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Sample records for 12-25 kev photon

  1. 511 keV photons from superconducting cosmic strings.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Francesc; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2005-12-31

    We show that a tangle of light superconducting strings in the Milky Way could be the source of the observed 511 keV emission from electron-positron annihilation in the Galactic bulge. The scenario predicts a flux that is in agreement with observations if the strings are at the approximately 1 TeV scale, making the particle physics within reach of planned accelerator experiments. The emission is directly proportional to the galactic magnetic field, and future observations should be able to differentiate the superconducting string scenario from other proposals. PMID:16486335

  2. 3.55 keV photon lines from axion to photon conversion in the Milky Way and M31

    SciTech Connect

    Conlon, Joseph P.; Day, Francesca V. E-mail: francesca.day@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2014-11-01

    We further explore a scenario in which the recently observed 3.55 keV photon line arises from dark matter decay to an axion-like particle (ALP) of energy 3.55 keV, which then converts to a photon in astrophysical magnetic fields. This ALP scenario is well-motivated by the observed morphology of the 3.55 keV flux. For this scenario we study the expected flux from dark matter decay in the galactic halos of both the Milky Way and Andromeda (M31). The Milky Way magnetic field is asymmetric about the galactic centre, and so the resulting 3.55 keV flux morphology differs significantly from the case of direct dark matter decay to photons. However the Milky Way magnetic field is not large enough to generate an observable signal, even with ASTRO-H. In contrast, M31 has optimal conditions for a → γ conversion and the intrinsic signal from M31 becomes two orders of magnitude larger than for the Milky Way, comparable to that from clusters and consistent with observations.

  3. Excess astrophysical photons from a 0.1-1 keV cosmic axion background.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Joseph P; Marsh, M C David

    2013-10-11

    Primordial decays of string theory moduli at z~10(12) naturally generate a dark radiation cosmic axion background with 0.1-1 keV energies. This cosmic axion background can be detected through axion-photon conversion in astrophysical magnetic fields to give quasithermal excesses in the extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray bands. Substantial and observable luminosities may be generated even for axion-photon couplings <10(-11) GeV(-1). We propose that axion-photon conversion may explain the observed excess emission of soft x rays from galaxy clusters, and may also contribute to the diffuse unresolved cosmic x-ray background. We list a number of correlated predictions of the scenario. PMID:24160588

  4. Attenuation of photons at 3 to 14 keV energies in helium

    SciTech Connect

    Azuma, Y.; Berry, H.G.; Gemmell, D.S.

    1995-08-01

    Using X-ray photons at the X24A, X23B and X23A2 beam lines at NSLS, we measured the total photo-attenuation cross section of helium for photons in the energy range of 3 to 14 keV. In this range the photoionization cross section decreases rapidly with energy, so that Compton scattering is significant at 4 keV and dominates at the highest energies. The apparatus consisted of a 1.4-m long helium-absorption tube, 5 cm in diameter, with 75-{mu} thick, 7-mm diameter, kapton end windows. The tube could be filled with helium up to a pressure of 10{sup 6} Pa. We attained a precision of 1-2% in the attenuation cross section. The measurements verify the dominance of Compton scattering in this energy range and its importance in recent measurements of the ratio of double-to-single photoionization of helium. The measured cross sections are close to the combined calculated cross sections for Compton scattering and photoionization, and we are able to distinguish the contributions of the two effects.

  5. X-ray grating interferometry at photon energies over 180 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Yaniz, M.; Koch, F.; Zanette, I.; Rack, A.; Meyer, P.; Kunka, D.; Hipp, A.; Mohr, J.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2015-04-01

    We report on the implementation and characterization of grating interferometry operating at an x-ray energy of 183 keV. With the possibility to use this technique at high x-ray energies, bigger specimens could be studied in a quantitative way. Also, imaging strongly absorbing specimens will benefit from the advantages of the phase and dark-field signals provided by grating interferometry. However, especially at these high photon energies the performance of the absorption grating becomes a key point on the quality of the system, because the grating lines need to keep their small width of a couple of micrometers and exhibit a greater height of hundreds of micrometers. The performance of high aspect ratio absorption gratings fabricated with different techniques is discussed. Further, a dark-field image of an alkaline multicell battery highlights the potential of high energy x-ray grating based imaging.

  6. Measurements of anomalous elastic scattering of 59.54-keV photons

    SciTech Connect

    Baraldi, C.; Casnati, E.; Tartari, A.; Andreis, M.; Singh, B.

    1996-12-01

    Coherent scattering cross sections of 59.54-keV photons on target foils of {sup 64}Gd, {sup 66}Dy, {sup 68}Er, {sup 70}Yb, {sup 72}Hf, and {sup 73}Ta at 60{degree}, 90{degree}, and 120{degree} have been measured to provide information on the region of {ital K} anomalous elastic scattering. The results are compared with the values calculated by the second perturbative order {ital S} matrix and by two procedures based on the form-factor approximation corrected by the anomalous scattering factors. Agreement of the {ital S} matrix values is very satisfactory, on the whole, and that of the values given by the form-factor approximations is fairly good. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. Observational consistency and future predictions for a 3.5 keV ALP to photon line

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Pedro D.; Conlon, Joseph P.; Day, Francesca V.; Marsh, M.C. David; Rummel, Markus

    2015-04-09

    Motivated by the possibility of explaining the 3.5 keV line through dark matter decaying to axion-like particles that subsequently convert to photons, we study ALP-photon conversion for sightlines passing within 50 pc of the galactic centre. Conversion depends on the galactic centre magnetic field which is highly uncertain. For fields at low or mid-range of observational estimates (10–100 μG), no observable signal is possible. For fields at the high range of observational estimates (a pervasive poloidal mG field over the central 150 pc) it is possible to generate sufficient signal to explain recent observations of a 3.5 keV line in the galactic centre. In this scenario, the galactic centre line signal comes predominantly from the region with z>20pc, reconciling the results from the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray telescopes. The dark matter to ALP to photon scenario also naturally predicts the non-observation of the 3.5 keV line in stacked galaxy spectra. We further explore predictions for the line flux in galaxies and suggest a set of galaxies that is optimised for observing the 3.5 keV line in this model.

  8. Observations of solar flare photon energy spectra from 20 keV to 7 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshimori, M.; Watanabe, H.; Nitta, N.

    1985-01-01

    Solar flare photon energy spectra in the 20 keV to 7 MeV range are derived from the Apr. 1, Apr. 4, apr. 27 and May 13, 1981 flares. The flares were observed with a hard X-ray and a gamma-ray spectrometers on board the Hinotori satellite. The results show that the spectral shape varies from flare to flare and the spectra harden in energies above about 400 keV. Effects of nuclear line emission on the continuum and of higher energy electron bremsstrahlung are considered to explain the spectral hardening.

  9. Two-photon above-threshold ionization of hydrogen over the photon energy range from 15 eV to 50 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Florescu, Viorica; Budriga, Olimpia; Bachau, Henri

    2011-09-15

    We investigate the absorption of two identical photons from the ground state of hydrogen-like atoms over an energy range that extends beyond that explored up to now. Our approach is based on a hybrid formula, valid in second-order perturbation theory, in which the A{sup 2} contribution from the nonrelativistic Hamiltonian is treated exactly, while the A{center_dot}P contribution is calculated in dipole approximation. We find that, at least up to 50 keV, the nonrelativistic dipole approximation, based only on the A{center_dot}P contribution, determines the values of the total cross section. Our numerical results, covering photon energies from 90 nm (13.7 eV) to 0.0248 nm (50 keV) are in very good agreement with most previous theoretical works. Differences with recent results are discussed.

  10. Dependence of Cell Survival on Iododeoxyuridine Concentration in 35-keV Photon-Activated Auger Electron Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dugas, Joseph P.; Varnes, Marie E.; Sajo, Erno; Welch, Christopher E.; Ham, Kyungmin; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To measure and compare Chinese hamster ovary cell survival curves using monochromatic 35-keV photons and 4-MV x-rays as a function of concentration of the radiosensitizer iododeoxyuridine (IUdR). Methods and Materials: IUdR was incorporated into Chinese hamster ovary cell DNA at 16.6 {+-} 1.9%, 12.0 {+-} 1.4%, and 9.2 {+-} 1.3% thymidine replacement. Cells were irradiated from 1 to 8 Gy with 35-keV synchrotron-generated photons and conventional radiotherapy 4-MV x-rays. The effects of the radiation were measured via clonogenic survival assays. Surviving fraction was plotted vs. dose and fit to a linear quadratic model. Sensitization enhancement ratios (SER{sub 10}) were calculated as the ratio of doses required to achieve 10% surviving fraction for cells without and with DNA-incorporated IUdR. Results: At 4 MV, SER{sub 10} values were 2.6 {+-} 0.1, 2.2 {+-} 0.1, and 1.5 {+-} 0.1 for 16.6%, 12.0%, and 9.2% thymidine replacement, respectively. At 35 keV, SER{sub 10} values were 4.1 {+-} 0.2, 3.0 {+-} 0.1, and 2.0 {+-} 0.1, respectively, which yielded SER{sub 10} ratios (35 keV:4 MV) of 1.6 {+-} 0.1, 1.4 {+-} 0.1, and 1.3 {+-} 0.1, respectively. Conclusions: SER{sub 10} increases monotonically with percent thymidine replacement by IUdR for both modalities. As compared to 4-MV x-rays, 35-keV photons produce enhanced SER{sub 10} values whose ratios are linear with percent thymidine replacement and assumed to be due to Auger electrons contributing to enhanced dose to DNA. Although this Auger effectiveness factor is less than the radiosensitization factor of IUdR, both could be important for the clinical efficacy of IUdR radiotherapy.

  11. Backscattering of α-Quartz (0 6 10) for 14.4 keV Mössbauer Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Yasuhiko; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Zhang, Xiaowei; Kikuta, Seishi

    2007-01-01

    Backscattering of α-quartz (0 6 10) was investigated using 14.4 keV 57Fe Mössbauer photons from α-57Fe2O3 at nuclear resonant scattering beamline BL09XU, SPring-8. The α-quartz crystal was heated to around 353 K by an oven so that the Bragg angle of α-quartz 0 6 10 diffraction meats 90 degrees. Energy width of the reflection was measured by changing temperature of the oven. The measured bandwidth is 1.14(33) meV. Backscattering by a α-quartz crystal can be applied for high-energy-resolution monochromator or analyzer.

  12. Measurements of the total atomic differential cross section of elastic scattering of 59.54-keV photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casnati, E.; Baraldi, C.; Tartari, A.

    1990-09-01

    Accurate measurements, mostly to within 2%, of the total atomic cross section for the elastic scattering of 59.54-keV photons on atoms in the 13<=Z<=82 range were carried out at 60°, 90°, and 120° scattering angles. Very good agreement with other experimental data was observed, in particular, with those of Schumacher and Stoffregen [Z. Phys. A 283, 15 (1977)]. The comparison with the theoretical results given by Kissel and co-workers [Phys. Rev. A 22, 1979 (1980); Phys. Rep. 140, 75 (1986)] confirms the validity of their procedure within the value intervals explored.

  13. Multigap RPC time resolution to 511 keV annihilation photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, G.; Gabusi, M.; Musitelli, G.; Nardò, R.; Ratti, S. P.; Tamborini, A.; Vitulo, P.

    2015-05-01

    The time resolution of Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPCs) to 511 keV gamma rays has been investigated using a 22Na source and four detectors. The MRPCs time resolution has been derived from the Time-of-Flight information, measured from pairs of space correlated triggered events. A GEANT4 simulation has been performed to analyze possible setup contributions and to support experimental results. A time resolution (FWHM) of 312 ps and 376 ps has been measured for a single MRPC with four 250 μm gas gaps by considering respectively one and two independent pairs of detectors. These values, endorsed by the GEANT4 simulation, represent a good result compared to those reported in the literature.

  14. Studies of polarization bremsstrahlung and ordinary bremsstrahlung from 89Sr beta particles in metallic targets in the photon energy region of 1-100 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amrit; Dhaliwal, A. S.

    2015-06-01

    Studies of polarization bremsstrahlung (PB) and ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) produced by the 89Sr beta emitter in Al, Ti, Sn and Pb targets were undertaken at photon energies of 1-100 keV. The experimental results are compared with the Elwert corrected (non-relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (EBH) theory and the modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (Fmod BH) theory for OB and with the Avdonina and Pratt (Fmod BH + PB) theory for total bremsstrahlung (BS). These results are in agreement with the Fmod BH + PB theory up to 13 keV, 16 keV, 22 keV and 28 keV energies for Al, Ti, Sn and Pb targets, respectively; Fmod BH theory is more accurate at higher energies.

  15. Studies on effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption and electron density of some narcotic drugs in the energy range 1 keV-20 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gounhalli, Shivraj G.; Shantappa, Anil; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2013-04-01

    Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption ZPEA,eff, photon interaction ZPI,eff and for electron density Nel, have been calculated by a direct method in the photon-energy region from 1 keV to 20 MeV for narcotic drugs, such as Heroin (H), Cocaine (CO), Caffeine (CA), Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), Cannabinol (CBD), Tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV). The ZPEA,eff, ZPI,eff and Nel values have been found to change with energy and composition of the narcotic drugs. The energy dependence ZPEA,eff, ZPI,eff and Nel is shown graphically. The maximum difference between the values of ZPEA,eff, and ZPI,eff occurs at 30 keV and the significant difference of 2 to 33% for the energy region 5-100 keV for all drugs. The reason for these differences is discussed.

  16. Analysis of photon emission from 50--350-keV proton impact on H{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, Benjamin D.; Timpone, Stephanie A.; Monce, Michael N.; Mitchell, Laurel; Griffin, Brian

    2011-04-15

    We have measured photon emission cross sections from neutral fragments produced by collisions of 50-350 keV protons with H{sub 2}O molecules. Balmer {alpha}-{delta} emissions from both the target and projectile were recorded. We also analyzed A {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}-X {sup 2}{Pi} (0,0) and (1,0) emission from the excited OH fragment produced during target dissociation. Trends in the cross sections revealed two key properties of the collision process: (1) The Bethe theory accurately describes target emission from both H and OH fragments and (2) the ratio of any two Balmer emission cross sections for both the target and projectile can be approximated by simple functions of the respective optical oscillator strengths. Finally, we provide the Bethe fit parameters necessary to calculate the target emission cross sections at all nonrelativistic impact energies.

  17. Two-color ionization of hydrogen close to threshold with keV photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dondera, Mihai; Florescu, Viorica; Bachau, Henri

    2014-09-01

    In a recent Letter [H. Bachau, M. Dondera, and V. Florescu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 073001 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.073001] we considered the hydrogen atom in interaction with an electromagnetic field consisting in the coherent superposition of two keV pulses centered around two frequencies ω1 and ω2 that differ by a few atomic units. The analysis of the results obtained from the resolution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation focused on stimulated Compton scattering (SCS). We have developed in parallel an approach based on perturbation theory and it proved to be an appropriate and useful tool in complement to the nonperturbative approach. In this paper we present a detailed analysis of the electron spectra obtained for ℏω1= 55 a.u. and two values of ℏω2, 50 and 54 a.u. Emphasis is put on the case ℏω2=54 a.u., where the electron emitted through SCS has the lowest energy, showing in particular that in the vicinity of the ionization threshold the cross section increases as ℏω1-ℏω2 decreases. We calculate photoelectron energy and angular distributions at various relative directions of propagation of the pulses. We discuss the limitations of the approximations underlying the numerical and analytical approaches used in this work.

  18. Where do the 3.5 keV photons come from? A morphological study of the Galactic Center and of Perseus

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Eric; Jeltema, Tesla; Profumo, Stefano E-mail: tesla@ucsc.edu

    2015-02-01

    We test the origin of the 3.5 keV line photons by analyzing the morphology of the emission at that energy from the Galactic Center and from the Perseus cluster of galaxies. We employ a variety of different templates to model the continuum emission and analyze the resulting radial and azimuthal distribution of the residual emission. We then perform a pixel-by-pixel binned likelihood analysis including line emission templates and dark matter templates and assess the correlation of the 3.5 keV emission with these templates. We conclude that the radial and azimuthal distribution of the residual emission is incompatible with a dark matter origin for both the Galactic center and Perseus; the Galactic center 3.5 keV line photons trace the morphology of lines at comparable energy, while the Perseus 3.5 keV photons are highly correlated with the cluster's cool core, and exhibit a morphology incompatible with dark matter decay. The template analysis additionally allows us to set the most stringent constraints to date on lines in the 3.5 keV range from dark matter decay.

  19. Investigation of Coulombic bremsstrahlung spectra of metallic targets for the photon energy region of 1-100keV.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amrit; Dhaliwal, A S

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper, the formation of bremsstrahlung spectra by ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) and polarization bremsstrahlung (PB) in metallic targets by (35)S beta particles has been investigated in the photon energy region of 1-100keV. From the experimental measurements and the theoretical results obtained from Elwert corrected (non-relativistic) Bethe Heitler (EBH) theory, modified Elwert factor (relativistic) (FmodBH) theories for OB and Avdonina and Pratt (FmodBH+PB) theory for total bremsstrahlung (BS) having the contribution of PB into OB, it has been found that the contribution of PB into BS in a target is limited to a low energy region only and also varies with the atomic number of target material. The FmodBH+PB theory is in agreement with the experimental results in low energy regions of the target, whereas at high energy region FmodBH is found to give better agreement. Further, the present experimental results indicate that the screening effects in the Coulombic bremsstrahlung process cannot be neglected in the high energy region, and the multiple scattering and secondary electron emissions effects in thick target are required to be taken into account in describing the bremsstrahlung process. PMID:27400163

  20. Investigation of Coulombic bremsstrahlung spectra of metallic targets for the photon energy region of 1-100keV.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amrit; Dhaliwal, A S

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper, the formation of bremsstrahlung spectra by ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) and polarization bremsstrahlung (PB) in metallic targets by (35)S beta particles has been investigated in the photon energy region of 1-100keV. From the experimental measurements and the theoretical results obtained from Elwert corrected (non-relativistic) Bethe Heitler (EBH) theory, modified Elwert factor (relativistic) (FmodBH) theories for OB and Avdonina and Pratt (FmodBH+PB) theory for total bremsstrahlung (BS) having the contribution of PB into OB, it has been found that the contribution of PB into BS in a target is limited to a low energy region only and also varies with the atomic number of target material. The FmodBH+PB theory is in agreement with the experimental results in low energy regions of the target, whereas at high energy region FmodBH is found to give better agreement. Further, the present experimental results indicate that the screening effects in the Coulombic bremsstrahlung process cannot be neglected in the high energy region, and the multiple scattering and secondary electron emissions effects in thick target are required to be taken into account in describing the bremsstrahlung process.

  1. Charged particle equilibrium corrections for photon sources from 400 keV to 1.4 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Latha

    Lack of charged particle equilibrium (CPE) has practical importance in radiological health protection, in nuclear medicine, and radiobiology where small radioactive point sources irradiate the human body accidentally or may be introduced into the body for diagnostic, therapeutic, or analytical purposes. The absorbed dose under CPE is readily calculated from knowledge of the photon energy fluence and mass-absorption coefficient of the material. When estimating absorbed dose rates at points close to the source, the primary radiation field varies appreciably over the region within the range of secondary particles. Under such conditions, CPE does not exist and prediction of absorbed dose becomes difficult. However, if one applies correction factors for non-CPE conditions, absorbed dose rates can be calculated fairly easily. In this dissertation, a CPE model was developed for non-CPE conditions to predict the fraction of charged particle equilibrium (GammaCPE) attained in a water medium for point sources of energies in the range from 400 keV to 1.4 MeV using EGS4-DOSRZ Monte Carlo calculation. A new methodology to calculate absorbed dose and kerma along the central axis of the cylindrical phantom was presented and the results were found to be in excellent agreement with published values. In order to corroborate with the EGS4-DOSRZ calculation, another model based on the Klein-Nishina single scattering cross section was developed to quantify the GammaCPE attained in water for point sources. A CPE path length coefficient (mu cm-1) was found for each photon energy and compared with published values. This coefficient was used to determine dose rates averaged over 1 cm2 at depths that are of interest in skin dose exposures. Experimental measurements of CPE were carried out for a Co-60 point source using GAFCHROMICRTM MD-55 film (1990) as the dosimetry media. The films were read using a document scanner. Dose rates obtained using the scanner method were compared with those

  2. SU-D-201-01: Attenuation of PET/CT Gantries with 511 KeV Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Busse, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: PET shielding requires the use of large amounts of lead because of the penetrating nature of 511 keV photons. While the uptake rooms generally require the thickest lead, the scan room often requires substantial shielding. Attenuation by the PET/CT gantry is normally assumed to be zero, but may be significant in directions perpendicular to the scanner axis. Methods: A 5 mL tube was filled with between 14.7 and 20.5 mCi of F-18 and inserted into a phantom (70 cm NEMA PET Scatter Phantom). Exposure rates were recorded at several distances and 15° intervals with a pressurized ionization chamber (Ludlum 9DP) both with the phantom outside the gantry and centered in the CT and PET acquisition positions. These measurements were repeated with three scanners: Siemens Biograph TruePoint 6, GE Optima 560, and Philips Gemini 64. Measurements were decay corrected and normalized to exposure rates outside the gantry to calculate percent transmission. Results: Between 45° to 135° (measured from the patient bed at 0°), average transmission was about 20% for GE, 35% for Philips, and 30% for Siemens. The CT gantry was roughly twice as attenuating as the PET gantry at 90° for all three manufacturers, with about 10% transmission through the CT gantry and 20% through the PET gantry. Conclusion: The Philips system is a split-gantry and therefore has a narrower angle of substantial attenuation. For the GE and Siemens systems, which are single-gantry design, transmission was relatively constant once the angle was sufficient to block line-of-sight from the phantom. While the patient may spend a greater fraction of time at the PET position of the scanner, transmission characteristics of the two components are similar enough to be treated collectively. For shielding angles between 45° and 135°, a reasonably conservative assumption would be to assume gantry transmission of 50%.

  3. Direct and indirect signal detection of 122 keV photons with a novel detector combining a pnCCD and a CsI(Tl) scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, D. M.; Huth, M.; Hartmann, R.; Abboud, A.; Send, S.; Conka-Nurdan, T.; Shokr, M.; Pietsch, U.; Strüder, L.

    2016-01-01

    By combining a low noise fully depleted pnCCD detector with a CsI(Tl) scintillator, an energy-dispersive area detector can be realized with a high quantum efficiency (QE) in the range from below 1 keV to above 100 keV. In direct detection mode the pnCCD exhibits a relative energy resolution of 1% at 122 keV and spatial resolution of less than 75 μm, the pixel size of the pnCCD. In the indirect detection mode, i.e. conversion of the incoming X-rays in the scintillator, the measured energy resolution was about 9-13% at 122 keV, depending on the depth of interaction in the scintillator, while the position resolution, extracted with the help of simulations, was 30 μm only. We show simulated data for incident photons of 122 keV and compare the various interaction processes and relevant physical parameters to experimental results obtained with a radioactive 57Co source.

  4. Mass attenuation coefficient of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using 16.59 - 25.26 keV photon energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Yusof, Mohd Fahmi; Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz

    2015-04-01

    The Rhizophora spp. particleboards were fabricated using ≤ 104 µm particle size at three different fabrication methods; binderless, steam pre-treated and tannin-added. The mass attenuation coefficient of Rhizophora spp. particleboards were measured using x-ray fluorescent (XRF) photon from niobium, molybdenum, palladium, silver and tin metal plates that provided photon energy between 16.59 to 25.26 keV. The results were compared to theoretical values for water calculated using photon cross-section database (XCOM).The results showed that all Rhizophora spp. particleboards having mass attenuation coefficient close to calculated XCOM for water. Tannin-added Rizophora spp. particleboard was nearest to calculated XCOM for water with χ2 value of 13.008 followed by binderless Rizophora spp. (25.859) and pre-treated Rizophora spp. (91.941).

  5. Variation in the calibrated response of LiF, Al2O3, and silicon dosimeters when used for in-phantom measurements of source photons with energies between 30 KeV AND 300 KeV.

    PubMed

    Poudel, Sashi; Currier, Blake; Medich, David C

    2015-04-01

    The MCNP5 radiation transport code was used to quantify changes in the absorbed dose conversion factor for LiF, Al2O3, and silicon-based electronic dosimeters calibrated in-air using standard techniques and summarily used to measure absorbed dose to water when placed in a water phantom. A mono-energetic photon source was modeled at energies between 30 keV and 300 keV for a point-source placed at the center of a water phantom, a point-source placed at the surface of the phantom, and for a 10-cm radial field geometry. Dosimetric calculations were obtained for water, LiF, Al2O3, and silicon at depths of 0.2 cm and 10 cm from the source. These results were achieved using the MCNP5 *FMESH photon energy-fluence tally, which was coupled with the appropriate DE/DF card for each dosimetric material studied to convert energy-fluence into the absorbed dose. The dosimeter's absorbed dose conversion factor was calculated as a ratio of the absorbed dose to water to that of the dosimeter measured at a specified phantom depth. The dosimeter's calibration value also was obtained. Based on these results, the absorbed dose conversion factor for a LiF dosimeter was found to deviate from its calibration value by up to 9%, an Al2O3 dosimeter by 43%, and a silicon dosimeter by 61%. These data therefore can be used to obtain LiF, Al2O3, and silicon dosimeter correction factors for mono-energetic and poly-energetic sources at measurement depths up to 10 cm under the irradiation geometries investigated herein.

  6. Impact of IUdR on Rat 9L glioma cell survival for 25-35 keV photon-activated auger electron therapy.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Diane; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Brown, Thomas A D; Ii, Kenneth L Matthews; Dugas, Joseph P; Ham, Kyungmin; Varnes, Marie E

    2014-12-01

    The goal of the current study was to measure the energy dependence of survival of rat 9L glioma cells labeled with iododeoxyuridine (IUdR) that underwent photon-activated Auger electron therapy using 25-35 keV monochromatic X rays, i.e., above and below the K-edge energy of iodine. Rat 9L glioma cells were selected because of their radioresistance, ability to be implanted for future in vivo studies and analogy to radioresistant human gliomas. Survival curves were measured for a 4 MV X-ray beam and synchrotron produced monochromatic 35, 30 and 25 keV X-ray beams. IUdR was incorporated into the DNA at levels of 0, 9 and 18% thymidine replacement for 4 MV and 35 keV and 0 and 18% thymidine replacement for 30 and 25 keV. For 10 combinations of beam energy and thymidine replacement, 62 data sets (3-13 per combination) provided 776 data points (47-148 per combination). Survival versus dose data taken for the same combination, but on different days, were merged by including the zero-dose points in the nonlinear, chi-squared data fitting using the linear-quadratic model and letting the best estimate to the zero-dose plating efficiency for each of the different days be a fitting parameter. When comparing two survival curves, the ratio of doses resulting in 10% survival gave sensitization enhancement ratios (SER10) from which contributions due to linear energy transfer (LET) (SER10,LET), IUdR radiosensitization (SER10,RS), the Auger effect (SER10,AE) and the total of all effects (SER10,T) were determined. At 4 MV and 35, 30 and 25 keV, SER10,LET values were 1.00, 1.08 ± 0.03, 1.22 ± 0.02 and 1.37 ± 0.02, respectively. At 4 MV SER10,RS values for 9 and 18% IUdR were 1.28 ± 0.02 and 1.40 ± 0.02, respectively. Assuming LET effects were independent of percentage IUdR and radiosensitization effects were independent of energy, SER10,AE values for 18% IUdR at 35, 30 and 25 keV were 1.35 ± 0.05, 1.06 ± 0.03 and 0.98 ± 0.03, respectively. The value for 9% IUdR at 35 keV was 1

  7. Reduction in the intensity of solar X-ray emission in the 2- to 15-keV photon energy range and heating of the solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzoeva, I. K.

    2013-04-15

    The time profiles of the energy spectra of low-intensity flares and the structure of the thermal background of the soft X-ray component of solar corona emission over the period of January-February, 2003, are investigated using the data of the RHESSI project. A reduction in the intensity of X-ray emission of the solar flares and the corona thermal background in the 2- to 15-keV photon energy range is revealed. The RHESSI data are compared with the data from the Interball-Geotail project. A new mechanism of solar corona heating is proposed on the basis of the results obtained.

  8. Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope with spherical multilayer mirrors around 2.5keV photon energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ning; Du, Xuewei; Wang, Qiuping; Cao, Zhurong; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2014-09-01

    A Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) x-ray microscope has been developed for the diagnostics of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The KB microscope system works around 2.5keV with the magnification of 20. It consists of two spherical multilayer mirrors. The grazing angle is 3.575° at 2.5keV. The influence of the slope error of optical components and the alignment errors is simulated by SHADOW software. The mechanical structure which can perform fine tuning is designed. Experiment result with Manson x-ray source shows that the spatial resolution of the system is about 3-4μm over a field of view of 200μm.

  9. A novel flat-response x-ray detector in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhichao; Jiang, Xiaohua; Liu, Shenye; Huang, Tianxuan; Zheng, Jian; Yang, Jiamin; Li, Sanwei; Guo, Liang; Zhao, Xuefeng; Du, Huabin; Song, Tianming; Yi, Rongqing; Liu, Yonggang; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2010-07-01

    A novel flat-response x-ray detector has been developed for the measurement of radiation flux from a hohlraum. In order to obtain a flat response in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV, it is found that both the cathode and the filter of the detector can be made of gold. A further improvement on the compound filter can then largely relax the requirement of the calibration x-ray beam. The calibration of the detector, which is carried out on Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility at Institute of High Energy Physics, shows that the detector has a desired flat response in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV, with a response flatness smaller than 13%. The detector has been successfully applied in the hohlraum experiment on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. The radiation temperatures inferred from the detector agree well with those from the diagnostic instrument Dante installed at the same azimuth angle from the hohlraum axis, demonstrating the feasibility of the detector.

  10. A novel flat-response x-ray detector in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhichao; Guo Liang; Jiang Xiaohua; Liu Shenye; Huang Tianxuan; Yang Jiamin; Li Sanwei; Zhao Xuefeng; Du Huabin; Song Tianming; Yi Rongqing; Liu Yonggang; Jiang Shaoen; Ding Yongkun; Zheng Jian

    2010-07-15

    A novel flat-response x-ray detector has been developed for the measurement of radiation flux from a hohlraum. In order to obtain a flat response in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV, it is found that both the cathode and the filter of the detector can be made of gold. A further improvement on the compound filter can then largely relax the requirement of the calibration x-ray beam. The calibration of the detector, which is carried out on Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility at Institute of High Energy Physics, shows that the detector has a desired flat response in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV, with a response flatness smaller than 13%. The detector has been successfully applied in the hohlraum experiment on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. The radiation temperatures inferred from the detector agree well with those from the diagnostic instrument Dante installed at the same azimuth angle from the hohlraum axis, demonstrating the feasibility of the detector.

  11. Albedo factors of 123, 320, 511, 662 and 1115 keV gamma photons in carbon, aluminium, iron and copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiran, K. U.; Ravindraswami, K.; Eshwarappa, K. M.; Somashekarappa, H. M.

    2016-04-01

    Experimental measurements to study the variation of albedo factors in carbon, aluminium, iron and copper are carried out using gamma photons obtained from 57Co, 133Ba, 22Na, 137Cs and 65Zn. The back-scattered photons from the samples are detected by a 3^''× 3^'' NaI(Tl) scintillation detector placed at a backscattering angle of 180°. The variation of number albedo ( AN), energy albedo ( AE) and dose albedo ( AD) as a function of source energy and atomic number ( Z) is studied. The experimentally obtained, response corrected variation of multiple scattered photons as a function of target thickness is compared with the Monte Carlo simulation using MCNP code and are in good agreement.

  12. Dose calculation for photon-emitting brachytherapy sources with average energy higher than 50 keV: Report of the AAPM and ESTRO

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo; Das, Rupak K.; DeWerd, Larry A.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Ouhib, Zoubir; Rivard, Mark J.; Sloboda, Ron S.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Recommendations of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO) on dose calculations for high-energy (average energy higher than 50 keV) photon-emitting brachytherapy sources are presented, including the physical characteristics of specific {sup 192}Ir, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 60}Co source models. Methods: This report has been prepared by the High Energy Brachytherapy Source Dosimetry (HEBD) Working Group. This report includes considerations in the application of the TG-43U1 formalism to high-energy photon-emitting sources with particular attention to phantom size effects, interpolation accuracy dependence on dose calculation grid size, and dosimetry parameter dependence on source active length. Results: Consensus datasets for commercially available high-energy photon sources are provided, along with recommended methods for evaluating these datasets. Recommendations on dosimetry characterization methods, mainly using experimental procedures and Monte Carlo, are established and discussed. Also included are methodological recommendations on detector choice, detector energy response characterization and phantom materials, and measurement specification methodology. Uncertainty analyses are discussed and recommendations for high-energy sources without consensus datasets are given. Conclusions: Recommended consensus datasets for high-energy sources have been derived for sources that were commercially available as of January 2010. Data are presented according to the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism, with modified interpolation and extrapolation techniques of the AAPM TG-43U1S1 report for the 2D anisotropy function and radial dose function.

  13. High accuracy experimental determination of copper and zinc mass attenuation coefficients in the 100 eV to 30 keV photon energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ménesguen, Y.; Gerlach, M.; Pollakowski, B.; Unterumsberger, R.; Haschke, M.; Beckhoff, B.; Lépy, M.-C.

    2016-02-01

    The knowledge of atomic fundamental parameters such as mass attenuation coefficients with low uncertainties, is of decisive importance in elemental quantification using x-ray fluorescence analysis techniques. Several databases are accessible and frequently used within a large community of users. These compilations are most often in good agreement for photon energies in the hard x-ray ranges. However, they significantly differ for low photon energies and around the absorption edges of any element. In a joint cooperation of the metrology institutes of France and Germany, mass attenuation coefficients of copper and zinc were determined experimentally in the photon energy range from 100 eV to 30 keV by independent approaches using monochromatized synchrotron radiation at SOLEIL (France) and BESSY II (Germany), respectively. The application of high-accuracy experimental techniques resulted in mass attenuation coefficient datasets determined with low uncertainties that are directly compared to existing databases. The novel datasets are expected to enhance the reliability of mass attenuation coefficients.

  14. Dosimetric prerequisites for routine clinical use of photon emitting brachytherapy sources with average energy higher than 50 kev

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zuofeng; Das, Rupak K.; De Werd, Larry A.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Rivard, Mark J.; Sloboda, Ronald S.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2007-01-15

    This paper presents the recommendations of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) on the dosimetric parameters to be characterized, and dosimetric studies to be performed to obtain them, for brachytherapy sources with average energy higher than 50 keV that are intended for routine clinical use. In addition, this document makes recommendations on procedures to be used to maintain vendor source strength calibration accuracy. These recommendations reflect the guidance of the AAPM and the ESTRO for its members, and may also be used as guidance to vendors and regulatory agencies in developing good manufacturing practices for sources used in routine clinical treatments.

  15. Investigation of chemical effect on the absorption parameters for some selected indium complex at 59.54 keV photon energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akman, F.; Akman, F.; Kaçal, M. R.; Turhan, M. F.; Akdemir, F.; Araz, A.; Durak, R.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the mass attenuation coefficients, molecular, atomic and electronic cross sections, effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some selected indium complexes such as C5H10InNO9, C3H6InNO9 and C9H10InNO9, were determined with experimentally and theoretically using transmission geometry at 59.54 keV photon energy which emitted from 241Am annular source. The results were compared with the theoretical calculations which obtained from the WinXCOM program. Also, the results were interpreted based on some chemical parameters such as energy gap, ionization energy, electron affinity, hardness, chemical potential, electronegativity and global electrophilicity values of malonate, 2, 2 dimethylmalonate and phenylmalonate which were calculated using the density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP).

  16. Visible and near UV photon spectroscopy of charge-exchange collisions between Ar7+ and Li at 105 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, E.; Boduch, P.; Chantepie, M.; Druetta, M.; Hennecart, D.; Husson, X.; Lecler, D.; Wilson, M.

    1994-04-01

    Charge exchange collisions at 105 keV between Ar7+ ions and lithium atoms have been studied by photon spectroscopy in the 2000-6000 Å wavelength range. A large number of new lines in Ar VII have been identified with the help of ab initio pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations taking into account electrostatic interactions between 3snl (n = 6-10), 3 pnl (n = 4-6) and 3dnl (n = 4) configurations. They correspond to transitions 3snl-3sn'l' with n = 7, 8, 9 and Δn = 1 and 2. Lines in Ar VI were also observed and identified as transitions 3s2nl-3s2n'l' and 3s3pnl-3s3pn'l'(n = 6, 7) and Δn = 1.

  17. Bremsstrahlung in Mo and Pt targets produced by {sup 90}Sr beta particles in the photon energy region of 1-100 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Amrit; Dhaliwal, A. S.

    2015-08-28

    Bremsstrahlung spectra in thick targets of Mo and Pt, produced by beta emitter {sup 90}Sr (end point energy = 546 keV) have been studied in the photon energy range of 1-100 keV. The experimentally measured bremsstrahlung spectra measured with Si(Li) detector were compared with the theoretical spectral distributions calculated from Elwert corrected (non relativistic) Bethe-Heitler [EBH] theory, modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (F{sub mod}BH) theory for ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) and the modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (F{sub mod}BH+PB) theory, which includes the polarization bremsstrahlung (PB) into total bremsstrahlung (BS). The present results indicate the correctness of F{sub mod}BH+PB theory in the low energy region, where the contributions of PB into BS are dominant, which is described in terms of stripped atom (SA) approximation. But at the middle and higher energy region of the bremsstrahlung spectrum, where the contribution of PB is negligible, the F{sub mod}BH theory is more close to the experimental results. Hence, it is clear that the production of PB in the low energy region, due to the dynamic response of the target atom suppresses the production of bremsstrahlung at higher energy ends.

  18. Time differential 57Fe Mössbauer spectrometer with unique 4π YAP:Ce 122.06 keV gamma-photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Petr; Pechousek, Jiri; Prochazka, Vit; Navarik, Jakub; Kouril, Lukas; Kohout, Pavel; Vrba, Vlastimil; Machala, Libor

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a conceptually new design of the 57Fe Time Differential Mössbauer Spectrometer (TDMS) with the gamma-photon detector optimized for registration of a radiation emitted in a maximum solid angle. A high detection efficiency of 80% in 4π region was achieved for 122.06 keV photons emitted from 57Co source. Detector parameters have been optimized for the use in the Time Differential Mössbauer Spectroscopy where the high time resolution in range of 176-200 ns is highly required. Technical concept of the TDMS is based on the virtual instrumentation technique and uses fast digital oscilloscope. Performance and detector utilization have been clarified by decreasing the Mössbauer spectral line-width of K2MgFe(CN)6 reference sample from 0.33 mm/s (integral mode) to 0.23 mm/s (time differential mode). This report also describes characterization and utilization of the detector together with additional electronic blocks and two-channel fast data-acquisition system construction.

  19. Simulation of scattering and attenuation of 511 keV photons in a combined PET/field-cycled MRI system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handler, William B.; Gilbert, Kyle M.; Peng, Hao; Chronik, Blaine A.

    2006-05-01

    Mixing the imaging modalities of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will offer the best soft tissue contrast (MRI) with information about metabolic function (PET). The high magnetic field environment of an MRI system makes the detection of annihilation photons difficult, as the response of standard photo-multiplier tubes is compromised. An approach using field-cycled MRI is discussed here, as field-cycled MRI makes it possible to have long periods of time available for nuclear imaging when there is no magnetic field present. This work focuses upon the effect of the field-cycled MRI upon the nuclear image due to the added material providing additional attenuation of the PET signal, and additional nuclei for scatter. These effects are studied using a Monte Carlo simulation based upon the GEANT libraries. Attenuation effects are shown to be significant, approximately 6% for the RF shield and coil and approximately 24% for the gradients. No significant effect is seen in image quality due to the scattering of the gammas. With these levels of attenuation it is concluded that open gradient coils and shim coils are required around the imaging volume.

  20. 46 CFR 12.25-20 - Physical and medical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Physical and medical requirements. 12.25-20 Section 12.25-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN... Member of the Engine Department § 12.25-20 Physical and medical requirements. The physical and...

  1. 46 CFR 12.25-20 - Physical and medical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Physical and medical requirements. 12.25-20 Section 12.25-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN... Member of the Engine Department § 12.25-20 Physical and medical requirements. The physical and...

  2. 46 CFR 12.25-35 - Apprentice engineers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Apprentice engineers. 12.25-35 Section 12.25-35 Shipping... Department § 12.25-35 Apprentice engineers. (a) Persons enrolled in an apprentice engineer training program... evidence that they are so enrolled may be issued an endorsement as apprentice engineer and may be signed...

  3. 46 CFR 12.25-35 - Apprentice engineers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Apprentice engineers. 12.25-35 Section 12.25-35 Shipping... Department § 12.25-35 Apprentice engineers. (a) Persons enrolled in an apprentice engineer training program... evidence that they are so enrolled may be issued an endorsement as apprentice engineer and may be signed...

  4. 46 CFR 12.25-35 - Apprentice engineers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Apprentice engineers. 12.25-35 Section 12.25-35 Shipping... Department § 12.25-35 Apprentice engineers. (a) Persons enrolled in an apprentice engineer training program... evidence that they are so enrolled may be issued an endorsement as apprentice engineer and may be signed...

  5. 46 CFR 12.25-35 - Apprentice engineers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Apprentice engineers. 12.25-35 Section 12.25-35 Shipping... Department § 12.25-35 Apprentice engineers. (a) Persons enrolled in an apprentice engineer training program... evidence that they are so enrolled may be issued an endorsement as apprentice engineer and may be signed...

  6. 46 CFR 12.25-40 - Apprentice mate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Apprentice mate. 12.25-40 Section 12.25-40 Shipping... Department § 12.25-40 Apprentice mate. A person enrolled in an apprentice mate training program approved by... that he is so enrolled may be issued an endorsement as apprentice mate and may be signed on ships...

  7. 46 CFR 12.25-40 - Apprentice mate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Apprentice mate. 12.25-40 Section 12.25-40 Shipping... Department § 12.25-40 Apprentice mate. A person enrolled in an apprentice mate training program approved by... that he is so enrolled may be issued an endorsement as apprentice mate and may be signed on ships...

  8. 46 CFR 12.25-40 - Apprentice mate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Apprentice mate. 12.25-40 Section 12.25-40 Shipping... Department § 12.25-40 Apprentice mate. A person enrolled in an apprentice mate training program approved by... that he is so enrolled may be issued an endorsement as apprentice mate and may be signed on ships...

  9. 46 CFR 12.25-30 - Student observers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Student observers. 12.25-30 Section 12.25-30 Shipping... Department § 12.25-30 Student observers. Students in technical schools who are enrolled in courses in marine... shall be issued a MMC endorsed as student observers—any department and may be signed on ships as...

  10. 46 CFR 12.25-30 - Student observers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Student observers. 12.25-30 Section 12.25-30 Shipping... Department § 12.25-30 Student observers. Students in technical schools who are enrolled in courses in marine... shall be issued a MMC endorsed as student observers—any department and may be signed on ships as...

  11. 46 CFR 12.25-30 - Student observers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Student observers. 12.25-30 Section 12.25-30 Shipping... Department § 12.25-30 Student observers. Students in technical schools who are enrolled in courses in marine... shall be issued a MMC endorsed as student observers—any department and may be signed on ships as...

  12. Tables and graphs of photon-interaction cross sections from 0. 1 keV to 100 MeV derived from the LLL evaluated-nuclear-data library

    SciTech Connect

    Plechaty, E.F.; Cullen, D.E.; Howerton, R.J.

    1981-11-11

    Energy-dependent evaluated photon interaction cross sections and related parameters are presented for elements H through Cf(Z = 1 to 98). Data are given over the energy range from 0.1 keV to 100 MeV. The related parameters include form factors and average energy deposits per collision (with and without fluorescence). Fluorescence information is given for all atomic shells that can emit a photon with a kinetic energy of 0.1 keV or more. In addition, the following macroscopic properties are given: total mean free path and energy deposit per centimeter. This information is derived from the Livermore Evaluated-Nuclear-Data Library (ENDL) as of October 1978.

  13. Measurement of Lα and Lβ1,3,4 fluorescence cross sections of La, Ce, Pr and Nd induced by photons of energies between 7.01 keV and 8.75 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Herrera, J.; Miranda, J.

    2016-06-01

    This study presents measurement results of x-ray production cross sections of Lα and Lβ1,3,4 emitted by four lanthanoid elements (La, Ce, Pr and Nd), after irradiation with Kα and Kβ X rays of the elements Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn (covering energies between 7.01 keV and 8.75 keV). Primary x-rays were induced in turn by the irradiation of thick targets of these elements with a beam of x-rays produced by a tube with an Rh anode, operating at 50 kV and 850 μA. The experimental results are compared with theoretical cross sections predicted using known tabulations of photoelectric cross sections. Dirac-Hartree-Slater (DHS) atomic parameters were used for these calculations. An acceptable match between experiment and both sets of tabulated data is found.

  14. Mass attenuation coefficient of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using 16.59 – 25.26 keV photon energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah

    2015-04-29

    The Rhizophora spp. particleboards were fabricated using ≤ 104 µm particle size at three different fabrication methods; binderless, steam pre-treated and tannin-added. The mass attenuation coefficient of Rhizophora spp. particleboards were measured using x-ray fluorescent (XRF) photon from niobium, molybdenum, palladium, silver and tin metal plates that provided photon energy between 16.59 to 25.26 keV. The results were compared to theoretical values for water calculated using photon cross-section database (XCOM).The results showed that all Rhizophora spp. particleboards having mass attenuation coefficient close to calculated XCOM for water. Tannin-added Rizophora spp. particleboard was nearest to calculated XCOM for water with χ2 value of 13.008 followed by binderless Rizophora spp. (25.859) and pre-treated Rizophora spp. (91.941)

  15. 46 CFR 12.25-10 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false General requirements. 12.25-10 Section 12.25-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN REQUIREMENTS FOR RATING... department.) (b) When the holder of an endorsement is qualified as a food handler, the steward's...

  16. 46 CFR 12.25-10 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false General requirements. 12.25-10 Section 12.25-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN REQUIREMENTS FOR RATING... department.) (b) When the holder of an endorsement is qualified as a food handler, the steward's...

  17. 28 CFR 12.25 - Amended registration statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amended registration statement. 12.25 Section 12.25 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE REGISTRATION OF CERTAIN PERSONS HAVING KNOWLEDGE OF FOREIGN ESPIONAGE, COUNTERESPIONAGE, OR SABOTAGE MATTERS UNDER THE ACT OF AUGUST 1, 1956 §...

  18. 18 CFR 12.25 - Posting and readiness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Posting and readiness. 12.25 Section 12.25 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT SAFETY OF WATER POWER PROJECTS AND PROJECT...

  19. 18 CFR 12.25 - Posting and readiness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Posting and readiness. 12.25 Section 12.25 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT SAFETY OF WATER POWER PROJECTS AND PROJECT...

  20. 18 CFR 12.25 - Posting and readiness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Posting and readiness. 12.25 Section 12.25 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT SAFETY OF WATER POWER PROJECTS AND PROJECT...

  1. 18 CFR 12.25 - Posting and readiness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Posting and readiness. 12.25 Section 12.25 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT SAFETY OF WATER POWER PROJECTS AND PROJECT...

  2. 18 CFR 12.25 - Posting and readiness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Posting and readiness. 12.25 Section 12.25 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT SAFETY OF WATER POWER PROJECTS AND PROJECT...

  3. 46 CFR 12.25-30 - Student observers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Department § 12.25-30 Student observers. Students in technical schools who are enrolled in courses in marine management and ship operations who present a letter or other documentary evidence that they are so...

  4. Studies of total bremsstrahlung in thick targets of Al, Ti, Sn and Pb for 90Sr beta particles in the photon energy region of 1-100 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amrit; Dhaliwal, A. S.

    2016-02-01

    Total bremsstrahlung (BS) spectra in thick targets of Al, Ti, Sn and Pb produced by beta emitter 90Sr (End point energy=546 keV) are studied in the photon energy range of 1-100 keV. The experimentally measured BS spectra are compared with the theoretical spectral distributions calculated from Elwert corrected (non relativistic) Bethe-Heitler [EBH] theory, modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler [Fmod BH] theory for ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) and the Avdonina and Pratt [Fmod BH+PB] theory, which include the contribution of polarization bremsstrahlung (PB) into OB. The present results are indicating the correctness of Fmod BH+PB theory in the low energy region, where PB dominates into the BS, but at the middle and higher photon energy region of the bremsstrahlung spectrum, the Fmod BH theory is more close to the experimental results. The description of the bremsstrahlung process in stripped atom (SA) approximation, which indicates the suppression of the bremsstrahlung at higher energy ends due to the production of PB in the low energy region, needs further considerations. Hence, the present measurements for BS for different target materials indicates that the considerations of the screening effects along with other secondary effects during the interaction of incident electrons with the target nuclei are important while describing the production of bremsstrahlung, particularly for the higher energy regions.

  5. Verification of Compton scattering spectrum of a 662keV photon beam scattered on a cylindrical steel target using MCNP5 code.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Tran Thien; Nguyen, Vo Hoang; Chuong, Huynh Dinh; Tran, Le Bao; Tam, Hoang Duc; Binh, Nguyen Thi; Tao, Chau Van

    2015-11-01

    This article focuses on the possible application of a (137)Cs low-radioactive source (5mCi) and a NaI(Tl) detector for measuring the saturation thickness of solid cylindrical steel targets. In order to increase the reliability of the obtained experimental results and to verify the detector response function of Compton scattering spectrum, simulation using Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP5) code is performed. The obtained results are in good agreement with the response functions of the simulation scattering and experimental scattering spectra. On the basis of such spectra, the saturation depth of a steel cylinder is determined by experiment and simulation at about 27mm using gamma energy of 662keV ((137)Cs) at a scattering angle of 120°. This study aims at measuring the diameter of solid cylindrical objects by gamma-scattering technique. PMID:26363240

  6. Effect of external magnetic field on the Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios of TixNi1-x alloys excited by 59.54 and 22.69keV photons.

    PubMed

    Perişanoğlu, Ufuk; Alım, Bünyamin; Uğurlu, Mine; Demir, Lütfü

    2016-09-01

    The effects of external magnetic field and exciting photon energies on the Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios of various alloy compositions of Ti-Ni transition metal alloys have been investigated in this work using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The spectrum of characteristic K-X-ray photons from pure Ti, pure Ni and TixNi1-x (x=0.30; 0.40; 0.50; 0.60; 0.70) alloys were detected with a high resolution Si (Li) solid-state detector. Firstly, Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios of pure Ti, pure Ni and TixNi1-x alloys were measured following excitation by 59.54keV γ-rays from a 200mCi (241)Am radioactive point source without any magnetic field and under 0.5 and 1T external magnetic fields, separately. Later, the same measurements were repeated under the same experimental conditions for 22.69keV X-rays from a 370 MBq(1)(0)(9)Cd radioactive point source. The results obtained for Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios of pure Ti, pure Ni, Ti and Ni in various Ti-Ni alloys were evaluated in terms of both external magnetic field effect and exciting photon energy effect. When the results obtained for both exciting photon energies are evaluated in terms of changing of Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios depending on the alloy composition, the tendency of these changes are observed to be similar. Also, Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios for all samples examined have changed with increasing external magnetic field. Therefore, the results obtained have shown that Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios of Ti and Ni in TixNi1-x alloys are connected with the external magnetic field. The present study makes it possible to perform reliable interpretation of experimental Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios for Ti, Ni and TixNi1-x alloys and can also provide quantitative information about the changes of the Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios of these metals with alloy composition.

  7. Dual crystal x-ray spectrometer at 1.8 keV for high repetition-rate single-photon counting spectroscopy experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamboa, E. J.; Bachmann, B.; Kraus, D.; MacDonald, M. J.; Bucher, M.; Carron, S.; Coffee, R. N.; Drake, R. P.; Emig, J.; Ferguson, K. R.; Fletcher, L. B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Gorkhover, T.; Hau-Riege, S. P.; Krzywinski, J.; Levitan, A. L.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.; Osipov, T.; Pardini, T.; Peltz, C.; Skruszewicz, S.; Bostedt, C.; Fennel, T.; Döppner, T.

    2016-08-01

    With the recent development of high-repetition rate x-ray free electron lasers (FEL), it is now possible to perform x-ray scattering and emission spectroscopy measurements from thin foils or gasses heated to high-energy density conditions by integrating over many experimental shots. Since the expected signal may be weaker than the typical CCD readout noise over the region-of-interest, it is critical to the success of this approach to use a detector with high-energy resolution so that single x-ray photons may be isolated. Here we describe a dual channel x-ray spectrometer developed for the Atomic and Molecular Optics endstation at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) for x-ray spectroscopy near the K-edge of aluminum. The spectrometer is based on a pair of curved PET (002) crystals coupled to a single pnCCD detector which simultaneously measures x-ray scattering and emission in the forward and backward directions. The signals from single x-ray photons are accumulated permitting continuous single-shot acquisition at 120 Hz.

  8. Air kerma to HP(3) conversion coefficients for photons from 10 keV to 10 MeV, calculated in a cylindrical phantom.

    PubMed

    Gualdrini, G; Bordy, J M; Daures, J; Fantuzzi, E; Ferrari, P; Mariotti, F; Vanhavere, F

    2013-05-01

    In the framework of the ORAMED project (Optimization of RAdiation protection for MEDical staff), funded by the European Union Seventh Framework Programme, different studies were aimed at improving the quality of radiation protection in interventional radiology and nuclear medicine. The main results of the project were presented during a final workshop held in Barcelona in January 2011, the proceedings of which are available in the open literature. One of the ORAMED tasks was focused on the problem of eye-lens photon exposure of the medical staff, a topic that gained more importance especially after the ICRP decision to lower the limiting equivalent dose to 20 mSv per year. The present technical note has the scope, besides briefly summarising the physical reasons of the proposal and the practical implications, to provide, in tabular form, a set of air kerma to Hp(3) conversion coefficients based on the adoption of a theoretical cylindrical model that is well suited for reproduction of the mass and the shape of a human head.

  9. Energy dependence of photon-induced Kα and Kβ x-ray production cross-sections for some elements with 42≤Z≤68 in the energy range 38-80 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seven, Sabriye; Erdoğan, Hasan

    2015-12-01

    The energy dependence of photon-induced Kα and Kβ x-ray production cross-sections for Mo, Ru, Pd, In, Sb, Cs, La, Pr, Sm, Tb and Er elements has been studied in the energy range of 38-80 keV with secondary excitation method. K x-ray intensities were measured using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) Spectrometry. The measurements have been made by observing the x-ray emissions, with the help of HPGe detector coupled with a multichannel analyzer. The areas of the Kα and Kβ spectral peaks, as well as the net peak areas, have been determined by a fitting process. The measured Kα and Kβ x-ray production cross-sections have been compared with calculated theoretical values in this energy regime. The results have been plotted versus excitation energy. The present experimental Kα and Kβ x-ray production cross-section values for all the elements were in general agreement with the theoretical values calculated using photoionization cross-sections, fluorescence yields and fractional rates based on Hartree-Slater potentials.

  10. The absolute yield, angular distribution and resonance widths of the 6.13, 6.92 and 7.12 MeV photons from the 340.5 keV resonance of the 19F(p,αγ) 16O reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, S.

    1991-10-01

    Although the low lying resonances in the 19F(p,αγ) 16O reaction have been studied by many investigators in the past, only a few absolute determinations of the gamma-ray yield and branching ratios have been made. This is somewhat surprising in view of the widespread use of this reaction for the quantitative microanalysis of fluorine concentration profiles in the near surface regions of materials and for the calibration of gamma-ray detectors. In this work we report an absolute measurement of the yield, angular distribution and resonance widths of the 6.13, 6.92 and 7.12 MeV photons from the 340.5 keV resonance of the 19F(p,αγ) 16O reaction. Photons were produced by bombarding a semithick target of CaF 2 with protons from the Harwell 6 MV Van de Graaff accelerator. A 113 cm 3 HPGe spectrometer, with an energy resolution of 6.8 keV at 6129 keV, was used as the photon detector. This detector had previously been calibrated absolutely using a combination of radionuclide and thermal neutron capture gamma-ray sources at the neutron facility Badger, adjacent to the Harwell reactor DIDO. Measurements were made at seven angles in the range 0° - 150° permitting both differential and integral cross-sections to be derived. Geometrical correction factors were calculated using the Monte Carlo code EGS-4. A value for the reaction width was determined from the excitation curve. With conventional notation the principal results are as follows: γ1 : γ2 : γ3 = 0.9701:0.0033:0.0266; ΓCM = (2.08±0.13) keV; and Y( γ1) = (8.72±0.37)×10 4 6129 keV γμC -1as.

  11. 46 CFR 12.25-25 - Members of Merchant Marine Cadet Corps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Members of Merchant Marine Cadet Corps. 12.25-25 Section 12.25-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN... Member of the Engine Department § 12.25-25 Members of Merchant Marine Cadet Corps. No ratings other...

  12. Study of the angular-dependence of the L-alpha and L-beta radiation produced by 0-15 kev photons incident on Au targets of various thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requena, Sebastian; Williams, Scott

    2011-03-01

    We report the results of experiments involving the L-alpha and L-beta x-ray lines produced by 0-15 keV bremsstrahlung incident on gold targets of various thicknesses at forward-scattered angles ranging from 20 to 160 degrees. Previous reports [1, 2] have shown the L-beta peaks to be isotropic and the L-alpha peaks to be anisotropic due to the symmetry/asymmetry associated with the orbital being filled during the transition. The relative intensities are compared to the predictions of the Monte Carlo code, PENELOPE.

  13. XCOM: Photon Cross Sections Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 8 XCOM: Photon Cross Sections Database (Web, free access)   A web database is provided which can be used to calculate photon cross sections for scattering, photoelectric absorption and pair production, as well as total attenuation coefficients, for any element, compound or mixture (Z <= 100) at energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV.

