery stainless steel heat pipes using methanol and a mixture of inert gases. Test results presented include efficiencies, RF output power, frequency response, and performance with single and multiple (two) carriers frequency-modulated by video signals.

  19. Performance of the 12 GHz, 200 watt Transmitter Experiment Package for the Hermes Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexovich, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Performance characteristics from on-orbit tests of the Transmitter Experiment Package (TEP) for the Hermes Satellite are presented. The tests were conducted from February 8, 1976 through August 8, 1977. The TEP consists of a Power Processing System (PPS), an Output Stage Tube (OST) and a Variable Conductance Heat Pipe System (VCHPS), all of which are described. The OST is a coupled-cavity traveling wave tube with a multistage depressed collector and a stepped velocity-tapered slow wave structure for efficiency enhancement. It has an RF output power of 233 W and overall efficiency of 50.75% at a center band frequency of 12.080 GHz. The PPS provides the required operating voltages, regulation, control and protection for the OST. The VCHPS consists of a fin radiator and three dual-artery stainless steel heat pipes using methanol and a mixture of inert gases. Test results presented include efficiencies, RF output power and body current. A discussion of thermal anomalies which occurred is presented.

  20. 100-watt fiber-based green laser with near diffraction-limited beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dan; Eisenberg, Eric; Brar, Khush; Yilmaz, Tolga; Honea, Eric

    2010-02-01

    An air-cooled, light-weight, fiber-based, high power green laser has been prototyped. The system consists of an all-fibercoupled IR pump laser at 1064 nm and a frequency-conversion module in a compact and flexible configuration. The IR laser operates in QCW mode, with 10 MHz pulse repetition frequency and 3-5 ns pulse width, to generate sufficient peak power for frequency doubling in the converter module. The IR laser can produce more than 200 W in a linearlypolarized diffraction-limited output beam with high spectral brightness for frequency conversion. The converter module has an input telescope and an oven with a nonlinear crystal to efficiently convert the 1064-nm IR fiber laser output to 532-nm green output. The IR laser and conversion module are connected via a stainless-steel protected delivery fiber for optical beam delivery and an electrical cable harness for electrical power delivery and system control. The beam quality of the 532 nm output remains near diffraction-limited, with M2<1.4. Up to 101 W of 532 nm output was demonstrated and multi-hour runs were characterized at 75 W output. The weights of the IR laser package and doubler are 69 lbs and 14 lbs respectively. An overview of the system and full characterization results will be presented. Such compact, highbrightness green laser sources are expected to enable various scientific, defense and industrial applications.

  1. Extended operating range of the 30-cm ion thruster with simplified power processor requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, V. K.

    1981-01-01

    A two grid 30 cm diameter mercury ion thruster was operated with only six power supplies over the baseline J series thruster power throttle range with negligible impact on thruster performance. An analysis of the functional model power processor showed that the component mass and parts count could be reduced considerably and the electrical efficiency increased slightly by only replacing power supplies with relays. The input power, output thrust, and specific impulse of the thruster were then extended, still using six supplies, from 2660 watts, 0.13 newtons, and 2980 seconds to 9130 watts, 0.37 newtons, and 3820 seconds, respectively. Increases in thrust and power density enable reductions in the number of thrusters and power processors required for most missions. Preliminary assessments of the impact of thruster operation at increased thrust and power density on the discharge characteristics, performance, and lifetime of the thruster were also made.

  2. Brief Report: Repetitive Behaviors in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Developmentally Similar Peers--A Follow Up to Watt et al. (2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Angela B.; Wetherby, Amy M.; Chambers, Nola W.

    2012-01-01

    The present study extended the findings of Watt et al. (J Autism Dev Disord 38:1518-1533, 2008) by investigating repetitive and stereotyped behaviors (RSB) demonstrated by children (n = 50) and typical development (TD; n = 50) matched on developmental age, gender, and parents' education level. RSB were coded from videotaped Communication and…

  3. REMOVAL OF CHEMICAL AND MICROBIAL CONTAMINANTS IN DRINKING WATER - WATTS PREMIER M-2400 POINT-OF-ENTRY REVERSE OSMOSIS DRINKINGWATER TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Watts Premier M-2400 POE RO Drinking Water Treatment System was tested at the NSF Drinking Water Treatment Systems Laboratory for removal of the viruses fr and MS2, the bacteria Brevundimonas diminuta, and chemicals aldicarb, benzene, cadmium, carbofuran, cesium, chl...

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, REMOVAL OF ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: WATTS PREMIER M-SERIES M-15,000 REVERSE OSMOSIS TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the Watts Premier M-Series M-15,000 RO Treatment System was conducted over a 31-day period from April 26, 2004, through May 26, 2004. This test was conducted at the Coachella Valley Water District (CVWD) Well 7802 in Thermal, California. The source water...

  5. Warts and All: Personal Reflections on Social Justice in Counseling Psychology. Reply to Kiselica, Palmer, Thompson and Shermis, and Watts. Rejoinder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Lisa A.; Liang, Belle; Weintraub, Sarah R.; Helms, Janet E.; Latta, Rachel E.

    2004-01-01

    In their comments regarding Goodman, Liang, Helms, Latta, Sparks, and Weintraub's article "Training Counseling Psychologists as Social Justice Agents: Feminist and Multicultural Principles in Action," Kiselica, Palmer, Thompson and Shermis, and Watts offered a number of useful suggestions for elaborating on social justice theory, practice, and…

  6. Gas Turbine Energy Conversion Systems for Nuclear Power Plants Applicable to LiFTR Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2014-01-01

    This panel plans to cover thermal energy and electric power production issues facing our nation and the world over the next decades, with relevant technologies ranging from near term to mid-and far term.Although the main focus will be on ground based plants to provide baseload electric power, energy conversion systems (ECS) for space are also included, with solar- or nuclear energy sources for output power levels ranging tens of Watts to kilo-Watts for unmanned spacecraft, and eventual mega-Watts for lunar outposts and planetary surface colonies. Implications of these technologies on future terrestrial energy systems, combined with advanced fracking, are touched upon.Thorium based reactors, and nuclear fusion along with suitable gas turbine energy conversion systems (ECS) will also be considered by the panelists. The characteristics of the above mentioned ECS will be described, both in terms of their overall energy utilization effectiveness and also with regard to climactic effects due to exhaust emissions.

  7. High power arcjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goelz, T. M.; Auweter-Kurtz, M.; Kurtz, H. L.; Schrade, H. O.

    1992-01-01

    In this period a new mass flow controller was brought into the gas supply system, so that the upper limit for the mass flow rate could be increased up to 500 mg/s with hydrogen. A maximum specific impulse of 1500 s could be achieved with the high powered arcjet (HIPARC) at an efficiency of slightly better than 20 percent. Different nozzle throat diameters had been tested. The 100 kilo-watt input power limit was reached with the 4 mm nozzle throat diameter at a mass flow rate of 400 mg/s. Tests were carried out with different cathode gaps and with three different cathodes. In addition measurements of pressure and gas temperature were taken in the feed line in order to determine the pressure drop in the propellant injectors.

  8. HIGH ENERGY PULSED POWER SYSTEM FOR AGS SUPER NEUTRINO FOCUSING HORN.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG, S.Y.; SANDBERG, J.; WENG, W.-T.

    2005-05-16

    This paper present a preliminary design of a 300 kA, 2.5 Hz pulsed power system. This system will drive the focusing horn of proposed Brookhaven AGS Neutrino Super Beam Facility for Very Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment. The peak output power of the horn pulsed power system will reach Giga-watts, and the upgraded AGS will be capable of delivering 1 MW in beam power.

  9. Summary report on water quality, sediment and water chemistry data for water and sediment samples collected from source areas to Melton Hill and Watts Bar reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Tomaszewski, T.M.; Bruggink, D.J.; Nunn, D.L.

    1995-08-01

    Contamination of surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system as a result of past and present activities by the US Department of Energy (DOE) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and also activities by non-ORR facilities are being studied by the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). Previous studies have documented the presence of heavy metals, organics, and radionuclides in the sediments of reservoirs in the vicinity. In support of the CR-ERP, during the summer of 1991, TVA collected and evaluated water and sediment samples from swimming areas and municipal water intakes on Watts Bar Reservoir, Melton Hill Reservoir (which is considered part of the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir System), and Norris Reservoir, which was considered a source of less-contaminated reference or background data. Results of this study indicated that the levels of contamination in the samples from the Watts Bar and Melton Hill Reservoir sites did not pose a threat to human health. Despite the numerous studies, until the current work documented by this report, relatively few sediment or water samples had been collected by the CR-ERP in the immediate vicinity of contaminant point sources. This work focused on water and sediment samples taken from points immediately downstream from suspected effluent point sources both on and off the ORR. In August and September, 1994, TVA sampled surface water and sediment at twelve locations in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. Eleven of the sampling sites were selected based on existence of pollutant discharge permits, known locations of hazardous waste sites, and knowledge of past practices. The twelfth sample site was selected as a relatively less contaminated reference site for comparison purposes.

  10. A stable, high power optically pumped far infrared laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam; Pickett, Herbert M.

    1988-01-01

    The generation of 1.25 watts of CW laser power at the 119-micron (2522.8 GHz) methanol line is reported. The maximum frequency fluctuation of the free running laser is less than + or - 100 kHz per hour. This laser has also been tested on numerous other lines ranging from 403.7 GHz (HCOOH) to 5260 GHz (CH3OD) with improved power and stability.

  11. Conceptual approach study of a 200 watt per kilogram solar array, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rayl, G. J.; Speight, K. M.; Stanhouse, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Two alternative designs were studied; one a retractable rollout design and the other a nonretractable foldout configuration. An end of life (EOL) power for either design of 0.79 beginning of life (BOL) is predicted based on one solar flare during a 3 year interplanetary mission. Both array configurations incorporate the features of flexible substrates and cover sheets. A power capacity of 10 kilowatt is achieved in a blanket area of 76 sq m with an area utilization factor of 0.8. A single array consists of two identical solar cell blankets deployed concurrently by a single, coilable longeron boom. An out of plane angle of 8-1/4 deg is maintained between the two blankets so that the inherent inplane stiffness of the blankets may be used to obtain out of plane stiffness. This V-stiffened design results in a 67% reduction in the stiffness requirement for the boom. Since boom mass scales with stiffness, a lower requirement on boom stiffness results in a lower mass for the boom. These solar arrays are designed to be compatible with the shuttle launch environment and shuttle cargo bay size limitations.

  12. Traveling Wave Tube (TVT) RF Power Combining Demonstration for use in the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downey, Joseph A.

    2004-01-01

    The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) is set to launch between the years 2012 and 2015. It will possibly utilize a nuclear reactor power source and ion engines as it travels to the moons of Jupiter. The nuclear reactor will produce hundreds of kilowatts of power for propulsion, communication and various scientific instruments. Hence, the RF amplification devices aboard will be able to operate at a higher power level and data rate. The initial plan for the communications system is for an output of 1000 watts of RF power, a data rate of at least 10 megabits a second, and a frequency of 32 GHz. A higher data rate would be ideal to fully utilize the instruments aboard JIMO. At NASA Glenn, one of our roles in the JIMO project is to demonstrate RF power combining using multiple traveling wave tubes (TWT). In order for the power of separate TWT s to be combined, the RF output waves from each must be in-phase and have the same amplitude. Since different tubes act differently, we had to characterize each tube using a Network Analyzer. We took frequency sweeps and power sweeps to characterize each tube to ensure that they will behave similarly under the same conditions. The 200 watt Dornier tubes had been optimized to run at a lower power level (120 watts) for their extensive use in the ACTS program, so we also had to experiment with adjusting the voltage settings on several internal components (helix, anode, collector) of the tubes to reach the full 200 watt potential. from the ACTS program. Phase shifters and power attenuators were placed in the waveguide circuit at the inputs to the tubes so that adjustments could be made individually to match them exactly. A magic tee was used to route and combine the amplified electromagnetic RF waves on the tube output side. The demonstration of 200 watts of combined power was successful with efficiencies greater than 90% over a 500 MHz bandwidth. The next step will be to demonstrate the use of three amplifiers using two magic tees by

  13. A 10-watt CW photodissociation laser with IODO perfluoro-tert-butane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabibi, Bagher; Venable, Demetrius D.

    1989-01-01

    NASA has been investigating the feasibility of direct solar-pumped laser systems for power beaming in space. Among the various gas, liquid, and solid laser systems being proposed as candidates for solar-pumped lasers, the iodine photodissociation gas laser has demonstrated its potential for space application. Of immediate attention is the determination of system requirements and the choice of lasants to improve the system efficiency. The development of an efficient iodine laser depends on the availability of a suitable iodide which has favorable laser kinetics, chemically reversibility, and solar energy utilization. Among the various alkyliodide lasants comparatively tested in a long-pulse system, perfluoro- tert-butyl iodide, T-C4F9I, was found to be the best. However, the operating conditions for the laser medium in a continuously pumped and continuous-flow iodine laser differ considerably from those in the pulsed regime. The results of the continuous wave (CW)) laser performance from t-C4F9I are reported. Perfluoro- n-propyl iodide, n-C3F7I is used for comparison because of its universal use in photodissociation iodine lasers.

  14. High power Nd:YAG spinning disk laser.

    PubMed

    Ongstad, Andrew P; Guy, Matthew; Chavez, Joeseph R

    2016-01-11

    We report on a high power Nd:YAG spinning disk laser. The eight cm diameter disk generated 200 W CW output with 323 W of absorbed pump in a near diffraction-limited beam. The power conversion efficiency was 64%. The pulsed result, 5 ms pulses at 10 Hz PRF, was nearly identical to the CW result indicating good thermal management. Rotated at 1200-1800 RPM with He impingement cooling the disk temperature increased by only 17 °C reaching a maximum temperature of ~31 °C. The thermal dissipation per unit of output power was 0.61 watt of heat generated per watt of laser output, which is below the typical range of 0.8-1.1 for 808 nm diode pumped Nd:YAG lasers. PMID:26832242

  15. SITE TECHNOLOGY PROFILES - 11TH EDITION - DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM, VOLUME 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, now in its eleventh year is an integral part of EPA's research into alternative cleanup methods for hazardous waste sites around the nation. The SITE Program was created to encourage the development and routine use o...

  16. 11th Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology 2003 (ISMB 2003)

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    This report profiles the keynote talks given at ISMB03 in Brisbane, Australia by Ron Shamir, David Haussler, John Mattick, Yoshihide Hayashizaki, Sydney Brenner, the Overton Prize winner, Jim Kent, and the ISCB Senior Accomplishment Awardee, David Sankov. PMID:18629025

  17. Technical Progress Report (11th Semi-Annual)

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-31

    The objective of this proposed program is to ensure reliable supply of high-quality natural gas by reducing the cost of treating subquality natural gas containing H2O, CO2, H2S and/or trace quantities of other gaseous impurities by applying high-efficiency contractors with structured packing using physical solvent N-Formyl Morpholine and morpholine additives.

