Science.gov

Sample records for 12-18 years participated

  1. Community "San Gregorio." A Christian Educative Response to the Problem of Drug Abuse in Youth Aged 12-18 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamus, Jose Antonio Lopez; Sarmiento, Albeiro Saldana

    This pamphlet describes the "San Gregorio" pilot program in Latin America, the first of its type on the continent as a program specifically for adolescent drug addicts. The Christian educative program is designed for males 12-18 years of age, who are addicted to psycho-active substances and evidence serious behavioral problems. It is also aimed at…

  2. Snacking is associated with improved healthy eating index (HEI-2005 scores in adolescents aged 12-18 years: NHANES, 1999-2004

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to examine the association of snacking with diet quality in adolescents aged 12-18 years (n = 5,811). Snacks/drinks were combined when eating occasions were named in the 24-h recall, but analysis separated snacks from snacks/drinks that were only drinks. Adolescents were cl...

  3. The Turkish Adaptation Study of Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) for 12-18 Year Old Children: Results of Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karadeniz, Sirin; Buyukozturk, Sener; Akgun, Ozcan Erkan; Cakmak, Ebru Kilic; Demirel, Funda

    2008-01-01

    This study gives results of the first phase of the 12-18 year old Turkish students' norm study of The Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ), which developed by Pintrich, Smith, Garcia & McKeachie (1993). The scale was administrated to 1114 students from 3 primary schools and 3 high schools in Ankara in Turkish language, science,…

  4. The Turkish Adaptation Study of Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) for 12-18 Year Old Children: Results of Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karadeniz, Sirin; Büyüköztürk, Sener; Akgün, Özcan Erkan; Çakmak, Ebru Kiliç; Demirel, Funda

    2008-01-01

    This study gives results of the first phase of the 12-18 year old Turkish students' norm study of The Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ), which developed by Pintrich, Smith, Garcia & McKeachie (1993). The scale was administrated to 1114 students from 3 primary schools and 3 high schools in Ankara in Turkish language,…

  5. Snacking is associated with reduced risk for overweight and reduced abdominal obesity in adolescents aged 12-18 years: NHANES, 1999-2004

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to examine associations of snacking with weight status and abdominal obesity in adolescents aged 12-18 years (n = 5,811). Snacks/drinks were combined when eating occasions were named in the 24-h recall, but analysis separated snacks from snacks/drinks that were only drinks....

  6. Sources of Dietary Fiber and the Association of Fiber Intake with Childhood Obesity Risk (in 2-18 Year Olds) and Diabetes Risk of Adolescents 12-18 Year Olds: NHANES 2003-2006.

    PubMed

    Brauchla, Mary; Juan, Wenyen; Story, Jon; Kranz, Sibylle

    2012-01-01

    Increased fiber intake has been linked with lower risk of overweight and obesity in adults, but data are sparse for children. To address this issue, NHANES 2003-2006 data was used to evaluate (1) the food sources of fiber in children, (2) the dietary fiber density levels and risk of being classified as overweight/obese, and (3) the association between fiber intake level and impaired glucose metabolism in children. Analyses were restricted to the subsample of children with biological plausible diet reports (N = 4,667) and stratified by 2-11 year olds (n = 2072) and 12-18 year olds (n = 2595). Results showed that the food sources are predominantly foods that are low in dietary fiber, but are consumed at high levels. In 2-18 year old plausible reporters, the risk for overweight/obesity decreased by 17% from children in the medium tertile of fiber density intake compared to the lowest tertile (OR = 0.83, P value = 0.043) and by 21% between the highest compared to the lowest tertile (OR = 0.79, P value = 0.031). There was a protective effect of being in the medium tertile of dietary fiber density (OR = 0.68, P value <0.001) on impaired glucose metabolism. These results indicate a beneficial effect of higher fiber density in children's diets. PMID:22957219

  7. 19 CFR 12.18 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labels. 12.18 Section 12.18 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Viruses, Serums, and Toxins for Treatment of Domestic Animals § 12.18 Labels. Each separate container of such virus, serum,...

  8. 44 CFR 12.18 - Uniform pay guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Uniform pay guidelines. 12.18 Section 12.18 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 12.18 Uniform pay guidelines. (a) Members. Subject to...

  9. 44 CFR 12.18 - Uniform pay guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Uniform pay guidelines. 12.18 Section 12.18 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 12.18 Uniform pay guidelines. (a) Members. Subject to...

  10. 44 CFR 12.18 - Uniform pay guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Uniform pay guidelines. 12.18 Section 12.18 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 12.18 Uniform pay guidelines. (a) Members. Subject to...

  11. New Zealand Men's Participation in Early Years Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farquhar, Sarah-Eve

    2008-01-01

    The history of kiwi men's participation in paid early childcare and teaching work has not been documented to date. But what can be learned from the New Zealand experience may be helpful internationally in the movement towards greater male representation in early years work. This paper provides a brief recent history only, highlighting issues that…

  12. Increasing Participation in the Earth Sciences A 35 year Journey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blueford, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    In the 1970's the fact that woman and ethnic minorities men made up approximately10% of the workforce in the geosciences created concern. Determining ways to increase the participation became a topic of discussion amongst many of the geosciences agencies in the United States. Many created scholarships and work opportunities for students. One of the most successful projects was the MPES (Minority Participation in the Earth Science) Program implemented by the U.S. Geological Survey. A key factor in its success was its outreach programs which used employees to work in elementary schools to get children excited about earth sciences. Successive years added teacher workshops and developing career day presentations to help school districts increase the awareness of the earth sciences. However, cutbacks prevented the continuation of these programs, but from the ashes a new non-profit organization of scientists, the Math Science Nucleus, developed curriculum and implementation strategies that used Earth Sciences as a core content area. Using the power of the internet, it provided teachers and parents around the world content driven curriculum. The Integrating Science, Math, and Technology Reference Curriculum is used around the world to help teachers understand how children learn science content.

  13. 40 CFR 721.3025 - Fatty acids C12-18, C18 unsaturated, C12-18 alkyl esters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., C12-18 alkyl esters (generic). 721.3025 Section 721.3025 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... alkyl esters (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acids C12-18, C18 unsaturated, C12-18 alkyl esters...

  14. Intensity of Participation in Organized Youth Activities during the High School Years: Longitudinal Associations with Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denault, Anne-Sophie; Poulin, Francois; Pedersen, Sara

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the longitudinal associations between youth activity participation and adjustment over the high school years by examining (a) correlations between participation and adjustment growth curves, and (b) bidirectional links between participation and adjustment from one year to the next. Participation was…

  15. Intercollegiate Athletic Participation and Freshman-Year Cognitive Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascarella, Ernest T.

    1995-01-01

    Controlling for precollege aptitude and other influences, a study (n=2,416) found that male intercollegiate football and basketball players demonstrated net freshmen-year declines in reading and mathematics, while nonathletes and athletes in other sports showed modest net gains. Female athletes made smaller net gains in reading than nonathletes,…

  16. The Effect of Participating in a First-Year Learning Community on Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaPierre, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to discover whether participation in a first-year learning community is linked with increased levels of self-reported student engagement. The study compares the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) scores of students who participated in a first-year learning community with their peers who did not participate…

  17. Ten years and 100,000 participants later: occupational and other factors influencing participation in US Gulf War health registries.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tyler C; Smith, Besa; Ryan, Margaret A K; Gray, Gregory C; Hooper, Tomoko I; Heller, Jack M; Dalager, Nancy A; Kang, Han K; Gackstetter, Gary D

    2002-08-01

    For more than a decade after the Gulf War, there has been concern that wartime exposures have resulted in significant morbidity among Gulf War veterans. After the end of the war, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the Department of Defense (DoD) initiated health registries to provide systematic clinical evaluations of Gulf War veterans who chose to participate. By September 1999, there were 32,876 participants in the DoD Comprehensive Clinical Evaluation Program and 70,385 participants in the VA Gulf War Registry Health Examination Program. We identified demographic and military service factors, as well as potential war-related exposures associated with subsequent registry participation after 10 years of observation. Veterans potentially exposed to oil well fire smoke, those near Khamisiyah, Reserve and National Guard, Army veterans, and veterans in the theater of operations during intense combat periods were most likely to elect to participate in a registry. These findings support the hypothesis that certain occupational factors and wartime exposures may influence subsequent health care-seeking behavior. PMID:12185797

  18. Science Career Interests among High School Girls One Year after Participation in a Summer Science Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Katherine A.; Barrow, Lloyd H.; Chandrasekhar, Meera

    A residential summer program, the New Experiences far Women in Science and Technology (Newton) Academy, was developed to encourage high school girls' interest in the physical sciences and engineering. The goal of the Newton Academy was to increase and/or maintain interest and participation in the physical sciences among high schoolgirls. This study, part of a larger evaluation of the academy, reports the results of a follow-up of the 1998 Newton Academy participants 1 year after participation. It focuses on the participants' interests in the physical sciences and related careers as measured by the Strong Interest Inventory before and 1 year after participation. The results a/participant interviews conducted to further illuminate the findings from the quantitative data are also presented.

  19. Perceptions and Meanings Constructed by Participants in a Four-Year Instructional Coaching Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry Hummons, Monica

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study was conducted in the Midwestern U.S. It explored the stories of 27 educators who participated in a four-year instructional coaching project in a large urban school district. Subjects shared their perceptions of and meanings they constructed as a result of their experiences in the coaching project through participation in a…

  20. Science Career Interests among High School Girls One Year after Participation in a Summer Science Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Katherine A.; Barrow, Lloyd H.; Chandrasekhar, Meera

    2002-01-01

    Introduces a residential summer program, the New Experiences for Women in Science and Technology (Newton) Academy, which was developed to encourage high school girls' interest in the physical sciences and engineering. Reports the results of a follow-up evaluative study of the 1998 Newton Academy participants one year after participation. (Contains…

  1. Predictors of Adolescent Participation in Organized Activities: A Five-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denault, Anne-Sophie; Poulin, Francois

    2009-01-01

    This study examined (a) growth curves of youth participation in sports, performance and fine arts, and youth clubs throughout the high school years and (b) the associations between a series of predictors and the initial participation rates and growth over time. The predictors included individual, friend, and family factors. The moderating effect…

  2. Factors of Participants and Blogs That Predict Blogging Activeness during Teaching Practice and Induction Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luik, Piret; Taimalu, Merle

    2016-01-01

    The blog as a type of social software has been used in education for several years, and its positive effect in the field has been asserted in many studies. This study presents the factors of participants and blogs that predict blogging activeness during teaching practice and induction year. During the teaching practice and induction year all…

  3. Community participation and sustainability – evidence over 25 years in the Västerbotten Intervention Programme

    PubMed Central

    Norberg, Margareta; Blomstedt, Yulia; Lönnberg, Göran; Nyström, Lennarth; Stenlund, Hans; Wall, Stig; Weinehall, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Background Selection bias and declining participation rates are of concern in many long-term epidemiological studies. The Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) was launched in 1985 as a response to alarming reports on elevated cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in Västerbotten County in Northern Sweden. The VIP invites women and men to a health examination and health counselling during the year of their 40th, 50th, and 60th birthdays. Objective To evaluate trends in participation rates and determinants of participation in the VIP from 1990 to 2006. Design Registry data on socio-economic status from Statistics Sweden, and mortality and hospitalisation data from the National Board of Health and Welfare, both covering the whole Swedish population, were linked to the VIP and analysed for participants and non-participants. Results During 1990–2006, 117,710 individuals were eligible to participate in the VIP, and 40,472 of them were eligible to participate twice. There were 96,560 observations for participants and 61,622 for non-participants. The overall participation rate increased from 56 to 65%. Participants and non-participants had minimal differences in education and age. Initial small differences by sex and degree of urban residence decreased over time. Despite an increasing participation rate in all groups, those with low income or who were single had an approximately 10% lower participation rate than those with high or medium-income or who were married or cohabitating. Conclusion Sustainability of the VIP is based on organisational integration into primary health care services and targeting of the entire middle-aged population. This enables the programme to meet population expectations of health promotion and to identify high-risk individuals who are then entered into routine preventive health care services. This has the potential to increase participation rates, to minimise social selection bias, and to reinforce other community-based interventions

  4. Evaluation of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program. Second Year Report on Participation. NCEE 2006-4003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Patrick; Gutmann, Babette; Puma, Michael; Silverberg, Marsha

    2006-01-01

    By fall 2005, the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP), the first federally funded voucher program in the United States, was in its second year serving low-income students in the nation's capital. More than 5,800 students have applied to the Program over the 2 years, and about 2,300 of them--eligible public school students who participated in…

  5. Expanding Access, Participation, and Success in International Baccalaureate Programmes (IB Access Project): Evaluation Report Year Two

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerry, Gail; Corcoran, Tom

    2011-01-01

    In the fall of 2009, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation funded a three-year project proposed by the International Baccalaureate (IB) to demonstrate the feasibility of increasing the participation of minority students and students in poverty in its Middle Years Programme (MYP) and Diploma Programme (DP) in selected school districts in the…

  6. Expanding Access, Participation, and Success in International Baccalaureate Programmes: Year 1 Documentation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Thomas B.; Gerry, Gail B.

    2010-01-01

    In fall 2009, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation funded a three-year project (IB Access Project) with International Baccalaureate (IB) to increase participation of minority students and students in poverty in the Middle Years Programme (MYP) and Diploma Programme (DP). The IB Access Project seeks to do four things: (1) Improve teacher practice…

  7. Training Future Scientists: Predicting First-Year Minority Student Participation in Health Science Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtado, Sylvia; Eagan, M. Kevin; Cabrera, Nolan L.; Lin, Monica H.; Park, Julie; Lopez, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    Using longitudinal data from the UCLA Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP) and Your First College Year (YFCY) surveys, this study examines predictors of the likelihood that science-oriented students would participate in a health science undergraduate research program during the first year of college. The key predictors of…

  8. 76 FR 3192 - Value Pricing Pilot Program Participation, Fiscal Years 2010 and 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ..., which was published on October 19, 2010, at 75 FR 64397. The original deadline for formal grant... On October 19, 2010, at 75 FR 64397, the FHWA published in the Federal Register a notice inviting... Federal Highway Administration Value Pricing Pilot Program Participation, Fiscal Years 2010 and...

  9. Secondary Student Motivation to Participate in a Year 9 Australian Elective Classroom Music Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwan, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Despite strong philosophical arguments supporting the inclusion of music in all students' education, declining student participation rates in school music activities during the middle years of schooling remain an ongoing issue for music education researchers. This paper presents the findings of a case study examining the motivational factors…

  10. 29 CFR 2530.204-1 - Year of participation for benefit accrual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Year of participation for benefit accrual. 2530.204-1 Section 2530.204-1 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE BENEFITS SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR EMPLOYEE PENSION BENEFIT PLANS UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 RULES...

  11. One Year Term Review as a Participating Guest in the Detonator and Detonation Physics Group

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A; Roeske, F; Tran, T; Lee, R S

    2006-02-06

    The one year stay was possible after a long administrative process, because of the fact that this was the first participating guest of B division as a foreign national in HEAF (High Explosives Application Facility) with the Detonator/Detonation Physics Group.

  12. Examining the Role of Advanced Placement[R] Exam Participation in 4-Year College Enrollment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chajewski, Michael; Mattern, Krista D.; Shaw, Emily J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between Advanced Placement (AP) exam participation and enrollment in a 4-year postsecondary institution. A positive relationship was expected given that the primary purpose of offering AP courses is to allow students to engage in college-level academic work while in high school, and…

  13. 7 CFR 1467.11 - Easement and 30-year contract participation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Easement and 30-year contract participation requirements. 1467.11 Section 1467.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS...

  14. College Persistence over Time and Participation in a First-Year Seminar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John W.; Lesik, Sally S.

    2014-01-01

    Retention and graduation rates of an entire cohort of 1,913 first-time full-time college students are analyzed. The effects of participation in a first year experience (FYE) course and of entry level academic preparation (ELAP) on retention and graduation are examined, both descriptively and with discrete-time survival analyses. Although…

  15. Participation as a leader in immersion weight loss treatment: a 1-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L M; Schaumberg, K; Anderson, D A; Kirschenbaum, D S

    2016-02-01

    Non-overweight individuals may follow aggressive weight management approaches alongside overweight/obese friends or family members; thus, research has begun to evaluate subsequent effects among non-overweight populations. A prior study evaluated the short-term effects of an immersion weight loss programme on healthy young adult staff leaders. Results indicated that participation seemed to benefit, not harm, the young adults. The current investigation examined 1-year eating disorder and weight trajectories in this sample. The total sample (N = 244) consisted of staff leaders (44.3%) and demographically similar comparison participants who completed eating disorder and weight assessments across four time points: baseline, end of summer, 6-week follow-up and 1-year follow-up. Forty-seven per cent of the original sample responded to all time points (staff leaders n = 60; comparison n = 55). Over the course of 1 year, risk trajectories did not differ between groups. Staff leaders did not report significant changes in body mass index, suggesting that they maintained healthy weight over the course of 1 year. Participation as an immersion weight loss programme leader appeared to be protective against weight gain, without increasing eating disorder risk, for healthy young adults. This provides further support for using weight management interventions across a wide range of individuals. PMID:26638779

  16. Association of classroom participation and examination performance in a first-year medical school course.

    PubMed

    Millis, Richard M; Dyson, Sharon; Cannon, Dawn

    2009-09-01

    The advent of internet-based delivery of basic medical science lectures may unintentionally lead to decreased classroom attendance and participation, thereby creating a distance learning paradigm. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that classroom attendance/participation may be positively correlated with performance on a written examination for first-year medical school instruction. The study subjects consisted of 115 first-year medical students. The introductory respiratory structure-function instruction was designed to include one noncompulsory pretest, four short postinstruction noncompulsory self-evaluation tests that were unannounced as to date and time, and one compulsory comprehensive examination. The relationship between attendance/participation, measured by the number of noncompulsory tests taken, and performance on the comprehensive examination was determined by Pearson's correlation coefficient, one-way ANOVA, and a chi(2)-test of significance. The average score on the pretest was 28%; for the same items on the comprehensive examination (posttest), the average score was 73%. For the 80 students who took the pretest, this translated to an overall score increase of 161%. Attendance/participation in four or five of the noncompulsory tests resulted in an 83.3% pass rate on the comprehensive exam compared with a rate of 52.9% for attendance/participation in three, two, one, or none of the five noncompulsory tests; the overall pass rate was 60.9%. There was a significant association between a high rate of classroom attendance/participation and a high score on the comprehensive examination (Pearson's chi(2) = 8.599, P < 0.01). These findings suggest that classroom attendance/participation may be a significant determinant of performance of medical students on comprehensive examinations in first-year basic medical science courses. It is concluded that a substantial number of first-year medical students in this study could be at risk for poor performance

  17. First year participation in the affordable care act: costs and accessibility to gynecologic oncology.

    PubMed

    Pavlik, Edward J; Ore, Robert; Toyama, Aimi; Woolum, Dylan; Pavlik, Thomas E; Baldwin, Lauren

    2015-11-01

    With the ending of the operational first year of the American Affordable Care Act, health insurance premiums were accessed online. For a US$50,000 income, the lowest premiums ranged from US$805 annually (age 20 years) to US$3802 (age 64 years), while the highest ranged from US$2186 (age 20 years) to US$10,326 (age 64 years). The lowest premiums at age 50 years were higher in rural areas in contrast to the highest premiums that were less expensive rurally. At age 64 years, the lowest premiums were 9-12.6% of a US$50,000 income, while the most expensive varied between 16.5 and 39%. Access to gynecologic oncologists was variable in different networks. Medicaid enrollment nationally was ∼6× higher than paid enrollment. Eligible participation in Affordable Care Act coverage exceeded expectations by >190%. Performance of four healthcare exchange traded funds indicated that investor confidence is high in the American healthcare sector. PMID:26387757

  18. The external quality assessment scheme: Five years experience as a participating laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Rajendra; Das, Sudipta S.; Ojha, Shashank; Khetan, Dheeraj; Sonker, Atul

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aim: Quality assurance in blood banking includes active participation in the external quality program. Such a program offers valuable benefits to patient care, their safety, and an overall quality of laboratory practices. In the year 2002, we participated in the External Quality Assessment Scheme (EQAS) under the World Health Organization (WHO), Bureau of Laboratory Quality Standards, Thailand. Materials and Methods: In the current study we evaluated our EQAS test result of the past five years, from 2003 to 2007. Test results of all blood samples such as ABO grouping, D typing, antibody screening, antibody identification, and transfusion transmitted infection (TTI) testing were analyzed and documented. Results: Discordant results in one or more instances were observed with antibody identification, weak D testing, and tests for anti-HIV1/2 and HBsAg. Twice we failed to detect the ‘anti-Mia’ antibody in the issued sample and that could be attributed to the absence of the corresponding antigen in the used cell panel. HBsAg was missed due to its critically low titer in the serum and the comparatively low sensitivity of our Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) test kit. Conclusion: All these failures in the last five years have helped us to significantly improve our transfusion service in terms of performance evaluation, patient care and safety issues, and the overall quality of laboratory practices. We therefore recommend all laboratories and hospitals to participate in the EQAS program, which will definitely help them to improve from what they learn. PMID:20376263

  19. The impact of syphilis mass treatment one year later: self-reported behaviour change among participants.

    PubMed

    Rekart, Michael L; Wong, Thomas; Wong, Elsie; Hutchinson, Kylie; Ogilvie, Gina

    2005-08-01

    In 2000, syphilis mass treatment using oral azithromycin was delivered to at-risk British Columbians during a sex trade-related outbreak. The initiative included education, counselling and referral. This cross-sectional, observational study examines knowledge, attitudes and self-reported behaviour after one year among mass treatment participants compared with eligible non-participants. Participants self-reported positive changes: reduction in sexual partners overall (P=0.001) and for sex workers (P<0.01), decrease in unprotected oral sex (P=0.03), knowledge of asymptomatic syphilis (P=0.02), positive attitudes to mass treatment (P=0.02) and to the street nurses (P=0.01). Increased awareness was associated with increased condom use for vaginal sex overall (P=0.02) and for sex workers (P=0.03) and increased condom use for oral sex (P=0.05). There was no difference in syphilis incidence. Syphilis outbreak interventions that include education, support and referral can result in long-term positive behaviour changes. PMID:16105193

  20. Race-related Disparities in Five-year Cognitive Level and Change in Untrained ACTIVE Participants

    PubMed Central

    Marsiske, Michael; Dzierzewski, Joseph M.; Thomas, Kelsey R.; Kasten, Linda; Jones, Rich; Johnson, Kathy; Willis, Sherry; Whitfield, Keith; Ball, Karlene; Rebok, George

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The current study examined five-year cognitive change in untrained African American and White participants from the ACTIVE study Methods Five year trajectories of memory, reasoning, visual processing speed/useful field of view, digit symbol substitution, and vocabulary were investigated. Education, health, gender, age and retest/practice effects were controlled for, and a missing data pattern mixture approach was used to adjust for dropout effects. Results After considering age, education health and gender, being African American uniquely explained 2% to 7% of the variance in cognitive performance. There were virtually no significant race differences in rates of change. Discussion Race-related results in the current study are consistent with previous research suggesting that social advantage factors like education have a stronger influence on level of performance than rate of change. The small remaining effects of being African American on performance levels likely reflect uncontrolled variation in factors like literacy and financial advantage. PMID:24385632

  1. 25 CFR 1000.15 - How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... self-governance per year? 1000.15 Section 1000.15 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.15 How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year? (a) Sections 402(b) and (c) of the Act authorize the Director...

  2. 25 CFR 1000.15 - How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... self-governance per year? 1000.15 Section 1000.15 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.15 How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year? (a) Sections 402(b) and (c) of the Act authorize the Director...

  3. 25 CFR 1000.15 - How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... self-governance per year? 1000.15 Section 1000.15 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.15 How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year? (a) Sections 402(b) and (c) of the Act authorize the Director...

  4. 25 CFR 1000.15 - How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... self-governance per year? 1000.15 Section 1000.15 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.15 How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year? (a) Sections 402(b) and (c) of the Act authorize the Director...

  5. 25 CFR 1000.15 - How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... self-governance per year? 1000.15 Section 1000.15 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.15 How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year? (a) Sections 402(b) and (c) of the Act authorize the Director...

  6. Insights from an 8-Year Longitudinal Study of Female REU Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, S. J.

    2009-12-01

    The long-running REU program is tacitly intended to increase retention and provide "an important educational experience" for undergraduates, particularly women, minorities and underrepresented groups. This 8-year, two-stage study was designed to explore the ways in which the REU acted as an educational experience for 51 women from a single scientific discipline. This paper describes the results of that analysis in two sections. The first section describes the results from an ex post facto longitudinal data analysis. This data included multiple interviews with each participant during their REU, annual open-ended alumni surveys, faculty interviews, and extensive field notes, over an 8-year period. As a result of this analysis, four themes emerged, related to developing understandings of the nature of professional scientific work, the nature of the scientific process, the culture of academia, and finally, an understanding of the "self." This analysis served as an initial theory that was used to design the second stage, interview protocol. In the second stage over 10 hours of interviews with 8 participants were conducted and analyzed. These 8 participants were selected to represent a variety of career stages, and for their potential to disconfirm the initial theory. Analysis of this interview data failed to provide disconfirming evidence. Results from this study indicate that the REU did not provide a substantive educational experience related to the nature of scientific work, the scientific process, or the culture of academia. Results further indicated that the REU did not serve to transform participants' conceptions about themselves as situated in science, and learning gains with regard to other aspects of the self, were somewhat limited. Instead, the data suggests that these women arrived at the REU with pre-existing and remarkably strong conceptions in these areas, and that the REU did not functional to alter those states. These conceptions were frequently the

  7. Overview Of NASA Participation In The International Year Of Astronomy 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, H.; Cooper, L. P.; Smith, D.; Lowes, L.

    2008-12-01

    NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) is an active participant in the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) 2009, developing programs to celebrate astronomy and take the exciting science generated by NASA's space science missions to students, educators and the public worldwide. NASA is an Organizational Associate of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) IYA 2009 program, and as an integral component of national U.S. IYA team, is aligning its activities to the overarching themes outlined the team. A website was launched in May 2008 to guide visitors to NASA resources and enable participation in special events. Activities are planned around the launch of new missions in 2009. Images from NASA's Great Observatories, Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope and Chandra X-Ray Observatory will be unveiled in at least 50 science centers, museums, planetaria, and some schools. They will be made available on the web for download. A number of opportunities for the public to participate in personal observations will be offered through the Night Sky Network and other means. Existing programs will be expanded to provide a variety of IYA-themed educational materials. A NASA Events Calendar will feature space science topics and mission milestones to engage the public during each month of the IYA. These and other special programs being developed will be described in this talk. The NASA IYA Student Ambassador program will help spread the excitement of NASA's astronomy discoveries into local communities through the efforts of College and University students. Two of these students will represent NASA at the IYA Opening Ceremony in Paris in January 2009. The philosophy behind the IYA programs is to make them exciting and sustainable beyond 2009 - IYA is viewed as the beginning of a journey into the world of astronomy by the uninitiated and the continue of a quest by those already enraptured by the wonders of the sky.

  8. The status of African participation in the international heliophysical year (IHY)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabiu, Babatunde

    This paper assesses the participation of Africa in the ongoing International Heliophysical Year (IHY). IHY fosters ties between traditional/cosmic geophysics and astronomy. Astronomical Telescopes, Atmospheric Weather Electromagnetic System for Observation Modeling and Education AWESOME, Magnetic Data Acquisition System MAGDAS, Scintillation Network Decision Aid SCINDA, AMMA GPS and IGS GPS research facilities are the IHY intervention facilities already installed in African countries. The facilities are being well utilized and coordinated. National Organising Committees are being formed in individual member nations and the African Regional Committee is being strengthening towards the sensitization of the member countries and ultimate actualization of the goals of the International Cooperation program. Three continental IHY workshops have been held so far in Africa with participants drawn from several African states. The African IHY summer school has been scheduled for the last quarter of 2008. We describe the outreach activities across African axis during the 2006 total solar eclipse sponsored by IHY. Capacity building and technological transfer are part of the spin-off being derived from IHY. IHY is capable of providing a perfect bridge between north and south. African scientists and research institutes are already benefiting from the IHY planned international collaboration and cooperation. IHY is fostering strong intra-continental partnerships amongst African scientists.

  9. 12-step participation and outcomes over 7 years among adolescent substance use patients with and without psychiatric comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Chi, Felicia W; Sterling, Stacy; Campbell, Cynthia I; Weisner, Constance

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the associations between 12-step participation and outcomes over 7 years among 419 adolescent substance use patients with and without psychiatric comorbidities. Although level of participation decreased over time for both groups, comorbid adolescents participated in 12-step groups at comparable or higher levels across time points. Results from mixed-effects logistic regression models indicated that for both groups, 12-step participation was associated with both alcohol and drug abstinence at follow-ups, increasing the likelihood of either by at least 3 times. Findings highlight the potential benefits of 12-step participation in maintaining long-term recovery for adolescents with and without psychiatric disorders. PMID:23327502

  10. Health evaluation of the 2nd International "Quit and Win" Antinicotine Campaign participants ten years later.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Alina; Stelmach, Włodzimierz; Krakowiak, Jan; Rzeźnicki, Adam; Pikala, Małgorzata; Dziankowska-Zaborszczyk, Elzbieta; Drygas, Wojciech

    2008-01-01

    Smoking is one of the most often noticed types of negative behaviour among the Poles. In the work, the results of the health evaluation are presented of the participants of the 'Quit and Win' competition ten years after making a decision to refrain from smoking, also the dependency between this evaluation and behaviour connected with smoking among the people living in big cities and small towns and villages was analysed. Among the 648 respondents, majority, which is 302 people (46.6%) evaluated their health as good, 236 (36.4%) as average, and 76 of the questioned (11.7%) as very good, 29 people (4.5%) as bad, and 5 of the questioned (0.8%) as very bad. The respondents most often evaluated negatively their health in the group of the still smoking living in the big cities, and the least often in the group of the non-smokers living in small towns and villages. PMID:19189564

  11. Participation in an Intensive Longitudinal Study with Weekly Web Surveys Over 2.5 Years

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Jennifer; Kusunoki, Yasamin; Schulz, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Technological advances have made it easier for researchers to collect more frequent longitudinal data from survey respondents via personal computers, smartphones, and other mobile devices. Although technology has led to an increase in data-intensive longitudinal studies, little is known about attrition from such studies or the differences between respondents who complete frequently administered surveys in a timely manner, and respondents who do not. Objective We examined respondent characteristics and behaviors associated with continued and on-time participation in a population-based intensive longitudinal study, using weekly web-based survey interviews over an extended period. Methods We analyzed data from the Relationship Dynamics and Social Life study, an intensive longitudinal study that collected weekly web-based survey interviews for 2.5 years from 1003 18- and 19-year-olds to investigate factors shaping the dynamics of their sexual behavior, contraceptive use, and pregnancies. Results Ordinary least squares and logistic regression analyses showed background respondent characteristics measured at baseline were associated with the number of days respondents remained enrolled in the study, the number of interviews they completed, and the odds that they were late completing interviews. In addition, we found that changes in pregnancy-related behaviors reported in the weekly interviews were associated with late completion of interviews. Specifically, after controlling for sociodemographic, personality, contact information, and prior experience variables, we found that weekly reports such as starting to have sex (odds ratio [OR] 1.17, 95% CI 1.03-1.32, P=.01), getting a new partner (OR 1.76, 95% CI 1.53-2.03, P<.001), stopping the use of contraception (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.10-1.49, P=.001), and having a new pregnancy (OR 5.57, 95% CI 4.26-7.29, P<.001) were significantly associated with late survey completion. However, young women who reported changes in

  12. [Indicators of social functioning and social participation in mentally ill participants in a public health rehabilitation programme: a one year follow-up study].

    PubMed

    Kitajima, K; Kuroda, K; Tatara, K

    1996-02-01

    In order to investigate social functioning, a self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 66 participants (30 men and 36 women) in a group rehabilitation programme for the mentally ill at public health centers, and followed for 1 year to investigate their employability as an indicator of social participation. The survey included 20 items related to 5 aspects of daily life: diurnal routine, basic personal management, social activities, personal relationships, and management of illness. The major findings were as follows: 1. The group who had become employed showed significantly higher positive responses to questions concerning self-management such as conversation with others, consultation with others and when condition worsened than the unemployed group. Also the employed showed a tendency for higher positive responses to such items as cooking, keeping appointments, taking medicine, taking an active role in managing medications. 2. According to discriminant analysis by Hayashi's quantification method II, factors distinguishing 17 participants who had become employed within the year and those who remained unemployed included the following: ability to converse with others, taking an active role in managing medications, and ability to cook, male gender, co-residence with family, and a period of 3 years or less since hospital discharge. These results suggest that a public health rehabilitation program aimed at improving interpersonal skills, self-management of illness and other skills of daily living may be useful in helping the mentally ill participate socially. PMID:8901215

  13. Clinimetric Properties of Participation Measures for 5- to 13-Year-Old Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakzewski, Leanne; Boyd, Roslyn; Ziviani, Jenny

    2007-01-01

    This study systematically reviewed the validity, reliability, sensitivity to change, and clinical utility of measurements of participation for children with cerebral palsy. Sixteen measures were identified and seven met the inclusion criteria of having 30% content measuring participation, for use with children aged 5 to 13 years with physical…

  14. Seen and Not Heard: Participation as Tyranny in Theatre for Early Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher-Watsona, Ben

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses the frame of participation as tyranny to trouble the concept of "participating freely in cultural life and the arts" within Article 31 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, especially as it relates to the youngest children: when children's experiences are curated and determined by adults,…

  15. Retention of College Students and Freshman-Year Music Ensemble Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowe, Don R.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of music ensemble participation during the freshman fall semester on the ongoing retention of college students. Retention of college students is a concern across the nation. The research question for the study was, "Is there a correlation between participation in music ensembles during college students'…

  16. Association of Classroom Participation and Examination Performance in a First-Year Medical School Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millis, Richard M.; Dyson, Sharon; Cannon, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    The advent of internet-based delivery of basic medical science lectures may unintentionally lead to decreased classroom attendance and participation, thereby creating a distance learning paradigm. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that classroom attendance/participation may be positively correlated with performance on a written examination…

  17. Participation during the First Four Years of Tennessee's Voluntary Prekindergarten Program. Issues & Answers. REL 2011-No. 107

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grehan, Anna; Cavalluzzo, Linda; Gnuschke, John; Hanson, Ryan; Oliver, Simon; Vosters, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the first four years of Tennessee's Voluntary Prekindergarten program, directed to four-year-olds eligible for free or reduced-price lunch. It reviews participation levels and trends for the program as a whole, for collaborative partner classrooms, and for student and district subgroups and discusses the geographic distribution…

  18. Participation Trends of Underrepresented Students from 10-years of an Ocean Science REU Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohue, K. A.; Pockalny, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships in Oceanography (SURFO) program at the Graduate School of Oceanography/University of Rhode Island is a NSF-funded Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) site program with a programmatic research niche focused on quantitative aspects of Oceanography. Each summer-cohort includes 9-12 participants (rising seniors and juniors) who are paired with a primary research advisor and a graduate-student mentor. The primary components of the 10-week program include a 3-week introductory phase and a 7-week core-research phase. A review of SURFO application material from 2000 to present reveals demographic and temporal trends that may be helpful for targeted recruitment of underrepresented students. The demographic trends include a regional geographical bias with a significant proportion of applicants (45%) and participants (40%) attending college in neighboring states. Overall, the percentage of applicants and participants in the SURFO program is slightly greater than nationwide graduation rates for female students, minority students, and first-generation students. The temporal trends identify several factors that may be related to program increases in minority student applications and participation, including: the site director's participation in an NSF panel review of REU proposals, a partnership with a university with a significant minority population, ease of access to application materials, and active participation in minority-serving talent development programs (e.g., MSPHD). Correlations are not observed for new, updated websites or modest changes in site program personnel.

  19. Predicting Community College Student Success by Participation in a First-Year Experience Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Andy Franklin

    2013-01-01

    A first-year experience is a collaborative effort of many initiatives, with varying names that have the greatest impact on student success during the first year of college. A first-year experience course, a feature of the first-year experience, is an intervention program designed to increase student academic performance and integration (Braxton…

  20. Female Participation in ATE-Funded Programs: A Ten-Year Trend

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westine, Carl D.; Gullickson, Arlen R.; Wingate, Lori A.

    2010-01-01

    It is widely known that women are generally underrepresented in STEM disciplines (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). The National Science Foundation (NSF) Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program has persistently worked to reduce this disparity. For example, the 2000 solicitation specified "increasing the participation of…

  1. Differences in Math and Science Understanding between NSF GK-12 Participant Groups: A Year Long Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jennifer; She, Xiaobo; Morrison, Darrellee Clem

    2011-01-01

    In this study, interdisciplinary environments were created in NSF institutes and classrooms with graduate fellows and teachers. Using a mixed methodology, we examined how experiential learning influenced participants' mathematical/scientific actions and compared differences in mathematics/science efficacy and content understanding between…

  2. Follow-Up with Students after 6 Years of Participation in Project Excite

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Seon-Young; Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula; Peternel, George

    2009-01-01

    Project EXCITE is a program for minority students that supplements the regular school offerings with an emphasis on enhancing students' interest and performance in math and science. This study examines the experience and perceptions of 14 student participants in the program and their parents. In student and parent interviews, Project EXCITE was…

  3. Educational and Occupational Participation and Completion Patterns of the Class of '88: A Ten Year Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andres, Lesley

    This document discusses findings from the Paths on Life's Way project which began in 1989 with a sample of the British Columbia high school graduating class of 1988. By 1998, 1,055 individuals from all parts of the province remained in the study. Analyses of participation patterns indicated that only a few students had not attended some type of…

  4. Opening and Closing Interactive Spaces: Shaping Four-Year-Old Children's Participation in Two English Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payler, Jane

    2007-01-01

    This paper draws on an ESRC-funded study (Payler, 2005) of the sociocultural influences on learning processes of 10 four-year-old children in their second year of the Foundation Stage in England (DfEE, 2000). The children, very close in age, were in one of two early years settings: a pre-school playgroup with a largely invisible pedagogy…

  5. Thirty-Year Trends in U.S. Adolescents' Civic Engagement: A Story of Changing Participation and Educational Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syvertsen, Amy K.; Wray-Lake, Laura; Flanagan, Constance A.; Osgood, D. Wayne; Briddell, Laine

    2011-01-01

    Using annual cross-sectional data from Monitoring the Future, the present study examined trends in high school seniors' current and anticipated civic participation and beliefs over a 30-year period. We examined overall trends and patterns based on youths' post-high school educational plans. Findings point to declines in recent cohorts' involvement…

  6. 29 CFR 4022.25 - Five-year phase-in of benefit guarantee for participants other than substantial owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Five-year phase-in of benefit guarantee for participants other than substantial owners. 4022.25 Section 4022.25 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION COVERAGE AND BENEFITS BENEFITS PAYABLE IN TERMINATED SINGLE-EMPLOYER PLANS Limitations on Guaranteed Benefits...

  7. Predictors of 4-Year Retention among African American and White Community-Dwelling Participants in the UAB Study of Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allman, Richard M.; Sawyer, Patricia; Crowther, Martha; Strothers, Harry S., III; Turner, Timothy; Fouad, Mona N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To identify racial/ethnic differences in retention of older adults at 3 levels of participation in a prospective observational study: telephone, in-home assessments, and home visits followed by blood draws. Design and Methods: A prospective study of 1,000 community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 years and older included a…

  8. Voices in the Park: Researching the Participation of Young Children in Outdoor Play in Early Years Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Tim

    2014-01-01

    This article critically reflects on the participation of young children aged 3-4 years in an ongoing outdoor learning project started in 2004. The aims of the research are to investigate children's dispositions within the outdoor environment, to elicit children's perspectives of their outdoor experiences and to investigate the…

  9. Self-Directed Learning Characteristics of First-Generation, First-Year College Students Participating in a Summer Bridge Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to advance understanding of self-directed learning characteristics of first-year, first-generation college students participating in a summer bridge program. Understanding the experience of these students in higher education can lead to the development of programmatic and pedagogical strategies to better meet the…

  10. First-Year Male Students' Perceptions of a Rape Prevention Program 7 Months after Their Participation: Attitude and Behavior Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foubert, John D.; Tatum, Jerry L.; Godin, Eric E.

    2010-01-01

    Seven months after seeing The Men's Program, a commonly used rape prevention program, 248 first-year college men responded to four open-ended questions concerning whether or not the program impacted their attitudes or behavior, particularly regarding alcohol related sexual assault. Two thirds of participants reported either attitude or behavior…

  11. Association Between Self-efficacy and Participation in Community-Dwelling Manual Wheelchair Users Aged 50 Years or Older

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Brodie M.; Routhier, François; Backman, Catherine L.; Eng, Janice J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Self-efficacy with using a wheelchair is an emerging construct in the wheelchair-use literature that may have implications for the participation frequency in social and personal roles of wheelchair users. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the direct and mediated effects of self-efficacy on participation frequency in community-dwelling manual wheelchair users aged 50 years or older. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted. Methods Participants were community-dwelling wheelchair users (N=124), 50 years of age or older (mean=59.7 years), with at least 6 months of experience with wheelchair use. The Late-Life Disability Instrument, the Wheelchair Use Confidence Scale, the Life-Space Assessment, and the Wheelchair Skills Test–Questionnaire Version measured participation frequency, self-efficacy, life-space mobility, and wheelchair skills, respectively. Multiple regression analyses with bootstrapping were used to investigate the direct and mediated effects. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health was used to guide the analyses. Results Self-efficacy was a statistically significant determinant of participation frequency and accounted for 17.2% of the participation variance after controlling for age, number of comorbidities, and social support. The total mediating effect by life-space mobility, wheelchair skills, and perceived participation limitations was statistically significant (point estimate=0.14; bootstrapped 95% confidence interval=0.04, 0.24); however, the specific indirect effect by the wheelchair skills variable did not contribute to the total effect above and beyond the other 2 mediators. The mediated model accounted for 55.0% of the participation variance. Limitations Causality cannot be established due to the cross-sectional nature of the data, and the self-report nature of our data from a volunteer sample may be influenced by measurement bias or social desirability, or both. Conclusion Self

  12. 40 CFR 721.3152 - Ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl sulfates (salts). 721.3152 Section 721... Ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl sulfates... ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl...