  14. High resolution 17 keV to 75 keV backlighters for High Energy Density experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Maddox, B R; Giraldez, E; Hatchett, S P; Hudson, L; Izumi, N; Key, M H; Pape, S L; MacKinnon, A J; MacPhee, A G; Patel, P K; Phillips, T W; Remington, B A; Seely, J F; Tommasini, R; Town, R; Workman, J

    2008-02-25

    We have developed 17 keV to 75 keV 1-dimensional and 2-dimensional high-resolution (< 10 {micro}m) radiography using high-intensity short pulse lasers. High energy K-{alpha} sources are created by fluorescence from hot electrons interacting in the target material after irradiation by lasers with intensity I{sub L} > 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. We have achieved high resolution point projection 1-dimensional and 2-dimensional radiography using micro-foil and micro-wire targets attached to low-Z substrate materials. The micro-wire size was 10 {micro}m x 10 {micro}m x 300 {micro}m on a 300 {micro}m x 300 {micro}m x 5 {micro}m CH substrate. The radiography performance was demonstrated using the Titan laser at LLNL. We observed that the resolution is dominated by the micro-wire target size and there is very little degradation from the plasma plume, implying that the high energy x-ray photons are generated mostly within the micro-wire volume. We also observe that there are enough K{alpha} photons created with a 300 J, 1-{omega}, 40 ps pulse laser from these small volume targets, and that the signal-to-noise ratio is sufficiently high, for single shot radiography experiments. This unique technique will be used on future high energy density (HED) experiments at the new Omega-EP, ZR and NIF facilities.

  15. Characteristic 8 keV X rays possess radiobiological properties of higher-LET radiation.

    PubMed

    Shridhar, Ravi; Estabrook, William; Yudelev, Mark; Rakowski, Joseph; Burmeister, Jay; Wilson, George D; Joiner, Michael C

    2010-03-01

    Electronic brachytherapy systems are being developed that can deliver X rays of varying energy depending on the material of a secondary target. A copper target produces characteristic 8 keV X rays. Our aim was to determine whether 8 keV X rays might deliver greater biological effectiveness than megavoltage photons. Cells of the U251 human glioma cell line were used to compare the biological effects of 8 keV X rays and (60)Co gamma rays in terms of relative biological effectiveness (RBE), oxygen enhancement ratio (OER), and DNA damage. The RBE at 50% and 10% survival was 2.6 and 1.9, respectively. At 50% survival, the OER for cells treated with 8 keV X rays was 1.6 compared with 3.0 for (60)Co gamma rays. The numbers of H2AX foci per Gy after treatment with 8 keV X rays and (60)Co gamma rays were similar; however, the size of the foci generated at 8 keV was significantly larger, possibly indicating more complex DNA damage. The mean area of H2AX foci generated by 8 keV X rays was 0.785 microm(2) (95% CI: 0.756-0.814) compared with 0.491 microm(2) (95% CI: 0.462-0.520) for (60)Co gamma rays (P < 0.0001). Characteristic 8 keV X rays produce two to three times the biological effectiveness of megavoltage photons, with a radiobiological profile similar to higher-LET radiations.

  16. The low-energy photon tagger NEPTUN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savran, D.; Lindenberg, K.; Glorius, J.; Löher, B.; Müller, S.; Pietralla, N.; Schnorrenberger, L.; Simon, V.; Sonnabend, K.; Wälzlein, C.; Elvers, M.; Endres, J.; Hasper, J.; Zilges, A.

    2010-02-01

    A new photon tagging spectrometer was built at the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator (S-DALINAC). The system is designed for tagging photons in an energy range from 6 to 20 MeV with the emphasis on best possible energy resolution and intensity. The absolute energy resolution of photons at 10 MeV is expected to be about 20 keV. With scintillating fibres as focal-plane detectors a maximum rate of tagged photons of 104 keV -1s -1 will be achieved. Detailed design studies including Monte Carlo simulations are presented, as well as results for the measured tagged photon energy profile of the system realized so far. This photon-tagging facility will allow to determine the photon absorption cross-sections as a function of excitation energy and to study the decay patterns of nuclear photo-excitations in great detail.

  17. Photon-neutrino interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dicus, D.A.; Repko, W.W.

    1997-12-01

    The cross sections for the processes {gamma}{nu} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {nu}{anti {nu}} are calculated with the aid of an effective Lagrangian derived from the Standard model. These cross sections are shown to be much larger than the elastic cross section {sigma}({gamma}{nu} {yields} {gamma}{nu}) for photon energies {omega} {ge} 1 keV. Possible astrophysical implications are discussed.

  18. A 24 keV liquid-metal-jet x-ray source for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, D. H.; Takman, P. A. C.; Lundstroem, U.; Burvall, A.; Hertz, H. M.

    2011-12-15

    We present a high-brightness 24-keV electron-impact microfocus x-ray source based on continuous operation of a heated liquid-indium/gallium-jet anode. The 30-70 W electron beam is magnetically focused onto the jet, producing a circular 7-13 {mu}m full width half maximum x-ray spot. The measured spectral brightness at the 24.2 keV In K{sub {alpha}} line is 3 x 10{sup 9} photons/(s x mm{sup 2}x mrad{sup 2}x 0.1% BW) at 30 W electron-beam power. The high photon energy compared to existing liquid-metal-jet sources increases the penetration depth and allows imaging of thicker samples. The applicability of the source in the biomedical field is demonstrated by high-resolution imaging of a mammography phantom and a phase-contrast angiography phantom.

  19. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  20. Photon-photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1995-04-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et at., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention. A 1990 article by V.I. Teinov describes the situation at that time. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons -- the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R&D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy.

  1. Photon-photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    1996-01-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et al., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention [1]. A 1990 article by V.I. Telnov describes the situation at that time [2]. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held [3]. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons—the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R&D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy.

  2. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  3. Electron Flux Models at GEO: 30 keV - 600 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, R.; Balikhin, M. A.; Sibeck, D. G.; Walker, S. N.; Ganushkina, N. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Forecast models are developed for the electron fluxes measured by the Magnetospheric Electron Detector (MagED) onboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) 13. The models employ solar wind and geomagnetic indices as inputs to produce a forecast of the electron flux at Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) for five energy ranges from 30 keV - 600 keV. All of these models will be implemented in real time to forecast the electron fluxes on the PROGRESS project website (https://ssg.group.shef.ac.uk/progress2/html/index.phtml).

  4. Effective field theory and keV lines from dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Krall, Rebecca; Reece, Matthew; Roxlo, Thomas E-mail: mreece@physics.harvard.edu

    2014-09-01

    We survey operators that can lead to a keV photon line from dark matter decay or annihilation. We are motivated in part by recent claims of an unexplained 3.5 keV line in galaxy clusters and in Andromeda, but our results could apply to any hypothetical line observed in this energy range. We find that given the amount of flux that is observable, explanations in terms of decay are more plausible than annihilation, at least if the annihilation is directly to Standard Model states rather than intermediate particles. The decay case can be explained by a scalar or pseudoscalar field coupling to photons suppressed by a scale not far below the reduced Planck mass, which can be taken as a tantalizing hint of high-scale physics. The scalar case is particularly interesting from the effective field theory viewpoint, and we discuss it at some length. Because of a quartically divergent mass correction, naturalness strongly suggests the theory should be cut off at or below the 1000 TeV scale. The most plausible such natural UV completion would involve supersymmetry. These bottom-up arguments reproduce expectations from top-down considerations of the physics of moduli. A keV line could also arise from the decay of a sterile neutrino, in which case a renormalizable UV completion exists and no direct inference about high-scale physics is possible.

  5. Antigravity Acts on Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brynjolfsson, Ari

    2002-04-01

    Einstein's general theory of relativity assumes that photons don't change frequency as they move from Sun to Earth. This assumption is correct in classical physics. All experiments proving the general relativity are in the domain of classical physics. This include the tests by Pound et al. of the gravitational redshift of 14.4 keV photons; the rocket experiments by Vessot et al.; the Galileo solar redshift experiments by Krisher et al.; the gravitational deflection of light experiments by Riveros and Vucetich; and delay of echoes of radar signals passing close to Sun as observed by Shapiro et al. Bohr's correspondence principle assures that quantum mechanical theory of general relativity agrees with Einstein's classical theory when frequency and gravitational field gradient approach zero, or when photons cannot interact with the gravitational field. When we treat photons as quantum mechanical particles; we find that gravitational force on photons is reversed (antigravity). This modified theory contradicts the equivalence principle, but is consistent with all experiments. Solar lines and distant stars are redshifted in accordance with author's plasma redshift theory. These changes result in a beautiful consistent cosmology.

  6. Resolution of the 1,238-keV gamma-ray line from supernova 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.; Tueller, J.; Leventhal, M.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of supernova 1987A from the maiden flight of the Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS) are reported. SN1987A was observed for a period of 11.1 hours on May 1, 1988. Line emission at 1238 keV and continuum emission from 60-800 keV were detected. A gaussian line profile gives an acceptable fit to the 1238 keV line. The best-fit parameters are: flux = 8.5(+ 2.3, - 2.2) x 10 to the -4th photons/sq cm/s; peak energy = 1235.4 (+ 2.2, - 2.4) keV; FWHM = 16.3 (+ 6.1, - 5.7) keV. No evidence is found for a supernova-produced red- or blueshift in the 1238 keV line. The measured linewidth is a factor of about two greater than model predictions, although the discrepancy represents only two standard deviations. The line profiles are characteristic of optically thin regions, whereas the intensity implies a mean optical depth of about two. Fragmentation or nonspherical geometry of the supernova shell are possible explanations of the data.

  7. Secondary ion emission from V and Al surfaces under keV light ion on bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blauner, Patricia G.; Weller, Martha R.; Kaurin, Michael G.; Weller, Robert A.

    1986-03-01

    Positive secondary ion mass spectra have been measured for oxidized polycrystalline V and Al targets bombarded by H +, H 2+, He + and Ar + ions with beam energies ranging from 25 keV to 275 keV. An enhancement in the relative yield of positive ions of electronegative surface constituents, in particular O + is observed under light ion bombardment. Metallic ion intensities were found to decrease with increasing primary beam energy in proportion to the estimated total sputtering yields for these targets and beams. In contrast, the O + secondary ion intensities were independent of primary beam energy. This behavior is similar to that observed previously with heavy ions of comparable velocities. In addition, for the projectiles and targets used in these measurements, no energy thresholds or collective effects were observed in the emission of any positive ion. Published data on secondary ion emission resulting from electron, photon, and heavy ion bombardment are compared with these results.

  8. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of ..cap alpha../sub s/ and ..lambda../sup ms/ from the ..gamma..*..gamma.. ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/ form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub ..gamma gamma../ from exclusive channels at low W/sub ..gamma gamma../, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z/sup 0/ and W/sup + -/ beams from e ..-->.. eZ/sup 0/ and e ..-->.. nu W will become important. 44 references.

  9. Photon activation therapy.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, R G; Bond, V P

    1984-12-01

    It is suggested here that significant advantages should accrue from the use of 40 keV photons from implanted sources of 145Sm. These energies should stimulate Auger electron cascades from IdUrd, as well as produce non-repairable damage from radiosensitization. The use of low dose rates (approximately 10 rd/hr) should allow repair in normal tissues exposed to the activating photons. Utilization of this technique with brain tumors should minimize problems associated with radiosensitization of normal tissues, as CNS tissues do not synthesize DNA. The deposition of high LET radiations selectively in tumor cells provides unique advantages not available to either conventional therapy or other forms of particle therapy (fast neutrons, protons, pions, heavy ions). PMID:6515666

  10. New Observations of Soft X-ray (0.5-5 keV) Solar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, A.; Woods, T. N.; Mason, J. P.; Jones, A. R.; Warren, H. P.

    2013-12-01

    The solar corona is the brightest source of X-rays in the solar system, and the X-ray emission is highly variable on many time scales. However, the actual solar soft X-ray (SXR) (0.5-5 keV) spectrum is not well known, particularly during solar quiet periods, as, with few exceptions, this energy range has not been systematically studied in many years. Previous observations include high-resolution but very narrow-band spectra from crystal spectrometers (e.g., Yohkoh/BCS), or integrated broadband irradiances from photometers (e.g., GOES/XRS, TIMED/XPS, etc.) that lack detailed spectral information. In recent years, broadband measurements with moderate energy resolution (~0.5-0.7 keV FWHM) were made by SphinX on CORONAS-Photon and SAX on MESSENGER, although they did not extend to energies below ~1 keV. We present observations of solar SXR emission obtained using new instrumentation flown on recent SDO/EVE calibration rocket underflights. The photon-counting spectrometer, a commercial Amptek X123 with a silicon drift detector and an 8 μm Be window, measures the solar disk-integrated SXR emission from ~0.5 to >10 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution and 1 s cadence. A novel imager, a pinhole X-ray camera using a cooled frame-transfer CCD (15 μm pixel pitch), Ti/Al/C filter, and 5000 line/mm Au transmission grating, images the full Sun in multiple spectral orders from ~0.1 to ~5 nm with ~10 arcsec/pixel and ~0.01 nm/pixel spatial and spectral detector scales, respectively, and 10 s cadence. These instruments are prototypes for future CubeSat missions currently being developed. We present new results of solar observations on 04 October 2013 (NASA sounding rocket 36.290). We compare with previous results from 23 June 2012 (NASA sounding rocket 36.286), during which solar activity was low and no signal was observed above ~4 keV. We compare our spectral and imaging measurements with spectra and broadband irradiances from other instruments, including SDO/EVE, GOES/XRS, TIMED

  11. Decline of the 2-10 keV Emission from Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liburd, Jamar; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Gull, Theodore R.; Madura, Thomas; Teodoro, Mairan; Moffat, Anthony; Richardson, Noel; Russell, Chris; Pollock, Andrew; Owocki, Stan

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of Eta Car's X-ray spectrum in the 2-10 keV band using processed data from the X-ray Telescope on Swift reveals a peak flux on July 16, 2014 of 0.046 photons s(exp -1) cm(exp -2) (3.37+/-0.15×10(exp -10) ergs s(exp -1) cm(exp -2). This flux is similar to the previous maximum flux seen by the XRT, 3.53+/-0.13×10(exp -10) ergs s(exp -1) cm(exp -2) (0.049 photons s(exp -1) cm(exp -2), ATEL #6298). Since this peak on July 16, the most recent Swift XRT quicklook data show a drop in flux. On July 20, 2014 the XRT flux as seen in the quicklook data was 0.011 photons s(exp -1) cm(exp -2) (8.3+/-0.5×10(exp -11) ergs s(exp -1) cm(exp -2)). This most likely indicates that the 2-10 keV flux is in its declining phase as Eta Car approaches its deep X-ray minimum stage (Hamaguchi et al., 2014, ApJ, 784, 125) associated with periastron passage of the 2024-day binary orbit. The column density derived from analysis of the July 20 XRT quicklook data is 7.2×10(exp 22) cm(exp -2). This is consistent with the column density seen near the same orbital phase in 2003 (7.7×10(exp 22) cm(exp -2), Hamaguchi et al., 2007, ApJ, 663, 522). Eta Car's deep X-ray minimum phase is expected to begin on July 30, 2014. Weekly Swift/XRT observations of Eta Car in the 2-10 keV band are planned throughout the X-ray minimum.

  12. Calibration of SIOM-5FW film in the range of 0.1-4 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenais-Popovics, C.; Reverdin, C.; Ioannou, I.

    2006-06-01

    The SIOM-5FW film produced for the sub-keV x-ray detection range was calibrated here in a wide energy range (0.1-4keV). A single set of parameters valid in the whole measured energy range was determined for the calibration of the Shangai 5F (SIOM-5FW) film from a parametric fit of the data. The sensitivity of the SIOM-5FW film was measured to be four times lower than that of the Kodak DEF film at 2.5keV photon energy. Modeling of the DEF and SIOM-5FW films provides a good comparison of their sensitivity in the 0.1-10keV range.

  13. Detection of 511 keV positron annihilation radiation from the galactic center direction. [gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventhal, M.; Maccallum, C. J.; Stang, P. D.

    1978-01-01

    A balloon-borne gamma ray telescope with an approximately 130 cu cm high purity germanium detector was flown over Australia to detect sharp spectral features from the galactic center direction. A 511 keV positron annihilation line was observed at a flux level of (1.21 plus or minus 0.22) x (10/cu cm) photons/sec/sp cm. Suggestive evidence for the detection of the three-photon positronium continuum is presented. The possible origin of the positrons is discussed.

  14. Photon-activation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    Photon Activation Therapy (PAT) is a technique in which radiation dose to tumor is enhanced via introduction of stable /sup 127/I in the form of iodinated deoxyuridine (IdUrd). Stimulation of cytotoxic effects from IdUrd is accomplished by activation with external (or implanted) radiation sources. Thus, accumulations of this nucleoside in actively competing cellpools do not preclude therapy in so far as such tissues can be excluded from the radiation field. Calculations show that 5% replacement of thymidine (Tyd) in tumor DNA should enhance the biological effectiveness of a given photon radiotherapy dose by a factor of approx. 3. Proportionally higher gains would result from higher replacements of Tyd and IdUrd. In addition, biological response is enhanced by chemical sensitization with IdUrd. The data indicate that damage from photon activation as well as chemical sensitization does not repair. Thus, at low dose rates, a further increase in therapeutic gain should accrue as normal tissues are allowed to repair and regenerate. A samarium-145 source has been developed for PAT, with activating x-ray energies of from 38 to 45 keV. Favorable clinical results can be expected through the use of IdUrd and protracted irradiations with low energy x-rays. In particular, PAT may provide unique advantages at selected sites such as brain, or head and neck tumors. (ERB)

  15. Physics of a 17 keV neutrino.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayser, B.

    The possible 17 keV neutrino, if real, cannot be νμ but could be essentially ντ. Relic 17 keV neutrinos from the big bang must have disappeared, through a non-Standard-Model decay or annihilation process, before the present epoch. If one assumes that the 17 keV neutrino is not a Dirac neutrino of the conventional kind, then one is led to picture it as a Dirac neutrino of the unconventional Zeldovich-Konopinski-Mahmoud kind. It is then an amalgam of ντ and ν¯μ.

  16. Beta decay anomalies and the 17-keV conundrum

    SciTech Connect

    Hime, A.

    1993-03-01

    Recent developments in pursuance of the 17-keV neutrino are reviewed. Several different experiments found anomalies in {beta} decay spectra which were consistently interpreted as evidence for a heavy neutrino. On the other hand, recent null results definitively rule out the existence of a 17-keV neutrino, as well as escaping criticisms applicable to earlier experiments. While missing links remain, it seems that any strong evidence for a 17-keV neutrino has vanished. Specifically, the anomalies observed in {sup 35}S and {sup 63}Ni spectra at Oxford can be reinterpreted in terms of electron scattering effects. In addition, the discrepancy amongst internal bremsstrahlung measurements has an instrumental origin, and recent results disfavour a 17-keV neutrino. Anomalies persist in the low energy region of the tritium spectrum which deserve further investigation.

  17. Beta decay anomalies and the 17-keV conundrum

    SciTech Connect

    Hime, A.

    1993-01-01

    Recent developments in pursuance of the 17-keV neutrino are reviewed. Several different experiments found anomalies in [beta] decay spectra which were consistently interpreted as evidence for a heavy neutrino. On the other hand, recent null results definitively rule out the existence of a 17-keV neutrino, as well as escaping criticisms applicable to earlier experiments. While missing links remain, it seems that any strong evidence for a 17-keV neutrino has vanished. Specifically, the anomalies observed in [sup 35]S and [sup 63]Ni spectra at Oxford can be reinterpreted in terms of electron scattering effects. In addition, the discrepancy amongst internal bremsstrahlung measurements has an instrumental origin, and recent results disfavour a 17-keV neutrino. Anomalies persist in the low energy region of the tritium spectrum which deserve further investigation.

  18. Low-energy photons in high-energy photon fields--Monte Carlo generated spectra and a new descriptive parameter.

    PubMed

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Willborn, Kay; Rühmann, Antje; Poppe, Björn

    2011-09-01

    The varying low-energy contribution to the photon spectra at points within and around radiotherapy photon fields is associated with variations in the responses of non-water equivalent dosimeters and in the water-to-material dose conversion factors for tissues such as the red bone marrow. In addition, the presence of low-energy photons in the photon spectrum enhances the RBE in general and in particular for the induction of second malignancies. The present study discusses the general rules valid for the low-energy spectral component of radiotherapeutic photon beams at points within and in the periphery of the treatment field, taking as an example the Siemens Primus linear accelerator at 6 MV and 15 MV. The photon spectra at these points and their typical variations due to the target system, attenuation, single and multiple Compton scattering, are described by the Monte Carlo method, using the code BEAMnrc/EGSnrc. A survey of the role of low energy photons in the spectra within and around radiotherapy fields is presented. In addition to the spectra, some data compression has proven useful to support the overview of the behaviour of the low-energy component. A characteristic indicator of the presence of low-energy photons is the dose fraction attributable to photons with energies not exceeding 200 keV, termed P(D)(200 keV). Its values are calculated for different depths and lateral positions within a water phantom. For a pencil beam of 6 or 15 MV primary photons in water, the radial distribution of P(D)(200 keV) is bellshaped, with a wide-ranging exponential tail of half value 6 to 7 cm. The P(D)(200 keV) value obtained on the central axis of a photon field shows an approximately proportional increase with field size. Out-of-field P(D)(200 keV) values are up to an order of magnitude higher than on the central axis for the same irradiation depth. The 2D pattern of P(D)(200 keV) for a radiotherapy field visualizes the regions, e.g. at the field margin, where changes of

  19. Photon absorptiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the detection and treatment of osteoporosis. This paper is a review of the merits and limitations of the various noninvasive modalities currently available for the measurement of bone mineral density with special emphasis placed upon the nuclear medicine techniques of single-photon and dual-photon absorptiometry. The clinicians should come away with an understanding of the relative advantages and disadvantages of photon absorptiometry and its optimal clinical application. 49 references.

  20. Variable Gap Undulator for 1.5-48 Kev Free Electron Laser at Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, C.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2011-08-17

    We study the feasibility of generating femtosecond duration Free-Electron Laser with a variable photon energy from 1.5 to 48 keV, using an electron bunch with the same characteristics of the LINAC Coherent Light Source (LCLS) bunch, and a planar undulator with additional focusing. We assume that the electron bunch energy can be changed, and the undulator has a variable gap, allowing a variable undulator parameter. It is assumed to be operated in an ultra-low charge and ultra-short pulse regime. We study the feasibility of a tunable, short pulse, X-ray FEL with photon energy from 1.5 to 48 keV, using an electron beam like the one in the LCLS and a 2:5 cm period, variable gap, planar undulator. The beam energy changes from 4.6 to 13.8 GeV, the electorn charge is kept at 10 pC, and the undulator parameter varies from 1 to 3. The undulator length needed to saturate the 48 keV FEL is about 55 m, with a peak power around 5 GW. At longer wavelength the saturation length is as short as 15 m, and the peak power around 20 GW. The results from the analytical models and the GENESIS simulations show that the system is feasible. The large wavelength range, full tunability and short, few femtosecond pulses, together with the large peak power, would provide a powerful research tool.

  1. Decaying vector dark matter as an explanation for the 3.5 keV line from galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Farzan, Yasaman; Akbarieh, Amin Rezaei E-mail: am_rezaei@physics.sharif.ir

    2014-11-01

    We present a Vector Dark Matter (VDM) model that explains the 3.5 keV line recently observed in the XMM-Newton observatory data from galaxy clusters. In this model, dark matter is composed of two vector bosons, V and V', which couple to the photon through an effective generalized Chern-Simons coupling, g{sub V}. V' is slightly heavier than V with a mass splitting m{sub V'} – m{sub V} ≅ 3.5 keV. The decay of V' to V and a photon gives rise to the 3.5 keV line. The production of V and V' takes place in the early universe within the freeze-in framework through the effective g{sub V} coupling when m{sub V'} < T < Λ, Λ being the cut-off above which the effective g{sub V} coupling is not valid. We introduce a high energy model that gives rise to the g{sub V} coupling at low energies. To do this, V and V' are promoted to gauge bosons of spontaneously broken new U(1){sub V} and U(1){sub V'} gauge symmetries, respectively. The high energy sector includes milli-charged chiral fermions that lead to the g{sub V} coupling at low energy via triangle diagrams.

  2. THE ORIGIN OF THE 6.4 keV LINE EMISSION AND H{sub 2} IONIZATION IN THE DIFFUSE MOLECULAR GAS OF THE GALACTIC CENTER REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Dogiel, V. A.; Chernyshov, D. O.; Tatischeff, V.; Terrier, R.

    2013-07-10

    We investigate the origin of the diffuse 6.4 keV line emission recently detected by Suzaku and the source of H{sub 2} ionization in the diffuse molecular gas of the Galactic center (GC) region. We show that Fe atoms and H{sub 2} molecules in the diffuse interstellar medium of the GC are not ionized by the same particles. The Fe atoms are most likely ionized by X-ray photons emitted by Sgr A* during a previous period of flaring activity of the supermassive black hole. The measured longitudinal intensity distribution of the diffuse 6.4 keV line emission is best explained if the past activity of Sgr A* lasted at least several hundred years and released a mean 2-100 keV luminosity {approx}> 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1}. The H{sub 2} molecules of the diffuse gas cannot be ionized by photons from Sgr A*, because soft photons are strongly absorbed in the interstellar gas around the central black hole. The molecular hydrogen in the GC region is most likely ionized by low-energy cosmic rays, probably protons rather than electrons, whose contribution into the diffuse 6.4 keV line emission is negligible.

  3. The photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Russell L.

    2009-10-01

    There are no TEM waves, only photons. Lets build a photon, using a radio antenna. A short antenna (2L<< λ) simplifies the calculation, letting B fall off everywhere as 1/r^2. The Biot-Savart law finds B = (μ0/4π)(LI0/r^2)θφt. The magnetic flux thru a semi-circle of radius λ/2 is set equal to the flux quantum h/e, determining the needed source strength, LI0. From this, one can integrate the magnetic energy density over a sphere of radius λ/2 and finds it to be 1.0121 hc/λ. Pretty close. A B field collapses when the current ceases, but the photon evades this by creating a ɛ0E / t displacement current at center that fully supports the toroidal B assembly as it moves at c. This E=vxB arises because the photon moves at c. Stopped, a photon decays. At every point along the photon's path, an observer will note a transient oscillation of an E field. This sources the EM ``guiding wave'', carrying little or no energy and expanding at c. At the head of the photon, all these spherical guiding waves gather ``in-phase'' as a planar wavefront. This model speaks to all the many things we know about light. The photon is tiny, but its guiding wave is huge.

  4. A 9 keV electron-impact liquid-gallium-jet x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Otendal, M.; Tuohimaa, T.; Vogt, U.; Hertz, H. M.

    2008-01-15

    We demonstrate a high-brightness compact 9 keV electron-impact microfocus x-ray source based on a liquid-gallium-jet anode. A {approx}30 W, 50 kV electron gun is focused onto the {approx}20 m/s, 30 {mu}m diameter liquid-gallium-jet anode to produce an {approx}10 {mu}m full width at half maximum x-ray spot. The peak spectral brightness is >2x10{sup 10} photons/(s mm{sup 2} mrad{sup 2}x0.1% BW). Calculation and experiments show potential for increasing this brightness by approximately three orders of magnitude, making the source suitable for laboratory-scale x-ray crystallography and hard x-ray microscopy.

  5. Seeded quantum FEL at 478 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.; Seggebrock, T.; Habs, D.

    2012-07-09

    We present for the first time the concept of a seeded {gamma} quantum Free-Electron-Laser (QFEL) at 478 keV, which has very different properties compared to a classical. The basic concept is to produce a highly brilliant {gamma} beam via SASE. To produce highly intense and coherent {gamma} beam, we intend to use a seeded FEL scheme. Important for the production of such a {gamma} beam are novel refractive {gamma}-lenses for focusing and an efficient monochromator, allowing to generate a very intense and coherent seed beam. The energy of the {gamma} beam is 478 keV, corresponding to a wavelength in the sub-Angstrom regime (1/38 A). To realize a coherent {gamma} beam at 478 keV, it is necessary to use a quantum FEL design. At such high radiation energies a classical description of the {gamma}-FEL becomes wrong.

  6. Compact, maintainable 80-KeV neutral beam module

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H.; Molvik, Arthur W.

    1980-01-01

    A compact, maintainable 80-keV arc chamber, extractor module for a neutral beam system immersed in a vacuum of <10.sup.-2 Torr, incorporating a nested 60-keV gradient shield located midway between the high voltage ion source and surrounding grounded frame. The shield reduces breakdown or arcing path length without increasing the voltage gradient, tends to keep electric fields normal to conducting surfaces rather than skewed and reduces the peak electric field around irregularities on the 80-keV electrodes. The arc chamber or ion source is mounted separately from the extractor or ion accelerator to reduce misalignment of the accelerator and to permit separate maintenance to be performed on these systems. The separate mounting of the ion source provides for maintaining same without removing the ion accelerator.

  7. Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption and photon attenuation of tissues from human organs.

    PubMed

    Shivaramu

    2002-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers for photon energy- absorption (Z(PEA)eff) and photon interaction (ZPI(eff)) of human organs and tissues such as cortical bone, ovary, eye lens, testis, breast tissue, adipose tissue, lung tissue, soft tissue, soft tissue, (4-component), blood (whole), brain (grey/white matter), and skeletal muscle have been calculated by a direct method in the energy region of 1 keV to 20 MeV. The ZPEAeff and ZPIeff values steadily increase, up to 8-50 keV, and steadily decrease up to 1.25-2.0 MeV for all of the substances studied. From 2.0 MeV, the values rise with the increase in energy, up to 20 MeV. Significant differences exist between the ZPIeff and ZPEAeff in the energy region of 20-400 keV and 3-20 MeV for cortical bone; 15-150 keV for soft tissue, ovary, testis, blood, brain, lung, and skeletal muscle; 15-100 keV for breast tissue, eye lens, and soft tissue (4-component); and 10-100 keV for adipose tissue. A maximum difference of 28.37% is observed at 100 keV for cortical bone, and 30.43% at 40 keV for adipose tissue. For ovary, eye lens, testis, breast tissue, lung tissue, soft tissue, soft tissue (4-component), blood (whole), brain (grey/white matter), and skeletal muscle, a maximum difference of 31.74%, 29.60%, 31.87%, 30.61%, 31.47%, 31.52%, 29.95%, 31.63%, 32.36%, and 31.42%, respectively, is seen at 50 keV. The energy positions at which the maximum of ZPEAeff and ZPIeff occurs differ. The single effective atomic number directly obtained using the program XMuDat (Z(XMUDATTeff)) are found to be higher compared to those of ZPEAeff and ZPIeff values. The effect of absorption edge on effective atomic numbers, and its variation with photon energy and the possibility of defining 2 set values of effective atomic numbers below the absorption edges of elements present in the organs and tissues, are discussed.

  8. Phantom evaluation of simultaneous thallium-201/technetium-99m aquisition in single-photon emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Cao, Z; Chen, C C; Maunoury, C; Holder, L E; Abraham, T C; Tehan, A

    1996-11-01

    This study investigated downscatter effects in cardiac single-photon emission tomographic studies with simultaneous thallium-201/technetium-99m acquisition, and evaluated a previously proposed subtraction technique for downscatter compensation. Ten studies were carried out with different defect sizes and locations and varying activity distributions using four energy windows: 70+/-10% keV, 140+/-10% keV, 100+/-10% KeV, and 103+/-16% keV. The subtraction technique used the 100- or 103-keV data to remove scattered 99mTc counts from the 70-keV data. The size and contrast of infarcts in the dual-isotope 70-keV image were artificially decreased compared to those in the 140-keV image, caused by scattered 99mTc counts that were comparable to the primary 201Tl counts in the 70-keV window. The subtraction technique produced larger defects and more heterogeneous activity in the myocardial wall in dual-isotope 70-keV images compared to the corresponding 201Tl-only images. These artifacts were caused by the markedly different spatial distributions of scattered 99mTc counts in the 100-keV (or 103-keV) window as compared with the 70-keV window. It is concluded that scattered 99mTc photons may cause overestimation of ischemia and myocardial viability in simultaneous dual-isotope patient studies. The proposed subtraction technique was inaccurate and produced image artifacts. Adequate downscatter compensation methods must be developed before applying simultaneous 201Tl/99mTc acquisition in clinical practice.

  9. Photon generator

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni

    2002-01-01

    A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

  10. KevJumba and the Adolescence of YouTube

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saul, Roger

    2010-01-01

    This article considers the significance of YouTube as a pedagogical space from which young people can play participatory roles as theorists in their own constructions as popular cultural subjects. Drawing upon the public profile of "KevJumba," a teenager who makes videos of himself on YouTube, the article suggests that representational practices…

  11. Photonic lanterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; Argyros, Alexander; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2013-12-01

    Multimode optical fibers have been primarily (and almost solely) used as "light pipes" in short distance telecommunications and in remote and astronomical spectroscopy. The modal properties of the multimode waveguides are rarely exploited and mostly discussed in the context of guiding light. Until recently, most photonic applications in the applied sciences have arisen from developments in telecommunications. However, the photonic lantern is one of several devices that arose to solve problems in astrophotonics and space photonics. Interestingly, these devices are now being explored for use in telecommunications and are likely to find commercial use in the next few years, particularly in the development of compact spectrographs. Photonic lanterns allow for a low-loss transformation of a multimode waveguide into a discrete number of single-mode waveguides and vice versa, thus enabling the use of single-mode photonic technologies in multimode systems. In this review, we will discuss the theory and function of the photonic lantern, along with several different variants of the technology. We will also discuss some of its applications in more detail. Furthermore, we foreshadow future applications of this technology to the field of nanophotonics.

  12. Structure of the repeating unit of the O-specific polysaccharide of the lipopolysaccharide of Yersinia kristensenii strain 490 (O:12,25).

    PubMed

    L'vov, V L; Gur'yanova, S V; Rodionov, A V; Gorshkova, R P

    1992-04-27

    The O-specific polysaccharide isolated by mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide of Y. kristensenii strain 490 (O:12,25) contained D-glucose, 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose, 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose, 2-acetamido-2,6-dideoxy-L-galactose, glycerol, and phosphate in the ratios 2:2:1:1:1:1. On the basis of 31P- and 13C-n.m.r. data, methylation analysis, dephosphorylation, solvolysis with anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, and Smith degradation, it was concluded that the repeating unit of the polysaccharide was a branched hexaosylglycerol phosphate with the following structure. [formula: see text

  13. Photonic dark matter portal revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, S. A.; Kazemian, F. S.

    2016-05-01

    In our previous paper, we studied a model of dark matter (DM) in which the hidden sector interacts with standard model particles via a hidden photonic portal (HP). We investigated the effects of this new interaction on the hydrogen atom and obtained an upper bound for the coupling of the model as f ≤ 10-12. In this work, we study the effects of HP on two interesting exotic atoms namely muonium and positronium. We obtain a tighter upper limit on the coupling as f ≤ 10-13. We also calculate the change (shift) in the Aharonov-Bohm phase due to HP and find that the phase shift is negligibly small (for DM particles mass in the GeV range). Recently a 3.5 keV X-ray line signal observed in the spectrum of 73 galaxy clusters, reported by the XXM-Newton X-ray observatory. Since in HP model the DM particles can decay directly into photons, so we finally calculate the value of the coupling constant f using the condition ΔEDM = 3.5 keV.

  14. Study of keV radiation properties of Mo and Ti X-pinch plasma sources using a pinhole transmission grating spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jing; Deng Jianjun; Xie Weiping; Huang Xianbin; Yang Libing; Zhou Shaotong; Duan Shuchao; Zhang Siqun; Dan Jiakun; Zhu Xiaoli

    2010-07-15

    The properties of keV x-ray radiations from Mo and Ti X-pinch plasma sources at the current of 800 kA were investigated by a pinhole transmission grating spectrometer. The spectrometer was characterized by a high linear dispersion rate (2.9 A/mm), and from its time-integrated diffraction images, rich information about the X-pinch sources (e.g., source number, source size, and absolute spectra) could be obtained. Multiple hot spots were produced in all the Mo tests with loads made of two or four 25 mum wires with or without a shunt wire, and obvious increases both in the radiation intensity and in the source size around the spectral region of 2.6 keV were observed. In Ti X-pinch tests, a single keV x-ray burst with a source size of approx200 mum and a time duration of approx200 ps in full width at half maximum was obtained using a load made of two 50 mum wires plus a shunt wire. The intensity of x-rays decreased sharply from approx10{sup 11} photon eV{sup -1} sr{sup -1} at 1 keV to approx10{sup 8} photon eV{sup -1} sr{sup -1} at 4 keV. The energy-dependent source size in the band of 1-4 keV is less than 100 mum and seemed to shrink quickly as x-ray energy increases.

  15. Nonabelian dark matter models for 3.5 keV X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, James M.; Frey, Andrew R. E-mail: a.frey@uwinnipeg.ca

    2014-10-01

    A recent analysis of XXM-Newton data reveals the possible presence of an X-ray line at approximately 3.55 keV, which is not readily explained by known atomic transitions. Numerous models of eV-scale decaying dark matter have been proposed to explain this signal. Here we explore models of multicomponent nonabelian dark matter with typical mass ∼ 1-10 GeV (higher values being allowed in some models) and eV-scale splittings that arise naturally from the breaking of the nonabelian gauge symmetry. Kinetic mixing between the photon and the hidden sector gauge bosons can occur through a dimension-5 or 6 operator. Radiative decays of the excited states proceed through transition magnetic moments that appear at one loop. The decaying excited states can either be primordial or else produced by upscattering of the lighter dark matter states. These models are significantly constrained by direct dark matter searches or cosmic microwave background distortions, and are potentially testable in fixed target experiments that search for hidden photons. We note that the upscattering mechanism could be distinguished from decays in future observations if sources with different dark matter velocity dispersions seem to require different values of the scattering cross section to match the observed line strengths.

  16. A laboratory 8 keV transmission full-field x-ray microscope with a polycapillary as condenser for bright and dark field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumbach, S.; Kanngießer, B.; Malzer, W.; Stiel, H.; Wilhein, T.

    2015-08-01

    This article introduces a laboratory setup of a transmission full-field x-ray microscope at 8 keV photon energy. The microscope operates in bright and dark field imaging mode with a maximum field of view of 50 μm. Since the illumination geometry determines whether the sample is illuminated homogeneously and moreover, if different imaging methods can be applied, the condenser optic is one of the most significant parts. With a new type of x-ray condenser, a polycapillary optic, we realized bright field imaging and for the first time dark field imaging at 8 keV photon energy in a laboratory setup. A detector limited spatial resolution of 210 nm is measured on x-ray images of Siemens star test patterns.

  17. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities of bacteriorhodopsin and its comprising amino acids in the energy range 1 keV-100 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Morteza; Lunscher, Nolan; Yeow, John T. W.

    2013-04-01

    Recently, there has been an interest in fabrication of X-ray sensors based on bacteriorhodopsin, a proton pump protein in cell membrane of Halobacterium salinarium. Therefore, a better understanding of interaction of X-ray photons with bacteriorhodopsin is required. We use WinXCom program to calculate the mass attenuation coefficient of bacteriorhodopsin and its comprising amino acids for photon energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV. These amino acids include alanine, arginine, asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamine, glutamic acid, glycine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, serine, threonine, tryptophan, tyrosine, valine, Asx1, Asx2, Glx1 and Glx2. We then use that data to calculate effective atomic number and electron densities for the same range of energy. We also emphasize on two ranges of energies (10-200 keV and 1-20 MeV) in which X-ray imaging and radiotherapy machines work.

  18. A laboratory 8 keV transmission full-field x-ray microscope with a polycapillary as condenser for bright and dark field imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbach, S. Wilhein, T.; Kanngießer, B.; Malzer, W.; Stiel, H.

    2015-08-15

    This article introduces a laboratory setup of a transmission full-field x-ray microscope at 8 keV photon energy. The microscope operates in bright and dark field imaging mode with a maximum field of view of 50 μm. Since the illumination geometry determines whether the sample is illuminated homogeneously and moreover, if different imaging methods can be applied, the condenser optic is one of the most significant parts. With a new type of x-ray condenser, a polycapillary optic, we realized bright field imaging and for the first time dark field imaging at 8 keV photon energy in a laboratory setup. A detector limited spatial resolution of 210 nm is measured on x-ray images of Siemens star test patterns.

  19. An X-ray Raman spectrometer for EXAFS studies on minerals: bent Laue spectrometer with 20 keV X-rays.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, N; Fukui, H; Tanida, H; Toyokawa, H; Cai, Y Q; Tsuei, K D

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray Raman spectrometer for studies of local structures in minerals is discussed. Contrary to widely adopted back-scattering spectrometers using ≤10 keV X-rays, a spectrometer utilizing ~20 keV X-rays and a bent Laue analyzer is proposed. The 20 keV photons penetrate mineral samples much more deeply than 10 keV photons, so that high intensity is obtained owing to an enhancement of the scattering volume. Furthermore, a bent Laue analyzer provides a wide band-pass and a high reflectivity, leading to a much enhanced integrated intensity. A prototype spectrometer has been constructed and performance tests carried out. The oxygen K-edge in SiO(2) glass and crystal (α-quartz) has been measured with energy resolutions of 4 eV (EXAFS mode) and 1.3 eV (XANES mode). Unlike methods previously adopted, it is proposed to determine the pre-edge curve based on a theoretical Compton profile and a Monte Carlo multiple-scattering simulation before extracting EXAFS features. It is shown that the obtained EXAFS features are reproduced fairly well by a cluster model with a minimal set of fitting parameters. The spectrometer and the data processing proposed here are readily applicable to high-pressure studies.

  20. Compact focusing spectrometer: Visible (1 eV) to hard x-rays (200 keV)

    SciTech Connect

    Baronova, E. O.; Stepanenko, A. M.; Pereira, N. R.

    2014-11-15

    A low-cost spectrometer that covers a wide range of photon energies can be useful to teach spectroscopy, and for simple, rapid measurements of the photon spectrum produced by small plasma devices. The spectrometer here achieves its wide range, nominally from 1 eV to 200 keV, with a series of spherically and cylindrically bent gratings or crystals that all have the same shape and the same radius of curvature; they are complemented by matching apertures and diagnostics on the Rowland circle that serves as the circular part of the spectrometer's vacuum vessel. Spectral lines are easily identified with software that finds their positions from the dispersion of each diffractive element and the known energies of the lines.

  1. Systematics of photon strength functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, Richard

    2015-10-01

    The photon strength of high energy E1 transitions is well described by Brink-Axel theory based on the contribution of the Giant Dipole Resonance. No adequate theory is available for M1 and E2 transitions which do not generally compete strongly with high energy E1 transitions. Measurements with the 57Fe(3He,3He') reaction at the Oslo cyclotron have revealed that the photon strength below 2 MeV greatly exceeds BA predictions. Similar results have been found for numerous other nuclides. In this paper I will discuss my analysis of the 56Fe(n,γ)57Fe reaction which we investigated with both cold neutrons from the Budapest Reactor and thermal neutrons from the Rez Reactor (Prague). A >99% complete 57Fe capture γ-ray decay scheme containing 449 γ-rays deexciting 100 levels has been constructed on the basis of γ-ray singles and γγ -coincidence data. The photon strengths for 90 primary γ-rays with energies ranging from 92-7646 keV were calculated and compared with the predictions of Brink-Axel (BA) theory. Excellent agreement has been attained for the high energy transitions while the strength below 2 MeV exceeds BA predictions confirming the earlier Oslo (3He,3He' γ) results. Photon strengths for another 95 secondary M1, E1, and E2 γ-rays were also determined to also exceed BA predictions for transitions below 4 MeV. The dependence of photon strength on level energy and the statistical distribution of photon strengths will also be discussed in this talk.

  2. Applications of non-periodic multilayer optics for high-resolution x-ray microscopes below 30 keV.

    PubMed

    Troussel, Ph; Dennetiere, D; Rousseau, A; Darbon, S; Høghøj, P; Hedacq, S; Krumrey, M

    2012-10-01

    Multilayer mirrors with enhanced bandwidth were developed with special performances for dense plasma diagnostics and mainly for high spatial resolution x-ray imaging. The multilayer coatings are designed to provide broadband x-ray reflectance at low grazing incidence angles. They are deposited onto toroidal mirror substrates. Our research is directed at the development of non-periodic (depth graded) W∕Si multilayer specifically designed for use in the 1 to 30 keV photon energy band. First, we present a study for a 5 to 22 keV x-ray spectral window at 0.45° grazing angle. The goal is to obtain a high and constant reflectivity. Second, we have modeled a broadband mirror coating for harder x-rays in the range from 10 to 30 keV, with a non-periodic structure containing 300 W∕SiC layers with periods in the range from 0.8 to 4 nm, designed for 0.35° grazing incidence angle.

  3. FIRST INTEGRAL OBSERVATIONS OF V404 CYGNI DURING THE 2015 OUTBURST: SPECTRAL BEHAVIOR IN THE 20–650 KeV ENERGY RANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Roques, Jean-Pierre; Jourdain, Elisabeth; Bazzano, Angela; Fiocchi, Mariateresa; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Ubertini, Pietro

    2015-11-01

    In 2015 June, the source V404 Cygni (= GS2023+38) underwent an extraordinary outburst. We present the results obtained during the first revolution dedicated to this target by the INTEGRAL mission and focus on the spectral behavior in the hard X-ray domain, using both SPI and IBIS instruments. The source exhibits extreme variability and reaches fluxes of several tens of Crab. However, the emission between 20 and 650 keV can be understood in terms of two main components, varying on all the observable timescales, similar to what is observed in the persistent black hole system Cyg X-1. The low-energy component (up to ∼200 keV) presents a rather unusual shape, probably due to the intrinsic source variability. Nonetheless, a satisfactory description is obtained with a Comptonization model, if an unusually hot population of seed photons (kT{sub 0} ∼ 7 keV) is introduced. Above this first component, a clear excess extending up to 400–600 keV leads us to investigate a scenario where an additional (cutoff) power law could correspond to the contribution of the jet synchrotron emission, as proposed in Cyg X-1. A search for an annihilation feature did not provide any firm detection, with an upper limit of 2 × 10{sup −4} ph cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} (2σ) for a narrow line centered at 511 keV, on the averaged obtained spectrum.

  4. Fine pitch CdTe-based hard-X-ray polarimeter performance for space science in the 70-300 keV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antier, S.; Limousin, O.; Ferrando, P.

    2015-07-01

    X-rays astrophysical sources have been almost characterized through imaging, spectroscopy and timing analysis. Nevertheless, more observational parameters such as polarization are needed because some radiation mechanisms present in gamma-ray sources are still unclear. We have developed a CdTe based fine-pitch imaging spectrometer, Caliste to study polarization. With a 58-micron pitch and 1 keV energy resolution at 60 keV, we are able to accurately reconstruct the polarization angle and fraction of an impinging flux of photons which are scattered by 90° after Compton diffusion within the crystal. In this paper, we present the principles and the results obtained for this kind of measurements: on one hand, we compare simulations results with experimental data taken at ESRF ID15A (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility) using a 35-300 keV mono-energetic polarized beam. Applying a judicious energy selection to our data set, we reach a remarkable sensitivity level characterized by a measured Quality factor of 0.78±0.02 in the 200-300 keV range; and a measured Q factor of 0.64±0.0 at 70 keV where hard X-rays mirrors are already available.

  5. Microdosimetric measurements for photons in a water phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, M N; Baum, J W; Kliauga, P; Bond, V P

    1980-01-01

    Microdosimetric event distributions were determined in air at three primary photon energies (60, 660 and 1250 keV) and at depths of 2, 5, and 10 cm in a water phantom (30 x 30 x 30cm) from measurements of charge produced in a walled Rossi-type proportional counter. For 660 and 1250 keV photon energies free air sources of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 60/Co, respectively, were used at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) calibration facility and for 60 keV a 300 mCi /sup 241/Am source was used. Event size spectra were taken at simulated site diameters of 0.5, 1, and 2 ..mu..m. The frequency mean (anti Y/sub F/) and dose mean (anti Y/sub D/) of lineal energy density were determined from these measurements. Our results without a phantom indicate reasonably good agreement for anti Y/sub F/ and anti Y/sub D/ with measurements reported in the literature for walled proportional counters. Ratios anti Y/sub F/(water)/anti Y/sub F/(air) and anti Y/sub D/(water)/anti Y/sub D/(air) were determined for each site diameter and depth in the phantom. For 60 keV photons the maximum increase in these ratios was approximately 8 percent for a site diameter of 2 microns at 10 cm depth in the phantom. For 660 keV photons the maximum increase in these ratios was 24 percent whereas for 1250 keV photons this maximum increase was approximately 15 percent. However, for 60 keV photons only about 8 percent increase was observed; this small increase is consistent with the fact that about half of the scattered photons are removed by photoelectric processes. Since anti Y/sub D/ in the phantom increased only by about 24 percent large changes in biological effectiveness are not expected as a function of depth in typical biological systems.

  6. A New Observation of the Quiet Sun Soft X-ray (0.5-5 keV) Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, A.; Woods, T. N.; Stone, J.

    2012-12-01

    The solar corona is the brightest source of X-rays in the solar system, and the X-ray emission is highly variable with solar activity. While this is particularly true during solar flares, when emission can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude up to gamma-ray energies, even the so-called "quiet Sun" is bright in soft X-rays (SXRs), as the ~1-2 MK ambient plasma of the corona emits significant thermal bremsstrahlung up to ~5 keV. However, the actual solar SXR (0.5-5 keV) spectrum is not well known, particularly during quiet periods, as, with few exceptions, this energy range has not been systematically studied in many years. Previous observations include ultra-high-resolution but very narrow-band spectra from crystral spectrometers (e.g. Yohkoh/BCS), or integrated broadband irradiances from photometers (e.g. GOES/XRS, TIMED/XPS, etc.) that lack detailed spectral information. In recent years, broadband measurements with fair energy resolution (~0.5-0.7 keV FWHM) were made by SphinX on CORONAS-Photon and XRS on MESSENGER, although they did not extend below ~1 keV. We present observations of the quiet Sun SXR emission obtained using a new SXR spectrometer flown on the third SDO/EVE underflight calibration rocket (NASA 36.286). The commercial off-the-shelf Amptek X123 silicon drift detector, with an 8-micron Be window and custom aperture, measured the solar SXR emission from ~0.5 to >10 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution (though, due to hardware limitations, with only ~0.12 keV binning) and 2-sec cadence over ~5 minutes on 23 June 2012. Despite the rising solar cycle, activity on 23 June 2012 was abnormally low, with no visible active regions and GOES XRS emission near 2010 levels; we measured no solar counts above ~4 keV during the observation period. We compare our X123 measurements with spectra and broadband irradiances from other instruments, including the SphinX observations during the deep solar minimum of 2009, and with upper limits of >3 keV quiet Sun emission

  7. Vesicle Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Scott, E. A.; Roke, Sylvie; Hubbell, J. A.; Psaltis, D.

    2013-04-03

    Thin membranes, under appropriate boundary conditions, can self-assemble into vesicles, nanoscale bubbles that encapsulate and hence protect or transport molecular payloads. In this paper, we review the types and applications of light fields interacting with vesicles. By encapsulating light-emitting molecules (e.g. dyes, fluorescent proteins, or quantum dots), vesicles can act as particles and imaging agents. Vesicle imaging can take place also under second harmonic generation from vesicle membrane, as well as employing mass spectrometry. Light fields can also be employed to transport vesicles using optical tweezers (photon momentum) or directly pertrurbe the stability of vesicles and hence trigger the delivery of the encapsulated payload (photon energy).

  8. Photons Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batic, Matej; Begalli, Marcia; Han, Min Cheol; Hauf, Steffen; Hoff, Gabriela; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Kim, Han Sung; Grazia Pia, Maria; Saracco, Paolo; Weidenspointner, Georg

    2014-06-01

    A systematic review of methods and data for the Monte Carlo simulation of photon interactions is in progress: it concerns a wide set of theoretical modeling approaches and data libraries available for this purpose. Models and data libraries are assessed quantitatively with respect to an extensive collection of experimental measurements documented in the literature to determine their accuracy; this evaluation exploits rigorous statistical analysis methods. The computational performance of the associated modeling algorithms is evaluated as well. An overview of the assessment of photon interaction models and results of the experimental validation are presented.

  9. Green photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Frederic

    2012-02-01

    Photonics, the broad merger of electronics with the optical sciences, encompasses such a wide swath of technology that its impact is almost universal in our everyday lives. This is a broad overview of some aspects of the industry and their contribution to the ‘green’ or environmental movement. The rationale for energy conservation is briefly discussed and the impact of photonics on our everyday lives and certain industries is described. Some opinions from industry are presented along with market estimates. References are provided to some of the most recent research in these areas.

  10. Spectroscopy from 2 to 200 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, D. J.; Chanan, G. A.; Novick, R.; Maccallum, C. J.; Leventhal, M.

    1981-01-01

    The astrophysical processes responsible for line and continuum emission in the spectra range 2 keV to 200 keV are examined from the viewpoint of designing a spectrometer which would operate in this regime. Phenomena considered include fluorescent line radiation in X-ray binaries, magnetically shifted iron lines and cyclotron emission from neutron star surfaces, line emission from cosmically abundant elements in thermal plasmas, and nuclear deexcitation lines in fresh nucleosynthetically produced matter. An instrument consisting of a approximately 10 sq cm array of planar germanium detectors surrounded by a large sodium-iodide anticoincidence shield is described and projected background rates and sensitivities are considered. A sample observing program for a two-day shuttle-based mission is included as an example of the wide range of scientific questions which could be addressed by such an instrument.

  11. Statistical Properties of Local AGNs Inferred from the RXTE 3-20 keV All-Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revnivtsev, M.; Sazonov, S. Yu.

    We have recently ([1]) performed an all-sky survey in the 3-20 keV band from the data accumulated during satellite slews in 1996-2002 - the RXTE slew survey (XSS). For 90% of the sky at |b|>10° , a flux limit for source detection of 2.5×10-11 erg/s/sq.cm(3-20 keV) or lower was achieved, while a combined area of 7000 sq.deg was sampled to record flux levels (for such very large-area surveys) below 10-11 erg/s/sq.cm. A catalog contains 294 X-ray sources. 236 of these sources were identified with a single known astronomical object. Of particular interest are 100 identified active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and 35 unidentified sources. The hard spectra of the latter suggest that many of them will probably also prove AGNs when follow-up observations are performed. Most of the detected AGNs belong to the local population (z<0.1). In addition, the hard X-ray band of the XSS (3-20 keV) as compared to most previous X-ray surveys, performed at photon energies below 10 keV, has made possible the detection of a substantial number of X-ray absorbed AGNs (mostly Seyfert 2 galaxies). These properties make the XSS sample of AGNs a valuable one for the study of the local population of AGNs. We carried out a thorough statistical analysis of the above sample in order to investigate several key properties of the local population of AGNs, in particular their distribution in intrinsic absorption column density (NH) and X-ray luminosity function ([2]). Knowledge of these characteristics provides important constraints for AGN unification models and synthesis of the cosmic X-ray background, and is further needed to understand the details of the accretion-driven growth of supermassive black holes in the nuclei of galaxies.

  12. Photon-photon collisions via relativisitic mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, James K.

    2012-07-11

    Photon-photon scattering at low energies has been predicted theoretically for many years. However, due to the extremely small cross section there has been no experimental confirmation of this. Due to the rapid increase in laser irradiances and projected peak irradiances in planned facilities regimes could be reached where photon-photon scattering could be experimentally observed. We will first review basic aspects of photon-photon collisions concentrating on the calculation of the photon-photon scattering cross section. Then we will discuss the possibilities for observing these phenomena in ultra-high irradiance laser-plasma interactions involving relativistic mirrors.

  13. Photon Collider Physics with Real Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J; Asztalos, S

    2005-11-03

    Photon-photon interactions have been an important probe into fundamental particle physics. Until recently, the only way to produce photon-photon collisions was parasitically in the collision of charged particles. Recent advances in short-pulse laser technology have made it possible to consider producing high intensity, tightly focused beams of real photons through Compton scattering. A linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider could thus be transformed into a photon-photon collider with the addition of high power lasers. In this paper they show that it is possible to make a competitive photon-photon collider experiment using the currently mothballed Stanford Linear Collider. This would produce photon-photon collisions in the GeV energy range which would allow the discovery and study of exotic heavy mesons with spin states of zero and two.

  14. Preliminary experience with monoenergetic photon mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R.E.; Washburn, D.; Pisano, E.; Thomlinson, W.C.; Chapman, D.; Gmur, N.F.; Zhong, Zhong; Sayers, D.

    1995-12-31

    We are using a beam port at the National Synchrotron Light Source facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory as a source of monoenergetic photons. The photon source is radiation from a bending magnet on the X-ray storage ring and provides a usable X-ray spectrum from 5 keV to over 50 keV. A tunable crystal monochromotor is used for energy selection. The beam is 79mm wide and 0.5 mm high. We imaged the ACR mammography phantom and a contrast-detail phantom using a phosphor plate as the unaging detector. Phantom images were obtained at 16, 18, 20 and 22 keV. Phantom thickness varied from 15 mm to 82 mm. These images were compared to images obtained with a conventional dedicated mammography unit. Subjective preliminary results show that image contrast of the monoenergetic images is similar to those obtained from the conventional x-ray source with somewhat sharper and cleaner images from the monoenergetic source. Quantitative analysis shows that the monoenergetic images have improved contrast compared to the polyenergetic derived images. Entrance skin dose measurements show a factor of 5 to 10 times less radiation for the monoenergetic images with equivalent or better contrast Although there remain a number of technical problems to be addressed and much more work to be done, we are encouraged to further explore the use of monoenergetic imaging.

  15. Microalgae photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floume, Timmy; Coquil, Thomas; Sylvestre, Julien

    2011-05-01

    Due to their metabolic flexibility and fast growth rate, microscopic aquatic phototrophs like algae have a potential to become industrial photochemical converters. Algae photosynthesis could enable the large scale production of clean and renewable liquid fuels and chemicals with major environmental, economic and societal benefits. Capital and operational costs are the main issues to address through optical, process and biochemical engineering improvements. In this perspective, a variety of photonic approaches have been proposed - we introduce them here and describe their potential, limitations and compatibility with separate biotechnology and engineering progresses. We show that only sunlight-based approaches are economically realistic. One of photonics' main goals in the algae field is to dilute light to overcome photosaturation effects that impact upon cultures exposed to full sunlight. Among other approaches, we introduce a widely-compatible broadband spectral adaptation technique called AlgoSun® that uses luminescence to optimize sunlight spectrum in view of the bioconverter's requirements.