  18. Executive summary of the 11th HHT international scientific conference.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Helen; Geisthoff, Urban; Gossage, James R; Hughes, Christopher C W; Lacombe, Pascal; Meek, Mary E; Oh, Paul; Roman, Beth L; Trerotola, Scott O; Velthuis, Sebastiaan; Wooderchak-Donahue, Whitney

    2015-10-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a hereditary condition that results in vascular malformations throughout the body, which have a proclivity to rupture and bleed. HHT has a worldwide incidence of about 1:5000 and approximately 80 % of cases are due to mutations in ENG, ALK1 (aka activin receptor-like kinase 1 or ACVRL1) and SMAD4. Over 200 international clinicians and scientists met at Captiva Island, Florida from June 11-June 14, 2015 to present and discuss the latest research on HHT. 156 abstracts were accepted to the meeting and 60 were selected for oral presentations. The first two sections of this article present summaries of the basic science and clinical talks. Here we have summarized talks covering key themes, focusing on areas of agreement, disagreement, and unanswered questions. The final four sections summarize discussions in the Workshops, which were theme-based topical discussions led by two moderators. We hope this overview will educate as well as inspire those within the field and from outside, who have an interest in the science and treatment of HHT. PMID:26391603

  19. Indiana's Academic Standards: 11th Grade English/Language Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis.

    This booklet of academic standards spells out what students should know and be able to do in Grade 11 English/Language Arts. The booklet gives examples to help students understand what is required to meet the standards and provides a list of 10 things parents can do to help their child get a good education. It outlines the following seven…

  20. Vocational Agriculture III. A Curriculum Guide, 11th Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Bob; Cox, Cecil

    Designed to provide a basic core of instruction for the third year of agriculture in Oklahoma, this guide is for use by teachers and their eleventh grade students. Instructional content is in five sections, each with four or more units: soil science, leadership, animal science, farm business management, and agricultural mechanics. Each unit…

  1. Proceedings of the 11th JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.

    2002-01-01

    This publication contains the proceedings of the JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop forum held to report science research and applications results with spectral images measured by the NASA Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). These papers were presented at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory from March 5-8, 2001. Electronic versions of these papers may be found at the A VIRIS Web http://popo.jpl.nasa.gov/pub/docs/workshops/aviris.proceedings.html

  2. High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier: From the Lab to Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III; Bell, Joseph L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the beginnings of space travel, various microwave power amplifier designs have been employed. These included Class-A, -B, and -C bias arrangements. However, shared limitation of these topologies is the inherent high total consumption of input power associated with the generation of radio frequency (RF)/microwave power. The power amplifier has always been the largest drain for the limited available power on the spacecraft. Typically, the conversion efficiency of a microwave power amplifier is 10 to 20%. For a typical microwave power amplifier of 20 watts, input DC power of at least 100 watts is required. Such a large demand for input power suggests that a better method of RF/microwave power generation is required. The price paid for using a linear amplifier where high linearity is unnecessary includes higher initial and operating costs, lower DC-to-RF conversion efficiency, high power consumption, higher power dissipation and the accompanying need for higher capacity heat removal means, and an amplifier that is more prone to parasitic oscillation. The first use of a higher efficiency mode of power generation was described by Baxandall in 1959. This higher efficiency mode, Class-D, is achieved through distinct switching techniques to reduce the power losses associated with switching, conduction, and gate drive losses of a given transistor.

  3. Energetics of the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D. P.

    1980-01-01

    The approximate magnitudes of several power inputs and energies associated with the Earth's magnetosphere will be derived. They include: Solar wind power impinging on the dayside magnetopause approximately 1.4 10 to the 13th power watt; power input to cross tail current approximately 3 10 to the 11th power watt; energy of moderate magnetic storm approximately 2 10 to the 15th power joule; power related to the flow of j approximately 1 to 3 10 to the 11th power watt; average power deposited by the aurora approximately 2 10 to the 10th power watt. Stored magnetic energy: released in a substorm approximately 1.5 10 to the 14th power joule. Compared to the above, the rate at which energy is released locally in magnetospheric regions where magnetic merging occurs is probably small. Merging is essential, however, for the existence of open field lines, which provide the most likely explanation for some major energy inputs listed here. Merging is also required if part of the open flux of the tail lobes is converted into closed flux, as seems to happen during substorms. Again, most of the energy release becomes evident only beyond the merging region, though some particles may gain appreciable energy in that region itself, if the plasma sheet is completely squeezed out and the high latitude lobes interact directly.

  4. Reproductive effects assessment of largemouth bass and bluegill in the Watts Bar Lake/Clinch River system

    SciTech Connect

    Niemela, S.L.; McCracken, M.K.; Ivey, L.J.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Successful reproduction is key to the survival and maintenance of viable fish populations and therefore an important consideration in ecological risk assessments. In order to evaluate the reproductive health of fish in the Watts Bar Lake/Clinch River system downstream of the Department of Energy facilities in Oak Ridge, TN, largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) were collected from seven sites at the beginning of the spawning period and a suite of parameters indicative of reproductive condition were measured. Measures of reproductive condition common to male and female fish included gonadal somatic index (GSI), and plasma concentrations of reproductive hormones. Gender specific analyses included a histological examination of the testes in males and a quantitative evaluation of ovarian parameters in females including determinations of fecundity, the number of vitellogenic and atretic oocytes, and the incidences of ovarian parasites. Evidence of reproductive impairment in largemouth bass at the two sites immediately adjacent to the Oak Ridge Reservation included lower GSIs and reproductive hormone levels (males and females), and reduced fecundity and an increase in the number of atretic oocytes (females). Similar trends were not observed in bluegill sunfish. These findings suggest that reproduction in a top-level predatory fish species, the largemouth bass, may be negatively affected by activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  5. Transport and accumulation of cesium-137 and mercury in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir system. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C.R.; Larsen, I.L.; Lowry, P.D.; Moriones, C.R.; Ford, C.J.; Dearstone, K.C.; Turner, R.R.; Kimmel, B.L.; Brandt, C.C.

    1992-06-01

    Operations and waste disposal activities at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site (formerly the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant) on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) have introduced a variety of airborne, liquid, and solid wastes into the surrounding environment. Some of these wastes may affect off-site areas by entering local streams, which ultimately drain into the Clinch and Tennessee river system. Previously reported concentrations of radionuclides, metals and organic compounds in water, sediment, and biota of the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir suggest the presence of a variety of contaminants of possible concern to the protection of human health and the environment. The work reported here represents part of the initial scoping phase for the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation. In this work, the distribution of {sup 137}Cs is used to identify contaminant accumulation patterns and potential problem, or ``hot-spot,`` areas with regard to environmental hazard or human health. Radiocesium was chosen for this scoping effort because (1) its history of release into the Clinch River is reasonably well documented, (2) it is easy and inexpensive to measure by gamma spectrometry, and (3) it is rapidly sorbed to particulate matter and thus serves as a cost-effective tracer for identifying the transport and accumulation patterns of many other particle-reactive contaminants, such as mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and plutonium (Pu), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

  6. Transport and accumulation of cesium-137 and mercury in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir system

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C.R.; Larsen, I.L.; Lowry, P.D.; Moriones, C.R.; Ford, C.J.; Dearstone, K.C.; Turner, R.R.; Kimmel, B.L.; Brandt, C.C.

    1992-06-01

    Operations and waste disposal activities at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site (formerly the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant) on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) have introduced a variety of airborne, liquid, and solid wastes into the surrounding environment. Some of these wastes may affect off-site areas by entering local streams, which ultimately drain into the Clinch and Tennessee river system. Previously reported concentrations of radionuclides, metals and organic compounds in water, sediment, and biota of the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir suggest the presence of a variety of contaminants of possible concern to the protection of human health and the environment. The work reported here represents part of the initial scoping phase for the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation. In this work, the distribution of {sup 137}Cs is used to identify contaminant accumulation patterns and potential problem, or hot-spot,'' areas with regard to environmental hazard or human health. Radiocesium was chosen for this scoping effort because (1) its history of release into the Clinch River is reasonably well documented, (2) it is easy and inexpensive to measure by gamma spectrometry, and (3) it is rapidly sorbed to particulate matter and thus serves as a cost-effective tracer for identifying the transport and accumulation patterns of many other particle-reactive contaminants, such as mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and plutonium (Pu), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

  7. Periodic coupling strength-dependent multiple coherence resonance by time delay in Newman-Watts neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanan; Gong, Yubing; Xu, Bo

    2013-12-01

    Recently, multiple coherence resonance induced by time delay has been observed in neuronal networks with constant coupling strength. In this paper, by employing Newman-Watts Hodgkin-Huxley neuron networks with time-periodic coupling strength, we study how the temporal coherence of spiking behavior and coherence resonance by time delay change when the frequency of periodic coupling strength is varied. It is found that delay induced coherence resonance is dependent on periodic coupling strength and increases when the frequency of periodic coupling strength increases. Periodic coupling strength can also induce multiple coherence resonance, and the coherence resonance occurs when the frequency of periodic coupling strength is approximately multiple of the spiking frequency. These results show that for periodic coupling strength time delay can more frequently optimize the temporal coherence of spiking activity, and periodic coupling strength can repetitively optimize the temporal coherence of spiking activity as well. Frequency locking may be the mechanism for multiple coherence resonance induced by periodic coupling strength. These findings imply that periodic coupling strength is more efficient for enhancing the temporal coherence of spiking activity of neuronal networks, and thus it could play a more important role in improving the time precision of information processing and transmission in neural networks.

  8. On life assessment of high reliability high power optical switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuanjian; Chu, Peter

    2014-09-01

    High data rate and long range free space lasercom links require multi-watt optical transmitter power, which creates a need for high power redundancy switches to ensure high payload reliability. A high power optical switch (HPOS) with less than 0.15 dB loss and capable of switching more than 40 watts of optical power in a single mode fiber has been previously demonstrated in the Transformational Satellite Communication System program. Prototype switches, in either 1x2 or 2x2 configuration, have been subjected to pyro-shock test, vibration test, and vacuum operation. These switches showed no performance degradation as a result of these tests. Three prototypes went through 60,000 35-watt switching cycles and over 30 million low power switching cycles, and the switches showed no mechanical failure. The HPOS life is about 3.2 million switching cycles with a definition of 3-dB degradation in on/off extinction ratio, which is well suited for space applications.

  9. Design of small Stirling Dynamic Isotope Power System for robotic space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bents, David J.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Withrow, Colleen A.; McKissock, Barbara I.; Schmitz, Paul C.

    1993-01-01

    Design of a multihundred-watt Dynamic Isotope Power System (DIPS) based on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) and small (multihundred-watt) free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE) technology is being pursued as a potential lower cost alternative to radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG's). The design is targeted at the power needs of future unmanned deep space and planetary surface exploration missions ranging from scientific probes to Space Exploration Initiative precursor missions. Power level for these missions is less than a kilowatt. Unlike previous DIPS designs which were based on turbomachinery conversion (e.g. Brayton), this small Stirling DIPS can be advantageously scaled down to multihundred-watt unit size while preserving size and mass competitiveness with RTGs. Preliminary characterization of units in the output power ranges 200-600 We indicate that on an electrical watt basis the GPHS/small Stirling DIPS will be roughly equivalent to an advanced RTG in size and mass but require less than a third of the isotope inventory.

  10. Design of small Stirling dynamic isotope power system for robotic space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, D. J.; Schreiber, J. G.; Withrow, C. A.; Mckissock, B. I.; Schmitz, P. C.

    1992-01-01

    Design of a multihundred-watt Dynamic Isotope Power System (DIPS) based on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) and small (multihundred-watt) free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE) technology is being pursued as a potential lower cost alternative to radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's). The design is targeted at the power needs of future unmanned deep space and planetary surface exploration missions ranging from scientific probes to Space Exploration Initiative precursor missions. Power level for these missions is less than a kilowatt. Unlike previous DIPS designs which were based on turbomachinery conversion (e.g. Brayton), this small Stirling DIPS can be advantageously scaled down to multihundred-watt unit size while preserving size and mass competitiveness with RTG's. Preliminary characterization of units in the output power ranges 200-600 We indicate that on an electrical watt basis the GPHS/small Stirling DIPS will be roughly equivalent to an advanced RTG in size and mass but require less than a third of the isotope inventory.

  11. Power System for Venus Surface Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Mellott, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    A radioisotope power and cooling system is designed to provide electrical power for a probe operating on the surface of Venus. Most foreseeable electronics devices and sensors cannot operate at the 450 C ambient surface temperature of Venus. Because the mission duration is substantially long and the use of thermal mass to maintain an operable temperature range is likely impractical, some type of active refrigeration may be required to keep electronic components at a temperature below ambient. The fundamental cooling parameters are the cold sink temperature, the hot sink temperature, and the amount of heat to be removed. In this instance, it is anticipated that electronics would have a nominal operating temperature of 300 C. Due to the highly thermal convective nature of the high-density (90 bar CO2) atmosphere, the hot sink temperature was assumed to be 50 C, which provided a 500 C temperature of the cooler's heat rejecter to the ambient atmosphere. The majority of the heat load on the cooler is from the high temperature ambient surface environment on Venus, with a small contribution of heat generation from electronics and sensors. Both thermoelectric (RTG) and dynamic power conversion systems were analyzed, based on use of a standard isotope (General-purpose heat source, or GPHS) brick. For the radioisotope Stirling power converter configuration designed, the Sage model predicts a thermodynamic power output capacity of 478.1 watts, which slightly exceeds the required 469.1 watts. The hot sink temperature is 1200 C, and the cold sink temperature is 500 C. The required heat input is 1740 watts. This gives a thermodynamic efficiency of 27.48 %. It is estimated that the mechanical efficiency of the power converter design is on the order of 85 %, based on experimental measurements taken from 500-watt power class, laboratory-tested Stirling engines. The overall efficiency is calculated to be 23.36 %. The mass of the power converter is estimated at approximately 21.6 kg

  12. High voltage solar cell power generating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, E., Jr.; Opjorden, R. W.; Hoffman, A. C.

    1974-01-01

    A laboratory solar power system regulated by on-panel switches has been delivered for operating high power (3 kW), high voltage (15,000 volt) loads (communication tubes, ion thrusters). The modular system consists of 26 solar arrays, each with an integral light source and cooling system. A typical array contains 2,560 series-connected cells. Each light source consists of twenty 500-watt tungsten iodide lamps providing plus or minus 5 percent uniformity at one solar constant. An array temperature of less than 40 C is achieved using an infrared filter, a water-cooled plate, a vacuum hold-down system, and air flushing.