  13. 40 CFR 721.3152 - Ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl sulfates (salts). 721.3152 Section 721... Ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl sulfates... ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl...

  14. Disorientation inhibits landmark use in 12-18-month-old infants.

    PubMed

    Lew, Adina R; Foster, Kirsty A; Bremner, J Gavin

    2006-07-01

    Recent research has indicated that, particularly under conditions of inertial disorientation, mammals may be sensitive to landmark configuration geometry at the expense of individual featural information when locating hidden goals. The current study sought to establish whether landmark use could be demonstrated in 12-18-month-old infants with and without a disorientation procedure, and with geometrically ambiguous landmark configurations. A peekaboo paradigm was employed in which infants learned to anticipate a peekaboo event after a cue from two locations within a circular arena, followed by a test trial from a novel position in which no peekaboo occurred after the cue. In all conditions, an isosceles triangle arrangement of landmarks was used, with peekaboo occurring between the landmarks of one of the two equal "sides", thus being geometrically ambiguous. In two conditions, the landmarks were distinctive, and in two further conditions, they were identical. In one of the distinctive conditions and one of the identical landmark conditions, infants underwent a disorientation procedure in between training and test trials. Only oriented infants with distinctive landmarks were successful in test trials, thus suggesting that infants are able to use the individual features of landmarks to locate a goal, but can only do so if oriented. PMID:17138289

  15. Participants' Reflections Two and Three Years after an Introductory Chemistry Course-Embedded Research Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szteinberg, Gabriela A.; Weaver, Gabriela C.

    2013-01-01

    The Center for Authentic Science Practice in Education (CASPiE) is a course-embedded undergraduate research curriculum that aims to introduce authentic research experiences for students in their early college years. A cohort of students who were randomly assigned to the CASPiE laboratory sections was tracked during and two and three years after…

  16. Interest and Agency in 2- and 3-Year-Olds' Participation in Emergent Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Deborah Wells; Neitzel, Carin

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated 2- and 3-year-olds' personal interests as a possible source of variation in preschool writing activities. Structured observations of the play behaviors of 11 preschool children in a childcare classroom were conducted one to two days per week for one school year. These data were analyzed to determine choices of play…

  17. Efficacy of Participating in a First-Year Seminar on Student Satisfaction and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendel, Darwin D.

    2007-01-01

    Improving the first-year experience has been part of a broader set of initiatives to respond to concerns about undergraduate education (Astin, Keup, & Lindholm, 2002). This research examined the efficacy of a first-year seminar on student satisfaction and retention at a Research Extensive, urban and public land-grant university. This study used…

  18. Crocodile years: the traditional image of science and physical scientists' participation in weapons research

    SciTech Connect

    Crews, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis examines one dimension of the relationship between science and the arms race. More specifically, it develops and empirically examines a theoretical model of the relationship between the social demand for defense-related and weapons research, traditional scientific values related to the worldview of classical physics, and differential participation by physical scientists in such research. The theoretical model suggests that an antiquated traditional image of science exists, and that it may explain, in part, participation by physical scientists in defense-related or weapons research. Two major hypotheses are suggested by the model: first, that a constellation of values representing a traditional image of science obtains today among young physical scientists; and second, that those who currently engage (or are willing to engage) in defense-related or weapons research are more likely to agree with the values implicit in the traditional image of science than those who do not (or would not) engage in such research. The theoretical model is located within the sociologies of knowledge and science. This study includes chapters that provide an overview of the literature of these subdisciplines. This investigation concludes with an empirical examination of the model and hypotheses.

  19. Montana School Nutrition Programs Free and Reduced Price Participation Data, 2003-04 School Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCulloch, Linda

    2004-01-01

    This report provides a count of all students in Montana public and nonpublic schools who are eligible to receive free and reduced price benefits for meals and milk. Because the data presented in this report are frozen on December 31, there may be missing values as well as late corrections for a given year because data came in later than that date.

  20. Stability of Language Performance at 4 and 5 Years: Measurement and Participant Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eadie, Patricia; Nguyen, Cattram; Carlin, John; Bavin, Edith; Bretherton, Lesley; Reilly, Sheena

    2014-01-01

    Background: Language impairment (LI) in the preschool years is known to vary over time. Stability in the diagnosis of LI may be influenced by children's individual variability, the measurement error of commonly used assessment instruments and the cut-points used to define impairment. Aims: To investigate the agreement between two different…

  1. School Performance in Elementary, Middle, and High School: A Comparison of Children Based on HIPPY Participation during the Preschool Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Amber; Lee, Joohi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of the Home Improvement for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) program on school performance during the 3rd, 5th, 7th, and 9th grades. The study employed a quasi-experimental, post-hoc design using existing data on children who participated in the HIPPY program as 3-, 4-, or 5-year-olds, including:…

  2. Neighborhood socioeconomic status and food environment: a 20-year longitudinal latent class analysis among CARDIA participants

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Andrea S.; Meyer, Katie A.; Howard, Annie Green; Boone-Heinonen, Janne; Popkin, Barry M.; Evenson, Kelly R.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; Lewis, Cora E.; Gordon-Larsen, Penny

    2014-01-01

    Cross-sectional studies suggest neighborhood socioeconomic (SES) disadvantage is associated with obesogenic food environments. Yet, it is unknown how exposure to neighborhood SES patterning through adulthood corresponds to food environments that also change over time. We used latent class analysis (LCA) to classify participants in the US-based Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study [n=5,114 at baseline 1985-1986 to 2005-2006] according to their longitudinal neighborhood SES residency patterns (upward, downward, stable high and stable low). For all classes of residents, the availability of fast food and non-fast food restaurants and supermarkets and convenience stores increased (p<0.001). Yet, socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhood residents had fewer fast food and non-fast food restaurants, more convenience stores, and the same number of supermarkets in their neighborhoods than the advantaged residents. In addition to targeting the pervasive fast food restaurant and convenient store retail growth, improving neighborhood restaurant options for disadvantaged residents may reduce food environment disparities. PMID:25280107

  3. Neighborhood socioeconomic status and food environment: a 20-year longitudinal latent class analysis among CARDIA participants.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Andrea S; Meyer, Katie A; Howard, Annie Green; Boone-Heinonen, Janne; Popkin, Barry M; Evenson, Kelly R; Kiefe, Catarina I; Lewis, Cora E; Gordon-Larsen, Penny

    2014-11-01

    Cross-sectional studies suggest that neighborhood socioeconomic (SES) disadvantage is associated with obesogenic food environments. Yet, it is unknown how exposure to neighborhood SES patterning through adulthood corresponds to food environments that also change over time. We used latent class analysis (LCA) to classify participants in the U.S.-based Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study [n=5,114 at baseline 1985-1986 to 2005-2006] according to their longitudinal neighborhood SES residency patterns (upward, downward, stable high and stable low). For most classes of residents, the availability of fast food and non-fast food restaurants and supermarkets and convenience stores increased (p<0.001). Yet, socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhood residents had fewer fast food and non-fast food restaurants, more convenience stores, and the same number of supermarkets in their neighborhoods than the advantaged residents. In addition to targeting the pervasive fast food restaurant and convenient store retail growth, improving neighborhood restaurant options for disadvantaged residents may reduce food environment disparities. PMID:25280107

  4. Issues, Challenges, and Opportunities in Geoscience Education and Broadening Participation in the Geosciences at Two-year Colleges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Hoeven Kraft, K.; Guertin, L. A.; Filson, R. H.; Macdonald, H.; McDaris, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    A workshop on The Role of Two-Year Colleges in Geoscience Education and Broadening Participation in the Geosciences was held at Northern Virginia Community College in June 2010 to identify issues, challenges, and opportunities for geoscience faculty and students in two-year colleges (2YC) and to make recommendations for strengthening this component of the geoscience community. Given the wide diversity of 2YC students, a long term goal for this workshop was to work toward broadening the participation of underrepresented students to the geosciences. The workshop included sessions on strategies for supporting all students to be successful, the role of 2YC in broadening participation in the geosciences, and preparing geoscience students for the future (recruiting and retaining students in the geosciences, career preparation and workforce development, and transfer and 2YC and 4YC partnerships). Conversations between participants and professional organizations and societies focused on how increased communication with 2YC faculty could support faculty and students from two-year colleges. Participants considered strategies for addressing isolation and building community including interdisciplinary collaborations, scholarly practices, using Web 2.0, and working with adjunct faculty. Working groups addressed the following topics: establishment of a geoscience 2YC community, best practices for geoscience 2YC programs, faculty professional development, recruitment and retention of students, diversity in the geosciences, the role of 2YC in K-12 teacher preparation, and ocean science education in 2YC. Recommendations included the need to collect and disseminate information about 2YC including demographic information and best practices of 2YC geoscience programs, the desire to establish an organization for 2YC geoscience faculty, more opportunities to communicate (workshops and electronic communications), and other approaches for supporting 2YC students, faculty, and programs

  5. Pediatric Healthcare Professionals' Views on Autism Spectrum Disorder Screening at 12-18 Months

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crais, Elizabeth R.; McComish, Cara S.; Humphreys, Betsy P.; Watson, Linda R.; Baranek, Grace T.; Reznick, J. Steven; Christian, Rob B.; Earls, Marian

    2014-01-01

    This study explored North Carolina pediatric healthcare professional's (PHP) perceptions of screening 12-18 month old infants for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Eight focus groups (66 PHPs) were conducted across practice settings. The purpose was to explore PHP's perspectives to: inform development of ASD screening tools and ultimately…

  6. Broadening Participation in Geosciences with Academic Year and Summer Research Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, S. A.; Howard, A.; Johnson, L. P.; Gutierrez, R.; Chow, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Medgar Evers College, City University of New York, has initiated a multi-tiered strategy aimed at increasing the number of under-represented minority and female students pursuing careers in the Geosciences, especially Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and related areas. The strategy incorporates research on the persistence of minority and female under-represented students in STEM disciplines. The initiatives include NASA and NSF-funded team-based undergraduate research activities during the summer and academic year as well as academic support (clustering, PTLT workshops for gatekeeper courses), curriculum integration modules, and independent study/special topics courses. In addition, high school students are integrated into summer research activities working with undergraduate and graduate students as well as faculty and other scientist mentors. An important initial component was the building of an infrastructure to support remote sensing, supported by NASA. A range of academic year and summer research experiences are provided to capture student interest in the geosciences. NYC-based research activities include urban impacts of global climate change, the urban heat island, ocean turbulence and general circulation models, and space weather: magnetic rope structure, solar flares and CMEs. Field-based investigations include atmospheric observations using BalloonSat sounding vehicles, observations of tropospheric ozone using ozonesondes, and investigations of the ionosphere using a CubeSat. This presentation provides a description of the programs, student impact, challenges and observations.

  7. IHE year 3 demonstration participation at RSNA 2001: image manager, image archive and MPPS manager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, HeeJung; Lim, HyunWoo; Kim, DongOok; Kim, Yongseok; Moon, Sunho; Lee, JinHyung; Lee, DongHyuk

    2002-05-01

    The IHE initiative sponsored by the RSNA and HIMMS defines a Technical Framework designed to advance the state of data integration in a healthcare environment. This Technical framework defines a set of actors and the roles they must perform for each Integration Profile. Each role consists of a well-defined set of electronic transactions that are based on existing healthcare information standards, namely: DICOM and HL7. IHE brings together the major vendors in the healthcare information and imaging systems industry to agree upon and demonstrate standard interfaces and data architectures at the annual meetings of the RSNA and HIMSS since 1999. We have implemented grouping actors, namely Image Manager, Image Archive and MPPS Manager and selected PGP Integration Profile for IHE Year3 Demonstration at the annual meetings of the RSNA 2001 and HIMSS 2002. Storage Service, Query/Retrieve Service, Storage Commitment Service, and Modality Performed Procedure Step Service of DICOM Standard and also A02, A03, A06, A07, A08 and A40 Event of ADT Messages and ORM Message among lots of messages of HL7 Standard in accordance with IHE Technical Framework have developed in our system. We passed vendor interoperability testing at IHE Connectathon on October and demonstrated successfully with other vendors at the IHE Demonstration of RSNA 2001.

  8. Short EpiData course: do participants use the data entry tool two years post-training?

    PubMed Central

    Chinnakali, P.; Shewade, H.; Gupta, V.; Nagpal, P.; Harries, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    Setting: Training courses on data entry are few and far between compared to analysis. To address this gap, we conducted a short 2-day course on quality-assured data capture using EpiData for public health professionals in Bangalore and Puducherry, India, in 2013. Objective: To determine the proportion of participants who used EpiData and taught the software to others during the 2-years after training and explore the reasons for doing/not doing so. Design: Cross-sectional study with self-administered, semi-structured questionnaire developed using web-based Google Forms. We performed a manual thematic analysis to identify the major reasons for using/not using EpiData. Results: Of 46 participants, 38 (83%) responded. Of 31 participants involved in research, 17 (55%) had used EpiData, of whom 6 (35%) had performed double entry and validation. Of the 14 who did not use EpiData, 11 had used MS Excel or SPSS/Epi Info for data entry. Of the 38 respondents, 29 (76%) had taught EpiData to other colleagues and students. Reasons for using EpiData included its user-friendliness, its being open access and the ease in preventing data entry errors. Reasons for not performing double entry included lack of time and manpower. Conclusion: The short course on EpiData was effective in knowledge transfer and provides a scalable model for incorporation into the teaching curricula of medical schools and research institutions. PMID:26767181

  9. Endoscopy Nurse Participation May Increase the Polyp Detection Rate by Second-Year Fellows during Screening Colonoscopies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Sun; Lee, Do Young; Yoon, Jang Hyuk; Park, Jung Ho; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Lim, Jae Wan

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims The aim of this study was to assess the effects of endoscopy nurse participation on polyp detection rate (PDR) and adenoma detection rate (ADR) of second-year fellows during screening colonoscopies. Methods This was a single-center, prospective, randomized study comparing a fellow alone and a fellow plus an endoscopy nurse as an additional observer during afternoon outpatient screening colonoscopies. The primary end points were PDR and ADR. Results One hundred ninety-one colonoscopies performed by a fellow alone and 192 colonoscopies performed by a fellow plus an endoscopy nurse were analyzed. The PDR was significantly higher when the nurse was involved (53.1% vs. 41.3%, p<0.05); however, there was no significant difference in the ADR between the two groups (38.5% vs. 29.8%, p=0.073). There was no difference in the percentage of patients with ≥2 polyps, advanced adenomas, polyp size, polyp location, and polyp shapes between the two groups. There was no difference in the PDR according to the level of experience of the endoscopy nurse. Conclusions Endoscopy nurse participation as an additional observer during screening colonoscopy performed by second-year fellow increases the PDR; however, the level of experience of the nurse was not an important factor. PMID:22844563

  10. The Effect of the Involvement within Career Academies by Elective Participation of Eleventh and Twelfth Grade High School Students during the Implementation Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Nancy A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of elective participation in one of three implementation year Career Academies, Education, Entrepreneurship, or Finance, on upper-class high school academic grades, Grade Point Average, and school academy participation measures. Significance of the junior and senior year of high school, the…

  11. A Comparison of Recidivism Rates for Operation Outward Reach (OOR) Participants and Control Groups of Non-Participants for the Years 1990 through 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Desuta, Joesph F.

    2000-01-01

    A 5-year study of Operation Outward Reach, a nonprofit program providing community-based vocational training in carpentry and masonry for Pennsylvania inmates, compared completers and control groups. Results showed average differences in recidivism between the groups of 16% per year. Fiscal and social cost savings were also identified. (JOW)

  12. Finnish parental involvement ethos, health support, health education knowledge and participation: results from a 2-year school health intervention.

    PubMed

    Sormunen, Marjorita; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Turunen, Hannele

    2013-04-01

    A 2-year, participatory action research school health study focused on developing components for home-school partnerships to support children's health learning process. Two intervention schools implemented strengthened health and collaboration-orientated activities; two control schools followed the national core curriculum without extracurricular activities. The parents of fourth-grade pupils (10-11 years at baseline) completed questionnaires before intervention in spring 2008 (N = 348) and after intervention in spring 2010 (N = 358). A two-way analysis of variance was conducted to determine whether time (2008/2010) and group (intervention/control) influenced parents' perceptions and experiences of parental involvement, health education and health support received from the school. Compared with controls, the intervention schools' parents experienced greater involvement ethos (Cohen's d = 0.57, P < 0.001), increased knowledge of health education (Cohen's d = 0.60, P = 0.02) and health support (Cohen's d = 0.35, P = 0.02). Health education participation among parents increased only partially during the intervention (Cohen's d = -0.12, P = 0.193). School health interventions based on schools' needs may have the potential to influence positively the relationship between home and school and increase the visibility of health education. The study was undertaken within the Schools for Health in Europe program. PMID:23385382

  13. Participation in Physical, Social, and Religious Activity and Risk of Depression in the Elderly: A Community-Based Three-Year Longitudinal Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Hyun Woong; Hong, Chang Hyung; Lee, Yunhwan; Oh, Byoung Hoon; Lee, Kang Soo; Chang, Ki Jung; Kang, Dae Ryong; Kim, Jinhee; Lee, SooJin; Back, Joung Hwan; Chung, Young Ki; Lim, Ki Young; Noh, Jai Sung; Kim, Dongsoo; Son, Sang Joon

    2015-01-01

    Background We examined the longitudinal association between participation in individual or combinations of physical, social, and religious activity and risk of depression in the elderly. Methods Elderly subjects aged ≥60 years who completed the Living Profiles of Older People Survey in Korea (n = 6,647) were included. The baseline assessment, Wave 1, was conducted in 2008, and a follow-up assessment, Wave 2, was conducted in 2011. We defined participation in frequent physical activity as ≥3 times weekly (at least 30 minutes per activity). Frequent participation in social and religious activity was defined as ≥1 activity weekly. The primary outcome was depression at 3-year follow up. Results Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that subjects who participated in frequent physical, social, and religious activity had an adjusted odds ratio of 0.81 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69–0.96), 0.87 (95% CI, 0.75–1.00), and 0.78 (95% CI, 0.67–0.90), respectively, compared with participants who did not participate in each activity. Participants who participated in only one type of activity frequently and participants who participated in two or three types of activities frequently had an adjusted odds ratio of 0.86 (95% CI, 0.75–0.98) and 0.64 (95% CI, 0.52–0.79), respectively, compared with participants who did not participate in any type of physical, social, and religious activity frequently. Conclusion Participation in physical, social, and religious activity was associated with decreased risk of depression in the elderly. In addition, risk of depression was much lower in the elderly people who participated in two or three of the above-mentioned types of activity than that in the elderly who did not. PMID:26172441

  14. School-based sports participation and its effects on weight maintenance in Mexican American adolescents: A two-year analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Participation in sports has been shown to decrease standardized body mass index (zBMI), especially in school settings. Few studies have examined the impact of sports participation in a Mexican American sample. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effect of sports participation on wei...

  15. The Effect of Four Years of Participation in a Tibetan Buddhist Retreat on Perceptions of Physiological and Psychological Well-Being.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLachlan, Malcom; McAuliffe, Eilish; Page, Richard C.; Altschul, Deborah B.; Tabony, Rebecca

    1999-01-01

    Assesses the effect of participation in a Tibetan retreat at a center in Scotland over a four-year period using the General Health Questionnaire-60 and the Perceived Stress Scale. Residence at the retreat center did not show any harmful or beneficial effects on the participants' levels of stress and general health as measured by these scales.…

  16. More Time for Learning: Student Participation in Extended Day Programming at the UCCS Donoghue Campus during the 2009-10 School Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesnick, Joy; Hart, Bonnie; Spielberger, Julie

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the participation of students in extended day programming at Donoghue Elementary School, a University of Chicago Charter School, during the 2009-2010 school year and explore whether participation was related to academic performance and improvement. Using the available written records, the authors found that…

  17. Attitude to Physical Education and Participation in Organized Youth Sports during Adolescence Related to Physical Activity in Young Adulthood: A 10-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjonniksen, Lise; Fjortoft, Ingunn; Wold, Bente

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between participation in organized youth sport and attitude to physical education (PE) during adolescence and physical activity in young adulthood. The sample comprised 630 participants who completed questionnaires over a 10-year period. Analysis of variance and regression were used to examine the relationship…

  18. A comparison of 1-year substance abuse treatment outcomes in community syringe exchange participants versus other referrals.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, Karin; King, Van; Peirce, Jessica; Kolodner, Ken; Brooner, Robert; Kidorf, Michael

    2008-09-01

    This longitudinal cohort study of 324 consecutive admissions to methadone maintenance treatment between 08/1994 and 09/1997 compared 1-year outcomes of opioid-dependent patients referred from a syringe exchange program (SEP; n=81) versus other sources (n=243). All participants received stepped-based counseling. The Addiction Severity Index was completed upon admission. Treatment outcomes were assessed using weekly urine testing and days in treatment. GEE regression models were used to evaluate the association between baseline variables and treatment outcomes. SEP referrals were older, included more males and African Americans, reported greater unemployment and heavier heroin, cocaine, and injection drug use at admission. During treatment, SEP referrals used more opioids (OR 2.57; 95% CI 1.86-3.56) and cocaine (OR 2.77; 95% CI 1.93-3.95), and were less likely to complete 1 year (35%) compared to other referrals (56%; hazard ratio 1.88; 95% CI 1.35-2.62). Nevertheless, referral source was not significantly associated with outcome when adjusted for baseline characteristics. Greater baseline frequency of substance and injection drug use, and younger age were positively associated with ongoing opioid and cocaine use. African American race and baseline unemployment were also associated with ongoing cocaine use. Younger age and greater baseline cocaine use were associated with poorer retention at 1 year. The poorer treatment response of SEP referrals is likely due to higher baseline problem severity. Specialized interventions may be required to reduce drug use and improve retention in this population. PMID:18486360

  19. Participation in life situations of 8-12 year old children with cerebral palsy: cross sectional European study

    PubMed Central

    Fauconnier, Jérôme; Dickinson, Heather O; Beckung, Eva; Marcelli, Marco; McManus, Vicki; Michelsen, Susan I; Parkes, Jackie; Parkinson, Kathryn N; Thyen, Ute; Arnaud, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate how involvement in life situations (participation) in children with cerebral palsy varies with type and severity of impairment and to investigate geographical variation in participation. Design Cross sectional study. Trained interviewers visited parents of children with cerebral palsy; multilevel multivariable regression related participation to impairments, pain, and sociodemographic characteristics. Setting Eight European regions with population registers of children with cerebral palsy; one further region recruited children from multiple sources. Participants 1174 children aged 8-12 with cerebral palsy randomly selected from the population registers, 743 (63%) joined in the study; the further region recruited 75 children. Main outcome measure Children’s participation assessed by the Life-H questionnaire covering 10 main areas of daily life. Scoring ignored adaptations or assistance required for participation. Results Children with pain and those with more severely impaired walking, fine motor skills, communication, and intellectual abilities had lower participation across most domains. Type of cerebral palsy and problems with feeding and vision were associated with lower participation for specific domains, but the sociodemographic factors examined were not. Impairment and pain accounted for up to a sixth of the variation in participation. Participation on all domains varied substantially between regions: children in east Denmark had consistently higher participation than children in other regions. For most participation domains, about a third of the unexplained variation could be ascribed to variation between regions and about two thirds to variation between individuals. Conclusions Participation in children with cerebral palsy should be assessed in clinical practice to guide intervention and assess its effect. Pain should be carefully assessed. Some European countries facilitate participation better than others, implying some countries

  20. Four years of REU in South Texas: Fostering the Participation of Hispanic Students in Marine Science Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskey, E. J.; Erdner, D.

    2011-12-01

    Our REU site is a ten-week summer program that is currently in its fourth year and has served 37 undergraduate students in that time. The range of environments present in south Texas, including barrier islands, estuaries and hypersaline lagoons, and the inherent climatic variability of the region make it an excellent natural laboratory for studying the effects of both natural and human-driven change. REU projects to date have focused on many of the pressing environmental concerns in the region, including the impacts of land use and freshwater demand on the transport of water and waterborne constituents to coastal waters, harmful algal blooms, effects of nutrient loads on coastal ecosystems, and hypoxia. The program begins with a 2 day research cruise that serves as an immediate introduction to local biota and methods in marine science, and it brings the students and mentors together as a group in a more informal setting. The students then carry out independent research projects under the mentorship of a faculty member, and attend workshops on responsible research, graduate school, and science careers. Our program also benefits from a close interaction with the Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve, exposing the students to applied research of relevance to coastal management issues. One of the primary goals of our program is to foster the retention of underrepresented groups, particularly Hispanics, in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields by increasing their participation in undergraduate research experiences. We have targeted Hispanic students because our institute is located in a state where 37% of the population is Hispanic, and in a region where the proportion of Hispanic students is even higher. Our recruiting efforts have included advertising the program via in-person presentations at minority serving institutions (UT El Paso, UT San Antonio), and on list-serves for professional societies and sites at minority serving

  1. Prenatal Exposure to Perfluoroalkyl Acids and Serum Testosterone Concentrations at 15 Years of Age in Female ALSPAC Study Participants

    PubMed Central

    Calafat, Antonia M.; Marcus, Michele; Jaakkola, Jouni J.K.; Lashen, Hany

    2015-01-01

    exposure to some PFAAs may alter testosterone concentrations in females. Citation Maisonet M, Calafat AM, Marcus M, Jaakkola JJ, Lashen H. 2015. Prenatal exposure to perfluoroalkyl acids and serum testosterone concentrations at 15 years of age in female ALSPAC study participants. Environ Health Perspect 123:1325–1330; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408847 PMID:26034840

  2. The Differential Effects of Internship Participation on End-of-Fourth-Year GPA by Demographic and Institutional Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Eugene T., III.; Kilgo, Cindy A.; Sheets, Jessica K. Ezell; Pascarella, Ernest T.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the effects of internship participation on college students, specifically the effect on college GPA. Further, because of the capacity to disaggregate students by race in the sample, this study is significant because it provides much needed empirical evidence surrounding the impact of participation in…

  3. Does Chronic Classroom Peer Rejection Predict the Development of Children's Classroom Participation during the Grade School Years?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladd, Gary W.; Herald-Brown, Sarah L.; Reiser, Mark

    2008-01-01

    A sample of 398 children was followed up from ages 5 to 12 to investigate the relation between peer group rejection and classroom participation. The participation trajectories of individuals and groups of children who were rejected for differing periods of time were examined both during and after rejection using piecewise growth curve analyses.…

  4. Twenty Years Post-NIH Revitalization Act: Renewing the Case for Enhancing Minority Participation in Cancer Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Moon S.; Lara, Primo N.; Dang, Julie H.T.; Paterniti, Debora A.; Kelly, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Background The NIH Revitalization Act of 1993 mandated the appropriate inclusion of minorities in all National Institutes of Health-funded research. Twenty years after this Act, the proportion of minority patients enrolled in cancer clinical trials remains persistently low. Clinical trials are the vehicles for the development and evaluation of therapeutic and preventive agents under scientifically rigorous conditions. Without representation in trials, disparities in the cancer burden for minorities are projected to increase. Methods In this review paper, authors counted the frequencies in which minorities were the primary focus of National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, examined citations from PubMed focusing on the search terms: “NIH Revitalization Act of 1993” and “enhancing minority accrual to cancer clinical trials”, and supplemented the review with their expertise in NIH-funded research related to minority accrual in cancer clinical trials. Results The reporting and analyses of data based on minorities in clinical trials remain inadequate. Less than two percent of the National Cancer Institute's clinical trials focus on any racial/minority population as their primary emphasis. Our review of the literature indicated that the percentage of authors who reported their study sample by race/ethnicity ranged from 1.5% to 58.0%; only 20% of the randomized controlled studies in a high-impact oncology journal reported analyzing results by race/ethnicity. Proportionately greater population increases in minorities accompanied by their persistent and disproportionate cancer burden reinforce the need for their greater representation in clinical trials. Conclusions Renewing the emphasis for minority participation in clinical trials is warranted. Policy changes are recommended. PMID:24643646

  5. Science Education Policy: A Survey of the Participation of Sixth-Form Pupils in Science and Other Subjects over a 10-year Period, 1985-1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Tony; McEwen, Alex; Knipe, Damien

    1997-01-01

    Surveys of and interviews with year-12 students in Northern Ireland over 10 years examined the impact of government science education policy by noting student participation in advanced science courses. Overall, the number of boys taking advanced courses decreased and the number of girls increased. Students retained certain stereotyped views of…

  6. Hospital Expenditure as a Major Driver of Nurse Labour Force Participation: Evidence from a 10-Year Period in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Vujicic, Marko; Onate, Kanecy; Laporte, Audrey; Deber, Raisa

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines trends in the nursing labour market in Canada over a period of dramatic fluctuations in hospital expenditures. We add to previous analysis that covered the period 1991–1996 and use Census data from 2001 to examine the relationship between hospital expenditure and nurse labour force participation. We find that shifts in labour force participation over the period 1991–2001 had a significant impact on the nursing supply in Canada. Individuals who were trained in nursing but were working outside the profession in 1996 because of budgetary reductions and layoffs in hospitals had largely been reabsorbed back into nursing jobs by 2001. Our analysis provides further empirical evidence that the labour force participation among individuals trained in nursing is driven to a large extent by demand-side factors. PMID:22548099

  7. Participants in New Beginnings and Career Equity Programs Gain Knowledge and Equitable Attitudes. Evaluation Report, Program Year 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montclair State Univ., Upper Montclair, NJ. Career Equity Assistance Center for Research and Evaluation.

    Occupational and sex equity programs administered by the New Jersey Department of Education, Office of Bilingual Education and Equity Issues, and funded through the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Education Act were evaluated. Participants in single-parent and sex equity programs completed a series of pretests and posttests that…

  8. Pediatrician Participation in Medicaid—Findings of a Five-Year-Follow-up Study in California and Elsewhere

    PubMed Central

    Perloff, Janet Dale; Neckerman, Kathryn; Kletke, Phillip R.

    1986-01-01

    Medi-Cal—California's Medicaid program—underwent significant changes during the period 1978 through 1983. Most notable were the imposition of new copayments, reductions in physician reimbursement and selective contracting for hospital services. The state-funded medically indigent program was transferred to the counties and the state began to experiment with bulk purchasing of drugs and supplies, a lock-in for overutilizers and primary care case management. How have these changes affected primary care providers' participation in Medi-Cal? Surveys of California pediatricians in 1978 and 1983 suggest that while most continue to participate, the level of limited participation in Medi-Cal increased from 23% to 51%. Most pediatricians express discontent with the level of Medicaid payments and there is a growing sentiment that Medicaid regulations interfere with the provision of high quality medical care. Future Medi-Cal policy developments, such as contracting for physician services, should be structured in ways that maximize participation of primary care providers in the program. PMID:3538665

  9. Non-significant relationship between participation in school-provided meals and body mass index during the fourth-grade school year

    PubMed Central

    Paxton, Amy E.; Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Tebbs, Joshua M.; Royer, Julie A.; Guinn, Caroline H.; Devlin, Christina M.; Finney, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Data from four cross-sectional studies involving fourth-grade children were analyzed to investigate the relationship between participation in school-provided meals and body mass index (BMI), and the effect observed energy intake has on that relationship. Participation and BMI data were available on 1,535 children (51% Black; 51% girls) for four school years (Fall 1999 to Spring 2003; one study per school year) at 13 schools total. Direct meal observations were available for a subset of 342 children (54% Black; 50% girls) for one to three breakfasts and one to three lunches per child for a total of 1,268 school meals (50% breakfast). Participation in breakfast, lunch, and combined (both meals on the same day) was determined from nametag records compiled for meal observations for each study. Weight and height were measured. A marginal regression model was fit with BMI as the dependent variable; independent variables were breakfast participation, lunch participation, combined participation, sex, age, race, and study. For the subset of children, observed energy intake at breakfast, lunch, and combined was included in additional analyses. Participation in breakfast, lunch, and combined was not significantly associated with BMI regardless of whether analyses included observed energy intake (P values > 0.181). The relationship between observed energy intake at breakfast and lunch, separately and combined, with BMI was positive (P values < 0.01). In conclusion, these results do not support a relationship between school-meal participation and BMI but do support a relationship between observed energy intake at school meals and BMI during fourth grade. PMID:22709640

  10. Maternal employment, child care, and nutritional status of 12-18-month-old children in Managua, Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Lamontagne, J F; Engle, P L; Zeitlin, M F

    1998-02-01

    Relationships among women's employment, child care strategies, and nutritional status of children 12-18 months of age were examined in 80 Nicaraguan households sampled by randomized block design in 10 low income urban communities. Multiple regression analyses showed that children of employed mothers (56%) fared better in weight/height than those whose mothers were not employed, with and without controlling for socioeconomic status and maternal education, paternal financial support, child care adequacy, and sex and age of the child. Children with inadequate alternate child care (care by a preteen or care at the work place) had lower height for age, even controlling for the same variables and for maternal employment. Differences in 10 caregiving behaviors between families as a function of work status of the mother and adequacy of child care were examined. In families with working mothers, caregivers were less likely to be observed washing their hands, suggesting that the positive associations of work for earnings might be due to income rather than improved care. Inadequate care was associated with less food variety, less use of health care, and marginally less hand-washing. Inadequate child care, which tends to be associated with informal work, nuclear families and poverty, should be a concern for child welfare. PMID:9460821

  11. Evaluation of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program: An Early Look at Applicants and Participating Schools under the SOAR Act. Year 1 Report. NCEE 2015-4000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Jill; Lucas-McLean, Juanita; Gutmann, Babette; Dynarski, Mark; Betts, Julian

    2014-01-01

    This report explores implementation of the District of Columbia Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP) in the first two years after Congress reauthorized it with some changes under the SOAR Act of 2011. Key findings include the following: (1) Just over half of all DC private schools participated in the OSP, with current schools more likely to have…

  12. Evaluation of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program: An Early Look at Applicants and Participating Schools under the SOAR Act. Year 1 Report, Executive Summary. NCEE 2015-4000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Jill; Lucas-McLean, Juanita; Gutmann, Babette; Dynarski, Mark; Betts, Julian

    2014-01-01

    This report explores implementation of the District of Columbia Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP) in the first two years after Congress reauthorized it with some changes under the SOAR Act of 2011. Key findings include the following: (1) Just over half of all DC private schools participated in the OSP, with current schools more likely to have…

  13. A Study of Factors that Influence First-Year Nonmusic Majors' Decisions to Participate in Music Ensembles at Small Liberal Arts Colleges in Indiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faber, Ardis R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate factors that influence first-year nonmusic majors' decisions regarding participation in music ensembles at small liberal arts colleges in Indiana. A survey questionnaire was used to gather data. The data collected was analyzed to determine significant differences between the nonmusic majors who have…

  14. Accessibility, Affordability, and Flexibility: The Relationship of Selected State Sociopolitical Factors and the Participation of Adults in Public Two-Year Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Joseph Michael

    2010-01-01

    This non-experimental, quantitative study examined the extent selected state sociopolitical factors relate to adult participation in public two-year colleges, and assessed how Montana compares to those states enrolling the most adult students. Utilizing archived data from the National Center for Education Statistics' (NCES) Integrated…

  15. In Their Own Words: Sophomore College Men Describe Attitude and Behavior Changes Resulting from a Rape Prevention Program 2 Years after Their Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foubert, John D.; Godin, Eric E.; Tatum, Jerry L.

    2010-01-01

    The study conducted involved assessing students from a Southeastern public university during two academic years, after their participation in an all-male sexual assault peer education program. The study findings revealed that 79% of 184 college men reported attitude change, behavior change, or both. Furthermore, a multistage inductive analysis…

  16. The Impact of Four-Year Participation in Music and/or Athletic Activities in South Dakota Public High Schools on GPA and ACT Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Patrick S.

    2010-01-01

    Finding the key to success for high school students has long been the goal for both school personnel and parents. This study examined the impact of four-year participation in music and/or athletics activities in South Dakota public high schools on student GPA and ACT scores. The data in this study were collected from five Class A high schools…

  17. Relationship of Perceived Barriers to Employment and Return to Work Five Years Later: A Pilot Study among 343 Participants with Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, James S.; Pickelsimer, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    The authors identified perceived barriers to employment in 1998 among 343 unemployed participants with spinal cord injury and correlated these data with employment status 5 years later. Actively looking for work was associated with the greatest likelihood of employment. Health factors, not disincentives or resources, were the primary barriers to…

  18. Measures of participation outcomes related to hand use for 2- to 12-year-old children with disabilities: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chien, C-W; Rodger, S; Copley, J; McLaren, C

    2014-07-01

    Many interventions have been used to improve children's hand-related impairments or hand skill performance in functional activities so as to promote life participation. There is thus a need to have suitable instruments assessing children's participation in life situations that specifically require hand use in order to support and evaluate such interventions. This systematic review investigated the availability of potential instruments that can be used to assess children's participation specifically in life situations requiring hand use. Clinical utility and evidence for psychometric properties were also sourced. Database searches initially identified measures that were used to evaluate participation of children aged 2-12 years, involved self- or proxy report or interview administration and had generic application for a range of disabilities/diagnoses. These measures were further evaluated to determine if they fulfilled the above inclusion criteria and contained at least 60% of the items involving hand use. Further searches for psychometric evidence were undertaken for the eligible measures. Fourteen measures were identified and nine met the inclusion criteria. However, none of these measures, except for the Children Helping Out: Responsibilities, Expectations, and Supports (CHORES), contained all items related to hand use. Most of the included measures had limited psychometric properties. Only the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment/Preferences for Activities of Children (CAPE/PAC), the School Function Assessment-Participation section (SFA-P) and the Children Participation Questionnaire (CPQ) revealed sufficient evidence of validity and reliability. The findings suggest a need for adapting existing participation measures or developing new ones that specifically assess participation in life situations requiring hand use to support interventions. PMID:23461808

  19. The Relationship between Starting Age of Music Instruction and Years of Participation in a String Program outside School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Hsin-Yi; Costa-Giomi, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    It is not uncommon for very young children to start music instruction on string instruments. Previous studies have examined the relationship between starting age of formal music instruction and years of study (Duke, Flowers & Wolfe, 1997; Hartley, 1996; Hartley & Porter, 2009). Duke et al. (1997) found that students who took more years of…

  20. Energy savings one and two years after participation in Minnesota home energy audit and retrofit loan programs

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, E.; Goeltz, R.

    1985-01-01

    Northern States Power (NSP), the largest utility in Minnesota, operates several residential energy conservation programs. This report updates a 1983 detailed quantitative evaluation of two of these programs. The Minnesota Energy Conservation Service (MECS), Minnesota's version of the federal Residential Conservation Service, provides home energy audits and related services to households who live in structures with four or fewer dwelling units and pay gas or electricity bills to a utility participating in MECS. Between April 1981 and December 1982, NSP conducted almost 12 thousand audits. The data collected for this evaluation are described briefly. The factors that affect household energy use and how these factors might be included in models are discussed, from which estimates of program energy savings are derived. These sections focus primarily on differences between the present work and the earlier analysis of the NSP programs. The results of this analysis on total and net natural gas savings are presented.

  1. Straddling the Gap: How Second-Year Peers Empower First-Year Students to Participate in a Community of Independent Learning by Means of the Educative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Alison

    2008-01-01

    Transition from school or college to university is a time of great anxiety for many first-year undergraduates: some studies illustrate the emphasis which students place on finding new friends and securing a consistent social life; the importance of which resonates more with peers than with parents or lecturers. This has to be accomplished…

  2. Childhood Club Participation and All-cause Mortality in Adulthood: A 65-year Follow-up Study of a Population-representative Sample in Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Calvin, Catherine M.; Batty, G. David; Brett, Caroline E.; Deary, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Social participation in middle- and older-age is associated with lower mortality risk across many prospective cohort studies. However there is a paucity of evidence on social participation in youth in relation to mortality, which could help inform an understanding of the origin of the association, and give credence to causality. The present study investigates the relation of early life club membership—a proxy measure of social participation—with mortality risk in older age in a nationally representative sample. Methods We linked historical data collected on the 6-Day Sample of the Scottish Mental Survey 1947 during the period 1947-1963 with vital status records up to April 2014. Analyses were based on 1059 traced participants (446 deceased). Results Club membership at age 18 years was associated with lower mortality risk by age 78 years (hazard ratio=0.54, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.68, p<.001). Club membership remained a significant predictor in models that included early life health, socioeconomic status (SES), measured intelligence, and teachers’ ratings of dependability in personality. Conclusion In a study which circumvented the problem of reverse causality, a proxy indicator of social participation in youth was related to lower mortality risk. The association may be mediated by several behavioural and neurobiological factors, which prospective ageing cohort studies could address. PMID:26176775

  3. Gender in Motion: Developmental Changes in Students' Conceptualizations of Gender through Participation in a First-Year Seminar Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Andrew S.; Sylaska, Kateryna M.

