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Sample records for 12-14cr ods ferritic

  1. Joining Techniques for Ferritic ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    V.G. Krishnardula; V.G. Krishnardula; D.E. Clark; T.C. Totemeier

    2005-06-01

    This report presents results of research on advanced joining techniques for ferritic oxide-dispersion strengthened alloys MA956 and PM2000. The joining techniques studied were resistance pressure welding (also known as pressure forge welding), transient liquid phase bonding, and diffusion bonding. All techniques were shown to produce sound joints in fine-grained, unrecrystallized alloys. Post-bond heat treatment to produce a coarse-grained, recrystallized microstructure resulted in grain growth across the bondline for transient liquid phase and diffusion bonds, giving microstructures essentially identical to that of the parent alloy in the recrystallized condition. The effects of bond orientation, boron interlayer thickness, and bonding parameters are discussed for transient liquid phase and diffusion bonding. The report concludes with a brief discussion of ODS joining techniques and their applicability to GEN IV reactor systems.

  2. Residual ferrite formation in 12CrODS steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukai, S.; Kudo, Y.; Wu, X.; Oono, N.; Hayashi, S.; Ohtsuka, S.; Kaito, T.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing Cr content from 9 to 12 mass% leads to superior corrosion and high-temperature oxidation resistances, and usually changes microstructure from martensite to a ferrite. To make transformable martensitic type of 12CrODS steels that have superior processing capability by using α/γ phase transformation, alloy design was conducted through varying nickel content. The structure of 12CrODS steels was successfully modified from full ferrite to a transformable martensite-base matrix containing ferrite. This ferrite consists of both equilibrium ferrite and a metastable residual ferrite. It was shown that the fraction of the equilibrium ferrite is predictable by computed phase diagram and formation of the residual ferrite was successfully evaluated through pinning of α/γ interfacial boundaries by oxide particles.

  3. Precipitates and boundaries interaction in ferritic ODS steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallez, Nicolas; Hatzoglou, Constantinos; Delabrouille, Fredéric; Sornin, Denis; Chaffron, Laurent; Blat-Yrieix, Martine; Radiguet, Bertrand; Pareige, Philippe; Donnadieu, Patricia; Bréchet, Yves

    2016-04-01

    In the course of a recrystallization study of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels during extrusion, particular interest was paid to the (GB) Grain Boundaries interaction with precipitates. Complementary and corresponding characterization experiments using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Atom Probe Tomography (APT) have been carried out on a voluntarily interrupted extrusion or extruded samples. Microscopic observations of Precipitate Free Zones (PFZ) and precipitates alignments suggest precipitate interaction with migrating GB involving dissolution and Oswald ripening of the precipitates. This is consistent with the local chemical information gathered by EDX and APT. This original mechanism for ODS steels is similar to what had been proposed in the late 80s for similar observation made on Ti alloys reinforced by nanosized yttrium oxides: An interaction mechanism between grain boundaries and precipitates involving a diffusion controlled process of precipitates dissolution at grain boundaries. It is believed that this mechanism can be of primary importance to explain the mechanical behaviour of such steels.

  4. Development of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Ferritic Steel Through Powder Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepak; Prakash, Ujjwal; Dabhade, Vikram V.; Laha, K.; Sakthivel, T.

    2017-02-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels are candidates for cladding tubes in fast breeder nuclear reactors. In this study, an 18%Cr ODS ferritic steel was prepared through powder forging route. Elemental powders with a nominal composition of Fe-18Cr-2 W-0.2Ti (composition in wt.%) with 0 and 0.35% yttria were prepared by mechanical alloying in a Simoloyer attritor under argon atmosphere. The alloyed powders were heated in a mild steel can to 1473 K under flowing hydrogen atmosphere. The can was then hot forged. Steps of sealing, degassing and evacuation are eliminated by using powder forging. Heating ODS powder in hydrogen atmosphere ensures good bonding between alloy powders. A dense ODS alloy with an attractive combination of strength and ductility was obtained after re-forging. On testing at 973 K, a loss in ductility was observed in yttria-containing alloy. The strength and ductility increased with increase in strain rate at 973 K. Reasons for this are discussed. The ODS alloy exhibited a recrystallized microstructure which is difficult to achieve by extrusion. No prior particle boundaries were observed after forging. The forged compacts exhibited isotropic mechanical properties. It is suggested that powder forging may offer several advantages over the traditional extrusion/HIP routes for fabrication of ODS alloys.

  5. The influence of Cr content on the mechanical properties of ODS ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaofu; Zhou, Zhangjian; Jang, Jinsung; Wang, Man; Hu, Helong; Sun, Hongying; Zou, Lei; Zhang, Guangming; Zhang, Liwei

    2014-12-01

    The present investigation aimed at researching the mechanical properties of the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels with different Cr content, which were fabricated through a consolidation of mechanical alloyed (MA) powders of 0.35 wt.% nano Y2O3 dispersed Fe-12.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy A), Fe-16.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy B), and Fe-18.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy C) alloys (all in wt.%) by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) with 100 MPa pressure at 1150 °C for 3 h. The mechanical properties, including the tensile strength, hardness, and impact fracture toughness were tested by universal testers, while Young's modulus was determined by ultrasonic wave non-destructive tester. It was found that the relationship between Cr content and the strength of ODS ferritic steels was not a proportional relationship. However, too high a Cr content will cause the precipitation of Cr-enriched segregation phase, which is detrimental to the ductility of ODS ferritic steels.

  6. Structure of Oxide Nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr MA/ODS Ferritic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Fluss, M; Kimura, A

    2010-04-06

    Oxide nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr ODS ferritic steel fabricated by mechanical alloying (MA) method have been examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. A partial crystallization of oxide nanoparticles was frequently observed in as-fabricated ODS steel. The crystal structure of crystalline oxide particles is identified to be mainly Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} (YAM) with a monoclinic structure. Large nanoparticles with a diameter larger than 20 nm tend to be incoherent and have a nearly spherical shape, whereas small nanoparticles with a diameter smaller than 10 nm tend to be coherent or semi-coherent and have faceted boundaries. The oxide nanoparticles become fully crystallized after prolonged annealing at 900 C. These results lead us to propose a three-stage formation mechanism of oxide nanoparticles in MA/ODS steels.

  7. Microstructure of a 14Cr-ODS ferritic steel before and after helium ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chenyang; Lu, Zheng; Xie, Rui; Liu, Chunming; Wang, Lumin

    2014-12-01

    A 14Cr-ODS ferritic steel with the nominal compositions of Fe-14Cr-2 W-0.3Ti-0.3Y2O3 (wt.%) was produced by mechanical alloying (MA) and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Helium ion was implanted into the 14Cr-ODS steel along with Eurofer 97 steel as reference at 400 °C to a fluence of 1 × 1017 He+/cm2. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), high angle annual dark field (HAADF) scanning TEM (STEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) were used to characterize the microstructure of 14Cr-ODS and Eurofer 97 steels before and after helium implantation. High-density Y-Ti-O-rich nanoclusters and Y2Ti2O7 precipitates as well as large Cr-Ti rich oxides were observed in the 14Cr-ODS steel. The average size of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters and Y2Ti2O7 precipitates is 9 nm. After helium implantation, the helium bubbles formed in the 14Cr-ODS steel exhibit the smaller size and the lower volume fraction than that in Eurofer 97 steel, indicating high-density nano-scale precipitates can effectively suppress the coarsening of helium bubbles.

  8. HRTEM Study of the Role of Nanoparticles in ODS Ferritic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Tumey, S; Fluss, M; Serruys, Y; Willaime, F

    2011-08-30

    Structures of nanoparticles and their role in dual-ion irradiated Fe-16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (K3) ODS ferritic steel produced by mechanical alloying (MA) were studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. The observation of Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} complex-oxide nanoparticles in the ODS steel imply that decomposition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} in association with internal oxidation of Al occurred during mechanical alloying. HRTEM observations of crystalline and partially crystalline nanoparticles larger than {approx}2 nm and amorphous cluster-domains smaller than {approx}2 nm provide an insight into the formation mechanism of nanoparticles/clusters in MA/ODS steels, which we believe involves solid-state amorphization and re-crystallization. The role of nanoparticles/clusters in suppressing radiation-induced swelling is revealed through TEM examinations of cavity distributions in (Fe + He) dual-ion irradiated K3-ODS steel. HRTEM observations of helium-filled cavities (helium bubbles) preferably trapped at nanoparticle/clusters in dual-ion irradiated K3-ODS are presented.

  9. Microstructural characterizations of 14Cr ODS ferritic steels subjected to hot torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karch, A.; Sornin, D.; Barcelo, F.; Bosonnet, S.; de Carlan, Y.; Logé, R.

    2015-04-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are very promising materials for nuclear applications. In this paper, the hot working behavior of ODS ferritic steels, consolidated by hot extrusion, is studied through torsion tests. Three ODS steels are produced acting on both the quantity of Ti and Y2O3 added to the matrix (wt% Fe-14Cr-1W), and the density and size of the nanoparticles. A temperature range of 1000-1200 °C and strain rates from 5 ṡ 10-2 to 5 s-1 are considered. The microstructures of deformed samples are examined by Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction and X-ray diffraction techniques. It is observed that hot plastic strain leads to an early damage with nucleation and growth of cavities along grain boundaries. Except for the damage, very few microstructural and textural evolutions are noticed. The three tested ODS steels exhibit almost the same behavior under hot torsion straining, regardless of the precipitation state. Overall, the experimental results are interpreted through a mechanism of strain accommodation at grain boundaries, with low dislocation activity in the bulk of the grains.

  10. ODS Ferritic/martensitic alloys for Sodium Fast Reactor fuel pin cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubuisson, Philippe; Carlan, Yann de; Garat, Véronique; Blat, Martine

    2012-09-01

    The development of ODS materials for the cladding for Sodium Fast Reactors is a key issue to achieve the objectives required for the GEN IV reactors. CEA, AREVA and EDF have launched in 2007 an important program to determine the optimal fabrication parameters, and to measure and understand the microstructure and properties before, under and after irradiation of such cladding materials. The aim of this paper is to present the French program and the major results obtained recently at CEA on Fe-9/14/18Cr1WTiY2O3 ferritic/martensitic ODS materials. The first step of the program was to consolidate Fe-9/14/18Cr ODS materials as plates and bars to study the microstructure and the mechanical properties of the new alloys. The second step consists in producing tubes at a geometry representative of the cladding of new Sodium Fast Reactors. The optimization of the fabrication route at the laboratory scale is conducted and different tubes were produced. Their microstructure depends on the martensitic (Fe-9Cr) or ferritic (Fe-14Cr) structure. To join the plug to the tube, the reference process is the welding resistance. A specific approach is developed to model the process and support the development of the welds performed within the "SOPRANO" facility. The development at CEA of Fe-9/14/18Cr new ODS materials for the cladding for GENIV Sodium Fast Reactors is in progress. The first microstructural and mechanical characterizations are very encouraging and the full assessment and qualification of this new alloys and products will pass through the irradiation of specimens, tubes, fuel pins and subassemblies up to high doses.

  11. Diffusion bonding between ODS ferritic steel and F82H steel for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Byungjun; Kasada, Ryuta; Kimura, Akihiko

    2012-07-01

    Diffusion bonding techniques were employed to join high Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel (Fe-15Cr-2W-0.2Ti-0.35Y2O3) and F82H steel under uni-axial hydrostatic pressure using a high vacuum hot press, and the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints were investigated. The dissimilar joints were bonded by solid-state diffusion bonding (SSDB) and liquid phase diffusion bonding (LPDB). After bonding process, heat treatments were conducted to utilize the phase transformation of F82H steel for recovering the martensitic structure. Tensile tests with miniaturized specimens were carried out to investigate and compare the bonding strengths of each joint. Microstructure was observed for the bonding interface, and fracture mode was investigated after the tensile tests. LPDB joint of interfacial F82H steel fully recovered to martensite phase by post-joining heat treatments, while SSDB joint had ferrite phases at the interface even after heat treatment, which is considered to be due to decarburization of F82H steel during the bonding process. Therefore it is considered that the insert material plays a role as diffusion barrier of carbon during LPDB process. Microstructure observations and tensile tests of the joints revealed that the LPDB joints possess suitable tensile properties which are comparable to that of F82H steel. This indicates that LPDB is more promising method to bond ODS-FS and F82H steel than SSDB.

  12. Irradiation hardening of ODS ferritic steels under helium implantation and heavy-ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hengqing; Zhang, Chonghong; Yang, Yitao; Meng, Yancheng; Jang, Jinsung; Kimura, Akihiko

    2014-12-01

    Irradiation hardening of ODS ferritic steels after multi-energy He-ion implantation, or after irradiation with energetic heavy ions including Xe and Bi-ions was investigated with nano-indentation technique. Three kinds of high-Cr ODS ferritic steels including the commercial MA956 (19Cr-3.5Al), the 16Cr-0.1Ti and the 16Cr-3.5Al-0.1Zr were used. Data of nano-hardness were analyzed with an approach based on Nix-Gao model. The depth profiles of nano-hardness can be understood by the indentation size effect (ISE) in specimens of MA956 implanted with multi-energy He-ions or irradiated with 328 MeV Xe ions, which produced a plateau damage profile in the near-surface region. However, the damage gradient overlaps the ISE in the specimens irradiated with 9.45 Bi ions. The dose dependence of the nano-hardness shows a rapid increase at low doses and a slowdown at higher doses. An 1/2-power law dependence on dpa level is obtained. The discrepancy in nano-hardness between the helium implantation and Xe-ion irradiation can be understood by using the average damage level instead of the peak dpa level. Helium-implantation to a high dose (7400 appm/0.5 dpa) causes an additional hardening, which is possibly attributed to the impediment of motion dislocations by helium bubbles formed in high concentration in specimens.

  13. Structural and chemical evolution in neutron irradiated and helium-injected ferritic ODS PM2000 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hee Joon; Edwards, Dan J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Yamamoto, Takuya; Wu, Yuan; Odette, G. Robert

    2017-02-01

    An investigation of the influence of helium on damage evolution under neutron irradiation of an 11 at% Al, 19 at% Cr ODS ferritic PM2000 alloy was carried out in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) using a novel in situ helium injection (ISHI) technique. Helium was injected into adjacent TEM discs from thermal neutron 58Ni(nth,γ) 59Ni(nth,α) reactions in a thin NiAl layer. The PM2000 undergoes concurrent displacement damage from the high-energy neutrons. The ISHI technique allows direct comparisons of regions with and without high concentrations of helium since only the side coated with the NiAl experiences helium injection. The corresponding microstructural and microchemical evolutions were characterized using both conventional and scanning transmission electron microscopy techniques. The evolutions observed include formation of dislocation loops and associated helium bubbles, precipitation of a variety of phases, amorphization of the Al2YO3 oxides (which also variously contained internal voids), and several manifestations of solute segregation. Notably, high concentrations of helium had a significant effect on many of these diverse phenomena. These results on PM2000 are compared and contrasted to the evolution of so-called nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA).

  14. HRTEM Study of Oxide Nanoparticles in K3-ODS Ferritic Steel Developed for Radiation Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Fluss, M; Tumey, S; Kuntz, J; El-Dasher, B; Wall, M; Choi, W; Kimura, A; Willaime, F; Serruys, Y

    2009-11-02

    Crystal and interfacial structures of oxide nanoparticles and radiation damage in 16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37 Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} ODS ferritic steel have been examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. Oxide nanoparticles with a complex-oxide core and an amorphous shell were frequently observed. The crystal structure of complex-oxide core is identified to be mainly monoclinic Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} (YAM) oxide compound. Orientation relationships between the oxide and the matrix are found to be dependent on the particle size. Large particles (> 20 nm) tend to be incoherent and have a spherical shape, whereas small particles (< 10 nm) tend to be coherent or semi-coherent and have a faceted interface. The observations of partially amorphous nanoparticles and multiple crystalline domains formed within a nanoparticle lead us to propose a three-stage mechanism to rationalize the formation of oxide nanoparticles containing core/shell structures in as-fabricated ODS steels. Effects of nanoparticle size and density on cavity formation induced by (Fe{sup 8+} + He{sup +}) dual-beam irradiation are briefly addressed.

  15. Formation of nano-size oxide particles and δ-ferrite at elevated temperature in 9Cr-ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sawoong; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Kaito, Takeji; Yamashita, Shinichiro; Inoue, Masaki; Asayama, Tai; Shobu, Takahisa

    2011-10-01

    Excellent high-temperature strength and resistance to radiation damage of 9Cr Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (9Cr-ODS) martensitic steel have been realized by nano-size Y-Ti-O complex oxide particles dispersed in the matrix and a dual phase structure consisting of α'-martensite and δ-ferrite. These are produced by mechanically alloying Fe-Cr-Ti powders with Y 2O 3 followed by a hot-consolidation process. Therefore, the hot-consolidation process is the issue to be clarified for the formation of nano-size oxide particle and δ-ferrite. The temperature dependence of the formation and development of nano-size oxide particles and δ-ferrite using mechanically alloyed 9Cr-ODS raw powder were investigated applying X-ray Diffraction and Small Angle X-ray Scattering measurement at SPring-8 and by Electron Probe Micro Analysis. In situ heating measurement techniques with XRD and SAXS enabled real-time observation of phase transformations and allowed correlation between formation of nano-size oxide particle and δ-ferrite.

  16. Microstructure and impact properties of ferritic ODS ODM401 (14%Cr-ODS of MA957 type)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadraba, Hynek; Kazimierzak, Bohumil; Stratil, Ludek; Dlouhy, Ivo

    2011-10-01

    The oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel ODM401 is one of the ODS steels developed during the 1960-1970s as a structural tubing material for fast breeder reactors, mainly because of their high-temperature strength and swelling resistance under irradiation. Nowadays, these steels are taken under consideration as a structural material for blanket and heat exchanger components in fusion reactors. The aim of the work was to describe fracture behaviour of ODM401 steel in connection to the microstructure. The microstructure of as-extruded ODM401 steel has fine grains elongated in the extrusion direction. The two population of Y-Ti-O particles sizes were found in the microstructure of size about 10-20 nm and 2-3 nm. Temperature dependence of KLST impact energy was measured and transition temperature tDBTT evaluated about -110 °C. The fracture surface was formed by alternated cleavage areas connected by inclined areas fractured by dimple micro mechanism proportional to the impact energy.

  17. Oxidation behavior of ferritic-martensitic and ODS steels in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Jeremy

    Ferritic-martensitic and ODS alloys are primary candidates for application as cladding and structural material in Generation IV nuclear power plants, especially the supercritical water reactor. One of the main in-service degradation mechanisms for these alloys is uniform corrosion, thus this project focuses on understanding the oxidation behavior of these alloys in the supercritical water (SCW) environment. This understanding is acquired through the analysis of the oxide microstructure using microbeam synchrotron radiation diffraction and fluorescence associated with electron microscopy (both SEM and TEM). The microbeam synchrotron radiation diffraction and fluorescence technique provides unique microstructural data of the oxide. This technique simultaneously probes elemental and phase information step by step with a sub-micron spatial resolution throughout the oxide layers. Thus we were able to locate specific phases, such as Cr2O3, at specific locations in the oxide layer, mainly the interfaces. The electron microscopy complemented this analysis by imaging the oxide layers, to yield detailed information on the oxide morphology. All the alloys studied exhibited the same three-layer structure with an outer layer containing only Fe3O4, an inner layer containing a mixture of Fe3O4 and FeCr2O 4, and a diffusion layer containing a mixture of chromium-rich precipitates (Cr2O3 and FeCr2O4) and metal grains. By analyzing samples with various exposure times, we were able to follow the evolution of the oxide microstructure with exposure time. To obtain the corroded samples, several corrosion experiments were performed: some in supercritical water (at 500°C and 600°C) and one experiment in 500°C steam. The test in steam was undertaken to obtain more data points in the kinetic curves, because we thought the corrosion in steam and supercritical water at the same temperature would result in similar kinetics. This turned out not to be the case and the samples in supercritical

  18. High temperature deformation mechanism of 15CrODS ferritic steels at cold-rolled and recrystallized conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugino, Yoshito; Ukai, Shigeharu; Oono, Naoko; Hayashi, Shigenari; Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Masuda, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Sato, Eiichi

    2015-11-01

    The ODS ferritic steels realize potentially higher operating temperature due to structural stability by the dispersed nano-size oxide particles. The deformation process and mechanism of 15CrODS ferritic steels were investigated at 1073 K and 1173 K for the cold-rolled and recrystallized conditions. Tensile and creep tests were conducted at the stress in parallel (LD) and perpendicular (TD) directions to the grain boundaries. Strain rate varied from 10-1 to 10-9 s-1. For the LD specimens, deformation in the cold rolled and recrystallized conditions is reinforced by finely dispersed oxide particles. The dominant deformation process for the recrystallized TD specimen is controlled through the grain boundary sliding and stress accommodation via diffusional creep at temperature of 1173 K and lower strain rate less than 10-4 s-1. The grain boundary sliding couldn't be rate-controlling process at 1073 K for the as-cold rolled TD specimen, where a dynamic recovery of the dislocation produced by cold-rolling is related to the deformation process.

  19. Load partitioning between ferrite/martensite and dispersed nanoparticles of a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guangming; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Zhou, Zhangjian; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-06-18

    In this study, a high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray technique was used to investigate the tensile deformation processes of a 9Cr-ODS ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel at different temperatures. Two minor phases within the 9Cr-ODS F/M steel matrix were identified as Y2Ti2O7 and TiN by the high-energy X-ray diffraction, and confirmed by the analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The lattice strains of the matrix and particles were measured through the entire tensile deformation process. During the tensile tests, the lattice strains of the ferrite/martensite and the particles (TiN and Y2Ti2O7) showed a strong temperature dependence, decreasing with increasing temperature. Analysis of the internal stress at three temperatures showed that the load partitioning between the ferrite/martensite and the particles (TiN and Y2Ti2O7) was initiated during sample yielding and reached to a peak during sample necking. At three studied temperatures, the internal stress of minor phases (Y2Ti2O7 and TiN) was about 2 times that of F/M matrix at yielding position, while the internal stress of Y2Ti2O7 and TiN reached about 4.5-6 times and 3-3.5 times that of the F/M matrix at necking position, respectively. It indicates that the strengthening of the matrix is due to minor phases (Y2Ti2O7 and TiN), especially Y2Ti2O7 particles. Although the internal stresses of all phases decreased with increasing temperature from RT to 600 degrees C, the ratio of internal stresses of each phase at necking position stayed in a stable range (internal stresses of Y2Ti2O7 and TiN were about 4.5-6 times and 3-3.5 times of that of F/M matrix, respectively). The difference between internal stress of the F/M matrix and the applied stress at 600 degrees C is slightly lower than those at RI and 300 degrees C, indicating that the nanoparticles still have good strengthening effect at 600 degrees C. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of the use of the ferritic/martensitic ODS steels cladding on the fuel reprocessing PUREX process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwinner, B.; Auroy, M.; Mas, D.; Saint-Jevin, A.; Pasquier-Tilliette, S.

    2012-09-01

    Some ferritic/martensitic oxide dispersed strengthened (F/M ODS) steels are presently developed at CEA for the fuel cladding of the next generation of sodium fast nuclear reactors. The objective of this work is to study if this change of cladding could have any consequences on the spent fuel reprocessing PUREX process. During the fuel dissolution stage the cladding can actually be corroded by nitric acid. But some process specifications impose not to exceed a limit concentration of the corrosion products such as iron and chromium in the dissolution medium. For that purpose the corrosion behavior of these F/M ODS steels is studied in hot and concentrated nitric acid. The influence of some metallurgical parameters such as the chromium content, the elaboration process and the presence of the yttrium oxides is first discussed. The influence of environmental parameters such as the nitric acid concentration, the temperature and the presence of oxidizing species coming from the fuel is then analyzed. The corrosion rate is characterized by mass loss measurements and electrochemical tests. Analyses of the corroded surface are carried out by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  1. Tensile properties and deformation mechanisms of a 14Cr ODS ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckmeyer, A.; Praud, M.; Fournier, B.; Malaplate, J.; Garnier, J.; Béchade, J. L.; Tournié, I.; Tancray, A.; Bougault, A.; Bonnaillie, P.

    2010-10-01

    The search for a new cladding material is part of the research studies carried out at CEA to develop a sodium-cooled fast reactor meeting the expectations of the Generation IV International Forum. In this study, the tensile properties of a ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened steel produced by hot extrusion at CEA have been evaluated. They prove the studied alloy to be as resistant as and more ductile than the other nano-reinforced alloys of literature. The effects of the strain rate and temperature on the total plastic strain of the material remind of diffusion phenomena. Intergranular damage and intergranular decohesion are clearly highlighted.

  2. Innovative Powder Processing of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened ODS Ferritic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel; Anderson, Iver; Kramer, Matthew

    2011-04-01

    An innovative gas atomization reaction synthesis technique was employed as a viable method to dramatically lower the processing cost for precursor oxide dispersion forming ferritic stainless steel powders (i.e., Fe-Cr-(Hf,Ti)-Y). During this rapid solidification process the atomized powders were enveloped by a nano-metric Cr-enriched metastable oxide film. Elevated temperature heat treatment was used to dissociate this metastable oxide phase through oxygen exchange reactions with Y-(Hf,Ti) enriched intermetallic compound precipitates. These solid state reactions resulted in the formation of highly stable nano-metric mixed oxide dispersoids (i.e., Y-Ti-O or Y-Hf-O) throughout the alloy microstructure. Subsequent high temperature (1200 C) heat treatments were used to elucidate the thermal stability of each nano-metric oxide dispersoid phase. Transmission electron microscopy coupled with X-ray diffraction was used to evaluate phase evolution within the alloy microstructure.

  3. Past research and fabrication conducted at SCK•CEN on ferritic ODS alloys used as cladding for FBR's fuel pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bremaecker, Anne

    2012-09-01

    In the 1960s in the frame of the sodium-cooled fast breeders, SCK•CEN decided to develop claddings made with ferritic stainless materials because of their specific properties, namely a higher thermal conductivity, a lower thermal expansion, a lower tendency to He-embrittlement, and a lower swelling than the austenitic stainless steels. To enhance their lower creep resistance at 650-700 °C arose the idea to strengthen the microstructure by oxide dispersions. This was the starting point of an ambitious programme where both the matrix and the dispersions were optimized. A purely ferritic 13 wt% Cr matrix was selected and its mechanical strength was improved through addition of ferritizing elements. Results of tensile and stress-rupture tests showed that Ti and Mo were the most beneficial elements, partly because of the chi-phase precipitation. In 1973 the optimized matrix composition was Fe-13Cr-3.5Ti-2Mo. To reach creep properties similar to those of AISI 316, different dispersions and methods were tested: internal oxidation (that was not conclusive), and the direct mixing of metallic and oxide powders (Al2O3, MgO, ZrO2, TiO2, ZrSiO4) followed by pressing, sintering, and extrusion. The compression and extrusion parameters were determined: extrusion as hollow at 1050 °C, solution annealing at 1050 °C/15 min, cleaning, cold drawing to the final dimensions with intermediate annealings at 1050 °C, final annealing at 1050 °C, straightening and final aging at 800 °C. The choice of titania and yttria powders and their concentrations were finalized on the basis of their out-of-pile and in-pile creep and tensile strength. As soon as a resistance butt welding machine was developed and installed in a glove-box, fuel segments with PuO2 were loaded in the Belgian MTR BR2. The fabrication parameters were continuously optimized: milling and beating, lubrication, cold drawing (partial and final reduction rates, temperature, duration, atmosphere and furnace). Specific non

  4. Energy-filtered TEM imaging and EELS study of ODS particles and argon-filled cavities in ferritic-martensitic steels.

    PubMed

    Klimiankou, M; Lindau, R; Möslang, A

    2005-01-01

    Oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic-martensitic steels with yttrium oxide (Y(2)O(3)) have been produced by mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing for use as advanced material in fusion power reactors. Argon gas, usually widely used as inert gas during mechanical alloying, was surprisingly detected in the nanodispersion-strengthened materials. Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) led to the following results: (i) chemical composition of ODS particles, (ii) voids with typical diameters of 1-6 nm are formed in the matrix, (iii) these voids are filled with Ar gas, and (iv) the high-density nanosized ODS particles serve as trapping centers for the Ar bubbles. The Ar L(3,2) energy loss edge at 245 eV as well as the absorption features of the ODS particle elements were identified in the EELS spectrum. The energy resolution in the EEL spectrum of about 1.0 eV allows to identify the electronic structure of the ODS particles.

  5. Optimization of the chemical composition and manufacturing route for ODS RAF steels for fusion reactor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Baluc, N.

    2009-05-01

    As the upper temperature for use of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels is presently limited by a drop in mechanical strength at about 550 °C, Europe, Japan and the US are actively researching steels with high strength at higher operating temperatures, mainly using stable oxide dispersion. In addition, the numerous interfaces between matrix and oxide particles are expected to act as sinks for the irradiation-induced defects. The main R&D activities aim at finding a compromise between good tensile and creep strength and sufficient ductility, especially in terms of fracture toughness. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) reduced activation ferritic (RAF) steels appear as promising materials for application in fusion power reactors up to about 750 °C. Six different ODS RAF steels, with compositions of Fe-(12-14)Cr-2W-(0.1-0.3-0.5)Ti-0.3Y2O3 (in wt%), were produced by powder metallurgy techniques, including mechanical alloying, canning and degassing of the milled powders and compaction of the powders by hot isostatic pressing, using various devices and conditions. The materials have been characterized in terms of microstructure and mechanical properties. The results have been analysed in terms of optimal chemical composition and manufacturing conditions. In particular, it was found that the composition of the materials should lie in the range Fe-14Cr-2W-(0.3-0.4)Ti-(0.25-0.3)Y2O3, as 14Cr ODS RAF steels exhibit higher tensile strength and better Charpy impact properties and are more stable than 12Cr materials (no risk of martensitic transformation), while materials with 0.5% Ti or more should not be further investigated, due to potential embrittlement by large TiO2 particles.

  6. TEM characterization of 14YWT and 12YWT ODS ferritic alloys neutron irradiated at 500C using in-situ helium injection

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Hee Joon; Edwards, Danny J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Odette, G Robert; Wu, Yuan; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2015-03-31

    This report summaries TEM characterization of 14YWT and 12YWT, ODS ferritic alloys with 14 and 12 wt % of Cr respectively, to compare the effect of neutron irradiation with and without concurrent He injection using ISHI. The density and average size of <100>/{100} type dislocation loops are always larger than those of 1/2<111>/{111} type, but this difference is significantly affected by He implantation. The density of dislocation loops of both types ranges from ~1 to 4x1021 m-3 with average size ranging from 5~20 nm. 14YWT has lower density but larger size dislocation loops than 12YWT, while the line dislocation density of 14YWT is 3 times lower than that of 12YWT. Helium bubble densities of both 14YWT and 12YWT are 1.9x1023 m-3, the average He bubbles size of 14YWT and 12YWT are 1.4 and 1.2 nm, respectively. 14YWT exhibits α-α’ phase separation, Y-rich particles and uniformly distributed W. In addition to those features, 12YWT exhibits Y-Ti-O particles (not Y-O rich) and elongated Cr-rich phases.

  7. The evolution of internal stress and dislocation during tensile deformation in a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel investigated by high-energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-12-01

    An application of high-energy wide angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction to investigate the tensile deformation of 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel is presented. With tensile loading and in-situ Xray exposure, the lattice strain development of matrix was determined. The lattice strain was found to decrease with increasing temperature, and the difference in Young's modulus of six different reflections at different temperatures reveals the temperature dependence of elastic anisotropy. The mean internal stress was calculated and compared with the applied stress, showing that the strengthening factor increased with increasing temperature, indicating that the oxide nanoparticles have a good strengthening impact at high temperature. The dislocation density and character were also measured during tensile deformation. The dislocation density decreased with increasing of temperature due to the greater mobility of dislocation at high temperature. The dislocation character was determined by best-fit methods for different dislocation average contrasts with various levels of uncertainty. The results shows edge type dislocations dominate the plastic strain at room temperature (RT) and 300 C, while the screw type dislocations dominate at 600 C. The dominance of edge character in 9Cr F/M ODS steels at RT and 300 C is likely due to the pinning effect of nanoparticles for higher mobile edge dislocations when compared with screw dislocations, while the stronger screw type of dislocation structure at 600 C may be explained by the activated cross slip of screw segments.

  8. ODS iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; Pint, B.A.; Ohriner, E.K.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-08-01

    The overall goal of this program is to develop an oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) version of Fe{sub 3}Al that has sufficient creep strength and resistance to oxidation at temperatures in the range 1000 to 1200{degrees}C to be suitable for application as heat exchanger tubing in advanced power generation cycles. The program has two main thrusts: (a) alloy processing, which involves mechanical alloying and thermomechanical processing to achieve the desired size and distribution of the oxide dispersoid, and (b) optimization of the oxidation behavior to provide increased service life compared to ODS-FeCrAl alloys intended for the same applications. Control of the grain size and shape in the final alloy is very dependent on the homogeneity of the alloy powder, in terms of the size and distribution of the dispersed oxide particles, and on the level of strain and temperature applied in the recrystallization step. Studies of the effects of these variables are being made using mechanically-alloyed powder from two sources: a commercial powder metallurgy alloy vendor and an in-house, controlled environment high-energy mill. The effects of milling parameters on the microstructure and composition of the powder and consolidated alloy are described. Comparison of the oxidation kinetics of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloys with commercial ODS-FeCrAl alloys in air at 1000-1300{degrees}C indicated that the best Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys oxidized isothermally at the same rate as the ODS-FeCrAl alloys but, under thermal cycling conditions, the oxidation rate of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al was faster. The main difference was that the ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al experienced significantly more scale spallation above 1000{degrees}C. The differences in oxidation behavior were translated into expected lifetimes which indicated that, for an alloy section thickness of 2.5 mm, the scale spallation of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al leads to an expected service lifetime similar to that for the INCO alloy MA956 at 1100 to 1300{degrees}C.

  9. ODS iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; Pint, B.A.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Ohriner, E.K.

    1996-06-01

    Interest in advanced cycles that involve indirectly-fired gas turbines, in which coal- or gas-fired high-temperature heat exchangers are used to heat a working fluid in a closed system, has led to investigation of materials for heat exchangers capable of operation at temperatures of the order of 1200 to 1300{degrees}C. The candidate materials are ceramics and, possibly, oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys. An ODS FeCrAl alloy was found to meet the strength requirements for such an application, in which the working fluid at 0.9 MPa was to be heated from 800 to 1100{degrees}C over a tube length of 4 m. The oxidation life of ODS FeCrAl alloys is determined by their ability to form or reform a protective alumina scale, and can be related to the time for the aluminum content of the alloy to be depleted to some minimum level. As a result, the service life is a function of the available aluminum content of the alloys and the minimum aluminum level at which breakaway oxidation occurs, hence there is a limit on the minimum cross section which can be safely employed at temperatures above 1200{degrees}C. Because of their significantly higher aluminum content ({ge}28 atom %/{ge}16 wt. percent compared to {approx}9 atom %15 wt. percent), alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al afford a potentially larger reservoir of aluminum to sustain oxidation resistance at higher temperatures and, therefore, offer a possible improvement over the currently-available ODS FeCrAl alloys, providing they can be strengthened in a similar manner.

  10. Inhibited Aluminization of an ODS FeCr Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Vande Put Ep Rouaix, Aurelie; Pint, Bruce A

    2012-01-01

    Aluminide coatings are of interest for fusion energy applications both for compatibility with liquid Pb-Li and to form an alumina layer that acts as a tritium permeation barrier. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels are a structural material candidate for commercial reactor concepts expected to operate above 600 C. Aluminizing was conducted in a laboratory scale chemical vapor deposition reactor using accepted conditions for coating Fe- and Ni-base alloys. However, the measured mass gains on the current batch of ODS Fe-14Cr were extremely low compared to other conventional and ODS alloys. After aluminizing at two different Al activities at 900 C and at 1100 C, characterization showed that the ODS Fe-14Cr specimens formed a dense, primarily AlN layer that prevented Al uptake. This alloy batch contained a higher (> 5000 ppma) N content than the other alloys coated and this is the most likely reason for the inhibited aluminization. Other factors such as the high O content, small ({approx} 140 nm) grain size and Y-Ti oxide nano-clusters in ODS Fe-14Cr also could have contributed to the observed behavior. Examples of typical aluminide coatings formed on conventional and ODS Fe- and Ni-base alloys are shown for comparison.

  11. ODS iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; McKamey, C.G.; Pint, B.A.

    1995-06-01

    There has been a recent increase of interest in advanced cycles that involve indirectly-fired gas turbines, in which coal- or gas-fired high-temperature heat exchangers are used to heat a working fluid in a closed system. In a program conducted as part of the European COST-501 Concerted Action Project, available alloys based on FeCrAl-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} were evaluated for use in the main heat exchanger in a similar closed-cycle gas turbine application. One of the currently available ODS FeCrAl alloys was found to meet the strength requirements for this application, in which the working fluid at 0.9 MPa (131 psi) flowing at 5,889 kg/hr (12,955 lb/hr) was to be heated from 800 to 1100{degrees}C (1472 to 2012{degrees}F) over a tube length of 4 m (13 ft).

  12. In Situ Synchrotron Tensile Investigations on 14YWT, MA957 and 9-Cr ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jun-Li; Mo, Kun; Yun, Di; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Zhao, Huijuan; Hoelzer, David T; Park, Jun-Sang; Almer, Jonathan; Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Stubbins, James; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) provide exceptional radiation tolerance and high-temperature mechanical properties when compared to traditional ferritic and ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels. Their remarkable properties result from ultrahigh density and ultrafine size of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within the ferritic matrix. In this work, we applied a high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray to study the deformation process of two NFAs including 14YWT and MA957, and a 9-Cr ODS steel. Only the relatively large nanoparticles in the 9-Cr ODS were observed in the synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The nanoclusters in both 14 YWT and MA957 were invisible in the measurement due to their non-stoichiometric nature. Due to the different sizes of nanoparticles and nanoclusters in the materials, the Orowan looping was considered to be the major strengthening mechanism in the 9-Cr ODS, while the dispersed-barrier-hardening is dominant strengthening mechanism in both 14YWT and MA957, respectively. This analysis was inferred from the different build-up rates of dislocation density when plastic deformation was initiated. Finally, the dislocation densities interpreted from the X-ray measurements were successfully modeled using the Bergstr m s dislocation models.

  13. Corrosion behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wenhua; Guo, Xianglong; Shen, Zhao; Zhang, Lefu

    2017-04-01

    The corrosion resistance of three different Cr content oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels in supercritical water (SCW) and their passive films formed on the surface have been investigated. The results show that the dissolved oxygen (DO) and chemical composition have significant influence on the corrosion behavior of the ODS ferritic steels. In 2000 ppb DO SCW at 650 °C, the 14Cr-4Al ODS steel forms a tri-layer oxide film and the surface morphologies have experienced four structures. For the tri-layer oxide film, the middle layer is mainly Fe-Cr spinel and the Al is gradually enriched in the inner layer.

  14. Creep constitutive equation of dual phase 9Cr-ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakasegawa, Hideo; Ukai, Shigeharu; Tamura, Manabu; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Ogiwara, Hiroyuki; Kohyama, Akira; Fujiwara, Masayuki

    2008-02-01

    9Cr-ODS (oxide dispersion strengthened) steels developed by JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency) have superior creep properties compared with conventional heat resistant steels. The ODS steels can enormously contribute to practical applications of fast breeder reactors and more attractive fusion reactors. Key issues are developments of material processing procedures for mass production and creep life prediction methods in present R&D. In this study, formulation of creep constitutive equation was performed against the backdrop. The 9Cr-ODS steel displaying an excellent creep property is a dual phase steel. The ODS steel is strengthened by the δ ferrite which has a finer dispersion of oxide particles and shows a higher hardness than the α' martensite. The δ ferrite functions as a reinforcement in the dual phase 9Cr-ODS steel. Its creep behavior is very unique and cannot be interpreted by conventional theories of heat resistant steels. Alternative qualitative model of creep mechanism was formulated at the start of this study using the results of microstructural observations. Based on the alternative creep mechanism model, a novel creep constitutive equation was formulated using the exponential type creep equation extended by a law of mixture.

  15. Assessment of a new fabrication route for Fe-9Cr-1W ODS cladding tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toualbi, L.; Cayron, C.; Olier, P.; Malaplate, J.; Praud, M.; Mathon, M.-H.; Bossu, D.; Rouesne, E.; Montani, A.; Logé, R.; de Carlan, Y.

    2012-09-01

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened ferritic/martensitic steels are developed as future cladding materials for Generation IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors. ODS alloys are elaborated by powder metallurgy, consolidated by hot extrusion and manufactured into tube cladding using cold rolling process. ODS steels present low ductility and high hardness at room temperature which complicate their manufacturing. Cold working leads to the hardening of the tube which needs to be softened by heat treatment. A new high temperature fabrication route performed on a Fe-9Cr-1W-Ti-Y2O3-ODS martensitic steel has been designed by following the hardness values, the morphological and crystallographic anisotropy and the nano-precipitation size evolution at each step of the fabrication route. Observations show that phase transformation from ferrite (α) to austenite (γ) is crucial to reduce the morphological and the crystallographic anisotropy induced by the manufacturing processes. The high temperature heat treatments permit to make the austenitic grain grow leading to an improvement of the cold workability. Ultimate Tensile Strength values obtained in the hoop direction remain about 315 MPa at 650 °C which is slightly lower compared to other Fe-9Cr ODS tubes but the new microstructure could be more favorable for creep properties.

  16. Characteristic results and prospects of the 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiselt, Ch. Ch.; Klimenkov, M.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.

    2009-04-01

    For specific blanket and divertor applications in future fusion power reactors a replacement of presently considered reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steels as structural material by suitable oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic martensitic steels would allow a substantial increase of the operating temperature from ˜550 °C to about 650 °C. Temperatures above 700 °C in the He cooled modular divertor concept necessitates the use of ferritic (RAF) ODS steels, which are not limited by a phase transition. Therefore a 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 ferritic ODS steel is being developed, using an Attritor with varying milling parameters. Afterwards the mechanically alloyed powders were encapsulated, sealed and consolidated in a hot isostatic press device. In this work, the effects of several parameter variations on the microstructure of the produced ferritic ODS-alloys, analysed by optical microscopy (OM) and high resolution TEM, as well as results of conducted mechanical tests are presented.

  17. Influence of microstructure on impact properties of 9-18%Cr ODS steels for fusion/fission applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadraba, H.; Fournier, B.; Stratil, L.; Malaplate, J.; Rouffié, A.-L.; Wident, P.; Ziolek, L.; Béchade, J.-L.

    2011-04-01

    The paper describes the influence of the microstructure (coming from the extrusion shape, the chemical composition and the thermo-mechanical treatments) of (9-18%)Cr-W-Ti-Y 2O 3 ODS steels on their impact fracture properties. The extrusion shape plays a major role on the impact properties, materials extruded as a rod present a higher upper shelf energy (USE) and a lower ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) compared to materials extruded as plates. The DBTT for the non-recrystallized 14%Cr ferritic steels was shifted towards higher temperatures compared to the 9%Cr tempered ferritic-martensitic steel. Increasing the W and Ti content in 9%Cr tempered ferritic-martensitic ODS steel leads to a USE and a DBTT shifted towards higher energies and higher temperatures respectively. Increasing the yttria content leads to a drop of the impact energy and a shift of the DBTT of ferritic ODS steel towards higher temperatures. The present study highlights extensive splitting of the fracture surfaces and a dependency of the impact energy on the fracture plane orientation according to the microstructure anisotropy.

  18. Development of Austenitic ODS Strengthened Alloys for Very High Temperature Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbins, James; Heuser, Brent; Robertson, Ian; Sehitoglu, Huseyin; Sofronis, Petros; Gewirth, Andrew

    2015-04-22

    This “Blue Sky” project was directed at exploring the opportunities that would be gained by developing Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys based on the Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloy system. A great deal of research effort has been directed toward ferritic and ferritic/martensitic ODS alloys which has resulted in reasonable advances in alloy properties. Similar gains should be possible with austenitic alloy which would also take advantage of other superior properties of that alloy system. The research effort was aimed at the developing an in-depth understanding of the microstructural-level strengthening effects of ODS particles in austentic alloys. This was accomplished on a variety of alloy compositions with the main focus on 304SS and 316SS compositions. A further goal was to develop an understanding other the role of ODS particles on crack propagation and creep performance. Since these later two properties require bulk alloy material which was not available, this work was carried out on promising austentic alloy systems which could later be enhanced with ODS strengthening. The research relied on a large variety of micro-analytical techniques, many of which were available through various scientific user facilities. Access to these facilities throughout the course of this work was instrumental in gathering complimentary data from various analysis techniques to form a well-rounded picture of the processes which control austenitic ODS alloy performance. Micromechanical testing of the austenitic ODS alloys confirmed their highly superior mechanical properties at elevated temperature from the enhanced strengthening effects. The study analyzed the microstructural mechanisms that provide this enhanced high temperature performance. The findings confirm that the smallest size ODS particles provide the most potent strengthening component. Larger particles and other thermally- driven precipitate structures were less effective contributors and, in some cases, limited

  19. Fabrication of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic clad fuel pins

    SciTech Connect

    Zirker, L.R. ); Bottcher, J.H. ); Shikakura, S. ); Tsai, C.L. . Dept. of Welding Engineering); Hamilton, M.L. )

    1991-01-01

    A resistance butt welding procedure was developed and qualified for joining ferritic fuel pin cladding to end caps. The cladding are INCO MA957 and PNC ODS lots 63DSA and 1DK1, ferritic stainless steels strengthened by oxide dispersion, while the end caps are HT9 a martensitic stainless steel. With adequate parameter control the weld is formed without a residual melt phase and its strength approaches that of the cladding. This welding process required a new design for fuel pin end cap and weld joint. Summaries of the development, characterization, and fabrication processes are given for these fuel pins. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Thermal helium desorption behavior in advanced ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Akihiko; Sugano, R.; Matsushita, Y.; Ukai, S.

    2005-02-01

    Thermal helium desorption measurements were performed to investigate the difference in the helium trapping and accumulation behavior among a reduced activation ferritic (RAF) steel and oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) steels after implantation of He+ ions at room temperature. Thermal helium desorption spectra (THDS) were obtained during annealing to 1200 °C at a heating rate of 1 °C/s. The THDS of the ODS steels are very similar to that of the RAF steel, except for the presence of the peak in the temperature range from 800 to 1000 °C, where the α γ transformation related helium desorption from the γ-phase is considered to occur in the 9Cr-ODS martensitic steels. The fraction of helium desorption becomes larger at higher temperatures, and this trend is increased with the amount of implanted helium. In the 9Cr-ODS steels, the fraction of helium desorption by bubble migration mechanism was smaller than that in the RAF steel. This suggests that the bubble formation was suppressed in the ODS steels. In the 12Cr-ODS steel, the fraction of helium desorption by bubble migration reached more than 90%, suggesting that the trapping capacity of martensite phase in the 9Cr-ODS steel is rather large.

  1. The oxidation and corrosion of ODS alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation and hot corrosion of high temperature oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are reviewed. The environmental resistance of such alloys are classified by oxide growth rate, oxide volatility, oxide spalling, and hot corrosion limitations. Also discussed are environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. It is concluded that ODS NiCrAl and FeCrAl alloys are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant and can probably be used uncoated.

  2. Characterization of precipitates in nano structured 14% Cr ODS alloys for fusion application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, P.; Klimenkov, M.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.

    2012-09-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) reduced activation ferritic (RAF) steels, have been considered as promising materials for application in fusion power reactors up to about 750 °C. Four ODS RAF steels, with compositions of Fe-13.5Cr-2W-(0-0.2-0.3-0.4)Ti-0.3Y2O3 (in wt.%) were produced by powder metallurgy technique. For the different Ti-contents, the correlation between microstructure and mechanical properties was analyzed by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with energy- dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX) and electron energy loss spectrometer (EELS). A bimodal grain size distribution was observed in all as-hipped Ti-containing ODS alloys. These alloys consisted of coarse grains typical ranging from 1 μm to 8 μm and fine grains well below 1 μm in diameter. The addition of Ti resulted in the formation of spherical Ti oxides rather than Cr oxides owing to the stronger affinity of Ti. The influence of Ti on particle size refinement was striking and the optimum effect was obtained when adding 0.3% Ti. Generally the hardness increased consistently with increasing in Ti content. The ODS alloying with 0.3% Ti exhibit the highest strength due to the optimum refinement of mean ODS particle size.

  3. Effect of recrystallization on ion-irradiation hardening and microstructural changes in 15Cr-ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Yoosung; Kimura, Akihiko

    2015-12-01

    The effects of recrystallization on ion-irradiation hardening and microstructural changes were investigated for a 15Cr-ODS ferritic steel. Dual ion-irradiation experiments were performed at 470 °C using 6.4 MeV Fe3+ ions simultaneously with energy-degraded 1 MeV He+ ions. The displacement of damage at 600 nm depth from the specimen surface was 30 dpa. Nano-indentation test with Berkovich type indentation tip was measured by constant stiffness measurement (CSM) technique. Results from nano-indentation tests indicate irradiation hardening in ODS steels even at 470 °C, while it wasn't observed in reduced activation ferritic steel. Recrystallized ODS steel shows a larger irradiation hardening, which is considered to be due to the reduction of grain boundaries and interfaces of matrix/oxide particles. In 20% cold rolled ODS steel after recrystallization, both the hardening and bubble number density were lower than those of recrystallized ODS steel, suggesting that dislocations generated by cold rolling suppress bubble formation. Based on the estimation of irradiation hardening from TEM observation results, it is considered that the bubbles are not the main factor controlling ion-irradiation hardening.

  4. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, D.K.; Froes, F.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1998-03-01

    An oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with high temperature strength has been developed in line with low activation criteria for application in fusion power systems. The composition Fe-13.5Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.25Y{sub 2}O{sup 3} was chosen to provide a minimum chromium content to insure fully delta-ferrite stability. High temperature strength has been demonstrated by measuring creep response of the ODS alloy in uniaxial tension at 650 and 900 C in an inert atmosphere chamber. Results of tests at 900 C demonstrate that this alloy has creep properties similar to other alloys of similar design and can be considered for use in high temperature fusion power system designs. The alloy selection process, materials production, microstructural evaluation and creep testing are described.

  5. ODS steel raw material local structure analysis using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cintins, A.; Anspoks, A.; Purans, J.; Kuzmin, A.; Timoshenko, J.; Vladimirov, P.; Gräning, T.; Hoffmann, J.

    2015-03-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are promising materials for fusion power reactors, concentrated solar power plants, jet engines, chemical reactors as well as for hydrogen production from thermolysis of water. In this study we used X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Fe and Cr K-edges as a tool to get insight into the local structure of ferritic and austenitic ODS steels around Fe and Cr atoms and its transformation during mechanical alloying process. Using the analysis of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) we found that for austenitic samples a transformation of ferritic steel to austenitic steel is detectable after 10 hours of milling and proceeds till 40 hours of milling; only small amount of a-phase remains after 80 hours of milling. We found that the Cr K-edge EXAFS can be used to observe distortions inside the material and to get an impression on the formation of chromium clusters. In-situ EXAFS experiments offer a reliable method to investigate the ferritic to austenitic transformation.

  6. R&D of low activation ferritic steels for fusion in japanese universities*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohyama, Akira; Kohno, Yutaka; Asakura, Kentaro; Kayano, Hideo

    1994-09-01

    Following the brief review of the R&D of low activation ferritic steels in Japanese universities, the status of 9Cr-2W type ferritic steels development is presented. The main emphasis is on mechanical property changes by fast neutron irradiation in FFTF. Bend test, tensile test, CVN test and in-reactor creep results are provided including some data about low activation ferritic steels with Cr variation from 2.25 to 12%. The 9Cr-2W ferritic steel, denoted as JLF-1, showed excellent mechanical properties under fast neutron irradiation as high as 60 dpa. As potential materials for DEMO and beyond, innovative oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) quasi-amorphous low activation ferritic steels are introduced. The baseline properties, microstructural evolution under ion irradiation and the recent progress of new processes are provided.

  7. Progress in ODS Alloys: A Synopsis of a 2010 Workshop on Fe- Based ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kad, Bimal; Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Jones, Andy R.; Vito, Cedro III; Tatlock, Gordon J; Pint, Bruce A; Tortorelli, Peter F; Rawls, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    In Fall 2010, a workshop on the role and future of Fe-based Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys gathered together ODS alloy suppliers, potential industrial end-users, and technical experts in relevant areas. Presentations and discussions focused on the current state of development of these alloys, their availability from commercial suppliers, past major evaluations of ODS alloy components in fossil and nuclear energy applications, and the technical and economic issues attendant to commercial use of ODS alloys. Significant progress has been achieved in joining ODS alloys, with creep resistant joints successfully made by inertia welding, friction stir welding and plasma-assisted pulse diffusion bonding, and in improving models for the prediction of lifetime components. New powder and alloy fabrication methods to lower cost or improve endproduct properties were also described. The final open discussion centered on challenges and pathways for further development and large-scale use of ODS alloys.

  8. Formation mechanism and the role of nanoparticles in Fe-Cr ODS steels developed for radiation tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, Luke L.; Fluss, Michael J.; Tumey, Scott J.; Choi, B. William; Serruys, Yves; Willaime, Francois; Kimura, Akihiko

    2010-11-01

    Structures of nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (K3) and Fe-20Cr-4.5Al-0.34Ti-0.5Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (MA956) oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels produced by mechanical alloying (MA) and followed by hot extrusion have been studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques to understand the formation mechanism of nanoparticles in MA/ODS steels. The observations of Y-Al-O complex-oxide nanoparticles in both ODS steels imply that decomposition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} in association with internal oxidation of Al occurred during mechanical alloying. While the majority of oxide nanoparticles formed in both steels is Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9}, a few oxide particles of YAlO{sub 3} are also observed occasionally. These results reveal that Ti (0.3 wt %) plays an insignificant role in forming oxide nanoparticles in the presence of Al (4.5 wt %). HRTEM observations of crystalline nanoparticles larger than {approx}2 nm and amorphous or disordered cluster domains smaller than {approx}2 nm provide an insight into the formation mechanism of oxide nanoparticle in MA/ODS steels, which we believe from our observations involves solid-state amorphization and recrystallization. The role of nanoparticles in suppressing radiation-induced swelling is revealed through TEM examinations of cavity distributions in ion-irradiated Fe-14Cr and K3-ODS ferritic steels. HRTEM observations of helium-filled cavities (helium bubbles) preferably trapped at nanoscale oxide particles and clusters in ion-irradiated K3-ODS are presented.

  9. Comminuting irradiated ferritic steel

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Roger E.; Straalsund, Jerry L.; Chin, Bryan A.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of comminuting irradiated ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other irradiated components.

  10. XXIst Century Ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaleyrat, F.; Zehani, K.; Pasko, A.; Loyau, V.; LoBue, M.

    2012-05-01

    Ferrites have always been a subject of great interest from point of view of magnetic application, since the fist compass to present date. In contrast, the scientific interest for iron based magnetic oxides decreased after Ørsted discovery as they where replaced by coil as magnetizing sources. Neel discovery of ferrimagnetism boosted again interest and leads to strong developments during two decades before being of less interest. Recently, the evolution of power electronics toward higher frequency, the downsizing of ceramics microstucture to nanometer scale, the increasing price of rare-earth elements and the development of magnetocaloric materials put light again on ferrites. A review on three ferrite families is given herein: harder nanostructured Ba2+Fe12O19 magnet processed by spark plasma sintering, magnetocaloric effect associated to the spin transition reorientation of W-ferrite and low temperature spark plasma sintered Ni-Zn-Cu ferrites for high frequency power applications.

  11. Epitaxial Garnets and Hexagonal Ferrites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    Ferrites Lithium Ferrite Magnetostatic Wave Garnets Epitaxy Yttrium Iron Garnet Liquid Phase Epitaxy Hexagonal Ferrite Microwave Signal Processing...epitaxial ferrit ( materials for use in microwave and millirreter-wave signal processing devices. The major emphasis has been on multiple layer...overall objective of this research is to develop epitaxial single crystal ferrite films suitable for microwave and millimeter-wave signal processing at

  12. SEDS Tether M/OD Damage Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashida, K. B.; Robinson, J. H.; Hill, S. A.

    1997-01-01

    The Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS) was designed to deploy an endmass at the end of a 20-km-long tether which acts as an upper stage rocket, and the threats from the meteoroid and orbital debris (M/OD) particle environments on SEDS components are important issues for the safety and success of any SEDS mission. However, the possibility of severing the tether due to M/OD particle impacts is an even more serious concern, since the SEDS tether has a relatively large exposed area to the M/OD environments although its diameter is quite small. The threats from the M/OD environments became a very important issue for the third SEDS mission, since the project office proposed using the shuttle orbiter as a launch platform instead of the second stage of a Delta II expendable rocket, which was used for the first two SEDS missions. A series of hyper-velocity impact tests were performed at the Johnson Space Center and Arnold Engineering Development Center to help determine the critical particle sizes required to sever the tether. The computer hydrodynamic code or hydrocode called CTH, developed by the Sandia National Laboratories, was also used to simulate the damage on the SEDS tether caused by both the orbital debris and test particle impacts. The CTH hydrocode simulation results provided the much needed information to help determine the critical particle sizes required to sever the tether. The M/OD particle sizes required to sever the tether were estimated to be less than 0.1 cm in diameter from these studies, and these size particles are more abundant in low-Earth orbit than larger size particles. Finally, the authors performed the M/OD damage analyses for the three SEDS missions; i.e., SEDS-1, -2, and -3 missions, by using the information obtained from the hypervelocity impact test and hydrocode simulations results.

