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Sample records for 12-h overnight fast

  1. Whole-body fat oxidation increases more by prior exercise than overnight fasting in elite endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Andersson Hall, Ulrika; Edin, Fredrik; Pedersen, Anders; Madsen, Klavs

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare whole-body fat oxidation kinetics after prior exercise with overnight fasting in elite endurance athletes. Thirteen highly trained athletes (9 men and 4 women; maximal oxygen uptake: 66 ± 1 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1)) performed 3 identical submaximal incremental tests on a cycle ergometer using a cross-over design. A control test (CON) was performed 3 h after a standardized breakfast, a fasting test (FAST) 12 h after a standardized evening meal, and a postexercise test (EXER) after standardized breakfast, endurance exercise, and 2 h fasting recovery. The test consisted of 3 min each at 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, 70%, and 80% of maximal oxygen uptake and fat oxidation rates were measured through indirect calorimetry. During CON, maximal fat oxidation rate was 0.51 ± 0.04 g·min(-1) compared with 0.69 ± 0.04 g·min(-1) in FAST (P < 0.01), and 0.89 ± 0.05 g·min(-1) in EXER (P < 0.01). Across all intensities, EXER was significantly higher than FAST and FAST was higher than CON (P < 0.01). Blood insulin levels were lower and free fatty acid and cortisol levels were higher at the start of EXER compared with CON and FAST (P < 0.05). Plasma nuclear magnetic resonance-metabolomics showed similar changes in both EXER and FAST, including increased levels of fatty acids and succinate. In conclusion, prior exercise significantly increases whole-body fat oxidation during submaximal exercise compared with overnight fasting. Already high rates of maximal fat oxidation in elite endurance athletes were increased by approximately 75% after prior exercise and fasting recovery. PMID:26988766

  2. Effects of overnight fasting on working memory-related brain network: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Chechko, Natalia; Vocke, Sebastian; Habel, Ute; Toygar, Timur; Kuckartz, Lisa; Berthold-Losleben, Mark; Laoutidis, Zacharias G; Orfanos, Stelios; Wassenberg, Annette; Karges, Wölfram; Schneider, Frank; Kohn, Nils

    2015-03-01

    Glucose metabolism serves as the central source of energy for the human brain. Little is known about the effects of blood glucose level (BGL) on higher-order cognitive functions within a physiological range (e.g., after overnight fasting). In this randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind study, we assessed the impact of overnight fasting (14 h) on brain activation during a working memory task. We sought to mimic BGLs that occur naturally in healthy humans after overnight fasting. After standardized periods of food restriction, 40 (20 male) healthy participants were randomly assigned to receive either glucagon to balance the BGL or placebo (NaCl). A parametric fMRI paradigm, including 2-back and 0-back tasks, was used. Subclinically low BGL following overnight fasting was found to be linked to reduced involvement of the bilateral dorsal midline thalamus and the bilateral basal ganglia, suggesting high sensitivity of those regions to minimal changes in BGLs. Our results indicate that overnight fasting leads to physiologically low levels of glucose, impacting brain activation during working memory tasks even when there are no differences in cognitive performance. PMID:25393934

  3. Arteriovenous differences across human adipose and forearm tissues after overnight fast.

    PubMed

    Coppack, S W; Frayn, K N; Humphreys, S M; Whyte, P L; Hockaday, T D

    1990-04-01

    Measurements of arteriovenous differences across subcutaneous abdominal tissue (mainly adipose) and deep forearm tissue (mainly muscle) were made on 25 occasions in normal subjects after an overnight fast. Adipose tissue was shown to be strongly lipolytic (releasing nonesterified fatty acids and glycerol), to clear circulating triacylglycerol, glucose, ketone bodies and acetate, and to produce lactate. Uptake of circulating carbohydrate and ketones was sufficient to account for only 51% of the adipose tissue oxygen consumption, implying that adipose tissue utilizes fuel(s) stored within it. The mean fractional re-esterification rate of fatty acids in adipose tissue was 13% to 19%. Arteriovenous differences were converted to fluxes of carbon atoms to compare the movements of different fuels. (Amino acids were not included in these calculations.) Adipose tissue after an overnight fast was a net exporter of carbon, whereas in resting muscle the uptake of carbon atoms from circulating carbohydrate and lipid fuels approximately balanced the CO2 production. Fatty acids were the main form in which carbon left adipose tissue, and the main source of carbon atoms entering the resting forearm. PMID:2109165

  4. A unique, fast-forwards rotating schedule with 12-h long shifts prevents chronic sleep debt.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Dorothee; Vetter, Céline; Oberlinner, Christoph; Wegener, Sven; Roenneberg, Till

    2016-01-01

    Sleep debt - together with circadian misalignment - is considered a central factor for adverse health outcomes associated with shift work. Here, we describe in detail sleep-wake behavior in a fast-forward rotating 12-h shift schedule, which involves at least 24 hours off after each shift and thus allows examining the role of immediate recovery after shift-specific sleep debt. Thirty-five participants at two chemical plants in Germany were chronotyped using the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire for Shift-Workers (MCTQ(Shift)) and wore actimeters throughout the two-week study period. From these actimetry recordings, we computed sleep and nap duration, social jetlag (a measure of circadian misalignment), and the daily timing of activity and sleep (center of gravity and mid-sleep, respectively). We observed that the long off-work periods between each shift create a fast alternation between shortened (mean ± standard deviation, 5h 17min ± 56min) and extended (8h 25min ± 72min) sleep episodes resulting in immanent reductions of sleep debt. Additionally, extensive napping of early chronotypes (up to 3 hours before the night shift) statistically compensated short sleep durations after the night shift. Partial rank correlations showed chronotype-dependent patterns of sleep and activity that were similar to those previously described in 8-h schedules; however, sleep before the day shift did not differ between chronotypes. Our findings indicate that schedules preventing a build-up of chronic sleep debt may reduce detrimental effects of shift work irrespective of shift duration. Prospective studies are needed to further elucidate the relationship between sleep, the circadian system, and health and safety hazards. PMID:26745752

  5. Effects of Arginine Supplementation on Amino Acid Profiles in Blood and Tissues in Fed and Overnight-Fasted Rats.

    PubMed

    Holecek, Milan; Sispera, Ludek

    2016-01-01

    Chronic arginine intake is believed to have favorable effects on the body. However, it might be hypothesized that excessive consumption of an individual amino acid exerts adverse effects on distribution and metabolism of other amino acids. We evaluated the effect of chronic intake of arginine on amino acid concentrations in blood plasma, liver, kidneys, and soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles. Rats were fed a standard diet or a high-arginine diet (HAD) for two months. Half of the animals in each group were sacrificed in the fed state, and the other half after fasting overnight. HAD increased blood plasma concentrations of urea, creatinine, arginine, and ornithine and decreased most other amino acids. Arginine and ornithine also increased in muscles and kidneys; an increase of lysine was observed in both muscle types. Methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, asparagine, glycine, serine, and taurine decreased in most tissues of HAD fed animals. Most of the effects of HAD disappeared after overnight fasting. It is concluded that (i) enhanced dietary arginine intake alters distribution of almost all amino acids; and (ii) to attain a better assessment of the effects of various nutritional interventions, an appropriate number of biochemical measurements must be performed in both postprandial and postabsorptive states. PMID:27070638

  6. Effects of Arginine Supplementation on Amino Acid Profiles in Blood and Tissues in Fed and Overnight-Fasted Rats

    PubMed Central

    Holecek, Milan; Sispera, Ludek

    2016-01-01

    Chronic arginine intake is believed to have favorable effects on the body. However, it might be hypothesized that excessive consumption of an individual amino acid exerts adverse effects on distribution and metabolism of other amino acids. We evaluated the effect of chronic intake of arginine on amino acid concentrations in blood plasma, liver, kidneys, and soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles. Rats were fed a standard diet or a high-arginine diet (HAD) for two months. Half of the animals in each group were sacrificed in the fed state, and the other half after fasting overnight. HAD increased blood plasma concentrations of urea, creatinine, arginine, and ornithine and decreased most other amino acids. Arginine and ornithine also increased in muscles and kidneys; an increase of lysine was observed in both muscle types. Methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, asparagine, glycine, serine, and taurine decreased in most tissues of HAD fed animals. Most of the effects of HAD disappeared after overnight fasting. It is concluded that (i) enhanced dietary arginine intake alters distribution of almost all amino acids; and (ii) to attain a better assessment of the effects of various nutritional interventions, an appropriate number of biochemical measurements must be performed in both postprandial and postabsorptive states. PMID:27070638

  7. Comparison of the effects of acute exercise after overnight fasting and breakfast on energy substrate and hormone levels in obese men

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Woon; Lee, Sang Hoon; Choi, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong Hyun; Han, Tae Kyung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] We compared the effects of acute aerobic exercise following overnight fasting and breakfast on energy substrate and hormone levels in obese male college students. [Subjects and Methods] This crossover study recruited 10 obese male college students with a body mass index >25 kg/m2 or >20% body fat. One week post-recruitment, the subjects exercised in the morning after an overnight fast. At 2 weeks, they exercised post-breakfast. Energy substrate (glucose, free fatty acid) and metabolic hormone (insulin, growth hormone, and cortisol) levels were measured immediately before and after exercise and at 60 min post-exercise. [Results] We observed interaction effects between the measurement time and exercise treatment for glucose; significant differences between measurement times and between exercise treatments for free fatty acids; interaction effects between the measurement time and exercise treatment for insulin and significant differences in the measurement time; significance differences between measurement times and between exercise treatments for growth hormone; and significant differences between measurement times and between exercise treatments for cortisol. [Conclusion] Morning exercise following an overnight fast can be more effective in reducing body fat than post-prandial exercise. However, increased cortisol levels following exercise after overnight fasting may negatively affect long-term weight loss in obese men. PMID:26180350

  8. Comparison of the effects of acute exercise after overnight fasting and breakfast on energy substrate and hormone levels in obese men.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Woon; Lee, Sang Hoon; Choi, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong Hyun; Han, Tae Kyung

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] We compared the effects of acute aerobic exercise following overnight fasting and breakfast on energy substrate and hormone levels in obese male college students. [Subjects and Methods] This crossover study recruited 10 obese male college students with a body mass index >25 kg/m(2) or >20% body fat. One week post-recruitment, the subjects exercised in the morning after an overnight fast. At 2 weeks, they exercised post-breakfast. Energy substrate (glucose, free fatty acid) and metabolic hormone (insulin, growth hormone, and cortisol) levels were measured immediately before and after exercise and at 60 min post-exercise. [Results] We observed interaction effects between the measurement time and exercise treatment for glucose; significant differences between measurement times and between exercise treatments for free fatty acids; interaction effects between the measurement time and exercise treatment for insulin and significant differences in the measurement time; significance differences between measurement times and between exercise treatments for growth hormone; and significant differences between measurement times and between exercise treatments for cortisol. [Conclusion] Morning exercise following an overnight fast can be more effective in reducing body fat than post-prandial exercise. However, increased cortisol levels following exercise after overnight fasting may negatively affect long-term weight loss in obese men. PMID:26180350

  9. Overnight Scentsation Rose Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    International Flavors and Fragrances Inc., Dr. Braja Mookherjee with the Overnight Scentsation rose plant after its flight aboard NASA's shuttle mission STS-95 for experimentation on scent in microgravity.

  10. The Overnight Scentsation Rose Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    International Flavors and Fragrances Inc., is a company that creates and manufactures flavors, fragrances and aroma chemicals. The Overnight Scentsation rose plant will be housed aboard NASA's shuttle flight STS-95 in a specially-designed structure under ultraviolet lights. The flowering plant was brought to Cape Canaveral from its home at IFF's greenhouse in Union Beach, New Jersey.

  11. 46 CFR 177.710 - Overnight accommodations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Overnight accommodations. 177.710 Section 177.710 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Crew Spaces § 177.710 Overnight accommodations....

  12. 46 CFR 177.810 - Overnight accommodations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Overnight accommodations. 177.810 Section 177.810... TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Passenger Accommodations § 177.810 Overnight accommodations. (a) A.... Each berth must measure at least 1,880 millimeters (74 inches) by 610 millimeters (24 inches) and...

  13. Sleep and satisfaction in 8- and 12-h forward-rotating shift systems: Industrial employees prefer 12-h shifts.

    PubMed

    Karhula, Kati; Härmä, Mikko; Ropponen, Annina; Hakola, Tarja; Sallinen, Mikael; Puttonen, Sampsa

    2016-01-01

    Twelve-hour shift systems have become more popular in industry. Survey data of shift length, shift rotation speed, self-rated sleep, satisfaction and perceived health were investigated for the associations among 599 predominantly male Finnish industrial employees. The studied forward-rotating shift systems were 12-h fast (12fast, DDNN------, n = 268), 8-h fast (8fast, MMEENN----, n = 161) and 8-h slow (8slow, MMMM-EEEE-NNNN, n = 170). Satisfaction with shift system differed between the groups (p < 0.01) after controlling for age, gender, shift work experience and self-rated stress. In the 12fast, 98% of employees were satisfied with their shift system (75% 8fast, 54% 8slow). Negative effects on sleep and alertness were rare (8%) in the 12fast group (53% 8fast, 66% 8 slow, p < 0.01) and self-reported sleep difficulties were less frequent than in the 8fast and 8slow groups (8%, 27%, 41%, respectively, p < 0.01). The self-reported average sleep duration (12fast 7:50, 8fast 7:24, 8slow 7:15, p < 0.01), and shift-specific sleep before and between morning shifts and after first night shift were longer in the 12fast group. Perceived negative effects of the current shift system on general health (12fast 4%, 8fast 30%, 8slow 41%, p < 0.001) and work-life balance (12fast 8%, 8fast 52%, 8slow 63%, p < 0.001) differed strongly between the groups. In conclusion, the perceived effects of shift work were dependent on both shift length and shift rotation speed: employees in the 12-h rapidly forward-rotating shift system were most satisfied, perceived better work-life balance and slept better than the employees in the 8fast or especially the employees in the 8-h slowly rotating systems. PMID:27077442

  14. Overnight Changes Recorded by Phoenix Conductivity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This graph presents simplified data from overnight measurements by the Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander from noon of the mission's 70th Martian day, or sol, to noon the following sol (Aug. 5 to Aug. 6, 2008).

    The graph shows that water disappeared from the atmosphere overnight, at the same time that electrical measurements detected changes consistent with addition of water to the soil.

    Water in soil appears to increase overnight, when water in the atmosphere disappears.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. A mechanical model of overnight hair curling.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hang; Chen, Xi

    2015-09-01

    Based on the observation of overnight hair curling procedure, we establish a mechanical model to describe the temporary wave formation of straight hair (initial curvature is zero), which incorporates the contact between hair and hair roller. Systematic studies are carried out to explore the effects of radius ratio between hair and hair roller, hair's average axial strain, creep time, Poisson's ratio and gravity on the curl retention. The variation of curl retention with respect to time obtained from our numerical model is validated by a simple theoretical model and by overnight curling experiments on hair samples. The results of simulation show that overnight hair curling is suitable to create a wavy hairstyle within about 7 hours, while the combined usage with hair fixatives enables a wavy hairstyle with desired curvature that lasts for a day or more. PMID:26338501

  16. Negative reinforcement impairs overnight memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Stamm, Andrew W; Nguyen, Nam D; Seicol, Benjamin J; Fagan, Abigail; Oh, Angela; Drumm, Michael; Lundt, Maureen; Stickgold, Robert; Wamsley, Erin J

    2014-11-01

    Post-learning sleep is beneficial for human memory. However, it may be that not all memories benefit equally from sleep. Here, we manipulated a spatial learning task using monetary reward and performance feedback, asking whether enhancing the salience of the task would augment overnight memory consolidation and alter its incorporation into dreaming. Contrary to our hypothesis, we found that the addition of reward impaired overnight consolidation of spatial memory. Our findings seemingly contradict prior reports that enhancing the reward value of learned information augments sleep-dependent memory processing. Given that the reward followed a negative reinforcement paradigm, consolidation may have been impaired via a stress-related mechanism. PMID:25320351

  17. Tank 12H residuals sample analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L. N.; Shine, E. P.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.

    2015-06-11

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 12H final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Eleven Tank 12H floor and mound residual material samples and three cooling coil scrape samples were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August of 2014.

  18. Negative Reinforcement Impairs Overnight Memory Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamm, Andrew W.; Nguyen, Nam D.; Seicol, Benjamin J.; Fagan, Abigail; Oh, Angela; Drumm, Michael; Lundt, Maureen; Stickgold, Robert; Wamsley, Erin J.

    2014-01-01

    Post-learning sleep is beneficial for human memory. However, it may be that not all memories benefit equally from sleep. Here, we manipulated a spatial learning task using monetary reward and performance feedback, asking whether enhancing the salience of the task would augment overnight memory consolidation and alter its incorporation into…

  19. Continuous overnight observation of human premolar eruption.

    PubMed

    Risinger, R K; Proffit, W R

    1996-01-01

    Such observation was made possible by transmitting the image of a mobile ceramic ruling on the erupting maxillary second premolar to a video-microscope via a coaxial fibreoptic cable. The cable was inserted into a reference bar secured to the adjacent first molar and first premolar. The image of the ruling was superimposed with the image from a surveillance camera focused on the patient and continuously recorded on video-tape along with the participant's blood pressure, pulse rate, electromyographic activity and occlusal contact sounds. Overnight data from 12 individuals clearly revealed a circadian rhythm in eruption during the prefunctional spurt. On average, the maxillary second premolar erupted 41 microns during an 11-h overnight observation, with almost all the eruption occurring in the late evening from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. After 1 a.m., eruption typically ceased, with a tendency for intrusion to occur until 7 a.m. Sleep increased the rate of eruption during the late evening, but did not influence the eruption rate during the early morning. Haemodynamic changes, including blood pressure and pulse rate, did not have a significant impact on the rhythm of eruption. The observed eruption rhythm is most probably caused by changing hormone levels and their effect on the periodontal ligament. The late-evening eruption of human premolars coincides with the late-evening secretion of growth hormone and thyroid hormone typically found in humans. PMID:9022915

  20. The overnight effect on the Taiwan stock market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Kuo-Ting; Lih, Jiann-Shing; Ko, Jing-Yuan

    2012-12-01

    This study examines statistical regularities among three components of stocks and indices: daytime (trading hour) return, overnight (off-hour session) return, and total (close-to-close) return. Owing to the fact that the Taiwan Stock Exchange (TWSE) has the longest non-trading periods among major markets, the TWSE is selected to explore the correlation among the three components and compare it with major markets such as the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) and the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation (NASDAQ). Analysis results indicate a negative cross correlation between the sign of daytime return and the sign of overnight return; possibly explaining why most stocks feature a negative cross correlation between daytime return and overnight return [F. Wang, S.-J. Shieh, S. Havlin, H.E. Stanley, Statistical analysis of the overnight and daytime return, Phys. Rev. E 79 (2009) 056109]. Additionally, the cross correlation between the magnitude of returns is analyzed. According to those results, a larger magnitude of overnight return implies a higher probability that the sign of the following daytime return is the opposite of the sign of overnight return. Namely, the predictability of daytime return might be improved when a stock undergoes a large magnitude of overnight return. Furthermore, the cross correlations of 29 indices of worldwide markets are discussed.

  1. Overnight shift work: factors contributing to diagnostic discrepancies.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Tarek N; Loehfelm, Thomas; Khosa, Faisal; Rohatgi, Saurabh; Johnson, Jamlik-Omari

    2016-02-01

    The aims of the study are to identify factors contributing to preliminary interpretive discrepancies on overnight radiology resident shifts and apply this data in the context of known literature to draw parallels to attending overnight shift work schedules. Residents in one university-based training program provided preliminary interpretations of 18,488 overnight (11 pm–8 am) studies at a level 1 trauma center between July 1, 2013 and December 31, 2014. As part of their normal workflow and feedback, attendings scored the reports as major discrepancy, minor discrepancy, agree, and agree--good job. We retrospectively obtained the preliminary interpretation scores for each study. Total relative value units (RVUs) per shift were calculated as an indicator of overnight workload. The dataset was supplemented with information on trainee level, number of consecutive nights on night float, hour, modality, and per-shift RVU. The data were analyzed with proportional logistic regression and Fisher's exact test. There were 233 major discrepancies (1.26 %). Trainee level (senior vs. junior residents; 1.08 vs. 1.38 %; p < 0.05) and modality were significantly associated with performance. Increased workload affected more junior residents' performance, with R3 residents performing significantly worse on busier nights. Hour of the night was not significantly associated with performance, but there was a trend toward best performance at 2 am, with subsequent decreased accuracy throughout the remaining shift hours. Improved performance occurred after the first six night float shifts, presumably as residents acclimated to a night schedule. As overnight shift work schedules increase in popularity for residents and attendings, focused attention to factors impacting interpretative accuracy is warranted. PMID:26475281

  2. Flight Schedule and the Circadian Clock Influence on Sleep Loss During Overnight Cargo Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gander, Philippa H.; Gregory, Kevin B.; Rosekind, Mark R.; Shafto, Michael G. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Thirty-four flight crew members were monitored before, during, and after two 8-day overnight cargo duty patterns which involved multiple flights at night crossing no more than one time zone per 24 h. Rectal temperature, heart rate, and wrist activity were recorded every 2 min. Sleep quantity and quality, and nap timing, were noted in a logbook. To reduce the masking effects of physical activity on temperature, 0.28 C was added to each subject's raw temperature data whenever he reported being asleep. For both masked and unmasked data, daily temperature minima were estimated from the multiple complex demodulated waveform. The temperature minima did not show a progressive adaptation to night duty, which was interrupted by a night off after 5 nights on one trip pattern and after 3 nights on the other. On duty days, the average temperature minimum delayed by about 3 h, occurring near the end of the duty period. Daytime sleep episodes averaged 2.9 h shorter than nighttime sleep episodes, and were rated as lighter, less restorative, and poorer overall. Fifty-three percent of subjects slept more than once per 24 h while they were on night duty, compared to 17% when able to sleep at night. The total sleep per 24 h on duty days averaged 1.2 h less than pretrip. Twenty-nine percent of subjects lost more than 2 h of sleep per 24 h across the 8-day duty patterns. After night duty, subjects awoke around 1400 local time, even when they had slept 2-3 h less than a normal nocturnal sleep episode. Consequently, the duration of morning sleep episodes was correlated with the off-duty time (multiple r(sup 2)=0.44, F=37.23, p less than 0.0001). Anecdotally, crew members complained of being unable to sleep longer and not feeling well-rested. These wakeups were clustered 6 h after the temperature minimum, which suggests that they may have been a response to the circadian wakeup signal. Daytime layovers in which crew members were able to sleep again in the evening ended later (0200

  3. Overnight Therapy? The Role of Sleep in Emotional Brain Processing

    PubMed Central

    van der Helm, Els; Walker, Matthew P.

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive neuroscience continues to build meaningful connections between affective behavior and human brain function. Within the biological sciences, a similar renaissance has taken place, focusing on the role of sleep in various neurocognitive processes, and most recently, the interaction between sleep and emotional regulation. In this review, we survey an array of diverse findings across basic and clinical research domains, resulting in a convergent view of sleep-dependent emotional brain processing. Based on the unique neurobiology of sleep, we outline a model describing the overnight modulation of affective neural systems and the (re)processing of recent emotional experiences, both of which appear to redress the appropriate next-day reactivity of limbic and associated autonomic networks. Furthermore, a REM sleep hypothesis of emotional-memory processing is proposed, the implications of which may provide brain-based insights into the association between sleep abnormalities and the initiation and maintenance of mood disturbances. PMID:19702380

  4. Do environmental variables influence overnight weight loss of yearling steers in semiarid rangelands?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to measure the weight gains of free-ranging livestock, animals are frequently corralled and confined overnight prior to weighing. Animals may take several days to recover from this overnight loss in weight associated with dehydration and excretion of urine and feces. Quantitative estimates ...

  5. Lean mass influences overnight changes in hydration, blood pressure and strength in community-dwelling older women.

    PubMed

    Benton, Melissa J; Schlairet, Maura C

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated the hypothesis that greater lean mass promotes better overnight hydration, improved postural blood pressure and greater strength. Thirty women, aged 71 ± 0.9 years (mean ± SE), completed one measurement in a euhydrated state and another the following morning after an overnight fast. Measurements included hydration, lean mass, orthostatic blood pressure and strength. Participants were grouped by fat-free mass index (FFMI), with cut-points defined as low (< 15.0 kg/m(2)) and normal (≥ 15.0 kg/m(2)). Women with normal FFMI had significantly greater hydration (p < 0.01), lean mass (p < 0.001) and upper body strength (p < 0.05), while those with low FFMI had more unstable blood pressure. On day 1, women with low FFMI experienced significant postural systolic blood pressure changes from sitting to standing (-11.3 ± 4.0 mmHg, p < 0.05). On day 2, they experienced significant systolic changes from lying to sitting (-8.0 ± 2.2 mmHg, p < 0.01) and sitting to standing (-14.9 ± 5.5 mmHg, p < 0.05), and diastolic changes from lying to sitting (-8.9 ± 2.8 mmHg, p < 0.05). In conclusion, overnight fluid shifts in older women with low lean mass result in unstable postural blood pressure and loss of strength that increases the risk for early morning falls. PMID:27104659

  6. The Overnight Effect of Dietary Energy Balance on Postprandial Plasma Free Amino Acid (PFAA) Profiles in Japanese Adult Men

    PubMed Central

    Nishioka, Manabu; Imaizumi, Akira; Ando, Toshihiko; Tochikubo, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    The plasma free amino acid (PFAA) profile is affected by various nutritional conditions, such as the dietary energy balance. Regarding the clinical use of PFAA profiling, it is of concern that differences in food ingestion patterns may generate systematic errors in a plasma amino acid profile and constitute a confounding factor in assessment. In this study, the overnight impact of the dietary energy balance on the postprandial plasma amino acid profile was investigated to elucidate in particular the effects of high protein meals typical in Japanese cuisine. We conducted diet-controlled, crossover trials in eleven healthy male volunteers aged 40–61 y. They consumed either a normal meal (meal N) or high protein meal (meal H) at dinner. Forearm venous blood was collected, and plasma amino acid concentrations were measured before dinner and the next morning. We found that a high protein meal in the evening that contained 40% energy would significantly increase the PFAA concentration the next morning, even more than 12 hours after the meal. Among amino acids, the most significant difference was observed in the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and in some urea-cycle related compounds. If the subject consumed the high protein diet at dinner, the PFAA profile after overnight fasting might be still affected by the meal even 12 hours after the meal, suggesting that the PFAA profile does not reflect the subject's health condition, but rather the acute effect of high protein ingestion. PMID:23667542

  7. The effects of sleep debt and monotonous work on sleepiness and performance during a 12-h dayshift.

    PubMed

    Sallinen, Mikael; Härmä, Mikko; Akila, Ritva; Holm, Anu; Luukkonen, Ritva; Mikola, Hannu; Müller, Kiti; Virkkala, Jussi

    2004-12-01

    The study examined the effects of the amount of preceding sleep and work pace on sleepiness and cognitive performance during a 12-h dayshift. Twelve process operators (aged 28-56 years) completed a study with four single 12-h dayshifts and preceding night sleep in the laboratory. A simulated distillation process served as a work task. The 12-h shifts differed from each other in terms of the amount of preceding night sleep (23:00-06:30 hours or 2:30-6:30 hours) and work pace (slow or fast). All shifts contained four work simulation sessions of 1.5 h, and each of them included a 15-min alarm session. Cognitive performance was also measured with a 10-choice reaction time test and a mental subtraction test. Objective sleepiness was measured with a continuous electroencephalography/electro-oculography (EEG/EOG) recording during the work periods and with a sleep latency test. Subjective sleepiness at work was measured with the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale. Sleep debt increased the proportion of EEG/EOG-defined and subjective sleepiness at work, but did not impair work or test performance. The fatiguing effect of monotonous work as indicated by EEG/EOG-defined sleepiness was comparable with the effect of sleep debt. The alarm epochs in the middle of monotonous work temporarily decreased EEG/EOG-defined sleepiness. Sleep debt or monotonous work did not have a significant effect on the results of the sleep latency test. None of the sleepiness or performance measures indicated the impairment of a subject's functional capacity at the end of the 12-h shift. Our results suggest that monotonous work is at least as harmful as moderate sleep debt for alertness at work. The results support the view that the last hours of a single 12-h dayshift with frequent pauses are not associated with an increase in sleepiness or performance errors. PMID:15560763

  8. An Overnight Success?: Usage Patterns and Demographics of Academic Library Patrons during the Overnight Period from 11 p.m.-8 a.m.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Mark; Hodges, Chris

    2014-01-01

    During the Fall 2013 semester East Carolina University's main library piloted 24/5 hours of operation by opening on Sunday morning and not closing until Friday night. This article details the planning and execution of the pilot program, as well the findings from the data collected during the overnight period by people-counting cameras and a…

  9. EVALUATION OF CHROMOMYCIN A3 ASSAY IN HUMAN SPERM AFTER SIMULATED OVERNIGHT SHIPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EVALUATION OF CHROMOMYCIN A3ASSAY IN HUMAN SPERM AFTER SIMULATED OVERNIGHT SHIPMENT.
    SC Jeffay1, R Morris Buus1, LF Strader1, AF Olshan2, DP Evenson3, SD Perreault1. 1US EPA/ORD, RTP, NC;2UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, NC;3SDSU, Brookings, SD.

    Semen collection kits that allow ...

  10. Psychosocial outcomes of a summer overnight recreational experience for children with heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bultas, Margaret W; Steurer, Lisa M; Balakas, Karen; Brooks, Charlotte; Fields, Heidi

    2015-12-01

    Children with chronic heart disease (CHD) are often turned away from recreational summer overnight experiences because of complicated medical histories and medication regimens. The purpose of this qualitative study was to evaluate the psychosocial impact of a five-day overnight recreational experience for children with CHD and their parents. Thirty-six children with CHD between the age of 8 and 15 years and their parents participated in the study. Data were collected from the children using photovoice interviews. Parent data were collected using a post camp survey. Results included the following external outcome themes: inclusion in a peer group and the importance of friendship, fun, and safety. Internal or personal outcome themes included counselor as a role model, increased self-confidence, and the realization of life's possibilities. Parent themes included increased child independence, increased child confidence, and child feelings of normalcy related to belonging to a peer group. Findings from this study can be used to encourage families of children with CHD to allow participation in a well-supervised overnight recreational experience. Such an experience can foster the child's overall development, provide peer group support, and reduce parent anxiety about overnight separation from the child. PMID:24951544

  11. Effects of Model Performances on Music Skill Acquisition and Overnight Memory Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cash, Carla D.; Allen, Sarah E.; Simmons, Amy L.; Duke, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the extent to which the presentation of an auditory model prior to learning a novel melody affects performance during active practice and the overnight consolidation of procedural memory. During evening training sessions, 32 nonpianist musicians practiced a 13-note keyboard melody with their left…

  12. EVALUATION OF SPERM CHROMATIN STRUCTURE ASSAY (SCSA REGISTERED TRADEMARK) IN HUMAN SPERM AFTER SIMULATED OVERNIGHT SHIPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Home semen collection kits allow men to collect a sample at their convenience and send it via overnight mail to the laboratory. Benefits of this approach include facilitated sample collection from different geographic locations, minimized variability through analysis by a central...

  13. Crew Factors in Flight Operations 7: Psychophysiological Responses to Overnight Cargo Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gander, Philippa H.; Gregory, Kevin B.; Connell, Linda J.; Miller, Donna L.; Graeber, R. Curtis; Rosekind, Mark R.

    1996-01-01

    To document the psychophysiological effects of flying overnight cargo operations, 41 B-727 crew members (average age 38 yr) were monitored before, during, and after one of two typical 8-day trip patterns. During daytime layovers, the average sleep episode was 3 hr (41%) shorter than nighttime sleeps and was rated as lighter, less restorative, and poorer overall. Sleep was frequently split into several episodes and totaled 1.2 hr less per 24 hr than on pretrip days. Each trip pattern included a night off, which was an effective countermeasure against the accumulating sleep debt. The organization of sleep during daytime layovers reflected the interaction of duty timing with circadian physiology. The circadian temperature rhythm did not adapt completely to the inverted wake-rest schedule on duty days, being delayed by about 3 hr. Highest subjective fatigue and lowest activation occurred around the time of the temperature minimum. On duty days, reports of headaches increased by 400%, of congested nose by 200%, and of burning eyes by 900%. Crew members also reported eating more snacks. Compared with daytime short-haul air-transport operations, the overnight cargo trips included fewer duty and flight hours, and had longer layovers. Overnight cargo crews also averaged 5.4 yr younger than their daytime short-haul counterparts. On trips, both groups lost a comparable amount of sleep per 24 hr, but the overnight cargo crews had shorter individual sleep episodes and more broken sleep. These data clearly demonstrate that overnight cargo operations, like other night work, involve physiological disruption not found in comparable daytime operations.

  14. Traveling Overnight

    MedlinePlus

    ... someone to help you at the airport, train station, or bus station. • Keep important documents with you in a safe ... she were a child. • Respect the person’s personal space, and don’t get too close. • Make eye ...

  15. Overnight Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nancy N.; Stahl, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    Outlines objectives for an elementary science camping program and summarizes general operational procedures. Campsite activities related to such topics as microorganisms, eye and sight, nature trails, bees, carpentry, and astronomy are described. (DS)

  16. Hantavirus Infections among Overnight Visitors to Yosemite National Park, California, USA, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Jonathan J.; Fritz, Curtis L.; Knust, Barbara; Buttke, Danielle; Enge, Barryett; Novak, Mark G.; Kramer, Vicki; Osadebe, Lynda; Messenger, Sharon; Albariño, César G.; Ströher, Ute; Niemela, Michael; Amman, Brian R.; Wong, David; Manning, Craig R.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Rollin, Pierre E.; Xia, Dongxiang; Watt, James P.