  16. Evaluation of bremsstrahlung contribution to photon transport in coupled photon-electron problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Jorge E.; Scot, Viviana; Di Giulio, Eugenio; Salvat, Francesc

    2015-11-01

    The most accurate description of the radiation field in x-ray spectrometry requires the modeling of coupled photon-electron transport. Compton scattering and the photoelectric effect actually produce electrons as secondary particles which contribute to the photon field through conversion mechanisms like bremsstrahlung (which produces a continuous photon energy spectrum) and inner-shell impact ionization (ISII) (which gives characteristic lines). The solution of the coupled problem is time consuming because the electrons interact continuously and therefore, the number of electron collisions to be considered is always very high. This complex problem is frequently simplified by neglecting the contributions of the secondary electrons. Recent works (Fernández et al., 2013; Fernández et al., 2014) have shown the possibility to include a separately computed coupled photon-electron contribution like ISII in a photon calculation for improving such a crude approximation while preserving the speed of the pure photon transport model. By means of a similar approach and the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE (coupled photon-electron Monte Carlo), the bremsstrahlung contribution is characterized in this work. The angular distribution of the photons due to bremsstrahlung can be safely considered as isotropic, with the point of emission located at the same place of the photon collision. A new photon kernel describing the bremsstrahlung contribution is introduced: it can be included in photon transport codes (deterministic or Monte Carlo) with a minimal effort. A data library to describe the energy dependence of the bremsstrahlung emission has been generated for all elements Z=1-92 in the energy range 1-150 keV. The bremsstrahlung energy distribution for an arbitrary energy is obtained by interpolating in the database. A comparison between a PENELOPE direct simulation and the interpolated distribution using the data base shows an almost perfect agreement. The use of the data base increases

  17. Photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Va`vra, J.

    1995-10-01

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF{sub 2} windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission.

  18. Microdosimetry of a 25 keV electron microbeam.

    PubMed

    Wilson, W E; Lynch, D J; Wei, K; Braby, L A

    2001-01-01

    Electron microbeam experiments are planned or under way to explore in part the question regarding whether the bystander effect is a general phenomenon or is restricted to high-LET radiation. Since low-LET radiations scatter more readily compared to high-LET radiations, identifying bystander cells and assessing the potential dose that they may receive will be crucial to the interpretation of radiobiological results. This paper reports on initial calculations of the basic information needed for a stochastic model of the penetration of energetic electrons in tissue-like matter; the model will be used to predict doses delivered to adjacent regions in which bystander cells may reside. Results are presented of calculations of the stochastics of energy deposition by 25 keV electrons slowing down in a homogeneous water medium. Energy deposition distributions were scored for 1-micrometer spheres located at various penetration and radial distances up to 10 micrometer from the point of origin. The energy of 25 keV was selected because experiments are planned for that energy. At 25 keV there is a high probability that the entire electron track will be contained within a typical mammalian cell. Individual tracks are scored because of their primacy; data for higher doses can be obtained by convoluting single-track distributions. The event frequency decreases approximately exponentially after the first micrometer to 1% at about 8 micrometer of penetration. Radially, the 1% contour extends to 3.5 micrometer at a penetration of 5.5 micrometer. The frequency-mean energy deposited decreases from 1.5 to 1 keV/micrometer at a penetration of 3.5 micrometer, then increases back to about 1.5 at a penetration of 6.5 micrometer. The mean energy increases to about 3 keV/micrometer at a radial distance of 8.5 micrometer.

  19. Astrophysics and cosmology confront the 17-keV neutrino

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Turner, Michael S.

    1991-01-01

    A host of astrophysical and cosmological arguments severely constrain the properties of a 17 keV Dirac neutrino. Such a neutrino must have interactions beyond those of the standard electroweak theory to reduce its cosmic abundance (through decay or annihilation) by a factor of two hundred. A predicament arises because the additional helicity states of the neutrino necessary to construct a Dirac mass must have interactions strong enough to evade the astrophysical bound from SN 1987A, but weak enough to avoid violating the bound from primordial nucleosynthesis.

  20. Astrophysics and cosmology confront the 17 keV neutrino

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Turner, Michael S.

    1991-01-01

    A host of astrophysical and cosmological arguments severely constrain the properties of a 17 keV Dirac neutrino. Such a neutrino must have interactions beyond those of the standard electroweak theory to reduce its cosmic abundance (through decay or annihilation) by a factor of two hundred. A predicament arises because the additional helicity states of the neutrino necessary to construct a Dirac mass must have interactions strong enough to evade the astrophysical bound from SN 1987A, but weak enough to avoid violating the bound from primordial nucleosynthesis.

  1. Width of the 3841-keV level in 17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreh, R.; Beck, O.; Kneissl, U.; Margraf, J.; Maser, H.; Pitz, H. H.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Pietralla, N.; Zilges, A.

    1994-10-01

    The width of 3841-keV level in 17O was precisely measured in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments performed at the Stuttgart Dynamitron facility. The result of Γ(3841 keV)=(92+/-6) meV is compared with upper limits quoted in the literature. Possible particle-hole configurations of the 3841-keV level are discussed.

  2. Coherent to incoherent cross section ratio for 59.54 keV gamma rays at scattering angle of 110°

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M. P.; Singh, Bhajan; Sandhu, B. S.; Sharma, Amandeep

    2015-08-28

    The coherent (Rayleigh) to incoherent (Compton) scattering cross-section ratio of elements, in the range 13 ≤ Z ≤ 82, are determined experimentally for 59.54 keV incident gamma photons. An HPGe (High purity germanium) semiconductor detector is employed, at scattering angle of 110°, to record the spectra originating from interactions of incident gamma photons with the target under investigation. The intensity ratio of Rayleigh to Compton scattered peaks observed in the recorded spectra, and corrected for photo-peak efficiency of gamma detector and absorption of photons in the target and air, along with the other required parameters provides the differential cross-section ratio. The measured values of cross-section ratio are found to agree with theoretical predictions based upon non-relativistic form factor, relativistic form factor, modified form factor and S-matrix theory.

  3. High-accuracy x-ray line standards in the 3-keV region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlesser, S.; Boucard, S.; Covita, D. S.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Fuhrmann, H.; Gotta, D.; Gruber, A.; Hennebach, M.; Hirtl, A.; Indelicato, P.; Le Bigot, E.-O.; Simons, L. M.; Stingelin, L.; Trassinelli, M.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Wasser, A.; Zmeskal, J.

    2013-08-01

    A set of 14 high-accuracy x-ray transition energies in the 2.4-3.1 keV range is presented, which can be used as x-ray standards. They were measured in two- to four-electron sulfur, chlorine, and argon ions produced in an electron-cyclotron resonance ion source, using a single spherically bent crystal spectrometer. The results include the first measurement of six transitions and improve the accuracy of six other experimental values. These measurements considerably extend the set of high-accuracy x-ray energies reported for highly charged ions. Their relative uncertainties range from 1 to 10 ppm. Theory only reaches such a precision in one- and two-electron ions. Our results thus have two distinct applications. On the one hand, they test predictions in two-electron ions [Artemyev, Shabaev, Yerokhin, Plunien, and Soff, Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.71.062104 71, 062104 (2005)], at the precision level of some two-photon QED contributions. We observe an agreement with theory for most of the transitions. On the other hand, the three- and four-electron ion transitions provide new benchmark energies for the calculation of missing theoretical contributions, such as Auger shifts or electronic correlations. Spectra were analyzed with an x-ray tracing simulation that contains all the relevant physics of the spectrometer.

  4. ON THE SPECTRAL HARDENING AT {approx}>300 keV IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G.; Kong, X.; Zank, G.; Chen, Y.

    2013-05-20

    It has long been noted that the spectra of observed continuum emissions in many solar flares are consistent with double power laws with a hardening at energies {approx}>300 keV. It is now widely believed that at least in electron-dominated events, the hardening in the photon spectrum reflects an intrinsic hardening in the source electron spectrum. In this paper, we point out that a power-law spectrum of electrons with a hardening at high energies can be explained by the diffusive shock acceleration of electrons at a termination shock with a finite width. Our suggestion is based on an early analytical work by Drury et al., where the steady-state transport equation at a shock with a tanh profile was solved for a p-independent diffusion coefficient. Numerical simulations with a p-dependent diffusion coefficient show hardenings in the accelerated electron spectrum that are comparable with observations. One necessary condition for our proposed scenario to work is that high-energy electrons resonate with the inertial range of the MHD turbulence and low-energy electrons resonate with the dissipation range of the MHD turbulence at the acceleration site, and the spectrum of the dissipation range {approx}k {sup -2.7}. A {approx}k {sup -2.7} dissipation range spectrum is consistent with recent solar wind observations.

  5. Dynamics of charge evolution in glass capillaries for 230-keV Xe23+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassimi, A.; Ikeda, T.; Maunoury, L.; Zhou, C. L.; Guillous, S.; Mery, A.; Lebius, H.; Benyagoub, A.; Grygiel, C.; Khemliche, H.; Roncin, P.; Merabet, H.; Tanis, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    We have measured the transmission of 230-keV (10-keV/q) Xe23+ ions through insulating tapered glass capillaries of microscopic dimensions. The dynamics of charging and discharging processes have been investigated, evidencing an unexpected slow alignment of the beam along the capillary axis. Oscillations of the exiting beam position have been observed during the charging process associated to the formation of charge patches on the capillary inner walls. The emerging ions are guided with a characteristic guiding angle falling on a universal curve proposed for PET polymer nanocapillaries. This result, very similar to the channeling process, is somewhat surprising in view of the significant differences between the straight nanocapillary polymer foils and the tapered microscopic single glass capillary used here. The transmitted ions show no evidence of energy loss or charge changing except for the production of a small neutral fraction that was determined to be due to ions that had become neutralized to form atoms rather than due to photon emission. These results thus test and confirm the validity of transmission and guiding and provide insight into the dynamics of higher-energy ions than have been previously studied in this regard, allowing a determination of the maximum energy for which the guiding process might occur.

  6. Photon Calorimeter

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Tze-Show

    1989-01-01

    A photon calorimeter (20, 40) is provided that comprises a laminar substrate (10, 22, 42) that is uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition. A plasma-sprayed coating (28, 48, 52), that is generally uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition within the proximity of planes that are parallel to the surfaces of the substrate, is applied to either one or both sides of the laminar substrate. The plasma-sprayed coatings may be very efficiently spectrally tailored in atomic number. Thermocouple measuring junctions (30, 50, 54) are positioned within the plasma-sprayed coatings. The calorimeter is rugged, inexpensive, and equilibrates in temperature very rapidly.

  7. Photon calorimeter

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Tze-Show

    1988-04-22

    A photon calorimeter is provided that comprises a laminar substrate that is uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition. A plasma-sprayed coating, that is generally uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition within the proximity of planes that are parallel to the surfaces of the substrate, is applied to either one or both sides of the laminar substrate. The plasma-sprayed coatings may be very efficiently spectrally tailored in atomic number. Thermocouple measuring junctions, are positioned within the plasma-sprayed coatings. The calorimeter is rugged, inexpensive, and equilibrates in temperature very rapidly. 4 figs.

  8. Effective temperature of amorphous carbon studied using nuclear-resonance photon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreh, R.; Beck, O.; Jäger, D.; Finkelstein, Y.; Kneissl, U.; Margraf, J.; Maser, H.; Pitz, H. H.

    1997-07-01

    The effective temperature of isotopic amorphous carbon (13C) was measured, at 295 K, by employing the nuclear resonance photon scattering (NRPS) technique. The photon beam was in the form of bremsstrahlung obtained from an electron beam of the Stuttgart Dynamitron, with E=4.1 MeV, and the resonance scattering from the 3089-keV and the 3684-keV levels in 13C was measured. The effective temperature of 13C was found to be (822+/-123) K, which is higher by about 13% than that calculated from the experimental vibrational density of states of amorphous carbon. This deviation is discussed.

  9. Monte Carlo electron/photon transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, J.M.; Morel, J.E.; Hughes, H.G.

    1985-01-01

    A review of nonplasma coupled electron/photon transport using Monte Carlo method is presented. Remarks are mainly restricted to linerarized formalisms at electron energies from 1 keV to 1000 MeV. Applications involving pulse-height estimation, transport in external magnetic fields, and optical Cerenkov production are discussed to underscore the importance of this branch of computational physics. Advances in electron multigroup cross-section generation is reported, and its impact on future code development assessed. Progress toward the transformation of MCNP into a generalized neutral/charged-particle Monte Carlo code is described. 48 refs.

  10. Jets and Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Stephen D.; Roy, Tuhin S.; Scholtz, Jakub

    2013-03-01

    This Letter applies the concept of “jets,” as constructed from calorimeter cell four-vectors, to jets composed (primarily) of photons (or leptons). Thus jets become a superset of both traditional objects such as QCD jets, photons, and electrons, and more unconventional objects such as photon jets and electron jets, defined as collinear photons and electrons, respectively. Since standard objects such as single photons become a subset of jets in this approach, standard jet substructure techniques are incorporated into the photon finder toolbox. Using a (reasonably) realistic calorimeter model we demonstrate that, for a single photon identification efficiency of 80% or above, the use of jet substructure techniques reduces the number of QCD jets faking photons by factors of 2.5 to 4. Depending on the topology of the photon jets, the substructure variables reduce the number of photon jets faking single photons by factors of 10 to 103 at a single photon identification efficiency of 80%.

  11. 500-nm-Resolution 10 keV X-Ray Imaging Transmission Microscope with Tantalum Phase Zone Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagoshima, Yasushi; Ibuki, Takashi; Takai, Kengo; Yokoyama, Yoshiyuki; Miyamoto, Naoki; Tsusaka, Yoshiyuki; Matsui, Junji

    2000-05-01

    An imaging transmission hard X-ray microscope has been constructed at the Hyogo-BL (BL24XU) of SPring-8. It makes use of X-ray phase zone plates (PZP’s) made of tantalum as its condenser and objective lenses. The objective PZP has an outermost zone width of 250 nm, which corresponds to the theoretically expected spatial resolution of 300 nm. An experiment was performed at the photon energy of 10 keV to check the performance of the microscope. Since a 250 nm line-and-space pattern was clearly resolved, we concluded that the microscope attained a spatial resolution limit better than 500 nm. A few samples were also examined and the feasibility of the microscope was successfully demonstrated.

  12. Absolute Calibration of Image Plate for electrons at energy between 100 keV and 4 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Back, N L; Eder, D C; Ping, Y; Song, P M; Throop, A

    2007-12-10

    The authors measured the absolute response of image plate (Fuji BAS SR2040) for electrons at energies between 100 keV to 4 MeV using an electron spectrometer. The electron source was produced from a short pulse laser irradiated on the solid density targets. This paper presents the calibration results of image plate Photon Stimulated Luminescence PSL per electrons at this energy range. The Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX results are also presented for three representative incident angles onto the image plates and corresponding electron energies depositions at these angles. These provide a complete set of tools that allows extraction of the absolute calibration to other spectrometer setting at this electron energy range.

  13. Enhanced room temperature oxidation in silicon and porous silicon under 10 keV x-ray irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ryckman, Judson D.; Reed, Robert A.; Weller, Robert A.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Weiss, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    We report the observation of enhanced oxidation on silicon and porous silicon samples exposed in air ambient to high-dose-rate 10 keV x-ray radiation at room temperature. The evolution of the radiation-induced oxide growth is monitored by ellipsometry and interferometric reflectance spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy shows the emergence of Si-O-Si stretching modes and corresponding suppression of SiH{sub x} and Si-Si modes in the porous silicon samples. The radiation response depends strongly on initial native oxide thickness and Si-H surface species. The enhanced oxidation mechanism is attributed to photoinduced oxidation processes wherein energetic photons are used to dissociate molecular oxygen and promote the formation of more reactive oxygen species.

  14. Resonance formation in photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gidal, G.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental progress on resonance formation in photon-photon collisions is reviewed with particular emphasis on the pseudoscalar and tensor nonents and on the ..gamma gamma..* production of spin-one resonances. 37 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. First INTEGRAL Observations of V404 Cygni during the 2015 Outburst: Spectral Behavior in the 20-650 keV Energy Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roques, Jean-Pierre; Jourdain, Elisabeth; Bazzano, Angela; Fiocchi, Mariateresa; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Ubertini, Pietro

    2015-11-01

    In 2015 June, the source V404 Cygni (= GS2023+38) underwent an extraordinary outburst. We present the results obtained during the first revolution dedicated to this target by the INTEGRAL mission and focus on the spectral behavior in the hard X-ray domain, using both SPI and IBIS instruments. The source exhibits extreme variability and reaches fluxes of several tens of Crab. However, the emission between 20 and 650 keV can be understood in terms of two main components, varying on all the observable timescales, similar to what is observed in the persistent black hole system Cyg X-1. The low-energy component (up to ˜200 keV) presents a rather unusual shape, probably due to the intrinsic source variability. Nonetheless, a satisfactory description is obtained with a Comptonization model, if an unusually hot population of seed photons (kT0 ˜ 7 keV) is introduced. Above this first component, a clear excess extending up to 400-600 keV leads us to investigate a scenario where an additional (cutoff) power law could correspond to the contribution of the jet synchrotron emission, as proposed in Cyg X-1. A search for an annihilation feature did not provide any firm detection, with an upper limit of 2 × 10-4 ph cm-2 s-1 (2σ) for a narrow line centered at 511 keV, on the averaged obtained spectrum. Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data center funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and Switzerland), Czech Republic, and Poland with the participation of Russia and USA.

  16. First INTEGRAL Observations of V404 Cygni during the 2015 Outburst: Spectral Behavior in the 20–650 keV Energy Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roques, Jean-Pierre; Jourdain, Elisabeth; Bazzano, Angela; Fiocchi, Mariateresa; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Ubertini, Pietro

    2015-11-01

    In 2015 June, the source V404 Cygni (= GS2023+38) underwent an extraordinary outburst. We present the results obtained during the first revolution dedicated to this target by the INTEGRAL mission and focus on the spectral behavior in the hard X-ray domain, using both SPI and IBIS instruments. The source exhibits extreme variability and reaches fluxes of several tens of Crab. However, the emission between 20 and 650 keV can be understood in terms of two main components, varying on all the observable timescales, similar to what is observed in the persistent black hole system Cyg X-1. The low-energy component (up to ∼200 keV) presents a rather unusual shape, probably due to the intrinsic source variability. Nonetheless, a satisfactory description is obtained with a Comptonization model, if an unusually hot population of seed photons (kT0 ∼ 7 keV) is introduced. Above this first component, a clear excess extending up to 400–600 keV leads us to investigate a scenario where an additional (cutoff) power law could correspond to the contribution of the jet synchrotron emission, as proposed in Cyg X-1. A search for an annihilation feature did not provide any firm detection, with an upper limit of 2 × 10‑4 ph cm‑2 s‑1 (2σ) for a narrow line centered at 511 keV, on the averaged obtained spectrum. Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data center funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and Switzerland), Czech Republic, and Poland with the participation of Russia and USA.

  17. Biogeochemical impacts of aquifer thermal energy storage at 5, 12, 25 and 60°C investigated with anoxic column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonte, M.; van Breukelen, B. M.; Van Der Wielen, P. W. J. J.; Stuyfzand, P. J.

    2012-04-01

    Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) uses groundwater to store energy for heating or cooling purposes in the built environment. ATES systems are often located in the same aquifers used for public drinking water supply, leading to urgent questions on its environmental impacts. This contribution presents the results of research on the biogeochemical impacts of ATES in anoxic column experiments at 5, 12, 25, and 60° C. In- and effluents are analyzed for major ions, trace elements, heavy metals, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and UV extinction. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of 16S rRNA genes and analysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were used to detect changes in the microbiological population and activity. Results from the column experiments at 5, 25, and 60° C compared to the reference column at 12° C showed a number of changes in biogeochemical conditions: At 5° C, only changes were observed in alkalinity and calcium concentrations, resulting from calcite dissolution. The 25° C and 60° C column effluents from a sediment containing Fe-(hydr)oxides showed an increase in arsenic concentrations, well above the drinking water limit. This is due to either (reductive) dissolution of, or desorption from, iron(hydro)xides containing arsenic. In addition, at these two temperatures sulfate reduction occurred while this was undetectable at 5 and 12° C within the given timeframe (25 days) and analytical accuracy. The carbon source for sulfate reduction is inferred to be sedimentary organic carbon. Increasing DOC with residence time in the 60° C effluent suggests that at 60° C the terminal sulfate reduction step is rate limiting, while at 25° C the enzymatic hydrolization step in sulfate reducing bacteria is overall rate limiting. Specific ultraviolet absorption (SUVA, the ratio of UV extinction and DOC) however shows a clear decrease in reactivity of the humic acid fraction in DOC. This means that the DOC accumulation at 60° C could

  18. Water and tissue equivalency of some gel dosimeters for photon energy absorption.

    PubMed

    Un, Adem

    2013-12-01

    The mass energy absorption coefficients,, effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption, ZPEAeff, and effective electron numbers for photon-energy absorption, NPEAeff, is calculated for 14 polymer gel dosimeter, five gel dosimeter, soft tissue and water, in the energy range from 1 keV to 20 MeV. The ZPEAeff(Gel)/ZPEAeff(Tissue) and NPEAeff(Gel)/NPEAeff (Tissue) are used to evaluate the tissue equivalency.

  19. High resolution spectrometer for extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements in the 6 keV to 15 keV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, J. F.; Hudson, L. T.; Henins, Albert; Feldman, U.

    2016-11-01

    A Cauchois transmission-crystal spectrometer has been developed with high crystal resolving power in the 6 keV-15 keV energy range and sufficient sensitivity to record single-shot spectra from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Titan laser and other comparable or more energetic lasers. The spectrometer capabilities were tested by recording the W L transitions from a laboratory source and the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectrum through a Cu foil.

  20. RR photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cámara, Pablo G.; Ibáñez, Luis E.; Marchesano, Fernando

    2011-09-01

    Type II string compactifications to 4d generically contain massless Ramond-Ramond U(1) gauge symmetries. However there is no massless matter charged under these U(1)'s, which makes a priori difficult to measure any physical consequences of their existence. There is however a window of opportunity if these RR U(1)'s mix with the hypercharge U(1) Y (hence with the photon). In this paper we study in detail different avenues by which U(1) RR bosons may mix with D-brane U(1)'s. We concentrate on Type IIA orientifolds and their M-theory lift, and provide geometric criteria for the existence of such mixing, which may occur either via standard kinetic mixing or via the mass terms induced by Stückelberg couplings. The latter case is particularly interesting, and appears whenever D-branes wrap torsional p-cycles in the compactification manifold. We also show that in the presence of torsional cycles discrete gauge symmetries and Aharanov-Bohm strings and particles appear in the 4d effective action, and that type IIA Stückelberg couplings can be understood in terms of torsional (co)homology in M-theory. We provide examples of Type IIA Calabi-Yau orientifolds in which the required torsional cycles exist and kinetic mixing induced by mass mixing is present. We discuss some phenomenological consequences of our findings. In particular, we find that mass mixing may induce corrections relevant for hypercharge gauge coupling unification in F-theory SU(5) GUT's.

  1. Photon-Photon Collisions -- Past and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2005-12-02

    I give a brief review of the history of photon-photon physics and a survey of its potential at future electron-positron colliders. Exclusive hadron production processes in photon-photon and electron-photon collisions provide important tests of QCD at the amplitude level, particularly as measures of hadron distribution amplitudes. There are also important high energy {gamma}{gamma} and e{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, including the production of jets in photon-photon collisions, deeply virtual Compton scattering on a photon target, and leading-twist single-spin asymmetries for a photon polarized normal to a production plane. Since photons couple directly to all fundamental fields carrying the electromagnetic current including leptons, quarks, W's and supersymmetric particles, high energy {gamma}{gamma} collisions will provide a comprehensive laboratory for Higgs production and exploring virtually every aspect of the Standard Model and its extensions. High energy back-scattered laser beams will thus greatly extend the range of physics of the International Linear Collider.

  2. Photon signature analysis using template matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, D. A.; Hashim, S.; Saripan, M. I.; Wells, K.; Dunn, W. L.

    2011-10-01

    We describe an approach to detect improvised explosive devices (IEDs) by using a template matching procedure. This approach relies on the signature due to backstreaming γ photons from various targets. In this work we have simulated cylindrical targets of aluminum, iron, copper, water and ammonium nitrate (nitrogen-rich fertilizer). We simulate 3.5 MeV source photons distributed on a plane inside a shielded area using Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP TM) code version 5 (V5). The 3.5 MeV source gamma rays yield 511 keV peaks due to pair production and scattered gamma rays. In this work, we simulate capture of those photons that backstream, after impinging on the target element, toward a NaI detector. The captured backstreamed photons are expected to produce a unique spectrum that will become part of a simple signal processing recognition system based on the template matching method. Different elements were simulated using different sets of random numbers in the Monte Carlo simulation. To date, the sum of absolute differences (SAD) method has been used to match the template. In the examples investigated, template matching was found to detect all elements correctly.

  3. Array-compatible transition-edge sensor microcalorimeter {gamma}-ray detector with 42 eV energy resolution at 103 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Zink, B. L.; Ullom, J. N.; Beall, J. A.; Irwin, K. D.; Doriese, W. B.; Duncan, W. D.; Ferreira, L.; Hilton, G. C.; Horansky, R. D.; Reintsema, C. D.; Vale, L. R.

    2006-09-18

    The authors describe a microcalorimeter {gamma}-ray detector with measured energy resolution of 42 eV full width at half maximum for 103 keV photons. This detector consists of a thermally isolated superconducting transition-edge thermometer and a superconducting bulk tin photon absorber. The absorber is attached with a technique compatible with producing arrays of high-resolution {gamma}-ray detectors. The results of a detailed characterization of the detector, which includes measurements of the complex impedance, detector noise, and time-domain pulse response, suggest that a deeper understanding and optimization of the thermal transport between the absorber and thermometer could significantly improve the energy resolution of future detectors.

  4. Search for 14.4-KeV Solar Axions Emitted in the M1-Transition of Fe-57 Nuclei with CAST

    SciTech Connect

    Andriamonje, S.; Aune, S.; Autiero, D.; Barth, K.; Belov, A.; Beltran, B.; Brauninger, H.; Carmona, J.M.; Cebrian, S.; Collar, J.I.; Dafni, T.; Davenport, M.; Di Lella, L.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Englhauser, J.; Fanourakis, G.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Friedrich, P.; Geralis, T.; /Democritos Nucl. Res. Ctr. /DAPNIA, Saclay /Moscow, INR /Zaragoza U. /British Columbia U. /Freiburg U. /Darmstadt, Tech. Hochsch. /DAPNIA, Saclay /Zaragoza U. /Frankfurt U. /Boskovic Inst., Zagreb /Freiburg U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Boskovic Inst., Zagreb /Democritos Nucl. Res. Ctr. /Darmstadt, Tech. Hochsch. /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /Boskovic Inst., Zagreb /CERN /Aristotle U., Thessaloniki /Boskovic Inst., Zagreb /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Zaragoza U. /Chicago U., EFI /Chicago U., KICP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Zaragoza U. /CERN /DAPNIA, Saclay /CERN /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Darmstadt, Tech. Hochsch. /Zaragoza U. /Aristotle U., Thessaloniki /Patras U. /Brookhaven /CERN /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /CERN /Chicago U., EFI /Chicago U., KICP /Zaragoza U. /Freiburg U. /CERN /CERN /Patras U.

    2011-12-02

    We have searched for 14.4 keV solar axions or more general axion-like particles (ALPs), that may be emitted in the M1 nuclear transition of 57Fe, by using the axion-to-photon conversion in the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) with evacuated magnet bores (Phase I). From the absence of excess of the monoenergetic X-rays when the magnet was pointing to the Sun, we set model-independent constraints on the coupling constants of pseudoscalar particles that couple to two photons and to a nucleon g{sub ay}|-1.19g{sub aN}{sup 0}+g{sub aN}{sup 3}| < 1.36 x 10{sup -16} GeV{sup -1} for ma < 0.03 eV at the 95% confidence level.

  5. Search for 14.4 keV solar axions emitted in the M1-transition of {sup 57}Fe nuclei with CAST

    SciTech Connect

    Andriamonje, S.; Aune, S.; Dafni, T.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Autiero, D.; Barth, K.; Davenport, M.; Lella, L. Di; Belov, A.; Beltrán, B.; Carmona, J.M.; Cebrián, S.; Bräuninger, H.; Englhauser, J.; Friedrich, P.; Collar, J.I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Collaboration: CAST collaboration; and others

    2009-12-01

    We have searched for 14.4 keV solar axions or more general axion-like particles (ALPs), that may be emitted in the M1 nuclear transition of {sup 57}Fe, by using the axion-to-photon conversion in the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) with evacuated magnet bores (Phase I). From the absence of excess of the monoenergetic X-rays when the magnet was pointing to the Sun, we set model-independent constraints on the coupling constants of pseudoscalar particles that couple to two photons and to a nucleon g{sub aγ}|−1.19g{sub aN}{sup 0}+g{sub aN}{sup 3}| < 1.36 × 10{sup −16} GeV{sup −1} for m{sub a} < 0.03 eV at the 95% confidence level.

  6. A method for characterizing photon radiation fields

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, J.J.; Hsu, H.H.; Hsieh, F.H.; Borak, T.B.

    1999-04-01

    Uncertainty in dosimetric and exposure rate measurements can increase in areas where multi-directional and low-energy photons (< 100 keV) exist because of variations in energy and angular measurement response. Also, accurate measurement of external exposures in spatially non-uniform fields may require multiple dosimetry. Therefore, knowledge of the photon fields in the workplace is required for full understanding of the accuracy of dosimeters and instruments, and for determining the need for multiple dosimeters. This project was designed to develop methods to characterize photon radiation fields in the workplace, and to test the methods in a plutonium facility. The photon field at selected work locations was characterized using TLDs and a collimated NaI(Tl) detector from which spatial variations in photon energy distributions were calculated from measured spectra. Laboratory results showed the accuracy and utility of the method. Field measurement results combined with observed work patterns suggested the following: (1) workers are exposed from all directions, but not isotropically, (2) photon energy distributions were directionally dependent, (3) stuffing nearby gloves into the glovebox reduced exposure rates significantly, (4) dosimeter placement on the front of the chest provided for a reasonable estimate of the average dose equivalent to workers` torsos, (5) justifiable conclusions regarding the need for multiple dosimetry can be made using this quantitative method, and (6) measurements of the exposure rates with ionization chambers pointed with open beta windows toward the glovebox provided the highest measured rates, although absolute accuracy of the field measurements still needs to be assessed.

  7. WE-E-18A-05: Bremsstrahlung of Laser-Plasma Interaction at KeV Temperature: Forward Dose and Attenuation Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Saez-Beltran, M; Fernandez Gonzalez, F

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To obtain an analytical empirical formula for the photon dose source term in forward direction from bremsstrahlung generated from laser-plasma accelerated electron beams in aluminum solid targets, with electron-plasma temperatures in the 10–100 keV energy range, and to calculate transmission factors for iron, aluminum, methacrylate, lead and concrete and air, materials most commonly found in vacuum chamber labs. Methods: Bremsstrahlung fluence is calculated from the convolution of thin-target bremsstrahlung spectrum for monoenergetic electrons and the relativistic Maxwell-Juettner energy distribution for the electron-plasma. Unattenuatted dose in tissue is calculated by integrating the photon spectrum with the mass-energy absorption coefficient. For the attenuated dose, energy dependent absorption coefficient, build-up factors and finite shielding correction factors were also taken into account. For the source term we use a modified formula from Hayashi et al., and we fitted the proportionality constant from experiments with the aid of the previously calculated transmission factors. Results: The forward dose has a quadratic dependence on electron-plasma temperature: 1 joule of effective laser energy transferred to the electrons at 1 m in vacuum yields 0,72 Sv per MeV squared of electron-plasma temperature. Air strongly filters the softer part of the photon spectrum and reduce the dose to one tenth in the first centimeter. Exponential higher energy tail of maxwellian spectrum contributes mainly to the transmitted dose. Conclusion: A simple formula for forward photon dose from keV range temperature plasma is obtained, similar to those found in kilovoltage x-rays but with higher dose per dissipated electron energy, due to thin target and absence of filtration.

  8. Nuclear photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Habs, D.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-09

    With the planned new {gamma}-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 10{sup 13}{gamma}/s and a band width of {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3}, a new era of {gamma} beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HI{gamma}S facility at Duke University (USA) with 10{sup 8}{gamma}/s and {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup -2}. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for {gamma} beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused {gamma} beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the {gamma} beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for {gamma} beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for {gamma} beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the {gamma}-beam facility, the {gamma}-beam optics and {gamma} detectors. We can trade {gamma} intensity for band width, going down to {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -6} and address individual nuclear levels. The term 'nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with {gamma}-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, {gamma} beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to {mu}m resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of

  9. Nuclear photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habs, D.; Günther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-01

    With the planned new γ-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 1013 γ/s and a band width of ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-3, a new era of γ beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HIγS facility at Duke University (USA) with 108 γ/s and ΔEγ/Eγ≈3ṡ10-2. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for γ beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused γ beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the γ beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for γ beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for γ beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the γ-beam facility, the γ-beam optics and γ detectors. We can trade γ intensity for band width, going down to ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-6 and address individual nuclear levels. The term "nuclear photonics" stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with γ-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, γ beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to μm resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

  10. Dark matter inelastic up-scattering with the interstellar plasma: A new source of x-ray lines, including at 3.5 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Eramo, Francesco; Hambleton, Kevin; Profumo, Stefano; Stefaniak, Tim

    2016-05-01

    We explore the phenomenology of a class of models where the dark matter particle can inelastically up-scatter to a heavier excited state via off-diagonal dipolar interactions with the interstellar plasma (gas or free electrons). The heavier particle then rapidly decays back to the dark matter particle plus a quasimonochromatic photon. For the process to occur at appreciable rates, the mass splitting between the heavier state and the dark matter must be comparable to, or smaller than, the kinetic energy of particles in the plasma. As a result, the predicted photon line falls in the soft x-ray range, or, potentially, at arbitrarily lower energies. We explore experimental constraints from cosmology and particle physics, and present accurate calculations of the dark matter thermal relic density and of the flux of monochromatic x rays from thermal plasma excitation. We find that the model provides a natural explanation for the observed 3.5 keV line from clusters of galaxies and from the Galactic center, and is consistent with null detections of the line from dwarf galaxies. The unique line shape, which will be resolved by future observations with the Hitomi (formerly Astro-H) satellite, and the predicted unique morphology and target-temperature dependence will enable easy discrimination of this class of models versus other scenarios for the generation of the 3.5 keV line or of any other unidentified line across the electromagnetic spectrum.

  11. Studies on effective atomic numbers and electron densities in amino acids and sugars in the energy range 30 1333 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowda, Shivalinge; Krishnaveni, S.; Gowda, Ramakrishna

    2005-10-01

    The effective atomic numbers and electron densities of the amino acids glycine, alanine, serine, valine, threonine, leucine, isoleucine, aspartic acid, lysine, glutamic acid, histidine, phenylalanine, arginine, tyrosine, tryptophane and the sugars arabinose, ribose, glucose, galactose, mannose, fructose, rhamnose, maltose, melibiose, melezitose and raffinose at the energies 30.8, 35.0, 81.0, 145, 276.4, 302.9, 356, 383.9, 661.6, 1173 and 1332.5 keV were calculated by using the measured total attenuation cross-sections. The interpolations of total attenuation cross-sections for photons of energy E in elements of atomic number Z was performed using the logarithmic regression analysis of the XCOM data in the photon energy region 30-1500 keV. The best-fit coefficients obtained by a piece wise interpolation method were used to find the effective atomic number and electron density of the compounds. These values are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values calculated based on XCOM data.

  12. Experimental Determination of the HPGe Spectrometer Efficiency Calibration Curves for Various Sample Geometry for Gamma Energy from 50 keV to 2000 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Saat, Ahmad; Hamzah, Zaini; Yusop, Mohammad Fariz; Zainal, Muhd Amiruddin

    2010-07-07

    Detection efficiency of a gamma-ray spectrometry system is dependent upon among others, energy, sample and detector geometry, volume and density of the samples. In the present study the efficiency calibration curves of newly acquired (August 2008) HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry system was carried out for four sample container geometries, namely Marinelli beaker, disc, cylindrical beaker and vial, normally used for activity determination of gamma-ray from environmental samples. Calibration standards were prepared by using known amount of analytical grade uranium trioxide ore, homogenized in plain flour into the respective containers. The ore produces gamma-rays of energy ranging from 53 keV to 1001 keV. Analytical grade potassium chloride were prepared to determine detection efficiency of 1460 keV gamma-ray emitted by potassium isotope K-40. Plots of detection efficiency against gamma-ray energy for the four sample geometries were found to fit smoothly to a general form of {epsilon} = A{Epsilon}{sup a}+B{Epsilon}{sup b}, where {epsilon} is efficiency, {Epsilon} is energy in keV, A, B, a and b are constants that are dependent on the sample geometries. All calibration curves showed the presence of a ''knee'' at about 180 keV. Comparison between the four geometries showed that the efficiency of Marinelli beaker is higher than cylindrical beaker and vial, while cylindrical disk showed the lowest.

  13. Controllable photon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oszetzky, Dániel; Nagy, Attila; Czitrovszky, Aladár

    2006-10-01

    We have developed our pervious experimental setup using correlated photon pairs (to the calibration of photo detectors) to realize a controllable photon source. For the generation of such photon pairs we use the non-linear process of parametric down conversion. When a photon of the pump beam is incident to a nonlinear crystal with phase matching condition, a pair of photons (signal and idler) is created at the same time with certain probability. We detect the photons in the signal beam with a single photon counting module (SPCM), while delaying those in the idler beam. Recently we have developed a fast electronic unit to control an optical shutter (a Pockels cell) placed to the optical output of the idler beam. When we detect a signal photon with the controlling electronic unit we are also able to open or close the fast optical shutter. Thus we can control which idler photons can propagate through the Pockels cell. So with this photon source we are able to program the number of photons in a certain time window. This controllable photon source that is able to generate a known number of photons with specified wavelength, direction, and polarization could be useful for applications in high-accuracy optical characterisation of photometric devices at the ultra-low intensities. This light source can also serve as a standard in testing of optical image intensifiers, night vision devices, and in the accurate measurement of spectral distribution of transmission and absorption in optical materials.

  14. Photonic crystal light source

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Bur, James A.

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  15. Photonic Design for Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Kosten, E.; Callahan, D.; Horowitz, K.; Pala, R.; Atwater, H.

    2014-08-28

    We describe photonic design approaches for silicon photovoltaics including i) trapezoidal broadband light trapping structures ii) broadband light trapping with photonic crystal superlattices iii) III-V/Si nanowire arrays designed for broadband light trapping.

  16. WE-E-BRE-08: Impact of IUdR in Rat 9L Glioma Cell Survival for 25–35 KeV Photo-Activated Auger Electron Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, D; Hogstrom, K; Brown, T; Dugas, J; Varnes, M; Matthews, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the biological effect from Auger electrons with 9% and 18% iododeoxyuridine (IUdR) incorporated into the DNA of rat 9L glioma cells at photon energies above and below the K-edge of iodine (33.2 keV). Methods: Rat 9L glioma cell survival versus dose curves with 0%, 9%, and 18% thymidine replacement with IUdR were measured using four irradiation energies (4 MV x-rays; monochromatic 35, 30, and 25 keV synchrotron photons). For each of 11 conditions (Energy, %IUdR) survival curves were fit to the data (826 cell cultures) using the linear-quadratic model. The ratio of doses resulting in 10% survival gave sensitization enhancement ratios (SER10) from which contributions due to linear-energy transfer (LET), radiosensitization (RS), and Auger effect (AE) were extracted. Results: At 35, 30, and 25 keV, SER10,LET values were 1.08±0.03, 1.22±0.02, and 1.37±0.02, respectively. At 4 MV SER10,RS values for 9% and 18% IUdR were 1.28±0.02 and 1.40±0.02, respectively. Assuming LET effects are independent of %IUdR and radiosensitization effects are independent of energy, SER10,AE values for 18% IUdR at 35, 30, and 25 keV were 1.35±0.05, 1.06±0.03, and 0.98±0.03, respectively; values for 9% IUdR at 35 and 25 keV were 1.01±0.04 and 0.82±0.02, respectively. Conclusion: For 18% IUdR the radiosensitization effect of 1.40 and the Auger effect of 1.35 at 35 keV are equally important to the combined effect of 1.90. No measureable Auger effect was observed for energies below the K-edge at 20 and 25 keV, as expected. The insignificant Auger effect at 9% IUdR was not expected. Additional data (40–70 keV) and radiobiological modeling are being acquired to better understand the energy dependence of Auger electron therapy with IUdR. Funding support in part by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program and in part by Contract No. W81XWH-10-1-0005 awarded by the U.S. Army Research Acquisition Activity. This paper does not necessarily

  17. Stacked depth graded multilayer for hard X-rays measured up to 130 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, C. P.; Christensen, F. E.; Romaine, S.; Bruni, R.; Zhong, Z.

    2007-09-01

    Depth graded multilayer designs for hard x-ray telescopes in the 10 keV to 70-80 keV energy range have had either W or Pt as the heavy element. These materials have been chosen because of reasonable optical constants, the possibility to grow smooth interfaces with the spacer material, and the stability over time. On the flip side both W and Pt have an absorption edge -- 69.5 keV (W) and 78.4 keV (Pt) -- which is very close to the two 44Ti lines at 67.9 keV and 78.4 keV that are produced in the envelope of a super nova explosion. Other materials have better optical constants and no absorption edges in this energy range, for example Ni 0.93V 0.07, but are not used because of high interface roughness. By using a WC/SiC multilayer for the bottom and a Ni 0.93V 0.07/SiC multilayer for the thicker top layers of a depth graded multilayer we have made a reflector that doesn't have a clear absorption edge. This reflector has been measured at energies between 8 keV and 130 keV. At a graze angle of 0.11 degree there is still nearly the same reflectivity below the W absorption edge as for a traditional W based coating, and above the W absorption edge there is still 48% reflection at 80 keV.

  18. A study of photon interaction in some hormones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjunatha, H. C.

    2013-05-01

    The effective atomic numbers (Z eff) and electron density (N el) of some hormones such as testosterone, methandienone, estradiol and rogesterone for total and partial photon interactions have been computed in the wide energy region 1 keV-100 GeV using an accurate database of photon-interaction cross sections and the WinXCom program. The computed Z eff and N el are compared with the values generated by XMuDat program. The computer tomography (CT) numbers and kerma values relative to air are also calculated and the computed data of CT numbers in the low-energy region help in visualizing the image of the biological samples and to obtain precise accuracy in treating the inhomogenity of them in medical radiology. In view of dosimetric interest, the photon absorbed dose rates of some commonly used gamma sources (Na-21, Cs-137, Mn-52, Co-60 and Na-22) are also estimated.

  19. Effective atomic numbers for low-energy total photon interactions in human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, N.C.; Leichner, P.K.; Hawkins, W.G.

    1987-09-01

    A new method is introduced in which the total photon interaction cross sections per electron of human tissues are used to define effective atomic numbers for blood, bone, brain, fat, heart, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, ovary, pancreas, spleen, and water. These effective atomic numbers are equal within 4% from 10 to 200 keV in each soft tissue, whereas for bones of different chemical compositions the variation ranges from 2.86% to 5.03%. This effective atomic number definition is less energy dependent than a previous definition based on the total photon interaction cross section per atom averaged over all elements in the tissue, from which the computed effective atomic numbers varied by as much as 50% (in bone) as a function of photon energy over the energy range from 10 to 200 keV.

  20. Effective atomic numbers for low-energy total photon interactions in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Yang, N C; Leichner, P K; Hawkins, W G

    1987-01-01

    A new method is introduced in which the total photon interaction cross sections per electron of human tissues are used to define effective atomic numbers for blood, bone, brain, fat, heart, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, ovary, pancreas, spleen, and water. These effective atomic numbers are equal within 4% from 10 to 200 keV in each soft tissue, whereas for bones of different chemical compositions the variation ranges from 2.86% to 5.03%. This effective atomic number definition is less energy dependent than a previous definition based on the total photon interaction cross section per atom averaged over all elements in the tissue, from which the computed effective atomic numbers varied by as much as 50% (in bone) as a function of photon energy over the energy range from 10 to 200 keV.

  1. Effective atomic numbers for low-energy total photon interactions in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Yang, N C; Leichner, P K; Hawkins, W G

    1987-01-01

    A new method is introduced in which the total photon interaction cross sections per electron of human tissues are used to define effective atomic numbers for blood, bone, brain, fat, heart, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, ovary, pancreas, spleen, and water. These effective atomic numbers are equal within 4% from 10 to 200 keV in each soft tissue, whereas for bones of different chemical compositions the variation ranges from 2.86% to 5.03%. This effective atomic number definition is less energy dependent than a previous definition based on the total photon interaction cross section per atom averaged over all elements in the tissue, from which the computed effective atomic numbers varied by as much as 50% (in bone) as a function of photon energy over the energy range from 10 to 200 keV. PMID:3683305

  2. Improving the energy response of external beam therapy (EBT) GafChromic{sup TM} dosimetry films at low energies (≤100 keV)

    SciTech Connect

    Bekerat, H. Devic, S.; DeBlois, F.; Singh, K.; Sarfehnia, A.; Seuntjens, J.; Shih, Shelley; Yu, Xiang; Lewis, D.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Purpose of this work is to investigate the effects of varying the active layer composition of external beam therapy (EBT) GafChromic{sup TM} films on the energy dependence of the film, as well as try to develop a new prototype with more uniform energy response at low photon energies (⩽100 keV). Methods: First, the overall energy response (S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q)) of different commercial EBT type film models that represent the three different generations produced to date, i.e., EBT, EBT2, and EBT3, was investigated. Pieces of each film model were irradiated to a fixed dose of 2 Gy to water for a wide range of beam qualities and the corresponding S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q) was measured using a flatbed document scanner. Furthermore, the DOSRZnrc Monte Carlo code was used to determine the absorbed dose to water energy dependence of the film, f(Q). Moreover, the intrinsic energy dependence, k{sub bq}(Q), for each film model was evaluated using the corresponding S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q) and f(Q). In the second part of this study, the authors investigated the effects of changing the chemical composition of the active layer on S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q). Finally, based on these results, the film manufacturer fabricated several film prototypes and the authors evaluated their S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q). Results: The commercial EBT film model shows an under response at all energies below 100 keV reaching 39% ± 4% at about 20 keV. The commercial EBT2 and EBT3 film models show an under response of about 27% ± 4% at 20 keV and an over response of about 16% ± 4% at 40 keV.S{sub AD,} {sub W}(Q) of the three commercial film models at low energies show strong correlation with the corresponding f{sup −1}(Q) curves. The commercial EBT3 model with 4% Cl in the active layer shows under response of 22% ± 4% at 20 keV and 6% ± 4% at about 40 keV. However, increasing the mass percent of chlorine makes the film more hygroscopic which may affect the stability of the film's readout. The

  3. Method of photon spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gehrke, Robert J.; Putnam, Marie H.; Killian, E. Wayne; Helmer, Richard G.; Kynaston, Ronnie L.; Goodwin, Scott G.; Johnson, Larry O.

    1993-01-01

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and .gamma.-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2000 keV), as well as high-energy .gamma. rays (>1 MeV). A 8192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The .gamma.-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge .gamma.-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and .gamma.-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the .gamma.-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  4. Method of photon spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gehrke, R.J.; Putnam, M.H.; Killian, E.W.; Helmer, R.G.; Kynaston, R.L.; Goodwin, S.G.; Johnson, L.O.

    1993-04-27

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and [gamma]-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2,000 keV), as well as high-energy [gamma] rays (>1 MeV). A 8,192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The [gamma]-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge [gamma]-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and [gamma]-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the [gamma]-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  5. Photon stimulated desorption measurement of an extruded aluminum beam chamber for the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, C.L.; Lanni, C.; Noonan, J.R.; Rosenberg, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), presently being commisioned, will produce X-ray s of unprecedented brightness. The high energy ring of the APS is a 7 GeV positron storage ring, 1104 meters in circumference designed to operate at less than 10{sup {minus}9} Torr with 300 ma of beam and a greater than 10 hour lifetime. The storage ring vacuum chamber is constructed from an extruded 6063 aluminum alloy. During the construction phase, a 2.34 m long section of the APS extruded aluminum chamber was set up on National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) X-ray Beamlline X28A and Photon Stimulated Desorption (PSD) was measured. Cleaning and preparation of the chamber was identical to that of the APS construction. In addition to the chamber, small samples of M, Be, and Cu were also exposed to white light having a critical energy of 5 keV. In addition to PSD, measurements were made of specular and diffuse scattering of photons. The chamber and samples were each exposed to a dose greater than 10{sup 23} photons per meter. Desorption yields for H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2}0 are reported as a function of accumulated flux, critical energy, incidence angle, and preparation. These results are compared with previous results for aluminum on NSLS Beamlline U1OB and PSD results of other laboratories published for aluminum.

  6. Enhanced nonlinear coupling in the keV x-ray range: Xe(L) hollow atom excitation with Xe(M) radiation at ℏω ≅ 1 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Alex B.; McCorkindale, John C.; Poopalasingam, Sankar; Longworth, James W.; Rhodes, Charles K.

    2015-08-01

    Anomalously enhanced nonlinear electromagnetic coupling can arise from ordered driven collective motions in many electron systems. The augmented strength of the interaction can be expressed as an effective increase in the fine structure constant α in which α → Z2α, where Z specifies the number of electrons involved in the ordered response to the external field. The present work illustrates this phenomenon in the x-ray range with the observation of the 5-photon nonlinear excitation of Xe(L)* hollow atom states that are generated by intense (˜7 × 1015 W cm-2) Xe(M) radiation {γ }{{M}} at ˜1 keV. The nonlinear cross section experimentally determined for the 5{γ }{{M}} + Xe → [Xeq+(L)]* + qe- amplitude is {σ }5 ˜ 2 × 10-21 cm2. The matching theoretical cross section corresponds to Z = 18, an outcome indicating the participation of the full Xe(4d105s25p6) supershell, a dynamic feature of Xe that also plays a significant role in the linear photoionization of neutral Xe atoms in the kilovolt region. For the high-intensity 5γ nonlinear coupling, the outcome for the Xe(L)* hollow atom excitation is an enhancement of the strength of the interaction by a factor of ˜1012 and, with Z2α > 1, a fundamentally new region of strong coupling is entered. The experimental value of {σ }5 is likewise shown to be in very good accord with an earlier analysis that estimated the upper bound of cross sections for high-order multi-photon cross sections in the combined high-Z and high-intensity limit. These results forecast the general presence of comparably enhanced coupling strengths in the interaction of sufficiently intense (I ≥ 7 × 1015 W cm-2) x-rays with high-Z atoms and molecules.

  7. Photon energy response of luminescence dosemeters and its impact on assessment of Hp(10) and Hp(0.07) in mixed fields of varying energies of photons and beta radiation.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, A S

    2002-01-01

    X and gamma rays continue to remain the main contributors to the dose to humans. As these photons of varying energies are encountered in various applications, the study of photon energy response of a dosemeter is an important aspect to ensure the accuracy in dose measurement. Responses of dosemeters have to be experimentally established because for luminescence dosemeters, they depend not only on the effective atomic number (ratio of mass energy absorption coefficients of dosemeter and tissue) of the detector, but also considerably on the luminescence efficiency and the material surrounding the dosemeters. Metal filters are generally used for the compensation of energy dependence below 200 keV and/or to provide photon energy discrimination. It is noted that the contribution to Hp(0.07) could be measured more accurately than Hp(10). For the dosemeters exhibiting high photon energy-dependent response, estimation of the beta component of Hp(0.07) becomes very difficult in the mixed field of beta radiation and photons of energy less than 100 keV. Recent studies have shown that the thickness and the atomic number of metal filters not only affect the response below 200 keV but also cause a significant over-response for high energy (>6 MeV) photons often encountered in the environments of pressurised heavy water reactors and accelerators. PMID:12382729

  8. Single-photon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lounis, Brahim; Orrit, Michel

    2005-05-01

    The concept of the photon, central to Einstein's explanation of the photoelectric effect, is exactly 100 years old. Yet, while photons have been detected individually for more than 50 years, devices producing individual photons on demand have only appeared in the last few years. New concepts for single-photon sources, or 'photon guns', have originated from recent progress in the optical detection, characterization and manipulation of single quantum objects. Single emitters usually deliver photons one at a time. This so-called antibunching of emitted photons can arise from various mechanisms, but ensures that the probability of obtaining two or more photons at the same time remains negligible. We briefly recall basic concepts in quantum optics and discuss potential applications of single-photon states to optical processing of quantum information: cryptography, computing and communication. A photon gun's properties are significantly improved by coupling it to a resonant cavity mode, either in the Purcell or strong-coupling regimes. We briefly recall early production of single photons with atomic beams, and the operation principles of macroscopic parametric sources, which are used in an overwhelming majority of quantum-optical experiments. We then review the photophysical and spectroscopic properties and compare the advantages and weaknesses of various single nanometre-scale objects used as single-photon sources: atoms or ions in the gas phase and, in condensed matter, organic molecules, defect centres, semiconductor nanocrystals and heterostructures. As new generations of sources are developed, coupling to cavities and nano-fabrication techniques lead to improved characteristics, delivery rates and spectral ranges. Judging from the brisk pace of recent progress, we expect single photons to soon proceed from demonstrations to applications and to bring with them the first practical uses of quantum information.

  9. Calculations of photo-induced X-ray production cross-sections in the energy range 1-150 keV and average fluorescence yields for Zn, Cd and Hg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaio, J. M.; Guerra, M.; Parente, F.; Madeira, T. I.; Indelicato, P.; Santos, J. P.; Marques, J. P.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we calculate the K-, L- and M-shells X-ray production, and X-ray fluorescence cross-sections after photo-induced ionization, for Zn, Cd, and Hg, and for incident photon energy range from 1 to 150 keV. For this purpose, the corresponding average fluorescence yields for Zn, Cd, and Hg as well as the photoionization cross-sections were calculated using the Dirac-Fock method. Subshell fluorescence, intrashell and intershell yields are obtained consistently from radiative and radiationless transitions calculated in the exact same method. A comprehensive account of the relations between the X-ray production, X-ray fluorescence cross-sections and the photoionization cross-sections and these yields is presented. Comparisons are made with results from other authors. The obtained values for the photoionization cross-sections are in good agreement with the widely used data of Scofield in the studied energy range. However our results for the X-ray fluorescence cross sections seem to favor some data relatively to others. The energy dependence of the average fluorescence yields is discussed, in particular, the reliability of extrapolated data for lighter elements from measurements and calculations in heavier elements above the inner shell absorption edges is questioned. Tabulated data on photoionization and X-ray production cross-sections are presented for the incident photon energy range 1-150 keV in steps of 1 keV.

  10. A low background-rate detector for ions in the 5 to 50 keV energy range to be used for radioisotope dating with a small cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, P.G.

    1986-11-25

    Accelerator mass spectrometry in tandem Van de Graaff accelerators has proven successful for radioisotope dating small samples. We are developing a 20 cm diameter 30 to 40 keV cyclotron dedicated to high-sensitivity radioisotope dating, initially for /sup 14/C. At this energy, range and dE/dx methods of particle identification are impossible. Thus arises the difficult problem of reliably detecting 30 to 40 keV /sup 14/C at 10/sup -2/ counts/sec in the high background environment of the cyclotron, where lower energy ions, electrons, and photons bombard the detector at much higher rates. We have developed and tested an inexpensive, generally useful ion detector that allows dark-count rates below 10/sup -4/ counts/sec and excellent background suppression. With the cyclotron tuned near the /sup 13/CH background peak, to the frequency for /sup 14/C, the detector suppresses the background to 6 x 10/sup -4/ counts/sec. For each /sup 14/C ion the detectors grazing-incidence Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ conversion dynode emits about 20 secondary electrons, which are independently multiplied in separate pores of a microchannel plate. The output signal is proportional to the number of secondary electrons, allowing pulse-height discrimination of background. We have successfully tested the detector with positive /sup 12/C, /sup 23/Na, /sup 39/K, /sup 41/K, /sup 85/Rb, /sup 87/Rb, and /sup 133/Cs at 5 to 40 keV, and with 36 keV negative /sup 12/C and /sup 13/CH. It should detect ions and neutrals of all species, at energies above 5 keV, with good efficiency and excellent background discrimination. Counting efficiency and background discrimination improve with higher ion energy. The detector can be operated at least up to 2 x 10/sup -7/ Torr and be repeatedly exposed to air. The maximum rate is 10/sup 6.4/ ions/sec in pulse counting mode and 10/sup 9.7/ ions/sec in current integrating mode.

  11. Function photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Zhang, Bai-Jun; Yang, Jing-Hai; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Ba, Nuo; Wu, Yi-Heng; Wang, Qing-Cai

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we present a new kind of function photonic crystals (PCs), whose refractive index is a function of space position. Conventional PCs structure grows from two materials, A and B, with different dielectric constants εA and εB. Based on Fermat principle, we give the motion equations of light in one-dimensional, two-dimensional and three-dimensional function photonic crystals. For one-dimensional function photonic crystals, we give the dispersion relation, band gap structure and transmissivity, and compare them with conventional photonic crystals, and we find the following: (1) For the vertical and non-vertical incidence light of function photonic crystals, there are band gap structures, and for only the vertical incidence light, the conventional PCs have band gap structures. (2) By choosing various refractive index distribution functions n( z), we can obtain more wider or more narrower band gap structure than conventional photonic crystals.

  12. First-photon imaging.

    PubMed

    Kirmani, Ahmed; Venkatraman, Dheera; Shin, Dongeek; Colaço, Andrea; Wong, Franco N C; Shapiro, Jeffrey H; Goyal, Vivek K

    2014-01-01

    Imagers that use their own illumination can capture three-dimensional (3D) structure and reflectivity information. With photon-counting detectors, images can be acquired at extremely low photon fluxes. To suppress the Poisson noise inherent in low-flux operation, such imagers typically require hundreds of detected photons per pixel for accurate range and reflectivity determination. We introduce a low-flux imaging technique, called first-photon imaging, which is a computational imager that exploits spatial correlations found in real-world scenes and the physics of low-flux measurements. Our technique recovers 3D structure and reflectivity from the first detected photon at each pixel. We demonstrate simultaneous acquisition of sub-pulse duration range and 4-bit reflectivity information in the presence of high background noise. First-photon imaging may be of considerable value to both microscopy and remote sensing.