  13. Effects of heat treatment conditions on the microstructure and impact properties of EUROFER 97 ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Martino, S. F.; Faulkner, R. G.; Riddle, N. B.; Monge, M. A.; Munoz, A.

    2011-12-01

    Probably the most important range of materials to consider for the blanket material in the tokamak design for fusion reactors such as ITER and DEMO is the high alloy Fe9Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels. These steels possess exceptional thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion while being strongly resistant to void swelling. Their main drawback is the high ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), particularly in the ODS versions of the material. This paper describes attempts that are being made to reduce this DBTT in as yet unirradiated materials by a novel heat treatment procedure. The principle behind this approach is that low DBTT in the unirradiated materials will lead to relatively low DBTT even in He-containing material that has been irradiated with fusion blanket-type irradiations. New batches of high alloy Fe9Cr ODS (EUROFER) ferritic steel have been produced by a powder metallurgical route, and relatively homogeneous material has been produced by a hot isostatic pressing procedure. Mini-Charpy test specimens were made from materials that had been subjected to a matrix of heat treatments designed to show up variations in solution treatment (ST) temperature, cooling rate from the ST temperature and tempering treatment. The initial DBTT was in the range 150-200 °C. Extremely interesting results have been obtained. DBTT downward shifts of up to 200 °C have been observed by using a high 1300 °C ST temperature and a low cooling rate. The paper goes on to describe the microstructure of this material, and discusses the possible microstructural factors needed to produce these very high DBTT downward shifts. Low dissolved carbon and higher proportions of low-angle grain boundaries seem to provide the key to the understanding of the alloy behaviour.

  14. Short Communication on "Coarsening of Y-rich oxide particles in 9%Cr-ODS Eurofer steel annealed at 1350 °C"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandim, M. J. R.; Souza Filho, I. R.; Bredda, E. H.; Kostka, A.; Raabe, D.; Sandim, H. R. Z.

    2017-02-01

    Oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) Eurofer steel is targeted for structural applications in future fusion nuclear reactors. Samples were cold rolled down to 80% reduction in thickness and annealed at 1350 °C up to 8 h. The microstructural characterization was performed using Vickers microhardness testing, electron backscatter diffraction, scanning and scanning transmission electron microscopies. Experimental results provide evidence of coarsening of the Y-rich oxide particles in ODS-Eurofer steel annealed at 1350 °C within delta ferrite phase field.

  15. Effect of microstructure on low cycle fatigue properties of ODS steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubena, Ivo; Fournier, Benjamin; Kruml, Tomas

    2012-05-01

    Low cycle fatigue properties at room temperature, 650 °C and 750 °C of three high chromium steels (9%Cr ferritic-martensitic and two 14%Cr ferritic steels) strengthened by oxide dispersion were studied and compared. Cyclic softening/hardening curves, cyclic deformation curves, S-N curves and Coffin-Manson curves are presented together with microstructural observations. Differences in cyclic response, stress level and fatigue life are attributed to differences in the matrix microstructure. The oxide particles stabilize the cyclic response, even if cyclic softening is detected for some experimental conditions. The strength of these steels is discussed in terms of strengthening mechanisms such as grain size effect, particle-dislocations interaction and dislocation density. Comparing three different ODS steels offers an opportunity to tests the contribution of individual mechanisms to the cyclic strength. The reduction of fatigue life in one of the ferritic steels is explained by the presence of large grains, facilitating the fatigue crack nucleation and the early growth.

  16. Reduction in Defect Content of ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ritherdon, J

    2001-05-15

    The work detailed within this report is a continuation of earlier work carried out under contract number 1DX-SY382V. The earlier work comprises a literature review of the sources and types of defects found principally in Fe-based ODS alloys as well as experimental work designed to identify defects in the prototype ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloy, deduce their origins and to recommend methods of defect reduction. The present work is an extension of the experimental work already reported and concentrates on means of reduction of defects already identified rather than the search for new defect types. This report also includes results gathered during powder separation trials, conducted by the University of Groningen, Netherlands and coordinated by the University of Liverpool, involving the separation of different metallic powders in terms of their differing densities. The scope and objectives of the present work were laid out in the technical proposal ''Reduction in Defect Content in ODS Alloys-III''. All the work proposed in the ''Statement of Work'' section of the technical proposal has been carried out and all work extra to the ''Statement of Work'' falls within the context of an ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloy of improved overall quality and potential creep performance in the consolidated form. The outturn of the experimental work performed is reported in the following sections.

  17. Impedance calculation for ferrite inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Breitzmann, S.C.; Lee, S.Y.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Passive ferrite inserts were used to compensate the space charge impedance in high intensity space charge dominated accelerators. They study the narrowband longitudinal impedance of these ferrite inserts. they find that the shunt impedance and the quality factor for ferrite inserts are inversely proportional to the imaginary part of the permeability of ferrite materials. They also provide a recipe for attaining a truly passive space charge impedance compensation and avoiding narrowband microwave instabilities.

  18. Morphology of Proeutectoid Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jiaqing; Hillert, Mats; Borgenstam, Annika

    2017-01-01

    The morphology of grain boundary nucleated ferrite particles in iron alloys with 0.3 mass pct carbon has been classified according to the presence of facets. Several kinds of particles extend into both grains of austenite and have facets to both. It is proposed that they all belong to a continuous series of shapes. Ferrite plates can nucleate directly on the grain boundary but can also develop from edges on many kinds of particles. Feathery structures of parallel plates on both sides of a grain boundary can thus form. In sections, parallel to their main growth direction, plates have been seen to extend the whole way from the nucleation site at the grain boundary and to the growth front. This happens in the whole temperature range studied from 973 K to 673 K (700 °C to 400 °C). The plates thus grow continuously and not by subunits stopping at limited length and continuing the growth by new ones nucleating. Sometimes, the plates have ridges and in oblique sections they could be mistaken for the start of new plates. No morphological signs were observed indicating a transition between Widmanstätten ferrite and bainitic ferrite. It is proposed that there is only one kind of acicular ferrite.

  19. Morphology of Proeutectoid Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jiaqing; Hillert, Mats; Borgenstam, Annika

    2017-03-01

    The morphology of grain boundary nucleated ferrite particles in iron alloys with 0.3 mass pct carbon has been classified according to the presence of facets. Several kinds of particles extend into both grains of austenite and have facets to both. It is proposed that they all belong to a continuous series of shapes. Ferrite plates can nucleate directly on the grain boundary but can also develop from edges on many kinds of particles. Feathery structures of parallel plates on both sides of a grain boundary can thus form. In sections, parallel to their main growth direction, plates have been seen to extend the whole way from the nucleation site at the grain boundary and to the growth front. This happens in the whole temperature range studied from 973 K to 673 K (700 °C to 400 °C). The plates thus grow continuously and not by subunits stopping at limited length and continuing the growth by new ones nucleating. Sometimes, the plates have ridges and in oblique sections they could be mistaken for the start of new plates. No morphological signs were observed indicating a transition between Widmanstätten ferrite and bainitic ferrite. It is proposed that there is only one kind of acicular ferrite.

  20. Ferrite logic reliability study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer, J. A.; Clark, C. B.

    1973-01-01

    Development and use of digital circuits called all-magnetic logic are reported. In these circuits the magnetic elements and their windings comprise the active circuit devices in the logic portion of a system. The ferrite logic device belongs to the all-magnetic class of logic circuits. The FLO device is novel in that it makes use of a dual or bimaterial ferrite composition in one physical ceramic body. This bimaterial feature, coupled with its potential for relatively high speed operation, makes it attractive for high reliability applications. (Maximum speed of operation approximately 50 kHz.)

  1. Reduction in Defect Content in ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A.R.; Ritherdon, J.; Prior, D.J.

    2003-04-22

    In order to develop FeCrAl-based ODS alloy tubing with the coarse, high aspect ratio, appropriately oriented grain structures likely to deliver enhanced high temperature (11000C) hoop creep strength compared to conventionally formed ODS alloy tubing, flow forming techniques were explored in a European funded programme. The evolution of microstructure in PM2000 alloy tubing formed by warm flow forming techniques has been the subject of continuing investigation and more detailed study in the current work. The warm flow formed tubes investigated were produced by reverse flow forming using three, 1200 opposed rollers described around a tube preform supported on a driven mandrel. This produced a complex pattern of shape changing deformation, driven from the outer surface of the tube preforms. The grain size and shape together with the pattern of nucleation and growth of secondary recrystallization that developed through the thickness of the tube wall during the subsequent high temperature annealing (13800C) of these warm flow formed samples is described, as are the textures that formed. The unusual pattern and shape of secondary recrystallized grain structures that formed on the outer surfaces of the flow formed tubes closely follows the pattern and pitch of the flow forming rollers. The local texture, grain shape and pattern of misorientation in the surface of warm flow formed tubes that was associated with the development of these outer surface microstructures are described. Parallel studies have continued on the influence of microstructural inhomogeneities on the development of secondary recrystallized grain structures in ODS alloys. As part of this work, a separate variant of PM2000 alloy with additions of 1 wt.% ODS-free Fe powder have been manufactured as extruded bar by Plansee GmbH. The initial recrystallization behavior of the variant has been studied and cross-compared with the recrystallization behavior found in a prototype ODS-Fe3Al alloy, notably where the

  2. Effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wentuo; Kimura, Akihiko; Tsuda, Naoto; Serizawa, Hisashi; Chen, Dongsheng; Je, Hwanil; Fujii, Hidetoshi; Ha, Yoosung; Morisada, Yoshiaki; Noto, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-01

    The weldability of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels is a critical obstructive in the development and use of these steels. Friction stir welding has been considered to be a promising way to solve this problem. The main purpose of this work was to reveal the effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded ODS ferritic steel. The grain appearances and the misorientation angles of grain boundaries in different welded zones were investigated by the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Results showed that the mechanical force imposed by the stir tool can activate and promote the recrystallization characterized by the transformation of boundaries from LABs to HABs, and contribute to the grain refinement. The type of recrystallization in the stir zone can be classified as the continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX).

  3. Role of Y-Al oxides during extended recovery process of a ferritic ODS alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Capdevila, C.; Pimentel, G.; Aranda, M. M.; Rementeria, R.; Dawson, K.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Tatlock, G. J.; Miller, Michael K.

    2015-08-04

    The microstructural stability of Y-Al oxides during the recrystallization of Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened alloy is studied in this work. The goal is to determine the specific distribution pattern of oxides depending where they are located: in the matrix or at the grain boundaries. It was concluded that those located at the grain boundaries yielded a faster coarsening than the ones in the matrix, although no significant differences in composition and/or crystal structure were observed. However, the recrystallization heat treatment leads to the dissolution of the Y2O3 and its combination with Al to form the YAlO3 perovskite oxide particles process, mainly located at the grain boundaries. Lastly, atom probe tomography analysis revealed a significant Ti build-up at the grain boundaries that might affect subsequent migration during recrystallization.

  4. Complete Status Report Documenting Weld Development for Thin Wall Tubing of ODS Ferritic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelzer, David T.; Edmondson, Philip D.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Tang, Wei; Feng, Zhili

    2016-09-16

    Beginning in 2015, research in the FCRD program began the development of FSW for joining thin sections of 14YWT in the form of thin (0.5 mm) plate and ultimately thin wall tubing. In the previous fiscal year, a ~1 mm thick plate, or sheet, of 14YWT was produced by hot rolling with no edge cracking. The initial FSW experiment was performed on the 1 mm thick plate and involved a bead-on-plate weld in which the spinning pin tool is plunged into the plate surface, but does not penetrate the thickness of the plate, and then travels the length of the plate. The FSW run successfully produced a bead-on-plate stir zone on the 1 mm thick plate of 14YWT, but no characterization studies of the stir zone were performed by the end of FY15. Therefore, the results presented in this report cover the microstructural analysis of the bead-on-plate stir zone and the initial research task on obtaining tensile properties of the stir zone using the digital image correlation (DIC) approach during testing of miniature tensile specimens to assess the quality of the FSW parameters used in the initial experiment. The results of the microstructural characterization study using optical, scanning electron and scanning transmission electron microscopies showed the grain structure in the SZ to have isotropic and irregular shape but very similar size compared to the highly elongated grains oriented horizontally with the plane of the plate that were observed in the unaffected zone of 14YWT. Several cracks oriented horizontally were observed mostly on the retreating side of the SZ in both the SZ and TMAZ. These cracks may have formed due to insufficient pressure being exerted on the top surface of the plate by the shoulder and pin tool during the FSW run. High resolution STEM-EDS analysis showed the presence of the Y-Ti-O particles in the SZ, but that some particles exhibited coarsening. Overall, the FSW parameters used to produce the bead-on-plate SZ in the 0.1 cm thick plate of 14YWT were nearly optimized. The results of the digital image correlation (DIC) analysis of the two SS-Mini-2 tensile specimens fabricated from the 0.1 cm thick plate of 14YWT showed that the specimens exhibited high strength and good ductility. However, strain localization occurred in one of the specimens during the tensile test that was too close to the grips, which invalidated the data from the DIC analysis. This was surprising since the abrupt crack pop-in that occurred in the 0.1 cm thick plate of 14YWT during fabrication by wire EDM suggested that residual stresses were high. Residual stress measurements and the effects of post weld heat treatment on the FSW quality of joined 14YWT plates will be investigated in the next FW work package.

  5. Role of Y-Al oxides during extended recovery process of a ferritic ODS alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Capdevila, C.; Pimentel, G.; Aranda, M. M.; ...

    2015-08-04

    The microstructural stability of Y-Al oxides during the recrystallization of Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened alloy is studied in this work. The goal is to determine the specific distribution pattern of oxides depending where they are located: in the matrix or at the grain boundaries. It was concluded that those located at the grain boundaries yielded a faster coarsening than the ones in the matrix, although no significant differences in composition and/or crystal structure were observed. However, the recrystallization heat treatment leads to the dissolution of the Y2O3 and its combination with Al to form the YAlO3 perovskite oxide particles process,more » mainly located at the grain boundaries. Lastly, atom probe tomography analysis revealed a significant Ti build-up at the grain boundaries that might affect subsequent migration during recrystallization.« less

  6. The Bgo-Od Experiment at Elsa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bantes, B.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Becker, M.; Bella, A.; Bieling, J.; Böse, S.; Braglieri, A.; Brinkmann, K.; Burdeynyi, D.; Curciarello, F.; de Leo, V.; di Salvo, R.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Fantini, A.; Frese, T.; Friedrick, S.; Frommberger, F.; Ganenko, V.; Gervino, G.; Ghio, F.; Giardina, G.; Girolami, B.; Glazier, D.; Goertz, S.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hammann, D.; Hannappel, J.; Hillert, W.; Ignatov, A.; Jahn, O.; Jahn, R.; Joosten, R.; Jude, T. C.; Klein, F.; Koop, K.; Krusche, B.; Lapik, A.; Levi Sandri, P.; Lopatin, I.; Mandaglio, G.; Messi, F.; Messi, R.; Metag, V.; Moricciani, D.; Nanova, M.; Nedorezov, V.; Noviskiy, D.; Pedroni, P.; Romaniuk, M.; Rostomyan, T.; Schaerf, C.; Schmieden, H.; Sumachev, V.; Tarakonov, V.; Vegna, V.; Vlasov, P.; Walther, D.; Watts, D.; Zaunick, H.-G.; Zimmermann, T.

    2014-01-01

    Meson photoproduction is a key tool for the experimental investigation of the nucleon excitation spectrum. To disentangle the specific couplings of resonances, in addition to the rather well measured pion and eta photoproduction channels it is mandatory to obtain information on channels involving strange and vector mesons and higher mass pseudoscalar mesons, and the associated multi-particle final states with both charged and neutral particles. In this respect, the new BGO-OD experiment at the ELSA accelerator of the University of Bonn's Physikalisches Institut provides unique instrumentation. We describe the experiment, present its status and the initial program of measurements.

  7. Development and characterization of advanced 9Cr ferritic/martensitic steels for fission and fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saroja, S.; Dasgupta, A.; Divakar, R.; Raju, S.; Mohandas, E.; Vijayalakshmi, M.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Raj, Baldev

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents the results on the physical metallurgy studies in 9Cr Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) and Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steels. Yttria strengthened ODS alloy was synthesized through several stages, like mechanical milling of alloy powders and yttria, canning and consolidation by hot extrusion. During characterization of the ODS alloy, it was observed that yttria particles possessed an affinity for Ti, a small amount of which was also helpful in refining the dispersoid particles containing mixed Y and Ti oxides. The particle size and their distribution in the ferrite matrix, were studied using Analytical and High Resolution Electron Microscopy at various stages. The results showed a distribution of Y 2O 3 particles predominantly in the size range of 5-20 nm. A Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steel has also been developed with the replacement of Mo and Nb by W and Ta with strict control on the tramp and trace elements (Mo, Nb, B, Cu, Ni, Al, Co, Ti). The transformation temperatures ( Ac1, Ac3 and Ms) for this steel have been determined and the transformation behavior of the high temperature austenite phase has been studied. The complete phase domain diagram has been generated which is required for optimization of the processing and fabrication schedules for the steel.

  8. Epitaxial Garnets and Hexagonal Ferrites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-20

    Iron Garnet Liquid Phase Epitaxy Hexagonal Ferrite microwave Signal Processing Millimeter-Wave 20. ABSTRACT (Continue ani revee arde if necoeermy and...le.’uIfy by block rns.) e objective of this research is to develop new and improved epitauial ferrite materials for use in microwave and millimeter... ferrite films suitable for microwave and millimeter-wave signal processing at frequencies above 1 GHz. The specific tasks are: a. Analyze and develop

  9. Dual and Triple Ion-Beam Irradiations of Fe, Fe(Cr) and Fe(Cr)-ODS Final Report: IAEA SMoRE CRP

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M J; Hsiung, L L; Marian, J

    2011-11-20

    Structures of nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37Y2O3 (K3) and Fe-20Cr-4.5Al-0.34Ti-0.5Y2O3 (MA956) oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels produced by mechanical alloying (MA) and followed by hot extrusion have been studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques to gain insight about the formation mechanism of nanoparticles in MA/ODS steels. The observations of Y-Al-O complex-oxide nanoparticles in both ODS steels imply that decomposition of Y2O3 in association with internal oxidation of Al occurred during mechanical alloying. While the majority of oxide nanoparticles formed in both steels is Y4Al2O9, a few oxide particles of YAlO3 are also occasionally observed. These results reveal that Ti (0.3 wt %) plays an insignificant role in forming oxide nanoparticles in the presence of Al (4.5 wt %). HRTEM observations of crystalline nanoparticles larger than {approx}2 nm and amorphous or disordered cluster domains smaller than {approx}2 nm provide an insight into the formation mechanism of oxide nanoparticle in MA/ODS steels, which we believe from our observations involves a solid-state amorphous precursor followed by recrystallization. Dual ion-beam irradiations using He{sup +} + Fe{sup +8} ions were employed to gain more detailed insight about the role of nanoparticles in suppressing radiation-induced swelling. This is elaborated through TEM examinations of cavity distributions in ion-irradiated Fe-14Cr and K3-ODS ferritic steels. HRTEM observations of helium-filled cavities (helium bubbles) preferably trapped at nanoscale oxide particles and clusters in ion-irradiated K3-ODS are presented. Finally, we describe the results from triple ion-beam irradiations using H{sup +} + He{sup +} + Fe{sup +8} ions to emulate fusion first wall radiation effects. Preliminary work is reported that confirms the existence of significant hydrogen synergistic effects described earlier by Tanaka et al., for Fe(Cr) and by Wakai et al

  10. Chemical and microstructural evolution on ODS Fe-14CrWTi steel during manufacturing stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olier, P.; Malaplate, J.; Mathon, M. H.; Nunes, D.; Hamon, D.; Toualbi, L.; de Carlan, Y.; Chaffron, L.

    2012-09-01

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels are promising candidate materials for fission and fusion applications thanks to their improved properties related to both their fine grained microstructure and high density of Y-Ti-O nanoscale clusters (NCs). The Fe-14Cr-1 W-0.3Ti-0.3Y2O3 ODS ferritic steel was produced by powder metallurgy: Iron-base gas atomized powders were mechanically alloyed with 0.3% Y2O3 particles in an attritor. Then, the ODS powders were encapsulated in a soft steel can, consolidated by hot extrusion and cold rolled under the shape of tube cladding. The present work investigates the evolution of the chemical composition and the microstructure after each stage of the fabrication route (i.e. mechanical alloying, extrusion and cold rolling). Chemical analysis indicates a significant increase of the carbon content and a moderate increase of oxygen and nitrogen after mechanical alloying compared to initial atomized powders. After extrusion, the measured oxygen content corresponds mainly to the oxygen coming from yttria addition during MA process. In addition, electron microprobe analyses are performed after hot extrusion to determine the concentration and the distribution of the constitutive elements (Cr, Ti, W, Y, O). The microstructure was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) in order to characterize the size distribution of Y-Ti-O particles. TEM results reveal a fine microstructure (average grain size of 600 nm in the transverse direction) including Y-Ti-O NCs with a mean diameter close to 3 nm after extrusion. A slight coarsening of Y-Ti-O NCs is evidenced by SANS after cold rolling and heat treatments.

  11. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  12. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF ODS HEAT EXCHANGER TUBING

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Harper, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01

    The Vision 21 project titled ''Development of ODS Heat Exchanger Tubing'' has been initiated. A project kick-off meeting was held in Huntington, WV, the MA956 powder that will be used in the extrusion campaign has been obtained, and some of the MA956 tubing and rod required for joining trials has been shipped to the appropriate subcontractors. Acquisition of the MA956 alloy powder will allow the extrusion campaign to begin during the month of February. Also, tubing shipped to Edison Welding Institute and rod shipped to Michigan Technological University will allow joining trials to begin. In addition to these technical aspects, negotiations with all the subcontractors have been completed and the Project Management Plan and Project Work Plan have been prepared and submitted for approval.

  14. Suppression effect of nano-sized oxide particles on helium irradiation hardening in F82H-ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Wang, Y.; Tadaki, K.; Hashimoto, N.; Ohnuki, S.

    2014-12-01

    Helium implantation was performed to investigate irradiation hardening in ferritic/martensitic steels. Depth dependence of nano-hardness was obtained using a Berkovich nano-indenter, and then nano-hardness was extracted from Nix-Gao model. The correlation between irradiation hardening and the concentration 500-2000 appm of helium was plotted. Nano-hardness increases as a function of helium concentration. F82H-ODS with a higher nano-hardness provides a lower irradiation hardening than F82H-IEA. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) revealed that cavities with a uniform distribution were formed after helium implantation at 2000 appm helium concentration, showing a mean size of 1.1 nm with an average number density of 4.9 × 1023 m-3 in F82H-IEA and 1.3 nm with 7.4 × 1023 m-3 in F82H-ODS. Orowan model was applied to evaluate the hardening from dispersed cavities. The significant difference of hardening between calculation and nano-indentation result of F82H-ODS indicates that oxide particles may shield the hardening effect from cavities because of the complex multi-interaction.

  15. Transient liquid-phase bonding of ODS steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noto, H.; Ukai, S.; Hayashi, S.

    2011-10-01

    The use of transient liquid-phase bonding of 9CrODS steels using Fe-3B-2Si-0.5C filler was investigated for bonding temperature of 1180 °C and hold times of 0.5-4.0 h. The sequential process, consisting of isothermal melting, solidification and homogenization, was confirmed for bonding the 9CrODS steel. The precipitation of chromium boride found in 19CrODS steel is avoided in 9CrODS steel due to the lower Cr content. Silicon tends to be slightly enriched inside the bonding zone. Agglomeration and coarsening of Y 2O 3 particles in 9CrODS steel lead to softening inside the bonding zone formed by incipient melting of the foil bonding alloy, and in a diffusion affected zone (DAZ) adjacent to the bonding zone.

  16. Influence of hot rolling and high speed hydrostatic extrusion on the microstructure and mechanical properties of an ODS RAF steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Lewandowska, M.; Kurzydlowski, K. J.; Baluc, N.

    2011-02-01

    An argon gas atomized, pre-alloyed Fe-14Cr-2W-0.3Ti (wt.%) reduced activation ferritic (RAF) steel powder was mechanically alloyed with 0.3wt.% Y 2O 3 nano-particles in an attritor ball mill and consolidated by hot isostatic pressing at 1150 °C under a pressure of 200 MPa for 3 h. In the aim to improve its mechanical properties the ODS steel was then submitted to a thermo-mechanical treatment (TMT): hot rolling (HR) at 850 °C or high speed hydrostatic extrusion (HSHE) at 900 °C, followed by heat treatment (HT). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations of the ODS alloys after TMT and heat treatment revealed the presence of elongated grains in the longitudinal direction, with an average width of 8 μm and an average length of 75 μm, and equiaxed grains, a few microns in diameter, in the transverse direction. Two populations of oxide particles were observed by TEM: large Ti-Al-O particles, up to 250 nm in diameter, usually located at the grain boundaries and small Y-Ti-O nanoclusters, about 2.5 nm in diameter, uniformly distributed in the matrix. Charpy impact tests revealed that the HSHE material exhibits a larger upper shelf energy (5.8 J) than the HR material (2.9 J). The ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of both alloys is relatively high, in the range of 55-72 °C. Tensile mechanical properties of both ODS alloys were found satisfactory over the full range of investigated temperatures (23-750 °C). The HSHE material exhibits better tensile strength and ductility than the HR material. These results indicate that HSHE can be considered as a promising TMT method for improving the mechanical properties of ODS RAF steels.

  17. High strength ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high-strength ferritic alloy useful for fast reactor duct and cladding applications where an iron base contains from about 9% to about 13% by weight chromium, from about 4% to about 8% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight niobium, from about 0.1% to about 0.3% by weight vanadium, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight silicon, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight manganese, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, and from about 0.04% to about 0.12% by weight carbon.

  18. Characterization of Tubing from Advanced ODS alloy (FCRD-NFA1)

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, Stuart Andrew; Aydogan, Eda; Anderoglu, Osman; Lavender, Curt; Anderson, Iver; Rieken, Joel; Lewandowski, John; Hoelzer, Dave; Odette, George R.

    2016-09-20

    Fabrication methods are being developed and tested for producing fuel clad tubing of the advanced ODS 14YWT and FCRD-NFA1 ferritic alloys. Three fabrication methods were based on plastically deforming a machined thick-wall tube sample of the ODS alloys by pilgering, hydrostatic extrusion or drawing to decrease the outer diameter and wall thickness and increase the length of the final tube. The fourth fabrication method consisted of the additive manufacturing approach involving solid-state spray deposition (SSSD) of ball milled and annealed powder of 14YWT for producing thin-wall tubes. Of the four fabrication methods, two methods were successful at producing tubing for further characterization: production of tubing by high-velocity oxy-fuel spray forming and production of tubing using high-temperature hydrostatic extrusion. The characterization described shows through neutron diffraction the texture produced during extrusion while maintaining the beneficial oxide dispersion. In this research, the parameters for innovative thermal spray deposition and hot extrusion processing methods have been developed to produce the final nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) tubes having approximately 0.5 mm wall thickness. Effect of different processing routes on texture and grain boundary characteristics has been investigated. It was found that hydrostatic extrusion results in combination of plane strain and shear deformations which generate rolling textures of α- and γ-fibers on {001}<110> and {111}<110> together with a shear texture of ζ-fiber on {011}<211> and {011}<011>. On the other hand, multi-step plane strain deformation in cross directions leads to a strong rolling textures of θ- and ε-fiber on {001}<110> together with weak γ-fiber on {111}<112>. Even though the amount of the equivalent strain is similar, shear deformation leads to much lower texture indexes compared to the plane strain deformations. Moreover, while 50% of hot rolling brings about a large number of

  19. Evaluation of Pb-17Li compatibility of ODS Fe-12Cr-5Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unocic, Kinga A.; Hoelzer, David T.

    2016-10-01

    The Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL: eutectic Pb-17Li and He) blanket concept requires improved Pb-17Li compatibility with ferritic steels in order to demonstrate acceptable performance in fusion reactors. As an initial step, static Pb-17at.%Li (Pb-17Li) capsule experiments were conducted on new oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys ((1) Y2O3 (125Y), (2) Y2O3 + ZrO2 (125YZ), (3) Y2O3 + HfO2 (125YH), and (4) Y2O3 + TiO2 (125YT)) produced at ORNL via mechanical alloying (MA). Tests were conducted in static Pb-17Li for 1000 h at 700 °C. Alloys showed promising compatibility with Pb-17Li with small mass change after testing for 125YZ, 125YH and 125YT, while the 125Y alloy experienced the highest mass loss associated with some oxide spallation and subsequent alloy dissolution. X-ray diffraction methods identified the surface reaction product as LiAlO2 on all four alloys. A small decrease (∼1 at.%) in Al content beneath the oxide scale was observed in all four ODS alloys, which extended 60 μm beneath the oxide/metal interface. This indicates improvements in alloy dissolution by decreasing the amount of Al loss from the alloy. Scales formed on 125YZ, 125YH and 125YT were examined via scanning transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) and revealed incorporation of Zr-, Hf-, and Ti-rich precipitates within the LiAlO2 product, respectively. This indicates an inward scale growth mechanism. Future work in flowing Pb-17Li is needed to further evaluate the effectiveness of this strategy in a test blanket module.

  20. Evaluation of Pb-17Li compatibility of ODS Fe-12Cr-5Al alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Unocic, Kinga A.; Hoelzer, David T.

    2016-07-09

    The Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL: eutectic Pb–17Li and He) blanket concept requires improved Pb–17Li compatibility with ferritic steels in order to demonstrate acceptable performance in fusion reactors. As an initial step, static Pb-17at.%Li (Pb-17Li) capsule experiments were conducted on new oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys ((1) Y2O3 (125Y), (2) Y2O3+ZrO2 (125YZ), (3) Y2O3+HfO2 (125YH), and (4) Y2O3+TiO2 (125YT)) produced at ORNL via mechanical alloying (MA). Tests were conducted in static Pb–17Li for 1000 h at 700°C. Alloys showed promising compatibility with Pb–17Li with small mass change after testing for 125YZ, 125YH and 125YT, while the 125Y alloy experiencedmore » the highest mass loss associated with some oxide spallation and subsequent alloy dissolution. X-ray diffraction methods identified the surface reaction product as LiAlO2 on all four alloys. A small decrease (~1 at.%) in Al content beneath the oxide scale was observed in all 4 ODS alloys, which extended through 60 μm beneath the oxide/metal interface. This indicates improvements in alloy dissolution by decreasing the amount of Al loss from the alloy. Scales formed on 125YZ, 125YH and 125YT were examined via scanning transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) and revealed incorporation of Zr-, Hf-, and Ti-rich precipitates within the LiAlO2 product, respectively. This indicates an inward scale growth mechanism. Future work in flowing Pb–17Li is needed to further evaluate the effectiveness of this strategy in a test blanket module.« less

  1. Evaluation of Pb-17Li compatibility of ODS Fe-12Cr-5Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Kinga A.; Hoelzer, David T.

    2016-07-09

    The Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL: eutectic Pb–17Li and He) blanket concept requires improved Pb–17Li compatibility with ferritic steels in order to demonstrate acceptable performance in fusion reactors. As an initial step, static Pb-17at.%Li (Pb-17Li) capsule experiments were conducted on new oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys ((1) Y2O3 (125Y), (2) Y2O3+ZrO2 (125YZ), (3) Y2O3+HfO2 (125YH), and (4) Y2O3+TiO2 (125YT)) produced at ORNL via mechanical alloying (MA). Tests were conducted in static Pb–17Li for 1000 h at 700°C. Alloys showed promising compatibility with Pb–17Li with small mass change after testing for 125YZ, 125YH and 125YT, while the 125Y alloy experienced the highest mass loss associated with some oxide spallation and subsequent alloy dissolution. X-ray diffraction methods identified the surface reaction product as LiAlO2 on all four alloys. A small decrease (~1 at.%) in Al content beneath the oxide scale was observed in all 4 ODS alloys, which extended through 60 μm beneath the oxide/metal interface. This indicates improvements in alloy dissolution by decreasing the amount of Al loss from the alloy. Scales formed on 125YZ, 125YH and 125YT were examined via scanning transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) and revealed incorporation of Zr-, Hf-, and Ti-rich precipitates within the LiAlO2 product, respectively. This indicates an inward scale growth mechanism. Future work in flowing Pb–17Li is needed to further evaluate the effectiveness of this strategy in a test blanket module.

  2. Drug OD Deaths Have Nearly Tripled Since 1999: CDC

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug OD Deaths Have Nearly Tripled Since 1999: CDC Whites, middle-aged adults hardest hit, new report ... Sinai Health System in New York City. The CDC report, released Feb. 24, found that drug overdose ...

  3. The Optical Depth Sensor (ODS) for Mars atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, D.; Rannou, P.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Sarkissian, A.; Foujols, T.

    2015-10-01

    A small and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS) has been designed to work in both Martian and Earth environments. The principal goal of ODS is to carry out the opacity due to the Martian dust as well as to characterize the high altitude clouds at twilight, crucial parameters in understanding of Martian meteorology. The instrument was initially designed for the failed MARS96 Russian mission, and also was included in the payload of several other missions [1]. Until recently, it was selected (NASA/ESA AO) in the payload of the atmospheric package DREAMS onboard the MARS 2016 mission. But following a decision of the CNES, it is no more included in the payload. In order to study the performance of ODS under a wide range of conditions as well as its capable to provide daily measurements of both dust optical thickness and high altitude clouds properties, the instrument has participated in different terrestrial campaigns. A good performance of ODS prototype (Figure 1) on cirrus clouds detection and in dust opacity estimation was previously archived in Africa during 2004-2005 and in Brasil from 2012 to nowadays. Moreover, a campaign in the arctic is expected before 2016 where fifteen ODSs will be part of an integrated observing system over the Arctic Ocean, allowing test the ODS performance in extreme conditions. In this presentation we present main principle of the retrieval, the instrumental concept, the result of the tests performed and the principal objectives of ODS in Mars.

  4. Microstructural characterization of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-12Cr-0.5Y2O3 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsudin, Farha Mizana; Radiman, Shahidan; Abdullah, Yusof; Hamid, Nasri A.

    2016-11-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic alloy containing 12wt% Cr and 0.5wt% Y2O3 was prepared by mechanical alloying (MA) method and then compacted into bulk shape. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) was performed to characterize the microstructure of milled alloy powder. The fragments and nanoclusters of Y2O3 were observed in this alloy powder. FESEM-EDS mapping on the milled alloy powder reveal the uniformity of the element distribution achieved by the alloy. The Y element is finely dispersed into the alloy matrix and the O element is observed indicating the presence of oxides throughout the alloy sample. The compacted alloy was then heat treated at 1050°C and analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The formations of nano-scale Y2O3 were observed after the heat treatment process of alloy indicating the dispersion and incorporation of Y2O3 nanoparticles into the alloy matrix.

  5. Ferrite attenuator modulation improves antenna performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooks, J. C.; Larson, S. G.; Shorkley, F. H.; Williams, B. T.

    1970-01-01

    Ferrite attenuator inserted into appropriate waveguide reduces the gain of the antenna element which is causing interference. Modulating the ferrite attenuator to change the antenna gain at the receive frequency permits ground tracking until the antenna is no longer needed.

  6. Optimization and testing results of Zr-bearing ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Yang, Ying; Tyburska-Puschel, Beata; Sridharan, K.

    2014-09-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels are important structural materials for nuclear reactors due to their advantages over other applicable materials like austenitic stainless steels, notably their resistance to void swelling, low thermal expansion coefficients, and higher thermal conductivity. However, traditional FM steels exhibit a noticeable yield strength reduction at elevated temperatures above ~500°C, which limits their applications in advanced nuclear reactors which target operating temperatures at 650°C or higher. Although oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels have shown excellent high-temperature performance, their extremely high cost, limited size and fabricability of products, as well as the great difficulty with welding and joining, have limited or precluded their commercial applications. Zirconium has shown many benefits to Fe-base alloys such as grain refinement, improved phase stability, and reduced radiation-induced segregation. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of a new generation of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys to be fabricated using conventional

  7. Effect of ferrite on cast stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nadezhdin, A.; Cooper, K. ); Timbers, G. . Kraft Pulp Division)

    1994-09-01

    Premature failure of stainless steel castings in bleach washing service is attributed to poor casting quality high porosity and to a high ferrite content, which makes the castings susceptible to corrosion by hot acid chloride solutions. A survey of the chemical compositions and ferrite contents of corrosion-resistant castings in bleach plants at three pulp mills found high [delta]-ferrite levels in the austenitic matrix due to the improper balance between austenite and ferrite stabilizers.

  8. Study of the deformation mechanisms in a Fe-14% Cr ODS alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praud, M.; Mompiou, F.; Malaplate, J.; Caillard, D.; Garnier, J.; Steckmeyer, A.; Fournier, B.

    2012-09-01

    In this present work, the plasticity of a rod bar of a 14% Cr ferritic ODS steel is examined through a multiscale approach based on both macroscopic and microscopic results. This bar was elaborated at CEA by powder metallurgy and consolidated by hot extrusion. The microstructure of the material has been characterized. First, the tensile behavior of this material is studied in a wide range of temperatures. Thereafter, through in situ Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) straining experiments, dislocation/dislocation and dislocation/precipitates interactions are observed. The collapse of the tensile properties noticed from 400 °C can be explained by a change in the deformation mechanism. At lower temperatures, the hardening seems to be due to the precipitates, dislocations are pinned on oxides. At higher temperatures, the hardening role of the precipitates is still observed, but the dislocations seem to move in a more steady way, thermal activation of dislocations sources is observed and leads to formation of cavities at the grain boundaries.

  9. Stress relaxation behavior of nanocluster-strengthened ferritic alloy at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeoung H; Byun, Thak Sang; Hoelzer, David T

    2012-01-01

    Stress relaxation behavior was investigated for the nanoclusters/dispersoids-strengthened steels including the nanostructured ferritic alloy 14YWT (SM10), oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) Eurofer97, and commercial ODS steel PM2000. The stress relaxation tests were carried out at high temperatures ranging from 600 to 1000 degrees C. Overall, the relaxation rates of 14YWT and ODS-Eurofer97 were lower than that of PM2000. To analyze the strain rate sensitivity of the alloys, the load drop-time curves were converted to the stress-strain rate curves. In the log-log plots of these curves, no significant change in slope was observed in the strain rate range of 2 x 10(-5)-1 x 10(-3)s(-1). At 600 degrees C, 14YWT and ODS-Eurofer97 have similar activation values of similar to 50b(3) while PM2000 has similar to 100b(3). Above 700 degrees C, the differences of the activation energy among alloys become more noticeable with increasing temperature. The activation energies of the three alloys were derived and compared. The rate-controlling mechanisms in the stress relaxation of the three nanoclusters/dispersoids-hardened alloys include dislocation glide and climb, and further study is necessary to clarify detailed contributing mechanisms.

  10. Small high directivity ferrite antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. M. B.

    A centimeter-wavelength antenna of millimetric dimensions, which uses the intrinsic angular sensitivity of ferrites, is described, with an emphasis on the modification of the material's permeability. The construction of both the ferrite film lens antenna and the ferrite film cassegrain antenna are detailed; both can be devised in a number of configurations for appropriate beam positioning and rf filtering. The antenna design, discussed primarily in the context of smart missiles, electronic warfare, and satellite systems, presents the possibility of magnetically switching between the transmit and receive modes within the antenna structure itself. Finally, it is noted that for a simple 2-dipole array the angular resolution can be two orders of magnitude higher than with the conventional techniques.

  11. Articles comprising ferritic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, James M.

    2016-06-28

    An article of manufacture comprises a ferritic stainless steel that includes a near-surface region depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the ferritic stainless steel. The article has a reduced tendency to form an electrically resistive silica layer including silicon derived from the steel when the article is subjected to high temperature oxidizing conditions. The ferritic stainless steel is selected from the group comprising AISI Type 430 stainless steel, AISI Type 439 stainless steel, AISI Type 441 stainless steel, AISI Type 444 stainless steel, and E-BRITE.RTM. alloy, also known as UNS 44627 stainless steel. In certain embodiments, the article of manufacture is a fuel cell interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell.

  12. High power ferrite microwave switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardash, I.; Roschak, N. K.

    1975-01-01

    A high power ferrite microwave switch was developed along with associated electronic driver circuits for operation in a spaceborne high power microwave transmitter in geostationary orbit. Three units were built and tested in a space environment to demonstrate conformance to the required performance characteristics. Each unit consisted of an input magic-tee hybrid, two non-reciprocal latching ferrite phase shifters, an out short-slot 3 db quadrature coupler, a dual driver electronic circuit, and input logic interface circuitry. The basic mode of operation of the high power ferrite microwave switch is identical to that of a four-port, differential phase shift, switchable circulator. By appropriately designing the phase shifters and electronic driver circuits to operate in the flux-transfer magnetization mode, power and temperature insensitive operation was achieved. A list of the realized characteristics of the developed units is given.

  13. RF cavities with transversely biased ferrite tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Smythe, W.R.; Brophy, T.G.; Carlini, R.D.; Friedrichs, C.C.; Grisham, D.L.; Spalek, G.; Wilkerson, L.C.

    1985-10-01

    Earley et al. suggested that ferrite tuned rf cavities have lower ferrite power dissipation if the ferrite bias field is perpendicular rather than parallel to the rf magnetic field. A 50-84 MHz cavity has been constructed in which ferrite can be biased either way. Low power measurements of six microwave ferrites show that the magnetic Q's of these ferrites under perpendicular bias are much higher than under parallel bias, and that the high Q region extends over a much wider range of rf permeability. TDK Y-5 ferrite was found to have a magnetic Q of 10,800, 4,800, 1,200 and 129 at rf permeabilities of 1.2, 2.4, 3.7 and 4.5, respectively. Measurements of perpendicularly biased ferrite at various power levels were made in a coaxial line cavity. The Q of Y-5 ferrite was found to decrease by less than a factor of 2 as the power density in the ferrite was increased to 1.3 W/cmT. A cavity design for a 6 GeV, high current, rapid cycling synchrotron using transversely biased ferrite tuning is described.

  14. Machinery alignment tables: Face-OD and reverse indicator methods

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    Many alignment techniques are too complex for practical use, and guessing never provides the needed precision. The face-OD (face-rim) and reverse indicator methods are the two most popular techniques experienced millwrights use, but both methods require time-consuming calculations. These tables replace the graphs, formulas, and calculations used to determine shim requirements. Contents: Face-OD method and reverse indicator method: Setting up Data forms. Equations and calculations. Examples. Alignment Tolerances. Errors in taking data. Typical alignment tolerances. Indicator sag. Cause of indicator sag. Correction of indicator sag. Typical values of indicator sag. Hot alignment. References.

  15. A STUDY OF FERRITE CAVITY.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHAO, Y.

    2002-04-19

    This note addresses the general concerns for the design of a ferrite cavity. The parameters are specified for the RCMS, for which the frequency ramp is in the range of 1.27 MHz to 6.44 MHz, or a ratio of 1:5.

  16. 46 CFR 280.4 - Standards governing payment of ODS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... each service if, during the calendar year, at least 50 percent of the inbound and 50 percent of the outbound gross freight revenues earned on voyages terminated during the calendar year, for each service.... The amount of ODS payable for the inbound leg of a service for the calendar year shall be reduced...

  17. Development of a monolithic ferrite memory array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, C. H., Jr.; Bhiwandker, N. C.

    1972-01-01

    The results of the development and testing of ferrite monolithic memory arrays are presented. This development required the synthesis of ferrite materials having special magnetic and physical characteristics and the development of special processes; (1) for making flexible sheets (laminae) of the ferrite composition, (2) for embedding conductors in ferrite, and (3) bonding ferrite laminae together to form a monolithic structure. Major problems encountered in each of these areas and their solutions are discussed. Twenty-two full-size arrays were fabricated and fired during the development of these processes. The majority of these arrays were tested for their memory characteristics as well as for their physical characteristics and the results are presented. The arrays produced during this program meet the essential goals and demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating monolithic ferrite memory arrays by the processes developed.

  18. Ferrite Phase Shifters Using Stress Insensitive Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    loop property as far as microvave applications of ferrite toroids is concerned. Ideally, the remanent magnetization should equal the saturation ...a second phase that is presumably Mn ferrite or mannetite which both have large values of saturation magnetization (- 5000 gauss) and low field...temperature. In a ferrite device this may result in a loss of saturation and remanent magnetizations vhich may degrade phaser performance. In a unit excited

  19. Development of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; Pint, B.A.; Tortorelli, P.F.; McKamey, C.G.

    1997-12-01

    The overall goal of this program is to develop an oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) version of Fe{sub 3}Al that has sufficient creep strength and resistance to oxidation at temperatures in the range 1000 to 1200 C to be suitable for application as heat exchanger tubing in advanced power generation cycles. The main areas being addressed are: (a) alloy processing to achieve the desired alloy grain size and shape, and (b) optimization of the oxidation behavior to provide increased service life compared to semi-commercial ODS-FeCrAl alloys intended for the same applications. The recent studies have focused on mechanically-alloyed powder from a commercial alloy vendor. These starting alloy powders were very clean in terms of oxygen content compared to ORNL-produced powders, but contained similar levels of carbon picked up during the milling process. The specific environment used in milling the powder appears to exert a considerable influence on the post-consolidation recrystallization behavior of the alloy. A milling environment which produced powder particles having a high surface carbon content resulted in a consolidated alloy which readily recrystallized, whereas powder with a low surface carbon level after milling resulted in no recrystallization even at 1380 C. A feature of these alloys was the appearance of voids or porosity after the recrystallization anneal, as had been found with ORNL-produced alloys. Adjustment of the recrystallization parameters did not reveal any range of conditions where recrystallization could be accomplished without the formation of voids. Initial creep tests of specimens of the recrystallized alloys indicated a significant increase in creep strength compared to cast or wrought Fe{sub 3}Al, but the specimens failed prematurely by a mechanism that involved brittle fracture of one of the two grains in the test cross section, followed by ductile fracture of the remaining grain. The reasons for this behavior are not yet understood. The

  20. Progress in ferrite phase shifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, C. R., Jr.

    1983-10-01

    Advances in the technology of reciprocal ferrite phase shifters are outlined. Nonlatching rotary-field phase shifters have been produced with enhanced phase accuracy and modest control power. A significant quantity of dual-mode latching units has been built at 35 GHz, with good results. Both types of phase shifter can be adapted to perform other functions in addition to phase shifting. Examples of phase shifters that perform duplexing and polarization switching functions are given.

  1. Spin canting in ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, J.; Huang, H.; Salih, K. S. M.; Thiel, W. R.; Schünemann, V.

    2016-12-01

    Recently, an easily scalable process for the production of small (3 -7 nm) monodisperse superparamagnetic ferrite nanoparticles MeFe2O4 (Me = Zn, Mn, Co) from iron metal and octanoic acid has been reported (Salih et al., Chem. Mater. 25 1430-1435 2013). Here we present a Mössbauer spectroscopic study of these ferrite nanoparticles in external magnetic fields of up to B = 5 T at liquid helium temperatures. Our analysis shows that all three systems show a comparable inversion degree and the cationic distribution for the tetrahedral A and the octahedral B sites has been determined to (Zn0.19Fe0.81) A [Zn0.81Fe1.19] B O4, (Mn0.15Fe0.85) A [Mn0.85Fe1.15] B O4 and (Co0.27Fe0.73) A [Co0.73Fe1.27] B O4. Spin canting occurs presumably in the B-sites and spin canting angles of 33°, 51° and 59° have been determined for the zinc, the manganese, and the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  2. Multifunctionality of nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Atma; Thakur, Awalendra K.

    2016-05-01

    Nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite has been synthesized by adopting modified Pechini route. No evidence of impurity or secondary phase has been detected up to the detection of error limit of X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction pattern reveals orthorhombic crystal system with space group Pnma (62).Crystallite size and lattice strain was found to be ˜42.8nm and 0.306% respectively. Optical band gap was found to be 2.109 eV, by UV-Visible diffused reflectance spectrum (DRS). Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface area was found to be ˜3.45 m2/g. Magnetization-hysteresis (M-H) loop was recorded at room temperature (300K) reveals weak ferromagnetism in Nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite. The weak ferromagnetism in lanthanum ferrite is due to the uncompensated antiferromagnetic spin ordering. Ferroelectric loop hysteresis observed at room temperature at 100Hz depicts the presence of ferroelectric ordering in LaFeO3.Simultanious presence of magnetic and ferroelectric ordering at room temperature makes it suitable candidate of Multiferroic family.

  3. Mechanical testing of anisotropy in ODS steel tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špirit, Z.; Chocholoušek, M.; Šíma, M.

    2017-02-01

    Anisotropy of fuel claddings made from Fe-9Cr and Fe-14Cr ODS (oxide dispersion-strengthened) steel for Generation IV reactors with coolants based on liquid metals was examined. Basic mechanical tests were performed at temperatures of 30 °C, 500 °C and 625 °C on ODS steel thin-walled tubes. Tensile tests were performed in axial and tangential directions in a vacuum to avoid oxidation of the small specimens. A scanning electron microscope with a small in-situ tensile testing device was used to conduct the tests. The result of this paper describes the basic mechanical properties of thin-walled tubes as ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, tensile modulus, etc. depending on the direction of loading.

  4. Direct frequency comb measurement of OD + CO → DOCO kinetics.

    PubMed

    Bjork, B J; Bui, T Q; Heckl, O H; Changala, P B; Spaun, B; Heu, P; Follman, D; Deutsch, C; Cole, G D; Aspelmeyer, M; Okumura, M; Ye, J

    2016-10-28

    The kinetics of the hydroxyl radical (OH) + carbon monoxide (CO) reaction, which is fundamental to both atmospheric and combustion chemistry, are complex because of the formation of the hydrocarboxyl radical (HOCO) intermediate. Despite extensive studies of this reaction, HOCO has not been observed under thermal reaction conditions. Exploiting the sensitive, broadband, and high-resolution capabilities of time-resolved cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy, we observed deuteroxyl radical (OD) + CO reaction kinetics and detected stabilized trans-DOCO, the deuterated analog of trans-HOCO. By simultaneously measuring the time-dependent concentrations of the trans-DOCO and OD species, we observed unambiguous low-pressure termolecular dependence of the reaction rate coefficients for N2 and CO bath gases. These results confirm the HOCO formation mechanism and quantify its yield.

  5. Evaluation of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Molybdenum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    containing 4 parts concentrated sulfuric acid and 1 part distilled water using a Type 304 stainless steel cathode and a direct current accelerating...Ductile-to-Brittle Transition Temperature ( DBTT ): The following mechanical properties were measured from the ODS molybdenum alloy rods: (a) 0.2...and to determine the DBTT . Elevated Temperature Tensile Tests: Elevated temperature tensile specimens of each as- swaged alloy were equilibrated

  6. Annealing effects on the microstructure and coercive field of two ferritic-martensitic Eurofer steels: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, V. B.; Sandim, M. J. R.; Stamopoulos, D.; Renzetti, R. A.; Santos, A. D.; Sandim, H. R. Z.

    2013-04-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels are promising candidates for structural applications in future nuclear fusion power plants. Oxide dispersion strengthened ODS-Eurofer and Eurofer 97 steels were cold rolled to 80% reduction in thickness and annealed in vacuum for 1 h from 200 to 1350 °C to evaluate both their thermal stability and magnetic behavior. The microstructural changes were followed by magnetic measurements, in particular the corresponding variation of the coercive field (Hc), as a function of both annealing and tempering treatments. Results show that Y2O3 nanoparticles strongly affect the mechanical properties of ODS-Eurofer steel but leave their magnetic properties fairly unchanged when compared with Eurofer-97 steel.

  7. Ferrite Solutions for Electromagnetic Shock Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Phillip D.; Dudley, Mark; Primm, Paul

    2014-09-01

    The goal of this work is to develop tools and test procedures for identifying ferrites suitable for use in shock line applications. Electromagnetic shocklines have been used to provide fast rising voltage pulses for many applications. In these applications a slow rising pulse is injected into the line where currents drive the ferrites into saturation leading to a fast rising output pulse. A shockline’s unique capabilities could be applied to new detonator configurations. A properly conditioned voltage pulse is critical for fire set applications. A carefully designed shockline could provide a passive solution to generating a fast rising voltage pulse for the fire set. Traditional circuits use ferrites operating in a linear regime. Shock lines push the ferrites well into the nonlinear regime where very few tools and data currently exist. Ferrite material is key to the operation of these shock lines, and tools for identifying suitable ferrites are critical. This report describes an experimental setup to that allows testing of ferrite samples and comparison to models with the goal of identifying optimal ferrites for shockline use.

  8. Subdomain zinc ferrite particles: Synthesis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannaparayil, T.; Komarneni, S.; Marande, R.; Zadarko, M.

    1990-05-01

    Ultrafine and nearly spherical particles of zinc ferrite were synthesized under mild hydrothermal conditions by precipitating from metal nitrates. These particles exhibited antiferromagnetic ordering below 13 K. Mössbauer spectroscopic measurements revealed the subdomain superparamagnetic nature of the particles having a narrow particle size distribution. The hydrothermal ferrite powders were found to sinter to almost theoretical density with little or no intragranular porosity.

  9. Ferrite thin films for microwave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zaquine, I.; Benazizi, H.; Mage, J.C.

    1988-11-15

    Production of ferrite thin films is the key to integration of microwave ferrite devices (circulators for phased array antennas, for instance). The interesting materials are the usual microwave ferrites: garnets, lithium ferrites, barium hexaferrites. The required thicknesses are a few tens of micrometers, and it will be important to achieve high deposition rates. Different substrates can be used: silicon and alumina both with and without metallization. The films were deposited by rf sputtering from a single target. The as-deposited films are amorphous and therefore require careful annealing in oxygen atmosphere. The sputtered films are a few micrometers thick on 4 in. substrates. The optimum annealing temperature was found by trying to obtain the highest possible magnetization for each ferrite. The precision on the value of magnetization is limited by the precision on the thickness of the film. We obtain magnetization values slightly lower than the target's. The ferromagnetic resonance linewidth was measured on toroids from 5 to 18 GHz.

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of Nickel Zinc Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurian, Manju; Nair, Divya S.

    2011-10-01

    Nano crystalline mixed ferrites can be prepared through different methods. In the present work a comparison was made on sol-gel auto combustion method and co-precipitation method by preparing Nickel Zinc Ferrite. The prepared samples were calcined at different temperatures and were characterized by powder XRD, FTIR. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the formation of ferrite in nanophase. The lattice parameter was found to be in the range 8.31-8.41Ao. This confirms that nano crystalline ferrite samples are in the cubic spinel structure. An average nano crystalline size was estimated from XRD by the Scherrer's equation. FTIR study also confirms the formation of ferrites. Sol-gel auto combustion technique was superior to co-precipitation method for producing single phase nano particles with smaller crystallite size.

  11. Ferrite Phase Shifters Using Stress Insensitive Materials. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-11

    PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 1.3 PROGRAM TECHNICAL TASKS (PHASE I) 2.0 BACKGROUND DISCUSSION 2.1 REMANENT STATE FERRITE PHASERS 2.2 REMANENT MAGNETIZATION 2.3... MAGNETIZATION AND MAGNETOSTRICTION 2.1 REMANENT STATE FERRITE PHASERS Microwave ferrite digital phase shifters utilize ferrite toroidal structures and the...The insertion phase length of the structure is dependent on the remanent magnetization of the ferrite (see the hysteresis loop shown in Figure 2-4

  12. Mechanical properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, R.; Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1998-03-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened molybdenum, Mo-ODS, developed by a proprietary powder metallurgy process, exhibits a creep rupture life at 0.65T{sub m} (1,600 C) of three to five orders of magnitude greater than unalloyed molybdenum, while maintaining ductile fracture behavior at temperatures significantly below room temperature. In comparison, the creep rupture life of the Mo-50Re solid solution strengthened alloy at 1,600 C is only an order of magnitude greater than unalloyed molybdenum. The results of microstructural characterization and thermal stability and mechanical property testing are discussed.

  13. Oxide Evolution in ODS Steel Resulting From Friction Stir Welding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Master’s Thesis 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE OXIDE EVOLUTION IN ODS STEEL RESULTING FROM FRICTION STIR WELDING 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6 . AUTHOR(S...temperatures, from [5]. ........... 6   Figure 4 .  The phase diagram for aluminum and yttrium oxide, from [13]. ......................8  Figure 5...millimeters per minute. FSW Conditions RPM IPM MMPM Heat Index 400 7 175 2.3 300 4 100 3 200 2 50 4 400 4 100 4 300 2 50 6 400 2 50 8 500 1 25

  14. Comparison of nanostructured nickel zinc ferrite and magnesium copper zinc ferrite prepared by water-in-oil microemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hee, Ay Ching; Mehrali, Mehdi; Metselaar, Hendrik Simon Cornelis; Mehrali, Mohammad; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu

    2012-12-01

    Ferrite is an important ceramic material with magnetic properties that are useful in many types of electronic devices. In this study, structure and magnetic properties of nanostructured nickel zinc ferrite and magnesium copper zinc ferrite prepared by water-in-oil microemulsion were compared. Both ferrites samples demonstrated similar weight loss characteristics in TGA. The magnesium copper zinc ferrite showed a crystalline structure with an average crystallite size of 13.5 nm. However, nickel zinc ferrite showed an amorphous phase. Transmission electron micrographs showed agglomerated nanoparticles with an average crystallite size of 26.6 nm for magnesium copper zinc ferrite and 22.7 nm for nickel zinc ferrite. Magnesium copper zinc ferrite exhibited soft ferromagnetic bahaviour whereas nickel zinc ferrite showed superparamagnetic nature.

  15. Loss of DNC from ionized 4-hydroxypyridine-OD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jobst, Karl J.; Khan, Tanya R.; Terlouw, Johan K.