    2012-01-01

    Students enrolled in a first-year seminar course focused on gender provided attitudinal and experiential responses at two points during the course: during the first week of class and during the last week of class. A qualitative-quantitative method using concurrent triangulation was used to investigate pre- and post-test responses to core concepts…

  4. Finnish Parental Involvement Ethos, Health Support, Health Education Knowledge and Participation: Results from a 2-Year School Health Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sormunen, Marjorita; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Turunen, Hannele

    2013-01-01

    A 2-year, participatory action research school health study focused on developing components for home-school partnerships to support children's health learning process. Two intervention schools implemented strengthened health and collaboration-orientated activities; two control schools followed the national core curriculum without extracurricular…

  5. Participation, Progression and Value Added: Business and Economics for 14-19-Year-Olds in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brant, Jacek; Cullimore, Duncan

    2012-01-01

    This article attempts to map the business and economics curriculum and explain some of the reasons for it being as it is; and to examine the number of students choosing to study the subjects and the "perceived relative value" of studying economics and business studies. In 1988 a National Curriculum was introduced for all 5-16-year-olds in state…

  6. The Fate of Ten Scientist-Science Educator Teams Three Years After Participation in a Leadership Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Mary Budd

    Ten two-person teams made up the primary target population for the Leadership Training Program (LTP) described in this report. The back home activities of the team members were studied for nearly three years following the LTP. A brief resume of the design and conduct of the LTP is given. Training of the college teams took three weeks and included…

  7. Perceived Life Satisfaction of Workplace Specialist I Faculty and Mentors Participating in a First-Year STEM Teacher Training Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickolich, David; Feldhaus, Charles; Cotton, Sam; Barrett, Andrew, II; Smallwood, Jim

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure perceived professional and personal life satisfaction of Indiana Workplace Specialist I (WS I) faculty and their mentors. Workplace Specialist I teachers are all first-year career and technical education (CTE) faculty who must complete the WS I training program to be eligible for the Workplace Specialist II…

  8. Developing the IT Workforce: Certification Programs, Participants and Outcomes in High Schools and Two-Year Colleges. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haimson, Joshua; VanNoy, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    Many high school and two-year college vocational programs are exploring new ways to help students develop and document skills valued in the labor market. Over the past decade, some efforts to improve vocational programs have focused on reorganizing curricula around skill standards and assessments formulated by employers. One recent example of this…

  9. CAHRD Consultation 2014: the 10-20 year Horizon Introduction and Overview – as circulated to Consultation participants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The overall aim of the 2014 Consultation is to bring together internal and external partners to help shape the strategic direction for CAHRD over the 10 to 20 year horizon. Our strategic thinking will be guided by our vision of a healthy future for low and middle income populations and our mission to transform health systems to improve the health of these populations. Partnership between northern and southern institutions is integral to this work and critical in the consultation process. The Consultation considers four selected areas of the current work of CAHRD: Lung Health, Maternal & Newborn Health, Neglected Tropical Diseases, and Health Systems. We aim to foster dialogue and learning between these and across contexts and disciplines. The major challenges that will need to be addressed over the next 10 to 20 years will be scoped and pathways to possible solutions proposed. The overall vision is a process of co-production of knowledge

  10. Construction work practices and conditions improved after 2-years' participation in the HomeSafe pilot program.

    PubMed

    Gilkey, David P; Hautaluoma, Jacob E; Ahmed, Taslim P; Keefe, Thomas J; Herron, Robert E; Bigelow, Philip L

    2003-01-01

    This study reevaluated changes in job-site safety audit scores for a cohort of residential construction workers that had protracted exposure to the HomeSafe pilot program for 2(1/2) years. The investigation was a repeated measure of a cohort study underway in the six-county metro area of Denver, Colo. The larger study was a longitudinal, quasi-experimental design with a cohort of residential construction workers within the HomeSafe strategic partnership between Occupational Safety and Health Administration Region VIII and the Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Denver (HBA). Audits were conducted on residential construction sites. Study subjects were construction workers employed by partner or control companies within the study. Repeated measures of 41 companies showed significant improvement (p=.01) in audit scores, increasing from 71.8 to 76.8 after 2(1/2) years in the program. HomeSafe companies out-performed controls (p=.01) for both the retest group and previously unaudited HomeSafe companies. Prolonged exposure in the HomeSafe pilot program resulted in improved audit scores for companies within the program for at least 2 years. PMID:12809540

  11. Scaling Up: Adapting a Phage-Hunting Course to Increase Participation of First-Year Students in Research.

    PubMed

    Staub, Nancy L; Poxleitner, Marianne; Braley, Amanda; Smith-Flores, Helen; Pribbenow, Christine M; Jaworski, Leslie; Lopatto, David; Anders, Kirk R

    2016-01-01

    Authentic research experiences are valuable components of effective undergraduate education. Research experiences during the first years of college are especially critical to increase persistence in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields. The Science Education Alliance Phage Hunters Advancing Genomics and Evolutionary Science (SEA-PHAGES) model provides a high-impact research experience to first-year students but is usually available to a limited number of students, and its implementation is costly in faculty time and laboratory space. To offer a research experience to all students taking introductory biology at Gonzaga University (n = 350/yr), we modified the traditional two-semester SEA-PHAGES course by streamlining the first-semester Phage Discovery lab and integrating the second SEA-PHAGES semester into other courses in the biology curriculum. Because most students in the introductory course are not biology majors, the Phage Discovery semester may be their only encounter with research. To discover whether students benefit from the first semester alone, we assessed the effects of the one-semester Phage Discovery course on students' understanding of course content. Specifically, students showed improvement in knowledge of bacteriophages, lab math skills, and understanding experimental design and interpretation. They also reported learning gains and benefits comparable with other course-based research experiences. Responses to open-ended questions suggest that students experienced this course as a true undergraduate research experience. PMID:27146160

  12. Scaling Up: Adapting a Phage-Hunting Course to Increase Participation of First-Year Students in Research

    PubMed Central

    Staub, Nancy L.; Poxleitner, Marianne; Braley, Amanda; Smith-Flores, Helen; Pribbenow, Christine M.; Jaworski, Leslie; Lopatto, David; Anders, Kirk R.

    2016-01-01

    Authentic research experiences are valuable components of effective undergraduate education. Research experiences during the first years of college are especially critical to increase persistence in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields. The Science Education Alliance Phage Hunters Advancing Genomics and Evolutionary Science (SEA-PHAGES) model provides a high-impact research experience to first-year students but is usually available to a limited number of students, and its implementation is costly in faculty time and laboratory space. To offer a research experience to all students taking introductory biology at Gonzaga University (n = 350/yr), we modified the traditional two-semester SEA-PHAGES course by streamlining the first-semester Phage Discovery lab and integrating the second SEA-PHAGES semester into other courses in the biology curriculum. Because most students in the introductory course are not biology majors, the Phage Discovery semester may be their only encounter with research. To discover whether students benefit from the first semester alone, we assessed the effects of the one-semester Phage Discovery course on students’ understanding of course content. Specifically, students showed improvement in knowledge of bacteriophages, lab math skills, and understanding experimental design and interpretation. They also reported learning gains and benefits comparable with other course-based research experiences. Responses to open-ended questions suggest that students experienced this course as a true undergraduate research experience. PMID:27146160

  13. What are the barriers which discourage 15-16 year-old girls from participating in team sports and how can we overcome them?

    PubMed

    Wetton, Abigail R; Radley, Rebecca; Jones, Angela R; Pearce, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Given the clear benefits of regular physical activity (such as reduced risks of cardiovascular disease and obesity, as well as other benefits including those related to mental health), exploration of the reasons that adolescent girls give for not taking part in team sports may be particularly valuable for enhancing later rates of participation. We combined questionnaires (n = 60) and semistructured interviews (n = 6) to assess the barriers that prevent 15-16-year-old girls from participating in extracurricular team games and what can be done to overcome these barriers and improve physical activity levels. Four barriers became prominent as to why girls in this sample do not participate: Internal Factors, Existing Stereotypes, Other Hobbies and Teachers. Methods to overcome these barriers were identified; changing teachers' attitudes and shifting the media's focus away from male sport. Following the successful summer Olympics and Paralympics in the UK, and the resulting positive focus on some of the nation's female athletes, a shift in focus may be possible. However, this needs to be maintained to allow girls more opportunities, role models and motivation to participate in sport. PMID:24073416

  14. What Are the Barriers Which Discourage 15-16 Year-Old Girls from Participating in Team Sports and How Can We Overcome Them?

    PubMed Central

    Wetton, Abigail R.; Jones, Angela R.; Pearce, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Given the clear benefits of regular physical activity (such as reduced risks of cardiovascular disease and obesity, as well as other benefits including those related to mental health), exploration of the reasons that adolescent girls give for not taking part in team sports may be particularly valuable for enhancing later rates of participation. We combined questionnaires (n = 60) and semistructured interviews (n = 6) to assess the barriers that prevent 15-16-year-old girls from participating in extracurricular team games and what can be done to overcome these barriers and improve physical activity levels. Four barriers became prominent as to why girls in this sample do not participate: Internal Factors, Existing Stereotypes, Other Hobbies and Teachers. Methods to overcome these barriers were identified; changing teachers' attitudes and shifting the media's focus away from male sport. Following the successful summer Olympics and Paralympics in the UK, and the resulting positive focus on some of the nation's female athletes, a shift in focus may be possible. However, this needs to be maintained to allow girls more opportunities, role models and motivation to participate in sport. PMID:24073416

  15. The American Board of Radiology Holman Research Pathway: 10-Year Retrospective Review of the Program and Participant Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, Paul E.; Ang, K. Kian; Zietman, Anthony L.; Harris, Jay R.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Mahoney, Mary C.; Mezwa, Duane G.; Wilson, Lynn D.; Becker, Gary J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In 1999, the American Board of Radiology (ABR) implemented an innovative training program track in diagnostic radiology (DR) and radiation oncology (RO) designed to stimulate development of a cadre of future academic researchers and educators in the 2 disciplines. The program was designated the Holman Research Pathway (HRP). An in-depth retrospective review of initial certification examination performance, post-training career choices, and academic productivity has not been written. This report represents a 10-year retrospective review of post-training performance of a cohort of trainees who have had sufficient time to complete their training and initial certification process and to enter practice. Methods and Materials: All pertinent proceedings of the ABR and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Residency Review Committees for DR and RO between 1997 and May 2011 were reviewed. Thirty-four HRP candidates who fulfilled the established evaluation criteria were identified, and their ABR data files were analyzed regarding performance on the qualifying and certifying examinations. All candidates were contacted directly to obtain a current curriculum vitae. Results: Twenty candidates in RO and 14 candidates in DR were identifiable for review. All candidates attained initial certification. At the time of analysis, 23 of 33 (66.6%) candidates were employed in full-time academic practice (1 DR candidate remained in a fellowship and was not evaluated regarding employment status). Fifteen of 20 (75%) RO candidates were in faculty positions compared with 7 of 13 (53.8%) DR trainees. Additional academic productivity metrics are reported. Conclusions: A high percentage of HRP trainees remained in academic practice and demonstrated significant academic productivity as measured by manuscript authorship and research support. Additional time and observation will be needed to determine whether these findings will be sustained by past, current

  16. The 10-year course of Alcoholics Anonymous participation and long-term outcomes: a follow-up study of outpatient subjects in Project MATCH.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Maria E; White, William L; Kelly, John F; Stout, Robert L; Tonigan, J Scott

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the 10-year course and impact of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)-related helping (AAH), step-work, and meeting attendance on long-term outcomes. Data were derived from 226 treatment-seeking alcoholics recruited from an outpatient site in Project MATCH and followed for 10 years post treatment. Alcohol consumption, AA participation, and other-oriented behavior were assessed at baseline, end of the 3-month treatment period, and 1, 3, and 10 years post treatment. Controlling for explanatory baseline and time-varying variables, results showed significant direct effects of AAH and meeting attendance on reduced alcohol outcomes and a direct effect of AAH on improved other-oriented interest. PMID:23327504

  17. Effect of suspension method on meat quality and ultra-structure of Chinese Yellow Cattle under 12-18°C pre-rigor temperature controlled chilling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuqing; Mao, Yanwei; Liang, Rongrong; Zhang, Yimin; Wang, Renhuan; Zhu, Lixian; Han, Guangxing; Luo, Xin

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of suspension method under 12-18°C pre-rigor temperature controlled chilling on quality traits and ultra-structure of Chinese Yellow Cattle M. Longissimus lumborum (LL). After slaughter, the right sides of carcasses were hung by the Achilles tendon (SA), while the left sides were hung from the pelvic bone (SP). Both sides went through the 12-18°C pre-rigor muscle temperature controlled chilling. LL muscles were aged for 1, 7 or 14days and then evaluated for quality traits and ultra-structure. SP had no significant effect on myofibril fragmentation index, but significantly decreased the purge loss during aging and the Warner-Bratzler shear force values after aging for 1day. Electron microscopy and sarcomere length examination of LL showed that SP resulted in extended I-bands and sarcomere length. To conclude, applying SP under 12-18°C pre-rigor temperature controlled chilling is a potential method for the Chinese beef industry to improve tenderness especially after 1day of aging. PMID:26826666

  18. Solar disinfection of drinking water in the prevention of dysentery in South African children aged under 5 years: the role of participant motivation.

    PubMed

    Du Preez, Martella; Mcguigan, Kevin G; Conroy, Ronan M

    2010-11-15

    Solar disinfection (SODIS) effectively improves the microbial quality of drinking water for preventing diarrhea; however, the effect of participant motivation has not been studied. This 1-year randomized controlled trial investigated the effect of SODIS of drinking water and motivation on the incidence of dysentery and nondysentery diarrhea among children of age 6 months to 5 years living in periurban communities in South Africa.We compared 383 children in 297 households using SODIS with 335 children in 267 households with no intervention. At baseline 62.4% of the study households had stored water which met World Health Organization guidelines for zero thermotolerant coliforms per 100 mL. Dysentery was recorded using a pictorial diary. Incidence of dysentery was significantly associated with higher motivation, defined as 75% or better completion of diarrhea data. Incidence rates were lower in those drinking solar disinfected water (incidence rate ratio 0.64, 95% CI 0.39 - 1.0, P = 0.071) but not statistically significant. Compared with the control, participants with higher motivation achieved a significant reduction in dysentery (incidence rate ratio 0.36, 95% CI 0.16 - 0.81, P = 0.014). However, there was no significant reduction in risk at lower levels of motivation. Solar disinfection was not significantly associated with nondysentery diarrhea risk overall (P = 0.419). A statistically significant reduction in dysentery was achieved only in households with higher motivation, showing that motivation is a significant determinant for measurable health gains. Failure of three-quarters of participants to achieve a significant reduction in dysentery suggests that research into effective implementation is required. PMID:20977257

  19. Incidental Intracranial Findings and Their Clinical Impact; The HUNT MRI Study in a General Population of 1006 Participants between 50-66 Years

    PubMed Central

    Håberg, Asta Kristine; Hammer, Tommy Arild; Kvistad, Kjell Arne; Rydland, Jana; Müller, Tomm B.; Eikenes, Live; Gårseth, Mari; Stovner, Lars Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Evaluate types and prevalence of all, incidental, and clinically relevant incidental intracranial findings, i.e. those referred to primary physician or clinical specialist, in a cohort between 50 and 66 years from the Nord-Trøndelag Health (HUNT) study. Types of follow-up, outcome of repeated neuroimaging and neurosurgical treatment were assessed. Material and Methods 1006 participants (530 women) underwent MRI of the head at 1.5T consisting of T1 weighted sagittal IR-FSPGR volume, axial T2 weighted, gradient echo T2* weighted and FLAIR sequences plus time of flight cerebral angiography covering the circle of Willis. The nature of a finding and if it was incidental were determined from previous radiological examinations, patient records, phone interview, and/or additional neuroimaging. Handling and outcome of the clinically relevant incidental findings were prospectively recorded. True and false positives were estimated from the repeated neuroimaging. Results Prevalence of any intracranial finding was 32.7%. Incidental intracranial findings were present in 27.1% and clinically relevant findings in 15.1% of the participants in the HUNT MRI cohort. 185 individuals (18.4%) were contacted by phone about their findings. 40 participants (6.2%) underwent ≥ 1 additional neuroimaging session to establish etiology. Most false positives were linked to an initial diagnosis of suspected glioma, and overall positive predictive value of initial MRI was 0.90 across different diagnoses. 90.8% of the clinically relevant incidental findings were developmental and acquired cerebrovascular pathologies, the remaining 9.2% were intracranial tumors, of which extra-axial tumors predominated. In total, 3.9% of the participants were referred to a clinical specialist, and 11.7% to their primary physician. 1.4% underwent neurosurgery/radiotherapy, and 1 (0.1%) experienced a procedure related postoperative deficit. Conclusions In a general population between 50 and 66 years most

  20. Can Perceptuo-Motor Skills Assessment Outcomes in Young Table Tennis Players (7-11 years) Predict Future Competition Participation and Performance? An Observational Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Faber, Irene R; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; Faber, Niels R; Oosterveld, Frits G J; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2016-01-01

    Forecasting future performance in youth table tennis players based on current performance is complex due to, among other things, differences between youth players in growth, development, maturity, context and table tennis experience. Talent development programmes might benefit from an assessment of underlying perceptuo-motor skills for table tennis, which is hypothesized to determine the players' potential concerning the perceptuo-motor domain. The Dutch perceptuo-motor skills assessment intends to measure the perceptuo-motor potential for table tennis in youth players by assessing the underlying skills crucial for developing technical and tactical qualities. Untrained perceptuo-motor tasks are used as these are suggested to represent a player's future potential better than specific sport skills themselves as the latter depend on exposure to the sport itself. This study evaluated the value of the perceptuo-motor skills assessment for a talent developmental programme by evaluating its predictive validity for competition participation and performance in 48 young table tennis players (7-11 years). Players were tested on their perceptuo-motor skills once during a regional talent day, and the subsequent competition results were recorded half-yearly over a period of 2.5 years. Logistic regression analysis showed that test scores did not predict future competition participation (p >0.05). Yet, the Generalized Estimating Equations analysis, including the test items 'aiming at target', 'throwing a ball', and 'eye-hand coordination' in the best fitting model, revealed that the outcomes of the perceptuo-motor skills assessment were significant predictors for future competition results (R2 = 51%). Since the test age influences the perceptuo-motor skills assessment's outcome, another multivariable model was proposed including test age as a covariate (R2 = 53%). This evaluation demonstrates promising prospects for the perceptuo-motor skills assessment to be included in a talent

  1. Bromine-rich Zinc Bromides: Zn6Br12(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)5, Zn4Br8(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)3, and Zn6Br12(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)2.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, David; Feldmann, Claus

    2016-06-20

    The bromine-rich zinc bromides Zn6Br12(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)5 (1), Zn4Br8(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)3 (2), and Zn6Br12(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)2 (3) are prepared by reaction of ZnBr2, 18-crown-6, and elemental bromine in the ionic liquid [MeBu3N][N(Tf)2] (N(Tf)2 = bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide). Zn6Br12(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)5 (1) is formed instantaneously by the reaction. Even at room temperature, compound 1 releases bromine, which was confirmed by thermogravimetry (TG) and mass spectrometry (MS). The release of Br2 can also be directly followed by the color and density of the title compounds. With controlled conditions (2 weeks, 25 °C, absence of excess Br2) Zn6Br12(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)5 (1) slowly releases bromine with conconcurrent generation of Zn4Br8(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)3 (2) (in ionic liquid) and Zn6Br12(18-crown-6)2×(Br2)2 (3) (in inert oil). All bromine-rich zinc bromides contain voluminous uncharged (e.g., Zn3Br6(18-crown-6), Zn2Br4(18-crown-6)) or ionic (e.g., [Zn2Br3(18-crown-6)](+), [(Zn2Br6)×(Br2)2](2-)) building units with dibromine molecules between the Zn oligomers and partially interconnecting the Zn-containing building units. Due to the structural similarity, the bromine release is possible via crystal-to-crystal transformation with retention of the crystal shape. PMID:27281122

  2. High school biology students' participation in a year-long sequence of analogical activities: The relationship of development of analogical thought to student learning and classroom interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackney, Marcella Wichser

    1999-10-01

    This research explored development of analogical thought through high school biology students' participation in a year-long sequence of analogical activities. Analogizing involves: selecting a familiar analog; mapping similarities and differences between the analog and less familiar target; making inferences from the analogy; evaluating validity of the inferences; and ultimately, understanding the biological target (Holyoak & Thagard, 1995). This investigation considered: student development of independence in learning through analogical thought, student learning of biology, the relationship between development of students' analogical thinking and students' learning of biology, and the quality of student interactions in the classroom This researcher, as teacher participant, used three approaches for teaching by analogy: traditional didactic, teacher-guided, and analogy-generated-by-the-student (Zeitoun, 1983). Within cooperative groups, students in one honors biology class actively engaged in research-based analogical activities that targeted specific biological topics. Two honors biology classes participated in similar, but nonanalogical activities that targeted the same biological topics. This two-class comparison group permitted analytical separation of effects of the analogical emphasis from the effects of biology content and activity-based learning. Data collected included: fieldnotes of researcher observations, student responses to guidesheets, tapes of group interactions, student products, student perceptions survey evaluations, ratings of students' expressed analogical development, pre- and posttest scores on a biology achievement test, essay responses, and selected student interviews. These data formed the basis for researcher qualitative analysis, augmented by quantitative techniques. Through participation in the sequence of analogical activities, students developed their abilities to engage in the processes of analogical thinking, but attained different

  3. Childhood body weight in relation to morbidity from cardiovascular disease and cancer in older adulthood: 67-year follow-up of participants in the 1947 Scottish Mental Survey.

    PubMed

    Batty, G David; Calvin, Catherine M; Brett, Caroline E; Čukić, Iva; Deary, Ian J

    2015-11-01

    Although it has been well documented that elevated body weight in middle- and older-aged populations is associated with multiple morbidities, the influence of childhood body weight on health endpoints other than coronary heart disease is not well understood. Accordingly, using a subsample of 4,620 participants (2,288 women) from the Scottish Mental Survey of 1947, we examined the association between body mass index measured at 11 years of age and future risk of 9 independent health endpoints as ascertained from national hospital admissions and cancer registers until 2014 (up to age 77 years). Although there was some evidence of a relationship between elevated childhood body mass index and higher rates of peripheral vascular disease (per each 1-standard deviation increase in body mass index, hazard ratio = 1.21, 95% confidence interval: 1.07, 1.37) and smoking-related cancers (per each 1-standard deviation increase in body mass index, hazard ratio = 1.09, 95% confidence interval: 1.01, 1.17), there was no apparent association with coronary heart disease, stroke (including ischemic stroke), heart failure, or carcinomas of the colorectum, stomach, lung, prostate, or breast. In conclusion, a relationship between childhood body weight and later morbidity was largely lacking in the present study. PMID:26443418

  4. Can Perceptuo-Motor Skills Assessment Outcomes in Young Table Tennis Players (7–11 years) Predict Future Competition Participation and Performance? An Observational Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Forecasting future performance in youth table tennis players based on current performance is complex due to, among other things, differences between youth players in growth, development, maturity, context and table tennis experience. Talent development programmes might benefit from an assessment of underlying perceptuo-motor skills for table tennis, which is hypothesized to determine the players’ potential concerning the perceptuo-motor domain. The Dutch perceptuo-motor skills assessment intends to measure the perceptuo-motor potential for table tennis in youth players by assessing the underlying skills crucial for developing technical and tactical qualities. Untrained perceptuo-motor tasks are used as these are suggested to represent a player’s future potential better than specific sport skills themselves as the latter depend on exposure to the sport itself. This study evaluated the value of the perceptuo-motor skills assessment for a talent developmental programme by evaluating its predictive validity for competition participation and performance in 48 young table tennis players (7–11 years). Players were tested on their perceptuo-motor skills once during a regional talent day, and the subsequent competition results were recorded half-yearly over a period of 2.5 years. Logistic regression analysis showed that test scores did not predict future competition participation (p >0.05). Yet, the Generalized Estimating Equations analysis, including the test items ‘aiming at target’, ‘throwing a ball’, and ‘eye-hand coordination’ in the best fitting model, revealed that the outcomes of the perceptuo-motor skills assessment were significant predictors for future competition results (R2 = 51%). Since the test age influences the perceptuo-motor skills assessment’s outcome, another multivariable model was proposed including test age as a covariate (R2 = 53%). This evaluation demonstrates promising prospects for the perceptuo-motor skills assessment to be

  5. Social Mobility and Mental Disorders at 30 Years of Age in Participants of the 1982 Cohort, Pelotas, Rio Grande Do Sul – RS

    PubMed Central

    de Quadros, Lenice de Castro Muniz; Quevedo, Luciana de Avila; Motta, Janaína Vieira dos Santos; Carraro, André; Ribeiro, Felipe Garcia; Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Gigante, Denise Petrucci

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between mental disorders at 30 years of age and social mobility by formally testing three hypotheses: Risk Accumulation; Critical Period; and Social Mobility. The study was performed using data from the 30-year follow-up of the Pelotas Birth Cohort Study, conducted in 1982, and data from previous follow-ups. The tool used to evaluate mental health was the Self Report Questionnaire (SRQ-20). For the statistical analysis, the chi-square test with the Yates correction was used to estimate the prevalence of mental disorder, and the Poisson regression with robust variance was used to formally test the hypotheses according to the Risk Accumulation, Critical Period and Social Mobility Models. The analyses were stratified by gender. The prevalence of Common Mental Disorders (CMDs) was 24.3% (95% CI 22.9–25.7) when the whole sample was considered. The highest prevalence, 27.1% (95% CI 25.1–29.2), was found in women, and the difference between genders was significant (p < 0.001). CMDs were more frequent in participants who remained “poor” in the three follow-ups. In both men and women, the best fit was obtained with the Risk Accumulation Model, with p = 0.6348 and p = 0.2105, respectively. The results indicate the need to rethink public income maintenance policies. Finally, we suggest further studies to investigate the role of different public policies in decreasing the prevalence of mental disorders and thus contribute proposals of new policies that may contribute to the prevention of these disorders. PMID:26448480

  6. Parental Estimation of Their Child's Increased Type 1 Diabetes Risk During the First 2 Years of Participation in an International Observational Study: Results From the TEDDY study.

    PubMed

    Swartling, Ulrica; Lynch, Kristian; Smith, Laura; Johnson, Suzanne Bennett

    2016-04-01

    This study assessed mothers' and fathers' perception of their child's risk of getting type 1 diabetes (T1D) during the first 2 years of their participation in The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study. TEDDY parents were informed of their child's increased genetic risk for T1D at study inception. Parent perception of the child's risk was assessed at 3, 6, 15, and 27 months of age. In families with no history of T1D, underestimation of the child's T1D risk was common in mothers (>38%) and more so in fathers (>50%). The analyses indicated that parental education, country of residence, family history of T1D, household crowding, ethnic minority status, and beliefs that the child's T1D risk can be reduced were factors associated with parental risk perception accuracy. Even when given extensive information about their child's T1D risk, parents often fail to accurately grasp the information provided. This is particularly true for fathers, families from low socioeconomic backgrounds, and those with no family history of T1D. It is important to develop improved tools for risk communication tailored to individual family needs. PMID:27241873

  7. [First results of participation of the Czech Republic in the 7th Framework Programme, priority Health, in years 2007-2013].

    PubMed

    Kinkorová, Judita

    2013-01-01

    European Commission has announced the first preliminary results of participation in the 7th Framework Programme (FP7), priority Health. The overview presents the basic statistics regarding the participation of the Czech teams, universities, institutions, and small and medium size enterprises (SMEs) in FP7 projects. The aim of the article is to present the basic data on the projects with the Czech participation, the EU financial contribution for Czech teams and the main research topics. PMID:24041023

  8. Anthropometric Characteristics, Physical Fitness and Motor Coordination of 9 to 11 Year Old Children Participating in a Wide Range of Sports

    PubMed Central

    Elferink-Gemser, Marije; Hartman, Esther; Willemse, Bas; Philippaerts, Renaat; Visscher, Chris; Lenoir, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent 9 to 11 year old children participating in a specific sport already exhibit a specific anthropometric, physical fitness and motor coordination profile, in line with the requirements of that particular sport. In addition, the profiles in children with a different training volume were compared and possible differences in training hours per week between children from a low, moderate, and high level of physical fitness and motor coordination were investigated. Methods and Results Data of 620 children, 347 boys and 273 girls, who participated in the Flemish Sports Compass were used. Only the primary sport of each child was considered and six groups of sports (Ball sports, Dance, Gymnastics, Martial arts, Racquet sports and Swimming) were formed based on common characteristics. Measurements consisted of 17 tests. Independent T-tests and Mann-Whitney U-tests revealed few differences between the groups of sports and the discriminant analyses with the moderate and low active group did not show any significant results (p > .05). However, when discriminating among the high active children, a 85.2 % correct classification between six groups of sports was found (Wilks’ Λ = .137 and p < .001). Finally, children performing under average on the tests spent significantly fewer hours in sport per week (2.50 ± 1.84 hours) compared to the children performing best (3.25 ± 2.60 hours) (p = .016) and the children performing above average (2.90 ± 1.96 hours) (p = .029) on physical fitness and motor coordination. Discussion The study showed that in general, children at a young age do not exhibit sport-specific characteristics, except in children with a high training volume. It is possible that on the one hand, children have not spent enough time yet in their sport to develop sport-specific qualities. On the other hand, it could be possible that they do not take individual qualities into account when choosing a sport

  9. The first year of the Australian Seismometers in Schools Network: Inspiring Students to follow careers in science by participating in a national science experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balfour, N.; Sambridge, M.; O'Neill, C.

    2012-12-01

    The first year of The Australian Seismometers in Schools program (AuSIS) has been filled with excitement as we completed installing pilot instruments in schools, launched the program nationally and received over 70 "Expressions of Interest" from schools around Australia. The data quality has exceeded expectations with schools recording local earthquakes down to magnitude 1, and large distant earthquakes. Some students participate in the program by looking up earthquake locations on maps and learning about geography, while other more advanced students have been investigating the frequency characteristics and sources of noise at their school. Both students and the schools are particularly proud that their instrument is contributing to the global scientific community and are actively incorporating seismology into the school curriculum. AuSIS is a four-year project (2011-2014) funded by the Education component of AuScope Australian Geophysical Observing System. Over the next four years we will build a network of 40 seismometers in high schools across the nation to provide real-time monitoring of the Australian continent and raise awareness of geoscience through observing our dynamic earth in motion. This program is unique to other seismometers in schools programs as it uses professional seismometers to provide research quality data to the seismological community. The AuSIS project's educational aims are to: raise community awareness of earthquakes; raise awareness of seismology and geoscience, as a field of study; promote science as a possible career; and, provide a tool to teachers to assist in teaching physics and earth science. The data schools collect will be useful to researchers and could complement networks run by government and state agencies due to the high quality of the instruments and will be stored at internationally accessible and supported data management centres, such as IRIS. Data collected during the pilot program have provided clear recordings of

  10. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 394: Areas 12, 18, and 29 Spill/Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-09-26

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting a closure recommendation for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 394: Areas 12, 18, and 29 Spill/Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in compliance with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. This CAU contains six Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 12-25-04, UST 12-16-2 Waste Oil Release; 18-25-01, 18-25-02, 18-25-03, Oil Spills; 18-25-04, Spill (Diesel Fuel); and 29-44-01, Fuel Spill, located within Areas 12, 18, and 29 on the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting recommendations of no further action or closure in place for CASs within CAU 394. Throughout late 2002 and early to mid 2003, closure activities were performed as set forth in the CAU 394 Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan. The closure activities identified the nature and extent of contaminants of potential concern at the CASs, and provided sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions for the CASs. Soil in CASs 18-25-02 and 18-25-03 containing polychlorinated biphenyls exceeding the action levels established by the Nevada Administrative Code were removed for proper disposal. The soil remaining in these CASs containing petroleum hydrocarbons exceeding the action level were closed in place with use restrictions. Corrective Action Sites 18-25-04 required no further corrective action; closure in place is required at CASs 12-25-04, 18-25-01, 18-25-02, 18-25-03, and 29-44-01; and use restrictions are required at CASs 12-25-04, 18-25-01, 18-25-02, 18-25-03 and 29-44-01. In summary, no corrective action plan is required for CAU 394.

  11. Extra Copies of der(21)t(12;21) plus Deletion of ETV6 Gene due to dic(12;18) in B-Cell Precursor ALL with Poor Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Hernandes, Marina Araújo Fonzar; Marques-Salles, Terezinha de Jesus; Mkrtchyan, Hasmik; Soares-Ventura, Eliane Maria; Leite, Edinalva Pereira; Muniz, Maria Tereza Cartaxo; Cornélio, Maria Teresa Marquim Nogueira; Liehr, Thomas; Santos, Neide; Silva, Maria Luiza Macedo

    2012-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), CD10+ B-cell precursor, represents the most frequent type of childhood ALL from 3 to 6 years of age. The t(12;21)(p13;q22) occurs in 25% of cases of B-cell precursor ALL, it is rare in children less than 24 months and have been related to good prognosis. Some relapse cases and unfavorable prognosis in ALL CD10+ are associated with t(12;21) bearing additional aberrations as extra copies of chromosome 21 and ETV6 gene loss. This report describes the case of a 15 month-year old girl, who displayed a karyotype with addition on chromosome 12p plus trisomy 10 and tetrasomy of chromosome 21. Molecular cytogenetic studies revealed two extra copies of the der(21) t(12;21), trisomy 10 and deletion of the second ETV6 gene due to the dic(12;18). These findings show the great importance of molecular cytogenetic studies to clarify complex karyotypes, to define prognostic, to carry out risk group stratification and to support correctly disease treatment in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:23074685

  12. The Norwegian Network of Health Promoting Schools: A Three-Year Follow-Up Study of Teacher Motivation, Participation and Perceived Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjomsland, Hege E.; Iversen, Anette C.; Wold, Bente

    2009-01-01

    Teachers' participation in health promotion was studied in Norwegian schools involved in the European Network of Health Promoting Schools. The study examined how teachers' motivation was related to participation in health promoting activities. The sample consisted of 104 teachers surveyed in 1994 and 1997. The teachers reported high motivation in…

  13. Sports Participation and Health during Periods of Educational Transition: A Study of 30-35-Year-Olds in North-West England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haycock, David; Smith, Andy

    2014-01-01

    In view of the persistence of health inequalities and declines in leisure-sport participation over the life course, several quantitative investigations have explored the links between participation and other leisure activities, which have their foundations in childhood and youth, as a means of understanding adults' health behaviours. This…

  14. Cultural Dimensions of Decisions about Educational Participation among 14- to 19-Year-olds: The Parts that Tomlinson Doesn't Reach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furlong, Andy

    2005-01-01

    The continued increase in levels of educational participation and patterns of attainment among young people from less advantaged social backgrounds suggests that class cultures can no longer be seen as providing significant barriers to educational progression. Indeed, it can be argued that this increase in educational participation has been…

  15. The American Geological Institute Minority Participation Program (MPP): Thirty Years of Improving Access to Opportunities in the Geosciences Through Undergraduate and Graduate Scholarships for Underrepresented Minorities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, C. N.; Byerly, G. R.; Smith, M. J.

    2001-05-01

    Since 1971, the American Geological Institute (AGI) Minority Participation Program (MPP) has supported scholarships for underrepresented minorities in the geosciences at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Some of our MPP scholars have gone on to hugely successful careers in the geosciences. MPP scholars include corporate leaders, university professors, a NASA scientist-astronaut and a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER awardee. Yet as ethnic minorities continue to be underrepresented in the geosciences, AGI plans to expand its efforts beyond its traditional undergraduate and graduate scholarships to include diversity programs for secondary school geoscience teacher internships, undergraduate research travel support, and doctoral research fellowships. AGI promotes its MPP efforts primarily through its web pages, which are very successful in attracting visitors; through its publications, especially Geotimes; and through its Corporate Associates and Member Societies. Funding for the MPP has come from multiple sources over the past 30 years. Industry, non-profit organizations, and individuals have been the primary source of funding for graduate scholarships. The NSF has regularly funded the undergraduate scholarships. AGI Corporate Associates have contributed to both scholarship programs. The MPP Advisory Committee selects scholarship recipients based upon student academic performance, financial need, and potential for success as a geoscience professional. AGI currently has 29 MPP scholars, including 11 undergraduate and 18 graduate students. Undergraduate scholarships range from \\1000 to \\5000, with an average award of approximately \\2500. Graduate scholarships range from \\500 to \\4000, with an average award of approximately \\1300. In addition to financial assistance, every MPP scholar is assigned a professional geoscientist as a mentor. The mentor is responsible for regular personal contacts with MPP scholars, and with writing evaluation reports that

  16. The Relationship that Summer Bridge and Non-Summer Bridge Participation, Demographics, and High School Academic Performance Have on First-Year College Students: Effects of Grade Point Average and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinson, Terence LeRay

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between participation in the Summer Bridge Program, grade point averages and retention of first-year college students. Additionally, this study examined the differences in grade point averages of college students after their first semester and first-year of college with regard to their…

  17. Employee Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarratt, Alex

    1975-01-01

    The article presents another approach to individual motivation--participative management--which concerns an emotional rather than financial commitment to the job through involvement and job satisfaction. The author favors within this approach: employee participation in decision-making, entitlement to information, and the establishment of…

  18. TANF Participation in 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Mark; Rahmanou, Hedieh

    During 2002, there were disputes about most aspects of the participation rate structure for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families. The Administration put forward, and the House adopted, a proposal to raise TANF participation rates to 70 percent over 5 years, require families to be in selected activities for 40 hours per week to be fully…

  19. A Self-Advocacy Training Program for Students with Disabilities: Adult Outcomes and Advocacy Involvement One to Six Years after Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Eric Landon

    2013-01-01

    The Texas Statewide Youth Leadership Forum (TXYLF) provides self-advocacy training to high school youths with disabilities. TXYLF is an enhanced version of the Youth Leadership Forum (YLF) that is comprised of an initial five day training, a nine month support phase, regional YLFs, and the opportunity for participants to return to the five day…

  20. Time Use Differences in Activity Participation among Children 4-5 Years Old with and without the Risk of Developing Conduct Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Mong-Lin; Ziviani, Jenny; Baxter, Janeen; Haynes, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Conduct problems in childhood are associated with the way in which children engage in daily activities. Research, to date, on conduct problems in relation to time use has primarily focused on school aged children and their participation in discrete activities such as watching TV and sport. The purpose of the present study is to determine if…

  1. A Survey of Factors and Attitudes of Students at a Rural Two-Year College Which Promote Low Participation in Student Activities Programs: An Institutional Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolar, Steven M.

    In spring 1988, a survey was conducted of the student body at Cumberland County College (CCC) to obtain insight into students' perceptions of student activities programs at the college, the characteristics of participants in these activities, the activities students would like to see offered, and the most convenient times. A random sample of 202…

  2. Oral health status among 12-year-old children in primary schools participating in an oral health preventive school program in Phnom Penh City, Cambodia, 2002.

    PubMed

    Teng, O; Narksawat, K; Podang, J; Pacheun, O

    2004-06-01

    A cross-sectional survey was undertaken to assess dental caries status, knowledge, attitude and practice in oral health among 12-year-old primary schoolchildren participating in the Oral Health Preventive School Program (OHPSP) conducted since 1998 in Phnom Penh City, Cambodia. Schools were stratified into 3 groups by levels of cooperation (good, partial, and poor) with the OHPS program and samples of schools randomly selected from each group. A total sample size of 239 schoolchildren was randomly selected from the sampled schools. There were 79, 82, and 79 children from schools with good, partial, and poor cooperation, respectively. Dental caries status DMFT (Decayed Missing Filled teeth) and knowledge, attitude and practices in oral health were assessed from 21 January to 5 February 2002. Opinions of school directors toward the OHPS Program were evaluated by interview. The results showed the overall mean DMFT per person in schoolchildren in Phnom Penh City, Cambodia of 2.33 (95%CI=2.05-2.61) while mean DT(Decayed teeth) was 2.31 (95%CI=1.97-2.52) and mean MT (Missing teeth) and mean FT (Filled teeth) were 0.01 per person, which were quite small. Children from schools with good cooperation with the OHPSP had the lowest significant mean DMFT 1.62 (95%CI=1.25-1.98) compared to children from schools with partial and poor cooperation (Mean DMFT=2.67:95%CI=2.10-3.23, and 2.69:95%CI=2.19-3.19, respectively). There were no significant differences in levels of knowledge, attitude and practices in oral health among the 3 groups of schools, but the proportion of good practices was highest in good cooperation schools compared to the schools with partial and poor cooperation to the OHPSP (41.3%, 27.3%, and 31.3%, respectively). Among 35 school directors, the majority of them (97.1%) believed that the OHPS program can reduce the dental caries prevalence among schoolchildren. Only 20.0% agreed that parents of schoolchildren should pay money to the school for tooth brushes and

  3. Nutrient intakes and iron and vitamin D status differ depending on main milk consumed by UK children aged 12-18 months - secondary analysis from the Diet and Nutrition Survey of Infants and Young Children.

    PubMed

    Sidnell, Anne; Pigat, Sandrine; Gibson, Sigrid; O'Connor, Rosalyn; Connolly, Aileen; Sterecka, Sylwia; Stephen, Alison M

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition in the second year is important as this is a period of rapid growth and development. Milk is a major food for young children and this analysis evaluated the impact of the type of milk consumed on nutrient intakes and nutritional status. Data from the Diet and Nutrition Survey of Infants and Young Children were used to investigate the intakes of key nutrients, and Fe and vitamin D status, of children aged 12-18 months, not breastfed, and consuming >400 g/d fortified milk (n 139) or >400 g/d of whole cows' milk (n 404). Blood samples from eligible children for measurement of Hb (n 113), serum ferritin and plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations (n 105) were available for approximately 20 % of children. Unpaired Mann-Whitney tests were used to compare nutrient intakes and status between consumers of fortified and cows' milk. Mean daily total dietary intakes of Fe, Zn, vitamin A and vitamin D were significantly higher in the fortified milk group. Mean daily total dietary intakes of energy, protein, Ca, iodine, Na and saturated fat were significantly higher in the cows' milk group. Hb was not different between groups. The fortified milk group had significantly higher serum ferritin (P = 0·049) and plasma 25(OH)D (P = 0·014). This analysis demonstrates significantly different nutrient intakes and status between infants consuming >400 g/d fortified milk v. those consuming >400 g/d whole cows' milk. These results indicate that fortified milks can play a significant role in improving the quality of young children's diets in their second year of life. PMID:27547395

  4. [Functional indices of the participants of the satellite experiments of the "Mars-500" project in the north of Russia in different seasons of a year].