  13. Two-photon physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1981-10-01

    A new experimental frontier has recently been opened to the study of two photon processes. The first results of many aspects of these reactions are being presented at this conference. In contrast, the theoretical development of research ito two photon processes has a much longer history. This talk reviews the many different theoretical ideas which provide a detailed framework for our understanding of two photon processes.

  14. Photonically Engineered Incandescent Emitter

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2005-03-22

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  15. Photonic Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, Scott; Krainak, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Integrated photonics generally is the integration of multiple lithographically defined photonic and electronic components and devices (e.g. lasers, detectors, waveguides passive structures, modulators, electronic control and optical interconnects) on a single platform with nanometer-scale feature sizes. The development of photonic integrated circuits permits size, weight, power and cost reductions for spacecraft microprocessors, optical communication, processor buses, advanced data processing, and integrated optic science instrument optical systems, subsystems and components. This is particularly critical for small spacecraft platforms. We will give an overview of some NASA applications for integrated photonics.

  16. Photon simulated desorption revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, D.

    A promising new method for surface investigations is discussed: Photon stimulated desorption. The electronic excitations of adsorbate complexes on surfaces, either by electron impact or photon absorption, which can lead to repulsive states of the complex and therefore to expulsion of ions and neutrals are considered. Such processes are termed electron (or photon) stimulated desorption, ESD and PSD, respectively. Apart from the primary agent (electrons or photons), these processes are similar, and common label "desorption induced by electronic transitions" (acronym DIET) was proposed. Desorption effects, intrinsic photoneffects, and some of the advantages of PSD over ESD are discussed.

  17. Steady State Sputtering Yields and Surface Compositions of Depleted Uranium and Uranium Carbide bombarded by 30 keV Gallium or 16 keV Cesium Ions.

    SciTech Connect

    Siekhaus, W. J.; Teslich, N. E.; Weber, P. K.

    2014-10-23

    Depleted uranium that included carbide inclusions was sputtered with 30-keV gallium ions or 16-kev cesium ions to depths much greater than the ions’ range, i.e. using steady-state sputtering. The recession of both the uranium’s and uranium carbide’s surfaces and the ion corresponding fluences were used to determine the steady-state target sputtering yields of both uranium and uranium carbide, i.e. 6.3 atoms of uranium and 2.4 units of uranium carbide eroded per gallium ion, and 9.9 uranium atoms and 3.65 units of uranium carbide eroded by cesium ions. The steady state surface composition resulting from the simultaneous gallium or cesium implantation and sputter-erosion of uranium and uranium carbide were calculated to be U₈₆Ga₁₄, (UC)₇₀Ga₃₀ and U₈₁Cs₉, (UC)₇₉Cs₂₁, respectively.

  18. Resonances in photon-photon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1984-11-01

    A quantity called stickiness is introduced which should be largest for J not equal to 0 glueballs and can be measured in two photon scattering and radiative J/psi decay. An argument is reviewed suggesting that light J = 0 glueballs may have large couplings to two photons. The analysis of radiative decays of eta and eta' is reviewed and a plea made to desist from false claims that they are related to GAMMA(..pi../sup 0/ ..-->.. ..gamma gamma..) by SU(3) symmetry. It is shown that two photon studies can refute the difficult-to-refute hypothesis that xi(2220) or zeta(8320) are Higgs bosons. A gallery of rogue resonances and resonance candidates is presented which would usefully be studied in ..gamma gamma.. scattering, including especially the low mass dipion. 34 references.

  19. Luminescence imaging of water during irradiation of X-ray photons lower energy than Cerenkov- light threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Koyama, Shuji; Komori, Masataka; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-10-01

    Luminescence imaging of water using X-ray photon irradiation at energy lower than maximum energy of ~200 keV is thought to be impossible because the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov- light. Contrary to this consensus assumption, we show that the luminescence imaging of water can be achieved by X-ray irradiation at energy lower than 120 keV. We placed water phantoms on a table with a conventional X-ray imaging system, and luminescence images of these phantoms were measured with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera during X-ray photon irradiation at energy below 120 keV. We also carried out such imaging of an acrylic block and plastic scintillator. The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during X-ray photon irradiation clearly showed X-ray photon distribution. The intensity of the X-ray photon images of the phantom increased almost proportionally to the number of X-ray irradiations. Lower-energy X-ray photon irradiation showed lower-intensity luminescence at the deeper parts of the phantom due to the higher X-ray absorption in the water phantom. Furthermore, lower-intensity luminescence also appeared at the deeper parts of the acrylic phantom due to its higher density than water. The intensity of the luminescence for water was 0.005% of that for plastic scintillator. Luminescence imaging of water during X-ray photon irradiation at energy lower than 120 keV was possible. This luminescence imaging method is promising for dose estimation in X-ray imaging systems.

  20. HEAO 3 upper limits to the expected 1634 KeV line from SS 483

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheaton, W. A.; Ling, J. C.; Mahoney, W. A.; Jacobson, A. S.

    1985-01-01

    A model based on 24 Mg(1369) was developed as the source of the lines in which refractory grains in the jets, containing Mg and 0, are bombarded, by ambient protons in the local ISM. The narrowness of the features results because the recoil Mg nucleus is stopped in the grain before the 1369 keV excited state decays. A consequence of the 24 Mg interpretation is the expected appearance of other emission lines, due to 20 Ne and 20 Na, which are produced by proton bombardment of 24 Mg at the 33 MeV/nucleon energy corresponding to the velocity of the jets. These lines appear at rest energies of 1634 keV and 1636 keV, respectively, and should have essentially the same total flux as that emited at 1369 keV. The HEAO 3 data are examined to search for the 1634 keV (rest) emission. The observation and analysis, the results, and the implications for the understanding of SS 433 are discussed.

  1. Influence of ~7 keV sterile neutrino dark matter on the process of reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudakovskyi, Anton; Iakubovskyi, Dmytro

    2016-06-01

    Recent reports of a weak unidentified emission line at ~3.5 keV found in spectra of several matter-dominated objects may give a clue to resolve the long-standing problem of dark matter. One of the best physically motivated particle candidate able to produce such an extra line is sterile neutrino with the mass of ~7 keV . Previous works show that sterile neutrino dark matter with parameters consistent with the new line measurement modestly affects structure formation compared to conventional cold dark matter scenario. In this work, we concentrate for the first time on contribution of the sterile neutrino dark matter able to produce the observed line at ~3.5 keV, to the process of reionization. By incorporating dark matter power spectra for ~7 keV sterile neutrinos into extended semi-analytical `bubble' model of reionization we obtain that such sterile neutrino dark matter would produce significantly sharper reionization compared to widely used cold dark matter models, impossible to `imitate' within the cold dark matter scenario under any reasonable choice of our model parameters, and would have a clear tendency of lowering both the redshift of reionization and the electron scattering optical depth (although the difference is still below the existing model uncertainties). Further dedicated studies of reionization (such as 21 cm measurements or studies of kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect) will thus be essential for reconstruction of particle candidate responsible the ~3.5 keV line.

  2. CdZnTe x-ray detector for 30 {endash} 100 keV energy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, S.-S.; Rodricks, B.; Shastri, S.D.; Montano, P.A.

    1996-07-01

    High-pressure-Bridgman (HPB) grown CdZnTe x-ray detectors 1.25-1.7 mm thick were tested using monochromatic x-rays of 30 to 100 keV generated by a high energy x-ray generator. The results were compared with a commercially available 5 cm thick NaI detector. A linear dependence of the counting rate versus the x-ray generator tube current was observed at 58.9 keV. The measured pulse height of the photopeaks shows a linear dependence on energy. Electron and hole mobility-lifetime products ({mu}{tau}) were deduced by fitting bias dependent photopeak channel numbers at 30 keV x-ray energy. Values of 2 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}/V and 2 x 10{sup -4}cm{sup 2}/V were obtained for {mu}{tau}{sub e} and {mu}{tau}{sub p}, respectively. The detector efficiency of CdZnTe at a 100 V bias was as high as, or higher than 90 % compared to a NaI detector. At x-ray energies higher than 70 keV, the detection efficiency becomes a dominant factor and decreases to 75 % at 100 keV.

  3. Spatial distribution of upstream magnetospheric geq50 keV ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulos, G. C.; Argyropoulos, G.; Kaliabetsos, G.

    2000-01-01

    We present for the first time a statistical study of geq50 keV ion events of a magnetospheric origin upstream from Earth's bow shock. The statistical analysis of the 50-220 keV ion events observed by the IMP-8 spacecraft shows: (1) a dawn-dusk asymmetry in ion distributions, with most events and lower intensities upstream from the quasi-parallel pre-dawn side (4 LT-6 LT) of the bow shock, (2) highest ion fluxes upstream from the nose/dusk side of the bow shock under an almost radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) configuration, and (3) a positive correlation of the ion intensities with the solar wind speed and the index of geomagnetic index Kp, with an average solar wind speed as high as 620 km s-1 and values of the index Kp > 2. The statistical results are consistent with (1) preferential leakage of sim50 keV magnetospheric ions from the dusk magnetopause, (2) nearly scatter free motion of sim50 keV ions within the magnetosheath, and (3) final escape of magnetospheric ions from the quasi-parallel dawn side of the bow shock. An additional statistical analysis of higher energy (290-500 keV) upstream ion events also shows a dawn-dusk asymmetry in the occurrence frequency of these events, with the occurrence frequency ranging between sim16%-sim34% in the upstream region.

  4. 3.5 keV X-ray line signal from dark matter decay in local U(1) B- L extension of Zee-Babu model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seungwon

    2015-08-01

    We consider a local U(1) B- L extension of Zee-Babu model to explain the recently observed 3.5 keV X-ray line signal. The model has three Standard model (SM)-singlet Dirac fermions with different U(1) B- L charges. A complex scalar field charged under U(1) B- L is introduced to break the U(1) B- L symmetry. After U(1) B- L symmetry breaking a remnant discrete symmetry stabilizes the lightest state of the Dirac fermions, which can be a stable dark matter (DM). The second lightest state, if mass splitting with the stable DM is about 3.5 keV, decays dominantly to the stable DM and 3.5 keV photon through two-loop diagrams, explaining the X-ray line signal. Two-loop suppression of the decay amplitude makes its lifetime much longer than the age of the universe and it can be a decaying DM candidate in large parameter region. We also introduce a real scalar field which is singlet under both the SM and U(1) B- L and can explain the current relic abundance of the Dirac fermionic DMs. If the mixing with the SM Higgs boson is small, it does not contribute to DM direct detection. The main contribution to the scattering of DM off atomic nuclei comes from the exchange of U(1) B- L gauge boson, Z ', and is suppressed below current experimental bound when Z' mass is heavy (≳10 TeV). If the singlet scalar mass is about 0.1-10 MeV, DM self-interaction can be large enough to solve small scale structure problems in simulations with the cold DM, such as, the core-vs-cusp problem and too-big-to-fail problem.

  5. A 3.55 keV line from DM →a→γ: predictions for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Conlon, Joseph P.; Powell, Andrew J.

    2015-01-13

    We further study a scenario in which a 3.55 keV X-ray line arises from decay of dark matter to an axion-like particle (ALP), that subsequently converts to a photon in astrophysical magnetic fields. We perform numerical simulations of Gaussian random magnetic fields with radial scaling of the magnetic field magnitude with the electron density, for both cool-core 'Perseus' and non-cool-core 'Coma' electron density profiles. Using these, we quantitatively study the resulting signal strength and morphology for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters. Our study includes the effects of fields of view that cover only the central part of the cluster, the effects of offset pointings on the radial decline of signal strength and the effects of dividing clusters into annuli. We find good agreement with current data and make predictions for future analyses and observations.

  6. Photon mass from inflation.

    PubMed

    Prokopec, Tomislav; Törnkvist, Ola; Woodard, Richard

    2002-09-01

    We consider vacuum polarization from massless scalar electrodynamics in de Sitter inflation. The theory exhibits a 3+1 dimensional analog of the Schwinger mechanism in which a photon mass is dynamically generated. The mechanism is generic for light scalar fields that couple minimally to gravity. The nonvanishing of the photon mass during inflation may result in magnetic fields on cosmological scales.

  7. Photonic layered media

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2002-01-01

    A new class of structured dielectric media which exhibit significant photonic bandstructure has been invented. The new structures, called photonic layered media, are easy to fabricate using existing layer-by-layer growth techniques, and offer the ability to significantly extend our practical ability to tailor the properties of such optical materials.

  8. Spin-orbit photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardano, Filippo; Marrucci, Lorenzo

    2015-12-01

    Spin-orbit optical phenomena involve the interaction of the photon spin with the light wave propagation and spatial distribution, mediated by suitable optical media. Here we present a short overview of the emerging photonic applications that rely on such effects.

  9. Photon beam position monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kuzay, Tuncer M.; Shu, Deming

    1995-01-01

    A photon beam position monitor for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade "shadowing". Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation.

  10. Photon beam position monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kuzay, T.M.; Shu, D.

    1995-02-07

    A photon beam position monitor is disclosed for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade ''shadowing''. Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation. 18 figs.

  11. Low-background-rate detector for ions in the 5- to 50-keV energy range to be used for radioisotope dating with a small cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry in tandem Van de Graaff accelerators has proven successful for radioisotope dating small samples. Small, inexpensive cyclotrons serving this purpose would make the technique accessible to more researchers and inexpensive enough to compare many small samples. To this end, VC Berkeley is developing a 20-cm-diameter, 30- to 40-keV cyclotron dedicated to high-sensitivity radioisotope dating, initially for /sup 14/C. At this energy, range and dE/dx methods of particle identification are impossible. Thus arises the difficult problem of reliably detecting 30- to 40-keV /sup 14/C at 10/sup -1/ counts/sec in the high-background environment of the cyclotron, where lower energy ions, electrons, and photons bombard the detector at much higher rates. To meet this challenge, an inexpensive, generally useful ion detector was developed that allows dark-count rates below 10/sup -4/ counts/sec and excellent background suppression. With the cyclotron tuned near the /sup 13/CH background peak, to the frequency for /sup 14/C, the detector suppresses the background to 6 x 10/sup -4/ counts/sec. For each /sup 14/C ion, the detector's grazing-incidence Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ conversion dynode emits about 20 secondary electrons, which are independently multiplied in separate pores of a microchannel plate. The output signal is proportional to the number of secondary electrons, allowing pulse-height discrimination of background.

  12. Validation of modelled imaging plates sensitivity to 1-100 keV x-rays and spatial resolution characterisation for diagnostics for the "PETawatt Aquitaine Laser".

    PubMed

    Boutoux, G; Batani, D; Burgy, F; Ducret, J-E; Forestier-Colleoni, P; Hulin, S; Rabhi, N; Duval, A; Lecherbourg, L; Reverdin, C; Jakubowska, K; Szabo, C I; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S; Consoli, F; Curcio, A; De Angelis, R; Ingenito, F; Baggio, J; Raffestin, D

    2016-04-01

    Thanks to their high dynamic range and ability to withstand electromagnetic pulse, imaging plates (IPs) are commonly used as passive detectors in laser-plasma experiments. In the framework of the development of the diagnostics for the Petawatt Aquitaine Laser facility, we present an absolute calibration and spatial resolution study of five different available types of IP (namely, MS-SR-TR-MP-ND) performed by using laser-induced K-shell X-rays emitted by a solid silver target irradiated by the laser ECLIPSE at CEntre Lasers Intenses et Applications. In addition, IP sensitivity measurements were performed with a 160 kV X-ray generator at CEA DAM DIF, where the absolute response of IP SR and TR has been calibrated to X-rays in the energy range 8-75 keV with uncertainties of about 15%. Finally, the response functions have been modeled in Monte Carlo GEANT4 simulations in order to reproduce experimental data. Simulations enable extrapolation of the IP response functions to photon energies from 1 keV to 1 GeV, of interest, e.g., for laser-driven radiography. PMID:27131655

  13. Non-abelian dark matter solutions for Galactic gamma-ray excess and Perseus 3.5 keV X-ray line

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Kingman; Huang, Wei-Chih; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming

    2015-05-26

    We attempt to explain simultaneously the Galactic center gamma-ray excess and the 3.5 keV X-ray line from the Perseus cluster based on a class of non-abelian SU(2) DM models, in which the dark matter and an excited state comprise a “dark” SU(2) doublet. The non-abelian group kinetically mixes with the standard model gauge group via dimensions-5 operators. The dark matter particles annihilate into standard model fermions, followed by fragmentation and bremsstrahlung, and thus producing a continuous spectrum of gamma-rays. On the other hand, the dark matter particles can annihilate into a pair of excited states, each of which decays back into the dark matter particle and an X-ray photon, which has an energy equal to the mass difference between the dark matter and the excited state, which is set to be 3.5 keV. The large hierarchy between the required X-ray and γ-ray annihilation cross-sections can be achieved by a very small kinetic mixing between the SM and dark sector, which effectively suppresses the annihilation into the standard model fermions but not into the excited state.

  14. Non-abelian dark matter solutions for Galactic gamma-ray excess and Perseus 3.5 keV X-ray line

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Kingman; Huang, Wei-Chih; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming E-mail: wei-chih.huang@ucl.ac.uk

    2015-05-01

    We attempt to explain simultaneously the Galactic center gamma-ray excess and the 3.5 keV X-ray line from the Perseus cluster based on a class of non-abelian SU(2) DM models, in which the dark matter and an excited state comprise a ''dark'' SU(2) doublet. The non-abelian group kinetically mixes with the standard model gauge group via dimensions-5 operators. The dark matter particles annihilate into standard model fermions, followed by fragmentation and bremsstrahlung, and thus producing a continuous spectrum of gamma-rays. On the other hand, the dark matter particles can annihilate into a pair of excited states, each of which decays back into the dark matter particle and an X-ray photon, which has an energy equal to the mass difference between the dark matter and the excited state, which is set to be 3.5 keV. The large hierarchy between the required X-ray and γ-ray annihilation cross-sections can be achieved by a very small kinetic mixing between the SM and dark sector, which effectively suppresses the annihilation into the standard model fermions but not into the excited state.

  15. Refractive lens based full-field x-ray imaging at 45-50 keV with sub-micron resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shastri, S. D.; Kenesei, P.; Suter, R. M.

    2015-09-01

    Combining sub-micron spatial resolution full-field-imaging with the penetration property of high-energy x-rays (> 50 keV) offers numerous applications, such as the ability to observe cracks and voids associated with the onset of failure in engineering materials, complementing x-ray diffraction microscopy probes. Progress in the development of adding such an imaging capability at the Advanced Photon Source high-energy x-ray undulator beamline 1-ID is reported. An initially tested, long baseline configuration had 18-21× x-ray image magnification with compound refractive lenses (as objective) placed 1.8 m after the specimen, and a two-dimensional detector located at a 32-37 m additional distance, in a different experimental station. Later, a more compact set-up of 3.5× magnification with a ≍6 m sample-to-detector separation, fitting within a single end-station, was tested. Both set-ups demonstrated 500 nm level spatial resolutions at energies within the 45-50 keV range. Phase contrast artifacts are present, and are discussed in view of the goal of achieving tomography capability, at even higher resolution, in such an instrument with high x-ray energies.

  16. Validation of modelled imaging plates sensitivity to 1-100 keV x-rays and spatial resolution characterisation for diagnostics for the "PETawatt Aquitaine Laser".

    PubMed

    Boutoux, G; Batani, D; Burgy, F; Ducret, J-E; Forestier-Colleoni, P; Hulin, S; Rabhi, N; Duval, A; Lecherbourg, L; Reverdin, C; Jakubowska, K; Szabo, C I; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S; Consoli, F; Curcio, A; De Angelis, R; Ingenito, F; Baggio, J; Raffestin, D

    2016-04-01

    Thanks to their high dynamic range and ability to withstand electromagnetic pulse, imaging plates (IPs) are commonly used as passive detectors in laser-plasma experiments. In the framework of the development of the diagnostics for the Petawatt Aquitaine Laser facility, we present an absolute calibration and spatial resolution study of five different available types of IP (namely, MS-SR-TR-MP-ND) performed by using laser-induced K-shell X-rays emitted by a solid silver target irradiated by the laser ECLIPSE at CEntre Lasers Intenses et Applications. In addition, IP sensitivity measurements were performed with a 160 kV X-ray generator at CEA DAM DIF, where the absolute response of IP SR and TR has been calibrated to X-rays in the energy range 8-75 keV with uncertainties of about 15%. Finally, the response functions have been modeled in Monte Carlo GEANT4 simulations in order to reproduce experimental data. Simulations enable extrapolation of the IP response functions to photon energies from 1 keV to 1 GeV, of interest, e.g., for laser-driven radiography.

  17. Validation of modelled imaging plates sensitivity to 1-100 keV x-rays and spatial resolution characterisation for diagnostics for the "PETawatt Aquitaine Laser"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutoux, G.; Batani, D.; Burgy, F.; Ducret, J.-E.; Forestier-Colleoni, P.; Hulin, S.; Rabhi, N.; Duval, A.; Lecherbourg, L.; Reverdin, C.; Jakubowska, K.; Szabo, C. I.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Consoli, F.; Curcio, A.; De Angelis, R.; Ingenito, F.; Baggio, J.; Raffestin, D.

    2016-04-01

    Thanks to their high dynamic range and ability to withstand electromagnetic pulse, imaging plates (IPs) are commonly used as passive detectors in laser-plasma experiments. In the framework of the development of the diagnostics for the Petawatt Aquitaine Laser facility, we present an absolute calibration and spatial resolution study of five different available types of IP (namely, MS-SR-TR-MP-ND) performed by using laser-induced K-shell X-rays emitted by a solid silver target irradiated by the laser ECLIPSE at CEntre Lasers Intenses et Applications. In addition, IP sensitivity measurements were performed with a 160 kV X-ray generator at CEA DAM DIF, where the absolute response of IP SR and TR has been calibrated to X-rays in the energy range 8-75 keV with uncertainties of about 15%. Finally, the response functions have been modeled in Monte Carlo GEANT4 simulations in order to reproduce experimental data. Simulations enable extrapolation of the IP response functions to photon energies from 1 keV to 1 GeV, of interest, e.g., for laser-driven radiography.

  18. Chirality in photonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solnyshkov, Dmitry; Malpuech, Guillaume

    2016-10-01

    The optical modes of photonic structures are the so-called TE and TM modes that bring intrinsic spin-orbit coupling and chirality to these systems. This, combined with the unique flexibility of design of the photonic potential, and the possibility to mix photon states with excitonic resonances, sensitive to magnetic field and interactions, allows us to achieve many phenomena, often analogous to other solid-state systems. In this contribution, we review in a qualitative and comprehensive way several of these realizations, namely the optical spin Hall effect, the creation of spin currents protected by a non-trivial geometry, the Berry curvature for photons, and the photonic/polaritonic topological insulator.

  19. Ion photon emission microscope

    DOEpatents

    Doyle, Barney L.

    2003-04-22

    An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

  20. A novel photonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. S.; Maleki, L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a novel oscillator for photonic RF systems. This oscillator is capable of generating high-frequency signals up to 70 GHz in both electrical and optical domains and is a special voltage-controlled oscillator with an optical output port. It can be used to make a phase-locked loop (PLL) and perform all functions that a PLL is capable of for photonic systems. It can be synchronized to a reference source by means of optical injection locking, electrical injection locking, and PLL. It can also be self-phase locked and self-injection locked to generate a high-stability photonic RF reference. Its applications include high-frequency reference regeneration and distribution, high-gain frequency multiplication, comb-frequecy and square-wave generation, carrier recovery, and clock recovery. We anticipate that such photonic voltage-controlled oscillators (VCOs) will be as important to photonic RF systems as electrical VCOs are to electrical RF systems.

  1. Nonlinear Photonics 2014: introduction.

    PubMed

    Akhmediev, N; Kartashov, Yaroslav

    2015-01-12

    International Conference "Nonlinear Photonics-2014" took place in Barcelona, Spain on July 27-31, 2014. It was a part of the "Advanced Photonics Congress" which is becoming a traditional notable event in the world of photonics. The current focus issue of Optics Express contains contributions from the participants of the Conference and the Congress. The articles in this focus issue by no means represent the total number of the congress contributions (around 400). However, it demonstrates wide range of topics covered at the event. The next conference of this series is to be held in 2016 in Australia, which is the home of many researchers working in the field of photonics in general and nonlinear photonics in particular.

  2. Degeneracy at 1871 keV in Cd112 and implications for neutrinoless double electron capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, K. L.; Garrett, P. E.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D. S.; Colosimo, S.; Cross, D.; Demand, G. A.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hackman, G.; Kulp, W. D.; Leach, K. G.; Morton, A. C.; Pearson, C. J.; Phillips, A. A.; Schumaker, M. A.; Svensson, C. E.; Wong, J.; Wood, J. L.; Yates, S. W.

    2009-09-01

    High-statistics β-decay measurements of Ag112 and In112 were performed to study the structure of the Cd112 nucleus. The precise energies of the doublet of levels at 1871 keV, for which the 0+ member has been suggested as a possible daughter state following neutrinoless double electron capture of Sn112, were determined to be 1871.137(72) keV (04+ level) and 1870.743(54) keV (42+ level). The nature of the 04+ level, required for the calculation of the nuclear matrix element that would be needed to extract a neutrino mass from neutrinoless double electron capture to this state, is suggested to be of intruder origin.

  3. Evaluation of the 1077 keV γ-ray emission probability from 68Ga decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Li-Yang; Chen, Xiong-Jun; Chen, Guo-Chang

    2014-04-01

    68Ga decays to the excited states of 68Zn through the electron capture decay mode. New recommended values for the emission probability of 1077 keV γ-ray given by the ENSDF and DDEP databases all use data from absolute measurements. In 2011, JIANG Li-Yang deduced a new value for 1077 keV γ-ray emission probability by measuring the 69Ga(n,2n) 68Ga reaction cross section. The new value is about 20% lower than values obtained from previous absolute measurements and evaluations. In this paper, the discrepancies among the measurements and evaluations are analyzed carefully and the new values are re-recommended. Our recommended value for the emission probability of 1077 keV γ-ray is (2.72±0.16)%.

  4. Hyper-filter-fluorescer spectrometer for x-rays above 120 keV

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus utilizing filter-fluorescer combinations is provided to measure short bursts of high fluence x-rays above 120 keV energy, where there are no practical absorption edges available for conventional filter-fluorescer techniques. The absorption edge of the prefilter is chosen to be less than that of the fluorescer, i.e., E.sub.PRF E.sub.F. In this way, the response function is virtually zero between E.sub.PRF and E.sub.F and well defined and enhanced in an energy band of less than 1000 keV above the 120 keV energy.

  5. The Morphology of the X-ray Emission above 2 keV from Jupiter's Aurorae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Galand, M.; Grodent, D.; Waite, J. H.; Cravens, T.; Ford, P.

    2007-01-01

    The discovery in XMM-Newton X-ray data of X-ray emission above 2 keV from Jupiter's aurorae has led us to reexamine the Chandra ACIS-S observations taken in Feb 2003. Chandra's superior spatial resolution has revealed that the auroral X-rays with E > 2 keV are emitted from the periphery of the region emitting those with E < 1 keV. We are presently exploring the relationship of this morphology to that of the FUV emission from the main auroral oval and the polar cap. The low energy emission has previously been established as due to charge exchange between energetic precipitating ions of oxygen and either sulfur or carbon. It seems likely to us that the higher energy emission is due to precipitation of energetic electrons, possibly the same population of electrons responsible for the FUV emission. We discuss our analysis and interpretation.

  6. A search for a keV signature of radiatively decaying dark matter with Suzaku XIS observations of the X-ray diffuse background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Norio; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

    2016-06-01

    We performed the deepest search for an X-ray emission line at between 0.5 and 7 keV from non-baryonic dark matter by the Suzaku XIS. Dark matter associated with the Milky Way was selected as the target to obtain the best signal-to-noise ratio. From the Suzaku archive, we selected 187 data sets of blank-sky regions that were dominated by the X-ray diffuse background. The data sets were from 2005 to 2013. The instrumental responses were adjusted by multiple calibration data sets of the Crab Nebula. We also improved the technique of subtracting lines of instrumental origin. These energy spectra were well described by X-ray emission due to charge exchange around the Solar System, hot plasma in and around the Milky Way, and the superposition of extra-galactic point sources. A signal of a narrow emission-line was searched for, and the significance of detection was evaluated in consideration of the blind search method (the Look-elsewhere Effect). Our results exhibited no significant detection of an emission line feature from dark matter. The 3 σ upper limit for the emission line intensity between 1 and 7 keV was ˜ 10-2 photons cm-2 s-1 sr-1, or ˜ 5 × 10-4 photons cm-2 s-1 sr-1 per M⊙ pc-2, assuming a dark matter distribution with the Galactic rotation curve. The parameters of sterile neutrinos as candidates of dark-matter were also constrained.

  7. Measurement of mass attenuation coefficients of Eremurus-Rhizophora spp. particleboards for X-ray in the 16.63-25.30 keV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tousi, E. T.; Bauk, S.; Hashim, R.; Jaafar, M. S.; Abuarra, A.; Aldroobi, K. S. A.; Al-Jarrah, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    The roots of Eremurus spp. were used as a bio-adhesive in the fabrication of Rhizophora spp. particleboards. The mass attenuation coefficients of Eremurus-Rhizophora spp. particleboard of six samples with two different weight percentages of the Eremurus spp. root (6% and 12%) and three various Rhizophora spp. particle sizes (≤149 μm, 149-500 μm and 500-1000 μm) were determined by using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) photons in 16.63 keV and 25.30 keV of the photon energy range. The results were compared with theoretically calculated mass attenuations using the XCOM computer program for younger-age (breast 1: 75% muscle+25% fat), middle-age (breast 2: 50% muscle+50% fat), and old-age (breast 3: 25% muscle+75% fat) breasts. The results indicated that Eremurus-Rhizophora spp. particleboard is the appropriate suitable phantom in the diagnostic energy region. The mass attenuation coefficient in the low weight percentage of the bio-adhesive and the large Rhizophora spp. particle size were found very close to breast 1. Moreover the mass attenuation coefficient of the sample with high weight percentage of the bio-adhesive and small Rhizophora spp. particle size was found very close to water as a standard material phantom. In addition, the viscosity of dissolved Eremurus spp. root in water could be considerably higher than that of formaldehyde-based adhesives, which affects on some properties such as high strength and high binding.

  8. Roadmap on silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, David; Zilkie, Aaron; Bowers, John E.; Komljenovic, Tin; Reed, Graham T.; Vivien, Laurent; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Cassan, Eric; Virot, Léopold; Fédéli, Jean-Marc; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Schmid, Jens H.; Xu, Dan-Xia; Boeuf, Frédéric; O'Brien, Peter; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Nedeljkovic, M.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon photonics research can be dated back to the 1980s. However, the previous decade has witnessed an explosive growth in the field. Silicon photonics is a disruptive technology that is poised to revolutionize a number of application areas, for example, data centers, high-performance computing and sensing. The key driving force behind silicon photonics is the ability to use CMOS-like fabrication resulting in high-volume production at low cost. This is a key enabling factor for bringing photonics to a range of technology areas where the costs of implementation using traditional photonic elements such as those used for the telecommunications industry would be prohibitive. Silicon does however have a number of shortcomings as a photonic material. In its basic form it is not an ideal material in which to produce light sources, optical modulators or photodetectors for example. A wealth of research effort from both academia and industry in recent years has fueled the demonstration of multiple solutions to these and other problems, and as time progresses new approaches are increasingly being conceived. It is clear that silicon photonics has a bright future. However, with a growing number of approaches available, what will the silicon photonic integrated circuit of the future look like? This roadmap on silicon photonics delves into the different technology and application areas of the field giving an insight into the state-of-the-art as well as current and future challenges faced by researchers worldwide. Contributions authored by experts from both industry and academia provide an overview and outlook for the silicon waveguide platform, optical sources, optical modulators, photodetectors, integration approaches, packaging, applications of silicon photonics and approaches required to satisfy applications at mid-infrared wavelengths. Advances in science and technology required to meet challenges faced by the field in each of these areas are also addressed together with

  9. Photon energy absorption coefficients for nuclear track detectors using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vishwanath P.; Medhat, M. E.; Badiger, N. M.

    2015-01-01

    Geant4 Monte Carlo code simulations were used to solve experimental and theoretical complications for calculation of mass energy-absorption coefficients of elements, air, and compounds. The mass energy-absorption coefficients for nuclear track detectors were computed first time using Geant4 Monte Carlo code for energy 1 keV-20 MeV. Very good agreements for simulated results of mass energy-absorption coefficients for carbon, nitrogen, silicon, sodium iodide and nuclear track detectors were observed on comparison with the values reported in the literatures. Kerma relative to air for energy 1 keV-20 MeV and energy absorption buildup factors for energy 50 keV-10 MeV up to 10 mfp penetration depths of the selected nuclear track detectors were also calculated to evaluate the absorption of the gamma photons. Geant4 simulation can be utilized for estimation of mass energy-absorption coefficients in elements and composite materials.

  10. Relative biological effectiveness of 280 keV neutrons for apoptosis in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ryan, L A; Wilkins, R C; McFarlane, N M; Sung, M M; McNamee, J P; Boreham, D R

    2006-07-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons varies from unity to greater than ten depending upon neutron energy and the biological endpoint measured. In our study, we examined apoptosis in human lymphocytes to assess the RBE of low energy 280 keV neutrons compared to Cs gamma radiation and found the RBE to be approximately one. Similar results have been observed for high energy neutrons using the same endpoint. As apoptosis is a major process that influences the consequences of radiation exposure, our results indicate that biological effect and the corresponding weighting factors for 280 keV neutrons may be lower in some cell types and tissues.

  11. 3.55 keV line in minimal decaying dark matter scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Arcadi, Giorgio; Covi, Laura; Dradi, Federico

    2015-07-20

    We investigate the possibility of reproducing the recently reported 3.55 keV line in some simple decaying dark matter scenarios. In all cases a keV scale decaying DM is coupled with a scalar field charged under SM gauge interactions and thus capable of pair production at the LHC. We will investigate how the demand of a DM lifetime compatible with the observed signal, combined with the requirement of the correct DM relic density through the freeze-in mechanism, impacts the prospects of observation at the LHC of the decays of the scalar field.

  12. First measurement of the antiproton-nucleus annihilation cross section at 125 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghai-Khozani, H.; Barna, D.; Corradini, M.; De Salvador, D.; Hayano, R.; Hori, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Leali, M.; Lodi-Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V.; Prest, M.; Seiler, D.; Soter, A.; Todoroki, K.; Vallazza, E.; Venturelli, L.

    2015-08-01

    The first observation of in-flight antiproton-nucleus annihilation at ˜130 keV obtained with the ASACUSA detector has demonstrated that the measurement of the cross section of the process is feasible at such extremely low energies Aghai-Khozani, H., et al., Eur. Phys. J. Plus 127, 55 (2012). Here we present the results of the data analysis with the evaluations of the antiproton annihilation cross sections on carbon, palladium and platinum targets at ˜125 keV.

  13. Indistinguishability of independent single photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, F. W.; Wong, C. W.

    2009-01-01

    The indistinguishability of independent single photons is presented by decomposing the single photon pulse into the mixed state of different transform-limited pulses. The entanglement between single photons and outer environment or other photons induces the distribution of the center frequencies of those transform-limited pulses and makes photons distinguishable. Only the single photons with the same transform-limited form are indistinguishable. In details, the indistinguishability of single photons from the solid-state quantum emitter and spontaneous parametric down-conversion is examined with two-photon Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer. Moreover, experimental methods to enhance the indistinguishability are discussed, where the usage of spectral filter is highlighted.

  14. Atlas of solar hidden photon emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Javier

    2015-07-01

    Hidden photons, gauge bosons of a U(1) symmetry of a hidden sector, can constitute the dark matter of the universe and a smoking gun for large volume compactifications of string theory. In the sub-eV mass range, a possible discovery experiment consists on searching the copious flux of these particles emitted from the Sun in a helioscope setup à la Sikivie. In this paper, we compute in great detail the flux of HPs from the Sun, a necessary ingredient for interpreting such experiments. We provide a detailed exposition of transverse photon-HP oscillations in inhomogenous media, with special focus on resonance oscillations, which play a leading role in many cases. The region of the Sun emitting HPs resonantly is a thin spherical shell for which we justify an averaged-emission formula and which implies a distinctive morphology of the angular distribution of HPs on Earth in many cases. Low mass HPs with energies in the visible and IR have resonances very close to the photosphere where the solar plasma is not fully ionised and requires building a detailed model of solar refraction and absorption. We present results for a broad range of HP masses (from 0-1 keV) and energies (from the IR to the X-ray range), the most complete atlas of solar HP emission to date.

  15. Atlas of solar hidden photon emission

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, Javier

    2015-07-20

    Hidden photons, gauge bosons of a U(1) symmetry of a hidden sector, can constitute the dark matter of the universe and a smoking gun for large volume compactifications of string theory. In the sub-eV mass range, a possible discovery experiment consists on searching the copious flux of these particles emitted from the Sun in a helioscope setup à la Sikivie. In this paper, we compute in great detail the flux of HPs from the Sun, a necessary ingredient for interpreting such experiments. We provide a detailed exposition of transverse photon-HP oscillations in inhomogenous media, with special focus on resonance oscillations, which play a leading role in many cases. The region of the Sun emitting HPs resonantly is a thin spherical shell for which we justify an averaged-emission formula and which implies a distinctive morphology of the angular distribution of HPs on Earth in many cases. Low mass HPs with energies in the visible and IR have resonances very close to the photosphere where the solar plasma is not fully ionised and requires building a detailed model of solar refraction and absorption. We present results for a broad range of HP masses (from 0–1 keV) and energies (from the IR to the X-ray range), the most complete atlas of solar HP emission to date.

  16. Atlas of solar hidden photon emission

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, Javier

    2015-07-01

    Hidden photons, gauge bosons of a U(1) symmetry of a hidden sector, can constitute the dark matter of the universe and a smoking gun for large volume compactifications of string theory. In the sub-eV mass range, a possible discovery experiment consists on searching the copious flux of these particles emitted from the Sun in a helioscope setup à la Sikivie. In this paper, we compute in great detail the flux of HPs from the Sun, a necessary ingredient for interpreting such experiments. We provide a detailed exposition of transverse photon-HP oscillations in inhomogenous media, with special focus on resonance oscillations, which play a leading role in many cases. The region of the Sun emitting HPs resonantly is a thin spherical shell for which we justify an averaged-emission formula and which implies a distinctive morphology of the angular distribution of HPs on Earth in many cases. Low mass HPs with energies in the visible and IR have resonances very close to the photosphere where the solar plasma is not fully ionised and requires building a detailed model of solar refraction and absorption. We present results for a broad range of HP masses (from 0–1 keV) and energies (from the IR to the X-ray range), the most complete atlas of solar HP emission to date.

  17. Investigating photonic quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Casey Robert

    The use of photons as qubits is a promising implementation for quantum computation. The inability of photons to interact, especially with the environment, makes them an ideal physical candidate. However, this also makes them a difficult system to perform two qubit gates on. Recent breakthroughs in photonic quantum computing have shown methods around the requirement of direct photon-photon interaction. In this thesis we study three recently discovered schemes for optical quantum computation. We first investigate the so called linear optical quantum computing (LOQC) scheme, exploring a method to improve the original proposal by constructing a photon-number QND detector that succeeds with a high probability. In doing this we present a new type of LOQC teleporter, one that can detect the presence of a single photon in an arbitrary polarisation state when the input state is a sum of vacuum and multi-photon terms. This new type of teleporter is an improvement on the original scheme in that the entangled states required can be made offline with fewer entangling operations. We next investigate the so called quantum bus (qubus) scheme for photonic quantum computing. We show a scheme to measure the party of n qubit states by using a single qubus mode, controlled rotations and displacements. This allows for the syndrome measurements of any stabilizer quantum error correcting code. We extend these results to a fault tolerant scheme to measure an arbitrary Pauli operator of weight n, incorporating so called single bit teleportations. We investigate the construction of a Toffoli gate by using a single qubus mode, controlled rotations and displacements that works with a success probability of at least 25%. We also investigate the use of single bit teleportations to construct a universal set of gates on coherent state type logic and in the construction of cluster states. We finally investigate the optical Zeno gate, a gate that uses the Zeno effect in the form of two photon

  18. Photon Beamlines and Diagnostics at LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, S.; Arthur, J.; Brachmann, A.; Coffee, R.; Decker, F.-J.; Edstrom, S.; Emma, P.; Feng, Y.; Fisher, S.; Fritsch, J.; Galayda, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hastings, J.; Hays, G.; Hering, P.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Krzywinski, J.; Lewis, S.; Loos, H.; Messerschmidt, M.; /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore /Argonne

    2011-02-07

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is the first hard-x-ray free electron laser in operation. The turn-on of LCLS was rapid and operation has been reliable. Performance has exceeded the design parameters in several areas. The photon energy output covers a range from 480 eV to over 9 keV; the pulse energy is typically 2-3 mJ, with a maximum of 4 mJ at 2 keV. Electron pulse lengths can be varied from 500 fs to shorter than 10 fs. A low-charge option at 20 pC is being explored, which delivers pulses shorter than 10 fs with a reduced pulse energy, typically around 0.2 mJ. On-demand, single-shot and multi-shot modes up to 60 Hz (planned is 120 Hz) can be made available. The photon diagnostics built for LCLS have been commissioned and provide measurements of various properties of the FEL beam, such as pulse energy, beam size and position, wavelength, and allows for intensity attenuation over the entire wavelength range. The two soft x-ray instruments, the Atomic Molecular and Optics (AMO) and Soft X-ray Material Science (SXR) stations, are fully operational and completed their second user run in mid September 2010. The third user run is scheduled from October to December 2010, and will include the first hard x-ray instrument X-ray Pump-and-Probe (XPP). Three additional hard x-ray stations will follow: CXI (Coherent X-ray Imaging) is planned to start commissioning in December 2010, the XCS (X-ray correlation spectroscopy) instrument will start in June 2011, and the station for Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) in 2012. A list of past and future milestones for LCLS commission and operations is shown in table 1. The LCLS hard x-ray Free Electron Laser at SLAC reported first lasing in April of 2009. Since then two successful user runs have been completed at the two soft x-ray stations. The first hard x-ray station has started commissioning in July of 2010. Beam diagnostics play an essential role for tuning the machine and delivering the requested beam properties to the

  19. Direct Photons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor,D.

    2008-07-29

    Direct photons are ideal tools to investigate kinematical and thermodynamical conditions of heavy ion collisions since they are emitted from all stages of the collision and once produced they leave the interaction region without further modification by the medium. The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured direct photon production in p+p and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV over a wide transverse momentum (p{sub T}) range. The p+p measurements allow a fundamental test of QCD, and serve as a baseline when we try to disentangle more complex mechanisms producing high p{sub T} direct photons in Au+Au. As for thermal photons in Au+Au we overcome the difficulties due to the large background from hadronic decays by measuring 'almost real' virtual photons which appear as low invariant mass e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs: a significant excess of direct photons is measured above the above next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. Additional insights on the origin of direct photons can be gained with the study of the azimuthal anisotropy which benefits from the increased statistics and reaction plane resolution achieved in RHIC Year-7 data.

  20. Photon Identification with Segmented Germanium Detectors in Low Radiation Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Kroeninger, K.; Liu, J.; Liu, X.; Majorovits, B.; Stelzer, F.

    2007-03-28

    Effective identification of photon-induced events is essential for a new generation of double beta-decay experiments. One such experiment is the GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA, located at the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) in Italy. It uses germanium, enriched in 76Ge, as source and detector, and aims at a background level of less than 10-3 counts/(kg {center_dot} keV {center_dot} y) in the region of the Q{beta}{beta}-value. Highly segmented detectors are being developed for this experiment. A detailed GEANT4 Monte Carlo study about the possibilities to identify photon--induced background was published previously. An 18-fold segmented prototype detector was tested and its performance compared with Monte Carlo predictions. The detector performed well and the agreement with the Monte Carlo is excellent.

  1. Photon detector system

    DOEpatents

    Ekstrom, Philip A.

    1981-01-01

    A photon detector includes a semiconductor device, such as a Schottky barrier diode, which has an avalanche breakdown characteristic. The diode is cooled to cryogenic temperatures to eliminate thermally generated charge carriers from the device. The diode is then biased to a voltage level exceeding the avalanche breakdown threshold level such that, upon receipt of a photon, avalanche breakdown occurs. This breakdown is detected by appropriate circuitry which thereafter reduces the diode bias potential to a level below the avalanche breakdown threshold level to terminate the avalanche condition. Subsequently, the bias potential is reapplied to the diode in preparation for detection of a subsequently received photon.

  2. Photonic Maxwell's Demon.

    PubMed

    Vidrighin, Mihai D; Dahlsten, Oscar; Barbieri, Marco; Kim, M S; Vedral, Vlatko; Walmsley, Ian A

    2016-02-01

    We report an experimental realization of Maxwell's demon in a photonic setup. We show that a measurement at the few-photons level followed by a feed-forward operation allows the extraction of work from intense thermal light into an electric circuit. The interpretation of the experiment stimulates the derivation of an equality relating work extraction to information acquired by measurement. We derive a bound using this relation and show that it is in agreement with the experimental results. Our work puts forward photonic systems as a platform for experiments related to information in thermodynamics.

  3. Photonic structures in biology.

    PubMed

    Vukusic, Pete; Sambles, J Roy

    2003-08-14

    Millions of years before we began to manipulate the flow of light using synthetic structures, biological systems were using nanometre-scale architectures to produce striking optical effects. An astonishing variety of natural photonic structures exists: a species of Brittlestar uses photonic elements composed of calcite to collect light, Morpho butterflies use multiple layers of cuticle and air to produce their striking blue colour and some insects use arrays of elements, known as nipple arrays, to reduce reflectivity in their compound eyes. Natural photonic structures are providing inspiration for technological applications.

  4. Single photon quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Beveratos, Alexios; Brouri, Rosa; Gacoin, Thierry; Villing, André; Poizat, Jean-Philippe; Grangier, Philippe

    2002-10-28

    We report the full implementation of a quantum cryptography protocol using a stream of single photon pulses generated by a stable and efficient source operating at room temperature. The single photon pulses are emitted on demand by a single nitrogen-vacancy color center in a diamond nanocrystal. The quantum bit error rate is less that 4.6% and the secure bit rate is 7700 bits/s. The overall performances of our system reaches a domain where single photons have a measurable advantage over an equivalent system based on attenuated light pulses.

  5. Photonic Maxwell's Demon.

    PubMed

    Vidrighin, Mihai D; Dahlsten, Oscar; Barbieri, Marco; Kim, M S; Vedral, Vlatko; Walmsley, Ian A

    2016-02-01

    We report an experimental realization of Maxwell's demon in a photonic setup. We show that a measurement at the few-photons level followed by a feed-forward operation allows the extraction of work from intense thermal light into an electric circuit. The interpretation of the experiment stimulates the derivation of an equality relating work extraction to information acquired by measurement. We derive a bound using this relation and show that it is in agreement with the experimental results. Our work puts forward photonic systems as a platform for experiments related to information in thermodynamics. PMID:26894692

  6. Photon collider Higgs factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, V. I.

    2014-09-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson (and still nothing else) have triggered appearance of many proposals of Higgs factories for precision measurement of the Higgs properties. Among them there are several projects of photon colliders (PC) without e+e- in addition to PLC based on e+e- linear colliders ILC and CLIC. In this paper, following a brief discussion of Higgs factories physics program I give an overview of photon colliders based on linear colliders ILC and CLIC, and of the recently proposed photon-collider Higgs factories with no e+e- collision option based on recirculation linacs in ring tunnels.

  7. Photonic Maxwell's Demon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidrighin, Mihai D.; Dahlsten, Oscar; Barbieri, Marco; Kim, M. S.; Vedral, Vlatko; Walmsley, Ian A.

    2016-02-01

    We report an experimental realization of Maxwell's demon in a photonic setup. We show that a measurement at the few-photons level followed by a feed-forward operation allows the extraction of work from intense thermal light into an electric circuit. The interpretation of the experiment stimulates the derivation of an equality relating work extraction to information acquired by measurement. We derive a bound using this relation and show that it is in agreement with the experimental results. Our work puts forward photonic systems as a platform for experiments related to information in thermodynamics.

  8. Photon physics at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Skuja, A.; White, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    Two photon processes induced by heavy ion collisions have been considered. An approximate formalism for calculation is derived. The event rate is interesting at low-photon-photon mass but is limited by the form factor of the nuclei at high mass. The event rate is compared with that at LEP and found to be favorable at the mass of charm mesons but unfavorable at higher masses. It is further noted that two pomeron processes are similar in configuration and are prolific at low pomeron-pomeron masses. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Photonics: Technology project summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Depaula, Ramon P.

    1991-01-01

    Photonics involves the use of light (photons) in conjunction with electronics for applications in communications, computing, control, and sensing. Components used in photonic systems include lasers, optical detectors, optical wave guide devices, fiber optics, and traditional electronic devices. The goal of this program is to develop hybrid optoelectronic devices and systems for sensing, information processing, communications, and control. It is hoped that these new devices will yield at least an order of magnitude improvement in performance over existing technology. The objective of the program is to conduct research and development in the following areas: (1) materials and devices; (2) networking and computing; (3) optical processing/advanced pattern recognition; and (4) sensing.

  10. A freon-filled, holographic bubble chamber as a high energy photon burst spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dendooven, P.G.; Lerche, R.A.

    1994-04-26

    A small holographic, freon-filled bubble chamber is being built to measure the energy spectrum of high-energy photons (energy above a few 100 keV) emitted in a short burst (less than about 1 ms duration). The photon energy is calculated from the scattered electron`s energy and direction in the case of Compton scattering or from the electron and positron energies in the case of pair production. Electron and positron energies are determined from the curvature of the tracks in a magnetic field. The use of freon results in a large photon interaction probability. Holography combines good spatial resolution with large depth of field. The main concern for the holographic system is the minimization of the bubble image size, so as to maximize the number of bubbles visible in one hologram. A high energy photon burst spectrometer has several potential applications in Inertial Confinement Fusion research.

  11. A freon-filled, holographic bubble chamber as a high-energy photon burst spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dendooven, P.G.; Lerche, R.A. )

    1995-01-01

    A small holographic, freon-filled bubble chamber is being built to measure the energy spectrum of high-energy photons (energy above a few 100 keV) emitted in a short burst (less than about 1-[mu]s duration). The photon energy is calculated from the scattered electron's energy and direction in the case of Compton scattering or from the electron and positron energies in the case of pair production. Electron and positron energies are determined from the curvature of the tracks in a magnetic field. The use of freon results in a large photon interaction probability. Holography combines good spatial resolution with large depth of field. The main concern for the holographic system is the minimization of the bubble image size, so as to maximize the number of bubbles visible in one hologram. A high-energy photon burst spectrometer has several potential applications in inertial confinement fusion research.

  12. Study of photon emission by electron capture during solar nuclei acceleration. 3: Photon production evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez, M.; Gallegos, A.

    1985-01-01

    Lower limits of photon fluxes were evaluated from electron capture during acceleration in solar flares, because the arbitrary q sub c asterisk assumed in this work evolves very slow with velocity, probably much more slowly than the physical actual situation: in fact, more emission is expected toward the IR region. Nevertheless the authors claim to show that the factibility of sounding acceleration processes, charge evolution processes and physical parameters of the source itself, by the observational analysis of this kind of emissions. For instance, it would be interesting to search observationally, for the predicted flux and energy drift of F sub e ions interacting with the atomic 0 and F sub e of the source matter, or, even more feasible for the X-ray lines at 4.2 keV and 2.624 + 0.003 KeV from Fe and S ions in ionized Fe at T = 10 to the 7th power K respectively, the 418 + or - 2 eV and 20 + or - 4 eV lines of Fe and S in ionized Fe at 5 x 10 to the 6th power K, which are predicted from Fermi acceleration.

  13. The effect of entanglement in gravitational photon-photon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rätzel, Dennis; Wilkens, Martin; Menzel, Ralf

    2016-09-01

    The differential cross-section for gravitational photon-photon scattering calculated in perturbative quantum gravity is shown to depend on the degree of polarization entanglement of the two photons. The interaction between photons in the symmetric Bell state is stronger than between not entangled photons. In contrast, the interaction between photons in the anti-symmetric Bell state is weaker than between not entangled photons. The results are interpreted in terms of quantum interference, and it is shown how they fit into the idea of distance-dependent forces.

  14. Quasidiatomic Approach to the Collisions of Low KEV Molecular Ions with Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yenen, Orhan

    The polarization of L(,(alpha)) radiation is measured in coincidence with a charged particle scattered at specific laboratory angles, resulting from the collision induced dissociation of low keV H(,2)('+) and H(,3)('+) incident on target gases. Coincidence measurements of the polarization pattern are made for a variety of scattering angles for 3.22 keV H(,2)('+) incident on He and Ne, and for 4.83 keV H(,3)('+) incident on He. The molecular states excited during the collision are determined from the alignment of the observed polarization patterns. A quasidiatomic collision model, which is an extension of the electron promotion model of ion-atom collisions at low keV energies to molecule-atom collisional systems, is developed to interpret the experimental results. The rules of building simple quasidiatomic correlation diagrams, to qualitatively estimate the dynamical behavior of molecular collisions, are presented. The general idea of treating the molecule as an atom under certain circumstances, is applied to a molecular two-state calculation of the differential charge-transfer probabilities in H('+)-H(,2) collisions. This calculation reproduces the essential features of previous experiments.

  15. Field aligned currents and the auroral spectrum below 1 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoldy, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements during auroral events were conducted with the aid of detectors flown aboard three Nike-Tomahawk rocket flights. The detectors used to measure the auroral spectrum below 1 keV consisted of electrostatic analyzers positioned in the rocket to measure particles moving up and down the magnetic field lines. The analyzers measured electrons and protons simultaneously during a given sweep.

  16. The Solar Flare 4: 10 keV X-ray Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.

    2004-01-01

    The 4-10 keV solar flare spectrum includes highly excited lines of stripped Ca, Fe, and Ni ions as well as a continuum steeply falling with energy. Groups of lines at approximately 7 keV and approximately 8 keV, observed during flares by the broad-band RHESSI spectrometer and called here the Fe-line and Fe/Ni-line features, are formed mostly of Fe lines but with Ni lines contributing to the approximately 8 keV feature. Possible temperature indicators of these line features are discussed - the peak or centroid energies of the Fe-line feature, the line ratio of the Fe-line to the Fe/Ni-line features, and the equivalent width of the Fe-line feature. The equivalent width is by far the most sensitive to temperature. However, results will be confused if, as is commonly believed, the abundance of Fe varies from flare to flare, even during the course of a single flare. With temperature determined from the thermal continuum, the Fe-line feature becomes a diagnostic of the Fe abundance in flare plasmas. These results are of interest for other hot plasmas in coronal ionization equilibrium such as stellar flare plasmas, hot gas in galaxies, and older supernova remnants.

  17. Gamma-ray burst spectra and time histories from 2 to 400keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenimore, E. E.

    1999-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray burst detector on Ginga consisted of a proportional counter to observe the x-rays and a scintillation counter to observe the gamma-rays. It was ideally suited to study the x-rays associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Ginga detected ~120 GRBs and 22 of them had sufficient statistics to determine spectra from 2 to 400keV. Although the Ginga and BATSE trigger criteria were very similar, the distribution of spectral parameters was different. Ginga observed bend energies in the spectra down to 2keV and had a larger fraction of bursts with low energy power law indexes greater than zero. The average ratio of energy in the x-ray band (2 to 10keV) compared to the gamma-ray band (50 to 300keV) was 24%. Some events had more energy in the x-ray band than in the gamma-ray band. One Ginga event had a period of time preceding the gamma rays that was effectively pure x-ray emission. This x-ray ``preactivity'' might be due to the penchant for the GRB time structure to be broader at lower energy rather than a different physical process. The x-rays tend to rise and fall slower than the gamma rays but they both tend to peak at about the same time. This argues against models involving the injection of relativistic electrons that cool by synchrotron radiation.

  18. Heliospheric Neutral Atom Spectra Between 0.01 and 6 keV fom IBEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Allegrini, F.; Bzowski, M.; Funsten, H. O.; Ghielmetti, A. G.; Gloeckler, G.; Heirtzler, D.; Janzen, P.; Kubiak, M.; Kucharek, H.; McComas, D. J.; Moebius, E.; Moore, T. E.; Petrinec, S. M.; Quinn, M.; Reisenfeld, D.; Saul, L. A.; Scheer, J. A.; Schwardron, N.; Trattner, K. J.; Vanderspek, R.; Wurz, P.

    2012-01-01

    Since 2008 December, the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) has been making detailed observations of neutrals from the boundaries of the heliosphere using two neutral atom cameras with overlapping energy ranges. The unexpected, yet defining feature discovered by IBEX is a Ribbon that extends over the energy range from about 0.2 to 6 keV. This Ribbon is superposed on a more uniform, globally distributed heliospheric neutral population. With some important exceptions, the focus of early IBEX studies has been on neutral atoms with energies greater than approx. 0.5 keV. With nearly three years of science observations, enough low-energy neutral atom measurements have been accumulated to extend IBEX observations to energies less than approx. 0.5 keV. Using the energy overlap of the sensors to identify and remove backgrounds, energy spectra over the entire IBEX energy range are produced. However, contributions by interstellar neutrals to the energy spectrum below 0.2 keV may not be completely removed. Compared with spectra at higher energies, neutral atom spectra at lower energies do not vary much from location to location in the sky, including in the direction of the IBEX Ribbon. Neutral fluxes are used to show that low energy ions contribute approximately the same thermal pressure as higher energy ions in the heliosheath. However, contributions to the dynamic pressure are very high unless there is, for example, turbulence in the heliosheath with fluctuations of the order of 50-100 km/s.

  19. A study on the microstructural parameters of 550 keV electron irradiated Lexan polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Hareesh, K.; Pramod, R.; Petwal, V. C.; Dwivedi, Jishnu; Sangappa; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2012-06-05

    Lexan polymer films irradiated with 550 keV Electron Beam (EB) were characterized using Wide Angle Xray Scattering (WAXS) data to study the microstructural parameters. The crystal imperfection parameters like crystal size , lattice strain (g in %) and enthalpy ({alpha}) have been determined by Line Profile Analysis (LPA) using Fourier method of Warren.