    2007-07-01

    Low energy 4-hydroxypyridine ions (HP-1) decarbonylate but also readily lose hydrogen (iso)cyanide. Surprisingly, this reaction leads to a specific loss of the label from the OD-labelled isotopomer. Our tandem mass spectrometry experiments show that ionized vinylketene, CH2CHCHCO+ (1), is the product ion. This ion is also generated by the decarbonylation of 4-cyclopentene-1,3-dione ions (CP-1) and a computational analysis using the CBS-QB3 model chemistry indicates that these seemingly unrelated ionic systems share similar dissociation mechanisms. In this study, a mechanism is presented for the decarbonylation of metastable ions CP-1 that satisfies the energy requirement dictated by its appearance energy. Our computational analysis further shows that ions HP-1 may isomerize into the (iso)imino analogues of CP-1, by consecutive H-shift, ring-opening and cyclization steps. The CP-1 analogues serve as the immediate precursors for the specific loss of DNC (rather than DCN) from OD-labelled HP-1 and also its decarbonylation into the vinyl(iso)ketenimine ions CH2CHCHNCH+ (3) and CH2CHCHCNH+ (4).

  16. ODS Characterization Progress Report 06/27/08

    SciTech Connect

    El-Dasher, B

    2008-11-25

    This progress report is intended to help keep track of the work that has been performed in characterizing ODS steels for the LIFE project. This specific report details the current status of the characterization of a 24% Cr, 1% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} ODS steel obtained from Wayne King via Geoff Campbell. Since no pedigree of the material could be obtained, a baseline characterization was necessary prior to studying processing, welding, and corrosion behavior. This document details the results obtained from analysis performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). At the time of writing, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and microhardness measurements have not been completed, and will be included in a future report. The results are presented in two sections: microstructure, and phase identification. As the names suggest, the first section will report on the microstructure in the general sense and include details such as grain size and texture, and the second section will include the identification of the phases present in the baseline material.

  17. Ferrite thin films for microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaquine, I.; Benazizi, H.; Mage, J. C.

    1988-11-01

    This paper describes the preparation and the properties of thin (a few micron-thick) ferrite films for microwave applications. The films were deposited by RF sputtering from a single ferrite target on two different 4-in-thick substrates, silicon and alumina, both bare and metallized. The as-deposited films were amorphous, requiring careful annealing in oxygen atmosphere. The optimum annealing temperature was determined by obtaining the highest possible magnetization for each ferrite. The conditions of microwave measurements are described together with the results.

  18. Annealing effects on the microstructure and mechanical properties of hot-rolled 14Cr-ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, R.; Zhang, T.; Ding, H. L.; Jiang, Y.; Wang, X. P.; Fang, Q. F.; Liu, C. S.

    2015-10-01

    The oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels with nominal composition (weight percent) of Fe-14Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.06Si-0.2V-0.1Mn-0.05Ta-0.03C-0.3Y2O3 were fabricated by sol-gel method, mechanical alloying, and hot isostatic pressing techniques. The evolution of microstructure and mechanical properties of the hot-rolled specimens with heat treatment was investigated. Tensile strength and hardness of hot-rolled ODS steel are significantly enhanced due to the formation of mechanical twins and high density dislocations. Uniformly dispersed oxide particles (10-40 nm) and fine-grained structure (200-400 nm) are responsible for the superior mechanical properties of the hot-rolled specimen annealed between 650 °C and 850 °C. With further increasing annealing temperature, the grain size of the hot-rolled specimens increases while the size of oxide particles decreases, which leads to lower strength and hardness but better ductility. The tensile strength and total elongation of samples in the rolling direction are higher than those in the transverse direction after the same treatments owing to the grain anisotropy induced by the large mechanical deformation.

  19. Structural analysis of emerging ferrite: Doped nickel zinc ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajinder; Kumar, Hitanshu; Singh, Ragini Raj; Barman, P. B.

    2015-08-28

    Ni{sub 0.6-x}Zn{sub 0.4}Co{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0, 0.033, 0.264) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method and annealed at 900°C. Structural properties of all prepared samples were examined with X-ray diffraction (XRD). The partial formation of hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) secondary phase with spinel phase cubic structure of undoped and cobalt doped nickel zinc ferrite was found by XRD peaks. The variation in crystallite size and other structural parameters with cobalt doping has been calculated for most prominent peak (113) of XRD and has been explained on the basis of cations ionic radii difference.

  20. Latent tracks of swift heavy ions in Сr23C6 and Y-Ti-O nanoparticles in ODS alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skuratov, V. A.; Sohatsky, A. S.; O'Connell, J. H.; Kornieieva, K.; Nikitina, A. A.; Uglov, V. V.; Neethling, J. H.; Ageev, V. S.

    2016-05-01

    The radiation stability of dielectric nanoparticles embedded into a metallic matrix is of considerable practical value due to the growing interest in oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels as promising nuclear reactor materials. In this report the results of a TEM study of structural changes in Cr23C6 and Y-Ti-O nanoparticles in several ODS alloys irradiated with 1.2 MeV/amu Xe and 3.4 MeV/amu Bi ions is presented. It was found that swift heavy ion irradiation leads to the formation of amorphous latent tracks in both materials. The upper limit of the threshold electronic stopping power for track formation in carbides is estimated to be around 35 keV/nm. Multiple ion track overlapping leads to complete amorphization of carbide and Y-Ti oxide nanoparticles. Microstructural analysis have revealed a strong influence of the ferritic matrix on track morphology in Y2Ti2O7 nanoparticles in pre-thinned TEM targets after postradiation annealing and irradiation at elevated temperatures.

  1. HRTEM Study of Oxide Nanoparticles in 16Cr-4Al-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y2O3 ODS Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Fluss, M; Wall, M; Kimura, A

    2009-11-18

    Crystal and interfacial structures of oxide nanoparticles in 16Cr-4Al-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} ODS ferritic steel have been examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. Oxide nanoparticles with a complex-oxide core and an amorphous shell were frequently observed. The crystal structure of complex-oxide core is identified to be mainly monoclinic Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} (YAM) oxide compound. Orientation relationships between the oxide and matrix are found to be dependent on the particle size. Large particles (> 20 nm) tend to be incoherent and have a spherical shape, whereas small particles (< 10 nm) tend to be coherent or semi-coherent and have a faceted interface. The observations of partially amorphous nanoparticles lead us to propose three-stage mechanisms to rationalize the formation of oxide nanoparticles containing core/shell structures in as-fabricated ODS steels.

  2. HIGH POWER MICROWAVE FERRITES AND DEVICES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FERROMAGNETIC MATERIALS, * MICROWAVE EQUIPMENT, ALUMINUM, DELAY LINES, ELECTRODES, FERRITES , GADOLINIUM , GARNET, IONS, IRON, MAGNESIUM ALLOYS...MAGNETIC FIELDS, MAGNETIC MATERIALS, MAGNETIC MOMENTS, MANGANESE ALLOYS, MICROWAVE SPECTROSCOPY, NICKEL ALLOYS, RADIOFREQUENCY POWER, RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS, SINGLE CRYSTALS, WAVEFORM GENERATORS, YTTRIUM.

  3. HIGH POWER MICROWAVE FERRITES AND DEVICES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FERRITES , *FERROMAGNETIC MATERIALS, *GARNET, *MICROWAVE EQUIPMENT, ABSORPTION, ALUMINUM, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, ANISOTROPY, CRYSTALS, DIELECTRICS, DIRECT...CURRENT, ELECTRODES, GADOLINIUM , IRON, IRON ALLOYS, MAGNETIC FIELDS, MAGNETIC PROPERTIES, NICKEL ALLOYS, PHASE SHIFT CIRCUITS, RADIOFREQUENCY, RESONANCE, WAVEGUIDES, X RAY DIFFRACTION, YTTRIUM.

  4. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    2008-10-01

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

  5. Ferrite Nanoparticles in Pharmacological Modulation of Angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Aparna; Radha, S.; Khan, Y.; Tilak, Priya

    2011-07-01

    Nanoparticles are being explored in the targeted drug delivery of pharmacological agents : angiogenesis being one such novel application which involves formation of new blood vessels or branching of existing ones. The present study involves the use of ferrite nanoparticles for precise therapeutic modulation of angiogenesis. The ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation of ferrous and ferric salts by a suitable base, were found to be 10-20 nm from X-ray diffraction and TEM measurements. The magnetization measurements showed superparamagnetic behavior of the uncoated nanoparticles. These ferrite nanoparticles were found to be bio-compatible with lymphocytes and neural cell lines from the biochemical assays. The chick chorioallantoic membrane(CAM) from the shell of fertile white Leghorn eggs was chosen as a model to study angiogenic activity. An enhancement in the angiogenic activity in the CAM due to addition of uncoated ferrite nanoparticles was observed.

  6. Ferrite insertion at Recycler Flying Wire System

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2004-02-27

    Ferrite rods are installed inside the flying-wire cavity of the Recycler Ring and at entrance and exit beam pipes in order to absorb high-frequency electromagnetic waves excited by the beam. However, these rods may also deteriorate the vacuum pressure of the ring. An investigation is made to analyze the necessity of the ferrite rods at the entrance and exit beam pipes.

  7. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    2015-09-14

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this paper, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW on grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Finally, post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.

  8. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    2015-09-01

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this work, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW on grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.

  9. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; ...

    2015-09-14

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this paper, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW onmore » grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Finally, post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.« less

  10. The crystal structure of Sr(OD) 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, D. E.; O'Keeffe, M.

    1995-10-01

    The crystal structure of Sr(OD) 2 has been determined from a Reitveld refinement of time-of-flight neutron diffraction data, and the deuterium atom positions have been determined for the first time. The structure is orthorhombic: Pnma, a = 9.8269(5) Å, b = 3.9051(2) Å, c = 6.0733(3) Å, V = 233.06 Å 3, D x = 3.466 g cm -3, Rwp = 3.93%, Rp = 2.95%, reduced X2 = 4.774 for 81 variables. Although the data were collected at 12 K, the H atoms have large thermal parameters suggesting the possibility of some disorder. Relationships of the structure to the structures of YOOH, SrBr 2, SrI 2, and SrBr 2 · H 2O are discussed.

  11. Influence of structural-phase state of ferritic-martensitic steels on the helium porosity development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, I. I.; Staltsov, M. S.; Kalin, B. A.; Bogachev, I. A.; Guseva, L. Yu; Dzhumaev, P. S.; Emelyanova, O. V.; Drozhzhina, M. V.; Manukovsky, K. V.; Nikolaeva, I. D.

    2016-04-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used to study the effect of the initial structural-phase state (SPhS) of ferritic-martensitic steels EK-181, EP-450 and EP-450- ODS (with 0.5 wt.% nanoparticles of Y2O3) on the of helium porosity formation and gas swelling. Different SPhS of steel EK-181 was produced by water quenching, annealing, normalizing plus tempered, intensive plastic deformation by torsion (HPDT). Irradiation was carried out by He+-40 keV ions at 923 K up to fluence of 5-1020 He+/m2. It is shown that the water quenching causes the formation of uniformly distributed small bubbles (d¯ ∼ 2 nm) of the highest density (ρ∼ 1025 m-3). After normalization followed by tempering as well as after annealing bubbles distribution is highly non-uniform both by volume and in size. Very large faceted bubbles (pre-equilibrium gas-filled voids) are formed in ferrite grains resulting in high level of gas swelling of the irradiated layer with S = 4,9 ± 1,2 and 3.8 ± 0.9% respectively. Nano- and microcrystalline structure created by HPDT completely degenerate at irradiation temperature and ion irradiation formed bubbles of the same parameters as in the annealed steel. Bubbles formed in EP-450-ODS steel are smaller in size and density, which led to a decrease of helium swelling by 4 times (S = 0.8 ± 0.2%) as compared to the swelling of the matrix steel EP-450 (S = 3.1 ± 0.7%).

  12. Ferrite Materials for Advanced Multifunction Microwave Systems Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-05

    TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Ferrite Materials for Advanced Multifunction Microwave Systems Applications Award No. (Grant) N00014-03-1-0070 PR...were also used in this work. (200 words) 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Microwave ferrites , yttrium iron garnet, lithium ferrites , hexagonal...Unlimited COVER PAGE FINAL REPORT to the UNITED STATES OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH Ferrite Materials for Advanced Multifunction Microwave Systems

  13. 46 CFR 280.9 - Special rules for last year of ODS agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) of this section, if on a cumulative basis for each quarter of the calendar year: (1) Less than 50... ODS payable for the preceding calendar year as required by paragraph (b) (3) of § 280.4. (b) Amount..., the amount payable on the ODS voucher for the last month of any quarter of the last calendar year...

  14. High-Temperature Tensile Properties of Nano-Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Ferritic Steels Produced by Mechanical Alloying and Spark Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulnat, Xavier; Fabregue, Damien; Perez, Michel; Mathon, Marie-Hélène; de Carlan, Yann

    2013-06-01

    Oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels were produced by mechanical alloying and subsequent spark plasma sintering. Very fast heating rates were used to minimize porosity when controlling grain size and precipitation of dispersoids within a compacted material. Sintering cycles performed at 1373 K (1100 °C) induced heterogeneous, but fine grain size distribution and high density of nano-oxides. Yield strengths at room temperature and at 923 K (650 °C) are 975 MPa and 298 MPa, respectively. Furthermore, high-temperature ductility is much increased: total strain of 28 pct at 923 K (650 °C).

  15. Ultra-high temperature tensile properties of ODS steel claddings under severe accident conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Y.; Tanno, T.; Oka, H.; Ohtsuka, S.; Inoue, T.; Kato, S.; Furukawa, T.; Uwaba, T.; Kaito, T.; Ukai, S.; Oono, N.; Kimura, A.; Hayashi, S.; Torimaru, T.

    2017-04-01

    Ultra-high temperature ring tensile tests were performed to investigate the tensile behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings and wrapper materials under severe accident conditions with temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1400 °C which is close to the melting point of core materials. The experimental results showed that the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings was highest in the core materials at ultra-high temperatures of 900-1200 °C, but there was significant degradation in the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings above 1200 °C. This degradation was attributed to grain boundary sliding deformation with γ/δ transformation, which is associated with reduced ductility. By contrast, the tensile strength of recrystallized 12Cr-ODS and FeCrAl-ODS steel claddings retained its high value above 1200 °C, unlike the other tested materials.

  16. Magnetic Characterization of Ferrite Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Matthew; Sokol, Paul; Gumina, Greg; Bronstein, Lyudmila; Dragnea, Bogdan

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) of different compositions (FeO/ Fe 3 O4 , g- Fe 2 O3 , FePt, and CoFe 2 O4) have been synthesized using high temperature organometallic routes described elsewhere. NPs (16.6 nm in diameter) of a mixed FeO/ Fe 3 O4 (wuestite/magnetite) composition were prepared by thermal decomposition or iron oleate in the presence of oleic acid as a surfactant in dodocane at 370C in argon atmosphere. After the thermal treatment of the reaction solution at 200 C under air for 2 hours these NPs are transformed into maghemite (g- Fe 2 O3) , the magnetization of which is significantly enhanced. NPs of CoFe 2 O4 (8 nm) have been prepared by simultaneous decomposition of Co(II) and Fe(III) acetylacetonates in the presence of oleic acid and oleylamine. The X-ray diffraction profile of these NPs is characteristic of cobalt ferrite. Alternatively, alloyed 1.8 nm FePt NPs prepared by simultaneous decomposition of Fe and Pt acetylacetonates in the reductive environment demonstrate a completely disordered structure, which is reflected in their magnetic properties. SQUID magnetometry was used to measure the magnetization of NPs at high and low temperatures. Zero-field cooling and field-cooling measurements were taken to demonstrate superparamagnetic behavior and an associated blocking temperature.

  17. Synthesis of ferrite and nickel ferrite nanoparticles using radio-frequency thermal plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, S.; Taheri, M.; Carpenter, E.; Harris, V. G.; McHenry, M. E.

    2002-05-01

    Nanocrystalline (NC) ferrite powders have been synthesized using a 50 kW-3 MHz rf thermal plasma torch for high-frequency soft magnet applications. A mixed powder of Ni and Fe (Ni:Fe=1:2), a NiFe permalloy powder with additional Fe powder (Ni:Fe=1:2), and a NiFe permalloy powder (Ni:Fe=1:1) were used as precursors for synthesis. Airflow into the reactor chamber was the source of oxygen for oxide formation. XRD patterns clearly show that the precursor powders were transformed into NC ferrite particles with an average particle size of 20-30 nm. SEM and TEM studies indicated that NC ferrite particles had well-defined polygonal growth forms with some exhibiting (111) faceting and many with truncated octahedral and truncated cubic shapes. The Ni content in the ferrite particles was observed to increase in going from mixed Ni and Fe to mixed permalloy and iron and finally to only permalloy starting precursor. The plasma-torch synthesized ferrite materials using exclusively the NiFe permalloy precursor had 40%-48% Ni content in the Ni-ferrite particle, differing from the NiFe2O4 ideal stoichiometry. EXAFS was used to probe the cation coordination in low Ni magnetite species. The coercivity and Neel temperature of the high Ni content ferrite sample were 58 Oe and ˜590 °C, respectively.

  18. Effects of helium on ductile-brittle transition behavior of reduced-activation ferritic steels after high-concentration helium implantation at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, A.; Ejiri, M.; Nogami, S.; Ishiga, M.; Kasada, R.; Kimura, A.; Abe, K.; Jitsukawa, S.

    2009-04-01

    The effects of He on the fracture behavior of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels, including oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels and F82H, was determined by characterizing the microstructural evolution in and fracture behavior of these steels after He implantation up to 1000 appm at around 550 °C. He implantation was carried out by a cyclotron with a beam of 50 MeV α-particles. In the case of F82H, the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) increase induced by He implantation was about 70 °C and the grain boundary fracture surface was only observed in the He-implanted area of all the ruptured specimens in brittle manner. By contrast, no DBTT shift or fracture mode change was observed in He-implanted 9Cr-ODS and 14Cr-ODS steels. Microstructural characterization suggested that the difference in the bubble formation behavior of F82H and ODS steels might be attributed to the grain boundary rupture of He-implanted F82H.

  19. Behavior of Fe-ODS Alloys After Thermal Aging Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano Garcia, Marta; Hernández-Mayoral, Mercedes; Esparraguera, Elvira Oñorbe

    2016-06-01

    Oxide dispersion alloys are one of the candidates as cladding materials for Gen IV fast reactors, due to their high strength at high temperature, good creep properties, and swelling resistance. This good performance is mainly due to a fine dispersion of nano-oxide particles on the microstructure and to non-grained structure. The microstructural stability and the mechanical properties of a Fe-ODS alloy are studied after different thermal aging experiments at 973 K (700 °C), 5000 hours; 973 K (700 °C), 10,000 hours; and 1123 K (850 °C), 10,000 hours. SEM/EBSD and TEM together with tensile and impact tests on the as-received and thermally aged material have been carried out. In general, for all the tested conditions, a slight softening effect is observed attributed to the changes in the grain structure as well as to the changes in the amount and size of nano-oxide particles. In addition, the aged material shows a lower impact USE value while the DBTT is maintained.

  20. [Enantioseparation behavior of chiral stationary phases AD, AS and OD].

    PubMed

    Li, Liqun; Fan, Jun; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Xiaodong; Wang, Tai; He, Jianfeng; Zhang, Weiguang

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, HPLC enantioseparation with chiral stationary phases (CSPs) has been widely applied in chiral analysis and preparation of new pharmaceuticals, pesticides, food, etc. Herein, enantioseparation of 20 chiral compounds have been carried out on three polysaccharide-based CSPs (EnantioPak AD, AS and OD) with normal phases by HPLC, separately. The influences of skeletal structure and the kinds of derivative groups on separation behaviors of these CSPs have been studied in detail. As results indicated, except for compound 13, the other compounds were baseline separated on EnantioPak AD, with most of resolution over 2. 0; in addition, better separation for acidic or basic compounds was achieved through adding acidic/basic additives into the mobile phase of hexane-alcohol. For four aromatic alcohols (compounds 13-16), their retention in the EnantioPak AD column showed a weakening tendency with increase of carbon number in side chain group, and the reverse trend of their resolution was observed. Furthermore, EnantioPak AD showed much better separation performance for eight compounds (13-20) than the others. In short, these results have provided some references for further investigation of separation behavior and applications of polysaccharide-based CSPs.

  1. Microstructure Evolution of Gas Atomized Iron Based ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, J.R.; Anderson, I.E.; Kramer, M.J.; Anderegg, J.W.; Shechtman, D.

    2009-12-01

    In a simplified process to produce precursor powders for oxide dispersion-strength- ened (ODS) alloys, gas-atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was used to induce a surface oxide layer on molten droplets of three differing erritic stainless steel alloys during break-up and rapid solidification. The chemistry of the surface oxide was identified using auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The precursor iron-base powders were consolidated at 850 C and 1,300 C using hot isostatic pressing (HIPing). Consolidation at the lower temperature resulted in a fully dense microstructure, while preventing substantial prior particle-boundary-oxide dissociation. Microstructural analysis of the alloys consolidated at the higher temperature confirmed a significant reduction in prior-particle-boundary-oxide volume fraction, in comparison with the lower-temperature-consolidated sample. This provided evidence that a high-temperature internal oxygen-exchange reaction occurred between the metastable prior particle-boundary-oxide phase (chromium oxide) and the yttrium contained within each prior particle. This internal oxygen-exchange reaction is shown to result in the formation of yttrium-enriched oxide dispersoids throughout the alloy microstructure. The evolving microstructure was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD).

  2. Microstructure Evolution of Gas Atomized Iron Based ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, J.R.; Anderson, I.E.; Kramer, M.J.

    2011-08-09

    In a simplified process to produce precursor powders for oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys, gas-atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was used to induce a surface oxide layer on molten droplets of three differing erritic stainless steel alloys during break-up and rapid solidification. The chemistry of the surface oxide was identified using auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The precursor iron-base powders were consolidated at 850 C and 1,300 C using hot isostatic pressing (HIPing). Consolidation at the lower temperature resulted in a fully dense microstructure, while preventing substantial prior particle-boundary-oxide dissociation. Microstructural analysis of the alloys consolidated at the higher temperature confirmed a significant reduction in prior-particle-boundary-oxide volume fraction, in comparison with the lower-temperature-consolidated sample. This provided evidence that a high-temperature internal oxygen-exchange reaction occurred between the metastable prior particle-boundary-oxide phase (chromium oxide) and the yttrium contained within each prior particle. This internal oxygen-exchange reaction is shown to result in the formation of yttrium-enriched oxide dispersoids throughout the alloy microstructure. The evolving microstructure was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD).

  3. Rapid phase synthesis of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugavel, T.; Raj, S. Gokul; Rajarajan, G.; Kumar, G. Ramesh

    2014-04-24

    Synthesis of single phase nanocrystalline Cobalt Ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) was achieved by single step autocombustion technique with the use of citric acid as a chelating agent in mono proportion with metal. Specimens prepared with this method showed significantly higher initial permeability's than with the conventional process. Single phase nanocrystalline cobalt ferrites were formed at very low temperature. Surface morphology identification were carried out by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The average grain size and density at low temperature increased gradually with increasing the temperature. The single phase formation is confirmed through powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Magnetization measurements were obtained at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), which showed that the calcined samples exhibited typical magnetic behaviors. Temperature dependent magnetization results showed improved behavior for the nanocrystalline form of cobalt ferrite when compared to the bulk nature of materials synthesized by other methods.

  4. Dual-mode latching ferrite devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Jiang, Z.

    1986-05-01

    A primary consideration with microwave ferrite control devices is related to the switching speed. In order to achieve fast switching with the considered devices, an operation in the latching mode is required. A description is given of a new class of ferrite latching devices, taking into account latching quadrupole devices and their modifications. It is pointed out that the advantages of the new devices include fast switching, high electrical performance, and simple construction. According to the utilization of external or internal magnetic return paths, there are two modes of operation in latching ferrite devices. Attention is given to constructions and calculations, the design of a model for each of the two modes of operation, polarization insensitive phase shifters (PIPS) with external magnetic return paths, and PIPS with internal magnetic return paths.

  5. Status of ferrite technology for high volume microwave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, D.C.

    1995-08-01

    With the emergence of high volume commercial and military applications, there is a growing need to reduce the size and cost of microwave ferrite components, especially ferrite circulators, to be more compatible with monolithic integrated circuits. The Ferrite Development Consortium, consisting of leading US ferrite government, university and industrial institutions, was formed under Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) sponsorship to address these needs. Areas of Consortium technical activity include bulk and thick-film techniques for batch processing of ferrite devices, improved computer-aided-design tools and protype demonstrations. This paper will review the Consortium`s materials development needs and progress.

  6. Characterization of (Mg, La) Substituted Ni-Zn Spinel Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Wei, S. C.; Wang, Y. J.; Tian, H. L.; Tong, H.; Xu, B. S.

    Spinel structure of (Mg, La) substituted spinel Ni-Zn ferrite has been synthesized by sol-gel auto combustion method. The ferrite exhibits a single-spinel structure. The ferrite is studied as a microwave absorbing material. The microwave measurements are carried out by a vector network analyzer. The reflection loss of the ferrite is calculated as a single-layer absorber. The results indicate that the ferrite annealed at 850°C has great potential for application in electromagnetic wave attenuation.

  7. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  8. Development of Lanthanum Ferrite SOFC Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Simner, Steve P.; Bonnett, Jeff F.; Canfield, Nathan L.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Shelton, Jayne P.; Sprenkle, Vince L.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2003-01-01

    A number of studies have been conducted concerning compositional/microstructural modifications of a Sr-doped lanthanum ferrite (LSF) cathode and protective Sm-doped ceria (SDC) layer in an anode supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Emphasis was placed on achieving enhanced low temperature (700-800 degrees C) performance, and long-term cell stability. Investigations involved manipulation of the lanthanum ferrite chemistry, addition of noble metal oxygen reduction catalysts, incorporation of active cathode layer compositions containing Co, Fe and higher Sr contents, and attempts to optimize the ceria barrier layer between the LSF cathode and YSZ electrolyte.

  9. Implantable ferrite antenna for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazeli, Maxwell L.

    We have developed an implantable microstrip patch antenna with dimensions of 10x10x1.28 mm, operating around the Industrial, Scientific and Medical (ISM) band (2.4-2.5 GHz). The antenna is characterized in skin-mimicking gels and compared with simulation results. The experimental measurements are in good agreement with simulations, having a -16 dB reflection coefficient and -18 dBi realized gain at resonance, with a 185 MHz -10 dB bandwidth. The simulated effects of ferrite film loading on antenna performance are investigated, with comparisons made for 5 and 10 microm thick films, as well as for 10 microm thick films with varying magnetic loss (tan delta micro = 0.05, 0.1 and 0.3). Our simulations reveal that the addition of 10 microm thick magnetic layers has effectively lowered the resonant frequency by 70 MHz, while improving return loss and -10 dB bandwidth by 3 dB and 40 MHz, respectively, over the uncoated antenna. Ferrite film coating also improved realized gain within the ISM band, with largest gain increases at resonance found for films having lower magnetic loss. Additionally, the gain (G) variance at ISM band limits, Delta Gf(2.5GHz)-f (2.4GHz), decreased from 1.97 to 0.44 dBi for the antenna with 10 microm films over the non-ferrite antenna. The measured dip-coated NiCo ferrite films effectively reduces the antenna resonance by 110 MHz, with a 4.2 dB reflection coefficient improvement as compared to an antenna without ferrite. The measured ferrite antenna also reveals a 6 dBi and 35 MHz improvement in realized gain and -10 dB bandwidth, respectively, at resonance. Additionally, the ferrite-coated antenna shows improved directivity, with wave propagation attenuated at the direction facing the body internal. These results indicate that implantable antenna miniaturization and reliable wireless communication in the operating frequency band can be realized with ferrite loading.

  10. Transmission through Ferrite Samples at Submillimeter Frequencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    K w+ i YAH YH P+ i , with "a - - B _ iB y = + iH) and / Bx = Hx + iKHy By = y iKHx where 4nM = the saturation magnetization , Y = the gyromagnetic...nac..ry ma Idertify by block number) A theoretical analysis is presented of 1he transmission spectra of thin magnetized ferrite slabs The energy range...chosen was 1 < V < 120 cm 1 (30 GHz < f < 3600 GHz) The magnetic field was assumed to lie in the plane of the ferrite slab, and the incident

  11. A study of the magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite-coated zinc ferrite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Huan; Du, You-wei; Qiu, Zi-qiang; Walker, J. C.

    1987-04-01

    Nearly spherical Zn0.2Fe2.8O4 particles coated with an epitaxial layer of CoFe2O4 ferrites of various thicknesses were studied with Mössbauer spectroscopy. Measurements reveal that the magnetic structures of these particles are different at room temperature and liquid nitrogen or liquid helium temperatures, indicating the existence of a Verwey transition, which occurs between 77 and 119 K. Coating of Co-ferrite has no sizable effect on the transition.

  12. Effect of ferrite addition above the base ferrite on the coupling factor of wireless power transfer for vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, T.; Schaltz, E.; Ahn, S.

    2015-05-01

    Power transfer capability of wireless power transfer systems is highly dependent on the magnetic design of the primary and secondary inductors and is measured quantitatively by the coupling factor. The inductors are designed by placing the coil over a ferrite base to increase the coupling factor and reduce magnetic emissions to the surroundings. Effect of adding extra ferrite above the base ferrite at different physical locations on the self-inductance, mutual inductance, and coupling factor is under investigation in this paper. The addition can increase or decrease the mutual inductance depending on the placement of ferrite. Also, the addition of ferrite increases the self-inductance of the coils, and there is a probability for an overall decrease in the coupling factor. Correct placement of ferrite, on the other hand, can increase the coupling factor relatively higher than the base ferrite as it is closer to the other inductor. Ferrite being a heavy compound of iron increases the inductor weight significantly and needs to be added judiciously. Four zones have been identified in the paper, which shows different sensitivity to addition of ferrite in terms of the two inductances and coupling factor. Simulation and measurement results are presented for different air gaps between the coils and at different gap distances between the ferrite base and added ferrite. This paper is beneficial in improving the coupling factor while adding minimum weight to wireless power transfer system.

  13. Tantalum modified ferritic iron base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldrieve, R. E.; Blankenship, C. P. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Strong ferritic alloys of the Fe-CR-Al type containing 0.4% to 2% tantalum were developed. These alloys have improved fabricability without sacrificing high temperature strength and oxidation resistance in the 800 C (1475 F) to 1040 C (1900 F) range.

  14. Temperature stabilization of microwave ferrite devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaminsky, R.; Wendt, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    Thin-film heating element for strip-line circulator is sandwiched between insulation and copper laminations. Disks conform to shape of circulator ferrite disks and are installed between copper-clad epoxy ground planes. Heater design eliminates external cartridges and reduces weight by approximately one-third.

  15. Adding calcium improves lithium ferrite core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessoff, H.

    1969-01-01

    Adding calcium increases uniformity of grain growth over a wide range of sintering temperatures and reduces porosity within the grain. Ferrite cores containing calcium have square hysteresis loops and high curie temperatures, making them useful in coincident current memories of digital electronic computers.

  16. Rectangular microstrip antenna on a ferrite substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S.; Chowdhury, S. K.

    1982-05-01

    The bandwidth and radiation characteristics of a simple quarter wave microstrip antenna on a typical ferrite substrate are measured and compared with the theoretical results in the lower range of ultrahigh frequency (UHF). A method has also been discussed for impedance matching of the antenna to the feed line.

  17. Properties of ferrites at low temperatures (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, G.F.

    1997-04-01

    At cryogenic temperatures magnetic properties of ferrites change significantly from their values at room temperature, which has been the main regime for most device applications. Recently, microwave ferrite devices with superconducting microstrip circuits have been demonstrated at a temperature of 77 K with virtually no electrical conduction losses. Conventional ferrimagnetic garnet and spinel compositions, however, are not generally optimized for low temperatures and may require chemical redesign if the full potential of these devices is to be realized. Saturation magnetizations increase according to the Brillouin{endash}Weiss function dependence that is characteristic of all ferromagnetic materials. Increased magnetocrystalline anisotropy and magnetostriction can have large effects on hysteresis loop squareness and coercive fields that are essential for stable phase shift and efficient switching. Rare-earth impurities and other ions with short spin-lattice relaxation times can cause increased microwave losses. In this article, the basic magnetochemistry pertaining to ferrites will be examined for adaptation of ferrite technology to cryogenic environments. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Hexagonal ferrites for millimeter wave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, Donald E.; Hathaway, Kristl B.

    1993-01-01

    A review of the work accomplished on this contract is presented. A review of the physics of hexagonal ferrite materials and the effective linewidth concept and the detailed overall research plan are contained in the original proposal document. The focus of the program was on the effective linewidth in millimeter wave materials, including planar hexagonal ferrite Y-type materials, uniaxial M-type materials, and thin ferromagnetic transition metal and alloy films. The key idea in the original proposal was that the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) linewidth in hexagonal ferrites is dominated by inhomogeneous and two-magnon scattering losses and that off-resonance measurements of the effective linewidth would (1) show that the FMR losses do not represent the intrinsic losses, and (2) that the intrinsic losses are significantly lower. This basic idea was verified. Results were obtained on the off-resonance far-field effective linewidth in planar Zn-Y hexagonal ferrite single crystal platelets, single crystal spheres of Ba- and Sr-hexaferrite materials, and permalloy thin films. Three papers on these results were published.

  19. Contact material for pressure-sintering ferrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentworth, C.

    1970-01-01

    Pressure-sintering, in which the unfired laminated ferrite plane is placed between two flat punches and pressed during firing, reduces lateral firing shrinkage to less than one percent. A decrease in thickness of the laminate produces the required volume shrinkage. Phlogopite is the most suitable contact material investigated.

  20. ENABLING THE PRACTICAL APPLICATION OF OXIDE DISPERSION-STRENGTHENED FERRITIC STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Ian G; Pint, Bruce A; Dyadko, Dr. Eugene G.; Bornstein, Norman S.; Tatlock, Gordon J

    2007-01-01

    Effort has continued to evaluate joints made in oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl by (i) pulsed plasma-assisted diffusion (PPAD) bonding, and (ii) transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding. Creep tests of PPAD-bonded butt joints in air at 1000 C, using small, shoulder-loaded, dog bone-shaped specimens and an incrementally-loaded test technique, indicated that failure occurred at loads of up to 82% of that required to fail the parent alloy in the same test. For high creep-strength ferritic steels joined by conventional welding methods, strength reduction factors of 50-80% are considered to be acceptable. The failures apparently did not initiate along the joints; the observed mode of failure of the joined specimens was the same as observed for monolithic specimens of this alloy, by crack-initiated transgranular brittle fracture, followed by ductile overload failure. The progress of TLP bonding has been slower, with the major effort focused on understanding the behavior of the transient liquid phase and its interaction with the alloy microstructure during the various stages of bonding. Creep testing using the same procedures also has been used to evaluate changes resulting from torsional deformation of ODS-FeCrAl tubes in an attempt to modify their microstructures and increase their hoop strength. Interpretation of the results so far has not shown a clear trend, largely due to difficulties in measuring the effective angle of twist in the specimen gauge lengths. Other issues that have been addressed are the refinement of an approach for prediction of the oxidation-limited service lifetime of alumina scale-forming ODS alloys, and alternative routes for ODS alloy powder processing. Analysis of alloy specimens oxidized to failure (in some cases involving exposures for many thousands of hours) over a range of temperatures has provided an improved basis for calculating the values of parameters required in the lifing model (minimum Al content for protective behavior

  1. Continuation of Studies on Development of ODS Heat Exchanger Tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Brown; David Workman; Bimal Kad; Gaylord Smith; Archie Robertson; Ian Wright

    2008-04-15

    The Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Center (NETL), has initiated a strategic plan for the development of advanced technologies needed to design and build fossil fuel plants with very high efficiency and environmental performance. These plants, referred to as 'Vision 21' and FutureGen programs by DOE, will produce electricity, chemicals, fuels, or a combination of these products, and possibly secondary products such as steam/heat for industrial use. MA956 is a prime candidate material being considered for a high temperature heat exchanger in the 'Vision 21' and FutureGen programs. This material is an oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy; however, there are some gaps in the data required to commit to the use of these alloys in a full-size plant. To fill the technology gaps for commercial production and use of the material for 'Advanced Power Generation Systems' this project has performed development activity to significant increase in circumferential strength of MA956 as compared to currently available material, investigated bonding technologies for bonding tube-to-tube joints through joining development, and performed tensile, creep and fire-side corrosion tests to validate the use and fabrication processes of MA956 to heat exchanger tubing applications. Development activities within this projected has demonstrated increased circumferential strength of MA956 tubes through flow form processing. Of the six fabrication technologies for bonding tube-to-tube joints, inertia friction welding (IFW) and flash butt welding (FBW) were identified as processes for joining MA956 tubes. Tensile, creep, and fire-side corrosion test data were generated for both base metal and weld joints. The data can be used for design of future systems employing MA956. Based upon the positive development activities, two test probes were designed and fabricated for field exposure testing at 1204 C ({approx}2200 F) flue gas. The probes contained tube portions with FBW

  2. Effects of mechanical alloying time on microstructure and properties of 9Cr-ODS steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Rui; Lu, Zheng; Lu, Chenyang; Liu, Chunming

    2014-12-01

    Pre-alloyed powders of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels were produced by atomization. The atomized powders without mechanical alloying (MA) and with short-time MA were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The morphology and microstructure of the atomized and the MA powders were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The microstructure of 9Cr-ODS steels with different MA time was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and atom probe tomography (APT). The results showed that high-density of nanosized precipitates and ultrafine grains are formed in the ODS steels using the processing route, which remarkably reduce MA time. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of ODS steels are improved with the increase of MA time.

  3. Microstructural and mechanical property characterization of ingot metallurgy ODS iron aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Howell, C.R.; Hall, F.; Valykeo, J.

    1997-12-01

    This paper deals with a novel, lower cost method of producing a oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron-aluminide alloy. A large 250-kg batch of ODS iron-aluminide alloy designated as FAS was produced by Hoskins Manufacturing Company (Hoskins) [Hamburg, Michigan] using the new process. Plate and bar stock of the ODS alloy were the two major products received. Each of the products was characterized for its microstructure, including grain size and uniformity of oxide dispersion. Tensile tests were completed from room temperature to 1100 C. Only 100-h creep tests were completed at 800 and 1000 C. The results of these tests are compared with the commercial ODS alloy designated as MA-956. An assessment of these data is used to develop future plans for additional work and identifying applications.

  4. Differential cytotoxicity of copper ferrite nanoparticles in different human cells.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Javed; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Alshamsan, Aws; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Saquib, Quaiser; Khan, Shams T; Wahab, Rizwan; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed; Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Ahamed, Maqusood

    2016-10-01

    Copper ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) have the potential to be applied in biomedical fields such as cell labeling and hyperthermia. However, there is a lack of information concerning the toxicity of copper ferrite NPs. We explored the cytotoxic potential of copper ferrite NPs in human lung (A549) and liver (HepG2) cells. Copper ferrite NPs were crystalline and almost spherically shaped with an average diameter of 35 nm. Copper ferrite NPs induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity in both types of cells, evident by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide and neutral red uptake assays. However, we observed a quite different susceptibility in the two kinds of cells regarding toxicity of copper ferrite NPs. Particularly, A549 cells showed higher susceptibility against copper ferrite NP exposure than those of HepG2 cells. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential due to copper ferrite NP exposure was observed. The mRNA level as well as activity of caspase-3 enzyme was higher in cells exposed to copper ferrite NPs. Cellular redox status was disturbed as indicated by induction of reactive oxygen species (oxidant) generation and depletion of the glutathione (antioxidant) level. Moreover, cytotoxicity induced by copper ferrite NPs was efficiently prevented by N-acetylcysteine treatment, which suggests that reactive oxygen species generation might be one of the possible mechanisms of cytotoxicity caused by copper ferrite NPs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing the cytotoxic potential of copper ferrite NPs in human cells. This study warrants further investigation to explore the mechanisms of differential toxicity of copper ferrite NPs in different types of cells. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Chemical engineering and structural and pharmacological characterization of the α-scorpion toxin OD1.

    PubMed

    Durek, Thomas; Vetter, Irina; Wang, Ching-I Anderson; Motin, Leonid; Knapp, Oliver; Adams, David J; Lewis, Richard J; Alewood, Paul F

    2013-01-01

    Scorpion α-toxins are invaluable pharmacological tools for studying voltage-gated sodium channels, but few structure-function studies have been undertaken due to their challenging synthesis. To address this deficiency, we report a chemical engineering strategy based upon native chemical ligation. The chemical synthesis of α-toxin OD1 was achieved by chemical ligation of three unprotected peptide segments. A high resolution X-ray structure (1.8 Å) of synthetic OD1 showed the typical βαββ α-toxin fold and revealed important conformational differences in the pharmacophore region when compared with other α-toxin structures. Pharmacological analysis of synthetic OD1 revealed potent α-toxin activity (inhibition of fast inactivation) at Nav1.7, as well as Nav1.4 and Nav1.6. In addition, OD1 also produced potent β-toxin activity at Nav1.4 and Nav1.6 (shift of channel activation in the hyperpolarizing direction), indicating that OD1 might interact at more than one site with Nav1.4 and Nav1.6. Investigation of nine OD1 mutants revealed that three residues in the reverse turn contributed significantly to selectivity, with the triple OD1 mutant (D9K, D10P, K11H) being 40-fold more selective for Nav1.7 over Nav1.6, while OD1 K11V was 5-fold more selective for Nav1.6 than Nav1.7. This switch in selectivity highlights the importance of the reverse turn for engineering α-toxins with altered selectivity at Nav subtypes.

  6. Commissioning and initial experimental program of the BGO-OD experiment at ELSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alef, S.; Bauer, P.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Becker, M.; Bella, A.; Bielefeldt, P.; Böse, S.; Braghieri, A.; Brinkmann, K.; Cole, P.; Di Salvo, R.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Fantini, A.; Freyermuth, O.; Friedrich, S.; Frommberger, F.; Ganenko, V.; Geffers, D.; Gervino, G.; Ghio, F.; Görtz, S.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hammann, D.; Hannappel, J.; Hillert, W.; Ignatov, A.; Jahn, R.; Joosten, R.; Jude, T. C.; Klein, F.; Knaust, J.; Kohl, K.; Koop, K.; Krusche, B.; Lapik, A.; Levi Sandri, P.; Lopatin, I. V.; Mandaglio, G.; Messi, F.; Messi, R.; Metag, V.; Moricciani, D.; Mushkarenkov, A.; Nanova, M.; Nedorezov, V.; Novinskiy, D.; Pedroni, P.; Reitz, B.; Romaniuk, M.; Rostomyan, T.; Rudnev, N.; Schaerf, C.; Scheluchin, G.; Schmieden, H.; Stugelev, A.; Sumachev, V.; Tarakanov, V.; Vegna, V.; Walther, D.; Watts, D.; Zaunick, H.; Zimmermann, T.

    2016-11-01

    BGO-OD is a new meson photoproduction experiment at the ELSA facility of Bonn University. It aims at the investigation of non strange and strange baryon excitations, and is especially designed to be able to detect weekly bound meson-baryon type structures. The setup for the BGO-OD experiment is presented, the characteristics of the photon beam and the detector performances are shown and the initial experimental program is discussed.

  7. TEM and HRTEM study of oxide particles in an Al-alloyed high-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel with Hf addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Peng; Kimura, Akihiko; Kasada, Ryuta; Okuda, Takanari; Inoue, Masaki; Ukai, Shigeharu; Ohnuki, Somei; Fujisawa, Toshiharu; Abe, Fujio; Jiang, Shan; Yang, Zhigang

    2017-03-01

    The nanoparticles in an Al-alloyed high-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with Hf addition, i.e., SOC-16 (Fe-15Cr-2W-0.1Ti-4Al-0.62Hf-0.35Y2O3), have been examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Relative to an Al-alloyed high-Cr ODS ferritic steel without Hf addition, i.e., SOC-9 (Fe-15.5Cr-2W-0.1Ti-4Al-0.35Y2O3), the dispersion morphology and coherency of the oxide nanoparticles in SOC-16 were significantly improved. Almost all the small nanoparticles (diameter <10 nm) in SOC-16 were found to be consistent with cubic Y2Hf2O7 oxides with the anion-deficient fluorite structure and coherent with the bcc steel matrix. The larger particles (diameter >10 nm) were also mainly identified as cubic Y2Hf2O7 oxides with the anion-deficient fluorite structure. The results presented here are compared with those of SOC-9 with a brief discussion of the underlying mechanisms of the unusual thermal and irradiation stabilities of the oxides as well as the superior strength, excellent irradiation tolerance and extraordinary corrosion resistance of SOC-16.

  8. Evaluation of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum and molybdenum-rhenium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, A.J.; Bianco, R.; Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1999-10-22

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum alloys being developed for high temperature applications possess excellent high temperature strength and creep resistance. In addition they exhibit a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBIT) in the worked and stress-relieved condition under longitudinal tensile load well below room temperature. However, in the recrystallized condition, the DBTT maybe near or above room temperature, depending on the volume fraction of oxide dispersion and the amount of prior work. Dilute rhenium additions (7 and 14 wt.%) to ODS molybdenum were evaluated to determine their effect on low temperature ductility. The addition of 7 wt.% rhenium to the ODS molybdenum did not significantly enhance the mechanical properties. However, the addition of 14 wt.% rhenium to the ODS molybdenum resulted in a DBTT well below room temperature in both the stress-relieved and recrystallized condition. Additionally, the tensile strength of ODS Mo-14Re is greater than the base ODS molybdenum at 1,000 to 1,250 C.

  9. odNEAT: An Algorithm for Decentralised Online Evolution of Robotic Controllers.

    PubMed

    Silva, Fernando; Urbano, Paulo; Correia, Luís; Christensen, Anders Lyhne

    2015-01-01

    Online evolution gives robots the capacity to learn new tasks and to adapt to changing environmental conditions during task execution. Previous approaches to online evolution of neural controllers are typically limited to the optimisation of weights in networks with a prespecified, fixed topology. In this article, we propose a novel approach to online learning in groups of autonomous robots called odNEAT. odNEAT is a distributed and decentralised neuroevolution algorithm that evolves both weights and network topology. We demonstrate odNEAT in three multirobot tasks: aggregation, integrated navigation and obstacle avoidance, and phototaxis. Results show that odNEAT approximates the performance of rtNEAT, an efficient centralised method, and outperforms IM-(μ + 1), a decentralised neuroevolution algorithm. Compared with rtNEAT and IM-(μ + 1), odNEAT's evolutionary dynamics lead to the synthesis of less complex neural controllers with superior generalisation capabilities. We show that robots executing odNEAT can display a high degree of fault tolerance as they are able to adapt and learn new behaviours in the presence of faults. We conclude with a series of ablation studies to analyse the impact of each algorithmic component on performance.

  10. Non-Linear Dielectrics and Ferrites in ICEPIC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-10

    Technical Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 2010-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Non-linear Dielectrics and Ferrites in ICEPIC 5a. CONTRACT...Electromagnetics Government Purpose Rights 14. ABSTRACT Models for non-linear dielectrics and magnetic ferrites are developed and coded into the particle...be longer than an FDTD time step. The ferrite model accounts for the non-linearity of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gibert equation, and the magnetization

  11. Advanced Microwave Ferrite Research (AMFeR): Phase Four

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-15

    COVERED (From - To) 28 Dec 2006 - 30 Sep 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Advanced Microwave Ferrite Research (AMFeR): Phase Four 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...research endeavor is to devise ferrite materials for microwave , self-biased circulator applications. To this end, the research team focused on two key...Std Z39-18 Final Report Advanced Microwave Ferrite Research (AMFeR): Phase Four Dr. Jeffrey L. Young MRC Institute/Electrical and Computer

  12. Electric Field Tunable Microwave and MM-wave Ferrite Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-30

    Electric Field Tunable Microwave and MM-wave Ferrite Devices (N00014-06-01-0167) Period of Performance: May 1, 2006-April 30, 2010 Principal...modes as a function of E. The coupling was strong and ranged from 1 to 30 MHz/(kV/cm). Ferrite - ferroelectric composites were used in microwave and...2005, focused on ME effects at microwave and millimeter wave frequencies in ferrite -ferroelectric composites. Studies were performed on basic

  13. Epitaxial Hexagonal Ferrites for Millimeter Wave Tunable Filters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-13

    anisotropy fields which, in effect, provide built-in biasing. The result is that ferrite components, similar to those used in microwave systems, can operate... method for growing hexagonal ferrites in the form of single crystal layers on non-magnetic, trAnsparmat subsrates - . The LPE method circumvents... method , single crystal hexagonal ferrites which are superior in quality to those grown by conventional methods . In order to have a more specific goal

  14. Distributed Ferrite Isolation in Traveling-Wave Tubes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    coupling to broadband edge modes of ferrite slabs. Evidence of coupling to the lower branch of edge mode, i.e., magnetostatic, has been obtained with...L-band helix . Cold tests and analysis suggest coupling to ferrite edge modes from helix is easier at higher microwave frequencies. Plans for a hot...test at the 1-2 kW power level is an L-band TWT incorporating such distributed ferrites are described.

  15. Studies on the activation energy from the ac conductivity measurements of rubber ferrite composites containing manganese zinc ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, Mohd.; Alimuddin; Kumar, Shalendra; Shirsath, Sagar E.; Mohammed, E. M.; Chung, Hanshik; Kumar, Ravi

    2012-11-01

    Manganese zinc ferrites (MZF) have resistivities between 0.01 and 10 Ω m. Making composite materials of ferrites with either natural rubber or plastics will modify the electrical properties of ferrites. The moldability and flexibility of these composites find wide use in industrial and other scientific applications. Mixed ferrites belonging to the series Mn(1-x)ZnxFe2O4 were synthesized for different ‘x’ values in steps of 0.2, and incorporated in natural rubber matrix (RFC). From the dielectric measurements of the ceramic manganese zinc ferrite and rubber ferrite composites, ac conductivity and activation energy were evaluated. A program was developed with the aid of the LabVIEW package to automate the measurements. The ac conductivity of RFC was then correlated with that of the magnetic filler and matrix by a mixture equation which helps to tailor properties of these composites.

  16. Tunable dielectric properties of ferrite-dielectric based metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Bi, K; Huang, K; Zeng, L Y; Zhou, M H; Wang, Q M; Wang, Y G; Lei, M

    2015-01-01

    A ferrite-dielectric metamaterial composed of dielectric and ferrite cuboids has been investigated by experiments and simulations. By interacting with the electromagnetic wave, the Mie resonance can take place in the dielectric cuboids and the ferromagnetic precession will appear in the ferrite cuboids. The magnetic field distributions show the electric Mie resonance of the dielectric cuboids can be influenced by the ferromagnetic precession of ferrite cuboids when a certain magnetic field is applied. The effective permittivity of the metamaterial can be tuned by modifying the applied magnetic field. A good agreement between experimental and simulated results is demonstrated, which confirms that these metamaterials can be used for tunable microwave devices.

  17. Properties of ferrites important to their friction and wear behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Environmental, chemical and crystallographical effects on the fundamental nature on friction and wear of the ferrites in contact with metals, magnetic tapes and themselves are reviewed. The removal of adsorbed films from the surfaces of ferrites results in very strong interfacial adhesion and high friction in ferrite to metal and ferrite to magnetic tape contacts. The metal ferrite bond at the interface is primarily a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the large oxygen anions in the ferrite surface, and the strength of these bonds is related to the oxygen to metal bond strength in the metal oxide. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. Not only under adhesive conditions, but also under abrasive conditions the friction and wear properties of ferrites are related to the crystallographic orientation. With ferrite to ferrite contact the mating of highest atomic density (most closely packed) direction on matched crystallographic planes, that is, 110 directions on /110/planes, results in the lowest coefficient of friction.

  18. Dielectric investigations of polycrystalline samarium bismuth ferrite ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaimiene, E.; Macutkevic, J.; Karpinsky, D. V.; Kholkin, A. L.; Banys, J.

    2015-01-01

    Results of broadband dielectric investigations of samarium doped bismuth ferrite ceramics are presented in wide temperature range (20-800 K). At temperatures higher than 400 K, the dielectric properties of samarium bismuth ferrite ceramics are governed by Maxwell-Wagner relaxation and electrical conductivity. The DC conductivity increases and activation energy decreases with samarium concentration. In samarium doped bismuth ferrite, the ferroelectric phase transition temperature decreases with samarium concentration and finally no ferroelectric order is observed at x = 0.2. At lower temperatures, the dielectric properties of ferroelectric samarium doped bismuth ferrite are governed by ferroelectric domains dynamics. Ceramics with x = 0.2 exhibit the relaxor-like behaviour.

  19. Tunable Dielectric Properties of Ferrite-Dielectric Based Metamaterial

    PubMed Central

    Bi, K.; Huang, K.; Zeng, L. Y.; Zhou, M. H.; Wang, Q. M.; Wang, Y. G.; Lei, M.

    2015-01-01

    A ferrite-dielectric metamaterial composed of dielectric and ferrite cuboids has been investigated by experiments and simulations. By interacting with the electromagnetic wave, the Mie resonance can take place in the dielectric cuboids and the ferromagnetic precession will appear in the ferrite cuboids. The magnetic field distributions show the electric Mie resonance of the dielectric cuboids can be influenced by the ferromagnetic precession of ferrite cuboids when a certain magnetic field is applied. The effective permittivity of the metamaterial can be tuned by modifying the applied magnetic field. A good agreement between experimental and simulated results is demonstrated, which confirms that these metamaterials can be used for tunable microwave devices. PMID:25993433

  20. Ferrite microwave electronics Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, W. E.

    1980-07-01

    Research reports on single crystals, thin films, dielectrics, semiconductor devices, integrated circuits, phase shifters, and waveguide components are cited. Studies on the microwave properties of ferrites are included.

  1. Soft ferrite cores characterization for integrated micro-inductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Yen Mai; Lopez, Thomas; Laur, Jean-Pierre; Bourrier, David; Charlot, Samuel; Valdez-Nava, Zarel; Bley, Vincent; Combettes, Céline; Brunet, Magali

    2013-12-01

    Ferrite-based micro-inductors are proposed for hybrid integration on silicon for low-power medium frequency DC-DC converters. Due to their small coercive field and their high resistivity, soft ferrites are good candidates for a magnetic core working at moderate frequencies in the range of 5-10 MHz. We have studied several soft ferrites including commercial ferrite film and U70 and U200 homemade ferrites. The inductors are fabricated at wafer level using micromachining and assembling techniques. The proposed process is based on a sintered ferrite core placed in between thick electroplated copper windings. The low profile ferrite cores of 1.2 × 2.6 × 0.2 mm3 are produced by two methods from green tape-casted films and ferrite powder. This paper presents the magnetic characterization of the sintered ferrite films cut and printed in rectangular shape and sintered at different temperatures. The comparison is made in order to find out the best material for the core that can reach the required inductance (470 nH at 6 MHz) under 0.6A current DC bias and that generate the smallest losses. An inductance density of 285 nH/ mm2 up to 6 MHz was obtained for ESL 40011 cores that is much higher than the previously reported devices. The small size of our devices is also a prominent point.

  2. Tunable polarity of the Casimir force based on saturated ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Ran; Yang Yaping

    2011-01-15

    We study the polarity of the Casimir force between two different parallel slabs separated by vacuum when the saturated ferrite materials under the influence of an external magnetic field are taken into consideration. Between the ordinary dielectric slab and the ferrite slab, repulsive Casimir force may be observed by adjusting the applied magnetic field. For the ferrite material, we consider the frequency dependence of the permeability modified by the external magnetic field to analyze the formation of the repulsive Casimir force. The restoring force, which means the transition of the force polarity from repulsion to attraction with the increasing slab separation, can also be obtained between two different ferrite slabs.

  3. Magnetoacoustic resonance in ferrite-ferroelectric nanopillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, V. M.; Zibtsev, V. V.; Srinivasan, G.

    2009-10-01

    This work is concerned with the nature of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) under the influence of acoustic oscillations with the same frequency as FMR. Here we provide the theoretical model for ME coupling at FMR in the nanopillars of ferrite in a piezoelectric matrix. Our calculations show that magnification of ME coefficient is obtained at the magnetoacoustic resonance (MAR) region where FMR and acoustic oscillations at electromechanical resonance (EMR) overlap. The clamping effect of the substrate for nanopillars is considered in determining the ME voltage coefficient. In addition, nanostructures based on single crystal ferrites take on special significance as magnetic resonance line width of such materials may be narrow enough to enable the observation of effects connected with magnetoelastic interaction. As an example, ME coefficient is estimated for the nanopillars of yttrium iron garnet in lead zirconate titanate matrix. The phenomenon is of importance for the realization of multifunctional ME nanosensors/transducers operating at microwave frequencies.

  4. Cold worked ferritic alloys and components

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to liquid metal fast breeder reactor and steam generator precipitation hardening fully ferritic alloy components which have a microstructure substantially free of the primary precipitation hardening phase while having cells or arrays of dislocations of varying population densities. It also relates to the process by which these components are produced, which entails solution treating the alloy followed by a final cold working step. In this condition, the first significant precipitation hardening of the component occurs during high temperature use.