  13. Australian Marsh Beetles (Coleoptera: Scirtidae). 8. The new genera
    Cygnocyphon, Eximiocyphon, Paracyphon, Leptocyphon, Tectocyphon,
    and additions to Contacyphon de Gozis, Nanocyphon Zwick and Eurycyphon Watts.

    PubMed

    Zwick, Peter

    2015-07-07

    New monotypic genera proposed are: Cygnocyphon ibex n. gen., n. sp., Eximiocyphon excisus n. gen., n. sp., and Paracyphon avicularis n. gen., n. sp. Also proposed are the new genera Leptocyphon n. gen., with L. furcalonga, n. sp. and L. quadricornutus, n. sp., Tectocyphon n. gen., with T. microphallus n. sp., T. hirsutus n. sp., and T. victoriae n. sp. The diagnosis of genus Eurycyphon Watts is amended, E. fulvus Watts and E. aquilus Watts are partly redescribed. New species are: Eurycyphon barringtoni n. sp., E. castaneus n. sp., E. falcatus n. sp., E. parvus n. sp., E. perlatus n. sp., E. thunguttii, n. sp., E. tomweiri n. sp., and E. tricornis n. sp. Species of Nanocyphon are discussed and N. tasmanicus n. sp. is described. Contacyphon forcipatus n. sp. is described and an apparently introduced population of the European Contacyphon putonii Gozis is reported from West Australia. For comparison with some of the new taxa the redescription of Pseudomicrocara orientalis Armstrong, type species of the genus, is supplemented.

  14. Report on water quality, sediment and water chemistry data for water and sediment samples collected from source areas to Melton Hill and Watts Bar reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Tomaszewski, T.M.; Bruggink, D.J.; Nunn, D.L.

    1995-08-18

    Contamination of surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system as a result of past and present activities by the US Department of Energy (DOE) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and also activities by non-ORR facilities are being studied by the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). Previous studies have documented the presence of heavy metals, organics, and radionuclides in the sediments of reservoirs in the vicinity. In support of the CR-ERP, during the summer of 1991, TVA collected and evaluated water and sediment samples from swimming areas and municipal water intakes on Watts Bar Reservoir, Melton Hill Reservoir and Norris Reservoir, which was considered a source of less-contaminated reference or background data. Despite the numerous studies, until the current work documented by this report, relatively few sediment or water samples had been collected by the CR-ERP in the immediate vicinity of contaminant point sources. This work focused on water and sediment samples taken from points immediately downstream from suspected effluent point sources both on and off the ORR. In August and September, 1994, TVA sampled surface water and sediment at twelve locations in melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs.

  15. Assessment of potential impact of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant thermal effluent on the Watts Bar Reservoir striped bass population

    SciTech Connect

    Heuer, J H; McIntosh, D; Ostrowski, P; Tomljanovich, D A

    1983-11-01

    This report is an assessment of potential adverse impact to striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in Watts Bar Reservoir caused by thermal effluent from operation of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP). The Clinch River arm of Watts Bar Reservoir is occupied by adult striped bass during the warmest months of the year. Concern was raised that operation of the CRBRP, specifically thermal discharges, could conflict with management of striped bass. In all cases examined the thermal plume becomes nearly imperceptible within a short distance from the discharge pipe (about 30 ft (10 m)) compared to river width (about 630 ft (190 m)). Under worst case conditions any presence of the plume in the main channel (opposite side of the river from the discharge) will be confined to the surface layer of the water. An ample portion of river cross sections containing ambient temperature water for passage or residence of adult striped bass will always be available in the vicinity of this thermal effluent. Although a small portion of river cross section would exceed the thermal tolerance of striped bass, the fish would naturally avoid this area and seek out adjacent cooler water. Therefore, it is concluded the CRBRP thermal effluent will not significantly affect the integrity of the striped bass thermal refuge in the Clinch River arm of Watts Bar Reservoir. At this time there is no need to consider alternative diffuser designs and thermal modeling. 8 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Results of sediment and water sampling and inorganic, organic, and radionuclide analysis at recreation areas and water intakes - Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Lakes - Data report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-10-01

    Suspected water quality contamination in Watts Bar Reservoir as a result of activities in past decades at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge facility is of public concern. DOE, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the State of Tennessee, and other agencies and officials have received many inquiries from the public in recent years concerning this suspected pollution, especially how this potential contamination may affect the health and safety of those persons who use beaches in the area for swimming or other water-body-contact sports. As a result of these concerns, TVA conducted a study in May and June 1991 to obtain data on potential contaminants of concern in the water and sediment of Watts Bar Reservoir. TVA collected water and sediment samples at a total of 29 sites, including 18 recreation areas and 11 water intake locations, located throughout Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Reservoirs. The samples were analyzed for radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds which could pose a threat to human health.

  17. Results of sediment and water sampling for inorganic, organic, and radionuclide analysis at recreation areas and water intakes -- Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Lakes. Data report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-10-01

    Suspected water quality contamination in Watts Bar Reservoir as a result of activities in past decades at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge facility is of public concern. DOE, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the State of Tennessee, and other agencies and officials have received many inquiries from the public in recent years concerning this suspected pollution, especially how this potential contamination may affect the health and safety of those persons who use beaches in the area for swimming or other water-body-contact sports. As a result of these concerns, TVA conducted a study in May and June 1991 to obtain data on potential contaminants of concern in the water and sediment of Watts Bar Reservoir. TVA collected water and sediment samples at a total of 29 sites, including 18 recreation areas and 11 water intake locations, located throughout Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Reservoirs. The samples were analyzed for radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds which could pose a threat to human health.

  18. 47 CFR 90.267 - Assignment and use of frequencies in the 450-470 MHz band for low power use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... operation determine whether a station is within an “80 km circle.” (i) The maximum ERP for low power... ERP for low power operation on these frequencies is as follows: Operation Low side of frequency pair.... (2) Operation on these frequencies is limited to 6 watts ERP for base, mobile or operational...

  19. High Power Local Oscillator Sources for 1-2 THz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehdi, Imran; Thomas, Bertrand; Lin, Robert; Maestrini, Alain; Ward, John; Schlecht, Erich; Gill, John; Lee, Choonsup; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Maiwald, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Recent results from the Heterodyne Instrument for Far-Infrared (HIFI) on the Herschel Space Telescope have confirmed the usefulness of high resolution spectroscopic data for a better understanding of our Universe. This paper will explore the current status of tunable local oscillator sources beyond HIFI and provide demonstration of how power combining of GaAs Schottky diodes can be used to increase both power and upper operating frequency for heterodyne receivers. Availability of power levels greater than 1 watt in the W-band now makes it possible to design a 1900 GHz source with more than 100 microwatts of expected output power.

  20. Energetics of the magnetosphere, revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D. P.

    1984-01-01

    The approximate magnitudes of power inputs and energies associated with the Earth's magnetosphere were derived. The nearest 40 R sub E of the plasma sheet current receive some 3.10 to the 11th power watt, and much of this goes to the Birkeland currents, which require 1-3 10 to the 11th power watt. Of that energy, about 30% appears as the energy of auroral particles and most of the rest as ionosphere joule heating. The ring current contains about 10 to the 15th power joule at quiet times, several times as much during magnetic storms, and the magnetic energy stored in the tail lobes is comparable. Substorm energy releases may range at 1.5 to 30 10 to the 11th power watt. Compared to these, the local energy release rate by magnetic merging in the magnetosphere is small. Merging is essential for the existence of open field lines, which make such inputs possible. Merging also seems to be implicated in substorms: most of the released energy only becomes evident far from the merging region, though some particles may gain appreciable energy in that region itself, if the plasma sheet is squeezed out completely and the high latitude lobes interact directly.

  1. AMTEC radioisotope power system design and analysis for Pluto Express Fly-By

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, T.J.; Huang, C.; Sievers, R.K.

    1997-12-31

    The Pluto Express Fly-By program requires a Radioisotope Power System (RPS) to supply spacecraft power for various internal functions and mission instruments and experiments. AMTEC (Alkali-Metal Thermal-Electric Conversion) power conversion is the DOE-selected technology for an advanced, high-efficiency RPS to power the Pluto Express Fly-By spacecraft. An AMTEC-based RPS using the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) has been conceptually designed to satisfy the Pluto Express power requirements. Integrated AMTEC cell and system thermal/electrical design analyses, structural design analyses, and mass analyses were performed to define an optimum system design. Using fresh radioisotope fuel at beginning of mission, the RPS produces 102 watts of power, has a mass of 8.35 kg (specific power density = 12.2 watts/kg), with a system conversion efficiency of 20.3%. Mass/power scale-up estimates have also been generated, indicating that a 150-watt version of this RPS would weigh approximately 11.3 kg. This paper presents and discusses the key features of this RPS design, the design and analysis methodology, and the numerous system and AMTEC cell tradeoff studies establishing the optimum AMTEC-based RPS.

  2. Regenerative Fuel Cells for Space Power and Energy Conversion (NaBH4/H2O2 Fuel Cell Development)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas I.; Miley, George H.; Luo, Nie; Burton, Rodney; Mather, Joseph; Hawkins, Glenn; Byrd, Ethan; Gu, Lifeng; Shrestha, Prajakti Joshi

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing hydrogen peroxide and sodium borohydride development is shown. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) The Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell; 3) Fuel Cell Comparisons; 4) MEA Optimization; 5) 500-Watt Stack Testing; 6) System Modeling: Fuel Cell Power Source for Lunar Rovers; and 7) Conclusions

  3. Development of a high power 12GHz PPM focused traveling wave tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, R.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical and experimental program to demonstrate the technical feasibility of a high efficiency coupled cavity traveling wave tube with periodic permanent magnetic focusing operating at 12.06 GHz, with 1 to 2 kilowatts CW power is described. Such a tube would ultimately be used for broadcasting power transmission from a satellite. The electron gun was designed to be demountable with a replaceable cathode, and the tube to be operable in a bakeable vacuum chamber with its collector replaced by a collector. Therefore, the high efficiency design was concerned with the slow wave structure only, utilizing velocity resynchronization. A special adapter was designed which incorporated an electromagnet refocusing section and a collector baseplate to facilitate testing the collector. CW output power of 1000 watts yielding 21.5% electronic efficiency was demonstrated, with a minimum output power of 525 watts across the specified 160 MHz bandwidth.

  4. High-efficiency solid state power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, Robert E. (Inventor); Cheng, Sheng (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A high-efficiency solid state power amplifier (SSPA) for specific use in a spacecraft is provided. The SSPA has a mass of less than 850 g and includes two different X-band power amplifier sections, i.e., a lumped power amplifier with a single 11-W output and a distributed power amplifier with eight 2.75-W outputs. These two amplifier sections provide output power that is scalable from 11 to 15 watts without major design changes. Five different hybrid microcircuits, including high-efficiency Heterostructure Field Effect Transistor (HFET) amplifiers and Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) phase shifters have been developed for use within the SSPA. A highly efficient packaging approach enables the integration of a large number of hybrid circuits into the SSPA.

  5. Space station power semiconductor package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balodis, Vilnis; Berman, Albert; Devance, Darrell; Ludlow, Gerry; Wagner, Lee

    1987-01-01

    A package of high-power switching semiconductors for the space station have been designed and fabricated. The package includes a high-voltage (600 volts) high current (50 amps) NPN Fast Switching Power Transistor and a high-voltage (1200 volts), high-current (50 amps) Fast Recovery Diode. The package features an isolated collector for the transistors and an isolated anode for the diode. Beryllia is used as the isolation material resulting in a thermal resistance for both devices of .2 degrees per watt. Additional features include a hermetical seal for long life -- greater than 10 years in a space environment. Also, the package design resulted in a low electrical energy loss with the reduction of eddy currents, stray inductances, circuit inductance, and capacitance. The required package design and device parameters have been achieved. Test results for the transistor and diode utilizing the space station package is given.

  6. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391): Supplement No. 19

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    Supplement No. 19 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for license to operate Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391, located in Rhea County Tennessee, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of this supplement is to update the Safety Evaluation with (1) additional information submitted by the applicant since Supplement No. 18 was issued, and (2) matters that the staff had under review when Supplement No. 18 was issued.

  7. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement No. 12

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, P.S.

    1993-10-01

    Supplement No. 12 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for license to operate Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391, located in Rhea County, Tennessee, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of this supplement is to update the Safety Evaluation of (1) additional information submitted by the applicant since Supplement No. 11 was issued, and (2) matters that the staff had under review when Supplement No. 11 was issued.

  8. NASA Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology NRA Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David J.

    2005-01-01

    The focus of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Development program is aimed at developing nuclear power and technologies that would improve the effectiveness of space science missions. The Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology (RPCT) NASA Research Announcement (NRA) is an important mechanism through which research and technology activities are supported in the Advanced Power Conversion Research and Technology project of the Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems Development program. The purpose of the RPCT NRA is to advance the development of radioisotope power conversion technologies to provide higher efficiencies and specific powers than existing systems. These advances would enable a factor of two to four decrease in the amount of fuel and a reduction of waste heat required to generate electrical power, and thus could result in more cost effective science missions for NASA. The RPCT NRA selected advanced RPS power conversion technology research and development proposals in the following three areas: innovative RPS power conversion research, RPS power conversion technology development in a nominal 100 W(sub e) scale; and, milliwatt/multi-watt RPS (mWRPS) power conversion research. Ten RPCT NRA contracts were awarded in 2003 in the areas of Brayton, Stirling, thermoelectric (TE), and thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power conversion technologies. This paper will provide an overview of the RPCT NRA, a summary of the power conversion technologies approaches being pursued, and a brief digest of first year accomplishments.

  9. NASA Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology NRA Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David J.

    2005-01-01

    The focus of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Development program is aimed at developing nuclear power and technologies that would improve the effectiveness of space science missions. The Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology (RPCT) NASA Research Announcement (NRA) is an important mechanism through which research and technology activities are supported in the Advanced Power Conversion Research and Technology project of the Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems Development program. The purpose of the RPCT NRA is to advance the development of radioisotope power conversion technologies to provide higher efficiencies and specific powers than existing systems. These advances would enable a factor of 2 to 4 decrease in the amount of fuel and a reduction of waste heat required to generate electrical power, and thus could result in more cost effective science missions for NASA. The RPCT NRA selected advanced RPS power conversion technology research and development proposals in the following three areas: innovative RPS power conversion research, RPS power conversion technology development in a nominal 100We scale; and, milliwatt/multi-watt RPS (mWRPS) power conversion research. Ten RPCT NRA contracts were awarded in 2003 in the areas of Brayton, Stirling, thermoelectric (TE), and thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power conversion technologies. This paper will provide an overview of the RPCT NRA, a summary of the power conversion technologies approaches being pursued, and a brief digest of first year accomplishments.