    2014-01-01

    In summer 2012, an outbreak of hantavirus infections occurred among overnight visitors to Yosemite National Park in California, USA. An investigation encompassing clinical, epidemiologic, laboratory, and environmental factors identified 10 cases among residents of 3 states. Eight case-patients experienced hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, of whom 5 required intensive care with ventilatory support and 3 died. Staying overnight in a signature tent cabin (9 case-patients) was significantly associated with becoming infected with hantavirus (p<0.001). Rodent nests and tunnels were observed in the foam insulation of the cabin walls. Rodent trapping in the implicated area resulted in high trap success rate (51%), and antibodies reactive to Sin Nombre virus were detected in 10 (14%) of 73 captured deer mice. All signature tent cabins were closed and subsequently dismantled. Continuous public awareness and rodent control and exclusion are key measures in minimizing the risk for hantavirus infection in areas inhabited by deer mice. PMID:24565589

  17. Hantavirus infections among overnight visitors to Yosemite National Park, California, USA, 2012.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Jonathan J; Fritz, Curtis L; Knust, Barbara; Buttke, Danielle; Enge, Barryett; Novak, Mark G; Kramer, Vicki; Osadebe, Lynda; Messenger, Sharon; Albariño, César G; Ströher, Ute; Niemela, Michael; Amman, Brian R; Wong, David; Manning, Craig R; Nichol, Stuart T; Rollin, Pierre E; Xia, Dongxiang; Watt, James P; Vugia, Duc J

    2014-03-01

    In summer 2012, an outbreak of hantavirus infections occurred among overnight visitors to Yosemite National Park in California, USA. An investigation encompassing clinical, epidemiologic, laboratory, and environmental factors identified 10 cases among residents of 3 states. Eight case-patients experienced hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, of whom 5 required intensive care with ventilatory support and 3 died. Staying overnight in a signature tent cabin (9 case-patients) was significantly associated with becoming infected with hantavirus (p<0.001). Rodent nests and tunnels were observed in the foam insulation of the cabin walls. Rodent trapping in the implicated area resulted in high trap success rate (51%), and antibodies reactive to Sin Nombre virus were detected in 10 (14%) of 73 captured deer mice. All signature tent cabins were closed and subsequently dismantled. Continuous public awareness and rodent control and exclusion are key measures in minimizing the risk for hantavirus infection in areas inhabited by deer mice. PMID:24565589

  18. Overnight S100B in Parkinson's Disease: A glimpse into sleep-related neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, D Z; Schönwald, S V; Schumacher-Schuh, A F; Braga, C W; Souza, D O; Oses, J P; Donis, K C; Rieder, C R

    2015-11-01

    Calcium-binding protein B (S100B), a primary product of astrocytes, is a proposed marker of Parkinson's Disease (PD) pathophysiology, diagnosis and progression. However, it has also been implicated in sleep disruption, which is very common in PD. To explore the relationship between S100B, disease severity, sleep symptoms and polysomnography (PSG) findings, overnight changes in serum S100B levels were investigated for the first time in PD. 17 fully treated, non-demented, moderately advanced PD patients underwent PSG and clinical assessment of sleep symptoms. Serum S100B samples were collected immediately before and after the PSG. Results are shown as median [interquartile range]. Night and morning S100B levels were similar, but uncorrelated (rs=-0.277, p=0.28). Morning S100B levels, as opposed to night levels, positively correlated with the Unified Parkinson's Disease rating scale (UPDRS) subsections I and II (rs=0.547, p=0.023; rs=0.542, p=0.025). Compared to those with overnight S100B reduction, patients with overnight S100B elevation had higher H&Y scores (2.5 [0.87] vs. 2 [0.25], p=0.035) and worse total Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scores (10 [3.2] vs. 8 [4.5], p=0.037; 92.9 [39] vs. 131.4 [28], p=0.034). Correlation between morning S100B levels and total UPDRS score was strengthened after controlling for total PSQI score (rs=0.531, p=0.034; partial rs=0.699, p=0.004, respectively). Overnight S100B variation and morning S100B were associated with PD severity and perceived sleep disruption. S100B is proposed as a putative biomarker for sleep-related neuroinflammation in PD. Noradrenergic-astrocytic dysfunction is hypothesized as a possible mechanism underlying these findings. PMID:26453767

  19. A single bout of exercise activates skeletal muscle satellite cells during subsequent overnight recovery.

    PubMed

    Snijders, Tim; Verdijk, Lex B; Beelen, Milou; McKay, Bryon R; Parise, Gianni; Kadi, Fawzi; van Loon, Luc J C

    2012-06-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cell (SC) content has been reported to increase following a single bout of exercise. Data on muscle fibre type-specific SC content and/or SC activation status are presently lacking. The objective of the study was to determine the impact of a single bout of exercise on muscle fibre type-specific SC content and activation status following subsequent overnight recovery. Eight healthy men (age, 20 ± 1 years) performed a single bout of combined endurance- and resistance-type exercise. Muscle biopsies were collected before and immediately after exercise, and following 9 h of postexercise, overnight recovery. Muscle fibre type-specific SC and myonuclear content and SC activation status were determined by immunohistochemical analyses. Satellite cell activation status was assessed by immunohistochemical staining for both Delta-like homologue 1 (DLK1) and Ki-67. Muscle fibre size and fibre area per nucleus were greater in type II compared with type I muscle fibres (P < 0.05). At baseline, no differences were observed in the percentage of SCs staining positive for DLK1 and/or Ki67 between fibre types. No significant changes were observed in SC content following 9 h of postexercise, overnight recovery; however, the percentage of DLK1-positive SCs increased significantly during overnight recovery, from 22 ± 5 to 41 ± 5% and from 24 ± 6 to 51 ± 9% in the type I and II muscle fibres, respectively. No changes were observed in the percentage of Ki-67-positive SCs. A single bout of exercise activates both type I and II skeletal muscle fibre SCs within a single night of postexercise recovery, preceding the subsequent increase in SC content. PMID:22327327

  20. Overnight consolidation promotes generalization across talkers in the identification of nonnative speech sounds.

    PubMed

    Earle, F Sayako; Myers, Emily B

    2015-01-01

    This investigation explored the generalization of phonetic learning across talkers following training on a nonnative (Hindi dental and retroflex) contrast. Participants were trained in two groups, either in the morning or in the evening. Discrimination and identification performance was assessed in the trained talker and an untrained talker three times over 24 h following training. Results suggest that overnight consolidation promotes generalization across talkers in identification, but not necessarily discrimination, of nonnative speech sounds. PMID:25618106

  1. Overnight consolidation promotes generalization across talkers in the identification of nonnative speech sounds

    PubMed Central

    Earle, F. Sayako; Myers, Emily B.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation explored the generalization of phonetic learning across talkers following training on a nonnative (Hindi dental and retroflex) contrast. Participants were trained in two groups, either in the morning or in the evening. Discrimination and identification performance was assessed in the trained talker and an untrained talker three times over 24 h following training. Results suggest that overnight consolidation promotes generalization across talkers in identification, but not necessarily discrimination, of nonnative speech sounds. PMID:25618106

  2. Behavioral changes in female Asian elephants when given access to an outdoor yard overnight.

    PubMed

    Powell, David M; Vitale, Cathy

    2016-07-01

    A study was conducted at the Bronx Zoo to determine whether providing elephants with access to an outdoor corral at night had any significant effects on behavior, use of space, and use of a sand corral. Activity budgets for three female Asian elephants were compared when the subjects were housed indoors overnight and when they were given access to an outdoor yard overnight. Observations were recorded via infrared video cameras between the hours of 1900 and 0700 during the months of July-September. Two of the three elephants showed a significant preference for spending time outdoors, whereas, the third elephant spent most of her time indoors. Standing and play behavior increased when the elephants had outdoor access while lying down and feeding behavior decreased. Swaying behavior decreased significantly when the elephants had access to the outdoor yard. The elephants made very little use of a sand-floor stall regardless of whether or not they had access to outdoors. The results of this study, suggest that having access to alternate areas overnight can promote well-being by reducing repetitive behavior and allowing animals to express their preferences for different locations. The relative importance of choice alone vs. the behavioral opportunities provided by choice options for zoo animals is discussed. Zoo Biol. 35:298-303, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27128882

  3. Synthesis, spectral characterization and larvicidal activity of acridin-1(2H)-one analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subashini, R.; Bharathi, A.; Roopan, Selvaraj Mohana; Rajakumar, G.; Abdul Rahuman, A.; Gullanki, Pavan Kumar

    Acridin-1(2H)-one analogue of 7-chloro-3,4-dihydro-9-phenyl-2-[(pyridine-2yl) methylene] acridin-1(2H)-one, 5 was prepared by using 7-chloro-3,4-dihydro-9-phenylacridin-1(2H)-one, 3 and picolinaldehyde, 4 in the presence of KOH at room temperature. These compounds were characterized by analytical and spectral analyses. The purpose of the present study was to assess the efficacy of larvicidal and repellent activity of synthesized 7-chloro-3,4-dihydro-9-phenyl-acridin-1(2H)-one analogues such as compounds 3 and 5 against the early fourth instar larvae of filariasis vector, Culex quinquefasciatus and Japanese encephalitis vector, Culex gelidus (Diptera: Culicidae). The compound exhibited high larvicidal effects at 50 mg/L against both the mosquitoes with LC50 values of 25.02 mg/L (r2 = 0.998) and 26.40 mg/L (r2 = 0.988) against C. quinquefasciatus and C. gelidus, respectively. The 7-chloro-3,4-dihydro-9-phenyl-acridin-1(2H)-one analogues that are reported for the first time to our best of knowledge can be better explored for the control of mosquito population. This is an ideal ecofriendly approach for the control of Japanese encephalitis vectors, C. quinquefasciatus and C. gelidus.

  4. Tank 12H Acidic Chemical Cleaning Sample Analysis And Material Balance

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C. J.; Reboul, S. H.; Wiersma, B. J.; Coleman, C. J.

    2013-11-08

    A process of Bulk Oxalic Acid (BOA) chemical cleaning was performed for Tank 12H during June and July of 2013 to remove all or a portion of the approximately 4400 gallon sludge heel. Three strikes of oxalic acid (nominally 4 wt% or 2 wt%) were used at 55°C and tank volumes of 96- to 140-thousand gallons. This report details the sample analysis of a scrape sample taken prior to BOA cleaning and dip samples taken during BOA cleaning. It also documents a rudimentary material balance for the Tank 12H cleaning results.

  5. Outcomes of Operations Performed by Attending Surgeons after Overnight Trauma Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, John P; Weinberg, Jordan A; Magnotti, Louis J; Nouer, Simonne S; Yoo, Wonsuk; Zarzaur, Ben L; Cullinan, Darren R; Hendrick, Leah E; Fabian, Timothy C; Croce, Martin A

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND To date, work-hour restrictions have not been imposed on attending surgeons in the United States. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of working an overnight trauma shift on outcomes of general surgery operations performed the next day by the post-call attending physician. STUDY DESIGN Consecutive patients over a 3.5-year period undergoing elective general surgical procedures were reviewed. Procedures were limited to hernia repairs (inguinal and ventral), cholecystectomies, and intestinal operations. Any operations that were performed the day after the attending surgeon had taken an overnight trauma shift were considered post-call (PC) cases; all other cases were considered nonpost-call (NP). Outcomes from the PC operations were compared with those from the NP operations. RESULTS There were 869 patients identified; 132 operations were performed PC and 737 were NP. The majority of operations included hernia repairs (46%), followed by cholecystectomies (35%), and intestinal procedures (19%). Overall, the PC operations did not differ from the NP operations with respect to complication rate (13.7% vs 13.5%, p = 0.93) or readmission within 30 days (5% vs 6%, p = 0.84). Additionally, multivariable logistic regression failed to identify an association between PC operations and the development of adverse outcomes. Follow-up was obtained for an average of 3 months. CONCLUSIONS Performance of general surgery operations the day after an overnight in-hospital trauma shift did not affect complication rates or readmission rates. At this time, there is no compelling evidence to mandate work-hour restrictions for attending general surgeons. PMID:23313541

  6. Prolonged respiratory illness after single overnight continuous positive airway pressure humidification: endotoxin as the suspect.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Lawrence W; Barkley, John E; Langley, Ricky; Sautter, Robert

    2009-12-01

    A patient developed a prolonged respiratory illness after a single overnight use of tap water to humidify air supplied by a constant positive airway pressure (CPAP) device, which she had previously used for six years without difficulty. During those years, she used only distilled water for this purpose, as instructed by her sleep specialist. Analysis of the well water supplying her home showed no microorganisms, metals or other analytes likely to have caused her illness, but endotoxin was found at concentrations well above that recommended by the U.S. Pharmacopeia, as a maximum in water which may be inhaled as an aerosol. PMID:20016436

  7. Accuracy evaluation of blood glucose monitoring systems in children on overnight closed-loop control.

    PubMed

    DeSalvo, Daniel J; Shanmugham, Satya; Ly, Trang T; Wilson, Darrell M; Buckingham, Bruce A

    2014-09-01

    This pilot study evaluated the difference in accuracy between the Bayer Contour® Next (CN) and HemoCue® (HC) glucose monitoring systems in children with type 1 diabetes participating in overnight closed-loop studies. Subjects aged 10-18 years old were admitted to a clinical research center and glucose values were obtained every 30 minutes overnight. Glucose values were measured using whole blood samples for CN and HC readings and results were compared to Yellow Springs Instrument (YSI) reference values obtained with plasma from the same sample. System accuracy was compared using mean absolute relative difference (MARD) and International Organization for Standardization (ISO) accuracy standards. A total of 28 subjects were enrolled in the study. Glucose measurements were evaluated at 457 time points. CN performed better than HC with an average MARD of 3.13% compared to 10.73% for HC (P < .001). With a limited sample size, CN met ISO criteria (2003 and 2013) at all glucose ranges while HC did not. CN performed very well, and would make an excellent meter for future closed-loop studies outside of a research center. PMID:24876427

  8. Differences between measured and linearly interpolated synoptic variables over a 12-h period during AVE 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupuis, L. R.; Scoggins, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Results of analyses revealed that nonlinear changes or differences formed centers or systems, that were mesosynoptic in nature. These systems correlated well in space with upper level short waves, frontal zones, and radar observed convection, and were very systematic in time and space. Many of the centers of differences were well established in the vertical, extending up to the tropopause. Statistical analysis showed that on the average nonlinear changes were larger in convective areas than nonconvective regions. Errors often exceeding 100 percent were made by assuming variables to change linearly through a 12-h period in areas of thunderstorms, indicating that these nonlinear changes are important in the development of severe weather. Linear changes, however, accounted for more and more of an observed change as the time interval (within the 12-h interpolation period) increased, implying that the accuracy of linear interpolation increased over larger time intervals.

  9. Preparation of bis-(1(2)H-tetrazol-5-yl)-amine monohydrate

    DOEpatents

    Naud, Darren L.; Hiskey, Michael A.

    2003-05-27

    A process of preparing bis-(1(2)H-tetrazol-5-yl)-amine monohydrate is provided including combining a dicyanamide salt, an azide salt and water to form a first reaction mixture, adding a solution of a first strong acid characterized as having a pKa of less than about 1 to said first reaction mixture over a period of time characterized as providing a controlled reaction rate so as to gradually form hydrazoic acid without loss of significant quantities of hydrazoic acid from the solution while heating the first reaction mixture at temperatures greater than about 65.degree. C., heating the resultant reaction mixture at temperatures greater than about 65.degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to substantially completely form a reaction product, treating the reaction product with a solution of a second strong acid to form a product of bis-(1(2)H-tetrazol-5-yl)-amine monohydrate, and, recovering the bis-(1(2)H-tetrazol-5-yl)-amine monohydrate product.

  10. A cross-sectional study of the association between overnight call and irritable bowel syndrome in medical students

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Malcolm; Roth, Lee; McWilliam, Morgan; Thompson, Kim; Chande, Nilesh

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Shift work has been associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which includes gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain, constipation and diarrhea. Overnight call shifts also lead to a disruption of the endogenous circadian rhythm. HYPOTHESIS: Medical students who perform intermittent overnight call shifts will demonstrate a higher prevalence of IBS symptoms when compared with medical students who perform no overnight call shifts. METHODS: First- and second-year (preclinical) medical students have no overnight call requirements, whereas third- and fourth-year medical (clerkship) students do have overnight call requirements. All medical students at the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry (London, Ontario) were invited to complete an anonymous, web-based survey or an identical paper copy that included demographic data, the Rome III questionnaire and the IBS-Quality of Life measure (IBS-QOL). The prevalence of IBS symptoms and quality of life secondary to those symptoms were determined. RESULTS: Data were available for 247 medical students (110 pre-clinical students, 118 clerkship students and 19 excluded surveys). There was no significant difference in the presence of IBS between preclinical and clerkship students (21 of 110 [19.1%] versus 26 of 118 [22.0%]; P=0.58). The were no significant differences in mean (± SD) IBS-QOL score of those with IBS between preclinical (43.5±8.3) and clerkship students (45.7±13.8) (P=0.53). CONCLUSIONS: Participation in overnight call was not associated with the development of IBS or a lower quality of life secondary to IBS in medical students. PMID:22590702

  11. 76 FR 28482 - Notice of an Application of BF Enterprises, Inc. Under Section 12(h) of the Securities Exchange...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... COMMISSION Notice of an Application of BF Enterprises, Inc. Under Section 12(h) of the Securities Exchange.... has filed an application under Section 12(h) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. BF Enterprises... stock under Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act. In its application, BF Enterprises asserts that...

  12. Quinolone-1-(2H)-ones as hedgehog signalling pathway inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Trieu N; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Abdel-Hamid, Mohammed K; Gordon, Christopher P; Bernstein, Ilana R; Pye, Victoria; Cossar, Peter; Sakoff, Jennette A; McCluskey, Adam

    2016-07-14

    A series of quinolone-2-(1H)-ones derived from the Ugi-Knoevenagel three- and four-component reaction were prepared exhibiting low micromolar cytotoxicity against a panel of eight human cancer cell lines known to possess the Hedgehog Signalling Pathway (HSP) components, as well as the seminoma TCAM-2 cell line. A focused SAR study was conducted and revealed core characteristics of the quinolone-2-(1H)-ones required for cytotoxicity. These requirements included a C3-tethered indole moiety, an indole C5-methyl moiety, an aliphatic tail or an ester, as well as an additional aromatic moiety. Further investigation in the SAG-activated Shh-LIGHT2 cell line with the most active analogues: 2-(3-cyano-2-oxo-4-phenylquinolin-1(2H)-yl)-2-(1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-N-(pentan-2-yl)acetamide (5), 2-(3-cyano-2-oxo-4-phenylquinolin-1(2H)-yl)-2-(5-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-N-(pentan-2-yl)acetamide (23) and ethyl (2-(3-cyano-2-oxo-4-phenylquinolin-1(2H)-yl)-2-(5-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetyl)glycinate (24) demonstrated a down regulation of the HSP via a reduction in Gli expression, and in the mRNA levels of Ptch1 and Gli2. Analogues 5, 23 and 24 returned in cell inhibition values of 11.6, 2.9 and 3.1 μM, respectively, making this new HSP-inhibitor pharmacophore amongst the most potent non-Smo targeted inhibitors thus far reported. PMID:27272335

  13. Phthalazin-1(2H)-one–picric acid (1/1)

    PubMed Central

    Yathirajan, H. S.; Narayana, B.; Swamy, M. T.; Sarojini, B. K.; Bolte, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The geometric parameters of the title compound, C8H6N2O·C6H3N3O7, are in the usual ranges. The three nitro groups are almost coplanar with the aromatic picrate ring [dihedral angles 10.2 (2)°, 7.62 (16) and 8.08 (17)°]. The mol­ecular conformation of the picric acid is stabilized by an intra­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bond. The phthalazin-1(2H)-one mol­ecules are connected via N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming centrosymmetric dimers. PMID:21200682

  14. Overnight Pulse Oximetry for Evaluation of Sleep Apnea among Children with Trisomy 21

    PubMed Central

    Coverstone, Andrea M.; Bird, Merielle; Sicard, Melissa; Tao, Yu; Grange, Dorothy K.; Cleveland, Claudia; Molter, David; Kemp, James S.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: For children with trisomy 21, polysomnography at age 4 to assess obstructive sleep disordered breathing (OSDB) is the standard of care. Oximetry alone has been used to screen for disease among children without trisomy 21. This study evaluates the potential usefulness of oximetry scoring in diagnosing OSDB among children with trisomy 21. Methods: A McGill oximetry score from 1 to 4 was derived from a full overnight PSG done on 119 consecutive pediatric subjects with trisomy 21. Most were referred to the sleep laboratory because of suspicion for OSDB. Oximetry scorers were blinded to the child's full PSG and clinical course. Results of the complete PSG were then compared to oximetry scores. Results: Obstructive apnea-hypopnea index (OAHI) was ≥ 2.5 for 50% of all subjects. Fifty-nine subjects (49.6%) had McGill Score 1 (“inconclusive”); median OAHI was 1.0 (IQR 0.4–3.3). McGill Score was 2 for 43 subjects (36.1%); median OAHI was 4.5 (IQR 1.3-8.8). Seventeen subjects (14.3%) had McGill Scores of 3 or 4; median OAHI was 16.1 (IQR 9.3–45.5, range 2.1 to 101.1). Ten percent of subjects had a considerable number of central events (≥ 2.5 respiratory events/h but OAHI < 2.5), including 7 with McGill Score 2. Conclusions: In a retrospective cohort of children with trisomy 21, McGill oximetry scores of 3 or 4 reliably identified patients with marked OSDB. The possibility of central apneas causing hypoxemia must be considered in those with McGill Score 2. With these caveats, oximetry screening should be considered when developing streamlined protocols for early intervention to treat OSDB in this population. Citation: Coverstone AM, Bird M, Sicard M, Tao Y, Grange DK, Cleveland C, Molter D, Kemp JS. Overnight pulse oximetry for evaluation of sleep apnea among children with trisomy 21. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(12):1309-1315. PMID:25325597

  15. Overnight Closed-Loop Insulin Delivery in Young People With Type 1 Diabetes: A Free-Living, Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hovorka, Roman; Elleri, Daniela; Thabit, Hood; Allen, Janet M.; Leelarathna, Lalantha; El-Khairi, Ranna; Kumareswaran, Kavita; Caldwell, Karen; Calhoun, Peter; Kollman, Craig; Murphy, Helen R.; Acerini, Carlo L.; Wilinska, Malgorzata E.; Nodale, Marianna; Dunger, David B.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate feasibility, safety, and efficacy of overnight closed-loop insulin delivery in free-living youth with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Overnight closed loop was evaluated at home by 16 pump-treated adolescents with type 1 diabetes aged 12–18 years. Over a 3-week period, overnight insulin delivery was directed by a closed-loop system, and on another 3-week period sensor-augmented therapy was applied. The order of interventions was random. The primary end point was time when adjusted sensor glucose was between 3.9 and 8.0 mmol/L from 2300 to 0700 h. RESULTS Closed loop was constantly applied over at least 4 h on 269 nights (80%); sensor data were collected over at least 4 h on 282 control nights (84%). Closed loop increased time spent with glucose in target by a median 15% (interquartile range −9 to 43; P < 0.001). Mean overnight glucose was reduced by a mean 14 (SD 58) mg/dL (P < 0.001). Time when glucose was <70 mg/dL was low in both groups, but nights with glucose <63 mg/dL for at least 20 min were less frequent during closed loop (10 vs. 17%; P = 0.01). Despite lower total daily insulin doses by a median 2.3 (interquartile range −4.7 to 9.3) units (P = 0.009), overall 24-h glucose was reduced by a mean 9 (SD 41) mg/dL (P = 0.006) during closed loop. CONCLUSIONS Unsupervised home use of overnight closed loop in adolescents with type 1 diabetes is safe and feasible. Glucose control was improved during the day and night with fewer episodes of nocturnal hypoglycemia. PMID:24757227

  16. Corneal deswelling following overnight wear of rigid and hydrogel contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Holden, B A; Sweeney, D F; La Hood, D; Kenyon, E

    1988-01-01

    The edema response over a 24-hour sleep/wake cycle of ten subjects wearing a rigid gas-permeable (RGP) lens in one eye and a hydrogel lens in the other was evaluated. Lenses that result in equivalent amounts of overnight edema were selected. There was no significant difference in the rates of deswelling during the initial hour. However, at three and five hours after eye opening, the amount of residual edema was greater in the eye wearing the hydrogel lens. We suggest that when an RGP lens provides the same closed-eye level of oxygen as a hydrogel lens, the greater tear exchange of the RGP lens will result in a greater open-eye oxygen supply, leading to less daytime edema. This suggests that the more complete deswelling we observed with RGP lenses can be attributed to a lower stimulus to open-eye swelling. Biomicroscopy, subjective vision, and patient comfort were also rated on waking and ten hours after eye opening. On eye opening there was significantly more back-surface debris (P = 0.01) with the RGP lenses. Patients wearing RGPs rated comfort as poorer and vision as better but only the latter attained statistical significance. PMID:3162866

  17. Development of an overnight rapid bovine identification test (ORBIT) for field use.

    PubMed

    Mageau, R P; Cutrufelli, M E; Schwab, B; Johnston, R W

    1984-01-01

    An Overnight Rapid Bovine Identification Test (ORBIT) has been developed as a serological screen test for species verification of raw, whole tissue, bovine meat products. The test, an agar-gel immunodiffusion technique, uses stabilized reagent paper discs and prepared agar plates that have a printed template for correct placement of test components. This test is reliable, practical, economical, and easily performed in the field, such as at a meat import inspection station. The only nonbovine species found to react in the test are the bovine-related species of American bison (buffalo) and water buffalo (from Australia); however, these rare-occurring species do not present a problem for the intended application of the test. Stability of all test components, when stored in a refrigerator, is excellent for at least 1 year. The nature and stability of the test make it suitable for commercial development into test kits which should be highly practical and economical for wide availability and application of this procedure to meat inspection programs concerned with species verification. PMID:6438051

  18. Energy landscapes in diexo and exo/endo isomers derived from Li 2B 12H 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, Josep M.; Fernández-Barbero, Antonio; Serrano-Andrés, Luis; Canle-L., Moisés; Santaballa, J. Arturo; Fernández, M. Isabel

    2010-09-01

    In the pursuit of detecting the first endohedral polyhedral borane complex, we report a quantum-chemical computational study of energy landscapes for diexo isomers derived from Li 2B 12H 12 and the exo/endo isomer Li@{LiB 12H 12}. Geometries, electronic structure and energy barriers are computed for the interconversion between diexo isomers and the exo/ endo isomer, the latter leading to a thermal injection/ ejection mechanism of Li + from outside/ inside the complex [LiB 12H 12] -.

  19. 46 CFR 116.730 - Crew accommodations on vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length with overnight...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (65 feet) in length with overnight accommodations for more than 49 passengers. 116.730 Section 116.730... ARRANGEMENT Crew Spaces § 116.730 Crew accommodations on vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length... more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length with overnight accommodations for more than 49...

  20. 46 CFR 116.730 - Crew accommodations on vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length with overnight...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (65 feet) in length with overnight accommodations for more than 49 passengers. 116.730 Section 116.730... ARRANGEMENT Crew Spaces § 116.730 Crew accommodations on vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length... more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length with overnight accommodations for more than 49...

  1. 46 CFR 116.730 - Crew accommodations on vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length with overnight...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (65 feet) in length with overnight accommodations for more than 49 passengers. 116.730 Section 116.730... ARRANGEMENT Crew Spaces § 116.730 Crew accommodations on vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length... more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length with overnight accommodations for more than 49...

  2. 46 CFR 116.730 - Crew accommodations on vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length with overnight...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (65 feet) in length with overnight accommodations for more than 49 passengers. 116.730 Section 116.730... ARRANGEMENT Crew Spaces § 116.730 Crew accommodations on vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length... more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length with overnight accommodations for more than 49...

  3. 46 CFR 116.730 - Crew accommodations on vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length with overnight...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (65 feet) in length with overnight accommodations for more than 49 passengers. 116.730 Section 116.730... ARRANGEMENT Crew Spaces § 116.730 Crew accommodations on vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length... more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length with overnight accommodations for more than 49...

  4. Daily salt intake estimated by overnight urine collections indicates a high cardiovascular disease risk in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Yokokawa, Hirohide; Yuasa, Motoyuki; Nedsuwan, Supalert; Moolphate, Saiyud; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Kitajima, Tsutomu; Minematsu, Kazuo; Tanimura, Susumu; Marui, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional study (February 2012 to March 2013) was conducted to estimate daily salt intake and basic characteristics among 793 community-dwelling participants at high risk of cardiovascular disease (Framingham risk score >15%), who had visited diabetes or hypertension clinics at health centres in the Muang district, Chiang Rai, Thailand. We performed descriptive analysis of baseline data and used an automated analyser to estimate the average of 24-hour salt intake estimated from 3 days overnight urine collection. Participants were divided into two groups based on median estimated daily salt intake. Mean age and proportion of males were 65.2 years and 37.6% in the higher salt intake group (>=10.0 g/day, n=362), and 67.5 years and 42.7% in the lower salt intake group (<10.0 g/day, n=431), respectively (p=0.01, p<0.01). The higher salt intake group comprised more patients with a family history of hypertension, antihypertensive drug use, less ideal body mass index (18.5-24.9), higher exercise frequency (>=2 times weekly) and lower awareness of high salt intake. Among higher salt intake participants, those with lower awareness of high salt intake were younger and more often had a family history of hypertension, relative to those with more awareness. Our data indicated that families often share lifestyles involving high salt intake, and discrepancies between actual salt intake and awareness of high salt intake may represent a need for salt reduction intervention aiming at family level. Awareness of actual salt intake should be improved for each family. PMID:26965760

  5. Preoperative overnight parenteral nutrition (TPN) improves skeletal muscle protein metabolism indicated by microarray algorithm analyses in a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Engström, Cecilia; Lundholm, Kent

    2016-06-01

    Loss of muscle mass is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Uncertainties of treatment efficiency by short-term artificial nutrition remain, specifically improvement of protein balance in skeletal muscles. In this study, algorithmic microarray analysis was applied to map cellular changes related to muscle protein metabolism in human skeletal muscle tissue during provision of overnight preoperative total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Twenty-two patients (11/group) scheduled for upper GI surgery due to malignant or benign disease received a continuous peripheral all-in-one TPN infusion (30 kcal/kg/day, 0.16 gN/kg/day) or saline infusion for 12 h prior operation. Biopsies from the rectus abdominis muscle were taken at the start of operation for isolation of muscle RNA RNA expression microarray analyses were performed with Agilent Sureprint G3, 8 × 60K arrays using one-color labeling. 447 mRNAs were differently expressed between study and control patients (P < 0.1). mRNAs related to ribosomal biogenesis, mRNA processing, and translation were upregulated during overnight nutrition; particularly anabolic signaling S6K1 (P < 0.01-0.1). Transcripts of genes associated with lysosomal degradation showed consistently lower expression during TPN while mRNAs for ubiquitin-mediated degradation of proteins as well as transcripts related to intracellular signaling pathways, PI3 kinase/MAPkinase, were either increased or decreased. In conclusion, muscle mRNA alterations during overnight standard TPN infusions at constant rate altered mRNAs associated with mTOR signaling; increased initiation of protein translation; and suppressed autophagy/lysosomal degradation of proteins. This indicates that overnight preoperative parenteral nutrition is effective to promote muscle protein metabolism. PMID:27273879

  6. Short-Term Effects of Overnight Orthokeratology on Corneal Epithelial Permeability and Biomechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Thao N.; Green, Harry M.; Zhou, Yixiu; Pitts, Julie; Kitamata-Wong, Britney; Lee, Sophia; Wang, Shiyin L.; Lin, Meng C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the effects of 30 nights of overnight orthokeratology (OOK) on corneal epithelial permeability (Pdc) and corneal biomechanical properties. Methods. BE Retainer and Paragon CRT lenses were used. Visits were scheduled approximately 4 hours after awakening at baseline and after 1, 5, 10, 14, and 30 days of treatment. Pdc was measured at baseline and at day 30, whereas corneal biomechanical properties and visual acuities (VAs) were measured at all visits. Results. Thirty-nine neophytes and soft contact lens wearers completed the study. There was no difference in Pdc between baseline (ln[Pdc] [95% confidence interval (CI)] = −2.65 [−2.80 to −2.50]) and day 30 (ln[Pdc][CI] = −2.68 [−2.85 to −2.50]) (P = 0.88). Corneal hysteresis (CH) and corneal resistance factor (CRF) reduced significantly from baseline (CH [CI] = 10.89 [10.59–11.19] mm Hg and CRF [CI] = 10.35 [9.99–10.72] mm Hg) to day 30 (CH [CI] = 10.59 [10.31–10.87] mm Hg and CRF [CI] = 9.58 [9.26–9.89] mm Hg) (P = 0.001 for CH and P < 0.001 for CRF). Posttreatment VA did not reach baseline targets, and the difference was worse with low-contrast letters. Asian individuals (n = 18) had significantly worse VA than non-Asian individuals (n = 21) under most conditions through day 5, and the difference extended through day 14 with low-contrast letters under mesopic conditions. The percentage of participants who achieved 20/20 uncorrected was 17% Asian and 40% non-Asian individuals after day 1 and reached 69% Asian and 83% non-Asian individuals at day 30. Conclusions. Thirty nights of OOK did not alter Pdc when measured 4 hours after awakening. OOK caused CH and CRF to decrease, but the changes were not clinically significant compared with diseased and postsurgical cases. Asian individuals, who had lower baseline CH in this study, responded slower to OOK based on early uncorrected VA and overrefraction measurements. PMID:23652492

  7. Arousal Responses during Overnight Polysomnography and their Reproducibility in Healthy Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Azarbarzin, Ali; Ostrowski, Michele; Younes, Magdy; Keenan, Brendan T.; Pack, Allan I.; Staley, Bethany; Kuna, Samuel T.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Arousal intensity and heart rate (HR) response to arousal during polysomnography (PSG) vary considerably between patients with sleep disorders. Our objective was to determine the range of these arousal characteristics in healthy young adults and whether they are consistent on repeated testing. Design: Post hoc analysis of 56 preexisting PSG files recorded from 28 healthy adults on 2 consecutive nights. Setting: Academic medical center and Research and Development Laboratory (YRT Limited, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada). Participants: Twenty-eight healthy young adults. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Arousals were identified using an automatic system followed by manual editing. The intensity of arousals was scaled (between 0 and 9) using an automatic algorithm based on the change in the electroencephalography (EEG) signals' wavelet characteristics. 4,751 arousals in 28 pairs of PSGs (night 1 and night 2) were scaled. HR responses (ΔHR) to all arousals were determined and averaged at each arousal scale per file. Overall average arousal intensity ranged 3.0–7.1 in different subjects, and average ΔHR ranged 1.9–18.3 beats.min−1. Heart rate response at a given arousal intensity, expressed as ΔHR at a moderate arousal scale of 5.0 (ΔHR5), ranged 4.1–18.1 beats.min−1. There was a strong correlation between arousal intensity and ΔHR within each subject. More importantly, there were excellent intraclass correlations (ICC) between night 1 and night 2 results for all three variables (ICC = 0.72 for average intensity, 0.92 for average ΔHR4, and 0.91 for ΔHR5). Conclusions: Average arousal intensity and heart rate response to arousal are highly variable among healthy young adults and stable within individuals. Citation: Azarbarzin A, Ostrowski M, Younes M, Keenan BT, Pack AI, Staley B, Kuna ST. Arousal responses during overnight polysomnography and their reproducibility in healthy young adults. SLEEP 2015;38(8):1313–1321. PMID

  8. Aluminum Leaching of ''Archived'' Sludge from Tanks 8F, 11H, and 12H

    SciTech Connect

    FONDEUR, FERNANDOF.

    2004-03-12

    Aluminum can promote formation or dissolution of networks in hydroxide solid solutions. When present in large amounts it will act as a network former increasing both the viscosity and the surface tension of melts. This translates into poor free flow properties that affect pour rate of glass production in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). To mitigate this situation, DWPF operations limit the amount of aluminum contained in sludge. This study investigated the leaching of aluminum compounds from archived sludge samples. The conclusions found boehmite present as the predominant aluminum compound in sludge from two tanks. We did not identify an aluminum compound in sludge from the third tank. We did not detect any amorphous aluminum hydroxide in the samples. The amount of goethite measured 4.2 percentage weight while hematite measured 3.7 percentage weight in Tank 11H sludge. The recommended recipe for removing gibbsite in sludge proved inefficient for digesting boehmite, removing less than 50 per cent of the compound within 48 hours. The recipe did remove boehmite when the test ran for 10 days (i.e., 7 more days than the recommended baseline leaching period). Additions of fluoride and phosphate to Tank 12H archived sludge did not improve the aluminum leaching efficiency of the baseline recipe.

  9. Complex high-temperature phase transitions in Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} and Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect

    Verdal, Nina; Her, Jae-Hyuk; Stavila, Vitalie; Soloninin, Alexei V.; Babanova, Olga A.; Skripov, Alexander V.; Udovic, Terrence J.; Rush, John J.

    2014-04-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry measurements of Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} and Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} indicate hysteretic transformations to high-temperature phases at ≈615 K and 529 K, respectively, upon heating (1 K/min) from room temperature. X-ray and neutron powder diffraction measurements corroborate the phase-change behavior. For Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12}, the diffraction data are consistent with a previous study suggesting that the overall face-centered-cubic arrangement of icosahedral B{sub 12}H{sub 12}{sup 2−} anions is maintained upon transformation to the high-temperature polymorph, although the anions are now orientationally disordered and the Li{sup +} cations crystallographically disordered within an enlarged lattice. For Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12}, the diffraction data indicate the existence of three different high-temperature phases in addition to the known low-temperature monoclinic phase. The highest-temperature structure possesses Im3{sup -}m symmetry and exhibits a body-centered-cubic arrangement of orientationally disordered anions. The interstitial, disordered Na{sup +} cations appear to favor off-center positions within the distorted tetrahedral sites formed by the anions in this structure. An intermediate Pm3{sup -}n-symmetric phase at lower temperature is the result of a partial ordering of this higher-temperature structure. A third, minor, face-centered-cubic phase coexists with these high-temperature polymorphs. {sup 1}H NMR measurements of Li{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} and Na{sub 2}B{sub 12}H{sub 12} reveal an approximately two-orders-of-magnitude increase in the reorientational jump rate of the anions in both cases upon transformation to their high-temperature structures. The enhanced anion mobilities were corroborated by neutron scattering fixed-window scans across the respective phase boundaries. The inherent cation disorder associated with these high-temperature polymorphs suggests their potential use as superionic

  10. A specialized program for children with developmental disabilities within a "typical" overnight summer camp: Camp Ramah's Tikvah Program.

    PubMed

    Blas, Howard I

    2007-10-01

    The Tikvah Program is an overnight camping program at Camp Ramah in New England that serves campers with a range of developmental disabilities. The program has evolved over its 37-year history and includes a camping program, vocational training program, and inclusion program. Select graduates are hired by the camp for summer employment. The Tikvah Program offers a model for serving campers with special needs within a larger "typical" summer camp. Although serving the needs of such campers offers unique challenges, the presence of such a program in a regular summer camp offers tremendous opportunities and benefits for campers with special needs and more typically developing campers. PMID:17823062

  11. Effect of short-term fasting on free/dissociable insulin-like growth factor I concentrations in normal human serum.

    PubMed

    Bereket, A; Wilson, T A; Blethen, S L; Fan, J; Frost, R A; Gelato, M C; Lang, C H

    1996-12-01

    A small portion of circulating insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is detected in the free or readily dissociable state, which is thought to be the metabolically active form. The amount of free/dissociable IGF-I in serum is dependent on a complex interplay between the production rate and the concentrations of IGF-I and IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs). IGF availability is also influenced by posttranslational changes in IGFBPs that affect the affinity of IGFBPs for IGF-I. In the present study, we examined whether a short term fast (approximately 12 h) alters the serum concentration of free/dissociable IGF-I, and whether these changes are associated with alterations in IGFBP-1 and the proteolysis status of IGFBP-3. Circulating free/dissociable IGF-I concentrations, as assessed by a two-site immunoradiometric assay, did not differ between fasting and 4 h after a morning meal (1.48 +/- 0.07 vs. 1.50 +/- 0.07 microgram/L, respectively). Likewise, free/dissociable IGF-I levels measured by RIA after separation by centrifugal ultrafiltration were not different between the two groups (1.43 +/- 0.14 vs. 1.38 +/- 0.18 microgram/L, respectively). IGF-I bioactivity, as measured by thymidine incorporation by fibroblasts, did not differ in fasting and 4-h postprandial sera. There was no difference in IGFBP-3 and total acid-ethanol-extractable IGF-I concentrations in serum from fasted and fed subjects. In contrast, the concentration of IGFBP-1 in the serum was increased approximately 5-fold in the fasted state compared to fed values. IGFBP-1 existed in a highly phosphorylated form under fasting conditions. There was no change in IGFBP-3 proteolysis assessed either in vivo or in vitro between the fasting and fed states. The results indicate that a physiologically relevant short term overnight fast does not alter the circulating levels of free/dissociable IGF-I despite a marked elevation in IGFBP-1. PMID:8954045

  12. Randomized clinical trial of multimodal physiotherapy treatment compared to overnight lidocaine ointment in women with provoked vestibulodynia: Design and methods.