  20. Ionization of atomic hydrogen by 30 1000 keV antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, H.; Mikkelsen, U.; Paludan, K.; Kirsebom, K.; Moller, S.P.; Uggerhoj, E.; Slevin, J.; Charlton, M.; Morenzoni, E.

    1995-06-05

    Ionization in collisions between antiprotons and atomic hydrogen is perhaps the least complicated and most fundamental process that can be treated by atomic-collision theory. We present measurements of the ionization cross section for 30--1000 keV antiprotons colliding with atomic hydrogen.

  1. A STRONG EXCESS IN THE 20-100 keV EMISSION OF NGC 1365

    SciTech Connect

    Risaliti, G.; Elvis, M.; Fabbiano, G.; Wang, J.; Braito, V.; Laparola, V.; Bianchi, S.; Matt, G.; Maiolino, R.; Reeves, J.; Salvati, M.

    2009-11-01

    We present a new Suzaku observation of the obscured active galactic nucleus in NGC 1365, revealing an unexpected excess of X-rays above 20 keV of at least a factor approx2 with respect to the extrapolation of the best-fitting 3-10 keV model. Additional Swift-BAT and Integral-IBIS observations show that the 20-100 keV is concentrated within approx1.5 arcmin from the center of the galaxy, and is not significantly variable on timescales from days to years. A comparison of this component with the 3-10 keV emission, which is characterized by a rapidly variable absorption, suggests a complex structure of the circumnuclear medium, consisting of at least two distinct components with rather different physical properties, one of which covers >80% of the source with a column density N {sub H} approx 3-4x10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}. An alternative explanation is the presence of a double active nucleus in the center of NGC 1365.

  2. Microwave background constraints on mixing of photons with hidden photons

    SciTech Connect

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Redondo, Javier; Sigl, Guenter E-mail: javier.redondo@desy.de

    2009-03-15

    Various extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of hidden photons kinetically mixing with the ordinary photon. This mixing leads to oscillations between photons and hidden photons, analogous to the observed oscillations between different neutrino flavors. In this context, we derive new bounds on the photon-hidden photon mixing parameters using the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer instrument on board of the Cosmic Background Explorer. Requiring the distortions of the CMB induced by the photon-hidden photon mixing to be smaller than experimental upper limits, this leads to a bound on the mixing angle {chi}{sub 0} {approx}< 10{sup -7}-10{sup -5} for hidden photon masses between 10{sup -14} eV and 10{sup -7} eV. This low-mass and low-mixing region of the hidden photon parameter space was previously unconstrained.

  3. Variation of photon interaction parameters with energy for some Cu-Pb alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Tejbir Kaur, Sarpreet; Kaur, Parminder; Kaur, Harvinder; Singh, Parjit S.

    2015-08-28

    Various photon interaction parameters (mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron numbers) have been computed for different compositions of Cu-Pb alloys in the wide energy regime of 1 keV to 100 GeV. The mass attenuation coefficients have been computed using mixture rule with the help of WinXCom (mass attenuation coefficient database for elements). The variation of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron density has been analysed and discussed in terms of dominance of different photon interaction processes viz. Compton scattering, photoelectric effect and pair production.

  4. Measurement of energy and direction distribution of neutron and photon fluences in workplace fields.

    PubMed

    Luszik-Bhadra, M; Reginatto, M; Lacoste, V

    2004-01-01

    Within the EU Project EVIDOS, a spectrometer with 24 silicon detectors mounted on the surface of a polyethylene sphere is used for the determination of the energy and direction distribution of neutrons and photons. It has been characterized with respect to neutron radiation with energies from thermal up to 15 MeV and to photon radiation with energies from 65 keV to 6 MeV. The first measurements described here were performed in the simulated workplace field, CANEL, at Cadarache, with the purpose of checking the instrument and the unfolding procedures.

  5. Variation of photon interaction parameters with energy for some Cu-Pb alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Tejbir; Kaur, Sarpreet; Kaur, Parminder; Kaur, Harvinder; Singh, Parjit S.

    2015-08-01

    Various photon interaction parameters (mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron numbers) have been computed for different compositions of Cu-Pb alloys in the wide energy regime of 1 keV to 100 GeV. The mass attenuation coefficients have been computed using mixture rule with the help of WinXCom (mass attenuation coefficient database for elements). The variation of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron density has been analysed and discussed in terms of dominance of different photon interaction processes viz. Compton scattering, photoelectric effect and pair production.

  6. Development of grating-based x-ray Talbot interferometry at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Marathe, Shashidhara; Xiao Xianghui; Wojcik, Michael J.; Divan, Ralu; Butler, Leslie G.; Ham, Kyungmin; Fezzaa, Kamel; Erdmann, Mark; Wen, Han H.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Macrander, Albert T.; De Carlo, Francesco; Mancini, Derrick C.; Assoufid, Lahsen

    2012-07-31

    We report on the ongoing effort to develop hard x-ray Talbot interferometry at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National Laboratory, USA. We describe the design of the interferometer and preliminary results obtained at 25 keV using a feather and a phantom sample lithographically fabricated of gold. We mention the future developmental goals and applications of this technique as a metrology tool for x-ray optics and beam wavefront characterization.

  7. Measurement of spine and total body mineral by dual-photon absorptiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazess, R. B.; Young, D.

    1983-01-01

    The use of Gd-153 dual-photon absorptiometry at 43 and 100 keV to measure individual-bone and total-body bone minerals is discussed in a survey of recent studies on humans, phantoms, and monkeys. Precision errors of as low as 1 percent have been achieved in vivo, suggesting the use of sequential measurements in studies of immobilization and space-flight effects.

  8. Photonic crystal beam splitters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chii-Chang; Chien, Hung-Da; Luan, Pi-Gang

    2004-11-20

    This work studies two-dimensional photonic crystal beam splitters with two input ports and two output ports. The beam splitter structure consists of two orthogonally crossed line defects and one point defect in square-lattice photonic crystals. The point defect is positioned at the intersection of the line defects to divide the input power into output ports. If the position and the size of the point defect are varied, the power of two output ports can be identical. The beam splitters can be used in photonic crystal Mach-Zehnder interferometers or switches. The simulation results show that a large bandwidth of the extinction ratio larger than 20 dB can be obtained while two beams are interfered in the beam splitters. This enables photonic crystal beam splitters to be used in fiber optic communication systems.

  9. Diamond nonlinear photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, B. J. M.; Bulu, I.; Venkataraman, V.; Deotare, P.; Lončar, M.

    2014-05-01

    Despite progress towards integrated diamond photonics, studies of optical nonlinearities in diamond have been limited to Raman scattering in bulk samples. Diamond nonlinear photonics, however, could enable efficient, in situ frequency conversion of single photons emitted by diamond's colour centres, as well as stable and high-power frequency microcombs operating at new wavelengths. Both of these applications depend crucially on efficient four-wave mixing processes enabled by diamond's third-order nonlinearity. Here, we have realized a diamond nonlinear photonics platform by demonstrating optical parametric oscillation via four-wave mixing using single-crystal ultrahigh-quality-factor (1 × 106) diamond ring resonators operating at telecom wavelengths. Threshold powers as low as 20 mW are measured, and up to 20 new wavelengths are generated from a single-frequency pump laser. We also report the first measurement of the nonlinear refractive index due to the third-order nonlinearity in diamond at telecom wavelengths.

  10. Biophotonics: Circadian photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, Mark S.

    2011-05-01

    A growing body of medical evidence suggests that disrupting the body's biological clock can have adverse effects on health. Researchers are now creating the photonic tools to monitor, predict and influence the circadian rhythm.

  11. Photon counting: Avalanche inspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milburn, Gerard

    2008-07-01

    The ability of a customized avalanche-photodiode detector to distinguish the exact number of photons that it receives will simplify the tools required to perform reliable experiments in quantum optics.

  12. Smart packaging for photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.; Carson, R.F.; Sullivan, C.T.; McClellan, G.; Palmer, D.W.

    1997-09-01

    Unlike silicon microelectronics, photonics packaging has proven to be low yield and expensive. One approach to make photonics packaging practical for low cost applications is the use of {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes} packages. {open_quotes}Smart{close_quotes} in this context means the ability of the package to actuate a mechanical change based on either a measurement taken by the package itself or by an input signal based on an external measurement. One avenue of smart photonics packaging, the use of polysilicon micromechanical devices integrated with photonic waveguides, was investigated in this research (LDRD 3505.340). The integration of optical components with polysilicon surface micromechanical actuation mechanisms shows significant promise for signal switching, fiber alignment, and optical sensing applications. The optical and stress properties of the oxides and nitrides considered for optical waveguides and how they are integrated with micromechanical devices were investigated.

  13. Photonic band gap materials

    SciTech Connect

    Soukoulis, C.M. |

    1993-12-31

    An overview of the theoretical and experimental efforts in obtaining a photonic band gap, a frequency band in three-dimensional dielectric structures in which electromagnetic waves are forbidden, is presented.

  14. Neutron Total Cross Sections of {sup 235}U From Transmission Measurements in the Energy Range 2 keV to 300 keV and Statistical Model Analysis of the Data

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.; Harvey, J.A.; Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Wright, R.Q.

    2000-05-01

    The average {sup 235}U neutron total cross sections were obtained in the energy range 2 keV to 330 keV from high-resolution transmission measurements of a 0.033 atom/b sample.1 The experimental data were corrected for the contribution of isotope impurities and for resonance self-shielding effects in the sample. The results are in very good agreement with the experimental data of Poenitz et al.4 in the energy range 40 keV to 330 keV and are the only available accurate experimental data in the energy range 2 keV to 40 keV. ENDF/B-VI evaluated data are 1.7% larger. The SAMMY/FITACS code 2 was used for a statistical model analysis of the total cross section, selected fission cross sections and data in the energy range 2 keV to 200 keV. SAMMY/FITACS is an extended version of SAMMY which allows consistent analysis of the experimental data in the resolved and unresolved resonance region. The Reich-Moore resonance parameters were obtained 3 from a SAMMY Bayesian fits of high resolution experimental neutron transmission and partial cross section data below 2.25 keV, and the corresponding average parameters and covariance data were used in the present work as input for the statistical model analysis of the high energy range of the experimental data. The result of the analysis shows that the average resonance parameters obtained from the analysis of the unresolved resonance region are consistent with those obtained in the resolved energy region. Another important result is that ENDF/B-VI capture cross section could be too small by more than 10% in the energy range 10 keV to 200 keV.

  15. NEUTRON TOTAL CROSS SECTIONS OF 235U FROM TRANSMISSION MEASUREMENTS IN THE ENERGY RANGE 2 keV to 300 keV AND STATISTICAL MODEL ANALYSIS OF THE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.

    2000-05-22

    The average {sup 235}U neutron total cross sections were obtained in the energy range 2 keV to 330 keV from high-resolution transmission measurements of a 0.033 atom/b sample. The experimental data were corrected for the contribution of isotope impurities and for resonance self-shielding effects in the sample. The results are in very good agreement with the experimental data of Poenitz et al. in the energy range 40 keV to 330 keV and are the only available accurate experimental data in the energy range 2 keV to 40 keV. ENDF/B-VI evaluated data are 1.7% larger. The SAMMY/FITACS code was used for a statistical model analysis of the total cross section, selected fission cross sections and {alpha} data in the energy range 2 keV to 200 keV. SAMMY/FITACS is an extended version of SAMMY which allows consistent analysis of the experimental data in the resolved and unresolved resonance region. The Reich-Moore resonance parameters were obtained from a SAMMY Bayesian fits of high resolution experimental neutron transmission and partial cross section data below 2.25 keV, and the corresponding average parameters and covariance data were used in the present work as input for the statistical model analysis of the high energy range of the experimental data. The result of the analysis shows that the average resonance parameters obtained from the analysis of the unresolved resonance region are consistent with those obtained in the resolved energy region. Another important result is that ENDF/B-VI capture cross section could be too small by more than 10% in the energy range 10 keV to 200 keV.

  16. Dispersion in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzens, Jeremy

    2005-11-01

    Investigations on the dispersive properties of photonic crystals, modified scattering in ring-resonators, monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers and advanced data processing techniques for the finite-difference time-domain method are presented. Photonic crystals are periodic mesoscopic arrays of scatterers that modify the propagation properties of electromagnetic waves in a similar way as "natural" crystals modify the properties of electrons in solid-state physics. In this thesis photonic crystals are implemented as planar photonic crystals, i.e., optically thin semiconductor films with periodic arrays of holes etched into them, with a hole-to-hole spacing of the order of the wavelength of light in the dielectric media. Photonic crystals can feature forbidden frequency ranges (the band-gaps) in which light cannot propagate. Even though most work on photonic crystals has focused on these band-gaps for application such as confinement and guiding of light, this thesis focuses on the allowed frequency regions (the photonic bands) and investigates how the propagation of light is modified by the crystal lattice. In particular the guiding of light in bulk photonic crystals in the absence of lattice defects (the self-collimation effect) and the angular steering of light in photonic crystals (the superprism effect) are investigated. The latter is used to design a planar lightwave circuit for frequency domain demultiplexion. Difficulties such as efficient insertion of light into the crystal are resolved and previously predicted limitations on the resolution are circumvented. The demultiplexer is also fabricated and characterized. Monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers by means of resonantly enhanced grating couplers is investigated. The grating coupler is designed to bend light through a ninety-degree angle and is characterized with the finite-difference time-domain method. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers are

  17. Photonics Explorer: revolutionizing photonics in the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Amrita; Debaes, Nathalie; Cords, Nina; Fischer, Robert; Vlekken, Johan; Euler, Manfred; Thienpont, Hugo

    2012-10-01

    The `Photonics Explorer' is a unique intra-curricular optics kit designed to engage, excite and educate secondary school students about the fascination of working with light - hands-on, in their own classrooms. Developed with a pan European collaboration of experts, the kit equips teachers with class sets of experimental material provided within a supporting didactic framework, distributed in conjunction with teacher training courses. The material has been specifically designed to integrate into European science curricula. Each kit contains robust and versatile components sufficient for a class of 25-30 students to work in groups of 2-3. The didactic content is based on guided inquiry-based learning (IBL) techniques with a strong emphasis on hands-on experiments, team work and relating abstract concepts to real world applications. The content has been developed in conjunction with over 30 teachers and experts in pedagogy to ensure high quality and ease of integration. It is currently available in 7 European languages. The Photonics Explorer allows students not only to hone their essential scientific skills but also to really work as scientists and engineers in the classroom. Thus, it aims to encourage more young people to pursue scientific careers and avert the imminent lack of scientific workforce in Europe. 50 Photonics Explorer kits have been successfully tested in 7 European countries with over 1500 secondary school students. The positive impact of the kit in the classroom has been qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated. A non-profit organisation, EYESTvzw [Excite Youth for Engineering Science and Technology], is responsible for the large scale distribution of the Photonics Explorer.

  18. Spectral Analysis on Solar Flares with an Emission > 300 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, R.; Connaughton, V.

    2013-12-01

    The continuum gamma-ray emission from solar flares is caused when a population of electrons is accelerated to relativistic speeds and interacts with the solar plasma. However, it has been theorized that the gamma-ray emission from some brighter flares comes from two populations of electrons. Using the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM), we studied the gamma-ray emission spectra of solar flares and paid special attention to the solar flares that showed emission above 300 keV. We found that the emission above 300 keV was better fit with a broken power-law than a single power-law, evidence that the gamma-ray emission from certain solar flares involved two populations of electrons. Specifically, our best model involved a broken power law that had a steeper slope before the break in energy than after. We studied the spectral parameters as a function of time during the period of the high-energy emission. We also found that solar flares with emission above 300 keV form a small subset (~4%) of flares that trigger GBM above 20 keV. One of the flares with an emission greater than 300 keV was fitted with a Broken Power Law model. Only data from the BGO detector was used in making the plots. Various parameters of the fit have been plotted vs. time with the top two graphs representing the light curves of the flare from different detectors (BGO-0 and NaI-4). A spectral fit for bn100612038 for the time interval of [45s-50s] using only the BGO (0) detector file. Data from this fit was used in creating the other plots.

  19. Happy centenary, photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeilinger, Anton; Weihs, Gregor; Jennewein, Thomas; Aspelmeyer, Markus

    2005-01-01

    One hundred years ago Albert Einstein introduced the concept of the photon. Although in the early years after 1905 the evidence for the quantum nature of light was not compelling, modern experiments - especially those using photon pairs - have beautifully confirmed its corpuscular character. Research on the quantum properties of light (quantum optics) triggered the evolution of the whole field of quantum information processing, which now promises new technology, such as quantum cryptography and even quantum computers.

  20. QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY: Single Photons.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, S

    2000-12-22

    Quantum cryptography offers the potential of totally secure transfer of information, but as Benjamin discusses in this Perspective, its practical implementation hinges on being able to generate single photons (rather than two or more) at a time. Michler et al. show how this condition can be met in a quantum dot microdisk structure. Single molecules were also recently shown to allow controlled single-photon emission.

  1. Ultrastable Multigigahertz Photonic Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Ronald T., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Novel photonic oscillator developed to serve as ultrastable source of microwave and millimeter-wave signals. In system, oscillations generated photonically, then converted to electronic form. Includes self-mode-locked semiconductor laser producing stream of pulses, detected and fed back to laser as input. System also includes fiber-optic-delay-line discriminator, which detects fluctuations of self-mode-locking frequency and generates error signal used in negative-feedback loop to stabilize pulse-repetition frequency.

  2. Photon structure function

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1980-11-01

    Theoretical understanding of the photon structure function is reviewed. As an illustration of the pointlike component, the parton model is briefly discussed. However, the systematic study of the photon structure function is presented through the framework of the operator product expansion. Perturbative QCD is used as the theoretical basis for the calculation of leading contributions to the operator product expansion. The influence of higher order QCD effects on these results is discussed. Recent results for the polarized structure functions are discussed.

  3. Photonic band structure

    SciTech Connect

    Yablonovitch, E.

    1993-05-01

    We learned how to create 3-dimensionally periodic dielectric structures which are to photon waves, as semiconductor crystals are to electron waves. That is, these photonic crystals have a photonic bandgap, a band of frequencies in which electromagnetic waves are forbidden, irrespective of propagation direction in space. Photonic bandgaps provide for spontaneous emission inhibition and allow for a new class of electromagnetic micro-cavities. If the perfect 3-dimensional periodicity is broken by a local defect, then local electromagnetic modes can occur within the forbidden bandgap. The addition of extra dielectric material locally, inside the photonic crystal, produces {open_quotes}donor{close_quotes} modes. Conversely, the local removal of dielectric material from the photonic crystal produces {open_quotes}acceptor{close_quotes} modes. Therefore, it will now be possible to make high-Q electromagnetic cavities of volume {approx_lt}1 cubic wavelength, for short wavelengths at which metallic cavities are useless. These new dielectric micro-resonators can cover the range all the way from millimeter waves, down to ultraviolet wavelengths.

  4. Photonic quantum technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Jeremy

    2013-03-01

    Of the approaches to quantum computing, photons are appealing for their low-noise properties and ease of manipulation, and relevance to other quantum technologies, including communication, metrology and measurement. We report an integrated waveguide approach to photonic quantum circuits for high performance, miniaturization and scalability [6-10]. We address the challenges of scaling up quantum circuits using new insights into how controlled operations can be efficiently realised, demonstrating Shor's algorithm with consecutive CNOT gates and the iterative phase estimation algorithm. We have shown how quantum circuits can be reconfigured, using thermo-optic phase shifters to realise a highly reconfigurable quantum circuit, and electro-optic phase shifters in lithium niobate to rapidly manipulate the path and polarisation of telecomm wavelength single photons. We have addressed miniaturisation using multimode interference architectures to directly implement NxN Hadamard operations, and by using high refractive index contrast materials such as SiOxNy, in which we have implemented quantum walks of correlated photons, and Si, in which we have demonstrated generation of orbital angular momentum states of light. We have incorporated microfluidic channels for the delivery of samples to measure the concentration of a blood protein with entangled states of light. We have begun to address the integration of superconducting single photon detectors and diamond and non-linear single photon sources. Finally, we give an overview of recent work on fundamental aspects of quantum measurement, including a quantum version of Wheeler's delayed choice experiment.

  5. Initial Design Calculations for a Detection System that will Observe Resonant Excitation of the 680 keV state in 238U

    SciTech Connect

    Pruet, J; Hagmann, C

    2007-01-26

    We present calculations and design considerations for a detection system that could be used to observe nuclear resonance fluorescence in {sup 238}U. This is intended as part of an experiment in which a nearly monochromatic beam of light incident on a thin foil of natural uranium resonantly populates the state at 680 keV in {sup 238}U. The beam of light is generated via Compton upscattering of laser light incident on a beam of relativistic electrons. This light source has excellent energy and angular resolution. In the current design study we suppose photons emitted following de-excitation of excited nuclei to be observed by a segmented array of BGO crystals. Monte Carlo calculations are used to inform estimates for the design and performance of this detector system. We find that each detector in this array should be shielded by about 2 cm of lead. The signal to background ratio for each of the BGO crystals is larger than ten. The probability that a single detector observes a resonant photon during a single pulse of the light source is near unity.

  6. Angular distribution of bremsstrahlung produced by electrons with initial energies in the range from 10 to 20 keV incident on thick Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, Daniel; Cavness, Brandon; Williams, Scott

    2012-03-01

    Experimental results are presented comparing the intensities of the thick-target bremsstrahlung produced by electrons with initial energies ranging from 10 to 20 keV incident on Ag, measured at forward angles in the range of 0 to 55 degrees. When the data are corrected for attenuation due to photon absorption within the target, the results indicate that the detected radiation is distributed anisotropically only at photon energies k that are approximately equal to the initial energy of the incident electrons E0. The results of our experiments suggest that, as k/E0->0, the detected radiation essentially becomes isotropic due primarily to the scattering of electrons within the target. Comparison to the theory of Kissel et al. [At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 28, 381 (1983)] suggests that the angular distribution of bremsstrahlung emitted by electrons incident on thick targets is similar to the angular distribution of bremsstrahlung emitted by electrons incident on free-atom targets only when k/E0 1. The experimental data also are in approximate agreement with the angular distribution predictions of the Monte Carlo program PENELOPE.

  7. The X-ray behaviour of the high-energy peaked BL Lacertae source PKS 2155-304 in the 0.3-10 keV band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapanadze, B.; Romano, P.; Vercellone, S.; Kapanadze, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of our monitoring of the high-energy peaked BL Lac object PKS 2155-304 by the Swift/X-Ray Telescope (XRT) during 2005-2012. Our timing study shows that the source was highly variable both on longer (weeks-to-months) and intra-day time-scales, up to a factor of 7 in flux, and 30 per cent in fractional variability amplitudes, with no periodic variations. The X-ray spectra are mainly curved with broad ranges of photon index, curvature parameter, and hardness ratio which exhibit significant variability with the flux on different time-scales. Our study of multi-wavelength cross-correlations has revealed that the one-zone SSC scenario seems to be valid for the most optical-to-gamma-ray flares observed during 2006-2012. An `orphan' X-ray flare with no counterpart in other spectral bands suggests the existence of different electron populations. Based on the absence of a correlation between photon index and curvature parameter (expected from the energy-dependent acceleration probability scenario), the observed distribution of curvature parameter from the XRT spectra peaking at b = 0.37, and the observed anti-correlation between the curvature parameter and the 0.3-10 keV flux (i.e. lower curvatures in flaring states), we conclude that the most likely mechanism responsible for producing X-ray emission during the flares is the stochastic acceleration of the electrons.

  8. The cryogenic cooling program at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.S.; Mills, D.M.; Assoufid, L.

    1994-06-01

    This paper describes the experimental and analytical program in cryogenic cooling of high-heat-load optics at the Advanced-Photon Source. A prototype liquid nitrogen pumping system has been procured. This pump provides a variable flow rate of 1 to 10 gpm of pressurized liquid nitrogen and is sized to handle up to 5 kW of optic heat load. Also, a high-vacuum, double-crystal monochromator testing tank has been fabricated. This system will be used to test cryogenic crystals at existing synchrotron sources. A finite element analysis has been performed for a cryogenically cooled Si crystal in the inclined geometry for Undulator A at 100 mA. The inclination angle was 80{degrees}. It was set to diffract from the (111) planes at the first harmonic energy of 4.2 keV. The maximum slope error in the diffraction plane was calculated to be about 1 {mu}rad with a peak temperature of 94 K. An analysis has also been performed for a cryogenically-cooled ``thin`` crystal oriented in the Bragg geometry which accepts 87% of the lst harmonic photons at 3.866 keV. The total absorbed power was 131 W at 100 mA current and the peak temperature was 124 K.

  9. Improvement of Photon Buildup Factors for Radiological Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Schirmers, Fritz Gordon

    2006-07-01

    Slant-path buildup factors for photons between 1 keV and 10 MeV for nine radiation shielding materials (air, aluminum, concrete, iron, lead, leaded glass, polyethylene, stainless steel, and water) are calculated with the most recent cross-section data available using Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates methods. Discrete ordinates calculations use a 244-group energy structure that is based on previous research at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), but extended with the results of this thesis, and its focused studies on low-energy photon transport and the effects of group widths in multigroup calculations. Buildup factor calculations in discrete ordinates benefit from coupled photon/electron cross sections to account for secondary photon effects. Also, ambient dose equivalent (herein referred to as dose) buildup factors were analyzed at lower energies where corresponding response functions do not exist in literature. The results of these studies are directly applicable to radiation safety at LANL, where the dose modeling tool Pandemonium is used to estimate worker dose in plutonium handling facilities. Buildup factors determined in this thesis will be used to enhance the code's modeling capabilities, but should be of interest to the radiation shielding community.

  10. Space-radiation-induced Photon Luminescence of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas; Lee, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    We report on the results of a study of the photon luminescence of the Moon induced by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and space radiation from the Sun, using the Monte Carlo program FLUKA. The model of the lunar surface is taken to be the chemical composition of soils found at various landing sites during the Apollo and Luna programs, averaged over all such sites to define a generic regolith for the present analysis. This then becomes the target that is bombarded by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) above 1 keV in FLUKA to determine the photon fluence albedo produced by the Moon's surface when there is no sunlight and Earthshine. This is to be distinguished from the gamma-ray spectrum produced by the radioactive decay of radiogenic constituents lying in the surface and interior of the Moon. From the photon fluence we derive the spectrum which can be utilized to examine existing lunar spectral data and to design orbiting instrumentation for measuring various components of the space-radiation-induced photon luminescence present on the Moon.

  11. 180/sup 0/-correlated equal-energy photons from 5. 9-MeV/nucleon U + Th collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Danzmann, K.; Meyerhof, W.E.; Montenegro, E.C.; Xu, X.; Dillard, E.; Huelskotter, H.P.; Stephens, F.S.; Diamond, R.M.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Macchiavelli, A.O.

    1987-10-26

    We have found a narrow line (intrinsic width less than or equal to2.5 keV) at 1062 +- 1 keV in the summed-energy 180/sup 0/-c.m.-correlated two-photon spectrum from 5.95-MeV/nucleon U+Th collisions. Including possible systematic uncertainties, the production cross section is found to be 50 +- 25 ..mu..b, averaged over the 1-mg/cm/sup 2/ Th target thickness. This line may belong to the decay of a neutral system which also produces correlated electron-positron pairs found by others in the same reaction.

  12. Multi-photon absorption limits to heralded single photon sources

    PubMed Central

    Husko, Chad A.; Clark, Alex S.; Collins, Matthew J.; De Rossi, Alfredo; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; Rey, Isabella H.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Xiong, Chunle; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Single photons are of paramount importance to future quantum technologies, including quantum communication and computation. Nonlinear photonic devices using parametric processes offer a straightforward route to generating photons, however additional nonlinear processes may come into play and interfere with these sources. Here we analyse spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) sources in the presence of multi-photon processes. We conduct experiments in silicon and gallium indium phosphide photonic crystal waveguides which display inherently different nonlinear absorption processes, namely two-photon (TPA) and three-photon absorption (ThPA), respectively. We develop a novel model capturing these diverse effects which is in excellent quantitative agreement with measurements of brightness, coincidence-to-accidental ratio (CAR) and second-order correlation function g(2)(0), showing that TPA imposes an intrinsic limit on heralded single photon sources. We build on these observations to devise a new metric, the quantum utility (QMU), enabling further optimisation of single photon sources. PMID:24186400

  13. Multi-photon absorption limits to heralded single photon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husko, Chad A.; Clark, Alex S.; Collins, Matthew J.; de Rossi, Alfredo; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; Rey, Isabella H.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Xiong, Chunle; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2013-11-01

    Single photons are of paramount importance to future quantum technologies, including quantum communication and computation. Nonlinear photonic devices using parametric processes offer a straightforward route to generating photons, however additional nonlinear processes may come into play and interfere with these sources. Here we analyse spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) sources in the presence of multi-photon processes. We conduct experiments in silicon and gallium indium phosphide photonic crystal waveguides which display inherently different nonlinear absorption processes, namely two-photon (TPA) and three-photon absorption (ThPA), respectively. We develop a novel model capturing these diverse effects which is in excellent quantitative agreement with measurements of brightness, coincidence-to-accidental ratio (CAR) and second-order correlation function g(2)(0), showing that TPA imposes an intrinsic limit on heralded single photon sources. We build on these observations to devise a new metric, the quantum utility (QMU), enabling further optimisation of single photon sources.

  14. Two-photon interference with non-identical photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianbin; Zhou, Yu; Zheng, Huaibin; Chen, Hui; Li, Fu-li; Xu, Zhuo

    2015-11-01

    Two-photon interference with non-identical photons is studied based on the superposition principle in Feynman's path integral theory. The second-order temporal interference pattern is observed by superposing laser and pseudothermal light beams with different spectra. The reason why there is two-photon interference for photons of different spectra is that non-identical photons can be indistinguishable for the detection system when Heisenberg's uncertainty principle is taken into account. These studies are helpful to understand the second-order interference of light in the language of photons.

  15. CMOS-compatible photonic devices for single-photon generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Chunle; Bell, Bryn; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2016-09-01

    Sources of single photons are one of the key building blocks for quantum photonic technologies such as quantum secure communication and powerful quantum computing. To bring the proof-of-principle demonstration of these technologies from the laboratory to the real world, complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible photonic chips are highly desirable for photon generation, manipulation, processing and even detection because of their compactness, scalability, robustness, and the potential for integration with electronics. In this paper, we review the development of photonic devices made from materials (e.g., silicon) and processes that are compatible with CMOS fabrication facilities for the generation of single photons.

  16. Simulation study of optimizing the 3-5 keV x-ray emission from pure Ar K-shell vs. Ag L-shell targets on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, G. E.; Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B.; Patel, M. V.; Scott, H. A.; Marinak, M.; Fisher, J. H.; Davis, J. F.

    2014-10-01

    High-flux x-ray sources are desirable for testing the radiation hardness of materials used in various civilian, space and military applications. For this study, there is an interest to design a source with primarily mid-energy (~ 3 keV) but limited soft (< 1 keV) x-ray contributions; we focus on optimizing the 3--5 keV non-LTE emission from targets consisting of pure Ar (K-shell) or Ag (L-shell) at sub-critical densities (~nc / 10) to ensure supersonic, volumetric laser heating with minimal losses to kinetic energy and thermal x rays. However, K and L-shell sources are expected to optimize at different temperatures and densities and it is a priori unclear under what target and laser conditions this will occur. Using HYDRA, a multi-dimensional, arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian, radiation-hydrodynamics code, we performed a simulation study by varying initial target density and laser parameters for each material as it would perform on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). We employ a model, benchmarked against Kr data collected on the NIF, that uses flux-limited Lee-More thermal conductivity and implicit Monte-Carlo photonics with non-LTE, detailed configuration accounting opacities from CRETIN. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. EDITORIAL: Photonic Crystal Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Pallab K.

    2007-05-01

    The engineering of electromagnetic modes at optical frequencies in artificial dielectric structures with periodic and random variation of the refractive index, enabling control of the radiative properties of the materials and photon localization, was first proposed independently by Yablonovitch and John in 1987. It is possible to control the flow of light in the periodic dielectric structures, known as photonic crystals (PC). As light waves scatter within the photonic crystal, destructive interference cancels out light of certain wavelengths, thereby forming a photonic bandgap, similar to the energy bandgap for electron waves in a semiconductor. Photons whose energies lie within the gap cannot propagate through the periodic structure. This property can be used to make a low-loss cavity. If a point defect, such as one or more missing periods, is introduced into the periodic structure a region is obtained within which the otherwise forbidden wavelengths can be locally trapped. This property can be used to realize photonic microcavities. Similarly, a line of defects can serve as a waveguide. While the realization of three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals received considerable attention initially, planar two-dimensional (2D) structures are currently favoured because of their relative ease of fabrication. 2D photonic crystal structures provide most of the functionality of 3D structures. These attributes have generated worldwide research and development of sub-μm and μm size active and passive photonic devices such as single-mode and non- classical light sources, guided wave devices, resonant cavity detection, and components for optical communication. More recently, photonic crystal guided wave devices are being investigated for application in microfludic and biochemical sensing. Photonic crystal devices have been realized with bulk, quantum well and quantum dot active regions. The Cluster of articles in this issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics provides a

  18. Photonic topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Khanikaev, Alexander B; Mousavi, S Hossein; Tse, Wang-Kong; Kargarian, Mehdi; MacDonald, Allan H; Shvets, Gennady

    2013-03-01

    Recent progress in understanding the topological properties of condensed matter has led to the discovery of time-reversal-invariant topological insulators. A remarkable and useful property of these materials is that they support unidirectional spin-polarized propagation at their surfaces. Unfortunately topological insulators are rare among solid-state materials. Using suitably designed electromagnetic media (metamaterials) we theoretically demonstrate a photonic analogue of a topological insulator. We show that metacrystals-superlattices of metamaterials with judiciously designed properties-provide a platform for designing topologically non-trivial photonic states, similar to those that have been identified for condensed-matter topological insulators. The interfaces of the metacrystals support helical edge states that exhibit spin-polarized one-way propagation of photons, robust against disorder. Our results demonstrate the possibility of attaining one-way photon transport without application of external magnetic fields or breaking of time-reversal symmetry. Such spin-polarized one-way transport enables exotic spin-cloaked photon sources that do not obscure each other.

  19. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsia, Kevin K.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-05-01

    An intriguing optical property of silicon is that it exhibits a large third-order optical nonlinearity, with orders-ofmagnitude larger than that of silica glass in the telecommunication band. This allows efficient nonlinear optical interaction at relatively low power levels in a small footprint. Indeed, we have witnessed a stunning progress in harnessing the Raman and Kerr effects in silicon as the mechanisms for enabling chip-scale optical amplification, lasing, and wavelength conversion - functions that until recently were perceived to be beyond the reach of silicon. With all the continuous efforts developing novel techniques, nonlinear silicon photonics is expected to be able to reach even beyond the prior achievements. Instead of providing a comprehensive overview of this field, this manuscript highlights a number of new branches of nonlinear silicon photonics, which have not been fully recognized in the past. In particular, they are two-photon photovoltaic effect, mid-wave infrared (MWIR) silicon photonics, broadband Raman effects, inverse Raman scattering, and periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). These novel effects and techniques could create a new paradigm for silicon photonics and extend its utility beyond the traditionally anticipated applications.

  20. Photonics for life.

    PubMed

    Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Bassi, Andrea; Comelli, Daniela; Cova, Sergio; Farina, Andrea; Ghioni, Massimo; Rech, Ivan; Pifferi, Antonio; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Taroni, Paola; Torricelli, Alessandro; Tosi, Alberto; Valentini, Gianluca; Zappa, Franco

    2011-01-01

    Light is strictly connected with life, and its presence is fundamental for any living environment. Thus, many biological mechanisms are related to light interaction or can be evaluated through processes involving energy exchange with photons. Optics has always been a precious tool to evaluate molecular and cellular mechanisms, but the discovery of lasers opened new pathways of interactions of light with biological matter, pushing an impressive development for both therapeutic and diagnostic applications in biomedicine. The use of light in different fields has become so widespread that the word photonics has been utilized to identify all the applications related to processes where the light is involved. The photonics area covers a wide range of wavelengths spanning from soft X-rays to mid-infrared and includes all devices related to photons as light sources, optical fibers and light guides, detectors, and all the related electronic equipment. The recent use of photons in the field of telecommunications has pushed the technology toward low-cost, compact, and efficient devices, making them available for many other applications, including those related to biology and medicine where these requirements are of particular relevance. Moreover, basic sciences such as physics, chemistry, mathematics, and electronics have recognized the interdisciplinary need of biomedical science and are translating the most advanced researches into these fields. The Politecnico school has pioneered many of them,and this article reviews the state of the art of biomedical research at the Politecnico in the field internationally known as biophotonics.

  1. High order reflectivity of graphite (HOPG) crystals for x ray energies up to 22 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Doeppner, T; Neumayer, P; Girard, F; Kugland, N L; Landen, O L; Niemann, C; Glenzer, S H

    2008-04-30

    We used Kr K{alpha} (12.6 keV) and Ag K{alpha} (22.1 keV) x-rays, produced by petawatt class laser pulses interacting with a Kr gas jet and a silver foil, to measure the integrated crystal reflectivity of flat Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) up to fifth order. The reflectivity in fourth order is lower by a factor of 50 when compared to first order diffraction. In second order the integrated reflectivity decreases from 1.3 mrad at 12.6 keV to 0.5 mrad at 22.1 keV. The current study indicates that HOPG crystals are suitable for measuring scattering signals from high energy x ray sources (E {ge} 20 keV). These energies are required to penetrate through the high density plasma conditions encountered in inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility.

  2. Energetic (greater than 100 keV) O(+) ions in the plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipavich, F. M.; Galvin, A. B.; Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Scholer, M.

    1984-01-01

    The first measurements of very energetic (112 - 157 keV) O(+) ions in the earth's magnetosphere are presented. The observations were made with the UMd/MPE ULECA sensor on ISEE-1 on 5 March 1981 at geocentric distances approximately 20 R(E) in the earth's magnetotail. During this time period an Energetic Storm Particle event was observed by the nearly identical sensor on the ISEE-3 spacecraft, located approximately 250 R(E) upstream of the earth's magnetosphere. The ISEE-1 sensor observed a similar temporal profile except for several sharp intensity enhancements, corresponding to substorm recoveries during which the plasma sheet engulfed the spacecraft. During these plasma sheet encounters we observe O(+)/H(+) abundance ratios, at approximately 130 kev, as large as 0.35. In between plasma sheet encounters the O(+)/H(+) ratio at this energy is consistent with zero.

  3. Experimental results of a dual-beam ion source for 200 keV ion implanter

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L. H. Cui, B. Q.; Ma, R. G.; Ma, Y. J.; Tang, B.; Huang, Q. H.; Jiang, W. S.; Zheng, Y. N.

    2014-02-15

    A dual beam ion source for 200 keV ion implanter aimed to produce 200 keV H{sub 2}{sup +} and He{sup +} beams simultaneously has been developed. Not suitable to use the analyzing magnet, the purity of beam extracted from the source becomes important to the performance of implanter. The performance of ion source was measured. The results of experiments show that the materials of inlet tube of ion source, the time of arc ionization in ion source, and the amount of gas flow have significant influence on the purity of beam. The measures by using copper as inlet tube material, long time of arc ionization, and increasing the inlet of gas flow could effectively reduce the impurity of beam. And the method using the gas mass flow controller to adjust the proportion of H{sub 2}{sup +} and He{sup +} is feasible.

  4. 0. 073% (95% C. L. ) upper limit on 17keV neutrino admixture

    SciTech Connect

    Ohshima, T. )

    1992-02-01

    A direct search was made for a threshold kink in [sup 63]Ni [beta]-ray spectrum due possibly to a sizeable admixture of 17keV neutrino. A fine energy scan was performed using a magnetic spectrometer over the specific energy region with very high statistics and a very high signal-to-background ratio. The resultant mixing strength is [vert bar][ital U][vert bar][sup 2]=([minus]0.011[plus minus]0.033(stat.)[plus minus]0.030(sys.) )% and its upper limit [vert bar][ital U][vert bar][sup 2][le]0.073% (95% C.L.). The result clearly excludes neutrinos with [vert bar][ital U][vert bar][sup 2][ge]0.1% for the mass range from 11 to 24keV.

  5. Tuning of wettability of PANI-GNP composites using keV energy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi, G. B. V. S.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2016-07-01

    Polyaniline nanofiber composites with various nanomaterials have several applications in electrochemical biosensors. The surface properties of these composites coated electrodes play crucial role in enzyme absorption and analyte detection process. In the present study, Polyaniline-Graphene nanopowder (PANI-GNP) composites were prepared by rapid-mixing polymerization method. The films were prepared on ITO coated glass substrates and irradiated with 42 keV He+ ions produced by indigenously fabricated accelerator at IUAC, New Delhi. The films were characterized before and after irradiation by SEM, Raman spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The as-prepared films show superhydrophilic nature and after irradiation the films show highly hydrophobic nature with water contact angle (135°). The surface morphology was studied by SEM and structural changes were studied by Raman spectra. The surface morphological modifications induced by keV energy ions helps in tuning the wettability at different ion fluences.

  6. The Morphology of the X-ray Emission above 2 keV from Jupiter's Aurorae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Galand, M.; Grodent, D.; Gladstone, G. R.; Waite, J. H.; Cravens, T.; Ford, P.

    2007-01-01

    The discovery in XMM-Newton X-ray data of X-ray emission above 2 keY from Jupiter's aurorae has led us to reexamine the Chandra ACIS-S observations taken in Feb 2003. Chandra's superior spatial resolution has revealed that the auroral X-rays with E > 2 keV are emitted from the periphery of the region emitting those with E < 1 keV. We are presently exploring the relationship of this morphology to that of the FUV emission from the main auroral oval and the polar cap. The low energy emission has previously been established as due to charge exchange between energetic precipitating ions of oxygen and either sulfur or carbon. It seems likely to us that the higher energy emission is due to precipitation of energetic electrons, possibly the same population of electrons responsible for the FUV emission. We discuss our analysis and interpretation.

  7. Limits on a variable source of 511 keV annihilation radiation near the Galactic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Share, Gerald H.; Leising, Mark D.; Messina, Daniel C.; Purcell, William R.

    1990-08-01

    The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Solar Maximum Mission satellite (SMM) has observed a strong Galactic source of 511 keV annihilation radiation from its launch in 1980 to its reentry in 1989. These observations are consistent with an extended source having an intensity of about 0.002 gamma/sq cm/s averaged over the central radian of Galactic longitude. These data are searched for evidence of the variable Galactic center source of 511 keV line radiation which was reported to have reappeared in 1988 by Leventhal et al. The SMM data are consistent with, but do not require, a compact source emitting a time-averaged flux of about 0.0004 gamma/sq cm/s during about 3 month transits in 1987 and 1988; they are inconsistent with a compact source flux in excess of 0.0008 gamma/sq cm/s for each year.

  8. The 871 keV gamma ray from 17O and the identification of plutonium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peurrung, Anthony; Arthur, Richard; Elovich, Robert; Geelhood, Bruce; Kouzes, Richard; Pratt, Sharon; Scheele, Randy; Sell, Richard

    2001-12-01

    Disarmament agreements and discussions between the United States and the Russian Federation for reducing the number of stockpiled nuclear weapons require verification of the origin of materials as having come from disassembled weapons. This has resulted in the identification of measurable "attributes" that characterize such materials. It has been proposed that the 871 keV gamma ray of 17O can be observed as an indicator of the unexpected presence of plutonium oxide, as opposed to plutonium metal, in such materials. We have shown that the observation of the 871 keV gamma ray is not a specific indicator of the presence of the oxide, but rather indicates the presence of nitrogen.

  9. Dynamical simulations of radiation damage induced by 10 keV energetic recoils in UO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, X. F.; Gao, T.; Long, Chongsheng; Li, JiuKai; Jiang, Gang; Xiao, Hongxing

    2011-08-01

    We have performed classical molecular dynamics simulations to simulate the primary damage state induced by 10 keV energetic recoils in UO 2. The numbers versus time and the distance distributions for the displaced uranium and oxygen atoms were investigated with the energetic recoils accelerated along four different directions. The simulations suggest that the direction of the primary knock-on atom (PKA) has no effect on the final primary damage state. In addition, it was found that atomic displacement events consisted of replacement collision sequences in addition to the production of Frenkel pairs. The spatial distribution of defects introduced by 10 keV collision cascades was also presented and the results were similar to that of energetic recoils with lower energy.

  10. The 511 keV emission from positron annihilation in the Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Prantzos, N.; Boehm, C.; Bykov, A. M.; Diehl, R.; Ferriere, K.; Guessoum, N.; Jean, P.; Knoedlseder, J.; Marcowith, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Strong, A.; Weidenspointner, G.

    2011-07-01

    The first {gamma}-ray line originating from outside the Solar System that was ever detected is the 511 keV emission from positron annihilation in the Galaxy. Despite 30 years of intense theoretical and observational investigation, the main sources of positrons have not been identified up to now. Observations in the 1990s with OSSE/CGRO (Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment on GRO satellite/Compton Gamma Ray Observatory) showed that the emission is strongly concentrated toward the Galactic bulge. In the 2000s, the spectrometer SPI aboard the European Space Agency's (ESA) International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) allowed scientists to measure that emission across the entire Galaxy, revealing that the bulge-to-disk luminosity ratio is larger than observed at any other wavelength. This mapping prompted a number of novel explanations, including rather ''exotic'' ones (e.g., dark matter annihilation). However, conventional astrophysical sources, such as type Ia supernovae, microquasars, or x-ray binaries, are still plausible candidates for a large fraction of the observed total 511 keV emission of the bulge. A closer study of the subject reveals new layers of complexity, since positrons may propagate far away from their production sites, making it difficult to infer the underlying source distribution from the observed map of 511 keV emission. However, in contrast to the rather well-understood propagation of high-energy (>GeV) particles of Galactic cosmic rays, understanding the propagation of low-energy ({approx}MeV) positrons in the turbulent, magnetized interstellar medium still remains a formidable challenge. The spectral and imaging properties of the observed 511 keV emission are reviewed and candidate positron sources and models of positron propagation in the Galaxy are critically discussed.

  11. Solar Wind ~0.1-1.5 keV Electrons at Quiet Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, J.; Wang, L.; Zong, Q. G.; Li, G.; He, J.; Tu, C.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Salem, C. S.; Yang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Solar wind halo/strahl electrons carry important information on the formation of suprathermal electrons in the solar wind. Here we present a statistical survey on the energy spectrum of 0.1-1.5 keV electrons observed by WIND/3DP in the solar wind during quiet times at solar minimum and maximum of solar cycle 23 and 24. First, we separate strahl electrons from halo electrons according to their different behaviors in the angular distribution. Secondly, we fit the observed energy spectrum of halo/strahl electrons at 0.1-1.5 keV to a kappa distribution function with an index κ and effective temperature Teff. We also integrate the electron measurements to obtain the number density n of halo/strahl electrons at 0.1-1.5 keV. We find a strong positive correlation between κ and Teff for both halo and strahl electrons. For strahl electrons, the index κ (number density n) appears to decrease (increase) with increasing solar activity. For halo electrons, the index κ also decreases with increasing solar activity, while the number density n shows no clear solar-cycle variation. Based on a simple model, we find that the escape of thermal electrons from the coronal region with a higher temperature T could lead to a larger κ for the 0.1-1.5 keV electrons measured in the solar wind, if T > ~0.73×106 K. These results suggest that strahl electrons are likely related to the escaping thermal electrons from different regions in the hot corona, while halo electrons are probably formed due to the scatter/acceleration of strahl electrons in the interplanetary medium.

  12. Compton polarimeter for 10–30 keV x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, S.; Beilmann, C.; Shah, C.; Tashenov, S.

    2015-09-15

    We present a simple and versatile polarimeter for x rays in the energy range of 10–30 keV. It uses Compton scattering in low-Z materials such as beryllium or boron carbide. The azimuthal distribution of the scattered x rays is sampled by an array of 12 silicon PIN diodes operated at room temperature. We evaluated the polarimetry performance using Monte-Carlo simulations and show experimental results.

  13. Compton polarimeter for 10-30 keV x rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, S.; Beilmann, C.; Shah, C.; Tashenov, S.

    2015-09-01

    We present a simple and versatile polarimeter for x rays in the energy range of 10-30 keV. It uses Compton scattering in low-Z materials such as beryllium or boron carbide. The azimuthal distribution of the scattered x rays is sampled by an array of 12 silicon PIN diodes operated at room temperature. We evaluated the polarimetry performance using Monte-Carlo simulations and show experimental results.

  14. Compton polarimeter for 10-30 keV x rays.

    PubMed

    Weber, S; Beilmann, C; Shah, C; Tashenov, S

    2015-09-01

    We present a simple and versatile polarimeter for x rays in the energy range of 10-30 keV. It uses Compton scattering in low-Z materials such as beryllium or boron carbide. The azimuthal distribution of the scattered x rays is sampled by an array of 12 silicon PIN diodes operated at room temperature. We evaluated the polarimetry performance using Monte-Carlo simulations and show experimental results.

  15. Compton polarimeter for 10-30 keV x rays.

    PubMed

    Weber, S; Beilmann, C; Shah, C; Tashenov, S

    2015-09-01

    We present a simple and versatile polarimeter for x rays in the energy range of 10-30 keV. It uses Compton scattering in low-Z materials such as beryllium or boron carbide. The azimuthal distribution of the scattered x rays is sampled by an array of 12 silicon PIN diodes operated at room temperature. We evaluated the polarimetry performance using Monte-Carlo simulations and show experimental results. PMID:26429432

  16. Picosecond x-ray measurements from 100 eV to 30 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Attwood, D.T.; Kauffman, R.L.; Stradling, G.L.

    1980-10-15

    Picosecond x-ray measurements relevant to the Livermore Laser Fusion Program are reviewed. Resolved to 15 picoseconds, streak camera detection capabilities extend from 100 eV to higher than 30 keV, with synchronous capabilities in the visible, near infrared, and ultraviolet. Capabilities include automated data retrieval using charge coupled devices (CCD's), absolute x-ray intensity levels, novel cathodes, x-ray mirror/reflector combinations, and a variety of x-ray imaging devices.

  17. Proton collisions with the water dimer at keV energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinet, O.; Deumens, E.; Öhrn, Y.

    Proton collisions with the water dimer are studied using a nonadiabatic, direct, time-dependent approach called electron nuclear dynamics (END). Fragmentation of the water dimer in collisions with protons at energies of 5.0, 1.0 keV and 200 eV is the primary aim of this initial study of water clusters using END. We report on the initial fragmentation dynamic, that is, for times less than 200 fs.

  18. Origin of the Galactic Disk 6.7 kev Line Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Churchwell, Ed

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this program was to determine if the extended FeXXV 6.7 kev line emission might possibly be produced and confined by the hot wind-shocked bubbles to accompany UC HII regions. The main result of this study are: (1) FeXXV is detected in the W3 complex, but at a level that could only explain a small fraction of the galactic disk emission if all UC HII regions emit at about the same intensity as the W3 complex; (2) Two X-ray sources are detected in W3. W3-X 1 coincides with the radio image of this region, but W3-X2 has no radio, optical, or infrared counterpart; (3) There is no evidence for variability of W3-X1 during the period of observations (approx, 40,000 sec); (4) The X-ray spectrum of W3-X1 has no emission shortward of 1 kev, it peaks at approx. 2 kev and show significant emission out to approx. 6 kev. No individual lines are resolved. There is currently no generally accepted theory for extended hard X-ray emission in HII regions. Perhaps the most significant discovery of this program has been the detection of extended hard X-rays and the realization that some entirely new processes must be invoked to understand this; and (5)A minimum (chi)(sup 2) fit of the spectrum implies a H absorbing column of N(sub H) approx, equals to 2.1 x 10(exp 22)/ cm, a temperature of the emitting plasma of 7 x 10(exp 7) K, and a luminosity of approx. equal to 10(33)erg/s.

  19. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser

    PubMed Central

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-01-01

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M2 reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the “photonic crystal microchip laser”, a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation. PMID:27683066

  20. Photon physics with PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    White, S.

    1995-07-15

    In this Paper the author discusses briefly the physics motivation for extending measurements of particle production with high granularity and particle id capabilities to neutrals in PHENIX. The author then discusses the technique of direct photon measurement in the presence of copious background photons from {pi}{sup o} decays. The experiment will measure relatively low p{sub t} photons near y=0 in the lab frame. This new experimental environment of high multiplicity and low {gamma} momenta will affect both the techniques used and the type of analysis which can be performed. The Phenix Electromagnetic calorimeter is described and its capabilities illustrated with results from simulation and beam tests of the first production array.

  1. Sensing individual terahertz photons.

    PubMed

    Hashiba, Hideomi; Antonov, Vladimir; Kulik, Leonid; Tzalenchuk, Alexander; Komiyama, Susumu

    2010-04-23

    One of the promising ways to perform single-photon counting of terahertz radiation consists in sensitive probing of plasma excitation in the electron gas upon photon absorption. We demonstrate the ultimate sensor operating on this principle. It is assembled from a GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dot, electron reservoir and superconducting single-electron transistor. The quantum dot is isolated from the surrounding electron reservoir in such a way that when the excited plasma wave decays, an electron could tunnel off the dot to the reservoir. The resulting charge polarization of the dot is detected with the single-electron transistor. Such a system forms an easy-to-use sensor enabling single-photon counting in a very obscure wavelength region.

  2. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-09-01

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M2 reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the “photonic crystal microchip laser”, a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation.

  3. A large scale height galactic component of the diffuse 2-60 keV background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwan, D.; Marshall, F. E.; Boldt, E. A.; Mushotzky, R.; Shafer, R. A.; Stottlemyer, A.

    1982-01-01

    The diffuse 2-60 keV X-ray background has a galactic component clearly detectable by its strong variation with both galactic latitude and longitude. This galactic component is typically 10 percent of the extragalactic background toward the galactic center, half that strong toward the anticenter, and extrapolated to a few percent of the extragalactic background toward the galactic poles. It is acceptably modeled by a finite radius emission disk with a scale height of several kiloparsecs. The averaged galactic spectrum is best fitted by a thermal spectrum of kT about 9 keV, a spectrum much softer than the about 40 keV spectrum of the extragalactic component. The most likely source of this emission is low luminosity stars with large scale heights such as subdwarfs. Inverse Compton emission from GeV electrons on the microwave background contributes only a fraction of the galactic component unless the local cosmic ray electron spectrum and intensity are atypical.

  4. No 17 keV neutrino: Admixture [lt]0. 073% (95% C. L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Ohshima, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sato, T.; Shirai, J.; Tsukamoto, T. ); Sugaya, Y.; Takahashi, K. ); Suzuki, T. ); Rosenfeld, C.; Wilson, S. ); Ueno, K. ); Yonezawa, Y. ); Kawakami, H.; Kato, S.; Shibata, S.; Ukai, K. )

    1993-06-01

    To solve the controversial issue concerning the possible existence of a 17 keV neutrino with a 1% admixture in nuclear [beta] decay, we searched directly for any evidence of a production-threshold effect. The [sup 63]Ni [beta] spectrum was measured with a magnetic spectrometer, with very high statistics along with a fine energy scan over a narrow energy region around the expected threshold. The obtained mixing strength was [vert bar][ital U][vert bar][sup 2]=[[minus]0.011[plus minus]0.033(stat)[plus minus]0.030(syst)]%, very consistent with zero, and decisively excluding the existence of a 17 keV neutrino admixing at the 1% level with the electron neutrino. The corresponding upper limit was set at [vert bar][ital U][vert bar][sup 2][lt]0.073% (95% C.L.). A new limit was also obtained for a wider mass range: [vert bar][ital U][vert bar][sup 2][lt]0.15% (95% C.L.) for 10.5 to 25.0 keV neutrinos.

  5. Solar wind ˜0.1-1.5 keV electrons at quiet times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jiawei; Wang, Linghua; Zong, Qiugang; Li, Gang; Salem, Chadi S.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Bale, Stuart D.

    2016-03-01

    We present a statistical survey of the energy spectrum of solar wind suprathermal (˜0.1-1.5 keV) electrons measured by the WIND 3-D Plasma & Energetic Particle (3DP) instrument at 1 AU during quiet times at the minimum and maximum of solar cycles 23 and 24. Firstly, we separate strahl (beaming) electrons and halo (isotropic) electrons based on their features in pitch angle distributions. Secondly, we fit the observed energy spectrum of both the strahl and halo electrons at ˜0.1-1.5 keV to a Kappa distribution function with an index κ, effective temperature Teff and density n0. We also integrate the the measurements over ˜0.1-1.5 keV to obtain the average electron energy Eavg of the strahl and halo. We find a strong positive correlation between κ and Teff for both the strahl and halo, possibly reflecting the nature of the generation of these suprathermal electrons. Among the 245 selected samples, ˜68% have the halo κ smaller than the strahl κ, while ˜50% have the halo Eh larger than the strahl Es.

  6. Searching for keV Sterile Neutrino Dark Matter with X-Ray Microcalorimeter Sounding Rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Anderson, A. J.; Castro, D.; Goldfinger, D. C.; Rutherford, J.; Eckart, M. E.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; McCammon, D.; Morgan, K.; Porter, F. S.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; XQC Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    High-resolution X-ray spectrometers onboard suborbital sounding rockets can search for dark matter candidates that produce X-ray lines, such as decaying keV-scale sterile neutrinos. Even with exposure times and effective areas far smaller than XMM-Newton and Chandra observations, high-resolution, wide field of view observations with sounding rockets have competitive sensitivity to decaying sterile neutrinos. We analyze a subset of the 2011 observation by the X-ray Quantum Calorimeter instrument centered on Galactic coordinates l=165°,b=-5° with an effective exposure of 106 s, obtaining a limit on the sterile neutrino mixing angle of {{sin}}22θ < 7.2× {10}-10 at 95% CL for a 7 keV neutrino. Better sensitivity at the level of {{sin}}22θ ∼ 2.1× {10}-11 at 95% CL for a 7 keV neutrino is achievable with future 300-s observations of the galactic center by the Micro-X instrument, providing a definitive test of the sterile neutrino interpretation of the reported 3.56 keV excess from galaxy clusters.