  10. Lightweight Innovative Solar Array (LISA): Providing Higher Power to Small Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Carr, John; Fabisinski, Leo; Russell,Tiffany; Smith, Leigh

    2015-01-01

    Affordable and convenient access to electrical power is essential for all spacecraft and is a critical design driver for the next generation of smallsats, including cubesats, which are currently extremely power limited. The Lightweight Innovative Solar Array (LISA), a concept designed, prototyped, and tested at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama provides an affordable, lightweight, scalable, and easily manufactured approach for power generation in space. This flexible technology has many wide-ranging applications from serving small satellites to providing abundant power to large spacecraft in GEO and beyond. By using very thin, ultra-flexible solar arrays adhered to an inflatable structure, a large area (and thus large amount of power) can be folded and packaged into a relatively small volume. The LISA array comprises a launch-stowed, orbit-deployed structure on which lightweight photovoltaic devices and, potentially, transceiver elements are embedded. The system will provide a 2.5 to 5 fold increase in specific power generation (Watts/kilogram) coupled with a >2x enhancement of stowed volume (Watts/cubic-meter) and a decrease in cost (dollars/Watt) when compared to state-of-the-art solar arrays.

  11. High-power diffusing-tip fibers for interstitial photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinofsky, Edward L.; Farr, Norman; Baxter, Lincoln; Weiler, William

    1997-05-01

    A line of optical fiber based diffusing tips has been designed, developed, and tested that are capable of distributing tens of watts of cw laser power over lengths ranging from two millimeters to over 10 cm. The result is a flexible non-stick diffuser capable of coagulating large volumes of tissue in reasonably short exposures of 3 - 5 minutes. Sub-millimeter diameter devices have a distinct effect on reducing the force needed to insert the applicator interstitially into tissue. Utilizing our design approach, we have produced diffusers based on 200 micrometer core fiber that has delivered over 35 watts of Nd:YAG energy over diffusion lengths as short as 4 mm. These applicators are being tested for applications in oncology, cardiology, electrophysiology, urology and gynecology.

  12. "Watts per person" paradigm to design net zero energy buildings: Examining technology interventions and integrating occupant feedback to reduce plug loads in a commercial building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi Kim, Mika

    As building envelopes have improved due to more restrictive energy codes, internal loads have increased largely due to the proliferation of computers, electronics, appliances, imaging and audio visual equipment that continues to grow in commercial buildings. As the dependency on the internet for information and data transfer increases, the electricity demand will pose a challenge to design and operate Net Zero Energy Buildings (NZEBs). Plug Loads (PLs) as a proportion of the building load has become the largest non-regulated building energy load and represents the third highest electricity end-use in California's commercial office buildings, accounting for 23% of the total building electricity consumption (Ecova 2011,2). In the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO2008), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) that presents long-term projections of energy supply and demand through 2030 states that office equipment and personal computers are the "fastest growing electrical end uses" in the commercial sector. This thesis entitled "Watts Per Person" Paradigm to Design Net Zero Energy Buildings, measures the implementation of advanced controls and behavioral interventions to study the reduction of PL energy use in the commercial sector. By integrating real world data extracted from an energy efficient commercial building of its energy use, the results produce a new methodology on estimating PL energy use by calculating based on "Watts Per Person" and analyzes computational simulation methods to design NZEBs.

  13. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement No. 15

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, P.S.

    1995-06-01

    This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (SER), NUREG-0847 (June 1982), Supplement No. 1 (September 1982), Supplement No. 2 (January 1984), Supplement No. 3 (January 1985), Supplement No. 4 (March 1985), Supplement No. 5 (November 1990), Supplement No. 6 (April 1991), Supplement No. 7 (September 1991), Supplement No. 8 (January 1992), Supplement No. 9 (June 1992), Supplement No. 10 (October 1992), Supplement No. 11 (April 1993), Supplement No. 12 (October 1993), Supplement No. 13 (April 1994), and Supplement No. 14 (December 1994) issued by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority, as applicant and owner, for licenses to operate the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). The facility is located in Rhea County, Tennessee, near the Watts Bar Dam on the Tennessee River. This supplement provides recent information regarding resolution of some of the outstanding and confirmatory items, and proposed license conditions identified in the SER.

  14. Initial tests of thermoacoustic space power engine.

    SciTech Connect

    Backhaus, S. N.

    2002-01-01

    Future NASA deep-space missions will require radioisotope-powered electric generators that are just as reliable as current RTGs, but more efficient and of higher specific power (Wikg). Thennoacoustic engines at the -1-kW scale have converted high-temperature heat into acoustic, or PV, power without moving parts at 30% efficiency. Consisting of only tubes and a few heat exchangers, thennoacoustic engines are low mass and promise to be highly reliable. Coupling a thennoacoustic engine to a low mass, highly reliable and efficient linear alternator will create a heat-driven electric generator suitable for deep-space applications. Conversion efficiency data will be presented on a demonstration thennoacoustic engine designed for the 1 00-Watt power range.

  15. Thermoacoustic power systems for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhaus, Scott; Tward, Emanuel; Petach, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Future NASA deep-space missions will require radioisotope-powered electric generators that are just as reliable as current RTGs, but more efficient and of higher specific power (W/kg). Thermoacoustic engines can convert high-temperature heat into acoustic, or PV, power without moving parts at 30% efficiency. Consisting of only tubes and a few heat exchangers, these engines are low mass and promise to be highly reliable. Coupling a thermoacoustic engine to a low-mass, highly reliable and efficient linear alternator will create a heat-driven electric generator suitable for deep-space applications. Data will be presented on the first tests of a demonstration thermoacoustic engine designed for the 100-Watt power range. .

  16. Power Generator with Thermo-Differential Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiz, John R.; Nguyen, James

    2010-01-01

    A thermoelectric power generator consists of an oven box and a solar cooker/solar reflector unit. The solar reflector concentrates sunlight into heat and transfers the heat into the oven box via a heat pipe. The oven box unit is surrounded by five thermoelectric modules and is located at the bottom end of the solar reflector. When the heat is pumped into one side of the thermoelectric module and ejected from the opposite side at ambient temperatures, an electrical current is produced. Typical temperature accumulation in the solar reflector is approximately 200 C (392 F). The heat pipe then transfers heat into the oven box with a loss of about 40 percent. At the ambient temperature of about 20 C (68 F), the temperature differential is about 100 C (180 F) apart. Each thermoelectric module, generates about 6 watts of power. One oven box with five thermoelectric modules produces about 30 watts. The system provides power for unattended instruments in remote areas, such as space colonies and space vehicles, and in polar and other remote regions on Earth.

  17. Watt-level supercontinuum generation in As2Se3 fibers pumped by a 2-micron random fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yulong; Li, Feng; Xu, Jianqiu

    2016-05-01

    Chalcogenide fibers are good candidates for generating supercontinuum (SC) radiation due to their large nonlinear refractive indices and high mid-infrared transmission, but their low damage thresholds hamper the SC power scaling, thereby limiting the ultimately achieved SC brightness. Here, we report an As2Se3 fiber SC system pumped by a novel random Q-switched 2 μm Tm3+ fiber laser. The maximum SC output power is 1.09 W with slope efficiency of 24%, and the SC spans from ~1980 to ~2500 nm with a spectral width of ~500 nm at the  -20 dB points. The spectral power density is ~2 mW nm-1. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest power and spectral density SC emission ever achieved in chalcogenide fibers.

  18. Stirling converters for space dynamic power concepts with 2 to 130 W{sub e} output

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, B.A.

    1995-12-31

    Three innovative Stirling converter concepts are described. Two concepts are based on Pluto Fast Flyby (PFF) mission requirements, where two General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules provide the thermal input. The first concept (PFF2) considers a power system with two opposed Stirling converters; the second concept (PFF4) considers four opposed Stirling converters. For both concepts the Stirling converters are designed to vary their power production capability to compensate for the failure of one Stirling converter. While the net thermal efficiency of PFF4 is a few percentage points lower than PFF2, the total Stirling converter mass of PFF4 is half that for PFF2. The third concept (ITTI) is designed to supply 2 watts of power for weather stations on the Martian surface. The predicted thermal performance of the ITTI is low compared to PFF2 and PFF4, yet the ITTI concept offers significant advantages compared to currently available power systems at the 2-watt power level. All three concepts are based on long-life technology demonstrated by an 11-watt output Stirling generator that as of March 1995 has accumulated over 15,000 operating hours without maintenance.

  19. Effect of different bicycle body positions on power output in aerobically trained females.

    PubMed

    Hubenig, Lindsay R; Game, Alex B; Kennedy, Michael D

    2011-10-01

    Aerodynamic bicycle positioning reduces drag but also reduces power output (PO) in males. The effect of aerodynamic bicycle positioning in trained endurance females is unknown. Eighteen females participants (VO2max 49.7 ± 6.3 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1)) all with competitive experience performed cycling trials at ventilatory threshold 1 and 2 (VT-1, VT-2) in both an aerodynamic and an upright position. There was a significant difference in PO between the aerodynamic and upright positions at VT-1 (152.7 ± 28.0 Watts and 159.7 ± 33.1 Watts, respectively) but not at VT-2 (191.2 ± 39.1 Watts and 192.4 ± 40.0 Watts, respectively). There were no significant differences in heart rate, oxygen consumption, or cadence between positions at either intensity. At both intensities the individual response was varied and no trends due to years of experience or background (triathlete or cyclist) explained this variability. Therefore, despite the significant mean difference in PO at VT-1, these results indicate that in trained females the effect of aerodynamic positioning is individual.

  20. Special Application Thermoelectric Micro Isotope Power Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Heshmatpour, Ben; Lieberman, Al; Khayat, Mo; Leanna, Andrew; Dobry, Ted

    2008-01-21

    Promising design concepts for milliwatt (mW) size micro isotope power sources (MIPS) are being sought for use in various space and terrestrial applications, including a multitude of future NASA scientific missions and a range of military applications. To date, the radioisotope power sources (RPS) used on various space and terrestrial programs have provided power levels ranging from one-half to several hundred watts. In recent years, the increased use of smaller spacecraft and planned new scientific space missions by NASA, special terrestrial and military applications suggest the need for lower power, including mW level, radioisotope power sources. These power sources have the potential to enable such applications as long-lived meteorological or seismological stations distributed across planetary surfaces, surface probes, deep space micro-spacecraft and sub-satellites, terrestrial sensors, transmitters, and micro-electromechanical systems. The power requirements are in the range of 1 mW to several hundred mW. The primary technical requirements for space applications are long life, high reliability, high specific power, and high power density, and those for some special military uses are very high power density, specific power, reliability, low radiological induced degradation, and very low radiation leakage. Thermoelectric conversion is of particular interest because of its technological maturity and proven reliability. This paper summarizes the thermoelectric, thermal, and radioisotope heat source designs and presents the corresponding performance for a number of mW size thermoelectric micro isotope power sources.

  1. High average power diode pumped solid state lasers for CALIOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Comaskey, B.; Halpin, J.; Moran, B.

    1994-07-01

    Diode pumping of solid state media offers the opportunity for very low maintenance, high efficiency, and compact laser systems. For remote sensing, such lasers may be used to pump tunable non-linear sources, or if tunable themselves, act directly or through harmonic crystals as the probe. The needs of long range remote sensing missions require laser performance in the several watts to kilowatts range. At these power performance levels, more advanced thermal management technologies are required for the diode pumps. The solid state laser design must now address a variety of issues arising from the thermal loads, including fracture limits, induced lensing and aberrations, induced birefringence, and laser cavity optical component performance degradation with average power loading. In order to highlight the design trade-offs involved in addressing the above issues, a variety of existing average power laser systems are briefly described. Included are two systems based on Spectra Diode Laboratory`s water impingement cooled diode packages: a two times diffraction limited, 200 watt average power, 200 Hz multi-rod laser/amplifier by Fibertek, and TRW`s 100 watt, 100 Hz, phase conjugated amplifier. The authors also present two laser systems built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) based on their more aggressive diode bar cooling package, which uses microchannel cooler technology capable of 100% duty factor operation. They then present the design of LLNL`s first generation OPO pump laser for remote sensing. This system is specified to run at 100 Hz, 20 nsec pulses each with 300 mJ, less than two times diffraction limited, and with a stable single longitudinal mode. The performance of the first testbed version will be presented. The authors conclude with directions their group is pursuing to advance average power lasers. This includes average power electro-optics, low heat load lasing media, and heat capacity lasers.

  2. Sun powered aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccready, P. B.; Lissaman, P. B. S.; Morgan, W. R.; Burke, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    Two piloted aircraft have been developed and flown powered solely by photovoltaic cells in a program sponsored by the DuPont Company. The 30.8-kg (68-lb), 21.6-m (71-ft) span, Gossamer Penguin was used as a solar test bed, making a 2.6-km (1.6-mile) flight in August 1980. The 88.1-kg (194-lb), 14.3-m (47-ft) span Solar Challenger was developed for long flights in normal turbulence. Stressed to +9 G, it utilizes Kevlar, Nomex honeycomb-graphite sandwich wall tubes, expanded polystyrene foam ribs, and Mylar skin. With a 54.9-kg (121-lb) airframe, 33.1-kg (73-lb) propulsion system, and a 45.4-kg (100-lb) pilot, it flies on 1400 watts. In summer, the projected maximum climb is 1.0 m/s (200 ft/min) at 9,150 m (30,000 ft). Sixty purely solar-powered flights were made during winter 1980-1981. Using thermals, 1,070 m (3,500 ft) was reached with 115-minute duration.

  3. Micro-integrated 1 Watt semiconductor laser system with a linewidth of 3.6 kHz.

    PubMed

    Spiessberger, Stefan; Schiemangk, Max; Sahm, Alexander; Wicht, Andreas; Wenzel, Hans; Peters, Achim; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther

    2011-04-11

    We demonstrate a compact, narrow-linewidth, high-power, micro-integrated semiconductor-based master oscillator power amplifier laser module which is implemented on a footprint of 50 x 10 mm(2). A micro-isolator between the oscillator and the amplifier suppresses optical feedback. The oscillator is a distributed Bragg reflector laser optimized for narrow-linewidth operation and the amplifier consists of a ridge waveguide entry and a tapered amplifier section. The module features stable single-mode operation with a FWHM linewidth of only 100 kHz and an intrinsic linewidth as small as 3.6 kHz for an output power beyond 1 W. PMID:21503020

  4. Standardized multiple output power supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragusa, E. V.

    1975-01-01

    A comprehensive program to develop a prototype model of a standardized multiple output power supply for use in space flight applications is described. The prototype unit was tested and evaluated to assure that the design would provide near optimum performance for the planned application. The prototype design used a dc-to-dc converter incorporating reqenerative current feedback with a time-ratio controlled duty cycle to achieve high efficiency over a wide variation of input voltage and output loads. The packaging concept uses a mainframe capable of accommodating up to four inverter/regulator modules with one common input filter and housekeeping module. Each inverter/regulator module provides a maximum of 100 watts or 10 amperes. Each module is adaptable to operate at any voltage between 4.0 volts and 108 volts. The prototype unit contains +5, + or - 15 and +28 volt modules.