    PubMed

    Morin, Mélanie; Dumoulin, Chantale; Bergeron, Sophie; Mayrand, Marie-Hélène; Khalifé, Samir; Waddell, Guy; Dubois, Marie-France

    2016-01-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) is a highly prevalent and debilitating condition yet its management relies mainly on non-empirically validated interventions. Among the many causes of PVD, there is growing evidence that pelvic floor muscle (PFM) dysfunctions play an important role in its pathophysiology. Multimodal physiotherapy, which addresses these dysfunctions, is judged by experts to be highly effective and is recommended as a first-line treatment. However, the effectiveness of this promising intervention has been evaluated through only two small uncontrolled trials. The proposed bi-center, single-blind, parallel group, randomized controlled trial (RCT) aims to evaluate the efficacy of multimodal physiotherapy and compare it to a frequently used first-line treatment, topical overnight application of lidocaine, in women with PVD. A total of 212 women diagnosed with PVD according to a standardized protocol were eligible for the study and were randomly assigned to either multimodal physiotherapy or lidocaine treatment for 10weeks. The primary outcome measure is pain during intercourse (assessed with a numerical rating scale). Secondary measures include sexual function, pain quality, psychological factors (including pain catastrophizing, anxiety, depression and fear of pain), PFM morphology and function, and patients' global impression of change. Assessments are made at baseline, post-treatment and at the 6-month follow-up. This manuscript presents and discusses the rationale, design and methodology of the first RCT investigating physiotherapy in comparison to a commonly prescribed first-line treatment, overnight topical lidocaine, for women with PVD. PMID:26600287

  13. Effects of overnight sleep restriction on brain chemistry and mood in women with unipolar depression and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, Denise; Bartha, Robert; Devarajan, Sivakumaran; MacMaster, Frank P.; Schmidt, Matthias H.; Rusak, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Background Partial or total overnight sleep deprivation produces immediate mood improvement in about 50% of patients with depression, but not in healthy controls. Our objectives were to compare the neurochemical changes that accompanied partial overnight sleep deprivation in healthy and depressed participants, and to compare baseline neurochemical profiles and overnight neurochemical changes between those depressed participants who did and did not respond to sleep loss with mood improvement. Methods We studied 2 brain regions (left dorsal prefrontal area and pons) in 12 women with unipolar depression and in 15 healthy women using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy acquired at 1.5 T. The scans took place at baseline and 24 hours later after a night with sleep restricted to a maximum of 2.5 hours (22:30–01:00). We assessed 3 neurochemical signals (referenced to internal water): N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline compounds (Cho) and creatine-plus-phosphocreatine (tCr). Results In both groups combined, sleep restriction caused a 20.1% decrease in pontine tCr (F1–16 = 5.07, p = 0.039, Cohen’s d = 0.54) and an 11.3% increase in prefrontal Cho (F1–21 = 5.24, p = 0.033, Cohen’s d = 0.46). Follow-up tests revealed that prefrontal Cho increases were significant only among depressed participants (17.9% increase, t9 = −3.35, p = 0.008, Cohen’s d = 1.06). Five depressed patients showed at least 30% improvement in mood, whereas 6 showed no change or worsening in mood after sleep restriction. Baseline pontine Cho levels distinguished subsequent responders from nonresponders to sleep restriction among depressed participants (z = 2.61, p = 0.008). Limitations A limitation of this study is the relatively small sample size. Conclusion Sleep restriction altered levels of pontine tCr and prefrontal Cho in both groups combined, suggesting effects on phospholipid and creatine metabolism. Baseline levels of pontine Cho were linked to subsequent mood responses to sleep loss

  14. Caustic Leaching of SRS Tank 12H Sludge With and Without Chelating Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.B.

    2003-04-30

    The primary objective of this study was to measure the effect of adding triethanolamine (TEA) to caustic leaching solutions to improve the solubility of aluminum in actual tank-waste sludge. High-level radioactive waste sludge that had a high aluminum assay was used for the tests. This waste, which originated with the processing of aluminum-clad/aluminum-alloy fuels, generates high levels of heat because of the high {sup 90}Sr concentration and contains hard-to-dissolve boehmite phases. In concept, a chelating agent, such as TEA, can both improve the dissolution rate and increase the concentration in the liquid phase. For this reason, TEA could also increase the solubility of other sludge components that are potentially problematic to downstream processing. Tests were conducted to determine if this were the case. Because of its relatively high vapor pressure, process design should include methods to minimize losses of the TEA. Sludge was retrieved from tank 12H at the Savannah River Site by on-site personnel, and then shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the study. The sludge contained a small quantity of rocky debris. One slate-like flat piece, which had approximate dimensions of 1 1/4 x 1/2 x 1/8 in., was recovered. Additional gravel-like fragments with approximate diameters ranging from 1/8 to 1/4 in. were also recovered by sieving the sludge slurry through a 1.4-mm square-pitch stainless steel mesh. These particles ranged from a yellow quartz-like material to grey-colored gravel. Of the 32.50 g of sludge received, the mass of the debris was only 0.89 g, and the finely divided sludge comprised {approx}97% of the mass. The sludge was successfully subdivided into uniform aliquots during hot-cell operations. Analytical measurements confirmed the uniformity of the samples. The smaller sludge samples were then used as needed for leaching experiments conducted in a glove box. Six tests were performed with leachate concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 3.0 m Na

  15. Subtask 12H2: Status of the dynamic helium charging experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Chung, H.M.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of the dynamic helium charging experiment (DHCE) is to investigate the effects of concurrent helium production and fast-neutron irradiation on the physical and mechanical properties of vanadium-based alloys for fusion blanket applications. A major task in this reporting period was to disassemble the tritium-bearing DHCE capsules to retrieve irradiated specimens for examination and testing. Seven DHCE capsules containing vanadium-alloy specimens were irradiated in the MOTA-2B vehicle in FFTF to {approx}20-29 dpa. In this and the previous reporting periods, equipment and procedures were developed at Argonne National Laboratory-East to disassemble these capsules. Six of the seven capsules have been disassembled. (The seventh capsule was processed in April 1994, immediately following this reporting period.) Effluence of tritium into the cell exhaust was <2% of the total inventory. No contamination incidents occurred during the DHCE disassembly work. Initial testing of the retrieved specimens is under way. 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Portable obstructive sleep apnea screening system using overnight ECG and a PDA-based wireless transmission system.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kang-Ming

    2009-05-01

    Sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are now regarded as an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The increasing demands for home-based sleep monitoring have prompted studies to develop devices that monitor sleep using fewer sensors. This paper proposes an electrocardiogram (ECG)-based sleep monitoring system that uses a personal digital assistant to display signals and a wireless transmission system. An OSA detection algorithm based only on the overnight-ECG-derived heart-rate-variability low-frequency component (0.02-0.04 Hz) exhibited detection sensitivity of 68.97% and specificity of 100%. This system could meet the future demands of home-based sleep monitoring and thereby reduce the current considerable burdens on hospital sleep centers. PMID:19441954

  17. Effects of early and late rest breaks during training on overnight memory consolidation of a keyboard melody.

    PubMed

    Duke, Robert A; Allen, Sarah E; Cash, Carla D; Simmons, Amy L

    2009-07-01

    In two experiments, we tested the extent to which overnight procedural memory consolidation is affected by extended rest breaks during training. In the first experiment, nonmusicians practiced a 5-element keypress sequence with their nondominant hand in 12 30-s practice intervals separated by 30-s pauses. In the second experiment, nonpianist musicians practiced a 13-note keyboard melody using the same procedures. In both experiments, approximately one-third of the subjects took a 5-min break after the first three blocks of practice; another third took a break after nine blocks of practice; the remaining participants did not take an extended break. All were trained in the evening and were retested the following morning. Participants in both experiments made dramatic improvements over the course of the training and retest sessions, and participants who took an extended rest break early in practice made the largest gains in performance between the end of training and the beginning of retest. PMID:19673774

  18. Overnight Glucose Control With an Automated, Unified Safety System in Children and Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes at Diabetes Camp

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Trang T.; Breton, Marc D.; Keith-Hynes, Patrick; De Salvo, Daniel; Clinton, Paula; Benassi, Kari; Mize, Benton; Chernavvsky, Daniel; Place, Jéróme; Wilson, Darrell M.; Kovatchev, Boris P.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the safety and efficacy of an automated unified safety system (USS) in providing overnight closed-loop (OCL) control in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes attending diabetes summer camps. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The Diabetes Assistant (DIAS) USS used the Dexcom G4 Platinum glucose sensor (Dexcom) and t:slim insulin pump (Tandem Diabetes Care). An initial inpatient study was completed for 12 participants to evaluate safety. For the main camp study, 20 participants with type 1 diabetes were randomized to either OCL or sensor-augmented therapy (control conditions) per night over the course of a 5- to 6-day diabetes camp. RESULTS Subjects completed 54 OCL nights and 52 control nights. On an intention-to-treat basis, with glucose data analyzed regardless of system status, the median percent time in range, from 70–150 mg/dL, was 62% (29, 87) for OCL nights versus 55% (25, 80) for sensor-augmented pump therapy (P = 0.233). A per-protocol analysis allowed for assessment of algorithm performance. The median percent time in range, from 70–150 mg/dL, was 73% (50, 89) for OCL nights (n = 41) versus 52% (24, 83) for control conditions (n = 39) (P = 0.037). There was less time spent in the hypoglycemic range <50, <60, and <70 mg/dL during OCL compared with the control period (P = 0.019, P = 0.009, and P = 0.023, respectively). CONCLUSIONS The DIAS USS algorithm is effective in improving time spent in range as well as reducing nocturnal hypoglycemia during the overnight period in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes in a diabetes camp setting. PMID:24879841

  19. Overnight hypoxic exposure and glucagon-like peptide-1 and leptin levels in humans

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Eric M.; Carr, Richard D.; Deacon, Carolyn F.; Johnson, Bruce D.

    2009-01-01

    Altitude exposure has been associated with loss of appetite and weight loss in healthy humans; however, the endocrine factors that contribute to these changes remain unclear. Leptin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are peptide hormones that contribute to the regulation of appetite. Leptin increases with hypoxia; however, the influence of hypoxia on GLP-1 has not been studied in animals or humans to date. We sought to determine the influence of normobaric hypoxia on plasma leptin and GLP-1 levels in 25 healthy humans. Subjects ingested a control meal during normoxia and after 17 h of exposure to normobaric hypoxia (fraction of inspired oxygen of 12.5%, simulating approximately 4100 m). Plasma leptin was assessed before the meal, and GLP-1 was assessed premeal, at 20 min postmeal, and at 40 min postmeal. We found that hypoxia caused a significant elevation in plasma leptin levels (normoxia, 4.9 ± 0.8 pg·mL−1; hypoxia, 7.7 ± 1.5 pg·mL−1; p < 0.05; range, −16% to 190%), no change in the average GLP-1 response to hypoxia, and only a small trend toward an increase in GLP-1 levels 40 min postmeal (fasting, 15.7 ± 0.9 vs 15.9 ± 0.7 pmol·L−1; 20 min postmeal, 21.7 ± 0.9 vs 21.8 ± 1.2 pmol·L−1; 40 min postmeal, 19.5 ± 1.2 vs. 21.0 ± 1.2 pmol·L−1 for normoxia and hypoxia, respectively; p > 0.05 normoxia vs hypoxia). There was a correlation between SaO2 and leptin after the 17 h exposure (r= 0.45; p < 0.05), but no relation between SaO2 and GLP-1. These data confirm that leptin increases with hypoxic exposure in humans. Further study is needed to determine the influence of hypoxia and altitude on GLP-1 levels. PMID:18923568

  20. 78 FR 26407 - Notice of an Application of W2007 Grace Acquisition I, Inc. Under Section 12(h) of the Securities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... COMMISSION Notice of an Application of W2007 Grace Acquisition I, Inc. Under Section 12(h) of the Securities... Acquisition I, Inc. (``W2007 Grace'') has filed an application under Section 12(h) of the Securities Exchange... from the requirement to file reports under Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act. In its application,...

  1. Improving sensitivity of direct microscopy for detection of acid-fast bacilli in sputum: use of chitin in mucus digestion.

    PubMed

    Farnia, P; Mohammadi, F; Zarifi, Z; Tabatabee, D J; Ganavi, J; Ghazisaeedi, K; Farnia, P K; Gheydi, M; Bahadori, M; Masjedi, M R; Velayati, A A

    2002-02-01

    In order to try to improve the results of direct smear microscopy, we used the mucus-digesting quality of chitin in tuberculosis (TB) laboratories. For this purpose, a total of 430 sputum specimens were processed by the N-acetyl-L-cysteine concentration, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) liquefaction, chitin sedimentation, and direct microscopy methods. Then, the smear sensitivity for acid-fast bacillus detection by chitin-treated sputum was compared with the sensitivity of smears prepared by other methods. Our results showed that the chitin solution took less time to completely homogenize the mucoid sputum than did the N-acetyl-L-cysteine and NaOCl methods. The N-acetyl-L-cysteine concentration method demonstrated sensitivity and specificity levels of 83 and 97%, respectively. In comparison, the sensitivity of chitin sedimentation was 80%, with a specificity of 96.7%. The NaOCl liquefaction method showed a sensitivity of 78%, with a specificity of 96%. Finally, the sensitivity of direct microscopy was lower than those of the other tested methods and was only 46%, with a specificity of 90%. The chitin and NaOCl liquefaction methods are both easy to perform, and they do not require additional equipment (centrifuges). Also, our results demonstrated that the chitin method is less time-consuming than the NaOCl method, since only 30 min of incubation is required to bring complete sedimentation of bacilli in chitin-treated sputum whereas the NaOCl method needs 10 to 12 h to give the same results in the same sputum specimens. Therefore, the chitin liquefaction and sedimentation method may provide better results in TB laboratories of developing countries than the N-acetyl-L-cysteine concentration, NaOCl overnight sedimentation, and direct smear microscopy methods. PMID:11825964

  2. Utilization of potatoes for life support systems. II - The effects of temperature under 24-h and 12-h photoperiods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; Steffen, Kenneth L.; Tibbitts, Theodore W.; Palta, Jiwan P.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of temperature and the photoperiod length on the growth and tuberization of Norland potatoes were investigated for two photoperiods, 12-h and 24-hr at 400 micromol/sq m per sec PPF, and at temperatures of 12, 16, 20, 24, and 28 C. It was found that stem length increased with increasing temperature under both photoperiods. The highest tuber yield was obtained at 16 C under the 24-hr photoperiod and at 20 C under the 12-hr photoperiod (i.e., increasing the photoperiod from 12 to 24 hrs effectively decreases the optimal temperature for tuber formation). Little or no tuber formation occurred at 28 C under either photoperiod.

  3. Relations of Parenting Quality, Interparental Conflict, and Overnights with Mental Health Problems of Children in Divorcing Families with High Legal Conflict

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Irwin N.; Wheeler, Lorey A.; Braver, Sanford L.

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the associations between child mental health problems and the quality of maternal and paternal parenting, and how these associations were moderated by three contextual factors, quality of parenting by the other parent, interparental conflict, and the number of overnights parents had with the child. Data for the current study come from a sample of divorcing families who are in high legal conflict over developing or maintaining a parenting plan following divorce. Analyses revealed that the associations between child mental health problems and positive maternal and paternal parenting were moderated by the quality of parenting provided by the other parent and by the number of overnights children spent with parents, but not by the level of interparental conflict. When both parenting by the other parent and number of overnights were considered in the same model, only number of overnights moderated the relations between parenting and child behavior problems. The results support the proposition that the well-being of children in high conflict divorcing families is better when they spend adequate time with at least one parent who provides high quality parenting. PMID:24098960

  4. Improvement of antibacterial activity of some sulfa drugs through linkage to certain phthalazin-1(2H)-one scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hany S; Eldehna, Wagdy M; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A; Elaasser, Mahmoud M; Abdel-Aziz, Marwa M

    2014-10-01

    RAB1 5 is a lead antibacterial agent in which trimethoprim is linked to phthalazine moiety. Similarly, our strategy in this research depends on the interconnection between some sulfa drugs and certain phthalazin-1(2H)-one scaffolds in an attempt to enhance their antibacterial activity. This approach was achieved through the combination of 4-substituted phthalazin-1(2H)-ones 9a, b or 14a, b with sulfanilamide 1a, sulfathiazole 1b or sulfadiazine 1c through amide linkers 6a, b to produce the target compounds 10a-d and 15a-e, respectively. The antibacterial activity of the newly synthesized compounds showed that all tested compounds have antibacterial activity higher than that of their reference sulfa drugs 1a-c. Compound 10c represented the highest antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria Streptococcus pneumonia and Staphylococcus aureus with MIC = 0.39 μmol/mL. Moreover, compound 10d displayed excellent antibacterial activity against Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium with MIC = 0.39 and 0.78 μmol/mL, respectively. PMID:25113876

  5. Lattice potential energy and standard molar enthalpy in the formation of 1—dodecylamine hydrobromide (1-C12H25NH3·Br)(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Pu; Di, You-Ying; Dan, Wen-Yan; He, Dong-Hua; Kong, Yu-Xia; Yang, Wei-Wei

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports that 1-dodecylamine hydrobromide (1-C12H25NH3·Br)(s) has been synthesized using the liquid phase reaction method. The lattice potential energy of the compound 1-C12H25NH3·Br and the ionic volume and radius of the 1-C12H25NH3+ cation are obtained from the crystallographic data and other auxiliary thermodynamic data. The constant-volume energy of combustion of 1-C12H25NH3·Br(s) is measured to be ΔcUmo(1-C12H25NH3·Br, s) = -(7369.03±3.28) kJ·mol-1 by means of an RBC-II precision rotating-bomb combustion calorimeter at T = (298.15±0.001) K. The standard molar enthalpy of combustion of the compound is derived to be ΔcHmo(1-C12H25NH3·Br, s) = -(7384.52±3.28) kJ·mol-1 from the constant-volume energy of combustion. The standard molar enthalpy of formation of the compound is calculated to be ΔfHmo(1-C12H25NH3·Br, s)=-(1317.86±3.67) kJ·mol-1 from the standard molar enthalpy of combustion of the title compound and other auxiliary thermodynamic quantities through a thermochemical cycle.

  6. Impact of Denture Cleaning Method and Overnight Storage Condition on Denture Biofilm Mass and Composition: A Cross-Over Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Duyck, Joke; Vandamme, Katleen; Krausch-Hofmann, Stefanie; Boon, Lies; De Keersmaecker, Katrien; Jalon, Eline; Teughels, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Background Appropriate oral hygiene is required to maintain oral health in denture wearers. This study aims to compare the role of denture cleaning methods in combination with overnight storage conditions on biofilm mass and composition on acrylic removable dentures. Methods In a cross-over randomized controlled trial in 13 older people, 4 conditions with 2 different mechanical cleaning methods and 2 overnight storage conditions were considered: (i) brushing and immersion in water without a cleansing tablet, (ii) brushing and immersion in water with a cleansing tablet, (iii) ultrasonic cleaning and immersion in water without a cleansing tablet, and (iv) ultrasonic cleaning and immersion in water with a cleansing tablet. Each test condition was performed for 5 consecutive days, preceded by a 2-days wash-out period. Biofilm samples were taken at baseline (control) and at the end of each test period from a standardized region. Total and individual levels of selected oral bacteria (n = 20), and of Candida albicans were identified using the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technique. Denture biofilm coverage was scored using an analogue denture plaque score. Paired t-tests and Wilcoxon-signed rank tests were used to compare the test conditions. The level of significance was set at α< 5%. Results Overnight denture storage in water with a cleansing tablet significantly reduced the total bacterial count (p<0.01). The difference in total bacterial level between the two mechanical cleaning methods was not statistically significant. No significant effect was observed on the amount of Candida albicans nor on the analogue plaque scores. Conclusions The use of cleansing tablets during overnight denture storage in addition to mechanical denture cleaning did not affect Candida albicans count, but reduced the total bacterial count on acrylic removable dentures compared to overnight storage in water. This effect was more pronounced when combined with ultrasonic cleaning compared to

  7. Alcohol and the regulation of energy balance: overnight effects on diet-induced thermogenesis and fuel storage.

    PubMed

    Murgatroyd, P R; Van De Ven, M L; Goldberg, G R; Prentice, A M

    1996-01-01

    The effect of alcohol on overnight energy expenditure and substrate disposal was studied in eleven subjects (five men, six women) using whole-body indirect calorimetry for 15.5 h after test meals. Three test meals were studied in random order with at least 48 h between treatments: control, 50% of maintenance energy needs provided as 14, 40 and 46% energy from protein, fat and carbohydrate respectively; alcohol addition, control plus 23% energy as alcohol; alcohol substitution, control with alcohol replacing 23% of carbohydrate energy. ANOVA revealed no significant sex effects. Alcohol-induced thermogenesis dissipated only 15 (SD 14)% of the alcohol energy. Alcohol addition had no significant effect on protein or carbohydrate oxidation but fat oxidation was suppressed (P < 0.0005) to an extent equivalent to storing 74 (SD 51)% of the alcohol energy as fat. Alcohol substitution reduced carbohydrate oxidation (P < 0.009) to an equivalent of 42 (SD 41)% and also spared fat (P < 0.005) to an equivalent of 59 (SD 37)% of the alcohol energy. It is concluded that alcohol has no special thermogenic capacity, and that its energy can be accounted for in a similar way to carbohydrate. PMID:8785189

  8. Effects of overnight captivity on antioxidant capacity and clinical chemistry of wild southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons).

    PubMed

    Debrincat, Steven; Taggart, David; Rich, Brian; Beveridge, Ian; Boardman, Wayne; Dibben, Ron

    2014-09-01

    An animal's antioxidant capacity is measured by its ability to quench reactive oxygen species (ROS). During everyday metabolism, antioxidants and ROS are in equilibrium with one another. In times of stress, an animal produces more ROS and therefore uses its antioxidant capacity more readily in order to maintain this equilibrium. When the production of ROS exceeds the antioxidant capacity, an animal will experience extensive oxidative stress, which can ultimately affect that animal's health. During experimental study of wild animals, it is often necessary to capture them for a short period of time. In order to obtain a measurement of the effects of short-term captivity on oxidative capacity in wild animals, a population of southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons) in Swan Reach, South Australia (34.57 degrees S, 139.60 degrees E), was studied. To assess the variation in antioxidant capacity, two assays, the ferric reducing ability of plasma and the trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, were performed. A third assay, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, was used to measure the effects of ROS. Measurements of the specific antioxidants uric acid, ascorbic acid, retinol, alpha-tocopherol, and superoxide dismutase were also performed. The biochemical parameters albumin, total protein, cholinesterase, creatinine, and urea were measured as indicators for health. Results showed a significant reduction in antioxidant capacity during the overnight period of captivity. PMID:25314812

  9. Syntheses, characterization and energetic properties of closo-(B12H12)2- salts of imidazolium derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hanumantha Rao, Muddamarri; Muralidharan, Krishnamurthi

    2013-06-28

    The diimidazolium derivative of acetylene and its salt 3,3'-(but-2-yne-1,4-diyl)bis(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium)chloride (1) was synthesized by a solvent free sonochemical method and then the counter chloride ions were replaced by closo-dodecaborate [(B12H12)(2-)] and perchlorate (ClO4(-)) anions respectively. Along with these two ionic salts, a series of salts with closo-dodecaborate and alkyl imidazolium cations were also synthesized. All the compounds were characterized by NMR and MASS spectral data, elemental analyses and thermogravimetric analyses. In addition to that enthalpy of combustion, enthalpy of formation and heat of explosion of all the compounds were experimentally determined. Based on the properties of these compounds, they can be used as insensitive energetic materials in various fields in propellant research and technology such as solid rocket propellants and burn rate accelerators. PMID:23653071

  10. Diabatic Initialization of Mesoscale Models in the Southeastern United States: Can 0 to 12h Warm Season QPF be Improved?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapenta, William M.; Bradshaw, Tom; Burks, Jason; Darden, Chris; Dembek, Scott

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that numerical warm season quantitative precipitation forecasts lack significant skill for numerous reasons. Some are related to the model--it may lack physical processes required to realistically simulate convection or the numerical algorithms and dynamics employed may not be adequate. Others are related to initialization-mesoscale features play an important role in convective initialization and atmospheric observation systems are incapable of properly depicting the three-dimensional stability structure at the mesoscale. The purpose of this study is to determine if a mesoscale model initialized with a diabatic initialization scheme can improve short-term (0 to 12h) warm season quantitative precipitation forecasts in the Southeastern United States. The Local Analysis and Prediction System (LAPS) developed at the Forecast System Laboratory is used to diabatically initialize the Pennsylvania State University/National center for Atmospheric Research (PSUNCAR) Mesoscale Model version 5 (MM5). The SPORT Center runs LAPS operationally on an hourly cycle to produce analyses on a 15 km covering the eastern 2/3 of the United States. The 20 km National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Rapid Update Cycle analyses are used for the background fields. Standard observational data are acquired from MADIS with GOES/CRAFT Nexrad data acquired from in-house feeds. The MM5 is configured on a 140 x 140 12 km grid centered on Huntsville Alabama. Preliminary results indicate that MM5 runs initialized with LAPS produce improved 6 and 12h QPF threat scores compared with those initialized with the NCEP RUC.

  11. Overnight Social Isolation in Pigs Decreases Salivary Cortisol but Does Not Impair Spatial Learning and Memory or Performance in a Decision-Making Task.

    PubMed

    van der Staay, F Josef; Schoonderwoerd, Annelieke J; Stadhouders, Bo; Nordquist, Rebecca E

    2015-01-01

    Pigs in modern farming practice may be exposed to a number of stressors, including social stressors such as mixing or isolation. This may potentially affect both cognitive abilities and stress physiology of the animals. We tested the hypothesis that overnight social isolation in pigs impairs performance in a cognitive holeboard (HB) task (Experiment 1) and the Pig Gambling Task (PGT) (Experiment 2), a decision-making task inspired by the Iowa Gambling Task. In addition, we tested the effect of overnight social isolation on salivary cortisol levels. A within-subjects approach was used in which performance in the two behavioral tasks and cortisol levels were first determined during normal social housing, followed by performance and cortisol levels after experiencing stress induced by overnight social isolation. A total of 19 female pigs with a birth weight closest to their respective litter average was selected from 10 different litters and placed in two pens after weaning. Following habituation, pigs were trained in the HB task, starting at 10 weeks of age. Then, the pigs were isolated overnight, five individuals per night, at 15, 16, and 17 weeks of age. Between these three isolations, social housing and training in the HB continued. Starting 6 weeks after the end of the HB experiment, at approximately 23 weeks of age, the pigs were trained in the PGT. The effects of overnight social isolation on performance in this task were assessed once, when the pigs were 25 weeks old. Salivary cortisol was measured from samples collected 15 min after the start of isolation and at the end of the isolation period and compared to baseline values collected before the start of social isolation. Our results did not confirm the hypothesis that isolation impaired HB performance and decision-making in the PGT. Unexpectedly, overnight social isolation decreased cortisol levels below baseline values, an effect that was not associated with changes in performance of the

  12. Overnight Social Isolation in Pigs Decreases Salivary Cortisol but Does Not Impair Spatial Learning and Memory or Performance in a Decision-Making Task

    PubMed Central

    van der Staay, F. Josef; Schoonderwoerd, Annelieke J.; Stadhouders, Bo; Nordquist, Rebecca E.

    2016-01-01

    Pigs in modern farming practice may be exposed to a number of stressors, including social stressors such as mixing or isolation. This may potentially affect both cognitive abilities and stress physiology of the animals. We tested the hypothesis that overnight social isolation in pigs impairs performance in a cognitive holeboard (HB) task (Experiment 1) and the Pig Gambling Task (PGT) (Experiment 2), a decision-making task inspired by the Iowa Gambling Task. In addition, we tested the effect of overnight social isolation on salivary cortisol levels. A within-subjects approach was used in which performance in the two behavioral tasks and cortisol levels were first determined during normal social housing, followed by performance and cortisol levels after experiencing stress induced by overnight social isolation. A total of 19 female pigs with a birth weight closest to their respective litter average was selected from 10 different litters and placed in two pens after weaning. Following habituation, pigs were trained in the HB task, starting at 10 weeks of age. Then, the pigs were isolated overnight, five individuals per night, at 15, 16, and 17 weeks of age. Between these three isolations, social housing and training in the HB continued. Starting 6 weeks after the end of the HB experiment, at approximately 23 weeks of age, the pigs were trained in the PGT. The effects of overnight social isolation on performance in this task were assessed once, when the pigs were 25 weeks old. Salivary cortisol was measured from samples collected 15 min after the start of isolation and at the end of the isolation period and compared to baseline values collected before the start of social isolation. Our results did not confirm the hypothesis that isolation impaired HB performance and decision-making in the PGT. Unexpectedly, overnight social isolation decreased cortisol levels below baseline values, an effect that was not associated with changes in performance of the

  13. 46 CFR 122.282 - Logbook for vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length with overnight accommodations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Logbook for vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet... Voyage Records § 122.282 Logbook for vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length with overnight..., the owner, managing operator, or master of a vessel of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length...

  14. 46 CFR 122.282 - Logbook for vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length with overnight accommodations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Logbook for vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet... Voyage Records § 122.282 Logbook for vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length with overnight..., the owner, managing operator, or master of a vessel of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length...

  15. 46 CFR 122.282 - Logbook for vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length with overnight accommodations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Logbook for vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet... Voyage Records § 122.282 Logbook for vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length with overnight..., the owner, managing operator, or master of a vessel of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length...

  16. 46 CFR 122.282 - Logbook for vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length with overnight accommodations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Logbook for vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet... Voyage Records § 122.282 Logbook for vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length with overnight..., the owner, managing operator, or master of a vessel of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length...

  17. 46 CFR 122.282 - Logbook for vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length with overnight accommodations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Logbook for vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet... Voyage Records § 122.282 Logbook for vessels of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length with overnight..., the owner, managing operator, or master of a vessel of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length...

  18. Overnight storage of blood in ACD tubes at 4{degrees}C increases NK cell fraction in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Da-Woon; Jang, Youn-Young; Shin, Myung-Geun; Shin, Jong-Hee; Suh, Soon-Pal; Ryang, Dong-Wook; Yoon, Meesun; Lee, Je-Jung; Kim, Sang-Ki; Cho, Duck

    2013-01-01

    A considerable variabilility in the effects of sample handling on NK cytotoxicity has been observed. Using flow cytometry, NK cytotoxicity assays and lymphocyte subset analysis of Ficoll-Hypaque-separated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from whole blood stored under various conditions were performed. The NK cytotoxicity of samples in heparin tubes stored overnight at 4 and 22°C, as well as at 22°C in acid citrate dextrose (ACD) tubes, was lower than that of a fresh sample. However, the NK cytotoxicity of samples in an ACD tube stored at 4°C was similar to that of a fresh sample. Based on lymphocyte subset analysis, samples in an ACD tube stored at 4°C showed a lower percentage of CD3+ T cells and a higher percentage of CD16/56+ NK cells compared to samples stored under other conditions. The NK cytotoxicity of fresh samples and samples in ACD tubes stored in a Styrofoam cooler box did not differ significantly; however, the differences were inconsistent. Overnight storage of peripheral blood in ACD tubes at 4°C is optimum for retention of NK cytotoxicity, the level of which is similar to that of fresh blood. This may be associated with an increased NK-cell fraction in Ficoll-Hypaque-separated PBMCs after overnight storage. PMID:23884220

  19. First-Principles Study of 8H-, 10H-, 12H-, and 18H-SiC Polytypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kazuaki; Komatsu, Shojiro

    2012-02-01

    We calculated the electronic and lattice properties of 8H-, 10H-, 12H-, and 18H-SiC polytypes, which are sp3-bonded compounds. A tetrahedral structure is formed by Si and C atoms in their hexagonal polytypes. Their possible symmetries are P63mc and P3m1. All possible structures in the 8H polytype, six structures in the 10H polytype, seven structures in the 12H polytype, and one structure in the 18H polytype were considered. The calculated hexagonalities (H) are 16.7, 20, 25, 33.3, 40, 44.4, 50, 60, 66.7, 75, 80, and 83.3%. Hexagonality is a ratio of the number of hexagonal (h) characters and total number of cubic (c) and h characters in a unit cell. We calculated their electronic properties [i.e., electronic band structures, band gaps, valence band maximum (VBM), and conduction band minimum (CBM)]. All the calculated electronic band structures are nonmetallic and the band gaps are indirect. The lattice properties (i.e., lattice constants and internal coordinates of atoms in the unit cell) were optimized by the total energy pseudopotential method based on the local density approximation (LDA). There is no clear trend in the order of the total energies for the SiC polytype structures. The total energies of three 10H-SiC polytype structures are slightly lower than that of 4H-SiC. One of them, whose stacking sequence is ABCACBCACB (ABC notation) and whose H = 40%, is lower by 2.4 meV/Si2C2 than 4H-SiC, and lowest in the SiC polytype structures calculated by LDA. The Zhdanov notation of 10H-SiC(ABCACBCACB) is ``3322''. As for the 2H-, 3C-, 4H-, 6H-, 8H-, and 10H-SiC polytypes, we obtained their electronic and lattice properties using the total energy pseudopotential method based on the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for comparison with the LDA results.

  20. Artificial Pancreas Using a Personalized Rule-Based Controller Achieves Overnight Normoglycemia in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rigla, Mercedes; García-Sáez, Gema; Rodríguez-Herrero, Agustín; Pons, Belén; Subías, David; García-García, Fernando; Gallach, Maria; Aguilar, Montserrat; Pérez-Gandía, Carmen; Gómez, Enrique J.; Caixàs, Assumpta; Hernando, M. Elena

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study assessed the efficacy of a closed-loop (CL) system consisting of a predictive rule-based algorithm (pRBA) on achieving nocturnal and postprandial normoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The algorithm is personalized for each patient's data using two different strategies to control nocturnal and postprandial periods. Research Design and Methods: We performed a randomized crossover clinical study in which 10 T1DM patients treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) spent two nonconsecutive nights in the research facility: one with their usual CSII pattern (open-loop [OL]) and one controlled by the pRBA (CL). The CL period lasted from 10 p.m. to 10 a.m., including overnight control, and control of breakfast. Venous samples for blood glucose (BG) measurement were collected every 20 min. Results: Time spent in normoglycemia (BG, 3.9–8.0 mmol/L) during the nocturnal period (12 a.m.–8 a.m.), expressed as median (interquartile range), increased from 66.6% (8.3–75%) with OL to 95.8% (73–100%) using the CL algorithm (P<0.05). Median time in hypoglycemia (BG, <3.9 mmol/L) was reduced from 4.2% (0–21%) in the OL night to 0.0% (0.0–0.0%) in the CL night (P<0.05). Nine hypoglycemic events (<3.9 mmol/L) were recorded with OL compared with one using CL. The postprandial glycemic excursion was not lower when the CL system was used in comparison with conventional preprandial bolus: time in target (3.9–10.0 mmol/L) 58.3% (29.1–87.5%) versus 50.0% (50–100%). Conclusions: A highly precise personalized pRBA obtains nocturnal normoglycemia, without significant hypoglycemia, in T1DM patients. There appears to be no clear benefit of CL over prandial bolus on the postprandial glycemia. PMID:24152323

  1. Eszopiclone Improves Overnight Polysomnography and Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Titration: A Prospective, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lettieri, Christopher J.; Quast, Timothy N.; Eliasson, Arn H.; Andrada, Teotimo

    2008-01-01

    for polysomnography and the need to improve efficiency, the routine use of nonbenzodiazepines as premedication for polysomnography should be considered. Citation: Lettieri CJ; Quast TN; Eliasson AH; Andrada T. Eszopiclone improves overnight polysomnography and continuous positive airway pressure titration: a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. SLEEP 2008;31(9):1310-1316. PMID:18788656

  2. Measurements of collision-broadened line widths in the 7.66-micron band of (C-12)H4 at temperatures relevant to the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varanasi, Prasad; Chudamani, Sury

    1989-01-01

    A tunable diode laser spectrometer is used to measure the collision-broadened half widths of spectral lines in the fundamental band of (C-12)H4 at 7.66 microns at temperatures between 130 and 295 K. Consideration is given to O2-, N2-, and air-broadened half widths. The temperature dependence of the measured line widths is examined.

  3. Multiple short bouts of exercise over 12-h period reduce glucose excursions more than an energy-matched single bout of exercise

    PubMed Central

    Holmstrup, ME; Fairchild, TJ; Keslacy, S; Weinstock, RS; Kanaley, JA

    2014-01-01

    Objective Long, uninterrupted bouts of sedentary behavior are thought to negatively influence postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations. We examined the effects of a 1-h bout of morning exercise versus intermittent walking bouts of short duration on glucose excursions and insulin secretion over 12-h. Materials/Methods Eleven young, obese individuals (18–35y, BMI>30kg/m2) with impaired glucose tolerance were studied on three 12-h study days: 1) sedentary behavior (SED); 2) sedentary behavior with 1-h morning exercise (EX) at 60–65% VO2peak; and 3) sedentary behavior with 12-hourly, 5-min intervals of exercise (INT) at 60–65% VO2peak. Meals (1046 kJ/meal) were provided every 2-h. Blood samples were collected every 10 min and measured for glucose, insulin, and c-peptide concentrations. Results Glucose iAUC (12-h) was attenuated in the INT and SED conditions compared to the EX condition (P<0.05). Glucose concentrations were higher in the EX compared to the SED condition for ~150 min (20% of the study day), and comparison of the EX-INT study days revealed that glucose concentrations were greater for ~ 240 minutes (~1/3 of the 12-h day). In the SED condition, the 12-h insulin iAUC was ~15% higher (P<0.05) compared to the INT and EX conditions. Insulin production rate was found to increase ~20% with INT exercise vs. the SED and EX condition (P<0.05). Conclusions Short, frequent periods of exercise attenuated glucose excursions and insulin concentrations in obese individuals to a greater degree than an equal amount of exercise performed continuously in the morning. PMID:24439242

  4. Fast valve

    DOEpatents

    Van Dyke, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing.