    PubMed

    Solonin, Iu G; Markov, A L; Boĭko, E R; Potolitsyna, N N; Parshukova, O I

    2014-01-01

    17 male northerners participating in the satellite experiments of the '"Mars-500" project passed through the morphological, physiometric, psychological and biochemical studies. The prenosological health indices in different seasons were calculated using the hardware-software complex "Ecosan-2007". Seasonal sinusoidal fluctuations were detected for the thermoregulation (body and skin temperature), lipids metabolism (cholesterol, HDL and LDL levels in the blood), circulation regulation under physical exercise (the increase of "double product" and its recovery time). In the majority of the participants the unfavorable deviations of body mass index, "power" and "life" indices, simple visual-motor reaction time, Kerdo vegetative index, physical health levels and regulatory systems activity index (in comparison with the mid-latitude standards) were found. PMID:25711109

  5. The University of Minnesota Morris - N.S.F. REU Program: Twenty years of encouraging women to participate in the Geological Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotter, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    The goal of the UMM - REU program is to nurture the development of women in the geological sciences. Women are historically under-represented in the geological sciences. This program introduces undergraduate women to research project design and independent data collection and analysis designed to increase student’s scientific skills, introduce them to new fields of study, and to develop academic/professional confidence. In so doing, the program tries to encourage students to continue their education at the graduate level and/or to pursue a career in the Geosciences. The program was first proposed in 1988 and was run during the summers of 1989, '90, '91, '94, '95, '97, ’99, 2000, 05, 07, and 09 (in 1996 and 1998 a similar program was run at Gustavus Adolphus College). The focus of the program is field and laboratory research to determine the origin and history of glacial deposits in west-central Minnesota and the late Paleozoic Glacial deposits of the Parana Basin, Brazil. Much of the success of the program can be attributed to developing student “ownership” of their individual projects, their particular REU group, and the UMM-REU program overall. Research projects are selected and designed by the participants. Frequently considered are: research subject, location of field area and geologic techniques employed. Both project ownership and team building is encouraged by participant led weekly visits to field areas and frequent group discussions of research problems, successes and major gaffes. Additional team building activities include: 1) living in the same on-campus apartments and Brazilian B&B, 2) organized social activities, 3) international travel and working with Brazilian (women) students, 4) readings and discussions on "women in geology”, 5) shared strategies and concerns for career choices and; 6) participation in the "Friends of UMM-REU" conference (an "informal" presentation of results). Finally, an emphasis is placed on the utilization of the

  6. Testing Direct and Indirect Effects of Sports Participation on Perceived Health in Spanish Adolescents between 15 and 18 Years of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastor, Yolanda; Balaguer, Isabel; Pons, Diana; Garcia-Merita, Marisa

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the direct and indirect effects of sports participation on perceived health. It is based on a representative sample of middle adolescents aged 15-18 (N=1038, M AGE=16.31, S. D.=0.92; 510 boys and 528 girls) from the Valencian Community (Spain). This study used two different models; Model A is an adaptation of Thorlindsson,…

  7. Worker Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, W. F.

    1973-01-01

    The philosophy and workability of the concept of worker participation in management decisions is discussed in the context of British society. It is recommended that four interests be represented in any kind of Workers' Council: management, workers, shareholders, and consumers. (AG)

  8. Eating behaviour patterns in Chinese children aged 12-18 months and association with relative weight - factorial validation of the Children's Eating Behaviour Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Eating behaviours have been suggested relating to obesity development. The Children's Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (CEBQ) is a parent-report measure constructed to assess multiple dimensions of eating behavior for children. This study aimed to test the validity of the Chinese version of Children's Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (CEBQ) in Chinese children aged 12-18 months. We examined factor structure and the reliability of the Chinese version of the CEBQ, the associations between children's eating behaviours and children's weight (BMI SDS) were assessed. Methods 219 questionnaires were filled out by the caregivers, approached in community health care centers in two cities in China. BMI of each child was calculated and converted to BMI SDS. Factor validation (Principal Component Analysis, exploratory factor analysis) on all CEBQ items was performed and gender difference in eating behaviours was examined. Correlations between eating behaviours and the child's BMI SDS were analyzed by linear regression analysis controlling for gender, parental combined weight, and education. Results The factor analysis revealed a seven-factor solution, with factor 'food responsiveness' (FR) split into two. 'Satiety responsiveness' (SR) and 'Enjoyment of food' (EF) factors were not detected. Interestingly, boys scored higher than girls in the FR scales, whereas girls had a higher score in 'food fussiness' (FF) scale. Conclusions We conclude that although a valuable psychometric instrument, CEBQ might be affected by age and cultural differences. Therefore, adjusting it in order to fit the Chinese population was suggested. We did not find an association between eating behaviours and children's BMI SDS, when it was controlled for gender and parental weight. PMID:22272572

  9. Increased participation and improved performance in age group backstroke master swimmers from 25-29 to 100-104 years at the FINA World Masters Championships from 1986 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Unterweger, Chiara M; Knechtle, Beat; Nikolaidis, Pantelis T; Rosemann, Thomas; Rüst, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    Participation and performance trends in age group athletes have been investigated for different sport disciplines, but not for master swimmers. The knowledge on this topic is still missing for a particular stroke such as backstroke. Changes in participation and performance of male and female age group backstroke swimmers (≥25 years) competing in 50, 100 and 200 m pool swimming at the FINA World Masters Championships held between 1986 and 2014 were investigated using mixed-effects regression analyses. The overall participation was n = 26,217 including n = 13,708 women and n = 12,509 men. In 50 m, female (age groups 85-89 years; p = 0.002) and male participation (age groups 55-59; p = 0.030 and 80-84 years; p = 0.002) increased, while female participation decreased in age groups 55-59 (p = 0.010) and 60-64 years (p = 0.050). In 100 and 200 m, participation increased in age groups 45-49, 50-54, 65-69, 70-74, 80-84 years. Swimmers in age groups 25-29 to 95-99 years improved performance over all distances. Women were slower than men in age groups 25-29 to 80-84 years, but not in age groups 85-89 to 95-99 years over all distances. In 50 m and 100 m, the sex difference decreased in age groups 40-44 (p = 0.007 and p = 0.005), 45-49 (p = 0.017 and p = 0.034), 50-54 (p = 0.002 and p = 0.040), to 55-59 years (p = 0.002 and p = 0.004). In 200 m, the sex difference decreased in age groups 40-44 (p = 0.044) and 90-94 (p = 0.011), but increased in age group 25-29 years (p = 0.006). In summary, in age group backstroke swimmers, (1) participation increased or remained unchanged (except women in age groups 55-59 and 60-64 years in 50 m), (2) swimming performance improved in all age groups from 25-29 to 95-99 years over all distances, (3) men were faster than women in age groups 25-29 to 80-84 years (except age groups 85-89 to 95-99 years) over time and all distances. PMID:27330911

  10. Participative Design for Participative Democracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emery, Merrelyn, Ed.

    This four-part volume addresses design principles for introducing democratic forms in workplaces, educational institutions, and social institutions, based on a trend toward participative democracy in Australia. Following an introduction, part I sets the context with two papers: "The Agenda for the Next Wave" and "Educational Paradigms: An…

  11. Plasma F2-isoprostane class VI isomers at 12-18 weeks of pregnancy are associated with later occurrence of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, Jean-François; Qin Wei, Shu; Larose, Jessica; Greffard, Karine; Moisan, Vanessa; Audibert, Francois; Fraser, William D; Julien, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) has long been associated with early oxidative stress, although the symptoms occur later in pregnancy. We have hypothesized that the oxidative stress in PE, as characterized by the presence of F2-isoprostane (F2-isoP) isomers in late pregnancy, should already be present in plasma at the first regular visit of the obstetrical follow-up. There are 64 possible isomers of F2-isoPs derived from the oxidation of arachidonic acid (AA), but only one of these isomers has been investigated so far in PE, the classical 8-iso-PGF2α. Here, we have investigated two regioisomers of class III (8-iso-15(R)-PGF2α and 8-iso-PGF2α) and a mix of two isomers of class VI ((±)5-iPF2α-VI) in plasma samples collected prospectively at 12-18 weeks from normotensive controls (n = 60) and pregnant mothers who developed PE later in pregnancy (n = 33). The plasma samples were subjected to alkaline hydrolysis followed by liquid-liquid extraction to extract total F2-isoPs for later quantification by HPLC-MS/MS. The F2-isoPs were normalized to either plasma volume or polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) levels measured by GC-FID in plasma phospholipids. Early in pregnancy, only the class VI F2-isoP isomers were found at concentrations significantly higher in women developing PE later in pregnancy (+13%; p = 0.0074). Normalization of F2-isoPs to their substrate, AA, or the omega-3 to omega-6 ratio improved the predictability of PE as determined by receiver operating characteristic (from area under the curve of 0.67 to 0.68 and 0.70 respectively). Interestingly, omega-3 fatty acids were 25% higher in the control group than in the PE group (P = 0.0225). Omega-6 PUFAs correlated with F2-Isop isomers only in cases of PE (r > 0.377; P >0.03, Spearman correlation). In sum, this study indicates that specific isomers of class VI are significant predictors of PE. This work also suggests that F2-isoP isomers are not all generated and eliminated to the same extent and are influenced by the

  12. Morphological classification of nuchal skin in human fetuses with trisomy 21, 18, and 13 at 12-18 weeks and in a trisomy 16 mouse.

    PubMed

    von Kaisenberg, C S; Krenn, V; Ludwig, M; Nicolaides, K H; Brand-Saberi, B

    1998-02-01

    An increase in the nuchal translucency that can be detected at 10-14 weeks of gestation by ultrasound forms the basis for a screening test for chromosomal abnormality. Several mechanisms leading to this increase in skin thickness have been proposed, including changes of the extracellular matrix, cardiac defects and abnormalities of the large vessels. This study examines the composition of the extracellular matrix of the skin in gestational age-matched fetuses with trisomy 21, 18 and 13 from 12-18 weeks. Immunohistochemistry was applied with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against collagen type I, III, IV, V and VI and against laminin and fibronectin. Collagen type VI gene expression was further studied by in situ hybridization to detect differences in expression patterns of COL6A1, COL6A3 and COL1A1 between normal fetuses and those with trisomy 21. The ultrastructure of tissue samples was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and additionally by immunogold TEM. Further, we examined the morphology of the skin in an animal model for Down's syndrome, the murine trisomy 16, by light and TEM. The dermis of trisomy 21 fetuses was richer in collagen type VI than that of normal fetuses and other trisomies, and COL6A1, located on chromosome 21, was expressed in a wider area than COL6A3, which is located on chromosome 2. Collagen type I was less abundant in the skin of trisomy 18 fetuses, while the skin of all three trisomies contained a dense network of collagen type III and V in comparison with normal fetuses. Collagen type IV, of which two genes are located on chromosome 13, was expressed in the basement membranes of the skin in all fetuses and additionally in the dermal fibroblasts only of trisomy 13 fetuses. Likewise, laminin was present in all basement membranes of normal and trisomic fetuses as well as in dermal fibroblasts of fetuses with trisomy 18. LAMA1 and LAMA3 genes are located on chromosome 18. Dermal cysts were found in the skin of trisomy 18

  13. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 394: Areas 12, 18, and 29 Spill/Release Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the September 2003, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 394: Areas 12, 18, and 29 Spill/Release Sites as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS 12-25-04, UST 12-16-2 Waste Oil Release • CAS 18-25-01, Oil Spills • CAS 18-25-02, Oil Spills • CAS 18-25-03, Oil Spill • CAS 29-44-01, Fuel Spill These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the

  14. [A self-improvement and participatory career development education program involving internships and volunteer training experience for pharmacy students: results verified in a follow-up survey three years after participation].

    PubMed

    Kurio, Wasako; Konishi, Motomi; Okuno, Tomofumi; Nakao, Teruyuki; Kimura, Tomoki; Tsuji, Takumi; Yamamuro, Akiko; Yamamoto, Yumi; Nishikawa, Tomoe; Yanada, Kazuo; Yasuhara, Tomohisa; Kohno, Takeyuki; Ogita, Kiyokazu; Sone, Tomomichi

    2014-01-01

    The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Setsunan University, offers the Self-improvement and Participatory Career Development Education Program: Internship and Volunteer Training Experience for Pharmacy Students to third-year students. We previously reported that the training experience was effective in cultivating important attributes among students, such as a willingness to learn the aims of pharmacists, an awareness of their own role as healthcare workers, and a desire to reflect on their future careers and lives. A follow-up survey of the participants was carried out three years after the training experience. The questionnaire verified that the training experience affected attendance at subsequent lectures and course determination after graduation. We confirmed the relationship between the participants' degree of satisfaction with the training experience and increased motivation for attending subsequent lectures. Through the training experience, participants discovered future targets and subjects of study. In addition, they became more interested in subsequent classroom lessons and their future. The greater the participants' degree of satisfaction with their training experience, the more interest they took in practical training and future courses. The present study clarified that the training experience was effective in cultivating important attributes such as a willingness to learn and an interest in future courses. Moreover, the training positively affected the course determination after graduation. PMID:25366917

  15. Improving Students' Participation in Active Learning Methods: Group Discussions, Presentations and Demonstrations: A Case of Madda Walabu University Second Year Tourism Management Students of 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesfaye, Sewnet; Berhanu, Kassegn

    2015-01-01

    Education is a means by which people develop and acquire knowledge, skills, values and attitudes. It paves the way for development and plays a vital role (serves as a catalyst) in bringing socio-cultural, economical, technological, political and environmental advancements. The general objective of this study was to improve Second Year Tourism…

  16. Potholes on the Road to College: High School Effects in Shaping Urban Students' Participation in College Application, Four-Year College Enrollment, and College Match

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roderick, Melissa; Coca, Vanessa; Nagaoka, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the extent to which indicators of the college-going climate of urban high schools are associated with students' application to, enrollment in, and choice among four-year colleges. The investigators examine two mechanisms by which high schools may shape college enrollment among low-income students in an urban school system:…

  17. "This Is the Beginning of My Life Educationally": Older (50+ Years) Working Class Adults' Participation in Higher Education in Scotland, through the Lens of Critical Educational Gerontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Chris

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on original research where the primary objective was to critically explore the learning experiences of older (50+ years) working class adults in the context of a new university. Semi-structured interviews with 10 older learners engaged in a range of study in a new university in the west of Scotland were utilised. This…

  18. Who Is Physically Active? Cultural Capital and Sports Participation from Adolescence to Middle Age--A 38-Year Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engstrom, Lars-Magnus

    2008-01-01

    Background: Many studies have found that there is a low-to-moderate association between exercise during adolescence and exercise habits in adulthood. A question that arises from these earlier studies, with a follow-up period of about five to 20 years, is how children's and adolescents' physical activity affects their inclination to exercise later…

  19. To What Extent Does Participation in Extracurricular Music Affect the Future Aspirations of 11-12-Year-Olds? A Small-Scale Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Eleanor

    2007-01-01

    I undertook this project as a 12-year-old student while studying research methods at the Children's Research Centre at the Open University. It has already been shown that doing music improves children's Mathematics and English scores. The aim of this study was to find out if it also raises the aspirations of the children taking part. A…

  20. Asking Questions about Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Ian; Flanagan, Bernie; Hogarth, Sylvia; Mountford, Paula; Philpott, Jenny

    2009-01-01

    We raise questions about young people's participation in light of findings from a project ("Democracy through Citizenship") funded by the Joseph Rowntree Reform Trust Limited, and managed by the Institute for Citizenship. Following a six-month feasibility study the project took place over a three-year period in one local authority in the north of…

  1. Katimavik Participant Information Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OPCAN, Montreal (Quebec).

    The guide provides prospective participants with an overview of Katimavik, a 9-month community volunteer service and learning program for 17- to 21-year-olds sponsored since 1977 by the Canadian Government. The guide describes the application process and computerized random selection procedures; work projects, which may range from building…

  2. Prevention of Filipino Youth Behavioral Health Disparities: Identifying Barriers and Facilitators to Participating in “Incredible Years,” an Evidence-Based Parenting Intervention, Los Angeles, California, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Nicole; Supan, Jocelyn; Kreutzer, Cary B.; Samson, Allan; Coffey, Dean M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Evidence-based interventions for training parents are proven to prevent onset and escalation of childhood mental health problems. However, participation in such programs is low, especially among hard-to-reach, underserved populations such as Filipino Americans. Filipinos, the largest Asian subgroup in California, have significant behavioral health disparities compared with non-Hispanic whites and other Asian subgroups. The purpose of this study was to learn about Filipinos’ barriers and facilitators to participating in “Incredible Years” (IY), a parenting program. Methods We conducted 4 focus groups in Los Angeles, California, in 2012; the groups consisted of 20 Filipino parents of children aged 6 to 12 years who recently completed the IY parenting program, which was offered as a prevention workshop. Three reviewers, including two co-authors (A.S., J.J.) and a research assistant used content analysis to independently code the interview transcripts and extract subthemes. Grounded theory analytic methods were used to analyze interview transcripts. Results Parents’ perceived benefits of participation in IY were learning more effective parenting techniques, networking with other parents, improved spousal relationships, and improvements in their children's behavior. Parents’ most common motivating factor for enrollment in IY was to improve their parenting skills and their relationships with their children. The most common barriers to participation were being uncomfortable sharing problems with others and the fear of being stigmatized by others judging their parenting skills. Participants said that parent testimonials would be the most effective way to promote IY. Many recommended outreach at schools, pediatricians’ offices, and churches. Conclusion Increasing Filipino American parent enrollment in IY in culturally relevant ways will reduce the incidence of mental health disorders among children in this growing population. PMID:26491813

  3. The Impact of Freshman Year Learning Community Participation on Students' Self-Reported Sense of Meaning in Life, Academic Self-Efficacy and Commitment to Academic Major at the Beginning of the Second Academic Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruett, Karen Ann

    2011-01-01

    Student retention is one of the most studied areas in higher education. Much of the focus has been on providing services to aid in retention efforts from the first to the second academic year. Freshman seminar classes as well as learning community programs have become common on college campuses to provide students with the resources and support to…

  4. The International Youth Year "Participation, Development, Peace."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceausescu, Nicu

    1985-01-01

    Governments, decision makers, and international organizations must become more receptive to youth's ideas and endeavors to build a better, more just society and to stimulate their aspirations for a world of peace, understanding, and cooperation among nations. Youth organizations must make their efforts more conspicuous. (MSE)

  5. Effect of a 4-year workplace-based physical activity intervention program on the blood lipid profiles of participating employees: the high-risk and population strategy for occupational health promotion (HIPOP-OHP) study.

    PubMed

    Naito, Mariko; Nakayama, Takeo; Okamura, Tomonori; Miura, Katsuyuki; Yanagita, Masahiko; Fujieda, Yoshiharu; Kinoshita, Fujihisa; Naito, Yoshihiko; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Tanaka, Taichiro; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2008-04-01

    Individuals who are physically fit or engage in regular physical activity have a lower incidence of cardiovascular disease and risk of mortality. We conducted a large-scale controlled trial of interventions to decrease cardiovascular risk factors, during which we assessed the effect of a workplace-based intervention program, which was part of a population strategy for promoting long-term increases in physical activity, on the blood lipid profiles of participating employees. Data were collected from 2929 participants and this report presents the results of a survey conducted in five factories for the intervention group and five factories for the control group at baseline and year 5. The absolute/proportional changes in HDL-cholesterol were 2.7 mg/dL (4.8%) in the intervention group and -0.6 mg/dL (-1.0%) in the control group. The differences between the two groups in the change in serum levels of HDL-cholesterol were highly significant (p<0.001) in each analysis of covariance, in which the number of cigarettes smoked was included or excluded. In the intervention group, the daily walking time increased significantly (p<0.001) when compared between baseline and year 5, whereas no significant difference was observed in daily walking time in the control group over the identical period. Our results show that an intervention program promoting physical activity raises serum HDL-cholesterol levels of middle-aged employees. Increased awareness of the benefits of physical activity, using environmental rearrangement and health promotion campaigns, which especially target walking, may have contributed to a beneficial change in serum HDL-cholesterol levels in the participants. PMID:17868680

  6. Sex and the city: Differences in disease- and disability-free life years, and active community participation of elderly men and women in 7 cities in Latin America and the Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Angela MC; Hennis, Anselm J; Hambleton, Ian R

    2008-01-01

    Background The world's population is ageing, and four of the top 10 most rapidly ageing developing nations are from the region of Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). Although an ageing population heralds likely increases in chronic disease, disability-related dependence, and economic burden, the societal contribution of the chronically ill or those with disability is not often measured. Methods We calculated country-specific prevalences of 'disability' (difficulty with at least one activity of daily living), 'disease' and 'co-morbidity' (presence of at least one, and at least two, of seven chronic diseases/conditions, respectively), and 'active community engagement' (using five levels of community participation, from less than weekly community contact to voluntary or paid work) in seven LAC cities. We estimated remaining life expectancy (LE) with and without disability, disease and co-morbidity, and investigated age, sex, and regional variations in disability-free LE. Finally, we modeled the association of disease, co-morbidity and disability with active community participation using an ordinal regression model, adjusted for depression. Results Overall, 77% of the LAC elderly had at least one chronic disease/condition, 44% had co-morbidity and 19% had a disability. The proportion of disability-free LE declined between the youngest (60–64 years) and the eldest (90 years and over) age-groups for both men (from 85% to 55%) and women (from 75% to 45%). Disease-free and co-morbidity-free LE, however, remained at approximately 30% and 62%, respectively, for men (20% and 48% for women), until 80–84 years of age, then increased. Only Bridgetown's participants had statistically significantly longer disability-free LE than the regional average (IRR = 1.08; 95%CI 1.05–1.10; p < 0.001). Only Santiago's participants had disability-free LE which was shorter than the regional average (IRR = 0.94; 95%CI 0.92–0.97; p < 0.001). There was 75% active community participation

  7. Food-related behavior and intake of adult main meal preparers of 9-10 year-old children participating in iCook 4-H: A five-state childhood obesity prevention pilot study.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ashley; Franzen-Castle, Lisa; Aguirre, Trina; Krehbiel, Michelle; Colby, Sarah; Kattelmann, Kendra; Olfert, Melissa D; Mathews, Douglas; White, Adrienne

    2016-06-01

    It is important to understand adult outcomes in childhood obesity prevention programs as parents and caregivers have a significant influence on the eating and physical activity habits of youth. Grounded in the social cognitive theory, the iCook 4-H study was centered on a dyad model (9-10 year-olds and their primary meal preparers) to teach healthy cooking skills, shopping and meal habits, and being active as a family. The program took place in five states and dyads (n = 54) were recruited through flyers, e-mails, and in-person contact. The focus of this article is to provide findings from adult program participants. Demographics and self-reported food intake, procurement, preparation and safety practices, feeding relationships, mealtime routines, and height and weight were collected through surveys at baseline and program completion, which spanned 3 months. Descriptive statistics including two-related samples tests and paired samples t tests were used to assess pre- and post-program survey data responses at p < 0.05 significance level. Most had a bachelor's degree (31%) or some college (29%), about half were white, 66% were married, about 30% of households participated in assistance programs, and 82% were female. At program conclusion, participants significantly improved meal planning, prioritizing healthy meal choices, shopping with a grocery list, and reading Nutrition Facts Labels. There were also significant, positive differences noted in cooking skill confidence (p = 0.015), desire to cook more meals at home, and fewer fast food meals. Adult-youth feeding interactions also significantly improved. There were also significant increases in fruit juice (100%), vegetable soup, and whole grain consumption. Based on results, adults reported improvements in meal planning, cooking, and purchasing skills that were taught in classes. PMID:26970294

  8. 19 CFR 12.18 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... separate container of such virus, serum, toxin, or analogous product imported is required by the regulations of the Department of Agriculture to bear the true name of the product and the permit number... product with the records of preparation thereof, together with a return date....

  9. 19 CFR 12.18 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... separate container of such virus, serum, toxin, or analogous product imported is required by the regulations of the Department of Agriculture to bear the true name of the product and the permit number... product with the records of preparation thereof, together with a return date....

  10. 19 CFR 12.18 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... separate container of such virus, serum, toxin, or analogous product imported is required by the regulations of the Department of Agriculture to bear the true name of the product and the permit number... product with the records of preparation thereof, together with a return date....

  11. 19 CFR 12.18 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... separate container of such virus, serum, toxin, or analogous product imported is required by the regulations of the Department of Agriculture to bear the true name of the product and the permit number... product with the records of preparation thereof, together with a return date....

  12. [Women's participation in science].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Guzmán, María Alejandra; Corona-Vázquez, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    The participation of women in higher education in Mexico took place in the late 19th and early 20th century. The rise of women's enrollment in universities known as the "feminization of enrollment" occurred in the last thirty years. In this review we analyze how the new conditions that facilitated better access to higher education are reflected in the inclusion of women in science. We include an overview of the issues associated with a change in the demographics of enrollment, segregation of academic areas between men and women and participation in post graduate degrees. We also review the proportion of women in science. While in higher education the ratio between male and women is almost 50-50 and in some areas the presence of women is even higher, in the field of scientific research women account for barely 30% of professionals. This is largely due to structural conditions that limit the access of women to higher positions of power that have been predominantly taken by men. PMID:19256415

  13. Women's Participation in Academic Conferences in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eden, Devorah

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the participation of women in academic conferences in Israel, a country in which women are under-represented in academia vertically and horizontally. Data were retrieved from announcements of academic conferences in Israel, for one academic year, covering 56 conferences that attracted 997 participants. Participation was…

  14. Encouraging Undergraduate Class Participation: A Student Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Nichole S.; Gragg, Marcia N.; Cramer, Kenneth M.

    2009-01-01

    Undergraduate classes typically involve a professor lecturing to 100 or more students. Too often, this results in minimal opportunities for student participation. Positive reinforcement was used to promote student participation (i.e., defined as relevant comments or questions) in a second-year psychology class (N = 97). Class participation was…

  15. [Discussion paper participation research].

    PubMed

    Farin, Erik

    2012-12-01

    This contribution introduces the "Diskussionspapier Teilhabeforschung" (discussion paper participation research) of the German Association for Rehabilitation (DVfR) and German Society for Rehabilitation Science (DGRW). The aim of this paper is to more clearly define current scientific research activity on the subject of participation and the significance of interdisciplinary participation research. The authors emphasise the desirability of a stronger scientific basis for instruments designed to improve the participation of disabled individuals. The paper is meant to be understood as an initial basis for the discussion about participation research development, and the authors are open to suggestions and elaboration.Participation research is understood in this discussion paper as an interdisciplinary research field with 7 goals and characteristics: 1. focussing on participation and self-determination; 2. contextual approach (taking environmental and personal factors into consideration that affect participation); 3. the participation of disabled persons in participation research; 4. interdisciplinary cooperation; 5. involving organisations and institutions whose approaches to participation research overlap; 6. referring to social and healthcare policies; 7. national and international orientations.The authors discuss the rationale behind increasing the support for participation research and theoretical models thereof. Fundamental concepts with high relevance to participation research include the biopsychosocial model of the International Classification of Functionality, Disability and Health (ICF), the inclusion concept, empowerment concept, and capabilities concept. The authors conclude their paper with recommendations for strengthening the research funding for participation research, and specify concrete steps toward greater participation research. PMID:23235948

  16. Learning Participation as Systems Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ison, Ray; Blackmore, Chris; Armson, Rosalind

    2007-01-01

    Learning participation only makes sense if it is purposeful. From our perspective its primary purpose is to achieve more effective managing in situations of complexity and change. We describe our evolving understandings and practices (a praxeology) for Systems Practice for managing complexity, built on 30 years of developing supported open…

  17. Federal participation in LEED

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Christopher; Dyer, Beverly

    2004-11-10

    The federal government has been an active participant in the development and use of USGBC's Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design Green Building Rating System (LEED). This paper presents a review of this participation and some expectations for ongoing partnership.

  18. Promoting People's Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Colin

    1981-01-01

    Discusses problems associated with communication in rural areas to promote participation in development programs. Suggests that success of such programs depends on continued government policy in favor of citizen participation in agricultural and rural development. (SK)

  19. Facilitating Active Learner Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Steven; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Project Participate has developed and implemented a model for making decisions about interventions that enhance the ability of a preschool child with severe motor disabilities to actively participate in educational programs. The effectiveness of the process in increasing child participation in play, communication, social interaction, and mobility…

  20. Reproductive Health CHOICES for Young Adults with Sickle Cell Disease or Trait: Randomized Controlled Trial Outcomes over Two Years.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Agatha M; Wilkie, Diana J; Yao, Yingwei; Molokie, Robert E; Stahl, Christiane; Hershberger, Patricia E; Zhao, Zhongsheng; Suarez, Marie L; Johnson, Bonnye; Angulo, Rigoberto; Carrasco, Jesus; Angulo, Veronica; Thompson, Alexis A

    2016-04-01

    Interventions to assist reproductive health decision-making in populations affected by sickle cell disease (SCD) or trait (SCT) lack proven efficacy over time. Our aim was to compare effects of CHOICES, a Web-based multimedia education program on implementing informed reproductive plans, and usual care education (e-Book) on reproductive knowledge, intention, and behavior over 24 months. We randomized 234 participants with SCD (n = 138) or SCT (n = 96) (age 18-35 years, 35 % male, 94 % African American) to CHOICES and e-Book groups. Participants completed a sickle cell-specific reproductive measure before and four times after the intervention (6, 12, 18 and 24 months). Compared to the e-Book group the CHOICES group had significantly more improvement in knowledge over time (p = .004) but not intention (p = .18) or behavior (p = .69). At baseline, 114 (48.7 %) participants reported having partners who would not put the couple at risk for their children inheriting SCD. Of the 116 (49.6 %) at-risk participants, a higher poroportion of those who were in the CHOICES group chose partners that reduced their risk by the last visit than the e-Book group (p = .04). Study findings provide important insights for designing a national trial of the CHOICES intervention focusing on subjects whose partner status puts them at risk for having a child with SCD. PMID:26310871

  1. Later Academic Achievements of Child Development Program Participants: A Longitudinal Study of the South Carolina Early Childhood Development Program for Four-Year-Olds, from 1995-96 to 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Wei; Hearn, Cynthia

    Educators know that quality early childhood intervention programs servicing children at risk for early school failure have immediate or short-term positive effects. However, there are different opinions on the persistence of long-term program effects on participants' academic performances. This study compared the performance on standardized tests…

  2. Steamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan For Corrective Action Unit 394: Areas 12, 18, and 29, Spill/Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (November 2001, Rev. 0)

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office

    2001-09-24

    This plan addresses the actions necessary for the characterization and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 394: Areas 12, 18, and 29, Spill/Release Sites, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The CAU, located on the Nevada Test Site, consists of six Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 12-25-04, UST 12-16-2 Waste Oil Release; CAS 18-25-02, Oil Spills; CAS 18-25-02, Oil Spills; CAS 18-25-03, Oil Spill; CAS 18-25-04, Spill (Diesel Fuel); CAS 29-44-01, Fuel Spill (a & b). Process knowledge is the basis for the development of the conceptual site models (CSMs). The CSMs describe the most probable scenario for current conditions at each site, and define the assumptions that are the basis for the SAFER plan. The assumptions are formulated from historical information and process knowledge. Vertical migration of contaminant(s) of potential concern (COPCs) is expected to be predominant over lateral migration in the absence of any barrier (with asphalt /concrete being the exception at least two of the CASs). Soil is the impacted or potentially impacted media at all the sites, with asphalt and/or concrete potentially impacted at two of the CASs. Radionuclides are not expected at any CAS; hydrocarbons are the primary COPC at each CAS, and can be used to guide the investigation; future land-use scenarios limit use to various nonresidential uses; and exposure scenarios are limited by future land-use scenarios to site workers. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 394 using the SAFER process. On completion of the field activities, a Closure Report will be prepared and submitted to the NDEP for review and approval.

  3. Patterns of public participation.

    PubMed

    Slutsky, Jean; Tumilty, Emma; Max, Catherine; Lu, Lanting; Tantivess, Sripen; Hauegen, Renata Curi; Whitty, Jennifer A; Weale, Albert; Pearson, Steven D; Tugendhaft, Aviva; Wang, Hufeng; Staniszewska, Sophie; Weerasuriya, Krisantha; Ahn, Jeonghoon; Cubillos, Leonardo

    2016-08-15

    Purpose - The paper summarizes data from 12 countries, chosen to exhibit wide variation, on the role and place of public participation in the setting of priorities. The purpose of this paper is to exhibit cross-national patterns in respect of public participation, linking those differences to institutional features of the countries concerned. Design/methodology/approach - The approach is an example of case-orientated qualitative assessment of participation practices. It derives its data from the presentation of country case studies by experts on each system. The country cases are located within the historical development of democracy in each country. Findings - Patterns of participation are widely variable. Participation that is effective through routinized institutional processes appears to be inversely related to contestatory participation that uses political mobilization to challenge the legitimacy of the priority setting process. No system has resolved the conceptual ambiguities that are implicit in the idea of public participation. Originality/value - The paper draws on a unique collection of country case studies in participatory practice in prioritization, supplementing existing published sources. In showing that contestatory participation plays an important role in a sub-set of these countries it makes an important contribution to the field because it broadens the debate about public participation in priority setting beyond the use of minipublics and the observation of public representatives on decision-making bodies. PMID:27468773

  4. EDUCATIONAL PARTICIPATION AND INNOVATIVENESS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AVERILL, THOMAS B.

    FARMERS WERE CLASSIFIED INTO FOUR GROUPS ACCORDING TO THEIR TENDENCY TO ADOPT FARM PRACTICE INNOVATIONS. PARTICIPATION IN EDUCATIVE ACTIVITIES WAS POSTULATED TO BE RELATED TO THEIR OPENNESS TO NEW IDEAS AND PRACTICES. A STRUCTURED INTERVIEW SCHEDULE WAS USED TO DETERMINE THE FARMERS' PARTICIPATION IN EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES--READING BOOKS AND…

  5. Colloquium Participants Speak.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chafe, Joanne

    1996-01-01

    Presents a summary and interpretation of responses from the participants of the Catholic-Jewish Colloquium. The participants reflect on a number of issues including the changing nature of the relationship between Judaism and Christianity, the rationale and impact of this changed relationship, the particular elements involved in the…

  6. Natural History and Galsulfase Treatment in Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI, Maroteaux-Lamy Syndrome) — 10 Year Follow-up of Patients Who Previously Participated in an MPS VI Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    Giugliani, Roberto; Lampe, Christina; Guffon, Nathalie; Ketteridge, David; Teles, Elisa Leão; Wraith, James E.; Jones, Simon A; Piscia-Nichols, Cheri; Lin, Ping; Quartel, Adrian; Harmatz, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is a clinically heterogeneous and progressive disorder with multiorgan manifestations caused by deficient N-acetlylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase activity. A cross-sectional Survey Study in individuals (n=121) affected with MPS VI was conducted between 2001–2002 to establish demographics, urinary glycosaminoglycan (GAG) levels, and clinical progression of disease. We conducted a Resurvey Study (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01387854) to obtain 10-year follow-up data, including medical histories and clinical assessments (n=59), and survival status over 12-years (n=117). Patients received a mean (SD) of 6.8 (2.2) years of galsulfase ERT between baseline (Survey Study) and follow-up. ERT patients increased in height by 20.4 cm in the 4–7 year-old baseline age group and by 16.8 cm in the 8–12 year-old baseline age group. ERT patients <13 years old demonstrated improvement in forced vital capacity (FVC) by 68% and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) by 55%, and those ≥13 years old increased FVC by 12.8% and maintained FEV1. Patients with >200 µg/mg baseline uGAG levels increased FVC by 48% in the <13 year-old and by 15% in the ≥13 year-old baseline age group. ERT patients who completed the 6-minute walk test demonstrated a mean (SD) increase of 65.7 (100.6) m. Cardiac outcomes did not significantly improve or worsen. Observed mortality rate among naïve patients was 50% (7/14) and 16.5% (17/103) in the ERT group (unadjusted hazard ratio, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.10 to 0.59). Long-term galsulfase ERT was associated with improvements in pulmonary functions and endurance, stabilized cardiac function and increased survival. PMID:24764221

  7. Intakes of (n-3) fatty acids and fatty fish are not associated with cognitive performance and 6-year cognitive change in men participating in the Veterans Affairs Normative Aging Study.

    PubMed

    van de Rest, Ondine; Spiro, Avron; Krall-Kaye, Elizabeth; Geleijnse, Johanna M; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; Tucker, Katherine L

    2009-12-01

    High intake of fish and (n-3) PUFA may protect against age-related cognitive decline. However, results are inconsistent and limited data exist regarding changes in multiple cognitive functions over a longer period of time. In this study, we assessed the association between fatty fish intake as well as (n-3) PUFA intake with cognitive performance and cognitive change over 6 y in 1025 elderly men. Participants were from the Veterans Affairs Normative Aging Study. Cognitive function was assessed with a battery of cognitive tests focusing on factors representing memory/language, speed, and visuospatial/attention. Dietary intakes were assessed with a validated FFQ. We used general linear models to assess cross-sectional associations and mixed models to assess the associations over time. Models were adjusted for age, education, BMI, smoking, diabetes, and intake of alcohol, saturated fat, vitamin C, and vitamin E. The mean age of participating men was 68 y at baseline. Median fish consumption ranged from 0.2 to 4.2 servings/wk across quartiles. Cross-sectional analyses showed no association between fatty fish or (n-3) PUFA intake and cognitive performance. Longitudinal analyses, over 6 y of follow-up, also did not show any significant associations between fatty fish or (n-3) PUFA intake and cognitive change. In this population of elderly men, intake of neither fatty fish nor (n-3) PUFA was associated with cognitive performance. PMID:19828689

  8. Maximizing Classroom Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englander, Karen

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how to maximize classroom participation in the English-as-a-Second-or-Foreign-Language classroom, and provides a classroom discussion method that is based on real-life problem solving. (Author/VWL)

  9. Clinical Trials - Participants

    MedlinePlus

    ... participating in was reviewed by an IRB. Further Reading For more information about research protections, see: Office ... data and decide whether the results have medical importance. Results from clinical trials are often published in ...

  10. Public Participation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The purpose of this Public Participation Plan is to describe the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) plan for involving the public in the decision-making process for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The plan describes how the DOE will meet the public participation requirements of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, as amended, and of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. It includes the UMTRA Project Office plans for complying with DOE Order 5440.1D and for implementing the DOE`s Public Participation Policy for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (1992) and Public Participation Guidance for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (1993).

  11. 26 CFR 1.469-5 - Material participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Material participation. 1.469-5 Section 1.469-5...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxable Year for Which Deductions Taken § 1.469-5 Material participation. (a)-(e... year of the taxpayer. (i) (j) Material participation for preceding taxable years—(1) In general....

  12. 26 CFR 1.469-5 - Material participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Material participation. 1.469-5 Section 1.469-5...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxable Year for Which Deductions Taken § 1.469-5 Material participation. (a)-(e... year of the taxpayer. (i) (j) Material participation for preceding taxable years—(1) In general....

  13. 26 CFR 1.469-5 - Material participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Material participation. 1.469-5 Section 1.469-5...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxable Year for Which Deductions Taken § 1.469-5 Material participation. (a)-(e... year of the taxpayer. (i) (j) Material participation for preceding taxable years—(1) In general....

  14. Effects of solvation on the spin state of iron(III) in 2,8,12,18-tetrabutyl-3,7,13,17-tetramethyl-5,10-diazaporphyrinatoiron(III) chloride.

    PubMed

    Stuzhin, Pavel A; Nefedov, Sergei E; Kumeev, Roman S; Ul-Haq, Anwar; Minin, Vadim V; Ivanova, Svetlana S

    2010-06-01

    The chloroiron(III) complex of 2,8,12,18-tetrabutyl-3,7,13,17-tetramethyl-5,10-diazaporphyrin, [(Cl)FeMBDAP], was prepared and studied by X-ray crystallography and by solution (1)H NMR and UV-vis measurements. In the crystal structure of hemisolvate [(Cl)FeMBDAP] x 0.5CHCl(3), two nonequivalent [(Cl)FeMBDAP] units containing Fe1 and Fe2 are arranged in pi-dimers with considerable overlap on their concave sides. Axial chloride bonded to Fe2 is solvated by hydrogen bonding with CHCl(3). Parameters of the coordination pyramid have typical values for the spin-mixed (S = 3/2 / 5/2) Fe(III) complexes in the case of Fe1 and are characteristic for the pure intermediate-spin state for Fe2 (displacement from the (N(Pyr))(4) planes - 0.385 and 0.290 A and the average N(Pyr)-Fe bond lengths -1.992 and 1.954 A for Fe1 and Fe2, respectively). Effective magnetic moments in CHCl(3) and CH(2)Cl(2) capable of specific solvation of chloride by hydrogen bonding (4.5-4.6 micro(B) at 298 K) are indicative about mixed intermediate/high-spin state S = 3/2 / 5/2, with the S = 3/2 contribution increasing upon lowering of the temperature (4.02 micro(B) in CD(2)Cl(2) at 193 K). In nonsolvating CCl(4), C(6)D(6), and THF-d(8), the mu(eff) values are consistent with the predominantly high-spin state at ambient temperature (5.5-5.75 micro(B) at 298 K) and almost pure S = 5/2 state at low temperature (ca. 5.9 micro(B) in THF-d(8) below 270 K). Downfield isotropic shifts from 35 to 50 ppm are observed for alpha-alkyl protons and upfield shifts from -5 to -15 ppm for meso-CH protons, which is characteristic for the presence of the intermediate-spin state. The splitting of signals of the diastereotopic alpha-CH(2) protons is increased with growth of the S = 3/2 state contribution from 1.5 to 4 ppm in nonsolvating to 11 ppm in specifically solvating solvents at 298 K and further to 31 ppm at 193 K (in CD(2)Cl(2)). In the presence of DMSO addition and in methanol solution, the single CH(2) signal is

  15. Coordination and citizen participation.

    PubMed

    Tucker, D J

    1980-03-01

    This study investigates the validity of the assumption that coordination and citizen participation are related inversely and, thus, are incompatible as features in the same social service reform strategy. Seventeen social service organizations situated in the same urban area were studied. Data were obtained by structured interview. The concepts of coordination and citizen participation were operationalized by means of scales. The findings support the validity of the assumption noted above. Although interpretations of the findings can be provided, they are post-factum. This implies a need for explanatory research which might be guided by theories of community power structure and of organizational behavior. PMID:10246483

  16. Analysis of operator participation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarakovskiy, G. M.; Zinchenko, V. P.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of providing a psychological conception of the analysis of operator participation in a form that will allow the qualitative approach to be combined with the quantitative approach is examined. This conception is based on an understanding of the essence of human endeavor in automated control systems that now determine the development of society's productive forces and that are the main object of ergonomic research. Two main types of operator participation were examined; information retrieval with immediate service and information retrieval with delayed service.