  5. Contact diode laser: high power application through fiberoptic cutting tips.

    PubMed

    Wafapoor, H; Peyman, G A; Moritera, T

    1994-01-01

    Diode laser energy has been applied through a fiberoptic probe using a power setting of 2.5 watts (W) in the continuous mode. In this study we employed high-power diode laser energy (4 to 12 W, continuous wave) to incise ocular tissue through a fiberoptic probe using 100 microns and 300 microns tips. The retina was photocoagulated with a 300 microns orb tip. No bleeding occurred at the incision sites. Histologic evaluation revealed coagulation into the healthy tissue ranging from 10 to 50 microns.

  6. Simulations of table-top watt-class 1 THz radiation sources with two-section periodic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Weihao Xu, Zhengyuan

    2014-01-07

    Two types of terahertz sources with two-section periodical waveguide structure are studied by simulations. The operation frequency of the rear section (section-II) is the fourth harmonic of that of the front section (section-I), and section-II can operate both in the forward wave region and backward wave region. The critical factor that may affect the proper functioning of this kind of sources—overbunching—is discussed, and the corresponding solutions are proposed. These sources, with millimeter in length, can generate 1 THz wave radiation with power over 1 W, so, they are promising table-top and relatively high power terahertz sources.

  7. Mini-Brayton heat source assembly design study. Volume 1: Space shuttle mission. [feasibility of Brayton isotope power system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Conceptual design definitions of a heat source assembly for use in nominal 500 watt electrical (W(e)) 1200 W(e)and 2000 W(e) mini-Brayton isotope power systems are reported. The HSA is an independent package which maintains thermal and nuclear control of an isotope fueled heat source and transfers the thermal energy to a Brayton rotating unit turbine-alternator-compressor power conversion unit.

  8. Noncompatibility of power and endurance training among college baseball players.

    PubMed

    Rhea, Matthew R; Oliverson, Jeff R; Marshall, Greg; Peterson, Mark D; Kenn, Joseph G; Ayllón, Fernando Naclerio

    2008-01-01

    Exercise professionals seeking to develop evidence-based training programs rely on several training principles demonstrated through research and professional experience. In an effort to further research examining these principles, an investigation was designed and completed to evaluate the compatibility of cardiovascular endurance and neuromuscular power training. Sixteen Division-I collegiate baseball players were divided into two training groups with lower body power measured before and after their college playing season. The two groups differed in training in that one group performed moderate- to high-intense cardiovascular endurance training 3-4 days per week throughout the season, while the other group participated in speed/speed endurance training. A significant difference between groups (P < .05) was identified in the change in lower body power during the baseball season. During the season, the endurance training group decreased an average of 39.50 +/- 128.03 watts while the speed group improved an average of 210.63 +/- 168.96 watts. These data demonstrate that moderate- to high-intense cardiovascular endurance and neuromuscular power training do not appear to be compatible when performed simultaneously. For baseball players, athletes who rely heavily on power and speed, conventional baseball conditioning involving significant amounts of cardiovascular endurance training should be altered to include more speed/power interval training.

  9. Melting and freezing behaviors of prototype ionic liquids, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide and its chloride, studied by using a nano-Watt differential scanning calorimeter.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Keiko; Wang, Shaolan; Katayanagi, Hideki; Hayashi, Satoshi; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o; Koga, Yoshikata; Tozaki, Ken-ichi

    2007-05-10

    1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([bmim]Br) and its chloride ([bmim]Cl) are representative prototypes of ionic liquids. We investigated the melting and freezing behaviors of [bmim]Br and [bmim]Cl by using a homemade differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with nano-Watt stability and sensitivity. The measurements were carried out at heating and cooling rates slow enough to mimic quasi-static processes. Their thermal behaviors of melting and freezing show characteristic features such as a wide pre-melting range and excessive supercooling and individual behaviors of single crystals even for the same substance. The melting temperatures of [bmim]Br and [bmim]Cl were determined from the broad DSC traces and discussed in relation to the crystal structure. We suggest that the observed characteristics are due to the dynamics of the cooperative change between gauche-trans (GT) and trans-trans (TT) conformations of the butyl group in the [bmim]+ cation.

  10. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement No. 18

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, P.S.

    1995-10-01

    In June 1982, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff (NRC staff or staff) issued a Safety Evaluation Report, NUREG-0847, regarding the application by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA or the applicant) for licenses to operate the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2. Each of the following sections and appendices of this supplement is numbered the same as the section or appendix of the SER that is being updated, and the discussions are supplementary to, and not in lieu of, the discussion in the SER, unless otherwise noted. Accordingly, Appendix A continues the chronology of the safety review. Appendix E lists principal contributors to this supplement. Appendix FF is added in this supplement. The other appendices are not changed by this supplement.

  11. Watts-level super-compact narrow-linewidth Tm-doped silica all-fiber laser near 1707 nm with fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, X. S.; Guo, H. T.; Lu, M.; Yan, Z. J.; Wang, H. S.; Wang, Y. S.; Xu, Y. T.; Gao, C. X.; Cui, X. X.; Guo, Q.; Peng, B.

    2016-11-01

    Watts-level ultra-short wavelength operation of a Tm-doped all fiber laser was developed by using a 1550 nm Er-doped fiber laser pump source and a pair of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The laser yielded 1.28 W of continuous-wave output at 1707.01 nm with a narrow linewidth of ~44 pm by means of a 20 cm Tm-doped fiber. The dependencies of the slope efficiencies and pump threshold of the Tm-doped fiber laser versus the length of active fiber and reflectivity of the output mirror (FBG) were investigated in detail, in which the maximum average slope efficiency was 36.1%. There is no doubt that this all fiber laser will be a perfect pump source for mid-IR laser output.

  12. Parametric Study of Radiator Concepts for a Stirling Radioisotope Power System Applicable to Deep Space Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Tew, Roy C.; Thieme, Lanny G.

    2000-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and the NASA Glenn Research Center are developing a Stirling converter for an advanced radioisotope power system to provide spacecraft onboard electric power for NASA deep space missions. This high-efficiency converter is being evaluated as an alternative to replace the much lower efficiency radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). The current power requirement (six years after beginning of mission (BOM) for a mission to Jupiter) is 210 W(sub e) (watts electric) to be generated by two separate power systems, one on each side of the spacecraft. Both two-converter and four-converter system designs are being considered, depending on the amount of required redundancy.

  13. High power, short pulses ultraviolet laser for the development of a new x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Meixler, L.; Nam, C.H.; Robinson, J.; Tighe, W.; Krushelnick, K.; Suckewer, S.; Goldhar, J.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.

    1989-04-01

    A high power, short pulse ultraviolet laser system (Powerful Picosecond-Laser) has been developed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) as part of experiments designed to generate shorter wavelength x-ray lasers. With the addition of pulse compression and a final KrF amplifier the laser output is expected to have reached 1/3-1/2 TW (10/sup 12/ watts) levels. The laser system, particularly the final amplifier, is described along with some initial soft x-ray spectra from laser-target experiments. The front end of the PP-Laser provides an output of 20--30 GW (10/sup 9/ watts) and can be focussed to intensities of /approximately/10/sup 16/ W/cm/sup 2/. Experiments using this output to examine the effects of a prepulse on laser-target interaction are described. 19 refs., 14 figs.

  14. Development of a powerful continuously tunable mid-infrared cw PPLN OPO for trace gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Herpen, Maarten; te Lintel Hekkert, Sacco; Bisson, Scott E.; Harren, Frans J. M.

    2002-08-01

    A new Optical Parametric Oscillator for the mid infrared wavelength region of 3-3.8 micrometer is developed with an idler output power of more than 1 Watt. The OPO is pumped with a 10 Watt, cw, Nd:YAG Laser and consists of a bowtie ring cavity (FSR 320 MHz) resonating at the signal wavelength. The wavelength is controlled with a fan-out PPLN crystal and a low finesse intracavity Fabry-Perot. The idler output could be tuned over more than 24 Ghz modehop-free, by tuning the pump laser and keep the OPO cavity fixed. Mode hop tuning over 100 Ghz could be obtained changing the length of the intracavity Fabry-Perot. This high power OPO is combined with photoacoustic spectroscopy in order to develop a sensitive trace gas detector for LifeScience applications.

  15. Development status on a TPV cylinder for combined heat and electric power for the home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraas, Lewis; Samaras, John; Huang, Han-Xiang; Seal, Michael; West, Edward

    1999-03-01

    Several first-generation water-cooled TPV cylinders have been built and tested. The existing units contain 380 GaSb cells mounted on 20 circuits; the design and test results on these photovoltaic converter arrays are presented here. Tested with a 1600 °C glowbar, one of these cylinders generated 990 Watts from a cell active area of 396 cm2, which is an electric power density of 2.5 Watts per cm2. A second-generation design is presented, using a new shingled circuit assembly. These shingled circuits allow for a slightly larger cylinder design with nearly double the cell active area. Using a SiC emitter operating at 1425 °C, this second-generation cylinder should produce over 1.5 kW of power with improved efficiency.

  16. Watt-level erbium-doped all-fiber laser at 3.44 μm.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Vincent; Maes, Frédéric; Bernier, Martin; Bah, Souleymane Toubou; D'Auteuil, Marc; Vallée, Réal

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate a 3.44 μm all-fiber laser emitting a maximum of 1.5 W at room temperature, the highest continuous power ever generated from a mid-IR fiber oscillator clearly beyond 3 μm. The laser operates on the 4F(9/2)→4I(9/2) transition of erbium-doped fluoride glasses and relies on a dual pumping scheme at 974 and 1976 nm. By combining a dichroic mirror deposited on the input fiber tip and a fiber Bragg grating as an output coupler, a stable laser emission is produced with a FWHM bandwidth of less than 0.6 nm. The laser cavity has an efficiency of 19% with respect to the launched pump power at 1976 nm and no saturation is observed provided 974 nm co-pumping is sufficient. The joint effect of the two pumps is also investigated. PMID:26907423

  17. Solar array maximum power tracking with closed-loop control of a 30-centimeter ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, R. P.

    1977-01-01

    A new solar array/ion thruster system control concept has been developed and demonstrated. An ion thruster beam load is used to automatically and continuously operate an unregulated solar array at its maximum power point independent of variations in solar array voltage and current. Preliminary tests were run which verified that this method of control can be implemented with a few, physically small, signal level components dissipating less than two watts.

  18. Impact of Balance Of System (BOS) costs on photovoltaic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hein, G. F.; Cusick, J. P.; Poley, W. A.

    1978-01-01

    The Department of Energy has developed a program to effect a large reduction in the price of photovoltaic modules, with significant progress already achieved toward the 1986 goal of 50 cents/watt (1975 dollars). Remaining elements of a P/V power system (structure, battery storage, regulation, control, and wiring) are also significant cost items. The costs of these remaining elements are commonly referred to as Balance-of-System (BOS) costs. The BOS costs are less well defined and documented than module costs. The Lewis Research Center (LeRC) in 1976/77 and with two village power experiments that will be installed in 1978. The costs were divided into five categories and analyzed. A regression analysis was performed to determine correlations of BOS Costs per peak watt, with power size for these photovoltaic systems. The statistical relationship may be used for flat-plate, DC systems ranging from 100 to 4,000 peak watts. A survey of suppliers was conducted for comparison with the predicted BOS cost relationship.

  19. Power management systems for sediment microbial fuel cells in high power and continuous power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, Conrad Koble

    The objective of this dissertation was to develop power management systems (PMS) for sediment microbial fuel cells (SFMCs) for high power and continuous applications. The first part of this dissertation covers a new method for testing the performance of SMFCs. This device called the microbial fuel cell tester was developed to automatically test power generation of PMS. The second part focuses on a PMS capable of delivering high power in burst mode. This means that for a small amount of time a large amount of power up to 2.5 Watts can be delivered from a SMFC only generating mW level power. The third part is aimed at developing a multi-potentiostat laboratory tool that measures the performance at fixed cell potentials of microbial fuel cells so that I can optimize them for use with the PMS. This tool is capable of controlling the anode potential or cathode potential and measuring current of six separate SMFCs simultaneously. By operating multiple potentiostats, I was able to run experiments that find ideal operating conditions for the sediment microbial fuel cells, and also I can optimize the power management system for these conditions. The fourth part of the dissertation is targeting a PMS that was able to operate a sensor continuously which was powered by an SMFC. In pervious applications involving SMFCs, the PMS operated in batch mode. In this PMS, the firmware on the submersible ultrasonic receiver (SUR) was modified for use with my PMS. This integration of PMS and SUR allowed for the continuous operation of the SUR without using a battery. Finally, the last part of the dissertation recommends a scale-up power management system to overcome the linearity scale up issue of SMFCs as future work. Concluding remarks are also added to summarize the goal and focus of this dissertation.

  20. Future Photovoltaic Power Generation for Space-Based Power Utilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S.; Landis, G.; Raffaelle, R.; Hepp, A.

    2002-01-01

    dictate a more complicated trade space. Until recently the focus in space cells has been on efficiency rather than cost. In a several billion-dollar spacecraft the cell cost is relatively small at even a thousand dollars per watt, which is approximately the current array cost. This has primarily been true for spacecraft with power needs from a few hundred watts to tens of kilowatts. However, deployment of a large earth orbiting space power system will require major advances in the photovoltaic array weight, stability in the space environment, efficiency, and ultimately the cost of production and deployment of such arrays. The development of large space power systems, and a host of other proposed space missions, will require the development of viable thin film arrays. The specific power required is almost 40 times what is presently available in commercial arrays. While high efficiency ultra lightweight arrays are not likely to become commercially available anytime soon, advances in thin film photovoltaics may still impact other space technologies (i.e., thin film integrated power supplies) and thus support a broad range of missions in the next decade. Mission examples include micro- air vehicles, ultra-long duration balloons (e.g. Olympus), deep space solar electric propulsion (SEP) "Tug" Array, Mars SEP Array, and Mars surface power outpost. A discussion of the state of the art of thin film cells and their characteristics will be included, particularly focused on their applicability to the space environment. This survey of thin film cells will also include a discussion of inorganic/organic solar cells and their adaptability to the space environment. Enhancements to the efficiency of thin film cells, such as intermediate band quantum dots will be discussed and results presented for current cell configurations.

  1. U.S. Department of Energy Space and Defense Power Systems Program Ten-Year Strategic Plan, Volume 1 and Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Dwight, Carla

    2013-06-01

    The Department of Energy's Space and Defense Power Systems program provides a unique capability for supplying power systems that function in remote or hostile environments. This capability has been functioning since the early 1960s and counts the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as one of its most prominent customers. This enabling technology has assisted the exploration of our solar system including the planets Jupiter, Saturn, Mars, Neptune, and soon Pluto. This capability is one-of-kind in the world in terms of its experience (over five decades), breadth of power systems flown (over two dozen to date) and range of power levels (watts to hundreds of watts). This document describes the various components of that infrastructure, work scope, funding needs, and its strategic plans going forward.