  5. Hexagonal Ferrites for Millimeter Wave Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-07

    single crystal platelets, single crystal spheres of Ba- and Sr- hexaferrite materials, and permalloy thin films. Three papers on these results have been...effective linewidth in planar Zn-Y hexagonal ferrite single crystal platelets, single crystal spheres of Ba- and Sr- hexaferrite materials, and...basic thesis of the original proposal - that the measured linewidth in single crystal hexaferrites (1) may contain significant contributions related to

  6. Ferritic steel melt and FLiBe/steel experiment : melting ferritic steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Troncosa, Kenneth P.; Smith, Brandon M.; Tanaka, Tina Joan

    2004-11-01

    In preparation for developing a Z-pinch IFE power plant, the interaction of ferritic steel with the coolant, FLiBe, must be explored. Sandia National Laboratories Fusion Technology Department was asked to drop molten ferritic steel and FLiBe in a vacuum system and determine the gas byproducts and ability to recycle the steel. We tried various methods of resistive heating of ferritic steel using available power supplies and easily obtained heaters. Although we could melt the steel, we could not cause a drop to fall. This report describes the various experiments that were performed and includes some suggestions and materials needed to be successful. Although the steel was easily melted, it was not possible to drip the molten steel into a FLiBe pool Levitation melting of the drop is likely to be more successful.

  7. The Formation Process of Silico-Ferrite of Calcium (SFC) from Binary Calcium Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xiang; Guo, Xing-Min

    2014-08-01

    Silico-ferrite of calcium (SFC) is a significant equilibrium crystalline phase in the Fe2O3-CaO-SiO2 (FCS) ternary system and a key bonding phase in the sintering process of fine iron ore. In this work, the formation process of SFC from binary calcium ferrite has been determined by X-ray diffraction and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Experiments were carried out under air at 1473 K (1200 °C) by adding SiO2 and Fe2O3 into CaO·Fe2O3 (CF). It was found that the formation of SFC is dominated by solid-state reactions in the FCS ternary system, in which Fe2O3 reacts with CaO·Fe2O3 to form the binary calcium ferrite phase. The chemical composition of binary calcium ferrite is Ca2.5Fe15.5O25 and approximately Ca2Fe12O20 (CaO·3Fe2O3). Then Si4+ and Ca2+ ions take the place of Fe3+ ion in preference located on the octahedral layers which belongs to (0 0 18) plane of binary calcium ferrite. The crystal structure of binary calcium ferrite gradually transforms from orthorhombic to triclinic, and the grain is refined with the addition of silica due to the smaller radius of Si4+ ion. A solid solution SFC forms completely when the content of SiO2 reaches approximately 3.37 wt pct at 1473 K (1200 °C).

  8. End Closure Joining of Ferritic-Martensitic and Oxide-Dispersion Strengthened Steel Cladding Tubes by Magnetic Pulse Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Gu; Park, Jin-Ju; Lee, Min-Ku; Rhee, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Kyu; Spirin, Alexey; Krutikov, Vasiliy; Paranin, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    The magnetic pulse welding (MPW) technique was employed for the end closure joining of fuel pin cladding tubes made of ferritic-martensitic (FM) steel and oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel. The technique is a solid-state impact joining process based on the electromagnetic force, similar to explosive welding. For a given set of optimal process parameters, e.g., the end-plug geometry, the rigid metallurgical bonding between the tube and end plug was obtained by high-velocity impact collision accompanied with surface jetting. The joint region showed a typical wavy morphology with a narrow grain boundary-like bonding interface. There was no evidence of even local melting, and only the limited grain refinement was observed in the vicinity of the bonding interface without destructing the original reinforcement microstructure of the FM-ODS steel, i.e., a fine grain structure with oxide dispersion. No leaks were detected during helium leakage test, and moreover, the rupture occurred in the cladding tube section without leaving any joint damage during internal pressure burst test. All of the results proved the integrity and durability of the MPWed joints and signified the great potential of this method of end closure joining for advanced fast reactor fuel pin fabrication.

  9. Status of FeCrAl ODS Irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Howard, Richard H.

    2016-08-19

    FeCrAl oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are an attractive sub-set alloy class of the more global FeCrAl material class for nuclear applications due to their high-temperature steam oxidation resistance and hypothesized enhanced radiation tolerance. A need currently exists to determine the radiation tolerance of these newly developed alloys. To address this need, a preliminary study was conducted using the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to irradiate an early generation FeCrAl ODS alloy, 125YF. Preliminary post-irradiation examination (PIE) on these irradiated specimens have shown good radiation tolerance at elevated temperatures (≥330°C) but possible radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement at irradiations of 200°C to a damage level of 1.9 displacement per atom (dpa). Building on this experience, a new series of irradiations are currently being conceptualized. This irradiation series called the FCAD irradiation program will irradiate the latest generation FeCrAl ODS and FeCr ODS alloys to significantly higher doses. These experiments will provide the necessary information to determine the mechanical performance of irradiated FeCrAl ODS alloys at light water reactor and fast reactor conditions.

  10. Research on Methods of Processing Transit IC Card Information and Constructing Transit OD Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiuhua; Li, Jin; Peng, Han

    Transit OD matrix is of vital importance when planning urban transit system. Traditional transit OD matrix constructing method needs a large range of spot check survey. It is expensive and needs long cycle time to process information. Recently transit IC card charging systems have been widely applied in big cities. Being processed reasonably, transit passenger information stored in IC card database can turn into information resource. It will reduce survey cost a lot. The concept of transit trip chain is put forward in this paper. According to the characteristics of closed transit trip chain, it discusses how to process IC card information and construct transit OD matrix. It also points out that urban transit information platform and data warehouse should be constructed, and how to integrate IC card information.

  11. Investigation of microstructure changes in ODS-EUROFER after hydrogen loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelyanova, O. V.; Ganchenkova, M. G.; Malitskii, E.; Yagodzinskyy, Y. N.; Klimenkov, M.; Borodin, V. A.; Vladimirov, P. V.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.; Hänninen, H.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the microstructure of mechanically tested ODS-EUROFER steel was investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy, thermal desorption spectroscopy, and atomistic simulations. The presence of yttrium oxide particles notably increases hydrogen uptake in ODS-EUROFER steel as compared to ODS-free EUROFER 97. Under tensile loading, hydrogen accumulation promotes the loss of cohesion at the oxide particle interfaces. First-principles molecular dynamics simulations indicate that hydrogen can be trapped at nanoparticle/matrix interface, creating OH-groups. The accumulation of hydrogen atoms at the oxide particle surface can be the reason for the observed hydrogen-induced oxide/matrix interface weakening and de-cohesion under the action of external tensile stress.

  12. Characterization of Residual Stress as a Function of Friction Stir Welding Parameters in ODS Steel MA956

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    8  Figure 5.  (a) Residual stress profiles for the FSW of AA 5083. From Peel [15]. (b) The residual stress profile across PM2000, an ODS steel ...solid state technique for joining ODS steels (Figure 2). FSW does not melt the base metal, and preserves many mechanical and microstructural properties...been performed by Baker [5] and Han [12] for fine-grained ODS steels subjected to a variety of FSW conditions. Fine grained material has a grain

  13. Intrinsic modes of radiation in ferrite patch antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    How, Hoton; Fang, Ta-Ming; Vittoria, Carmine

    1994-06-01

    We have found two types of radiation modes for patch antennas loaded with ferrite materials. Each mode of radiation is a linear combination of normal modes of propagation in parallel plate waveguide separated by a slab of ferrite material. We have introduced new boundary conditions in which only TE modes of oscillation in the patch antenna cavity result.

  14. Optimization of High Temperature Hoop Creep Response in ODS-Fe3Al Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Kad, B.K.; Heatherington, J.H.; McKamey, C.; Wright, I.; Sikka, V.; Judkins, R.

    2003-04-22

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe3Al alloys are currently being developed for heat-exchanger tubes for eventual use at operating temperatures of up to 1100 C in the power generation industry. The development challenges include (a) efforts to produce thin walled ODS-Fe3Al tubes, employing powder extrusion methodologies, with (b) adequate increased strength for service at operating temperatures to (c) mitigate creep failures by enhancing the as-processed grain size. A detailed and comprehensive research and development methodology is prescribed to produce ODS-Fe3Al thin walled tubes. Current single step extrusion consolidation methodologies typically yield 8ft. lengths of 1-3/8 inch diameter, 1/8 inch wall thickness ODS-Fe3Al tubes. The process parameters for such consolidation methodologies have been prescribed and evaluated as being routinely reproducible. Recrystallization treatments at 1200 C produce elongated grains (with their long axis parallel to the extrusion axis), typically 200-2000 {micro}m in diameter, and several millimeters long. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloys requires an understanding and manipulating the factors that control grain alignment and recrystallization behavior. Current efforts are focused on examining the processing dependent longitudinal vs. transverse creep anisotropy, and exploring post-extrusion methods to improve hoop creep response in ODS-Fe3Al alloy tubes. In this report we examine the mechanisms of hoop creep failure and describe our efforts to improve creep performance via variations in thermal-mechanical treatments.

  15. Effect of displacement damage on the stability of oxide nanoparticles in model ODS alloys: TEM studies

    SciTech Connect

    Santra, Sumita; Balaji, S.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Serruys, Yves; Robertson, C.; Ana, Alamo; Sundar, C. S.

    2012-06-05

    Model ODS alloy containing Fe-0.3% yttria was prepared by ball milling and hipping at high temperature and the effect of irradiation on stability of yttria nanoclusters in model ODS alloy is studied by dual beam ion irradiation using 5 MeV Fe{sup +} and 1.5 MeV He{sup +} ions. TEM studies on irradiated sample show that these particles are stable at 25 dpa and 40 appm He concentration. However, at 80 dpa and 360 appm He concentration Yttria particles were found to be unstable as evidenced from increase in average particle size and particle size distribution.

  16. Irradiation effects in oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys for Gen. IV nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oono, Naoko; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kondo, Sosuke; Hashitomi, Okinobu; Kimura, Akihiko

    2015-10-01

    Oxide particle dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys are irradiated by using simulation technique (Fe/He dual-ion irradiation) to investigate the reliability to Gen. IV high-temperature reactors. The fine oxide particles with less than 10 nm in average size and approximately 8.0 × 1022 m-3 in number density remained after 101 dpa irradiation. The tiny helium bubbles were inside grains, not at grain-boundaries; it is advantageous effect of oxide particles which trap the helium atoms at the particle-matrix interface. Ni-base ODS alloys demonstrated their great ability to overcome He embrittlement.

  17. Development of ODS FeCrAl alloys for accident-tolerant fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Hoelzer, David T.; Pint, Bruce A.; Unocic, Kinga A.

    2015-09-18

    FeCrAl alloys are prime candidates for accident-tolerant fuel cladding due to their excellent oxidation resistance up to 1400 C and good mechanical properties at intermediate temperature. Former commercial oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys such as PM2000 exhibit significantly better tensile strength than wrought FeCrAl alloys, which would alloy for the fabrication of a very thin (~250 m) ODS FeCrAl cladding and limit the neutronic penalty from the replacement of Zr-based alloys by Fe-based alloys. Several Fe-12-Cr-5Al ODS alloys where therefore fabricated by ball milling FeCrAl powders with Y2O3 and additional oxides such as TiO2 or ZrO2. The new Fe-12Cr-5Al ODS alloys showed excellent tensile strength up to 800 C but limited ductility. Good oxidation resistance in steam at 1200 and 1400 C was observed except for one ODS FeCrAl alloy containing Ti. Rolling trials were conducted at 300, 600 C and 800 C to simulate the fabrication of thin tube cladding and a plate thickness of ~0.6mm was reached before the formation of multiple edge cracks. Hardness measurements at different stages of the rolling process, before and after annealing for 1h at 1000 C, showed that a thinner plate thickness could likely be achieved by using a multi-step approach combining warm rolling and high temperature annealing. Finally, new Fe-10-12Cr-5.5-6Al-Z gas atomized powders have been purchased to fabricate the second generation of low-Cr ODS FeCrAl alloys. The main goals are to assess the effect of O, C, N and Zr contents on the ODS FeCrAl microstructure and mechanical properties, and to optimize the fabrication process to improve the ductility of the 2nd gen ODS FeCrAl while maintaining good mechanical strength and oxidation resistance.

  18. The photodissociation lifetimes of the OH and OD radicals in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, P. D.; Van Dishoeck, E. F.; Dalgarno, A.

    1983-01-01

    The photodissociation rates of OH and OD molecules due to absorption of solar radiation in the X(2)Pi-A(2)Sigma(+) electronic transition are calculated to lie between 3.5 and 6.7 x 10 to the -6th/sec for OH for heliocentric velocities between -60 and +60 km/sec and at about 4.7 x 10 to the -7th/sec for OD at 1 AU from the sun. The corresponding lifetimes, which are upper bounds to the actual lifetimes, are generally consistent with the observational cometary data.

  19. Initial Development in Joining of ODS Alloys Using Friction Stir Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Feng, Zhili

    2007-08-01

    Solid-state welding of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy MA956 sheets using friction stir welding (FSW) was investigated. Butt weld was successfully produced. The weld and base metals were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy, and energy dispersion x-ray spectrum. Microhardness mapping was also conducted over the weld region. Analyses indicate that the distribution of the strengthening oxides was preserved in the weld. Decrease in microhardness of the weld was observed but was insignificant. The preliminary results seem to confirm the envisioned feasibility of FSW application to ODS alloy joining. For application to Gen IV nuclear reactor heat exchanger, further investigation is suggested.

  20. Radiation Stability of Nanoclusters in Nano-structured Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Certain, Alicia G.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Shutthanandan, V.; Hoelzer, D. T.; Allen, T. R.

    2013-03-01

    Nanostructured oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are considered candidates for nuclear fission and fusion applications at high temperature and dose. The complex oxide nanoclusters in these alloys provide high-temperature strength and are expected to afford better radiation resistance. Proton, heavy ion, and neutron irradiations have been performed to evaluate cluster stability in 14YWT and 9CrODS steel under a range of irradiation conditions. Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography were used in this work to analyze the evolution of the oxide population.

  1. Synthesis And Characterization Of Reduced Size Ferrite Reinforced Polymer Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Borah, Subasit; Bhattacharyya, Nidhi S.

    2008-04-24

    Small sized Co{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite particles are synthesized by chemical route. The precursor materials are annealed at 400, 600 and 800 C. The crystallographic structure and phases of the samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The annealed ferrite samples crystallized into cubic spinel structure. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) micrographs show that the average particle size of the samples are <20 nm. Particulate magneto-polymer composite materials are fabricated by reinforcing low density polyethylene (LDPE) matrix with the ferrite samples. The B-H loop study conducted at 10 kHz on the toroid shaped composite samples shows reduction in magnetic losses with decrease in size of the filler sample. Magnetic losses are detrimental for applications of ferrite at high powers. The reduction in magnetic loss shows a possible application of Co-Ni ferrites at high microwave power levels.

  2. Recent advances in processing and applications of microwave ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Vincent G.; Geiler, Anton; Chen, Yajie; Yoon, Soack Dae; Wu, Mingzhong; Yang, Aria; Chen, Zhaohui; He, Peng; Parimi, Patanjali V.; Zuo, Xu; Patton, Carl E.; Abe, Manasori; Acher, Olivier; Vittoria, Carmine

    2009-07-01

    Next generation magnetic microwave devices will be planar, smaller, weigh less, and perform well beyond the present state-of-the-art. For this to become a reality advances in ferrite materials must first be realized. These advances include self-bias magnetization, tunability of the magnetic anisotropy, low microwave loss, and volumetric and weight reduction. To achieve these goals one must turn to novel materials processing methods. Here, we review recent advances in the processing of microwave ferrites. Attention is paid to the processing of ferrite films by pulsed laser deposition, liquid phase epitaxy, spin spray ferrite plating, screen printing, and compaction of quasi-single crystals. Conventional and novel applications of ferrite materials, including microwave non-reciprocal passive devices, microwave signal processing, negative index metamaterial-based electronics, and electromagnetic interference suppression are discussed.

  3. Electrical transport behavior of nonstoichiometric magnesium-zinc ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatak, S.; Sinha, M.; Meikap, A.K.; Pradhan, S.K.

    2010-08-15

    This paper presents the direct current conductivity, alternate current conductivity and dielectric properties of nonstoichiometric magnesium-zinc ferrite below room temperature. The frequency exponent (s) of conductivity shows an anomalous temperature dependency. The magnitude of the temperature exponent (n) of dielectric permittivity strongly depends on frequency and its value decreases with increasing frequency. The grain boundary contribution is dominating over the grain contribution in conduction process and the temperature dependence of resistance due to grain and grain boundary contribution exhibits two activation regions. The ferrite shows positive alternating current magnetoconductivity. The solid state processing technique was used for the preparation of nanocrystalline ferrite powder from oxides of magnesium, zinc and iron. The X-ray diffraction methods were used in determining the structure and composition of obtained ferrite, while multimeter, impedance analyzer, liquid nitrogen cryostat and electromagnet were used in the study of conducting and dielectric properties of ferrite.

  4. Corrosion behavior of magnetic ferrite coating prepared by plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi; Wei, Shicheng Tong, Hui; Tian, Haoliang; Liu, Ming; Xu, Binshi

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g while the M{sub s} value of the ferrite powder is 71.916 emu/g. It can be seen that plasma spray process causes deterioration of the room temperature soft magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Spinel ferrite coatings have been prepared by plasma spraying. • The coating consists of nanocrystalline grains. • The saturation magnetization of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g. • Corrosion behavior of the ferrite coating was examined in NaCl solution. - Abstract: In this study, spray dried spinel ferrite powders were deposited on the surface of mild steel substrate through plasma spraying. The structure and morphological studies on the ferrite coatings were carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy. It was showed that spray dried process was an effective method to prepare thermal spraying powders. The coating showed spinel structure with a second phase of LaFeO{sub 3}. The magnetic property of the ferrite samples were measured by vibrating sample magnetometer. The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating was 34.417 emu/g. The corrosion behavior of coating samples was examined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. EIS diagrams showed three corrosion processes as the coating immersed in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results suggested that plasma spraying was a promising technology for the production of magnetic ferrite coatings.

  5. Gas atomized precursor alloy powder for oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel

    2011-12-13

    Gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was employed as a simplified method for producing precursor powders for oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic stainless steels (e.g., Fe-Cr-Y-(Ti,Hf)-O), departing from the conventional mechanical alloying (MA) process. During GARS processing a reactive atomization gas (i.e., Ar-O2) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t < 150 nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide layer that was used as a vehicle for solid-state transport of O into the consolidated microstructure. In an attempt to better understand the kinetics of this GARS reaction, theoretical cooling curves for the atomized droplets were calculated and used to establish an oxidation model for this process. Subsequent elevated temperature heat treatments, which were derived from Rhines pack measurements using an internal oxidation model, were used to promote thermodynamically driven O exchange reactions between trapped films of the initial Cr-enriched surface oxide and internal Y-enriched intermetallic precipitates. This novel microstructural evolution process resulted in the successful formation of nano-metric Y-enriched dispersoids, as confirmed using high energy X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), equivalent to conventional ODS alloys from MA powders. The thermal stability of these Y-enriched dispersoids was evaluated using high temperature (1200°C) annealing treatments ranging from 2.5 to 1,000 hrs of exposure. In a further departure from current ODS practice, replacing Ti with additions of Hf appeared to improve the Y-enriched dispersoid thermal stability by means of crystal structure modification. Additionally, the spatial distribution of the dispersoids was found to depend strongly on the original rapidly solidified microstructure. To exploit this, ODS microstructures were engineered from

  6. Gas atomized precursor alloy powder for oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieken, Joel Rodney

    Gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was employed as a simplified method for producing precursor powders for oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic stainless steels (e.g., Fe-Cr-Y-(Ti,Hf)-O), departing from the conventional mechanical alloying (MA) process. During GARS processing a reactive atomization gas (i.e., Ar-O2) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t < 150 nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide layer that was used as a vehicle for solid-state transport of O into the consolidated microstructure. In an attempt to better understand the kinetics of this GARS reaction, theoretical cooling curves for the atomized droplets were calculated and used to establish an oxidation model for this process. Subsequent elevated temperature heat treatments, which were derived from Rhines pack measurements using an internal oxidation model, were used to promote thermodynamically driven O exchange reactions between trapped films of the initial Cr-enriched surface oxide and internal Y-enriched intermetallic precipitates. This novel microstructural evolution process resulted in the successful formation of nano-metric Y-enriched dispersoids, as confirmed using high energy X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), equivalent to conventional ODS alloys from MA powders. The thermal stability of these Y-enriched dispersoids was evaluated using high temperature (1200°C) annealing treatments ranging from 2.5 to 1,000 hrs of exposure. In a further departure from current ODS practice, replacing Ti with additions of Hf appeared to improve the Y-enriched dispersoid thermal stability by means of crystal structure modification. Additionally, the spatial distribution of the dispersoids was found to depend strongly on the original rapidly solidified microstructure. To exploit this, ODS microstructures were engineered from different

  7. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Saccone, F. D.; Ferrari, S.; Grinblat, F.; Bilovol, V.; Errandonea, D.

    2015-08-21

    We report by the first time a high pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles carried out at room temperature up to 17 GPa. In contrast with previous studies of nanoparticles, which proposed the transition pressure to be reduced from 20–27 GPa to 7.5–12.5 GPa (depending on particle size), we found that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles remain in the spinel structure up to the highest pressure covered by our experiments. In addition, we report the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameter and Raman modes of the studied sample. We found that under quasi-hydrostatic conditions, the bulk modulus of the nanoparticles (B{sub 0} = 204 GPa) is considerably larger than the value previously reported for bulk CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (B{sub 0} = 172 GPa). In addition, when the pressure medium becomes non-hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses affect the experiments, there is a noticeable decrease of the compressibility of the studied sample (B{sub 0} = 284 GPa). After decompression, the cobalt ferrite lattice parameter does not revert to its initial value, evidencing a unit cell contraction after pressure was removed. Finally, Raman spectroscopy provides information on the pressure dependence of all Raman-active modes and evidences that cation inversion is enhanced by pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions, being this effect not fully reversible.

  8. Microstructural origin of the skeletal ferrite morphology of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J A; Williams, J C; Thompson, A W

    1982-04-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy was conducted on welds exhibiting a variety of skeletal, or vermicular ferrite morphologies in addition to one lathy ferrite morphology. These ferrite morphologies result from primary ferrite solidification followed by a solid state transformation upon cooling. During cooling, a large fraction of the ferrite transforms to austenite leaving a variety of ferrite morphologies. Comparison of composition profiles and alloy partitioning showed both the skeletal and lathy ferrite structures result from a diffusion controlled solid state transformation. However, the overall measured composition profiles of the weld structure are a result of partitioning during both solidification and the subsequent solid state transformation.

  9. Helium entrapment in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Philip D; Parish, Chad M; Zhang, Yanwen; Hallen, Dr Anders; Miller, Michael K

    2011-01-01

    The nanostructured ferritic alloy 14YWT has been irradiated with He ions to simulate accumulation of He during the service life of a nuclear reactor to test the hypothesis that the large surface area for nanoclusters is a preferential nucleation site for bubbles. Transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography showed that high number densities of He bubbles were formed on the surface of nanoclusters and Ti(C,N) precipitates, and along grain boundaries and dislocations. At higher fluences, facetted bubbles are formed and it is postulated that the lowest energy state configuration is the truncated rhombic dodecahedron.

  10. CASS Ferrite and Grain Structure Relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, Clayton O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2016-07-13

    This document summarizes the results of research conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine whether, based on experimental measurements, a correlation existed between grain structure in cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) piping and ferrite content of the casting alloy. The motivation for this research lies in the fact that ultrasonic testing (UT) is strongly influenced by CASS grain structure; knowledge of this grain structure may help improve the ability to interpret UT responses, thereby improving the overall reliability of UT inspections of CASS components.

  11. Finemet versus ferrite -- Pros and cons

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng and Z.B. Qian

    1999-05-19

    There is a new magnetic alloy called Finemet which has very constant {mu}'{sub p}Qf up to {approximately} 2 kG and is very stable at high magnet flux density and temperature. It may be a good can-didate for high-gradient rf cavities. However, it has a rather low quality factor and is therefore very lossy. We compare the pros and cons of Finemet versus the common ferrite, when used in low-energy accelerating cavities, insertion for space-charge compensation, and barrier cavities.

  12. Microstructure control for high strength 9Cr ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Hoelzer, D. T.; Busby, J. T.; Sokolov, M. A.; Klueh, R. L.

    2012-03-01

    Ferritic-martensitic (F-M) steels with 9 wt.%Cr are important structural materials for use in advanced nuclear reactors. Alloying composition adjustment, guided by computational thermodynamics, and thermomechanical treatment (TMT) were employed to develop high strength 9Cr F-M steels. Samples of four heats with controlled compositions were subjected to normalization and tempering (N&T) and TMT, respectively. Their mechanical properties were assessed by Vickers hardness and tensile testing. Ta-alloying showed significant strengthening effect. The TMT samples showed strength superior to the N&T samples with similar ductility. All the samples showed greater strength than NF616, which was either comparable to or greater than the literature data of the PM2000 oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel at temperatures up to 650 °C without noticeable reduction in ductility. A variety of microstructural analyses together with computational thermodynamics provided rational interpretations on the strength enhancement. Creep tests are being initiated because the increased yield strength of the TMT samples is not able to deduce their long-term creep behavior.

  13. Effect of Process Parameters on Microstructure and Hardness of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened 18Cr Ferritic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagini, M.; Vijay, R.; Rajulapati, Koteswararao V.; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Ramakrishna, M.; Reddy, A. V.; Sundararajan, G.

    2016-08-01

    Pre-alloyed ferritic 18Cr steel (Fe-18Cr-2.3W-0.3Ti) powder was milled with and without nano-yttria in high-energy ball mill for varying times until steady-state is reached. The milled powders were consolidated by upset forging followed by hot extrusion. Microstructural changes were examined at all stages of processing (milling, upset forging, and extrusion). In milled powders, crystallite size decreases and hardness increases with increasing milling time reaching a steady-state beyond 5 hours. The size of Y2O3 particles in powders decreases with milling time and under steady-state milling conditions; the particles either dissolve in matrix or form atomic clusters. Upset forged sample consists of unrecrystallized grain structure with few pockets of fine recrystallized grains and dispersoids of 2 to 4 nm. In extruded and annealed rods, the particles are of cuboidal Y2Ti2O7 at all sizes and their size decreased from 15 nm to 5 nm along with significant increase in number density. The oxide particles in ODS6 are of cuboidal Y2Ti2O7 with diamond cubic crystal structure ( Fd bar{3} m) having a lattice parameter of 10.1 Å and are semicoherent with the matrix. The hardness values of extruded and annealed samples predicted by linear summation model compare well with measured values.

  14. Texture analysis of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe alloys by X-ray and neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béchade, J. L.; Mathon, M. H.; Branger, V.; Réglé, H.; Alamo, A.

    2002-07-01

    The ferritic ODS alloys studied were obtained by mechanical alloying. This strengthening method is very attractive, in particular for nuclear applications. In order to ensure the alloy a good compromise between mechanical resistance and ductility at high temperatures, it is necessary to control the microstructure and in particular the evolution during the recrystallization. First, a preliminary study, performed by X ray diffraction and optical microscopy, shows several grain growth mechanisms ; in particular, the “abnormal” grain growth mechanism which conducts to a large grain size [1], [2]. After annealing (3600s at 1470^{circ}C), the 30% cold-worked (swaging) alloys exhibit an heterogeneous microstructure with a large grains size ( 200 to 500 μm) in the heart and near the surface of the material when the intermediate zone is inhabited by small grains ( 1 μm). Fora higher cold-work level (60%), large size grains are only present in the periphery of the material. On account of the large grain size and strong heterogeneity of the microstructure, texture analysis using laboratory x-ray beam in not well adapted and so we have decided to use neutron beam. The neutron diffraction texture analysis has been performed at the Laboratoire Léon Brillouin on the 6T1 diffractometer on 2 different rods of the alloy (corresponding to the reduction ratios of 30% and 60%). Specific samples have been machined to characterise separately the zones with a different microstructure. After deformation, the alloys exhibit a typical α-fibre texture \\{ hkl \\} <1l0> whatever the area of the sample and the reduction ratio. After recrystallization, a very inhomogeneous texture is evidenced through the thickness of the sample, in particular for the rod deformed with a reduction ratio of 30% : in the heart and in the periphery of the rod, a “single-crystal” type texture is observed; the a fibre remains for the intermediate diameter of the rod. For the rod cold rolled with a

  15. Infrared spectroscopic analysis of OH - and OD - in crystalline Li 2O as a function of chemical treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurasawa, T.; Maroni, V. A.

    1983-11-01

    Infrared spectroscopy has been used to study the chemical form and approximate concentration of OH - and OD - in Li 2O single crystals as a function of chemical treatment. Infrared absorption maxima at (3671±0.5) cm-1and (2711±3.3) cm-1 were observed for OH - and OD -, respectively. The absorption coefficient for OD - was determined to be 4.0±0.4 absorbance units per mol part per million OD - per mm of sample thickness. Vacuum baking of Li 2O crystals reduced the OH - and OD - concentrations to <50 mppm; baking in a low moisture-level D 2 environment at 600 to 800°C appeared to lead to volatilization of LiD from the Li 2O crystals; and baking in D 2 containing ( 350±50) mppm D 2O at 600 to 800°C produced a measurable quantity of LiOD. In all cases, the observed spectra indicated the presence of only one distinguishable form of OH - or OD - in the Li 2O lattice. Because of the close correspondence of the observed absorption maxima to reported values for pure LiOH and LiOD, the most consistent (although not conclusive) interpretation is that the OH - and OD - are present as a separate LiOH or LiOD phase at room temperature. Only limited conclusions can be drawn regarding the chemical state of OH - and OD - during the elevated temperatures exposures. An estimate of the approximate value for the solubility of tritium in Li 2O at 800°C was made using data from D 2/Li 2O isothermal exposure experiments — this value was ⩾ 25 wppm.

  16. Differences in ODS formatting for HTML with Proc Print and Proc Report

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While proc print is a terrific tool for data checking and data summary, proc report is similar to, but more powerful because it can do some basic calculations or statistics and data can be broken more effectively into manageable fields. The ODS procedure can produce HTML files from either procedure...

  17. odò: weed management issues in North American edamame

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the fact that the United States is a global leader in commodity soybean production, most of the vegetable soybean (i.e. edamame or máodò) consumed in North America is imported from Asia. Interest in domestically grown edamame is on the rise among consumers; however, the U.S. vegetable proces...

  18. Coaching, HRD, and OD: Towards Three "Silo" Fields of Practice or a Single "Unified" Profession?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellinger, Andrea D.; Hamlin, Robert G.; Beattie, Rona S.

    2008-01-01

    During the past few years, the growth of an emergent "coaching industry" in many countries has resulted in some scholars calling for the development of a "coaching profession." Yet, contemporary HRD and OD professionals conceive of coaching as a necessary area of expertise. This paper reports the results of a qualitative study of different…

  19. 46 CFR 280.9 - Special rules for last year of ODS agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special rules for last year of ODS agreement. 280.9 Section 280.9 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING SUBSIDIZED VESSELS AND OPERATORS LIMITATIONS ON THE AWARD AND PAYMENT OF OPERATING-DIFFERENTIAL SUBSIDY FOR LINER OPERATORS § 280.9 Special rules for...

  20. The optical depth sensor (ODS) for column dust opacity measurements and cloud detection on martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, D.; Rannou, P.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Foujols, T.

    2016-08-01

    A lightweight and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS) able to measure alternatively scattered flux at zenith and the sum of the direct flux and the scattered flux in blue and red has been developed to work in martian environment. The principal goals of ODS are to perform measurements of the daily mean dust opacity and to retrieve the altitude and optical depth of high altitude clouds at twilight, crucial parameters in the understanding of martian meteorology. The retrieval procedure of dust opacity is based on the use of radiative transfer simulations reproducing observed changes in the solar flux during the day as a function of 4 free parameters: dust opacity in blue and red, and effective radius and effective width of dust size distribution. The detection of clouds is undertaken by looking at the time variation of the color index (CI), defined as the ratio between red and blue ODS channels, at twilight. The retrieval of altitude and optical depth of clouds is carried out using a radiative transfer model in spherical geometry to simulate the CI time variation at twilight. Here the different retrieval procedures to analyze ODS signals, as well as the results obtained in different sensitivity analysis are presented and discussed.

  1. Advanced ODS FeCrAl alloys for accident-tolerant fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Unocic, Kinga A; Hoelzer, David T; Pint, Bruce A

    2014-09-01

    ODS FeCrAl alloys are being developed with optimum composition and properties for accident tolerant fuel cladding. Two oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-15Cr-5Al+Y2O3 alloys were fabricated by ball milling and extrusion of gas atomized metallic powder mixed with Y2O3 powder. To assess the impact of Mo on the alloy mechanical properties, one alloy contained 1%Mo. The hardness and tensile properties of the two alloys were close and higher than the values reported for fine grain PM2000 alloy. This is likely due to the combination of a very fine grain structure and the presence of nano oxide precipitates. The nano oxide dispersion was however not sufficient to prevent grain boundary sliding at 800 C and the creep properties of the alloys were similar or only slightly superior to fine grain PM2000 alloy. Both alloys formed a protective alumina scale at 1200 C in air and steam and the mass gain curves were similar to curves generated with 12Cr-5Al+Y2O3 (+Hf or Zr) ODS alloys fabricated for a different project. To estimate the maximum temperature limit of use for the two alloys in steam, ramp tests at a rate of 5 C/min were carried out in steam. Like other ODS alloys, the two alloys showed a significant increase of the mas gains at T~ 1380 C compared with ~1480 C for wrought alloys of similar composition. The beneficial effect of Yttrium for wrought FeCrAl does not seem effective for most ODS FeCrAl alloys. Characterization of the hardness of annealed specimens revealed that the microstructure of the two alloys was not stable above 1000 C. Concurrent radiation results suggested that Cr levels <15wt% are desirable and the creep and oxidation results from the 12Cr ODS alloys indicate that a lower Cr, high strength ODS alloy with a higher maximum use temperature could be achieved.

  2. Microstrip transmission line tapers on ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Albuquerque, M.R.; dAssuncao, A.G.; Lima, F.

    1997-04-01

    The spectral domain approach is employed to perform a theoretical investigation of tapered microstrip lines on magnetized ferrite substrates. A linear variation of the conducting strip width along the direction of propagation is considered. The analysis takes into account the effects of the applied dc magnetic bias field in the transmission characteristics of these structures. The properties of the taper are determined by a model based on a segmentation of the considered line into uniform microstrip line subsections. Normalized phase constants and characteristic impedances are obtained by using the Hertz vector potentials method and Galerkin numerical technique. Numerical results are presented to show the taper input parameters as a function of the load impedance, geometrical dimensions, operating frequency, and ferrite parameters, considering the orientation and magnitude changes of the biasing magnetic-field {bold H}{sub 0}. The results agree fairly well with those available in the literature for tapered microstrip lines on isotropic dielectric substrates. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. High magnetization limits of spinel ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionne, Gerald F.

    1987-04-01

    Modifications to a previously reported theoretical model of the thermomagnetization properties of LiZnTi spinel ferrite have made possible the prediction of upper limits to the magnetization of the spinel system. Extrapolation of the molecular-field coefficient relations to the limits of the undiluted spinel, i.e., the fictitious case of unrestricted Fe3+ occupancy, provides a basis for computing all combinations of dilutant site distributions. For this situation, the maximum room-temperature magnetization and Curie temperature approach 8000 G and 1050 K, respectively. Computations for the more realistic monovalent cation system Fe3+1-xA1+x [B1+0.5-xFe3+1.5+x]O4, where A and B could represent any combination of Li, Na, or possibly Cu, yield an optimum magnetization that could reach 6500 G with a Curie temperature of about 700 K. In the context of this theoretical model, the cation site distributions for high magnetization in the Mn and Ni spinel ferrite families are also discussed.

  4. Cast Stainless Steel Ferrite and Grain Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, Clayton O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Mathews, Royce; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-09-01

    In-service inspection requirements dictate that piping welds in the primary pressure boundary of light-water reactors be subject to a volumetric examination based on the rules contained within the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI. The purpose of the inspection is the reliable detection and accurate sizing of service-induced degradation and/or material flaws introduced during fabrication. The volumetric inspection is usually carried out using ultrasonic testing (UT) methods. However, the varied metallurgical macrostructures and microstructures of cast austenitic stainless steel piping and fittings, including statically cast stainless steel and centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS), introduce significant variations in the propagation and attenuation of ultrasonic energy. These variations complicate interpretation of the UT responses and may compromise the reliability of UT inspection. A review of the literature indicated that a correlation may exist between the microstructure and the delta ferrite content of the casting alloy. This paper discusses the results of a recent study where the goal was to determine if a correlation existed between measured and/or calculated ferrite content and grain structure in CCSS pipe.

  5. Ferrite Nanoparticles, Films, Single Crystals, and Metamaterials: High Frequency Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Harris,V.

    2006-01-01

    Ferrite materials have long played an important role in power conditioning, conversion, and generation across a wide spectrum of frequencies (up to ten decades). They remain the preferred magnetic materials, having suitably low losses, for most applications above 1 MHz, and are the only viable materials for nonreciprocal magnetic microwave and millimeter-wave devices (including tunable filters, isolators, phase shifters, and circulators). Recently, novel processing techniques have led to a resurgence of research interest in the design and processing of ferrite materials as nanoparticles, films, single crystals, and metamaterials. These latest developments have set the stage for their use in emerging technologies that include cancer remediation therapies such as magnetohyperthermia, magnetic targeted drug delivery, and magneto-rheological fluids, as well as enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. With reduced dimensionality of nanoparticles and films, and the inherent nonequilibrium nature of many processing schemes, changes in local chemistry and structure have profound effects on the functional properties and performance of ferrites. In this lecture, we will explore these effects upon the fundamental magnetic and electronic properties of ferrites. Density functional theory will be applied to predict the properties of these ferrites, with synchrotron radiation techniques used to elucidate the chemical and structural short-range order. This approach will be extended to study the atomic design of ferrites by alternating target laser-ablation deposition. Recently, this approach has been shown to produce ferrites that offer attractive properties not found in conventionally grown ferrites. We will explore the latest research developments involving ferrites as related to microwave and millimeter-wave applications and the attempt to integrate these materials with semiconductor materials platforms.

  6. [Experimental studies of ferrite as a MRI contrast agent].

    PubMed

    Aoki, F

    1992-02-01

    Using a 0.2 T permanent MR imaging system, the gradual changes of signal intensity after intravenous injection of Ferrite suspension were studied in liver of normal rabbits and those with intrahepatic VX2 tumor. After injection of Ferrite suspension, decreased signal intensities of liver were observed on both T1 and T2 weighted images. The decrease on T2 weighted images was more remarkable than that on the T1 weighted image. The image with 8 mg/kg (50 mumol/kg) dose of Ferrite suspension showed significant changes of signal intensity, while, the image with 24 mg/kg (150 mumol/kg) dose was hardly evaluated because of inducing intense artifacts. The decrease of signal intensity in liver was observed immediately after the injection and was lowest after 1 hour. After 48 hours, the signal intensity began to increase. However, a slight loss of signal intensity was visualized even after 4 weeks. A clear MRI of the intrahepatic tumor following injection of Ferrite suspension was acquired especially on T2 weighted image in comparison with MRI after Gd-DTPA administration. In addition, MRI using Ferrite suspension could detect the small intrahepatic tumors which had been unable to be visualized by plain CT or enhanced CT. It is of benefit, furthermore, that Ferrite suspension could be an useful tracer for observing the intrahepatic tumor growth by a first single injection. Histologically, Ferrite particles were accumulated in reticuloendothelial system of liver whereas no accumulated in intrahepatic tumor was verified. The particles produced changes in local magnetic field resulting that signal intensity of liver showed decrease on the image. Subsequently, relatively negative contrast enhancement of liver was displayed. As a result of the present investigation, the MR imaging following injection of Ferrite suspension was found to be useful for detection of intrahepatic tumors, particularly of metastatic tumors which were isointense or hypovascular to the surrounding tissue

  7. Simulations of Ferrite-Dielectric-Wire Composite Negative Index Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachford, Frederic J.; Armstead, Douglas N.; Harris, Vincent G.; Vittoria, Carmine

    2007-08-01

    We perform extensive finite difference time domain simulations of ferrite based negative index of refraction composites. A wire grid is employed to provide negative permittivity. The ferrite and wire grid interact to provide both negative and positive index of refraction transmission peaks in the vicinity of the ferrite resonance. Notwithstanding the extreme anisotropy in the index of refraction of the composite, negative refraction is seen at the composite air interface allowing the construction of a focusing concave lens with a magnetically tunable focal length.

  8. Ferrite-superconductor devices for advanced microwave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, G.F.; Oates, D.E.; Temme, D.H.; Weiss, J.A.

    1996-07-01

    Microwave devices comprising magnetized ferrite in contact with superconductor circuits designed to eliminate magnetic field penetration of the superconductor have demonstrated phase shift without significant conduction losses. The device structures are adaptable to low- or high-{Tc} superconductors. A nonoptimized design of a ferrite phase shifter that employs niobium or YBCO meanderlines has produced over 1,000 degrees of differential phase shift with a figure of merit exceeding 1,000 degrees/dB at X band. By combining superconductor meanderline sections with alternating T junctions on a ferrite substrate in a configuration with three-fold symmetry, a low-loss three-port switching circulator has been demonstrated.

  9. Magnetically tunable wideband microwave filter using ferrite-based metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Ke; Zhu, Wenting; Lei, Ming; Zhou, Ji

    2015-04-01

    Magnetically tunable wideband microwave filters have been designed and prepared by using ferrite-based metamaterial structures. The microwave properties of the filters have been investigated by experiments and simulations. The negative permeability appears around the ferromagnetic resonance frequency, which leads to a remarkable stopband for the bandstop filter. The bandpass filter is composed of two kinds of ferrite rods with different saturation magnetization. The bandwidth of the passband can be tuned by adjusting the saturation magnetization of the ferrite rods. Both the experimental and the simulated results show that those filters possess magnetically tunable property. This approach opens a way for designing tunable wideband microwave filters.

  10. Fast ferrite tuner for the BNL synchrotron light source

    SciTech Connect

    Pivit, E. ); Hanna, S.M.; Keane, J. )

    1991-01-01

    A new type of ferrite tuner has been tested at the BNL. The ferrite tuner uses garnet slabs partially filling a stripline. One of the important features of the tuner is that the ferrite is perpendicularly biased for operation above FMR, thus reducing the magnetic losses. A unique design was adopted to achieve the efficient cooling. The principle of operation of the tuner as well as our preliminary results on tuning a 52 MHz cavity are reported. Optimized conditions under which we demonstrated linear tunability of 80 KHz are described. The tuner's losses and its effect on higher-order modes in the cavity are discussed. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Nickel hydroxide/cobalt-ferrite magnetic nanocatalyst for alcohol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Pooja B; Inam, Fawad; Bhat, Badekai Ramachandra

    2014-08-11

    A magnetically separable, active nickel hydroxide (Brønsted base) coated nanocobalt ferrite catalyst has been developed for oxidation of alcohols. High surface area was achieved by tuning the particle size with surfactant. The surface area of 120.94 m2 g(-1) has been achieved for the coated nanocobalt ferrite. Improved catalytic activity and selectivity were obtained by synergistic effect of transition metal hydroxide (basic hydroxide) on nanocobalt ferrite. The nanocatalyst oxidizes primary and secondary alcohols efficiently (87%) to corresponding carbonyls in good yields.

  12. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2004-05-31

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (1) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  13. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2004-03-31

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (1) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  14. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2005-02-28

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (i) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  15. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2004-08-31

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (i) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  16. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2005-06-27

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (i) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  17. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2004-11-30

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (i) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  18. Dielectric investigations of polycrystalline samarium bismuth ferrite ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Palaimiene, E.; Macutkevic, J.; Banys, J.; Karpinsky, D. V.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2015-01-05

    Results of broadband dielectric investigations of samarium doped bismuth ferrite ceramics are presented in wide temperature range (20–800 K). At temperatures higher than 400 K, the dielectric properties of samarium bismuth ferrite ceramics are governed by Maxwell-Wagner relaxation and electrical conductivity. The DC conductivity increases and activation energy decreases with samarium concentration. In samarium doped bismuth ferrite, the ferroelectric phase transition temperature decreases with samarium concentration and finally no ferroelectric order is observed at x = 0.2. At lower temperatures, the dielectric properties of ferroelectric samarium doped bismuth ferrite are governed by ferroelectric domains dynamics. Ceramics with x = 0.2 exhibit the relaxor-like behaviour.

  19. Ferrite core coupled slapper detonator apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Boberg, R.E.; Lee, R.S.; Weingart, R.C.

    1989-08-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for coupling a temporally short electric power pulse from a thick flat-conductor power cable into a thin flat-conductor slapper detonator circuit. A first planar and generally circular loop is formed from an end portion of the power cable. A second planar and generally circular loop, of similar diameter, is formed from all or part of the slapper detonator circuit. The two loops are placed together, within a ferrite housing that provides a ferrite path that magnetically couples the two loops. Slapper detonator parts may be incorporated within the ferrite housing. The ferrite housing may be made vacuum and water-tight, with the addition of a hermetic ceramic seal, and provided with an enclosure for protecting the power cable and parts related thereto. 10 figs.

  20. New sintering process adjusts magnetic value of ferrite cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinal, A. W.

    1964-01-01

    A two-phase sintering technique based on time and temperature permits reversible control of the coercive threshold of sintered ferrite cores. Threshold coercivity may be controlled over a substantial range of values by selective control of the cooling rate.

  1. Sustainable synthesis of monodispersed spinel nano-ferrites

    EPA Science Inventory

    A sustainable approach for the synthesis of various monodispersed spinel ferrite nanoparticles has been developed that occurs at water-toluene interface under both conventional and microwave hydrothermal conditions. This general synthesis procedure utilizes readily available and ...

  2. Ferrite-filled cavities for compact planar resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keatley, P. S.; Durrant, C. J.; Berry, S. J.; Sirotkin, E.; Hibbins, A. P.; Hicken, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Sub-wavelength metallic planar cavities, closed at one end, have been constructed by wrapping aluminium foil around teflon or ferrite slabs. Finite cavity width perturbs the fundamental cavity mode frequency of ferrite-filled cavities due to different permeability inside and outside of the cavity, in contrast to teflon-filled cavities, while the cavity length required to achieve a specific resonance frequency is significantly reduced for a ferrite-filled cavity. Ferrite-filled cavities may be excited by an in-plane alternating magnetic field and may be advantageous for high-frequency (HF) and ultra HF tagging and radio frequency identification of metallic objects within security, manufacturing, and shipping environments.

  3. Controlled ferrite content improves weldability of corrosion-resistant steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, C. O.

    1967-01-01

    Corrosion-resistant steel that adds restrictions on chemical composition to ensure sufficient ferrite content decreases the tendency of CRES to develop cracks during welding. The equations restricting composition are based on the Schaeffler constitution diagram.

  4. Ferrite core coupled slapper detonator apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Boberg, Ralph E.; Lee, Ronald S.; Weingart, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for coupling a temporally short electric power pulse from a thick flat-conductor power cable into a thin flat-conductor slapper detonator circuit. A first planar and generally circular loop is formed from an end portion of the power cable. A second planar and generally circular loop, of similar diameter, is formed from all or part of the slapper detonator circuit. The two loops are placed together, within a ferrite housing that provides a ferrite path that magnetically couples the two loops. Slapper detonator parts may be incorporated within the ferrite housing. The ferrite housing may be made vacuum and water-tight, with the addition of a hermetic ceramic seal, and provided with an enclosure for protecting the power cable and parts related thereto.

  5. Magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite synthesized by hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaedini, Ghazaleh; Tasirin, Siti Masrinda; Aminayi, Payam

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the magnetic properties of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite synthesized via the hydrothermal method have been investigated. The structural properties of the produced powders were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The observed XRD pattern confirmed the spinel/cubic structure of the prepared cobalt ferrite. The SEM pictures show that the simple hydrothermal method produces uniform sphere-shaped nanopowders. Moreover, infrared spectroscopy was used to confirm the formation of cobalt ferrite particles. Magnetic hysteresis was measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer in a maximum field of 10 kOe. The magnetization of the prepared nanoparticles was investigated, and the saturation magnetization ( M s), remanence ( M r), and coercivity ( H c) were derived from the hysteresis loops. The results revealed that the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized via the simple hydrothermal method exhibit superior magnetic properties.

  6. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of the nanostructured oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiselt, Ch. Ch.; Klimenkov, M.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.; Odette, G. R.; Yamamoto, T.; Gragg, D.

    2011-10-01

    The realization of fusion power as an attractive energy source requires advanced structural materials that can cope with ultra-severe thermo-mechanical loads and high neutron fluxes experienced by fusion power plant components, such as the first wall, divertor and blanket structures. Towards this end, two variants of a 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 reduced activation ferritic (RAF-) ODS steel were produced by ball milling phase blended Fe-13Cr-1W, 0.3Y 20 3 and 0.3Ti powders in both argon and hydrogen atmospheres. The milled powders were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The as-HIPed alloys were then hot rolled into 6 mm plates. Microstructural, tensile and fracture toughness characterization of the hot rolled alloys are summarized here and compared to results previously reported for the as-HIPed condition.

  7. Surface impedance of transversely moving microwave ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical study was made of the surface impedance Z for an electromagnetic transverse magnetic wave from free space on a magnetized ferrite surface moving normal to the plane of incidence. It was found convenient to decompose the surface impedance into two transfer impedances, Z1 and Z2, which relate the hybrid reflected amplitudes to the amplitude of the incident wave. The surface impedance does not vary much with respect to the angle of incidence, so only the case of normal incidence (θi = 0°) was evaluated. Resonant poles at ƒc, [ƒc(ƒc + ƒm)]1/2, and ƒc + ƒm dominate the frequency characteristics of Z1 and Z2. The frequencies ƒc andƒm are the precessional frequency and magnetization frequency, respectively.

  8. Characterization of Irradiated Nanostructured Ferritic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, James; Hoelzer, David T; Tanigawa, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Odette, George R.

    2007-01-01

    The past decade has seen the development of a new class of mechanically alloyed (MA) ferritic steels with outstanding mechanical properties that come, at least in part, from the presence of high concentrations (>10{sup 23} m{sup -3}) of Ti-, Y-, and O-enriched nanoclusters (NC). From the outset, there has been much interest in their potential use for applications to fission and proposed fusion reactors, not only because of their attractive high-temperature strength, but also because the presence of NC may result in a highly radiation-resistant material by efficiently trapping point defects to enhance recombination. Of special interest for fusion applications is the potential of NC to trap transmutation-produced He in high concentrations of small cavities, rather than in fewer but larger cavities that lead to greater radiation-induced swelling and other degraded properties.

  9. Transport in Manganese-Zinc Ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, David J.; Gupta, M.; Gupta, R.

    2002-03-01

    Density functional studies of the electronic and magnetic structure of the spinel ferrites ZnFe_2O4 and MnFe_2O4 are reported. Correct magnetic orderings are obtained. ZnFe_2O4 is predicted to be a small gap insulator in agreement with experiment. MnFe_2O4 is found to be a low carrier density half-metal in the fully ordered state. However, strong effects on the band structure near the band edges are found upon partial interchange of Fe and Mn atoms. These are above the criterion for disorder induced localization. This indicates that the insulating character may well be due to Anderson localization associated with the intersite Mn-Fe disorder in contrast to the usual picture of a Mott insulating ground state. This possibility is discussed in relation to experimental data.

  10. Ethanol sensor based on nanocrystallite cadmium ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Gadkari, Ashok B.; Shinde, Tukaram J.; Vasambekar, Pramod N.

    2015-06-24

    The cadmium ferrite was synthesized by oxalate co-precipitation method. The crystal structure and surface morphology were examined by X-ray diffraction and SEM techniques, respectively. The nanocrystallite CdFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} sensor was tested for LPG, Cl{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH. The sensitivity was measured at various operating temperatures in the range of 100-400°C. The sensor shows highest sensitivity and selectivity to C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH at 350°C. The response and recovery time was measured at operating temperature of 350°C. The sensor exhibits a lower response and recovery time for LPG and Cl{sub 2} as compared to ethanol.

  11. High strength ferritic alloy-D53

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high strength ferritic alloy is described having from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight nickel, from about 2.5% to about 3.6% by weight chromium, from about 2.5% to about 3.5% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.1% to about 0.5% by weight vanadium, from about 0.1% to about 0.5% by weight silicon, from about 0.1% to about 0.6% by weight manganese, from about 0.12% to about 0.20% by weight carbon, from about 0.02% to about 0.1% by weight boron, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, and the balance iron.

  12. Ethanol sensor based on nanocrystallite cadmium ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadkari, Ashok B.; Shinde, Tukaram J.; Vasambekar, Pramod N.

    2015-06-01

    The cadmium ferrite was synthesized by oxalate co-precipitation method. The crystal structure and surface morphology were examined by X-ray diffraction and SEM techniques, respectively. The nanocrystallite CdFe2O4 sensor was tested for LPG, Cl2 and C2H5OH. The sensitivity was measured at various operating temperatures in the range of 100-400°C. The sensor shows highest sensitivity and selectivity to C2H5OH at 350°C. The response and recovery time was measured at operating temperature of 350°C. The sensor exhibits a lower response and recovery time for LPG and Cl2 as compared to ethanol.

  13. Advanced Microwave Ferrite Research (AMFeR): Phase Three

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-31

    10 GHz. Certain deviations from simulation The ferrite hysteresis and ferromagnetic resonance proper- are apparent particularly in the insertion loss...Field (Oe) 12 Frequency (GHz) Fig. 7. Measured hysteresis curve of TT1-1000. Fig. 10. Simulation and measurement Wwrtion loss and isolation of the 0...quality simulation of a ferrite phase shifter. The key team members of this project are divided into two functional groups: Material Science and Microwave

  14. DARHT-II Injector Transients and the Ferrite Damper

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, Will; Reginato, Lou; Chow, Ken; Houck, Tim; Henestroza, Enrique; Yu, Simon; Kang, Michael; Briggs, Richard

    2006-08-04

    This report summarizes the transient response of the DARHT-II Injector and the design of the ferrite damper. Initial commissioning of the injector revealed a rise time excited 7.8 MHz oscillation on the diode voltage and stalk current leading to a 7.8 MHz modulation of the beam current, position, and energy. Commissioning also revealed that the use of the crowbar to decrease the voltage fall time excited a spectrum of radio frequency modes which caused concern that there might be significant transient RF electric field stresses imposed on the high voltage column insulators. Based on the experience of damping the induction cell RF modes with ferrite, the concept of a ferrite damper was developed to address the crowbar-excited oscillations as well as the rise-time-excited 7.8 MHz oscillations. After the Project decided to discontinue the use of the crowbar, further development of the concept focused exclusively on damping the oscillations excited by the rise time. The design was completed and the ferrite damper was installed in the DARHT-II Injector in February 2006. The organization of this report is as follows. The suite of injector diagnostics are described in Section 2. The data and modeling of the injector transients excited on the rise-time and also by the crowbar are discussed in Section 3; the objective is a concise summary of the present state of understanding. The design of the ferrite damper, and the small scale circuit simulations used to evaluate the ferrite material options and select the key design parameters like the cross sectional area and the optimum gap width, are presented in Section 4. The details of the mechanical design and the installation of the ferrite damper are covered in Section 5. A brief summary of the performance of the ferrite damper following its installation in the injector is presented in Section 6.

  15. Propagation along azimuthally magnetized ferrite-loaded circular waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, R. S.; Rosenbaum, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes the modal dispersion characteristics of electromagnetic waves traveling along the azimuthally magnetized ferrite-loaded coaxial transmission line and the ferrite-loaded wire. The modal dispersion curves are used to determine the pass and stop bands of normal propagation. Boundary-value problems were solved with Bolle-Heller functions. The dispersion characteristics of transverse electric modes are presented as plots of the normalized propagation constant vs the normalized frequency.

  16. Charpy impact test results for low-activation ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, N.S.; Hu, W.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1987-05-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the shift of the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and the reduction of the upper shelf energy (USE) due to neutron irradiation of low activation ferritic alloys. Six low activation ferritic alloys have been tested following irradiation at 365/sup 0/C to 10 dpa and compared with control specimens in order to assess the effect of irradiation on Charpy impact properties.

  17. MHD Effects of a Ferritic Wall on Tokamak Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Paul E.

    It has been recognized for some time that the very high fluence of fast (14.1MeV) neutrons produced by deuterium-tritium fusion will represent a major materials challenge for the development of next-generation fusion energy projects such as a fusion component test facility and demonstration fusion power reactor. The best-understood and most promising solutions presently available are a family of low-activation steels originally developed for use in fission reactors, but the ferromagnetic properties of these steels represent a danger to plasma confinement through enhancement of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and increased susceptibility to error fields. At present, experimental research into the effects of ferromagnetic materials on MHD stability in toroidal geometry has been confined to demonstrating that it is still possible to operate an advanced tokamak in the presence of ferromagnetic components. In order to better quantify the effects of ferromagnetic materials on tokamak plasma stability, a new ferritic wall has been installated in the High Beta Tokamak---Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device. The development, assembly, installation, and testing of this wall as a modular upgrade is described, and the effect of the wall on machine performance is characterized. Comparative studies of plasma dynamics with the ferritic wall close-fitting against similar plasmas with the ferritic wall retracted demonstrate substantial effects on plasma stability. Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) are applied, demonstrating a 50% increase in n = 1 plasma response amplitude when the ferritic wall is near the plasma. Susceptibility of plasmas to disruption events increases by a factor of 2 or more with the ferritic wall inserted, as disruptions are observed earlier with greater frequency. Growth rates of external kink instabilities are observed to be twice as large in the presence of a close-fitting ferritic wall. Initial studies are made of the influence of mode rotation frequency

  18. Temperature dependent phase transformation in nano sized magnesium ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumangala T., P.; Mahender, C.; Venkataramani, N.; Prasad, Shiva

    2015-06-01

    The phase transformation in nanosized stoichiometric magnesium ferrite is being discussed. It was shown by TGA/DSC that there exist two reactions (shown by exothermic peaks) in nano sized magnesium ferrite when synthesized by sol gel combustion synthesis. First one of these reactions resulted in the precipitation of α-Fe2O3 and a resultant spinel. The second reaction resulted in stoichiometric spinel from this two phase system.