  17. 29 CFR 4044.55 - XRA when a participant must retire to receive a benefit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... calendar year in which the participant reaches unreduced retirement age (“URA”); (3) The participant's URA... benefit determined under paragraph (b)(1) of this section and the year in which the participant...

  18. Glycation and Carboxymethyllysine Levels in Skin Collagen Predict the Risk of Future 10-Year Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy and Nephropathy in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial and Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications Participants With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Genuth, Saul; Sun, Wanjie; Cleary, Patricia; Sell, David R.; Dahms, William; Malone, John; Sivitz, William; Monnier, Vincent M.

    2009-01-01

    Several mechanistic pathways linking hyperglycemia to diabetes complications, including glycation of proteins and formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), have been proposed. We investigated the hypothesis that skin collagen glycation and AGEs predict the risk of progression of microvascular disease. We measured glycation products in the skin collagen of 211 Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) volunteers in 1992 who continued to be followed in the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications study for 10 years. We determined whether the earlier measurements of glycated collagen and AGE levels correlated with the risk of progression of retinopathy and nephropathy from the end of the DCCT to 10 years later. In multivariate analyses, the combination of furosine (glycated collagen) and carboxymethyllysine (CML) predicted the progression of retinopathy (χ2 = 59.4, P < 0.0001) and nephropathy (χ2 = 18.2, P = 0.0001), even after adjustment for mean HbA1c (A1C) (χ2 = 32.7, P < 0.0001 for retinopathy) and (χ2 = 12.8, P = 0.0016 for nephropathy). The predictive effect of A1C vanished after adjustment for furosine and CML (χ2 = 0.0002, P = 0.987 for retinopathy and χ2 = 0.0002, P = 0.964 for nephropathy). Furosine explained more of the variation in the 10-year progression of retinopathy and nephropathy than did CML. These results strengthen the role of glycation of proteins and AGE formation in the pathogenesis of retinopathy and nephropathy. Glycation and subsequent AGE formation may explain the risk of these complications associated with prior A1C and provide a rational basis for the phenomenon of “metabolic memory” in the pathogenesis of these diabetes complications. PMID:16249432

  19. Partial Participation Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Dianne L.; Baumgart, Diane

    1991-01-01

    This article reanalyzes the principle of partial participation in integrated educational programing for students with severe or profound disabilities. The article presents four "error patterns" in how the concept has been used, some reasons why such error patterns have occurred, and strategies for avoiding these errors. (Author/JDD)

  20. Increasing Participation through Differentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christenson, Bridget; Wager, Anita A.

    2012-01-01

    One of the many challenges teachers face is trying to differentiate instruction so all students have equal opportunities to participate, learn, and engage. To provide guidelines for differentiated instruction in mathematics, staff from the Madison Metropolitan School District in Wisconsin created a pedagogical framework for teaching called…

  1. Communication Games: Participant's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krupar, Karen R.

    Using a series of communicational games, the author leads the participant through self-awareness, verbal and nonverbal communication, decision-making, problem-solving, and skills in perception, listening, and small group, organizational, and cultural communications. The thesis behind the book is that model-making, role-playing, or other forms of…

  2. Narrowing Participation Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Victoria; Kirtley, Karmen; Matassa, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Shrinking the achievement gap in mathematics is a tall order. One way to approach this challenge is to think about how the achievement gap manifests itself in the classroom and take concrete action. For example, opportunities to participate in activities that involve mathematical reasoning and argumentation in a safe and supportive manner are…

  3. Widening Participation; Widening Capability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Melanie

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes that widening participation in higher education might distinctively be conceptualised beyond economically driven human capital outcomes, as a matter of widening capability. Specifically, the paper proposes forming the capability of students to become and to be "strong evaluators", able to make reflexive and informed choices…

  4. Long-Term Stability of Social Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyyppa, Markku T.; Maki, Juhani; Alanen, Erkki; Impivaara, Olli; Aromaa, Arpo

    2008-01-01

    The long-term stability of social participation was investigated in a representative urban population of 415 men and 579 women who had taken part in the nationwide Mini-Finland Health Survey in the years 1978-1980 and were re-examined 20 years later. Stability was assessed by means of the following tracking coefficients: kappa, proportion of…

  5. Nova Survey participation requested

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-03-01

    The AAVSO solicits participation in an online nova survey from our member and observer communities. The survey is being conducted in advance of an upcoming long-term observing campaign that will be launched in mid-April 2013. We are seeking participation in this survey from as broad a sample of the AAVSO community as possible, and your responses will help us gauge the effectiveness of the campaign and serve the observer community better. The survey may be completed anonymously, but you will have the option of providing us with your name and AAVSO observer code if you choose. Please visit the following website to complete the survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ZQHDYWB. The survey should take no more than five minutes to complete. We ask that you complete the survey by Monday, April 15, 2013.

  6. National, regional, and global trends in body mass index since 1980: Systematic analysis of health examination surveys and epidemiological studies with 960 country-years and 9.1 million participants

    PubMed Central

    Finucane, Mariel M; Stevens, Gretchen A; Cowan, Melanie; Danaei, Goodarz; Lin, John K; Paciorek, Christopher J; Singh, Gitanjali M; Gutierrez, Hialy R; Lu, Yuan; Bahalim, Adil N; Farzadfar, Farshad; Riley, Leanne M; Ezzati, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Rising body weight is a major public health concern. However there have been few worldwide comparative analyses of long-term trends of body mass index (BMI), and none that have used recent national health examination surveys. Methods We estimated trends in mean in BMI and their uncertainties for adults 20 years of age and older in 199 countries and territories. Data were from published and unpublished health examination surveys and epidemiologic studies. For each sex, we used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate BMI by age, country, and year, accounting for whether a given study was nationally representative. Findings Between 1980 and 2008, global mean BMI increased at an annualized rate of 0.4 (95% uncertainty interval 0.2, 0.6, posterior probability (PP) of being a true increase > 0.999) kg/m2/decade for men and 0.5 (0.3–0.7, PP > 0.999) for women. National BMI change for women ranged from non-significant declines in 19 countries to rising over 2.5 (PP > 0.999) kg/m2/decade in Tonga and Cook Islands. There was an increase in male BMI in all but a few countries, reaching over 2 kg/m2/decade in Nauru and Cook Islands, PP > 0.999. Male and female BMIs in 2008 were highest in some Oceania countries, reaching 33.9 (32.8, 35.0) kg/m2 (men) and 35.0 (33.6, 36.3) (women) in Nauru. Female BMI was lowest in Bangladesh (20.5; 19.8, 21.3) kg/m2 and male BMI in Democratic Republic of the Congo 19.9 (18.2, 21.5), with BMI also below 21.5 kg/m2 for both sexes in a few countries in sub-Saharan Africa, and East, South, and Southeast Asia. USA had the highest BMI among high-income countries, followed by New Zealand. In 2008, an estimated 1.47 billion adults worldwide had BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2; of these 205 (193, 217) million men and 297 (280, 315) million women were obese. Interpretation Globally, mean BMI increased since 1980. The trends since 1980, and mean population BMI in 2008, varied substantially across nations. Interventions and policies that can curb

  7. Reactions to Participating in Dating Violence Research: Are Our Questions Distressing Participants?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shorey, Ryan C.; Cornelius, Tara L.; Bell, Kathryn M.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increased research focus on dating violence, producing important information for reducing these violent relationships. Yet Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) are often hesitant to approve research on dating violence, citing emotional distress of participants as a possible risk of participation. However, no known…

  8. Sport participation motives of young Brazilian athletes.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Dartagnan P; Netto, Jose Evaristo S

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the motives for sport participation in a sample of young Brazilian athletes according to sex, age, and training history. A total of 1,517 participants (714 girls, 803 boys) ages 12 to 18 years were included in the study. The Portuguese version of the Participation Motivation Questionnaire was used to identify motives for sport participation. The most important motives were Skill Development and Fitness, whereas the least important were Fun and Achievement/Status. Sex, age, type of sport, onset of training, duration of training, training volume, and competitive experience significantly influenced the motives for sport participation reported by the athletes. These results will contribute to establish intervention programs designed to reduce sport dropout rates among young athletes. PMID:24665795

  9. A narrative approach to explore grief experiences and treatment adherence in people with chronic pain after participation in a pain-management program: a 6-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Dysvik, Elin; Natvig, Gerd Karin; Furnes, Bodil

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to explore grief caused by chronic pain and treatment adherence, and how these experiences are integrated into ongoing life stories. Methods A 6-year follow-up using a qualitative mixed-methods design based on written narratives and image narratives was performed. Five women suffering from chronic pain comprised the purposive sample. They had completed an 8-week group pain-management program with two follow-ups, and thereafter continued as a self-help group. A narrative approach was used to analyze the written and image narratives guided by three analytic steps. Results Findings showed that experiences of grief over time were commonly associated with chronic pain. The participants’ past experiences reflected their grief at having to abandon jobs and social networks, and revealed loneliness and despair. The present life situation seemed to reflect adaptation, and hope for the future had been established. Overall, forward progression means an ongoing struggle towards a reintegrated body and a meaningful life. Conclusion Through such narratives, health-care workers can identify treatment adherence related to grief and pain, and learn how people might regain their lives beyond using traditional interviews. PMID:23990710

  10. Recruiting and retaining indigenous farmworker participants.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, Stephanie; de Jesus Gonzalez, Carmen; Hall, Jennifer; Samples, Julie; Ventura, Santiago; Sanchez, Valentin; Shadbeh, Nargess

    2014-10-01

    There is limited information on the specific practices used to successfully recruit and retain indigenous and Latino farmworkers in research studies. This article describes the strategies used in a community-based participatory research project with indigenous agricultural workers. Participants were recruited through consulting with indigenous relatives and friends, identifying and meeting with indigenous leaders from hometown associations in countries of origin, and asking current participants to recruit fellow farmworkers. Adjustments were initiated to the second year protocol to enhance recruitment and retention. The difference in attrition rates between years one and two was statistically significant, a difference partially attributed to modifications to recruitment and retention protocol. Findings confirmed that active recruitment techniques and word-of-mouth recruitment were more effective than passive methods. Trust among academic, organization, and community partners, and shared language and culture between those doing the recruitment and the participants, contributed to sustained farmworker participation. PMID:23733354

  11. Recruiting and retaining indigenous farmworker participants

    PubMed Central

    Farquhar, Stephanie; de Jesus Gonzalez, Carmen; Hall, Jennifer; Samples, Julie; Ventura, Santiago; Sanchez, Valentin; Shadbeh, Nargess

    2013-01-01

    There is limited information on the specific practices used to successfully recruit and retain indigenous and Latino farmworkers in research studies. This article describes the strategies used in a community-based participatory research project with indigenous agricultural workers. Participants were recruited through consulting with indigenous relatives and friends, identifying and meeting with indigenous leaders from hometown associations in countries of origin, and asking current participants to recruit fellow farmworkers. Adjustments were initiated to the second year protocol to enhance recruitment and retention. The difference in attrition rates between years one and two was statistically significant, a difference partially attributed to modifications to recruitment and retention protocol. Findings confirmed that active recruitment techniques and word-of-mouth recruitment were more effective than passive methods. Trust among academic, organization, and community partners, and shared language and culture between those doing the recruitment and the participants, contributed to sustained farmworker participation. PMID:23733354

  12. Aviation Security Stakeholder Participation Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Tester, Jon [D-MT

    2013-12-11

    11/17/2014 Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 598. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.1204, which became Public Law 113-238 on 12/18/2014. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Cost-Savings Analysis of the Better Beginnings, Better Futures Community-Based Project for Young Children and Their Families: A 10-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ray DeV; Petrunka, Kelly; Khan, Shahriar; Howell-Moneta, Angela; Nelson, Geoffrey; Pancer, S Mark; Loomis, Colleen

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the long-term cost-savings of the Better Beginnings, Better Futures (BBBF) initiative, a community-based early intervention project for young children living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods during their transition to primary school. A quasi-experimental, longitudinal two-group design was used to compare costs and outcomes for children and families in three BBBF project neighborhoods (n = 401) and two comparison neighborhoods (n = 225). A cost-savings analysis was conducted using all project costs for providing up to 4 years of BBBF programs when children were in junior kindergarten (JK) (4 years old) to grade 2 (8 years old). Data on 19 government service cost measures were collected from the longitudinal research sample from the time the youth were in JK through to grade 12 (18 years old), 10 years after ending project participation. The average family incremental net savings to government of providing the BBBF project was $6331 in 2014 Canadian dollars. When the BBBF monetary return to government as a ratio of savings to costs was calculated, for every dollar invested by the government, a return of $2.50 per family was saved. Findings from this study have important implications for government investments in early interventions focused on a successful transition to primary school as well as parenting programs and community development initiatives in support of children's development. PMID:26319616

  14. Participation Training for Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergevin, Paul; McKinley, John

    Participation Training for Adult Education serves as a manual, guide, and resource for leaders and participants interested in establishing a program of adult learning called group-participation training. Goals emphasize participants learning about themselves as learners, how they relate to and can help others, and exploring the dynamics of a…

  15. Consumers: from perceptions to participation.

    PubMed

    Genovich-Richards, Joann; Wyzkiewicz, Judith V

    2002-01-01

    As Winston Churchill once said, "Personally, I am always ready to learn, although I don't always like being taught." In behavioral health, consumers can make important contributions to the design and evaluation of programs and services. As demonstrated by this case study, progress can be made in incremental steps, over several years. Another reason for BABH's success was progression from very concrete projects to an ongoing organizational structure that consumers could identify as providing a role in policy and procedure development, program evaluation, strategic planning, and programmatic changes. Performance improvement professionals, through their contributions to the organizational design of committees and communication structures, are in ideal positions to promote the full participation of consumers across all healthcare settings. Just imagine what could be achieved in understanding how to design systems if current issues and recent research results were routinely explored--such as those by Harrington et al. regarding Medicare beneficiary complaints (2001) and Gines et al. (2001) on chronic care and satisfaction with managed care--with a consistent group of consumers. Consider adding consumer participation as a new exciting goal in the next edition of your performance improvement and strategic plans! PMID:12432862

  16. Public participation in environmental issues

    SciTech Connect

    Pilot, J.

    1998-12-31

    The need for public participation in environmental issues has grown in the past five years. The Responsible Care{reg_sign} Program, developed by the chemical industry, as well as government requirements for citizens` input into regulatory review have initiated public committees for environmental management issues. This paper will discuss three programs that have been implemented in Ontario to assist in public participation in environmental issues covering the following: 1. Great Waste Management Debate held in co-operation with Government, Boards of Trade, Industry, and Youth; 2. Public Liaison committee for Ontario`s Resource Recovery -- Waste to Energy Facility operating in the Region of Peel, the role they have played in its operation with the community; and 3. Brampton Environmental Community Advisory Panel, initiated by the Brampton Chemical Association`s need under Responsible Care for a public program to address concern related to company`s environmental issues in the community. As Chair of all three Committees, the paper will cover the benefits of the committees for public input and review of environmental issues related to environmental management.

  17. Participation in Sports and Sociometric Status of Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadzic, Aleksandar; Vuckovic, Igor

    2009-01-01

    Study aim: To examine the relationships between sport participation and sociometric status of adolescent youths. Material and methods: A group of 359 secondary school students from central Serbia (143 male and 216 female) aged 16-19 years participated in the study. The subjects were given questionnaires pertaining to their participation in sports…

  18. 26 CFR 1.469-5 - Material participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Material participation. 1.469-5 Section 1.469-5...) INCOME TAXES Taxable Year for Which Deductions Taken § 1.469-5 Material participation. (a)-(e) (f... taxpayer. (i) (j) Material participation for preceding taxable years—(1) In general. For purposes of §...

  19. Researching participant recruitment times.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Rachel; Black, Polly

    2015-11-01

    Conducting research in emergency departments is relatively new, and there are a number of ethical and practical challenges to recruiting patients in these settings. In 2008, the Emergency Medicine Research Group Edinburgh (EMERGE) was set up at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh emergency department to support researchers and encourage the growth of research in emergency medicine. As part of a review of their working methods, the group's clinical nurse researchers undertook a small study to identify participant recruitment times. The results showed a significant difference between perceived and actual recruitment times, which has implications for planning staff numbers and budgets. This article describes the evaluation process and methods of data collection, and discusses the results. PMID:26542924

  20. Yough, literacy and participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillette, Arthur

    1985-12-01

    The number of illiterates in the world continues to grow. Simultaneously, there are few if any literacy efforts in the world today that do not depend upon the energies and skills (and sometimes ideas) of young people. Youth's participation in the provision of literacy, in some industrialized as well as in many developing countries, is classified according to three patterns: the project pattern, the programme pattern, and the campaign pattern. The project pattern is not seen to hold out the prospect of enabling youth to make serious inroads into growing illiteracy. Conversely, the campaign pattern seemed largely exceptional. Suggestions are made to draw on elements of both the project and the campaign patterns to show ways of enrichting, systematizing and generalizing the programme pattern.

  1. The Over-Scheduling Hypothesis Revisited: Intensity of Organized Activity Participation During Adolescence and Young Adult Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Joseph L; Vest, Andrea E

    2012-09-01

    Concern exists that youth who spend a lot of time participating in organized out-of-school activities (e.g., sports) are at-risk for poor developmental outcomes. This concern - called the over-scheduling hypothesis - has primarily been assessed in terms of adolescent adjustment. This longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of 1,115 youth (ages 12-18) assessed long-term relations between intensity of participation during adolescence and adjustment at young adulthood (ages 18-24). Time diaries measured intensity as hours per week of participation. Results showed that, controlling for demographic factors and baseline adjustment, intensity was a significant predictor of positive outcomes (e.g., psychological flourishing, civic engagement, educational attainment) and unrelated to indicators of problematic adjustment (e.g., psychological distress, substance use, antisocial behavior) at young adulthood. PMID:23066336

  2. Dynamic Participation in Interdistrict Open Enrollment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavery, Lesley; Carlson, Deven

    2015-01-01

    Interdistrict open enrollment is the nation's largest and most widespread school choice program, but our knowledge of these programs is limited. Drawing on 5 years of student-level data from the universe of public school attendees in Colorado, we perform a three-stage analysis to examine the dynamics of student participation in the state's…

  3. Women's Participation in Behavioral and APA Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Edward K.; And Others

    Concern about the professional socialization of women in academic positions has increased markedly in recent years. This study examined women's participation in behavioral journals and journals published by the American Psychological Association (APA) in terms of journal authorship and the composition of journal editorial boards. Behavioral…

  4. Building a Common Platform on Students' Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundin, Mattias

    2007-01-01

    This article sets out to examine how school science activities can encourage students' participation while supporting a specific science content. One ordinary class with 12-year-old students was chosen and their regular classroom work was studied without intervention and with a minimum of interference. Lessons were video filmed, transcribed and…

  5. Community Participation in Tribal Diabetes Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Morris, Carolyn

    2006-01-01

    In the past five years, there has been a surge in the attention shown to community and community-based health programs among Native Americans, particularly for chronic health problems such as diabetes. Community participation in health programming--from the efforts of community health workers (CHWs), to participatory research, to the impact of…

  6. Patterns of Statewide Test Participation for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saven, Jessica L.; Anderson, Daniel; Nese, Joseph F. T.; Farley, Dan; Tindal, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Students with significant cognitive disabilities are eligible to participate in two statewide testing options for accountability: alternate assessments or general assessments with appropriate accommodations. Participation guidelines are generally quite vague, leading to students "switching" test participation between years. In this…

  7. Hemophilia and Sports: Guidelines for Participation. Case Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLain, Larry G.; Heldrich, Fred T.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a case report of a 15-year-old boy with severe hemophilia who played soccer 1 school year but was denied continued participation following another screening examination. Before deciding about participation, physicians must assess the type and severity of hemophilia and risk factors for injury. Appropriate sports for hemophiliacs are…

  8. Cross-Referencing Program Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Donald

    1981-01-01

    In an attempt to ascertain student involvement in physical education programs, a cross-referencing participation scale was conducted to determine which activities were most popular, the extent of participation, and budget justifications. (JN)

  9. Labor Education and Organizational Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Higdon C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Most of the leadership throughout the labor movement have been concerned about the lack of rank and file participation in labor unions. An evaluation of the relationship of labor education and union participation is explored. (WL)

  10. Participation Performance and Behavioral Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Paul R.

    The value of student participation in class discussion is considered. An approach is suggested for college teachers to help them better motivate and evaluate students who participate in classroom discussion. Reliable, accurate, and meaningful assessment of students' participation in classroom discussion can be achieved if an instructor bases the…

  11. Learning beyond Competence to Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Leo

    2013-01-01

    The essence of progressive education today is a view of learning centered on participation. In adulthood, the quest to participate and the quest to learn may ultimately be regarded as one and the same. Research on the learning journeys of adults undertaking a basic computer course are used to support these ideas. The participants in this study…

  12. Personality Preferences of Outdoor Participants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashel, Christine; Montgomery, Diane; Lane, Suzie

    A study investigated the personality type preferences of people who voluntarily chose to participate in a structured, field-based, outdoor education program. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) was administered to 87 participants prior to beginning a 10-day Wilderness Education Association outdoor leadership trip. Participants were 18-46 years…

  13. Perceptions of Reimbursement for Clinical Trial Participation

    PubMed Central

    Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki; Loza, Melissa; Vincent, Kathleen; Moench, Thomas; Stanberry, Lawrence R.; Rosenthal, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    A greater understanding of participant views regarding reimbursement will help investigators plan studies that have better potential for reaching target enrollment, maximize efficient recruitment, maintain scientific integrity, and enhance retention over time. As part of a clinical trial in the area of sexual health, healthy women’s perceptions of reimbursement for research participation were investigated. Semi-structured, audio-recorded, qualitative interviews were conducted immediately upon women’s completion of the clinical trial to enable a participant-driven understanding of perceptions about monetary reimbursement. Audio-recordings were transcribed and analyzed using framework analysis. Women (N = 30) had a mean age of 29.5 ± 5.7 years (range 22–45 years). Sixty-three percent of participants (n = 19) were non-Hispanic (white n = 13, black n = 4, and Asian n = 2), while the remaining were Hispanic (n = 11). Seventy-three percent (n = 22) reported previous participation in research. In general, women viewed reimbursement as a benefit to research participation, the amount of which should reflect time, the inconvenience to the research subject, and the potential for unknown risks in the short- and long-term. They believed reimbursement should take into account the degree of risk of the study, with investigations of experimental products offering greater reimbursement. Women believed that monetary reimbursement is unlikely to coerce an individual to volunteer for a study involving procedures or requirements that they found unacceptable. The results of this study can be used to provide guidance to those planning and evaluating reimbursement for research participation. PMID:21931235

  14. Participation in Quality Measurement Nationwide

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Jennifer Lynn

    2014-01-01

    In the interest of improving patient care quality and reducing costs, many hospitals across the nation participate in quality measurements. The three programs most applicable to colon and rectal surgery are the National Surgical Quality Improvement Project, the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP), and the Surgical Care and Outcomes Assessment Program. Participation in each is variable, although many hospitals are eligible and welcome to participate. Currently, SCIP is the only one with a financial incentive to participate. This article will focus on participation; however, the motivation for such is elusive in the literature. It is likely that a combination of resource utilization and faith in the concept that participation results in improvements in patient care actually drive participation. PMID:24587700

  15. Does a hospital admission in old age denote the beginning of life with a compromised health-related quality of life? A longitudinal study of men and women aged 65 years and above participating in the Stockholm Public Health Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Karampampa, Korinna; Frumento, Paolo; Ahlbom, Anders; Modig, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to analyse how hospitalisation after the age of 60 affected individuals' health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The main hypothesis was that a hospital admission in old age can be seen as a proxy of ill health and possibly as a health divider, separating life into a healthy and an unhealthy part. The extent to which this is true depends on which disease individuals face and how functional ability and HRQoL are affected. Settings This was a longitudinal study, based on an older cohort of individuals who participated in the Stockholm Public Health Cohort (SPHC) survey in 2006; the survey took place in Stockholm, Sweden. Information regarding hospitalisations and deaths, which is available through Swedish administrative registers, was linked to the survey from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. Participants 2101 individuals, 65+ years old at inclusion, with no previous hospitalisations at baseline (2006), were followed for 4 years until 2010 (end of follow-up). Primary and secondary outcome measures HRQoL was assessed through a utility index derived from the EuroQol 5D questionnaire, at baseline and at 2010. The change in HRQoL after admission(s) to the hospital was estimated as the difference between the 2010 and 2006 levels using linear regression, also considering several covariates. Results A single hospitalisation did not reduce individuals' HRQoL, either for men or women. On the other hand, multiple any-cause hospitalisations reduced HRQoL between 3.2% and 6.5%. When looking into hospitalisations for specific causes, such as hip fractures, a decrease in HRQoL was observed as well; however, conclusions regarding this were impeded by the small sample size. Conclusions Hospital admissions in old age may indicate a shift from a healthy life to a life of compromised health when considering their frequency and cause over a period of time. PMID:27401358

  16. [Discussion paper on participation and participative methods in gerontology].

    PubMed

    Aner, Kirsten

    2016-02-01

    The concept of "participation" and the demand for the use of "participative methods" in human, healthcare, nursing and gerontological research as well as the corresponding fields of practice are in great demand; however, the targets and organization of "participation" are not always sufficiently explicated. The working group on critical gerontology of the German Society of Gerontology and Geriatrics uses this phenomenon as an opportunity for positioning and develops a catalogue of criteria for reflection and assessment of participation of elderly people in science and practice, which can also be considered a stimulus for further discussions. PMID:26809852

  17. Effectiveness Trial of an Indicated Cognitive-Behavioral Group Adolescent Depression Prevention Program versus Bibliotherapy and Brochure Control at 1- and 2-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Rohde, Paul; Stice, Eric; Shaw, Heather; Gau, Jeff M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the longterm effects of a brief group cognitive-behavioral (CB) adolescent depression indicated prevention program through 2-year follow-up, relative to CB bibliotherapy and brochure control, when high school personnel recruited students and delivered the program. Method 378 adolescents (M age = 15.5, SD = 1.2; 68% female, 72% White) with elevated self-assessed depressive symptoms who were randomized to CB group, CB bibliotherapy, or educational brochure control were assessed at pre, post, 6-, 12-, 18-, and 24-month follow-up. Results By 2 years post-intervention, CB group participants showed significantly lower major depressive disorder (MDD) onset versus CB bibliotherapy (10% vs. 25%, respectively; HR = 2.48, p = .006), but the incidence difference relative to brochure controls (17%) was nonsignificant; MDD incidence for bibliotherapy and brochure controls did not differ. Although CB group participants showed lower depressive symptoms at post versus brochure controls, there were no effects for this outcome or for social adjustment or substance use over 2-year follow-up. Moderator analyses suggested that participants with higher baseline depressive symptoms showed greater longterm symptom reductions in the CB group intervention versus bibliotherapy. Conclusions The evidence that a brief CB group intervention delivered by real-world providers significantly reduced MDD onset versus CB bibliotherapy is potentially encouraging. However, the lack of MDD prevention effects relative to brochure control and lack of longterm symptom effects (though consistent with results from other depression prevention trials), suggest that the delivery of CB group should be refined to strengthen its effectiveness. PMID:25894666

  18. Astronaut Health Participant Summary Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kathy; Krog, Ralph; Rodriguez, Seth; Wear, Mary; Volpe, Robert; Trevino, Gina; Eudy, Deborah; Parisian, Diane

    2011-01-01

    The Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health (LSAH) Participant Summary software captures data based on a custom information model designed to gather all relevant, discrete medical events for its study participants. This software provides a summarized view of the study participant s entire medical record. The manual collapsing of all the data in a participant s medical record into a summarized form eliminates redundancy, and allows for the capture of entire medical events. The coding tool could be incorporated into commercial electronic medical record software for use in areas like public health surveillance, hospital systems, clinics, and medical research programs.

  19. JCE: 80 Years New

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.

    2003-01-01

    Participating in the National Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education Digital Library project is an exciting prospect for JCE. We expect to be able to make major contributions to the project and derive major benefits from participating in it. Your help in this important undertaking would be most welcome and greatly appreciated. Help us demonstrate that an 80-year-old can dance to a new tune!

  20. Mortality Benefit of Participation in BOOCS Program

    PubMed Central

    Odashiro, Keita; Fukata, Mitsuhiro; Maruyama, Toru; Saito, Kazuyuki; Wakana, Chikako; Fukumitsu, Michiko; Fujino, Takehiko

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to demonstrate the protective effect on mortality among participants of a health education program, Brain-Oriented Obesity Control System (BOOCS). Methods: A quasi-experimentally designed, 15-year (1993 to 2007) follow-up study was conducted with a total of 13,835 male and 7791 female Japanese workers. They were divided into three groups: participants in the program (1565 males and 742 females), nonparticipant comparative obese controls (1230 males and 605 females), and nonparticipant reference subjects (11,012 males and 6426 females). Hazard ratios were calculated with survival curves drawn to evaluate the mortality effects by the program participation. Results: The male participants showed significantly lower mortality risk for all causes of death at hazard ratio = 0.54 (95% confidence interval: 0.31 to 0.94) with significantly different survival curves (P = 0.014 by log-rank test) than obese controls. Conclusions: The results support a protective effect on mortality by participating in BOOCS program. PMID:25634811

  1. Choosing to Participate: Revised Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Phyllis; Strom, Adam

    2009-01-01

    "Choosing to Participate" focuses on civic choices--the decisions people make about themselves and others in their community, nation, and world. The choices people make, both large and small, may not seem important at the time, but little by little they shape them as individuals and responsible global citizens. "Choosing to Participate" grew out…

  2. Who Benefits from Participative Management?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoliel, Pascale; Somech, Anit

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study seeks to explore the moderating role of teachers' personality traits from the Big Five typology on the relationship between participative management and teacher outcomes with respect to performance, satisfaction and strain. The study suggests that participative management may produce different results depending on teachers'…

  3. Educational Participation and Inmate Misconduct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahm, Karen F.

    2009-01-01

    The majority of extant literature on correctional education focuses on the relationship between program participation and recidivism while ignoring the possible relationship between educational program participation and inmate misconduct. The present study sought to fill in this gap in the literature by investigating the effect of several types of…

  4. Program Participants Increase Equitable Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey Research Bulletin, 1996

    1996-01-01

    In 1996, the effectiveness of New Jersey's Perkins Act-funded single parent/displaced homemaker and gender equity programs were evaluated by using a modified version of MacDonald's Sex Role Survey to determine the effects of program participation on participants' attitudes toward four dimensions of sex equity: work, behavior, equity, and home.…

  5. Citizen participation on regulatory boards.

    PubMed

    Chesney, J D

    1984-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between regulatory board function and citizen participation. The research indicates that public members generally prefer advisory boards, while provider members prefer quasi-judicial bodies. Implications of these findings for structuring citizen participation in the regulatory process are examined. PMID:6736596

  6. Children's Participation and Teacher Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emilson, Anette; Folkesson, Anne-Mari

    2006-01-01

    In this study we have tried to come close to, and at the same time problematize, what participation in educational practice might be. The overall aim is to study how a toddler's participation can be understood in two kinds of educational activities, where the degree of teacher control differs. The data in this study are video observations of…

  7. Pupil Participation and Curriculum Relevance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramadas, Jayashree; Kulkarni, V. G.

    1982-01-01

    Investigated relationship between lesson content and participation of pupils in rural India primary schools. Spontaneous participation in teacher-directed classrooms (N=136) was shown to be correlated with time spent by teachers in relating textbook content to pupils' natural experience. Experiments and teaching aids were also useful in drawing…

  8. Nutrition and Food Participation Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Ellen Williams

    1991-01-01

    Reviews the nutritional consequences of participation in food assistance programs, specifically the impact of these programs on the diets of African American households. Findings indicate that, although participants have better quality diets than nonparticipants, these diets are inadequate when compared to accepted dietary standards. Suggests…

  9. High Participation Systems of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marginson, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The world is rapidly becoming more educated at higher education level. In nearly all countries with per capita GDP of more than about $5,000 per annum there is a long-term tendency to growth of participation. The worldwide Gross Tertiary Enrollment Ratio (GTER) increased from 10% in 1972 to 32% in 2012, and is now rising by 1% a year. By 2012 the…

  10. Measurement of balance function and community participation in stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sinae

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the relationship between balance function and community participation in stroke survivors. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty-three patients diagnosed with hemiparetic stroke participated in this study (36 males, 27 females, aged 58.6 ± 15.2 years). The participants were assessed for balance function and their level of participation in the community, using activity card sorting and the Berg Balance Scale. A regression analysis was used to identify the influence of balance function on instrumental activities of daily living and leisure and social activities. [Results] The results of the regression analysis indicated that balance function measured by using the Berg Balance Scale affected community participation of patients with hemiparetic stroke. Participation in instrumental activities of daily living and leisure and social activities was affected by balance function. [Conclusion] This study provides useful information for designing efficient programs and identifying their effectiveness for enhancement of community participation in stroke survivors.

  11. Factors Associated with School Meal Participation and the Relationship between Different Participation Measures. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Quinn; Hulsey, Lara; Ponza, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This report investigates three important aspects of National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) participation using recently collected data on a large, nationally representative sample of students certified for free and reduced-price meals during the 2005-2006 school year. First, we examine the factors that influence…

  12. 17 CFR 12.18 - Answer; election of procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Answer; election of procedure...; election of procedure. An answer filed pursuant to § 12.16 of these rules shall meet the following... wishes to pursue under § 12.19 of these rules; (7) An election of an alternative decisional...

  13. 17 CFR 12.18 - Answer; election of procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Answer; election of procedure...; election of procedure. An answer filed pursuant to § 12.16 of these rules shall meet the following... wishes to pursue under § 12.19 of these rules; (7) An election of an alternative decisional...

  14. 17 CFR 12.18 - Answer; election of procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Answer; election of procedure...; election of procedure. An answer filed pursuant to § 12.16 of these rules shall meet the following... wishes to pursue under § 12.19 of these rules; (7) An election of an alternative decisional...

  15. 17 CFR 12.18 - Answer; election of procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... reconsideration of determination to forward the complaint. An answer may include a motion for reconsideration of the determination to forward the complaint, specifying the grounds therefor, which the Director of the... the answer upon the complainant, either personally or by first-class mail addressed to the...

  16. Sports participation with arachnoid cysts.

    PubMed

    Strahle, Jennifer; Selzer, Béla J; Geh, Ndi; Srinivasan, Dushyanth; Strahle, MaryKathryn; Martinez-Sosa, Meleine; Muraszko, Karin M; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT There is currently no consensus on the safety of sports participation for patients with an intracranial arachnoid cyst (AC). The authors' goal was to define the risk of sports participation for children with this imaging finding. METHODS A survey was prospectively administered to 185 patients with ACs during a 46-month period at a single institution. Cyst size and location, treatment, sports participation, and any injuries were recorded. Eighty patients completed at least 1 subsequent survey following their initial entry into the registry, and these patients were included in a prospective registry with a mean prospective follow-up interval of 15.9 ± 8.8 months. RESULTS A total 112 patients with ACs participated in 261 sports for a cumulative duration of 4410 months or 1470 seasons. Of these, 94 patients participated in 190 contact sports for a cumulative duration of 2818 months or 939 seasons. There were no serious or catastrophic neurological injuries. Two patients presented with symptomatic subdural hygromas following minor sports injuries. In the prospective cohort, there were no neurological injuries CONCLUSIONS Permanent or catastrophic neurological injuries are very unusual in AC patients who participate in athletic activities. In most cases, sports participation by these patients is safe. PMID:26636254

  17. Patterns of Children's Participation in Unorganized Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findlay, Leanne C.; Garner, Rochelle E.; Kohen, Dafna E.

    2010-01-01

    Children's leisure-time or unorganized physical activity is associated with positive physical and mental health, yet there is little information available on tracking and predicting participation throughout the childhood and adolescent years. The purpose of the current study was to explore patterns of unorganized physical activity participation of…

  18. Predictors of Study Abroad Intent, Participation, and College Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Jiali; Jamieson-Drake, David

    2015-01-01

    This study examined US undergraduate students' intent to study abroad upon college entry and their actual participation in study abroad during their undergraduate years, correlating the college outcomes of three cohorts to identify trends. The findings show that study abroad intent and participation are interrelated and shaped by an array of…

  19. Characteristics of Teachers Participating in Voluntary Music Integration Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Diana; Baron, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    This study examines characteristics of teachers participating in the national Guitars in the Classroom program in the 2007-2008 school year. 96 teacher participants from programs across the United States completed an online survey at the start of their professional development programs, usually 6-10 hours. 75 percent of teachers electing to…

  20. Differences of Causal Attribution in Bullying among Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviles, Jose Maria

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Our aim is to investigate differences of causal attribution among participants in bullying, as they judge the facts from their particular place of participation in the abuse at any given moment, as well as their habitual profile in bullying situations. Method: Using a sample of students between 10 and 18 years of age, and the CIMEI…

  1. Child Care and Development Block Grant Participation in 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Hannah; Lim, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    The Office of Child Care released preliminary federal fiscal year 2009 administrative data for the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG). This fact sheet provides a snapshot of CCDBG program participation in 2009, noting the great variability in child care assistance programs among states. Participation is one of several significant…

  2. Tracking Club Sport Participation from Childhood to Early Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Rosalina; Williams, Sheila; Poulton, Richie; Reeder, Anthony I.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the strength of tracking sport participation from childhood to early adulthood among the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study cohort. Participation in sport, dance, or gymnastics as part of a club or group (outside of school) was assessed at ages 7, 9, 15, 18, and 21 years. In addition to the traditionally…

  3. Civic Participation and the Development of Adolescent Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vieno, Alessio; Nation, Maury; Perkins, Douglas D.; Santinello, Massimo

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed the links between civic participation and adolescent behavior problems (bullying, physical fighting, and alcohol and tobacco use), and whether civic engagement could be a moderator of the negative effects of parent/family detachment. Participants were 7,097 11-, 13-, and 15-year-olds (48.6% girls) in a region of Northern Italy.…

  4. Maternal Participation and Scaffolding While Coviewing Educational Television

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neulight, Nina Raquel

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation study examined how mothers participated and scaffolded while watching an educational television program at home with their 3- to 5-year-old children; whether maternal participation and scaffolding predicted children's learning of vocabulary, sight words, and reading skills presented in the program; and reasons (i.e.,…

  5. Reconsidering the Rise in A-Level Mathematics Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noyes, Andrew; Adkins, Michael

    2016-01-01

    There is growing support for making the study of mathematics to the age of 18 years compulsory for all young people in England. This article aims to inform this debate through new insights into historic A-Level Mathematics participation trends. We analyse full-year cohorts of 16-year-old students from the Department for Education's National Pupil…

  6. SIRTF - Key Projects and Community Participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicay, M.; Gehrz, R.; Caroff, L.; Jura, M.; Pipher, J. L.; Werner, M.; Young, E.

    1994-05-01

    SIRTF - the Space Infrared Telescope Facility - will be an observatory for the entire scientific community, but the modes of community participation may be somewhat different from those used on previous astrophysics missions. The limited lifetime of the mission demands the development of a highly efficient observing program that will maximize the scientific return. To achieve this goal, the SIRTF scientific program will probably consist largely of Key Projects - large scale targeted and unbiased spectroscopic and imaging surveys - supplemented by General Observer and Archival Research opportunities. Possible forms of community participation in the SIRTF program include: 1. Planning and preparation through collaboration in the definition of community roles and in the definition of the structure of the Key Projects Program. 2. Collaboration in SIRTF's Key Projects. Key Project investigations and investigators will be chosen by peer review several years before launch. Investigators will work with the instrument and operations teams in defining and preparing for their observations. 3. Participation in the General Observer Program. Selected General Observers will bear much of the responsibility for planning their observational programs and reducing the data. 4. Archival Research. We anticipate starting the archival research program during the mission while the spacecraft is still operating and adding data to the archive. The poster will describe these modes of participation in greater detail and serve as a focal point for discussion of the community's role in SIRTF.