  2. Wind-powered asynchronous AC/DC/AC converter system. [for electric power supply regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitan, D. K.

    1973-01-01

    Two asynchronous ac/dc/ac systems are modelled that utilize wind power to drive a variable or constant hertz alternator. The first system employs a high power 60-hertz inverter tie to the large backup supply of the power company to either supplement them from wind energy, storage, or from a combination of both at a preset desired current; rectifier and inverter are identical and operate in either mode depending on the silicon control rectifier firing angle. The second system employs the same rectification but from a 60-hertz alternator arrangement; it provides mainly dc output, some sinusoidal 60-hertz from the wind bus and some high harmonic content 60-hertz from an 800-watt inverter.

  3. Free-piston Stirling component test power converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dochat, George; Dhar, Manmohan

    1991-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been evaluating free-piston Stirling power converters (FPSPCs) for use on a wide variety of space missions. They provide high reliability, long life, and efficient operation and can be coupled with all potential heat sources, various heat input and heat rejection systems, and various power management and distribution systems. FPSPCs can compete favorably with alternative power conversion systems over a range of hundreds of watts to megawatts. Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) is developing FPSPC technology under contract to NASA Lewis Research Center and will demonstrate this technology in two full-scale power converters operating at space temperature conditions. The testing of the first of these, the component test power converter (CTPC), was initiated in Spring 1991 to evaluate mechanical operation at space operating temperatures. The CTPC design, hardware fabrication, and initial test results are reviewed.

  4. Industrial application of high power disk lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockmann, Rüdiger; Havrilla, David

    2008-02-01

    Laser welding has become one of the fastest growing areas for industrial laser applications. The increasing cost effectiveness of the laser process is enabled by the development of new highly efficient laser sources, such as the Disk laser, coupled with decreasing cost per Watt. TRUMPF introduced the Disk laser several years ago, and today it has become the most reliable laser tool on the market. The excellent beam quality and output powers of up to 10 kW enable its application in the automotive industry as well as in the range of thick plate welding, such as heavy construction and ship building. This serves as an overview of the most recent developments on the TRUMPF Disk laser and its industrial applications like cutting, welding, remote welding and hybrid welding, too. The future prospects regarding increased power and even further improved productivity and economics are presented.

  5. Millimeterwave Space Power Grid architecture development 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komerath, Narayanan; Dessanti, Brendan; Shah, Shaan

    This is an update of the Space Power Grid architecture for space-based solar power with an improved design of the collector/converter link, the primary heater and the radiator of the active thermal control system. The Space Power Grid offers an evolutionary approach towards TeraWatt-level Space-based solar power. The use of millimeter wave frequencies (around 220GHz) and Low-Mid Earth Orbits shrinks the size of the space and ground infrastructure to manageable levels. In prior work we showed that using Brayton cycle conversion of solar power allows large economies of scale compared to the linear mass-power relationship of photovoltaic conversion. With high-temperature materials permitting 3600 K temperature in the primary heater, over 80 percent cycle efficiency was shown with a closed helium cycle for the 1GW converter satellite which formed the core element of the architecture. Work done since the last IEEE conference has shown that the use of waveguides incorporated into lighter-than-air antenna platforms, can overcome the difficulties in transmitting millimeter wave power through the moist, dense lower atmosphere. A graphene-based radiator design conservatively meets the mass budget for the waste heat rejection system needed for the compressor inlet temperature. Placing the ultralight Mirasol collectors in lower orbits overcomes the solar beam spot size problem of high-orbit collection. The architecture begins by establishing a power exchange with terrestrial renewable energy plants, creating an early revenue generation approach with low investment. The approach allows for technology development and demonstration of high power millimeter wave technology. A multinational experiment using the International Space Station and another power exchange satellite is proposed to gather required data and experience, thus reducing the technical and policy risks. The full-scale architecture deploys pairs of Mirasol sunlight collectors and Girasol 1 GW converter satellites t

  6. A simplified, low power system for effective vessel sealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyle, Allison B.; Kennedy, Jenifer S.; Schmaltz, Dale F.; Kennedy, Aaron S.

    2015-03-01

    The first bipolar vessel sealing system was developed nearly 15 years ago and has since become standard of care in surgery. These systems make use of radio frequency current that is delivered between bipolar graspers to permanently seal arteries, veins and tissue bundles. Conventional vessel sealing generators are based off traditional electrosurgery generator architecture and deliver high power (150-300 Watts) and high current using complex control and sense algorithms to adjust the output for vessel sealing applications. In recent years, a need for small-scale surgical vessel sealers has developed as surgeons strive to further reduce their footprint on patients. There are many technical challenges associated with miniaturization of vessel sealing devices including maintaining electrical isolation while delivering high current in a saline environment. Research into creating a small, 3mm diameter vessel sealer revealed that a highly simplified generator system could be used to achieve excellent results and subsequently a low power vessel sealing system was developed. This system delivers 25 Watts constant power while limiting voltage (<= Vrms) and current (<= Amps) until an impedance endpoint is achieved, eliminating the use of complicated control and sensing software. The result is optimized tissue effect, where high seal strength is maintained (> 360mmHg), but seal times (1.7 +/- 0.7s versus 4.1 +/- 0.7s), thermal spread (<1mm vs <=2mm) and total energy delivery are reduced, when compared to an existing high power system.

  7. Abnormal cardiovascular responses induced by localized high power microwave exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.-T; Brown, D.O.; Johnson, C.E.; Mathur, S.P. ); Elson, E.C. )

    1992-05-01

    A hypothesis of microwave-induced circulatory under perfusion was tested in ketamine anesthetized rats whose heart rate, mean arterial pressure, pulse pressure, respiration rate, and body temperatures were monitored continuously. Fifty-eight ventral head and neck exposures in a waveguide consisted of sham-exposure and exposure to continuous wave (CW) and pulsed 1.25 GHz microwaves for 5 min. The 0.5 Hz and 16 Hz pulsemodulated microwaves were delivered at 400 kW peak power. The CW microwaves were 2 and 6.4 W. The average specific absorption rate was 4.75 W/kg per watt transmitted in the brain and 17.15 W/kg per watt transmitted in the neck. Respiration rate and mean arterial pressure were not altered. Changes in heart rate and pulse pressure were observed in rats exposed to higher power but not to the lower average power microwaves. Depression of pulse pressure, an indication of a decrease in stroke volume, and increased or decreased heart rate were noted in presence of whole-body hyperthermia. The cardiac output of those animals exposed to higher average power microwaves was considered to be below normal as hypothesized. Decreased cardiac output and normal mean arterial pressure resulted in an increase in the total peripheral resistance which was contrary to the anticipated thermal response of animals.

  8. Solid state RF power: The route to 1W per euro cent

    SciTech Connect

    Heid, Oliver

    2013-04-19

    In most particle accelerators RF power is a decisive design constraint due to high costs and relative inflexibility of current electron beam based RF sources, i.e. Klystrons, Magnetrons, Tetrodes etc. At VHF/UHF frequencies the transition to solid state devices promises to fundamentally change the situation. Recent progress brings 1 Watt per Euro cent installed cost within reach. We present a Silicon Carbide semiconductor solution utilising the Solid State Direct Drive technology at unprecedented efficiency, power levels and power densities. The proposed solution allows retrofitting of existing RF accelerators and opens the route to novel particle accelerator concepts.

  9. Lunar Surface Stirling Power Systems Using Am-241

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Paul C.; Penswick, L. Barry; Shaltens, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    For many years NASA has used the decay of Pu-238 (in the form of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS)) as a heat source for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG), which have provided electrical power for many NASA missions. While RTG's have an impressive reliability record for the missions in which they have been used, their relatively low thermal to electric conversion efficiency (-5% efficiency) and the scarcity of Plutoinium-238 (Pu-238) has led NASA to consider other power conversion technologies. NASA is considering returning both robotic and human missions to the lunar surface and, because of the long lunar nights (14 earth days) isotope power systems are an attractive candidate to generate electrical power. NASA is currently developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) as a candidate higher efficiency power system that produces greater than 160 watts with 2 GPHS modules at the beginning of life (BOL) (-30% efficiency). The ASRG uses the same Pu-238 GPHS modules, which are used in RTG, but by coupling them to a Stirling convertor provides a 4-fold reduction in the number of GPHS modules. This study considers the use of Americium 241 (Am-241) as a substitute for the Pu-238 in Stirling convertor based Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for power levels from 1 O's of watts to 5 kWe. The Am-241 is used as a replacement for the Pu-238 in GPHS modules. Depending on power level, different Stirling heat input and removal systems are modeled. It was found that substituting Am-241 GPHS modules into the ASRG reduces power output by about 1/5 while maintaining approximately the same system mass. In order to obtain the nominal 160 watts electrical output of the Pu-238 ASRG requires 10 Am-241 GPHS modules. Higher power systems require changing from conductive coupling heat input and removal from the Stirling convertor to either pumped loops or heat pipes. Liquid metal pumped loops are considered as the primary heat transportation on the hot end and

  10. Final Results for the GRC Supporting Technology Development Project for the 110-Watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Thieme, Lanny G.

    2007-01-01

    From 1999 to 2006, the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) supported the development of a high-efficiency, nominal 110-We Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) for potential use on NASA missions, including deep space missions, Mars rovers, and lunar applications. Lockheed Martin (LM) was the system integrator for the SRG110, under contract to the Department of Energy (DOE). Infinia Corporation (formerly Stirling Technology Company) developed the Stirling convertor, first as a contractor to DOE and then under subcontract to LM. The SRG110 development has been redirected, and recent program changes have been made to significantly increase the specific power of the generator. System development of an Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) has now begun, using a lightweight, advanced convertor from Sunpower, Inc. This paper summarizes the results of the supporting technology effort that GRC completed for the SRG110. GRC tasks included convertor extended-duration testing in air and thermal vacuum environments, heater head life assessment, materials studies, permanent magnet aging characterization, linear alternator evaluations, structural dynamics testing, electromagnetic interference (EMI) and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) characterization, organic materials evaluations, reliability studies, and development of an end-to-end system dynamic model. Related efforts are now continuing in many of these areas to support ASRG development.

  11. Final Results for the GRC Supporting Technology Development Project for the 110-Watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Thieme, Lanny G.

    2007-01-01

    From 1999-2006, the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) supported the development of a high-efficiency, nominal 110-We Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) for potential use on NASA missions, including deep space missions, Mars rovers, and lunar applications. Lockheed Martin (LM) was the system integrator for the SRG110, under contract to the Department of Energy (DOE). Infinia Corporation (formerly Stirling Technology Company) developed the Stirling convertor, first as a contractor to DOE and then under subcontract to LM. The SRG110 development has been redirected, and recent program changes have been made to significantly increase the specific power of the generator. System development of an Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) has now begun, using a lightweight, advanced convertor from Sunpower, Inc. This paper summarizes the results of the supporting technology effort that GRC completed for the SRG110. GRC tasks included convertor extended-duration testing in air and thermal vacuum environments, heater head life assessment, materials studies, permanent magnet aging characterization, linear alternator evaluations, structural dynamics testing, electromagnetic interference (EMI) and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) characterization, organic materials evaluations, reliability studies, and development of an end-to-end system dynamic model. Related efforts are now continuing in many of these areas to support ASRG development.

  12. AFRL Advanced Electric Lasers Branch - Construction and Upgrade of a 50-watt Facility-Class Sodium Guidestar Pump Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronder, T.; Miller, H.; Stohs, J.; Lu, C.; Baker, J.; Lucero, A.

    The development of a reliable and effective laser source for pumping mesospheric sodium to generate an artificial guidestar has been well documented. From the early achievements with 589nm high-power dye lasers at the Keck and Lick observatories to the ground-breaking 50W CW FASOR (Frequency Addition Source of Optical Radiation) Guidestar at the Air Forces Starfire Optical Range (SOR), there has been intense interest in this technology from both the academic and military communities. Beginning in the fall of 2008, the Air Force Research Laboratorys Advanced Electric Lasers Branch began a project to build, test, verify and deliver an upgraded version of the SOR FASOR for use at the AF Maui Optical Station (AMOS) in the summer of 2010. This FASOR will be similar in design to the existing SOR device and produce 50W of diffraction limited, linearly polarized narrow linewidth 589nm light by combining the output of two injection-locked Nd:YAG ring lasers (operating at 1064nm and 1319nm) using resonant sum-frequency generation in a lithium triborate crystal (LBO). The upgraded features will include modularized sub-components, embedded control electronics, and a simplified cooling system. The first portion of this upgrade project is to reconstruct the current SOR FASOR components and include improved methods of regulating the gain modules of the two injection lasers. In parallel with this effort, the technical plans for the modularization and re-packaging of the FASOR will be finalized and coordinated with the staff at Maui. This presentation will summarize the result of these efforts to date and provide updates on the AMOS FASOR status. Additionally, plans for "next-generation" FASOR upgrades for both SOR and AMOS will also be discussed.

  13. 'The trial the world is watching': the 1972 prosecution of Derk Crichton and James Watts, abortion, and the regulation of the medical profession in apartheid South Africa.

    PubMed

    Klausen, Susanne M

    2014-04-01

    After its formation in 1910 as a self-governing dominion within the British empire, the Union of South Africa followed a combination of English and Roman-Dutch common laws on abortion that decreed the procedure permissible only when necessary to save a woman's life. The government continued doing so after South Africa withdrew from the Commonwealth and became a republic in 1961. In 1972 a sensational trial took place in the South African Supreme Court that for weeks placed clandestine abortion on the front pages of the country's newspapers. Two men, one an eminent doctor and the other a self-taught abortionist, were charged with conspiring to perform illegal abortions on twenty-six white teenagers and young unmarried women. The prosecution of Dr Derk Crichton and James Watts occurred while the National Party government was in the process of drafting abortion legislation and was perceived by legal experts as another test of the judiciary's stance on the common law on abortion. The trial was mainly intended to regulate the medical profession and ensure doctors ceased helping young white women evade their 'duty' to procreate within marriage. Ultimately, the event encapsulated a great deal about elites' attempt to buttress apartheid culture and is significant for, among other reasons, contributing to the production of South Africa's extremely restrictive Abortion and Sterilisation Act (1975).

  14. 'The trial the world is watching': the 1972 prosecution of Derk Crichton and James Watts, abortion, and the regulation of the medical profession in apartheid South Africa.