  5. Fast valve

    DOEpatents

    Van Dyke, W.J.

    1992-04-07

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing. 4 figs.

  6. Self-reported health and sleep complaints among nursing personnel working under 12 h night and day shifts.

    PubMed

    Portela, Luciana F; Rotenberg, Lúcia; Waissmann, William

    2004-01-01

    This cross-sectional exploratory study involved health care workers of various skill types and levels. We tested the hypothesis that the prevalence of diseases, sleep complaints, and insufficient time for nonprofessional activities (family, leisure, and rest) are higher among night than day workers. Data collection was carried out in two public hospitals using questionnaires and other forms. Night work was explored as a risk factor, considering a night worker as one who had at least one night job on the occasion of the research. Data were assessed by a univariate analysis. The association between work schedule and the dependent variables--health conditions, sleep complaints, and insufficient time for nonprofessional activities--was evaluated through the estimation of the prevalence ratio, with a confidence interval of 95%. Two hundred and fifty-eight female nursing personnel participated; 41.5% were moonlighters, and only 20 worked a shift of less than 12h in length. Reports of migraine and need of medical care the 2 weeks before the survey were more prevalent among day than night workers (PR=0.71; CI=0.55-0.92 and PR=0.71; CI=0.52-0.95, respectively). Migraine headaches occurred less frequently among night than day workers as confirmed by comparing the reports of the night workers and day workers whose work history was always day shifts (PR = 0.74; CI = 0.57-0.96). Reports of mild emotional disorders (mild depression, tension, anxiety, or insomnia) were less frequent among night (PR=0.76; CI=0.59-0.98) and ex-night workers (PR=0.68; CI=0.50-0.91) than day workers who never had worked a night job. The healthy worker effect does not seem to explain the results of the comparisons between day and night workers. The possible role of exposure by day workers to some risk factors, such as stress, was suggested as an explanation for these results. No significant difference was observed between night and day workers as to sleep complaints, a result that may have been

  7. Project FAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essexville-Hampton Public Schools, MI.

    Described are components of Project FAST (Functional Analysis Systems Training) a nationally validated project to provide more effective educational and support services to learning disordered children and their regular elementary classroom teachers. The program is seen to be based on a series of modules of delivery systems ranging from mainstream…

  8. Utilization of potatoes for life support systems in space. III - Productivity at successive harvest dates under 12-h and 24-h photoperiods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; Tibbitts, Theodore W.

    1987-01-01

    Efficient crop production for controlled ecological life support systems requires near-optimal growing conditions with harvests taken when production per unit area per unit time is maximum. This maximum for potato was determined using data on Norland plants which were grown in walk-in growth rooms under 12-h and 24-h photoperiods at 16 C. Results show that high tuber production can be obtained from potatoes grown under a continuous light regime. The dry weights (dwt) of tuber and of the entire plants were found to increase under both photoperiods until the final harvest date (148 days), reaching 5732 g tuber dwt and 704 g total dwt under 12-h, and 791 g tuber dwt and 972 g total dwt under 24-h.

  9. A novel keratan sulphate domain preferentially expressed on the large aggregating proteoglycan from human articular cartilage is recognized by the monoclonal antibody 3D12/H7.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, D C; Haubeck, H D; Eich, K; Kolbe-Busch, S; Stöcker, G; Stuhlsatz, H W; Greiling, H

    1996-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were prepared against aggrecan which has been isolated from human articular cartilage and purified by several chromatographic steps. One of these mAbs, the aggrecan-specific mAb 3D12/H7, was selected for further characterization. The data presented indicate that this mAb recognizes a novel domain of keratan sulphate chains from aggrecan: (1) immunochemical staining of aggrecan is abolished by treatment with keratanase/keratanase II, but not with keratanase or chondroitin sulphate lyase AC/ABC; (2) after chemical deglycosylation of aggrecan no staining of the core-protein was observed; (3) different immunochemical reactivity was observed against keratan sulphates from articular cartilage, intervertebral disc and cornea for the mAbs 3D12/H7 and 5D4. For further characterization of the epitope, reduced and 3H-labelled keratan sulphate chains were prepared. In an IEF-gel-shift assay it was shown that the 3H-labelled oligosaccharides obtained after keratanase digestion of reduced and 3H-labelled keratan sulphate chains were recognized by the mAb 3D12/H7. Thus it can be concluded that the mAb 3D12/H7 recognizes an epitope in the linkage region present in, at least some, keratan sulphate chains of the large aggregating proteoglycan from human articular cartilage. Moreover, this domain seems to be expressed preferentially on those keratan sulphate chains which occur in the chondroitin sulphate-rich region of aggrecan, since the antibody does not recognize the keratan sulphate-rich region obtained after combined chondroitinase AC/ABC and trypsin digestion of aggrecan. PMID:8836155

  10. A novel keratan sulphate domain preferentially expressed on the large aggregating proteoglycan from human articular cartilage is recognized by the monoclonal antibody 3D12/H7.

    PubMed

    Fischer, D C; Haubeck, H D; Eich, K; Kolbe-Busch, S; Stöcker, G; Stuhlsatz, H W; Greiling, H

    1996-09-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were prepared against aggrecan which has been isolated from human articular cartilage and purified by several chromatographic steps. One of these mAbs, the aggrecan-specific mAb 3D12/H7, was selected for further characterization. The data presented indicate that this mAb recognizes a novel domain of keratan sulphate chains from aggrecan: (1) immunochemical staining of aggrecan is abolished by treatment with keratanase/keratanase II, but not with keratanase or chondroitin sulphate lyase AC/ABC; (2) after chemical deglycosylation of aggrecan no staining of the core-protein was observed; (3) different immunochemical reactivity was observed against keratan sulphates from articular cartilage, intervertebral disc and cornea for the mAbs 3D12/H7 and 5D4. For further characterization of the epitope, reduced and 3H-labelled keratan sulphate chains were prepared. In an IEF-gel-shift assay it was shown that the 3H-labelled oligosaccharides obtained after keratanase digestion of reduced and 3H-labelled keratan sulphate chains were recognized by the mAb 3D12/H7. Thus it can be concluded that the mAb 3D12/H7 recognizes an epitope in the linkage region present in, at least some, keratan sulphate chains of the large aggregating proteoglycan from human articular cartilage. Moreover, this domain seems to be expressed preferentially on those keratan sulphate chains which occur in the chondroitin sulphate-rich region of aggrecan, since the antibody does not recognize the keratan sulphate-rich region obtained after combined chondroitinase AC/ABC and trypsin digestion of aggrecan. PMID:8836155

  11. Host Cytokine Responses Induced after Overnight Stimulation with Novel M. tuberculosis Infection Phase-Dependent Antigens Show Promise as Diagnostic Candidates for TB Disease

    PubMed Central

    Essone, Paulin N.; Chegou, Novel N.; Loxton, Andre G.; Stanley, Kim; Kriel, Magdalena; van der Spuy, Gian; Franken, Kees L.; Ottenhoff, Tom H.; Walzl, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously identified Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) antigen-induced host markers that showed promise as TB diagnostic candidates in 7-day whole blood culture supernatants. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the utility of these markers further, and cross-compare results with short-term antigen stimulated and unstimulated culture supernatants. Methods We recruited 15 culture confirmed TB cases and 15 non-TB cases from a high-TB endemic community in Cape Town, South Africa into a pilot case-control study from an on-going larger study. Blood samples collected from study participants were stimulated with 4 M.tb antigens that were previously identified as promising (ESAT6/CFP10 (early secreted), Rv2029c (latency), Rv2032 (latency) and Rv2389c (rpf)) in a 7-day or overnight culture assay. Supernatants were also collected form the standard QuantiFERON In Tube (QFT-IT) test. The levels of 26 host markers were evaluated in the three culture supernatants using the Luminex platform. Results The unstimulated levels of CRP, Serum amyloid P (SAP) and serum amyloid A (SAA) and ESAT-6/CFP-10 specific IP-10 and SAA were amongst the best discriminatory markers in all 3 assays, ascertaining TB with AUC of 72–84%. Four-marker models accurately classified up to 92%, 100% and 100% of study participants in the overnight, 7-day and Quantiferon culture supernatants, respectively, after leave-one-out cross validation. Conclusion Unstimulated and antigen-specific levels of CRP, SAA, IP-10, MMP-2 and sCD40L hold promise as diagnostic candidates for TB disease in short-term stimulation assays. Larger studies are required to validate these findings but the data suggest that antigen-specific cytokine production and in particular mutimarker biosignatures might contribute to future diagnostic strategies. PMID:25025278

  12. Done that: short-term repetition related modulations of motor cortex activity as a stable signature for overnight motor memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Gabitov, Ella; Manor, David; Karni, Avi

    2014-12-01

    An almost universally accepted tacit expectation is that learning and memory consolidation processes must be reflected in the average brain activity in brain areas relevant to task performance. Motor cortex (M1) plasticity has been implicated in motor skill acquisition and its consolidation. Nevertheless, no consistent pattern of changes in the average signal, related to motor learning or motor memory consolidation following a single session of training, has emerged from imaging studies. Here we show that the pattern and magnitude of short-term brain activity modulations in response to task repetition, in M1, may provide a robust signature for effective motor memory consolidation processes. We studied participants during the paced performance of a finger-to-thumb opposition sequence (FOS), intensively trained a day earlier, and a similarly constructed untrained FOS. In addition to within-session "on-line" gains, most participants expressed delayed, consolidation-phase gains in the performance of the trained FOS. The execution of the trained FOS induced repetition enhancements in the contralateral M1 and bilaterally in the medial-temporal lobes, offsetting novelty-related repetition suppression effects. Moreover, the M1 modulations were positively correlated with the magnitude of each participant's overnight delayed gains but not with absolute performance levels. Our results suggest that short-term enhancements of brain signals upon task repetition reflect the effectiveness of overnight motor memory consolidation. We propose that procedural memory consolidation processes may affect the excitation-inhibition balance within cortical representations of the trained movements; this new balance is better reflected in repetition effects than in the average level of evoked neural activity. PMID:24893741

  13. Synthesis and crystal structure of 3-ammoniumphenyl sulfone selenate, 3-aminophenyl sulfone [C{sub 12}H{sub 14}N{sub 2}O{sub 2}S]SeO{sub 4} {center_dot} [C{sub 12}H{sub 12}N{sub 2}O{sub 2}S

    SciTech Connect

    Mahroug, A.; Belhouchet, M. Mhiri, T.

    2013-07-15

    The crystal structure of [C{sub 12}H{sub 14}N{sub 2}O{sub 2}S]SeO{sub 4} {center_dot} [C{sub 12}H{sub 12}N{sub 2}O{sub 2}S] was determined by X-ray diffraction on single crystal. Crystals are orthorhombic, space group Pbca, with cell parameters a = 11.545 (1), b = 8.143 (1), c = 55.783(1)A, V = 5244.2 (8)A{sup 3} and Z = 8. The structure can be described as organic layers built by [C{sub 12}H{sub 14}N{sub 2}O{sub 2}S]{sup 2+} cations and [C{sub 12}H{sub 12}N{sub 2}O{sub 2}S] molecules, parallel to ab plane, between which the inorganic groups SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-} are inserted. In this atomic arrangement, H-bonds between the different species play an important role in the three-dimensional network cohesion.

  14. Effects of prolonged fasting and sustained lipolysis on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Salgin, B; Marcovecchio, M L; Humphreys, S M; Hill, N; Chassin, L J; Lunn, D J; Hovorka, R; Dunger, D B

    2009-03-01

    Normal beta-cells adjust their function to compensate for any decrease in insulin sensitivity. Our aim was to explore whether a prolonged fast would allow a study of the effects of changes in circulating free fatty acid (FFA) levels on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity and whether any potential effects could be reversed by the antilipolytic agent acipimox. Fourteen (8 female, 6 male) healthy young adults (aged 22.8-26.9 yr) without a family history of diabetes and a body mass index of 22.6 +/- 3.2 kg/m(2) were studied on three occasions in random order. Growth hormone and FFA levels were regularly measured overnight (2200-0759), and subjects underwent an intravenous glucose tolerance test in the morning (0800-1100) on each visit. Treatment A was an overnight fast, treatment B was a 24-h fast with regular administrations of a placebo, and treatment C was a 24-h fast with regular ingestions of 250 mg of acipimox. The 24-h fast increased overnight FFA levels (as measured by the area under the curve) 2.8-fold [51.3 (45.6-56.9) vs. 18.4 (14.4-22.5) *10(4) micromol/l*min, P < 0.0001], and it led to decreases in insulin sensitivity [5.7 (3.6-8.9) vs. 2.6 (1.3-4.7) *10(-4) min(-1) per mU/l, P < 0.0001] and the acute insulin response [16.3 (10.9-21.6) vs. 12.7 (8.7-16.6) *10(2) pmol/l*min, P = 0.02], and therefore a reduction in the disposition index [93.1 (64.8-121.4) vs. 35.5 (21.6-49.4) *10(2) pmol/mU, P < 0.0001]. Administration of acipimox during the 24-h fast lowered FFA levels by an average of 20% (range: -62 to +49%; P = 0.03), resulting in a mean increase in the disposition index of 31% (P = 0.03). In conclusion, the 24-h fast was accompanied by substantial increases in fasting FFA levels and induced reductions in the acute glucose-simulated insulin response and insulin sensitivity. The use of acipimox during the prolonged fast increased the disposition index, suggesting a partial reversal of the effects of fasting on the acute insulin response and insulin

  15. Utilization of potatoes for life support systems in space: III. Productivity at successive harvest dates under 12-h and 24-h photoperiods.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, R M; Tibbitts, T W

    1987-01-01

    Potatoes are among several crops under consideration for use in controlled ecological life support systems (CELSS) being proposed for space colonies. Efficient crop production for such life support systems will require near-optimal growing conditions with harvests taken when production per unit area per unit time is maximum. To determine this maximum for potato, cv. Norland plants were grown in walk-in growth rooms under 12-h and 24-h photoperiods at 16 C and harvested at 42, 63, 84, 105, 126 and 148 days from planting. At 42 days, plants were encaged in wire fence cylinders with a cross-sectional area of 0.2 m2. The dry weights (dwt) of tubers and of the entire plants increased under both photoperiods until the final harvest date (148 days), reaching 572 g tuber dwt and 704 g total dwt under 12-h, and 791 g tuber dwt and 972 g total dwt under 24-h. At a spacing of 0.2 m2 per plant, the 148-day tuber production from plants under continuous light would equate to nearly 40 t ha-1 dry matter (200 t fresh weight), approximately twice that of exceptionally high field yields. Tuber productivity (g m-2 day-1) under the 24-h photoperiod reached a maximum of 29.4 g dwt m-2 day-1 at 126 days, but continued to rise throughout the experiment under the 12-h photoperiod, reaching 19.5 g dwt m-2 day-1 at 14 days, approximately 25 m2 would continuously provide the daily dietary energy requirements for one human. PMID:11539685

  16. A laboratory study of the 8.65 micron fundamental of (C-12)H3D at temperatures relevant to Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varanasi, P.; Giver, L. P.; Valero, F. P. J.

    1983-01-01

    Spectral transmittance measurements have been performed in the nu6-fundamental of (C-12)H3D at 153 K. Relevant to the studies of the emission spectra of Titan recorded by the IRIS instruments on board Voyagers 1 and 2, N2 has been used as the broadening gas. Excellent agreement between experimental and theoretical spectral transmittance has been the result of using N2-broadened line widths and their dependence upon temperature measured in the nu2-fundamental and S = 63.6 per(sq cm atm) for the absolute intensity of the nu6-fundamental.

  17. Room temperature synthesis and solid-state structure of Ni{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}.12H{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, J.M.; LeBret, G.C.; Cleary, D.A. . E-mail: cleary@gonzaga.edu; Twamley, B.

    2005-04-15

    The synthesis and crystal structure of Ni{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}.12H{sub 2}O are reported. The compound was synthesized from aqueous solutions of nickel chloride and sodium hypodiphosphate at room temperature. The space group is orthorhombic, Pnnm. Unit cell dimensions are a=11.2418(5)A, b=18.5245(8)A, and c=7.3188(3)A, Z=4. The product is unstable with respect to dehydration above room temperature.

  18. Measurements of collision-broadened line widths in the nu4-fundamental band of (C-12)H4 at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varanasi, P.; Chudamani, S.

    1989-01-01

    Collision-broadened half-widths of several lines in the nu4 fundamental band of (C-12)H4 have been measured at low temperatures between 130 and 295 K using a tunable diode laser and the sweep integration technique. The broadening gases are H2, N2, He, and Ar. The temperature dependence of the measured line widths is described in terms of an exponent n, which is shown not only to be different for each broadening gas but also to depend upon the tetrahedral symmetry identification of the lines of CH4.

  19. Effects of cortisol secreted via a 12-h infusion of adrenocorticotropic hormone on mineral homeostasis and bone metabolism in ovariectomized cows.

    PubMed

    Kim, D; Yamagishi, N; Devkota, B; Furuhama, K

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of endogenously secreted cortisol on mineral homeostasis and bone metabolism in cows, 4 ovariectomized Holstein cows were infused for 12 h with either an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) solution (0.5 mg/2 L isotonic NaCl solution per cow) or isotonic NaCl solution in a 2×2 crossover design. ACTH infusion stimulated cortisol secretion and increased plasma cortisol concentrations for 18 h (P<0.001), leading to an elevated plasma glucose concentration until 36 h (P<0.001). Plasma calcium and magnesium concentrations in ACTH-infused cows fluctuated within normal ranges, whereas hypophosphatemia was observed unequivocally. The biochemical bone resorption markers tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b and hydroxyproline decreased following ACTH infusion (P<0.001 and P=0.003, respectively). Similarly, the bone formation marker, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, decreased continuously until 72 h after the ACTH infusion (P<0.001). These results demonstrate that increased secretion of cortisol via a 12-h ACTH infusion disrupted homeostasis of inorganic phosphate and suppressed bone metabolism in ovariectomized cows without involving gonadal steroid hormones. PMID:22591952

  20. Rh(II)-catalyzed reaction of alpha-diazocarbonyl compounds bearing beta-trichloroacetylamino substituent: C-H insertion versus 1,2-H shift.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenhua; Shi, Weifeng; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Bingge; Liu, Yiyang; Fan, Bo; Xiao, Fengping; Xu, Feng; Wang, Jianbo

    2010-05-01

    The Rh(II)-carbene reaction is dramatically affected by the neighboring substituents. If the neighboring substituent is an OH group, a1,2-H shift is the exclusive pathway. If it is an OAc group, a 1,2-acetoxy migration is observed. If it is p-toluenesulfonyl group, 1,3 and 1,5-C-H insertion are the major pathways, and the 1,2-H shift is completely suppressed. If the adjacent substituent is a trichloroacetyl amino group, 1,5-C-H insertion competes with the 1,2-hydride shift, and no 1,3-C-H insertion can be observed. Both electronic and steric factors are responsible for the switching of the Rh(II)-carbene reaction pathway. The highly stereoselective 1,5-C-H insertions in Rh(II)-catalyzed reaction of alpha-diazocarbonyl compounds, bearing beta-trichloroacetylamino substituent, can be utilized as a novel way to synthesize five-membered cyclic beta-amino acid derivatives. PMID:20013998

  1. Effects of oral cyclosporine on canine T-cell expression of IL-2 and IFN-gamma across a 12-h dosing interval

    PubMed Central

    FELLMAN, C. L.; ARCHER, T. M.; STOKES, J. V.; WILLS, R. W.; LUNSFORD, K. V.; MACKIN, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    The duration of immunosuppressive effects following oral cyclosporine in dogs is unknown. This study used flow cytometry and quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to evaluate the effects of high-dose oral cyclosporine across a 12-h dosing interval. Expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) was compared before and after 8 days of cyclosporine at 10 mg/kg every 12 h in six healthy dogs. Samples were collected at 0, 2, 4, and 8 h postdosing for analysis of unactivated and activated T-cell and whole blood cytokine expression using flow cytometry and qRT-PCR, respectively, and at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 h postdosing for measurement of cyclosporine concentrations. Flow cytometry and qRT-PCR both demonstrated significant marked reductions in IL-2 and IFN-γ levels at 0, 2, 4, and 8 h after dosing compared to pretreatment levels (P < 0.05) for activated samples, with less consistent effects observed for unactivated samples. Both flow cytometry and qRT-PCR are viable techniques for measuring cyclosporine pharmacodynamics in dogs, yielding comparable results with activated samples. Two hours postdrug administration is the preferred time for concurrent assessment of peak drug concentration and cytokine expression, and T-cell activation is needed for optimal results. PMID:26676223

  2. Oxidation behaviour of ferritic stainless steel grade Crofer 22 APU at 700 °C in flowing Ar-75%CO2-12%H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariff, Nurul Atikah; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Jalar, Azman

    2013-11-01

    The oxidation of Ferritic Stainless Steel (FSS) grade Crofer 22 APU has been investigated. FSS alloys were exposed to isothermal conditions in a horizontal tube furnace at a 700 °C in flowing Ar-75%CO2-12%H2O at a pressure of approximately 1 atm. The results showed that the growth of non protective Fe2O3 and spinel was observed after 50 h exposure in the presence of 12% H2O. The weight was increased significantly with time of exposure. The formation of different oxides is presented on the interface of the specimen such as MnCr2O4, Fe3O4 and Fe2O3 were revealed by X-ray diffraction and supported by EDAX analysis. FSS did not form a protective Cr2O3 layer due to water vapour accelerates the kinetics oxidation. Data of microstructure observation is presented and discussed in this paper in term of water vapour effects.

  3. How To Eliminate Narcissism Overnight

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition appears likely to eliminate the diagnosis of narcissistic personality disorder. There are significant problems with the discriminant validity of the current narcissistic personality disorder critiera set; furthermore, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition's narrow focus on “grandiosity” probably contributes to the wide disparity between low narcissistic personality disorder prevalence rates in epidemiological studies and high rates of narcissistic personality disorder in clinical practice. Nevertheless, the best course of action may be to refine the narcissistic personality disorder criteria, followed by careful field testing and a search for biomarkers, rather than wholesale elimination of the narcissistic personality disorder category. The construct of “malignant narcissism” is also worthy of more intense empirical investigation. PMID:21468294

  4. Fasting levels of hepatic p-S6 are increased in old mice

    PubMed Central

    Leontieva, Olga V; Paszkiewicz, Geraldine M; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2014-01-01

    TOR is involved in aging in a wide range of species from yeast to mammals. Here we show that, after overnight fasting, mTOR activity is higher in the livers of 28 months old female mice compared with middle-aged mice. Taken together with previous reports, our data predict that the life-extending effect of calorie restriction (CR) may be diminished, if CR is started in very old age. In contrast, rapamycin is known to be effective, even when started late in life. PMID:25486351

  5. Measurements of (C-12)H4 nu-4 band halfwidths using a tunable diode laser system and a Fourier transform spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devi, V. M.; Benner, D. C.; Rinsland, C. P.; Smith, M. A. H.

    1985-01-01

    Air-broadened and N2-broadened halfwidths at room temperature for twenty-five transitions in the nu-4 fundamental band of (C-12)H4 have been determined from IR absorption spectra recorded with a tunable diode laser spectrometer. Two tunable diode lasers operating in the 1250-1380-kayser region were used to obtain these data. Air-broadened halfwidths for twenty of these lines were also determined from additional spectra recorded at 0.01-kayser resolution with the Fourier transform spectrometer in the McMath solar telescope complex on Kitt Peak. The air-broadened halfwidths obtained from these two techniques are very consistent with agreement better than 3 percent in most cases.

  6. Dibenzosiloles and 12H-indololo[3,2-d]naphtho[1,2-b][1]siloles: exploration of organic chromophores exhibiting efficient solid-state fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Masaki

    2015-02-01

    The construction of a diorganosilylene bridge over a biaryl moiety at the 2,2'-positions is a versatile strategy for fine-tuning its HOMO-LUMO energy gap, which is closely linked to the electronic and optical properties of the compounds. Therefore, there is growing interest in the use of silicon-bridged biaryl motifs as key cores of various types of advanced functional materials, such as light-emitting, semiconducting, photovoltaic, and sensing materials. To accelerate the advances of materials based on silicon-bridged biaryls, it is essential to create new classes of biaryls and explore their functions and properties. This Personal Account describes recent research on the development of organic chromophores based on functionalized dibenzosiloles and 12H-indololo[3,2-d]naphtho[1,2-b][1]siloles as solid-state emitters. PMID:25504808

  7. Polymer-bonded NiZn ferrite magnetic cores mixed with titanium (IV) isopropoxide (C12H28O4Ti)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, K. W. E.; Ding, Kai; Ho, S. L.; Fu, W. N.; Wang, Junhua; Wang, Shuxiao

    2011-04-01

    For decades, the technology and engineering domains have been constantly demanding high-performance magnetic materials. Recently, polymer bonded NiZn ferrite magnetic materials mixed with titanium (IV) isopropoxide (C12H28O4Ti) for power converter applications have been found to be very promising in reducing the loss, cost, and material weight when compared to their conventional counterparts using air-core technology, conventional soft ferrites, and powder iron. The proposed magnetic core is flexible in both size and shape and is not brittle. The design of a high-frequency transformer for a 100 W two-transistor forward converter-based electric vehicle battery charger operating at a switching frequency of 360 kHz is reported in this paper. Printed circuit board prototyping and experimental results as well as comparisons with conventional converters are provided to validate the application feasibility of the proposed materials.

  8. Comparison of the diagnostic yield and outcomes between standard 8 h capsule endoscopy and the new 12 h capsule endoscopy for investigating small bowel pathology

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Merajur; Akerman, Stuart; DeVito, Bethany; Miller, Larry; Akerman, Meredith; Sultan, Keith

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the completion rate and diagnostic yield of the PillCam SB2-ex in comparison to the PillCam SB2. METHODS: Two hundred cases using the 8-h PillCam SB2 were retrospectively compared to 200 cases using the 12 h PillCam SB2-ex at a tertiary academic center. Endoscopically placed capsules were excluded from the study. Demographic information, indications for capsule endoscopy, capsule type, study length, completion of exam, clinically significant findings, timestamp of most distant finding, and significant findings beyond 8 h were recorded. RESULTS: The 8 and 12 h capsule groups were well matched respectively for both age (70.90 ± 14.19 vs 71.93 ± 13.80, P = 0.46) and gender (45.5% vs 48% male, P = 0.69). The most common indications for the procedure in both groups were anemia and obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. PillCam SB2-ex had a significantly higher completion rate than PillCam SB2 (88% vs 79.5%, P = 0.03). Overall, the diagnostic yield was greater for the 8 h capsule (48.5% for SB2 vs 35% for SB2-ex, P = 0.01). In 4/70 (5.7%) of abnormal SB2-ex exams the clinically significant finding was noted in the small bowel beyond the 8 h mark. CONCLUSION: In our study, we found the PillCam SB2-ex to have a significantly increased completion rate, though without any improvement in diagnostic yield compared to the PillCam SB2. PMID:25987777

  9. Effect of a single brushing with two Zn-containing toothpastes on VSC in morning breath: a 12 h, randomized, double-blind, cross-over clinical study.

    PubMed

    Young, A; Jonski, G

    2011-12-01

    This randomized, double-blind, 12 h clinical study tested the effect of a single brushing with two Zn-containing toothpastes on volatile sulfur compound (VSC) levels in morning breath. The following toothpastes were each tested by all 28 participants: A-Zn toothpaste, B--experimental toothpaste (Zn citrate + PVM/MA copolymer) and C--control toothpaste without Zn. The evening prior to test days participants brushed their teeth for 2 min with 1 g toothpaste. 12 h later and prior to eating or performing oral hygiene, morning breath levels of VSC (H(2)S, CH(3)SH) were analysed by gas chromatography. Subjects then rinsed for 30 s with 5 ml cysteine and breath samples were analysed for H(2)S (H(2)S(cys)). Median VSC (area under the curve) values were compared for A, B and C and the effects of A and B on VSC were compared with C. Toothpaste B was more effective than both toothpastes A and C in reducing H(2)S, CH(3)SH and H(2)S(cys) (p < 0.05). Compared with toothpaste C, toothpastes A and B reduced H(2)S by 35% and 68%, respectively (p = 0.003), and CH(3)SH by 12% and 47%, respectively (p = 0.002). Toothpaste B reduced H(2)S(cys) by 48% compared with toothpaste C (p = 0.001). It is suggested that the superior effect of the experimental toothpaste was most likely due to a higher Zn concentration combined with longer retention of Zn due to the PVM/MA copolymer. PMID:22134057

  10. Variance in fasting breath hydrogen concentrations in Guatemalan preschool children.

    PubMed

    Barillas-Mury, C; Solomons, N W

    1987-01-01

    The concentration of hydrogen (H2) in expired air after an overnight fast is receiving interest as a diagnostic indicator in itself. We analyzed 319 fasting samples collected from 90 healthy, well-nourished preschool children aged 29-72 months in two institutional settings in Guatemala City. The overall range of fasting H2 concentration was 0-40 ppm, with an arithmetic mean of 4.4 +/- 5.4 ppm (+/- SD) and a geometric mean of 3.2 ppm. No differences between boys and girls was found, but there was a progressive increase in the mean levels and an increase in the number of samples with H2 concentrations greater than 10 ppm with decreasing chronological age. One child with three of six samples having H2 concentrations greater than 40 ppm was found to have intestinal multiple parasitism and hence was excluded from the sample. As compared with a previous report from the United States of fasting breath H2 concentrations in older children, the mean and distribution of values for Guatemalan preschoolers is identical. Intraindividual coefficients of variation in 48 children studied on four occasions had a mean of 62 +/- 31% (range 0-143%). PMID:3794926

  11. FAST: FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Travis J; Kauffman, Kyle T; Amrine, Katherine C H; Carper, Dana L; Lee, Raymond S; Becich, Peter J; Canales, Claudia J; Ardell, David H

    2015-01-01

    FAST (FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox) provides simple, powerful open source command-line tools to filter, transform, annotate and analyze biological sequence data. Modeled after the GNU (GNU's Not Unix) Textutils such as grep, cut, and tr, FAST tools such as fasgrep, fascut, and fastr make it easy to rapidly prototype expressive bioinformatic workflows in a compact and generic command vocabulary. Compact combinatorial encoding of data workflows with FAST commands can simplify the documentation and reproducibility of bioinformatic protocols, supporting better transparency in biological data science. Interface self-consistency and conformity with conventions of GNU, Matlab, Perl, BioPerl, R, and GenBank help make FAST easy and rewarding to learn. FAST automates numerical, taxonomic, and text-based sorting, selection and transformation of sequence records and alignment sites based on content, index ranges, descriptive tags, annotated features, and in-line calculated analytics, including composition and codon usage. Automated content- and feature-based extraction of sites and support for molecular population genetic statistics make FAST useful for molecular evolutionary analysis. FAST is portable, easy to install and secure thanks to the relative maturity of its Perl and BioPerl foundations, with stable releases posted to CPAN. Development as well as a publicly accessible Cookbook and Wiki are available on the FAST GitHub repository at https://github.com/tlawrence3/FAST. The default data exchange format in FAST is Multi-FastA (specifically, a restriction of BioPerl FastA format). Sanger and Illumina 1.8+ FastQ formatted files are also supported. FAST makes it easier for non-programmer biologists to interactively investigate and control biological data at the speed of thought. PMID:26042145

  12. FAST: FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Travis J.; Kauffman, Kyle T.; Amrine, Katherine C. H.; Carper, Dana L.; Lee, Raymond S.; Becich, Peter J.; Canales, Claudia J.; Ardell, David H.

    2015-01-01

    FAST (FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox) provides simple, powerful open source command-line tools to filter, transform, annotate and analyze biological sequence data. Modeled after the GNU (GNU's Not Unix) Textutils such as grep, cut, and tr, FAST tools such as fasgrep, fascut, and fastr make it easy to rapidly prototype expressive bioinformatic workflows in a compact and generic command vocabulary. Compact combinatorial encoding of data workflows with FAST commands can simplify the documentation and reproducibility of bioinformatic protocols, supporting better transparency in biological data science. Interface self-consistency and conformity with conventions of GNU, Matlab, Perl, BioPerl, R, and GenBank help make FAST easy and rewarding to learn. FAST automates numerical, taxonomic, and text-based sorting, selection and transformation of sequence records and alignment sites based on content, index ranges, descriptive tags, annotated features, and in-line calculated analytics, including composition and codon usage. Automated content- and feature-based extraction of sites and support for molecular population genetic statistics make FAST useful for molecular evolutionary analysis. FAST is portable, easy to install and secure thanks to the relative maturity of its Perl and BioPerl foundations, with stable releases posted to CPAN. Development as well as a publicly accessible Cookbook and Wiki are available on the FAST GitHub repository at https://github.com/tlawrence3/FAST. The default data exchange format in FAST is Multi-FastA (specifically, a restriction of BioPerl FastA format). Sanger and Illumina 1.8+ FastQ formatted files are also supported. FAST makes it easier for non-programmer biologists to interactively investigate and control biological data at the speed of thought. PMID:26042145

  13. Overnight improvements in two REM sleep-sensitive tasks are associated with both REM and NREM sleep changes, sleep spindle features, and awakenings for dream recall.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, T; O'Reilly, C; Carr, M; Dumel, G; Godin, I; Solomonova, E; Lara-Carrasco, J; Blanchette-Carrière, C; Paquette, T

    2015-07-01

    Memory consolidation is associated with sleep physiology but the contribution of specific sleep stages remains controversial. To clarify the contribution of REM sleep, participants were administered two REM sleep-sensitive tasks to determine if associated changes occurred only in REM sleep. Twenty-two participants (7 men) were administered the Corsi Block Tapping and Tower of Hanoi tasks prior to and again after a night of sleep. Task improvers and non-improvers were compared for sleep structure, sleep spindles, and dream recall. Control participants (N = 15) completed the tasks twice during the day without intervening sleep. Overnight Corsi Block improvement was associated with more REM sleep whereas Tower of Hanoi improvement was associated with more N2 sleep. Corsi Block improvement correlated positively with %REM sleep and Tower of Hanoi improvement with %N2 sleep. Post-hoc analyses suggest Tower of Hanoi effects-but not Corsi Block effects-are due to trait differences. Sleep spindle density was associated with Tower of Hanoi improvement whereas spindle amplitude correlated with Corsi Block improvement. Number of REM awakenings for dream reporting (but not dream recall per se) was associated with Corsi Block, but not Tower of Hanoi, improvement but was confounded with REM sleep time. This non-replication of one of 2 REM-sensitive task effects challenges both 'dual-process' and 'sequential' or 'sleep organization' models of sleep-dependent learning and points rather to capacity limitations on REM sleep. Experimental awakenings for sampling dream mentation may not perturb sleep-dependent learning effects; they may even enhance them. PMID:25291630

  14. Impact of overnight traffic noise on sleep quality, sleepiness, and vigilant attention in long-haul truck drivers: Results of a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Popp, Roland FJ; Maier, Stefanie; Rothe, Siegfried; Zulley, Jürgen; Crönlein, Tatjana; Wetter, Thomas C; Rupprecht, Rainer; Hajak, Göran

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of traffic noise along the motorway on sleep quality, sleepiness, and vigilant attention in long-haul truck drivers. This was a randomized, crossover, within-subject controlled study. Healthy long-haul truck drivers spent 6 consecutive nights in a real truck berth with full sleep laboratory equipment. During 3 nights, subjects were exposed to replayed traffic noise alongside motorways, whereas the other 3 nights were without traffic noise. Polysomnography was recorded during the nights and numerous sleepiness tests and vigilance examinations were performed during the following standardized working day. Outcome measures were compared between noisy and silent nights using the paired Wilcoxon test. Ten healthy long-haul truck drivers with a mean age of 36.3 ± 7.3 years completed the study as planned. On noisy nights, subjects had greater latencies to the rapid eye movement (REM) phase (90 ± 32 min vs 69 ± 16 min, P = 0.074) and higher percentages of sleep stage 1 (13.7 ± 5.5% vs 11.2 ± 4.4%; P = 0.059). Subjects also rated their sleep quality as having been better during nights without noise (28.1 ± 3.7 vs 30.3 ± 6.2, P = 0.092). The impact of these differences on daytime sleepiness and vigilance was rather low; however, mean Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) scores measured during the course of the following day were higher on six out of eight occasions after noisy nights. The effects of overnight traffic noise on sleep quality are detectable but unlikely to have any major impact on the vigilant attention and driving performance of long haul-truck drivers with low nocturnal noise sensitivity. This might not be true for subgroups prone to sleeping disorders. PMID:26572698

  15. Overnight Polysomnographic Characteristics and Oxygen Saturation of Healthy Infants, 1 to 18 Months of Age, Born and Residing At High Altitude (2,640 Meters)

    PubMed Central

    Bazurto-Zapata, María A.; Gozal, David; González-García, Mauricio; Durán-Cantolla, Joaquín; Torres-Duque, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 8% of the world population resides above 1,600 m, with about 10 million people living above 2,500 m in Colombia. However, reference values for polysomnography (PSG) and oxygen saturation (Spo2) of children < 2 years old residing at high altitude are currently unavailable. METHODS: Healthy infants aged 1 to 18 months born and residing at high altitude (Bogotá: 2,640 m) underwent overnight PSG. Four age groups were defined: group 1, < 45 days; group 2, 3 to 4 months; group 3, 6 to 7 months; and group 4, 10 to 18 months. Of 122 children enrolled, 50 had three consecutive PSG tests and were analyzed as a longitudinal subcohort. RESULTS: A total of 281 PSG tests were performed in 122 infants (56% girls): group 1, 106 PSG tests; group 2, 89 PSG tests; group 3, 61 PSG tests; and group 4, 25 PSG tests. Active sleep diminished and quiet sleep increased with maturation. Apnea-hypopnea indexes (total, central, and obstructive) were highest in group 1 (21.4, 12.4, and 6.8/h total sleep time, respectively) and diminished with age (P < .001). Mean Spo2 during waking and sleep increased with age (P < .001). Nadir Spo2 values during respiratory events were lower in younger infants. Longitudinal assessments of 50 infants confirmed the temporal trends described for the cross-sectional dataset. CONCLUSIONS: Healthy infants (≤ 18 months old) born and residing at high altitude show preserved sleep architecture but higher apnea-hypopnea indexes and more prominent desaturation with respiratory events than do those living at low altitude. The current study findings can be used as reference values for infants at high altitude. PMID:25811138

  16. New activity-based funding model for Australian private sector overnight rehabilitation cases: the rehabilitation Australian National Sub-Acute and Non-Acute Patient (AN-SNAP) model.