  7. Characteristics of participants in the Forum, psychotherapy clients, and control participants: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Gidi

    2005-12-01

    'New age' activities, personality variables, symptomatology, and subjective well-being (SWB) among the Forum (F) participants, psychotherapy (P) clients, individuals who are both Forum and psychotherapy (FP) clients, and control (C) participants, who were never involved in either F or P were compared. A group of 64 Israeli men and 76 women (mean age = 38.55 years) completed a demographic questionnaire; the Internal-external, Sensation-seeking, Happiness, Affects balance, Satisfaction with life, and Anxiety and depression scales of the SCL-90. The FP and F participants used occult counsellors significantly more than the C participants, although gender differences were also found. All in all, the FP and P clients were more depressive and anxious, and less happy, less satisfied with their life, and affectively balanced than the F and the C participants. The rationality, personal responsibility, and mental health of the F participants are discussed in light of the results with considerations of short-versus long-term interventions. PMID:16354440

  8. Participation and performance trends in ultracycling

    PubMed Central

    Shoak, Mohannad Abou; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2013-01-01

    Background Participation and performance trends have been investigated in ultramarathons and ultratriathlons but not in ultracycling. The aim of the present study was to investigate (1) participation and performance trends in ultraendurance cyclists, (2) changes in cycling speed over the years, and (3) the age of the fastest male and female ultraendurance cyclists. Methods Participation and performance trends in the 5000 km Race Across America (RAAM) and in two RAAM-qualifier races – the 818 km Furnace Creek 508 in the United States and the 715 km Swiss Cycling Marathon in Europe – were investigated using linear regression analyses and analyses of variance. Results On average, ~41% of participants did not finish either the RAAM or the Furnace Creek 508, whereas ~26% did not finish the Swiss Cycling Marathon. Female finishers accounted for ~11% in both the RAAM and the Furnace Creek 508 but only ~3% in the Swiss Cycling Marathon. The mean cycling speed of all finishers remained unchanged during the studied periods. The winner’s average speed was faster for men than for women in the RAAM (22.6 ± 1.1 km · h−1 versus 18.4 ± 1.7 km · h−1, respectively; average speed difference between male and female winners, 25.0% ± 11.9%), the Swiss Cycling Marathon (30.8 ± 0.8 km · h−1 versus 24.4 ± 1.9 km · h−1, respectively; average speed difference between male and female winners, 27.8% ± 9.4%), and the Furnace Creek 508 (27.4 ± 1.6 km · h−1 versus 23.4 ± 3.0 km · h−1, respectively; average speed difference between male and female winners, 18.4% ± 13.9%). In both the Furnace Creek 508 and the Swiss Cycling Marathon, ~46% of the finishers were aged between 35 and 49 years. The mean age of winners, both male and female, across the years in the Furnace Creek 508 and in the Swiss Cycling Marathon was 37 ± 10 years. Conclusion These findings in ultracycling races showed that (1) ~26%–40% of starters were unable to finish, (2) the percentage of female

  9. Activity and participation in children with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Barbara A; Sheng, Xiaoming; Perry, Amber S; Stevenson, David A

    2014-10-24

    We describe activity and participation in children and youth with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), and compared an intervention and control group after a strengthening program using the Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument (PODCI) and the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment (CAPE). Questionnaires were filled out by parents at baseline, 12-weeks, and 1-year. The intervention group performed a strengthening program twice a week for ten weeks, followed by a 9-month independent program. Thirty-six participants (18 control, 18 intervention) between the ages of 5- and 18-years (mean 10.6 years, SD 4.6 years) were enrolled, and 34 completed the 1-year assessment. There were significant differences between formal and informal participation (p<0.0001) in baseline CAPE scores for the entire cohort. At 12 weeks, PODCI upper extremity function improved in intervention and decreased in controls (p=0.040), while happiness declined in intervention and increased in control (p=0.003). There were no significant differences between control and intervention groups in any of the CAPE or PODCI change scores from baseline to 1-year. Upper extremity function, sport and physical function, comfort/pain and happiness PODCI scores were lower than normative values. The NF1 cohort had low participation in formal active physical and skill-based activities. The companionship and location dimensions suggest participation occurs with family and other relatives in the home or a relative's home and reflects a pattern of social isolation from peers. PMID:25462482

  10. Adolescent and Young Adult Patient Engagement and Participation in Survey-Based Research: A Report From the "Resilience in Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer" Study.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Abby R; Bona, Kira; Wharton, Claire M; Bradford, Miranda; Shaffer, Michele L; Wolfe, Joanne; Baker, Kevin Scott

    2016-04-01

    Conducting patient-reported outcomes research with adolescents and young adults (AYAs) is difficult due to low participation rates and high attrition. Forty-seven AYAs with newly diagnosed cancer at two large hospitals were prospectively surveyed at the time of diagnosis and 3-6 and 12-18 months later. A subset participated in 1:1 semistructured interviews. Attrition prompted early study closure at one site. The majority of patients preferred paper-pencil to online surveys. Interview participants were more likely to complete surveys (e.g., 93% vs. 58% completion of 3-6 month surveys, P = 0.02). Engaging patients through qualitative methodologies and using patient-preferred instruments may optimize future research success. PMID:26681427

  11. Citizen participation and health care: problems of government induced participation.

    PubMed

    Lipsky, M; Lounds, M

    1976-01-01

    In this paper we trace the implications of some common contradictions in government-inspired efforts to increase citizen participation in health care delivery. We cover general problems of generating citizen participation, specific difficulties in community organization resulting when issues of health are the organizing focus, and the benefits that were thought to result from efforts to increase citizen participation in social programs in the 1960's. When programs focused on increased citizen participation were initiated program administrators attempted to maximize citizen involvement quickly by: projecting an image of maximal social impact; minimizing or ignoring questions of long-term fiscal uncertainty; projecting an image of maximal control by citizens; and projecting images of institutional solidarity and of experimentation and innovation. They tended to recruit to the staff social activists taken to be representative of the community (although they might not be), promising opportunities for upward mobility. They also tended to adopt conciliatory administrative styles in keeping with their experimental non-elitist orientations. These tendencies characteristic of the initiation phase of projects conflicted with the demands placed upon programs in later phases of program implementation. These demands resulted from later perceived needs to: evaluate programs; limit spending; counter internal organizational opposition; and respond to sponsors' shifting interests. Paraprofessionals recruited to the staff tended to lose their "community" orientation, and administrative style tended to focus considerably more on program accountability. These shifting program demands substantially account for what otherwise appears to be the failure of efforts to increase citizens' participation in health delivery programs, and, by extension, in other areas where the impetus for increased citizen participation comes from government initiatives. PMID:1022799

  12. Toward ethical research practice with deaf participants.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Jenny L; Jones, Gabrielle; Hanumantha, Shilpa

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, scholars have been critical of what they consider unethical conduct by researchers whose studies focus on members of the Deaf or signing communities. This is the first empirical study that investigates ethical concerns and recommendations from the perspective of three stakeholder groups (Deaf research participants, researchers, and Deaf studies experts). We analyzed focus group discussions using strategies from grounded theory and community-based participatory research. The themes we identified highlight the need for the broader scientific research community to include linguistically and culturally sensitive research procedures that more adequately protect the rights of Deaf research participants, as well as other marginalized groups. We address the need to increase the number of Deaf scientists and reconsider collaboration practices between Deaf and hearing researchers. PMID:25746786

  13. Smog - the learning years

    SciTech Connect

    Heinen, C.M.; Fagley, W.S. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    35 years of continuous work by government and industry and the public have led to a very sophisticated system of emission controls. This paper is intended to recall and perhaps to honor those who participated in the hectic early period, when instrumentation, basic knowledge, and primitive devices competed for the attention of these pioneers with strident demands from policitians.

  14. Year of the Coast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobik, Gray; Lux, Gretchen

    1980-01-01

    President Carter has designated 1980 as the "Year of the Coast" through the efforts of a coalition known as the Coast Alliance. The Coast Alliance will alert people to changes along the coastline, and the need for public participation in the decisions which govern the use and abuse of the coastline. (DS)

  15. [Participation factors in a occupational health colorectal cancer screening program].

    PubMed

    Fabre, D; Faliu, B; Grosclaude, P; Gaston-Jeanzac, F; Couaillac, J P; Machelard-Sauvage, M

    1999-12-01

    A colorectal cancer screening campaign by Hemoccult test was carried out from January 1993 to December 1994 in collaboration with the company doctors of employees ages 45 and older in the companies of the Lot department of France. Of the 1311 employees to whom the test was offered, 811 actually had the test done, representing a rate of participation of 61.9%. Participation varied from 48.1% to 72.7% depending on the company doctor, and was higher for large companies. Managers participated less than other employees. People who never visit a dentist, who had not seen their doctor for over a year or who never give blood participated less than others. Thus, even though company doctors can play a true role by favouring the participation of general employees, their action is limited by the weak participation of people who already have little contact with the health care system. PMID:10798178

  16. Children's eyewitness memory: effects of participation and forensic context.

    PubMed

    Tobey, A E; Goodman, G S

    1992-01-01

    We examined effects of participation and forensic context on 4-year-old children's testimony. Children in "participant" and "police" conditions actively participated in games with a "babysitter"; each child in the "observer" condition watched a videotape of a child and the babysitter playing. Eleven days later, children were individually questioned about the event. Before the interview began, children in the police condition talked to a police officer who said the babysitter might have done something bad. Comparison of participant- and observer-condition performance indicated that participation increased free-recall accuracy concerning actions that took place and lowered suggestibility. Comparison of participant- and police-condition performance indicated that forensic context led to increased error in free recall and additional comments to misleading questions. However, forensic context also resulted in higher accuracy on an age-identification task and did not affect children's accuracy in answering abuse-related questions. PMID:1486508

  17. Female labor force participation: an international perspective.

    PubMed

    Psacharopoulos, G; Tzannatos, Z

    1989-07-01

    This article gives an international perspective in regard to female participation in the labor force. In most countries women contribute less than men toward the value of recorded production. Social environment, statistical inconsistencies and methods of recording labor all contribute to this inequity. In Britain for instance, women caring for the household duties are in some studies considered to be part of the labor force and in other studies they are not. Further, internationally, women often find themselves in casual, temporary, or seasonal work that goes unrecorded. Defining what "labor force participation" constitutes is a key starting point to any survey. At what age is one considered employable? What constitutes a person "actively seeking" employment? Economists often try to explain labor force participation rate by age, sex, race and income groups and use this information to cite trends. The income-leisure model theorizes that choice of work or non-work by women is based primarily upon wages for work vs. wages for non-work. This theory sees non-labor income exerting a negative influence. Empirical evidence, however, suggests that women will choose work if wages are good regardless of any non-work benefits. Because most men are permanently in the labor force, estimates of labor reserves and projections of supply focus mostly on women. International generalizations are often misleading since trends vary widely among countries. During the last 20 years the global female participation rate has remained almost constant, but this is misleading. The percentage of working women in industrial countries increased 10%; developing countries showed a decrease of 7%. Female rates are often tied closely to shifts in the overall economy, (e.g., a transition from an agricultural to an industrial economy often sees a drop in female labor because subsistence jobs are lost). Of course the ability of women to bear children and the social expectations regarding child care often

  18. How Do Young Children with DCD Participate and Enjoy Daily Activities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bart, O.; Jarus, T.; Erez, Y.; Rosenberg, L.

    2011-01-01

    Developmental problems may decrease participation of children. The objective of this study was to evaluate multidimensional aspects of participation amongst preschool children with and without DCD. Participants included 63 children with mean age of 4.96 years (SD = 0.62; range = 4.02-6.35 years). Twenty one children were diagnosed with DCD, 21…

  19. To Participate or Not to Participate: That Is the Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Lynne M.; Perkins, Daniel F.; Villarruel, Francisco A.; Stone, Margaret R.

    2005-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in issues pertaining to how a young person chooses to participate (or not) in youth programs, both school based (for example, sports, drama, yearbook) and community based (for example, Boys and Girls Clubs, Scouts, 4-H, sports, faith-based programs). Scholars, youth workers, policymakers, national organizations,…

  20. Developing Informed Research Participants in an Introductory Psychology Participant Pool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Michael P.; Lashley, Sarah L.

    2009-01-01

    This activity offers a way to use the informed consent procedure to help students better understand the responsibilities of research participants. During a class activity, students completed a brief study. The study included presentation of consent forms and questionnaires before a surprise quiz over material from the consent form and a discussion…

  1. [The political context for community participation in Latin America].

    PubMed

    Briceño-León, R

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews the overall significance of the concept of community participation in health with respect to endemic diseases. It also observes how changes in Latin American society during the past forty years have forced radical changes in the notion of participation. The article describes changes in society and analyzes participation in the Cold War context, with four modalities of participation: as ideological manipulation, as cheap labor, as medical care facilitation, and as subversion. It then reviews participation in the context of the crisis of ideologies and describes two modalities: participation as a grassroots movement and as popular promotion. Finally, it interprets the forms participation takes in the context of economic adjustment programs, and from there it describes participation as both a complement to the State and a form of privatization. The article concludes with a proposal for participation as a mechanism to expand and extend democracy; in this sense, it highlights participation as a means of criticism of power, a fomenter of democratic organization, and a mechanism of transformation for the health sector. PMID:9700233

  2. Entrofy: Participant Selection Made Easy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppenkothen, Daniela

    2016-03-01

    Selection participants for a workshop out of a much larger applicant pool can be a difficult task, especially when the goal is diversifying over a range of criteria (e.g. academic seniority, research field, skill levels, gender etc). In this talk I am presenting our tool, Entrofy, aimed at aiding organizers in this task. Entrofy is an open-source tool using a maximum entropy-based algorithm that aims to select a set of participants out of the applicant pool such that a pre-defined range of criteria are globally maximized. This approach allows for a potentially more transparent and less biased selection process while encouraging organizers to think deeply about the goals and the process of their participant selection.

  3. Consumer participation and social accountability.

    PubMed

    Metsch, J M; Veney, J E

    1976-04-01

    Consumer participation in the planning and management of health care programs is prescribed as a method for increasing provider responsiveness to the goals and needs of users of services. However, issues related to the nature of mandates to implement consumer participation has not had the impact on policy development proposed for it. While structural changes can be identified which might enhance the consumer role in decision making, it will also be necessary for the consumer sector to develop a strategy which will prompt major rather than incremental movement. PMID:1263625

  4. Preparation and crystal structure of H-BaTa{sub 2}O{sub 6}-type K{sub 1.83}Ba{sub 4.17}Nb{sub 12.18}O{sub 36} and dielectric properties of the related compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Kumada, N. . E-mail: kumada@yamanashi.ac.jp; Takei, T.; Yamanaka, J.; Kinomura, N.

    2005-07-12

    Single crystal of a novel compound, K{sub 1.83}Ba{sub 4.17}Nb{sub 12.18}O{sub 36}, has been synthesized in the course of investigation on the K{sub 2}O-BaO-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} system. The crystal structure was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction data. The space group of this compound was found to be P6/mmm (no. 191) with the lattice parameters of a=21.109(4) and c=3.967(1)A. The final R-factors were R=0.039 and R{sub w}=0.042 for unique 508 reflections. The crystal structure had the same tunnel structure as that of hexagonal BaTa{sub 2}O{sub 6} (H-BaTa{sub 2}O{sub 6}), which is the high temperature form in three modifications of BaTa{sub 2}O{sub 6}. The chemical composition of K{sub 1.83}Ba{sub 4.17}Nb{sub 12.18}O{sub 36} was close to that of the tetragonal tungsten bronze (TTB) type KBa{sub 2}Nb{sub 5}O{sub 15} and the powder samples within this composition were prepared so as to clarify the boundary between H-BaTa{sub 2}O{sub 6} and TTB-type structures. The H-BaTa{sub 2}O{sub 6}-type structure appears in (K+Ba)/Nb-bar 0.500 and the TTB-type structure is in (K+Ba)/Nb>=0.575. The dielectric constants of these samples were measured from room temperature to 500deg. C for sintered body. The TTB-type compounds exhibited ferroelectric temperature dependence with the Curie points of 284-372deg. C and the H-BaTa{sub 2}O{sub 6}-type compounds were not ferroelectrics as predicted from the crystal structure analysis.

  5. The influence of maternal health literacy and child's age on participation in social welfare programs.

    PubMed

    Pati, Susmita; Siewert, Elizabeth; Wong, Angie T; Bhatt, Suraj K; Calixte, Rose E; Cnaan, Avital

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the influence of maternal health literacy and child's age on participation in social welfare programs benefiting children. In a longitudinal prospective cohort study of 560 Medicaid-eligible mother-infant dyads recruited in Philadelphia, maternal health literacy was assessed using the test of functional health literacy in adults (short version). Participation in social welfare programs [Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), child care subsidy, and public housing] was self-reported at child's birth, and at the 6, 12, 18, 24 month follow-up interviews. Generalized estimating equations quantified the strength of maternal health literacy as an estimator of program participation. The mothers were primarily African-Americans (83%), single (87%), with multiple children (62%). Nearly 24% of the mothers had inadequate or marginal health literacy. Children whose mothers had inadequate health literacy were less likely to receive child care subsidy (adjusted OR = 0.54, 95% CI 0.34-0.85) than children whose mothers had adequate health literacy. Health literacy was not a significant predictor for TANF, SNAP, WIC or housing assistance. The predicted probability for participation in all programs decreased from birth to 24 months. Most notably, predicted WIC participation declined rapidly after age one. During the first 24 months, mothers with inadequate health literacy could benefit from simplified or facilitated child care subsidy application processes. Targeted outreach and enrollment efforts conducted by social welfare programs need to take into account the changing needs of families as children age. PMID:23990157

  6. A Rationale for Participant Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boody, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    There are many different models or approaches to doing program evaluation. Fitzpatrick, Sanders, and Worthen classify them into five general approaches: (a) objectives oriented, (b) management oriented, (c) consumer oriented, (d) expertise oriented, and (e) participant oriented. Within each of these general categories, of course, reside many…

  7. Encouraging and Evaluating Class Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czekanski, Kathleen E.; Wolf, Zane Robinson

    2013-01-01

    Many faculty interpret student responses to faculty questions as evidence of an actively engaged classroom. Because of this conviction, class participation, whether graded or ungraded, appears in many course syllabi in colleges and universities and is often promoted as the responsibility of students to contribute to the learning environment. Class…

  8. Children's Participation at Junior Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marklund, Inger, Ed.; Otter, Annica, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    This study examined the attitudes of Swedish junior high students concerning student participation in deciding matters that affect them. Over 100 students and their teachers were interviewed, class committees and school meetings were observed, and the students completed a short questionnaire. To illustrate the pitfalls that a study of pupils'…

  9. Emergency Exercise Participation and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julie; Black, Lynette; Williams, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Extension is uniquely positioned to participate in emergency exercises, formally or informally, with the goal of engaging community members in emergency and disaster preparedness. With their knowledge of community needs, Extension personnel are valuable resources and can assist emergency managers in the process of identifying local risks and…

  10. Youth Participation in Youth Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kothari, Roshani

    Frequently, adults organize and implement youth projects without involving youth in the process. However, youth should be involved in problem identification and program design because they understand the needs of their peers and how to reach them effectively. This paper examines youth participation as a process for bringing about effective youth…

  11. Participation in Educational Decision Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumley, Deborah D.

    1979-01-01

    The author suggests that teachers should be involved in the decision making process and that the administrator should structure meetings to generate such participation. Discussed are the National Group Technique (NGT) and the Delphi Technique as means of facilitating pooled judgments. (KC)

  12. Are Your Students Really Participating?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Meghan McCarthy; Dooley, Caitlin McMunn

    2013-01-01

    Students 8 and younger have access to screens everywhere--on smartphones, tablets, handheld games, and laptops, to name just a few places. How do you know if students are using these tools effectively? Are the students participating in digital environments in ways that encourage critical thinking, active engagement, and contribution, or are they…

  13. The Punctual Fallacy of Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Von Wright, Moira

    2006-01-01

    This article elaborates on a view of human subjectivity as open and intersubjectively constituted and discusses it as a presupposition for student's participation in educational situations. It questions the traditional persistent concept of subjectivity as inner and private, the "homo clausus", which puts self realization before recognition of the…

  14. Employee Participation: Some Australian Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lansbury, Russell D.; Davis, Edward M.

    1992-01-01

    The Australian Workplace Industrial Relations Survey of 2,353 companies showed sporadic employee participation in decision making. Although case studies of Ford Motor, Australia Post, Lend Lease, Telecom Australia, and Woodlawn Mining illustrate successful programs, most managers appear cautious about industrial democracy. (SK)

  15. Jail Participants Actively Study Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Donita Massengill; Berg, Margaret A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the impact of a word study literacy approach on the spelling ability and self-efficacy of adults in a county jail. Forty-four inmates participated in the word study intervention that provided them with hands-on learning. The word study intervention was conducted in four separate sessions (September,…

  16. Empowered Participation: Reinventing Urban Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fung, Archon

    2006-01-01

    Every month in every neighborhood in Chicago, residents, teachers, school principals, and police officers gather to deliberate about how to improve their schools and make their streets safer. Residents of poor neighborhoods participate as much or more as those from wealthy ones. All voices are heard. Since the meetings began more than a dozen…

  17. Road to Reconciliation: Participant's Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC. Student Financial Assistance.

    This workbook is intended to assist schools that participate in the William D. Ford Direct Loan Program gain the necessary skills to reconcile their loan records with U.S. Department of Education data each month. After an introduction that offers general information, establishes course goals and objectives, and sets out the course agenda, the…

  18. Training Alcoholism Trainers. Participant Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Alcohol Education, Arlington, VA.

    This workbook is to be used in conjunction with the Trainer Manual entitled Training Alcoholism Trainers. The program was developed to upgrade training design and delivery skills of inservice trainers in the field of alcoholism. The workbook contains all the handout sheets necessary for participant sessions. (Author/BMW)

  19. Ethnicity and Nonelectoral Political Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrinkle, Robert D.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Analyzes data from the Latino National Political Survey to examine whether nonelectoral political participation by Latino subgroups (Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, and Cuban Americans) can be explained on the basis of culture, socioeconomic status, or mobilization (political activism). Mobilization offered the strongest explanation for…

  20. Older adolescents’ views regarding participation in Facebook research

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Megan A; Grant, Alison; Kacvinsky, Lauren; Moreno, Peter; Fleming, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Facebook continues to grow in popularity among adolescents as well as adolescent researchers. Guidance on conducting this research with appropriate attention to privacy and ethics is scarce. To inform such research efforts, the purpose of this study was to determine older adolescents’ responses after learning that they were participants in a research study that involved identification of participants using Facebook. Methods Public Facebook profiles of older adolescents age 18 to 19 years from a large state university were examined. Profile owners were then interviewed. During the interview participants were informed that they were identified by examining publicly available Facebook profiles. Participants were asked to discuss their views on this research method. Results A total of 132 participants completed the interview (70% response rate), the average age was 18.4 years (SD=0.5) and our sample included 64 males (48.5%). Participant responses included: endorsement (19.7%), fine (36.4%), neutral (28.8%), uneasy (9.1%) and concerned (6.1%). Among participants who were uneasy or concerned, the majority voiced confusion regarding their current profile security settings (p=0.00). Conclusion The majority of adolescent participants viewed the use of Facebook for research positively. These findings are consistent with the approach taken by many US courts. Researchers may consider these findings when developing research protocols involving Facebook. PMID:23084164

  1. Incentives and participation in a medical survey.

    PubMed

    Gjøstein, Dagrun Kyte; Huitfeldt, Anders; Løberg, Magnus; Adami, Hans-Olov; Garborg, Kjetil; Kalager, Mette; Bretthauer, Michael

    2016-07-01

    BACKGROUND Questionnaire surveys are important for surveying the health and disease behaviour of the population, but recent years have seen a fall in participation. Our study tested whether incentives can increase participation in these surveys.MATERIAL AND METHOD We sent a questionnaire on risk factors for colorectal cancer (height, weight, smoking, self-reported diagnoses, family medical history) to non-screened participants in a randomised colonoscopy screening study for colorectal cancer: participants who were invited but did not attend for colonoscopy examination (screening-invited) and persons who were not offered colonoscopy (control group). The persons were randomised to three groups: no financial incentive, lottery scratch cards included with the form, or a prize draw for a tablet computer when they responded to the form. We followed up all the incentive groups with telephone reminder calls, and before the prize draw for the tablet computer.RESULTS Altogether 3 705 of 6 795 persons (54.5  %) responded to the questionnaire; 43.5  % of those invited for screening and 65.6  % of the control group (p < 0.001). The proportion that answered was not influenced by incentives, either among those invited for screening (42.4  % in the non-prize group, 45.5  % in the lottery scratch card group and 42.6  % in the prize draw group; p = 0.24), or in the control group (65.6  % in the non-prize group, 66.4  % in the lottery scratch card group and 64.7  % in the prize draw group; p = 0.69). Prior to reminder calls, 39.2  % responded. A further 15.3  % responded following telephone reminder calls (14.1  % of the screening-invited and 16.5  % of the control group; p < 0.001).INTERPRETATION Incentives did not increase participation in this medical questionnaire survey. Use of telephone reminder calls and telephone interviews increased participation, but whether this is more effective than other methods requires further study

  2. Triangular Titanium Implants for Minimally Invasive Sacroiliac Joint Fusion: 2-Year Follow-Up from a Prospective Multicenter Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bitan, Fabien; Lockstadt, Harry; Kovalsky, Don; Cher, Daniel; Hillen, Travis

    2016-01-01

    Background Sacroiliac joint (SIJ) dysfunction is an underdiagnosed condition. Several published cohorts have reported favorable mid-term outcomes after SIJ fusion using titanium implants placed across the SIJ. Herein we report long-term (24-month) results from a prospective multicenter clinical trial. Methods One hundred and seventy-two subjects at 26 US sites with SI joint dysfunction were enrolled and underwent minimally invasive SI joint fusion with triangular titanium implants. Subjects underwent structured assessments preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months postoperatively, including SIJ pain ratings (0-100 visual analog scale), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form-36 (SF-36), EuroQOL-5D (EQ-5D), and patient satisfaction. Adverse events were collected throughout follow-up. All participating patients underwent a high-resolution pelvic CT scan at 1 year. Results Mean subject age was 50.9 years and 69.8% were women. SIJ pain was present for an average of 5.1 years prior to surgical treatment. SIJ pain decreased from 79.8 at baseline to 30.4 at 12 months and remained low at 26.0 at 24 months (p<.0001 for change from baseline). ODI decreased from 55.2 at baseline to 31.5 at 12 months and remained low at 30.9 at 24 months (p<.0001 for change from baseline). Quality of life (SF-36 and EQ-5D) improvements seen at 12 months were sustained at 24 months. The proportion of subjects taking opioids for SIJ or low back pain decreased from 76.2% at baseline to 55.0% at 24 months (p <.0001). To date, 8 subjects (4.7%) have undergone one or more revision SIJ surgeries. 7 device-related adverse events occurred. CT scan at one year showed a high rate (97%) of bone adherence to at least 2 implants on both the iliac and sacral sides with modest rates of bone growth across the SIJ. Conclusions In this study of patients with SIJ dysfunction, minimally invasive SI joint fusion using triangular titanium implants showed marked improvements in pain, disability and

  3. Mono- and dinuclear complexes of a new binucleating porphyrin,. alpha. ,. alpha. -5,15-bis(o-(nicotinoylamino)phenyl)-2,8,12,18-tetraethyl-3,7,13,17-tetramethylporphyrin. Crystal structures of a mononuclear nickel(II) complex and a binuclear Cu-Pt complex

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, L.K.; Maurya, M.R.; Jacobson, R.A.; Yang, Shumei; Ringrose, S.L. )

    1992-03-04

    The synthesis and characterization of a new binucleating porphyrin ligand, {alpha},{alpha}-5,15-bis(o-(nicotinoylamido)phenyl)-2,8,12,18-tetraethyl-3,7,13,17-tetramethylporphyrin, (H{sub 2}(DPE))-(py){sub 2} is reported. Treatment of (H{sub 2}(DPE))-(py){sub 2} with methanol solutions of Ni(II) or Cu(II) leads to the formation of mononuclear metal complexes, (M(DPE))-(py){sub 2}, in which the metal has inserted into the porphyrin core, leaving the pyridine binding site free. Addition of a second metal to form a binuclear complex, (M(DPE))-(py){sub 2}M{prime}Cl{sub 2}, can be accomplished using the reagent M{prime}(DMSO){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, M{prime} = Pd, Pt, and Zn. (Ni(DPE))-(py){sub 2} and (Cu(DPE))-(py){sub 2}PtCl{sub 2} have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Pt-Pt distances between the two molecules in the asymmetric unit are 3.766 (3) {angstrom}.

  4. Nature's Notebook 2010: Data & participant summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crimmins, Theresa M.; Rosemartin, Alyssa H.; Marsh, R. Lee; Denny, Ellen G.; Enquist, Carolyn A.F.; Weltzin, Jake F.

    2011-01-01

    Data submitted by Nature’s Notebook participants show patterns that follow latitude and elevation. Multiple years of observations now allow for year‐to‐year comparisons within and across species. As such, these data should be useful to a variety of stakeholders interested in the spatial and temporal patterns of plant and animal activity on a national scale; through time, these data should also empower scientists, resource managers, and the public in decision‐making and adapting to variable and changing climates and environments. Data submitted toNature’s Notebook and supporting metadata are available for download at www.usanpn.org/results/data. Additionally, data visualization tools are available online at www.usanpn.org/results/visualizations.

  5. 48 CFR 752.7019 - Participant training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Participant training. 752... Participant training. For use in any USAID direct contract involving training of USAID participants. Participant Training (JAN 1999) (a) Definitions. (1) Participant training is the training of any...

  6. Participation in Universal Prevention Programs.

    PubMed

    Rosenman, Robert; Goates, Scott; Hill, Laura

    2012-01-01

    We analyze family decisions to participate in community-based universal substance-abuse prevention programs through the framework of expected utility theory. Family functioning, which has been shown to be a good indicator of child risk for substance abuse, provides a useful reference point for family decision making. Our results show that well-functioning families (with children at low risk for substance use) should have the lowest incentive to participate, but that high-risk families may also opt out of prevention programs. For programs that are most effective for high-risk youth, this could be a problem. Using data from the Strengthening Families Program and the Washington Healthy Youth Survey, we empirically test the implications of our model and find that at least for one measure of family functioning those families with children most likely to be at risk for substance use are opting out of the program. PMID:23894208

  7. Immunization and private sector participation.

    PubMed

    1998-10-01

    Representatives from Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama met August 19-20 in Honduras to discuss promoting and strengthening the participation of the private medical sector in immunization and surveillance programs for vaccine-preventable diseases. Participants met to analyze countries' experiences in incorporating the private medical sector into immunization and surveillance activities for vaccine-preventable diseases; to review regional and global goals for vaccine-preventable diseases, cold chain requirements, and issues related to introducing new vaccines into routine immunization schedules; and to sign agreements to facilitate the incorporation of the private medical sector into immunization and surveillance activities in the region. Country experiences are outlined. The Ministries of Health and the Societies/Associations of Pediatrics established specific objectives designed to develop and/or strengthen private medical sector participation in immunization. Agreements reached on epidemiological surveillance, a basic vaccination schedule, quality vaccines, the cold chain, national committees on immunization practices, annual work plans, technical cooperation, monitoring, and information, education, and promotion are described. PMID:12321836

  8. NITARP: Effects on Student Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Richard; Odden, Caroline; Hall, Garrison; Rebull, Luisa M.

    2016-01-01

    NITARP (NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program) is a teacher mentorship program designed to give educators experiences in authentic research in the area of astronomy. While the main focus of the program is aimed at giving educators experience working with and publishing scientific research, teachers are encouraged to involve students with the experience. NITARP funds up to two students to travel along with the educator while allowing an additional two students to attend but with no additional financial assistance. Teachers are welcome to have more student participants but no more than 4 may travel with the teacher to Caltech and the AAS meeting. Given that the focus of the NITARP program is on the educators, little is known about the effects of the program on the student participants other than anecdotal evidence. In order to better understand the impact on the students, we have designed a survey to be administered to past student participants. The survey was constructed with a goal to determine if the NITARP experience had an impact on students' views of science and influenced their educational paths. While the NITARP project has assembled some evidence of the impact on students, this is the first formal attempt to capture that impact. This poster will present the results of that survey.

  9. Mixed-method Exploration of Social Network Links to Participation

    PubMed Central

    Kreider, Consuelo M.; Bendixen, Roxanna M.; Mann, William C.; Young, Mary Ellen; McCarty, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The people who regularly interact with an adolescent form that youth's social network, which may impact participation. We investigated the relationship of social networks to participation using personal network analysis and individual interviews. The sample included 36 youth, age 11 – 16 years. Nineteen had diagnoses of learning disability, attention disorder, or high-functioning autism and 17 were typically developing. Network analysis yielded 10 network variables, of which 8 measured network composition and 2 measured network structure, with significant links to at least one measure of participation using the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment (CAPE). Interviews from youth in the clinical group yielded description of strategies used to negotiate social interactions, as well as processes and reasoning used to remain engaged within social networks. Findings contribute to understanding the ways social networks are linked to youth participation and suggest the potential of social network factors for predicting rehabilitation outcomes. PMID:26594737

  10. How Do The EV Project Participants Feel About Their EVS?

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, James E.

    2015-02-01

    The EV Project is an infrastructure study that enrolled over 8,000 residential participants. These participants purchased or leased a Nissan Leaf battery electric vehicle (BEV) or Chevrolet Volt extended range electric vehicle (EREV) and were among the first to explore this new electric drive technology. Collectively, BEV, EREV, and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are called plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs). The EV Project participants were very cooperative and enthusiastic about their participation in the project and very supportive in providing feedback and information. The information and attitudes of these participants concerning their experience with their PEVs were solicited using a survey in June 2013. At that time, some had up to 3 years of experience with their PEVs.

  11. [Community participation in health: the challenge in Chile].

    PubMed

    Méndez, Claudio A; López, Jairo J Vanegas

    2010-02-01

    Health care reforms implemented in Latin America and the Caribbean over the last 20 years have viewed community participation as a system-wide component. Nonetheless, these reform efforts have yet to break through the conceptual and operational barriers holding back the development and expansion of community participation. In Chile, changes introduced to the health care system are far from achieving any real participation from the community. Therefore, the consumer's role needs to be redefined from merely controlling the parts, to reaching across the whole system in a way that consumer input might identify and quickly correct any possible shortcomings in the health system's design, as well as its operations. With this in mind, the main challenges are to strengthen coordination among the various promotion and participation commitments, as well as community control, and to generate data and other evidence to assess the impact of community participation in health strategies. PMID:20339619

  12. Roles of participation and feedback in group potency.

    PubMed

    Gamero, Nuria; Peiró, José M; Zornoza, Ana; Picazo, Carmen

    2009-08-01

    The roles of group participation and group performance feedback were examined as antecedents of group potency, i.e., beliefs shared among a work group's members about the general effectiveness of the work group. Also examined were how group participation and the congruence of the feedback received from different sources about performance predicted convergence in members' beliefs about group effectiveness. The sample comprised 61 work groups of professionals involved in Master in Business Administration (MBA) programs (284 participants). Mean group size was 4.6 members (SD = .58). 65% of participants were male, and 51% were between 30 and 40 years of age. Data were gathered at two measurement times. Increases in group participation were positively related to increases in group potency and the convergence in beliefs about group effectiveness among group members over time. Results supported the premise that group performance feedback is an antecedent of changes in group potency over time. PMID:19810455

  13. Participation and hours of work of married females in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Soliman, A

    1991-12-01

    The study provides estimates of female labor force participation and hours of work in Cairo, Egypt, from a sample of 3882 married females in 1984. The determinants of labor force participation are examined. The urban participation rate was 31% in 1984 compared to total labor force participation of 9% in 1976. Hours of work were estimated with ordinary least squares techniques and were based on the theories of Ben-Porath, Gronau, and Heckman. Determinants of labor force participation include weekly earnings, income, unemployment, age, schooling, and fertility measures. Educational status and age explain 10% of the variance in earnings; however the full set of explanatory variables explain 40-50% of the variation in hours of work function for all females. An increase in the level of schooling increased the probability of labor force participation by 47-48%. Women with higher levels of education had an average work week longer by 6.2-6.9 hours. Unemployment of a household member decreased the probability of participation. Level of household income was statistically significant and positive for participation and hours of work. The probability of participation was decreased by the presence of children under the age of 5 years in the household. The presence of a child 6-11 years old decreased the number of hours of work by 2 hours and an additional child aged 6-11 years decreased an hour of work by 0.2%. An increased weekly wage rate of L.E.10 led to a 2-hour per week work increase. The relationship of hours of work and wages is considered strongly inelastic. PMID:12288770

  14. Early years.

    PubMed

    2011-04-01

    Healthcare professionals in Scotland who are involved in early years work now have an additional resource in the shape of NHS Scotland's Maternal and Early Years website, aimed at practitioners at all levels. The site includes evidence updates, news and events, and can be accessed at www.maternal-and-early-years.org.uk. PMID:27368523

  15. Factors associated with participant compliance in studies using accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul H; Macfarlane, Duncan J; Lam, T H

    2013-09-01

    Participant compliance is an important issue in studies using accelerometers. Some participants wear the accelerometer for the duration specified by the researchers but many do not. We investigated a range of demographic factors associated with participant compliance in obtaining analyzable accelerometer data. A total of 3601 participants (aged 47.6±13.1 years, 44.6% male) were included. They were asked to wear an accelerometer (ActiGraph) for four consecutive days after completing a household survey during March 2009-January 2011 in Hong Kong. Participants wore the accelerometer on average for 13.9h in a 24-h day. No significant difference was found between males and females (p=0.38). Using log-linear regression, it was found that older participants (0.5% more wearing hours for each year of age, p<0.001), those with full-time job (p<0.01), with tertiary education (p<0.01), non-smokers (p<0.01) and with high self-reported health (p<0.05) wore the accelerometer for more hours. These results provide details for estimating compliance rates for samples with different characteristics and thus sample size calculation to account for participant compliance. PMID:23688408

  16. Tracking club sport participation from childhood to early adulthood.

    PubMed

    Richards, Rosalina; Williams, Sheila; Poulton, Richie; Reeder, Anthony I

    2007-12-01

    This study examined the strength of tracking sport participation from childhood to early adulthood among the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study cohort. Participation in sport, dance, or gymnastics as part of a club or group (outside of school) was assessed at ages 7, 9, 15, 18, and 21 years. In addition to the traditionally used correlation coefficients, summary statistics (intraclass correlations; ICC) from random effect models and stability coefficients from generalized estimating equations (GEE) were calculated using all the longitudinal data and controlling for the influence of covariates on tracking strength. Correlation coefficients revealed statistically significant tracking of club sport participation (7-21 years) at low levels (r = .07-0.28). The ICC summary statistic (0.23) was consistent with this, while the GEE suggested moderate tracking (0.59). The results of this study suggest that encouraging sport participation during childhood and adolescence may result in a modest increase in the likelihood of participation later in life. However, the substantial movement into and out of sport participation observed here and in other studies cautions against relying solely on sport promotion among youth as a strategy to promote lifelong participation. PMID:18274213

  17. 9 CFR 145.52 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and Exhibition Waterfowl, Exhibition Poultry, and Game Bird Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.52 Participation. Participating flocks of hobbyist and exhibition waterfowl, exhibition poultry, and game...

  18. 9 CFR 145.52 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and Exhibition Waterfowl, Exhibition Poultry, and Game Bird Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.52 Participation. Participating flocks of hobbyist and exhibition waterfowl, exhibition poultry, and game...

  19. 9 CFR 145.52 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and Exhibition Waterfowl, Exhibition Poultry, and Game Bird Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.52 Participation. Participating flocks of hobbyist and exhibition waterfowl, exhibition poultry, and game...

  20. Texas JOBS Program Evaluation. Second Year Impacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schexnayder, Deanna T.; Olson, Jerome A.

    The second-year impacts of Texas' Job Opportunities and Basic Skills (JOBS) program for early participants were analyzed. A quasi-experimental study design was used to analyze data about 13,396 JOBS participants and 13,303 comparison group members. The analysis focused on the labor market outcomes of JOBS participants and their exits from and…

  1. Transitions in Gambling Participation during Late Adolescence and Young Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Bethany C.; Lee, Grace P.; Liu, Weiwei; Storr, Carla L.; Ialongo, Nicholas S.; Martins, Silvia S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine transitions in gambling participation from late adolescence into emerging adulthood, and to identify factors (i.e., gender, race, intervention status, lunch status, conduct disorder, parental monitoring, neighborhood environment, and substance use) that might influence these transitions. Methods Markov modeling was used to describe movement between past-year gambling states (i.e., non-gambling and gambling) over five years. Annual data on past-year gambling behavior and substance use were collected from 515 young men and women starting at age 17. Results Past-year gambling declined from 51% prevalence at age 17 to 21% prevalence at age 22. Participants who reported no past-year gambling at a particular annual assessment had more than an 80% probability of also reporting no past-year gambling at the following assessment. Men were 1.07–2.82 times more likely than women to transition from past-year non-gambling to gambling year-to-year, and women were 1.27–5.26 times more likely than men to transition from past-year gambling to non-gambling year-to-year. In addition, gender and past-year tobacco use interacted such that men who used tobacco were most likely (and men who did not use tobacco least likely) to gamble at baseline. Conclusions Transition rates between gambling states appear to be relatively stable over time from late adolescence into emerging adulthood; however, men and those who engage in substance use may be at increased risk for gambling participation. Implications and Contribution The current study provides important information about the naturalistic transitions in gambling behavior during late adolescence and emerging adulthood among an urban, mainly ethnic minority population. The finding that approximately half of past-year gamblers do not gamble during the following year suggests that gambling follows a variable developmental course. PMID:24656449

  2. Interview and recollection-based research with child disaster survivors: Participation-related changes in emotion and perceptions of participation.