    PubMed

    Klausen, Susanne M

    2014-04-01

    After its formation in 1910 as a self-governing dominion within the British empire, the Union of South Africa followed a combination of English and Roman-Dutch common laws on abortion that decreed the procedure permissible only when necessary to save a woman's life. The government continued doing so after South Africa withdrew from the Commonwealth and became a republic in 1961. In 1972 a sensational trial took place in the South African Supreme Court that for weeks placed clandestine abortion on the front pages of the country's newspapers. Two men, one an eminent doctor and the other a self-taught abortionist, were charged with conspiring to perform illegal abortions on twenty-six white teenagers and young unmarried women. The prosecution of Dr Derk Crichton and James Watts occurred while the National Party government was in the process of drafting abortion legislation and was perceived by legal experts as another test of the judiciary's stance on the common law on abortion. The trial was mainly intended to regulate the medical profession and ensure doctors ceased helping young white women evade their 'duty' to procreate within marriage. Ultimately, the event encapsulated a great deal about elites' attempt to buttress apartheid culture and is significant for, among other reasons, contributing to the production of South Africa's extremely restrictive Abortion and Sterilisation Act (1975). PMID:24775430

  15. Vertical GaN based light emitting diodes on metal alloy substrate boosts high power LED performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, T.; Tran, C.; Chu, C.; Chen, C.; Liu, W. H.; Chu, J.; Yen, K.; Chen, H.; Fan, F.

    2007-09-01

    Vertical GaN based Light Emitting Diodes on metal alloy substrate (VLEDMS) were realized and characterized for solid state lighting application. An efficiency of more than 100 lumens/watt from a white LED was achieved. And, an efficiency of more than 80 lumens/watt from a high efficiency and high power green LED was achieved also. The dissipate heat more effectively than conventional and flip-chip LEDs, thanks to the higher thermal conductivity of a copper alloy substrate. This increases their maximum operating current and output power and makes them more suitable for solid-state lighting applications. In addition, these VLEDMS exhibit many advantages over those on sapphire under extreme operation conditions for general lighting application.

  16. Fuel cells for low power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzel, A.; Hebling, C.; Müller, M.; Zedda, M.; Müller, C.

    Electronic devices show an ever-increasing power demand and thus, require innovative concepts for power supply. For a wide range of power and energy capacity, membrane fuel cells are an attractive alternative to conventional batteries. The main advantages are the flexibility with respect to power and capacity achievable with different devices for energy conversion and energy storage, the long lifetime and long service life, the good ecological balance, very low self-discharge. Therefore, the development of fuel cell systems for portable electronic devices is an attractive, although also a challenging, goal. The fuel for a membrane fuel cell might be hydrogen from a hydride storage system or methanol/water as a liquid alternative. The main differences between the two systems are the much higher power density for hydrogen fuel cells, the higher energy density per weight for the liquid fuel, safety aspects and infrastructure for fuel supply for hydride materials. For different applications, different system designs are required. High power cells are required for portable computers, low power methanol fuel cells required for mobile phones in hybrid systems with batteries and micro-fuel cells are required, e.g. for hand held PCs in the sub-Watt range. All these technologies are currently under development. Performance data and results of simulations and experimental investigations will be presented.

  17. Development of a dual-field heteropoplar power converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenhaure, D. B.; Johnson, B.; Bliamptis, T.; St. George, E.

    1981-01-01

    The design and testing of a 400 watt, dual phase, dual rotor, field modulated inductor alternator is described. The system is designed for use as a flywheel to ac utility line or flywheel to dc bus (electric vehicle) power converter. The machine is unique in that it uses dual rotors and separately controlled fields to produce output current and voltage which are in phase with each other. Having the voltage and current in phase allows the power electronics to be made of simple low cost components. Based on analytical predictions and experimental results, development of a complete 22 kilowatt (30 Hp) power conversion system is recommended. This system would include power electronics and controls and would replace the inductor alternator with an improved electromagnetic conversion system.

  18. Solid-state Isotopic Power Source for Computer Memory Chips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Paul M.

    1993-01-01

    Recent developments in materials technology now make it possible to fabricate nonthermal thin-film radioisotopic energy converters (REC) with a specific power of 24 W/kg and a 10 year working life at 5 to 10 watts. This creates applications never before possible, such as placing the power supply directly on integrated circuit chips. The efficiency of the REC is about 25 percent which is two to three times greater than the 6 to 8 percent capabilities of current thermoelectric systems. Radio isotopic energy converters have the potential to meet many future space power requirements for a wide variety of applications with less mass, better efficiency, and less total area than other power conversion options. These benefits result in significant dollar savings over the projected mission lifetime.

  19. A Tariff for Reactive Power

    SciTech Connect

    Kueck, John D; Kirby, Brendan J; Li, Fangxing; Tufon, Christopher; Isemonger, Alan

    2008-07-01

    Two kinds of power are required to operate an electric power system: real power, measured in watts, and reactive power, measured in volt-amperes reactive or VARs. Reactive power supply is one of a class of power system reliability services collectively known as ancillary services, and is essential for the reliable operation of the bulk power system. Reactive power flows when current leads or lags behind voltage. Typically, the current in a distribution system lags behind voltage because of inductive loads such as motors. Reactive power flow wastes energy and capacity and causes voltage droop. To correct lagging power flow, leading reactive power (current leading voltage) is supplied to bring the current into phase with voltage. When the current is in phase with voltage, there is a reduction in system losses, an increase in system capacity, and a rise in voltage. Reactive power can be supplied from either static or dynamic VAR sources. Static sources are typically transmission and distribution equipment, such as capacitors at substations, and their cost has historically been included in the revenue requirement of the transmission operator (TO), and recovered through cost-of-service rates. By contrast, dynamic sources are typically generators capable of producing variable levels of reactive power by automatically controlling the generator to regulate voltage. Transmission system devices such as synchronous condensers can also provide dynamic reactive power. A class of solid state devices (called flexible AC transmission system devices or FACTs) can provide dynamic reactive power. One specific device has the unfortunate name of static VAR compensator (SVC), where 'static' refers to the solid state nature of the device (it does not include rotating equipment) and not to the production of static reactive power. Dynamic sources at the distribution level, while more costly would be very useful in helping to regulate local voltage. Local voltage regulation would reduce

  20. INTRACORPOREAL HEAT DISSIPATION FROM A RADIOISOTOPE-POWERED ARTIFICIAL HEART.

    PubMed

    Huffman, Fred N.; Hagen, Kenneth G.; Whalen, Robert L.; Fuqua, John M.; Norman, John C.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of radioisotope-fueled circulatory support systems depends on the ability of the body to dissipate the reject heat from the power source driving the blood pump as well as to tolerate chronic intracorporeal radiation. Our studies have focused on the use of the circulating blood as a heat sink. Initial in vivo heat transfer studies utilized straight tube heat exchangers (electrically and radioisotope energized) to replace a segment of the descending aorta. More recent studies have used a left ventricular assist pump as a blood-cooled heat exchanger. This approach minimizes trauma, does not increase the area of prosthetic interface with the blood, and minimizes system volume. Heat rejected from the thermal engine (vapor or gas cycle) is transported from the nuclear power source in the abdomen to the pump in the thoracic cavity via hydraulic lines. Adjacent tissue is protected from the fuel capsule temperature (900 to 1200 degrees F) by vacuum foil insulation and polyurethane foam. The in vivo thermal management problems have been studied using a simulated thermal system (STS) which approximates the heat rejection and thermal transport mechanisms of the nuclear circulatory support systems under development by NHLI. Electric heaters simulate the reject heat from the thermal engines. These studies have been essential in establishing the location, suspension, surgical procedures, and postoperative care for implanting prototype nuclear heart assist systems in calves. The pump has a thermal impedance of 0.12 degrees C/watt. Analysis of the STS data in terms of an electrical analog model implies a heat transfer coefficient of 4.7 x 10(-3) watt/cm(2) degrees C in the abdomen compared to a value of 14.9 x 10(-3) watt/cm(2) degrees C from the heat exchanger plenum into the diaphragm.

  1. INTRACORPOREAL HEAT DISSIPATION FROM A RADIOISOTOPE-POWERED ARTIFICIAL HEART

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, Fred N.; Hagen, Kenneth G.; Whalen, Robert L.; Fuqua, John M.; Norman, John C.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of radioisotope-fueled circulatory support systems depends on the ability of the body to dissipate the reject heat from the power source driving the blood pump as well as to tolerate chronic intracorporeal radiation. Our studies have focused on the use of the circulating blood as a heat sink. Initial in vivo heat transfer studies utilized straight tube heat exchangers (electrically and radioisotope energized) to replace a segment of the descending aorta. More recent studies have used a left ventricular assist pump as a blood-cooled heat exchanger. This approach minimizes trauma, does not increase the area of prosthetic interface with the blood, and minimizes system volume. Heat rejected from the thermal engine (vapor or gas cycle) is transported from the nuclear power source in the abdomen to the pump in the thoracic cavity via hydraulic lines. Adjacent tissue is protected from the fuel capsule temperature (900 to 1200°F) by vacuum foil insulation and polyurethane foam. The in vivo thermal management problems have been studied using a simulated thermal system (STS) which approximates the heat rejection and thermal transport mechanisms of the nuclear circulatory support systems under development by NHLI. Electric heaters simulate the reject heat from the thermal engines. These studies have been essential in establishing the location, suspension, surgical procedures, and postoperative care for implanting prototype nuclear heart assist systems in calves. The pump has a thermal impedance of 0.12°C/watt. Analysis of the STS data in terms of an electrical analog model implies a heat transfer coefficient of 4.7 × 10−3 watt/cm2°C in the abdomen compared to a value of 14.9 × 10−3 watt/cm2°C from the heat exchanger plenum into the diaphragm. Images PMID:15215968

  2. Power electronic building block (PEDD) workshop. Trip report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.W.

    1995-10-09

    I attended the Power Electronic Building Block (PEBB) workshop at DOE HQ on June 21,1995. Accompanying me was Doug Hopkins, who is contracting with the Lab through Mark Newton on power electronics. The PEBB concept, and the workshop in particular, are sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and DOE. The general concept behind PEBB is a ``second electronics revolution`` facilitated by a single-package, smart, multi-function power control block. The PEBB will potentially replace all conventional power electronic elements at scales from watts to megawatts, thus shifting power engineering from circuit design to system design. ONR is interested because power distribution aboard ships is expensive, complex, and bulky, and getting worse. The same applies to aircraft and many other military systems. DOE`s interest is in electric vehicles, utility power systems, and various end-use applications such as adjustable speed drives. There was obvious enthusiasm from industry, academia, and Government at this workshop. The PEBB concept is in its infancy. Exactly what a PEBB will encompass is still up for discussion. What is certain is that everything is up to industry: standards, innovations, marketing strategies, etc. ONR and DOE are only acting as facilitators and coordinators, and perhaps offering a little seed money. The program will be long-term but fast-paced, relying on concurrent engineering in a serious way. Great strides are required in semiconductors, packaging, controls, and system design. ONR want to put a big knee in the historic power density and dollar-per-watt curves, starting right now.

  3. Small Power Technology for Tetrahedral Rovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, P. E.; Floyd, S. R.; Butler, C. D.; Flom, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The Small Power Technology (SPOT) being studied at GSFC has the potential to be an efficient and compact radioisotope based electrical power system. Such a system would provide power for innovative tetrahedral robotic arms and walkers to support the lunar exploration initiative within the next decade. Presently, NASA has designated two flight qualified Radioisotope Power Supplies (RPS): the Multi-Mission RTG (MMRTG) which uses thermocouple technology and the more efficient but more massive Stirling RTG (SRTG) which uses a mechanical heat (Stirling) engine technology. With SPOT, thermal output from a radioisotope source is converted to electrical power using a combination of shape memory material and piezoelectric crystals. The SPOT combined energy conversion technologies are potentially more efficient than thermocouples and do not require moving parts, thus keeping efficiency high with an excellent mass to power ratio. Applications of particular interest are highly modular, addressable, reconfigurable arrays of tetrahedral structural components designed to be arms or rovers with high mobility in rough terrain. Such prototypes are currently being built at GSFC. Missions requiring long-lived operation in unilluminated environments preclude the use of solar cells as the main power source and must rely on the use of RPS technology. The design concept calls for a small motor and battery assembly for each strut, and thus a distributed power system. We estimate, based on performance of our current tetrahedral prototypes and power scaling for small motors, that such devices require tens of watts of power output per kilogram of power supply. For these reasons, SPOT is a good candidate for the ART (addressable Reconfigurable Technology) baseline power system.

  4. Measuring aerobic cycling power as an assessment of childhood fitness.

    PubMed

    Carrel, Aaron L; Sledge, Jeffrey S; Ventura, Steve J; Clark, R Randall; Peterson, Susan E; Eickhoff, Jens; Allen, David B

    2007-08-01

    The emergence of obesity, insulin resistance (IR), and type-2 diabetes (T2DM) in children requires a rational, effective public health response. Physical activity remains an important component of prevention and treatment for obesity, T2DM, and IR. Studies in adults show cardiovascular fitness (CVF) to be more important than obesity in predicting IR. We recently demonstrated that a school-based fitness intervention in children who were overweight can improve cardiovascular fitness, body composition, and insulin sensitivity, but it remains unclear whether accurate assessment of fitness could be performed at the school or outside of an exercise laboratory. The purpose of the study was to determine if a new methodology using measurement of cycling power could estimate cardiovascular aerobic fitness (as defined by maximum oxygen consumption; VO(2)max) in middle school children who were overweight. Thirty-five middle school children who were overweight (mean age 12 +/- 0.4 years) underwent testing on a power sensor- equipped Cycle Ops Indoor Cycle (IC), as well as body composition by dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and VO(2)max by treadmill determination. Insulin sensitivity was also estimated by fasting glucose and insulin. Maximal heart rate (MHR) was determined during VO(2)max testing, and power produced at 80% of MHR was recorded. Spearman's rank correlation was performed to evaluate associations. Mean power determined on the IC at 80% of MHR was 129 +/- 77 watts, and average power at 80% MHR divided by total body weight (TBW) was 1.5 +/- 0.5. A significant correlation between watts/TBW was seen for VO(2)max (ml/kg/min) (p = 0.03), and significant negative correlation was seen between watts/TBW and fasting insulin (p < 0.05). In middle-school children who were overweight, there was a significant relationship between the power component of fitness and cardiovascular aerobic fitness (measured by VO(2)max). This more accessible and less intimidating field

  5. Measuring aerobic cycling power as an assessment of childhood fitness.

    PubMed

    Carrel, Aaron L; Sledge, Jeffrey S; Ventura, Steve J; Clark, R Randall; Peterson, Susan E; Eickhoff, Jens C; Allen, David B