  19. O(D-1) production in ozone photolysis near 310 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C.; Demore, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    Relative quantum yields of O(D-1)production, phi, in ozone photolysis from 275 nm to 334 nm were determined in the gas phase at 233 K. The O(D-1) was monitored by means of its reaction with isobutane to form isobutyl alcohol. The light source was a high pressure mercury lamp combined with a monochromator, with a bandwidth of 1.6 nm. The results show a constant phi below 300 nm, which is taken as unity on the basis of previous work. There is a very sharp fall-off in phi which is centered at 308 nm. At 313 nm phi is not greater than 0.1.

  20. STS-79 Ku-band antenna, ODS and Spacehab module at PCR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The orbiter Ku-band antenna looms large in this view of the Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay. Visible just past the antenna system -- stowed on the starboard side of the payload bay wall -- is the Orbiter Docking System (ODS), and connected to the ODS via a tunnel is the Spacehab Double Module in the aft area of the payload bay. This photograph was taken from the starboard wing platform on the fifth level of the Payload Changeout Room (PCR) at Launch Pad 39A. Work is under way in the PCR to close Atlantis' payload bay doors for flight. Atlantis currently is being targeted for liftoff on Mission STS-79, the fourth docking of the U.S. Shuttle to the Russian Space Station Mir, around September 12.

  1. The Okavango Dike Swarm (ODS) of Northern Botswana: Was it associated with a failed Rift System?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LePera, Alan; Atekwana, Estella; Abdelsalam, Mohamed

    2014-05-01

    Dikes and dike swarms often play a significant role in the initiation and extension of rift zones. The giant ODS in northern Botswana, Africa represents a Jurassic aged (~180Ma) thermo-tectonic event which developed during the initial lithospheric weakening phase of Gondwana. Detailed investigations of the mafic dike swarm over the last four decades have provided insights into its age, shape, orientation, and chemistry but have thus far been limited in addressing the crustal structure below the swarm. Historically, the ODS has been interpreted as a failed rift arm based on its association with the Bouvet Hotspot and geometric relationship with two other prominent dike swarms. More recent studies suggest instead that the ODS was emplaced along a preexisting Precambrian basement fabric. Accordingly, the origin of the swarm still remains a matter of debate. The objectives of this study were: (1) determine the role of crustal heterogeneities on the emplacement of the dikes, (2) determine variations in crustal thickness below the ODS and geographically related Okavango Rift Zone (ORZ), a zone of incipient rifting and (3) determine along-strike variations in Curie Point Depth (CPD) below the swarm. We used high resolution aeromagnetic data and applied mathematical filters to enhance structures associated with the swarm's oblique geometry. Crustal thicknesses were estimated using the radial average power spectrum method, applied to 1.2km spatial resolution gravity data. 3D inversions were used to map the magnetic basement and determine the depth to the base of the swarm. Our results showed: (1) There were no apparent basement structures with the same 110° orientation as the ODS. (2) Crustal thickness below the swarm ranges from 39 to 45km with an average of 42± 3km, comparable with thicknesses derived from the Southern African Seismic Experiment (SASE). In contrast, crustal thickness below the ORZ is 9 to 16km thinner than the surrounding blocks. (3) The magnetic

  2. Terahertz-visible two-photon rotational spectroscopy of cold OD-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seunghyun; Hauser, Daniel; Lakhmanskaya, Olga; Spieler, Steffen; Endres, Eric S.; Geistlinger, Katharina; Kumar, Sunil S.; Wester, Roland

    2016-03-01

    We present a method to measure rotational transitions of molecular anions in the terahertz domain by sequential two-photon absorption. Ion excitation by bound-bound terahertz absorption is probed by absorption in the visible on a bound-free transition. The visible frequency is tuned to a state-selective photodetachment transition of the excited anions. This provides a terahertz action spectrum for just a few hundred molecular ions. To demonstrate this we measure the two lowest rotational transitions, J =1 ←0 and J =2 ←1 of OD- anions in a cryogenic 22-pole trap. We obtain rotational transition frequencies of 598 596.08(19) MHz for J =1 ←0 and 1 196 791.57(27) MHz for J =2 ←1 of OD-, in good agreement with their only previous measurement. This two-photon scheme opens up terahertz rovibrational spectroscopy for a range of molecular anions, in particular for polyatomic and cluster anions.

  3. Exchange-spring mechanism of soft and hard ferrite nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Manjura Hoque, S.; Srivastava, C.; Kumar, V.; Venkatesh, N.; Das, H.N.; Saha, D.K.; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Exchange-spring behaviour of soft and hard ferrites was studied. • XRD patterns indicated soft and hard ferrites as fcc and hcp structure. • Hysteresis loops indicate wide difference in coercivity of soft and hard phases. • Nanocomposites produced convex hysteresis loop characteristic of single-phase. - Abstract: The paper reports exchange-spring soft and hard ferrite nanocomposites synthesized by chemical co-precipitation with or without the application of ultrasonic vibration. The composites contained BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} as the hard phase and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} as the soft phase. X-ray diffraction patterns of the samples in the optimum calcined condition indicated the presence of soft ferrites as face-centred cubic (fcc) and hard ferrites as hexagonal close packed (hcp) structure respectively. Temperature dependence of magnetization in the range of 20–700 °C demonstrated distinct presence of soft and hard ferrites as magnetic phases which are characterized by wide difference in magnetic anisotropy and coercivity. Exchange-spring mechanism led these nanocomposite systems to exchange-coupled, which ultimately produced convex hysteresis loops characteristic of a single-phase permanent magnet. Fairly high value of coercivity and maximum energy product were observed for the samples in the optimum calcined conditions with a maximum applied field of 1600 kA/m (2 T)

  4. Coating of zinc ferrite particles with a conducting polymer, polyaniline.

    PubMed

    Stejskal, Jaroslav; Trchová, Miroslava; Brodinová, Jitka; Kalenda, Petr; Fedorova, Svetlana V; Prokes, Jan; Zemek, Josef

    2006-06-01

    Particles of zinc ferrite, ZnOFe2O3, were coated with polyaniline (PANI) phosphate during the in situ polymerization of aniline in an aqueous solution of phosphoric acid. The PANI-ferrite composites were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the degree of coating with a conducting polymer. Even a low content of PANI, 1.4 wt%, resulted in the 45% coating of the particles' surface. On the other hand, even at high PANI content, the coating of ferrite surface did not exceeded 90%. This is explained by the clustering of hydrophobic aniline oligomers at the hydrophilic ferrite surface and the consequent irregular PANI coating. The conductivity increased from 2 x 10(-9) to 6.5 S cm(-1) with increasing fraction of PANI phosphate in the composite. The percolation threshold was located at 3-4 vol% of the conducting component. In the absence of any acid, a conducting product, 1.4 x 10(-2) Scm(-1), was also obtained. As the concentration of phosphoric acid increased to 3 M, the conductivity of the composites reached 1.8 S cm(-1) at 10-14 wt% of PANI. The ferrite alone can act as an oxidant for aniline; a product having a conductivity 0.11 S cm(-1) was obtained after a one-month immersion of ferrite in an acidic solution of aniline.

  5. Epitaxial single crystalline ferrite films for high frequency applications

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Y.; Dover, R.B. van; Korenivski, V.; Werder, D.; Chen, C.H.; Felder, R.J.; Phillips, J.M.

    1996-11-01

    The successful growth of single crystal ferrites in thin film form is an important step towards their future incorporation into integrated circuits operating at microwave frequencies. The authors have successfully grown high quality single crystalline spinel ferrite thin films of (Mn,Zn)Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} on (100) and (110) SrTiO{sub 3} and MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} at low temperature. These ferrite films are buffered with spinel structure layers that are paramagnetic at room temperature. In contrast to ferrite films grown directly on the substrates, ferrite films grown on buffered substrates exhibit excellent crystallinity and bulk saturation magnetization values, thus indicating the importance of lattice match and structural similarity between the film and the immediately underlying layer. X-ray, RBS, AFM and TEM analysis provide a consistent picture of the structural properties of these ferrite films. The authors then use this technique to grow exchange-coupled bilayers of single crystalline CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and (Mn,Zn)Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. In these bilayers, they observe strong exchange coupling across the interface that is similar in strength to the exchange coupling in the individual layers.

  6. Performance of ferritic stainless steels for automobile muffler corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Tarutani, Y.; Hashizume, T.

    1995-11-01

    Corrosion behavior of ferritic stainless steels was studied in artificial exhaust gas condensates containing corrosive ions such as Cl{sup {minus}} and SO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}. Continuous immersion tests in flasks and Dip and Dry tests by using the alternate corrosion tester with a heating system clarified the effects of chromium and molybdenum additions on the corrosion resistance of a ferritic stainless steel in the artificial exhaust gas condensates. Effects of surface oxidation on the corrosion behavior were investigated in a temperature range of 573K to 673K. Oxidation of 673K reduced the corrosion resistance of the ferritic stainless steels in the artificial environment of the automobile muffler. Particulate matter deposited on the muffler inner shell from the automobile exhaust gas was also examined. Deposited particulate matter increased the corrosion rate of the ferritic stainless steel. Finally, the authors also investigated the corrosion of the automobile mufflers made of Type 436L ferritic stainless steel with 18% chromium-1.2% molybdenum after 24 months, in Japan. The sets of results clarified that Type 436L ferritic stainless steel as the material for the automobile muffler exhibited acceptable corrosion resistance.

  7. Techniques to Improve the Environmental Safety of OB and OD Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    PEP material to be detonated will be lowered into the ODOBi by a crane and suspended approximately 2 m above the floor. The pan comprising the...Noise From OD Activities. Salter and Parkes10, Keenan and Wager9, Barrett12 and the DTEO11 have shown conclusively that water can be used to...National Laboratory, Livermore CA, September 1995, 40 pp. ’ 9. W.A. Keenan and P.C. Wager, "Mitigation of confined explosive effects by

  8. Low Cost Process for Manufacture of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Turbine Nozzle Components.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    SWTTPROCESS FORJIANUFACTURE OF9OXIDE)ISPERSIONSTRENGTHENED (ODS) O0 TURBINE !IJOZZLE COMPONENTS, -- , General Electric Company Aircraft Engine Group...machining processes for low pressure turbine (LPT) vanes , high pressure turbine (HPT) vanes , and HPT band segments for the F101 engine . The primary intent...for aircraft turbine nozzle components. These processes were shown capable of maintaining required microstructures and properties for the vane and

  9. Intermolecular potential and rovibrational states of the H2O-D2 complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Avoird, Ad; Scribano, Yohann; Faure, Alexandre; Weida, Miles J.; Fair, Joanna R.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2012-05-01

    A five-dimensional intermolecular potential for H2O-D2 was obtained from the full nine-dimensional ab initio potential surface of Valiron et al. [P. Valiron, M. Wernli, A. Faure, L. Wiesenfeld, C. Rist, S. Kedžuch, J. Noga, J. Chem. Phys. 129 (2008) 134306] by averaging over the ground state vibrational wave functions of H2O and D2. On this five-dimensional potential with a well depth De of 232.12 cm-1 we calculated the bound rovibrational levels of H2O-D2 for total angular momentum J = 0-3. The method used to compute the rovibrational levels is similar to a scattering approach—it involves a basis of coupled free rotor wave functions for the hindered internal rotations and the overall rotation of the dimer—while it uses a discrete variable representation of the intermolecular distance coordinate R. The basis was adapted to the permutation symmetry associated with the para/ortho (p/o) nature of both H2O and D2, as well as to inversion symmetry. As expected, the H2O-D2 dimer is more strongly bound than its H2O-H2 isotopologue [cf. A. van der Avoird, D.J. Nesbitt, J. Chem. Phys. 134 (2011) 044314], with dissociation energies D0 of 46.10, 50.59, 67.43, and 73.53 cm-1 for pH2O-oD2, oH2O-oD2, pH2O-pD2, and oH2O-pD2. A rotationally resolved infrared spectrum of H2O-D2 was measured in the frequency region of the H2O bend mode. The ab initio calculated values of the rotational and distortion constants agree well with the values extracted from this spectrum.

  10. Vibrational spectroscopy of O-H and O-D centers in TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekisli, Figen; Stavola, Michael; Fowler, W. Beall

    2012-02-01

    While the vibrational properties of O-H centers in TiO2 have been studied for many years, recent experiments suggest a new picture of their behavior. In the 1970s, Bates and Perkins found a single, sharp, strongly polarized O-H line in TiO2, and similarly for O-D and O-T [1]. On the contrary, recent studies by Herklotz et al. [2] find three closely spaced O-H (O-D) lines that were assigned to two different charge states of an O-H (O-D) shallow donor. We have in our possession the very TiO2 samples studied many years ago by Bates and Perkins. We have introduced H and D into these samples and also into TiO2 samples obtained recently. High-resolution vibrational spectroscopy performed as a function of temperature at Lehigh provides new insight into the different vibrational properties seen for O-H in TiO2 in the 1970's and in recent studies by Herklotz et al. [1] J.B. Bates and R.A. Perkins, Phys. Rev. B 16, 3713 (1977). [2] F. Herklotz et al., Phys. Rev. B 83, 235202 (2011)..

  11. Development of ODS FeCrAl for compatibility in fusion and fission energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A.; Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Hoelzer, David T.

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys with 12–15% Cr are being evaluated for improved compatibility with Pb-Li for a fusion energy application and with high temperature steam for a more accident-tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding application. A 12% Cr content alloy showed low mass losses in static Pb-Li at 700°C, where a LiAlO2 surface oxide formed and inhibited dissolution into the liquid metal. All the evaluated compositions formed a protective scale in steam at 1200°C, which is not possible with ODS FeCr alloys. However, most of the compositions were not protective at 1400°C, which is a general and somewhat surprising problem with ODS FeCrAl alloys that is still being studied. More work is needed to optimize the alloy composition, microstructure and oxide dispersion, but initial promising tensile and creep results have been obtained with mixed oxide additions, i.e. Y2O3 with ZrO2, HfO2 or TiO2.

  12. Development of ODS FeCrAl for compatibility in fusion and fission energy applications

    DOE PAGES

    Pint, Bruce A.; Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Unocic, Kinga A.; ...

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys with 12–15% Cr are being evaluated for improved compatibility with Pb-Li for a fusion energy application and with high temperature steam for a more accident-tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding application. A 12% Cr content alloy showed low mass losses in static Pb-Li at 700°C, where a LiAlO2 surface oxide formed and inhibited dissolution into the liquid metal. All the evaluated compositions formed a protective scale in steam at 1200°C, which is not possible with ODS FeCr alloys. However, most of the compositions were not protective at 1400°C, which is amore » general and somewhat surprising problem with ODS FeCrAl alloys that is still being studied. More work is needed to optimize the alloy composition, microstructure and oxide dispersion, but initial promising tensile and creep results have been obtained with mixed oxide additions, i.e. Y2O3 with ZrO2, HfO2 or TiO2.« less

  13. OD in North American Schools: A Scandinavian View, with Comments by Matthew Miles and Michael Fullan. Uppsala Reports on Education, No. 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Gunnar

    This report discusses the structural conditions under which organizational development (OD), as employed in the school systems of the United States and Canada, is more or less applicable to schools. The first section (chapters 1-6) reviews papers and books, concerning either OD in general or the ways in which the ideas of OD have been used in the…

  14. Analytical modeling of demagnetizing effect in magnetoelectric ferrite/PZT/ferrite trilayers taking into account a mechanical coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyau, V.; Aubert, A.; LoBue, M.; Mazaleyrat, F.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the demagnetizing effect in ferrite/PZT/ferrite magnetoelectric (ME) trilayer composites consisting of commercial PZT discs bonded by epoxy layers to Ni-Co-Zn ferrite discs made by a reactive Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) technique. ME voltage coefficients (transversal mode) were measured on ferrite/PZT/ferrite trilayer ME samples with different thicknesses or phase volume ratio in order to highlight the influence of the magnetic field penetration governed by these geometrical parameters. Experimental ME coefficients and voltages were compared to analytical calculations using a quasi-static model. Theoretical demagnetizing factors of two magnetic discs that interact together in parallel magnetic structures were derived from an analytical calculation based on a superposition method. These factors were introduced in ME voltage calculations which take account of the demagnetizing effect. To fit the experimental results, a mechanical coupling factor was also introduced in the theoretical formula. This reflects the differential strain that exists in the ferrite and PZT layers due to shear effects near the edge of the ME samples and within the bonding epoxy layers. From this study, an optimization in magnitude of the ME voltage is obtained. Lastly, an analytical calculation of demagnetizing effect was conducted for layered ME composites containing higher numbers of alternated layers (n ≥ 5). The advantage of such a structure is then discussed.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and potential application of MnZn ferrite and MnZn ferrite @ Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Lingyan; Lim, I-Im S; Bao, Kun; Mott, Derrick; Park, Hye-Young; Luo, Jin; Hao, Shunli; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2009-05-01

    The ability to tune the magnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles by manipulating the composition or surface properties of the nanoparticles is important for exploiting the application of the nanomaterials. This report describes preliminary findings of an investigation of the viability of synthesizing MnZn ferrite and core @ shell MnZn ferrite @ Au nanoparticles as potentially magnetization-tunable nanomaterials. The synthesis of the core-shell magnetic nanoparticles involved a simple combination of seed formation of the MnZn ferrite magnetic nanoparticles and surface coating of the seeds with gold shells. Water-soluble MnZn ferrite nanoparticles of 20-40 nm diameters and MnZn ferrite @ Au nanoparticles of 30-60 nm have been obtained. The MnZn ferrite @ Au nanoparticles have been demonstrated to be viable in magnetic separation of nanoparticles via interparticle antibody-specific binding reactivity between antibodies on the gold shells of the core-shell magnetic particles and proteins on gold nanoparticles. These findings have significant implications to the design of the core @ shell magnetic nanomaterials with core composition tuned magnetization for bioassay application.

  16. Collisional quenching of OD A 2Σ+ by H2: experimental and theoretical studies of the state-resolved OD X 2Π product distribution and branching fraction.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Julia H; Dempsey, Logan P; Lester, Marsha I; Fu, Bina; Kamarchik, Eugene; Bowman, Joel M

    2010-10-28

    We report joint experimental and theoretical studies of outcomes resulting from the nonreactive quenching of electronically excited OD A  (2)Σ(+) by H(2). The experiments utilize a pump-probe technique to detect the OD X  (2)Π product state distribution under single collision conditions. The OD X  (2)Π products are observed primarily in their lowest vibrational state (v(") = 0) with substantially less population in v(") = 1. The OD X  (2)Π products are generated with a high degree of rotational excitation, peaking at N(") = 21 with an average rotational energy of 4600 cm(-1), and a strong propensity for populating the Π(A(')) Λ-doublet component indicative of alignment of the half-filled pπ orbital in the plane of OD rotation. Branching fraction measurements show that the nonreactive channel accounts for less than 20% of quenching outcomes. Complementary classical trajectory calculations of the postquenching dynamics are initiated from representative points along seams of conical intersections between the ground and excited-state potentials of OD(A  (2)Σ(+),X  (2)Π) + H(2). Diabatic modeling of the initial momenta in the dynamical calculations captures the key experimental trends: OD X  (2)Π products released primarily in their ground vibrational state with extensive rotational excitation and a branching ratio that strongly favors reactive quenching. The OD A  (2)Σ(+) + H(2) results are also compared with previous studies on the quenching of OH A  (2)Σ(+) + H(2); the two experimental studies show remarkably similar rotational energy distributions for the OH and OD X  (2)Π radical products.

  17. Physical facets of ultrasonic cavitational synthesis of zinc ferrite particles.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Bhaskar Rao; Sivasankar, Thirugnanasambandam; Sivakumar, Manickam; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2010-02-01

    This paper addresses the physical features of the ultrasonic cavitational synthesis of zinc ferrite particles and tries to establish the relationship between cavitation physics and sonochemistry of the zinc ferrite synthesis. A dual approach of coupling experimental results with simulations of radial motion of cavitation bubbles has been adopted. The precursors for the zinc ferrite, viz. ZnO and Fe(3)O(4) are produced in situ by the hydrolysis of Zn and Fe(II) acetates stimulated by (*)OH radicals produced from the transient collapse of the cavitation bubbles. Experiments performed under different conditions create significant variation in the production of (*)OH radicals, and hence, the rate of acetate hydrolysis. Correlation of the results of experiments and simulations sheds light on the important facets of the physical mechanism of ultrasonic cavitational zinc ferrite synthesis. It is revealed that too much or too little rate of acetate hydrolysis results in smaller particle size of zinc ferrite. The first effect of a higher rate of hydrolysis leads to excessively large growth of particles, due to which they become susceptible to the disruptive action of cavitation bubbles. Whereas, the second effect of too small rate of hydrolysis of Zn and Fe(II) acetates restricts the growth of particles. It has been observed that the initial reactant concentration does not influence the mean particle size or the size distribution of zinc ferrite particles. The present investigation clearly confirms that the rate-controlling step of zinc ferrite synthesis through ultrasonic cavitational route is the rate of formation of (*)OH radicals from cavitation bubbles.

  18. Scattering from the Quasi-Optical Ferrite Circulator Using a Coupled Integral Equation/FEM Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, L. W.; Hoppe, D. J.; Chinn, G. C.; Lee, J.

    1994-01-01

    Ferrite materials are used in microwave devices that exploit the property of Faraday rotation to give non-reciprocal behavior. Examples of common waveguide components that use ferrite materials include circulators, isolators and gyrators.

  19. Synthesis of Novel Ferrite Based Recyclable Catalyst Used to Clean Dye and Emerging Contaminates from Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herein, we describe synthesis of novel palladium, copper, cobalt and vanadium ferrites. The ferrites were synthesized by combustion method using polyvinyl alcohol. The particles phases were confirmed using X-ray diffraction and sizes were determined using particle size analyzer. ...

  20. Measurement of aerosol optical depth and sub-visual cloud detection using the optical depth sensor (ODS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, D.; Rannou, P.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Sarkissian, A.; Foujols, T.

    2016-02-01

    A small and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS) has been designed to work in the atmosphere of Mars. The instrument measures alternatively the diffuse radiation from the sky and the attenuated direct radiation from the Sun on the surface. The principal goals of ODS are to retrieve the daily mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) and to detect very high and optically thin clouds, crucial parameters in understanding the Martian meteorology and climatology. The detection of clouds is undertaken at twilight, allowing the detection and characterization of clouds with opacities below 0.03 (sub-visual clouds). In addition, ODS is capable to retrieve the aerosol optical depth during nighttime from moonlight measurements. Recently, ODS has been selected at the METEO meteorological station on board the ExoMars 2018 Lander. In order to study the performance of ODS under Mars-like conditions as well as to evaluate the retrieval algorithms for terrestrial measurements, ODS was deployed in Ouagadougou (Africa) between November 2004 and October 2005, a Sahelian region characterized by its high dust aerosol load and the frequent occurrence of Saharan dust storms. The daily average AOD values retrieved by ODS were compared with those provided by a CIMEL sunphotometer of the AERONET (Aerosol Robotic NETwork) network localized at the same location. Results represent a good agreement between both ground-based instruments, with a correlation coefficient of 0.77 for the whole data set and 0.94 considering only the cloud-free days. From the whole data set, a total of 71 sub-visual cirrus (SVC) were detected at twilight with opacities as thin as 1.10-3 and with a maximum of occurrence at altitudes between 14 and 20 km. Although further optimizations and comparisons of ODS terrestrial measurements are required, results indicate the potential of these measurements to retrieve the AOD and detect sub-visual clouds.

  1. Applications of ferrites and ferromagnets in tuning rf cavities for accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, S.M. )

    1994-05-15

    Traditionally ferrites have been used in accelerators for tuning rf cavities and in nonreciprocal devices controlling the power flow in rf accelerating systems. Recently, the development of cavity tuners based on perpendicularly biased ferrites has shown good progress. Yttrium iron garnet (YIG) is gradually replacing the traditional Ni Zn ferrites. The use of conventional parallel-biased Ni Zn ferrites for varying the frequency of accelerating cavities has the disadvantage of high saturation magnetization (4[pi][ital M][sub [ital s

  2. Infrared spectroscopy of OD vibrators in minerals at natural dilution: hydroxyl groups in talc and kaolinite, and structural water in beryl and emerald.

    PubMed

    de Donato, Philippe; Cheilletz, Alain; Barres, Odile; Yvon, Jacques

    2004-05-01

    An infrared (IR) study of natural deuteration is conducted on minerals containing hydroxyl groups (talc and kaolinite) and channel-water-bearing minerals (beryl and emerald). In talc, the OD valence vibration is located at 2710 cm(-1), corresponding to OD groups surrounded by 3 Mg atoms. In kaolinite, the OD valence vibrations are located at 2671 cm(-1) (inner OD group), 2712, 2706, and 2700 cm(-1) (three inner-surface OD groups). In beryl and emerald, natural deuteration of channel water is observed for the first time by infrared microspectroscopy. In beryl from Minas Gerais (Brazil), the OD profiles are characterized by four bands at 2735, 2686, 2672, and 2641 cm(-1). In emeralds from Colombia and Brazil, the OD profiles are characterized by five or four bands, respectively, at 2816, 2737, 2685, 2673, and 2641 cm(-1) (Colombia) and 2730, 2684, 2672, and 2640 cm(-1) (Brazil). The band at 2816 cm(-1) can be assigned to -OD or OD(-), and bands at 2686-2684, 2673-2672, and 2641-2640 cm(-1) can be assigned to type-I and type-II HOD molecules. The band at 2737-2730 cm(-1) is partially disturbed by combination bands of the mineral. Such OD profiles are different from those obtained by artificial deuteration at higher OD dilution.

  3. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  7. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. Revision 4 updates...

  8. Strong and moldable cellulose magnets with high ferrite nanoparticle content.

    PubMed

    Galland, Sylvain; Andersson, Richard L; Ström, Valter; Olsson, Richard T; Berglund, Lars A

    2014-11-26

    A major limitation in the development of highly functional hybrid nanocomposites is brittleness and low tensile strength at high inorganic nanoparticle content. Herein, cellulose nanofibers were extracted from wood and individually decorated with cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles and then for the first time molded at low temperature (<120 °C) into magnetic nanocomposites with up to 93 wt % inorganic content. The material structure was characterized by TEM and FE-SEM and mechanically tested as compression molded samples. The obtained porous magnetic sheets were further impregnated with a thermosetting epoxy resin, which improved the load-bearing functions of ferrite and cellulose material. A nanocomposite with 70 wt % ferrite, 20 wt % cellulose nanofibers, and 10 wt % epoxy showed a modulus of 12.6 GPa, a tensile strength of 97 MPa, and a strain at failure of ca. 4%. Magnetic characterization was performed in a vibrating sample magnetometer, which showed that the coercivity was unaffected and that the saturation magnetization was in proportion with the ferrite content. The used ferrite, CoFe2O4, is a magnetically hard material, demonstrated by that the composite material behaved as a traditional permanent magnet. The presented processing route is easily adaptable to prepare millimeter-thick and moldable magnetic objects. This suggests that the processing method has the potential to be scaled-up for industrial use for the preparation of a new subcategory of magnetic, low-cost, and moldable objects based on cellulose nanofibers.

  9. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.

  10. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures. PMID:26548303

  11. Magnesium ferrite nanoparticles: a rapid gas sensor for alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godbole, Rhushikesh; Rao, Pratibha; Bhagwat, Sunita

    2017-02-01

    Highly porous spinel MgFe2O4 nanoparticles with a high specific surface area have been successfully synthesized by a sintering free auto-combustion technique and characterized for their structural and surface morphological properties using XRD, BET, TEM and SEM techniques. Their sensing properties to alcohol vapors viz. ethanol and methanol were investigated. The site occupation of metal ions was investigated by VSM. The as-synthesized sample shows the formation of sponge-like porous material which is necessary for gas adsorption. The gas sensing characteristics were obtained by measuring the gas response as a function of operating temperature, concentration of the gas, and the response-recovery time. The response of magnesium ferrite to ethanol and methanol vapors was compared and it was revealed that magnesium ferrite is more sensitive and selective to ethanol vapor. The sensor operates at a substantially low vapor concentration of about 1 ppm of alcohol vapors, exhibits fantastic response reproducibility, long term reliability and a very fast response and recovery property. Thus the present study explored the possibility of making rapidly responding alcohol vapor sensor based on magnesium ferrite. The sensing mechanism has been discussed in co-relation with magnetic and morphological properties. The role of occupancy of Mg2+ ions in magnesium ferrite on its gas sensing properties has also been studied and is found to influence the response of magnesium ferrite ethanol sensor.

  12. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; ...

    2015-11-09

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones.more » These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. Finally, the present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.« less

  13. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-09

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. Finally, the present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.

  14. Towards Radiation Tolerant Nanostructured Ferritic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Hoelzer, David T; Russell, Kaye F

    2010-01-01

    The high temperature and irradiation response of a new class of nanostructured ferritic alloys have been investigated by atom probe tomography. These materials are candidate materials for use in the extreme environments that will be present in the next generation of power generating systems. Atom probe tomography has revealed that the yttria powder is forced into solid solution during the mechanical alloying process andsubsequently 2-nm-diameter Ti-, Y- and O-enriched nanoclusters are formedduring the extrusion process. These nanoclusters have been shown to be remarkably stable during isothermal annealing treatments up to 0.92 of the melting temperature and during proton irradiation up to 3 displacements per atom. No significant difference in sizes, compositions and number densities of the nanoclusters was also observed between the unirradiated and proton irradiated conditions. The grain boundaries were found to have high number densities of nanoclusters as well as chromium and tungsten segregation which pin the grain boundary to minimize creep and grain growth.

  15. Tuning the magnetism of ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viñas, S. Liébana; Simeonidis, K.; Li, Z.-A.; Ma, Z.; Myrovali, E.; Makridis, A.; Sakellari, D.; Angelakeris, M.; Wiedwald, U.; Spasova, M.; Farle, M.

    2016-10-01

    The importance of magnetic interactions within an individual nanoparticle or between adjacent ones is crucial not only for the macroscopic collective magnetic behavior but for the AC magnetic heating efficiency as well. On this concept, single-(MFe2O4 where M=Fe, Co, Mn) and core-shell ferrite nanoparticles consisting of a magnetically softer (MnFe2O4) or magnetically harder (CoFe2O4) core and a magnetite (Fe3O4) shell with an overall size in the 10 nm range were synthesized and studied for their magnetic particle hyperthermia efficiency. Magnetic measurements indicate that the coating of the hard magnetic phase (CoFe2O4) by Fe3O4 provides a significant enhancement of hysteresis losses over the corresponding single-phase counterpart response, and thus results in a multiplication of the magnetic hyperthermia efficiency opening a novel pathway for high-performance, magnetic hyperthermia agents. At the same time, the existence of a biocompatible Fe3O4 outer shell, toxicologically renders these systems similar to iron-oxide ones with significantly milder side-effects.

  16. Feedback controlled hybrid fast ferrite tuners

    SciTech Connect

    Remsen, D.B.; Phelps, D.A.; deGrassie, J.S.; Cary, W.P.; Pinsker, R.I.; Moeller, C.P.; Arnold, W.; Martin, S.; Pivit, E.

    1993-09-01

    A low power ANT-Bosch fast ferrite tuner (FFT) was successfully tested into (1) the lumped circuit equivalent of an antenna strap with dynamic plasma loading, and (2) a plasma loaded antenna strap in DIII-D. When the FFT accessible mismatch range was phase-shifted to encompass the plasma-induced variation in reflection coefficient, the 50 {Omega} source was matched (to within the desired 1.4 : 1 voltage standing wave ratio). The time required to achieve this match (i.e., the response time) was typically a few hundred milliseconds, mostly due to a relatively slow network analyzer-computer system. The response time for the active components of the FFT was 10 to 20 msec, or much faster than the present state-of-the-art for dynamic stub tuners. Future FFT tests are planned, that will utilize the DIII-D computer (capable of submillisecond feedback control), as well as several upgrades to the active control circuit, to produce a FFT feedback control system with a response time approaching 1 msec.

  17. Must we use ferritic steel in TBM?

    SciTech Connect

    Salavy, Jean-Francois; Boccaccini, Lorenzo V.; Chaudhuri, Paritosh; Cho, Seungyon; Enoeda, Mikio; Giancarli, Luciano; Kurtz, Richard J.; Luo, Tian Y.; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Wong, Clement

    2010-12-13

    Mock-ups of DEMO breeding blankets, called Test Blanket Modules (TBMs), inserted and tested in ITER in dedicated equatorial ports directly facing the plasma, are expected to provide the first experimental answers on the necessary performance of the corresponding DEMO breeding blankets. Several DEMO breeding blanket designs have been studied and assessed in the last 20 years. At present, after considering various coolant and breeder combinations, all the TBM concepts proposed by the seven ITER Parties use Reduced-Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel as the structural material. In order to perform valuable tests in ITER, the TBMs are expected to use the same structural material as corresponding DEMO blankets. However, due to the fact that this family of steels is ferromagnetic, their presence in the ITER vacuum vessel will create perturbations of the ITER magnetic fields that could reduce the quality of the plasma confinement during H-mode. As a consequence, a legitimate question has been raised on the necessity of using RAFM steel for TBMs structural material in ITER. By giving a short description of the main TBM testing objectives in ITER and assessing the consequences of not using such a material, this paper gives a comprehensive answer to this question. According to the working group author of the study, the use of RAFM steel as structural material for TBM is judged mandatory.

  18. Cross-Roll Flow Forming of ODS Alloy Heat Exchanger Tubes For Hoop Creep Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2005-11-23

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in crossrolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (1) examine and identify post-extrusion forming methodologies to

  19. Chemical looping coal gasification with calcium ferrite and barium ferrite via solid--solid reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, Ranjani; Tian, Hanjing; Richards, George

    2016-01-01

    Coal gasification to produce synthesis gas by chemical looping was investigated with two oxygen carriers, barium ferrite (BaFe2O4) and calcium ferrite (CaFe2O4). Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and fixed-bed flow reactor data indicated that a solid–solid interaction occurred between oxygen carriers and coal to produce synthesis gas. Both thermodynamic analysis and experimental data indicated that BaFe2O4 and CaFe2O4 have high reactivity with coal but have a low reactivity with synthesis gas, which makes them very attractive for the coal gasification process. Adding steam increased the production of hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO), but carbon dioxide (CO2) remained low because these oxygen carriers have minimal reactivity with H2 and CO. Therefore, the combined steam–oxygen carrier produced the highest quantity of synthesis gas. It appeared that neither the water–gas shift reaction nor the water splitting reaction promoted additional H2 formation with the oxygen carriers when steam was present. Wyodak coal, which is a sub-bituminous coal, had the best gasification yield with oxygen carrier–steam while Illinois #6 coal had the lowest. The rate of gasification and selectivity for synthesis gas production was significantly higher when these oxygen carriers were present during steam gasification of coal. The rates and synthesis gas yields during the temperature ramps of coal–steam with oxygen carriers were better than with gaseous oxygen.

  20. Efficiency in supercritical fluid chromatography with different superficially porous and fully porous particles ODS bonded phases.

    PubMed

    Lesellier, E

    2012-03-09

    The chromatographic efficiency, in terms of plate number per second, was dramatically improved by the introduction of sub-two microns particles with ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC). On the other hand, the recent development of superficially porous particles, called core-shell or fused-core particles, appears to allow the achievement of the same efficiency performances at higher speed without high pressure drops. CO₂-based mobile phases exhibiting much lower viscosities than aqueous based mobile phases allow better theoretical efficiencies, even with 3-5 μm particles, but with relative low pressure drops. They also allow much higher flow rates or much longer columns while using conventional instruments capable to operate below 400 bar. Moreover, the use of superficially porous particles in SFC could enhance the chromatographic performances even more. The kinetic behavior of ODS phases bonded on these particles was studied, with varied flow rates, outlet (and obviously inlet) pressures, temperatures, by using a homologous series (alkylbenzenes) with 10% modifier (methanol or acetonitrile) in the carbon dioxide mobile phase. Results were also compared with classical fully porous particles, having different sizes, from 2.5 to 5 μm. Superior efficiency (N) and reduced h were obtained with these new ODS-bonded particles in regards to classical ones, showing their great interest for use in SFC. However, surprising behavior were noticed, i.e. the increase of the theoretical plate number vs. the increase of the chain length of the compounds. This behavior, opposite to the one classically reported vs. the retention factor, was not depending on the outlet pressure, but on the flow rate and the temperature changes. The lower radial trans-column diffusion on this particle types could explain these results. This diffusion reduction with these ODS-bonded superficially porous particles seems to decrease with the increase of the residence time of compounds.

  1. Investigation of eddy current examination on OD fatigue crack for steam generator tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Yuying; Ding, Boyuan; Li, Ming; Liu, Jinhong; Chen, Huaidong; Meyendorf, Norbert G.

    2015-03-01

    The opening width of fatigue crack was very small, and conventional Bobbin probe was very difficult to detect it in steam generator tubes. Different sizes of 8 fatigue cracks were inspected using bobbin probe rotating probe. The analysis results showed that, bobbin probe was not sensitive for fatigue crack even for small through wall crack mixed with denting signal. On the other hand, the rotating probe was easily to detect all cracks. Finally, the OD phase to depth curve for fatigue crack using rotating probe was established and the results agreed very well with the true crack size.

  2. Raman OD stretching spectral differences between aqueous and alcoholic tetraalkylammonium chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidaka, Fumi; Kanno, Hitoshi

    2003-09-01

    Raman OD stretching spectra were measured for aqueous and alcoholic R 4NCl solutions in both liquid state at room temperature and glassy state at liquid nitrogen temperature (alcohol=methanol and ethanol, R=alkyl group: methyl, ethyl and n-propyl). Comparison of the spectra indicates that enhancement of the low frequency region is more pronounced for the glassy aqueous solution than the corresponding alcohol solution. It is suggested that hydrophobic hydration plays a role in the strengthening of hydrogen bonds around an apolar solute (group) at low temperatures in aqueous solution system.

  3. [Odón de Buen: forty-five years of commitment to the university].

    PubMed

    Gomis, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The aragonese naturalist Odón de Buen y del Cos for twenty-two annual academic courses professor of natural history at the University of Barcelona and for twenty-three of the University of Madrid. Strong supporter of Darwin's evolutionary theory, experimental work in the field and laboratory, in this paper puts the value of their efforts, as an educator, to popularize the natural sciences and thus separated from the concerns, superstition and fanaticism, which they were basic reasons of the moral and material backwardness in which Spain was found.

  4. Origin of magnetocapacitance in chemically homogeneous and inhomogeneous ferrites.

    PubMed

    Mondal, R A; Murty, B S; Murthy, V R K

    2015-01-28

    The present work mainly focuses on the magnetodielectric (MD) effect in polycrystalline Ni0.9-yCuyZn0.1Fe1.98O3.97 (y = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5) ferrite synthesized by a solid-state reaction method. Sintered samples showed the formation of CuO-rich grain boundary segregation for y≥ 0.2. The appearance of segregation made the present material chemically inhomogeneous and electrically heterogeneous. A negative MD response was observed in homogeneous ferrite for y = 0 and 0.1 due to lattice distortion (an intrinsic effect), whereas a positive MD response occurs in chemically inhomogeneous segregated ferrite (y≥ 0.2) due the collective effects of Maxwell-Wagner (MW) polarization with intrinsic magnetoresistance (an extrinsic effect).

  5. Biocompatibility of transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanpo, Noppakun; Tharajak, Jirasak; Li, Yuncang; Berndt, Christopher C.; Wen, Cuie; Wang, James

    2014-07-01

    Transition metals of copper, zinc, manganese, and nickel were substituted into cobalt ferrite nanoparticles via a sol-gel route using citric acid as a chelating agent. The microstructure and elemental compositions of the nanoparticles were characterized using scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The particle size of the nanoparticles was investigated using particle size analyzer, and the zeta potentials were measured using zeta potential analyzer. The phase components of the synthesized transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were studied using Raman spectroscopy. The biocompatibility of the nanoparticles was assessed using osteoblast-like cells. Results indicated that the substitution of transition metals strongly influences the physical, chemical properties, and biocompatibility of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  6. Synthesis and magnetic properties of a novel ferrite organogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sichu; John, Vijay T.; Irvin, Glen C.; Rachakonda, Suguna H.; McPherson, Gary L.; O'Connor, Charles J.

    1999-04-01

    A novel magnetic organogel that can be considered a precursor example of a magnetoresponsive gel is reported. The gel is formed by the bridging of ferrite containing anionic bis(2-ethlhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate reverse micelles with 2,6-dihydroxynaphthalene (2,6-DHN). The addition of 2,6-DHN leads to a room temperature quotes "freezing in" of the liquid solution to a clear organogel. Ferrite particles in the size range 10-15 nm are doped into the gel network and are thus suspended in the optically clear gel media. The magnetic properties of the gel were measured using a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. The results reveal that the gel exhibits superparamagnetic behavior with a blocking temperature of 6 K (at an applied field of 1000 G), and a coercivity of 850 G at 2 K. The ferrites introduced into the gel serve the function of magnetic "seeds" via which magnetic properties are acquired by the gel.

  7. The nature of temper brittleness of high-chromium ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrak, V.I.; Suvorova, S.O.; Golovin, I.S.; Mishin, V.M.; Kislyuk, I.V.

    1995-03-01

    The reasons for development of {open_quotes}475{degrees}C brittleness{close_quotes} of high-chromium ferritic steels are considered from the standpoint of fracture mechanics. It is shown that the general rise in the curve of temperature-dependent local flow stress has the decisive influence on the position of the ductile-to-brittle transformation temperature and the increase in it as the result of a hold at temperatures of development of brittleness. The established effect is related to the change in the parameters determining dislocation mobility, that is, the activation energy of dislocation movement in high-chromium ferrite and the resistance to microplastic deformation, both caused by processes of separation into layers of high-chromium ferrite and decomposition of the interstitial solid solution.

  8. Ferrite synthesis in microstructured media: Template effects and magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, C. J.; Buisson, Y. S. L.; Li, S.; Banerjee, S.; Premchandran, R.; Baumgartner, T.; John, V. T.; McPherson, G. L.; Akkara, J. A.; Kaplan, D. L.

    1997-04-01

    Inverse micelles and organogels provide novel environments to synthesize ferrite particles. The fluid microstructure provides a template for the synthesis. Our experiments with ferrite synthesis in inverse micelles indicate the formation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles. Of interest is the encapsulation of these particles in polymer microspheres. The encapsulation is done using simple polymer precipitation in the micellar nonsolvent. The process results in a polymer-ferrite composite exhibiting supermagnetism. Low temperature spin glass properties of the composite are characterized through SQUID measurements. These composites have a superparamagnetic blocking temperature of 16 K and follow Curie-Weiss law at temperatures above 60 K with the fitted parameters: C=0.941 emu/g K, θ=-287 K, and TIP=0.0001 emu/g. Since the polymer used is polyphenol, a highly functionalizable material, the composite is well suited for applications in magnetic bioseparations and magnetic coatings.

  9. Antimicrobial Lemongrass Essential Oil-Copper Ferrite Cellulose Acetate Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Liakos, Ioannis L; Abdellatif, Mohamed H; Innocenti, Claudia; Scarpellini, Alice; Carzino, Riccardo; Brunetti, Virgilio; Marras, Sergio; Brescia, Rosaria; Drago, Filippo; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2016-04-20

    Cellulose acetate (CA) nanoparticles were combined with two antimicrobial agents, namely lemongrass (LG) essential oil and Cu-ferrite nanoparticles. The preparation method of CA nanocapsules (NCs), with the two antimicrobial agents, was based on the nanoprecipitation method using the solvent/anti-solvent technique. Several physical and chemical analyses were performed to characterize the resulting NCs and to study their formation mechanism. The size of the combined antimicrobial NCs was found to be ca. 220 nm. The presence of Cu-ferrites enhanced the attachment of LG essential oil into the CA matrix. The magnetic properties of the combined construct were weak, due to the shielding of Cu-ferrites from the polymeric matrix, making them available for drug delivery applications where spontaneous magnetization effects should be avoided. The antimicrobial properties of the NCs were significantly enhanced with respect to CA/LG only. This work opens novel routes for the development of organic/inorganic nanoparticles with exceptional antimicrobial activities.

  10. Transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Sanpo, Noppakun; Berndt, Christopher C; Wen, Cuie; Wang, James

    2013-03-01

    Transition metals of copper, zinc, chromium and nickel were substituted into cobalt ferrite nanoparticles via a sol-gel route using citric acid as a chelating agent. The microstructure and elemental composition were characterized using scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Phase analysis of transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was performed via X-ray diffraction. Surface wettability was measured using the water contact angle technique. The surface roughness of all nanoparticles was measured using profilometry. Moreover, thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry were performed to determine the temperature at which the decomposition and oxidation of the chelating agents took place. Results indicated that the substitution of transition metals influences strongly the microstructure, crystal structure and antibacterial property of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  11. Impedimetric detection of alcohol vapours using nanostructured zinc ferrite.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Padmanathan Karthick; Saraswathi, Ramiah

    2014-11-01

    A comparative study on the sensing characteristics of nanostructured zinc ferrite to three primary alcohols viz. methanol, ethanol and propanol has been carried out. The zinc ferrite has been prepared by a combustion method and characterized by XRD, FTIR, AFM and SEM. Impedance studies in the alcohol concentration range varying from 100 to 1000 ppm show definite variations in response to both the nature of the alcohol and its concentration. The nanostructured zinc ferrite shows the highest sensor response to methanol and least to propanol. Equivalent circuit modelling and calibration have been made for all the three alcohol sensors. The material shows a better selectivity to the alcohols compared to formaldehyde, ammonia and acetone vapours.

  12. Ferrite core non-linearity in coils for magnetic neurostimulation.

    PubMed

    RamRakhyani, Anil Kumar; Lazzi, Gianluca

    2014-10-01

    The need to correctly predict the voltage across terminals of mm-sized coils, with ferrite core, to be employed for magnetic stimulation of the peripheral neural system is the motivation for this work. In such applications, which rely on a capacitive discharge on the coil to realise a transient voltage curve of duration and strength suitable for neural stimulation, the correct modelling of the non-linearity of the ferrite core is critical. A demonstration of how a finite-difference model of the considered coils, which include a model of the current-controlled inductance in the coil, can be used to correctly predict the time-domain voltage waveforms across the terminals of a test coil is presented. Five coils of different dimensions, loaded with ferrite cores, have been fabricated and tested: the measured magnitude and width of the induced pulse are within 10% of simulated values.

  13. Some properties of the circular waveguide with azimuthally magnetized ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Kamen P.; Georgiev, Georgi N.

    1990-05-01

    A comprehensive analysis of normal rotationally symmetric TE modes in a circular waveguide, filled with ferrite, magnetized azimuthally to remanence by a coaxial switching conductor of finite radius, is presented. The characteristic equation of the structure, derived in terms of Kummer and Tricomi confluent hypergeometric functions of complex parameter and variable, is solved numerically, using specially compiled tables of wave functions. Families of theoretically calculated nonreciprocal phase characteristics of the gyrotropic waveguide are shown in normalized form for the two latched states of remanent magnetization, a variety of ferrite parameters, and different values of switching conductor to waveguide radius ratio. The influence of structure geometry and parameters of anisotropic ferrite on normalized differential phase shift and cutoff frequency spectrum of the TE01 mode is discussed.

  14. XANES evidence of arsenate removal from water with magnetic ferrite.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yao-Jen; You, Chen-Feng; Chang, Chien-Kuei; Wang, Shan-Li

    2013-05-15

    Arsenic (As) in groundwater and surface water is a worldwide problem possessing a serious threat to public health. In this study, a magnetic ferrite, was synthesized and investigated for its As(V) removal efficiency. The adsorption of As(V) by magnetic ferrite exhibited an L-shaped nonlinear isotherm, suggesting limiting binding sites on the adsorbent surface. The As K-edge X-Ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) revealed that the adsorbed As(V) on ferrite was not reduced to more toxic As(III) by Fe(2+) in the ferrite structure. The maximum As adsorption capacity of ferrite was 14 mg/g at pH 3 and decreased with increasing pH due to enhanced electrostatic repulsion between As(V) and the adsorbent surface. Desorption of As(V) using six different acid and salt solutions showed that the desorption rate decreased in an order of H3PO4 > Na3PO4 > H2SO4 > Na2SO4 > HCl > HNO3. These results suggest that magnetic ferrite without surface modification is an effective adsorbent for removing As(V) from water, which was confirmed by the effective removal of As(V) from contaminated groundwater using this material. The used material can then be recovered using a magnet because of its paramagnetism; the adsorbed As(V) on the material can be recovered using H3PO4 or Na3PO4 solutions.

  15. Measurement of aerosol optical depth and sub-visual cloud detection using the optical depth sensor (ODS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, D.; Rannou, P.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Sarkissian, A.; Foujols, T.

    2015-09-01

    A small and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS) has been designed to work in the atmosphere of Earth and Mars. The instrument measures alternatively the diffuse radiation from the sky and the attenuated direct radiation from the sun on the surface. The principal goals of ODS are to retrieve the daily mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) and to detect very high and optically thin clouds, crucial parameters in understanding the Martian and Earth meteorology and climatology. The detection of clouds is undertaken at twilight, allowing the detection and characterization of clouds with opacities below 0.03 (sub-visual clouds). In addition, ODS is capable to retrieve the aerosol optical depth during night-time from moonlight measurements. In order to study the performance of ODS under Mars-like conditions as well as to evaluate the retrieval algorithms for terrestrial measurements, ODS was deployed in Ouagadougou (Africa) between November 2004 and October 2005, a sahelian region characterized by its high dust aerosol load and the frequent occurrence of Saharan dust storms. The daily average AOD values retrieved by ODS were compared with those provided by a CIMEL Sun-photometer of the AERONET (Aerosol Robotic NETwork) network localized at the same location. Results represent a good agreement between both ground-based instruments, with a correlation coefficient of 0.79 for the whole data set and 0.96 considering only the cloud-free days. From the whole dataset, a total of 71 sub-visual cirrus (SVC) were detected at twilight with opacities as thin as 1.10-3 and with a maximum of occurrence at altitudes between 14 and 20 km. Although further analysis and comparisons are required, results indicate the potential of ODS measurements to detect sub-visual clouds.

  16. Cobalt ferrite based magnetostrictive materials for magnetic stress sensor and actuator applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiles, David C. (Inventor); Paulsen, Jason A. (Inventor); Snyder, John E. (Inventor); Lo, Chester C. H. (Inventor); Ring, Andrew P. (Inventor); Bormann, Keith A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Magnetostrictive material based on cobalt ferrite is described. The cobalt ferrite is substituted with transition metals (such manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) or mixtures thereof) by substituting the transition metals for iron or cobalt to form substituted cobalt ferrite that provides mechanical properties that make the substituted cobalt ferrite material effective for use as sensors and actuators. The substitution of transition metals lowers the Curie temperature of the material (as compared to cobalt ferrite) while maintaining a suitable magnetostriction for stress sensing applications.

  17. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Baltich, L.K.

    1987-02-23

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  18. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Silaban, A.; Harrison, D.P. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1989-05-02

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such as size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  19. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

    1989-05-02

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  20. Gas atomization of cobalt ferrite-phosphate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; O'Handley, R. C.; Kalonji, G.

    1989-01-01

    XRD, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and EDXS have been used to characterize a rapidly-solidified (Co,Fe)3O4 spinel generated in a cobalt-iron-phosphate glass matrix by gas atomization of melts. Of the two compositions tested, that containing 20 mol pct P2O5 exhibited randomly-oriented ferrite crystallization whose growth appears to have been diffusion-controlled. Unlike the ferrite, in which the iron has both tetrahedral and octahedral coordination, the iron in the glassy matrix was primarily of distorted-octahedral coordination. Calculations indicate that the cooling rates obtained with oxide melts vary strongly with droplet size, but less strongly with melt temperature.

  1. The ferrite/superconductor layered structure for tunable microwave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobyl, A.; Suris, R.; Karmanenko, S.; Semenov, A.; Melkov, A.; Konuhov, S.; Olshevski, A.

    2002-08-01

    The ferrite/superconductor (FS) structure composed from the separate ferrite garnet Y 3Fe 5O 12 epitaxial layers and superconducting films was used for development of such microwave devices as tunable pass-band filter, phase-shifter and delay line. Application of superconducting layer decreases the microwave losses and it provides new functions of magnetostatic waveguide FS structures. The central frequency of band-pass filter is tuned from 1.5 up to 3 GHz; bandwidth can be regulated by the geometry of antenna transducers (from 30 up to 300 MHz); band insertion loss is about 1.5-3 dB.

  2. Magnetodielectric effect of Mn-Zn ferrite at resonant frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pengfei, Pan; Ning, Zhang

    2016-10-01

    The dielectric properties and the magnetodielectric effect in Mn-Zn ferrite at resonant frequency have been studied in this paper. Dimensional-resonance-induced abnormal dielectric spectrum was observed at f≈1 MHz. The relatively large magnetodielectric ratio of 4500% in a magnetic field of 3.5 kOe was achieved from the Mn-Zn ferrite sample with the initial permeability of 15 K at resonant frequency at room temperature. Theoretical analysis suggests that the large MD effect at resonant frequency is attributed to the enhanced magnetostriction effect.

  3. Nanoindentation studies of nickel zinc ferrite embedded mesoporous silica template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, S.; Hajra, P.; Mada, M. R.; Bandopadhyay, S.; Chakravorty, D.

    2013-02-01

    Nickel zinc ferrite (NZF) embedded mesoporous silica KIT-6 nanocomposite (NZFMS) was synthesized via impregnation method. The microstructure of the samples was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Nanoindentation (NI) studies were carried out on both mesoporous silica (MS) and the nanocomposite NZFMS. It was found that the young's modulus (E) and hardness (H) of the NZFMS were higher than that of the MS. From creep measurement it was observed that the creep-strain rate was greater for NZFMS compared to MS. This arose due to diffusion of Fe3+ ions from nickel zinc ferrite to the silica glass. The results indicate that the NZFMS material shows superplastic behaviour at room temperature.

  4. Electrical and optical properties of gadolinium doped bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, A. Banerjee, M. Basu, S.; Pal, M.

    2014-04-24

    Multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BFO) and gadolinium (Gd) doped bismuth ferrite had been synthesized by a sol-gel method. Particle size had been estimated by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and found to decrease with Gd doping. We studied the temperature and frequency dependence of impedance and electric modulus and calculated the grain and grain boundary resistance and capacitance of the investigated samples. We observed that electrical activation energy increases for all the doped samples. Optical band gap also increases for the doped samples which can be used in photocatalytic application of BFO.

  5. Modeling ferrite electromagnetic response in the time domain

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.; DeFord, J.F.; Craig, G.D.

    1989-04-06

    The behavior of ferrite loads commonly found in induction accelertors has important consequences for the performance of these accelerators. Previous work by the authors on modeling the electromagnetic fields in induction cavities has focussed upon use of a simple, phenomenological model for the process of magnetization reversal in these ferrite loads. In this paper we consider a model for magnetization reversal which is more deeply rooted in theory, and present a simulation of the reversal process based upon this model for an idealized set of boundary conditions. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  6. The role of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles in medical science.

    PubMed

    Amiri, S; Shokrollahi, H

    2013-01-01

    The nanotechnology industry is rapidly growing and promises that the substantial changes that will have significant economic and scientific impacts be applicable to a wide range of areas, such as aerospace engineering, nano-electronics, environmental remediation and medical healthcare. In this area, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles have been regarded as one of the competitive candidates because of their suitable physical, chemical and magnetic properties like the high anisotropy constant, high coercivity and high Curie temperature, moderate saturation magnetization and ease of synthesis. This paper introduces the magnetic properties, synthesis methods and some medical applications, including the hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic separation and drug delivery of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  7. Control of magnetization reversal in oriented strontium ferrite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Debangsu Anil Kumar, P. S.

    2014-02-21

    Oriented Strontium Ferrite films with the c axis orientation were deposited with varying oxygen partial pressure on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrate using Pulsed Laser Deposition technique. The angle dependent magnetic hysteresis, remanent coercivity, and temperature dependent coercivity had been employed to understand the magnetization reversal of these films. It was found that the Strontium Ferrite thin film grown at lower (higher) oxygen partial pressure shows Stoner-Wohlfarth type (Kondorsky like) reversal. The relative importance of pinning and nucleation processes during magnetization reversal is used to explain the type of the magnetization reversal with different oxygen partial pressure during growth.

  8. Microstructure characterization and cation distribution of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Y. M.; Mansour, S. A.; Ibrahim, M. H.; Ali, Shehab E.

    2011-11-01

    Nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite has been synthesized using two different methods: ceramic and co-precipitation techniques. The nanocrystalline ferrite phase has been formed after 3 h of sintering at 1000 °C. The structural and microstructural evolutions of the nanophase have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction and the Rietveld method. The refinement result showed that the type of the cationic distribution over the tetrahedral and octahedral sites in the nanocrystalline lattice is partially an inverse spinel. The transmission electronic microscope analysis confirmed the X-ray results. The magnetic properties of the samples were characterized using a vibrating sample magnetometer.

  9. Electrical and optical properties of gadolinium doped bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, A.; Banerjee, M.; Basu, S.; Pal, M.

    2014-04-01

    Multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BFO) and gadolinium (Gd) doped bismuth ferrite had been synthesized by a sol-gel method. Particle size had been estimated by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and found to decrease with Gd doping. We studied the temperature and frequency dependence of impedance and electric modulus and calculated the grain and grain boundary resistance and capacitance of the investigated samples. We observed that electrical activation energy increases for all the doped samples. Optical band gap also increases for the doped samples which can be used in photocatalytic application of BFO.