  7. A study of 2-20 KeV X-rays from the Cygnus region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleach, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    Two rocket-borne proportional counters, each with 650 sq c, met area and 1.8 x 7.1 deg FWHM rectangular mechanical collimation, surveyed the Cygnus region in the 2 to 20 keV energy range on two occasions. X-ray spectral data gathered on 21 September 1970 from discrete sources in Cygnus are presented. The data from Cyg X-1, Cyg X-2, and Cyg X-3 have sufficient statistical significance to indicate mutually exclusive spectral forms for the three. Upper limits are presented for X-ray intensities above 2 keV for Cyg X-4 and Cyg X-5 (Cygnus loop). A search was made on 9 August 1971 for a diffuse component of X-rays 1.5 keV associated with an interarm region of the galaxy at galactic longitudes in the vicinity of 60 degrees. A statistically significant excess associated with a narrow disk component was detected. Several possible emission models are discussed, with the most likely candidate being a population of unresolvable low luminosity discrete sources.

  8. Absolute measurements of x-ray backlighter sources at energies above 10 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Maddox, B. R.; Park, H. S.; Remington, B. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, S.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Comley, A.; Back, C. A.; Szabo, C.; Seely, J. F.; Feldman, U.; Hudson, L. T.; Seltzer, S.; Haugh, M. J.; Ali, Z.

    2011-05-15

    Line emission and broadband x-ray sources with x-ray energies above 10 keV have been investigated using a range of calibrated x-ray detectors for use as x-ray backlighters in high energy density (HED) experiments. The conversion efficiency of short- and long-pulse driven Mo and Ag line-emission backlighters at 17 and 22 keV was measured to investigate the crossover region between short- and long-pulse conversion efficiency. It was found that significant 17 and 22 keV line emissions were observed using a 3 {omega}, 1 ns long-pulse drive for Mo and Ag targets and a comparison between the measured Mo x-ray spectrum and calculations using an atomic physics code suggests that the line emission is due to thermal emission from N-like Mo atoms. Electron temperatures derived from fits to the continuum region of the x-ray spectra agree well with the T{sub hot} scaling as 100x(I{lambda}{sup 2}){sup 1/3}. The continuum emissions from empty and 1 atm Kr-filled imploded CH shell targets were also measured for the use as broadband backlighters.

  9. Energy loss of tens keV charged particles traveling in the hot dense carbon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, ZhenGuo; Wang, ZhiGang; He, Bin; Li, DaFang; Zhang, Ping

    2016-08-01

    The energy loss of charged particles, including electrons, protons, and α-particles with tens keV initial energy E 0, traveling in the hot dense carbon (C) plasma for densities from 2.281 to 22.81 g/cm3 and temperatures from 400 to 1500 eV is systematically and quantitatively studied by using the dimensional continuation method. The behaviors of different charged particles are readily distinguishable from each other. Firstly, because an ion is thousands times heavier than an electron, the penetration distance of the electron is much longer than that of proton and α-particle traveling in the plasma. Secondly, most energy of electron projectile with E 0 < 100 keV deposits into the electron species of C plasma, while for the cases of proton and α-particle with E 0 < 100 keV, about more than half energy transfers into the ion species of C plasma. A simple decreasing law of the penetration distance as a function of the plasma density is fitted, and different behaviors of each projectile particle can be clearly found from the fitted data. We believe that with the advanced progress of the present experimental technology, the findings shown here could be confirmed in ion-stopping experiments in the near future.

  10. Relative dissociation fractions of SF6 under impact of 15-keV to 30-keV H- and C- negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zilong; Li, Junqin; Zhang, Xuemei

    2013-10-01

    The relative dissociation fractions for the production of fragment ions and ion pairs of SF6 are studied for H- and C- impact in the energy range from 15 to 30 keV. Recoil ions (SF4+, SF3+, SF2+, SF+, S+, F+, SF42+, SF22+) and ion pairs (SF3++F+,SF2++F+,SF++F+,S++F+, F++F+) are detected and identified in coincidence with scattered projectiles in two charge states (q=0 and q=+1) by using a time-of-flight spectrometer. The relative dissociation fractions are energy dependent for both single-electron-loss (SL) channel and double-electron-loss (DL) channel processes for certain negative ions. It is also found that the relative dissociation fractions for DL are larger than those for SL. In addition, the degree of fragmentation will become greater with a larger mass number of the projectiles at the same impact energy for the same electron-loss channel. A comparison of the time-of-flight spectra is made between that under negative-ion impact and that under electron impact, and it is found that the probability of production of SFn+ ions with n odd is higher than that of similar ions with n even, and the probability of production of SFn2+ ions with n even is higher than that of similar ions withn odd under H-, C-, positive-ion, and electron impact. We analyze this interesting phenomenon from the bond-dissociation energies of SFn+ and SFn2+. We also analyze the coincident time-of-flight spectra of two fragment ions resulting from double ionization of SF6 by H- and C- impact and describe the major dissociation pathways of SF62+ for H- and C- impact in the energy range from 15 to 30 keV.

  11. Photonic Floquet topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Rechtsman, Mikael C; Zeuner, Julia M; Plotnik, Yonatan; Lumer, Yaakov; Podolsky, Daniel; Dreisow, Felix; Nolte, Stefan; Segev, Mordechai; Szameit, Alexander

    2013-04-11

    Topological insulators are a new phase of matter, with the striking property that conduction of electrons occurs only on their surfaces. In two dimensions, electrons on the surface of a topological insulator are not scattered despite defects and disorder, providing robustness akin to that of superconductors. Topological insulators are predicted to have wide-ranging applications in fault-tolerant quantum computing and spintronics. Substantial effort has been directed towards realizing topological insulators for electromagnetic waves. One-dimensional systems with topological edge states have been demonstrated, but these states are zero-dimensional and therefore exhibit no transport properties. Topological protection of microwaves has been observed using a mechanism similar to the quantum Hall effect, by placing a gyromagnetic photonic crystal in an external magnetic field. But because magnetic effects are very weak at optical frequencies, realizing photonic topological insulators with scatter-free edge states requires a fundamentally different mechanism-one that is free of magnetic fields. A number of proposals for photonic topological transport have been put forward recently. One suggested temporal modulation of a photonic crystal, thus breaking time-reversal symmetry and inducing one-way edge states. This is in the spirit of the proposed Floquet topological insulators, in which temporal variations in solid-state systems induce topological edge states. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate a photonic topological insulator free of external fields and with scatter-free edge transport-a photonic lattice exhibiting topologically protected transport of visible light on the lattice edges. Our system is composed of an array of evanescently coupled helical waveguides arranged in a graphene-like honeycomb lattice. Paraxial diffraction of light is described by a Schrödinger equation where the propagation coordinate (z) acts as 'time'. Thus the helicity of the

  12. Photonic Floquet topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Rechtsman, Mikael C; Zeuner, Julia M; Plotnik, Yonatan; Lumer, Yaakov; Podolsky, Daniel; Dreisow, Felix; Nolte, Stefan; Segev, Mordechai; Szameit, Alexander

    2013-04-11

    Topological insulators are a new phase of matter, with the striking property that conduction of electrons occurs only on their surfaces. In two dimensions, electrons on the surface of a topological insulator are not scattered despite defects and disorder, providing robustness akin to that of superconductors. Topological insulators are predicted to have wide-ranging applications in fault-tolerant quantum computing and spintronics. Substantial effort has been directed towards realizing topological insulators for electromagnetic waves. One-dimensional systems with topological edge states have been demonstrated, but these states are zero-dimensional and therefore exhibit no transport properties. Topological protection of microwaves has been observed using a mechanism similar to the quantum Hall effect, by placing a gyromagnetic photonic crystal in an external magnetic field. But because magnetic effects are very weak at optical frequencies, realizing photonic topological insulators with scatter-free edge states requires a fundamentally different mechanism-one that is free of magnetic fields. A number of proposals for photonic topological transport have been put forward recently. One suggested temporal modulation of a photonic crystal, thus breaking time-reversal symmetry and inducing one-way edge states. This is in the spirit of the proposed Floquet topological insulators, in which temporal variations in solid-state systems induce topological edge states. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate a photonic topological insulator free of external fields and with scatter-free edge transport-a photonic lattice exhibiting topologically protected transport of visible light on the lattice edges. Our system is composed of an array of evanescently coupled helical waveguides arranged in a graphene-like honeycomb lattice. Paraxial diffraction of light is described by a Schrödinger equation where the propagation coordinate (z) acts as 'time'. Thus the helicity of the

  13. Photonic hydrogel sensors.

    PubMed

    Yetisen, Ali K; Butt, Haider; Volpatti, Lisa R; Pavlichenko, Ida; Humar, Matjaž; Kwok, Sheldon J J; Koo, Heebeom; Kim, Ki Su; Naydenova, Izabela; Khademhosseini, Ali; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Analyte-sensitive hydrogels that incorporate optical structures have emerged as sensing platforms for point-of-care diagnostics. The optical properties of the hydrogel sensors can be rationally designed and fabricated through self-assembly, microfabrication or laser writing. The advantages of photonic hydrogel sensors over conventional assay formats include label-free, quantitative, reusable, and continuous measurement capability that can be integrated with equipment-free text or image display. This Review explains the operation principles of photonic hydrogel sensors, presents syntheses of stimuli-responsive polymers, and provides an overview of qualitative and quantitative readout technologies. Applications in clinical samples are discussed, and potential future directions are identified. PMID:26485407

  14. Photonic hydrogel sensors.

    PubMed

    Yetisen, Ali K; Butt, Haider; Volpatti, Lisa R; Pavlichenko, Ida; Humar, Matjaž; Kwok, Sheldon J J; Koo, Heebeom; Kim, Ki Su; Naydenova, Izabela; Khademhosseini, Ali; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Analyte-sensitive hydrogels that incorporate optical structures have emerged as sensing platforms for point-of-care diagnostics. The optical properties of the hydrogel sensors can be rationally designed and fabricated through self-assembly, microfabrication or laser writing. The advantages of photonic hydrogel sensors over conventional assay formats include label-free, quantitative, reusable, and continuous measurement capability that can be integrated with equipment-free text or image display. This Review explains the operation principles of photonic hydrogel sensors, presents syntheses of stimuli-responsive polymers, and provides an overview of qualitative and quantitative readout technologies. Applications in clinical samples are discussed, and potential future directions are identified.

  15. Assessing the effect of electron density in photon dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Seco, J.; Evans, P. M.

    2006-02-15

    to be a consequence of the differences in the hydrogen content between the various media studied and water. On the other hand, the electron-density scaling method was shown to predict primary photon fluence in media other than water to within 1%-2% for all the materials studied and for energies up to 5 MeV. For energies above 5 MeV, the accuracy of the electron-density scaling method was shown to depend on the photon energy, where for materials with a high content of calcium (such as bone, cortical bone) or for primary photon energies above 10 MeV, the pair-production process could no longer be neglected. The electron-density scaling method was extended to account for pair-production attenuation of the primary photons. Therefore the scaling of the dose distributions in media other than water became dependent on the photon energy. The extended electron-scaling method was shown to estimate the photon range to within 1% for all materials studied and for energies from 100 keV to 20 MeV, allowing it to be used to scale dose distributions to media other than water and generated by clinical radiotherapy photon beams with accelerator energies from 4 to 20 MV.

  16. Mutagenic effect of a keV range N + beam on mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Huiyun; Wu, Lijun; Yu, Lixiang; Han, Wei; Liu, Xuelan; Yu, Zengliang

    2005-07-01

    The radiobiological effects of a keV (5-20 keV) range nitrogen ion (N +) beam on mammalian cells were studied, particularly with regard to the induction of mutation in the cell genome. The experiment demonstrated that the 20 keV N + beam, which resulted in cell death to a certain extent, induced a 2-3 fold increase in the mutation rates at the CD59 gene locus of the mammalian A L cells as compared to the control. Within certain fluence ranges (0-6 × 10 14 N +/cm 2), the cell survival displayed a down-up-down pattern which is similar to the phenomenon known as 'hyper-radiosensitivity' manifested under low-dose irradiation; the CD59 mutation rate firstly showed a gradual rise up to a 3-fold increment above the background level as the ion fluence went up to 4 × 10 14 N +/cm 2, after this peak point however, a downtrend appeared though the ion fluence increased further. It was also observed that the fraction of CD59 mutation bears no proportional relation to ion energy in further experiments of mutation induction by N + beams with the incident energies of 5, 10, 15 and 20 keV at the same fluence of 3 × 10 14 N +/cm 2. Analyses of the deletion patterns of chromosome 11 in CD59- mutants induced by 5-20 keV N + beams showed that these ions did not result in large-size chromosome deletions in this mammalian cell system. A preliminary discussion, suggesting that the mutagenic effect of such low-energy ion influx on mammalian cells could result from multiple processes involving direct collision of particles with cellular DNA, and cascade atomic and molecular reactions due to plentiful primary and secondary particles, was also presented. The study provided the first glimpse into the roles low-energy ions may play in inducing mutagenesis in mammalian cells, and results will be of much value in helping people to understand the contribution of low-energy ions to radiological effects of various ionising radiations.

  17. The Hard X-ray 20-40 keV AGN Luminosity Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckmann, V.; Soldi, S.; Shrader, C. R.; Gehrels, N.; Produit, N.

    2006-01-01

    We have compiled a complete, significance limited extragalactic sample based on approximately 25,000 deg(sup 2) to a limiting flux of 3 x 10(exp -11) ergs per square centimeter per second. (approximately 7,000 deg(sup 2)) to a flux limit of 10(exp -11) ergs per square centimeter per second)) in the 20 - 40 keV band with INTEGRAL. We have constructed a detailed exposure map to compensate for effects of non-uniform exposure. The flux-number relation is best described by a power-law with a slope of alpha = 1.66 plus or minus 0.11. The integration of the cumulative flux per unit area leads to f(sub 20-40 keV) = 2.6 x 10(exp -10) ergs per square centimeter per second per sr(sup -1) which is about 1% of the known 20-40 keV X-ray background. We present the first luminosity function of AGN in the 20-40 keV energy range, based on 68 extragalactic objects detected by the imager IBIS/ISGRI on-board INTEGRAL. The luminosity function shows a smoothly connected two power-law form, with an index of gamma (sub 1) = 0.9 below, and gamma (sub 2) = 2.2 above the turn-over luminosity of L(sub *), = 4.6 x 10(sup 43) ergs per second. The emissivity of all INTEGRAL AGNs per unit volume is W(sub 20-40keV)(greater than 10(sup 41) ergs per second) = 2.8 x 10(sup 38) ergs per second h(sup 3)(sub 70) Mpc(sup -3). These results are consistent with those derived in the 2-20keV energy band and do not show a significant contribution by Compton-thick objects. Because the sample used in this study is truly local (z(raised bar) = 0.022)), only limited conclusions can be drawn for the evolution of AGNs in this energy band. But the objects explaining the peak in the cosmic X-ray background are likely to be either low luminosity AGN (L(sub x) less than 10(sup 41) ergs per second) or of other type, such as intermediate mass black holes, clusters, and star forming regions.

  18. The 2-79 keV X-ray spectrum of the Circinus galaxy with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Chandra: a fully Compton-thick active galactic nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Arévalo, P.; Bauer, F. E.; Puccetti, S.; Walton, D. J.; Fuerst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Harrison, F. A.; Madsen, K. K.; Koss, M.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Brandt, W. N.; Luo, B.; Brightman, M.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Gandhi, P.; Hailey, C. J.; Madejski, G.; and others

    2014-08-20

    The Circinus galaxy is one of the closest obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs), making it an ideal target for detailed study. Combining archival Chandra and XMM-Newton data with new NuSTAR observations, we model the 2-79 keV spectrum to constrain the primary AGN continuum and to derive physical parameters for the obscuring material. Chandra's high angular resolution allows a separation of nuclear and off-nuclear galactic emission. In the off-nuclear diffuse emission, we find signatures of strong cold reflection, including high equivalent-width neutral Fe lines. This Compton-scattered off-nuclear emission amounts to 18% of the nuclear flux in the Fe line region, but becomes comparable to the nuclear emission above 30 keV. The new analysis no longer supports a prominent transmitted AGN component in the observed band. We find that the nuclear spectrum is consistent with Compton scattering by an optically thick torus, where the intrinsic spectrum is a power law of photon index Γ = 2.2-2.4, the torus has an equatorial column density of N {sub H} = (6-10) × 10{sup 24} cm{sup –2}, and the intrinsic AGN 2-10 keV luminosity is (2.3-5.1) × 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1}. These values place Circinus along the same relations as unobscured AGNs in accretion rate versus Γ and L{sub X} versus L {sub IR} phase space. NuSTAR's high sensitivity and low background allow us to study the short timescale variability of Circinus at X-ray energies above 10 keV for the first time. The lack of detected variability favors a Compton-thick absorber, in line with the spectral fitting results.

  19. Stability of the Photon Indices in Z-source GX 340+0 for Spectral States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifina, Elena; Titarchuk, Lev; Frontera, Filippo

    2013-03-01

    We show an analysis of the spectral and timing properties of X-ray radiation from Z-source GX 340+0 during its evolution when the electron temperature of the transition layer (TL) kTe monotonically decreases from 21 to 3 keV. We analyze episodes observed with BeppoSAX and RXTE. We reveal that the X-ray broadband energy spectra during all spectral states can be reproduced by a physical model composed of a soft Blackbody component and two Comptonized components (both due to the presence of the TL that upscatters both seed photons of T s1 <~ 1 keV coming from the disk (first component Comptb1), and seed photons of temperature T s2 <~ 1.5 keV coming from the neutron star (second component Comptb2) and the iron-line (Gaussian) component. Spectral analysis using this model indicates that the photon power-law indices Γcom1 and Γcom2 of the Comptonized components are almost constant, Γcom1 and Γcom2 ~ 2 when kTe changes from 3 to 21 keV along the Z-track. We interpret the detected quasi-stability of the indices of Comptonized components to be near a value of 2. Furthermore, this index stability now found for the Comptonized spectral components of Z-source GX 340+0 is similar to that previously established in the atoll sources 4U 1728-34 and GX 3+1, and earlier proposed for a number of X-ray neutron stars (NSs). This behavior of NSs both for atoll and Z-sources is essentially different from that observed in black hole binaries where Γcom increases during a spectral evolution from the low state to the high state and ultimately saturates at a high mass accretion rate.

  20. Two-photon interference of temporally separated photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Heonoh; Lee, Sang Min; Moon, Han Seb

    2016-10-01

    We present experimental demonstrations of two-photon interference involving temporally separated photons within two types of interferometers: a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and a polarization-based Michelson interferometer. The two-photon states are probabilistically prepared in a symmetrically superposed state within the two interferometer arms by introducing a large time delay between two input photons; this state is composed of two temporally separated photons, which are in two different or the same spatial modes. We then observe two-photon interference fringes involving both the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference effect and the interference of path-entangled two-photon states simultaneously in a single interferometric setup. The observed two-photon interference fringes provide simultaneous observation of the interferometric properties of the single-photon and two-photon wavepackets. The observations can also facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of the origins of the interference phenomena arising from spatially bunched/anti-bunched two-photon states comprised of two temporally separated photons within the interferometer arms.

  1. Two-photon interference of temporally separated photons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heonoh; Lee, Sang Min; Moon, Han Seb

    2016-01-01

    We present experimental demonstrations of two-photon interference involving temporally separated photons within two types of interferometers: a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and a polarization-based Michelson interferometer. The two-photon states are probabilistically prepared in a symmetrically superposed state within the two interferometer arms by introducing a large time delay between two input photons; this state is composed of two temporally separated photons, which are in two different or the same spatial modes. We then observe two-photon interference fringes involving both the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference effect and the interference of path-entangled two-photon states simultaneously in a single interferometric setup. The observed two-photon interference fringes provide simultaneous observation of the interferometric properties of the single-photon and two-photon wavepackets. The observations can also facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of the origins of the interference phenomena arising from spatially bunched/anti-bunched two-photon states comprised of two temporally separated photons within the interferometer arms. PMID:27708380

  2. Discrete Chromatic Aberrations Arising from Photoinduced Electron-Photon Interactions in Ultrafast Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Plemmons, Dayne A; Flannigan, David J

    2016-05-26

    In femtosecond ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) experiments, the initial excitation period is composed of spatiotemporal overlap of the temporally commensurate pump photon pulse and probe photoelectron packet. Generation of evanescent near-fields at the nanostructure specimens produces a dispersion relation that enables coupling of the photons (ℏω = 2.4 eV, for example) and freely propagating electrons (200 keV, for example) in the near-field. Typically, this manifests as discrete peaks occurring at integer multiples (n) of the photon energy in the low-loss/gain region of electron-energy spectra (i.e., at 200 keV ± nℏω eV). Here, we examine the UEM imaging resolution implications of the strong inelastic near-field interactions between the photons employed in optical excitation and the probe photoelectrons. We find that the additional photoinduced energy dispersion occurring when swift electrons pass through intense evanescent near-fields results in a discrete chromatic aberration that limits the spatial resolving power to several angstroms during the excitation period. PMID:27111530

  3. Photons and magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-06-01

    Magnets are often electrically activated, but recent research has demonstrated various schemes that can control magnetization using light and photocarriers. Nature Photonics spoke to Petr Němec and Tomas Jungwirth about their recent work on a polarization-independent optical-torque approach.

  4. Photon collider at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, Valery

    2001-10-01

    High energy photon colliders ( γγ, γe) based on backward Compton scattering of laser light is a very natural addition to e +e - linear colliders. In this report, we consider this option for the TESLA project. Recent study has shown that the horizontal emittance in the TESLA damping ring can be further decreased by a factor of four. In this case, the γγ luminosity in the high energy part of spectrum can reach about (1/3) Le +e -. Typical cross-sections of interesting processes in γγ collisions are higher than those in e +e - collisions by about one order of magnitude, so the number of events in γγ collisions will be more than that in e +e - collisions. Photon colliders can, certainly, give additional information and they are the best for the study of many phenomena. The main question is now the technical feasibility. The key new element in photon colliders is a very powerful laser system. An external optical cavity is a promising approach for the TESLA project. A free electron laser is another option. However, a more straightforward solution is "an optical storage ring (optical trap)" with a diode pumped solid state laser injector which is today technically feasible. This paper briefly reviews the status of a photon collider based on the linear collider TESLA, its possible parameters and existing problems.

  5. Extrapolation Ionization Chamber Dosimetry of Fluorescent X-Ray Energies from 4.5 to 19.6 keV.

    PubMed

    Rakowski, Joseph T; Tucker, Mark A; Snyder, Michael G; Makar, Simon P; Yudele, Mark; Burmeister, Jay; Joiner, Michael C

    2016-09-01

    Characteristic X rays of energies less than approximately 20 keV are of interest in radiobiology and radiation oncology. There is evidence that these low-energy photons produce higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and lower oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) relative to higher energies. Lower energy X rays also offer the advantage of healthy tissue sparing beyond the target treatment depth. Electronic brachytherapy systems that can deliver characteristic and bremsstrahlung X rays of varying energy are in clinical use as well as under development. We performed low-energy extrapolation ionization chamber dosimetry using two methods: 1. the exposure-to-dose method; and 2. the Burlin theory method combined with the extrapolation chamber method of Klevenhagen. We investigated fluorescent X rays emitted from seven metals: titanium (Ti, Z = 22); chromium (Cr, Z = 24); iron (Fe, Z = 26); cobalt (Co, Z = 27); copper (Cu, Z = 29); zinc (Zn, Z = 30); and molybdenum (Mo, Z = 42). X rays were produced by irradiation of the metals with a 55 kVp, 45 mA silver anode spectrum. The data obtained were air kerma rate (cGy/min), and radiation dose rate (cGy/min) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution and water. Air kerma rates ranged from 3.55 ± 0.10 to 14.36 ± 0.39 cGy/min. Dose rates ranged from 3.85 ± 0.10 to 16.96 ± 0.46 cGy/min in PBS and 3.59 ± 0.10 to 16.06 ± 0.43 cGy/min in water. Dose-rate energy dependence of both models was examined by taking a ratio of measured to Monte Carlo calculated dose rates. Dosimetry method 1 exhibited a linear relationship across all energies with a slope of 0.0127 keV(-1) and R(2) of 0.9276. Method 2 exhibited a linear relationship across all energies with a slope of 0.0467 keV(-1) and R(2) of 0.9933. Method 1 or 2 may be used as a relative dosimetry system to derive dose rates to water by using a second reference ion chamber with a NIST-traceable calibration for the molybdenum spectrum.

  6. Extrapolation Ionization Chamber Dosimetry of Fluorescent X-Ray Energies from 4.5 to 19.6 keV.

    PubMed

    Rakowski, Joseph T; Tucker, Mark A; Snyder, Michael G; Makar, Simon P; Yudele, Mark; Burmeister, Jay; Joiner, Michael C

    2016-09-01

    Characteristic X rays of energies less than approximately 20 keV are of interest in radiobiology and radiation oncology. There is evidence that these low-energy photons produce higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and lower oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) relative to higher energies. Lower energy X rays also offer the advantage of healthy tissue sparing beyond the target treatment depth. Electronic brachytherapy systems that can deliver characteristic and bremsstrahlung X rays of varying energy are in clinical use as well as under development. We performed low-energy extrapolation ionization chamber dosimetry using two methods: 1. the exposure-to-dose method; and 2. the Burlin theory method combined with the extrapolation chamber method of Klevenhagen. We investigated fluorescent X rays emitted from seven metals: titanium (Ti, Z = 22); chromium (Cr, Z = 24); iron (Fe, Z = 26); cobalt (Co, Z = 27); copper (Cu, Z = 29); zinc (Zn, Z = 30); and molybdenum (Mo, Z = 42). X rays were produced by irradiation of the metals with a 55 kVp, 45 mA silver anode spectrum. The data obtained were air kerma rate (cGy/min), and radiation dose rate (cGy/min) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution and water. Air kerma rates ranged from 3.55 ± 0.10 to 14.36 ± 0.39 cGy/min. Dose rates ranged from 3.85 ± 0.10 to 16.96 ± 0.46 cGy/min in PBS and 3.59 ± 0.10 to 16.06 ± 0.43 cGy/min in water. Dose-rate energy dependence of both models was examined by taking a ratio of measured to Monte Carlo calculated dose rates. Dosimetry method 1 exhibited a linear relationship across all energies with a slope of 0.0127 keV(-1) and R(2) of 0.9276. Method 2 exhibited a linear relationship across all energies with a slope of 0.0467 keV(-1) and R(2) of 0.9933. Method 1 or 2 may be used as a relative dosimetry system to derive dose rates to water by using a second reference ion chamber with a NIST-traceable calibration for the molybdenum spectrum. PMID:27548518

  7. Auxiliary Entanglement in Photon Pairs for Multi-Photon Entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Grice, Warren P; Bennink, Ryan S; Evans, Philip G; Humble, Travis S; Schaake, Jason

    2012-01-01

    A growing number of experiments make use of multiple pairs of photons generated in the process of spontaneous parametric down-conversion. We show that entanglement in unwanted degrees of freedom can adversely affect the results of these experiments. We also discuss techniques to reduce or eliminate spectral and spatial entanglement, and we present results from two-photon polarization-entangled source with almost no entanglement in these degrees of freedom. Finally, we present two methods for the generation of four-photon polarization- entangled states. In one of these methods, four-photon can be generated without the need for intermediate two-photon entanglement.

  8. Two-photon spectroscopy of excitons with entangled photons.

    PubMed

    Schlawin, Frank; Mukamel, Shaul

    2013-12-28

    The utility of quantum light as a spectroscopic tool is demonstrated for frequency-dispersed pump-probe, integrated pump-probe, and two-photon fluorescence signals which show Ramsey fringes. Simulations of the frequency-dispersed transmission of a broadband pulse of entangled photons interacting with a three-level model of matter reveal how the non-classical time-bandwidth properties of entangled photons can be used to disentangle congested spectra, and reveal otherwise unresolved features. Quantum light effects are most pronounced at weak intensities when entangled photon pairs are well separated, and are gradually diminished at higher intensities when different photon pairs overlap.

  9. Two-photon spectroscopy of excitons with entangled photons

    SciTech Connect

    Schlawin, Frank; Mukamel, Shaul

    2013-12-28

    The utility of quantum light as a spectroscopic tool is demonstrated for frequency-dispersed pump-probe, integrated pump-probe, and two-photon fluorescence signals which show Ramsey fringes. Simulations of the frequency-dispersed transmission of a broadband pulse of entangled photons interacting with a three-level model of matter reveal how the non-classical time-bandwidth properties of entangled photons can be used to disentangle congested spectra, and reveal otherwise unresolved features. Quantum light effects are most pronounced at weak intensities when entangled photon pairs are well separated, and are gradually diminished at higher intensities when different photon pairs overlap.

  10. Full Quantum Analysis of Two-Photon Absorption Using Two-Photon Wave Function: Comparison of Two-Photon Absorption with One-Photon Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Toshihiro; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko; Kitano, Masao

    2009-10-01

    For dissipation-free photon-photon interaction at the single photon level, we analyze one-photon and two-photon transitions induced by photon pairs in three-level atoms using two-photon wave functions. We show that two-photon absorption can be substantially enhanced by adjusting the time correlation of photon pairs. We study two typical cases: a Gaussian wave function and a rectangular wave function. In the latter, we find that under special conditions one-photon transition is completely suppressed, while two-photon transition is maintained with a high probability.

  11. Improved photon counting efficiency calibration using superconducting single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Haiyong; Xu, Nan; Li, Jianwei; Sun, Ruoduan; Feng, Guojin; Wang, Yanfei; Ma, Chong; Lin, Yandong; Zhang, Labao; Kang, Lin; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2015-10-01

    The quantum efficiency of photon counters can be measured with standard uncertainty below 1% level using correlated photon pairs generated through spontaneous parametric down-conversion process. Normally a laser in UV, blue or green wavelength range with sufficient photon energy is applied to produce energy and momentum conserved photon pairs in two channels with desired wavelengths for calibration. One channel is used as the heralding trigger, and the other is used for the calibration of the detector under test. A superconducting nanowire single photon detector with advantages such as high photon counting speed (<20 MHz), low dark count rate (<50 counts per second), and wideband responsivity (UV to near infrared) is used as the trigger detector, enabling correlated photons calibration capabilities into shortwave visible range. For a 355nm single longitudinal mode pump laser, when a superconducting nanowire single photon detector is used as the trigger detector at 1064nm and 1560nm in the near infrared range, the photon counting efficiency calibration capabilities can be realized at 532nm and 460nm. The quantum efficiency measurement on photon counters such as photomultiplier tubes and avalanche photodiodes can be then further extended in a wide wavelength range (e.g. 400-1000nm) using a flat spectral photon flux source to meet the calibration demands in cutting edge low light applications such as time resolved fluorescence and nonlinear optical spectroscopy, super resolution microscopy, deep space observation, and so on.

  12. Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography with quantum correlation of γ-ray photons

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, K.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2015-05-15

    Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography (PET) has long been discussed with respect to imaging instrumentation and algorithms for data treatment. Here, the molecular sensitivity in PET is discussed on the basis of 2-dimensional coincident measurements of 511 keV γ ray photons resultant from two-photon annihilation. Introduction of an additional selection window based on the energy sum and difference of the coincidently measured γ ray photons, without any significant instrumental and algorithmic changes, showed an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by an order of magnitude. Improvement of performance characteristics in the PET imaging system was demonstrated by an increase in the noise equivalent count rate (NECR) which takes both the SNR and the detection efficiency into consideration. A further improvement of both the SNR and the NECR is expected for the present system in real clinical and in-vivo environments, where much stronger positron sources are employed.

  13. Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography with quantum correlation of γ-ray photons.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Kobayashi, Y

    2015-05-01

    Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography (PET) has long been discussed with respect to imaging instrumentation and algorithms for data treatment. Here, the molecular sensitivity in PET is discussed on the basis of 2-dimensional coincident measurements of 511 keV γ ray photons resultant from two-photon annihilation. Introduction of an additional selection window based on the energy sum and difference of the coincidently measured γ ray photons, without any significant instrumental and algorithmic changes, showed an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by an order of magnitude. Improvement of performance characteristics in the PET imaging system was demonstrated by an increase in the noise equivalent count rate (NECR) which takes both the SNR and the detection efficiency into consideration. A further improvement of both the SNR and the NECR is expected for the present system in real clinical and in-vivo environments, where much stronger positron sources are employed.

  14. Calculation of conversion coefficients for clinical photon spectra using the MCNP code.

    PubMed

    Lima, M A F; Silva, A X; Crispim, V R

    2004-01-01

    In this work, the MCNP4B code has been employed to calculate conversion coefficients from air kerma to the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10)/Ka, for monoenergetic photon energies from 10 keV to 50 MeV, assuming the kerma approximation. Also estimated are the H*(10)/Ka for photon beams produced by linear accelerators, such as Clinac-4 and Clinac-2500, after transmission through primary barriers of radiotherapy treatment rooms. The results for the conversion coefficients for monoenergetic photon energies, with statistical uncertainty <2%, are compared with those in ICRP publication 74 and good agreements were obtained. The conversion coefficients calculated for real clinic spectra transmitted through walls of concrete of 1, 1.5 and 2 m thick, are in the range of 1.06-1.12 Sv Gy(-1). PMID:15367760

  15. Photon-splitting limits to the hardness of emission in strongly magnetized soft gamma repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    1995-01-01

    Soft gamma repeaters are characterized by recurrent activity consisting of short-duration outbursts of high-energy emission that is typically of temperature less than 40 keV. One recent model of repeaters is that they originate in the environs of neutron stars with superstrong magnetic fields, perhaps greater than 10(exp 14) G. In such fields, the exotic process of magnetic photon splitting gamma yields gamma gamma acts very effectively to reprocess gamma-ray radiation down to hard X-ray energies. In this Letter, the action of photon splitting is considered in some detail, via the solution of photon kinetic equations, determining how it limits the hardness of emission in strongly magnetized repeaters, and thereby obtaining observational constraints to the field in SGR 1806-20.

  16. Physical effects of mechanical design parameters on photon sensitivity and spatial resolution performance of a breast-dedicated PET system

    PubMed Central

    Spanoudaki, V. C.; Lau, F. W. Y.; Vandenbroucke, A.; Levin, C. S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to address design considerations of a high resolution, high sensitivity positron emission tomography scanner dedicated to breast imaging. Methods: The methodology uses a detailed Monte Carlo model of the system structures to obtain a quantitative evaluation of several performance parameters. Special focus was given to the effect of dense mechanical structures designed to provide mechanical robustness and thermal regulation to the minuscule and temperature sensitive detectors. Results: For the energies of interest around the photopeak (450–700 keV energy window), the simulation results predict a 6.5% reduction in the single photon detection efficiency and a 12.5% reduction in the coincidence photon detection efficiency in the case that the mechanical structures are interspersed between the detectors. However for lower energies, a substantial increase in the number of detected events (approximately 14% and 7% for singles at a 100–200 keV energy window and coincidences at a lower energy threshold of 100 keV, respectively) was observed with the presence of these structures due to backscatter. The number of photon events that involve multiple interactions in various crystal elements is also affected by the presence of the structures. For photon events involving multiple interactions among various crystal elements, the coincidence photon sensitivity is reduced by as much as 20% for a point source at the center of the field of view. There is no observable effect on the intrinsic and the reconstructed spatial resolution and spatial resolution uniformity. Conclusions: Mechanical structures can have a considerable effect on system sensitivity, especially for systems processing multi-interaction photon events. This effect, however, does not impact the spatial resolution. Various mechanical structure designs are currently under evaluation in order to achieve optimum trade-off between temperature stability, accurate detector positioning, and minimum

  17. NEW OBSERVATIONS OF THE SOLAR 0.5–5 KEV SOFT X-RAY SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, Amir; Woods, Thomas N.; Warren, Harry P.

    2015-03-20

    The solar corona is orders of magnitude hotter than the underlying photosphere, but how the corona attains such high temperatures is still not understood. Soft X-ray (SXR) emission provides important diagnostics for thermal processes in the high-temperature corona, and is also an important driver of ionospheric dynamics at Earth. There is a crucial observational gap between ∼0.2 and ∼4 keV, outside the ranges of existing spectrometers. We present observations from a new SXR spectrometer, the Amptek X123-SDD, which measured the spatially integrated solar spectral irradiance from ∼0.5 to ∼5 keV, with ∼0.15 keV FWHM resolution, during sounding rocket flights on 2012 June 23 and 2013 October 21. These measurements show that the highly variable SXR emission is orders of magnitude greater than that during the deep minimum of 2009, even with only weak activity. The observed spectra show significant high-temperature (5–10 MK) emission and are well fit by simple power-law temperature distributions with indices of ∼6, close to the predictions of nanoflare models of coronal heating. Observations during the more active 2013 flight indicate an enrichment of low first-ionization potential elements of only ∼1.6, below the usually observed value of ∼4, suggesting that abundance variations may be related to coronal heating processes. The XUV Photometer System Level 4 data product, a spectral irradiance model derived from integrated broadband measurements, significantly overestimates the spectra from both flights, suggesting a need for revision of its non-flare reference spectra, with important implications for studies of Earth ionospheric dynamics driven by solar SXRs.

  18. Photonic band gap materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassagne, D.

    Photonic band gap materials Photonic band gap materials are periodic dielectric structures that control the propagation of electromagnetic waves. We describe the plane wave method, which allows to calculate the band structures of photonic crystals. By symmetry analysis and a perturbative approach, we predict the appearance of the low energy photonic band gaps of hexagonal structures. We propose new two-dimensional structures called graphite and boron nitride. Using a transfer matrix method, we calculate the transmission of the graphite structure and we show the crucial role of the coupling with external modes. We study the appearance of allowed modes in the photonic band gap by the introduction of localized defects in the periodicity. Finally, we discuss the properties of opals formed by self-organized silica microspheres, which are very promising for the fabrication of three-dimensional photonic crystals. Les matériaux à bandes interdites photoniques sont des structures diélectriques périodiques qui contrôlent la propagation des ondes électromagnétiques. Nous décrivons la méthode des ondes planes qui permet de calculer les structures de bandes des cristaux photoniques. Par une analyse de la symétrie et une approche perturbative, nous précisons les conditions d'existence des bandes interdites de basse énergie. Nous proposons de nouvelles structures bidimensionnelles appelées graphite et nitrure de bore. Grâce à une méthode de matrices de transfert, nous calculons la transmission de la structure graphite et nous mettons en évidence le rôle fondamental du couplage avec les modes extérieurs. Nous étudions l'apparition de modes permis dans la bande interdite grâce à l'introduction de défauts dans la périodicité. Enfin, nous discutons les propriétés des opales constituées de micro-billes de silice auto-organisées, qui sont très prometteuses pour la fabrication de cristaux photoniques tridimensionnels.

  19. Photon + jets at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenschein, Lars; /RWTH Aachen U.

    2009-06-01

    Photon plus jet production has been studied by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at a centre of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Measurements of the inclusive photon, inclusive photon plus jet, photon plus heavy flavour jet cross sections and double parton interactions in photon plus three jet events are presented. They are based on integrated luminosities between 0.4 fb{sup -1} and 1.0 fb{sup -1}. The results are compared to perturbative QCD calculations in various approximations.

  20. Rise time in 20-32 keV impulsive X-radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorpahl, J. A.; Takakura, T.

    1974-01-01

    A new property of the X-ray impulsive component observed in solar flares is discussed, giving attention to the relation between the slope of the electron power spectrum and the rise time in the 20-32 keV X-ray spike. This particular energy range was chosen because it offered the greatest number of impulsive events while being sufficiently high to avoid contamination by soft X radiation. It is found for the thin-target model that the electron spectrum tends to be softer when the acceleration rate is smaller.

  1. Single ionization of helium by 40-3000-keV antiprotons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, L. H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Møller, S. P.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Tang-Petersen, S.; Uggerhøj, E.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1990-06-01

    Measurements of single-ionization cross sections for antiproton impact on helium atoms are reported for impact energies ranging from 40 keV to 3 MeV. It is found that the measured cross sections are in good agreement with recent theoretical estimates based on the continuum-distorted-wave approximation. From a comparison with similar proton data, the ratio between antiproton and proton results is obtained. The energy dependence of this ratio is compared with various theoretical estimates and explained as a result of polarization and binding effects.

  2. Asymmetric 511 keV Positron Annihilation Line Emission from the Inner Galactic Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Gerry; Weidenspointner, Georg; Jean, Pierre; Knodlseder, Jurgen; Ballmoos, Perer von; Bignami, Giovanni; Diehl, Roland; Strong, Andrew; Cordier, Bertrand; Schanne, Stephane; Winkler, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    A recently reported asymmetry in the 511 keV gamma-ray line emission from the inner galactic disk is unexpected and mimics an equally unexpected one in the distribution of LMXBs seen at hard X-ray energies. A possible conclusion is that LMXBs are an important source of the positrons whose annihilation gives rise to the line. We will discuss these results, their statistical significance and that of any link between the two. The implication of any association between LMXBs and positrons for the strong annihilation radiation from the galactic bulge will be reviewed.

  3. Extension to Low Energies (<7keV) of High Pressure X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Itie, J.-P.; Flank, A.-M.; Lagarde, P.; Idir, M.; Polian, A.; Couzinet, B.

    2007-01-19

    High pressure x-ray absorption has been performed down to 3.6 keV, thanks to the new LUCIA beamline (SLS, PSI) and to the use of perforated diamonds or Be gasket. Various experimental geometries are proposed, depending on the energy of the edge and on the concentration of the studied element. A few examples will be presented: BaTiO3 at the titanium K edge, Zn0.95 Mn0.05O at the manganese K edge, KCl at the potassium K edge.

  4. On the vectorial photoelectric effect at 2.69 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, P. S.; Hanany, S.; Liu, Y.; Church, E. D.; Fleischman, J.; Kaaret, P.; Novick, R.; Santangelo, A.

    1991-01-01

    Recent experiments conducted to study the vectorial photoelectric effect with CsI, Al2O3 and Si photocathodes at 2.69 keV indicate null results. Detailed analysis shows that previously measured modulation can be well explained by geometrical misalignment and a combination of the asymmetric shape of the incident X-ray beam and a small detection area of the photoelectron detector. After the elimination of the sources of spurious modulation, we observed a modulation factor of less than 3 percent for a grazing incidence angle as small as 5 deg. There is no observable difference in the pulse height distribution between s and p states.

  5. A 17 keV neutrino and large magnetic moment solution of the solar neutrino puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, E. Kh.; Senjanovic, G.; Tao, Zhijian; Berezhiani, Z. G.

    1992-08-01

    Zee-type models with Majorons naturally incorporate the 17 keV neutrino but in their minimal version fail to simultaneously solve the solar neutrino puzzle. If there is a sterile neutrino state, a particularly simple solution is found to the solar neutrino problem, which besides nu(sub 17) predicts a light Zeldovich-Konopinski-Mahmoud neutrino nu(sub light) = nu(sub e) + nu(sub mu)(sup c) with a magnetic moment being easily as large as 10(exp -11)(mu)(sub B) through the Barr-Freire-Zee mechanism.

  6. 17 keV neutrino and large magnetic moment solution of the solar neutrino puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, Eugeni Kh.; Berezhiani, Zurab G.; Senjanović, Goran; Tao, Zhijian

    1993-01-01

    Zee-type models with majorons naturally incorporate the 17 keV neutrino but in their minimal version fail to simultaneously solve the solar neutrino puzzle. If there is a sterile neutrino state, we find a particularly simple solution to the solar neutrino problem, which besides ν17 predicts a light Zeldovich-Konopinski-Mahmoud neutrino νlight = νe + νcμ with a magnetic moment being easily as large as 10 -11μB through the Barr-Freire-Zee mechanism.

  7. Microchannel plate pinhole camera for 20 to 100 keV x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.L.; Leipelt, G.R.; Nilson, D.G.

    1984-10-03

    We present the design and construction of a sensitive pinhole camera for imaging suprathermal x-rays. Our device is a pinhole camera consisting of four filtered pinholes and microchannel plate electron multiplier for x-ray detection and signal amplification. We report successful imaging of 20, 45, 70, and 100 keV x-ray emissions from the fusion targets at our Novette laser facility. Such imaging reveals features of the transport of hot electrons and provides views deep inside the target.

  8. The effect of 1 to 5 keV electrons on the reproductive integrity of microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barengoltz, J. B.; Brady, J.

    1977-01-01

    Microorganisms were exposed to simulated space environment in order to assess the effect of electrons in the energy range 1 to 5 keV on their colony-forming ability. The test system consisted of an electron gun and power supply, a dosimetry subsystem, and a vacuum subsystem. The system was capable of current densities ranging from 0.1 nA/sq cm to 5 micro A/sq cm on a 25 sq on target and an ultimate vacuum of 0.0006 N/sq m (0.000004 torr). The results of the experimental program show a significant reduction in microbial reproductive integrity.

  9. Ionization and Fragmentation of 5-Chlorouracil induced by 100 keV protons collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cafarelli, Pierre; Champeaux, Jean-Philippe; Le Padellec, Arnaud; Moretto-Capelle, Patrick; Rabier, Julien; Sence, Martine; Carcabal, Pierre

    2008-12-08

    We present preliminary experimental results on the dissociation of singly and doubly ionized 5-Chlorouracil induced by collisions with proton of 100 keV energy. Multiple coincidence techniques are used to detect the ionic fragments from single dissociation events. This enables a thorough analysis of kinetic momentums of the charged and neutral species involved in the dissociation. In many cases, this leads to the establishment of the scenario the molecule undergoes after ionization as well as the determination of the nature of intermediate (undetected) species. In other cases, the dissociation scenario cannot be unambiguously identified and further analysis as well as theoretical support is needed.

  10. Dynamic dependence of interaction potentials for keV atoms at metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schueller, A.; Adamov, G.; Wethekam, S.; Maass, K.; Mertens, A.; Winter, H.

    2004-05-01

    He and N atoms are scattered with keV energies under a grazing angle of incidence from clean and flat Ag(111) and Al(111) surfaces. For incidence along low index crystallographic directions in the surface plane, atomic projectiles are steered by rows of atoms (''axial surface channeling'') giving rise to characteristic rainbows in their angular distribution. From the analysis of this effect we derive effective scattering potentials which reveal pronounced dynamical effects. We attribute our observation to the embedding energy for penetration of atoms in the electron gas of a metal.

  11. Implementation and validation of collapsed cone superposition for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Garcia, Manuel; Gardin, Isabelle; Lebtahi, Rachida; Dieudonné, Arnaud

    2015-10-01

    Two collapsed cone (CC) superposition algorithms have been implemented for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters. The straight CC (SCC) superposition method uses a water energy deposition kernel (EDKw) for each electron, positron and photon components, while the primary and scatter CC (PSCC) superposition method uses different EDKw for primary and once-scattered photons. PSCC was implemented only for photons originating from the nucleus, precluding its application to positron emitters. EDKw are linearly scaled by radiological distance, taking into account tissue density heterogeneities. The implementation was tested on 100, 300 and 600 keV mono-energetic photons and 18F, 99mTc, 131I and 177Lu. The kernels were generated using the Monte Carlo codes MCNP and EGSnrc. The validation was performed on 6 phantoms representing interfaces between soft-tissues, lung and bone. The figures of merit were γ (3%, 3 mm) and γ (5%, 5 mm) criterions corresponding to the computation comparison on 80 absorbed doses (AD) points per phantom between Monte Carlo simulations and CC algorithms. PSCC gave better results than SCC for the lowest photon energy (100 keV). For the 3 isotopes computed with PSCC, the percentage of AD points satisfying the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion was always over 99%. A still good but worse result was found with SCC, since at least 97% of AD-values verified the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion, except a value of 57% for the 99mTc with the lung/bone interface. The CC superposition method for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry is a good alternative to Monte Carlo simulations while reducing computation complexity.

  12. Implementation and validation of collapsed cone superposition for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Garcia, Manuel; Gardin, Isabelle; Lebtahi, Rachida; Dieudonné, Arnaud

    2015-10-21

    Two collapsed cone (CC) superposition algorithms have been implemented for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters. The straight CC (SCC) superposition method uses a water energy deposition kernel (EDKw) for each electron, positron and photon components, while the primary and scatter CC (PSCC) superposition method uses different EDKw for primary and once-scattered photons. PSCC was implemented only for photons originating from the nucleus, precluding its application to positron emitters. EDKw are linearly scaled by radiological distance, taking into account tissue density heterogeneities. The implementation was tested on 100, 300 and 600 keV mono-energetic photons and (18)F, (99m)Tc, (131)I and (177)Lu. The kernels were generated using the Monte Carlo codes MCNP and EGSnrc. The validation was performed on 6 phantoms representing interfaces between soft-tissues, lung and bone. The figures of merit were γ (3%, 3 mm) and γ (5%, 5 mm) criterions corresponding to the computation comparison on 80 absorbed doses (AD) points per phantom between Monte Carlo simulations and CC algorithms. PSCC gave better results than SCC for the lowest photon energy (100 keV). For the 3 isotopes computed with PSCC, the percentage of AD points satisfying the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion was always over 99%. A still good but worse result was found with SCC, since at least 97% of AD-values verified the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion, except a value of 57% for the (99m)Tc with the lung/bone interface. The CC superposition method for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry is a good alternative to Monte Carlo simulations while reducing computation complexity. PMID:26406778

  13. Implementation and validation of collapsed cone superposition for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Garcia, Manuel; Gardin, Isabelle; Lebtahi, Rachida; Dieudonné, Arnaud

    2015-10-21

    Two collapsed cone (CC) superposition algorithms have been implemented for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters. The straight CC (SCC) superposition method uses a water energy deposition kernel (EDKw) for each electron, positron and photon components, while the primary and scatter CC (PSCC) superposition method uses different EDKw for primary and once-scattered photons. PSCC was implemented only for photons originating from the nucleus, precluding its application to positron emitters. EDKw are linearly scaled by radiological distance, taking into account tissue density heterogeneities. The implementation was tested on 100, 300 and 600 keV mono-energetic photons and (18)F, (99m)Tc, (131)I and (177)Lu. The kernels were generated using the Monte Carlo codes MCNP and EGSnrc. The validation was performed on 6 phantoms representing interfaces between soft-tissues, lung and bone. The figures of merit were γ (3%, 3 mm) and γ (5%, 5 mm) criterions corresponding to the computation comparison on 80 absorbed doses (AD) points per phantom between Monte Carlo simulations and CC algorithms. PSCC gave better results than SCC for the lowest photon energy (100 keV). For the 3 isotopes computed with PSCC, the percentage of AD points satisfying the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion was always over 99%. A still good but worse result was found with SCC, since at least 97% of AD-values verified the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion, except a value of 57% for the (99m)Tc with the lung/bone interface. The CC superposition method for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry is a good alternative to Monte Carlo simulations while reducing computation complexity.

  14. Evidence for electron acceleration up to approximately 300 keV in the magnetic reconnection diffusion region of earth's magnetotail.

    PubMed

    ØIeroset, M; Lin, R P; Phan, T D; Larson, D E; Bale, S D

    2002-11-01

    We report direct measurements of high-energy particles in a rare crossing of the diffusion region in Earth's magnetotail by the Wind spacecraft. The fluxes of energetic electrons up to approximately 300 keV peak near the center of the diffusion region and decrease monotonically away from this region. The diffusion region electron flux spectrum obeys a power law with an index of -3.8 above approximately 2 keV, and the electron angular distribution displays strong field-aligned bidirectional anisotropy at energies below approximately 2 keV, becoming isotropic above approximately 6 keV. These observations indicate significant electron acceleration inside the diffusion region. Ions show no such energization.

  15. Photonic-powered cable assembly

    DOEpatents

    Sanderson, Stephen N; Appel, Titus James; Wrye, IV, Walter C

    2014-06-24

    A photonic-cable assembly includes a power source cable connector ("PSCC") coupled to a power receive cable connector ("PRCC") via a fiber cable. The PSCC electrically connects to a first electronic device and houses a photonic power source and an optical data transmitter. The fiber cable includes an optical transmit data path coupled to the optical data transmitter, an optical power path coupled to the photonic power source, and an optical feedback path coupled to provide feedback control to the photonic power source. The PRCC electrically connects to a second electronic device and houses an optical data receiver coupled to the optical transmit data path, a feedback controller coupled to the optical feedback path to control the photonic power source, and a photonic power converter coupled to the optical power path to convert photonic energy received over the optical power path to electrical energy to power components of the PRCC.

  16. Photonic-powered cable assembly

    DOEpatents

    Sanderson, Stephen N.; Appel, Titus James; Wrye, IV, Walter C.

    2013-01-22

    A photonic-cable assembly includes a power source cable connector ("PSCC") coupled to a power receive cable connector ("PRCC") via a fiber cable. The PSCC electrically connects to a first electronic device and houses a photonic power source and an optical data transmitter. The fiber cable includes an optical transmit data path coupled to the optical data transmitter, an optical power path coupled to the photonic power source, and an optical feedback path coupled to provide feedback control to the photonic power source. The PRCC electrically connects to a second electronic device and houses an optical data receiver coupled to the optical transmit data path, a feedback controller coupled to the optical feedback path to control the photonic power source, and a photonic power converter coupled to the optical power path to convert photonic energy received over the optical power path to electrical energy to power components of the PRCC.

  17. Characteristics of upstream energetic (E>=50keV) ion events during intense geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulos, G. C.; Rigas, A. G.; Sarris, E. T.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1998-05-01

    In this work we examine the statistical presence of some important features of upstream energetic (>=50 keV) ion events under some special conditions in the upstream region and the magnetosphere. The 125 ion events considered in the statistic were observed by the IMP 7 and IMP 8 spacecraft, at ~35RE from the Earth, during nine long time intervals of a total of 153 hours. The time intervals analyzed were selected under the following restrictions: existence of high proton flux (i.e., >=900 pcm-2s-1sr-1) and of a great number of events (an occurrence frequency of ~10 events per 12 hours in the whole statistics) in the energy range 50-220 keV. The most striking findings are the following: (1) The upstream events were observed during times with high values of the geomagnetic activity index Kp(>=3-) (2) all of the upstream events (100%) have energy spectra extending up to energies E>=290keV (3) 86% of these events are accompanied by relativistic (E>=220keV) electrons; and (4) the majority of the upstream ion events (82%) showed noninverse velocity dispersion during their onset phase (22% of the events showed forward velocity dispersion, and 60% showed no velocity dispersion at all when 5.5-min averaged observations were analyzed). Further statistical analysis of this sample of upstream particle events shows that the 50- to 220-keV proton flux shows a positive correlation with the following parameters: the Kp index of geomagnetic activity and the flux of the high-energy (290-500 keV) protons and (>=220 keV) electrons. More specific findings are the following: (1) The spectral index γ for a power law distribution of ions detected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Energetic Particle Experiment (EPE) instrument (50<=E<=220keV) and The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory Charged Particle Measurement Experiment (CPME) instrument (290<=E<=500keV) ranges between 2 and 6, with maximum probability between 4 and 5 and (2) the peak

  18. Monte Carlo study of the energy and angular dependence of the response of plastic scintillation detectors in photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lilie L. W.; Klein, David; Beddar, A. Sam

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: By using Monte Carlo simulations, the authors investigated the energy and angular dependence of the response of plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) in photon beams. Methods: Three PSDs were modeled in this study: A plastic scintillator (BC-400) and a scintillating fiber (BCF-12), both attached by a plastic-core optical fiber stem, and a plastic scintillator (BC-400) attached by an air-core optical fiber stem with a silica tube coated with silver. The authors then calculated, with low statistical uncertainty, the energy and angular dependences of the PSDs' responses in a water phantom. For energy dependence, the response of the detectors is calculated as the detector dose per unit water dose. The perturbation caused by the optical fiber stem connected to the PSD to guide the optical light to a photodetector was studied in simulations using different optical fiber materials. Results: For the energy dependence of the PSDs in photon beams, the PSDs with plastic-core fiber have excellent energy independence within about 0.5% at photon energies ranging from 300 keV (monoenergetic) to 18 MV (linac beam). The PSD with an air-core optical fiber with a silica tube also has good energy independence within 1% in the same photon energy range. For the angular dependence, the relative response of all the three modeled PSDs is within 2% for all the angles in a 6 MV photon beam. This is also true in a 300 keV monoenergetic photon beam for PSDs with plastic-core fiber. For the PSD with an air-core fiber with a silica tube in the 300 keV beam, the relative response varies within 1% for most of the angles, except in the case when the fiber stem is pointing right to the radiation source in which case the PSD may over-response by more than 10%. Conclusions: At {+-}1% level, no beam energy correction is necessary for the response of all three PSDs modeled in this study in the photon energy ranges from 200 keV (monoenergetic) to 18 MV (linac beam). The PSD would be even closer

  19. Monte Carlo study of the energy and angular dependence of the response of plastic scintillation detectors in photon beams

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lilie L. W.; Klein, David; Beddar, A. Sam

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: By using Monte Carlo simulations, the authors investigated the energy and angular dependence of the response of plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) in photon beams. Methods: Three PSDs were modeled in this study: A plastic scintillator (BC-400) and a scintillating fiber (BCF-12), both attached by a plastic-core optical fiber stem, and a plastic scintillator (BC-400) attached by an air-core optical fiber stem with a silica tube coated with silver. The authors then calculated, with low statistical uncertainty, the energy and angular dependences of the PSDs’ responses in a water phantom. For energy dependence, the response of the detectors is calculated as the detector dose per unit water dose. The perturbation caused by the optical fiber stem connected to the PSD to guide the optical light to a photodetector was studied in simulations using different optical fiber materials. Results: For the energy dependence of the PSDs in photon beams, the PSDs with plastic-core fiber have excellent energy independence within about 0.5% at photon energies ranging from 300 keV (monoenergetic) to 18 MV (linac beam). The PSD with an air-core optical fiber with a silica tube also has good energy independence within 1% in the same photon energy range. For the angular dependence, the relative response of all the three modeled PSDs is within 2% for all the angles in a 6 MV photon beam. This is also true in a 300 keV monoenergetic photon beam for PSDs with plastic-core fiber. For the PSD with an air-core fiber with a silica tube in the 300 keV beam, the relative response varies within 1% for most of the angles, except in the case when the fiber stem is pointing right to the radiation source in which case the PSD may over-response by more than 10%. Conclusions: At ±1% level, no beam energy correction is necessary for the response of all three PSDs modeled in this study in the photon energy ranges from 200 keV (monoenergetic) to 18 MV (linac beam). The PSD would be even closer

  20. Natural photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneron, Jean Pol; Simonis, Priscilla

    2012-10-01

    Photonic structures appeared in nature several hundred millions years ago. In the living world, color is used for communication and this important function strongly impacts the individual chances of survival as well as the chances to reproduce. This has a statistical influence on species populations. Therefore, because they are involved in evolution, natural color-generating structures are - from some point of view - highly optimized. In this short review, a survey is presented of the development of natural photonic crystal-type structures occurring in insects, spiders, birds, fishes and other marine animals, in plants and more, from the standpoint of light-waves propagation. One-, two-, and three-dimensional structures will be reviewed with selected examples.