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes in children requires a rational, effective public health response. Physical activity remains an important component of prevention and treatment for obesity, type 2 diabetes, and insulin resistance. Studies in adults show cardiovascular fitness to be more important than obesity in predicting insulin resistance. We recently demonstrated that a school-based fitness intervention in children who are overweight could improve cardiovascular fitness, body composition, and insulin sensitivity, but it remains unclear whether accurate assessment of fitness could be performed at the school or outside of an exercise laboratory. To determine whether new methodology using measurement of cycling power could estimate cardiovascular aerobic fitness (as defined by VO2max) in middle school children who were overweight. Thirty-five middle school children (mean age 12 +/- 0.4 years) who were overweight underwent testing on a power sensor-equipped Cycle Ops indoor cycle (Saris Cycling Group, Fitchburg, WI) as well as body composition by dual x-ray absorptiometry and VO2max by treadmill determination. Insulin sensitivity was also estimated by fasting glucose and insulin. Maximal heart rate (MHR) was determined during VO2max testing, and power produced at 80%MHR was recorded. Spearman's rank correlation was performed to evaluate associations. Mean power determined on the indoor cycle at 80% of MHR was 129 +/- 77 watts, and average power at 80% MHR divided by total body weight was 1.5 +/- 0.5. A significant correlation between watts and total body weight was seen for VO2max (P = 0.03), and significant negative correlation was seen between watts/total body weight and fasting insulin (P < 0.05). Among middle school children who were overweight, there was a significant relationship between the power component of fitness and cardiovascular aerobic fitness (measured by VO2max). This more accessible and less intimidating field

  6. Measuring aerobic cycling power as an assessment of childhood fitness.

    PubMed

    Carrel, Aaron L; Sledge, Jeffrey S; Ventura, Steve J; Clark, R Randall; Peterson, Susan E; Eickhoff, Jens C; Allen, David B

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes in children requires a rational, effective public health response. Physical activity remains an important component of prevention and treatment for obesity, type 2 diabetes, and insulin resistance. Studies in adults show cardiovascular fitness to be more important than obesity in predicting insulin resistance. We recently demonstrated that a school-based fitness intervention in children who are overweight could improve cardiovascular fitness, body composition, and insulin sensitivity, but it remains unclear whether accurate assessment of fitness could be performed at the school or outside of an exercise laboratory. To determine whether new methodology using measurement of cycling power could estimate cardiovascular aerobic fitness (as defined by VO2max) in middle school children who were overweight. Thirty-five middle school children (mean age 12 +/- 0.4 years) who were overweight underwent testing on a power sensor-equipped Cycle Ops indoor cycle (Saris Cycling Group, Fitchburg, WI) as well as body composition by dual x-ray absorptiometry and VO2max by treadmill determination. Insulin sensitivity was also estimated by fasting glucose and insulin. Maximal heart rate (MHR) was determined during VO2max testing, and power produced at 80%MHR was recorded. Spearman's rank correlation was performed to evaluate associations. Mean power determined on the indoor cycle at 80% of MHR was 129 +/- 77 watts, and average power at 80% MHR divided by total body weight was 1.5 +/- 0.5. A significant correlation between watts and total body weight was seen for VO2max (P = 0.03), and significant negative correlation was seen between watts/total body weight and fasting insulin (P < 0.05). Among middle school children who were overweight, there was a significant relationship between the power component of fitness and cardiovascular aerobic fitness (measured by VO2max). This more accessible and less intimidating field

  7. Heat pipe cooled power magnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chester, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    A high frequency, high power, low specific weight (0.57 kg/kW) transformer developed for space use was redesigned with heat pipe cooling allowing both a reduction in weight and a lower internal temperature rise. The specific weight of the heat pipe cooled transformer was reduced to 0.4 kg/kW and the highest winding temperature rise was reduced from 40 C to 20 C in spite of 10 watts additional loss. The design loss/weight tradeoff was 18 W/kg. Additionally, allowing the same 40 C winding temperature rise as in the original design, the KVA rating is increased to 4.2 KVA, demonstrating a specific weight of 0.28 kg/kW with the internal loss increased by 50W. This space environment tested heat pipe cooled design performed as well electrically as the original conventional design, thus demonstrating the advantages of heat pipes integrated into a high power, high voltage magnetic. Another heat pipe cooled magnetic, a 3.7 kW, 20A input filter inductor was designed, developed, built, tested, and described. The heat pipe cooled magnetics are designed to be Earth operated in any orientation.

  8. Development of a portable thermophotovoltaic power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Frederick E.; Doyle, Edward F.; Shukla, Kailash

    1997-03-01

    A 150 Watt thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power generator is being developed. The technical approach taken in the design focused on optimizing the integrated performance of the primary subsystems in order to yield high energy conversion efficiency and cost effectiveness. An important aspect of the approach is the use of a selective emitter radiating to a bandgap matched photovoltaic array to minimize thermal and optical recuperation requirements, as well as the non-recoverable heat losses. For the initial prototype system, fibrous ytterbia emitters radiating in a band centered at 980 nm are matched with high efficiency silicon photoconverters. The integrated system includes a dielectric stack filter for optical energy recovery and a ceramic recuperator for thermal energy recovery. The system has been operated with air preheat temperatures up to 1350K. The design of the system and development status are presented.

  9. A microwave powered injectable neural stimulator.

    PubMed

    Towe, Bruce C; Larson, Patrick J; Gulick, Daniel W

    2012-01-01

    An unexpectedly simple implantable device that can achieve wireless neurostimulation consists of a short 1 cm long dipole platinum wire antenna, a Schottky diode, and a pulsed microwave transmitter. Fabricated into a 1 cm long by polyimide tubing, the implant can have a sub-millimeter diameter form factor suited to introduction into tissue by injection. Experiments that chronically implant the device next to a rat sciatic nerve show that a 915 MHz microwave transmitter emitting an average power of 0.5 watts has an ability to stimulate motor events when spaced up to 7 cm from the body surface. Tissue models consisting of saline filled tanks show the possibility of delivering milliampere pulsed current to neurosimulators though 5 centimeters or more of tissue. Such a neurostimulation system driven by microwave energy is limited in functional tissue depth by microwave SAR exposure. This report discusses some of the advantages and limitations of such a neurostimulation approach. PMID:23367052

  10. Advances in high-power harmonic generation: Q-switched lasers with electronically adjustable pulse width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyres, Loren A.; Morehead, James J.; Gregg, Jeffrey; Richard, Derek J.; Grossman, William

    2006-02-01

    We demonstrate a variable pulse width, internally-frequency-converted, near-diffraction-limited Nd:YAG laser with output power up to 40 Watts at 532 nm and pulse widths electronically adjustable over a 40-300 ns range. The variable pulse width is achieved by clipping the pulse decaying edge with the Q-switch in a laser cavity optimized for post-pulse gain insensitivity. This approach makes possible frequency converted lasers with pulse width and output power substantially independent of repetition rate.

  11. Limitations on millimeter-wave power generation with spiraling electron beams.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulke, B.

    1972-01-01

    A study is made of the suitability of the interaction between a thin, solid, spiraling electron beam of 5-15-kV energy and a microwave cavity, for the purpose of generating watts of CW millimeter-wave power. The effect of finite energy spread in the electron beam is considered both theoretically and experimentally. Measured results are given for a prototype device operating at 9.4 GHz. Power outputs of 5 W and electronic efficiencies near 2% have been obtained. The data agree well with the theory, subject to some ambiguity in the energy-distribution parameters. The performance is strongly limited by the energy spread in the beam.

  12. High voltage solar cell power generating system for regulated solar array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, E., Jr.; Hoffman, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    A laboratory solar power system regulated by on-panel switches has been delivered for operating high power (3 kw), high voltage (15,000 volt) loads (communication tubes, ion thrusters). The modular system consists of 26 solar arrays, each with an integral light source and cooling system. A typical array contains 2560 series-connected cells. Each light source consists of twenty 500 watt tungsten iodide lamps providing plus or minus 5 per cent uniformity at one solar constant. An array temperature of less than 40 C is achieved using an infrared filter, a water cooled plate, a vacuum hold-down system, and air flushing.

  13. Selected Papers from the 11th International Conference on College Teaching and Learning (11th, Jacksonville, Florida, April 12-15, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jack A., Ed.

    This collection of papers from an international conference on higher education teaching and learning includes: "Fostering Scientific Thinking with New Technologies: A Socio-Cognitive Approach" (Michel Aube); "The 'Classroom Flip': Using Web Course Management Tools to Become the Guide by the Side" (J. Wesley Baker); "Embracing Information and…

  14. Measurement of total ultrasonic power using thermal expansion and change in buoyancy of an absorbing target

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, P. K. Kumar, Yudhisther; Gupta, Reeta; Jain, Anshul; Gohiya, Chandrashekhar

    2014-05-15

    The Radiation Force Balance (RFB) technique is well established and most widely used for the measurement of total ultrasonic power radiated by ultrasonic transducer. The technique is used as a primary standard for calibration of ultrasonic transducers with relatively fair uncertainty in the low power (below 1 W) regime. In this technique, uncertainty comparatively increases in the range of few watts wherein the effects such as thermal heating of the target, cavitations, and acoustic streaming dominate. In addition, error in the measurement of ultrasonic power is also caused due to movement of absorber at relatively high radiated force which occurs at high power level. In this article a new technique is proposed which does not measure the balance output during transducer energized state as done in RFB. It utilizes the change in buoyancy of the absorbing target due to local thermal heating. The linear thermal expansion of the target changes the apparent mass in water due to buoyancy change. This forms the basis for the measurement of ultrasonic power particularly in watts range. The proposed method comparatively reduces uncertainty caused by various ultrasonic effects that occur at high power such as overshoot due to momentum of target at higher radiated force. The functionality of the technique has been tested and compared with the existing internationally recommended RFB technique.

  15. High-power MIXSEL: an integrated ultrafast semiconductor laser with 6.4 W average power.

    PubMed

    Rudin, B; Wittwer, V J; Maas, D J H C; Hoffmann, M; Sieber, O D; Barbarin, Y; Golling, M; Südmeyer, T; Keller, U

    2010-12-20

    High-power ultrafast lasers are important for numerous industrial and scientific applications. Current multi-watt systems, however, are based on relatively complex laser concepts, for example using additional intracavity elements for pulse formation. Moving towards a higher level of integration would reduce complexity, packaging, and manufacturing cost, which are important requirements for mass production. Semiconductor lasers are well established for such applications, and optically-pumped vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers (VECSELs) are most promising for higher power applications, generating the highest power in fundamental transverse mode (>20 W) to date. Ultrashort pulses have been demonstrated using passive modelocking with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM), achieving for example 2.1-W average power, sub-100-fs pulse duration, and 50-GHz pulse repetition rate. Previously the integration of both the gain and absorber elements into a single wafer was demonstrated with the MIXSEL (modelocked integrated external-cavity surface emitting laser) but with limited average output power (<200 mW). We have demonstrated the power scaling concept of the MIXSEL using optimized quantum dot saturable absorbers in an antiresonant structure design combined with an improved thermal management by wafer removal and mounting of the 8-µm thick MIXSEL structure directly onto a CVD-diamond heat spreader. The simple straight cavity with only two components has generated 28-ps pulses at 2.5-GHz repetition rate and an average output power of 6.4 W, which is higher than for any other modelocked semiconductor laser. PMID:21197032

  16. What induces watts in WAT?

    PubMed Central

    Forest, Claude; Joffin, Nolwenn; Jaubert, Anne-Marie; Noirez, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Excess calories stored in white adipose tissue (WAT) could be reduced either through the activation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) or the development of brown-like cells (“beige” or “brite”) in WAT, a process named “browning.” Calorie dissipation in brown and beige adipocytes might rely on the induction of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), which is absent in white fat cells. Any increase in UCP1 is commonly considered as the trademark of energy expenditure. The intracellular events involved in the recruitment process of beige precursors were extensively studied lately, as were the effectors, hormones, cytokines, nutrients and drugs able to modulate the route of browning and theoretically affect fat mass in rodents and in humans. The aim of this review is to update the characterization of the extracellular effectors that induce UCP1 in WAT and potentially provoke calorie dissipation. The potential influence of metabolic cycling in energy expenditure is also questioned. PMID:27386158

  17. 500-watt commercialized concentrator system

    SciTech Connect

    Ronney, K.; Aerni, E.

    1983-02-01

    A passively cooled, single-axis tracking, polar-axis mounted photovoltaic concentrator system has been designed, fabricated, installed, and tested. System description, design considerations, system performance and a production cost estimate are detailed.

  18. High-power laser chains used for laser isotope separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lompre, Louis A.

    2000-01-01

    Since 1985, France has chosen to focus on the selective photo-ionization process called SILVA for uranium enrichment. The general SILVA schedule has led to the construction of a pilot facility called ASTER, aimed to a general assessment of SILVA. It utilizes a mid power dye laser chain pumped by copper vapor laser chains. An alternative solution to pump dye laser is under development. It is based on high-power diode-pumped frequency doubled Nd:YAG modules. Performances as high as 150 Watts, at 532 nm, 10 kHz and pulse duration shorter than 75 ns have been obtained. The electrical efficiency overpasses 5 percent. The paper will give a description of the high power laser chains used or proposed for laser isotope separation.

  19. High average power supercontinuum generation in a fluoroindate fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiderski, J.; Théberge, F.; Michalska, M.; Mathieu, P.; Vincent, D.

    2014-01-01

    We report the first demonstration of Watt-level supercontinuum (SC) generation in a step-index fluoroindate (InF3) fiber pumped by a 1.55 μm fiber master-oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) system. The SC is generated in two steps: first ˜1 ns amplified laser diode pulses are broken up into soliton-like sub-pulses leading to initial spectrum extension and then launched into a fluoride fiber to obtain further spectral broadening. The pump MOPA system can operate at a changeable repetition frequency delivering up to 19.2 W of average power at 2 MHz. When the 8-m long InF3 fiber was pumped with 7.54 W at 420 kHz, output average SC power as high as 2.09 W with 27.8% of slope efficiency was recorded. The achieved SC spectrum spread from 1 to 3.05 μm.

  20. Characterization of advanced thermionic energy converters for modular power units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, Kevin L.; Ramalingam, Mysore L.; Lamp, Thomas R.

    1995-01-01

    The results of the initial characterization of two advanced, heat pipe cooled planar thermionic energy converters are presented. The advanced converters utilize chemical vapor deposited (CVD) rhenium on molybdenum for both the emitter and collector electrodes. Waste heat is rejected from the collector electrode by a niobium heat pipe that contains sodium as the working fluid. Output power densities in the range from 0.7 to 10.43 watts/cm2 were recorded using sweep blasing for emitter temperatures in the range from 1573 to 1950 K. Tests were conducted to investigate the design of a power conversion circuit for a series string of converters. Static loading of the converters was performed to verify the operation of the converters in an actual application. The dynamic switching characteristics of one converter were measured to evaluate the possibility of interfacing a pulse-width modulated (PWM) power regulator directly to a thermionic source.