  10. Analysis of high temperature deformation mechanism in ODS EUROFER97 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramar, A.; Spätig, P.; Schäublin, R.

    2008-12-01

    Oxide dispersion in tempered martensitic EUROFER97 steel is an efficient approach to improve its strength. The oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) EUROFER97 steel shows a good strength up to 600 °C, but degrades rapidly beyond that temperature. To understand the origin in the microstructure of this drop in strength in situ heating experiment in TEM was performed from room temperature to 1000 °C. Upon heating neither microstructure changes nor dislocation movement are observed up to 600 °C. Movement of dislocations are observed above 680 °C. Phase transformation to austenite starts at 840 °C. Yttria particles remain stable up to 1000 °C. Changes in mechanical properties thus do not relate to changes in yttria dispersion. It is attempted to relate these observations to the thermal activation parameters measured by the technique of conventional strain rate experiment, which allow to identify at a mesoscopic scale the microstructural mechanisms responsible for the degradation of ODS steel at high temperatures.

  11. A Comparative Study of Welded ODS Cladding materials for AFCI/GNEP Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Indrajit Charit; Megan Frary; Darryl Butt; K.L. Murty; Larry Zirker; James Cole; Mitchell Meyer; Rajiv S. Mishra; Mark Woltz

    2011-03-31

    This research project involved working on the pressure resistance welding of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys which will have a large role to play in advanced nuclear reactors. The project also demonstrated the research collaboration between four universities and one nation laboratory (Idaho National Laboratory) with participation from an industry for developing for ODS alloys. These alloys contain a high number density of very fine oxide particles that can impart high temperature strength and radiation damage resistance suitable for in-core applications in advanced reactors. The conventional fusion welding techniques tend to produce porosity-laden microstructure in the weld region and lead to the agglomeration and non-uniform distribution of the neededoxide particles. That is why two solid state welding methods - pressure resistance welding (PRW) and friction stir welding (FSW) - were chosen to be evaluated in this project. The proposal is expected to support the development of Advanced Burner Reactors (ABR) under the GNEP program (now incorporated in Fuel Cycle R&D program). The outcomes of the concluded research include training of graduate and undergraduate students and get them interested in nuclear related research.

  12. Influence of consolidation methods on the recrystallization kinetics of a Fe-14Cr based ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadé, M.; Malaplate, J.; Garnier, J.; De Geuser, F.; Lochet, N.; Deschamps, A.

    2016-04-01

    The recrystallization behavior during thermal annealing with or without prior cold work has been investigated in a 14%Cr ODS steel consolidated by two different methods, hot extrusion (HE) and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). We show that a 1400°C-1 h annealing induces an increase of the oxide nanoparticles radius from 1.3 to 3 nm, however the grain size remain stable despite a recovery of sub-grain boundaries for the hot extruded material. When pre-deformation is applied before annealing, almost full recrystallization can be achieved on the HE ODS steel. In this study, we show recrystallization after 40% cold deformation and annealing 30 min at 1450 °C together with coarsening of oxide particles. At lower temperature and higher pre-deformation (70%-1150 °C/30 min), we show that recrystallization can be achieved without change of the oxide size distribution. We show that due to a lower initial dislocation density, recrystallization is strongly delayed, by at least 250 °C, in the HIP material. Finally, we show that the evolution of the size of the oxide precipitates is controlled by the time and temperature of annealing and are independent on the pre-deformation and occurrence of recrystallization.

  13. Dispersoid Distribution and Microstructure in Fe-Cr-Al Ferritic Oxide Dispersion-Strengthened Alloy Prepared by Friction Consolidation

    SciTech Connect

    Catalini, David; Kaoumi, Djamel; Reynolds, Anthony; Grant, Glenn J.

    2015-07-09

    INCOLOY® MA956 is a ferritic Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloy. Three different oxides, Y4Al2O9, YAlO3 and Y3Al5O12, have been observed in this alloy. The oxide particle sizes range from just a few up to hundreds of nm and these particles are responsible of the high temperature mechanical strength of this alloy. Mechanically alloyed MA956 powder was consolidated via Friction Consolidation using three different processing conditions. As a result, three small compacts of low porosity were produced. The compacts exhibited a refined equiaxed grain structure with grain sizes smaller than 10 µm and the desired oxide dispersion.YAlO3 and Y3Al5O12 were identified in the compacts by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The size distribution of precipitates above 50 nm showed a direct proportionality between average precipitate size and grain size. The total energy input during processing was correlated with the relative amount of each of the oxides in the disks: the higher the total processing energy input, the higher the relative amount of Y3Al5O12 precipitates. The elemental composition of the oxide precipitates was also probed individually by EDS showing an aluminum enrichment trend as precipitates grow in size.

  14. Dependence of microwave absorption properties on ferrite volume fraction in MnZn ferrite/rubber radar absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gama, Adriana M.; Rezende, Mirabel C.; Dantas, Christine C.

    2011-11-01

    We report the analysis of measurements of the complex magnetic permeability ( μr) and dielectric permittivity ( ɛr) spectra of a rubber radar absorbing material (RAM) with various MnZn ferrite volume fractions. The transmission/reflection measurements were carried out in a vector network analyzer. Optimum conditions for the maximum microwave absorption were determined by substituting the complex permeability and permittivity in the impedance matching equation. Both the MnZn ferrite content and the RAM thickness effects on the microwave absorption properties, in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz, were evaluated. The results show that the complex permeability and permittivity spectra of the RAM increase directly with the ferrite volume fraction. Reflection loss calculations by the impedance matching degree (reflection coefficient) show the dependence of this parameter on both thickness and composition of RAM.

  15. Cross-Roll Flow Forming of ODS Alloy Heat Exchanger Tubes For Hoop Creep Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal Kad

    2007-09-30

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program were to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. The research program outlined was iterative and intended to systematically (i) examine and identify post-extrusion forming methodologies to create hoop strengthened tubes, to be (ii) evaluated at 'in-service' loads at service temperatures and environments. Our report outlines the significant hoop creep enhancements possible via secondary cross-rolling and/or flow-forming operations. Each of the

  16. Cross-Roll Flow Forming of ODS Alloy Heat Exchanger Tubes For Hoop Creep Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2006-09-30

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (a) examine and identify post-extrusion forming methodologies to create hoop strengthened tubes, which will be (b) evaluated at ''in-service'' loads at service temperatures and environments. In this 12th quarter of performance, program activities are concluded for Task 2 and continuing for Tasks 3, 4 and

  17. Cross-Roll Flow Forming of ODS Alloy Heat Exchanger Tubes for Hoop Creep Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2006-04-10

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (1) examine and identify post-extrusion forming methodologies to create hoop strengthened tubes, which will be (2) evaluated at ''in-service'' loads at service temperatures and environments. This research program is being conducted in collaboration with the DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the vested

  18. Recent advances in nanosized Mn-Zn ferrite magnetic fluid hyperthermia for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mei; Huang, Junxing; Sha, Min

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent research and development of nanosized manganese zinc (Mn-Zn) ferrite magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) for cancer treatment. Mn-Zn ferrite MFH, which has a targeted positioning function that only the temperature of tumor tissue with magnetic nanoparticles can rise, while normal tissue without magnetic nanoparticles is not subject to thermal damage, is a promising therapy for cancer. We introduce briefly the composition and properties of magnetic fluid, the concept of MFH, and features of Mn-Zn ferrite magnetic nanoparticles for MFH such as thermal bystander effect, universality, high specific absorption rate, the targeting effect of small size, uniformity of hyperthermia temperature, and automatic temperature control and constant temperature effect. Next, preparation methods of Mn-Zn ferrite magnetic fluid are discussed, and biocompatibility and biosecurity of Mn-Zn ferrite magnetic fluid are analyzed. Then the applications of nanosized Mn-Zn ferrite MFH in cancer are highlighted, including nanosized Mn-Zn ferrite MFH alone, nanosized Mn-Zn ferrite MFH combined with As2O3 chemotherapy, and nanosized Mn-Zn ferrite MFH combined with radiotherapy. Finally, the combination application of nanosized Mn-Zn ferrite MFH and gene-therapy is conceived, and the challenges and perspectives for the future of nanosized Mn-Zn ferrite MFH for oncotherapy are discussed.

  19. Microwave absorption property of plasma spray W-type hexagonal ferrite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shicheng; Liu, Yi; Tian, Haoliang; Tong, Hui; Liu, Yuxin; Xu, Binshi

    2015-03-01

    In order to enhance the adhesion strength of microwave absorbing materials, W-type hexagonal ferrite coating is fabricated by plasma spray. The feedstock of ferrite powders is synthesized by solid-state reaction and spray dried process. Microstructures of the coating are analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectra (EDS). Hexagonal ferrite coating is successfully deposited on the substrate with adhesion strength of 28 MPa. The magnetic property of ferrite samples is measured using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Saturation magnetization of the ferrite coating is lower than ferrite powder. Reflection loss of the hexagonal ferrite coating is measured in frequency of 2-18 GHz. The result shows that the coating is suitable for electromagnetic wave absorbers in Ku-band.

  20. Microwave characterization of (Co,Zn) 2W barium hexagonal ferrite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Y.; He, H. H.; Feng, Z. K.; Zhang, X. C.; Cheng, X. M.

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents the static magnetic and microwave characterization of hexagonal ferrite BaZn 1.1Co 0.9Fe 16O 27 particles for application in a microwave absorber. The hexagonal ferrite particles have been developed through conventional ceramic processes. Ferrite particles were examined via scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometry. The complex permeability and permittivity of ferrite-wax composites were measured over the frequency range of 2-8 GHz. The microwave intrinsic permeability and permittivity spectra have been presented, which were calculated on the basis of the measurement data of the ferrite-wax mixtures using the Bruggeman equation. The microwave absorption properties of these ferrite particles have also been discussed. The results indicate that these ferrites have good potential to be used as a broad band microwave absorber.

  1. A study of NiZnCu-ferrite/SiO 2 nanocomposites with different ferrite contents synthesized by sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shifeng; Geng, Jianxin; Chen, Jianfeng; Yin, Li; Zhou, Yunchun; Liu, Leijing; Zhou, Enle

    2005-04-01

    Ni 0.65Zn 0.35Cu 0.1Fe 1.9O 4/SiO 2 nanocomposites with different weight percentages of NiZnCu-ferrite dispersed in silica matrix were successfully fabricated by the sol-gel method using tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as a precursor of silica, and metal nitrates as precursors of NiZnCu ferrite. The thermal decomposition process of the dried gel was studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The obtained Ni 0.65Zn 0.35Cu 0.1Fe 1.9O 4/SiO 2 nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Mössbauer spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The formation of stoichiometric NiZnCu-ferrite dispersed in silica matrix is confirmed when the weight percentage of ferrite is not more than 30%. Samples with higher ferrite content have small amount of α-Fe 2O 3. The transition from the paramagnetic to the ferromagnetic state is observed as the ferrite content increases from 20 to 90 wt%. The magnetic properties of the nanocomposites are closely related to the ferrite content. The saturation magnetization increases with the ferrite content, while the coercivity reaches a maximum when the ferrite is 80 wt% in the silica matrix.

  2. Effect of δ-ferrite evolution and high-temperature annealing on mechanical properties of 11Cr3W3Co ferritic/martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Zhongxia; Shen, Yinzhong; Ji, Bo; Zhang, Lanting

    2016-03-01

    An 11Cr3W3Co ferritic/martensitic steel was annealed at 1100 °C for different time to gradually dissolve δ-ferrite, and then conducted tensile, hardness, and short-term creep tests in combination with microstructural characterization to study the effect of δ-ferrite on the mechanical properties of high-Cr ferritic/martensitic steels. The amount of δ-ferrite gradually decreased to a minimum value with increasing annealing time up to 10 h, and then tended to an ascending tendency when annealed for 15 and 20 h. Accordingly the tensile strength at 300 and 650 °C, and Vickers hardness of the steel had an increase and a decrease tendency when δ-ferrite amount decreased down to its minimum value and increased again, respectively. The short-term creep property at 210 MPa at 650 °C of the steel exhibited a serious degradation as annealing time gradually increased to 15 h. The morphology and orientation of δ-ferrite grains seriously affected the short-term creep property of the steel. δ-ferrite with a continuously bamboo-like shape parallel to loading direction effectively improved the short-term creep property of the steel at high temperature, while δ-ferrite with a granular or block shape seriously damaged the short-term creep property of the steel. These findings have also been discussed.

  3. A novel high power X-band ferrite phase shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, G. J.; Huang, W. H.; Li, J. W.; Ba, T.; Guo, L. T.; Jiang, Y.

    2017-01-01

    A novel high power X-band ferrite phase shifter (PS) employing the structure of several waveguides connected in parallel is proposed. Each of the waveguides is a phase shift unit utilizing a dual-toroid structure. First, the phase shift unit is designed, manufactured, and tested. The results indicate that the power capacity reaches 115 kW. At this power, the maximum magnetic field strength of ferrite is 7.9 kA/m, beyond which the nonlinear effect of ferrite will occur. On this basis, the PS that consists of four units connected in parallel is designed. According to the threshold of ferrite, the power capacity of the PS can theoretically reach 430 kW. Limited by the maximum output power of the microwave source, the preliminary high-power test results demonstrate that the PS can operate properly at 270 kW. The PS exhibits an insertion loss of 0.82 dB and a maximum differential phase shift of approximately 300° at 9.3 GHz. The return loss of the PS is more than 16 dB from 9.0 to 9.5 GHz.

  4. A novel high power X-band ferrite phase shifter.

    PubMed

    Deng, G J; Huang, W H; Li, J W; Ba, T; Guo, L T; Jiang, Y

    2017-01-01

    A novel high power X-band ferrite phase shifter (PS) employing the structure of several waveguides connected in parallel is proposed. Each of the waveguides is a phase shift unit utilizing a dual-toroid structure. First, the phase shift unit is designed, manufactured, and tested. The results indicate that the power capacity reaches 115 kW. At this power, the maximum magnetic field strength of ferrite is 7.9 kA/m, beyond which the nonlinear effect of ferrite will occur. On this basis, the PS that consists of four units connected in parallel is designed. According to the threshold of ferrite, the power capacity of the PS can theoretically reach 430 kW. Limited by the maximum output power of the microwave source, the preliminary high-power test results demonstrate that the PS can operate properly at 270 kW. The PS exhibits an insertion loss of 0.82 dB and a maximum differential phase shift of approximately 300° at 9.3 GHz. The return loss of the PS is more than 16 dB from 9.0 to 9.5 GHz.

  5. Ferritic Fe-Mn alloy for cryogenic applications

    DOEpatents

    Hwang, Sun-Keun; Morris, Jr., John W.

    1979-01-01

    A ferritic, nickel-free alloy steel composition, suitable for cryogenic applications, which consists essentially of about 10-13% manganese, 0.002-0.01% boron, 0.1-0.5% titanium, 0-0.05% aluminum, and the remainder iron and incidental impurities normally associated therewith.

  6. Characteristics of a broad band and thin ferrite absorbing wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsuka, Youji

    The author proposes a method of reducing the thickness of a ferrite absorbing wall and controlling the matching frequency characteristics by applying a DC magnetic field, HDC, perpendicularly to the microwave magnetic field. The matching characteristics of this method are investigated in detail on the basis of experimental data. The thickness reduction of the absorbing is first discussed from the standpoint of scalar permeability. Based upon these investigations, a thinned ferrite absorbing wall has been designed on a trial basis. The synthetic wave-absorbing material consists of a ferrite disk backed with a samarium-cobalt magnetic material generating a static magnetic field. Fairly good VSWR (voltage standing wave ratio) characteristics below 1.2 have been obtained with a total thickness of 3.8 mm in the frequency range from VHF to UHF. As an application of these characteristics, by controlling both the ferrite thickness and DC magnetic field simultaneously, it has been clarified that the matching frequency characteristics are easily exchanged in the broad frequency region.

  7. Magnetoabsorption and magnetic hysteresis in Ni ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Gómez, P.; Muñoz, J. M.; Valente, M. A.; Torres, C.; de Francisco, C.

    2013-01-01

    Nickel ferrite nanoparticles were prepared by a modified sol-gel technique employing coconut oil, and then annealed at different temperatures in 400-1200 °C range. This route of preparation has revealed to be one efficient and cheap technique to obtain high quality nickel ferrite nanosized powder. Sample particles sizes obtained with XRD data and Scherrer's formula lie in 13 nm to 138 nm, with increased size with annealing temperature. Hysteresis loops have been obtained at room temperature with an inductive method. Magnetic field induced microwave absorption in nanoscale ferrites is a recent an active area of research, in order to characterize and explore potential novel applications. In the present work microwave magnetoabsorption data of the annealed nickel ferrite nanoparticles are presented. These data have been obtained with a system based on a network analyzer that operates in the frequency range 0 - 8.5 GHz. At fields up to 400 mT we can observe a peak according to ferromagnetic resonance theory. Sample annealed at higher temperature exhibits different absorption, coercivity and saturation magnetization figures, revealing its multidomain character.

  8. Millimetre-wave isolator based on Al substituted Ba ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinov, A. B.; Vinnik, D. A.; Belyavskii, P. Yu; Gudkova, S. A.; Zakharchuk, I.; Lähderanta, E.

    2016-11-01

    A mm-wave isolator is fabricated and studied. The operating frequency of the devices is 78.5 GHz. A bandwidth at the level of -3 dB equals 1.6 GHz. The device used a flux grown single-crystal aluminum substituted barium ferrite.

  9. Tuning of magnetic properties in cobalt ferrite nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Cedeno-Mattei, Y.; Roman, F.; Perales-Perez, O.; Tomar, M. S.; Voyles, P. M.; Stratton, W. G.

    2008-04-01

    Cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) possesses excellent chemical stability, good mechanical hardness, and a large positive first order crystalline anisotropy constant, making it a promising candidate for magneto-optical recording media. In addition to precise control of the composition and structure of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, its practical application will require the capability to control particle size at the nanoscale. The results of a synthesis approach in which size control is achieved by modifying the oversaturation conditions during ferrite formation in water through a modified coprecipitation approach are reported. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) diffraction, and TEM energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analyses confirmed the formation of the nanoscale cobalt ferrite. M-H measurements verified the strong influence of synthesis conditions on crystal size and hence, on the magnetic properties of ferrite nanocrystals. The room-temperature coercivity values increased from 460 up to 4626 Oe under optimum synthesis conditions determined from a 2{sup 3} factorial design.

  10. Surface hardening of parts from ferrite-pearlite gray iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, Yu. G.; Ovsyannikov, V. E.; Marfitsyn, V. V.; Frolov, V. A.

    2011-10-01

    The possibility of a simple method of chromizing of parts from ferrite-pearlite gray iron is studied theoretically and proved experimentally. A process for diffusion chromizing of parts from this iron is suggested. When followed by surface hardening the process yields a high-hardness surface layer with abrasive strength comparable to that of white chromium cast iron.

  11. Molded elastomer provides compact ferrite-core holder, simplifies assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, R. R.

    1964-01-01

    A ferrite-core holder, fabricated by casting an elastomer in a simple mold, simplifies the assembly of modular matrix units for computers. Use of the device permits the core leads to be multiply threaded and soldered to terminals, without requiring intermediate terminals.

  12. Microwave Loss Properties of Hexagonal Ferrites for Millimeter Wave Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-15

    concerns the magnetic loss. Previous ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) linewidth data indicated that these losses were too large for efficient device... magnetic and dielectric materials measurement facility at Colorado State University and one to extend the measurements reported herein to the actual...reprint of the article, "Off Resonance Relaxation in Hexagonal Ferrites", which was presented at the International Conference on Magnetics , San

  13. Tailoring the magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Vega, A. Estrada; Garza-Navarro, M. A.; Durán-Guerrero, J. G.; Moreno Cortez, I. E.; Lucio-Porto, R.; González-González, V.

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution, we report on the tuning of magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters. The cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters were synthesized from a two-step approach that consists of the synthesis of cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles in organic media, followed by their dispersion into aqueous dissolution to form an oil-in-water emulsion. These emulsions were prepared at three different concentrations of the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), in order to control the size and clustering density of the nanoparticles in the nanoclusters. The synthesized samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and their related techniques, such as bright-field and Z-contrast imaging, electron diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry; as well as static magnetic measures. The experimental evidence indicates that the size, morphology, and nanoparticles clustering density in the nanoclusters is highly dependent of the cobalt-ferrite:CTAB molar ratio that is used in their synthesis. In addition, due to the clustering of the nanoparticles into the nanoclusters, their magnetic moments are blocked to relax cooperatively. Hence, the magnetic response of the nanoclusters can be tailored by controlling the size and nanoparticles clustering density.

  14. Synthesis and Magnetic Properties of Cobalt Ferrite with Different Morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Bibhuti B.; Nayak, Nadiya Bihary; Mallik, Rahul Kumar; Mondal, Aparna

    Different morphologies (spherical, flake and rod) of cobalt ferrite were synthesized using cobalt salt, iron salts, hydrazine hydrate (as a precipitating agent) and CTAB (surfactant) in water as well as ethylene glycol solvents. Four different synthesis ways (HIS, SIH, HISCO and HISG) were adopted to synthesize cobalt ferrite nanopowders using precipitation method. The as-prepared powders obtained after different synthesis ways were calcined at 800°C and structure, microstructure as well as magnetic properties are studied. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and magnetization studies using pulsed field loop tracer were employed to characterize these cobalt ferrite powders, prepared using different precipitation ways. All the samples are identified with single phase cobalt ferrite and the crystallite size was found to be around 40 nm. Nearly spherical (multifaceted), rod with flake-like, nearly spherical and rod-like morphologies are obtained while synthesizing using HIS, SIH, HISCO and HISG ways, respectively. Rod with flake-like (SIH sample) and rod-like morphologies (HISG sample) show higher coercivity, than the spherical-like (SIH and HISCO smaples) morphology. The highest coericivty was found to be around 925 Oe for HISG sample and highest magnetization is 67 emu/g for HISCO sample.

  15. Study of DNA interaction with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pershina, A G; Sazonov, A E; Novikov, D V; Knyazev, A S; Izaak, T I; Itin, V I; Naiden, E P; Magaeva, A A; Terechova, O G

    2011-03-01

    Interaction of cobalt ferrite nanopowder and nucleic acid was investigated. Superparamagnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (6-12 nm) were prepared by mechanochemical synthesis. Structure of the nanopowder was characterized using X-ray diffraction. It was shown that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were associated with ssDNA and dsDNA in Tris-buffer resulting in bionanocomposite formation with mass weight relation nanoparticles: DNA 1:(0.083 +/- 0.003) and 1:(0.075 +/- 0.003) respectively. The mechanism of interaction between a DNA and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was considered basing on the whole set of obtained data: FTIR-spectroscopy, analyzing desorption of DNA from the surface of the particles while changing the chemical content of the medium, and on the modeling interaction of specific biomolecule fragments with surface of a inorganic material. It was supposed that the linkage was based on coordination interaction of the phosphate groups and oxygen atoms heterocyclic bases of DNA with metal ions on the particle surface. These data can be used to design specific magnetic DNA-nanoparticles hybrid structures.

  16. Vapor-phase catalytic oxidesulfurization (ODS) of organosulfur compounds over supported metal oxide catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sukwon

    Sulfur in transportation fuels remains a leading source of SOx emissions from vehicle engines and is a major source of air pollution. The very low levels of sulfur globally mandated for transportation fuels in the near future cannot be achieved by current practices of hydrodesulfurization (HDS) for sulfur removal, which operate under severe conditions (high T, P) and use valuable H2. Novel vapor-phase catalytic oxidesulfurization (ODS) processes of selectively oxidizing various organosulfur compounds (carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide (DMS), dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), thiophene, 2,5-dimenthylthiophene) typically found in various industrial streams (e.g., petroleum refining, pulp and paper) into valuable chemical intermediates (H 2CO, CO, H2, maleic anhydride and concentrated SO2) has been extensively studied. This research has primarily focused on establishing the fundamental kinetics and mechanisms of these selective oxidation reactions over well-defined supported metal oxide catalysts. The selective oxidation reactions of COS + O2 → CO + SO2; 2CS2 + 5O2 → 2CO + 4SO2; CH3SH + 2O 2 → H2CO + SO2 + H2O; C4 H4S + 3O2 → C4H2O 3 + H2O + SO2; were studied. Raman spectroscopy revealed that the supported metal oxide phases were 100% dispersed on the oxide substrate. All the catalysts were highly active and selective for the oxidesulfurization of carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, methanethiol, and thiophene between 290--330°C, 230--270°C, 350--400°C, and 250--400°C, respectively and did not deactivate. The TOFs (turnover frequency, normalized activity per active catalytic site) for all ODS reactions over supported vanadia catalysts, only containing molecularly dispersed surface vanadia species, varied within one order of magnitude and revealed the V-O-Support bridging bond was involved in the critical rate-determining kinetic steps. The surface reaction mechanism for each reaction was revealed by in situ IR (infrared) and

  17. Direct correlation between morphology of (Fe,Cr) 23C 6 precipitates and impact behavior of ODS steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimiankou, M.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.

    2007-08-01

    The microstructure of ODS steels was investigated after different thermal and thermo-mechanical treatments by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and analytical TEM techniques, including energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) mapping of the elemental distribution at the nanometer scale. In 'as-HIPped' first generation ODS-Eurofer steel the grain boundaries were decorated with Cr-rich precipitates of M 23C 6 type. In addition, EDX mapping showed Cr-depleted areas at grain boundaries. Thermal and thermo-mechanical treatments of the ODS material affect the size, composition and spatial distribution of the precipitates. Depending on the treatments, the morphology and density of the M 23C 6 can be systematically varied. A significant decrease in ductile-to-brittle-transition-temperature (DBTT) in impact tests and an improvement in the tensile ductility at high temperature can be directly linked to the changes in precipitate morphology and size.

  18. Anisotropic mechanical properties of the MA956 ODS steel characterized by the small punch testing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turba, K.; Hurst, R. C.; Hähner, P.

    2012-09-01

    The small punch testing technique was used to assess both creep and fracture properties of the MA956 oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel. The anisotropy in mechanical properties was addressed, as well as the alloy's susceptibility to thermal embrittlement. Strong anisotropy was found in the material's creep resistance at 725 °C for longer rupture times. Anisotropic behavior was also observed for the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). The origin of the anisotropy can be related to the strongly directional microstructure which enables a large amount of intergranular cracking during straining at both high and low temperatures. The DBTT of the alloy is very high, and can be further increased by at least 200 °C after 1000 h of ageing at 475 °C, due to the formation of the Cr-rich α' phase. The particularly high susceptibility of the MA956 to thermal embrittlement is mainly a consequence of its high chromium content.

  19. Spindly cobalt ferrite nanocrystals: preparation, characterization and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xuebo; Gu, Li

    2005-02-01

    In this paper we describe the preparation of homogeneously needle-shaped cobalt ferrite (CoFe(2)O(4)) nanocrystals on a large scale through the smooth decomposition of urea and the resulting co-precipitation of Co(2+) and Fe(3+) in oleic acid micelles. Furthermore, we found that other ferrite nanocrystals with a needle-like shape, such as zinc ferrite (ZnFe(2)O(4)) and nickel ferrite (NiFe(2)O(4)), can be prepared by the same process. Needle-shaped CoFe(2)O(4) nanocrystals dispersed in an aqueous solution containing oleic acid exhibit excellent stability and the formed colloid does not produce any precipitations after two months, which is of prime importance if these materials are applied in magnetic fluids. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements were used to characterize the phase and component of the co-precipitation products, and demonstrate that they are spinel ferrite with a cubic symmetry. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation showed that all the nanocrystals present a needle-like shape with a 22 nm short axis and an aspect ratio of around 6. Varying the concentration of oleic acid did not bring about any obvious influence on the size distribution and shapes of CoFe(2)O(4). The magnetic properties of the needle-shaped CoFe(2)O(4) nanocrystals were evaluated by using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and a Mössbauer spectrometer, and the results all demonstrated that CoFe(2)O(4) nanocrystals were superparamagnetic at room temperature.

  20. Dielectric Properties of Hydrothermal Nickel-Zinc Ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Anderson; della Santina Mohallem, Nelcy; Luiz Moreira, Roberto

    1996-07-01

    NiZn ferrites were hydrothermally prepared and sintered at different experimental conditions, leading to materials of composition Ni{0.34}Zn{0.60}Fe{2.06}O{4}. An investigation of the dielectric properties over a wide frequency range showed the semiconductor character of the ferrites and the presence of a masked relaxation, revealed after a mathematical treatment. The relaxation was modeled using a Cole-Cole model and the parameters correlated with the microstructural evolution of the ferrites during the sintering. The contributions of hopping electrons and space charges to the total conductivity have been discussed. La méthode hydrothermale a été utilisée pour préparer des poudres de NiZn. Ces matériaux ont été synthétisés sous différentes conditions expérimentales. Après frittage, la composition est Ni{0,34}Zn{0,60}Fe{2,06}O{4}. L'investigation des propriétés diélectriques, sur une large intervalle de fréquence, a démontré le caractère semiconducteur des ferrites et l'existence d'une relaxation masquée, mise en évidence après un traitement mathématique. Cette relaxation a été traitée par un modèle de type Cole-Cole et les paramètres corrélés à l'évolution microstructurale des ferrites, pendant le processus de frittage. Les contributions à la conductivités complexe dues aux électrons (“hopping”) et aux charges d'espace ont été discutées.

  1. Joining a Ni-based creep-resistant (ODS) alloy by brazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucklow, I. A.

    Joints are produced in a fine-grained Ni oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy by means of brazing alloys with and without boron, and the resulting joints are studied mechanographically. The brazing alloys employed are either sputtered coatings or foils, and brazing is conducted in a vacuum for approximately two hours. The resulting joints are examined during the process by mass spectrometry and afterwards by means of metallographic observation following etching in glyceregia. Premature and uncontrolled recrystallization of the parent metal is noted in the samples brazed with alloys obtaining boron. The 2-micron braze coating used minimize second-phase formation and dispersoid agglomerations, and the 25-micron brazing foils lead to high porosity and dispersoid aggregation due to excessive melting. Recrystallization of the parent metal near brazing zones is concluded to be undesirable although is does not necessarily influence the quality of the joint.

  2. Reactions of Deuterated Methanol (CD3OD) on Fe3O4(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhisheng; Potapenko, Denis V.; Rim, Kwang T.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Flynn, George; Osgood, Richard; Wen, Xiaodong; Batista, Enrique R.

    2015-01-15

    We report an experimental and theoretical investigation of the decomposition (partial oxidation) of deuterated methanol (CD3OD) on a single-crystal Fe3O4(111) surface. The crystal surface contains majority areas of a Fe-terminated Fe3O4(111) surface as well as smaller regions of O-terminated FeO(111) or biphase surface reconstruction. Our investigation uses a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy, temperature-programmed desorption, and density functional theory calculations to examine the surface reactions and adsorbates as a function of coverage. Our studies show that the reaction of methanol on this iron–oxide surface is highly sensitive to atomic-level surface reconstructions

  3. Front-end electronics for the tagger of the BGO-OD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messi, Francesco

    2013-08-01

    The BGO-OD experiment is intended for the systematic investigation of the photo-production of mesons off the nucleon. The experiment will use bremsstrahlung photons from an e- beam incident upon a thin radiator. The photon energy will be measured via the deflection of the electrons in the magnetic field of a photon tagger. The B-FrED is a 16 channel double-threshold discriminator and shaper board designed as Front-End Electronics for the new Tagger detector of the experiment. It is a 6U-VME form factor card. The analog input stage has 1.7 GHz bandwidth. The output stage provides two LVDS signals with an expected jitter of ∼ 8 ps with respect to the input signal. The threshold settings are managed by a micro-controller which is remotely accessible through Ethernet.

  4. Radiation induced microstructures in ODS 316 austenitic steel under dual-beam ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, He Ken; Yao, Zhongwen; Zhou, Zhangjian; Wang, Man; Kaitasov, Odile; Daymond, Mark R.

    2014-12-01

    An ODS 316 austenitic steel was fabricated and irradiated using dual ion beams (1 MeV Kr+ and 15 keV He+) with in-situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation. Cavities formed at a low dose in samples irradiated with simultaneous helium injection. It was found that Y-Ti-O particles acted as strong traps for cavity formation at low doses. Helium exhibited a significant effect on cavity development. Cavities were also preferentially nucleated along grain boundaries, phase boundaries and twin boundaries. Irradiation induced lattice defects mainly consisted of small 1/2<1 1 0> perfect loops and 1/3<1 1 1> Frank loops. An increment of helium injection rate also greatly enhanced the Frank loop growth. Small (<10 nm) Y-Ti-O particles were found to be unstable after irradiation to high doses. M23C6 precipitates were observed after irradiation and helium might play a major role in their formation.

  5. Study of radiation damage in ODS steels by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartošová, I.; Bouhaddane, A.; Dománková, M.; Slugeň, V.; Wall, D.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Microstructure of various oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels with 15% chromium content was studied in term of vacancy defects presence and their accumulation after defined irradiation treatment, respectively. Studied materials originated from Kyoto University and studied via IAEA collaborative project. Samples were characterized “as received” by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and their microstructure was examined by transmission electron microscopy as well. Samples were afterwards irradiated in Washington State University Nuclear Radiation Center via a strong gamma source (6TBq). Damage induced by gamma irradiation was evaluated by positron lifetime measurements in emphasis on defect accumulation in the materials. We have demonstrated strong defect production induced by gamma irradiation which results from positron measurement data.

  6. Progress toward determining the potential of ODS alloys for gas turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Hoppin, G., III; Sheffler, K.

    1983-01-01

    The Materials for Advanced Turbine Engine (MATE) Program managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center is supporting two projects to evaluate the potential of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys for aircraft gas turbine applications. One project involves the evaluation of Incoloy (TM) MA-956 for application as a combustor liner material. An assessment of advanced engine potential will be conducted by means of a test in a P&WA 2037 turbofan engine. The other project involves the evaluation of Inconel (TM) MA 6000 for application as a high pressure turbine blade material and includes a test in a Garrett TFE 731 turbofan engine. Both projects are progressing toward these engine tests in 1984.

  7. Impact of friction stir welding on the microstructure of ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, H.; Serrano, M.; Cater, S.; Iqbal, N.; Almásy, L.; Tian, Q.; Jimenez-Melero, E.

    2017-04-01

    We have assessed the impact of the welding parameters on the nano-sized oxide dispersion and the grain size in the matrix of an ODS steel after friction stir welding. Our results, based on combined small angle neutron scattering and electron microscopy, reveal a decrease in the volume fraction of the particles smaller than 80 nm in the welds, mainly due to particle agglomeration. The increase in tool rotation speed or decrease in transverse speed leads to a higher reduction in nano-sized particle fraction, and additionally to the occurrence of particle melting. The dependence of the average grain size in the matrix on the particle volume fraction follows a Zener pinning-type relationship. This result points to the principal role that the particles have in pinning grain boundary movement, and consequently in controlling the grain size during welding.

  8. Development oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, D.K.; Froes, F.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1997-04-01

    Uniaxial tension creep response is reported for an oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel, Fe-13.5Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.25 Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (in weight percent) manufactured using the mechanical alloying process. Acceptable creep response is obtained at 900{degrees}C.

  9. High-temperature corrosion behavior of coatings and ODS alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.

    1996-06-01

    Iron aluminides containing greater than about 20-25 @ % Al have oxidation/sulfidation resistance at temperatures well above those at which these alloys have adequate mechanical strength. In addition to alloying modifications for improved creep resistance of wrought material, this strength limitation is being addressed by development of oxide-dispersion- strengthened (ODS) iron aluminides and by evaluation of Fe{sub 3}Al alloy compositions as coatings or claddings on higher-strength, less corrosion-resistant materials. As part of these efforts, the high-temperature corrosion behavior of iron-aluminide weld overlays and ODS alloys is being characterized and compared to previous results for ingot-processed material.

  10. The reduced genomes of Parcubacteria (OD1) contain signatures of a symbiotic lifestyle

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, William C.; Stegen, James C.

    2015-07-21

    Candidate phylum OD1 bacteria (also referred to as Parcubacteria) have been identified in broad range of anoxic environments through community survey analysis. Although none of these species have been isolated in the laboratory, several genome sequences have been reconstructed from metagenomic sequence data and single-cell sequencing. The organisms have small (generally <1 Mb) genomes with severely reduced metabolic capabilities. We have reconstructed 8 partial to near-complete OD1 genomes from oxic groundwater samples, and compared them against existing genomic data. The conserved core gene set comprises 202 genes, or ~28% of the genomic complement. ‘Housekeeping’ genes and genes for biosynthesis of peptidoglycan and Type IV pilus production are conserved. Gene sets for biosynthesis of cofactors, amino acids, nucleotides and fatty acids are absent entirely or greatly reduced. The only aspects of energy metabolism conserved are the non-oxidative branch of the pentose-phosphate shunt and central glycolysis. These organisms also lack some activities conserved in almost all other known bacterial genomes, including signal recognition particle, pseudouridine synthase A, and FAD synthase. Pan-genome analysis indicates a broad genotypic diversity and perhaps a highly fluid gene complement, indicating historical adaptation to a wide range of growth environments and a high degree of specialization. The genomes were examined for signatures suggesting either a free-living, streamlined lifestyle or a symbiotic lifestyle. The lack of biosynthetic capabilities and DNA repair, along with the presence of potential attachment and adhesion proteins suggest the Parcubacteria are ectosymbionts or parasites of other organisms. The wide diversity of genes that potentially mediate cell-cell contact suggests a broad range of partner/prey organisms across the phylum.

  11. The reduced genomes of Parcubacteria (OD1) contain signatures of a symbiotic lifestyle

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, William C.; Stegen, James C.

    2015-07-21

    Candidate phylum OD1 bacteria (also referred to as Parcubacteria) have been identified in a broad range of anoxic environments through community survey analysis. Although none of these species have been isolated in the laboratory, several genome sequences have been reconstructed from metagenomic sequence data and single-cell sequencing. The organisms have small (generally <1 Mb) genomes with severely reduced metabolic capabilities. We have reconstructed 8 partial to near-complete OD1 genomes from oxic groundwater samples, and compared them against existing genomic data. The conserved core gene set comprises 202 genes, or ~28% of the genomic complement. “Housekeeping” genes and genes for biosynthesismore » of peptidoglycan and Type IV pilus production are conserved. Gene sets for biosynthesis of cofactors, amino acids, nucleotides, and fatty acids are absent entirely or greatly reduced. The only aspects of energy metabolism conserved are the non-oxidative branch of the pentose-phosphate shunt and central glycolysis. These organisms also lack some activities conserved in almost all other known bacterial genomes, including signal recognition particle, pseudouridine synthase A, and FAD synthase. Pan-genome analysis indicates a broad genotypic diversity and perhaps a highly fluid gene complement, indicating historical adaptation to a wide range of growth environments and a high degree of specialization. The genomes were examined for signatures suggesting either a free-living, streamlined lifestyle, or a symbiotic lifestyle. The lack of biosynthetic capabilities and DNA repair, along with the presence of potential attachment and adhesion proteins suggest that the Parcubacteria are ectosymbionts or parasites of other organisms. The wide diversity of genes that potentially mediate cell-cell contact suggests a broad range of partner/prey organisms across the phylum.« less

  12. The reduced genomes of Parcubacteria (OD1) contain signatures of a symbiotic lifestyle

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, William C.; Stegen, James C.

    2015-07-21

    Candidate phylum OD1 bacteria (also referred to as Parcubacteria) have been identified in a broad range of anoxic environments through community survey analysis. Although none of these species have been isolated in the laboratory, several genome sequences have been reconstructed from metagenomic sequence data and single-cell sequencing. The organisms have small (generally <1 Mb) genomes with severely reduced metabolic capabilities. We have reconstructed 8 partial to near-complete OD1 genomes from oxic groundwater samples, and compared them against existing genomic data. The conserved core gene set comprises 202 genes, or ~28% of the genomic complement. “Housekeeping” genes and genes for biosynthesis of peptidoglycan and Type IV pilus production are conserved. Gene sets for biosynthesis of cofactors, amino acids, nucleotides, and fatty acids are absent entirely or greatly reduced. The only aspects of energy metabolism conserved are the non-oxidative branch of the pentose-phosphate shunt and central glycolysis. These organisms also lack some activities conserved in almost all other known bacterial genomes, including signal recognition particle, pseudouridine synthase A, and FAD synthase. Pan-genome analysis indicates a broad genotypic diversity and perhaps a highly fluid gene complement, indicating historical adaptation to a wide range of growth environments and a high degree of specialization. The genomes were examined for signatures suggesting either a free-living, streamlined lifestyle, or a symbiotic lifestyle. The lack of biosynthetic capabilities and DNA repair, along with the presence of potential attachment and adhesion proteins suggest that the Parcubacteria are ectosymbionts or parasites of other organisms. The wide diversity of genes that potentially mediate cell-cell contact suggests a broad range of partner/prey organisms across the phylum.

  13. Production, microstructure and mechanical properties of two different austenitic ODS steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräning, T.; Rieth, M.; Hoffmann, J.; Möslang, A.

    2017-04-01

    This article is to summarize and examine processing parameters of novel developed austenitic oxide dispersed strengthened (ODS) steels. Comparing hot-rolled and extruded conditions after the same degree of deformation after and before annealing, are just some examples to give insights into the complex processing of austenitic ODS steels. One of the major drawbacks of the material is the more sophisticated production process. Due to a ductile matrix material with an increased stickiness during milling, a two-step milling procedure with the use of ZrO2 milling balls was applied to raise the production yield and to use the abrasion of the ZrO2 as an additional element to facilitate the formation of nano-sized precipitates. To get a better understanding how the different powder particle sizes after milling affect final properties, sieving was applied and revealed a serious effect in terms of precipitate size, distribution and mechanical properties. Grain sizes in relation to the precipitate size, annealing time and processing parameters were determined and compared to the mechanical properties. Hardness and tensile test have pointed out, that the precipitate size and number are more important in respect to the ultimate tensile strength than the grain size and that in this study hot-rolled material exhibited the better properties. The investigation of the microstructure illustrated the stability of precipitates during annealing at 1100 °C for 40 h. These heat treatments also led to a consistent grain size, due to the pinning effect of the grain boundaries, caused by precipitates.

  14. The reduced genomes of Parcubacteria (OD1) contain signatures of a symbiotic lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, William C.; Stegen, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Candidate phylum OD1 bacteria (also referred to as Parcubacteria) have been identified in a broad range of anoxic environments through community survey analysis. Although none of these species have been isolated in the laboratory, several genome sequences have been reconstructed from metagenomic sequence data and single-cell sequencing. The organisms have small (generally <1 Mb) genomes with severely reduced metabolic capabilities. We have reconstructed 8 partial to near-complete OD1 genomes from oxic groundwater samples, and compared them against existing genomic data. The conserved core gene set comprises 202 genes, or ~28% of the genomic complement. “Housekeeping” genes and genes for biosynthesis of peptidoglycan and Type IV pilus production are conserved. Gene sets for biosynthesis of cofactors, amino acids, nucleotides, and fatty acids are absent entirely or greatly reduced. The only aspects of energy metabolism conserved are the non-oxidative branch of the pentose-phosphate shunt and central glycolysis. These organisms also lack some activities conserved in almost all other known bacterial genomes, including signal recognition particle, pseudouridine synthase A, and FAD synthase. Pan-genome analysis indicates a broad genotypic diversity and perhaps a highly fluid gene complement, indicating historical adaptation to a wide range of growth environments and a high degree of specialization. The genomes were examined for signatures suggesting either a free-living, streamlined lifestyle, or a symbiotic lifestyle. The lack of biosynthetic capabilities and DNA repair, along with the presence of potential attachment and adhesion proteins suggest that the Parcubacteria are ectosymbionts or parasites of other organisms. The wide diversity of genes that potentially mediate cell-cell contact suggests a broad range of partner/prey organisms across the phylum. PMID:26257709

  15. Advanced TEM characterization of oxide nanoparticles in ODS Fe–12Cr–5Al alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Unocic, Kinga A; Hoelzer, David T; Pint, Bruce A

    2016-01-01

    For oxide nanoparticles present in three oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Fe–12Cr–5Al alloys containing additions of (1) Y2O3 (125Y), (2) Y2O3 + ZrO2 (125YZ), and (3) Y2O3 + HfO2 (125YH), were investigated using transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, in all three alloys nano-sized (<3.5 nm) oxide particles distributed uniformly throughout the microstructure were characterized using advanced electron microscopy techniques. In the 125Y alloy, mainly Al2O3 and yttrium–aluminum garnet (YAG) phases (Y3Al5O12) were present, while in the 125YZ alloy, additional Zr(C,N) precipitates were identified. The 125YH alloy had the most complex precipitation sequence whereby in addition to the YAG and Al2O3 phases,more » Hf(C,N), Y2Hf2O7, and HfO2 precipitates were also found. The presence of HfO2 was mainly due to the incomplete incorporation of HfO2 powder during mechanical alloying of the 125YH alloy. The alloy having the highest total number density of the oxides, the smallest grain size, and the highest Vickers hardness was the 125YZ alloy indicating, that Y2O3 + ZrO2 additions had the strongest effect on grain size and tensile properties. Finally, high-temperature mechanical testing will be addressed in the near future, while irradiation studies are underway to investigate the irradiation resistance of these new ODS FeCrAl alloys.« less

  16. Influence of ferrite phase in alite-calcium sulfoaluminate cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvallet, Tristana Yvonne Francoise

    Since the energy crisis in 1970's, research on low energy cements with low CO2- emissions has been increasing. Numerous solutions have been investigated, and the goal of this original research is to create a viable hybrid cement with the components of both Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSAC), by forming a material that contains both alite and calcium sulfoaluminate clinker phases. Furthermore, this research focuses on keeping the cost of this material reasonable by reducing aluminum requirements through its substitution with iron. The aim of this work would produce a cement that can use large amounts of red mud, which is a plentiful waste material, in place of bauxite known as an expensive raw material. Modified Bogue equations were established and tested to formulate this novel cement with different amounts of ferrite, from 5% to 45% by weight. This was followed by the production of cement from reagent chemicals, and from industrial by-products as feedstocks (fly ash, red mud and slag). Hydration processes, as well as the mechanical properties, of these clinker compositions were studied, along with the addition of gypsum and the impact of a ferric iron complexing additive triisopropanolamine (TIPA). To summarize this research, the influence of the addition of 5-45% by weight of ferrite phase, was examined with the goal of introducing as much red mud as possible in the process without negatively attenuate the cement properties. Based on this PhD dissertation, the production of high-iron alite-calcium sulfoaluminateferrite cements was proven possible from the two sources of raw materials. The hydration processes and the mechanical properties seemed negatively affected by the addition of ferrite, as this phase was not hydrated entirely, even after 6 months of curing. The usage of TIPA counteracted this decline in strength by improving the ferrite hydration and increasing the optimum amount of gypsum required in each composition

  17. Tunable dual-band negative refractive index in ferrite-based metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Bi, Ke; Zhou, Ji; Zhao, Hongjie; Liu, Xiaoming; Lan, Chuwen

    2013-05-06

    A tunable dual-band ferrite-based metamaterial has been investigated by experiments and simulations. The negative permeability is realized around the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) frequency which can be influenced by the dimension of the ferrites. Due to having two negative permeability frequency regions around the two FMR frequencies, the metamaterials consisting of metallic wires and ferrite rods with different sizes possess two passbands in the transmission spectra. The microwave transmission properties of the ferrite-based metamaterials can be not only tuned by the applied magnetic field, but also adjusted by the dimension of the ferrite rods. A good agreement between experimental and simulated results is demonstrated, which confirms that the tunable dual-band ferrite-based metamaterials can be used for cloaks, antennas and absorbers.

  18. Comments on ferrite phase shifter configurations for the millimeter wave region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuss, M. L., Jr.

    1982-09-01

    In the microwave region of the electromagnetic spectrum, electronically controllable ferrite phase shifters have demonstrated their value as components and as control elements for switches and attenuators. As the need for control components operating in the lower millimeter wave region increases, it is a reasonable approach to scale successful microwave ferrite configurations into the lower millimeter wave region (30 GHz to 140 GHz). However, many problems are encountered when attempting to scale efficient microwave ferrite configurations, particularly latching ferrite configurations, into the millimeter wave region. It is the objective of this report to review several ferrite configurations with the intent that consideration of these configurations may stimulate development of practical millimeter wave configurations. Ferrite phase shifter configurations that will be the subject of comment include the toroidal (dual slab), dual mode, Bush-Reggia-Spencer, and single slab configurations. Comments are also presented on a circulator used as a phase shifter.

  19. Measuring the Fracture Toughness of TZM and ODS Molybdenum Alloys Using Standard and Sub-Sized Bend Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B. V.

    2002-12-01

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) and TZM molybdenum have excellent creep resistance and strength at high temperatures in inert atmospheres. Fracture toughness and tensile testing was performed at temperatures between -150 degrees C and 450 degrees C to characterize 6.35 mm thick plate material of ODS and TZM molybdenum. A transition from low fracture toughness values (5.8 to 29.6 MPa square root m) to values greater than 30 MPa square root m is observed for TZM molybdenum in the longitudinal orientation at 100 degrees C and in the transverse orientation at 150 degrees C. These results are consistent with data reported in literature for molybdenum. A transition to low fracture toughness values (less than 30 MPa square root m) was not observed for longitudinal ODS molybdenum at temperatures greater than or equal to -150 degrees C, while a transition to low fracture toughness values (12.6 to 25.4 MPa square root m) was observed for the transverse orientation at room-temperature. The fi ne spacing of La-oxide precipitates that are present in ODS molybdenum result in a transition temperature that is significantly lower than any molybdenum alloy reported to date, with upper bound fracture toughness values that bound the literature data. A comparison of fracture toughness values obtained using a 1T, 0.5T, and 0.25T Charpy shows that a 0.5T Charpy could be used as a sub-sized specimen geometry.

  20. A Safe Place to Stay Sharp: Action Learning Meets Cooperative Inquiry in the Service of NHS OD Capacity Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traeger, James; Norgate, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    This is an account of practice. It explores the meeting point between action learning and action research, as a way of doing capacity building in organisational development (OD) in the NHS in the UK. The authors were part of a short cooperative inquiry (Heron, J. 1996. "Co-operative Inquiry: Research into the Human Condition." London:…

  1. Corrosion property of 9Cr-ODS steel in nitric acid solution for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, M.; Koizumi, T.; Inoue, M.; Koyama, S.I.

    2013-07-01

    Corrosion tests of oxide dispersion strengthened with 9% Cr (9Cr-ODS) steel, which is one of the desirable materials for cladding tube of sodium-cooled fast reactors, in pure nitric acid solution, spent FBR fuel solution, and its simulated solution were performed to understand the corrosion behavior in a spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, the 9Cr-ODS steel with lower effective chromium content was evaluated to understand the corrosion behavior conservatively. As results, the tube-type specimens of the 9Cr-ODS steels suffered severe weight loss owing to active dissolution at the beginning of the immersion test in pure nitric acid solution in the range from 1 to 3.5 M. In contrast, the weight loss was decreased and they showed a stable corrosion in the higher nitric acid concentration, the dissolved FBR fuel solution, and its simulated solution by passivation. The corrosion rates of the 9Cr-ODS steel in the dissolved FBR fuel solution and its simulated solution were 1-2 mm/y and showed good agreement with each other. The passivation was caused by the shift of corrosion potential to noble side owing to increase in nitric acid concentration or oxidative ions in the dissolved FBR fuel solution and the simulated spent fuel solution. (authors)

  2. New design concepts for ferrite-tuned low-energy-booster cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, G.

    1991-05-01

    The design concepts for ferrite-tuned accelerating cavities discussed in this paper differ from conventional solutions using thick ferrite toroids for frequency tuning. Instead, tuners consisting of an array of ferrite-loaded striplines are investigated. These promise more efficient cooling and higher operational reliability. Layout examples for the SSC-LEB rf system are presented (tuning range 47.5 to 59.8 MHz, repetition frequency 10 Hz). 15 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Investigation of Hexagonal Ferrite Film Growth Techniques for Millimeter-Wave Systems Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-15

    hexagonal ferrite compounds. The approach was twofold: to synthesize lattice-matched substrate materials and to explore epitaxial growth methods which...poly-crystal garnet or spinel ferrites find widespread use as tunable microwave filters and resonators in applica- tions ranging from test equipment...REFERENCES 1. W. H. von Aulock, ed., Handbook of Microwave Ferrite Materials, Academic Press, NY. 2. R. 0. Savage et al., J. App1. Phys., 36: 873 (1965

  4. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015 to 0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

  5. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, James M.

    1981-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015-0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

  6. Ion-molecule reaction dynamics: Velocity map imaging studies of N+ and O+ with CD3OD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Linsen; Farrar, James M.

    2015-08-01

    We present a study of the charge transfer reactions of the atomic ions N+and O+ with methanol in the collision energy range from ˜2 to 4 eV. Charge transfer is driven primarily by energy resonance, although the widths of the product kinetic energy distributions suggest that significant interchange between relative translation and product vibration occurs. Charge transfer with CD3OD is more exoergic for N+, and the nascent parent ion products appear to be formed in excited B ˜ and C ˜ electronic states, and fragment to CD2OD+ by internal conversion and vibrational relaxation to the ground electronic state. The internal excitation imparted to the parent ion is sufficient to result in loss of one or two D atoms from the carbon atom. The less exoergic charge transfer reaction of O+ forms nascent parent ions in the excited A ˜ state, and internal conversion to the ground state only results in ejection of single D atom. Selected isotopomers of methanol were employed to identify reaction products, demonstrating that deuterium atom loss from nascent parent ions occurs by C-D bond cleavage. Comparison of the kinetic energy distributions for charge transfer to form CD3OD+ and CD2OD+ by D atom loss with the known dynamics for hydride abstraction from a carbon atom provides strong evidence that the D loss products are formed by dissociative charge transfer rather than hydride (deuteride) transfer. Isotopic labeling also demonstrates that chemical reaction in the N+ + CD3OD system to form NO+ + CD4 does not occur in the energy range of these experiments, contrary to earlier speculation in the literature.

  7. Suitability of cation substituted cobalt ferrite materials for magnetoelastic sensor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nlebedim, Ikenna Catjetan; Jiles, David C

    2015-02-01

    The results of a study on the suitability of materials derived from cobalt ferrite for sensor and actuator applications are presented. The mechanism responsible for the superior sensor properties of Ge-substituted cobalt ferrite compared with Ti and other cation substituted cobalt ferrite materials is believed to be due to the tetrahedral site preference of Ge4+ and its co-substitution with Co2+. Results also showed that the higher strain derivative of Ge-substituted cobalt ferrite compared with Ti-substitution is due to a higher magnetostrictive coupling in response to applied field in the material.

  8. The study of the ferroelectric properties of lithium-titanium ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshev, A. V.; Nikolaev, E. V.; Surzhikov, A. P.; Zarubin, A. N.

    2015-04-01

    Loop-shaped dependences of the electric polarization on the electric field strength (the dielectric hysteresis) are registered for the first time for polycrystalline Li-Ti ferrite. Temperature evolution of the hysteresis loop parameters is investigated for ferrite samples. A thermal Barkhausen effect is detected during heating and cooling of ferrite specimens prepolarized in an electric field. The results obtained can be interpreted from the viewpoint of the Maxwell-Wagner relaxation polarization or induced ferroelectric-like state in the electric ferrite subsystem.

  9. Material for magnetostrictive sensors and other applications based on ferrite materials

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R. William; Snyder, John E.; Dennis, Kevin W.; Schwichtenberg, Carl R.; Jiles, David C.

    2000-07-25

    The present invention provides magnetostrictive compositions that include an oxide ferrite which provides mechanical properties that make the magnetostrictive compositions effective for use as sensors and actuators.

  10. Method for making conductors for ferrite memory arrays. [from pre-formed metal conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, C. H.; Baba, P. D.; Bhiwandker, N. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The ferrite memory arrays are made from pre-formed metal conductors for the ferrite arrays. The conductors are made by forming a thin sheet of a metallizing paste of metal alloy powder, drying the paste layer, bisque firing the dried sheet at a first temperature, and then punching the conductors from the fired sheet. During the bisque firing, the conductor sheet shrinks to 58 percent of its pre-fired volume and the alloy particles sinter together. The conductors are embedded in ferrite sheet material and finally fired at a second higher temperature during which firing the conductors shrink approximately the same degree as the ferrite material.

  11. Dye removal using modified copper ferrite nanoparticle and RSM analysis.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Niyaz Mohammad; Soltani-Gordefaramarzi, Sajjad; Sadeghi-Kiakhani, Moosa

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, copper ferrite nanoparticle (CFN) was synthesized, modified by cetyl trimethylammonium bromide, and characterized. Dye removal ability of the surface modified copper ferrite nanoparticle (SMCFN) from single system was investigated. The physical characteristics of SMCFN were studied using Fourier transform infrared, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Acid Blue 92, Direct Green 6, Direct Red 23, and Direct Red 80 were used as model compounds. The effect of operational parameters (surfactant concentration, adsorbent dosage, dye concentration, and pH) on dye removal was evaluated. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used for the analysis of the dye removal data. The experimental checking in these optimal conditions confirms good agreements with RSM results. The results showed that the SMCFN being a magnetic adsorbent might be a suitable alternative to remove dyes from colored aqueous solutions.