    PubMed

    Hanning, Brian; Predl, Nicolle

    2015-09-01

    Traditional overnight rehabilitation payment models in the private sector are not based on a rigorous classification system and vary greatly between contracts with no consideration of patient complexity. The payment rates are not based on relative cost and the length-of-stay (LOS) point at which a reduced rate applies (step downs) varies markedly. The rehabilitation Australian National Sub-Acute and Non-Acute Patient (AN-SNAP) model (RAM), which has been in place for over 2 years in some private hospitals, bases payment on a rigorous classification system, relative cost and industry LOS. RAM is in the process of being rolled out more widely. This paper compares and contrasts RAM with traditional overnight rehabilitation payment models. It considers the advantages of RAM for hospitals and Australian Health Service Alliance. It also considers payment model changes in the context of maintaining industry consistency with Electronic Claims Lodgement and Information Processing System Environment (ECLIPSE) and health reform generally. PMID:25725655

  17. The new minerals levinsonite-(Y) [(Y, Nd,Ce)Al(SO 4) 2(C 2O 4) · 12H 2O] and zugshunstite-(Ce) [(Ce,Nd,La)Al(SO 4) 2(C 2O 4) · 12H 2O]: Coexisting oxalates with different structures and differentiation of LREE and HREE >

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouse, R. C.; Peacor, D. R.; Essene, E. J.; Coskren, T. D.; Lauf, R. J.

    2001-04-01

    Two new minerals, levinsonite-(Y) [(Y,Nd,Ce)Al(SO 4) 2(C 2O 4) · 12H 2O] and zugshunstite-(Ce) [(Ce,Nd,La)Al(SO 4) 2(C 2O 4) · 12H 2O], occur in an evaporite assemblage at Alum Cave Bluff, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee. Electron microprobe analyses with oxalate and water assumed as stoichiometric yield the formula Y 0.33La 0.02Ce 0.12Pr 0.03Nd 0.23Sm 0.12Eu 0.02Gd 0.08Dy 0.04Er 0.01Al(SO 4) 2(C 2O 4) · 12H 2O for levinsonite-(Y) and Y 0.00La 0.09Ce 0.54Pr 0.07Nd 0.26Sm 0.03Eu 0.01Gd 0.01Dy 0.00Er 0.00Al(SO 4) 2(C 2O 4) · 12H 2O for zugshunstite-(Ce). Smaller ions such as Y and several MREE to HREE are enriched in the former phase, whereas the LREE are concentrated in the latter phase. The two minerals occur in intimate contact, with low-temperature conditions favoring MREE in levinsonite-(Y) and LREE in zugshunstite-(Ce). The crystal structures are based on the same fundamental building blocks, chains of alternating REE polyhedra and oxalate groups, with two sulfate tetrahedra attached to each REE polyhedron. The REE polyhedron in levinsonite-(Y) is a square antiprism defined by eight ligands ( = 2.404 Å), whereas that in zugshunstite-(Ce) is a nine-fold cooordinated capped square antiprism ( = 2.507 Å). The polyhedra resemble those in xenotime and monazite, respectively. The addition of one ligand in zugshunstite-(Ce) into the capping position results in relative shifts of the chains, isolated water molecules, and isolated Al(H 2O) 6 octahedra relative to their positions in the levinsonite-(Y) structure. The source of the REE elements is likely to be the weathering of pyritiferous schist, which is reported to contain monazite and xenotime. Chelation of REE and Al by oxalate under hydrous conditions at surface temperature permits formation of the minerals.

  18. Effects of oral cyclosporine on canine T-cell expression of IL-2 and IFN-gamma across a 12-h dosing interval.

    PubMed

    Fellman, C L; Archer, T M; Stokes, J V; Wills, R W; Lunsford, K V; Mackin, A J

    2016-06-01

    The duration of immunosuppressive effects following oral cyclosporine in dogs is unknown. This study used flow cytometry and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to evaluate the effects of high-dose oral cyclosporine across a 12-h dosing interval. Expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) was compared before and after 8 days of cyclosporine at 10 mg/kg every 12 h in six healthy dogs. Samples were collected at 0, 2, 4, and 8 h postdosing for analysis of unactivated and activated T-cell and whole blood cytokine expression using flow cytometry and qRT-PCR, respectively, and at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 h postdosing for measurement of cyclosporine concentrations. Flow cytometry and qRT-PCR both demonstrated significant marked reductions in IL-2 and IFN-γ levels at 0, 2, 4, and 8 h after dosing compared to pretreatment levels (P < 0.05) for activated samples, with less consistent effects observed for unactivated samples. Both flow cytometry and qRT-PCR are viable techniques for measuring cyclosporine pharmacodynamics in dogs, yielding comparable results with activated samples. Two hours postdrug administration is the preferred time for concurrent assessment of peak drug concentration and cytokine expression, and T-cell activation is needed for optimal results. PMID:26676223

  19. Crystal growth and characterization of a novel inorganic-organic hybrid NLO crystal: (NH4)[Cd(NCS)3]·C12H24O6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, V.; Rajarajan, K.

    2013-10-01

    It is reported here, for the first time, that high-quality bulk size (18 × 5 × 4 mm3) single crystals of a new nonlinear optical crystal, [(NH4)[Cd(NCS)3]·C12H24O6] [Ammonium (18-crown-6-ether) Cadmium(II) tri-thiocyanate; ACCTC], have been grown from aqueous solution via slow evaporation technique. Solubility of ACCTC has been determined for various temperatures. The grown crystals were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, FT-IR, FT-Raman, and UV-Vis-NIR studies. ACCTC crystallizes in orthorhombic system with cell parameters a = 14.7568 Ǻ, b = 15.4378 Ǻ, and c = 10.6383 Ǻ with space group Cmc21. The optical second-harmonic generation effect has been measured by using the Kurtz powder technique and is found to be 2 times higher than that of KDP (KH2PO4). The sample possesses wide optical transparency range from 200 to 2,500 nm. The TG-DSC thermal analysis revealed that the sample is thermally stable up to 237.92 °C, which is comparatively far better than the thermal stability of [(18C6)Li][Cd(SCN)3]; CLTC (170 °C).

  20. Characterization of organic-inorganic hybrid layered perovskite and intercalated compound (n-C12H25NH3)2ZnCl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Kader, M. M.; Aboud, A. I.; Gamal, W. M.

    2016-05-01

    We report on some electrical properties and solid-solid phase transitions of organic-inorganic hybrid layered halide perovskite and intercalated compound (n-C12H25NH3)2ZnCl4 which is one member of the long-chain compounds of the series (n-CnH2n+1NH3)2,(n = 8-18). The complex dielectric permittivity ɛ*(ω,T) and the ac conductivity σ (ω,T) were measured as functions of temperature 100 K < T < 390 K and frequency 5 kHz < f < 100 kHz. Moreover, the differential scanning calorimetery and the differential thermal analysis thermograms were performed. The analysis of our data confirms the existence of a structural phase transition at T ≈ (362 ± 2) K, where the compound changes its state from intercalation to non-intercalation with a drastic increase in the c-axis by about 16.4%. The behavior of the frequency-dependent conductivity follows the Jonscher universal power law: σ (ω, T) αῳs(ῳ,T). The mechanism of electrical conduction in the low-temperature phase (phase II) can be described as quantum mechanical tunneling model.

  1. Measurements of argon broadened Lorentz width and pressure-induced line shift coefficients in the nu4 band of (C-12)H4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris

    1989-01-01

    Room temperature argon broadened halfwidth and pressure-induced line shift coefficients have been determined for 118 transitions in the nu4 band of (C-12)H4 from analysis of high resolution laboratory absorption spectra recorded with the McMath Fourier transform spectrometer operated on Kitt Peak by the National Solar Observatory. Transitions up to J-double-prime = 12 have been measured using a nonlinear least-squares spectral fitting procedure. The variation of the measured halfwidth coefficients with symmetry type and rotational quantum number is very similar to that measured previously for N2 and air broadening, but the absolute values of the argon broadening coefficients are all smaller. On average, the ratio of the argon broadened halfwidth coefficient to the corresponding N2 broadened halfwidth coefficient is 0.877 + or - 0.017 (2 Sigma). More than 95 percent of the pressure-induced shifts are negative with values ranging from -0.0081 to +0.0055/cm atm. The pressure shifts in argon are nearly equal to corresponding values measured previously in N2 and air.

  2. Phase transitions and electrical conduction in thermal energy storage compound (n-C12H25NH3)2CdCl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud Abdelkader, Mohamed; Aboud, Aboud Ibrahim; Gamal, Wafia Mohamed

    2015-05-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) are performed for the compound (n-C12H25NH3)2CdCl4. The ac conductivity σ(ω,T), and the complex dielectric permittivity ɛ*(ω,T) are measured as a function of temperature (100 K < T < 375 K) and at some selected frequencies (3 → 100 kHz). Two structural phase transitions are detected at T = (330 ± 1) K and T = (343 ± 1) K as minor and major transitions, respectively. The analysis of the measured electrical parameters reveals that the frequency-dependent conductivity obeys the power law, and the quantum mechanical tunneling (QMT) model is the main conduction mechanism in the low-temperature phase (LTP; phase III). The role of hydrogen bond N-H…Cl as a trigger force for phase transitions has been discussed. While the LTP is of the order-disorder type, the high-temperature phase (HTP) or phase I seems to be conformational and represents the main transition.

  3. Mental alertness in response to hypoglycaemia in normal man: the effect of 12 hours and 72 hours of fasting.

    PubMed

    Fourest-Fontecave, S; Adamson, U; Lins, P E; Ekblom, B; Sandahl, C; Strand, L

    1987-01-01

    To study the influence of hypoglycaemia and starvation on mental functions eight healthy male students age 25-34 years with an ideal body mass of 99.9% +/- 2.5% (mean +/- SEM) were recruited. Hypoglycaemia was induced in random order by an insulin-glucose clamp technique (insulin: 2.4 mU/kg/min + glucose at variable rate) keeping the venous blood glucose at 2.2 mmol/l both after an overnight fast and after 72 h fasting. Mental alertness was assessed by measuring the recognition time, moving time and total reaction time to a visual signal and by a verbal mental clearness test and a synonym learning test during normo- as well as hypoglycaemia. Hypoglycaemia prolonged the total reaction time (p less than 0.05) and the time required for the mental clearness test (p less than 0.05). Compared with a control study performed at normoglycaemia the learning effect of the synonym test was reduced by hypoglycaemia. Fasting, which resulted in a body weight reduction of 2.6 +/- 0.3 kg and ketonuria prolonged the total reaction time (p less than 0.005) by increasing the moving time but did not affect the mental clearness test. When hypoglycaemia was preceded by 72 h fasting it did not increase the total reaction time, nor did it modify the mental clearness test. Moreover, the learning effect of the synonym test was less impaired. In conclusion, mental alertness was reduced by moderate hypoglycaemia after an overnight fast while similar hypoglycaemia did not reduce mental alertness after prolonged fasting. This may illustrate a decrease of the glucose dependency of the central nervous system during prolonged fasting. PMID:3315761

  4. Van Allen probes, NOAA, GOES, and ground observations of an intense EMIC wave event extending over 12 h in magnetic local time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Posch, J. L.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C. A.; Lessard, M. R.; Huang, C.-L.; Spence, H. E.; Smith, C. W.; Singer, H. J.; Omura, Y.; Horne, R. B.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Gkioulidou, M.; Oksavik, K.; Mann, I. R.; Raita, T.; Shiokawa, K.

    2015-07-01

    Although most studies of the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on Earth's outer radiation belt have focused on events in the afternoon sector in the outer plasmasphere or plume region, strong magnetospheric compressions provide an additional stimulus for EMIC wave generation across a large range of local times and L shells. We present here observations of the effects of a wave event on 23 February 2014 that extended over 8 h in UT and over 12 h in local time, stimulated by a gradual 4 h rise and subsequent sharp increases in solar wind pressure. Large-amplitude linearly polarized hydrogen band EMIC waves (up to 25 nT p-p) appeared for over 4 h at both Van Allen Probes, from late morning through local noon, when these spacecraft were outside the plasmapause, with densities ~5-20 cm-3. Waves were also observed by ground-based induction magnetometers in Antarctica (near dawn), Finland (near local noon), Russia (in the afternoon), and in Canada (from dusk to midnight). Ten passes of NOAA-POES and METOP satellites near the northern foot point of the Van Allen Probes observed 30-80 keV subauroral proton precipitation, often over extended L shell ranges; other passes identified a narrow L shell region of precipitation over Canada. Observations of relativistic electrons by the Van Allen Probes showed that the fluxes of more field-aligned and more energetic radiation belt electrons were reduced in response to both the emission over Canada and the more spatially extended emission associated with the compression, confirming the effectiveness of EMIC-induced loss processes for this event.

  5. The facile construction of the phthalazin-1(2H)-one scaffold via copper-mediated C–H(sp2)/C–H(sp) coupling under mild conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Wang, Bao; Zhou, Shengbin

    2015-01-01

    Summary A novel strategy for the construction of the phthalazin-1(2H)-one scaffold has been developed by means of a copper-mediated cascade C–H/C–H coupling and intramolecular annulations and a subsequent facile hydrazinolysis. This C–H activation transformation proceeds smoothly with wide generality, good functional tolerance and high stereo- and regioselectivity under mild conditions. Through the removal of the directing group, the resulting moiety could easily be transformed into the phthalazin-1(2H)-one scaffold, which is known to be a privileged moiety and a bioactive nucleus in pharmaceuticals. PMID:26664581

  6. Acid-fast stain

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003766.htm Acid-fast stain To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines ...

  7. Fast food (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Fast foods are quick, reasonably priced, and readily available alternatives to home cooking. While convenient and economical for a busy lifestyle, fast foods are typically high in calories, fat, saturated fat, ...

  8. Fast food tips (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... challenge to eat healthy when going to a fast food place. In general, avoiding items that are deep ... challenge to eat healthy when going to a fast food place. In general, avoiding items that are deep ...

  9. Is fast food addictive?

    PubMed

    Garber, Andrea K; Lustig, Robert H

    2011-09-01

    Studies of food addiction have focused on highly palatable foods. While fast food falls squarely into that category, it has several other attributes that may increase its salience. This review examines whether the nutrients present in fast food, the characteristics of fast food consumers or the presentation and packaging of fast food may encourage substance dependence, as defined by the American Psychiatric Association. The majority of fast food meals are accompanied by a soda, which increases the sugar content 10-fold. Sugar addiction, including tolerance and withdrawal, has been demonstrated in rodents but not humans. Caffeine is a "model" substance of dependence; coffee drinks are driving the recent increase in fast food sales. Limited evidence suggests that the high fat and salt content of fast food may increase addictive potential. Fast food restaurants cluster in poorer neighborhoods and obese adults eat more fast food than those who are normal weight. Obesity is characterized by resistance to insulin, leptin and other hormonal signals that would normally control appetite and limit reward. Neuroimaging studies in obese subjects provide evidence of altered reward and tolerance. Once obese, many individuals meet criteria for psychological dependence. Stress and dieting may sensitize an individual to reward. Finally, fast food advertisements, restaurants and menus all provide environmental cues that may trigger addictive overeating. While the concept of fast food addiction remains to be proven, these findings support the role of fast food as a potentially addictive substance that is most likely to create dependence in vulnerable populations. PMID:21999689

  10. A prospective study of hospitalization with gallstone disease among women: role of dietary factors, fasting period, and dieting.

    PubMed Central

    Sichieri, R; Everhart, J E; Roth, H

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dietary risk factors for the development of gallstones have not been clearly established. We analyzed data from a population-based prospective study to determine dietary risk factors for hospitalization with gallstone disease. METHODS: We evaluated the role of dietary constituents, fasting, and dieting on subsequent hospitalization with gallstone disease among 4,730 women, ages 25 to 74 years, who participated in the first follow-up of the first National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Baseline dietary variables were established through a 24-hour dietary recall and a medical history. Proportional hazards models were used to calculate the effects of dietary variables while controlling for baseline risk factors. RESULTS: After an average of 10 years follow-up, gallstone disease was confirmed by hospital records among 216 women who denied gallstone disease at the baseline examination. The hazard rate of hospitalization with gallstone disease increased with increasing overnight fasting period and with dieting. Intake of fiber showed a small protective effect. The effect of energy intake was significant only among women younger than age 50 years at baseline. Results were not affected by adjustment for known risk factors for gallstone disease or other dietary factors. CONCLUSION: A long overnight fasting period, dieting, and low fiber intake may increase the risk of hospitalization with gallstone disease. PMID:1647144

  11. Short-term fasting alters cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism in humans.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Laureen A; Achterbergh, Roos; de Vries, Emmely M; van Nierop, F Samuel; Klümpen, Heinz-Josef; Soeters, Maarten R; Boelen, Anita; Romijn, Johannes A; Mathôt, Ron A A

    2015-06-01

    Experimental studies indicate that short-term fasting alters drug metabolism. However, the effects of short-term fasting on drug metabolism in humans need further investigation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of short-term fasting (36 h) on P450-mediated drug metabolism. In a randomized crossover study design, nine healthy subjects ingested a cocktail consisting of five P450-specific probe drugs [caffeine (CYP1A2), S-warfarin (CYP2C9), omeprazole (CYP2C19), metoprolol (CYP2D6), and midazolam (CYP3A4)] on two occasions (control study after an overnight fast and after 36 h of fasting). Blood samples were drawn for pharmacokinetic analysis using nonlinear mixed effects modeling. In addition, we studied in Wistar rats the effects of short-term fasting on hepatic mRNA expression of P450 isoforms corresponding with the five studied P450 enzymes in humans. In the healthy subjects, short-term fasting increased oral caffeine clearance by 20% (P = 0.03) and decreased oral S-warfarin clearance by 25% (P < 0.001). In rats, short-term fasting increased mRNA expression of the orthologs of human CYP1A2, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 (P < 0.05), and decreased the mRNA expression of the ortholog of CYP2C9 (P < 0.001) compared with the postabsorptive state. These results demonstrate that short-term fasting alters cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism in a nonuniform pattern. Therefore, short-term fasting is another factor affecting cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism in humans. PMID:25795462

  12. FAST User Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Clucas, Jean; McCabe, R. Kevin; Plessel, Todd; Potter, R.; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Flow Analysis Software Toolkit, FAST, is a software environment for visualizing data. FAST is a collection of separate programs (modules) that run simultaneously and allow the user to examine the results of numerical and experimental simulations. The user can load data files, perform calculations on the data, visualize the results of these calculations, construct scenes of 3D graphical objects, and plot, animate and record the scenes. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) visualization is the primary intended use of FAST, but FAST can also assist in the analysis of other types of data. FAST combines the capabilities of such programs as PLOT3D, RIP, SURF, and GAS into one environment with modules that share data. Sharing data between modules eliminates the drudgery of transferring data between programs. All the modules in the FAST environment have a consistent, highly interactive graphical user interface. Most commands are entered by pointing and'clicking. The modular construction of FAST makes it flexible and extensible. The environment can be custom configured and new modules can be developed and added as needed. The following modules have been developed for FAST: VIEWER, FILE IO, CALCULATOR, SURFER, TOPOLOGY, PLOTTER, TITLER, TRACER, ARCGRAPH, GQ, SURFERU, SHOTET, and ISOLEVU. A utility is also included to make the inclusion of user defined modules in the FAST environment easy. The VIEWER module is the central control for the FAST environment. From VIEWER, the user can-change object attributes, interactively position objects in three-dimensional space, define and save scenes, create animations, spawn new FAST modules, add additional view windows, and save and execute command scripts. The FAST User Guide uses text and FAST MAPS (graphical representations of the entire user interface) to guide the user through the use of FAST. Chapters include: Maps, Overview, Tips, Getting Started Tutorial, a separate chapter for each module, file formats, and system

  13. NMR relaxation study of the phase transitions and relaxation mechanisms of the alums MCr(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.12H{sub 2}O (M=Rb and Cs) single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Ae Ran; Paik, Younkee; Lim, Kye-Young

    2011-06-15

    The physical properties and phase transition mechanisms of MCr(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.12H{sub 2}O (M=Rb and Cs) single crystals have been investigated. The phase transition temperatures, NMR spectra, and the spin-lattice relaxation times T{sub 1} of the {sup 87}Rb and {sup 133}Cs nuclei in the two crystals were determined using DSC and FT NMR spectroscopy. The resonance lines and relaxation times of the {sup 87}Rb and {sup 133}Cs nuclei undergo significant changes at the phase transition temperatures. The sudden changes in the splitting of the Rb and Cs resonance lines are attributed to changes in the local symmetry of their sites, and the changes in the temperature dependences of T{sub 1} are related to variations in the symmetry of the octahedra of water molecules surrounding Rb{sup +} and Cs{sup +}. We also compared these {sup 87}Rb and {sup 133}Cs NMR results with those obtained for the trivalent cations Cr and Al in MCr(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.12H{sub 2}O and MAl(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.12H{sub 2}O crystals. - Graphical Abstract: The physical properties and phase transition mechanisms of MCr(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.12H{sub 2}O (M=Rb, Cs, and NH{sub 4}) single crystals have been investigated. Highlights: > The physical properties and phase transition mechanisms of MCr(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.12H{sub 2}O (M=Rb and Cs) crystals {yields} The NMR spectra and the spin-lattice relaxation times T{sub 1} of the {sup 87}Rb and {sup 133}Cs nuclei in the two crystals {yields} The variations in the symmetry of the octahedra of water molecules surrounding Rb{sup +} and Cs{sup +}.

  14. Fast food (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... quick, reasonably priced, and readily available alternatives to home cooking. While convenient and economical for a busy lifestyle, fast foods are typically high in calories, fat, saturated fat, ...

  15. fast-matmul

    SciTech Connect

    Grey Ballard, Austin Benson

    2014-11-26

    This software provides implementations of fast matrix multiplication algorithms. These algorithms perform fewer floating point operations than the classical cubic algorithm. The software uses code generation to automatically implement the fast algorithms based on high-level descriptions. The code serves two general purposes. The first is to demonstrate that these fast algorithms can out-perform vendor matrix multiplication algorithms for modest problem sizes on a single machine. The second is to rapidly prototype many variations of fast matrix multiplication algorithms to encourage future research in this area. The implementations target sequential and shared memory parallel execution.

  16. [Medical aspects of fasting].

    PubMed

    Gavrankapetanović, F

    1997-01-01

    Fasting (arabic-savm) was proclaimed through islam, and thus it is an obligation for Holly Prophet Muhammad s.a.v.s.-Peace be to Him-in the second year after Hijra (in 624 after Milad-born of Isa a.s.). There is a month of fasting-Ramadan-each lunar (hijra) year. So, it was 1415th fasting this year. Former Prophets have brought obligative messages on fasting to their people; so there are also certain forms of fasting with other religions i.e. with Catholics, Jews, Orthodox. These kinds of fasting above differ from muslim fasting, but they also appear obligative. All revelations have brought fasting as obligative. From medical point of view, fasting has two basical components: psychical and physical. Psychical sphere correlate closely with its fundamental ideological message. Allah dz.s. says in Quran: "... Fasting is obligative for you, as it was obligative to your precedents, as to avoid sins; during very few days (II, II, 183 & 184)." Will strength, control of passions, effort and self-discipline makes a pure faithfull person, who purify its mind and body through fasting. Thinking about The Creator is more intensive, character is more solid; and spirit and will get stronger. We will mention the hadith saying: "Essaihune humus saimun!" That means: "Travellers at the Earth are fasters (of my ummet)." The commentary of this hadith, in the Collection of 1001 hadiths (Bin bir hadis), number 485, says: "There are no travelling dervishs or monks in islam; thus there is no such a kind of relligousity in islam. In stead, it is changed by fasting and constant attending of mosque. That was proclaimed as obligation, although there were few cases of travelling in the name of relligousity, like travelling dervishs and sheichs." In this paper, the author discusses medical aspects of fasting and its positive characteristics in the respect of healthy life style and prevention of many sicks. The author mentions positive influence of fasting to certain system and organs of human

  17. Integrative Physiology of Fasting.

    PubMed

    Secor, Stephen M; Carey, Hannah V

    2016-04-01

    Extended bouts of fasting are ingrained in the ecology of many organisms, characterizing aspects of reproduction, development, hibernation, estivation, migration, and infrequent feeding habits. The challenge of long fasting episodes is the need to maintain physiological homeostasis while relying solely on endogenous resources. To meet that challenge, animals utilize an integrated repertoire of behavioral, physiological, and biochemical responses that reduce metabolic rates, maintain tissue structure and function, and thus enhance survival. We have synthesized in this review the integrative physiological, morphological, and biochemical responses, and their stages, that characterize natural fasting bouts. Underlying the capacity to survive extended fasts are behaviors and mechanisms that reduce metabolic expenditure and shift the dependency to lipid utilization. Hormonal regulation and immune capacity are altered by fasting; hormones that trigger digestion, elevate metabolism, and support immune performance become depressed, whereas hormones that enhance the utilization of endogenous substrates are elevated. The negative energy budget that accompanies fasting leads to the loss of body mass as fat stores are depleted and tissues undergo atrophy (i.e., loss of mass). Absolute rates of body mass loss scale allometrically among vertebrates. Tissues and organs vary in the degree of atrophy and downregulation of function, depending on the degree to which they are used during the fast. Fasting affects the population dynamics and activities of the gut microbiota, an interplay that impacts the host's fasting biology. Fasting-induced gene expression programs underlie the broad spectrum of integrated physiological mechanisms responsible for an animal's ability to survive long episodes of natural fasting. PMID:27065168

  18. Quantitative comparison of pathways of hepatic glycogen repletion in fed and fasted humans

    SciTech Connect

    Shulman, G.I.; Cline, G.; Schumann, W.C.; Chandramouli, V.; Kumaran, K.; Landau, B.R. )

    1990-09-01

    The effect of fasting vs. refeeding on hepatic glycogen repletion by the direct pathway, i.e., glucose----glucose 6-phosphate (G-6-P)----glycogen, was determined. Acetaminophen was administered during an infusion of glucose labeled with (1-13C)- and (6-14C)glucose into four healthy volunteers after an overnight fast and into the same subjects 4 h after breakfast. 13C enrichments in C-1 and C-6 of glucose formed from urinary acetaminophen glucuronide compared with enrichments in C-1 and C-6 of plasma glucose provided an estimate of glycogen formation by the direct pathway. The specific activity of glucose from the glucuronide compared with the specific activity of the plasma glucose, along with the percentages of 14C in C-1 and C-6 of the glucose from the glucuronide, also provided an estimate of the amount of glycogen formed by the direct pathway. The estimates were similar. Those from (6-14C)glucose would have been higher than from (1-13C)glucose if the pentose cycle contribution to overall glucose utilization had been significant. After an overnight fast, during the last hour of infusion, 49 +/- 3% of the glycogen formed was formed via the direct pathway. After breakfast, at similar plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, the percentage increased to 69 +/- 7% (P less than 0.02). Thus the contributions of the pathways to hepatic glycogen formation depend on the dietary state of the individual. For a dietary regimen in which individuals consume multiple meals per day containing at least a moderate amount of carbohydrates most glycogen synthesis occurs by the direct pathway.

  19. Fast and effective?

    PubMed

    Trueland, Jennifer

    2013-12-18

    The 5.2 diet involves two days of fasting each week. It is being promoted as the key to sustained weight loss, as well as wider health benefits, despite the lack of evidence on the long-term effects. Nurses need to support patients who wish to try intermittent fasting. PMID:24345130

  20. fastKDE

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Travis A.; Kashinath, Karthik

    2015-05-22

    This software implements the fast, self-consistent probability density estimation described by O'Brien et al. (2014, doi: ). It uses a non-uniform fast Fourier transform technique to reduce the computational cost of an objective and self-consistent kernel density estimation method.

  1. Fast protein folding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fast folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well less than 1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even “slow” folding processes: fast folders are small, relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general as well as some work that is left to do. PMID:24641816

  2. RFI Mitigation for FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiyan; Nan, Rendong; Gan, Hengqian; Yue, Youling; Wu, Mingchang; Zhang, Zhiwei; Jin, Chengjin; Peng, Bo

    2015-08-01

    Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) is a Chinese mega-science project to build the largest single dish radio telescope in the world. The construction was officially commenced in March 2011. The first light of FAST is expected in 2016. Due to the high sensitivity of FAST, Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) mitigation for the telescope is required to assure the realization of the scientific goals. In order to protect the radio environment of FAST site, the local government has established a radio quiet zone with 30 km radius. Moreover, Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) designs and measurements for FAST have also been carried out, and some examples, such as EMC designs for actuator and focus cabin, have been introduced briefly.

  3. Synthesis of Substituted N-[4(5-Methyl/phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)-3,6-dihydropyridin-1(2H)-yl]benzamide/benzene Sulfonamides as Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Cancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Gangapuram, Madhavi; Redda, Kinfe K.

    2010-01-01

    Fourteen novel substituted N-[4(5-methyl/phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)-3,6-dihydropyridin-1(2H)-y1] benzamide/benzene sulfonamides (11a–n) were synthesized in fair to good yields via sodium borohydride reduction of the corresponding substituted N-(benzoylimino)-4-(5-methyl/5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2yl) pyridinium ylide (10a–n) in absolute ethanol. PMID:20526413

  4. Ambulatory measurement of nocturnal fluctuations in subcutaneous blood flow rate in the lower leg of man during 12-h periods with the portable CdTe(Cl) detector. Methodological considerations.

    PubMed

    Sindrup, J H; Kastrup, J; Jørgensen, B; Bülow, J; Tønnesen, K H

    1991-07-01

    Possible sources of error during long-term measurements of subcutaneous blood flow rate with the portable CdTe(Cl) detector system were ruled out in the present study. Local blood flow rates were recorded in the lower legs of normal human subjects by means of the 133Xe wash-out technique. A good correlation was found between the portable CdTe(Cl) and stationary NaI(Tl) detector systems both prior to (r = 0.88, P less than 0.0001) and after (r = 0.68, P = 0.07) day over night (12 h) measurements. Identical post-ischaemic reactive hyperaemia could be demonstrated by both detector systems 12 h after the application of the isotope depot. This indicates that blood flow rates and vascular reactivity can be measured over 12 h by the portable CdTe(Cl) detector. Identical results were obtained during the 12-h measurements performed with the portable CdTe(Cl) detector attached directly to the skin surface and with the detector elevated above the skin surface. Therefore, geometrical changes were without any influence on our measurements. We conclude that measurements of subcutaneous blood flow rates in the lower leg of human subjects can be performed under out-patients conditions by means of the 133Xe wash-out technique and portable CdTe(Cl) detectors. A skin area greater than or equal to 4 cm should be labelled by means of the atraumatic, epicutaneous labelling technique and the detector attached directly to the skin surface with a single layer of a 20-micron thick gas-tight Mylar membrane interposed between the skin surface and the detector. The investigation of the subcutaneous blood flow rate should not be initiated until at least 90 min after labelling.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1914438

  5. Fasting improves static apnea performance in elite divers without enhanced risk of syncope.

    PubMed

    Schagatay, Erika; Lodin-Sundström, Angelica

    2014-01-01

    In competitive apnea divers, the nutritional demands may be essentially different from those of, for example, endurance athletes, where energy resources need to be maximised for successful performance. In competitive apnea, the goal is instead to limit metabolism, as the length of the sustainable apneic period will depend to a great extent on minimising oxygen consumption. Many but not all elite divers fast before performing static apnea in competition. This may increase oxygen consumption as mainly lipid stores are metabolised but could also have beneficial effects on apneic duration. Our aim was to determine the effect of over-night fasting on apnea performance. Six female and seven male divers performed a series of three apneas after eating and fasting, respectively. The series consisted of two 2-min apneas spaced by 3 min rest and, after 5 min rest, one maximal effort apnea. Apneas were performed at supine rest and preceded by normal respiration and maximal inspiration. Mean (± SD) time since eating was 13 h (± 2 h 43 min) for the fasting and 1 h 34 min (± 33 min) for the eating condition (P < 0.001). Mean blood glucose was 5.1 (± 0.4) mmol/L after fasting and 5.9 (± 0.7) mmol/L after eating (P<0.01). Lung volumes were similar in both conditions (NS). For the 2-min apneas, nadir SaO2 during fasting was 95 (± 1)% and 92 (± 2)% (P < 0.001) on eating and ETCO2 was lower in the fasting condition (P < 0.01) while heart rate (HR) during apnea was 74 (± 10) bpm for fasting and 80 (± 10) bpm for eating conditions (P < 0.01). Maximal apnea durations were 4 min 41 s (± 43 s) during fasting and 3 min 51 s (± 37 s) after eating (P < 0.001), and time without respiratory contractions was 31 s (25%) longer after fasting (P < 0.01). At maximal apnea termination, SaO2 and ETCO2 were similar in both conditions (NS) and apneic HR was 63 (± 9) bpm for fasting and 70 (± 10) bpm for eating (P < 0.01). The 22% longer apnea duration after fasting with analogous end apnea

  6. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

  7. Reusable fast opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Van Devender, J.P.; Emin, D.

    1983-12-21

    A reusable fast opening switch for transferring energy, in the form of a high power pulse, from an electromagnetic storage device such as an inductor into a load. The switch is efficient, compact, fast and reusable. The switch comprises a ferromagnetic semiconductor which undergoes a fast transition between conductive and metallic states at a critical temperature and which undergoes the transition without a phase change in its crystal structure. A semiconductor such as europium rich europhous oxide, which undergoes a conductor to insulator transition when it is joule heated from its conductor state, can be used to form the switch.

  8. fast-matmul

    2014-11-26

    This software provides implementations of fast matrix multiplication algorithms. These algorithms perform fewer floating point operations than the classical cubic algorithm. The software uses code generation to automatically implement the fast algorithms based on high-level descriptions. The code serves two general purposes. The first is to demonstrate that these fast algorithms can out-perform vendor matrix multiplication algorithms for modest problem sizes on a single machine. The second is to rapidly prototype many variations of fastmore » matrix multiplication algorithms to encourage future research in this area. The implementations target sequential and shared memory parallel execution.« less

  9. Fasting and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Pollitt, E; Lewis, N L; Garza, C; Shulman, R J

    The effects of short-term fasting (skipping breakfast) on the problem-solving performance of 9 to 11 yr old children were studied under the controlled conditions of a metabolic ward. The behavioral test battery included an assessment of IQ, the Matching Familiar Figure Test and Hagen Central Incidental Test. Glucose and insulin levels were measured in blood. All assessments were made under fasting and non-fasting conditions. Skipping breakfast was found to have adverse effects on the children's late morning problem-solving performance. These findings support observations that the timing and nutrient composition of meals have acute and demonstrable effects on behavior. PMID:6764933

  10. Basic surface-active properties in the homologous series of β-alkyl (C12H25/C18H37) polyethyleneoxy (n = 0-20) propionamides

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Heterogeneous β-Alkyl (C12H25/C18H37) polyethyleneoxy (n = 0-20) propionamides [R(EO)nPD] represent new “hybrid” nonionic-ionic colloidal structures in the field of surface-active products (technical products). These “niche” compounds have three structural and compositional characteristics that also define their basic colloidal properties: mixture of R and PEO chain homologues; specific conformations due to the PEO chains; and the presence of side products from the addition of higher alcohols, polyethyleneglycols and traces of water to acrylamide. The proposed major objective of this paper is the basic informative colloidal characterization (functional classification, HLB balance, surface tension, critical micelle concentration) in direct correlation with the structural changes in the homologous series of LM(EO)nPD and CS(EO)nPD. The structures were obtained either indirectly by cyanoethylation followed by partial acid hydrolysis of the corresponding β-propionitriles, or directly by the nucleophilic addition under alkaline catalysis of linear higher alcohols C12H25/C14H29 (7/3) (LM) and C16H33/C18H37 (CS) as such and heterogeneous polyethoxylated (n = 3-20) to acrylamide monomer, through an adapted classic reaction scheme. Results In the series of basic colloidal characteristics investigated the structure-surface activity dependence is confirmed. Their indicative character for R(EO)nPD is based on the assumption that the structures studied are not unitary (heterogeneous) because: a) the hydrophobic chains C12H25/C18H37 have been grouped in two variants, C12H25/C14H29 (LM); C16H33/C18H37 (CS), each with an internal mass ratio of 7/3; b) the hydrophilic polyoxyethylene chains (n = 3-20) have polydisperse character; the meaning and value the oligomerization degree, n, is that of weighted average. In these conditions the surface tension increases proportionally with the oligomerization degree of the polyoxyethylene chain, while the

  11. Overnight urinary uric acid: creatinine ratio for detection of sleep hypoxemia. Validation study in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obstructive sleep apnea before and after treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Braghiroli, A; Sacco, C; Erbetta, M; Ruga, V; Donner, C F

    1993-07-01

    During hypoxia ATP degradation to uric acid is increased in animal models and humans. To assess the reliability of an overnight increase in uric acid excretion as a marker of nocturnal hypoxemia, we selected 10 normal volunteers (7 males and 3 females), 29 COPD patients (26 males and 3 females), and 49 subjects with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) (43 males and 6 females). The patients underwent standard polysomnography, which was repeated in 14 subjects with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), and were subdivided into two groups: Group D included desaturating subjects who spent at least 1 h at SaO2 < 90% and 15 min below 85%, and Group ND were nondesaturating subjects. The overnight change in the uric acid:creatinine ratio (delta UA:Cr) was negative in normal subjects (-27.5 +/- 9.1 [mean +/- SD]) and ND groups: -19.7 +/- 14.3 in COPD, -16.1 +/- 13.0 in OSA. In both COPD and OSA Group D, the ratio was usually positive: delta UA:Cr was 17.9 +/- 31.4 in Group D COPD (p < 0.001 versus ND) and 10.1 +/- 30.7 in Group D OSA (p < 0.001 versus ND and versus normal subjects) despite 4 of 15 false negative results in COPD and 8 of 20 in OSA. CPAP effective treatment induced a marked reduction ((p = 0.0024) in delta UA:Cr, leading to a negative value. We conclude that delta UA:Cr seems to be a promising index of significant nocturnal tissue hypoxia, with good specificity but poor sensitivity (about 30% false negative), which might be useful for the long-term follow-up of outpatients on nasal CPAP with a positive ratio at baseline. PMID:8317794

  12. Acid-fast stain

    MedlinePlus

    The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines if a sample of tissue, blood, or other body ... dye. The slide is then washed with an acid solution and a different stain is applied. Bacteria ...