  1. PHOTON: A user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, D.

    1988-01-01

    PHOTON has proven very useful in the development of the X17 superconducting wiggler beamline. Its use has determined the shielding required from the wiggler device to the very end of the beamline in the hutches and angiography section. Doses calculated by this program have been compared with experimental results from conventional bending magnet beamline with great success. In each case the program consistently overestimated the dose by factors ranging from 2 to 10. The reason for this overestimation is understood and was not refined further in the program in order to maintain some level of safety in the shielding calculations. PHOTON should prove useful in the design of any beamline. Its ability to calculate power deposited and spectra transmitted through nearly arbitrary beamline configurations as well as the scattered radiation doses through shielding walls make it a very powerful tool.

  2. Photons in a ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mück, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    The electromagnetic field inside a spherical cavity of large radius R is considered in the presence of stationary charge and current densities. R provides infra-red regularisation while maintaining gauge invariance. The quantum ground state of physical photons forming the magnetic field is found to be a coherent state with a definite mean occupation number. The electric field, which is determined by the Gauss law constraint, is maintained by a minimum uncertainty coherent state, according to the projection operator approach to the quantisation of constrained systems. The mean occupation number of this state is proportional to the square of the total charge. The results confirm formulae obtained previously from a calculation with a finite photon mass for infra-red regularisation.

  3. Optics of photonic quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardeny, Z. Valy; Nahata, Ajay; Agrawal, Amit

    2013-03-01

    The physics of periodic systems are of fundamental importance and result in various phenomena that govern wave transport and interference. However, deviations from periodicity may result in higher complexity and give rise to a number of surprising effects. One such deviation can be found in the field of optics in the realization of photonic quasicrystals, a class of structures made from building blocks that are arranged using well-designed patterns but lack translational symmetry. Nevertheless, these structures, which lie between periodic and disordered structures, still show sharp diffraction patterns that confirm the existence of wave interference resulting from their long-range order. In this Review, we discuss the beautiful physics unravelled in photonic quasicrystals of one, two and three dimensions, and describe how they can influence optical transmission and reflectivity, photoluminescence, light transport, plasmonics and laser action.

  4. Surface nanoscale axial photonics.

    PubMed

    Sumetsky, M; Fini, J M

    2011-12-19

    Dense photonic integration promises to revolutionize optical computing and communications. However, efforts towards this goal face unacceptable attenuation of light caused by surface roughness in microscopic devices. Here we address this problem by introducing Surface Nanoscale Axial Photonics (SNAP). The SNAP platform is based on whispering gallery modes circulating around the optical fiber surface and undergoing slow axial propagation readily described by the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation. These modes can be steered with dramatically small nanoscale variation of the fiber radius, which is quite simple to introduce in practice. Extremely low loss of SNAP devices is achieved due to the low surface roughness inherent in a drawn fiber surface. In excellent agreement with the developed theory, we experimentally demonstrate localization of light in quantum wells, halting light by a point source, tunneling through potential barriers, dark states, etc. This demonstration has intriguing potential applications in filtering, switching, slowing light, and sensing.

  5. Precise Determination of the Intensity of 226Ra Alpha Decay to the 186 keV Excited State

    SciTech Connect

    S.P. LaMont; R.J. Gehrke; S.E. Glover; R.H. Filby

    2001-04-01

    There is a significant discrepancy in the reported values for the emission probability of the 186 keV gamma-ray resulting from the alpha decay of 226 Ra to 186 keV excited state of 222 Rn. Published values fall in the range of 3.28 to 3.59 gamma-rays per 100 alpha-decays. An interesting observation is that the lower value, 3.28, is based on measuring the 186 keV gamma-ray intensity relative to the 226 Ra alpha-branch to the 186 keV level. The higher values, which are close to 3.59, are based on measuring the gamma-ray intensity from mass standards of 226 Ra that are traceable to the mass standards prepared by HÓNIGSCHMID in the early 1930''s. This discrepancy was resolved in this work by carefully measuring the 226 Ra alpha-branch intensities, then applying the theoretical E2 multipolarity internal conversion coefficient of 0.692±0.007 to calculate the 186 keV gamma-ray emission probability. The measured value for the alpha branch to the 186 keV excited state was (6.16±0.03)%, which gives a 186 keV gamma-ray emission probability of (3.64±0.04)%. This value is in excellent agreement with the most recently reported 186 keV gamma-ray emission probabilities determined using 226 Ra mass standards.

  6. Photonics for accelerator instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Stillman, A.

    1993-12-31

    Nonlinear optical effects in certain types of crystals have the capacity to improve the performance of sampling circuits by a large margin. The theory on nonlinear optics and the associated devices is rather straightforward. I will present some of the relevant ideas and illustrate how these principles can result in order of magnitude improvements in sampling circuits. As an example of the photonic technique, I will illustrate how to design a beam position monitor that uses a nonlinear crystal.

  7. Photonic crystal optical memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, A. Wirth; Sombra, A. S. B.

    2011-06-01

    After several decades pushing the technology and the development of the world, the electronics is giving space for technologies that use light. We propose and analyze an optical memory embedded in a nonlinear photonic crystal (PhC), whose system of writing and reading data is controlled by an external command signal. This optical memory is based on optical directional couplers connected to a shared optical ring. Such a device can work over the C-Band of ITU (International Telecommunication Union).

  8. Photonics Explorer Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Amrita; Debaes, Nathalie

    2014-07-01

    The Photonics Explorer is an intra-curricular educational kit developed in a European project with a pan-European collaboration of over 35 teachers and science education professors. Unlike conventional educational outreach kits, the Photonics Explorer is specifically designed to integrate seamlessly in school curricula and enhance and complement the teaching and learning of science and optics in the classroom. The kit equips teachers with class sets of experimental components, provided within a supporting didactic framework and is designed for lower and upper secondary students (12-18 years). The kit is provided completely free of charge to teachers in conjunction with teacher training courses. The workshop will provide an overview of the Photonics Explorer intra-curricular kit and give teachers the opportunity to work hands-on with the material and didactic content of two modules, `Light Signals' (lower secondary) and `Diffraction and Interference'(upper secondary). We also aim to receive feedback regarding the content, components and didactic framework from teachers from non- European countries, to understand the relevance of the kit for their teaching and the ability for such a kit to integrate into non-EU curricula.

  9. Slotted Photonic Crystal Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Di Falco, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them results in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This review article presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which provide higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the optical mode peak within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. Higher sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than possible with most competing devices reported in the literature. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study. PMID:23503295

  10. Slotted photonic crystal sensors.

    PubMed

    Scullion, Mark G; Krauss, Thomas F; Di Falco, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them results in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This review article presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which provide higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the optical mode peak within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. Higher sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than possible with most competing devices reported in the literature. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study. PMID:23503295

  11. Super Photon Counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John

    1999-01-01

    The perfect photon detector would measure the arrival time, the energy, the polarization, and the position of every arriving quantum, but that is easier said than done. Two groups have now succeeded in doing time-resolved spectroscopy on the Crab Nebula pulsar, measuring everything but the polarization, with reports from Romani et al. at Stanford and from Perryman et al. at ESTEC. Both groups use superconducting detectors to gain the necessary speed and sensitivity. The photon can heat the electrons in a superconductor biased in the middle of its resistive transition, or break bound superconducting electron-hole pairs, which can then be collected. Three years ago, Peacock et al. reported that they had detected single optical photons with a superconducting tunnel junction (STJ), and Paresce wrote a News and Views article. A tunnel junction uses two pieces of conductive material, separated by a tiny gap of insulating material or even vacuum. If the gap is thin enough, electrons can tunnel across anyway, and if the conductors are superconductors, the junction displays very useful quantum mechanical properties and electrical nonlinearities. Amplifiers, detectors, oscillators, and computer circuits can all be made from them. Their special advantage is that they operate at very low temperatures, dissipate very little power, operate very fast, and are very small.

  12. Integrated photonic quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, Markus; Heilmann, René; Lebugle, Maxime; Guzman-Silva, Diego; Perez-Leija, Armando; Szameit, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Over the last 20 years quantum walks (QWs) have gained increasing interest in the field of quantum information science and processing. In contrast to classical walkers, quantum objects exhibit intrinsic properties like non-locality and non-classical many-particle correlations, which renders QWs a versatile tool for quantum simulation and computation as well as for a deeper understanding of genuine quantum mechanics. Since they are highly controllable and hardly interact with their environment, photons seem to be ideally suited quantum walkers. In order to study and exploit photonic QWs, lattice structures that allow low loss coherent evolution of quantum states are demanded. Such requirements are perfectly met by integrated optical waveguide devices that additionally allow a substantial miniaturization of experimental settings. Moreover, by utilizing the femtosecond direct laser writing technique three-dimensional waveguide structures are capable of analyzing QWs also on higher dimensional geometries. In this context, advances and findings of photonic QWs are discussed in this review. Various concepts and experimental results are presented covering, such as different quantum transport regimes, the Boson sampling problem, and the discrete fractional quantum Fourier transform.

  13. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  14. Nonlocal Structures: Bilocal Photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Roger E.

    1980-01-01

    As a starting point, it is postulated that all particles and fields are built from a single primitive field, which must then be a massless fermion with a σ spin of one-half. Two helicities are embodied in a τ spin of one-half. The vacuum is an open Fermi sea whose height is a wave number κ. Elementary particles are structures having the form of standing-wave systems floating on the vacuum sea, with the height κ providing both the scale of inner structural size and the mass unit for the elementary particle mass spectrum. A bilocal photon starts with a function describing two primitive quanta with parallel σ spin and opposite τ spin. A centroid-time wave equation then couples-in an infinite set of orthogonal functions. The introduction of an operator Q λ permits the reduction of the infinite secular determinant to a finite six-by-six determinant. Solutions (for the infinite expansion) are obtained describing photons with right-handed and left-handed polarizations. Superpositions of these give linearly polarized photons. Electric and magnetic field vectors, satisfying the vacuum Maxwell equations, are obtained from a bilocal Hertz vector given by п= (2/κ3 c)(∂/∂ t r)∇rΨ(1,2), where Ψ(1,2) is the bilocal wave function, and tr and r are the relative time and relative position variables.

  15. Influence of a keV sterile neutrino on neutrinoless double beta decay: How things changed in recent years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merle, Alexander; Niro, Viviana

    2013-12-01

    Earlier studies of the influence of dark matter keV sterile neutrinos on neutrinoless double beta decay concluded that there is no significant modification of the decay rate. These studies have focused only on a mass of the keV sterile neutrino above 2 and 4 keV, respectively, as motivated by certain production mechanisms. On the other hand, alternative production mechanisms have been proposed, which relax the lower limit for the mass, and new experimental data are available, too. For this reason, an updated study is timely and worthwhile. We focus on the most recent data, i.e., the newest Chandra and XMM-Newton observational bounds on the x-ray line originating from radiative keV sterile neutrino decay, as well as the new measurement of the previously unknown leptonic mixing angle θ13. While the previous works might have been a little short-sighted, the new observational bounds do indeed render any influences of keV sterile neutrinos on neutrinoless double beta decay small. This conclusion even holds in case not all the dark matter is made up of keV sterile neutrinos.

  16. High order reflectivity of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite crystals for x-ray energies up to 22 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Doeppner, T.; Neumayer, P.; Landen, O. L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Girard, F.; Kugland, N. L.; Niemann, C.

    2008-10-15

    We used Kr K{alpha} (12.6 keV), Zr K{alpha} (15.7 keV), and Ag K{alpha} (22.2 keV) x-rays, produced by petawatt-class laser pulses, to measure the integrated crystal reflectivity R{sub int} of flat highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) up to the fifth order. The maximum R{sub int} was observed in first order (3.7 mrad at 12.6 keV), decreasing by a factor of 3-5 for every successive order, and dropping by a factor of 2-2.5 at 22.2 keV. The current study indicates that HOPG crystals are suitable for measuring scattering signals from high energy x-ray sources (E{>=}20 keV). These energies are required to penetrate through the high density plasma conditions encountered in inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility.

  17. Evaluation of Silicon Neutron Resonance Parameters in the Energy Range Thermal to 1800 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.

    2002-09-30

    The evaluation of the neutron cross sections of the three stable isotopes of silicon in the energy range thermal to 20 MeV was performed by Hetrick et al. for ENDF/B-VI (Evaluated Nuclear Data File). Resonance parameters were obtained in the energy range thermal to 1500 keV from a SAMMY analysis of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory experimental neutron transmission data. A new measurement of the capture cross section of natural silicon in the energy range 1 to 700 keV has recently been performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. Results of this measurement were used in a SAMMY reevaluation of the resonance parameters, allowing determination of the capture width of a large number of resonances. The experimental data base is described; properties of the resonance parameters are given. For the first time the direct neutron capture component has been taken into account from the calculation by Rauscher et al. in the energy range from thermal to 1 MeV. Results of benchmark calculations are also given. The new evaluation is available in the ENDF/B-VI format.

  18. Hydroxyapatite-titanium interface reaction induced by keV electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Foti, G.

    1992-03-01

    Thin films of hydroxyapatite bioceramic, 5-50 Å in thickness, have been deposited on ion cleaned titanium surfaces to study the chemical-physical adhesion of metal-ceramic interfaces of biomedical devices (orthopaedic and dentistry prosthesis). Film deposition was performed in ultrahigh vacuum condition (10 -10 mbar) using 5 keV argon sputtering of hydroxyapatite matrix; the film thickness was measured in situ with Auger electron spectroscopy. The hydroxyapatite-titanium interface was irradiated with an electron beam of 0.5-5 keV energy and 0.2-2 A/cm 2 current density. During electron irradiation, Auger spectra show chemical shifts of phosphorus, titanium and oxygen peaks. The released electron energy induces modifications in the tetraedric phosphorus-oxygen groups with production of new chemical bonds between phosphorus, oxygen and titanium. Oxygen, for example, diffuses into the titanium interface forming titanium oxide. Chemical reactions induced by electron irradiation are driven by the metal-ceramic interface. Near the interface a strong and fast effect is observed while far from the interface a weak and slow effect occurs. Chemical reactions depend on the electron irradiation dose showing an inhibition threshold at about 10 19 e/cm 2 and, near the interface, a saturation condition at about 5 × 10 20 e/cm 2. Titanium-ceramic chemical reactions are inhibited if the substrate titanium surface is rich in oxide.

  19. Lifetime measurement of the 167.1 keV state in {sup 41}Ar

    SciTech Connect

    White, E. R.; Mach, H.; Fraile, L. M.; Koester, U.; Arndt, O.; Blazhev, A.; Braun, N.; Fransen, C.; Jolie, J.; Boelaert, N.; Borge, M. J. G.; Boutami, R.; Reillo, E.-M.; Tengblad, O.; Bradley, H.; Dlouhy, Z.; Ugryumov, V.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Hinke, Ch.; Kroell, T.

    2007-11-15

    The Advanced-Time-Delayed method was used to measure lifetimes of the states in {sup 41}Ar populated in the {beta} decay of {sup 41}Cl. The nuclei {sup 41}Cl were produced at ISOLDE by 1.4-GeV proton bombardment of a thick UC{sub x} target and mass-separated as molecular ions, XeCl{sup +}. Our measured half-life of the 167.1-keV state, T{sub 1/2}=315(15) ps, is significantly lower than the previously measured value of 410(30) ps. We have also determined T{sub 1/2}=260(80) ps and T{sub 1/2}{<=}46 ps for the 515.9- and 1867.7-keV states, respectively. These are the shortest lifetimes measured so far with the ultrafast timing method using the new LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) crystals for {gamma}-ray detection.

  20. EMISSION LINES BETWEEN 1 AND 2 keV IN COMETARY X-RAY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Ian; Christian, Damian J.; Bodewits, Dennis; Dennerl, Konrad; Lisse, Carey M.; Wolk, Scott J. E-mail: daman.christian@csun.edu

    2013-01-20

    We present the detection of new cometary X-ray emission lines in the 1.0-2.0 keV range using a sample of comets observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory and ACIS spectrometer. We have selected five comets from the Chandra sample with good signal-to-noise spectra. The surveyed comets are C/1999 S4 (LINEAR), C/1999 T1 (McNaught-Hartley), 153P/2002 (Ikeya-Zhang), 2P/2003 (Encke), and C/2008 8P (Tuttle). We modeled the spectra with an extended version of our solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission model. Above 1 keV, we find Ikeya-Zhang to have strong emission lines at 1340 and 1850 eV which we identify as being created by SWCX lines of Mg XI and Si XIII, respectively, and weaker emission lines at 1470, 1600, and 1950 eV formed by SWCX of Mg XII, Mg XI, and Si XIV, respectively. The Mg XI and XII and Si XIII and XIV lines are detected at a significant level for the other comets in our sample (LS4, MH, Encke, 8P), and these lines promise additional diagnostics to be included in SWCX models. The silicon lines in the 1700-2000 eV range are detected for all comets, but with the rising background and decreasing cometary emission, we caution that these detections need further confirmation with higher resolution instruments.

  1. Stimulated Raman scattering in hydrogen by ultrashort laser pulse in the keV regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachau, H.; Dondera, M.

    2016-04-01

    This letter addresses the problem of stimulated Raman excitation of a hydrogen atom submitted to an ultrashort and intense laser pulse in the keV regime. The pulse central frequency ω of 55 a.u. (about 1.5 keV) is in the weakly relativistic regime, ω ≤ c/a0 (c is the speed of light in vacuum and a 0 the Bohr radius) and the pulse duration is τ ≈ 18.85 a.u. (about 456 attoseconds). We solve the corresponding time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) using a spectral approach, retardation (or nondipole) effects are included up to O(1/c) , breaking the conservation of the magnetic quantum number m and forcing the resolution of the TDSE in a three-dimensional space. Due to the laser bandwidth, which is of the order of the ionization potential of hydrogen, stimulated Raman scattering populates nlm excited states (n and l are the principal and azimuthal quantum numbers, respectively). The populations of these excited states are calculated and analyzed in terms of l and m quantum numbers, this showing the contributions of the retardation effects and their relative importance.

  2. Improving accuracy and reliability of 186-keV measurements for unattended enrichment monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Ianakiev, Kiril D; Boyer, Brian D; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Moss, Calvin E; Goda, Joetta M; Favalli, Andrea; Lombardi, Marcie; Paffett, Mark T; Hill, Thomas R; MacArthur, Duncan W; Smith, Morag K

    2010-04-13

    Improving the quality of safeguards measurements at Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants (GCEPs), whilst reducing the inspection effort, is an important objective given the number of existing and new plants that need to be safeguarded. A useful tool in many safeguards approaches is the on-line monitoring of enrichment in process pipes. One aspect of this measurement is a simple, reliable and precise passive measurement of the 186-keV line from {sup 235}U. (The other information required is the amount of gas in the pipe. This can be obtained by transmission measurements or pressure measurements). In this paper we describe our research efforts towards such a passive measurement system. The system includes redundant measurements of the 186-keV line from the gas and separately from the wall deposits. The design also includes measures to reduce the effect of the potentially important background. Such an approach would practically eliminate false alarms and can maintain the operation of the system even with a hardware malfunction in one of the channels. The work involves Monte Carlo modeling and the construction of a proof-of-principle prototype. We will carry out experimental tests with UF{sub 6} gas in pipes with and without deposits in order to demonstrate the deposit correction.

  3. The 16 August 1997 Novaya Zemlya seismic event as viewed from GSN stations KEV and KBS

    SciTech Connect

    Hartse, H.E.

    1997-11-01

    Using current and historic seismic records from Global Seismic Network stations KEV and KBS, the authors find that S minus P arrival time comparisons between nuclear explosions and the 16 August 1997 seismic event (m{sub b} {approx} 3.6) from near Novaya Zemlya clearly indicate that (relative to KEV) the 16 August event occurred at least 80 km east of the Russian test site. Including S minus P arrival times from KBS constrains the location to beneath the Kara Sea and in good agreement with previously reported locations, over 100 km southeast of the test site. From an analysis of P{sub n}/S{sub n} waveform ratios at frequencies above 4 Hz, they find that the 16 August event falls within the population of regional earthquakes and is distinctly separated from Novaya Zemlya and other northern Eurasian nuclear explosion populations. Thus, given its location and waveform characteristics, they conclude the 16 August event was an earthquake. The 16 August event was not detected at teleseismic distances, and thus, this event provides a good example of the regional detection, location, and identification efforts that will be required to monitor the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty below m{sub b} {approx} 4.

  4. Neutron activation of natural zinc samples at kT=25 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifarth, R.; Dababneh, S.; Heil, M.; Käppeler, F.; Plag, R.; Sonnabend, K.; Uberseder, E.

    2012-03-01

    The neutron-capture cross sections of 64Zn, 68Zn, and 70Zn have been measured with the activation technique in a quasistellar neutron spectrum corresponding to a thermal energy of kT=25 keV. By a series of repeated irradiations with different experimental conditions, an uncertainty of 3% could be achieved for the 64Zn(n,γ)65Zn cross section and for the partial cross section 68Zn(n,γ)69Znm feeding the isomeric state in 69Zn. For the partial cross sections 70Zn(n,γ)71Znm and 70Zn(n,γ)71Zng, which had not been measured so far, uncertainties of only 16% and 6% could be reached because of limited counting statistics and decay intensities. Compared to previous measurements on 64,68Zn, the uncertainties could be significantly improved, while the 70Zn cross section was found to be two times smaller than existing model calculations. From these results Maxwellian average cross sections were determined between 5 and 100 keV. Additionally, the β-decay half-life of 71Znm could be determined with significantly improved accuracy. The consequences of these data have been studied by network calculations for convective core He burning and convective shell C burning in massive stars.

  5. Topological Photonic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Cheng; Lin, Liang; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2014-01-01

    As exotic phenomena in optics, topological states in photonic crystals have drawn much attention due to their fundamental significance and great potential applications. Because of the broken time-reversal symmetry under the influence of an external magnetic field, the photonic crystals composed of magneto-optical materials will lead to the degeneracy lifting and show particular topological characters of energy bands. The upper and lower bulk bands have nonzero integer topological numbers. The gapless edge states can be realized to connect two bulk states. This topological photonic states originated from the topological property can be analogous to the integer quantum Hall effect in an electronic system. The gapless edge state only possesses a single sign of gradient in the whole Brillouin zone, and thus the group velocity is only in one direction leading to the one-way energy flow, which is robust to disorder and impurity due to the nontrivial topological nature of the corresponding electromagnetic states. Furthermore, this one-way edge state would cross the Brillouin center with nonzero group velocity, where the negative-zero-positive phase velocity can be used to realize some interesting phenomena such as tunneling and backward phase propagation. On the other hand, under the protection of time-reversal symmetry, a pair of gapless edge states can also be constructed by using magnetic-electric coupling meta-materials, exhibiting Fermion-like spin helix topological edge states, which can be regarded as an optical counterpart of topological insulator originating from the spin-orbit coupling. The aim of this article is to have a comprehensive review of recent research literatures published in this emerging field of photonic topological phenomena. Photonic topological states and their related phenomena are presented and analyzed, including the chiral edge states, polarization dependent transportation, unidirectional waveguide and nonreciprocal optical transmission, all

  6. Synthetic Landau levels for photons.

    PubMed

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Gromov, Andrey; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-06-30

    Synthetic photonic materials are an emerging platform for exploring the interface between microscopic quantum dynamics and macroscopic material properties. Photons experiencing a Lorentz force develop handedness, providing opportunities to study quantum Hall physics and topological quantum science. Here we present an experimental realization of a magnetic field for continuum photons. We trap optical photons in a multimode ring resonator to make a two-dimensional gas of massive bosons, and then employ a non-planar geometry to induce an image rotation on each round-trip. This results in photonic Coriolis/Lorentz and centrifugal forces and so realizes the Fock–Darwin Hamiltonian for photons in a magnetic field and harmonic trap. Using spatial- and energy-resolved spectroscopy, we track the resulting photonic eigenstates as radial trapping is reduced, finally observing a photonic Landau level at degeneracy. To circumvent the challenge of trap instability at the centrifugal limit, we constrain the photons to move on a cone. Spectroscopic probes demonstrate flat space (zero curvature) away from the cone tip. At the cone tip, we observe that spatial curvature increases the local density of states, and we measure fractional state number excess consistent with the Wen–Zee theory, providing an experimental test of this theory of electrons in both a magnetic field and curved space. This work opens the door to exploration of the interplay of geometry and topology, and in conjunction with Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency, enables studies of photonic fractional quantum Hall fluids and direct detection of anyons.

  7. Synthetic Landau levels for photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Gromov, Andrey; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic photonic materials are an emerging platform for exploring the interface between microscopic quantum dynamics and macroscopic material properties. Photons experiencing a Lorentz force develop handedness, providing opportunities to study quantum Hall physics and topological quantum science. Here we present an experimental realization of a magnetic field for continuum photons. We trap optical photons in a multimode ring resonator to make a two-dimensional gas of massive bosons, and then employ a non-planar geometry to induce an image rotation on each round-trip. This results in photonic Coriolis/Lorentz and centrifugal forces and so realizes the Fock–Darwin Hamiltonian for photons in a magnetic field and harmonic trap. Using spatial- and energy-resolved spectroscopy, we track the resulting photonic eigenstates as radial trapping is reduced, finally observing a photonic Landau level at degeneracy. To circumvent the challenge of trap instability at the centrifugal limit, we constrain the photons to move on a cone. Spectroscopic probes demonstrate flat space (zero curvature) away from the cone tip. At the cone tip, we observe that spatial curvature increases the local density of states, and we measure fractional state number excess consistent with the Wen–Zee theory, providing an experimental test of this theory of electrons in both a magnetic field and curved space. This work opens the door to exploration of the interplay of geometry and topology, and in conjunction with Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency, enables studies of photonic fractional quantum Hall fluids and direct detection of anyons.

  8. Synthetic Landau levels for photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Gromov, Andrey; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic photonic materials are an emerging platform for exploring the interface between microscopic quantum dynamics and macroscopic material properties. Photons experiencing a Lorentz force develop handedness, providing opportunities to study quantum Hall physics and topological quantum science. Here we present an experimental realization of a magnetic field for continuum photons. We trap optical photons in a multimode ring resonator to make a two-dimensional gas of massive bosons, and then employ a non-planar geometry to induce an image rotation on each round-trip. This results in photonic Coriolis/Lorentz and centrifugal forces and so realizes the Fock-Darwin Hamiltonian for photons in a magnetic field and harmonic trap. Using spatial- and energy-resolved spectroscopy, we track the resulting photonic eigenstates as radial trapping is reduced, finally observing a photonic Landau level at degeneracy. To circumvent the challenge of trap instability at the centrifugal limit, we constrain the photons to move on a cone. Spectroscopic probes demonstrate flat space (zero curvature) away from the cone tip. At the cone tip, we observe that spatial curvature increases the local density of states, and we measure fractional state number excess consistent with the Wen-Zee theory, providing an experimental test of this theory of electrons in both a magnetic field and curved space. This work opens the door to exploration of the interplay of geometry and topology, and in conjunction with Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency, enables studies of photonic fractional quantum Hall fluids and direct detection of anyons.

  9. Synthetic Landau levels for photons.

    PubMed

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Gromov, Andrey; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-06-30

    Synthetic photonic materials are an emerging platform for exploring the interface between microscopic quantum dynamics and macroscopic material properties. Photons experiencing a Lorentz force develop handedness, providing opportunities to study quantum Hall physics and topological quantum science. Here we present an experimental realization of a magnetic field for continuum photons. We trap optical photons in a multimode ring resonator to make a two-dimensional gas of massive bosons, and then employ a non-planar geometry to induce an image rotation on each round-trip. This results in photonic Coriolis/Lorentz and centrifugal forces and so realizes the Fock–Darwin Hamiltonian for photons in a magnetic field and harmonic trap. Using spatial- and energy-resolved spectroscopy, we track the resulting photonic eigenstates as radial trapping is reduced, finally observing a photonic Landau level at degeneracy. To circumvent the challenge of trap instability at the centrifugal limit, we constrain the photons to move on a cone. Spectroscopic probes demonstrate flat space (zero curvature) away from the cone tip. At the cone tip, we observe that spatial curvature increases the local density of states, and we measure fractional state number excess consistent with the Wen–Zee theory, providing an experimental test of this theory of electrons in both a magnetic field and curved space. This work opens the door to exploration of the interplay of geometry and topology, and in conjunction with Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency, enables studies of photonic fractional quantum Hall fluids and direct detection of anyons. PMID:27281214

  10. Optics of globular photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, V S

    2007-05-31

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the optical properties of globular photonic crystals - new physical objects having a crystal structure with the lattice period exceeding considerably the atomic size, are presented. As globular photonic crystals, artificial opal matrices consisting of close-packed silica globules of diameter {approx}200 nm were used. The reflection spectra of these objects characterising the parameters of photonic bands existing in these crystals in the visible spectral region are presented. The idealised models of the energy band structure of photonic crystals investigated in the review give analytic dispersion dependences for the group velocity and the effective photon mass in a globular photonic crystal. The characteristics of secondary emission excited in globular photonic crystals by monochromatic and broadband radiation are presented. The results of investigations of single-photon-excited delayed scattering of light observed in globular photonic crystals exposed to cw UV radiation and radiation from a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser are presented. The possibilities of using globular photonic crystals as active media for lasing in different spectral regions are considered. It is proposed to use globular photonic crystals as sensitive sensors in optoelectronic devices for molecular analysis of organic and inorganic materials by the modern methods of laser spectroscopy. The results of experimental studies of spontaneous and stimulated globular scattering of light are discussed. The conditions for observing resonance and two-photon-excited delayed scattering of light are found. The possibility of accumulation and localisation of the laser radiation energy inside a globular photonic crystal is reported. (review)

  11. Learning to Apply Metrology Principles to the Measurement of X-ray Intensities in the 500 eV to 110 keV Energy Range

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J.; Pond, T.; Silbernagel, C.; Torres, P.; Marlett, K.; Goldin, F.; Cyr, S.

    2011-02-08

    National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Livermore Operations, has two optical radiation calibration laboratories accredited by “the National Voluntary Laboratories Accreditation Program (NVLAP) which is the accrediting body of” the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and is now working towards accreditation for its X-ray laboratories. NSTec operates several laboratories with X-ray sources that generate X-rays in the energy range from 50 eV to 115 keV. These X-ray sources are used to characterize and calibrate diagnostics and diagnostic components used by the various national laboratories, particularly for plasma analysis on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) National Ignition Facility (NIF). Because X-ray photon flux measurement methods that can be accredited, i.e., traceable to NIST, have not been developed for sources operating in these energy ranges, NSTec, NIST, and the National Voluntary Accreditation Program (NVLAP) together have defined a path toward the development and validation of accredited metrology methods for X-ray energies. The methodology developed for the high energy X-ray (HEX) Laboratory was NSTec’s starting point for X-ray metrology accreditation and will be the basis for the accredited processes in the other X-ray laboratories. This paper will serve as a teaching tool, by way of this example using the NSTec X-ray sources, for the process and methods used in developing an accredited traceable metrology.

  12. An in-vacuum x-ray diffraction microscope for use in the 0.7-2.9 keV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vine, D. J.; Williams, G. J.; Clark, J. N.; Putkunz, C. T.; Pfeifer, M. A.; Legnini, D.; Roehrig, C.; Wrobel, E.; Huwald, E.; van Riessen, G.; Abbey, B.; Beetz, T.; Irwin, J.; Feser, M.; Hornberger, B.; McNulty, I.; Nugent, K. A.; Peele, A. G.

    2012-03-01

    A dedicated in-vacuum coherent x-ray diffraction microscope was installed at the 2-ID-B beamline of the Advanced Photon Source for use with 0.7-2.9 keV x-rays. The instrument can accommodate three common implementations of diffractive imaging; plane wave illumination; defocused-probe (Fresnel diffractive imaging) and scanning (ptychography) using either a pinhole, focused or defocused probe. The microscope design includes active feedback to limit motion of the optics with respect to the sample. Upper bounds on the relative optics-to-sample displacement have been measured to be 5.8 nm(v) and 4.4 nm(h) rms/h using capacitance micrometry and 27 nm/h using x-ray point projection imaging. The stability of the measurement platform and in-vacuum operation allows for long exposure times, high signal-to-noise and large dynamic range two-dimensional intensity measurements to be acquired. Finally, we illustrate the microscope's stability with a recent experimental result.

  13. Time-resolved analysis of the X-ray emission of femtosecond-laser-produced plasmas in the 1.5-keV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Audebert, P.; Nagels-Silvert, V.; Geindre, J. P.; Gauthier, J. C.; Adam, J. C.; Héron, A.; Chenais-Popovics, C.

    Recent experimental results on ion beams produced in high-intensity laser-solid interactions indicate the presence of very intense electric fields in the target. This suggests the possibility of efficiently heating a solid material by means of the fast electrons created during the laser-solid interactions and trapped in the target, rather than by the laser photons themselves. We tested this mechanism by irradiating very small cubic aluminum targets with the LULI 100-TW, 300-fs laser at 1.06-μm wavelength. X-ray spectra were measured with an ultra-fast streak camera, coupled to a conical Bragg crystal, providing spectra in the 1.5-keV range with high temporal and spectral resolution. The results indicate the creation of a hot plasma, but a very low coupling between the rapid electrons and the solid. A tentative explanation, in agreement with other experimental results and with preliminary particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, points out the fatal role of the laser prepulse.

  14. Design of a vacuum-compatible high-precision monochromatic beam-position monitor for use with synchrotron radiation from 5 to 25 keV.

    PubMed

    Alkire, R W; Rosenbaum, G; Evans, G

    2000-03-01

    The Structural Biology Center beamline, 19ID, has been designed to take full advantage of the highly intense undulator radiation and very low source emittance available at the Advanced Photon Source. In order to keep the X-ray beam focused onto the pre-sample slits, a novel position-sensitive PIN diode array has been developed. The array consists of four PIN diodes positioned upstream of a 0.5 microm-thick metal foil placed in the X-ray beam. Using conventional difference-over-the-sum techniques, two-dimensional position information is obtained from the metal foil fluorescence. Because the full X-ray beam passes through the metal foil, the true beam center-of-mass is measured. The device is compact, inexpensive to construct, operates in a vacuum and has a working range of 8 mm x 10 mm that can be expanded with design modifications. Measured position sensitivity is 1-2 microm. Although optimized for use in the 5-25 keV energy range, the upper limit can be extended by changing metals or adjusting foil thickness. PMID:16609175

  15. Tunable photonic Bloch oscillations in electrically modulated photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Huang, Ji Ping; Yu, Kin Wah

    2008-10-01

    We exploit theoretically the occurrence and tunability of photonic Bloch oscillations (PBOs) in one-dimensional photonic crystals (PCs) containing nonlinear composites. Because of the enhanced third-order nonlinearity (Kerr-type nonlinearity) of composites, photons undergo oscillations inside tilted photonic bands, which are achieved by the application of graded external-pump electric fields on such PCs, varying along the direction perpendicular to the surface of layers. The tunability of PBOs (including amplitude and period) is readily achieved by changing the field gradient. With an appropriate graded pump ac or dc electric field, terahertz PBOs can appear and cover a terahertz band in an electromagnetic spectrum.

  16. Resonant photonic States in coupled heterostructure photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jd; Sabarinathan, J; Singh, Mr

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study the photonic resonance states and transmission spectra of coupled waveguides made from heterostructure photonic crystals. We consider photonic crystal waveguides made from three photonic crystals A, B and C, where the waveguide heterostructure is denoted as B/A/C/A/B. Due to the band structure engineering, light is confined within crystal A, which thus act as waveguides. Here, photonic crystal C is taken as a nonlinear photonic crystal, which has a band gap that may be modified by applying a pump laser. We have found that the number of bound states within the waveguides depends on the width and well depth of photonic crystal A. It has also been found that when both waveguides are far away from each other, the energies of bound photons in each of the waveguides are degenerate. However, when they are brought close to each other, the degeneracy of the bound states is removed due to the coupling between them, which causes these states to split into pairs. We have also investigated the effect of the pump field on photonic crystal C. We have shown that by applying a pump field, the system may be switched between a double waveguide to a single waveguide, which effectively turns on or off the coupling between degenerate states. This reveals interesting results that can be applied to develop new types of nanophotonic devices such as nano-switches and nano-transistors.

  17. Topological photonics: an observation of Landau levels for optical photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    Creating photonic materials with nontrivial topological characteristics has seen burgeoning interest in recent years; however, a major route to topology, a magnetic field for continuum photons, has remained elusive. We present the first experimental realization of a bulk magnetic field for optical photons. By using a non-planar ring resonator, we induce an image rotation on each round trip through the resonator. This results in a Coriolis/Lorentz force and a centrifugal anticonfining force, the latter of which is cancelled by mirror curvature. Spatial- and energy- resolved spectroscopy tracks photonic eigenstates as residual trapping is reduced, and we observe photonic Landau levels as the eigenstates become degenerate. We will discuss the conical geometry of the resulting manifold for photon dynamics and present a measurement of the local density of states that is consistent with Landau levels on a cone. While our work already demonstrates an integer quantum Hall material composed of photons, we have ensured compatibility with strong photon-photon interactions, which will allow quantum optical studies of entanglement and correlation in manybody systems including fractional quantum Hall fluids. This work was supported by DOE, DARPA, and AFOSR.

  18. Photon correlation in single-photon frequency upconversion.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaorong; Huang, Kun; Pan, Haifeng; Wu, E; Zeng, Heping

    2012-01-30

    We experimentally investigated the intensity cross-correlation between the upconverted photons and the unconverted photons in the single-photon frequency upconversion process with multi-longitudinal mode pump and signal sources. In theoretical analysis, with this multi-longitudinal mode of both signal and pump sources system, the properties of the signal photons could also be maintained as in the single-mode frequency upconversion system. Experimentally, based on the conversion efficiency of 80.5%, the joint probability of simultaneously detecting at upconverted and unconverted photons showed an anti-correlation as a function of conversion efficiency which indicated the upconverted photons were one-to-one from the signal photons. While due to the coherent state of the signal photons, the intensity cross-correlation function g(2)(0) was shown to be equal to unity at any conversion efficiency, agreeing with the theoretical prediction. This study will benefit the high-speed wavelength-tunable quantum state translation or photonic quantum interface together with the mature frequency tuning or longitudinal mode selection techniques.

  19. RESONANCE PRODUCTION BY TWO-PHOTON INTERACTIONS AT SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Jenni, P.; Burke, D.L.; Telnov, V.; Alam, M.S.; Boyarski, A.M.; Breidenbach, M.; Dorenbosch, J.; Dorfan, J.M.; Feldman, G.J.; Franklin, M.E.B.; Hanson, G.; Hayes, K.G.; Himel, T.; Hitlin, D.G.; Hollebeek, R.J.; Innes, W.R.; Jaros, J.A.; Larsen, R.R.; Luth, V.; Perl, M.L.; Richter, B.; Roussarie, A.; Scharre, D.L.; Schindler, R.H.; Schwitters, R.F.; Siegrist, J.L.; Taureg, H.; Tonutti, M.; Vidal, R.A.; Weiss, J.M.; Zaccone, H.

    1981-06-01

    Two-photon interactions have been studied with the SLAC-LBL Mark II magnetic detector at SPEAR. The cross section for {eta}' production by the reaction e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}{eta}' has been measured at beam energies from 2.0 GeV to 3.7 GeV. The radiative width {Lambda}{sub {gamma}{gamma}}({eta}') has been determined to be 5.8 {+-} 1.1 keV ({+-}20% systematic uncertainty). Upper limits on the radiative widths of the f(1270), A{sub 2}(1310) and f'(1515) tensor mesons have been determined. A search has been made for production of the E(1420) by {gamma}{gamma} collisions, but no signal is observed.

  20. Age-dependent protection quantities for external photon irradiation.

    PubMed

    Chou, D P; Wang, J N; Chen, I J

    2001-01-01

    The age-dependent conversion coefficients of the protection quantities, the equivalent dose and the effective dose defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), are obtained. A Monte Carlo computer code and the age-dependent hermaphrodite mathematical phantoms of six age groups: newborn, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old and adult are used for the evaluation. Twenty-three photon source energies from 10 keV to 10 MeV and six kinds of irradiation geometries: AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT, and ISO are chosen in the calculation. The evaluated conversion coefficients for the adult are compared with those in ICRP Publication 74 with good agreement. The conversion coefficients of the equivalent dose and the effective dose increase while the age of the phantom decreases, but with some exceptions for the AP irradiation geometry under certain conditions. PMID:11605795

  1. Edge-on illumination photon-counting for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doni, M.; Visser, J.; Koffeman, E.; Herrmann, C.

    2015-08-01

    In medical X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) a silicon based sensor (300-1000 μm) in face-on configuration does not collect the incoming X-rays effectively because of their high energy (40-140 keV). For example, only 2% of the incoming photons at 100 keV are stopped by a 500 μm thick silicon layer. To increase the efficiency, one possibility is to use materials with higher Z (e.g. GaAs, CZT), which have some drawbacks compared to silicon, such as short carrier lifetime or low mobility. Therefore, we investigate whether illuminating silicon edge-on instead of face-on is a solution. Aim of the project is to find and take advantage of the benefits of this new geometry when used for a pixel detector. In particular, we employ a silicon hybrid pixel detector, which is read out by a chip from the Medipix family. Its capabilities to be energy selective will be a notable advantage in energy resolved (spectral) X-ray CT.

  2. All-photonic quantum repeaters.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories.

  3. Quantum simulation with interacting photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Michael J.

    2016-10-01

    Enhancing optical nonlinearities so that they become appreciable on the single photon level and lead to nonclassical light fields has been a central objective in quantum optics for many years. After this has been achieved in individual micro-cavities representing an effectively zero-dimensional volume, this line of research has shifted its focus towards engineering devices where such strong optical nonlinearities simultaneously occur in extended volumes of multiple nodes of a network. Recent technological progress in several experimental platforms now opens the possibility to employ the systems of strongly interacting photons, these give rise to as quantum simulators. Here we review the recent development and current status of this research direction for theory and experiment. Addressing both, optical photons interacting with atoms and microwave photons in networks of superconducting circuits, we focus on analogue quantum simulations in scenarios where effective photon-photon interactions exceed dissipative processes in the considered platforms.

  4. Nonlinear interaction between single photons.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, T; Martin, A; Sanguinetti, B; Pelc, J S; Langrock, C; Fejer, M M; Gisin, N; Zbinden, H; Sangouard, N; Thew, R T

    2014-10-24

    Harnessing nonlinearities strong enough to allow single photons to interact with one another is not only a fascinating challenge but also central to numerous advanced applications in quantum information science. Here we report the nonlinear interaction between two single photons. Each photon is generated in independent parametric down-conversion sources. They are subsequently combined in a nonlinear waveguide where they are converted into a single photon of higher energy by the process of sum-frequency generation. Our approach results in the direct generation of photon triplets. More generally, it highlights the potential for quantum nonlinear optics with integrated devices and, as the photons are at telecom wavelengths, it opens the way towards novel applications in quantum communication such as device-independent quantum key distribution.

  5. Single-photon quadratic optomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jie-Qiao; Nori, Franco

    2014-01-01

    We present exact analytical solutions to study the coherent interaction between a single photon and the mechanical motion of a membrane in quadratic optomechanics. We consider single-photon emission and scattering when the photon is initially inside the cavity and in the fields outside the cavity, respectively. Using our solutions, we calculate the single-photon emission and scattering spectra, and find relations between the spectral features and the system's inherent parameters, such as: the optomechanical coupling strength, the mechanical frequency, and the cavity-field decay rate. In particular, we clarify the conditions for the phonon sidebands to be visible. We also study the photon-phonon entanglement for the long-time emission and scattering states. The linear entropy is employed to characterize this entanglement by treating it as a bipartite one between a single mode of phonons and a single photon. PMID:25200128

  6. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  7. Silicon photonic integration in telecommunications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    Silicon photonics is the guiding of light in a planar arrangement of silicon-based materials to perform various functions. We focus here on the use of silicon photonics to create transmitters and receivers for fiber-optic telecommunications. As the need to squeeze more transmission into a given bandwidth, a given footprint, and a given cost increases, silicon photonics makes more and more economic sense.

  8. Silicon photonic heater-modulator

    DOEpatents

    Zortman, William A.; Trotter, Douglas Chandler; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-07-14

    Photonic modulators, methods of forming photonic modulators and methods of modulating an input optical signal are provided. A photonic modulator includes a disk resonator having a central axis extending along a thickness direction of the disk resonator. The disk resonator includes a modulator portion and a heater portion. The modulator portion extends in an arc around the central axis. A PN junction of the modulator portion is substantially normal to the central axis.

  9. Spaceborne Photonics Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, D. D.; Farrukh, U. O.; Han, K. S.; Hwang, I. H.; Jalufka, N. W.; Lowe, C. W.; Tabibi, B. M.; Lee, C. J.; Lyons, D.; Maclin, A.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes in chronological detail the development of the Spaceborne Photonics Institute as a sustained research effort at Hampton University in the area of optical physics. This provided the research expertise to initiate a PhD program in Physics. Research was carried out in the areas of: (1) modelling of spaceborne solid state laser systems; (2) amplified spontaneous emission in solar pumped iodine lasers; (3) closely simulated AM0 CW solar pumped iodine laser and repeatedly short pulsed iodine laser oscillator; (4) a materials spectroscopy and growth program; and (5) laser induced fluorescence and atomic and molecular spectroscopy.

  10. Robust Photon Locking

    SciTech Connect

    Bayer, T.; Wollenhaupt, M.; Sarpe-Tudoran, C.; Baumert, T.

    2009-01-16

    We experimentally demonstrate a strong-field coherent control mechanism that combines the advantages of photon locking (PL) and rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). Unlike earlier implementations of PL and RAP by pulse sequences or chirped pulses, we use shaped pulses generated by phase modulation of the spectrum of a femtosecond laser pulse with a generalized phase discontinuity. The novel control scenario is characterized by a high degree of robustness achieved via adiabatic preparation of a state of maximum coherence. Subsequent phase control allows for efficient switching among different target states. We investigate both properties by photoelectron spectroscopy on potassium atoms interacting with the intense shaped light field.

  11. Generalized Fibonacci photon sieves.

    PubMed

    Ke, Jie; Zhang, Junyong

    2015-08-20

    We successfully extend the standard Fibonacci zone plates with two on-axis foci to the generalized Fibonacci photon sieves (GFiPS) with multiple on-axis foci. We also propose the direct and inverse design methods based on the characteristic roots of the recursion relation of the generalized Fibonacci sequences. By switching the transparent and opaque zones, according to the generalized Fibonacci sequences, we not only realize adjustable multifocal distances but also fulfill the adjustable compression ratio of focal spots in different directions. PMID:26368763

  12. Silicon active photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitropoulos, Dimitrios

    Active photonic devices utilizing the optical nonlinearities of silicon have emerged in the last 5 years and the effort for commercial photonic devices in the material that has been the workhorse of electronics has been building up since. This dissertation presents the theory for some of these devices. We are concerned herein with CW lasers, amplifiers and wavelength converters that are based on the Raman effect. There have already been cursory experimental demonstrations of these devices and some of their limitations are already apparent. Most of the limitations observed are because of the appearance of effects that are competing with stimulated Raman scattering. Under the high optical powers that are necessary for the Raman effect (tens to hundrends of mW's) the process of optical two-photon (TPA) absorption occurs. The absorption of optical power that it causes itself is weak but in the process electrons and holes are generated which can further absorb light through the free-carrier absorption effect (FCA). The effective "lifetime" that these carriers have determines the magnitude of the FCA loss. We present a model for the carrier lifetime in Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) waveguides and numerical simulations to understand how this critical parameter varies and how it can be controlled. A p-i-n junction built along SOI waveguides can help achieve lifetime of the order of 20--100 ps but the price one has to pay is on-chip electrical power consumption on the order of 100's of mWs. We model CW Raman lasers and we find that the carrier lifetime reduces the output power. If the carrier lifetime exceeds a certain "critical" value optical losses become overwhelming and lasing is impossible. As we show, in amplifiers, the nonlinear loss does not only result in diminished gain, but also in a higher noise figure. Finally the effect of Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is examined. The effect is important because with a pump frequency at 1434nm coherent power

  13. Imaging by photon counting with 256x256 pixel matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlustos, Lukas; Campbell, Michael; Heijne, Erik H. M.; Llopart, Xavier

    2004-09-01

    Using 0.25µm standard CMOS we have developed 2-D semiconductor matrix detectors with sophisticated functionality integrated inside each pixel of a hybrid sensor module. One of these sensor modules is a matrix of 256x256 square 55µm pixels intended for X-ray imaging. This device is called 'Medipix2' and features a fast amplifier and two-level discrimination for signals between 1000 and 100000 equivalent electrons, with overall signal noise ~150 e- rms. Signal polarity and comparator thresholds are programmable. A maximum count rate of nearly 1 MHz per pixel can be achieved, which corresponds to an average flux of 3x10exp10 photons per cm2. The selected signals can be accumulated in each pixel in a 13-bit register. The serial readout takes 5-10 ms. A parallel readout of ~300 µs could also be used. Housekeeping functions such as local dark current compensation, test pulse generation, silencing of noisy pixels and threshold tuning in each pixel contribute to the homogeneous response over a large sensor area. The sensor material can be adapted to the energy of the X-rays. Best results have been obtained with high-resistivity silicon detectors, but also CdTe and GaAs detectors have been used. The lowest detectable X-ray energy was about 4 keV. Background measurements have been made, as well as measurements of the uniformity of imaging by photon counting. Very low photon count rates are feasible and noise-free at room temperature. The readout matrix can be used also with visible photons if an energy or charge intensifier structure is interposed such as a gaseous amplification layer or a microchannel plate or acceleration field in vacuum.

  14. Photonic crystal fibers in biophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchin, Valery V.; Skibina, Julia S.; Malinin, Anton V.

    2011-12-01

    We observed recent experimental results in area of photonic crystal fibers appliance. Possibility of creation of fiberbased broadband light sources for high resolution optical coherence tomography is discussed. Using of femtosecond pulse laser allows for generation of optical radiation with large spectral width in highly nonlinear solid core photonic crystal fibers. Concept of exploitation of hollow core photonic crystal fibers in optical sensing is demonstrated. The use of photonic crystal fibers as "smart cuvette" gives rise to efficiency of modern optical biomedical analysis methods.

  15. Phenomenology of photon-jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Stephen D.; Roy, Tuhin S.; Scholtz, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    One of the challenges of collider physics is to unambiguously associate detector-based objects with the corresponding elementary physics objects. A particular example is the association of calorimeter-based objects such as “jets,” identified with a standard (IR-safe) jet algorithm, with the underlying physics objects, which may be QCD-jets (arising from a scattered parton), electrons, photons or, as discussed here, photon-jets (a group of collinear photons). This separation is especially interesting in the context of Higgs search, where the signal includes events with two photons (in the Standard Model) as well as events with two photon-jets (in a variety of Beyond the Standard Model scenarios), while QCD provides ever-present background. Here we describe the implementation of techniques from the rapidly evolving area of jet substructure studies, not only to enhance the more familiar photon-QCD separation, but also to separately distinguish photon-jets, i.e., to separate usual jets into three categories: single photons, photon-jets and QCD-jets. The efficacy of these techniques for separation is illustrated through studies of simulated data.

  16. Hologram of a single photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrapkiewicz, Radosław; Jachura, Michał; Banaszek, Konrad; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    The spatial structure of single photons is becoming an extensively explored resource to facilitate free-space quantum communication and quantum computation as well as for benchmarking the limits of quantum entanglement generation with orbital angular momentum modes or reduction of the photon free-space propagation speed. Although accurate tailoring of the spatial structure of photons is now routinely performed using methods employed for shaping classical optical beams, the reciprocal problem of retrieving the spatial phase-amplitude structure of an unknown single photon cannot be solved using complementary classical holography techniques that are known for excellent interferometric precision. Here, we introduce a method to record a hologram of a single photon that is probed by another reference photon, on the basis of a different concept of the quantum interference between two-photon probability amplitudes. As for classical holograms, the hologram of a single photon encodes the full information about the photon's ‘shape’ (that is, its quantum wavefunction) whose local amplitude and phase are retrieved in the demonstrated experiment.

  17. Photonic Landau levels on cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Gromov, Andrey; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Creating photonic materials with nontrivial topological characteristics has seen burgeoning interest in recent years; however, a major route to topology, a magnetic field for continuum photons, has remained elusive. We present the first experimental realization of a bulk magnetic field for optical photons. By using a non-planar ring resonator, we induce an image rotation on each round trip through the resonator. This results in a Coriolis/Lorentz force and a centrifugal anticonfining force, the latter of which is cancelled by mirror curvature. Spatial- and energy- resolved spectroscopy tracks photonic eigenstates as residual trapping is reduced, and we observe photonic Landau levels as the eigenstates become degenerate. We will discuss the conical geometry of the resulting manifold for photon dynamics and present a measurement of the local density of states that is consistent with Landau levels on a cone. While our work already demonstrates an integer quantum Hall material composed of photons, we have ensured compatibility with strong photon-photon interactions, which will allow quantum optical studies of entanglement and correlation in manybody systems including fractional quantum Hall fluids.

  18. 200 keV Xe+ ions irradiation effects on Zr-Ti binary films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weipeng; Chai, Maosheng; Feng, Wei; Li, Zhengcao; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2015-05-01

    200 keV Xenon irradiation experiments were performed on magnetron sputtered Zr-Ti films under different doses up to 9 * 1015 ions/cm2. XRD, FE-SEM, AFM, HRTEM, nano-indentation and white light interferometer characterizations were applied to study the structural and mechanical properties modification introduced by the bombardment. Upon Xenon irradiation, structure of film matrix kept stable while the crystallinity of the top surface degraded significantly. Meanwhile, properties of irradiated films such as hardness, modulus and sheet resistance evolved with the same tendency, i.e. increased firstly and decrease with further increasing the irradiation dose. By selective area irradiation, competition between the surface sputtering and swelling was revealed, by which surface defects evolution was highlighted. The micro-defects evolution during Xenon irradiation was believed to be responsible for the macro-properties' modification.

  19. Laboratory source based full-field x-ray microscopy at 9 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fella, C.; Balles, A.; Wiest, W.; Zabler, S.; Hanke, R.

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, hard x-ray transmission microscopy experienced tremendous developments. With the avail-ability of efficient Fresnel zone plates, even set-ups utilizing laboratory sources were developed [1]. In order to improve the performance of these x-ray microscopes, novel approaches to fabricate optical elements [2] and brighter x-ray tubes [3] are promising candidates. We are currently building a laboratory transmission x-ray microscope for 9.25 keV, using an electron impact liquid-metal-jet anode source. Up to now, the further elements of our setup are: a polycapillary condenser, a tungsten zone plate, and a scintillator which is optically coupled to a CMOS camera. However, further variations in terms of optical elements are intended. Here we present the current status of our work, as well as first experimental results.

  20. Preliminary resolved resonance region evaluation of copper-63 from 0 to 300 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Sobes, V.; Forget, B.; Leal, L.; Guber, K.

    2012-07-01

    A new preliminary evaluation of Cu-63 was done in the energy region from 0 to 300 keV extending the resolved resonance region of the previous, ENDF/B-VII.0, evaluation three-fold. The new evaluation was based on three experimental transmission data sets; two measured at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) and one from the Massachusetts Inst. of Technology Nuclear Reactor (MITR). A total of 275 new resonances were identified and a corresponding set of external resonances was approximated to mock up the external levels. The negative external levels (bound level) were modified to match the thermal cross section values. A preliminary benchmarking calculation was made using 11 ICSBEP benchmarks. This work is in support of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program. (authors)

  1. Point Defect Cluster Formation in Iron Displacement Cascades Up to 50 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, R.E.

    1998-11-30

    The results of molecular dynamics displacement cascade simulations in iron at energies up to 50 keV and temperatures of 100, 600, and 900K are summarized, with a focus on the characterization of interstitial and vacancy clusters that are formed directly within the cascade. The fraction of the surviving point defects contained in clusters, and the size distributions of these in-cascade clusters have been determined. Although the formation of true vacancy clusters appears to be inhibited in iron, a significant degree of vacancy site correlation was observed. These well correlated arrangements of vacancies can be considered nascent clusters, and they have been observed to coalesce during longer term Monte Carlo simulations which permit short range vacancy diffusion. Extensive interstitial clustering was observed. The temperature and cascade energy dependence of the cluster size distributions are discussed in terms of their relevance to microstructural evolution and mechanical property changes in irradiated iron-based alloys.

  2. A 75-keV, 145-mA proton injector

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, T. L.; Hansborough, L. D.; Kerstiens, D. M.; Schneider, J. D.; Smith, H. V.; Stettler, M. W.; Thuot, M. E.; Warren, D. S.; Zaugg, T. J.; Arvin, A. A.; Bolt, A. S.; Sherman, Joseph D.

    2001-01-01

    A dc and pulsed-mode 75-keV proton injector has been developed and is used in characterization of a continuous-wave (cw) 6.7-MeV, 100-mA radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ). The injector is used frequently at the full RFQ design power (100-mA, 6.7-MeV) where the RFQ admittance (1rms, normalized) is 0.23 ({pi}mm-mrad). The injector includes a 2.45-GHz microwave proton source and a beam space-charge-neutralized, two magnetic-solenoid, low-energy beam-transport system (LEBT). The design RFQ beam transmission of 95% has been demonstrated at 100-mA RFQ output current.

  3. 350 keV accelerator based PGNAA setup to detect nitrogen in bulk samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqvi, A. A.; Al-Matouq, Faris A.; Khiari, F. Z.; Gondal, M. A.; Rehman, Khateeb-ur; Isab, A. A.; Raashid, M.; Dastageer, M. A.

    2013-11-01

    Nitrogen concentration was measured in explosive and narcotics proxy material, e.g. anthranilic acid, caffeine, melamine, and urea samples, bulk samples through thermal neutron capture reaction using 350 keV accelerator based prompt gamma ray neutron activation (PGNAA) setup. Intensity of 2.52, 3.53-3.68, 4.51, 5.27-5.30 and 10.38 MeV prompt gamma rays of nitrogen from the bulk samples was measured using a cylindrical 100 mm×100 mm (diameter×height ) BGO detector. Inspite of interference of nitrogen gamma rays from bulk samples with capture prompt gamma rays from BGO detector material, an excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated yields of nitrogen gamma rays has been obtained. This is an indication of the excellent performance of the PGNAA setup for detection of nitrogen in bulk samples.