    PubMed

    Hambrick, Erin P; O'Connor, Bridget M; Vernberg, Eric M

    2016-03-01

    Research suggests that some types of trauma research can be conducted safely with children ages 10 and older. The aim of this project was to learn more about potential risks or benefits of conducting research with younger children and with child disaster survivors, specifically about research that includes children providing trauma recollections. Fifty 8- to 12-year-old children who experienced a devastating tornado participated in an in-person interview that included both individual and joint (mother-child) recollections of their tornado experiences 1 year after exposure. These 50 children also rated 3 emotions at 3 time points and rated their perceptions (e.g., benefit and regret) of research post-participation. Children (N = 28) also participated in phone surveys 3 months later to assess persistent participation-related emotions and perceptions. Child reported that emotions worsened from pre- to during participation; however, reports of emotions returned to preparticipation levels post-participation and remained so at the 3-month follow-up. Sixty-four percent of children reported at least some participation benefit and no participation regret immediately postparticipation, as did 89.3% at the 3-month follow-up. Four percent of children reported some participation regret (no benefit) postparticipation, and 0% 3 months later. No children requested to stop participating, and none required postresearch connection with crisis services. Posttraumatic stress symptom severity, tornado exposure, and age were largely unrelated to child-reported emotions and perceptions of research. Results indicate that carefully planned and executed disaster-related research that includes children providing recollections can be conducted with preadolescents with little risk and some benefit. PMID:26390107

  3. Participation and the right to health: lessons from Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Halabi, Sam Foster

    2009-01-01

    The right to participation is the "the right of rights"--the basic right of people to have a say in how decisions that affect their lives are made. All legally binding international human rights treaties explicitly recognize the essential role of participation in realizing fundamental human rights. While the substance of the human right to health has been extensively developed, the right to participation as one of its components has remained largely unexplored. Should rights-based health advocacy focus on participation because there is a relationship between an individual's or a community's active involvement in health care decision-making and the highest attainable standard of health? In the context of the human right to health, does participation mean primarily political participation, or should we take the right to participation to mean more specifically the right of persons, individually and as a group, to shape health care policy for society and for themselves as patients? Decentralization of health care decision-making promises greater participation through citizen involvement in setting priorities, monitoring service provision, and finding new and creative ways to finance public health programs. Between 1999 and 2008, Indonesia decentralized health care funding and delivery to regional governments, resulting in substantial exclusion of its poor and uneducated citizens from the health care system while simultaneously expanding the opportunities for political participation for educated elites. This article explores the tension between the right to participation as an underlying determinant of health and as a political right by reviewing the experience of Indonesia ten years after its decision to decentralize health care provision. It is ultimately argued that rights-based advocates must be vigilant in retaining a unified perspective on human rights, resisting the persistent tendency to separate and prioritize the civil and political aspects of participation

  4. Motivation of fitness center participants toward resistance training.

    PubMed

    Kathrins, Bess P; Turbow, David J

    2010-09-01

    There is a need to better understand the behavior and sense of motivation of fitness center participants. The purpose of this study was to assess whether or not demographic characteristics and health self-determinism (intrinsic or extrinsic motivation) of fitness center participants were predictive of their levels of resistance training. A cross-sectional design was used; participants were recruited via the Internet to complete an online survey. There were 185 participants (age = 39.1 +/- 11.3 years) in the study. The majority of respondents reported having carried out levels of resistance training that met national health organization recommendations. Regression analysis of the data revealed that health self-determinism predicted quantity of resistance training reported (p = 0.014), whereas demographics did not. Being intrinsically motivated to health self-determinism predicted meeting national resistance training recommendations compared to participants extrinsically motivated (p = 0.007). For those who work with fitness center participants, our findings are useful by identifying participants as a predominantly intrinsically motivated group of people that performs adequate quantities of resistance training; the methodology employed in this study can be used to identify participants in need of increased levels of resistance training and heightened sense of motivation to do so. PMID:20802286

  5. Who participates in a computer-tailored physical activity program delivered through the Internet? A comparison of participants' and non-participants' characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Spittaels, Heleen; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2007-01-01

    Background Today, more and more health professionals use the Internet to deliver behavioral change interventions, because of its advantage to reach a wide variety of people at low costs. However, little is known about who is interested in and actually participates in such website-delivered programs. Therefore, the purpose of this manuscript was to examine the characteristics of participants and non-participants (parents recruited through schools) in a computer-tailored physical activity intervention delivered through the Internet. Methods Data was collected in two ways. First, 5706 brochures with a call to participate in a physical activity program, with as key element a website-delivered tailored physical activity advice, were distributed indirectly (through their ildren) to parents of all pupils in 14 primary and secondary schools in Belgium. Parents were asked to return the reply card mentioning if they wanted to participate or not. Second, characteristics of participating and non-participating parents were collected by distributing 2000 short questionnaires to pupils between 10–18 years of age, in 12 of the 14 schools. Chi-square analysis and binary logistic regressions were used to compare characteristics of those parents who showed interest (i.e. positive response on reply card) or actually participated (completed online assessment) in a website-delivered physical activity intervention with the characteristics of those parents who showed no interest or did not participate. Results In total 1730 pupils (87% respondents), completed the short questionnaire concerning their parents' age, occupation (to derive the socio-economic status) and physical activity habits. The results of the binary logistic regression showed that mothers were more likely to show interest (Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.68, p < 0.001) and participate (OR = 2.27, p < 0.005) in the program than fathers. High socioeconomic status (OR = 3.42, p < 0.001) and being employed (OR = 3.03, p < 0.001) were

  6. Participation in European water policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ast, J. A.; Boot, S. P.

    This paper considers the possibilities for interactive policy-making in European water management. In the new European Water Framework Directive, public information and consultation are major elements in the procedure (process) that leads to River Basin Management Plans. In general, decision making in integrated water management should not be limited to the application of models and desk studies. Important decisions need a high level of participation. In this interactive approach, visions, ideas, patterns of behaviour and solutions to perceived problems of different societal actors can be identified and incorporated into the decision-making process. For example, farmer organisations, environmental groups and associations of house owners, but also individual citizens often have various and differing ideas about measures that change the physical, chemical or biological characteristics of a river basin. Well-organised interaction has two main potential advantages: The quality of the decision will be higher because specific knowledge of people involved and their different views are taken into consideration. The interaction enables exchange of information which can lead to a better understanding of the ins and outs of the specific situation and in this way contribute to public support. By means of two examples of water related policy issues in Europe, i.e. economic approaches in the water framework directive and Integrated Product Policy, various opportunities for pluralistic as well as corporatist types of participation in modern water management are presented and discussed.

  7. 38 CFR 52.70 - Participant rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., to refuse to participate in patient activities, to refuse to participate in experimental research... treatment. (d) Privacy and confidentiality. Participants have the right to privacy and confidentiality of their personal and clinical records. (1) Participants have a right to privacy in their medical...

  8. 38 CFR 52.70 - Participant rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., to refuse to participate in patient activities, to refuse to participate in experimental research... treatment. (d) Privacy and confidentiality. Participants have the right to privacy and confidentiality of their personal and clinical records. (1) Participants have a right to privacy in their medical...

  9. 7 CFR 1940.954 - State participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true State participation. 1940.954 Section 1940.954....954 State participation. (a) Application. If a State desires to participate in this pilot program, the... 424.1: (1) A narrative signed by the Governor including reasons for State participation in...

  10. 7 CFR 1940.954 - State participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false State participation. 1940.954 Section 1940.954....954 State participation. (a) Application. If a State desires to participate in this pilot program, the... 424.1: (1) A narrative signed by the Governor including reasons for State participation in...

  11. 7 CFR 1940.954 - State participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2011-01-01 2009-01-01 true State participation. 1940.954 Section 1940.954....954 State participation. (a) Application. If a State desires to participate in this pilot program, the... 424.1: (1) A narrative signed by the Governor including reasons for State participation in...

  12. 34 CFR 691.7 - Institutional participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Grant Program under 34 CFR part 690 must participate in the ACG Program. (b) An institution that offers... Program, and that participates in the Federal Pell Grant Program under 34 CFR part 690 must participate in... subpart M of 34 CFR part 668, it also loses its eligibility to participate in the ACG or National...

  13. 34 CFR 691.7 - Institutional participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Grant Program under 34 CFR part 690 must participate in the ACG Program. (b) An institution that offers... Program, and that participates in the Federal Pell Grant Program under 34 CFR part 690 must participate in... subpart M of 34 CFR part 668, it also loses its eligibility to participate in the ACG or National...

  14. 34 CFR 691.7 - Institutional participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Grant Program under 34 CFR part 690 must participate in the ACG Program. (b) An institution that offers... Program, and that participates in the Federal Pell Grant Program under 34 CFR part 690 must participate in... subpart M of 34 CFR part 668, it also loses its eligibility to participate in the ACG or National...

  15. 34 CFR 691.7 - Institutional participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Grant Program under 34 CFR part 690 must participate in the ACG Program. (b) An institution that offers... Program, and that participates in the Federal Pell Grant Program under 34 CFR part 690 must participate in... subpart M of 34 CFR part 668, it also loses its eligibility to participate in the ACG or National...

  16. 15 CFR 930.42 - Public participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Public participation. 930.42 Section... Activities § 930.42 Public participation. (a) Management programs shall provide for public participation in the State agency's review of consistency determinations. Public participation, at a minimum,...

  17. 15 CFR 930.42 - Public participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Public participation. 930.42 Section... Activities § 930.42 Public participation. (a) Management programs shall provide for public participation in the State agency's review of consistency determinations. Public participation, at a minimum,...

  18. 15 CFR 930.42 - Public participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Public participation. 930.42 Section... Activities § 930.42 Public participation. (a) Management programs shall provide for public participation in the State agency's review of consistency determinations. Public participation, at a minimum,...

  19. 7 CFR 1940.954 - State participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true State participation. 1940.954 Section 1940.954....954 State participation. (a) Application. If a State desires to participate in this pilot program, the... 424.1: (1) A narrative signed by the Governor including reasons for State participation in...

  20. Efficiency of dairy farms participating and not participating in veterinary herd health management programs.

    PubMed

    Derks, Marjolein; Hogeveen, Henk; Kooistra, Sake R; van Werven, Tine; Tauer, Loren W

    2014-12-01

    This paper compares farm efficiencies between dairies who were participating in a veterinary herd health management (VHHM) program with dairies not participating in such a program, to determine whether participation has an association with farm efficiency. In 2011, 572 dairy farmers received a questionnaire concerning the participation and execution of a VHHM program on their farms. Data from the questionnaire were combined with farm accountancy data from 2008 through 2012 from farms that used calendar year accounting periods, and were analyzed using Stochastic Frontier Analysis (SFA). Two separate models were specified: model 1 was the basic stochastic frontier model (output: total revenue; input: feed costs, land costs, cattle costs, non-operational costs), without explanatory variables embedded into the efficiency component of the error term. Model 2 was an expansion of model 1 which included explanatory variables (number of FTE; total kg milk delivered; price of concentrate; milk per hectare; cows per FTE; nutritional yield per hectare) inserted into the efficiency component of the joint error term. Both models were estimated with the financial parameters expressed per 100 kg fat and protein corrected milk and per cow. Land costs, cattle costs, feed costs and non-operational costs were statistically significant and positive in all models (P<0.01). Frequency distributions of the efficiency scores for the VHHM dairies and the non-VHHM dairies were plotted in a kernel density plot, and differences were tested using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov two-sample test. VHHM dairies had higher total revenue per cow, but not per 100 kg milk. For all SFA models, the difference in distribution was not statistically different between VHHM dairies and non-VHHM dairies (P values 0.94, 0.35, 0.95 and 0.89 for the basic and complete model per 100 kg fat and protein corrected milk and per cow respectively). Therefore we conclude that with our data farm participation in VHHM is not related

  1. Female labour force participation and fertility.

    PubMed

    Concepcion, M B

    1974-01-01

    The levels of labor force participation by women in selected Asian countries were recorded in a series of censuses taken over a period of years. These levels were less influenced than male employment levels by economic conditions and more influenced by cultural traits of the country. Postwar trends seem to have fallen in Korea, risen in Singapore and the Philippines, and remained steady in Japan, Malaya, and Thailand. The limitations of these data are mentioned. In Thailand and West Malaysia greater percentages of women worked in agricultural than non-agricultural employment; in the Philippines, where women did not work so much in agricultural pursuits, their jobs were still in traditional rather than in development industries. In the cities of Bangkok, Manila, and Kuala Lumpur, fertility was lower for working than for non-working women. In rural agricultural areas, the fertility of working women was minimally higher, probably due to economic need of lar ger families. It is concluded that urban life separates the employment and the family roles of working women, leading to lowered fertility; this does not occur in rural areas. The creation of new roles for women alternative or supplementary to marriage and motherhood would result in lowered fertility. In high fertility Asian countries, policies directed toward greater participation of women in non-agricultural work and great er exposure to an urban lifestyle might achieve fertility reductions. PMID:12307194

  2. Medical student participation in surface anatomy classes.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, R; Brough, H; Ellis, H

    2006-10-01

    Surface anatomy is an integral part of medical education and enables medical students to learn skills for future medical practice. In the past decade, there has been a decline in the teaching of anatomy in the medical curriculum, and this study seeks to assess the attitudes of medical students to participation in surface anatomy classes. Consequently, all first year medical students at the Guy's, King's and St Thomas's Medical School, London, were asked to fill in an anonymous questionnaire at the end of their last surface anatomy session of the year. A total of 290 medical students completed the questionnaires, resulting in an 81.6% response rate. The students had a mean age of 19.6 years (range 18-32) and 104 (35.9%) of them were male. Seventy-six students (26.2%) were subjects in surface anatomy tutorials (60.5% male). Students generally volunteered because no one else did. Of the volunteers, 38.2% would rather not have been subjects, because of embarrassment, inability to make notes, or to see clearly the material being taught. Female medical students from ethnic minority groups were especially reluctant to volunteer to be subjects. Single-sex classes improved the volunteer rate to some extent, but not dramatically. Students appreciate the importance of surface anatomy to cadaveric study and to future clinical practice. Computer models, lectures, and videos are complementary but cannot be a substitute for peer group models, artists' models being the only alternative. PMID:16302232

  3. Transition from High School to College and Work for Tech Prep Participants in Eight Selected Consortia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Debra D.; Loeb, Jane W.; Gong, Yuqin; Deng, Chi-Ping; Yoo, Jung-sup; Hill, Jerry L.

    The transition from high school to college and work for tech prep participants was examined in a 4-year longitudinal study of local tech prep consortia in eight regions of the United States. The study methodology drew heavily on transcript analysis and two surveys with tech prep participants and nonparticipants. The tech prep participants and…

  4. The Assessment of Preschool Children's Participation: Internal Consistency and Construct Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Mary; King, Gillian; Petrenchik, Theresa; Kertoy, Marilyn; Anaby, Dana

    2012-01-01

    Participation in activities provides the means for young children to learn, play, develop skills, and develop a sense of personal identity. The Assessment of Preschool Children's Participation (APCP) is a newly developed measure to capture the participation of children aged 2 to 5 years and 11 months in the areas of play, skill development, active…

  5. Increasing Practitioners Knowledge of Participation Among Elderly Adults in Senior Center Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jan; Bisbee, Carol; Porter, Russell; Flanders, Joanne

    2004-01-01

    The research reported in this paper attempted to identify predictors of senior center participation and to ascertain why there has been a decline in the number of individuals participating at senior centers in recent years. The research reports the results of a survey conducted among senior center participants in an 11-county area in the Nortex…

  6. Increasing Practitioners' Knowledge of Participation among Elderly Adults in Senior Center Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jan; Bisbee, Carol; Porter, Russell; Flanders, Joanne

    2004-01-01

    The research reported in this paper attempted to identify predictors of senior center participation and to ascertain why there has been a decline in the number of individuals participating at senior centers in recent years. The research reports the results of a survey conducted among senior center participants in an 11-county area in the Nortex…

  7. A Conceptual Framework and Proposed Taxonomy for Social Policy Research on Participation in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigley, B. Allan

    Although a considerable body of research has been developed in recent years on participation in adult education, little has been done from the standpoint of social policy and its impact on participation. To assist investigation of this aspect of participation, three social policy models are presented: market models, progressive-liberal-welfare…

  8. Demand for University Continuing Education in Canada: Who Participates and Why?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamuti-Trache, Maria; Schuetze, Hans G.

    2009-01-01

    The demand for and participation in continuing education by Canadian university graduates who completed bachelor and/or first professional degrees in 1995 are analyzed in this article. Within five years of completing their first degree, in addition to participating in graduate programs, a large number of those graduates participated in non-degree…

  9. Naturalistic Observations of Schoolyard Social Participation: Marker Variables for Socio-Emotional Functioning in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coplan, Robert J.; Ooi, Laura L.; Rose-Krasnor, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine links between observed social participation in the schoolyard and indices of socio-emotional functioning in early adolescence. Participants were children (N = 290) aged 9 to 12 years. Social participation (e.g., solitary play, dyadic interaction, group interaction) was assessed in the schoolyard during recess…

  10. [Participated observation of nursing child health consultation].

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Fernanda Manuela; da Silva, José António Neto Ferreira; Quitério, Margarida Maria de Sousa Lourenço; Charepe, Zaida Borges

    2012-12-01

    Situation diagnosis using exploratory and descriptive scientific methodology (participant observation with descriptive statistical treatment) in order to identify nursing' practices in the area of health promotion during a nursing child health consultation. The 31 consultations observed (n = 31) showed that the majority of observations occurred in children younger than 2 years being the most discussed topic feed with predominant use of expository methodology. There was also little use of informational support and when used relate to the themes of security and nutrition. Most providers raised questions and there was limited registration of the interaction between provider and child with an expenditure averaging of 23 minutes per consultation. Given the results and reflecting about them stands out as intervention the construction of a health promotion manual with the integration of theory and evidence of good practice in this area. PMID:23380769

  11. Public Participation Plan. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    The purpose of this Public Participation Plan is to describe the Department of Energy's plan for involving the public in the decision-making process required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 as related to the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. This project was authorized by congress in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, PL95-604. The Act provides for a cooperative effort with affected states and Indian tribes for the cleanup of designated inactive uranium mill tailings sites and associated vicinity properties, which are located in ten western states and in Pennsylvania. The Act was amended in 1982 to also include vicinity properties contaminated with residual radioactive material in Edgemont, South Dakota.

  12. Student Participation in Rover Field Trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, C. D.; Arvidson, R. E.; Nelson, S. V.; Sherman, D. M.; Squyres, S. W.

    2001-12-01

    The LAPIS program was developed in 1999 as part of the Athena Science Payload education and public outreach, funded by the JPL Mars Program Office. For the past three years, the Athena Science Team has been preparing for 2003 Mars Exploration Rover Mission operations using the JPL prototype Field Integrated Design and Operations (FIDO) rover in extended rover field trials. Students and teachers participating in LAPIS work with them each year to develop a complementary mission plan and implement an actual portion of the annual tests using FIDO and its instruments. LAPIS is designed to mirror an end-to-end mission: Small, geographically distributed groups of students form an integrated mission team, working together with Athena Science Team members and FIDO engineers to plan, implement, and archive a two-day test mission, controlling FIDO remotely over the Internet using the Web Interface for Telescience (WITS) and communicating with each other by email, the web, and teleconferences. The overarching goal of LAPIS is to get students excited about science and related fields. The program provides students with the opportunity to apply knowledge learned in school, such as geometry and geology, to a "real world" situation and to explore careers in science and engineering through continuous one-on-one interactions with teachers, Athena Science Team mentors, and FIDO engineers. A secondary goal is to help students develop improved communication skills and appreciation of teamwork, enhanced problem-solving skills, and increased self-confidence. The LAPIS program will provide a model for outreach associated with future FIDO field trials and the 2003 Mars mission operations. The base of participation will be broadened beyond the original four sites by taking advantage of the wide geographic distribution of Athena team member locations. This will provide greater numbers of students with the opportunity to actively engage in rover testing and to explore the possibilities of

  13. Association between food assistance program participation and overweight.

    PubMed

    Chaparro, M Pia; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Harrison, Gail G

    2014-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to investigate the association between food assistance program participation and overweight/obesity according to poverty level. METHODS A cross-sectional analysis of data from 46,217 non-pregnant and non-lactating women in Lima, Peru was conducted; these data were obtained from nationally representative surveys from the years 2003, 2004, 2006, and 2008-2010. The dependent variable was overweight/obesity, and the independent variable was food assistance program participation. Poisson regression was used to stratify the data by family socioeconomic level, area of residence (Lima versus the rest of the country; urban versus rural), and survey year (2003-2006 versus 2008-2010). The models were adjusted for age, education level, urbanization, and survey year. RESULTS Food assistance program participation was associated with an increased risk of overweight/obesity in women living in homes without poverty indicators [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.29; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06;1.57]. When stratified by area of residence, similar associations were observed for women living in Lima and urban areas; no associations were found between food assistance program participation and overweight/obesity among women living outside of Lima or in rural areas, regardless of the poverty status. CONCLUSIONS Food assistance program participation was associated with overweight/obesity in non-poor women. Additional studies are required in countries facing both aspects of malnutrition. PMID:26039391

  14. Association between food assistance program participation and overweight

    PubMed Central

    Chaparro, M Pia; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Harrison, Gail G

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to investigate the association between food assistance program participation and overweight/obesity according to poverty level. METHODS A cross-sectional analysis of data from 46,217 non-pregnant and non-lactating women in Lima, Peru was conducted; these data were obtained from nationally representative surveys from the years 2003, 2004, 2006, and 2008-2010. The dependent variable was overweight/obesity, and the independent variable was food assistance program participation. Poisson regression was used to stratify the data by family socioeconomic level, area of residence (Lima versus the rest of the country; urban versus rural), and survey year (2003-2006 versus 2008-2010). The models were adjusted for age, education level, urbanization, and survey year. RESULTS Food assistance program participation was associated with an increased risk of overweight/obesity in women living in homes without poverty indicators [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.29; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06;1.57]. When stratified by area of residence, similar associations were observed for women living in Lima and urban areas; no associations were found between food assistance program participation and overweight/obesity among women living outside of Lima or in rural areas, regardless of the poverty status. CONCLUSIONS Food assistance program participation was associated with overweight/obesity in non-poor women. Additional studies are required in countries facing both aspects of malnutrition. PMID:26039391

  15. Caloric Beverage Intake Among Adult Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Participants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We compared sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB), alcohol, and other caloric beverage (juice and milk) consumption of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participants with that of low-income nonparticipants. Methods. We used 1 day of dietary intake data from the 2005–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for 4594 adults aged 20 years and older with household income at or below 250% of the federal poverty line. We used bivariate and multivariate methods to compare the probability of consuming and the amount of calories consumed for each beverage type across 3 groups: current SNAP participants, former participants, and nonparticipants. We used instrumental variable methods to control for unobservable differences in participant groups. Results. After controlling for observable characteristics, SNAP participants were no more likely to consume SSBs than were nonparticipants. Instrumental variable estimates showed that current participants consumed fewer calories from SSBs than did similar nonparticipants. We found no differences in alcoholic beverage consumption, which cannot be purchased with SNAP benefits. Conclusions. SNAP participants are not unique in their consumption of SSBs or alcoholic beverages. Purchase restrictions may have little effect on SSB consumption. PMID:25033141

  16. Genomic Research and Wide Data Sharing: Views of Prospective Participants

    PubMed Central

    Trinidad, Susan Brown; Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Bares, Julie M.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Larson, Eric B.; Burke, Wylie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Sharing study data within the research community generates tension between two important goods: promoting scientific goals and protecting the privacy interests of study participants. The present study was designed to explore the perceptions, beliefs, and attitudes of research participants and possible future participants regarding genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and repository-based research. Methods Focus group sessions with (1) current research participants, (2) surrogate decision-makers, and (3) three age-defined cohorts (18–34 years, 35–50, >50). Results Participants expressed a variety of opinions about the acceptability of wide sharing of genetic and phenotypic information for research purposes through large, publicly accessible data repositories. Most believed that making de-identified study data available to the research community is a social good that should be pursued. Privacy and confidentiality concerns were common, though they would not necessarily preclude participation. Many participants voiced reservations about sharing data with for-profit organizations. Conclusions Trust is central in participants’ views regarding GWAS data sharing. Further research is needed to develop governance models that enact the values of stewardship. PMID:20535021

  17. Research Participation Among Older Adults With Mobility Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Schlenk, Elizabeth A.; Ross, Diana; Stilley, Carol S.; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Olshansky, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to examine reasons for participation in clinical research among older adults with mobility limitation. A purposive sample of 20 men and 20 women aged 70 years or older was recruited. Data were collected by audiotaped telephone interviews using a semi-structured interview guide and transcribed verbatim. Participants expect privacy, professionalism by research staff, and respectful treatment. Benefits to protocol adherence include personal education, comparison of their health status with that of others, opportunity to maintain vitality, and altruism. Barriers to protocol adherence are apprehension, in particular a negative impact on their health care, randomization to the control group, and experimental drugs; and inconvenience. Factors promoting study completion are obligation, reciprocity, receipt of test results, health promotion, and socialization. Implications include meeting expectations, providing health education and study results to participants, reducing barriers to participation, and presenting opportunities for interaction with others. PMID:19692549

  18. An investigation of the dynamic processes promoting citizen participation.

    PubMed

    Foster-Fishman, Pennie G; Collins, Charles; Pierce, Steven J

    2013-06-01

    This study expanded the citizen participation literature by examining the dynamic nature of citizen participation and the extent to which the factors associated with citizen participation may be moderated by resident leadership status. Longitudinal survey data collected from 542 residents in one small Midwestern city implementing a community change initiative provide some insight into the challenges surrounding the promotion of an active citizenry. Within this one community, citizenship behaviors of emergent resident leaders and residents uninterested in a leadership role were influenced, to some extent, by different factors and the importance of these factors shifted in only a 2 years time span. Future research is needed to determine if the dynamics uncovered in this study were due to the initiative or to the nature of citizen participation processes. PMID:23423324

  19. Disentangling Public Participation In Science and Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This article provides a framework for disentangling the concept of participation, with emphasis on participation in genomic medicine. We have derived seven ‘dimensions’ of participation that are most frequently invoked in the extensive, heterogeneous literature on participation. To exemplify these dimensions, we use material from a database of 102 contemporary cases of participation, and focus here on cases specific to science and medicine. We describe the stakes of public participation in biomedical research, with a focus on genomic medicine and lay out the seven dimensions. Discussion We single out five cases of participation that have particular relevance to the field of genomic medicine, we apply the seven dimensions to show how we can differentiate among forms of participation within this domain. Summary We conclude with some provocations to researchers and some recommendations for taking variation in participation more seriously. PMID:24479693

  20. Trends in the Participation and Performance of Students with Disabilities. Technical Report 50

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurlow, Martha; Quenemoen, Rachel; Altman, Jason; Cuthbert, Marge

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the participation and performance trends over time for students with disabilities, progressing from school year 2001-02, a base year for determining AYP goals under NCLB, through school year 2004-05, the third year that states reported after the NCLB baseline year (VanGetson & Thurlow, 2007). Within this…

  1. Pension sponsorship and participation: trends and policy issues.

    PubMed

    Purcell, P J

    Employment sector and employer size account for substantial variation in workers' participation in employer-sponsored retirement plans. Other things being equal, employees in the public sector--that is, federal, state, and local governments--are much more likely to be offered a retirement plan than workers in the private sector. Within the private sector, workers in firms with 100 or more employees are significantly more likely than workers in smaller firms to have the opportunity to participate in a retirement plan. This situation has prompted Congress to seek ways of reducing small businesses' obstacles to pension coverage. For example, Congress has authorized retirement plans that have fewer reporting requirements and less stringent contribution rules than those imposed on larger employers. Evaluating the effect of these laws on pension coverage is complicated by the many other variables that affect an employer's decision to sponsor a retirement plan and a worker's decision to participate in it. Nevertheless, data collected in national surveys of employers and households can be used to establish a baseline against which future changes in retirement plan sponsorship and participation can be measured. Recent surveys of employers and households reveal that: During the 1990s, participation in retirement plans rose among workers in firms with fewer than 100 employees but remained steady among workers in larger firms. The 1990s saw a substantial shift from defined benefit retirement plans to defined contribution plans. Despite increases in participation, workers in firms with fewer than 100 employees are only about half as likely as those in larger firms to participate in an employer-sponsored retirement plan. In both the public and private sectors, part-year or part-time workers are much less likely than year-round, full-time workers to be offered an opportunity to participate in an employer-sponsored retirement plan. PMID:12428512

  2. Enabling Participation In Exoplanet Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stuart F.

    2015-08-01

    Determining the distribution of exoplanets has required the contributions of a community of astronomers, who all require the support of colleagues to finish their projects in a manner to enable them to enter new collaborations to continue to contribute to understanding exoplanet science.The contributions of each member of the astronomy community are to be encouraged and must never be intentionally obstructed.We present a member’s long pursuit to be a contributing part of the exoplanet community through doing transit photometry as a means of commissioning the telescopes for a new observatory, followed by pursuit of interpreting the distributions in exoplanet parameter data.We present how the photometry projects have been presented as successful by the others who have claimed to have completed them, but how by requiring its employees to present results while omitting one member has been obstructive against members working together and has prevented the results from being published in what can genuinely be called a peer-reviewed fashion.We present how by tolerating one group to obstruct one member from finishing participation and then falsely denying credit is counterproductive to doing science.We show how expecting one member to attempt to go around an ostracizing group by starting something different is destructive to the entire profession. We repeat previously published appeals to help ostracized members to “go around the observatory” by calling for discussion on how the community must act to reverse cases of shunning, bullying, and other abuses. Without better recourse and support from the community, actions that do not meet standard good collegial behavior end up forcing good members from the community. The most important actions are to enable an ostracized member to have recourse to participating in group papers by either working through other authors or through the journal. All journals and authors must expect that no co-author is keeping out a major

  3. Opportunity to Participate in ESSE 21: The 2003 Call for Participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzek, M.; Johnson, D. R.

    2003-12-01

    Earth System Science Education for the 21st Century (ESSE 21), sponsored by NASA through the Universities Space Research Association (USRA), is a collaborative undergraduate/graduate education program offering small grants to colleges and universities to engage a diverse interdisciplinary community of faculty and scientists in the development of courses, curricula and degree programs and sharing of learning resources focused on the fundamental understanding and application of Earth system principles for the classroom and laboratory. Through an expanded focus including partnerships with minority institutions, ESSE 21 is further developing broadly based courses, educational resources, electronic learning materials and degree programs that extend Earth system science concepts in both undergraduate and graduate classrooms and laboratories. These resources emphasizing the fundamentals of Earth system science advance the nation's broader agenda for improving science, technology, engineering and mathematics competency. The thrust to establish Earth system and global change science within the classrooms of colleges and universities is critical to laying and extending the foundation for knowledge-based decision making in the 21st century by both scientists and society in an effort to achieve sustainability. ESSE 21 released a Call for Participation (CFP) in the Fall of 2002 soliciting proposals from undergraduate institutions to create and adopt undergraduate and graduate level Earth system science content in courses, curricula and degree programs. In February 2003, twelve college and university teams were competitively selected through the CFP as the Year 1 and Year 2 Program participants. Eight of the participating teams are from minority institutions. The goal for all is to effect systemic change through developing Earth system science learning materials, courses, curricula, degree tracks or programs, and departments that are self-sustaining in the coming decades. ESSE

  4. Initial Response to Program, Program Participation, and Weight Reduction Among 375 MOVE! Participants, Augusta, Georgia, 2008–2010

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Dale; Xu, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obesity management guidelines specify initial goals for participation and weight reduction for the first 6 months of a weight-reduction intervention, but guidelines do not specify when to assess early response and make adjustments. We aimed to determine whether very early or early weight reduction in the weight-reduction program MOVE! predicted later participation or achievement of weight-reduction goals. Methods Using clinical data from 375 MOVE! participants enrolled from July 2008 through May 2010, we examined program participation and weight reduction. Very early response was defined as achieving a weight reduction of 0.5% or more at week 2, and early response was defined as achieving weight reduction of 1.0% or more at week 4. Success, or achievement of weight-reduction goal, at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years was defined as a weight reduction of 5% or more. Participation was assessed according to the number of sessions attended within the first 6 months of program enrollment; attendance of 14 or more sessions was classified as high-intensity participation. Results Very early responders were more than 5 times as likely (odds ratio [OR] = 5.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.69–17.71; P = .005) and early responders were more than 10 times as likely (OR = 10.76; 95% CI, 2.64–43.80; P = .001) to achieve the 6-month weight-reduction goal as participants who were not very early responders or early responders, respectively. Early responders were almost 7 times as likely to achieve the 1-year weight-reduction goal (OR = 6.96; 95% CI, 1.85–26.13; P = .004). Neither very early nor early response predicted participation, high-intensity participation, or success at 2 years. Conclusion This research supports the predictive value of very early response and early response to MOVE! on weight-reduction success at 6 months; early response also predicted 1-year success, suggesting that the 2-week point may be an ideal time to assess initial response and make

  5. Accountability to Research Participants: Unresolved Dilemmas and Unravelling Ethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinson, Martin P.

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on findings from an ethnographic study of Romani Gypsy groups in England (1996-2000), along with data from follow-up work involving original and additional participants (2005-ongoing), this paper explores several ethical issues that arose. It traces developing relationships across a 13-year period, identifying the problems of attempting to…

  6. Students' Autobiographical Memory of Participation in Multiple Sport Education Seasons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinelnikov, Oleg A.; Hastie, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the recollections of the Sport Education experiences of a cohort of students (15 boys and 19 girls) who had participated in seasons of basketball, soccer and badminton across grades six through eight (average age at data collection = 15.6 years). Using autobiographic memory theory techniques, the students completed surveys and…

  7. Principals' Participation Levels in Best Practices for School Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stogdill, Christopher T.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify Nebraska principal perceptions regarding the level of participation the AdvancED school improvement process. Further, the study identified differences among principals' knowledge, based on demographic characteristics of years of experience, size of school enrollments, and formal training in school…

  8. Children's Eyewitness Memory: Effects of Participation and Forensic Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobey, Ann E.; Goodman, Gail S.

    1992-01-01

    This study, with 39 4-year-olds, found that children had better free recall accuracy and lowered suggestibility when they participated with a "babysitter" rather than observed a babysitter and child. Addition of forensic context (by a policeman prior to questioning) increased error in free recall but did not affect children's accuracy in answering…

  9. Head Start Participants, Programs, Families and Staff in 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Head Start programs provide poor children and their families with comprehensive early education and support services. Each year, programs are required to submit a Program Information Report (PIR) to the Office of Head Start on participating children, pregnant women, and families, as well as the staff serving the Head Start population. In 2013, the…

  10. Nutrition Needs Assessment of Young Special Olympics Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Jennifer C.; Temple, Viviene A.; Anholt, Jane P.; Gaul, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Children with intellectual disability (ID) are at increased risk for obesity and nutrition-related health concerns, yet there is a paucity of data describing their nutrition status. The purpose of this study was to evaluate nutritional challenges of young participants (2-10 years of age) enrolled in Special Olympics Canada (SOC)…

  11. 12 CFR 705.7 - Loans to participating credit unions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... amount. However, any loan monies matched by member share deposits will be credited as a two-for-one match... available to the participating credit union only after it has documented that it has met the match... generate the required match within one year of the approval of the loan will result in the reduction of...

  12. The MBA Experience: Participants' Entry Level Conceptions of Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viljoen, John; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Interviews with a sample of 18 first-year Master's of Business Administration students elicited their conceptions of management in terms of attributes, roles, and choices. Comparisons with major management theories showed that, although participants view management as an amalgam of highly personal choices, theories underplay the importance of…

  13. Who's Playing College Sports? Trends in Participation. Research Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheslock, John

    2007-01-01

    This study provides the most accurate and comprehensive examination of participation trends to date. We analyze data from almost every higher education institution in the country and utilize data and methods that are free of the shortcomings present in previous research on this subject. A 10-year NCAA sample containing 738 NCAA colleges and…

  14. 15 CFR 9.5 - Participation of manufacturers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... LABELING PROGRAM FOR HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES AND EQUIPMENT TO EFFECT ENERGY CONSERVATION § 9.5 Participation... kept on file by the manufacturer or his agent for two years after that model of appliance or equipment... Specification, the Label on or with each individual unit of appliance or equipment within the subject class...

  15. Changing Attitudes in Underprivileged Adolescents Participating in Group Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Julia

    Group psychotherapy was used with socio-economically deprived adolescents whose capacity for self-expression was promising. Non-psychotic acting out characters and passive inadequate personalities participated, and discussion, role playing, and psychodrama were the techniques utilized. After one year the following changes were seen: (1) increased…

  16. Participant-Observation and the Development of Urban Neighborhood Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.

    The urban neighborhood, long of interest to city planners and sociologists, has in recent years become of increasing concern to public policy-makers. This new concern has called attention to a large gap in the municipal policy-maker's information resources. Social scientists have employed a field method, participant-observation, that can…

  17. Elementary Students' Participation Style in Synchronous Online Communication and Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, C. H.; Yang, H. Y.; Liang, T. H.; Chen, H. P.

    2010-01-01

    This research investigated how differently elementary school students participate in synchronous online collaborative learning by analysing their discussions with their partners. Two hundred and seventy-eight Taiwanese students, ranging in age from 11 to 12 years old, were involved in this study. The students were randomly arranged within-class…

  18. An Earthquake Education Program with Parent Participation for Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulay, Hulya

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the earthquake education program which was prepared for 5 to 6 year old children and to draw attention to the importance of parent participation. The earthquake education program was applied to 93 children and 31 parents in the province of Denizli situated in the first degree seismic zone…

  19. Unfinished Business in Widening Participation: The End of the Beginning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton, Geoff; David, Miriam; Hall, Geoff; Brown, Richard; Ebdon, Les; Kendall, Steve; Watters, Kate

    2008-01-01

    Over a decade has gone by since the report of the Widening Participation Committee--"Learning works"--was presented to the Further Education Funding Council. Ten years on, this report asks how far have we come in the decade since "Learning works"? What progress have we made? And what barriers have we yet to overcome? Bringing together the…

  20. Relationships among Ensemble Participation, Private Instruction, and Aural Skill Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, William V.; Elliott, Charles A.

    1980-01-01

    This study sought to determine the relationships that exist among junior high school students' participation in school performing ensembles, those skills measured by the Gaston Test of Musicality, and the number of years of private study on the piano or on ensemble instruments. (Author/SJL)

  1. The Role of Oral Participation in Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frymier, Ann Bainbridge; Houser, Marian L.

    2016-01-01

    Engagement has received significant research attention in recent years in an effort to better understand student achievement and the lack of it. Oral participation is generally highly valued in American classrooms and is often thought to be a good indicator of students' engagement in learning. As a result, many college instructors require and/or…

  2. Challenges in Cultivating EOSDIS User Survey Participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boquist, C. L.; Sofinowski, E. J.; Walter, S.

    2011-12-01

    Since 2004 NASA has surveyed users of its Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) to determine user satisfaction with its services. The surveys have been conducted by CFI Group under contract with the Federal Consulting Group, Executive Agent in government for the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI). The purpose of these annual surveys is to help EOSDIS and the data centers assess current status and improve future services. The survey questions include demographic and experiential questions in addition to the ACSI and EOSDIS specific rating questions. In addition to customer satisfaction, analysis of each year's results has provided insight into the survey process. Although specific questions have been added, modified, or deleted to reflect changes to the EOSDIS system and processes, the model rating questions have remained the same to ensure consistency for evaluating cross year trends. Working with the CFI Group, we have refined the invitation and questions to increase clarity and address the different ways diverse groups of users access services at EOSDIS data centers. We present challenges in preparing a single set of questions that go to users with backgrounds in many Earth science disciplines. These users may have contacted any of the 12 EOSDIS data centers for information or may have accessed data or data products from many kinds of aircraft and satellite instruments. We discuss lessons learned in preparing the invitation and survey questions and the steps taken to make the survey easier to complete and to encourage increased participation.

  3. Elderly patients’ participation in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Premnath; Harugeri, Anand

    2015-01-01

    The elderly population is a large and the fastest-growing portion of the population worldwide. The elderly make up the lion's share of patients for certain health conditions including cancer, cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and Parkinson's disease, among others in most parts of the world. Furthermore, elderly make up the majority of patients for many medications treating chronic conditions. Typically, clinical trials conducted in adult population include patients between the ages of 18 and 64 years. However, drugs should be studied in all age groups and trial participants should be representative of the patient population receiving the therapy in daily medical practice. Elderly patients are poorly represented in clinical trials. Hence, there is inadequate evidence and knowledge about responses of geriatric patients to medications. Regulatory authorities in developed countries urge to avoid arbitrary upper age limits and advise researchers and industry not to exclude elderly people from clinical trials without a valid reason. Since last few years Indian regulatory authority has been stipulating upper age limit for studies conducted in India. The Central Drugs Standard Control Organization (CDSCO) will be doing a great contribution to the researchers if it changes its view on stipulating upper age restrictions in clinical studies. This article describes the need for including elderly patients in the clinical trials in order to garner data from geriatric patients who form major medication users in most of the chronic diseases. PMID:26623388

  4. College Students' Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and Participation in Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Kelly M.; Soria, Krista M.

    2015-01-01

    College students in the U.S. are increasingly participating in study abroad opportunities; for example, from the 2010-2011 academic year, 273,996 U.S. students studied abroad, an increase of 1.3% from the previous year (Institute of International Education, 2012). Participation in study abroad has more than tripled over the past two decades…

  5. Intervention Research to Benefit People with Autism: How Old Are the Participants?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Timothy L.; Watkins, Erin E.; Lotfizadeh, Amin D.; Poling, Alan

    2012-01-01

    We determined the reported ages of participants with autism (or autism spectrum disorders) in 146 intervention research studies published recently in four prominent journals. Most participants were between two and eight years of age and only 1.7% of them were 20 or more years of age. These findings suggest that the special needs of older people…

  6. 9 CFR 146.22 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Commercial Table-Egg Layer Flocks § 146.22 Participation. (a) Participating commercial table-egg layer flocks... of subpart B of this part. (b) Commercial table-egg laying premises with fewer than 75,000 birds...