  12. Experimental demonstration of a magnetically tunable ferrite based metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongjun; Wen, Guangjun; Zhu, Weiren; Li, Jian; Si, Li-Ming; Premaratne, Malin

    2014-06-30

    We synthesize and systematically characterize a novel type of magnetically tunable metamaterial absorber (MA) by integrating ferrite as a substrate or superstrate into a conventional passive MA. The nearly perfect absorption and tunability of this device is studied both numerically and experimentally within X-band (8-12 GHz) in a rectangular waveguide setup. Our measurements clearly show that the resonant frequency of the MA can be shifted across a wide frequency band by continuous adjustment of a magnetic field acting on the ferrite. Moreover, the effects of substrate/superstrate's thickness on the MA's tunability are discussed. The insight gained from the generic analysis enabled us to design an optimized tunable MA with relative frequency tuning range as larger as 11.5% while keeping the absorptivity higher than 98.5%. Our results pave a path towards applications with tunable devices, such as selective thermal emitters, sensors, and bolometers.

  13. Studies on structural properties of clay magnesium ferrite nano composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Singh, Mandeep; Jeet, Kiran; Kaur, Rajdeep

    2015-08-01

    Magnesium ferrite-bentonite clay composite was prepared by sol-gel combustion method employing citric acid as complexing agent and fuel. The effect of clay on the structural properties was studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM- Energy dispersive Spectroscope (EDS) and BET surface area analyzer. Decrease in particle size and density was observed on addition of bentonite clay. The BET surface area of nano composite containing just 5 percent clay was 74.86 m2/g. Whereas porosity increased from 40.5 per cent for the pure magnesium ferrite to 81.0 percent in the composite showing that nano-composite has potential application as an adsorbent.

  14. Stress insensitive multilayer chip inductor with ferrite core

    SciTech Connect

    Vishwas, B.; Madhuri, W. Rao, N. Madhusudan; Kaleemulla, S.

    2015-06-24

    Mg{sub 0.25}Cu{sub 0.25}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is synthesized by sol gel auto combustion technique. The obtained ferrite powder is finally sintered in a microwave furnace at 850°C. Multilayer chip inductor (MLCI) of two layers is prepared by screen printing technique. The sintered ferrite is characterized by X-ray diffraction. The frequency response of dielectric constant is studied in the frequency range of 100Hz to 5MHz. Dielectric polarization is discussed in the light of Maxwell-Wagner interfacial polarization. The prepared MLCI is studied for stress sensitivity in the range of 0 to 8 MPa.

  15. Design and screening of nanoprecipitates-strengthened advanced ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Yang, Ying; Chen, Tianyi; Sridharan, K.; He, Li

    2016-12-30

    Advanced nuclear reactors as well as the life extension of light water reactors require advanced alloys capable of satisfactory operation up to neutron damage levels approaching 200 displacements per atom (dpa). Extensive studies, including fundamental theories, have demonstrated the superior resistance to radiation-induced swelling in ferritic steels, primarily inherited from their body-centered cubic (bcc) structure. This study aims at developing nanoprecipitates strengthened advanced ferritic alloys for advanced nuclear reactor applications. To be more specific, this study aims at enhancing the amorphization ability of some precipitates, such as Laves phase and other types of intermetallic phases, through smart alloying strategy, and thereby promote the crystalline®amorphous transformation of these precipitates under irradiation.

  16. Studies on structural properties of clay magnesium ferrite nano composite

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Manpreet Singh, Mandeep; Jeet, Kiran Kaur, Rajdeep

    2015-08-28

    Magnesium ferrite-bentonite clay composite was prepared by sol-gel combustion method employing citric acid as complexing agent and fuel. The effect of clay on the structural properties was studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM- Energy dispersive Spectroscope (EDS) and BET surface area analyzer. Decrease in particle size and density was observed on addition of bentonite clay. The BET surface area of nano composite containing just 5 percent clay was 74.86 m{sup 2}/g. Whereas porosity increased from 40.5 per cent for the pure magnesium ferrite to 81.0 percent in the composite showing that nano-composite has potential application as an adsorbent.

  17. Development of ferrite logic devices for an arithmetic processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, C. H., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A number of fundamentally ultra-reliable, all-magnetic logic circuits are developed using as a basis a single element ferrite structure wired as a logic delay element. By making minor additions or changes to the basic wiring pattern of the delay element other logic functions such as OR, AND, NEGATION, MAJORITY, EXCLUSIVE-OR, and FAN-OUT are developed. These logic functions are then used in the design of a full-adder, a set/reset flip-flop, and an edge detector. As a demonstration of the utility of all the developed devices, an 8-bit, all-magnetic, logic arithmetic unit capable of controlled addition, subtraction, and multiplication is designed. A new basic ferrite logic element and associated complementary logic scheme with the potential of improved performance is also described. Finally, an improved batch process for fabricating joint-free power drive and logic interconnect conductors for this basic class of all-magnetic logic is presented.

  18. Advanced TEM characterization of oxide nanoparticles in ODS Fe–12Cr–5Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Kinga A; Hoelzer, David T; Pint, Bruce A

    2016-01-01

    For oxide nanoparticles present in three oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Fe–12Cr–5Al alloys containing additions of (1) Y2O3 (125Y), (2) Y2O3 + ZrO2 (125YZ), and (3) Y2O3 + HfO2 (125YH), were investigated using transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, in all three alloys nano-sized (<3.5 nm) oxide particles distributed uniformly throughout the microstructure were characterized using advanced electron microscopy techniques. In the 125Y alloy, mainly Al2O3 and yttrium–aluminum garnet (YAG) phases (Y3Al5O12) were present, while in the 125YZ alloy, additional Zr(C,N) precipitates were identified. The 125YH alloy had the most complex precipitation sequence whereby in addition to the YAG and Al2O3 phases, Hf(C,N), Y2Hf2O7, and HfO2 precipitates were also found. The presence of HfO2 was mainly due to the incomplete incorporation of HfO2 powder during mechanical alloying of the 125YH alloy. The alloy having the highest total number density of the oxides, the smallest grain size, and the highest Vickers hardness was the 125YZ alloy indicating, that Y2O3 + ZrO2 additions had the strongest effect on grain size and tensile properties. Finally, high-temperature mechanical testing will be addressed in the near future, while irradiation studies are underway to investigate the irradiation resistance of these new ODS FeCrAl alloys.

  19. Advanced Microwave Ferrite Research (AMFeR): Phase Two

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-31

    well with the measured longitudinal-plane and normal-plane hysteresis and torque curve data. Since the micromagnetic modeling effort has reach maturation...temperature/slow furnace cooling process The hysteresis loops in Fig. 7 show the magnetization curves of different samples measured in perpendicular... Hysteresis loops of sintered Co0 .8Zn 1 2Z ferrite phases were identified by x-ray disks with 5 wt% Bi 20 3 sintering agent at diffraction pattern for low

  20. FTIR and VSM properties of samarium-doped nickel ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şabikoğlu, Israfil; Paralı, Levent

    2014-05-01

    Nickel Ferrite (NiFe2O4) doped with Samarium (Sm) (0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 mol.%) was prepared by the conventional solid-state reaction. The crystal structure, surface morphology, infrared spectrum of absorption, and magnetic properties of samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). XRD patterns were indexed with inverse spinel cubic phase with the space group of Fd-3m of nickel ferrite. The average grain size was about 5-10 μm. FTIR spectral study on the NiFe2O4 ferrite phase was recorded between 350 cm-1 and 4000 cm-1. Two fundamental absorption bands of the ferrites were appeared at 450 cm-1 and 1000 cm-1 characteristic of metal vibrations. VSM measurements show that the NiFe2O4 doped with Sm 0.3% has the highest value of saturation magnetization. It is also easily demagnetized due to the low value of coercivity field it has. Both NiFe2O4 doped with Sm 0.2 mol.% and 0.4 mol.% materials have same values of coercivity field. However, NiFe2O4 doped with Sm 0.4 mol.% material has the comparatively high value of saturation magnetization than NiFe2O4 doped with Sm 0.2%, also this material was hardly demagnetized, and has highest coercivity field.

  1. Growth of Ferrite Needles in Compacted Graphite Cast Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, G.A.; Mercader, R.C.; Desimoni, J.; Perez, T.; Gregorutti, R.W.

    2005-04-26

    The austempering kinetics transformation of compacted graphite cast irons austempered at 623K is studied. The length (l) and the number per unit volume (N) of ferrite needles were followed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), while Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) was used to determine the austenite relative areas. The SEM results are compared with theoretical calculations available in the literature and indicate that the diffusion of C atoms in austenite controls the transformation, confirming the indirect MS determinations.

  2. Magnetic and magnetostrictive properties of Cu substituted Co-ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra Sekhar, B.; Rao, G. S. N.; Caltun, O. F.; Dhana Lakshmi, B.; Parvatheeswara Rao, B.; Subba Rao, P. S. V.

    2016-01-01

    Copper substituted cobalt ferrite, Co1-xCuxFe2O4 (x=0.00-0.25), nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel autocombustion method. X-ray diffraction analysis on the samples was done to confirm the cubic spinel structures and Scherrer equation was used to estimate the mean crystallite size as 40 nm. Using the obtained nanoparticles, fabrication of the sintered pellets was done by standard ceramic technique. Magnetic and magnetostrictive measurements on the samples were made by strain gauge and vibrating sample magnetometer techniques, respectively. Maximum magnetostriction and strain derivative values were deduced from the field dependent magnetostriction curves while the magnetic parameters such as saturation magnetization (51.7-61.9 emu/g) and coercivity (1045-1629 Oe) on the samples were estimated from the obtained magnetic hysteresis loops. Curie temperature values (457-315 °C) were measured by a built in laboratory set-up. Copper substituted cobalt ferrites have shown improved strain derivative values as compared to the pure cobalt ferrite and thus making them suitable for stress sensing applications. The results have been explained on the basis of cationic distributions, strength of exchange interactions and net decreased anisotropic contributions due to the increased presence of Co2+ ions in B-sites as a result of Cu substitutions.

  3. Physiological Remediation of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles by Ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Volatron, Jeanne; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Javed, Yasir; Vuong, Quoc Lam; Gossuin, Yves; Neveu, Sophie; Luciani, Nathalie; Hémadi, Miryana; Carn, Florent; Alloyeau, Damien; Gazeau, Florence

    2017-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have been increasingly suggested as prospective therapeutic nanoplatforms, yet their long-term fate and cellular processing in the body is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of an endogenous iron storage protein – namely the ferritin – in the remediation of biodegradable cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. Structural and elemental analysis of ferritins close to exogenous nanoparticles within spleens and livers of mice injected in vivo with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, suggests the intracellular transfer of degradation-derived cobalt and iron, entrapped within endogenous protein cages. In addition, the capacity of ferritin cages to accommodate and store the degradation products of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was investigated in vitro in the acidic environment mimicking the physiological conditions that are present within the lysosomes. The magnetic, colloidal and structural follow-up of nanoparticles and proteins in the lysosome-like medium confirmed the efficient remediation of nanoparticle-released cobalt and iron ions by ferritins in solution. Metal transfer into ferritins could represent a quintessential process in which biomolecules and homeostasis regulate the local degradation of nanoparticles and recycle their by-products. PMID:28067263

  4. Perpendicular Biased Ferrite Tuned Cavities for the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady; Awida, Mohamed; Khabiboulline, Timergali; Pellico, William; Tan, Cheng-Yang; Terechkine, Iouri; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Zwaska, Robert

    2014-07-01

    The aging Fermilab Booster RF system needs an upgrade to support future experimental program. The important feature of the upgrade is substantial enhancement of the requirements for the accelerating cavities. The new requirements include enlargement of the cavity beam pipe aperture, increase of the cavity voltage and increase in the repetition rate. The modification of the present traditional parallel biased ferrite cavities is rather challenging. An alternative to rebuilding the present Fermilab Booster RF cavities is to design and construct new perpendicular biased RF cavities, which potentially offer a number of advantages. An evaluation and a preliminary design of the perpendicular biased ferrite tuned cavities for the Fermilab Booster upgrade is described in the paper. Also it is desirable for better Booster performance to improve the capture of beam in the Booster during injection and at the start of the ramp. One possible way to do that is to flatten the bucket by introducing second harmonic cavities into the Booster. This paper also looks into the option of using perpendicularly biased ferrite tuners for the second harmonic cavities.

  5. Physiological Remediation of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles by Ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volatron, Jeanne; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Javed, Yasir; Vuong, Quoc Lam; Gossuin, Yves; Neveu, Sophie; Luciani, Nathalie; Hémadi, Miryana; Carn, Florent; Alloyeau, Damien; Gazeau, Florence

    2017-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have been increasingly suggested as prospective therapeutic nanoplatforms, yet their long-term fate and cellular processing in the body is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of an endogenous iron storage protein – namely the ferritin – in the remediation of biodegradable cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. Structural and elemental analysis of ferritins close to exogenous nanoparticles within spleens and livers of mice injected in vivo with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, suggests the intracellular transfer of degradation-derived cobalt and iron, entrapped within endogenous protein cages. In addition, the capacity of ferritin cages to accommodate and store the degradation products of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was investigated in vitro in the acidic environment mimicking the physiological conditions that are present within the lysosomes. The magnetic, colloidal and structural follow-up of nanoparticles and proteins in the lysosome-like medium confirmed the efficient remediation of nanoparticle-released cobalt and iron ions by ferritins in solution. Metal transfer into ferritins could represent a quintessential process in which biomolecules and homeostasis regulate the local degradation of nanoparticles and recycle their by-products.

  6. Mechanical alloying of lanthana-bearing nanostructured ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Somayeh Paseban; Indrajit Charit; Yaqiao Q. Wu; Jatuporn Burns; Kerry N. Allahar; Darryl P. Butt; James I. Cole

    2013-09-01

    A novel nanostructured ferritic steel powder with the nominal composition Fe–14Cr–1Ti–0.3Mo–0.5La2O3 (wt.%) was developed via high energy ball milling. La2O3 was added to this alloy instead of the traditionally used Y2O3. The effects of varying the ball milling parameters, such as milling time, steel ball size and ball to powder ratio, on the mechanical properties and micro structural characteristics of the as-milled powder were investigated. Nanocrystallites of a body-centered cubic ferritic solid solution matrix with a mean size of approximately 20 nm were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Nanoscale characterization of the as-milled powder by local electrode atom probe tomography revealed the formation of Cr–Ti–La–O-enriched nanoclusters during mechanical alloying. The Cr:Ti:La:O ratio is considered “non-stoichiometric”. The average size (radius) of the nanoclusters was about 1 nm, with number density of 3.7 1024 m3. The mechanism for formation of nanoclusters in the as-milled powder is discussed. La2O3 appears to be a promising alternative rare earth oxide for future nanostructured ferritic steels.

  7. Impedance spectroscopic characterization of gadolinium substituted cobalt ferrite ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Md. T. Ramana, C. V.

    2014-10-28

    Gadolinium (Gd) substituted cobalt ferrites (CoFe{sub 2−x}Gd{sub x}O{sub 4}, referred to CFGO) with variable Gd content (x = 0.0–0.4) have been synthesized by solid state ceramic method. The crystal structure and impedance properties of CFGO compounds have been evaluated. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that CFGO crystallize in the inverse spinel phase. The CFGO compounds exhibit lattice expansion due to substitution of larger Gd ions into the crystal lattice. Impedance spectroscopy analysis was performed under a wide range of frequency (f = 20 Hz–1 MHz) and temperature (T = 303–573 K). Electrical properties of Gd incorporated Co ferrite ceramics are enhanced compared to pure CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} due to the lattice distortion. Impedance spectroscopic analysis illustrates the variation of bulk grain and grain-boundary contributions towards the electrical resistance and capacitance of CFGO materials with temperature. A two-layer heterogeneous model consisting of moderately conducting grain interior (ferrite-phase) regions separated by insulating grain boundaries (resistive-phase) accurately account for the observed temperature and frequency dependent electrical characteristic of CFGO ceramics.

  8. Lattice strain induced magnetism in substituted nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajnish; Kar, Manoranjan

    2016-10-01

    Strontium (Sr) substituted cobalt ferrite i.e. Co1-xSrxFe2O4 (x=0.00, 0.01, 0.015, 0.02, 0.05, 0.1) have been synthesized by the citric acid modified sol-gel method. Crystal structure and phase purity have been studied by the X-ray powder diffraction technique. The Rietveld refinement of XRD pattern using the space group Fd 3 bar m shows monotonically increasing of lattice parameter with the increase in Sr concentration. Magnetic hysteresis loops measurement has been carried out at room temperature using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) over a field range of ±1.5 T. Magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant were calculated by employing the Law of Approach (LA) to the saturation. It is observed that magnetocrystalline anisotropy has anomaly for x=0.01 (Co0.99Sr0.01Fe2O4) sample. Strain mediated modification of magnetic properties in Sr substituted cobalt ferrite has been observed. The saturation magnetization for doping concentration i.e. x=0.01 abruptly increase while for x>0.01 decreases with the increase in Sr concentration. A correlation between lattice strain and magnetic behavior in non-magnetic Sr- substituted nano-crystalline cobalt ferrite has been reported.

  9. Study of Zn-Cu Ferrite Nanoparticles for LPG Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anuj; Baranwal, Ravi Kant; Bharti, Ajaya; Vakil, Z.; Prajapati, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured zinc-copper mixed ferrite was synthesized using sol-gel method. XRD patterns of different compositions of zinc-copper ferrite, Zn(1−x)CuxFe2O4 (x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75), revealed single phase inverse spinel ferrite in all the samples synthesized. With increasing copper concentration, the crystallite size was found to be increased from 28 nm to 47 nm. The surface morphology of all the samples studied by the Scanning Electron Microscopy there exhibits porous structure of particles throughout the samples. The pellets of the samples are prepared for LPG sensing characteristics. The sensing is carried out at different operating temperatures (200, 225, and 250°C) with the variation of LPG concentrations (0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 vol%). The maximum sensitivity of 55.33% is observed at 250°C operating for the 0.6 vol% LPG. PMID:23864833

  10. Defect detection for end surface of ferrite magnetic tile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jiayuan; Wang, Yuwei; Wang, Keyi

    2016-09-01

    A visual automatic detection method is proposed for defect detection on end surface of ferrite magnetic tile to tackle the disadvantages generated by human work which has low efficiency and unstable accuracy. Because the defects on end surface of ferrite magnetic tile with dark colors and low contrasts are negative for defect detection, uniform illumination is provided by LED light source and a dedicated optical system is designed to extract defects conveniently. The approach uses comparison of the fitting and actual edge curves to detect defects mainly with most defects located on the edge. Firstly improved adaptive median filter is used as the image preprocessing. Subsequently the appropriate threshold is calculated by Otsu algorithm based on the extreme points in the gray-level histogram to segment the preprocessing image. Then the Sobel operator can be used to extract the edge of end surface precisely. Finally through comparing the ideal fitting and actual edge curves of end surface, to detect the defects with some relevant features. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme could detect defects on the end surface of ferrite magnetic tile efficiency and accurately with 93.33% accuracy rate, 2.30% false acceptance rate and 8.45% correct rejection rate.

  11. Evidence of domain wall pinning in aluminum substituted cobalt ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, J. C.; Janrao, P. S.; Datar, A. A.; Kanhe, N. S.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.

    2016-08-01

    In the present work spinel structured cobalt ferrites with aluminum substitution having composition CoAlxFe2-xO4 (x=0.0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3) have been synthesized using chemical co-precipitation method. Their microstructural, magnetic, magnetostriction and magnetoimpedance properties have been investigated. The piezomagnetic coefficient (dλ/dH) obtained from magnetostriction data is found to enhance with 0.1 Al substitutions in place of iron which decreases with further increase of Al content. It is noticed that 0.3 Al substitutions in place of Fe introduces domain wall pinning as evidenced from magnetostriction, magnetoimpedance and dc magnetization data. It is noted that ferrites so prepared using a simple procedure are magnetostrictive in good measure and with the addition of very small amount of non-magnetic aluminum their magnetostriction has shown saturation at relatively low magnetic fields. Such magnetostrictive ferrites find their applications in magnetic sensors and actuators.

  12. Structural, dielectric and magnetic properties of Ni substituted zinc ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumbhar, S. S.; Mahadik, M. A.; Mohite, V. S.; Rajpure, K. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Moholkar, A. V.; Bhosale, C. H.

    2014-08-01

    NixZn1-xFe2O4 ferrite has been synthesized by the ceramic method using Ni CO3, ZnO, Fe2O3 precursors. The influence of Ni content on the structural, morphological, electrical and magnetic properties of NixZn1-xFe2O4 ferrites is studied. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis reveals that the samples are polycrystalline with spinel cubic structure. The SEM images of NixZn1-xFe2O4 ferrite show that the grain size decreases with an increase in the Ni content. The tetrahedral and octahedral vibrations in the samples are studied by IR spectra. Frequency dependence of dielectric constant shows dielectric dispersion due to the Maxwell-Wagner type of interfacial polarization. Conduction mechanism due to polarons has been analyzed by measuring the AC conductivity. Impedance spectroscopy is used to study the electrical behavior. Magnetic properties of NixZn1-xFe2O4 are studied by using hysteresis loop measurement. The maximum value of saturation magnetization of 132.8 emu/g obtained for the composition, x=0.8, is attributed to magnetic moment of Fe3+ ions.

  13. Study of Zn-Cu ferrite nanoparticles for LPG sensing.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anuj; Baranwal, Ravi Kant; Bharti, Ajaya; Vakil, Z; Prajapati, C S

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured zinc-copper mixed ferrite was synthesized using sol-gel method. XRD patterns of different compositions of zinc-copper ferrite, Zn(1-x)Cu(x)Fe2O4 (x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75), revealed single phase inverse spinel ferrite in all the samples synthesized. With increasing copper concentration, the crystallite size was found to be increased from 28 nm to 47 nm. The surface morphology of all the samples studied by the Scanning Electron Microscopy there exhibits porous structure of particles throughout the samples. The pellets of the samples are prepared for LPG sensing characteristics. The sensing is carried out at different operating temperatures (200, 225, and 250°C) with the variation of LPG concentrations (0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 vol%). The maximum sensitivity of 55.33% is observed at 250°C operating for the 0.6 vol% LPG.

  14. Physiological Remediation of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles by Ferritin.

    PubMed

    Volatron, Jeanne; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Javed, Yasir; Vuong, Quoc Lam; Gossuin, Yves; Neveu, Sophie; Luciani, Nathalie; Hémadi, Miryana; Carn, Florent; Alloyeau, Damien; Gazeau, Florence

    2017-01-09

    Metallic nanoparticles have been increasingly suggested as prospective therapeutic nanoplatforms, yet their long-term fate and cellular processing in the body is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of an endogenous iron storage protein - namely the ferritin - in the remediation of biodegradable cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. Structural and elemental analysis of ferritins close to exogenous nanoparticles within spleens and livers of mice injected in vivo with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, suggests the intracellular transfer of degradation-derived cobalt and iron, entrapped within endogenous protein cages. In addition, the capacity of ferritin cages to accommodate and store the degradation products of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was investigated in vitro in the acidic environment mimicking the physiological conditions that are present within the lysosomes. The magnetic, colloidal and structural follow-up of nanoparticles and proteins in the lysosome-like medium confirmed the efficient remediation of nanoparticle-released cobalt and iron ions by ferritins in solution. Metal transfer into ferritins could represent a quintessential process in which biomolecules and homeostasis regulate the local degradation of nanoparticles and recycle their by-products.

  15. Stabilization of 48- and 57-μ m CH3OD lasers for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, K.; Okajima, S.; Akiyama, T.; Tanaka, K.; Kawahata, K.

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneously oscillated 48-μ m and 57-μ m CH3OD lasers pumped by a 9R(8) CO2 laser have been developed as optical sources of interferometer and polarimeter for fusion plasma diagnostics. The objective of this paper is to present a method for stabilizing the two-color far-infrared (FIR) laser outputs. A stable FIR laser requires a stable pump CO2 laser and a prevention of a back reflection from the FIR laser cavity. The frequency of the pump CO2 laser has been stabilized by an external Stark-cell modulation. The back reflection has been reduced by an optical isolator using a quarter-wave plate and an absorbing thin-film reflector. The two-color FIR laser outputs have been stabilized by controlling the cavity length. As a result of these measures, we have achieved output stabilities of ± 1.2%/h at the 48-μ m laser and ± 1.3%/h at the 57-μ m laser.

  16. High-cycle fatigue properties of the ODS-alloy MA 6000 at 850 C

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffelner, W.; Singer, R.F.

    1985-03-01

    The high cycle fatigue (HCF) and cyclic crack growth rate (CCGR) properties of the dispersion strengthened ODS-alloy MA 6000 were investigated with smooth bars and with fracture mechanics samples at 850 C. The material was very coarse-grained with the grains elongated in the rolling direction. The fatigue limit of samples cut parallel to the grain elongation direction (p-samples) was almost a factor of 2 higher than the one of samples cut transverse to the elongation direction (t-samples). Inclusions were found to be responsible for crack initiation. For p-samples a reasonable agreement between particle size, fatigue limit, and crack growth behavior was found. For t-type samples such an agreement also exists, provided differences in the crack growth behavior of short cracks and long cracks are taken into consideration. The low fatigue strength of t-samples could be linked with low Young's modulus in this direction. The crack propagation rate of long cracks is lower in t-samples than in p-samples due to crack branching along the grain boundaries. HCF-strength of MA 6000 is high compared to conventional cast alloys mainly because of reduced size of crack nucleation sites and higher fatigue threshold stress intensity range, as a result of higher Young's modulus. 15 references.

  17. Magnetic Structure and Spin Waves in Co2(OD)3Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissanayake, Sachith; Ji, S.; Chan, C.; Ng, T. K.; Lee, J.; Qiu, Y.; Rule, K. C.; Lake, B.; Green, M.; Zheng, X. G.; Lee, S.-H.

    2012-02-01

    We have examined the magnetic structure of Co2(OD)3Cl with magnetic Co^2+ (3d^7; s= 3/2) ions using neutron powder diffraction data. Magnetic structure that yields the best refinement factor is an ``umbrella''-type antiferromagnetic structure with ab-components of magnetic moments in the kagome plane forming a q=0 120^o structure and the moments are canted out of the plane by ˜ 40^o. The magnetic moments in the triangular plane are aligned ferromagnetically along the c-axis. We have performed linear spin wave calculations considering the nearest neighbor interactions J within the kagome plane and JF between the kagome and the triangular plane. The effects of JF/J and the canting angle to the spin wave dispersion was studied thoroughly, to find out an effective spin hamiltonian that explains our inelastic neutron scattering data with two prominent excitation modes centered at 3 meV and 19 meV. Single ion-type anisotropy was also included in the spin hamiltonian to study its effect to the spin wave excitation.

  18. Deuterium ordering found in new ferroelectric compound Co2(OD)3Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Dong-Dong; Zheng, Xu-Guang; Liu, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Xing-Liang; Guo, Qi-Xin

    2015-07-01

    A detailed temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopic study revealed a new type of deuterium-order ferroelectrics in a geometrically frustrated magnet Co2(OD)3Cl at Tɛ = 229 K. Significant changes in the parameters of the Raman vibration modes were observed near Tɛ, suggesting a strong phonon-charge coupling. Additional asymmetric phonon bands appeared below around Tɛ, which are consistently interpreted by phonon folding processes due to a small local structural change resulting from the ordering of deuterium. The wavenumber and intensity changes of the Raman-active modes, as well as the normalized intensities of the additional bands, all follow a power-law fit Δω, ΔI, I ∝ (1 - T/TC)2β, wherein TC = 230 K ˜ Tɛ and β = 0.35(2), clearly demonstrating an ordering process below Tɛ. The critical exponent is reminiscent of a second order transition. Our study presents a rare and new type of multiferroic material with ferroelectricity arising from the deuterium ordering in geometrically frustrated magnets.

  19. High temperature Oxidation of ODS alloy with zirconia dispersions synthesized using Arc Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandriyana; Sujatno, A.; Salam, R.; Sugeng, B.; Dimyati, A.

    2017-02-01

    Microstructure formation and oxidation behaviour of the Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels for application as structure material in Nuclear Power Plant was investigated. A mixture composed of Fe and 12 wt. % Cr powder with addition of 0.5 and 1 wt.% ZrO2 particles was milled and isostatic pressed to form a sample coin. The coin was then consolidated in the Arc Plasma Sintering (APS) for 4 minutes. The samples were subjected to the high temperature oxidation test in the Magnetic Suspension Balance (MSB). The oxidation test was carried out at 700°C for 6 hours to evaluate the oxide growth in the early stage of it formation by extraction the mass gain curve. The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) imaging and X-ray Diffraction Spectroscopy (EDX) elemental mapping were performed to study the microstructure change and compositional distribution. SEM and EDX observation revealed the time dependent development of the Fe-Cr-phases during consolidation. The oxidation rate behaviour of the samples followed the parabolic rate characteristic for inward oxidation process driven by oxygen inward diffusion through the oxide scale with the maximum weight gain around of 60 g/m2. The oxidation resistance was strongly affected by the formation of the oxide protective layer on the surface. In so far, addition of zirconia particles has played no significant role to the oxidation behaviour.

  20. The metallurgical and mechanical properties of ODS alloy MA 956 friction welds

    SciTech Connect

    Shinozaki, K.; Kang, C.Y.; Kim, Y.C.; Nakao, Y.; Aritoshi, M.; North, T.H.

    1997-08-01

    The metallurgical and mechanical properties of friction welded MA 956 oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron-based superalloy material were investigated. The mechanical properties of friction welded joints were evaluated using a combination of room temperature and elevated temperature tensile testing and creep rupture testing. The microstructural features and particle characteristics were examined using optical and transmission electron microscopy. The distribution of residual stress in completed joints was analyzed using FEM analysis. The room temperature and elevated temperature tensile strengths of friction welded joints were similar to those of as-received MA 956 base material and, in all cases, failure occurred away from the weld interface. However, the creep rupture properties of friction welded joints were much poorer than those of as-received MA 956 base material. The friction welding operation created low-aspect-ratio, fully recrystallized grains at the joint centerline and substantially altered the oxide particle chemistry, dimensions and shape in the joint region. It is speculated that the coarse, irregularly shaped particles in regions immediately adjacent to the weld interface were produced as a result of a strain-induced agglomeration of small-diameter yttria dispersoids with larger-diameter alumina and Ti(C,N) particles.

  1. Relaxation pathways of the OD stretch fundamental of HOD in liquid H2O.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Beatriz; Zúñiga, José; Requena, Alberto; Bastida, Adolfo

    2016-12-28

    The molecular dynamics with quantum transitions method is used to study the vibrational relaxation of the OD stretching mode of HOD dissolved in liquid H2O water at 303 K. All the vibrational modes of the solute and solvent molecules that participate in the relaxation process are described by quantum mechanics, while the rotational and translational degrees of freedom are treated classically. A modification of the water intramolecular SPC/E (Simple Point Charge/Extended) force field providing vibrational frequencies in solution closer to the experimental values is proposed to analyze the influence of the vibrational energy gaps on the relaxation channels. The relaxation times obtained are in satisfactory agreement with experimental values. The energy transfer during the relaxation process alters significantly the H-bond network around the HOD molecule. The analysis of the vibrational transitions during the relaxation process reveals a complex mechanism which involves the participation of both intra- and intermolecular channels and provides a compromise for the different interpretations of the experimental data reported for this system in recent years.

  2. Unusual respiratory capacity and nitrogen metabolism in a Parcubacterium (OD1) of the Candidate Phyla Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Castelle, Cindy J.; Brown, Christopher T.; Thomas, Brian C.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2017-01-01

    The Candidate Phyla Radiation (CPR) is a large group of bacteria, the scale of which approaches that of all other bacteria. CPR organisms are inferred to depend on other community members for many basic cellular building blocks and all appear to be obligate anaerobes. To date, there has been no evidence for any significant respiratory capacity in an organism from this radiation. Here we report a curated draft genome for ‘Candidatus Parcunitrobacter nitroensis’ a member of the Parcubacteria (OD1) superphylum of the CPR. The genome encodes versatile energy pathways, including fermentative and respiratory capacities, nitrogen and fatty acid metabolism, as well as the first complete electron transport chain described for a member of the CPR. The sequences of all of these enzymes are highly divergent from sequences found in other organisms, suggesting that these capacities were not recently acquired from non-CPR organisms. Although the wide respiration-based repertoire points to a different lifestyle compared to other CPR bacteria, we predict similar obligate dependence on other organisms or the microbial community. The results substantially expand the known metabolic potential of CPR bacteria, although sequence comparisons indicate that these capacities are very rare in members of this radiation. PMID:28067254

  3. Anomalous H+ and D+ conductance in H2O-D2O mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingärtner, H.; Chatzidimttriou-Dreismann, C. A.

    1990-08-01

    A KNOWLEDGE of proton-transfer dynamics and hydrogen-bonding in water and aqueous solutions is necessary for the understanding of many important chemical and biological processes. For example, quantum effects related to proton transfer (or tunnelling) in H+(H2O)n clusters of liquid water (where n = 1,2,· · ·) are known to have a dominant role in the proton conductance mechanism1,2 and are responsible for the high conductances of H+ and OH- in water. A new quantum theoretical approach to this process has been presented3, which is based on the hypothesis that there are quantum correlations4-8 between each H+ and the protons of the surrounding water molecules, leading to the formation of coherent dissipative structures3,8. From further investigations, one of us predicted that an anomalous decrease of H+ conductance in H2O-D2O mixtures would take place9. Having thought of an experiment to test these predictions9 we now report the experimental results and conclude that an anomalous decrease in proton conductance does indeed occur.

  4. Effect of constituent phase on mechanical properties of 9Cr-1WVTa reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Hoon; Moon, Joonoh; Park, Min-Gu; Lee, Tae-Ho; Jang, Min-Ho; Kim, Hyoung Chan; Suh, Dong-Woo

    2014-12-01

    Influence of the formation of ferrite and accompanying carbides in martensite matrix on the tensile and Charpy impact properties was investigated for reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) 9Cr-1WVTa steel. As the fractions of ferrite and carbide adjacent to the ferrite grain boundary increase, both tensile and Charpy impact properties deteriorated in as-normalized condition. In particular, the tensile strength and elongation decreased simultaneously, which is believed to be led by the localized deformation in ferrite which is softer than martensite, promoting the formation and growth of voids. In addition, the formation of ferrite was also detrimental to the Charpy impact properties regarding to the absorbed energy because the precipitation of carbides around ferrite were vulnerable to the nucleation and propagation of cleavage cracks. The degradation of tensile properties can be recovered by tempering, but the DBTT temperature still increases with presence of ferrite.

  5. Synthesis and Staging of the Phase Formation for Strontium Ferrites in Thermal and Radiation-Thermal Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancharova, U. V.; Mikhailenko, M. A.; Tolochko, B. P.; Lyakhov, N. Z.; Korobeinikov, M. V.; Bryazgin, A. A.; Bezuglov, V. V.; Shtarklev, E. A.; Vlasov, A. Yu; Vinokurov, Z. S.

    2015-04-01

    The strontium ferrite radiation-thermal synthesis process due to heating by intensive electron beam is described. The radiation-thermal and thermal strontium ferrite synthesis processes kinetics were studied and compared.

  6. Copper ferrite nanoparticle-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Alshamsan, Aws

    2016-06-01

    Copper ferrite (CuFe2O4) nanoparticles (NPs) are important magnetic materials currently under research due to their applicability in nanomedicine. However, information concerning the biological interaction of copper ferrite NPs is largely lacking. In this study, we investigated the cellular response of copper ferrite NPs in human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells. Copper ferrite NPs were prepared by co-precipitation technique with the thermal effect. Prepared NPs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission transmission electron microscopy (FETEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Characterization data showed that copper ferrite NPs were crystalline, spherical with smooth surfaces and average diameter of 15nm. Biochemical studies showed that copper ferrite NPs induce cell viability reduction and membrane damage in MCF-7 cells and degree of induction was dose- and time-dependent. High SubG1 cell population during cell cycle progression and MMP loss with a concomitant up-regulation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 genes suggested that copper ferrite NP-induced cell death through mitochondrial pathway. Copper ferrite NP was also found to induce oxidative stress in MCF-7 cells as indicated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and glutathione depletion. Cytotoxicity due to copper ferrite NPs exposure was effectively abrogated by N-acetyl-cysteine (ROS scavenger) suggesting that oxidative stress could be the plausible mechanism of copper ferrite NPs toxicity. Further studies are underway to explore the toxicity mechanisms of copper ferrite NPs in different types of human cells. This study warrants further generation of extensive biointeraction data before their application in nanomedicine.

  7. Calculation of the standard heat capacity at constant pressure for cobalt ferrite-zinc ferrite solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chachanidze, G.D.; Pavlenishvili, T.A.; Machaladze, T.E.; Khutsishvili, D.I.

    1994-08-01

    Magnetic, electrical, and other properties of Co{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} solid solutions are widely studied because of their high coercive force and Curie temperature ({Tc}), which makes these compounds applicable in modern electronic devices. However, the information published on their thermodynamic properties is limited. This paper focuses on calculation of the standard heat capacity C{sub p}{sup 0} (298 K) for cobalt zinc ferrites using correlation analysis of the relationship between C{sub p}{sup 0} (298 K) and the saturation magnetic moment {mu}{sub o}. The authors studied the solid solutions Co{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0.2, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, and 0.8), whose magnetic and thermal parameters, crucial in our calculations, are known to be strongly dependent on the preparation conditions. An equation was derived for calculation of the standard heat capacity at constant pressure from the saturation magnetic moment of Co{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} solid solutions. The equation allows a satisfactory estimation of the standard heat capacity at 298 Kelvin for any cobalt ferrite-zinc ferrite solid, providing the saturation magnetic moment is available.

  8. Temporal trends and spatial variations of ozone-depleting substances (ODS) in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Xinming; Blake, Donald; Simpson, Isobel

    2014-05-01

    Long-term observation of mixing ratios of ozone-depleting substances (ODS) in ambient air can help to assess the implementation of the Montreal Protocol and Its Amendments in regional and national scales. Here we present our measurement of ODS such as CFCs, HCFCs, halons and other halocarbons in ambient air since 2000 in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, one of the most densely populated and highly industrialized regions that was supposed to be a hotspot for ODS emission in China. These halocarbons in the PRD region were found to have 5-348% enhancements when compared to their global background levels. CFC-12 and CFC-11 in the region, for example, were 37-56% and 12-43%, respectively, above their global background levels. CFC replacement compounds showed even larger enhancements. In average mixing ratios of HCFC-22, HCFC-141b, and HCFC-142b were 89%, 87%, and 86% above their background levels of 148 ppt, 12.1 ppt, and 12.1 ppt in the year of 2000, respectively; and 72%, 125%, and 52% over their background levels of 205 ppt, 20.2 ppt, and 20.0 ppt in the year of 2009, respectively. During 2000-2009, CFCs in the PRD region showed decline trends with the decreasing rates of -3.0, -5.9, and -9.4 ppt/yr for CFC-12, CFC-11, and CFC-113, respectively; these rates were faster than that at the global background sites, which were -0.91, -2.12, and -0.69 ppt/yr, respectively. The CFCs substitutes HCFC-22, HCFC-141b, and HCFC-142b, however, showed increasing trends with the increasing rates of 8.0, 2.6, and 0.9 ppt/yr, respectively. HFC-134a, a refrigerant used for mobile air conditioning, showed rapid increase with a rate of 15 ppt/yr from 2000 to 2009 in the region. As for other halocarbons, methyl chloroform and carbon tetrachloride decreased with rates of 21 and 1 ppt/yr during the period. The mixing ratios of methyl chloride in the region showed unusual rapid increase at a rate of 64 ppt/yr when compared to its increasing rate of 1.3 ppt/yr at the global background

  9. New Magnetic Materials and Phenomena for Radar and Microwave Signal Processing Devices - Bulk and Thin Film Ferrites and Metallic Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-15

    methods have been used to produce in-plane c-axis (IPCA) oriented barium ferrite (BaM) films on o-plane (1120) sapphire substrates with low microwave ...New magnetic materials and phenomena for radar and microwave signal processing devices - bulk and thin film ferrites and metallic films 6. AUTHOR(S...excitation properties in delay line structures. (173 words) 14. SUBJECT TERMS Microwave ferrites , yttrium iron garnet, hexagonal ferrites

  10. Synthesis of Highly Uniform and Compact Lithium Zinc Ferrite Ceramics via an Efficient Low Temperature Approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fang; Liao, Yulong; Zhang, Dainan; Zhou, Tingchuan; Li, Jie; Gan, Gongwen; Zhang, Huaiwu

    2017-03-27

    LiZn ferrite ceramics with high saturation magnetization (4πMs) and low ferromagnetic resonance line widths (ΔH) represent a very critical class of material for microwave ferrite devices. Many existing approaches emphasize promotion of the grain growth (average size is 10-50 μm) of ferrite ceramics to improve the gyromagnetic properties at relatively low sintering temperatures. This paper describes a new strategy for obtaining uniform and compact LiZn ferrite ceramics (average grains size is ∼2 μm) with enhanced magnetic performance by suppressing grain growth in great detail. The LiZn ferrites with a formula of Li0.415Zn0.27Mn0.06Ti0.1Fe2.155O4 were prepared by solid reaction routes with two new sintering strategies. Interestingly, results show that uniform, compact, and pure spinel ferrite ceramics were synthesized at a low temperature (∼850 °C) without obvious grain growth. We also find that a fast second sintering treatment (FSST) can further improve their gyromagnetic properties, such as higher 4πMs and lower ΔH. The two new strategies are facile and efficient for densification of LiZn ferrite ceramics via suppressing grain growth at low temperatures. The sintering strategy reported in this study also provides a referential experience for other ceramics, such as soft magnetism ferrite ceramics or dielectric ceramics.

  11. Effect of internal nitriding on the fatigue strength of ferritic corrosion-resistant steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogachev, S. O.; Nikulin, S. A.; Terent'ev, V. F.; Khatkevich, V. M.; Prosvirnin, D. V.; Savicheva, R. O.

    2015-04-01

    The effect of internal nitriding and subsequent annealing on the mechanical properties of ferritic corrosion-resistance 08Kh17T steel has been studied during static and cyclic loading. Nitriding was shown to increase the static and cyclic strength of ferritic steel substantially and to decrease its plasticity slightly. These changes are confirmed by results of fractographic studies.

  12. Influence of matching thickness on the absorption properties of doped barium ferrites at microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, A.; Saatchi, A.; Salehi, M.; Hossienpour, A.; Morisako, A.; Liu, X.

    2006-02-01

    The development and characterization of hexagonal ferrite powders of BaFe9Mn1.5Ti1.5O19, BaFe9Mn1.5Co1.5O19, and BaFe9Ti1.5Co1.5O19 as the microwave absorbers have been investigated. The ferrites were fabricated by conventional ceramic technology. The developed ferrite powders 80% by weight were mixed with polyvinylchloride plasticizer and fired to form rubber-ferrite with the thickness of 1.5 mm, 2 mm and 2.5 mm. XRD was used to identify structures of the samples. The magnetoplumbite structures for all the samples have been formed. Vibrating sample magnetometer was used to determine the hysteresis loops of barium ferrite and BaFe9Mn1.5Ti1.5O19 at room temperature. The vector network analyzers in the frequency range of 12 to 20 GHz have measured the reflection loss properties of rubber-ferrite. It was concluded that BaFe9Mn1.5Ti1.5O19 with thickness of 2 mm could be designed as a wide-band microwave absorber. By SEM, the size and morphology of grains in BaFe9Mn1.5Ti1.5O19 ferrite were examined. The results showed that ferrite with grain size of 5 μm do not have any impurities.

  13. Carbon concentration measurements by atom probe tomography in the ferritic phase of high-silicon steels

    DOE PAGES

    Rementeria, Rosalia; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Aranda, Maria M.; ...

    2016-12-19

    Current studies using atom probe tomography (APT) show that bainitic ferrite formed at low temperature contains more carbon than what is consistent with the paraequilibrium phase diagram. However, nanocrystalline bainitic ferrite exhibits a non-homogeneous distribution of carbon atoms in arrangements with specific compositions, i.e. Cottrell atmospheres, carbon clusters, and carbides, in most cases with a size of a few nanometers. The ferrite volume within a single platelet that is free of these carbon-enriched regions is extremely small. Proximity histograms can be compromised on the ferrite side, and a great deal of care should be taken to estimate the carbon contentmore » in regions of bainitic ferrite free from carbon agglomeration. For this purpose, APT measurements were first validated for the ferritic phase in a pearlitic sample and further performed for the bainitic ferrite matrix in high-silicon steels isothermally transformed between 200 °C and 350 °C. Additionally, results were compared with the carbon concentration values derived from X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses considering a tetragonal lattice and previous APT studies. In conclusion, the present results reveal a strong disagreement between the carbon content values in the bainitic ferrite matrix as obtained by APT and those derived from XRD measurements. Those differences have been attributed to the development of carbon-clustered regions with an increased tetragonality in a carbon-depleted matrix.« less

  14. Carbon concentration measurements by atom probe tomography in the ferritic phase of high-silicon steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rementeria, Rosalia; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Aranda, Maria M.; Guo, Wei; Jimenez, Jose A.; Garcia-Mateo, Carlos; Caballero, Francisca G.

    2016-12-19

    Current studies using atom probe tomography (APT) show that bainitic ferrite formed at low temperature contains more carbon than what is consistent with the paraequilibrium phase diagram. However, nanocrystalline bainitic ferrite exhibits a non-homogeneous distribution of carbon atoms in arrangements with specific compositions, i.e. Cottrell atmospheres, carbon clusters, and carbides, in most cases with a size of a few nanometers. The ferrite volume within a single platelet that is free of these carbon-enriched regions is extremely small. Proximity histograms can be compromised on the ferrite side, and a great deal of care should be taken to estimate the carbon content in regions of bainitic ferrite free from carbon agglomeration. For this purpose, APT measurements were first validated for the ferritic phase in a pearlitic sample and further performed for the bainitic ferrite matrix in high-silicon steels isothermally transformed between 200 °C and 350 °C. Additionally, results were compared with the carbon concentration values derived from X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses considering a tetragonal lattice and previous APT studies. In conclusion, the present results reveal a strong disagreement between the carbon content values in the bainitic ferrite matrix as obtained by APT and those derived from XRD measurements. Those differences have been attributed to the development of carbon-clustered regions with an increased tetragonality in a carbon-depleted matrix.

  15. Nano-ferrites for Water Splitting: Unprecedented High Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production under Visible Light

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the present investigation, hydrogen production via water splitting by nano ferrites has been studied using ethanol as the sacrificial donor. The nano ferrite has shown great potential in hydrogen generation with hydrogen yield of 8275 9moles/h/ g of photocatalyst under visible...

  16. 78 FR 63517 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... Information The NRC published DG-1279 in the Federal Register on October 3, 2012 (77 FR 60479), for a 60-day... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... revision to Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.31, ``Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.''...

  17. Thin-film ferrites vapor deposited by one-step process in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacskaylo, M.

    1966-01-01

    Thin-film ferrites are formed by vapor deposition of a mixture of powdered ferrites and powdered boron oxide at controlled temperatures in a vacuum chamber. These films are used in memory devices for computers and as thin-film inductors in communications and telemetry systems.

  18. Antibacterial activity and characteristics of modified ferrite powder coated with a gemini pyridinium salt molecule.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Akihiro; Maeda, Takuya; Ohkita, Motoaki; Nagamune, Hideaki; Kourai, Hiroki

    2007-09-01

    This report describes the synthesis of an antibacterial material consisting of a gemini quaternary ammonium salt (gemini-QUAT) immobilized on ferrite powder, and its antibacterial activity. A gemini-QUAT containing two pyridinium residues per molecule, 4,4'-[1,3-(2,2-dihydroxylmethyl-1,3-dithiapropane)]bis (1-octylpyridinium bromide), was immobilized on ferrite powder by a reaction between the hydroxyl group of the QUAT and trimethoxysilane. Immobilization of the gemini-QUAT on ferrite (F-gemini-QUAT) was confirmed when the dye, bromophenol blue, was released from F-gemini-QUAT-dye after contact between ferrite and the dye. Elemental analysis of the QUAT-ferrite determined the molar amount of QUAT on the ferrite. The antibacterial effect of the ferrite was investigated using a batch treatment system, and this effect was compared with that of another QUAT-ferrite (F-mono-QUAT) binding a mono-QUAT, which possesses one pyridinium residue, prepared by the same immobilization method as F-gemini-QUAT. Results indicated the F-gemini QUAT possessed a higher bactericidal potency and broader antibacterial spectrum compared to F-mono-QUAT. In addition, this study suggested that gemini-QUATs possessed high bactericidal potency without being influenced by immobilization to materials, and the antibacterial activity and characteristics of F-gemini-QUAT could be attributed to the unique structure of the immobilized gemini-QUAT.

  19. Effect of powder compaction on radiation-thermal synthesis of lithium-titanium ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surzhikov, A. P.; Lysenko, E. N.; Vlasov, V. A.; Malyshev, A. V.; Korobeynikov, M. V.; Mikhailenko, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Effect of powder compaction on the efficiency of thermal and radiation-thermal synthesis of lithium-substituted ferrites was investigated by X-Ray diffraction and specific magnetization analysis. It was shown that the radiation-thermal heating of compacted powder reagents mixture leads to an increase in efficiency of lithium-titanium ferrites synthesis.

  20. The H2O/D2O isotope effect in crystalline lanthanide sulfates at photo-, radio-, and triboluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharipov, G. L.; Tukhbatullin, A. A.; Mescheryakova, E. S.

    2016-02-01

    We comparatively studied the H2O/D2O isotope effect of lanthanide sulfate crystallohydrates on photo-, radio-, and triboluminescence and lifetimes of the excited Ln3+ ions. Replacing H2O by D2O leads to an increase in the luminescence intensity whereas this process does not affect the maxima positions in photo-, radio-, and triboluminescence spectra. This isotope effect agrees with the known concepts of changes in luminescence quantum yields of the Ln3+ ions being the main emitters. The bands of OH and OD radicals arise in triboluminescence spectra of lanthanide sulfate crystallohydrates (with H2O or D2O) registered in argon atmosphere in UV region. This supports the proposition that water destruction occurs at the degradation of the crystallohydrates.

  1. Synchrotron-based double imaging photoelectron/photoion coincidence spectroscopy of radicals produced in a flow tube: OH and OD

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Gustavo A.; Tang, Xiaofeng; Gil, Jean -Francois; Nahon, Laurent; Ward, Michael; Batut, Sebastien; Fittschen, Christa; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Loison, Jean -Christophe

    2015-04-23

    In this study, we present a microwave discharge flow tube coupled with a double imaging electron/ion coincidence device and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation. The system has been applied to the study of the photoelectron spectroscopy of the well-known radicals OH and OD. The coincidence imaging scheme provides a high selectivity and yields the spectra of the pure radicals, removing the ever-present contributions from excess reactants, background, or secondary products, and therefore obviating the need for a prior knowledge of all possible byproducts. The photoelectron spectra encompassing the X3Σ ground state of the OH+ and OD+ cations have been extracted and the vibrational constants compared satisfactorily to existing literature values. Future advantages of this approach include measurement of high resolution VUV spectroscopy of radicals, their absolute photoionization cross section, and species/isomer identification in chemical reactions as a function of time.

  2. Synchrotron-based double imaging photoelectron/photoion coincidence spectroscopy of radicals produced in a flow tube: OH and OD

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Gustavo A.; Tang, Xiaofeng; Gil, Jean-François; Nahon, Laurent; Ward, Michael; Batut, Sebastien; Fittschen, Christa; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Loison, Jean-Christophe

    2015-04-28

    We present a microwave discharge flow tube coupled with a double imaging electron/ion coincidence device and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation. The system has been applied to the study of the photoelectron spectroscopy of the well-known radicals OH and OD. The coincidence imaging scheme provides a high selectivity and yields the spectra of the pure radicals, removing the ever-present contributions from excess reactants, background, or secondary products, and therefore obviating the need for a prior knowledge of all possible byproducts. The photoelectron spectra encompassing the X{sup 3}Σ{sup −} ground state of the OH{sup +} and OD{sup +} cations have been extracted and the vibrational constants compared satisfactorily to existing literature values. Future advantages of this approach include measurement of high resolution VUV spectroscopy of radicals, their absolute photoionization cross section, and species/isomer identification in chemical reactions as a function of time.

  3. Synchrotron-based double imaging photoelectron/photoion coincidence spectroscopy of radicals produced in a flow tube: OH and OD

    DOE PAGES

    Garcia, Gustavo A.; Tang, Xiaofeng; Gil, Jean -Francois; ...

    2015-04-23

    In this study, we present a microwave discharge flow tube coupled with a double imaging electron/ion coincidence device and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation. The system has been applied to the study of the photoelectron spectroscopy of the well-known radicals OH and OD. The coincidence imaging scheme provides a high selectivity and yields the spectra of the pure radicals, removing the ever-present contributions from excess reactants, background, or secondary products, and therefore obviating the need for a prior knowledge of all possible byproducts. The photoelectron spectra encompassing the X3Σ– ground state of the OH+ and OD+ cations have been extractedmore » and the vibrational constants compared satisfactorily to existing literature values. Future advantages of this approach include measurement of high resolution VUV spectroscopy of radicals, their absolute photoionization cross section, and species/isomer identification in chemical reactions as a function of time.« less

  4. Microstructural study of an ODS stainless steel obtained by Hot Uni-axial Pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornin, D.; Grosdidier, T.; Malaplate, J.; Tiba, I.; Bonnaillie, P.; Allain-Bonasso, N.; Nunes, D.

    2013-08-01

    This study focuses on the consolidation of an ODS Fe-14Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y2O3 alloy obtained by powder metallurgy. The powder was sintered for 1 h at 1100 °C in a soft steel can and compacted by Hot Uni-axial Pressing (HUP) under 900 MPa within less than 5 s before air cooling. The HUPped material microstructure is prospected to determine relative density as well as microstructure and nano-precipitation. The HUP, which mimics the early stage of hot extrusion (HE), produces a fully dense metallurgical state. The HUPped microstructure is shown to be rather similar to the one obtained by HIPping for equivalent dwell time at high temperature. In both cases heterogeneous grain size microstructure was obtained. It is shown that the bigger grains come from static recrystallization occurring during the dwell time in furnace. Compared to HIP, the effect of the HUP is mainly to introduce intra-granular misorientations within these large recrystallized grains. During Hot Unidirectional Pressing the initially loose powder is fully consolidated. The relative density is rather similar to the HE and HIP process. Even with a uni-axial loading the HUPed material is homogeneous and does not presents any gradients of hardness. The obtained microstructure for the HUPed shows a bimodal grain size distribution and precipitates strings at grain boundaries. This material can be compared to HIP of similar composition grades [10]. Large grains are issued from an incomplete static recrystallization. Precipitation of nano-clusters is very similar for HUPed and HE materials. Nanometer scale precipitates are observed both within the large and small grains. One of the effects of the HUP compared to pure heat treatment is that the large grains that recrystallized during the early stages of the heat treatment present significant internal crystallographic misorientations. This is due to the plastic strain generated by the rapid compaction during HUP consolidation process.

  5. Microstructural characterization of a new mechanically alloyed Ni-base ODS superalloy powder

    SciTech Connect

    Seyyed Aghamiri, S.M.; Shahverdi, H.R.; Ukai, S.; Oono, N.; Taya, K.; Miura, S.; Hayashi, S.; Okuda, T.

    2015-02-15

    The microstructure of a new Ni-base oxide dispersion strengthened superalloy powder was studied for high temperature gas turbine applications after the mechanical alloying process. In this study, an atomized powder with a composition similar to the CMSX-10 superalloy was mechanically alloyed with yttria and Hf powders. The mechanically alloyed powder included only the supersaturated solid solution γ phase without γ′ and yttria provided by severe plastic deformation, while after the 3-step aging, the γ′ phase was precipitated due to the partitioning of Al and Ta to the γ′ and Co, Cr, Re, W, and Mo to the γ phase. Mechanical alloying modified the morphology of γ′ to the new coherent γ–γ′ nanoscale lamellar structure to minimize the elastic strain energy of the precipitation, which yielded a low lattice misfit of 0.16% at high temperature. The γ′ lamellae aligned preferentially along the elastically soft [100] direction. Also, the precipitated oxide particles were refined in the γ phase by adding Hf from large incoherent YAlO{sub 3} to fine semi-coherent Y{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} oxide particles with the average size of 7 nm and low interparticle spacing of 76 nm. - Highlights: • A new Ni-base ODS superalloy powder was produced by mechanical alloying. • The nanoscale γ–γ′ lamellar structure was precipitated after the aging treatment. • Fine semi-coherent Y{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} oxide particles were precipitated by addition of Hf.

  6. Dynamics of the reactions of O(1D) with CD3OH and CH3OD studied with time-resolved Fourier-transform IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chong-Kai; Xu, Zhen-Feng; Nakajima, Masakazu; Nguyen, Hue M. T.; Lin, M. C.; Tsuchiya, Soji; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the reactivity of O(1D) towards two types of hydrogen atoms in CH3OH. The reaction was initiated on irradiation of a flowing mixture of O3 and CD3OH or CH3OD at 248 nm. Relative vibration-rotational populations of OH and OD (1 ≤ v ≤ 4) states were determined from their infrared emission recorded with a step-scan time-resolved Fourier-transform spectrometer. In O(1D) + CD3OH, the rotational distribution of OD is nearly Boltzmann, whereas that of OH is bimodal; the product ratio [OH]/[OD] is 1.56 ± 0.36. In O(1D) + CH3OD, the rotational distribution of OH is nearly Boltzmann, whereas that of OD is bimodal; the product ratio [OH]/[OD] is 0.59 ± 0.14. Quantum-chemical calculations of the potential energy and microcanonical rate coefficients of various channels indicate that the abstraction channels are unimportant and O(1D) inserts into the C-H and O-H bonds of CH3OH to form HOCH2OH and CH3OOH, respectively. The observed three channels of OH are consistent with those produced via decomposition of the newly formed OH or the original OH moiety in HOCH2OH or decomposition of CH3OOH. The former decomposition channel of HOCH2OH produces vibrationally more excited OH because of incomplete intramolecular vibrational relaxation, and decomposition of CH3COOH produces OH with greater rotational excitation, likely due to a large torque angle during dissociation. The predicted [OH]/[OD] ratios are 1.31 and 0.61 for O(1D) + CD3OH and CH3OD, respectively, at collision energy of 26 kJ mol-1, in satisfactory agreement with the experimental results. These predicted product ratios vary weakly with collision energy.