  13. Discovery with FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, P.

    2016-02-01

    FAST offers "transformational" performance well-suited to finding new phenomena - one of which might be polarised spectral transients. But discoveries will only be made if "the system" provides its users with the necessary opportunities. In addition to designing in as much observational flexibility as possible, FAST should be operated with a philosophy which maximises its "human bandwidth". This band includes the astronomers of tomorrow - many of whom not have yet started school or even been born.

  14. Discordant signaling and autophagy response to fasting in hearts of obese mice: Implications for ischemia tolerance.

    PubMed

    Andres, Allen M; Kooren, Joel A; Parker, Sarah J; Tucker, Kyle C; Ravindran, Nandini; Ito, Bruce R; Huang, Chengqun; Venkatraman, Vidya; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Gottlieb, Roberta A; Mentzer, Robert M

    2016-07-01

    Autophagy is regulated by nutrient and energy status and plays an adaptive role during nutrient deprivation and ischemic stress. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a hypernutritive state characterized by obesity, dyslipidemia, elevated fasting blood glucose levels, and insulin resistance. It has also been associated with impaired autophagic flux and larger-sized infarcts. We hypothesized that diet-induced obesity (DIO) affects nutrient sensing, explaining the observed cardiac impaired autophagy. We subjected male friend virus B NIH (FVBN) mice to a high-fat diet, which resulted in increased weight gain, fat deposition, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and larger infarcts after myocardial ischemia-reperfusion. Autophagic flux was impaired after 4 wk on a high-fat diet. To interrogate nutrient-sensing pathways, DIO mice were subjected to overnight fasting, and hearts were processed for biochemical and proteomic analysis. Obese mice failed to upregulate LC3-II or to clear p62/SQSTM1 after fasting, although mRNA for LC3B and p62/SQSTM1 were appropriately upregulated in both groups, demonstrating an intact transcriptional response to fasting. Energy- and nutrient-sensing signal transduction pathways [AMPK and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)] also responded appropriately to fasting, although mTOR was more profoundly suppressed in obese mice. Proteomic quantitative analysis of the hearts under fed and fasted conditions revealed broad changes in protein networks involved in oxidative phosphorylation, autophagy, oxidative stress, protein homeostasis, and contractile machinery. In many instances, the fasting response was quite discordant between lean and DIO mice. Network analysis implicated the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor and mTOR regulatory nodes. Hearts of obese mice exhibited impaired autophagy, altered proteome, and discordant response to nutrient deprivation. PMID:27199111

  15. Transcriptome analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in human subjects following a 36 h fast provides evidence of effects on genes regulating inflammation, apoptosis and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Elliott, R M; de Roos, B; Duthie, S J; Bouwman, F G; Rubio-Aliaga, I; Crosley, L K; Mayer, C; Polley, A C; Heim, C; Coort, S L; Evelo, C T; Mulholland, F; Daniel, H; Mariman, E C; Johnson, I T

    2014-11-01

    There is growing interest in the potential health benefits of diets that involve regular periods of fasting. While animal studies have provided compelling evidence that feeding patterns such as alternate-day fasting can increase longevity and reduce incidence of many chronic diseases, the evidence from human studies is much more limited and equivocal. Additionally, although several candidate processes have been proposed to contribute to the health benefits observed in animals, the precise molecular mechanisms responsible remain to be elucidated. The study described here examined the effects of an extended fast on gene transcript profiles in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from ten apparently healthy subjects, comparing transcript profiles after an overnight fast, sampled on four occasions at weekly intervals, with those observed on a single occasion after a further 24 h of fasting. Analysis of the overnight fasted data revealed marked inter-individual differences, some of which were associated with parameters such as gender and subject body mass. For example, a striking positive association between body mass index and the expression of genes regulated by type 1 interferon was observed. Relatively subtle changes were observed following the extended fast. Nonetheless, the pattern of changes was consistent with stimulation of fatty acid oxidation, alterations in cell cycling and apoptosis and decreased expression of key pro-inflammatory genes. Stimulation of fatty acid oxidation is an expected response, most likely in all tissues, to fasting. The other processes highlighted provide indications of potential mechanisms that could contribute to the putative beneficial effects of intermittent fasting in humans. PMID:25260660

  16. Calibration and Data Analysis for the KCIF Fast Magnetics System

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, R. F.; Fasoli, A. F.; Ali-Arshad, A. S.; Moret, J, M.

    2000-03-01

    Alfven Eigenmodes (AEs) and other magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) phenomena have been studied at the Joint European Torus (JET) using a new 8-channel, 4 s, 1 MHz, 12-bit data acquisition system KC1F in conjunction with the JET fast Mirnov magnetic fluctuation pickup coils. The JET magnetic pickup coils were calibrated for the first time in the range 30-460 kHz using a new remote calibration technique which accounts for the presence of the first few LRC circuit resonances. A data-processing system has been developed within the MATLAB software environment to produce spectrograms of fluctuation amplitude and toroidal mode number versus frequency and time. The analysis software has been automated to allow routine overnight production of spectrogram web pages. Modes with amplitudes {delta}B/B {ge} 10{sup -8} and toroidal mode numbers |n| < 32 are now routinely detected. A pulse-characterization database has also been developed to select for the analysis of various useful subsets of the 4000+ JET discharges for which KC1F data is now available. Based on the work presented here and recent advances in data-acquisition technology, it should now be possible to obtain complete diagnostic data on the AEs.

  17. Nqrs Data for C8H5Li2O4.5 [C8H4Li2O4·1/2(H2O)] (Subst. No. 1059)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Substances Containing Ag … C10H15' of Volume 48 `Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III `Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section `3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter `3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C8H5Li2O4.5 [C8H4Li2O4·1/2(H2O)] (Subst. No. 1059)

  18. Absolute intensities and self-, N2-, and air-broadened Lorentz halfwidths for selected lines in the nu3 band of (C-12)H3D from measurements with a tunable diode laser spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malathy Devi, V.; Benner, D. C.; Rinsland, C. P.; Smith, M. A. H.; Thakur, K. B.

    1986-01-01

    Absolute intensities and self-, air- and N2-broadened half-widths have been determined for the first time for individual lines in the nu3(A1) band of (C-12)H3D near 7.6 microns from measurements of individual vibration-rotation lines using a tunable diode laser spectrometer. The intensity measurements are believed to be accurate to within three percent. Within experimental uncertainties, equal broadening efficiencies are found for both air and nitrogen. Self-broadened half-widths determined for three transitions yield an average half-width value of 0.803 + or -0.0010/cm/atm at 296 K.

  19. Cascade alkylarylation of substituted N-allylbenzamides for the construction of dihydroisoquinolin-1(2H)-ones and isoquinoline-1,3(2H,4H)-diones

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Ping; Du, Bingnan; Jiao, Wei; Mei, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    Summary An oxidative reaction for the synthesis of 4-alkyl-substituted dihydroisoquinolin-1(2H)-ones with N-allylbenzamide derivatives as starting materials has been developed. The radical alkylarylation reaction proceeds through a sequence of alkylation and intramolecular cyclization. The substituent on the C–C double bond was found to play a key role for the progress of the reaction to give the expected products with good chemical yields. Additionally, N-methacryloylbenzamides were also suitable substrates for the current reaction and provided the alkyl-substituted isoquinoline-1,3(2H,4H)-diones in good yield. PMID:26977189

  20. Nqrs Data for C24H48I12O42S12Tl12 [C12H24O6·12(CH2IO3STl)] (Subst. No. 1591)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C24H48I12O42S12Tl12 [C12H24O6·12(CH2IO3STl)] (Subst. No. 1591)

  1. Synthesis and the crystal and molecular structure of the Sn(IV)-Nd(III) coordination polymer based on the tartaric acid [NdSn2{H( Tart)3} · 12H2O] n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, V. S.; Chebanenko, E. A.; Seifullina, I. I.; Churakov, A. V.; Martsinko, E. E.

    2016-03-01

    The polymeric heterometallic [NdSn2{H( Tart)3} • 12H2O] n ( I) compound, where H4 Tart is the tartaric acid, is synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry, and IR spectroscopy. The structural elements of crystal I, namely, polymeric [{Nd(H2O)6}(μ3-H n Tart 4- n ) {Sn(μ2-H n Tart 4- n )}2} ( n = 0, 1) complex molecules and crystallization water molecules, are connected by an extended hydrogen-bond system.

  2. FAST2 Code validation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.E.; Freeman, L.N.; Walker, S.N.

    1995-09-01

    The FAST2 Code which is capable of determining structural loads of a flexible, teetering, horizontal axis wind turbine is described and comparisons of calculated loads with test data at two wind speeds for the ESI-80 are given. The FAST2 Code models a two-bladed HAWT with degrees of freedom for blade flap, teeter, drive train flexibility, yaw, and windwise and crosswind tower motion. The code allows blade dimensions, stiffness, and weights to differ and models tower shadow, wind shear, and turbulence. Additionally, dynamic stall is included as are delta-3 and an underslung rotor. Load comparisons are made with ESI-80 test data in the form of power spectral density, rainflow counting, occurrence histograms and azimuth averaged bin plots. It is concluded that agreement between the FAST2 Code and test results is good.

  3. Fast Reactor Technology Preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Wootan, David W.; Omberg, Ronald P.

    2008-01-11

    There is renewed worldwide interest in developing and implementing a new generation of advanced fast reactors. International cooperative efforts are underway such as the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). Advanced computer modeling and simulation efforts are a key part of these programs. A recognized and validated set of Benchmark Cases are an essential component of such modeling efforts. Testing documentation developed during the operation of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) provide the information necessary to develop a very useful set of Benchmark Cases.

  4. The LOX calculator for fasted channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) are typically harvested by seining, and are then transferred to a grading net, where the catch is held overnight. Respiratory demands of a large, confined channel catfish biomass can exceed available dissolved oxygen, so supplemental aeration is necessary. In 20...

  5. Rapid and robust spatiotemporal dynamics of the first-order phase transition in crystals of the organic-inorganic perovskite (C12H25NH3)2PbI4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yangui, Aymen; Sy, Mouhamadou; Li, Liang; Abid, Younes; Naumov, Panče; Boukheddaden, Kamel

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics of the thermally induced first-order structural phase transition in a high-quality single crystal of the organic-inorganic perovskite (C12H25NH3)2PbI4 was investigated by optical microscopy. The propagation of the straight phase front (habit plane) during the phase transition along the cooling and heating pathways of the thermal hysteresis was observed. The thermochromic character of the transition allowed monitoring of the thermal dependence of average optical density and aided the visualization of the interface propagation. The thermal hysteresis loop is 10 K wide, and the interface velocity is constant at V ≈ 1.6 mm s-1. The transition is accompanied with sizeable change in crystal size, with elongation of ~6% along the b axis and compression of ~ -2% along the a axis, in excellent agreement with previously reported X-ray diffraction data. The progression of the habit plane is at least 160 times faster than in spin-crossover materials, and opens new prospects for organic-inorganic perovskites as solid switching materials. Moreover, the crystals of (C12H25NH3)2PbI4 are unusually mechanically robust and present excellent resilience to thermal cycling. These hitherto unrecognized properties turn this and possibly similar hybrid perovskites into perspective candidates as active medium for microscopic actuation.

  6. Rapid and robust spatiotemporal dynamics of the first-order phase transition in crystals of the organic-inorganic perovskite (C12H25NH3)2PbI4.

    PubMed

    Yangui, Aymen; Sy, Mouhamadou; Li, Liang; Abid, Younes; Naumov, Panče; Boukheddaden, Kamel

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of the thermally induced first-order structural phase transition in a high-quality single crystal of the organic-inorganic perovskite (C12H25NH3)2PbI4 was investigated by optical microscopy. The propagation of the straight phase front (habit plane) during the phase transition along the cooling and heating pathways of the thermal hysteresis was observed. The thermochromic character of the transition allowed monitoring of the thermal dependence of average optical density and aided the visualization of the interface propagation. The thermal hysteresis loop is 10 K wide, and the interface velocity is constant at V ≈ 1.6 mm s(-1). The transition is accompanied with sizeable change in crystal size, with elongation of ~6% along the b axis and compression of ~ -2% along the a axis, in excellent agreement with previously reported X-ray diffraction data. The progression of the habit plane is at least 160 times faster than in spin-crossover materials, and opens new prospects for organic-inorganic perovskites as solid switching materials. Moreover, the crystals of (C12H25NH3)2PbI4 are unusually mechanically robust and present excellent resilience to thermal cycling. These hitherto unrecognized properties turn this and possibly similar hybrid perovskites into perspective candidates as active medium for microscopic actuation. PMID:26568147

  7. Oxidation behaviour of ferritic stainless steel grade Crofer 22 APU at 700 °C in flowing Ar−75%CO{sub 2}−12%H{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect

    Shariff, Nurul Atikah; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Jalar, Azman

    2013-11-27

    The oxidation of Ferritic Stainless Steel (FSS) grade Crofer 22 APU has been investigated. FSS alloys were exposed to isothermal conditions in a horizontal tube furnace at a 700 °C in flowing Ar−75%CO{sub 2}−12%H{sub 2}O at a pressure of approximately 1 atm. The results showed that the growth of non protective Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and spinel was observed after 50 h exposure in the presence of 12% H{sub 2}O. The weight was increased significantly with time of exposure. The formation of different oxides is presented on the interface of the specimen such as MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were revealed by X-ray diffraction and supported by EDAX analysis. FSS did not form a protective Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer due to water vapour accelerates the kinetics oxidation. Data of microstructure observation is presented and discussed in this paper in term of water vapour effects.

  8. Rapid and robust spatiotemporal dynamics of the first-order phase transition in crystals of the organic-inorganic perovskite (C12H25NH3)2PbI4

    PubMed Central

    Yangui, Aymen; Sy, Mouhamadou; Li, Liang; Abid, Younes; Naumov, Panče; Boukheddaden, Kamel

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of the thermally induced first-order structural phase transition in a high-quality single crystal of the organic-inorganic perovskite (C12H25NH3)2PbI4 was investigated by optical microscopy. The propagation of the straight phase front (habit plane) during the phase transition along the cooling and heating pathways of the thermal hysteresis was observed. The thermochromic character of the transition allowed monitoring of the thermal dependence of average optical density and aided the visualization of the interface propagation. The thermal hysteresis loop is 10 K wide, and the interface velocity is constant at V ≈ 1.6 mm s–1. The transition is accompanied with sizeable change in crystal size, with elongation of ~6% along the b axis and compression of ~ –2% along the a axis, in excellent agreement with previously reported X-ray diffraction data. The progression of the habit plane is at least 160 times faster than in spin-crossover materials, and opens new prospects for organic-inorganic perovskites as solid switching materials. Moreover, the crystals of (C12H25NH3)2PbI4 are unusually mechanically robust and present excellent resilience to thermal cycling. These hitherto unrecognized properties turn this and possibly similar hybrid perovskites into perspective candidates as active medium for microscopic actuation. PMID:26568147

  9. Integral Fast Reactor concept

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

    1986-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative LMR concept, being developed at Argonne National Laboratory, that fully exploits the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel to achieve breakthroughs in economics and inherent safety. This paper describes key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, technology development status, fuel cycle economics potential, and future development path.

  10. The Integral Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I. ); Lineberry, M.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory, since 1984, has been developing the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). This paper will describe the way in which this new reactor concept came about; the technical, public acceptance, and environmental issues that are addressed by the IFR; the technical progress that has been made; and our expectations for this program in the near term. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Preoperative carbohydrate nutrition reduces postoperative nausea and vomiting compared to preoperative fasting

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Neslihan; Çekmen, Nedim; Bilgin, Ferruh; Erten, Ela; Özhan, Mehmet Özhan; Coşar, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this prospective, randomized, single-blinded study was to compare the effects of a carbohydrate drink 400 mL given 2 h before the surgery with preoperative overnight fasting on the gastric pH and residual volume, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and antiemetic consumption in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials And Methods: Forty American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II patients who underwent elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Randomized, prospective, controlled study, Gulhane Medical Faculty and Guven Hospital Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups: Pre-operative carbohydrate drink group (group C, n = 20) and preoperative fasting group (group F, n = 20). Group C was given a 400 mL carbohydrate drink 2 h before to the surgery. The patients of group F were fasted 8 h before the surgery. Both groups were operated under general anesthesia with volatile anesthetics. Results: Hemodynamic parameters, demographic data, gastric acidity and residual volumes were similar for both groups. No complications were observed. PONV and antiemetic consumption was lower in group C compared to group F (P = 0.001). Patient's satisfaction was higher in group C (P < 0.001). Conclusion: This study showed that pre-operative carbohydrate drink may be used safely and also improves patient's satisfaction and comfort in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:24497851

  12. Carotid body denervation prevents fasting hyperglycemia during chronic intermittent hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Mi-Kyung; Yao, Qiaoling; Jun, Jonathan C.; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Yoo, Doo-Young; Han, Woobum; Mesarwi, Omar; Richardson, Ria; Fu, Ya-Yuan; Pasricha, Pankaj J.; Schwartz, Alan R.; Shirahata, Machiko

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea causes chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH) and is associated with impaired glucose metabolism, but mechanisms are unknown. Carotid bodies orchestrate physiological responses to hypoxemia by activating the sympathetic nervous system. Therefore, we hypothesized that carotid body denervation would abolish glucose intolerance and insulin resistance induced by chronic IH. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent carotid sinus nerve dissection (CSND) or sham surgery and then were exposed to IH or intermittent air (IA) for 4 or 6 wk. Hypoxia was administered by decreasing a fraction of inspired oxygen from 20.9% to 6.5% once per minute, during the 12-h light phase (9 a.m.–9 p.m.). As expected, denervated mice exhibited blunted hypoxic ventilatory responses. In sham-operated mice, IH increased fasting blood glucose, baseline hepatic glucose output (HGO), and expression of a rate-liming hepatic enzyme of gluconeogenesis phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), whereas the whole body glucose flux during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp was not changed. IH did not affect glucose tolerance after adjustment for fasting hyperglycemia in the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. CSND prevented IH-induced fasting hyperglycemia and increases in baseline HGO and liver PEPCK expression. CSND trended to augment the insulin-stimulated glucose flux and enhanced liver Akt phosphorylation at both hypoxic and normoxic conditions. IH increased serum epinephrine levels and liver sympathetic innervation, and both increases were abolished by CSND. We conclude that chronic IH induces fasting hyperglycemia increasing baseline HGO via the CSN sympathetic output from carotid body chemoreceptors, but does not significantly impair whole body insulin sensitivity. PMID:25103977

  13. Carotid body denervation prevents fasting hyperglycemia during chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mi-Kyung; Yao, Qiaoling; Jun, Jonathan C; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Yoo, Doo-Young; Han, Woobum; Mesarwi, Omar; Richardson, Ria; Fu, Ya-Yuan; Pasricha, Pankaj J; Schwartz, Alan R; Shirahata, Machiko; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2014-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea causes chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH) and is associated with impaired glucose metabolism, but mechanisms are unknown. Carotid bodies orchestrate physiological responses to hypoxemia by activating the sympathetic nervous system. Therefore, we hypothesized that carotid body denervation would abolish glucose intolerance and insulin resistance induced by chronic IH. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent carotid sinus nerve dissection (CSND) or sham surgery and then were exposed to IH or intermittent air (IA) for 4 or 6 wk. Hypoxia was administered by decreasing a fraction of inspired oxygen from 20.9% to 6.5% once per minute, during the 12-h light phase (9 a.m.-9 p.m.). As expected, denervated mice exhibited blunted hypoxic ventilatory responses. In sham-operated mice, IH increased fasting blood glucose, baseline hepatic glucose output (HGO), and expression of a rate-liming hepatic enzyme of gluconeogenesis phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), whereas the whole body glucose flux during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp was not changed. IH did not affect glucose tolerance after adjustment for fasting hyperglycemia in the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. CSND prevented IH-induced fasting hyperglycemia and increases in baseline HGO and liver PEPCK expression. CSND trended to augment the insulin-stimulated glucose flux and enhanced liver Akt phosphorylation at both hypoxic and normoxic conditions. IH increased serum epinephrine levels and liver sympathetic innervation, and both increases were abolished by CSND. We conclude that chronic IH induces fasting hyperglycemia increasing baseline HGO via the CSN sympathetic output from carotid body chemoreceptors, but does not significantly impair whole body insulin sensitivity. PMID:25103977

  14. "Fast" Capitalism and "Fast" Schools: New Realities and New Truths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Susan L.

    This paper locates the phenomenon of self-managing schools within the framework of "fast capitalism" and identifies themes of organization central to fast capitalism, which are argued to also underpin the self-managing schools. "Fast capitalism" refers to the rapidly intensified integration of regionalized productive activities into the global…

  15. Calcioferrite with composition (Ca3.94Sr0.06)Mg1.01(Fe2.93Al1.07)(PO4)6(OH)4·12H2O

    PubMed Central

    Lafuente, Barbara; Downs, Robert T.; Yang, Hexiong; Jenkins, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Calcioferrite, ideally Ca4MgFe3+ 4(PO4)6(OH)4·12H2O (tetra­calcium magnesium tetrairon(III) hexakis-phosphate tetra­hydroxide dodeca­hydrate), is a member of the calcioferrite group of hydrated calcium phosphate minerals with the general formula Ca4 AB 4(PO4)6(OH)4·12H2O, where A = Mg, Fe2+, Mn2+ and B = Al, Fe3+. Calcioferrite and the other three known members of the group, montgomeryite (A = Mg, B = Al), kingsmountite (A = Fe2+, B = Al), and zodacite (A = Mn2+, B = Fe3+), usually occur as very small crystals, making their structure refinements by conventional single-crystal X-ray diffraction challenging. This study presents the first structure determination of calcioferrite with composition (Ca3.94Sr0.06)Mg1.01(Fe2.93Al1.07)(PO4)6(OH)4·12H2O based on single-crystal X-ray diffraction data collected from a natural sample from the Moculta quarry in Angaston, Australia. Calcioferrite is isostructural with montgomeryite, the only member of the group with a reported structure. The calcioferrite structure is characterized by (Fe/Al)O6 octa­hedra (site symmetries 2 and -1) sharing corners (OH) to form chains running parallel to [101]. These chains are linked together by PO4 tetra­hedra (site symmetries 2 and 1), forming [(Fe/Al)3(PO4)3(OH)2] layers stacking along [010], which are connected by (Ca/Sr)2+ cations (site symmetry 2) and Mg2+ cations (site symmetry 2; half-occupation). Hydrogen-bonding inter­actions involving the water mol­ecules (one of which is equally disordered over two positions) and OH function are also present between these layers. The relatively weaker bonds between the layers account for the cleavage of the mineral parallel to (010). PMID:24764934

  16. Fast electrochemical actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarov, I. V.; Postnikov, A. V.; Svetovoy, V. B.

    2016-03-01

    Lack of fast and strong microactuators is a well-recognized problem in MEMS community. Electrochemical actuators can develop high pressure but they are notoriously slow. Water electrolysis produced by short voltage pulses of alternating polarity can overcome the problem of slow gas termination. Here we demonstrate an actuation regime, for which the gas pressure is relaxed just for 10 μs or so. The actuator consists of a microchamber filled with the electrolyte and covered with a flexible membrane. The membrane bends outward when the pressure in the chamber increases. Fast termination of gas and high pressure developed in the chamber are related to a high density of nanobubbles in the chamber. The physical processes happening in the chamber are discussed so as problems that have to be resolved for practical applications of this actuation regime. The actuator can be used as a driving engine for microfluidics.

  17. Fast fission phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In these lectures we have described two different phenomena occuring in dissipative heavy ion collisions : neutron-proton asymmetry and fast fission. Neutron-proton asymmetry has provided us with an example of a fast collective motion. As a consequence quantum fluctuations can be observed. The observation of quantum or statistical fluctuations is directly connected to the comparison between the phonon energy and the temperature of the intrinsic system. This means that this mode might also provide a good example for the investigation of the transition between quantum and statistical fluctuations which might occur when the bombarding energy is raised above 10 MeV/A. However it is by no means sure that in this energy domain enough excitation energy can be put into the system in order to reach such high temperatures over the all system. The other interest in investigating neutron-proton asymmetry above 10 MeV/A is that the interaction time between the two incident nuclei will decrease. Consequently, if some collective motion should still be observed, it will be one of the last which can be seen. Fast fission corresponds on the contrary to long interaction times. The experimental indications are still rather weak and mainly consist of experimental data which cannot be understood in the framework of standard dissipative models. We have seen that a model which can describe both the entrance and the exit configuration gives this mechanism in a natural way and that the experimental data can, to a good extend, be explained. The nicest thing is probably that our old understanding of dissipative heavy ion collisions is not changed at all except for the problems that can now be understood in terms of fast fission. Nevertheless this area desserve further studies, especially on the experimental side to be sure that the consistent picture which we have on dissipative heavy ion collisions still remain coherent in the future.

  18. Fast tracking hospital construction.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    Hospital leaders should consider four factors in determining whether to fast track a hospital construction project: Expectations of project length, quality, and cost. Whether decisions can be made quickly as issues arise. Their own time commitment to the project, as well as that of architects, engineers, construction managers, and others. The extent to which they are willing to share with the design and construction teams how and why decisions are being made. PMID:23513759

  19. PHENIX Fast TOF

    SciTech Connect

    Soha, Aria; Chiu, Mickey; Mannel, Eric; Stoll, Sean; Lynch, Don; Boose, Steve; Northacker, Dave; Alfred, Marcus; Lindesay, James; Chujo, Tatsuya; Inaba, Motoi; Nonaka, Toshihiro; Sato, Wataru; Sakatani, Ikumi; Hirano, Masahiro; Choi, Ihnjea

    2014-01-15

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of PHENIX Fast TOF group who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the FY2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. The goals for this test beam experiment are to verify the timing performance of the two types of time-of-flight detector prototypes.

  20. The Integral Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.

    1988-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system. This paper describes the key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, with emphasis on its safety characteristics. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Overnight lexical consolidation revealed by speech segmentation.

    PubMed

    Dumay, Nicolas; Gareth Gaskell, M

    2012-04-01

    Two experiments explored the consolidation of spoken words, and assessed whether post-sleep novel competitor effects truly reflect engagement of these novel words in competition for lexical segmentation. Two types of competitor relationships were contrasted: the onset-aligned case (such as "frenzylk"), where the novel word is a close variant of the existing word: they start at the same time point and overlap on most of their segments; and the fully embedding case (such as "lirmucktoze"), where the existing word corresponds to a smaller embedded portion of its novel competitor and is thus less noticeable. Experiment 1 (pause detection) revealed a similar performance for both cases, with no competitor effect immediately after exposure, but significant inhibition after 24 h and seven days. Experiment 2 (word spotting) produced exactly the same pattern; however, as is the case with existing word carriers (cf. McQueen, Norris, & Cutler, 1994), the inhibition was much stronger for fully embedded than for onset-aligned targets (e.g., "lirmuckt" vs. "frenzyl"). Meanwhile, explicit measures of learning, i.e., free recall and recognition, improved over time. These results cannot be explained by either consolidation of episodic traces or acquisition of new phonological/dialectal variants. We argue instead that they reflect a general trait of vocabulary learning and consolidation. PMID:22261419

  2. Overnight Lexical Consolidation Revealed by Speech Segmentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumay, Nicolas; Gaskell, M. Gareth

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments explored the consolidation of spoken words, and assessed whether post-sleep novel competitor effects truly reflect engagement of these novel words in competition for lexical segmentation. Two types of competitor relationships were contrasted: the onset-aligned case (such as "frenzylk"), where the novel word is a close variant of…

  3. Nocturia and Overnight Polysomnography in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Camille P.; Juncos, Jorge; Trotti, Lynn Marie; Johnson, Theodore M.; Bliwise, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Aim Characterize clinical factors related to nocturia and sleep disruption in PD using polysomnography (PSG). Methods Sixty-three PD patients were recruited regardless of sleep or voiding complaints from a university-based movement disorders clinic for a 48-hour inpatient PSG protocol. Nocturia frequency and bother related to urinary symptoms were assessed using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and were corroborated by measurements of PSG-defined sleep made immediately preceding and subsequent to each in-lab voiding episode. PSG measures included whole-night total sleep time (TST), sleep efficiency (SE), Apnea/Hypopnea Index (AHI), and time to PSG-defined sleep following nocturia episodes. Differences between groups were assessed using Mantel-Haenszel chi-square, t-tests, or Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Linear regression was used to assess factors associated with reported nocturia frequency. Results Sixty patients completed the IPSS. Thirty-seven (61%) reported at least 2 nocturia episodes nightly; those individuals demonstrated lower PSG-defined SE (p =.01) and TST (p =.02) than patients with 0-1 episodes. Participants reporting 2-3 episodes of nocturia with high bother on the IPSS (n=12) demonstrated lower whole-night TST (280.5 ± 116.1 min vs. 372.5 ± 58.7 min, p=0.03) and worse SE (59.2% ± 22.7 vs. 75.9% ± 11.2, p=0.04) when compared to participants with 2-3 episodes of nocturia with low bother (n=13). Conclusions These results verify objectively that PD patients with nocturia have poor sleep. Furthermore, among individuals with comparable levels of reported nocturia, higher bother is associated with poorer sleep as defined on PSG. PMID:23359220

  4. Fast Track Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Fast Track Study supports the efforts of a Special Study Group (SSG) made up of members of the Advanced Project Management Class number 23 (APM-23) that met at the Wallops Island Management Education Center from April 28 - May 8, 1996. Members of the Class expressed interest to Mr. Vem Weyers in having an input to the NASA Policy Document (NPD) 7120.4, that will replace NASA Management Institute (NMI) 7120.4, and the NASA Program/Project Management Guide. The APM-23 SSG was tasked with assisting in development of NASA policy on managing Fast Track Projects, defined as small projects under $150 million and completed within three years. 'Me approach of the APM-23 SSG was to gather data on successful projects working in a 'Better, Faster, Cheaper' environment, within and outside of NASA and develop the Fast Track Project section of the NASA Program/Project Management Guide. Fourteen interviews and four other data gathering efforts were conducted by the SSG, and 16 were conducted by Strategic Resources, Inc. (SRI), including five interviews at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and one at the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL). The interviews were compiled and analyzed for techniques and approaches commonly used to meet severe cost and schedule constraints.

  5. The fast Hartley transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mar, Mark H.

    1990-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the results of testing the fast Hartley transform (FHT) and comparing it with the fast Fourier transform (FFT). All the definitions and equations in this paper are quoted and cited from the series of references. The author of this report developed a FORTRAN program which computes the Hartley transform. He tested the program with a generalized electromagnetic pulse waveform and verified the results with the known value. Fourier analysis is an essential tool to obtain frequency domain information from transient time domain signals. The FFT is a popular tool to process many of today's audio and electromagnetic signals. System frequency response, digital filtering of signals, and signal power spectrum are the most practical applications of the FFT. However, the Fourier integral transform of the FFT requires computer resources appropriate for the complex arithmetic operations. On the other hand, the FHT can accomplish the same results faster and requires fewer computer resources. The FHT is twice as fast as the FFT, uses only half the computer resources, and so could be more useful than the FFT in typical applications such as spectral analysis, signal processing, and convolution. This paper presents a FORTRAN computer program for the FHT algorithm along with a brief description and compares the results and performance of the FHT and the FFT algorithms.

  6. Fast ignitor coupling physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Tabak, M.

    1997-10-01

    The Fast Ignitor is an alternate approach to ICF in which short pulse lasers are used to initiate burn at the surface of the compressed DT fuel. The aim is to avoid the need for careful central focusing of final shocks, and possibly to lower substantially the energy requirements for ignition. Ultimately, both goals may prove crucial to Science Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS). This will be the case should either emerging energetic needs, or funding difficulties render the presently planned radiative fusion approach to ignition with the NIF impractical. Ignition is a first step towards the achievement of substantial energy and neutron outputs for such Stewardship. For success with the Fast Ignitor, the laser energy must be efficiently deposited into megavolt electrons (suprathermal), which must, in turn, couple to the background ions within an alpha particle range. To understand the electron fuel coupling, we have used ANTHEM plasma simulation code to model the transport of hot electrons generated by an intense short pulse laser into plasma targets over a broad range of densities. Our study will spell out the acceleration and transport mechanisms active in the Fast Ignitor environment.

  7. Fasting - the ultimate diet?

    PubMed

    Johnstone, A M

    2007-05-01

    Adult humans often undertake acute fasts for cosmetic, religious or medical reasons. For example, an estimated 14% of US adults have reported using fasting as a means to control body weight and this approach has long been advocated as an intermittent treatment for gross refractory obesity. There are unique historical data sets on extreme forms of food restriction that give insight into the consequences of starvation or semi-starvation in previously healthy, but usually non-obese subjects. These include documented medical reports on victims of hunger strike, famine and prisoners of war. Such data provide a detailed account on how the body adapts to prolonged starvation. It has previously been shown that fasting for the biblical period of 40 days and 40 nights is well within the overall physiological capabilities of a healthy adult. However, the specific effects on the human body and mind are less clearly documented, either in the short term (hours) or in the longer term (days). This review asks the following three questions, pertinent to any weight-loss therapy, (i) how effective is the regime in achieving weight loss, (ii) what impact does it have on psychology? and finally, (iii) does it work long-term? PMID:17444963

  8. Neighborhood fast food availability and fast food consumption.

    PubMed

    Oexle, Nathalie; Barnes, Timothy L; Blake, Christine E; Bell, Bethany A; Liese, Angela D

    2015-09-01

    Recent nutritional and public health research has focused on how the availability of various types of food in a person's immediate area or neighborhood influences his or her food choices and eating habits. It has been theorized that people living in areas with a wealth of unhealthy fast-food options may show higher levels of fast-food consumption, a factor that often coincides with being overweight or obese. However, measuring food availability in a particular area is difficult to achieve consistently: there may be differences in the strict physical locations of food options as compared to how individuals perceive their personal food availability, and various studies may use either one or both of these measures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between weekly fast-food consumption and both a person's perceived availability of fast-food and an objective measure of fast-food presence - Geographic Information Systems (GIS) - within that person's neighborhood. A randomly selected population-based sample of eight counties in South Carolina was used to conduct a cross-sectional telephone survey assessing self-report fast-food consumption and perceived availability of fast food. GIS was used to determine the actual number of fast-food outlets within each participant's neighborhood. Using multinomial logistic regression analyses, we found that neither perceived availability nor GIS-based presence of fast-food was significantly associated with weekly fast-food consumption. Our findings indicate that availability might not be the dominant factor influencing fast-food consumption. We recommend using subjective availability measures and considering individual characteristics that could influence both perceived availability of fast food and its impact on fast-food consumption. If replicated, our findings suggest that interventions aimed at reducing fast-food consumption by limiting neighborhood fast-food availability might not be completely effective. PMID

  9. Synthesis and crystal structure of bis(3-ammoniumphenyl) sulfone dinitrate [C{sub 12}H{sub 14}N{sub 2}O{sub 2}S](NO{sub 3}){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Mahroug, A.; Belhouchet, M. Mhiri, T.

    2013-07-15

    A new organic nitrate with the formula [C{sub 12}H{sub 14}N{sub 2}O{sub 2}S](NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, has been prepared and analyzed by X-ray diffraction. This compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic system: a = 16.771 (3), b = 13.884(2), c = 13.884(2) A, V = 3232.7(7)A{sup 3}, Z = 8, space group Pna2{sub 1}. Crystal structure can be described as a succession of organic and inorganic layers parallel to b, c plane. H-bonds between the different species play an important role in the three-dimensional network cohesion.

  10. Hispanics in Fast Food Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charner, Ivan; Fraser, Bryna Shore

    A study examined the employment of Hispanics in the fast-food industry. Data were obtained from a national survey of employees at 279 fast-food restaurants from seven companies in which 194 (4.2 percent) of the 4,660 respondents reported being Hispanic. Compared with the total sample, Hispanic fast-food employees were slightly less likely to be…

  11. The influence of sucrose on the crystallization behaviour in the system CaO-SiO{sub 2}-C{sub 12}H{sub 22}O{sub 11}-H{sub 2}O under hydrothermal conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, A.; Buhl, J.-Ch.