  4. Active detection of shielded SNM with 60-keV neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, C; Dietrich, D; Hall, J; Kerr, P; Nakae, L; Newby, R; Rowland, M; Snyderman, N; Stoeffl, W

    2008-07-08

    Fissile materials, e.g. {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu, can be detected non-invasively by active neutron interrogation. A unique characteristic of fissile material exposed to neutrons is the prompt emission of high-energy (fast) fission neutrons. One promising mode of operation subjects the object to a beam of medium-energy (epithermal) neutrons, generated by a proton beam impinging on a Li target. The emergence of fast secondary neutrons then clearly indicates the presence of fissile material. Our interrogation system comprises a low-dose 60-keV neutron generator (5 x 10{sup 6}/s), and a 1 m{sup 2} array of scintillators for fast neutron detection. Preliminary experimental results demonstrate the detectability of small quantities (370 g) of HEU shielded by steel (200 g/cm{sup 2}) or plywood (30 g/cm{sup 2}), with a typical measurement time of 1 min.

  5. Silicon-carbon bond inversions driven by 60-keV electrons in graphene.

    PubMed

    Susi, Toma; Kotakoski, Jani; Kepaptsoglou, Demie; Mangler, Clemens; Lovejoy, Tracy C; Krivanek, Ondrej L; Zan, Recep; Bangert, Ursel; Ayala, Paola; Meyer, Jannik C; Ramasse, Quentin

    2014-09-12

    We demonstrate that 60-keV electron irradiation drives the diffusion of threefold-coordinated Si dopants in graphene by one lattice site at a time. First principles simulations reveal that each step is caused by an electron impact on a C atom next to the dopant. Although the atomic motion happens below our experimental time resolution, stochastic analysis of 38 such lattice jumps reveals a probability for their occurrence in a good agreement with the simulations. Conversions from three- to fourfold coordinated dopant structures and the subsequent reverse process are significantly less likely than the direct bond inversion. Our results thus provide a model of nondestructive and atomically precise structural modification and detection for two-dimensional materials.

  6. Ion Source Development For The Proposed FNAL 750 keV Injector Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, D. S.

    2011-09-26

    Currently there is a Proposed FNAL 750 keV Injector Upgrade for the replacement of the 40 year old Fermi National Laboratory (FNAL) Cockcroft-Walton accelerators with a new ion source and 200 MHz Radio Frequency Quadruple (RFQ). The slit type magnetron being used now will be replaced with a round aperture magnetron similar to the one used at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). Operational experience from BNL has shown that this type of source is more reliable with a longer lifetime due to better power efficiency. The current source development effort is to produce a reliable source with >60 mA of H{sup -} beam current, 15 Hz rep-rate, 100 {mu}s pulse width, and a duty factor of 0.15%. The source will be based on the BNL design along with development done at FNAL for the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS).

  7. Ion source development for the proposed FNAL 750keV injector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, D.S.; /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    Currently there is a Proposed FNAL 750keV Injector Upgrade for the replacement of the 40 year old Fermi National Laboratory (FNAL) Cockcroft-Walton accelerators with a new ion source and 200MHz Radio Frequency Quadruple (RFQ). The slit type magnetron being used now will be replaced with a round aperture magnetron similar to the one used at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). Operational experience from BNL has shown that this type of source is more reliable with a longer lifetime due to better power efficiency. The current source development effort is to produce a reliable source with >60mA of H- beam current, 15Hz rep-rate, 100s pulse width, and a duty factor of 0.15%. The source will be based on the BNL design along with development done at FNAL for the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS).

  8. Neutral beam injector for 475 keV MARS sloshing ions

    SciTech Connect

    Goebel, D.M.; Hamilton, G.W.

    1983-12-13

    A neutral beam injector system which produces 5 MW of 475 keV D/sup 0/ neutrals continuously on target has been designed. The beamline is intended to produce the sloshing ion distribution required in the end plug region of the conceptual MARS tandem mirror commercial reactor. The injector design utilizes the LBL self-extraction negative ion source and Transverse Field Focusing (TFF) accelerator to generate a long, ribbon ion beam. A laser photodetachment neutralizer strips over 90% of the negative ions. Magnetic and neutron shield designs are included to exclude the fringe fields of the end plug and provide low activation by the neutron flux from the target plasma. The use of a TFF accelerator and photodetachment neutralizer produces a total system electrical efficiency of about 63% for this design.

  9. Laser acceleration and deflection of 963 keV electrons with a silicon dielectric structure

    DOE PAGES

    Leedle, Kenneth J.; Pease, R. Fabian; Byer, Robert L.; Harris, James S.

    2015-02-12

    Radio frequency particle accelerators are ubiquitous in ultrasmall and ultrafast science, but their size and cost have prompted exploration of compact and scalable alternatives such as the dielectric laser accelerator. We present the first demonstration, to the best of our knowledge, of high gradient laser acceleration and deflection of electrons with a silicon structure. Driven by a 5 nJ, 130 fs mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser at 907 nm wavelength, our devices achieve accelerating gradients in excess of 200 MeV/m and suboptical cycle streaking of 96.30 keV electrons. These results pave the way for high gradient silicon dielectric laser accelerators using commercialmore » lasers and subfemtosecond electron beam experiments.« less

  10. MOLECULAR DYNAMICS OF CASCADES OVERLAP IN TUNGSTEN WITH 20-KEV PRIMARY KNOCK-ON ATOMS

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Nandipati, Giridhar; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-04-16

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the mutual influence of two subsequent cascades in tungsten. The influence is studied using 20-keV primary knock-on atoms, to induce one cascade after another separated by 15 ps, in a lattice temperature of 1025 K (i.e. 0.25 of the melting temperature of the interatomic potential). The center of mass of the vacancies at the peak damage during the cascade is taken as the location of the cascade. The distance between this location to that of the next cascade is taken as the overlap parameter. Empirical fits describing the number of surviving vacancies and interstitial atoms as a function of overlap are presented.

  11. Spectroscopy in the 10 keV to 10 MeV range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Spectral lines in the 10 keV to 1 MeV range carry information of fundamental importance on many astronomical objects. Since the lines are directly related to specific physical processes this information is model independent and gives the physical conditions in the objects. At the sensitivities achieved to date, approximately 0.0001 to 0.001 phsq cm. sec for steady sources and approximately 0.01 to 1 ph/sq cm sec for transient sources, lines were detected from the galactic center, gamma-ray bursts and transients, X-ray pulsators, the Crab pulsar and solar flares. Future instruments with a factor of approximately 100 sensitivity improvement will allow detailed spectroscopic study of these classes of objects as well as supernova remnants, active galaxies and the interstellar medium. This sensitivity improvement can be obtained through the use of detector technology already proven in balloon and satellite instruments.

  12. A neutron source with an effective energy of 0-5 keV.

    PubMed

    Harvey, J R; Bending, R C

    1976-01-01

    Calculations indicate that an assembly consisting of an antimony-beryllium source at the centre of a 4 cm radius water sphere surrounded by a 1 mm thick shell of boron-10 will emit neutrons with a broad spectrum at intermediate energies. A device based on this design was constructed using a water-filled, boron-carbide loaded, plastic shell with an antimony-beryllium source located at the centre. The output spectrum was calculated by Monte Carlo program and the computed total yield agreed well with measurements made with a manganese bath system. The main peak has an effective energy of 0-5 keV and the total yield is 18% of the antimony-beryllium source strength. Experience with this source suggests some possible avenues for future development.

  13. Solution of controversy over 1583-keV levels in sup 204 Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Trzaska, W.H.; Julin, R.; Kantele, J.; Kumpulainen, J. )

    1989-09-01

    Data from {sup 204}Pb({ital p},{ital p}{prime}){sup 204}Pb conversion-electron and gamma-ray experiments, together with previous results, prove the existence of two levels (0{sup +} and 2{sup +}) at 1583-keV excitation energy in {sup 204}Pb. Modified values (limits) of the {rho}{sub 21}{sup 2} and {ital X}{sub 211} are 0.0013{lt}{rho}{sub 21}{sup 2}{lt}0.015 and {ital X}{sub 211}{gt}0.073. New experimental evidence indicates that all the three observed excited {ital O}{sup +} states in {sup 204}Pb can be explained as belonging to the four-neutron-hole valence space and, therefore, there is no clear candidate for the proton 2p-2h intruder state in this nucleus.

  14. The study of the guiding process for 10 keV electrons by planar Plexiglass surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokhmyanina, K. A.; Zhukova, P. N.; Kubankin, A. S.; Thu Hoai, Le; Nazhmudinov, R. M.; Oleinik, A. N.; Pokhil, G. P.

    2014-05-01

    Experimental study of electron beam reflection from a single planar surface of Plexiglas was made. The distinct guiding effect for the part of the beam was observed for 10 keV electrons within angles of incidence from 0 to +3 degrees. The experiments using Poly plates showed a number of features of the process such as the dependence of the reflection on the plate surface quality and material of the surfaces, the divisions of the beam into two parts with different behaviour depend on tilt angle and the beam current value, the effect of an elevation angle of the beam in compare with initial beam trace at negative and zero tilt angles of the plate.

  15. 200 keV electron mini-accelerators for scientific and applied purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazarezov, I. V.

    2006-12-01

    Created in BINP, 200 keV electron mini-accelerators with different types of high voltage generators are described: cascade generator with serial capacitance connection generator with high voltage step-up transformer and voltage-doubling circuit of rectification generators on the base of pulse and Tesla step-up transformers. Described are their circuit and design performance peculiarities and fields of application.

  16. The XMM-Newton slew survey in the 2-10 keV band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warwick, R. S.; Saxton, R. D.; Read, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Context. The on-going XMM-Newton Slew Survey (XSS) provides coverage of a significant fraction of the sky in a broad X-ray bandpass. Although shallow by contemporary standards, in the "classical" 2-10 keV band of X-ray astronomy, the XSS provides significantly better sensitivity than any currently available all-sky survey. Aims: We investigate the source content of the XSS, focussing on detections in the hard 2-10 keV band down to a very low threshold (≥ 4 counts net of background). At the faint end, the survey reaches a flux sensitivity of roughly 3 × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 (2-10 keV). Methods: Our starting point was a sample of 487 sources detected in the XSS (up to and including release XMMSL1d2) at high galactic latitude in the hard band. Through cross-correlation with published source catalogues from surveys spanning the electromagnetic spectrum from radio through to gamma-rays, we find that 45% of the sources have likely identifications with normal/active galaxies. A further 18% are associated with other classes of X-ray object (nearby coronally active stars, accreting binaries, clusters of galaxies), leaving 37% of the XSS sources with no current identification. We go on to define an XSS extragalactic sample comprised of 219 galaxies and active galaxies selected in the XSS hard band. We investigate the properties of this extragalactic sample including its X-ray log N - log S distribution. Results: We find that in the low-count limit, the XSS is, as expected, strongly affected by Eddington bias. There is also a very strong bias in the XSS against the detection of extended sources, most notably clusters of galaxies. A significant fraction of the detections at and around the low-count limit may be spurious. Nevertheless, it is possible to use the XSS to extract a reasonably robust sample of extragalactic sources, excluding galaxy clusters. The differential log N - log S relation of these extragalactic sources matches very well to the HEAO-1 A2 all-sky survey

  17. A search for the 478 keV line from the decay of nucleosynthetic Be-7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael J.; Leising, Mark D.; Share, Gerald H.

    1991-01-01

    Unstable Be-7 (half-life 53.28 days) is expected to be present in the ejecta of classical novae. If the frequency of novae in the central Galaxy is high enough, a nearly steady state abundance of Be-7 will be present there. Data accumulated during transits of the Galactic center across the aperture of the Solar Maximum Mission Gamma Ray Spectrometer have been searched for evidence of the 478 keV gamma-ray line resulting from Be-7 decay. A 3-sigma upper limit of 0.00016 gamma/sq cm s has been placed on the emission in this line from the central radian of the Galactic plane. Less stringent limits have been set on the production of Be-7 in Nova Aquilae 1982, Nova Vulpeculae 1984 No. 2, and Nova Centauri 1986 from observations with the same instrument.

  18. Mechanisms of O2 Sputtering from Water Ice by keV Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teolis, B. D.; Vidal, R. A.; Shi, J.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2005-01-01

    We have conducted experiments on the sputtering of water ice by 100 keV Ar(+) between 20 and 150 K. Our findings indicate that the temperature dependence of the total sputtering yield is heavily influenced by the thermal and irradiation history of the ice, showing a complex dependence on irradiation fluence that is correlated to the ejection of O2 molecules. The results suggest that O2 produced by the ions inside the ice diffuses to the surface where it is trapped and then ejected via sputtering or thermal desorption. A high concentration of O2 can trap in a subsurface layer during bombardment at 130 K, which we relate to the formation of hydrogen and its escape from that region. A simple model allows us to determine the depth profile of the absolute concentration of O2 trapped in the ice.

  19. Evolution of nanodot morphology on polycarbonate (PC) surfaces by 40 keV Ar+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Meetika; Chawla, Mahak; Gupta, Divya; Shekhawat, Nidhi; Sharma, Annu; Aggarwal, Sanjeev

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper we have discussed the effect of 40 keV Ar+ ions irradiation on nanoscale surface morphology of Polycarbonate (PC) substrate. Specimens were sputtered at off normal incidences of 30°, 40° and 50° with the fluence of 1 × 1016 Ar+cm-2. The topographical behaviour of specimens was studied by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) technique. AFM study demonstrates the evolution of nano dot morphology on PC specimens on irradiating with 1 × 1016 Ar+cm-2. Average size of dots varied from 37-95 nm in this specified range of incidence while density of dots varied from 0.17-3.0 × 107 dotscm-2. Such variations in morphological features have been supported by estimation of ion range and sputtering yield through SRIM simulations.

  20. Preparation of radiotherapy glass by phosphorus ion implantation at 100 keV.

    PubMed

    Kawashita, M; Miyaji, F; Kokubo, T; Takaoka, G H; Yamada, I; Suzuki, Y; Kajiyama, K

    1997-01-01

    A chemically durable glass containing a large amount of phosphorus is useful for in situ irradiation of cancers. It can be activated to be a beta emitter (half-life of 14.3 days) by neutron bombardment. Microspheres of the activated glass injected into the tumors can irradiate the tumors directly with beta rays without irradiating neighboring normal tissues. In the present study a P+ ion was implanted into a pure silica glass in a plate form at 100 keV in order to find the fundamental conditions for obtaining such a glass. Little phosphorus was present in the surface region, at least to a depth of 2.4 nm for doses of 5 x 10(16) and 1 x 10(17) cm-2, whereas an appreciable amount of it was distributed on the glass surface and a part of it was oxidized for doses above 5 x 10(17) cm-2. The glasses implanted with doses of 5 x 10(16) and 1 x 10(17) cm-2 hardly released the P and Si into water at 95 degrees C, even after 7 days, whereas the glasses implanted with doses above 5 x 10(17) cm-2 released appreciable amounts of these elements. Implantation energies of 20 and 50 keV (even at doses of 5 x 10(16) and 1 x 10(17) cm-2, respectively), formed oxidized phosphorus on the glass surfaces and gave appreciable release of the P and Si into the hot water. This indicates that a chemically durable glass containing a larger amount of phosphorus could be obtained if a P+ ion is implanted at higher energies to localize in a deeper region of the glass surface.

  1. keV sterile neutrino dark matter from singlet scalar decays: basic concepts and subtle features

    SciTech Connect

    Merle, Alexander; Totzauer, Maximilian

    2015-06-08

    We perform a detailed and illustrative study of the production of keV sterile neutrino Dark Matter (DM) by decays of singlet scalars in the early Universe. In the current study we focus on providing a clear and general overview of this production mechanism. For the first time we study all regimes possible on the level of momentum distribution functions, which we obtain by solving a system of Boltzmann equations. These quantities contain the full information about the production process, which allows us to not only track the evolution of the DM generation but to also take into account all bounds related to the spectrum, such as constraints from structure formation or from avoiding too much dark radiation. In particular we show that this simple production mechanism can, depending on the regime, lead to strongly non-thermal DM spectra which may even feature more than one peak in the momentum distribution. These cases could have particularly interesting consequences for cosmological structure formation, as their analysis requires more refined tools than the simplistic estimate using the free-streaming horizon. Here we present the mechanism including all concepts and subtleties involved, for now using the assumption that the effective number of relativistic degrees of freedom is constant during DM production, which is applicable in a significant fraction of the parameter space. This allows us to derive analytical results to back up our detailed numerical computations, thus leading to the most comprehensive picture of keV sterile neutrino DM production by singlet scalar decays that exists up to now.

  2. QUIET-TIME INTERPLANETARY {approx}2-20 keV SUPERHALO ELECTRONS AT SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Linghua; Lin, Robert P.; Salem, Chadi; Pulupa, Marc; Larson, Davin E.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Yoon, Peter H.

    2012-07-01

    We present a statistical survey of {approx}2-20 keV superhalo electrons in the solar wind measured by the SupraThermal Electron instrument on board the two STEREO spacecraft during quiet-time periods from 2007 March through 2009 March at solar minimum. The observed superhalo electrons have a nearly isotropic angular distribution and a power-law spectrum, f{proportional_to}v{sup -{gamma}}, with {gamma} ranging from 5 to 8.7, with nearly half between 6.5 and 7.5, and an average index of 6.69 {+-} 0.90. The observed power-law spectrum varies significantly on a spatial scale of {approx}>0.1 AU and a temporal scale of {approx}>several days. The integrated density of quiet-time superhalo electrons at 2-20 keV ranges from {approx}10{sup -8} cm{sup -3} to 10{sup -6} cm{sup -3}, about 10{sup -9}-10{sup -6} of the solar wind density, and, as well as the power-law spectrum, shows no correlation with solar wind proton density, velocity, or temperature. The density of superhalo electrons appears to show a solar-cycle variation at solar minimum, while the power-law spectral index {gamma} has no solar-cycle variation. These quiet-time superhalo electrons are present even in the absence of any solar activity-e.g., active regions, flares or microflares, type III radio bursts, etc.-suggesting that they may be accelerated by processes such as resonant wave-particle interactions in the interplanetary medium, or possibly by nonthermal processes related to the acceleration of the solar wind such as nanoflares, or by acceleration at the CIR forward shocks.

  3. Low-energy electrons (5-50 keV) in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganushkina, N. Y.; Liemohn, M. W.; Amariutei, O. A.; Pitchford, D.

    2014-01-01

    Transport and acceleration of the 5-50 keV electrons from the plasma sheet to geostationary orbit were investigated. These electrons constitute the low-energy part of the seed population for the high-energy MeV particles in the radiation belts and are responsible for surface charging. We modeled one nonstorm event on 24-30 November 2011, when the presence of isolated substorms was seen in the AE index. We used the Inner Magnetosphere Particle Transport and Acceleration Model (IMPTAM) with the boundary at 10 RE with moment values for the electrons in the plasma sheet. The output of the IMPTAM modeling was compared to the observed electron fluxes in 10 energy channels (from 5 to 50 keV) measured on board the AMC 12 geostationary spacecraft by the Compact Environmental Anomaly Sensor II with electrostatic analyzer instrument. The behavior of the fluxes depends on the electron energy. The IMPTAM model, driven by the observed parameters such as Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) By and Bz, solar wind velocity, number density, dynamic pressure, and the Dst index, was not able to reproduce the observed peaks in the electron fluxes when no significant variations are present in those parameters. We launched several substorm-associated electromagnetic pulses at the substorm onsets during the modeled period. The observed increases in the fluxes can be captured by IMPTAM when substorm-associated electromagnetic fields are taken into account. Modifications of the pulse front velocity and arrival time are needed to exactly match the observed enhancements.

  4. Low-energy x-ray dosimetry studies (6 to 16 keV) at SSRL beamline 1-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipe, N. E.; Chatterji, S.; Fassò, A.; Kase, K. R.; Seefred, R.; Olko, P.; Bilski, P.; Soares, C.

    1997-07-01

    Synchrotron radiation facilities provide a unique opportunity for low-energy x-ray dosimetry studies because of the availability of monochromatic x-ray beams. Results of such studies performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) are described. Polish lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs), MTS-N(LiF:Mg, Ti- 0.4 mm thick), MCP-N (LiF:Mg, Cu, P - 0.4 mm thick) were exposed free in air to monochromatic x-rays (6-16 keV). These exposures were monitored with an SSRL ionization chamber. The responses (counts/Gy) of MTS-N and MCP-N were generally found to increase with increasing energy. The response at 16 keV is about 3 and 4 times higher than the response at 6 keV for MTS-N and MCP-N, respectively. Irradiation at 6 keV indicates a fairly linear dose response for both type of TLDs over a dose range of 0.01 to 0.4 Gy. In addition there appears to be no significant difference in responses between irradiating the TLDs from the front and the back sides. The energy response of the PTW ionization chamber type 23342 relative to the SSRL ionization chamber is within ±4.5% between 6 and 16 keV. Both the TLDs and the PTW ionization chamber can also be used for beam dosimetry.

  5. DISPLACEMENT CASCADE SIMULATION IN TUNGSTEN UP TO 200 KEV OF DAMAGE ENERGY AT 300, 1025, AND 2050 K

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Nandipati, Giridhar; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-09-22

    We generated molecular dynamics database of primary defects that adequately covers the range of tungsten recoil energy imparted by 14-MeV neutrons. During this semi annual period, cascades at 150 and 200 keV at 300 and 1025 K were simulated. Overall, we included damage energy up to 200 keV at 300 and 1025 K, and up to 100 keV at 2050 K. We report the number of surviving Frenkel pairs (NF) and the size distribution of defect clusters. The slope of the NF curve versus cascade damage energy (EMD), on a log-log scale, changes at a transition energy (μ). For EMD > μ, the cascade forms interconnected damage regions that facilitate the formation of large clusters of defects. At 300 K and EMD = 200 keV, the largest size of interstitial cluster and vacancy cluster is 266 and 335, respectively. Similarly, at 1025 K and EMD = 200 keV, the largest size of interstitial cluster and vacancy cluster is 296 and 338, respectively. At 2050 K, large interstitial clusters also routinely form, but practically no large vacancy clusters do

  6. CONTRIBUTION OF UNRESOLVED POINT SOURCES TO THE DIFFUSE X-RAY BACKGROUND BELOW 1 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A.; Galeazzi, M.

    2009-09-01

    We present here the analysis of X-ray point sources detected in several observations available in the XMM-Newton public archive. We focused, in particular, on energies below 1 keV, which are of particular relevance to the understanding of the diffuse X-ray background (DXB). The average field of all the exposures is 0.09 deg{sup -2}. We reached an average flux sensitivity of 5.8 x 10{sup -16}ergs{sup -1}cm{sup -2} in the soft band (0.5-2.0 keV) and 2.5 x 10{sup -16}ergs{sup -1}cm{sup -2} in the very soft band (0.4-0.6 keV). In this paper, we discuss the log N-log S results, the contribution to the integrated X-ray sky flux, and the properties of the cumulative spectrum from all sources. In particular, we found an excess flux at around 0.5 keV in the composite spectrum of faint sources. The excess seems to be a general property of all the fields observed suggesting an additional class of weak sources is contributing to the X-ray emission at these energies. Combining our results with previous investigations, we have also quantified the contribution of the individual components of the DXB in the 3/4 keV band.

  7. Photon Molecules in Atomic Gases Trapped Near Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, James S.; Caneva, Tommaso; Chang, Darrick E.

    2016-07-01

    Realizing systems that support robust, controlled interactions between individual photons is an exciting frontier of nonlinear optics. To this end, one approach that has emerged recently is to leverage atomic interactions to create strong and spatially nonlocal interactions between photons. In particular, effective photonic interactions have been successfully created via interactions between atoms excited to Rydberg levels. Here, we investigate an alternative approach, in which atomic interactions arise via their common coupling to photonic crystal waveguides. This technique takes advantage of the ability to separately tailor the strength and range of interactions via the dispersion engineering of the structure itself, which can lead to qualitatively new types of phenomena. For example, much of the work on photon-photon interactions relies on the linear optical effect of electromagnetically induced transparency, in combination with the use of interactions to shift optical pulses into or out of the associated transparency window. Here, we identify a large new class of "correlated transparency windows," in which photonic states of a certain number and shape selectively propagate through the system. Through this technique, we show that molecular bound states of photon pairs can be created.

  8. The ubiquitous photonic wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, Andrea; Banzer, Peter

    2016-08-01

    A circularly polarized electromagnetic plane wave carries an electric field that rotates clockwise or counterclockwise around the propagation direction of the wave. According to the handedness of this rotation, its longitudinal spin angular momentum (AM) density is either parallel or antiparallel to the propagation of light. However, there are also light waves that are not simply plane and carry an electric field that rotates around an axis perpendicular to the propagation direction, thus yielding transverse spin AM density. Electric field configurations of this kind have been suggestively dubbed ‘photonic wheels’. It has been recently shown that photonic wheels are commonplace in optics as they occur in electromagnetic fields confined by waveguides, in strongly focused beams, in plasmonic and evanescent waves. In this work we establish a general theory of electromagnetic waves propagating along a well defined direction, and carrying transverse spin AM density. We show that depending on the shape of these waves, the spin density may be either perpendicular to the mean linear momentum (globally transverse spin) or to the linear momentum density (locally transverse spin). We find that the latter case generically occurs only for non-diffracting beams, such as the Bessel beams. Moreover, we introduce the concept of meridional Stokes parameters to operationally quantify the transverse spin density. To illustrate our theory, we apply it to the exemplary cases of Bessel beams and evanescent waves. These results open a new and accessible route to the understanding, generation and manipulation of optical beams with transverse spin AM density.

  9. Smart photonic carbon brush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Oleg G.; Kuznetsov, Artem A.; Morozov, Gennady A.; Nureev, Ilnur I.; Sakhabutdinov, Airat Z.; Faskhutdinov, Lenar M.; Artemev, Vadim I.

    2016-03-01

    Aspects of the paper relate to a wear monitoring system for smart photonic carbon brush. There are many applications in which regular inspection is not feasible because of a number of factors including, for example, time, labor, cost and disruptions due to down time. Thus, there is a need for a system that can monitor the wear of a component while the component is in operation or without having to remove the component from its operational position. We propose a new smart photonic method for characterization of carbon brush wear. It is based on the usage of advantages of the multiplicative response of FBG and LPFG sensors and its double-frequency probing. Additional measuring parameters are the wear rate, the brush temperature, the engine rotation speed, the hangs control, and rotor speed. Sensor is embedded in brush. Firstly the change of sensor length is used to measure wear value and its central wavelength shift for temperature ones. The results of modeling and experiments are presented.

  10. Ion photon emission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, P.; Doyle, B. L.; Banks, J. C.; Battistella, A.; Gennaro, G.; McDaniel, F. D.; Mellon, M.; Vittone, E.; Vizkelethy, G.; Wing, N. D.

    2003-09-01

    A new ion-induced emission microscopy has been invented and demonstrated, which is called ion photon emission microscopy (IPEM). It employs a low current, broad ion beam impinging on a sample, previously coated or simply covered with a few microns of a fast, highly efficient phosphor layer. The light produced at the single ion impact point is collected with an optical microscope and projected at high magnification onto a single photon position sensitive detector (PSD). This allows maps of the ion strike effects to be produced, effectively removing the need for a microbeam. Irradiation in air and even the use of alpha particle sources with no accelerator are possible. Potential applications include ion beam induced charge collection studies of semiconducting and insulating materials, single event upset studies on microchips and even biological cells in radiobiological effectiveness experiments. We describe the IPEM setup, including a 60× OM-40 microscope with a 1.5 mm hole for the beam transmission and a Quantar PSD with 60 μm pixel. Bicron plastic scintillator blades of 10 μm were chosen as a phosphor for their nanosecond time resolution, homogeneity, utility and commercial availability. The results given in this paper are for a prototype IPEM system. They indicate a resolution of ˜12 μm, the presence of a spatial halo and a He-ion efficiency of ˜20%. This marks the first time that nuclear microscopy has been performed with a radioactive source.

  11. Photonic Band Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabonovitch, Eli

    2001-09-01

    Scientists at UCLA, Caltech, and Polytechnic University have developed a new concept in Electromagnetics called "Photonic Bandgaps' that permits unprecedented control of Electromagnetic Waves, at both radio frequencies, and optical frequencies. This new paradigm of Electromagnetics is based on Nature's design for semiconductor crystals, but it is a crystal structure that is artificially engineered for electromagnetic waves rather than for electron waves. Beginning in 1996, new frontiers in the engineered control of electromagnetic waves have emerged from this design paradigm. For example, the very tiniest, most miniaturized electromagnetic cavity ever created was engineered, and demonstrated, under this MURI; trapping optical energy in the smallest volume ever achieved. This world's most tiny light trap was also made into the most miniaturized laser ever made, occupying a volume smaller than a cubic wavelength. At the same time this MURI advanced the electromagnetic bandgap concept into microwaves and radio waves that are so important for military systems. This required new concepts that permitted the bandgap structure to be much smaller than the electromagnetic wavelength. As in the optical version of photonic crystals, these electromagnetic bandgaps permit unprecedented control over radio frequency electromagnetic waves. For example new antenna structures have been invented that permit near field control over radio emissions from antennas, so that the hand-held radio transmitters can be more efficient.

  12. Octonacci photonic quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, E. R.; Costa, C. H.; Vasconcelos, M. S.; Anselmo, D. H. A. L.; Mello, V. D.

    2015-08-01

    We study theoretically the transmission spectra in one-dimensional photonic quasicrystals, made up of SiO2(A) and TiO2(B) materials, organized following the Octonacci sequence, where the nth-stage of the multilayer Sn is given by the rule Sn =Sn-1Sn-2Sn-1 , for n ⩾ 3 and with S1 = A and S2 = B . The expression for transmittance was obtained by employing a theoretical calculation based on the transfer-matrix method. For normally incident waves, we observe that, for a same generation, the transmission spectra for transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) waves are equal, at least qualitatively, and they present a scaling property where a self-similar behavior is obtained, as an evidence that these spectra are fractals. The spectra show regions where the omnidirectional band gaps emerges for specific generations of Octonacci photonic structure, except to TM waves. For TE waves, we note that all of them have almost the same width, for different generations. We also report the localization of modes as a consequence of the quasiperiodicity of the heterostructure.

  13. Relative biological damage in and out of field of 6, 10 and 18 MV clinical photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzati, A. O.

    2016-08-01

    The lower energy of scattered radiation in and out of a megavoltage (MV) photon beam suggests that relative biological damage (RBD) may change from in- to out-of-field regions for unit absorbed dose. Because of high linear energy transfer (LET) and potential of causing severe damage to the DNA, low-energy (10 eV-1 keV) slowing down electrons should be included in radiation biological damage calculations. In this study RBD was calculated in and out of field of 6, 10 and 18 MV clinical photon beams including low-energy slowing down electrons in the track length estimated method. Electron spectra at energies higher than 2 keV were collected in a water phantom at different depths and off-axis points by using the MCNP code. A new extrapolation method was used to estimate the electron spectra at energies lower than 2 keV. The obtained spectra at energies lower than 2 keV merged with spectra at energies higher than 2 keV by using continuity of the spectra. These spectra were used as an input to a validated microdosimetric Monte Carlo (MC) code, MC damage simulation (MCDS), to calculate the RBD of induced DSB in DNA at points in and out of the primary radiation field under fully aerobic (100% O2 and anoxic (0% O2 conditions. There was an observable difference in the energy spectra for electrons for points in the primary radiation field and those points out of field. RBD had maximum variation, 11% in 6 MV photons at field size of 20×20 cm2. This variation was less than 11% for 10 and 18 MV photons and field sizes smaller than 20×20 cm2. Our simulations also showed that under the anoxic condition, RBD increases up to 6% for 6 and 10 MV photons and the 20×20 cm2 field size. This work supports the hypothesis that in megavoltage treatments out-of-field radiation quality can vary enough to have an impact on RBD per unit dose and that this may play a role as the radiation therapy community explores biological optimization as a tool to assist treatment planning.

  14. Single photonics: Generation and detection of heralded single photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungsang

    Single photons are useful for experiments where the quantum nature of a particle plays a key role, since they make an ideal candidate for a single quantum system. Such a single quantum system is indispensable in fundamental tests of quantum mechanics where nonclassical properties, like non-locality and entanglement, are studied. Such a system is also useful in a more recently developed field of quantum information technology where these properties are utilized to perform secure communication and information processing. In the source of single photons utilized in these experiments, the arrival time of the photon is completely random and obeys Poissonian statistics. Efficiency of these experiments can be greatly enhanced when the arrival time of the photons can be controlled. Also, a technology that provides high quantum efficiency and low noise detection of single photons is crucial to improve the performance of these experimental schemes. This thesis reports an experimental effort towards realization of a single photon turnstile device where the emission time of a single photon can be controlled by means of an external modulation signal. This is achieved in a mesoscopic double barrier p- i-n junction operating in an ultra-low temperature environment, where the Coulomb charging energy of a single electron and a single hole is large enough to suppress the thermal fluctuation of carrier injection. One and only one electron-hole pair is injected into the active region, resulting in the emission of a single photon per modulation period. This thesis also reports a single photon counting system using a visible light photon counter (VLPC), which utilizes the impact ionization of As impurity atoms in Si as the multiplication process. Our system features a fast (~2 ns) detection of single photons with high quantum efficiency (~88%) and low multiplication noise (excess noise factor ~1.02). The detector system also has a unique capability of distinguishing a single photon

  15. Photonic module: An on-demand resource for photonic entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Devitt, Simon J.; Greentree, Andrew D.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.; Ionicioiu, Radu; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Munro, William J.

    2007-11-15

    Photonic entanglement has a wide range of applications in quantum computation and communication. Here we introduce a device: the photonic module, which allows for the rapid, deterministic preparation of a large class of entangled photon states. The module is an application independent, ''plug and play'' device, with sufficient flexibility to prepare entanglement for all major quantum computation and communication applications in a completely deterministic fashion without number-discriminated photon detection. We present two alternative constructions for the module, one using free-space components and one in a photonic band-gap structure. The natural operation of the module is to generate states within the stabilizer formalism and we present an analysis on the cavity requirements to experimentally realize this device.

  16. Optimal energy for cell radiosensitivity enhancement by gold nanoparticles using synchrotron-based monoenergetic photon beams.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Wan Nordiana; Corde, Stéphanie; Yagi, Naoto; Abdul Aziz, Siti Aishah; Annabell, Nathan; Geso, Moshi

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been shown to enhance radiation doses delivered to biological targets due to the high absorption coefficient of gold atoms, stemming from their high atomic number (Z) and physical density. These properties significantly increase the likelihood of photoelectric effects and Compton scattering interactions. Gold nanoparticles are a novel radiosensitizing agent that can potentially be used to increase the effectiveness of current radiation therapy techniques and improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. However, the optimum radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles is strongly dependent on photon energy, which theoretically is predicted to occur in the kilovoltage range of energy. In this research, synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays in the 30-100 keV range were used to investigate the energy dependence of radiosensitization by gold nanoparticles and also to determine the photon energy that produces optimum effects. This investigation was conducted using cells in culture to measure dose enhancement. Bovine aortic endothelial cells with and without gold nanoparticles were irradiated with X-rays at energies of 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 81, and 100 keV. Trypan blue exclusion assays were performed after irradiation to determine cell viability. Cell radiosensitivity enhancement was indicated by the dose enhancement factor which was found to be maximum at 40 keV with a value of 3.47. The dose enhancement factor obtained at other energy levels followed the same direction as the theoretical calculations based on the ratio of the mass energy absorption coefficients of gold and water. This experimental evidence shows that the radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles varies with photon energy as predicted from theoretical calculations. However, prediction based on theoretical assumptions is sometimes difficult due to the complexity of biological systems, so further study at the cellular level is required to fully characterize the effects

  17. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber

    PubMed Central

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons. PMID:27170160

  18. Transmission images and evaluation of tomographic imaging based scattered radiation from biological materials using 10, 15, 20 and 25 keV synchrotron X-rays: An analysis in terms of optimum energy

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Donepudi V.; Akatsuka, Takao; Tromba, Giuliana

    2004-05-12

    Transmission images and tomographic imaging based scattered radiation is evaluated from biological materials, for example, Polyethylene, Poly carbonate, Plexiglas and Nylon using 10, 15, 20 and 25 keV synchrotron X-rays. The SYRMEP facility at Elettra,Trieste, Italy and the associated detection system has been used for the image acquisition. The scattered radiation is detected for each sample at three energies at an angle of 90 deg. using Si-Pin detector coupled to a multi-channel analyzer. The contribution of transmitted, Compton and fluorescence photons are assessed for a test phantom of small dimensions. The optimum analysis is performed with the use of the dimensions of the sample and detected radiation at various energies.

  19. Progress in 2D photonic crystal Fano resonance photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weidong; Zhao, Deyin; Shuai, Yi-Chen; Yang, Hongjun; Chuwongin, Santhad; Chadha, Arvinder; Seo, Jung-Hun; Wang, Ken X.; Liu, Victor; Ma, Zhenqiang; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to a conventional symmetric Lorentzian resonance, Fano resonance is predominantly used to describe asymmetric-shaped resonances, which arise from the constructive and destructive interference of discrete resonance states with broadband continuum states. This phenomenon and the underlying mechanisms, being common and ubiquitous in many realms of physical sciences, can be found in a wide variety of nanophotonic structures and quantum systems, such as quantum dots, photonic crystals, plasmonics, and metamaterials. The asymmetric and steep dispersion of the Fano resonance profile promises applications for a wide range of photonic devices, such as optical filters, switches, sensors, broadband reflectors, lasers, detectors, slow-light and non-linear devices, etc. With advances in nanotechnology, impressive progress has been made in the emerging field of nanophotonic structures. One of the most attractive nanophotonic structures for integrated photonics is the two-dimensional photonic crystal slab (2D PCS), which can be integrated into a wide range of photonic devices. The objective of this manuscript is to provide an in depth review of the progress made in the general area of Fano resonance photonics, focusing on the photonic devices based on 2D PCS structures. General discussions are provided on the origins and characteristics of Fano resonances in 2D PCSs. A nanomembrane transfer printing fabrication technique is also reviewed, which is critical for the heterogeneous integrated Fano resonance photonics. The majority of the remaining sections review progress made on various photonic devices and structures, such as high quality factor filters, membrane reflectors, membrane lasers, detectors and sensors, as well as structures and phenomena related to Fano resonance slow light effect, nonlinearity, and optical forces in coupled PCSs. It is expected that further advances in the field will lead to more significant advances towards 3D integrated photonics, flat

  20. Degeneracy at 1871 keV in {sup 112}Cd and implications for neutrinoless double electron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Green, K. L.; Garrett, P. E.; Demand, G. A.; Grinyer, G. F.; Leach, K. G.; Phillips, A. A.; Schumaker, M. A.; Svensson, C. E.; Wong, J.; Austin, R. A. E.; Colosimo, S.; Ball, G. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D. S.; Hackman, G.; Morton, A. C.; Pearson, C. J.; Cross, D.; Kulp, W. D.; Wood, J. L.; Yates, S. W.

    2009-09-15

    High-statistics {beta}-decay measurements of {sup 112}Ag and {sup 112}In were performed to study the structure of the {sup 112}Cd nucleus. The precise energies of the doublet of levels at 1871 keV, for which the 0{sup +} member has been suggested as a possible daughter state following neutrinoless double electron capture of {sup 112}Sn, were determined to be 1871.137(72) keV (0{sub 4}{sup +} level) and 1870.743(54) keV (4{sub 2}{sup +} level). The nature of the 0{sub 4}{sup +} level, required for the calculation of the nuclear matrix element that would be needed to extract a neutrino mass from neutrinoless double electron capture to this state, is suggested to be of intruder origin.

  1. Demonstration of a 13-keV Kr K-shell x-ray source at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, K. B.; May, M. J.; Colvin, J. D.; Barrios, M. A.; Patterson, J. R.; Regan, S. P.

    2013-09-01

    We report 3% conversion efficiency of laser energy into Kr K-shell (≈13 keV) radiation, consistent with theoretical predictions. This is ≈10× greater than previous work. The emission was produced from a 4.1-mm-diameter, 4-mm-tall gas pipe target filled with 1.2 or 1.5 atm of Kr gas. 160 of the National Ignition Facility laser beams deposited ≈700 kJ of 3ω light into the target in an ≈140 TW, 5.0-ns-duration square pulse. The Dante diagnostics measured ≈5 TW into 4π solid angle of ≥12 keV x rays for ≈4 ns, which includes both continuum emission and flux in the Kr Heα line at 13 keV.

  2. The diffuse X-ray spectrum from 14-200 keV as measured on OSO-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Suri, A. N.; Frost, K. J.

    1973-01-01

    The measurement of energy spectrum of the diffuse component of cosmic X-ray flux made on the OSO-5 spacecraft is described. The contributions to the total counting rate of the actively shielded X-ray detector are considered in some detail and the techniques used to eliminate the non-cosmic components are described. Positive values for the cosmic flux are obtained in seven energy channels between 14 and 200 keV and two upper limits are obtained between 200 and 254 keV. The results can be fitted by a power law spectrum. A critical comparison is made with the OSO-3 results. Conclusions show that the reported break in the energy spectrum at 40 keV is probably produced by an erroneous correction for the radioactivity induced in the detector on each passage through the intense charged particle fluxes in the South Atlantic anomaly.

  3. Demonstration of a 13-keV Kr K-shell x-ray source at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Fournier, K B; May, M J; Colvin, J D; Barrios, M A; Patterson, J R; Regan, S P

    2013-09-01

    We report 3% conversion efficiency of laser energy into Kr K-shell (≈13 keV) radiation, consistent with theoretical predictions. This is ≈10× greater than previous work. The emission was produced from a 4.1-mm-diameter, 4-mm-tall gas pipe target filled with 1.2 or 1.5 atm of Kr gas. 160 of the National Ignition Facility laser beams deposited ≈700 kJ of 3ω light into the target in an ≈140 TW, 5.0-ns-duration square pulse. The Dante diagnostics measured ≈5 TW into 4π solid angle of ≥12 keV x rays for ≈4 ns, which includes both continuum emission and flux in the Kr He_{α} line at 13 keV.

  4. A sectored Ge-Compton polarimeter for parity assignments in photon scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlitt, B.; Maier, U.; Friedrichs, H.; Albers, S.; Bauske, I.; von Brentano, P.; Heil, R. D.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Kneissl, U.; Margraf, J.; Pitz, H. H.; Wesselborg, C.; Zilges, A.

    1994-01-01

    Parities of nuclear levels excited in photon scattering experiments can be determined by measurements of the linear polarization of the scattered photons. The needed theoretical formalism is summarized. A fourfold sectored single crystal Ge-Compton polarimeter, its operation and performances are described. The compact polarimeter has an outstanding coincidence efficiency ɛcoinc of about 25% and a good energy resolution of 2.2 keV at 1.333 MeV. The polarization sensitivity of the device as determined in (γ, overlineγ) polarization correlation measurements and several ( p, p' overlineγ) reaction studies amounts to about 20% at photon energies of 0.5 MeV and is about 10% at 4 MeV photon energies. The polarimeter has been successfully operated in systematic photon scattering experiments at the bremsstrahlung beam at the Stuttgart Dynamitron facility to investigate enhanced magnetic and electric dipole excitations in heavy deformed nuclei. Typical results are shown and discussed.

  5. Measurements of high energy photons in Z-pinch experiments on primary test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Si, Fenni Zhang, Chuanfei; Xu, Rongkun; Yuan, Xi; Huang, Zhanchang; Xu, Zeping; Ye, Fan; Yang, Jianlun; Ning, Jiamin; Hu, Qingyuan; Zhu, Xuebin

    2015-08-15

    High energy photons are measured for the first time in wire-array Z-pinch experiments on the Primary Test Stand (PTS) which delivers a current up to 8 MA with a rise time of 70 ns. A special designed detecting system composed of three types of detectors is used to measure the average energy, intensity, and pulse waveform of high energy photons. Results from Pb-TLD (thermoluminescence dosimeter) detector indicate that the average energy is 480 keV (±15%). Pulse shape of high energy photons is measured by the photodiode detector consisted of scintillator coupled with a photodiode, and it is correlated with soft x-ray power by the same timing signal. Intensity is measured by both TLD and the photodiode detector, showing good accordance with each other, and it is 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2} (±20%) at 2 m in the horizontal direction. Measurement results show that high energy photons are mainly produced in pinch regions due to accelerated electrons. PTS itself also produces high energy photons due to power flow electrons, which is one order smaller in amplitude than those from pinch region.

  6. Secondary bremsstrahlung and the energy-conservation aspects of kerma in photon-irradiated media.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Nahum, Alan E

    2016-02-01

    contribution to the total photon fluence by secondary bremsstrahlung in the latter case. Finally, a correction to the 'kerma integral' has been formulated to account for the energy transferred to charged particles by photons with initial energies below the Monte-Carlo photon transport cut-off PCUT; for 25 MeV photons this 'photon track end' correction is negligible for all PCUT below 10 keV.

  7. Secondary bremsstrahlung and the energy-conservation aspects of kerma in photon-irradiated media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Nahum, Alan E.

    2016-02-01

    -offs reveals the considerable contribution to the total photon fluence by secondary bremsstrahlung in the latter case. Finally, a correction to the ‘kerma integral’ has been formulated to account for the energy transferred to charged particles by photons with initial energies below the Monte-Carlo photon transport cut-off PCUT; for 25 MeV photons this ‘photon track end’ correction is negligible for all PCUT below 10 keV.

  8. The unique stability of the photon indices in "dipping" Z-source GX 340+0 throughout spectral states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifina, Elena; Titarchuk, Lev; Frontera, Filippo

    We present an analysis of the spectral and timing properties of X-ray radiation from accreting neutron star source GX340+0 during its evolution when the electron temperature of the transition layer (TL) kTe monotonically decreases from 21 to 3 keV. We analyze episodes observed with BeppoSAX and RXTE. We reveal that the X-ray broadband energy spectra during all spectral states can be reproduced by a physical model composed of a soft Blackbody component and two Comptonized components (both due to the presence of the TL that upscatters both seed photons of T_s1≤1 keV coming from the disk (first component Comptb1), and seed photons of temperature T_{s2}≤1.5 keV coming from the neutron star (second component Comptb2) and the iron-line (Gaussian) component. Spectral analysis using this model indicates that the photon power-law indices Gamma_com1 and Gamma_{com2} of the Comptonized components are almost constant, Gamma_{com1} and Gamma_{com2} 2 when kTe changes from 3 to 21 keV along the Z-track. We interpret the detected quasi-stability of the indices of Comptonized components to be near a value of 2. Furthermore, this index stability now found for the Comptonized spectral components of Z-source GX340+0 is similar to that previously established in the atoll sources 4U1728-34, 4U1820-30 and GX3+1, and earlier proposed for a number of X-ray neutron stars (NSs). This behavior of NSs both for atoll and Z-sources is essentially different from that observed in black hole binaries where Gamma_{com} increases during a spectral evolution from the low state to the high state and ultimately saturates at a high mass accretion rate

  9. Synchrotron X-ray Optics Testing at Beamline 1-BM at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macrander, Albert; Kujala, Naresh

    2014-03-01

    Beamline 1-BM at the Advanced Photon Source has been reconfigured, in part for testing of synchrotron optics with both monochromatic and white beams. Monochromatic energies between 6 and 30 keV are available. Primary agendas include both white beam and monochromatic beam topography, Talbot grating interferometry for measurement of coherence lengths and wavefronts, and micro-focusing. Recent examples will include topography of sapphire , tests of Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors, and tests of multilayer Laue lenses. Analyzers for Inelastic X-ray Scattering has also been characterized by two user groups. Supported from U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Contract No. DE-AC-02-06CH11357.

  10. Gamma-ray burst spectra from photon-deficient Compton scattering by nonthermal electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Lamb, Don Q.

    1986-01-01

    Consideration is given to a model of gamma-ray burst sources based on repeated Compton scatterings of soft photons by relativistic nonthermal electrons. Relativistic electrons which are continuously produced in the source radiate the total power L supplied to them. Higher order Compton scatterings, which occur when L(soft) is much less than L make the model distinct. The spectrum having an X-ray energy index of about one results from the superposition of the spectral components from several orders of Compton scattering; the change of the slope at several hundred keV arises from the Klein-Nishina decline of the scattering cross section.

  11. Photon detectors with gaseous amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Va`vra, J.

    1996-08-01

    Gaseous photon detectors, including very large 4{pi}-devices such as those incorporated in SLD and DELPHI, are finally delivering physics after many years of hard work. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photoelectrons. Among detector builders, there is hardly anybody who did not make mistakes in this area, and who does not have a healthy respect for the problems involved. This point is stressed in this paper, and it is suggested that only a very small operating phase space is available for running gaseous photon detectors in a very large system with good efficiency and few problems. In this paper the authors discuss what was done correctly or incorrectly in first generation photon detectors, and what would be their recommendations for second generation detectors. 56 refs., 11 figs.

  12. Single Photon diffraction and interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, John

    2015-04-01

    A previous paper based on the Scalar Theory of Everything studied photon diffraction and interference (IntellectualArchive, Vol.1, No. 3, P. 20, Toronto, Canada July 2012. http://intellectualarchive.com/?link=item&id=597). Several photons were required in the experiment at the same time. Interference experiments with one photon in the experiment at a time also showed interference patterns. The previous paper with the Bohm Interpretation, models of the screen and mask, and the Transaction Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics were combined. The reverse wave required by the Transaction Interpretation was provided by a reflected plenum wave rather than a reverse time wave. The speed of the plenum wave was assumed to be much faster than the speed of photons/light. Using the assumptions of Fraunhofer diffraction resulted in the same equation for the photon distribution on a screen as the intensity pattern of the Fraunhofer diffraction. (http://myplace.frontier.com/ ~ jchodge/)

  13. Collimator-free photon tomography

    DOEpatents

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Barbour, Randall L.

    1998-10-06

    A method of uncollimated single photon emission computed tomography includes administering a radioisotope to a patient for producing gamma ray photons from a source inside the patient. Emissivity of the photons is measured externally of the patient with an uncollimated gamma camera at a plurality of measurement positions surrounding the patient for obtaining corresponding energy spectrums thereat. Photon emissivity at the plurality of measurement positions is predicted using an initial prediction of an image of the source. The predicted and measured photon emissivities are compared to obtain differences therebetween. Prediction and comparison is iterated by updating the image prediction until the differences are below a threshold for obtaining a final prediction of the source image.

  14. Collimator-free photon tomography

    DOEpatents

    Dilmanian, F.A.; Barbour, R.L.

    1998-10-06

    A method of uncollimated single photon emission computed tomography includes administering a radioisotope to a patient for producing gamma ray photons from a source inside the patient. Emissivity of the photons is measured externally of the patient with an uncollimated gamma camera at a plurality of measurement positions surrounding the patient for obtaining corresponding energy spectrums thereat. Photon emissivity at the plurality of measurement positions is predicted using an initial prediction of an image of the source. The predicted and measured photon emissivities are compared to obtain differences therebetween. Prediction and comparison is iterated by updating the image prediction until the differences are below a threshold for obtaining a final prediction of the source image. 6 figs.

  15. Fermi Observations of GRB 090510: A Short-Hard Gamma-ray Burst with an Additional, Hard Power-law Component from 10 keV TO GeV Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Dermer, C. D.; de Palma, F.; Dingus, B. L.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Finke, J.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kippen, R. M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meegan, C.; Mészáros, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakajima, H.; Nakamori, T.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Preece, R.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Ritz, S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sander, A.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Stecker, F. W.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Toma, K.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Uehara, T.; Usher, T. L.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wu, X. F.; Yamazaki, R.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2010-06-01

    We present detailed observations of the bright short-hard gamma-ray burst GRB 090510 made with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi observatory. GRB 090510 is the first burst detected by the LAT that shows strong evidence for a deviation from a Band spectral fitting function during the prompt emission phase. The time-integrated spectrum is fit by the sum of a Band function with E peak = 3.9 ± 0.3 MeV, which is the highest yet measured, and a hard power-law component with photon index -1.62 ± 0.03 that dominates the emission below ≈20 keV and above ≈100 MeV. The onset of the high-energy spectral component appears to be delayed by ~0.1 s with respect to the onset of a component well fit with a single Band function. A faint GBM pulse and a LAT photon are detected 0.5 s before the main pulse. During the prompt phase, the LAT detected a photon with energy 30.5+5.8 -2.6 GeV, the highest ever measured from a short GRB. Observation of this photon sets a minimum bulk outflow Lorentz factor, Γgsim 1200, using simple γγ opacity arguments for this GRB at redshift z = 0.903 and a variability timescale on the order of tens of ms for the ≈100 keV-few MeV flux. Stricter high confidence estimates imply Γ >~ 1000 and still require that the outflows powering short GRBs are at least as highly relativistic as those of long-duration GRBs. Implications of the temporal behavior and power-law shape of the additional component on synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton, external-shock synchrotron, and hadronic models are considered.

  16. Search for 511 keV emission in satellite galaxies of the Milky Way with INTEGRAL/SPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegert, Thomas; Diehl, Roland; Vincent, Aaron C.; Guglielmetti, Fabrizia; Krause, Martin G. H.; Boehm, Celine

    2016-10-01

    Context. The positron (e+) annihilation γ-ray signal in the Milky Way (MW) shows a puzzling morphology: a very bright bulge and a very low surface-brightness disk. A coherent explanation of the e+ origin, propagation through the Galaxy and subsequent annihilation in the interstellar medium has not yet been found. Tentative explanations involve e+s from radioactivity, X-ray binaries, and dark matter (DM). Aims: Dwarf satellite galaxies (DSGs) are believed to be dominated by DM and hence are promising candidates in the search for 511 keV emission as a result of DM annihilation into e+e--pairs. The goal of this study is to constrain possible 511 keV γ-ray signals from 39 DSGs of the MW and to test the annihilating DM scenario. Methods: We used the spectrometer SPI on INTEGRAL to extract individual spectra for the studied objects in the range 490-530 keV. As the diffuse galactic 511 keV emission dominates the overall signal, we modelled the large-scale morphology of the MW accordingly and included this in a maximum likelihood analysis. Alternatively, a distance-weighted stacked spectrum was determined, representing an average DSG seen in 511 keV. Results: Only Reticulum II (Ret II) shows a 3.1σ signal. Five other sources show tentative 2σ signals. The ratio of mass to 511 keV luminosity, Υ511, shows a marginal trend towards higher values for intrinsically brighter objects in contrast to the mass-to-light ratio, ΥV in the V band, which is generally used to uncover DM in DSGs. Conclusions: All derived 511 keV flux values or upper limits are above the flux level implied by a DM interpretation of the MW bulge signal. The signal detected from Ret II is unlikely to be related to a DM origin alone, otherwise, the MW bulge would be ~100 times brighter in 511 keV than what is seen with SPI. Ret II is exceptional considering the DSG sample and rather points to enhanced recent star formation activity if its origins are similar to processes in the MW. Understanding this

  17. Relative dissociation fractions of CF4 under 15–30 keV H‑, C‑ and O‑ negative ion impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dedong; Fan, Yikui; Zhao, Zilong; Min, Guangxin; Zhang, Xuemei

    2016-08-01

    The relative dissociation fractions to produce the fragments of CF4 molecule are studied under the impact of 15 keV to 30 keV H‑, C‑ and O‑ negative ions. By using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, the recoil ions and ion pairs originating from the target molecule CF4 are detected and identified in coincidence with scattered ions in q = 0 and q = +1 charge states. The fractions for the production of the fragment ions are obtained relative to the {\\text{CF} }3+ yield, while that of the ion pairs relative to the (C+, F+) coincidence yield.

  18. Photon enhanced thermionic emission

    SciTech Connect

    Schwede, Jared; Melosh, Nicholas; Shen, Zhixun

    2014-10-07

    Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) is exploited to provide improved efficiency for radiant energy conversion. A hot (greater than 200.degree. C.) semiconductor cathode is illuminated such that it emits electrons. Because the cathode is hot, significantly more electrons are emitted than would be emitted from a room temperature (or colder) cathode under the same illumination conditions. As a result of this increased electron emission, the energy conversion efficiency can be significantly increased relative to a conventional photovoltaic device. In PETE, the cathode electrons can be (and typically are) thermalized with respect to the cathode. As a result, PETE does not rely on emission of non-thermalized electrons, and is significantly easier to implement than hot-carrier emission approaches.

  19. Photon counting digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demoli, Nazif; Skenderović, Hrvoje; Stipčević, Mario; Pavičić, Mladen

    2016-05-01

    Digital holography uses electronic sensors for hologram recording and numerical method for hologram reconstruction enabling thus the development of advanced holography applications. However, in some cases, the useful information is concealed in a very wide dynamic range of illumination intensities and successful recording requires an appropriate dynamic range of the sensor. An effective solution to this problem is the use of a photon-counting detector. Such detectors possess counting rates of the order of tens to hundreds of millions counts per second, but conditions of recording holograms have to be investigated in greater detail. Here, we summarize our main findings on this problem. First, conditions for optimum recording of digital holograms for detecting a signal significantly below detector's noise are analyzed in terms of the most important holographic measures. Second, for time-averaged digital holograms, optimum recordings were investigated for exposures shorter than the vibration cycle. In both cases, these conditions are studied by simulations and experiments.

  20. Photonic Crystal Nanolaser Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Shota; Otsuka, Shota; Hachuda, Shoji; Endo, Tatsuro; Imai, Yasunori; Nishijima, Yoshiaki; Misawa, Hiroaki; Baba, Toshihiko

    High-performance and low-cost sensors are critical devices for high-throughput analyses of bio-samples in medical diagnoses and life sciences. In this paper, we demonstrate photonic crystal nanolaser sensor, which detects the adsorption of biomolecules from the lasing wavelength shift. It is a promising device, which balances a high sensitivity, high resolution, small size, easy integration, simple setup and low cost. In particular with a nanoslot structure, it achieves a super-sensitivity in protein sensing whose detection limit is three orders of magnitude lower than that of standard surface-plasmon-resonance sensors. Our investigations indicate that the nanoslot acts as a protein condenser powered by the optical gradient force, which arises from the strong localization of laser mode in the nanoslot.