  7. Fabrication of ultrathin Ni-Zn ferrite films using electron cyclotron resonance sputtering method

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Terumitsu; Kurisu, Hiroki; Matsuura, Mitsuru; Shimosato, Yoshihiro; Okada, Shigenobu; Oshiro, Kazunori; Fujimori, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Setsuo

    2006-04-15

    Well-crystallized Ni-Zn ferrite (Ni{sub 0.4}Zn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) highly oriented ultrathin films were obtained at a substrate temperature of 200 deg. C by a reactive sputtering method utilizing electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma, which is very effective to crystallize oxide or nitride materials without heat treatment. Thin films of Ni-Zn ferrite deposited on a MgO (100) underlayer showed an intense X-ray-diffraction peak of (400) from the Ni-Zn ferrite as compared to similar films deposited directly onto thermally oxidized Si substrates. A 1.5-nm-thick Ni-Zn ferrite film, which corresponds to twice the lattice constant for bulk Ni-Zn ferrite, crystallized on a MgO (100) underlayer.

  8. FERRITE-LINED HOM ABSORBER FOR THE E-COOL ERL

    SciTech Connect

    HAHN,H.

    2007-06-25

    An R&D Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) intended as step towards electron-cooling of RHIC-II is being constructed at this laboratory. The center piece of the project is the experimental 5-cell 703.75 MHz superconducting ECX cavity. Successful operation will depend on effective NOM suppression, and it is planned to achieve NOM damping exclusively with room temperature ferrite absorbers. A ferrite-lined pillbox test model with dimensions reflecting the operational unit was assembled and attached to the 5-cell copper cavity. The cavity resonances of the lowest dipole and monopole modes and their damping due to the ferrite were determined. The effective ferrite properties in a form portable to other structures were obtained from network analyzer measurements of the ferrite absorber models and their interpretation with the simulation code Microwave Studio.

  9. Toughness of 12%Cr ferritic/martensitic steel welds produced by non-arc welding processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, B.J.; Gooch, T.G.

    1998-08-01

    Low carbon 12%Cr steels can offer reduced life cycle costs in many applications. The present work examined the behavior of commercial steels of varying composition when subject to low heat input welding by the electron beam (EB) process and to a forge cycle by linear friction welding (LFW). Charpy impact testing was carried out on the high temperature heat-affected zone (HAZ)/fusion boundary or weld interface, with metallographic examination. With EB welding, the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) was below 0 C (32 F) only for steel of low ferrite factor giving a fully martensitic weld area. Higher ferrite factor alloys showed predominantly ferritic transformed microstructures and a transition well above room temperature. Grain coarsening was found even with low EB process power, the peak grain size increasing with both heat input and steel ferrite factor. Use of LFW gave a fine weld area structure and DBTTs around 0 C even in high ferrite factor (FF) material.

  10. Negative and near zero refraction metamaterials based on permanent magnetic ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Ke; Guo, Yunsheng; Zhou, Ji; Dong, Guoyan; Zhao, Hongjie; Zhao, Qian; Xiao, Zongqi; Liu, Xiaoming; Lan, Chuwen

    2014-02-01

    Ferrite metamaterials based on the negative permeability of ferromagnetic resonance in ferrites are of great interest. However, such metamaterials face a limitation that the ferromagnetic resonance can only take place while an external magnetic field applied. Here, we demonstrate a metamaterial based on permanent magnetic ferrite which exhibits not only negative refraction but also near zero refraction without applied magnetic field. The wedge-shaped and slab-shaped structures of permanent magnetic ferrite-based metamaterials were prepared and the refraction properties were measured in a near-field scanning system. The negative and near zero refractive behaviors are confirmed by the measured spatial electric field maps. This work offers new opportunities for the development of ferrite-based metamaterials.

  11. Negative and near zero refraction metamaterials based on permanent magnetic ferrites

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Ke; Guo, Yunsheng; Zhou, Ji; Dong, Guoyan; Zhao, Hongjie; Zhao, Qian; Xiao, Zongqi; Liu, Xiaoming; Lan, Chuwen

    2014-01-01

    Ferrite metamaterials based on the negative permeability of ferromagnetic resonance in ferrites are of great interest. However, such metamaterials face a limitation that the ferromagnetic resonance can only take place while an external magnetic field applied. Here, we demonstrate a metamaterial based on permanent magnetic ferrite which exhibits not only negative refraction but also near zero refraction without applied magnetic field. The wedge-shaped and slab-shaped structures of permanent magnetic ferrite-based metamaterials were prepared and the refraction properties were measured in a near-field scanning system. The negative and near zero refractive behaviors are confirmed by the measured spatial electric field maps. This work offers new opportunities for the development of ferrite-based metamaterials. PMID:24553188

  12. Negative and near zero refraction metamaterials based on permanent magnetic ferrites.

    PubMed

    Bi, Ke; Guo, Yunsheng; Zhou, Ji; Dong, Guoyan; Zhao, Hongjie; Zhao, Qian; Xiao, Zongqi; Liu, Xiaoming; Lan, Chuwen

    2014-02-20

    Ferrite metamaterials based on the negative permeability of ferromagnetic resonance in ferrites are of great interest. However, such metamaterials face a limitation that the ferromagnetic resonance can only take place while an external magnetic field applied. Here, we demonstrate a metamaterial based on permanent magnetic ferrite which exhibits not only negative refraction but also near zero refraction without applied magnetic field. The wedge-shaped and slab-shaped structures of permanent magnetic ferrite-based metamaterials were prepared and the refraction properties were measured in a near-field scanning system. The negative and near zero refractive behaviors are confirmed by the measured spatial electric field maps. This work offers new opportunities for the development of ferrite-based metamaterials.

  13. Microstructure of HIPed and SPSed 9Cr-ODS steel and its effect on helium bubble formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chenyang; Lu, Zheng; Xie, Rui; Liu, Chunming; Wang, Lumin

    2016-06-01

    Two 9Cr-ODS steels with the same nominal composition were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP, named COS-1) and spark plasma sintering (SPS, named COS-2). Helium ions were implanted into COS-1, COS-2 and non-ODS Eurofer 97 steels up at 673 K. Microstructures before and after helium ion implantations were carefully characterized. The results show a bimodal grain size distribution in COS-2 and a more uniform grain size distribution in COS-1. Nanoscale clusters of GP-zone type Y-Ti-O and Y2Ti2O7 pyrochlore as well as large spinel Mn(Ti)Cr2O4 particles are all observed in the two ODS steels. The Y-Ti-enriched nano-oxides in COS-1 exhibit higher number density and smaller size than in COS-2. The Y-Ti-enriched nano-oxides in fine grains of COS-2 show higher number density and smaller size than that in coarse grains of COS-2. Nano-oxides effectively trap helium atoms and lead to the formation of high density and ultra-fine helium bubbles.

  14. Fe-Cr-Mo based ODS alloys via spark plasma sintering: A combinational characterization study by TEM and APT

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Q. Wu; K. N. Allahar; J. Burns; B. Jacques; I Charit; D. P. Butt; J. I. Cole

    2013-08-01

    Nanoscale oxides play an important role in oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys for improved high temperature creep resistance and enhanced radiation damage tolerance. In this study, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) were combined to investigate two novel Fe-16Cr-3Mo (wt.%) based ODS alloys. Spark plasma sintering (SPS) was used to consolidate the ODS alloys from powders that were milled with 0.5 wt.% Y2O3 powder only or with Y2O3 powder and 1 wt.% Ti. TEM characterization revealed that both alloys have a bimodal structure of nanometer-size (~ 100 – 500 nm) and micron-size grains with nanostructured oxide precipitates formed along and close to grain boundaries with diameters ranging from five to tens of nanometers. APT provides further quantitative analyses of the oxide precipitates, and also reveals Mo segregation at grain boundaries next to oxide precipitates. The alloys with and without Ti are compared based on their microstructures.

  15. Effect of heat treatment on microstructure and hardness of Eurofer 97, Eurofer ODS and T92 steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Faulkner, R. G.; Riddle, N.; Martino, F. D.; Yang, K.

    2009-04-01

    Eurofer ODS steel is a potential candidate for fusion reactor application due to its excellent swelling resistance, low thermal expansion coefficient and high temperature properties. One of the main issues is that high fluence neutron irradiation induces a significant increase of ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) at temperatures below 400 °C which restricts its application. The aim of this study is to explore the methods to lower the initial DBTT of Eurofer ODS steel by heat treatment optimization. Two heats of Eurofer ODS steels with different C contents are heat-treated at different normalizing temperatures, cooling rates and tempering conditions, and are compared with Eurofer 97 and T92 steels heat-treated with similar conditions. The microstructure is characterized by optical microscopy, FEG-TEM and OIM-EBSD techniques. The effect of normalization, cooling rate and temper on grain size, precipitation, grain boundary misorientation and hardness are investigated. The influences of these properties on DBTT are discussed.

  16. Time-Resolved Frequency Comb Spectroscopy for Studying the Kinetics and Branching Ratio of OD+CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Thinh Quoc; Bjork, Bryce J.; Heckl, Oliver H.; Changala, Bryan; Spaun, Ben; Okumura, Mitchio; Ye, Jun

    2016-06-01

    The chemical kinetics of the OH+CO reaction plays important roles in combustion and atmospheric processes. OH+CO has two product channels, H+CO_2 and the stabilized HOCO intermediate, with a branching ratio that is highly pressure dependent. Therefore, establishing an accurate kinetic model for this chemical system requires knowledge of the reaction rates and product yields, and the lifetimes of all molecules along a particular reaction pathway. We report the application of time-resolved frequency comb spectroscopy (TRFCS) in the mid-infrared (3.7 μm) spectral region to address the complex reaction kinetics of OD+CO at room temperature. We use the deuterated forms to avoid atmospheric water interference. This technique allows us to detect the lowest energy conformer trans-DOCO intermediate with high time-resolution and sensitivity while also permitting the direct determination of rotational state distributions of all relevant molecules. We simultaneously observe the time-dependent concentrations of trans-DOCO, OD, and D_2O which are used in conjunction with kinetics modeling to obtain the pressure- and collision partner-dependent branching ratio of OD+CO.

  17. In situ fabrication and characterization of cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Min; Jiao, Qingze; Zhao, Yun

    2013-12-15

    Cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites were prepared by a one-step hydrothermal process using NaHSO{sub 3} as the reducing agent and 1-propyl-3-hexadecylimidazolium bromide as the structure growth-directing template. The reduction of graphene oxide and the in situ formation of cobalt ferrite nanorods were accomplished in a one-step reaction. The structure and morphology of as-obtained composites were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscope, X-ray diffractometer, Fourier transform infrared spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Uniform rod-like cobalt ferrites with diameters of about 100 nm and length of about 800 nm were homogeneously distributed on the graphene sheets. The hybrid materials showed a saturation magnetization of 42.5 emu/g and coercivity of 495.1 Oe at room temperature. The electromagnetic parameters were measured using a vector network analyzer. A minimum reflection loss (RL) of − 25.8 dB was observed at 16.1 GHz for the cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites with a thickness of 2 mm, and the effective absorption frequency (RL < − 10 dB) ranged from 13.5 to 18.0 GHz. The composites exhibited better absorbing properties than the cobalt ferrite nanorods and the mixture of cobalt ferrite nanorods and graphene. - Highlights: • Reduction of GO and formation of ferrites were accomplished in a one-step reaction. • Ionic liquid was used to control 1D growth of ferrite nanorods for the first time. • Cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites showed dielectric and magnetic loss. • Cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites exhibited better absorbing properties.

  18. Morphological Stability of δ-Ferrite/γ Interphase Boundary in Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Guowei; Chen, Shuying; Yue, Xudong; Li, Qingchun

    2017-01-01

    The morphological changes of the δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary have been observed in situ with a high-temperature confocal scanning laser microscope (HTCSLM) during δ/γ transformations (δ → γ and γ → δ) of Fe-0.06 wt pct C-0.6 wt pct Mn alloy, and a kinetic equation of morphological stability of δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary has been established. Thereafter, the criterion expression for morphological stability of δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary was established and discussed, and the critical migration speeds of δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundaries are calculated in Fe-C, Fe-Ni, and Fe-Cr alloys. The results indicate that the δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary is very stable and nearly remains absolute planar all the time during γ → δ transformation in Fe-C alloy. The δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary remains basically planar during δ → γ transformation when the migration speed is lower than 0.88 μm/s, and the interphase boundary will be unstable and exhibit a finger-like morphology when the migration speed is higher than 0.88 μm/s. The morphological stability of δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary is primarily controlled by the interface energy and the solute concentration gradient at the front of the boundary. During the constant temperature phase transformation, an opposite temperature gradient on both sides of δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary weakens the steady effect of the temperature gradient on the boundary. The theoretical analysis of the morphological stability of the δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary is coincident with the observed experimental results utilizing the HTCSLM. There is a good agreement between the theoretical calculation of the critical moving velocities of δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundaries and the experimental results.

  19. Morphological Stability of δ-Ferrite/ γ Interphase Boundary in Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Guowei; Chen, Shuying; Yue, Xudong; Li, Qingchun

    2017-04-01

    The morphological changes of the δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary have been observed in situ with a high-temperature confocal scanning laser microscope (HTCSLM) during δ/ γ transformations ( δ → γ and γ → δ) of Fe-0.06 wt pct C-0.6 wt pct Mn alloy, and a kinetic equation of morphological stability of δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary has been established. Thereafter, the criterion expression for morphological stability of δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary was established and discussed, and the critical migration speeds of δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundaries are calculated in Fe-C, Fe-Ni, and Fe-Cr alloys. The results indicate that the δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary is very stable and nearly remains absolute planar all the time during γ → δ transformation in Fe-C alloy. The δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary remains basically planar during δ → γ transformation when the migration speed is lower than 0.88 μm/s, and the interphase boundary will be unstable and exhibit a finger-like morphology when the migration speed is higher than 0.88 μm/s. The morphological stability of δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary is primarily controlled by the interface energy and the solute concentration gradient at the front of the boundary. During the constant temperature phase transformation, an opposite temperature gradient on both sides of δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary weakens the steady effect of the temperature gradient on the boundary. The theoretical analysis of the morphological stability of the δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary is coincident with the observed experimental results utilizing the HTCSLM. There is a good agreement between the theoretical calculation of the critical moving velocities of δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundaries and the experimental results.

  20. Structure and magnetic properties of rf thermally plasma synthesized Mn and Mn-Zn ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, S.; Swaminathan, R.; McHenry, M. E.

    2003-05-01

    Plasma synthesis has previously been shown to be a viable route to producing nanocrystalline magnetite and Ni ferrite nanoparticles. In this work nanocrystalline powders of Mn and Mn-Zn ferrites have been synthesized using a 50 kW-3 MHz rf (radio frequency) induction plasma torch. We investigate these materials for soft magnetic applications. High-energy ball milled Mn + Fe powders and (Mn+Zn) +Fe powders (<10 μm) in the stoichiometric ratio of 1:2 were used as precursors for the ferrite synthesis. Compressed air was used in the oxygen source for oxidation of metal species in the plasma. X-ray diffraction patterns for the plasma-torched Mn ferrite and MnZn ferrite powders were indexed to the spinel ferrite crystal structure. An average grain size of ˜20 nm was determined from Scherrer analysis confirmed by transmission electron microscopy studies. The particles also exhibited faceted polygonal growth forms with the associated truncated cuboctahedral shapes. Room-temperature vibrating sample magnetometer measurements of the hysteretic response revealed saturation magnetization Ms and coercivity Hc of Mn ferrite are 23.65 emu/g and 20 Oe, respectively. The Néel temperatures of Mn ferrite powders before and after annealing (500 °C, 30 min) were determined to be 200 and 360 °C, respectively. Inductively coupled plasma chemical analysis and energy dispersive x-ray analysis data on the plasma-torched powders indicated deviations in the Mn or Zn contents than the ideal stoichiometry. MnZn ferrite was observed to have a Néel temperature increased by almost 400 °C as compared with as-synthesized Mn ferrite but with a larger coercivity of ˜35 Oe.

  1. Oxidative stress mediated apoptosis induced by nickel ferrite nanoparticles in cultured A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Ahmad, Javed; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; AlSalhi, Mohamad S; Alrokayan, Salman A

    2011-05-10

    Due to the interesting magnetic and electrical properties with good chemical and thermal stabilities, nickel ferrite nanoparticles are being utilized in many applications including magnetic resonance imaging, drug delivery and hyperthermia. Recent studies have shown that nickel ferrite nanoparticles produce cytotoxicity in mammalian cells. However, there is very limited information concerning the toxicity of nickel ferrite nanoparticles at the cellular and molecular level. The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis induction by well-characterized nickel ferrite nanoparticles (size 26 nm) in human lung epithelial (A549) cells. Nickel ferrite nanoparticles induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity in A549 cells demonstrated by MTT, NRU and LDH assays. Nickel ferrite nanoparticles were also found to induce oxidative stress evidenced by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depletion of antioxidant glutathione (GSH). Further, co-treatment with the antioxidant L-ascorbic acid mitigated the ROS generation and GSH depletion due to nickel ferrite nanoparticles suggesting the potential mechanism of oxidative stress. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that following the exposure of A549 cells to nickel ferrite nanoparticles, the level of mRNA expressions of cell cycle checkpoint protein p53 and apoptotic proteins (bax, caspase-3 and caspase-9) were significantly up-regulated, whereas the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin and bcl-2) were down-regulated. Moreover, activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9 enzymes were also significantly higher in nickel ferrite nanoparticles exposed cells. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report showing that nickel ferrite nanoparticles induced apoptosis in A549 cells through ROS generation and oxidative stress via p53, survivin, bax/bcl-2 and caspase pathways.

  2. Exchange coupling between soft magnetic ferrite and hard ferromagnetic Sm2Fe17N3 in ferrite/Sm2Fe17N3 composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaoka, N.; Kakimoto, E.; Takagi, K.; Ozaki, K.; Tada, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Abe, M.

    2016-05-01

    In our previous work, we succeeded in fabricating ferrite/Sm2Fe17N3 composite magnets from explosive-consolidating Sm2Fe17N3 powders (2μm size) which were coated with a continuous iron ferrite layer (50nm thick) in an aqueous solution. The magnetization curves had no inflection, which suggests that the soft magnetic ferrite layer is exchange-coupled with the hard ferromagnetic Sm2Fe17N3 particles. In this paper, we provide evidence of exchange coupling in ferrite/Sm2Fe17N3 composites by the following means: 1) measurements of recoil permeability, 2) detailed microstructural observation and 3) calculations of the reduction in remanence due to the introduction of a ferrite layer in the Sm2Fe17N3 magnets. Our ferrite/Sm2Fe17N3 composite magnets are a novel type of spring magnet in which an insulating soft magnetic phase is exchange-coupled with hard magnetic phase.

  3. The magnetic properties of aligned M hexa-ferrite fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullar, R. C.; Bhattacharya, A. K.

    2006-05-01

    Aligned and random fibres of strontium hexaferrite (SrM, SrFe 12O 19) and barium hexaferrite (BaM, BaFe 12O 19) were manufactured by blow spinning from an aqueous inorganic sol-gel precursor, which was then fired to give the hexagonal ferrite fibre. Their magnetic properties were studied by VSM, investigating the evolution of these properties with firing and measurement temperature, and in particular the effects of fibre alignment. It has been predicted that aligned ferrite fibres will demonstrate an enhanced magnetisation along the axis of alignment with respect to perpendicular to the axis, and this has been demonstrated here for the first time. The optimum firing temperature was 1000 °C, at which point they still had submicron grains. In BaM random fibres Ms=63.8 emu g -1 and Hc=428.1 kA m -1, and in SrM random fibres Ms=63.3 emu g -1 and Hc=452.8 kA m -1, high values for polycrystalline materials. Fibres aligned parallel to the applied field had saturation magnetisation ( Ms) values equal to those of the random fibres, whilst fibres aligned perpendicular to the field had Ms values 62% and 75% lower, for BaM and SrM, respectively. There was no change in coercivity ( Hc) between random or aligned fibres of any orientation, and fibres aligned 45° and parallel to H appeared identical. Therefore, properties along the axis of alignment were superior when compared to measurements perpendicular to the axis of alignment, giving a directionality to the magnetisation in an otherwise randomly oriented ferrite material.

  4. Size dependence of magnetorheological properties of cobalt ferrite ferrofluid

    SciTech Connect

    Radhika, B.; Sahoo, Rasmita; Srinath, S.

    2015-06-24

    Cobalt Ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized using co-precipitation method at reaction temperatures of 40°C and 80°C. X-Ray diffraction studies confirm cubic phase formation. The average crystallite sizes were found to be ∼30nm and ∼48nm for 40°C sample and 80°C sample respectively. Magnetic properties measured using vibrating sample magnetometer show higher coercivety and magnetization for sample prepared at 80°C. Magnetorheological properties of CoFe2O4 ferrofluids were measured and studied.

  5. R-SQUARE IMPEDANCES OF ERL FERRITE HOM ABSORBER.

    SciTech Connect

    HAHN, H.; BURRILL, A.; CALAGA,R.; KAYRAN, D.; ZHAO, Y.

    2005-07-10

    An R&D facility for an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) intended as part of an electron-cooling project for RHIC is, being constructed at this laboratory. The center piece of the facility is a 5-cell 703.75 MHz super-conducting RF linac. Successful operation will depend on effective HOM damping. It is planned to achieve HOM damping exclusively with ferrite absorbers. The performance of a prototype absorber was measured by transforming it into a resonant cavity and alternatively by a conventional wire method. The results expressed as a surface or R-square impedance are presented in this paper.

  6. SELECTIVE SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM FERRITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    DOEpatents

    Beaver, R.J.; Cherubini, J.H.

    1963-05-14

    A process is described for separating uranium from a nuclear fuel element comprising a uranium-containing core and a ferritic stainless steel clad by heating said element in a non-carburizing atmosphere at a temperature in the range 850-1050 un. Concent 85% C, rapidly cooling the heated element through the temperature range 815 un. Concent 85% to 650 EC to avoid annealing said steel, and then contacting the cooled element with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to selectively dissolve the uranium. (AEC)

  7. Electrical and magnetic properties of nano-sized magnesium ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T, Smitha; X, Sheena; J, Binu P.; Mohammed, E. M.

    2015-02-01

    Nano-sized magnesium ferrite was synthesized using sol-gel techniques. Structural characterization was done using X-ray diffractometer and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer. Vibration Sample Magnetometer was used to record the magnetic measurements. XRD analysis reveals the prepared sample is single phasic without any impurity. Particle size calculation shows the average crystallite size of the sample is 19nm. FTIR analysis confirmed spinel structure of the prepared samples. Magnetic measurement study shows that the sample is ferromagnetic with high degree of isotropy. Hysterisis loop was traced at temperatures 100K and 300K. DC electrical resistivity measurements show semiconducting nature of the sample.

  8. Stability of Waves in Semiconductor-Ferrite-Metamaterials Waveguide Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabat, M. M.; Hamada, M. S.; El-Astal, A. H.; Mohammad, H. A. H.

    In recent years, the properties of electromagnetic waves propagating in various waveguide structures containing metamaterials have attracted increasing and growing attention. In this paper, the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a layered structure consisting of ferrite film bounded by a semiconductor cover and a metamaterial substrate was analyzed and discussed. The stability of magnetostatic surface waves through mentioned three waveguide structures has been obtained by implementing the perturbation method and the lighthill criteria has also been checked to find out the possibility of existence of magnetostatic envelope Solitons.

  9. Magnetic tuning of electrically resonant metamaterial with inclusion of ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Lei; Zhao, Qian; Zhao, Hongjie; Zhou, Ji

    2008-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a magnetic tuning of electrically resonant metamaterial (EMM) at microwave frequencies by introducing microwave ferrite rods into the periodic array of electrically resonant element. Different from those based on controlling the capacitance of equivalent LC circuit, this tunability arises from a mechanism of magnetically tuning the inductance of resonant element via the active ambient effective permeability. For magnetic fields from 0 to 5000 Oe, resonance frequency of the EMM can be continuously and reversibly tuned in a range of about 800 MHz. The active effective permittivity has also been investigated through the simulated scattering parameters.

  10. Processing and Characterization of Cobalt-Zinc Nano Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Ritu; Thakur, Sangeeta; Singh, M.

    2011-07-01

    Co(1-x)ZnxFe2O4 (x = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) nano magnetic systems were prepared by solution combustion method. The powder samples are characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The average crystallite sizes of the prepared sample obtained from XRD are well consistent with particle size obtained from TEM images. Fourier transform confirm the spinel phase structure of cobalt zinc ferrite. Mössbauer spectra indicate that sample with 40% zinc concentration exhibits the collective magnetic excitations.

  11. Modeling the austenite decomposition into ferrite and bainite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazeli, Fateh

    2005-12-01

    Novel advanced high-strength steels such as dual-phase (DP) and transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steels, are considered as promising materials for new generation of lightweight vehicles. The superior mechanical properties of these steels, compared to classical high strength steels, are associated with their complex microstructures. The desired phase configuration and morphology can only be achieved through well-controlled processing paths with rather tight processing windows. To implement such challenging processing stages into the current industrial facilities a significant amount of development efforts, in terms of mill trials, have to be performed. Alternatively, process models as predictive tools can be employed to aid the process development' and also to design new steel grades. Knowledge-based process models are developed by virtue of the underlying physical phenomena occurring during the industrial processing and are validated with experimental data. The goal of the present work is to develop an integrated microstructure model to adequately describe the kinetics of austenite decomposition into polygonal ferrite and bainite, such that for complex thermal paths simulating those of industrial practice, the final microstructure in advanced high strength steels can reasonably be predicted. This is in particular relevant to hot-rolled DP and TRIP steels, where the intercritical ferrite evolution due to its crucial influence on the onset and kinetics of the subsequent bainite formation, has to be quantified precisely. The calculated fraction, size and spatial carbon distribution of the intercritical austenite are employed as input to characterize adequately the kinetic of the bainite reaction. Pertinent to ferrite formation, a phenomenological, physically-based model was developed on the ground of the mixed-mode approach. The model deals with the growth stage since nucleation site saturation at prior austenite grain boundaries is likely to be attained

  12. Corrosion Performance of Ferritic Steel for SOFC Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Jablonski, P.D.; Alman, D.E.

    2006-11-01

    Ferritic stainless steels have been identified as potential candidates for interconnects in planar-type solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) operating below 800ºC. Crofer 22 APU was selected for this study. It was studied under simulated SOFC-interconnect dual environment conditions with humidified air on one side of the sample and humidified hydrogen on the other side at 750ºC. The surfaces of the oxidized samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with microanalytical capabilities. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was also used in this study.

  13. Size dependence of magnetorheological properties of cobalt ferrite ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhika, B.; Sahoo, Rasmita; Srinath, S.

    2015-06-01

    Cobalt Ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized using co-precipitation method at reaction temperatures of 40°C and 80°C. X-Ray diffraction studies confirm cubic phase formation. The average crystallite sizes were found to be ˜30nm and ˜48nm for 40°C sample and 80°C sample respectively. Magnetic properties measured using vibrating sample magnetometer show higher coercivety and magnetization for sample prepared at 80°C. Magnetorheological properties of CoFe2O4 ferrofluids were measured and studied.

  14. Room temperature texturing of austenite/ferrite steel by electropulsing

    PubMed Central

    Rahnama, Alireza; Qin, Rongshan

    2017-01-01

    The work reports an experimental observation on crystal rotation in a duplex (austenite + ferrite) steel induced by the electropulsing treatment at ambient temperature, while the temperature rising due to ohmic heating in the treatment was negligible. The results demonstrate that electric current pulses are able to dissolve the initial material’s texture that has been formed in prior thermomechanical processing and to produce an alternative texture. The results were explained in terms of the instability of an interface under perturbation during pulsed electromigation. PMID:28195181

  15. Room temperature texturing of austenite/ferrite steel by electropulsing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahnama, Alireza; Qin, Rongshan

    2017-02-01

    The work reports an experimental observation on crystal rotation in a duplex (austenite + ferrite) steel induced by the electropulsing treatment at ambient temperature, while the temperature rising due to ohmic heating in the treatment was negligible. The results demonstrate that electric current pulses are able to dissolve the initial material’s texture that has been formed in prior thermomechanical processing and to produce an alternative texture. The results were explained in terms of the instability of an interface under perturbation during pulsed electromigation.

  16. Surface chemistry, friction and wear of Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in contact with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy analysis were used in sliding friction experiments. These experiments were conducted with hot-pressed polycrystalline Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites, and single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite in contact with various transition metals at room temperature in both vacuum and argon. The results indicate that Ni2O3 and Fe3O4 were present on the Ni-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents, while MnO2 and Fe3O4 were present on the Mn-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites in contact with metals were related to the relative chemical activity of these metals. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites were correlated with the free energy of formation of the lowest metal oxide. The interfacial bond can be regarded as a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the oxygen anions in the ferrite surfaces. The adsorption of oxygen on clean metal and ferrite does strengthen the metal-ferrite contact and increase the friction. The ferrites exhibit local cracking and fracture with sliding under adhesive conditions. All the metals transferred to he surfaces of the ferrites in sliding.

  17. Influence of high temperature pre-deformation on the dissolution rate of delta ferrites in martensitic heat-resistant steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junru; Liu, Jianjun; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Chaolei; Liu, Yazheng

    2017-03-01

    The dissolution process of delta ferrites and the influence of high temperature pre-deformation on the dissolution rate of delta ferrites in martensitic heat-resistant steel 10Cr12Ni3Mo2VN were studied by isothermal heating and thermal simulation experiments. The precipitation temperature of delta ferrites in experimental steel is about 1195 °C. M23C6-type carbides incline to precipitate and coarsen at the boundaries of delta ferrites below 930 °C, and can be rapidly dissolved by heating at 1180 °C. The percentage of delta ferrites gradually decreases with heating time. And a Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation was established to describe the dissolution process of delta ferrites at 1180 °C. High temperature pre-deformation can markedly increase the dissolution rate of delta ferrites. Pre-deformation can largely increase the interface area between delta ferrite and matrix and thus increase the unit-time diffusing quantities of alloying elements between delta ferrites and matrix. In addition, high temperature pre-deformation leads to dynamic recrystallization and increases the number of internal grain boundaries in the delta ferrites. This can also greatly increase the diffusing rate of alloying elements. In these cases, the dissolution of delta ferrites can be promoted.

  18. Surface chemistry, friction, and wear of Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in contact with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy analysis were used in sliding friction experiments. These experiments were conducted with hot-pressed polycrystalline Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites, and single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite in contact with various transition metals at room temperature in both vacuum and argon. The results indicate that Ni2O3 and Fe3O4 were present on the Ni-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents, while MnO2 and Fe3O4 were present on the Mn-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites in contact with metals were related to the relative chemical activity of these metals. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites were correlated with the free energy of formation of the lowest metal oxide. The interfacial bond can be regarded as a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the oxygen anions in the ferrite surfaces. The adsorption of oxygen on clean metal and ferrite does strengthen the metal-ferrite contact and increase the friction. The ferrites exhibit local cracking and fracture with sliding under adhesive conditions. All the metals transferred to the surfaces of the ferrites in sliding. Previously announced in STAR as N83-19901

  19. Influence of high temperature pre-deformation on the dissolution rate of delta ferrites in martensitic heat-resistant steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junru; Liu, Jianjun; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Chaolei; Liu, Yazheng

    2017-02-01

    The dissolution process of delta ferrites and the influence of high temperature pre-deformation on the dissolution rate of delta ferrites in martensitic heat-resistant steel 10Cr12Ni3Mo2VN were studied by isothermal heating and thermal simulation experiments. The precipitation temperature of delta ferrites in experimental steel is about 1195 °C. M23C6-type carbides incline to precipitate and coarsen at the boundaries of delta ferrites below 930 °C, and can be rapidly dissolved by heating at 1180 °C. The percentage of delta ferrites gradually decreases with heating time. And a Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation was established to describe the dissolution process of delta ferrites at 1180 °C. High temperature pre-deformation can markedly increase the dissolution rate of delta ferrites. Pre-deformation can largely increase the interface area between delta ferrite and matrix and thus increase the unit-time diffusing quantities of alloying elements between delta ferrites and matrix. In addition, high temperature pre-deformation leads to dynamic recrystallization and increases the number of internal grain boundaries in the delta ferrites. This can also greatly increase the diffusing rate of alloying elements. In these cases, the dissolution of delta ferrites can be promoted.

  20. Influence of particle size on the magnetic spectrum of NiCuZn ferrites for electromagnetic shielding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaohan; Yan, Shuoqing; Liu, Weihu; Feng, Zekun; Chen, Yajie; Harris, Vincent G.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of ferrite particle size on the magnetic spectra (1 MHz to 1 GHz) of NiCuZn polycrystalline ferrites doped with Co2O3 and Bi2O3 were systematically investigated. The experiments indicate that the ferrite particle size tailored by grinding time and corresponding sintering temperatures is crucial to achieving high permeability, high Q-factor and low magnetic loss, at 13.56 MHz for electromagnetic shielding applications especially in the near field communication (NFC) field. It is evident that high-performance NiZnCu ferrite materials are strongly tailored by morphology and microstructure. It is conclusive that fine ferrite particles and relatively low sintering temperatures are favorable to lowering magnetic loss and enhancing permeability. This work has built a foundation for improvement of the ferrite slurry used for fabrication of large area tape-casting ferrite sheets.

  1. Accumulation and annealing of radiation defects under low-temperature electron and neutron irradiation of ODS steel and Fe-Cr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzov, V. L.; Goshchitskii, B. N.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Danilov, S. E.; Kar'kin, A. E.

    2010-10-01

    The processes of accumulation and annealing of radiation defects at low-temperature (77 K) electron and neutron irradiation and their effect on the physicomechanical properties of Fe-Cr alloys and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel have been studied. It has been shown that the behavior of radiation defects in ODS steel and Fe-Cr alloys is qualitatively similar. Above 250 K, radiation-induced processes of the solid solution decomposition become conspicuous. These processes are much less pronounced in ODS steel because of specific features of its microstructure. Processes related to the overlapping of displacement cascades under neutron irradiation have been considered. It has been shown that, in this case, it is the increase in the size of vacancy clusters, rather than the growth of their concentration, that is prevailing. Possible mechanisms of the radiation hardening of the ODS steel and the Fe-13Cr alloy upon irradiation and subsequent annealing have been discussed.

  2. Microstructural evolution of delta ferrite in SAVE12 steel under heat treatment and short-term creep

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shengzhi; Eliniyaz, Zumrat; Zhang, Lanting; Sun, Feng; Shen, Yinzhong; Shan, Aidang

    2012-11-15

    This research focused on the formation and microstructural evolution of delta ferrite phase in SAVE12 steel. The formation of delta ferrite was due to the high content of ferrite forming alloy elements such as Cr, W, and Ta. This was interpreted through either JMatPro-4.1 computer program or Cr{sub eq} calculations. Delta ferrite was found in bamboo-like shape and contained large amount of MX phase. It was surrounded by Laves phases before creep or aging treatment. Annealing treatments were performed under temperatures from 1050 Degree-Sign C to 1100 Degree-Sign C and various time periods to study its dissolution kinetics. The result showed that most of the delta ferrite can be dissolved by annealing in single phase austenitic region. Dissolution process of delta ferrite may largely depend on dissolution kinetic factors, rather than on thermodynamic factors. Precipitation behavior during short-term (1100 h) creep was investigated at temperature of 600 Degree-Sign C under a stress of 180 MPa. The results demonstrated that delta ferrite became preferential nucleation sites for Laves phase at the early stage of creep. Laves phase on the boundary around delta ferrite showed relatively slower growth and coarsening rate than that inside delta ferrite. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Delta ferrite is systematically studied under heat treatment and short-term creep. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Delta ferrite contains large number of MX phase and is surrounded by Laves phases before creep or aging treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of delta ferrite is interpreted by theoretical and empirical methods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most of the delta ferrite is dissolved by annealing in single phase austenitic region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Delta ferrite becomes preferential nucleation sites for Laves phase at the early stage of creep.

  3. Synthesis and thermal stability of polycrystalline new divalent [beta][double prime]- and [beta]-ferrites prepared by ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Kalogirou, O. Aristotle Univ., Thessaloniki )

    1993-02-01

    Using ion-exchange chemistry the divalent cations Ba[sup 2+], Sr[sup 2+], Ca[sup 2+], Mg[sup 2+], Cd[sup 2+], Pb[sup 2+], Co[sup 2+], Zn[sup 2+], Mn[sup 2+], Fe[sup 2+], and Sn[sup 2+] have been substituted for K[sup +] in polycrystalline CdO-stabilized K-[beta][double prime]-ferrite samples. Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg, Pb, and Cd ion exchange led to the synthesis of new materials, the divalent M[sup 2+]-[beta][double prime]-ferrites (M = Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg) and M[sup 2+]-[beta]-ferrites (M = Cd, Pb), respectively. Co[sup 2+]-diffusion resulted in the formation of a spinel-type Co-ferrite. In the case of Zn, Mn, Fe, and Sn the samples decomposed to [alpha]-Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3]. The thermal stability of the new divalent [beta][double prime]- and [beta]-ferrites was studied either by high-temperature exchange reactions or by air annealing of the exchanged products. Ba- and Sr-[beta][double prime]-ferrites and Pb-[beta]-ferrite converted to M-type hexagonal ferrites with the magnetoplumbite structure, Mg-[beta][double prime]-ferrite decomposed to a spinel-type Mg-ferrite, and Ca-[beta][double prime]-ferrite and Cd-[beta]-ferrite decomposed to [alpha]-Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3]. Composition, lattice parameters, SEM photographs, and magnetic properties of the ferrites formed are given. The magnetic susceptibilities of the divalent [beta][double prime]- or [beta]-ferrites have values between 0.63 and 1.14 [times] 10[sup [minus]4] emu/g[center dot]Oe at room temperature. 41 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  4. Monosemousness of Thermal Plastic Strain on Thermal Fatigue Life in Ferrite Ductile Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Morihito; Mouri, Hayato

    In this study, the monosemous effect of thermal plastic strain on the thermal fatigue life is newly found on ferrite ductile cast iron around the alpha phase field. At first, the monosemousness is defined and its meaning described. Next, the monosemousness of thermal fatigue is demonstrated by its conditional equation and its existence is verified by the thermal fatigue test on ferrite ductile cast iron. By doing so, the feature on the thermal fatigue of ferrite ductile cast iron is clarified. Generally, it is considered that fatigue life in ferrite-matrix temperature range can be expressed at least by two or more different Arrhenius equations, namely there are two or more different activation mechanisms to govern the thermal fatigue life corresponding to various ferrite temperature ranges. In this case, for determining the life in any various ferrite temperature ranges, it must have at least four or more unknown quantities. If there is the presence of a general equation which is able to replace above described plural equations, then the life can be determined by simple one variable. Here, by introducing conditional equations, it is verified that the general equation is a Coffin and Manson's equation of low cycle fatigue and whole thermal fatigue life can be determined by a variable of thermal plastic strain occurred in thermal cycle. As a result, the law can apply to describe thermal fatigue phenomenon and predict thermal fatigue life monosemously from cyclic thermal plastic strain on ductile cast iron with ferrite matrix.

  5. Precipitation of sigma and chi phases in δ-ferrite of Type 316FR weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Eun Joon; Baba, Hayato; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Saida, Kazuyoshi

    2013-12-15

    The decomposition behavior and kinetics of δ-ferrite are examined using aging treatments between 873 and 1073 K for Type 316FR stainless steel weld metals with different solidification modes (316FR AF, 316FR FA). The dominant precipitates are sigma, chi, and secondary austenite nucleated at δ-ferrite/austenite interfaces or in the interior of the ferrite grains. These precipitates consume all the ferrite during isothermal aging in both 316FR AF and FA weld metals. Differences in the precipitation behavior (precipitation initiation time and precipitation speed) between weld metals can be explained by i) the degree of Cr and Mo microsegregation within δ-ferrite or austenite near ferrite and ii) the nucleation sites induced due to the solidification mode (AF or FA), such as the ferrite amount. For both weld materials, a Johnson–Mehl-type equation can express the precipitation behavior of the sigma + chi phases and quantitatively predict the behavior at the service-exposure temperatures of a fast breed reactor. - Highlights: • Precipitation of σ and χ phase in Type 316FR welds (two solidification modes) • Different precipitation behaviors: precipitation initiation time and growth speed • Johnson-Mehl–type equation is the most applicable to the precipitation behaviors • Precipitation behaviors are predicted under service conditions of FBRs.

  6. MnZn-ferrites: Targeted Material Design for New Emerging Application Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaspalis, V. T.; Tsakaloudi, V.; Kogias, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this article the main characteristics for emerging MnZn-ferrite applications are described on the basis of the new demands they possess on the ferrite material development. A number of recently developed MnZn-ferrite materials is presented together with the main scientific principles lying behind their development. These include: (i) high saturation flux density MnZn-ferrites (i.e. Bsat=550 mT at 10 kHz, 1200 A/m, 100°C), (ii) low power losses MnZn-ferrites (i.e. Pv~210 mW cm-3 at 100 kHz, 200mT, 100°C), (iii) MnZn-ferrites with broad temperature stability (i.e. PV<375 mW cm-3 for 25°Cferrites with high and frequency stable permeability (i.e. μi~12600 at 10 kHz, 0.1 mT, 25°C and tan(δ)/μi=20.5×10-6 at 100 kHz). In a final discussion the importance of defect chemistry for the time stability and stress sensitivity of the magnetic properties is discussed and some important issues are addressed, encountered during the transfer of a laboratory developed material to a large scale industrial production process.

  7. Field representations in uniaxial bianisotropic-ferrite medium by cylindrical vector wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Dajun; Lin, Weigan; Zhao, Yushen

    1995-04-01

    The uniaxial bianisotropic-ferrite medium is a generalization of the well-studied magnetically biased ferrite and uniaxial material. It can be manufactured either by immersing randomly oriented short helices and Ω-shaped particles in a magnetically biased ferrite, or by arranging short conductive helices in a magnetized ferrite in a certain manner. It has potential applications in microwave technology, antenna design, and antireflection shielding. In the present consideration, based on the concept of characteristic waves and the method of angular spectral expansion, field representations in uniaxial bianisotropic-ferrite medium are developed. The analysis reveals the solutions of source-free Maxwell's equations for uniaxial bianisotropic-ferrite medium can be represented in sum-integral forms of the circular cylindrical vector wave functions. The addition theorem of vector wave functions for uniaxial bianisotropic-ferrite medium can be straightforwardly derived from that of vector wave functions for isotropic medium. An application of the proposed theory in scattering is presented to show how to use these formulations in a practical way.

  8. An influence of a Glass Braze Composition on the Properties of Li-Ti Ferrite Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Panpan; Lin, Tiesong; He, Peng; Sekulic, Dusan P.; Zhao, Mengyuan; Wang, Shulei

    2017-04-01

    The influence of the chemical composition of Bi2O3-B2O3-SiO2-ZnO glass brazes on (i) the microstructure, (ii) the mechanical and (iii) the dielectric properties of Li-Ti ferrite joints was systematically investigated. The Bi5(Ti3Fe)O15 whisker and a white block phase consisting of Bi12SiO2 and Bi24B2O39 were observed in the joints of Li-Ti ferrite/Bi25-Ba and Li-Ti ferrite/glass brazes, respectively, containing a higher content of Bi2O3. No crystalline phase was detected in the Li-Ti ferrite/Bi25 and Li-Ti ferrite/Bi20 joints. The joint strength reached the maximum of 48 MPa in the Li-Ti ferrite/Bi25-Ba couples. It is assumed that this is mainly due to the strengthening effect of Bi5(Ti3Fe)O15 whiskers. The bonding temperature (700°C) had little effect on the dielectric properties of Li-Ti ferrite. Moreover, compared to the Bi25-Ba glass brazes, the Bi25 and Bi20 glass brazes had a less pronounced influence on the dielectric properties of joints. Different glass brazes can be tailored to different requirements depending on specific application and joint property requirements.

  9. Effect of filler loading of nickel zinc ferrite on the tensile properties of PLA nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahdan, Dalila; Ahmad, Sahrim Hj

    2013-05-01

    The mechanical strength of magnetic polymer nanocomposite (MPNC) of nickel zinc (NiZn) ferrite nanoparticles incorporated with polylactic acid (PLA) and liquid natural rubber (LNR) as compatibilizer is reported. The matrix was prepared from PLA and LNR in the ratio of 90:10. The MPNC were prepared at constant mixing temperature at 180°C, mixing time of 15 min. and mixing speed of 100 rpm. In order to achieve a good dispersion of NiZn ferrite in the matrix, firstly an ultrasonic treatment had been employed to mix the LNR and NiZn ferrite for 1 hour. The MPNC of PLA/LNR/NiZn ferrite then were prepared via Thermo Haake internal mixer using melt-blending method from different filler loading from 1-5 wt% NiZn ferrite. The result of tensile tests showed that as the filler loading increases the tensile strength also increases until an optimum value of filler loading was reached. The Young's modulus, tensile strength and elongation at break have also increased. The study proves that NiZn ferrite is excellent reinforcement filler in PLA matrix. Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were meant to show the homogeneity dispersion of nanoparticles within the matrix and to confirm the elemental composition of NiZn ferrites-PLA/LNR nanocomposites respectively.

  10. Studies on magnetic properties of chemically synthesized crystalline calcium ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, A.; Bera, A.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.; Saha, B.

    2016-05-01

    Spinel-type ferrites have taken a very important role for modern electronic industry. Most of these ferrites exhibit low-loss dielectric properties, high resistivity, low eddy current and also high temperature ferromagnetism. Calcium ferrite is one such important metal oxide which is environmentally safe, chemically stable, low cost and greatly abundant. This outstanding material of calcium ferrite is synthesized by a simple chemical precipitation method using NaOH as the precipitating agent. Ferric chloride anhydrous (FeCl3) and Calcium chloride dihydrate (CaCl2.2H2O) were used as iron and calcium sources respectively. The samples were heated at 200°C for 8h to obtain homogeneous powder of Calcium ferrite. The powders were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), Transmission electrical microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) measurements. The polycrystalline nature of the sample was confirmed by X-ray diffraction study. The magnetic properties of the sample were investigated by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) measurements. Magnetization curve of the prepared sample depicts that as synthesized calcium ferrite nanoparticles have saturation magnetic moment of 1.74 emu/g and the coercivity of 35.08 Oe with superparamagnetic behavior. The synthesized calcium ferrite nanoparticles with such magnetic properties will be a candidate material for different applications in electronics and exploring its functionality in the field of recently developing semiconductor device physics and spintronics.

  11. Chemical and physical characterizations of spinel ferrite nanoparticles containing Nd and B elements.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Takashi; Komorida, Yuki; Mito, Masaki; Takahara, Atsushi

    2010-05-15

    We first succeeded in synthesizing ferrite nanoparticles containing Nd and B elements by a chemical route using a polyol process. The lattice constants of the ferrite nanoparticles were equivalent to 8.39Å of the lattice constant for Fe(3)O(4) with the spinel structure in a bulk state independently of the size in diameter and composition (Fe:Nd:B). The size in diameter was actually dominated by the amount of ligands (oleic acid and oleylamine) coating the nanoparticles and easily tuned by changing refluxing-time under reaction. The spinel-structured ferrite nanoparticles containing Nd and B elements showed large coercivity as compared to Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles with the spinel structure, which were prepared by the same chemical method. By doping Nd and B elements into the spinel structure of ferrite, magnetic anisotropy increased in comparison with Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles. According to the analysis of magnetization curve using the modified Langevin function, the ferrite nanoparticles displayed the coexistence of superparamagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases. The ferrite nanoparticles containing Nd and B elements exhibited magnetic core/shell structure on the basis of various magnetic properties. The interface effect between the superparamagnetic core and antiferromagnetic shell might enhance the effective magnetic anisotropy of the ferrite nanoparticles containing Nd and B elements.

  12. Postirradiation thermocyclic loading of ferritic-martensitic structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaeva, L.; Orychtchenko, A.; Petersen, C.; Rybin, V.

    Thermonuclear fusion reactors of the Tokamak-type will be unique power engineering plants to operate in thermocyclic mode only. Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels are prime candidate structural materials for test blankets of the ITER fusion reactor. Beyond the radiation damage, thermomechanical cyclic loading is considered as the most detrimental lifetime limiting phenomenon for the above structure. With a Russian and a German facility for thermal fatigue testing of neutron irradiated materials a cooperation has been undertaken. Ampule devices to irradiate specimens for postirradiation thermal fatigue tests have been developed by the Russian partner. The irradiation of these ampule devices loaded with specimens of ferritic-martensitic steels, like the European MANET-II, the Russian 05K12N2M and the Japanese Low Activation Material F82H-mod, in a WWR-M-type reactor just started. A description of the irradiation facility, the qualification of the ampule device and the modification of the German thermal fatigue facility will be presented.

  13. Stability tests of permanent magnets built with strontium ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, H.D.; Brown, B.C.; Foster, G.W.; Fowler, W.B.; Gustafson, R.; Jackson, G.P.; Ostiguy, J.F.; Volk, J.T.

    1997-06-01

    Permanent magnets built using strontium ferrite bricks have been tested for stability against demagnetization. Ten test dipoles were built to monitor ferrite behavior under a variety of stressing conditions, including irradiation, mechanical shock, extreme thermal excursions, and long term magnetization stability. The test magnets were geometrically similar to, but much shorter than, the magnets built for the 8 GeV transfer line at FNAL. No loss of magnetization was observed for bricks exposed to a proton beam, and a magnet exposed to several Gigarads of Co{sup 60} gamma radiation suffered no measurable demagnetization. The magnet strength was observed to decrease logarithmically with time, consistent with the expected effect of thermal fluctuations. Irreversible demagnetization of {approx}0.1% was seen in cooling magnets to 0{degree}C, and the loss was {approx}0.2% for magnets cooled to -20{degree}C. No additional demagnetization was seen on subsequent cycling to 0{degree}C. Finally, one of the long dipoles built for the 8 GeV line was periodically tested over the course of 3 months, and showed no measurable demagnetization.

  14. Synthesis of Strontium Ferrite Ultrafine Particles Using Microemulsion Processing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong-Hwang; Chen, Yuh-Yuh

    2001-04-01

    The strontium ferrite ultrafine particles have been prepared using the microemulsion processing. The mixed hydroxide precursor was obtained via the coprecipitation of Sr(2+) and Fe(3+) in a water-in-oil microemulsion of water/CTAB/n-butanol/isooctane. According to the investigation on the thermochemical properties by TGA/DTA and the phase analysis by XRD, it was shown that the precursor could yield pure strontium ferrite after calcination at 700 degrees C for 5 h while using an appropriate molar ratio of Sr/Fe in microemulsions. From TEM measurement, the diameters of the precursor and calcined particles were 3.8+/-0.7 and 50-100 nm, respectively. The magnetic properties characterized by a SQUID magnetometer showed that the saturation magnetization, remanent magnetization, coercivity, and squareness ratio were 55 emu/g, 28 emu/g, 492 Oe, and 0.51, respectively. The magnetization was also observed to increase with the decrease of temperature at 5-400 K. Compared with those reported earlier, the quite low coercivity implies the potential application of final product in the high-density perpendicular recording media. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  15. Monodisperse cobalt ferrite nanomagnets with uniform silica coatings.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qiu; Lam, Michelle; Swanson, Sally; Yu, Rui-Hui Rachel; Milliron, Delia J; Topuria, Teya; Jubert, Pierre-Olivier; Nelson, Alshakim

    2010-11-16

    Ferro- and ferrimagnetic nanoparticles are difficult to manipulate in solution as a consequence of the formation of magnetically induced nanoparticle aggregates, which hamper the utility of these particles for applications ranging from data storage to bionanotechnology. Nonmagnetic shells that encapsulate these magnetic particles can reduce the interparticle magnetic interactions and improve the dispersibility of the nanoparticles in solution. A route to create uniform silica shells around individual cobalt ferrite nanoparticles--which uses poly(acrylic acid) to bind to the nanoparticle surface and inhibit nanoparticle aggregation prior to the addition of a silica precursor--was developed. In the absence of the poly(acrylic acid) the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles irreversibly aggregated during the silica shell formation. The thickness of the silica shell around the core-shell nanoparticles could be controlled in order to tune the interparticle magnetic coupling as well as inhibit magnetically induced nanoparticle aggregation. These ferrimagnetic core-silica shell structures form stable dispersion in polar solvents such as EtOH and water, which is critical for enabling technologies that require the assembly or derivatization of ferrimagnetic particles in solution.

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of Zirconium Substituted Cobalt Ferrite Nanopowders

    SciTech Connect

    Rus, S. F.; Vlazan, P.; Herklotz, A.

    2016-01-01

    Nanocrystalline ferrites; CoFe2O4 (CFO) and CoFe1.9Zr0.1O4 (CFZO) have been synthesized through chemical coprecipitation method. Moreover, the role played by the zirconium ions in improving the magnetic and structural properties is analyzed. X-ray diffraction revealed a single-phase cubic spinel structure for both materials, where the crystallite size increases and the lattice parameter decreases with substitution of Zr. The average sizes of the nanoparticles are estimated to be 16-19 nm. These sizes are small enough to achieve the suitable signal to noise ratio in the high density recording media. An increase in the saturation magnetization with the substitution of Zr suggests the preferential occupation of Zr4+ ions in the tetrahedral sites. A decrease in the coercivity values indicates the reduction of magneto-crystalline anisotropy. We investigated spinel ferrites can be used also in recoding media due to the large value of coercivity 1000 Oe which is comparable to those of hard magnetic materials.

  17. Monte Carlo calculations of the microstructure of barium ferrite dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walmsley, N. S.; Coverdale, G. N.; Chantrell, R. W.; Parker, D. A.; Bissell, P. R.

    1998-07-01

    A Monte Carlo (MC) model has been developed to investigate the influences of the volume packing fraction and applied field on the equilibrium microstructure of a dispersion of barium ferrite particles. We accounted for magnetostatic interaction effects by using a surface charge model which allows the calculation of the energy term required for the Metropolis-type MC algorithm. In addition to single particle moves, the model employs a clustering algorithm, based on particle proximity, in order to take into account the cooperative behaviour of the particles bound by magnetostatic energy. The stacks which are thought to be characteristic of barium ferrite systems are an example of this type of binding. Our study provides strong evidence, in agreement with experiment, for the formation of stacks both in the zero field and in the applied field equilibrium configurations. The simulation also predicts, by considering the effects of the packing density, that the dispersion properties are strongly affected by the mobility of these stacks. The equilibrium particle configurations have been investigated using a correlation function and visualized by computer graphics. The magnetic behaviour has been investigated by calculation of the magnetization curve.

  18. Preparation and Characterization of Zinc-Containing Nickel Gallate Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashhash, A.; Imam, N. G.; Ismail, S. M.; Yehia, M.

    2015-10-01

    Polycrystalline Ni1- x Zn x FeGaO4 samples containing different amounts of zinc ( x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5) were synthesized by solid-state reaction. Study of the crystal structure by x-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed peaks typical of a single-phase polycrystalline face-centered cubic structure (FCC). Elemental composition was determined by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra contained two absorption bands related to the tetrahedral A and octahedral B sites of the spinel ferrite. Magnetization loops obtained by vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) indicated that the saturation magnetization, M s, decreased gradually with increasing in Zn content ( x), and that coercivity H c was related to the microstructure of the Zn-doped samples. Mössbauer effect (ME) spectra of the samples were broad and magnetically split for x = 0.0 and 0.1 and quadruple doublets for the other Zn2+ concentrations. The dielectric constant ( ɛ') and dielectric loss tangent (tan δ) were also measured over wide ranges of frequency and temperature by use of the two probe method. The results were explained on the basis of cation-anion-cation and cation-cation interactions through the metal sites in the Ni-Zn-Ga ferrites.

  19. Structural and magnetic properties of chromium doped zinc ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, Rintu Mary; Thankachan, Smitha; Xavier, Sheena; Mohammed, E. M.; Joseph, Shaji

    2014-01-28

    Zinc chromium ferrites with chemical formula ZnCr{sub x}Fe{sub 2−x}O{sub 4} (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0) were prepared by Sol - Gel technique. The structural as well as magnetic properties of the synthesized samples have been studied and reported here. The structural characterizations of the samples were analyzed by using X – Ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The single phase spinel cubic structure of all the prepared samples was tested by XRD and FTIR. The particle size was observed to decrease from 18.636 nm to 6.125 nm by chromium doping and induced a tensile strain in all the zinc chromium mixed ferrites. The magnetic properties of few samples (x = 0.0, 0.4, 1.0) were investigated using Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM)

  20. Low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Kenik, E.A.

    1996-04-01

    Development of reduced-activation ferritic steels has concentrated on high-chromium (8-10 wt% Cr) steels. However, there are advantages for a low-chromium steel, and initial ORNL studies on reduced-activation steels were on compositions with 2.25 to 12% Cr. Those studies showed an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2WV) steel to have the highest strenglth of the steels studied. Although this steel had the best strength, Charpy impact properties were inferior to those of an Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) and an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2W) steel. Therefore, further development of the low-chromium Cr-W steels was required. These results indicate that it is possible to develop low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels that have tensile and impact properties as good or better than those of high-chromium (7-9% Cr) steels. Further improvement of properties should be possible by optimizing the composition.