    2010-04-15

    Hydrothermal synthesis in the presence of sucrose has been carried out at 200 {sup o}C and autogeneous pressure in the system CaO-SiO{sub 2}-C{sub 12}H{sub 22}O{sub 11}-H{sub 2}O to investigate the influence of C{sub 12}H{sub 22}O{sub 11} on phase formation and the crystal habit of calcium silicate hydrates (CSH-phases). A sucrose/lime ratio of 0.5 was utilized in all experiments and the reactivity of the SiO{sub 2} source was varied using educts of different grain size of {approx}40 mesh and >230 mesh. CaO/SiO{sub 2} concentration ratios of 0.5 and 0.8 have been selected, the latter with respect to the composition of the important CSH-phase 11 A tobermorite. The results were compared with experiments under similar but sucrose-free conditions. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX-analysis) as well as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-spectroscopy) have been applied for analyses. A retarding effect of sucrose on CSH-phase formation has been observed. Only minor amount of CSH without regular morphology was observed instead of typically fibrous 11 A tobermorite formed in the sucrose-free system. Sucrose altered the reaction mechanism in the CSH-system and hydrothermal process started with rapid reaction of sucrose and lime. The further course of crystallization was dominated by an extended precipitation of calcium carbonate and small amounts of calcium oxalate hydrate. Formation of these stable hydrothermal decomposition products of saccharated lime is strongly suppressing the CSH-crystallization.

  12. Data on the phospholipid fatty acyl composition of retroperitoneal white adipose tissue in ad libitum fed and fasted mice.

    PubMed

    Marks, Kristin A; Marvyn, Phillip M; Henao, Juan J Aristizabal; Bradley, Ryan M; Stark, Ken D; Duncan, Robin E

    2016-06-01

    Data are presented on the fatty acyl composition of phospholipid from retroperitoneal white adipose tissue of female mice that were either given ad libitum access to food or fasted for 16 h overnight prior to sacrifice. Our data show that total adipose phospholipid concentrations were more than 2-fold higher in the fasted animals compared with the fed animals (33.48±7.40 versus 16.57±4.43 μg phospholipid fatty acids/100 mg tissue). Concentrations of several individual phospholipid fatty acyl species, including palmitic acid (16:0), vaccenic acid (18:1n-7), linoleic acid (18:2n-6), dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (20:3n-6), arachidonic acid (20:4n-6), eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3), as well as total phospholipid saturated fatty acids, n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, were significantly higher in adipose tissue from the fasted animals compared with the fed animals. However, when the relative abundance of phospholipid fatty acyl species was analyzed, only 20:4n-6 was specifically enriched (by ~2.5-fold) in adipose phospholipid with fasting. PMID:27014729

  13. Simplified fast neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Sohrabi, Mehdi

    1979-01-01

    Direct fast-neutron-induced recoil and alpha particle tracks in polycarbonate films may be enlarged for direct visual observation and automated counting procedures employing electrochemical etching techniques. Electrochemical etching is, for example, carried out in a 28% KOH solution at room temperature by applying a 2000 V peak-to-peak voltage at 1 kHz frequency. Such recoil particle amplification can be used for the detection of wide neutron dose ranges from 1 mrad. to 1000 rads. or higher, if desired.

  14. FAST NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Snell, A.H.

    1957-12-01

    This patent relates to a reactor and process for carrying out a controlled fast neutron chain reaction. A cubical reactive mass, weighing at least 920 metric tons, of uranium metal containing predominantly U/sup 238/ and having a U/sup 235/ content of at least 7.63% is assembled and the maximum neutron reproduction ratio is limited to not substantially over 1.01 by insertion and removal of a varying amount of boron, the reactive mass being substantially freed of moderator.

  15. Fast Ignitor coupling physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Tabak, M.

    1997-10-01

    The Fast Ignitor is an alternate approach to ICF in which short pulse lasers are used to initiate burn at the surface of the compressed DT fuel. The aim is to avoid the need for careful central focusing of final shocks, and possibly to lower substantially the energy requirements for ignition. Ultimately, both goals may prove crucial to Science Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS). This will be the case should either emerging energetic needs, or finding difficulties render the presently planned radiative fusion approach to ignition with the NIF impractical. Ignition is a first step towards the achievement of substantial energy and neutron outputs for such Stewardship.

  16. Fast quench reactor method

    SciTech Connect

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.; Berry, Ray A.

    1999-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a means of rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Metal halide reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. Reducing gas is added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream.

  17. Fast quench reactor method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, B.A.; Donaldson, A.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Kong, P.C.; Berry, R.A.

    1999-08-10

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a means of rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Metal halide reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. Reducing gas is added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream. 8 figs.

  18. Fast neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report concentrates on two major areas of dosimetry research: measurement of fast neutron kerma factors for several elements for monochromatic and white spectrum neutron fields and determination of the response of thermoluminescent phosphors to various ultra-soft X-ray energies and beta-rays. Dr. Zhixin Zhou from the Shanghai Institute of Radiation Medicine, People's Republic of China brought with him special expertise in the fabrication and use of ultra-thin TLD materials. Such materials are not available in the USA. The rather unique properties of these materials were investigated during this grant period.

  19. The fast encryption package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Matt

    1988-01-01

    The organization of some tools to help improve passwork security at a UNIX-based site is described along with how to install and use them. These tools and their associated library enable a site to force users to pick reasonably safe passwords (safe being site configurable) and to enable site management to try to crack existing passworks. The library contains various versions of a very fast implementation of the Data Encryption Standard and of the one-way encryption functions used to encryp the password.

  20. Fast SCR Thyratron Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M.N.; /SLAC

    2007-06-18

    As part of an improvement project on the linear accelerator at SLAC, it was necessary to replace the original thyratron trigger generator, which consisted of two chassis, two vacuum tubes, and a small thyratron. All solid-state, fast rise, and high voltage thyratron drivers, therefore, have been developed and built for the 244 klystron modulators. The rack mounted, single chassis driver employs a unique way to control and generate pulses through the use of an asymmetric SCR, a PFN, a fast pulse transformer, and a saturable reactor. The resulting output pulse is 2 kV peak into 50 {Omega} load with pulse duration of 1.5 {mu}s FWHM at 180 Hz. The pulse risetime is less than 40 ns with less than 1 ns jitter. Various techniques are used to protect the SCR from being damaged by high voltage and current transients due to thyratron breakdowns. The end-of-line clipper (EOLC) detection circuit is also integrated into this chassis to interrupt the modulator triggering in the event a high percentage of line reflections occurred.

  1. Fast-Acting Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojciechowski, Bogdan V. (Inventor); Pegg, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A fast-acting valve includes an annular valve seat that defines an annular valve orifice between the edges of the annular valve seat, an annular valve plug sized to cover the valve orifice when the valve is closed, and a valve-plug holder for moving the annular valve plug on and off the annular valve seat. The use of an annular orifice reduces the characteristic distance between the edges of the valve seat. Rather than this distance being equal to the diameter of the orifice, as it is for a conventional circular orifice, the characteristic distance equals the distance between the inner and outer radii (for a circular annulus). The reduced characteristic distance greatly reduces the gap required between the annular valve plug and the annular valve seat for the valve to be fully open, thereby greatly reducing the required stroke and corresponding speed and acceleration of the annular valve plug. The use of a valve-plug holder that is under independent control to move the annular valve plug between its open and closed positions is important for achieving controllable fast operation of the valve.

  2. Fast ignitor coupling physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Tabak, M.

    1997-10-01

    The Fast Ignitor is an alternate approach to ICF in which short pulse lasers are used to initiate burn at the surface of the compressed DT fuel. The aim is to avoid the need for careful central focussing of final shocks, and possibly to lower substantially the energy requirements for ignition. Ultimately, both goals may prove crucial to Stockpile Stewardship. For success with the Fast Ignitor, the laser energy must be efficiently deposited into megavolt electrons, which must, in turn, couple to the background ions within an alpha particle range. To understand this coupling, we have used ANTHEM plasma simulation code to model the transport of hot electrons generated by an intense ({ge} 3 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) short pulse 1.06 {mu}m laser into plasma targets over a broad range of densities (0.35 to 10{sup 4} x n{sub crit}). Ponderomotive effects are included as a force on the cold background and hot emission electrons of the form, F{sub h,c} = -({omega}{sup 2}{sub Ph,c}/2{omega}{sup 2}){del}I, in which I is the laser intensity and {omega}{sub p}{sup 2} = 4{pi}e{sup 2}n/m{sub 0}{gamma} with m{sub 0} the electron rest mass.

  3. Fast separable nonlocal means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sanjay; Chaudhury, Kunal N.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a simple and fast algorithm called PatchLift for computing distances between patches (contiguous block of samples) extracted from a given one-dimensional signal. PatchLift is based on the observation that the patch distances can be efficiently computed from a matrix that is derived from the one-dimensional signal using lifting; importantly, the number of operations required to compute the patch distances using this approach does not scale with the patch length. We next demonstrate how PatchLift can be used for patch-based denoising of images corrupted with Gaussian noise. In particular, we propose a separable formulation of the classical nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm that can be implemented using PatchLift. We demonstrate that the PatchLift-based implementation of separable NLM is a few orders faster than standard NLM and is competitive with existing fast implementations of NLM. Moreover, its denoising performance is shown to be consistently superior to that of NLM and some of its variants, both in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio/structural similarity index and visual quality.

  4. Fast statistical alignment.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Robert K; Roberts, Adam; Smoot, Michael; Juvekar, Sudeep; Do, Jaeyoung; Dewey, Colin; Holmes, Ian; Pachter, Lior

    2009-05-01

    We describe a new program for the alignment of multiple biological sequences that is both statistically motivated and fast enough for problem sizes that arise in practice. Our Fast Statistical Alignment program is based on pair hidden Markov models which approximate an insertion/deletion process on a tree and uses a sequence annealing algorithm to combine the posterior probabilities estimated from these models into a multiple alignment. FSA uses its explicit statistical model to produce multiple alignments which are accompanied by estimates of the alignment accuracy and uncertainty for every column and character of the alignment--previously available only with alignment programs which use computationally-expensive Markov Chain Monte Carlo approaches--yet can align thousands of long sequences. Moreover, FSA utilizes an unsupervised query-specific learning procedure for parameter estimation which leads to improved accuracy on benchmark reference alignments in comparison to existing programs. The centroid alignment approach taken by FSA, in combination with its learning procedure, drastically reduces the amount of false-positive alignment on biological data in comparison to that given by other methods. The FSA program and a companion visualization tool for exploring uncertainty in alignments can be used via a web interface at http://orangutan.math.berkeley.edu/fsa/, and the source code is available at http://fsa.sourceforge.net/. PMID:19478997

  5. Fast Food Jobs. National Study of Fast Food Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charner, Ivan; Fraser, Bryna Shore

    A study examined employment in the fast-food industry. The national survey collected data from employees at 279 fast-food restaurants from seven companies. Female employees outnumbered males by two to one. The ages of those fast-food employees in the survey sample ranged from 14 to 71, with fully 70 percent being in the 16- to 20-year-old age…

  6. Effects of fasting on maximum thermogenesis in temperature-acclimated rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. C. H.

    1981-09-01

    To further investigate the limiting effect of substrates on maximum thermogenesis in acute cold exposure, the present study examined the prevalence of this effect at different thermogenic capabilities consequent to cold- or warm-acclimation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=11) were acclimated to 6, 16 and 26‡C, in succession, their thermogenic capabilities after each acclimation temperature were measured under helium-oxygen (21% oxygen, balance helium) at -10‡C after overnight fasting or feeding. Regardless of feeding conditions, both maximum and total heat production were significantly greater in 6>16>26‡C-acclimated conditions. In the fed state, the total heat production was significantly greater than that in the fasted state at all acclimating temperatures but the maximum thermogenesis was significant greater only in the 6 and 16‡C-acclimated states. The results indicate that the limiting effect of substrates on maximum and total thermogenesis is independent of the magnitude of thermogenic capability, suggesting a substrate-dependent component in restricting the effective expression of existing aerobic metabolic capability even under severe stress.

  7. Performance Impact of Fast Flow Paths Through Grout Monoliths Used for Radioactive Waste Disposal - 13224

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, Cynthia L.; Walter, Gary R.; Esh, David W.; Barr, Cynthia S.

    2013-07-01

    Empty HLW handling and storage tanks at SRS and INL contain residual radioactivity; these tanks are being stabilized with cementitious grout during closure operations. The US NRC directed the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA{sup R}) to develop physical analogs of cementitious grout monoliths to investigate their potential to form fast flow pathways such as macro-cracks, separations between grout lifts, and annuli around pipes, supports, and along tank walls. CNWRA developed and tested 15 55-gal-drum-scale specimens and 2 larger specimens of tank-filling cementitious grout, and 9 specimens of pipe-filling grout. These experiments demonstrated that the size of fast flow pathways that develop and the peak temperatures attained during hydration are proportional to the scale of the specimen, and that annular apertures and bulk grout permeability generally increased with time post-placement. Cracks developed overnight following placement of each grout lift in the largest specimen, but developed more slowly in smaller specimens, perhaps due to a ∼20 deg. C difference in peak temperatures, which influence the thermal gradients that can induce cracking. Plastic and drying shrinkage commonly led to poor grout-to-metal and grout-to-grout bonding. Cracks, annular gaps, and grout flow lobe seams transmitted fluids during injection testing. Macro-scale flow pathways such as these are not readily observed in bench-scale specimens of cementitious tank grout. (authors)

  8. Metabolomics of Ramadan fasting: an opportunity for the controlled study of physiological responses to food intake

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput screening techniques that analyze the metabolic endpoints of biological processes can identify the contributions of genetic predisposition and environmental factors to the development of common diseases. Studies applying controlled physiological challenges can reveal dysregulation in metabolic responses that may be predictive for or associated with these diseases. However, large-scale epidemiological studies with well controlled physiological challenge conditions, such as extended fasting periods and defined food intake, pose logistic challenges. Culturally and religiously motivated behavioral patterns of life style changes provide a natural setting that can be used to enroll a large number of study volunteers. Here we report a proof of principle study conducted within a Muslim community, showing that a metabolomics study during the Holy Month of Ramadan can provide a unique opportunity to explore the pre-prandial and postprandial response of human metabolism to nutritional challenges. Up to five blood samples were obtained from eleven healthy male volunteers, taken directly before and two hours after consumption of a controlled meal in the evening on days 7 and 26 of Ramadan, and after an over-night fast several weeks after Ramadan. The observed increases in glucose, insulin and lactate levels at the postprandial time point confirm the expected physiological response to food intake. Targeted metabolomics further revealed significant and physiologically plausible responses to food intake by an increase in bile acid and amino acid levels and a decrease in long-chain acyl-carnitine and polyamine levels. A decrease in the concentrations of a number of phospholipids between samples taken on days 7 and 26 of Ramadan shows that the long-term response to extended fasting may differ from the response to short-term fasting. The present study design is scalable to larger populations and may be extended to the study of the metabolic response in defined patient

  9. Metabolomics of Ramadan fasting: an opportunity for the controlled study of physiological responses to food intake.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Sweety; Krug, Susanne; Skurk, Thomas; Halama, Anna; Stank, Antonia; Artati, Anna; Prehn, Cornelia; Malek, Joel A; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Adamski, Jerzy; Hauner, Hans; Suhre, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput screening techniques that analyze the metabolic endpoints of biological processes can identify the contributions of genetic predisposition and environmental factors to the development of common diseases. Studies applying controlled physiological challenges can reveal dysregulation in metabolic responses that may be predictive for or associated with these diseases. However, large-scale epidemiological studies with well controlled physiological challenge conditions, such as extended fasting periods and defined food intake, pose logistic challenges. Culturally and religiously motivated behavioral patterns of life style changes provide a natural setting that can be used to enroll a large number of study volunteers. Here we report a proof of principle study conducted within a Muslim community, showing that a metabolomics study during the Holy Month of Ramadan can provide a unique opportunity to explore the pre-prandial and postprandial response of human metabolism to nutritional challenges. Up to five blood samples were obtained from eleven healthy male volunteers, taken directly before and two hours after consumption of a controlled meal in the evening on days 7 and 26 of Ramadan, and after an over-night fast several weeks after Ramadan. The observed increases in glucose, insulin and lactate levels at the postprandial time point confirm the expected physiological response to food intake. Targeted metabolomics further revealed significant and physiologically plausible responses to food intake by an increase in bile acid and amino acid levels and a decrease in long-chain acyl-carnitine and polyamine levels. A decrease in the concentrations of a number of phospholipids between samples taken on days 7 and 26 of Ramadan shows that the long-term response to extended fasting may differ from the response to short-term fasting. The present study design is scalable to larger populations and may be extended to the study of the metabolic response in defined patient

  10. Fast quasiadiabatic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Garaot, S.; Ruschhaupt, A.; Gillet, J.; Busch, Th.; Muga, J. G.

    2015-10-01

    We work out the theory and applications of a fast quasiadiabatic approach to speed up slow adiabatic manipulations of quantum systems by driving a control parameter as near to the adiabatic limit as possible over the entire protocol duration. We find characteristic time scales, such as the minimal time to achieve fidelity 1, and the optimality of the approach within the iterative superadiabatic sequence. Specifically, we show that the population inversion in a two-level system, the splitting and cotunneling of two-interacting bosons, and the stirring of a Tonks-Girardeau gas on a ring to achieve mesoscopic superpositions of many-body rotating and nonrotating states can be significantly speeded up.

  11. FAST OPENING SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Bender, M.; Bennett, F.K.; Kuckes, A.F.

    1963-09-17

    A fast-acting electric switch is described for rapidly opening a circuit carrying large amounts of electrical power. A thin, conducting foil bridges a gap in this circuit and means are provided for producing a magnetic field and eddy currents in the foil, whereby the foil is rapidly broken to open the circuit across the gap. Advantageously the foil has a hole forming two narrow portions in the foil and the means producing the magnetic field and eddy currents comprises an annular coil having its annulus coaxial with the hole in the foil and turns adjacent the narrow portions of the foil. An electrical current flows through the coil to produce the magnetic field and eddy currents in the foil. (AEC)

  12. Fast approximate motif statistics.

    PubMed

    Nicodème, P

    2001-01-01

    We present in this article a fast approximate method for computing the statistics of a number of non-self-overlapping matches of motifs in a random text in the nonuniform Bernoulli model. This method is well suited for protein motifs where the probability of self-overlap of motifs is small. For 96% of the PROSITE motifs, the expectations of occurrences of the motifs in a 7-million-amino-acids random database are computed by the approximate method with less than 1% error when compared with the exact method. Processing of the whole PROSITE takes about 30 seconds with the approximate method. We apply this new method to a comparison of the C. elegans and S. cerevisiae proteomes. PMID:11535175

  13. FAST NEUTRON SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Davis, F.J.; Hurst, G.S.; Reinhardt, P.W.

    1959-08-18

    An improved proton recoil spectrometer for determining the energy spectrum of a fast neutron beam is described. Instead of discriminating against and thereby"throwing away" the many recoil protons other than those traveling parallel to the neutron beam axis as do conventional spectrometers, this device utilizes protons scattered over a very wide solid angle. An ovoidal gas-filled recoil chamber is coated on the inside with a scintillator. The ovoidal shape of the sensitive portion of the wall defining the chamber conforms to the envelope of the range of the proton recoils from the radiator disposed within the chamber. A photomultiplier monitors the output of the scintillator, and a counter counts the pulses caused by protons of energy just sufficient to reach the scintillator.

  14. FAST ACTING CURRENT SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.; Cummings, D.B.; Ryan, J.F.

    1962-05-22

    A high-current, fast-acting switch is designed for utilization as a crowbar switch in a high-current circuit such as used to generate the magnetic confinement field of a plasma-confining and heat device, e.g., Pyrotron. The device particularly comprises a cylindrical housing containing two stationary, cylindrical contacts between which a movable contact is bridged to close the switch. The movable contact is actuated by a differential-pressure, airdriven piston assembly also within the housing. To absorb the acceleration (and the shock imparted to the device by the rapidly driven, movable contact), an adjustable air buffer assembly is provided, integrally connected to the movable contact and piston assembly. Various safety locks and circuit-synchronizing means are also provided to permit proper cooperation of the invention and the high-current circuit in which it is installed. (AEC)

  15. Fast Censored Linear Regression

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, YIJIAN

    2013-01-01

    Weighted log-rank estimating function has become a standard estimation method for the censored linear regression model, or the accelerated failure time model. Well established statistically, the estimator defined as a consistent root has, however, rather poor computational properties because the estimating function is neither continuous nor, in general, monotone. We propose a computationally efficient estimator through an asymptotics-guided Newton algorithm, in which censored quantile regression methods are tailored to yield an initial consistent estimate and a consistent derivative estimate of the limiting estimating function. We also develop fast interval estimation with a new proposal for sandwich variance estimation. The proposed estimator is asymptotically equivalent to the consistent root estimator and barely distinguishable in samples of practical size. However, computation time is typically reduced by two to three orders of magnitude for point estimation alone. Illustrations with clinical applications are provided. PMID:24347802

  16. Chemistry of fast electrons

    PubMed Central

    Maximoff, Sergey N.; Head-Gordon, Martin P.

    2009-01-01

    A chemicurrent is a flux of fast (kinetic energy ≳ 0.5−1.3 eV) metal electrons caused by moderately exothermic (1−3 eV) chemical reactions over high work function (4−6 eV) metal surfaces. In this report, the relation between chemicurrent and surface chemistry is elucidated with a combination of top-down phenomenology and bottom-up atomic-scale modeling. Examination of catalytic CO oxidation, an example which exhibits a chemicurrent, reveals 3 constituents of this relation: The localization of some conduction electrons to the surface via a reduction reaction, 0.5 O2 + δe− → Oδ− (Red); the delocalization of some surface electrons into a conduction band in an oxidation reaction, Oδ− + CO → CO2δ− → CO2 + δe− (Ox); and relaxation without charge transfer (Rel). Juxtaposition of Red, Ox, and Rel produces a daunting variety of metal electronic excitations, but only those that originate from CO2 reactive desorption are long-range and fast enough to dominate the chemicurrent. The chemicurrent yield depends on the universality class of the desorption process and the distribution of the desorption thresholds. This analysis implies a power-law relation with exponent 2.66 between the chemicurrent and the heat of adsorption, which is consistent with experimental findings for a range of systems. This picture also applies to other oxidation-reduction reactions over high work function metal surfaces. PMID:19561296

  17. Spatial kinetics in fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleznev, E. F.; Belov, A. A.; Panova, I. S.; Matvienko, I. P.; Zhukov, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    The analysis of the solution to the spatial nonstationary equation of neutron transport is presented by the example of a fast reactor. Experiments in spatial kinetics conducted recently at the complex of critical assemblies (fast physical stand) and computations of their data using the TIMER code (for solving the nonstationary equation in multidimensional diffusion approximation for direct and inverse problems of reactor kinetics) have shown that kinetics of fast reactors substantially differs from kinetics of thermal reactors. The difference is connected with influence of the delayed neutron spectrum on rates of the process in a fast reactor.

  18. Synthesis and crystal structure of a copper complex with (E)-2-(4-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)benzylidene)-3, 4-dihydronaphthalen-1(2H)-one ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Shu-Wen; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Gao-Feng

    2015-12-15

    The title compound, C{sub 35}H{sub 23}CuF{sub 6}N{sub 3}O{sub 5}S{sub 2} (1), was synthesized by the reaction of Cu(tta){sub 2} and L{sup 1}, (L{sup 1} = (E)-2-(4-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)benzylidene)-3, 4-dihydronaphthalen-1(2H)-one) in the dichloromethane solution. It crystallizes in the monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/c with a = 33.8388(5), b = 9.3874(2), c = 21.8194(4) Å, β = 95.522(2), V = 6898.9(2) Å{sup 3}, Z = 8, D{sub x} = 1.554 Mg/m{sup 3}, F(000) = 3272, µ = 0.834 mm{sup –1}, R{sub 1} = 0.0639, wR{sub 2} = 0.1637. The copper(II) ion of 1 is in a distorted square-pyramidal environment with four O atoms of the two tta ligands and one N atom of triazole ligand L{sup 1}. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction data revealed that the hydrogen bonds, weak C–H···π and π···π interactions in the crystals link the coordination units to form 3D supramolecular structures.

  19. Mineralogical studies of the nitrate deposits of Chile. V. Iquiqueite, Na4K3Mg(CrO4)B24O39(OH).12H2O, a new saline mineral.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ericksen, G.E.; Mrose, M.E.; Marinenko, J.W.; McGee, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Iquiqueite (Na4K3Mg(CrO4)B24O39(OH).12H2O, a 11.6369(14), c 30.158(7) A, P31c, Z = 3) occurs as a widespread minor constituent in the nitrate fields of northern Chile. It is particularly abundant in the vicinity of Zapiga, Tarapaca province. Associated minerals include nitratite, halite, nitre, darapskite, blodite, glauberite, dietzeite, bruggenite, ulexite and gypsum. Iquiqueite forms thin, yellow, hexagonal platelets (5-50 mu m in diameter, <5 mu m in thickness) that are disseminated singly or in vermiform aggregates in nitrate ore. Observed forms are c(0001) and m(1010). Cleavage is perfect on (0001) and imperfect on (1010); H. = or <2. D(calc.) 2.05 g/cm3 and measured sp. gr. 2.05 + or - 0.09. The mineral is uniaxial negative, epsilon 1.447(2), omega 1.502(2). The XRD pattern has the six strongest lines 3.02(100), 2.856(100), 10.11(85), 6.04(85), 3.28(85), 3.22(85) A. The name is for the city of Iquique, Chile.-J.A.Z.

  20. Rational design, synthesis, anti-HIV-1 RT and antimicrobial activity of novel 3-(6-methoxy-3,4-dihydroquinolin-1(2H)-yl)-1-(piperazin-1-yl)propan-1-one derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chander, Subhash; Wang, Ping; Ashok, Penta; Yang, Liu-Meng; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Murugesan, Sankaranarayanan

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, fifteen novel 3-(6-methoxy-3,4-dihydroquinolin-1(2H)-yl)-1-(piperazin-1-yl)propan-1-one (6a-o) derivatives were designed as inhibitor of HIV-1 RT using ligand based drug design approach and in-silico evaluated for drug-likeness properties. Designed compounds were synthesized, characterized and in-vitro evaluated for RT inhibitory activity against wild HIV-1 RT strain. Among the tested compounds, four compounds (6a, 6b, 6j and 6o) exhibited significant inhibition of HIV-1 RT (IC50⩽10μg/ml). All synthesized compounds were also evaluated for anti-HIV-1 activity as well as cytotoxicity on T lymphocytes, in which compounds 6b and 6l exhibited significant anti-HIV activity (EC50 values 4.72 and 5.45μg/ml respectively) with good safety index. Four compounds (6a, 6b, 6j and 6o) found significantly active against HIV-1 RT in the in-vitro assay were in-silico evaluated against two mutant RT strains as well as one wild strain. Further, titled compounds were evaluated for in-vitro antibacterial (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) and antifungal (Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger) activities. PMID:27288643

  1. Discovery of 2-(6-(5-Chloro-2-methoxyphenyl)-4-oxo-2-thioxo-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-1(2H)-yl)acetamide (PF-06282999): A Highly Selective Mechanism-Based Myeloperoxidase Inhibitor for the Treatment of Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Roger B; Buckbinder, Leonard; Bagley, Scott W; Carpino, Philip A; Conn, Edward L; Dowling, Matthew S; Fernando, Dilinie P; Jiao, Wenhua; Kung, Daniel W; Orr, Suvi T M; Qi, Yingmei; Rocke, Benjamin N; Smith, Aaron; Warmus, Joseph S; Zhang, Yan; Bowles, Daniel; Widlicka, Daniel W; Eng, Heather; Ryder, Tim; Sharma, Raman; Wolford, Angela; Okerberg, Carlin; Walters, Karen; Maurer, Tristan S; Zhang, Yanwei; Bonin, Paul D; Spath, Samantha N; Xing, Gang; Hepworth, David; Ahn, Kay; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2015-11-12

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a heme peroxidase that catalyzes the production of hypochlorous acid. Clinical evidence suggests a causal role for MPO in various autoimmune and inflammatory disorders including vasculitis and cardiovascular and Parkinson's diseases, implying that MPO inhibitors may represent a therapeutic treatment option. Herein, we present the design, synthesis, and preclinical evaluation of N1-substituted-6-arylthiouracils as potent and selective inhibitors of MPO. Inhibition proceeded in a time-dependent manner by a covalent, irreversible mechanism, which was dependent upon MPO catalysis, consistent with mechanism-based inactivation. N1-Substituted-6-arylthiouracils exhibited low partition ratios and high selectivity for MPO over thyroid peroxidase and cytochrome P450 isoforms. N1-Substituted-6-arylthiouracils also demonstrated inhibition of MPO activity in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human whole blood. Robust inhibition of plasma MPO activity was demonstrated with the lead compound 2-(6-(5-chloro-2-methoxyphenyl)-4-oxo-2-thioxo-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-1(2H)-yl)acetamide (PF-06282999, 8) upon oral administration to lipopolysaccharide-treated cynomolgus monkeys. On the basis of its pharmacological and pharmacokinetic profile, PF-06282999 has been advanced to first-in-human pharmacokinetic and safety studies. PMID:26509551

  2. Synthesis and X-ray diffraction study of [UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] {center_dot} 2C{sub 12}H{sub 18}O

    SciTech Connect

    Serezhkina, L. B.; Vologzhanina, A. V.; Klynin, E. S.; Korlyukov, A. A.; Moiseev, I. K.; Serezhkin, V. N.

    2012-03-15

    The compound [UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] {center_dot} 2C{sub 12}H{sub 18}O was synthesized and studied by IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The structure consists of the neutral island groups [UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}], which belong to the crystal-chemical group AB{sup 01}{sub 2}M{sup 1}{sub 2} (A = UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, B{sup 01} = NO{sub 3}{sup -}, M{sup 1} = H{sub 2}O) of uranyl complexes, and 1-adamantyl methyl ketone molecules. The characteristic features of the association of the complexes [UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] and 1-adamantyl methyl ketone molecules in the crystal structure via hydrogen bonds are considered with the use of Voronoi-Dirichlet polyhedra.

  3. Synthesis and crystal structure of a copper complex with ( E)-2-(4-(1 H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)benzylidene)-3,4-dihydronaphthalen-1(2 H)-one ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shu-Wen; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Gao-Feng

    2015-12-01

    The title compound, C35H23CuF6N3O5S2 ( 1), was synthesized by the reaction of Cu( tta)2 and L 1, ( L 1 = ( E)-2-(4-(1 H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)benzylidene)-3,4-dihydronaphthalen-1(2 H)-one) in the dichloromethane solution. It crystallizes in the monoclinic, space group P21/ c with a = 33.8388(5), b = 9.3874(2), c = 21.8194(4) Å, β = 95.522(2), V = 6898.9(2) Å3, Z = 8, D x = 1.554 Mg/m3, F(000) = 3272, µ = 0.834 mm-1, R 1 = 0.0639, wR 2 = 0.1637. The copper(II) ion of 1 is in a distorted square-pyramidal environment with four O atoms of the two tta ligands and one N atom of triazole ligand L 1. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction data revealed that the hydrogen bonds, weak C-H···π and π···π interactions in the crystals link the coordination units to form 3D supramolecular structures.

  4. Synthesis and structural characterization of metal-organic frameworks with the mellitate linker M2(OH)2[C12O12H2]·2H2O (M = Al, Ga, In) MIL-116

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkringer, Christophe; Loiseau, Thierry; Guillou, Nathalie; Férey, Gérard; Popov, Dmitry; Burghammer, Manfred; Riekel, Christian

    2013-12-01

    A new series of isostructural MOF-type carboxylates called MIL-116 (M2(OH)2[C12O12H2]·2H2O), was synthesized from the combination of mellitic acid and trivalent p cations M = Al3+, Ga3+ or In3+. Their structures were analyzed either by single-crystal microdiffraction using the synchrotron radiation beamline (ID13 station at ESRF, Grenoble) or solved from powder X-ray diffraction. The 3D hybrid framework is built up from the connection of infinite straight chains of metal-centered octahedra sharing trans corners linked to each other through the mellitate ligands. Here the ligand acts as octadentate linker with four of the carboxylic groups involved in the M-O-C bondings. The two other carboxylate arms remain non-bonded under their protonated form. This represents a rare case of the occurrence of both non-bonding and bonding organic functionalities in a MOF-type solid. Within the tunnels are located water species that interact with the non-coordinated -COOH groups pointing towards the channel.

  5. Synthesis, experimental spectra (IR & Raman and NMR), vibrational analysis and theoretical DFT investigations of N-(5-(4-methylbenzoyl)-2-oxo-4-(4-methylphenyl)pyrimidine-1(2H)-yl)-4-methylbenzamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydın, Lütfiye; Şahan, Emine; Önal, Zülbiye; Özpozan, Talat

    2014-08-01

    The title molecule, N-(5-(4-methylbenzoyl)-2-oxo-4-(4-methylphenyl)pyrimidine-1(2H)-yl)-4-methylbenzamide (C27H23N3O3), was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, Raman, 1H and 13C NMR spectral data. To determine conformational flexibility, potential energy surfaces of the title compound were obtained by DFT regarding the selected degree of torsional freedom, which was varied from 0° to 360° in 6° and 20° steps. The ten conformers of the title compound were determined and it was found that the conformer 1 basis the most stable one. All conformers were also optimized by using the density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with the 6-31G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p) and cc-pVDZ basis sets in the ground state. Potential energy distribution was calculated with the 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The vibrational spectra were recorded in solid phase IR and Raman spectra were compared based on the results of the theoretical calculations. The formation of hydrogen bonds was explained using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis and spectroscopic analysis. NMR analysis and frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) were also investigated by DFT.

  6. Two-Step Photon Absorption Driving the Chemical Reaction in the Model Ruthenium Nitrosyl System [Ru(py)4Cl(NO)](PF6)2·(1)/2H2O.

    PubMed

    Khadeeva, Liya; Kaszub, Wawrzyniec; Lorenc, Maciej; Malfant, Isabelle; Buron-Le Cointe, Marylise

    2016-05-01

    Various systems containing the [ML5NO] molecule, where M = Fe, Ru, ... and L = F, Cl, ..., exhibit switching under continuous light (CW) irradiation between the ground-state nitrosyl (GS), isonitrosyl (MSI), and side-on (MSII) configurations. The metastable populations, however, are often limited to a few percent. The [Ru(py)4Cl(NO)](PF6)2·(1)/2H2O system is thus a remarkable model compound as the GS to MSI transformation is nearly complete in a single crystal. A predominant two-step photon absorption process during GS to MSI switching under blue light is revealed by visible absorption spectroscopy, although a low concentration of the transient species hinders the determination of this process by the structural signature. During the depopulation of MSI, both two-step and direct processes are evidenced under red CW irradiation. Different intermediate visible spectra revealing transient species during GS to MSI and the reverse photochemical processes are discussed in relation to MSII properties. PMID:27054377

  7. Hydration of calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CaSO 4· {1}/{2}H 2O) into gypsum (CaSO 4·2H 2O). The influence of the sodium poly(acrylate)/surface interaction and molecular weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, Jean-Philippe; Domenech, Marc; Foissy, Alain; Persello, Jacques; Mutin, Jean-Claude

    2000-12-01

    The retarding influence of sodium poly(acrylate) (PANa) on the hydration of calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CaSO 4· {1}/{2}H 2O) was investigated. This study reports the influence of sodium poly(acrylate) on hemihydrate dissolution, on homogenous and heterogeneous gypsum (CaSO 4·2H 2O) nucleation as well as on gypsum growth. It is shown that adsorption of PANa does not hinder the dissolution of hemihydrate in the present experimental conditions. The specific interaction of PANa with gypsum can explain the oriented growth of gypsum crystal. The gypsum growth is slowed down but cannot be blocked by the adsorption of PANa. On the other hand, PANa can block the heterogeneous and homogenous gypsum nucleation. As soon as a critical surface density of PANa onto the hemihydrate surface is reached, the heterogeneous gypsum nucleation is prevented and hemihydrate hydration is indefinitely blocked. The interaction between PANa and the hemihydrate surface is of prime importance to control hydration. Also, the influence of the molecular weight of PANa on homogenous nucleation has been investigated. The precipitation of calcium polyacrylate can explain the differences between the two molecular weights used (2100 and 20 000). This work leads to the conclusion that heterogeneous nucleation is the key process that controls hydration of a system in which hemihydrate dissolution, gypsum nucleation and growth are all occurring at the same time in a continuous manner.

  8. Fast Feedback in Classroom Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmett, Katrina; Klaassen, Kees; Eijkelhof, Harrie

    2009-01-01

    In this article we describe one application of the fast feedback method (see Berg 2003 "Aust. Sci. Teach. J." 28-34) in secondary mechanics education. Two teachers tried out a particular sequence twice, in consecutive years, once with and once without the use of fast feedback. We found the method to be successful, and the data that we obtained…

  9. Responder fast steering mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullard, Andrew; Shawki, Islam

    2013-09-01

    Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems (SAS) has designed, built and tested a 3.3-inch diameter fast steering mirror (FSM) for space application. This 2-axis FSM operates over a large angle (over 10 degree range), has a very high servo bandwidth (over 3.3 Khz closed loop bandwidth), has nanoradian-class noise, and is designed to support microradian class line of sight accuracy. The FSM maintains excellent performance over large temperature ranges (which includes wave front error) and has very high reliability with the help of fully redundant angle sensors and actuator circuits. The FSM is capable of achieving all its design requirements while also being reaction-compensated. The reaction compensation is achieved passively and does not need a separate control loop. The FSM has undergone various environmental testing which include exported forces and torques and thermal vacuum testing that support the FSM design claims. This paper presents the mechanical design and test results of the mechanism which satisfies the rigorous vacuum and space application requirements.