  7. 9 CFR 146.22 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Commercial Table-Egg Layer Flocks § 146.22 Participation. (a) Participating commercial table-egg layer flocks... of subpart B of this part. (b) Commercial table-egg laying premises with fewer than 75,000 birds...

  8. 9 CFR 146.22 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Commercial Table-Egg Layer Flocks § 146.22 Participation. (a) Participating commercial table-egg layer flocks... of subpart B of this part. (b) Commercial table-egg laying premises with fewer than 75,000 birds...

  9. 9 CFR 146.22 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Commercial Table-Egg Layer Flocks § 146.22 Participation. (a) Participating commercial table-egg layer flocks... of subpart B of this part. (b) Commercial table-egg laying premises with fewer than 75,000 birds...

  10. 9 CFR 146.22 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Commercial Table-Egg Layer Flocks § 146.22 Participation. (a) Participating commercial table-egg layer flocks... of subpart B of this part. (b) Commercial table-egg laying premises with fewer than 75,000 birds...

  11. 9 CFR 145.92 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...-Type Waterfowl Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.92 Participation. Participating flocks of meat-type... poultry must be free of the avian pathogens that are officially represented in the Plan...

  12. 9 CFR 145.92 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...-Type Waterfowl Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.92 Participation. Participating flocks of meat-type... poultry must be free of the avian pathogens that are officially represented in the Plan...

  13. 9 CFR 145.92 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...-Type Waterfowl Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.92 Participation. Participating flocks of meat-type... poultry must be free of the avian pathogens that are officially represented in the Plan...

  14. 9 CFR 145.42 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT NATIONAL POULTRY IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR BREEDING POULTRY Special Provisions for Turkey Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.42 Participation. (a) Participating turkey flocks, and the eggs...

  15. 9 CFR 145.42 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT NATIONAL POULTRY IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR BREEDING POULTRY Special Provisions for Turkey Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.42 Participation. (a) Participating turkey flocks, and the eggs...

  16. 9 CFR 145.42 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT NATIONAL POULTRY IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR BREEDING POULTRY Special Provisions for Turkey Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.42 Participation. (a) Participating turkey flocks, and the eggs...

  17. 43 CFR 1784.4 - Public participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Public participation. 1784.4 Section 1784.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... Public participation....

  18. 43 CFR 1784.4 - Public participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Public participation. 1784.4 Section 1784.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... Public participation....

  19. 9 CFR 145.52 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Waterfowl, Exhibition Poultry, and Game Bird Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.52 Participation. Participating flocks of waterfowl, exhibition poultry, and game birds, and the eggs and baby poultry...

  20. 9 CFR 145.52 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Waterfowl, Exhibition Poultry, and Game Bird Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.52 Participation. Participating flocks of waterfowl, exhibition poultry, and game birds, and the eggs and baby poultry...

  1. Participation of nurses in abortions.

    PubMed

    Neustatter, P L

    1980-11-29

    Doctors for a Woman's Choice on Abortion would agree with 1 point in Lord Denning's ruling on the role of nurses in abortions induced by (PGS) prostaglandins (November 15, p. 1091). The nurse should not be doing a doctor's job, as Lord Denning indicated, and we sympathize with any nurse who is doing so (though the 1967 Abortion Act allows any nurse to abstain, on grounds of conscience). However, the ruling that nurses are not legally covered to participate in any way with the "procuring of a miscarriage" (using terminology of the 1861 Offenses against the Persons Act upon which the ruling is based) does not require a radical change in the practice of late abortions (constituting only 7% of the terminations) or any change in the law. PG abortion can be done without a nurse. With the extraamniotic technique, a very cheap pump can be used to give subsequent doses of the PG (a function normally performed by a nurse) through the catheter left inserted through the cervix after the 1st dose has been given by the doctor. Alternatively, the intraamniotic method can be used, where PG is instilled into the amniotic sac via a needle passed through the abdominal wall. This normally requires only 1 dose, given by the doctor. Rarely are subsequent doses needed; however they could be given by the doctor with very little addition to his or her workload. While the fact that PG abortion can be done without nurses is not realized, late abortion will be restricted, a situation which is entirely deplorable. Also deplorable are the comments of an antiabortion nature made by Lord Denning, over and above the legal ruling in his jurisdiction to make. His ruling, furthermore, seems to have been sufficiently confused for the Department of Health to withdraw its circular on abortion and await an interpretation before issuing another. PMID:6107800

  2. 24 CFR 1003.604 - Citizen participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Citizen participation. 1003.604... Requirements § 1003.604 Citizen participation. (a) In order to permit residents of Indian tribes and Alaska.... Accordingly, the citizen participation requirements of this section do not include concurrence by any...

  3. 40 CFR 35.3035 - Public participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Public participation. 35.3035 Section 35.3035 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Construction Grants Program Delegation to States § 35.3035 Public participation. (a) Public participation during...

  4. Individual and Group Credit for Class Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Cora M.; Galyon, Charles E.; Forbes, Bethany E.; Blondin, Carolyn A.; Williams, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    This research study focused on the use of cooperative groups to facilitate class-wide participation, especially for initially low participants. Undergraduates from three sections of a relatively large educational psychology course recorded their class participation in all course units. Four of the five units in each section offered either…

  5. 38 CFR 52.110 - Participant assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.110 Participant... appropriateness of the adult day health care program for each participant. (b) Enrollment orders. The program... in the participant's physical, mental, or social condition. (3) Review of assessments....

  6. 38 CFR 52.110 - Participant assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.110 Participant... appropriateness of the adult day health care program for each participant. (b) Enrollment orders. The program... in the participant's physical, mental, or social condition. (3) Review of assessments....

  7. Does Grading Encourage Participation? Evidence & Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paff, Lolita A.

    2015-01-01

    Research on the effects of grading on participation behavior is mixed. This study adds to the literature by analyzing the motivational effects of a policy that incorporates student self-assessment, flexible course weighting of the participation grade, and an expanded definition of participation. The results suggest that in some classes, more than…

  8. 38 CFR 52.70 - Participant rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Participant rights. 52.70 Section 52.70 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.70 Participant rights. The participant has a right to a dignified...

  9. Music Participation: Theory, Research, and Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, J. Terry

    1991-01-01

    Bases a music participation theory on findings in music education, ethnomusicology, and sociology of leisure. Posits six types of music participants: professionals, apprentices, amateurs, hobbyists, recreationists, and dabblers. Distinguishes each type by theoretical variations in cost-benefit relationships as perceived by participants. Discusses…

  10. 36 CFR 801.8 - Public participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... preservation. (b) The applicant, in preparing and following its citizen participation plan called for by 24 CFR... affected neighborhoods. 24 CFR 570.431(c) sets forth criteria for citizen participation plans. These should.... Applicants are referred to 36 CFR 800.15 for Council guidelines for public participation. (c) The...

  11. 36 CFR 801.8 - Public participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... preservation. (b) The applicant, in preparing and following its citizen participation plan called for by 24 CFR... affected neighborhoods. 24 CFR 570.431(c) sets forth criteria for citizen participation plans. These should.... Applicants are referred to 36 CFR 800.15 for Council guidelines for public participation. (c) The...

  12. 7 CFR 247.19 - Dual participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dual participation. 247.19 Section 247.19 Agriculture... CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.19 Dual participation. (a) What must State and local agencies do to prevent and detect dual participation? The State agency must work...

  13. 7 CFR 247.19 - Dual participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dual participation. 247.19 Section 247.19 Agriculture... CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.19 Dual participation. (a) What must State and local agencies do to prevent and detect dual participation? The State agency must work...

  14. 7 CFR 247.19 - Dual participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dual participation. 247.19 Section 247.19 Agriculture... CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.19 Dual participation. (a) What must State and local agencies do to prevent and detect dual participation? The State agency must work...

  15. 7 CFR 247.19 - Dual participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dual participation. 247.19 Section 247.19 Agriculture... CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.19 Dual participation. (a) What must State and local agencies do to prevent and detect dual participation? The State agency must work...

  16. 7 CFR 247.19 - Dual participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dual participation. 247.19 Section 247.19 Agriculture... CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.19 Dual participation. (a) What must State and local agencies do to prevent and detect dual participation? The State agency must work...

  17. 77 FR 70176 - Previous Participation Certification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Previous Participation Certification AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer... submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review, as required by the Paperwork Reduction... programs. The information will be used to evaluate participants' previous participation in...

  18. Assessing the Effects of Public Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halvorsen, Kathleen E.

    2003-01-01

    Pre/post meeting surveys of 181 participants in public land management meetings (51% response) determined that high-quality public participation in public agency meetings affects participants' beliefs in the effectiveness of those agencies. Positive associations were also found with tolerance for differences of opinion. (Contains 28 references.)…

  19. 12 CFR 614.4330 - Loan participations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Loan participations. 614.4330 Section 614.4330 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS Loan Purchases and Sales § 614.4330 Loan participations. Agreements to purchase or sell a participation interest shall be subject to the provisions of...

  20. 34 CFR 85.980 - Participant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Definitions § 85.980 Participant. Participant means any person who submits a proposal for or who enters into a covered transaction, including an agent or representative of a participant. Authority: E.O. 12549 (3 CFR, 1986 Comp., p. 189); E.O 12689 (3 CFR, 1989 Comp., p. 235); 20 U.S.C. 1082, 1094, 1221e-3 and 3474;...

  1. Optimizing Clinical Research Participant Selection with Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Chunhua

    2015-01-01

    Clinical research participants are often not reflective of the real-world patients due to overly restrictive eligibility criteria. Meanwhile, unselected participants introduce confounding factors and reduce research efficiency. Biomedical Informatics, especially Big Data increasingly made available from electronic health records, offers promising aids to optimize research participant selection through data-driven transparency. PMID:26549161

  2. 32 CFR 775.11 - Public participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 775.11 Public participation. The importance of public participation (40 CFR 1501.4(b)) in preparing environmental assessments is clearly... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Public participation. 775.11 Section...

  3. 38 CFR 52.70 - Participant rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.70 Participant rights. The participant has a right to a dignified existence, self-determination, and communication with and access to...) The participant is transferred to another health care institution; or (ii) The release is required...

  4. 5 CFR 1651.8 - Participant's estate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Participant's estate. 1651.8 Section 1651... Participant's estate. If the account is to be paid to the duly appointed executor or administrator of the participant's estate under § 1651.2(a)(5), the following rules apply: (a) Appointment by court. The...

  5. 12 CFR 701.22 - Loan participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Loan participation. 701.22 Section 701.22 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS ORGANIZATION AND OPERATION OF FEDERAL CREDIT UNIONS § 701.22 Loan participation. (a) For purposes of this section: (1) Participation loan means a loan where one...

  6. 24 CFR 1003.604 - Citizen participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Citizen participation. 1003.604... Requirements § 1003.604 Citizen participation. (a) In order to permit residents of Indian tribes and Alaska.... Accordingly, the citizen participation requirements of this section do not include concurrence by any...

  7. 40 CFR 35.3035 - Public participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Public participation. 35.3035 Section 35.3035 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE... participation. (a) Public participation during the development, review, approval, and substantial revision...

  8. 32 CFR 705.17 - Participation guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Participation guidelines. 705.17 Section 705.17 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.17 Participation guidelines. (a) The provisions of this section refer to participation...

  9. 49 CFR 511.17 - Public participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Public participation. 511.17 Section 511.17 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY... Documents § 511.17 Public participation. Participant Status. Any person interested in a proceeding...

  10. 15 CFR 930.2 - Public participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Public participation. 930.2 Section... MANAGEMENT FEDERAL CONSISTENCY WITH APPROVED COASTAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS General Information § 930.2 Public participation. State management programs shall provide an opportunity for public participation in the...

  11. 15 CFR 930.2 - Public participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Public participation. 930.2 Section... MANAGEMENT FEDERAL CONSISTENCY WITH APPROVED COASTAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS General Information § 930.2 Public participation. State management programs shall provide an opportunity for public participation in the...

  12. 16 CFR 1018.27 - Public participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Public participation. 1018.27 Section 1018... Operation of Advisory Committees § 1018.27 Public participation. (a) The Commission is committed to a policy of encouraging public participation in its activities and will hold all advisory committee...

  13. 15 CFR 930.2 - Public participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public participation. 930.2 Section... MANAGEMENT FEDERAL CONSISTENCY WITH APPROVED COASTAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS General Information § 930.2 Public participation. State management programs shall provide an opportunity for public participation in the...

  14. 34 CFR 300.709 - Public participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Public participation. 300.709 Section 300.709 Education... Interior § 300.709 Public participation. In fulfilling the requirements of § 300.708 the Secretary of the Interior must provide for public participation consistent with § 300.165. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1411(h))...

  15. 40 CFR 35.3035 - Public participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Public participation. 35.3035 Section... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Construction Grants Program Delegation to States § 35.3035 Public participation. (a) Public participation during the development, review, approval, and substantial revision...

  16. 15 CFR 930.2 - Public participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Public participation. 930.2 Section... MANAGEMENT FEDERAL CONSISTENCY WITH APPROVED COASTAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS General Information § 930.2 Public participation. State management programs shall provide an opportunity for public participation in the...

  17. Factors that Influence Participation in Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vonderwell, Selma; Zachariah, Sajit

    2005-01-01

    This study explored what factors influenced learner participation in two sections of a graduate online course at a Midwestern university. Findings indicated that online learner participation and patterns of participation are influenced by the following factors: technology and interface characteristics, content area experience, student roles and…

  18. Teacher Participation in Management of School Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conley, Sharon C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses the rationale for enhancing teacher involvement and presents a conceptual framework for analyzing teacher participation in school management. Also discussed are traditional and recent forms teacher participation has taken, examples of teacher organizations' activities to foster participation, and a prognosis of prospects for…

  19. Child Participation and Disaster Risk Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Yany; Hayden, Jacqueline; Cologon, Kathy; Hadley, Fay

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that child participation can have positive results in the rescue, relief and rehabilitation phases of a disaster. Currently child participation is achieving increased attention as a component of disaster risk reduction (DRR). This paper examines the ongoing dialogues on child participation and reviews pertinent literature…

  20. 48 CFR 19.1004 - Participating agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... The Department of Transportation. The Department of Veterans Affairs. The Environmental Protection... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Participating agencies. 19... Participating agencies. The following agencies have been identified as participants in the demonstration...

  1. 32 CFR 705.17 - Participation guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Participation guidelines. 705.17 Section 705.17 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.17 Participation guidelines. (a) The provisions of this section refer to participation...

  2. Violent Reinjury and Mortality Among Youth Seeking Emergency Department Care for Assault-Related Injury A 2-Year Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Rebecca M.; Carter, Patrick M.; Ranney, Megan; Zimmerman, Marc A.; Blow, Fred C.; Booth, Brenda M.; Goldstick, Jason; Walton, Maureen A.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Violence is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among youth, with more than 700 000 emergency department (ED) visits annually for assault-related injuries. The risk for violent reinjury among high-risk, assault-injured youth is poorly understood. OBJECTIVE To compare recidivism for violent injury and mortality outcomes among drug-using, assault-injured youth (AI group) and drug-using, non–assault-injured control participants (non-AI group) presenting to an urban ED for care. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Participants were enrolled in a prospective cohort study from December 2, 2009, through September 30, 2011, at an urban level I ED and followed up for 24 months. We administered validated measures of violence and substance use and mental health diagnostic interviews and reviewed medical records at baseline and at each point of follow-up (6, 12, 18, and 24 months). EXPOSURE Follow-up over 24 months. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Use of ED services for assault or mortality measured from medical record abstraction supplemented with self-report. RESULTS We followed 349 AI and 250 non-AI youth for 24 months. Youth in the AI group had almost twice the risk for a violent injury requiring ED care within 2 years compared with the non-AI group (36.7% vs 22.4%; relative risk [RR], 1.65 [95% CI, 1.25-2.14]; P < .001). Two-year mortality was 0.8%. Poisson regression modeling identified female sex (RR, 1.30 [95% CI, 1.02-1.65]), assault-related injury (RR, 1.57 [95% CI, 1.19-2.04), diagnosis of a drug use disorder (RR, 1.29 [95% CI, 1.01-1.65]), and posttraumatic stress disorder (RR, 1.47 [95% CI, 1.09-1.97]) at the index visit as predictive of ED recidivism or death within 24 months. Parametric survival models demonstrated that assault-related injury (P < .001), diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (P = .008), and diagnosis of a drug use disorder (P = .03) significantly shortened the expected waiting time until the first ED return visit for violence

  3. Patient and citizen participation in health care decisions in Italy.

    PubMed

    Goss, Claudia; Renzi, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growing recognition in Western healthcare systems of the importance of considering preferences of patients and the public in tailoring health services and treatment plans. The active collaboration between doctor and patient has recently been encouraged through the shared decision-making model. Aim of the present contribution is to describe the current state of patient and public participation in healthcare in Italy. First, we will briefly outline the organization of the Italian National Health Service; second, we will describe the governmental and institutional initiatives regarding participation; third, some examples of associations and initiatives promoting patient participation will be provided; forth, we will report on research projects on patient participation published in peer-reviewed journals; and finally, we will provide some examples on training activities promoting patient participation. The Italian National Health Plan and many regional and local health authorities in Italy explicitly recognize the importance of patient/citizen participation in healthcare decisions at the macro, meso and micro level of decision-making. However, application of a shared model is still at an early stage in Italy. The reported experiences have yielded positive results and have shown that particular attention should be dedicated to more disadvantaged subgroups of the population, involving patient organisations, enhancing patient/citizen knowledge and adopting approaches that take the specific context into account. PMID:17601178

  4. Deliberative public participation and hexachlorobenzene stockpiles.

    PubMed

    Carson, Lyn

    2009-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the quality of citizen involvement in relation to the governance of industrial risks. Specifically, it explores the hexachlorobenzene (HCB) case relative to best practice public participation, which is consistent with deliberative democratic theory. The case could be judged a public participation failure given that the community committee in combination with the corporate sponsor was unable to agree on a mutually acceptable technological pathway. This stalemate might have been attributable in part to the time spent on the task of review. A diligent participation working party could have created a much more effective public participation plan, grounded in the core values of professional public participation practice. PMID:18774216

  5. Participation in transvaginal ovarian cancer screening: compliance, correlation factors, and costs.

    PubMed

    Pavlik, E J; van Nagell, J R; DePriest, P D; Wheeler, L; Tatman, J M; Boone, M; Sollars, S; Rayens, M K; Kryscio, R K

    1995-06-01

    The objective was to identify factors influencing participation in screening for ovarian cancer using transvaginal sonography in the free experimental program at the University of Kentucky over its 6+ year history. Database records for screenings, performed from 1987 to June 1994, were utilized. Computer sorts, 1990 census information as predictors, and stepwise multiple regression analysis were employed. Participation in the model ovarian screening program took 3-4 years to approach > 300 screens/month, with repeat screenings exceeding new subject participation in this time period. A number of participants traveled > 200 miles for screening on both initial and repeat encounters. Analysis of distance to the screening site, median family income, county physician population, and education levels indicated that distance and then education correlated best with participation. Unit screening cost shrank from $45 to under $25 when maximal participation was achieved. Distance and education correlated with participation. Expenses compare favorably with diagnostic procedures for other diseases. PMID:7774844

  6. The American Geological Institute Minority Participation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. J.; Byerly, G. R.; Callahan, C. N.

    2001-12-01

    Since 1971, the American Geological Institute (AGI) Minority Participation Program (MPP) has supported scholarships for underrepresented minorities in the geosciences at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Some of our MPP scholars have gone on to hugely successful careers in the geosciences. MPP scholars include corporate leaders, university professors, a NASA scientist-astronaut and a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER awardee. Yet as ethnic minorities continue to be underrepresented in the geosciences, AGI plans to expand its efforts beyond its traditional undergraduate and graduate scholarships to include diversity programs for secondary school geoscience teacher internships, undergraduate research travel support, and doctoral research fellowships. Funding for the MPP has come from multiple sources, including industry, scientific societies, individuals, and during the last 10 years, the NSF. College-level students apply for the MPP awards or award renewals, and the MPP Advisory Committee selects scholarship recipients based upon student academic performance, financial need, and potential for success as a geoscience professional. Mentoring is a long-standing hallmark of the AGI MPP. Every AGI MPP scholar is assigned a professional geoscientist as a mentor. The mentor is responsible for regular personal contacts with MPP scholars. The MPP Advisory Committee aims to match the profession of the mentor with the scholar's academic interest. Throughout the year, mentors and scholars communicate about possible opportunities in the geosciences such as internships, participation in symposia, professional society meetings, and job openings. Mentors have also been active in helping younger students cope with the major changes involved in relocating to a new region of the country or a new college culture. We believe that AGI is well-positioned to advance diversity in the geosciences through its unique standing as the major professional organization in the

  7. Participation in the Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettengill, Gordon H.

    2002-01-01

    This NASA Grant, 5-4434, has covered the active participation of the Principal Investigator, Prof. Gordon Pettengill, and his Co-Investigator, Peter Ford, in the Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter (MOLA) Experiment, over a period of five years. This participation has included attending team meetings, planning observing operations, developing data-reduction software algorithms, and processing data, as well as presenting a number of oral reports at scientific meetings and published papers in refereed journals. This research has concentrated on the various types of Martian clouds that were detected by the laser altimeter.

  8. Personal Social Network Factors Associated with Overdose Prevention Training Participation

    PubMed Central

    Iverson, Ellen; Wong, Carolyn F.; Jackson-Bloom, Jennifer; McNeeley, Miles; Davidson, Peter J.; McCarty, Christopher; Kral, Alex H.; Lankenau, Stephen E.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated social network factors associated with participation in overdose prevention training among injection drug users (IDUs). From 2008-2010, 106 IDUs who had witnessed an overdose in the past year from two syringe exchange programs in Los Angeles provided data on: overdose prevention training status (trained vs. untrained), social networks, history of overdose, and demographics. In multivariate logistic regression, naming at least one network member who had been trained in overdose prevention was significantly associated with being trained (Adjusted Odds Ratio 3.25, 95% Confidence Interval 1.09, 9.68). Using social network approaches may help increase training participation. Limitations are noted. PMID:22988840

  9. 20 CFR 416.2204 - Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants. 416.2204 Section 416.2204 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... General Provisions § 416.2204 Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants. (a)...

  10. 20 CFR 404.2104 - Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants. 404.2104 Section 404.2104 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL... General Provisions § 404.2104 Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants. (a)...

  11. 20 CFR 416.2204 - Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants. 416.2204 Section 416.2204 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... General Provisions § 416.2204 Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants. (a)...

  12. 20 CFR 404.2104 - Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants. 404.2104 Section 404.2104 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL... General Provisions § 404.2104 Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants. (a)...

  13. 20 CFR 416.2204 - Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants. 416.2204 Section 416.2204 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... General Provisions § 416.2204 Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants. (a)...

  14. 20 CFR 404.2104 - Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants. 404.2104 Section 404.2104 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL... General Provisions § 404.2104 Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants. (a)...

  15. Passive or Passionate Participation in Mathematics: Diagnosing and Improving Student Participation in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottler, Rose M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the reasons behind fifth grade students' participation or non-participation in mathematical discussions, and determine whether this affected their understanding of the learning material. The researcher observed twenty-four students' participation or non-participation in mathematical discussions in a…

  16. 20 CFR 416.2204 - Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Participation by State VR agencies or... General Provisions § 416.2204 Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants. (a) General. In order to participate in the payment program under this subpart through its VR agency(ies), a...

  17. Race/Ethnicity and Arts Participation: Findings from the Survey of Public Participation in the Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Vincent, Jr.; Kim, Yonghyun

    2010-01-01

    This report analyzes data from the 1982, 1985, 1992, 2002, and 2008 Surveys of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPA). Analyses focus on differential arts participation by race/ethnicity and the effect of race/ethnicity on arts participation. Descriptive and inferential analyses explore trends in arts participation by race/ethnicity across the…

  18. 20 CFR 404.2104 - Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants. 404.2104 Section 404.2104 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL... General Provisions § 404.2104 Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants. (a)...

  19. 20 CFR 416.2204 - Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants. 416.2204 Section 416.2204 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... General Provisions § 416.2204 Participation by State VR agencies or alternate participants. (a)...

  20. The Obligation to Participate in Biomedical Research

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, G. Owen; Emanuel, Ezekiel J.; Wertheimer, Alan

    2009-01-01

    The prevailing view is that participation in biomedical research is above and beyond the call of duty. While some commentators have offered reasons against this, we propose a novel public goods argument for an obligation to participate in biomedical research. Biomedical knowledge is a public good, available to any individual even if that individual does not contribute to it. Participation in research is a critical way to support that important public good. Consequently, we all have a duty to participate. The current social norm is that people participate only if they have a good reason to do so. The public goods argument implies that people should participate unless they have a good reason not to. Such a shift would be of great aid to the progress of biomedical research, eventually making our society significantly healthier and longer-lived. PMID:19567441

  1. Drivers and socioeconomic impacts of tourism participation in protected areas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Vogt, Christine A; Luo, Junyan; He, Guangming; Frank, Kenneth A; Liu, Jianguo

    2012-01-01

    Nature-based tourism has the potential to enhance global biodiversity conservation by providing alternative livelihood strategies for local people, which may alleviate poverty in and around protected areas. Despite the popularity of the concept of nature-based tourism as an integrated conservation and development tool, empirical research on its actual socioeconomic benefits, on the distributional pattern of these benefits, and on its direct driving factors is lacking, because relevant long-term data are rarely available. In a multi-year study in Wolong Nature Reserve, China, we followed a representative sample of 220 local households from 1999 to 2007 to investigate the diverse benefits that these households received from recent development of nature-based tourism in the area. Within eight years, the number of households directly participating in tourism activities increased from nine to sixty. In addition, about two-thirds of the other households received indirect financial benefits from tourism. We constructed an empirical household economic model to identify the factors that led to household-level participation in tourism. The results reveal the effects of local households' livelihood assets (i.e., financial, human, natural, physical, and social capitals) on the likelihood to participate directly in tourism. In general, households with greater financial (e.g., income), physical (e.g., access to key tourism sites), human (e.g., education), and social (e.g., kinship with local government officials) capitals and less natural capital (e.g., cropland) were more likely to participate in tourism activities. We found that residents in households participating in tourism tended to perceive more non-financial benefits in addition to more negative environmental impacts of tourism compared with households not participating in tourism. These findings suggest that socioeconomic impact analysis and change monitoring should be included in nature-based tourism management systems

  2. Drivers and Socioeconomic Impacts of Tourism Participation in Protected Areas

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Vogt, Christine A.; Luo, Junyan; He, Guangming; Frank, Kenneth A.; Liu, Jianguo

    2012-01-01

    Nature-based tourism has the potential to enhance global biodiversity conservation by providing alternative livelihood strategies for local people, which may alleviate poverty in and around protected areas. Despite the popularity of the concept of nature-based tourism as an integrated conservation and development tool, empirical research on its actual socioeconomic benefits, on the distributional pattern of these benefits, and on its direct driving factors is lacking, because relevant long-term data are rarely available. In a multi-year study in Wolong Nature Reserve, China, we followed a representative sample of 220 local households from 1999 to 2007 to investigate the diverse benefits that these households received from recent development of nature-based tourism in the area. Within eight years, the number of households directly participating in tourism activities increased from nine to sixty. In addition, about two-thirds of the other households received indirect financial benefits from tourism. We constructed an empirical household economic model to identify the factors that led to household-level participation in tourism. The results reveal the effects of local households' livelihood assets (i.e., financial, human, natural, physical, and social capitals) on the likelihood to participate directly in tourism. In general, households with greater financial (e.g., income), physical (e.g., access to key tourism sites), human (e.g., education), and social (e.g., kinship with local government officials) capitals and less natural capital (e.g., cropland) were more likely to participate in tourism activities. We found that residents in households participating in tourism tended to perceive more non-financial benefits in addition to more negative environmental impacts of tourism compared with households not participating in tourism. These findings suggest that socioeconomic impact analysis and change monitoring should be included in nature-based tourism management systems

  3. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and Fiscal Year 2014 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; hospital conditions of participation; payment policies related to patient status. Final rules.

    PubMed

    2013-08-19

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2013. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes that were applied to the LTCH PPS by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these updates and statutory changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or have revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program. In addition, we are revising the conditions of participation (CoPs) for hospitals relating to the

  4. Anthroposophic therapy for children with chronic disease: a two-year prospective cohort study in routine outpatient settings

    PubMed Central

    Hamre, Harald J; Witt, Claudia M; Kienle, Gunver S; Meinecke, Christoph; Glockmann, Anja; Willich, Stefan N; Kiene, Helmut

    2009-01-01

    Background Many children with chronic disease use complementary therapies. Anthroposophic treatment for paediatric chronic disease is provided by physicians and differs from conventional treatment in the use of special therapies (art therapy, eurythmy movement exercises, rhythmical massage therapy) and special medications. We studied clinical outcomes in children with chronic diseases under anthroposophic treatment in routine outpatient settings. Methods In conjunction with a health benefit program, consecutive outpatients starting anthroposophic treatment for any chronic disease participated in a prospective cohort study. Main outcome was disease severity (Disease and Symptom Scores, physicians' and caregivers' assessment on numerical rating scales 0–10). Disease Score was documented after 0, 6, and 12 months, Symptom Score after 0, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Results A total of 435 patients were included. Mean age was 8.2 years (standard deviation 3.3, range 1.0–16.9 years). Most common indications were mental disorders (46.2% of patients; primarily hyperkinetic, emotional, and developmental disorders), respiratory disorders (14.0%), and neurological disorders (5.7%). Median disease duration at baseline was 3.0 years (interquartile range 1.0–5.0 years). The anthroposophic treatment modalities used were medications (69.2% of patients), eurythmy therapy (54.7%), art therapy (11.3%), and rhythmical massage therapy (6.7%). Median number of eurythmy/art/massage therapy sessions was 12 (interquartile range 10–20), median therapy duration was 118 days (interquartile range 78–189 days). From baseline to six-month follow-up, Disease Score improved by average 3.00 points (95% confidence interval 2.76–3.24 points, p < 0.001) and Symptom Score improved by 2.41 points (95% confidence interval 2.16–2.66 points, p < 0.001). These improvements were maintained until the last follow-up. Symptom Score improved similarly in patients not using adjunctive non

  5. Past Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodge, Oliver

    2012-07-01

    Preface; 1. Ancestry and early days; 2. Schooldays; 3. Relation with other boys at school; 4. Education; 5. Influence of the Royal Institution; 6. Later education in London; 7. Reminiscences of Bedford College; 8. Scientific work and friends in London; 9. Personal retrospect; 10. Romance; 11. Influence of the British Association; 12. Reminiscences of Coopers Hill and assistants and popular lectures; 13. Liverpool; 14. Scientific work at Liverpool; 15. Scientific work at Liverpool (cont.); 16. Scientific work at Liverpool (cont.); 17. Electric waves and the beginnings of wireless; 18. Other friends; 19. Family life; 20. Holidays; 21. Side issues; 22. Early experiences in psychical research; 23. Psychical research; 24. Further psychic adventures, and psycho-physical phenomena; 25. Reminiscences of my years at the university of Birmingham; 26. Birmingham friendships and recollections; 27. Scientific retrospect; 28. Apologia pro vita mea; Index.

  6. Productivity enhancement planning using participative management concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, M. E.; Kukla, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    A productivity enhancement project which used participative management for both planning and implementation is described. The process and results associated with using participative management to plan and implement a computer terminal upgrade project where the computer terminals are used by research and development (R&D) personnel are reported. The upgrade improved the productivity of R&D personnel substantially, and their commitment of the implementation is high. Successful utilization of participative management for this project has laid a foundation for continued style shift toward participation within the organization.

  7. Satellite Power System (SPS) student participation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladwig, A.; David, L.

    1978-01-01

    A assessment of methods which are appropriate to initiate student participation in the discussion of a satellite power system (SPS) is presented. Methods which are incorporated into the campus environment and the on-going learning experience are reported. The discussion of individual methods for student participation includes a description of the technique, followed by comments on its enhancing and limiting factors, references to situations where the method has been demonstrated, and a brief consideration of cost factors. The two categories of recommendations presented are: an outline of fourteen recommendations addressing specific activities related to student participation in the discussion of SPS, and three recommendations pertaining to student participation activities in general.

  8. Obese Employee Participation Patterns in a Wellness Program.

    PubMed

    Fink, Jennifer T; Smith, David R; Singh, Maharaj; Ihrke, Doug M; Cisler, Ron A

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this research was to retrospectively examine whether demographic differences exist between those who participated in an employee wellness program and those who did not, and to identify the selection of employees' choice in weight management activities. A nonequivalent, 2-group retrospective design was used. This study involved employees at a large, not-for-profit integrated health system. Of the total organization employee pool (29,194), 19,771 (68%) employees volunteered to be weighed (mean body mass index [BMI]=28.9) as part of an employee wellness program. Weight management activities available included: (1) Self-directed 5% total body weight loss; (2) Healthy Solutions at home; (3) Weight Watchers group meetings; (4) Weight Watchers online; and (5) Employee Assistance Program (EAP)-directed healthy weight coaching. Measures were participation rate and available weight management activity participation rate among obese employees across demographic variables, including sex, age, race, job type, and job location. The analysis included chi-square tests for all categorical variables; odds ratios were calculated to examine factors predictive of participation. Of the total 19,771 employees weighed, 6375 (32%) employees were obese (defined as BMI ≥30); of those, 3094 (49%) participated in available weight management activities. Participation was higher among females, whites, those ages >50 years, and non-nursing staff. In conclusion, participation rate varied significantly based on demographic variables. Self-directed 5% weight loss was the most popular weight management activity selected. (Population Health Management 2016;19:132-135). PMID:26086172

  9. Underserved populations in science education: Enhancement through learning community participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Jennifer Emily

    A positive relationship between college anatomy students' achievement and academic language proficiency in the context of a learning community was established. For many students the barrier to learning science is language. A relationship exists between low academic language proficiency and lack of success among students, in particular failure among at-risk minority and language-minority students. The sample consisted of Anatomy classes during the Fall semesters of the academic years, 2000, 2001, and 2002 at a community college in Central California having a high percentage of culturally and linguistically diverse students. Students from each semester participated in the academic language proficiency and science achievement studies. Twenty-two of the Fall 2002 students (n = 65) enrolled in the Learning Community (LC) that included instruction in academic language in the context of the anatomy course content. Fall 2002 students (n = 19) also participated in Peer-led Support (PLS) sessions. Fall 2001 students participated in a textbook use study (n = 44) and in a Cooperative-Learning (CL) (n = 35) study. Students in the LC and Non-LC groups took the academic language assessment; their results were correlated with course grades and attendance. Fall 2002 students were compared for: (1) differences regarding self-expectations, (2) program impressions, and (3) demographics. Fall 2001 student reading habits and CL participation were analyzed. Results identified: (1) selected academic language tasks as good predictors of science success, (2) a significant positive relationship between science success and participation in support interventions, (3) no differences in self expectations or demographic characteristics of participants and non-participants in the LC group, and (4) poor textbook reading habits. Results showed a significant positive relationship between academic language proficiency and science achievement in participatory instruction.

  10. Defining useful surrogates for user participation in online medical learning.

    PubMed

    Beddy, Peter; Ridgway, Paul F; Beddy, David; Clarke, Eric; Traynor, Oscar; Tierney, Sean

    2009-10-01

    "School for Surgeons" is a web-based distance learning program which provides online clinical-based tutorials to surgical trainees. Our aim was to determine surrogates of active participation and to assess the efficacy of methods to improve usage. Server logs of the 82 participants in the "School for Surgeons" were assessed for the two terms of the first year of the program. Data collected included total time online, mean session time, page requests, numbers of sessions online and the total number of assignments. An intervention regarding comparative peer usage patterns was delivered to the cohort between terms one and two. Of the 82 trainees enrolled, 83% (85% second term) logged into the program. Of all participants 88% (97% second term) submitted at least one assignment. Median submissions were four (eight second term) per trainee. Assignment submission closely correlated with number of sessions, total time online, downloads and page requests. Peer-based comparative feedback resulted in a significant increase in the number of assignments submitted (p < 0.01). Despite its recent introduction, "School for Surgeons" has a good participation rate. Assignment submission is a valid surrogate for usage. Students can be encouraged to move from passive observation to active participation in a virtual learning environment by providing structured comparative feedback ranking their performance. PMID:18931929

  11. Participating in mobility: People with schizophrenia driving motorized vehicles.

    PubMed

    Steinert, Tilman; Veit, Fabian; Schmid, Peter; Jacob Snellgrove, Brendan; Borbé, Raoul

    2015-08-30

    Participation of people with schizophrenia in individual mobility is an important aspect of inclusion according to the UN convention of human rights of persons with disabilities. However, driving motorized vehicles can be dangerous due to positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms, side effects of antipsychotic drugs and concomitant substance abuse. The objective of this study was to explore the patterns of individual mobility in a representative patient population, to determine predictors for active use of motorized vehicles, and to compare the results with data of the general population in the respective region. We interviewed N=150 participants with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, 66 in-patients and 84 out-patients, in different types of out-patient services. A questionnaire developed for this purpose was used in interviews. 64% of the participants had a driving licence, 32% had driven a motorized vehicle in the past year, 31% owned a car, 2% a motor bike. The driving licence had been withdrawn from 24.7% of participants, 32.7% reported having been involved in a road accident. Participants drove considerably less in time and distances than the general population. Significant variables determining the chance of active use of motorized vehicles in a logistic regression model were Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) (OR 1.04 per each point), number of previous admissions (OR 0.52 per admission), and history of driving under alcohol or drugs (OR 0.18). PMID:26089017

  12. 13 CFR 124.2 - What length of time may a business participate in the 8(a) BD program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8(a) BD program? A Participant receives a program term of nine years from the date of SBA's approval... its program eligibility. A firm that completes its nine year term of participation in the 8(a) BD program is deemed to graduate from the program. The nine year program term may be shortened only...

  13. NASA's Planetary Science Missions and Participations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, James

    2016-04-01

    NASA's Planetary Science Division (PSD) and space agencies around the world are collaborating on an extensive array of missions exploring our solar system. Planetary science missions are conducted by some of the most sophisticated robots ever built. International collaboration is an essential part of what we do. NASA has always encouraged international participation on our missions both strategic (ie: Mars 2020) and competitive (ie: Discovery and New Frontiers) and other Space Agencies have reciprocated and invited NASA investigators to participate in their missions. NASA PSD has partnerships with virtually every major space agency. For example, NASA has had a long and very fruitful collaboration with ESA. ESA has been involved in the Cassini mission and, currently, NASA funded scientists are involved in the Rosetta mission (3 full instruments, part of another), BepiColombo mission (1 instrument in the Italian Space Agency's instrument suite), and the Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer mission (1 instrument and parts of two others). In concert with ESA's Mars missions NASA has an instrument on the Mars Express mission, the orbit-ground communications package on the Trace Gas Orbiter (launched in March 2016) and part of the DLR/Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer instruments going onboard the ExoMars Rover (to be launched in 2018). NASA's Planetary Science Division has continuously provided its U.S. planetary science community with opportunities to include international participation on NASA missions too. For example, NASA's Discovery and New Frontiers Programs provide U.S. scientists the opportunity to assemble international teams and design exciting, focused planetary science investigations that would deepen the knowledge of our Solar System. Last year, PSD put out an international call for instruments on the Mars 2020 mission. This procurement led to the selection of Spain and Norway scientist leading two instruments and French scientists providing a significant portion of

  14. Student Participation Styles in Adventure Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zmudy, Mark H.; Curtner-Smith, Matthew D.; Steffen, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Sport pedagogy researchers have contributed much to the literature on physical education teaching by describing the participation styles of children, youth and young adults in various settings. The purpose of this study was to describe the participation styles of children enrolled in two consecutive week-long summer adventure camps. Primary…

  15. Encouraging Equitable Online Participation through Curriculum Articulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Ken; Oberprieler, Gudrun

    2004-01-01

    Student participation is a central issue in debates around online education. In most instances, course convenors wish to increase the amount of participation, while ensuring that the quality is of an acceptable standard. They also wish to ensure that their students have adequate access to the technology, and that there is no undue dominance by any…

  16. Occult Participation: Its Impact on Adolescent Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant-Clark, Cynthia M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Investigated relationship between occult participation, substance abuse, and level of self-esteem among 25 clinical (alcohol or drug treatment) and 25 nonclinical adolescents. Results indicated that adolescent substance abuse and occult participation were significantly related. Found significant differences between high versus low occult groups…

  17. 12 CFR 619.9250 - Participation certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Participation certificates. 619.9250 Section 619.9250 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9250 Participation certificates. Evidence of investment in a bank or association to which all the rights...

  18. Child Participant Roles in Applied Linguistics Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinter, Annamaria

    2014-01-01

    Children's status as research participants in applied linguistics has been largely overlooked even though unique methodological and ethical concerns arise in projects where children, rather than adults, are involved. This article examines the role of children as research participants in applied linguistics and discusses the limitations of…

  19. Dyslexic Participants Show Intact Spontaneous Categorization Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolopoulos, Dimitris S.; Pothos, Emmanuel M.

    2009-01-01

    We examine the performance of dyslexic participants on an unsupervised categorization task against that of matched non-dyslexic control participants. Unsupervised categorization is a cognitive process critical for conceptual development. Existing research in dyslexia has emphasized perceptual tasks and supervised categorization tasks (for which…

  20. Childhood Participation Experiences in the Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gómez, M.; Morata, T.; Trilla, J.

    2016-01-01

    This article is based on the findings of a broader research project entitled "Childhood Participation and Citizenship Building," which examined the medium-term effects of intense experiences of participation in childhood within both the school environment and those of leisure-time and community education. The results presented in this…