  10. Responder fast steering mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullard, Andrew; Shawki, Islam

    2013-10-01

    Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems (SAS) has designed, built and tested a 3.3-inch diameter fast steering mirror (FSM) for space application. This 2-axis FSM operates over a large angle (over 10 degree range), has a very high servo bandwidth (over 3.3 Khz closed loop bandwidth), has nanoradian-class noise, and is designed to support microradian class line of sight accuracy. The FSM maintains excellent performance over large temperature ranges (which includes wave front error) and has very high reliability with the help of fully redundant angle sensors and actuator circuits. The FSM is capable of achieving all its design requirements while also being reaction-compensated. The reaction compensation is achieved passively and does not need a separate control loop. The FSM has undergone various environmental testing which include exported forces and torques and thermal vacuum testing that support the FSM design claims. This paper presents the mechanical design and test results of the mechanism which satisfies the rigorous vacuum and space application requirements.

  11. Fast Resistive Bolometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Jeffrey

    2005-10-01

    A bolometer with microsecond scale response time is under construction for the Caltech spheromak experiment to measure radiation from a ˜20 μs duration plasma discharge emitting ˜10^2---10^3 kW/m^2. A gold film several micrometers thick absorbs the radiation, heats up, and the consequent change in resistance can be measured. The film itself is vacuum deposited upon a glass slide. Several geometries for the film are under consideration to optimize the amount of radiation absorbed, the response time and the signal-to-noise ratio. We measure the change in voltage across the film for a known current driven through it; a square pulse (3---30A, ˜20 μs) is used to avoid Joule heating. Results from prototypes tested with a UV flashlamp will be presented. After optimizing the bolometer design, the final vacuum-compatible diagnostic would consist of a plasma-facing bolometer and a reference in a camera obscura. This device could provide a design for fast resistive bolometry.

  12. Fast Fuzzy Arithmetic Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, Michael; Kosheleva, Olga

    1997-01-01

    In engineering applications of fuzzy logic, the main goal is not to simulate the way the experts really think, but to come up with a good engineering solution that would (ideally) be better than the expert's control, In such applications, it makes perfect sense to restrict ourselves to simplified approximate expressions for membership functions. If we need to perform arithmetic operations with the resulting fuzzy numbers, then we can use simple and fast algorithms that are known for operations with simple membership functions. In other applications, especially the ones that are related to humanities, simulating experts is one of the main goals. In such applications, we must use membership functions that capture every nuance of the expert's opinion; these functions are therefore complicated, and fuzzy arithmetic operations with the corresponding fuzzy numbers become a computational problem. In this paper, we design a new algorithm for performing such operations. This algorithm is applicable in the case when negative logarithms - log(u(x)) of membership functions u(x) are convex, and reduces computation time from O(n(exp 2))to O(n log(n)) (where n is the number of points x at which we know the membership functions u(x)).

  13. Parallel fast gauss transform

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Rahul S; Sundar, Hari; Veerapaneni, Shravan

    2010-01-01

    We present fast adaptive parallel algorithms to compute the sum of N Gaussians at N points. Direct sequential computation of this sum would take O(N{sup 2}) time. The parallel time complexity estimates for our algorithms are O(N/n{sub p}) for uniform point distributions and O( (N/n{sub p}) log (N/n{sub p}) + n{sub p}log n{sub p}) for non-uniform distributions using n{sub p} CPUs. We incorporate a plane-wave representation of the Gaussian kernel which permits 'diagonal translation'. We use parallel octrees and a new scheme for translating the plane-waves to efficiently handle non-uniform distributions. Computing the transform to six-digit accuracy at 120 billion points took approximately 140 seconds using 4096 cores on the Jaguar supercomputer. Our implementation is 'kernel-independent' and can handle other 'Gaussian-type' kernels even when explicit analytic expression for the kernel is not known. These algorithms form a new class of core computational machinery for solving parabolic PDEs on massively parallel architectures.

  14. Potentiation of Hormonal Responses to Hemorrhage and Fasting, but not Hypoglycemia in Conscious Adrenalectomized Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darlington, Daniel N.; Keil, Lanny C.; Dallman, Mary F.

    1989-01-01

    Bilateral adrenalectomy (ADRX) in rats removes the source of two major stress-responsive hormones, corticosterone and epinephrine. To test how ADRX rats with-stand stress, we performed the following experiments in adult male rats provided with indwelling femoral arterial and venous cannulae and either ADRX or sham-adrenalectomized (Sham) 3 days later and given 0.5% NaCl to drink. Five to 6 days after adrenal surgery the rats were studied after either a 15 ml/kg.5 min hemorrhage or after an overnight fast followed by insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In fed unstressed ADRX rats, basal mean arterial blood pressure was slightly decreased; heart rate was increased; blood volume, vasopressin, and oxytocin concentrations were not different from sham values; and renin and norepinephrine were significantly elevated. The recovery of arterial pressure after hemorrhage in the ADRX rats was similar to that in the sham group over a 5-h period; however, the responses of vasopressin and oxytocin were significantly greater, and those of renin and norepinephrine were markedly potentiated in the ADRX group. Heart rate recovered faster in the ADRX group and was elevated, compared to the sham value, for most of the 5-h period. Restitution of blood volume was attenuated in the ADRX group, although the restitution of plasma protein was not different between the groups. A significant difference in the change in plasma osmolality between groups after hemorrhage may account for the attenuated restitution of blood volume. After an overnight fast, which reduced blood volume in both groups of rats, the plasma renin concentration rose still further in ADRX rats; the differences in other measured variables observed between fed ADRX and sham groups remained the same. The insulin-induced 50% decrease in glucose caused minor effects on arterial blood pressure and heart rate and occasioned responses in renin and norepinephrine of similar magnitudes in the two groups. We conclude that in the absence of

  15. Comparison of seasonal variation in the fasting respiratory quotient of young Japanese, Polish and Thai women in relation to seasonal change in their percent body fat

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background From the viewpoint of human physiological adaptability, we previously investigated seasonal variation in the amount of unabsorbed dietary carbohydrates from the intestine after breakfast in Japanese, Polish and Thai participants. In this investigation we found that there were significant seasonal variations in the amount of unabsorbed dietary carbohydrates in Japanese and Polish participants, while we could not find significant seasonal variation in Thai participants. These facts prompted us to examine seasonal variations in the respiratory quotient after an overnight fast (an indicator of the ratio of carbohydrate and fat oxidized after the last meal) with female university students living in Osaka (Japan), Poznan (Poland) and Chiang Mai (Thailand). Methods We enrolled 30, 33 and 32 paid participants in Japan, Poland and Thailand, respectively, and measurements were taken over the course of one full year. Fasting respiratory quotient was measured with the participants in their postabsorptive state (after 12 hours or more fasting before respiratory quotient measurement). Respiratory quotient measurements were carried out by means of indirect calorimetry using the mixing chamber method. The percent body fat was measured using an electric bioelectrical impedance analysis scale. Food intake of the participants in Osaka and Poznan were carried out by the Food Frequency Questionnaire method. Results There were different seasonal variations in the fasting respiratory quotient values in the three different populations; with a significant seasonal variation in the fasting respiratory quotient values in Japanese participants, while those in Polish and Thai participants were non-significant. We found that there were significant seasonal changes in the percent body fat in the three populations but we could not find any significant correlation between the fasting respiratory quotient values and the percent body fat. Conclusions There were different seasonal

  16. Opportunity's Fast Progress Southward

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Opportunity's Traverse from Landing through Sol 413 Opportunity's Fast Progress Southward

    As of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's 413th martian day, or sol, (March 23, 2005), the robot had driven a total of 4.62 kilometers (2.87 miles) since. The red line on this image traces the rover's route. The base image is a mosaic combining images from the Mars Observer Camera on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor orbiter, the Thermal Emission Imaging System on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter, and Opportunity's own Descent Image Motion Estimation System.

    The rover has been making rapid progress southward since it finished examining its jettisoned heat shield on sol 357 (Jan. 24, 2005, one year after landing). Scientists are eager for Opportunity to reach an area to the south called the 'Etched Terrain,' which appears mottled in the map's base images and might offer access to different layers of bedrock than what the rover has seen so far. See figure 1.

    As of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's 414th martian day, or sol, (March 24, 2005), the robot had driven a total of 4.81 kilometers (2.99 miles) since landing. In this two-month period, Opportunity drove 2.69 kilometers (1.67 miles). As landmarks along the route, it used craters that the rover team informally named for ships of historic voyages of exploration. See figure 2. Figures 1 and 2 are traverse maps overlaid on a mosaic of images from NASA's Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey orbiters and from Opportunity's descent camera. The scale bar in figure 1 at lower left is 2 kilometers (1.24 miles) long and the scale bar in figure 2 is 1 kilometer (0.62 mile) long.

  17. Fast Fourier transform to measure pressure coefficient of muons in the GRAPES-3 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, P. K.; Ahmad, S.; Antia, H. M.; Arunbabu, K. P.; Chandra, A.; Dugad, S. R.; Gupta, S. K.; Hariharan, B.; Hayashi, Y.; Jagadeesan, P.; Jain, A.; Kawakami, S.; Kojima, H.; Morris, S. D.; Nayak, P. K.; Oshima, A.; Rao, B. S.; Reddy, L. V.; Shibata, S.

    2016-06-01

    The GRAPES-3 large area (560 m2) tracking muon telescope is operating at Ooty in India since 2001. It records 4 × 109 muons of energy ≥ 1 GeV every day. These high statistics data have enabled extremely sensitive measurements of solar phenomena, including the solar anisotropies, Forbush decreases, coronal mass ejections etc. to be made. However, prior to such studies, the variation in observed muon rate caused by changes in atmospheric pressure needs to be corrected. Traditionally, the pressure coefficient (β) for the muon rate was derived from the observed data. But the influence of various solar effects makes the measurement of β somewhat difficult. In the present work, a different approach to circumvent this difficulty was used to measure β, almost independent of the solar activity. This approach exploits a small amplitude (∼1 hPa) periodic (12 h) variation of atmospheric pressure at Ooty that introduces a synchronous variation in the muon rate. By using the fast Fourier transform technique the spectral power distributions at 12 h from the atmospheric pressure, and muon rate were used to measure β. The value of pressure coefficient was found to be β =(- 0.128 ± 0.005) % hPa-1.

  18. A fast neighbor joining method.

    PubMed

    Li, J F

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of sequencing technologies, an increasing number of sequences are available for evolutionary tree reconstruction. Although neighbor joining is regarded as the most popular and fastest evolutionary tree reconstruction method [its time complexity is O(n(3)), where n is the number of sequences], it is not sufficiently fast to infer evolutionary trees containing more than a few hundred sequences. To increase the speed of neighbor joining, we herein propose FastNJ, a fast implementation of neighbor joining, which was motivated by RNJ and FastJoin, two improved versions of conventional neighbor joining. The main difference between FastNJ and conventional neighbor joining is that, in the former, many pairs of nodes selected by the rule used in RNJ are joined in each iteration. In theory, the time complexity of FastNJ can reach O(n(2)) in the best cases. Experimental results show that FastNJ yields a significant increase in speed compared to RNJ and conventional neighbor joining with a minimal loss of accuracy. PMID:26345805

  19. Fast food: unfriendly and unhealthy.

    PubMed

    Stender, S; Dyerberg, J; Astrup, A

    2007-06-01

    Although nutrition experts might be able to navigate the menus of fast-food restaurant chains, and based on the nutritional information, compose apparently 'healthy' meals, there are still many reasons why frequent fast-food consumption at most chains is unhealthy and contributes to weight gain, obesity, type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. Fast food generally has a high-energy density, which, together with large portion sizes, induces over consumption of calories. In addition, we have found it to be a myth that the typical fast-food meal is the same worldwide. Chemical analyses of 74 samples of fast-food menus consisting of French fries and fried chicken (nuggets/hot wings) bought in McDonalds and KFC outlets in 35 countries in 2005-2006 showed that the total fat content of the same menu varies from 41 to 65 g at McDonalds and from 42 to 74 g at KFC. In addition, fast food from major chains in most countries still contains unacceptably high levels of industrially produced trans-fatty acids (IP-TFA). IP-TFA have powerful biological effects and may contribute to increased weight gain, abdominal obesity, type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. The food quality and portion size need to be improved before it is safe to eat frequently at most fast-food chains. PMID:17452996

  20. [Artificial nutrition and preoperative fasting].

    PubMed

    Francq, B; Sohawon, S; Perlot, I; Sekkat, H; Noordally, S O

    2012-01-01

    Preoperative fasting is a currently adopted measure since Mendelson's report pertaining to aspiration pneumonia as a cause of death following general anesthesia. From a metabolic point of view fasting is detrimental because surgery in itself causes a state of hypercatabolism and hyperglycemia as a result of insulinresistance. Preoperative fasting has become almost obsolete in certain elective surgical procedures. In these cases the use of clear liquids is now well established and this paper focuses on the safe use of clear fluids, postoperative insulinresistance, patient comfort and postoperative outcome as well as its effect on the length of stay. PMID:22812052

  1. [Fast food promotes weight gain].

    PubMed

    Stender, Steen; Dyerberg, Jørn; Astrup, Arne V

    2007-05-01

    The total amounts of fat in a fast food menu consisting of French fries and fried Chicken Nuggets from McDonald's and KFC, respectively, bought in 35 different countries vary from 41 to 71 gram. In most countries the menu contained unacceptably high amounts of industrially-produced trans fat which contributes to an increased risk of ischaemic heart disease, weight gain, abdominal fat accumulation and type 2 diabetes. The quality of the ingredients in fast food ought to be better and the size of the portions smaller and less energy-dense so that frequent fast food meals do not increase the risk of obesity and diseases among customers. PMID:17537359

  2. Effect of a short-term fast on intestinal disaccharidase activity and villus morphology of piglets suckling insulin-like growth factor-I transgenic sows.

    PubMed

    Hartke, J L; Monaco, M H; Wheeler, M B; Donovan, S M

    2005-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to use transgenic sows that overexpress IGF-I in milk to investigate the effect of a short-term fast on piglet intestinal morphology and disaccharidase activity and to determine how milk-borne IGF-I influences the response to fasting. After farrowing, litters were normalized to 10 piglets. On d 6, piglets (n = 30) suckling IGF-I transgenic (TG) sows and piglets (n = 30) suckling nontransgenic sows (control) were assigned randomly to three treatments: fed piglets (0 h), which remained with the sow until euthanized on d 7, or fasted piglets, which were removed from the sow at either 6 or 12 h before euthanasia on d 7. Serum IGF-I and IGFBP, intestinal weight and length, jejunal protein and DNA content, disaccharidase activity, and villus morphology were measured. Fasting for 12 h resulted in a negative weight change between d 6 and 7 (quadratic response to fasting; P < 0.001). Piglets suckling TG sows tended to have greater intestinal length (P = 0.068), but no effect of IGF-I overexpression was noted for intestinal weight. Fasting, however, resulted in linear (P < 0.001) and quadratic (P = 0.002) decreases in intestinal weight. Serum IGF-I did not differ between control and TG sows, but decreased linearly (P = 0.003) with fasting. Serum IGFBP-4 decreased (linear and quadratic; P < or = 0.02) with fasting, whereas IGFBP-1 increased quadratically (P < 0.001) with fasting. Jejunal villus height, width, and crypt depth were all increased with fasting (linear and quadratic; P < 0.04). Disaccharidase activity was not affected by fed state; however, piglets suckling TG sows had greater jejunal lactase-phlorhizin hydrolase (P < 0.01) and sucrase-isomaltase (P = 0.02) activities than control piglets. In summary, intestinal weight, villus morphology, serum IGF-I, serum IGFBP-1 and -4, and piglet BW change were altered (P < or = 0.02) in response to fasting. Thus, the duration of food deprivation before euthanization should be considered when

  3. Not all declarative memories are created equal: Fast Mapping as a direct route to cortical declarative representations.

    PubMed

    Merhav, Maayan; Karni, Avi; Gilboa, Asaf

    2015-08-15

    Memory formation for newly acquired associations typically depends on hippocampal-neocortical interactions. Through the process of system-consolidation, the mnemonic binding role of the hippocampus is subsequently replaced by cortical hubs, such as the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) or the anterior temporal lobe (ATL). Here, using BOLD-fMRI, we compared retrieval of semantic associations acquired through Fast Mapping (FM), an incidental, exclusion-based learning procedure, to retrieval of similar associations that were intentionally acquired through Explicit Encoding (EE). Despite an identical retrieval task, the encoding histories of the retrieved semantic associations (FM vs. EE) induced distinct neural substrates and disparate related neural dynamics in time. Retrieval of associations acquired through EE engaged the expected hippocampal and vmPFC related networks. Furthermore, retrieval intentionally encoded associations gave rise to a typical overnight increase in engagement of the vmPFC and increased vmPFC-hippocampal-neocortical functional connectivity. On the other hand, retrieval of associations acquired through FM immediately engaged an ATL related network that typically supports well-established semantic knowledge, a network that did not engage the hippocampus and the vmPFC. Moreover, FM learning was associated with minimal overnight changes in the BOLD responses and in the functional connectivity. Our findings indicate that FM may induce a direct, ATL-mediated acquisition and retention of novel arbitrary associations, bypassing the initial hippocampal-cortical representation phase. A direct, ATL-mediated vocabulary acquisition through FM could support the learning and retention of new associations in young children with presumably an immature hippocampal system, and possibly even in amnesic adults with hippocampal lesions. PMID:25988227

  4. Fast and thermal neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Jay T.; Piestrup, Melvin A.; Wu, Xizeng

    2005-09-01

    There is a need for high brightness neutron sources that are portable, relatively inexpensive, and capable of neutron radiography in short imaging times. Fast and thermal neutron radiography is as an excellent method to penetrate high-density, high-Z objects, thick objects and image its interior contents, especially hydrogen-based materials. In this paper we model the expected imaging performance characteristics and limitations of fast and thermal radiography systems employing a Rose Model based transfer analysis. For fast neutron detection plastic fiber array scintllators or liquid scintillator filled capillary arrays are employed for fast neutron detection, and 6Li doped ZnS(Cu) phosphors are employed for thermal neutron detection. These simulations can provide guidance in the design, construction, and testing of neutron imaging systems. In particular we determined for a range of slab thickness, the range of thicknesses of embedded cracks (air-filled or filled with material such as water) which can be detected and imaged.

  5. Fast Access Data Acquisition System

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Vladimir Katsman

    1998-03-17

    Our goal in this program is to develop Fast Access Data Acquisition System (FADAS) by combining the flexibility of Multilink's GaAs and InP electronics and electro-optics with an extremely high data rate for the efficient handling and transfer of collider experimental data. This novel solution is based on Multilink's and Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) unique components and technologies for extremely fast data transfer, storage, and processing.

  6. Fast-Tracking Colostomy Closures.

    PubMed

    Nanavati, Aditya J; Prabhakar, Subramaniam

    2015-12-01

    There have been very few studies on applying fast-track principles to colostomy closures. We believe that outcome may be significantly improved with multimodal interventions in the peri-operative care of patients undergoing this procedure. A retrospective study was carried out comparing patients who had undergone colostomy closures by the fast-track and traditional care protocols at our centre. We intended to analyse peri-operative period and recovery in colostomy closures to confirm that fast-track surgery principles improved outcomes. Twenty-six patients in the fast-track arm and 24 patients in the traditional care arm had undergone colostomy closures. Both groups were comparable in terms of their baseline parameters. Patients in the fast-track group were ambulatory and accepted oral feeding earlier. There was a significant reduction in the duration of stay (4.73 ± 1.43 days vs. 7.21 ± 1.38 days, p = 0.0000). We did not observe a rise in complications or 30-day re-admissions. Fast-track surgery can safely be applied to colostomy closures. It shows earlier ambulation and reduction in length of hospital stay. PMID:27011527

  7. Fast Hadamard Spectroscopic Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goelman, G.

    1994-07-01

    Fast Hadamard spectroscopic imaging (HSI) techniques are presented. These techniques combine transverse and longitudinal encoding to obtain multiple-volume localization. The fast techniques are optimized for nuclei with short T2 and long T1 relaxation times and are therefore suitable for in vivo31P spectroscopy. When volume coils are used in fast HSI techniques, the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time (SNRT) is equal to the SNRT in regular HSI techniques. When surface coils are used, fast HSI techniques give significant improvement of SNRT over conventional HSI. Several fast techniques which are different in total experimental time and pulse demands are presented. When the number of acquisitions in a single repetition time is not higher than two, fast HSI techniques can be used with surface coils and the B1 inhomogeneity does not affect the localization. Surface-coil experiments on phantoms and on human calf muscles in vivo are presented. In addition, it is shown that the localization obtained by the HSI techniques are independent of the repetition times.

  8. Direct Fast-Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect

    DC Stromswold; AJ Peurrung; RR Hansen; PL Reeder

    2000-01-18

    Direct fast-neutron detection is the detection of fast neutrons before they are moderated to thermal energy. We have investigated two approaches for using proton-recoil in plastic scintillators to detect fast neutrons and distinguish them from gamma-ray interactions. Both approaches use the difference in travel speed between neutrons and gamma rays as the basis for separating the types of events. In the first method, we examined the pulses generated during scattering in a plastic scintillator to see if they provide a means for distinguishing fast-neutron events from gamma-ray events. The slower speed of neutrons compared to gamma rays results in the production of broader pulses when neutrons scatter several times within a plastic scintillator. In contrast, gamma-ray interactions should produce narrow pulses, even if multiple scattering takes place, because the time between successive scattering is small. Experiments using a fast scintillator confirmed the presence of broader pulses from neutrons than from gamma rays. However, the difference in pulse widths between neutrons and gamma rays using the best commercially available scintillators was not sufficiently large to provide a practical means for distinguishing fast neutrons and gamma rays on a pulse-by-pulse basis. A faster scintillator is needed, and that scintillator might become available in the literature. Results of the pulse-width studies were presented in a previous report (peurrung et al. 1998), and they are only summarized here.

  9. Carbohydrate-rich breakfast attenuates glycaemic, insulinaemic and ghrelin response to ad libitum lunch relative to morning fasting in lean adults.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Enhad A; Richardson, Judith D; Tsintzas, Kostas; Thompson, Dylan; Betts, James A

    2015-07-14

    Breakfast omission is associated with obesity and CVD/diabetes, but the acute effects of extended morning fasting upon subsequent energy intake and metabolic/hormonal responses have received less attention. In a randomised cross-over design, thirty-five lean men (n 14) and women (n 21) extended their overnight fast or ingested a typical carbohydrate-rich breakfast in quantities relative to RMR (i.e. 1963 (sd 238) kJ), before an ad libitum lunch 3 h later. Blood samples were obtained hourly throughout the day until 3 h post-lunch, with subjective appetite measures assessed. Lunch intake was greater following extended fasting (640 (sd 1042) kJ, P< 0.01) but incompletely compensated for the omitted breakfast, with total intake lower than the breakfast trial (3887 (sd 1326) v. 5213 (sd 1590) kJ, P< 0.001). Systemic concentrations of peptide tyrosine-tyrosine and leptin were greater during the afternoon following breakfast (both P< 0.05) but neither acylated/total ghrelin concentrations were suppressed by the ad libitum lunch in the breakfast trial, remaining greater than the morning fasting trial throughout the afternoon (all P< 0.05). Insulin concentrations were greater during the afternoon in the morning fasting trial (all P< 0.01). There were no differences between trials in subjective appetite during the afternoon. In conclusion, morning fasting caused incomplete energy compensation at an ad libitum lunch. Breakfast increased some anorectic hormones during the afternoon but paradoxically abolished ghrelin suppression by the second meal. Extending morning fasting until lunch altered subsequent metabolic and hormonal responses but without greater appetite during the afternoon. The present study clarifies the impact of acute breakfast omission and adds novel insights into second-meal metabolism. PMID:26004166

  10. High mTORC1 signaling is maintained, while protein degradation pathways are perturbed in old murine skeletal muscles in the fasted state.

    PubMed

    White, Zoe; White, Robert B; McMahon, Christopher; Grounds, Miranda D; Shavlakadze, Tea

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated age-associated changes to protein synthesis and degradation pathways in the quadriceps muscles of male C57BL/6J mice at 5 ages, between 4 and 24 months (m). Sarcopenia was evident by 18m and was accompanied by hyper-phosphorylation of S6K1, indicating increased mTORC1 signaling. Proteasomal and autophagosomal degradation pathways were also impacted by aging. In the 1% NP40 insoluble protein fraction, the abundance of MuRF1 increased at 24m, while p62 increased at 15m, and remained elevated at older ages. In addition, we investigated how protein synthesis and degradation pathways are modulated by fasting in young (4m) and old (24m) muscles, and showed that old mice respond to fasting less robustly compared with young. Overnight fasting for 16h caused de-phosphorylation of AKT and molecules downstream of mTORC1 (S6K1, rpS6 and 4E-BP1) in young, but not old muscles. A longer time of fasting (24h) was required to reduce phosphorylation of these molecules in old mice. Induction of MuRF1 and Fbxo32 mRNA was also more robust in young compared with old muscles following fasting for 16h. In addition, a 16h fast reduced ULK1 phosphorylation at the mTORC1 specific site Ser757 only in young muscles. The striking accumulation of insoluble p62 protein in muscles of all old male mice (fed or fasted), suggests age-related dysregulation of autophagy and protein aggregation. These data provide an insight into the mechanisms of metabolic responses that affect protein homeostasis in old skeletal muscles, with applications to design of clinical interventions that target sarcopenia. PMID:27343428

  11. Mineralogical studies of the nitrate deposits of Chile: VII. Two new saline minerals with the composition K6(Na,K)4Na6Mg10 (XO4) 12(IO3)12.12H2O: fuenzalidaite (X = S) and carlosruizite (X = Se)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konnert, J.A.; Evans, H.T., Jr.; McGee, J.J.; Ericksen, G.E.

    1994-01-01

    Two new isostructural saline minerals from the nitrate deposits of northern Chile have the composition K6(Na,K)4Na6Mg10(XO4)12(IO3)12.12H2O: fuenzalidaite (X = S) and carlosruizite (X = Se,S,Cr). -from Authors

  12. Fast Poisson, Fast Helmholtz and fast linear elastostatic solvers on rectangular parallelepipeds

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegmann, A.

    1999-06-01

    FFT-based fast Poisson and fast Helmholtz solvers on rectangular parallelepipeds for periodic boundary conditions in one-, two and three space dimensions can also be used to solve Dirichlet and Neumann boundary value problems. For non-zero boundary conditions, this is the special, grid-aligned case of jump corrections used in the Explicit Jump Immersed Interface method. Fast elastostatic solvers for periodic boundary conditions in two and three dimensions can also be based on the FFT. From the periodic solvers we derive fast solvers for the new 'normal' boundary conditions and essential boundary conditions on rectangular parallelepipeds. The periodic case allows a simple proof of existence and uniqueness of the solutions to the discretization of normal boundary conditions. Numerical examples demonstrate the efficiency of the fast elastostatic solvers for non-periodic boundary conditions. More importantly, the fast solvers on rectangular parallelepipeds can be used together with the Immersed Interface Method to solve problems on non-rectangular domains with general boundary conditions. Details of this are reported in the preprint The Explicit Jump Immersed Interface Method for 2D Linear Elastostatics by the author.

  13. Metabonomic fingerprints of fasting plasma and spot urine reveal human pre-diabetic metabolic traits

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinjie; Fritsche, Jens; Wang, Jiangshan; Chen, Jing; Rittig, Kilian; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Schleicher, Erwin D.

    2010-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) which precedes overt type 2 diabetes (T2DM) for decades is associated with multiple metabolic alterations in insulin sensitive tissues. In an UPLC-qTOF-mass spectrometry-driven non-targeted metabonomics approach we investigated plasma as well as spot urine of 51 non-diabetic, overnight fasted individuals aiming to separate subjects with IGT from controls thereby identify pathways affected by the pre-diabetic metabolic state. We could clearly demonstrate that normal glucose tolerant (NGT) and IGT subjects clustered in two distinct groups independent of the investigated metabonome. These findings reflect considerable differences in individual metabolite fingerprints, both in plasma and urine. Pre-diabetes associated alterations in fatty acid-, tryptophan-, uric acid-, bile acid-, and lysophosphatidylcholine-metabolism, as well as the TCA cycle were identified. Of note, individuals with IGT also showed decreased levels of gut flora-associated metabolites namely hippuric acid, methylxanthine, methyluric acid, and 3-hydroxyhippuric acid. The findings of our non-targeted UPLC-qTOF-MS metabonomics analysis in plasma and spot urine of individuals with IGT vs NGT offers novel insights into the metabolic alterations occurring in the long, asymptomatic period preceding the manifestation of T2DM thereby giving prospects for new intervention targets. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11306-010-0203-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20676218

  14. Mechanism for fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, G. E.; del Valle, M. V.; Vieyro, F. L.

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts are mysterious transient sources likely located at cosmological distances. The derived brightness temperatures exceed by many orders of magnitude the self-absorption limit of incoherent synchrotron radiation, implying the operation of a coherent emission process. We propose a radiation mechanism for fast radio bursts where the emission arises from collisionless bremsstrahlung in strong plasma turbulence excited by relativistic electron beams. We discuss possible astrophysical scenarios in which this process might operate. The emitting region is a turbulent plasma hit by a relativistic jet, where Langmuir plasma waves produce a concentration of intense electrostatic soliton-like regions (cavitons). The resulting radiation is coherent and, under some physical conditions, can be polarized and have a power-law distribution in energy. We obtain radio luminosities in agreement with the inferred values for fast radio bursts. The time scale of the radio flare in some cases can be extremely fast, of the order of 1 0-3 s . The mechanism we present here can explain the main features of fast radio bursts and is plausible in different astrophysical sources, such as gamma-ray bursts and some active galactic nuclei.

  15. Effect of intravenous infusion of ranitidine on intragastric acidity in fasting subjects: comparison with bolus or Gastrojet (pH-stat-adjusted) infusion.

    PubMed

    Thomson, A B; Kirdeikis, P; Simon, K; Zuk, L; Pinchbeck, B; Wasarab-Rolland, D; Kersey, K

    1993-12-01

    This study was undertaken in nine fasting healthy volunteers to compare the effect of intravenous continuous infusion versus bolus injection of ranitidine on 12-h intragastric pH, and to compare the efficacy of these two modes of administration of pH-stat-adjusted infusion of ranitidine using the Gastrojet. Each volunteer had three study sessions with 12-h pH measurements. In the ranitidine infusion treatment arm (RAN-INF), ranitidine was continually infused intravenously using an IVAC-pump at a dose of 0.125 mg mg.kg over a 12-h period. In the ranitidine bolus treatment arm (RAN-BOL), ranitidine bolus 50 mg was given over 10 min, every 6 h. When ranitidine infusion was given by the pH stat method using the Gastrojet (RAN-JET), sufficient ranitidine was given to maintain a present value of pH > or = 5. The study was analysed with a 3 x 3 Latin square cross-over design with multiple measurements of each phase of the cross-over. No difference was found between RAN-INF and RAN-BOL in 12-h or in daytime (10.00-18.00 h) mean pH, median pH, or percentage of pH > or = 5. Using RAN-JET, 89.5% of the pH values were > or = 5., compared with 39.7% and 40.0% with RAN-INF or RAN-BOL. RAN-JET also gave higher (P < 0.05) mean and median 12-h or daytime pH values, as compared with RAN-INF or RAN-BOL. The mean doses of ranitidine given in the 12-h infusion periods were 100 mg, 109 mg and 112 mg (RAN-BOL, RAN-INF and RAN-JET, respectively). Thus, this superior inhibition of acid inhibition achieved with Gastrojet does not require higher mean doses of ranitidine. These findings cannot necessarily be applied to persons with duodenal ulcer disease or to patients in an intensive-care unit setting. However, the data do raise the possibility that much greater inhibition of acid inhibition can be achieved by individualizing the dose of ranitidine using the Gastrojet. PMID:8161672

  16. HI Intensity Mapping with FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigot-Sazy, M.-A.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Battye, R. A.; Browne, I. W. A.; Chen, T.; Dickinson, C.; Harper, S.; Maffei, B.; Olivari, L. C.; Wilkinsondagger, P. N.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss the detectability of large-scale HI intensity fluctuations using the FAST telescope. We present forecasts for the accuracy of measuring the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations and constraining the properties of dark energy. The FAST 19-beam L-band receivers (1.05-1.45 GHz) can provide constraints on the matter power spectrum and dark energy equation of state parameters (w0,wa) that are comparable to the BINGO and CHIME experiments. For one year of integration time we find that the optimal survey area is 6000 deg2. However, observing with larger frequency coverage at higher redshift (0.95-1.35 GHz) improves the projected errorbars on the HI power spectrum by more than 2 σ confidence level. The combined constraints from FAST, CHIME, BINGO and Planck CMB observations can provide reliable, stringent constraints on the dark energy equation of state.

  17. Fast reactors and nuclear nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Avrorin, E.N.; Rachkov, V.I.; Chebeskov, A.N.

    2013-07-01

    Problems are discussed with regard to nuclear fuel cycle resistance in fast reactors to nuclear proliferation risk due to the potential for use in military programs of the knowledge, technologies and materials gained from peaceful nuclear power applications. Advantages are addressed for fast reactors in the creation of a more reliable mode of nonproliferation in the closed nuclear fuel cycle in comparison with the existing fully open and partially closed fuel cycles of thermal reactors. Advantages and shortcomings are also discussed from the point of view of nonproliferation from the start with fast reactors using plutonium of thermal reactor spent fuel and enriched uranium fuel to the gradual transition using their own plutonium as fuel. (authors)

  18. Future Assets, Student Talent (FAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Future Assets, Student Talent (FAST) motivates and prepares talented students with disabilities to further their education and achieve High Tech and professional employment. The FAST program is managed by local professionals, business, and industry leaders; it is modeled after High School High Tech project TAKE CHARGE started in Los Angeles in 1983. Through cooperative efforts of Alabama Department of Education, Vocational Rehabilitation, Adult and Children Services, and the President's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities, north central Alabama was chosen as the second site for a High School High Tech project. In 1986 local business, industry, education, government agencies, and rehabilitation representatives started FAST. The program objectives and goals, results and accomplishments, and survey results are included.

  19. [Preoperative fasting guidelines: an update].

    PubMed

    López Muñoz, A C; Busto Aguirreurreta, N; Tomás Braulio, J

    2015-03-01

    Anesthesiology societies have issued various guidelines on preoperative fasting since 1990, not only to decrease the incidence of lung aspiration and anesthetic morbidity, but also to increase patient comfort prior to anesthesia. Some of these societies have been updating their guidelines, as such that, since 2010, we now have 2 evidence-based preoperative fasting guidelines available. In this article, an attempt is made to review these updated guidelines, as well as the current instructions for more controversial patients such as infants, the obese, and a particular type of ophthalmic surgery. PMID:25443866

  20. Fast generation of stereolithographic models.

    PubMed

    Raic, K; Jansen, T; von Rymon-Lipinski, B; Tille, C; Seitz, H; Keeve, E

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present a work-in-progress method for fast and efficient generation of stereolithographic models. The overall approach is embedded in our general software framework Julius, which runs on high-end-graphic systems as well as on low-level PCs. The design of the support structures needed for the stereolithographic process will allow semiautomatic generation of the model. We did produce support structures for stereolithographic models with this fast data processing pipeline and will show future perspectives in this paper. PMID:12451779

  1. The Sacramento Peak fast microphotometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrambide, M. R.; Dunn, R. B.; Healy, A. W.; Porter, R.; Widener, A. L.; November, L. J.; Spence, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    The Sacramento Peak Observatory Fast Microphotometer translates an optical system that includes a laser and photodiode detector across the film to scan the Y direction. A stepping motor moves the film gate in the X direction. This arrangement affords high positional accuracy, low noise (0.002 RMS density units), modest speed (5000 points/second), large dynamic range (4.5 density units), high stability (0.005 density units), and low scattered light. The Fast Microphotometer is interfaced to the host computer by a 6502 microprocessor.

  2. New AGS fast extraction system

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1980-09-01

    Both the high energy physics program and ISA injection require an improved fast extraction system from the AGS. The proposed new system consists of a fast kicker at H5 and an ejector magnet at H10. The H5 kicker is capable of producing 1.2 mrad deflection and rising up to 99% strength in 150 nsec with flat top ripple within +- 1%. It is found that the focusing strengths and positions of UQ3-UQ7 have to be modified to achieve an achromatic condition at the end of 8/sup 0/-bend. Also, the conceptual design of the H5 magnet and the pulser system are discussed.

  3. Insulin resistance after a 72-h fast is associated with impaired AS160 phosphorylation and accumulation of lipid and glycogen in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Vendelbo, M. H.; Clasen, B. F. F.; Treebak, J. T.; Møller, L.; Krusenstjerna-Hafstrøm, T.; Madsen, M.; Nielsen, T. S.; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, H.; Pedersen, S. B.; Jørgensen, J. O. L.; Goodyear, L. J.; Wojtaszewski, J. F. P.; Møller, N.

    2012-01-01

    During fasting, human skeletal muscle depends on lipid oxidation for its energy substrate metabolism. This is associated with the development of insulin resistance and a subsequent reduction of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. The underlying mechanisms controlling insulin action on skeletal muscle under these conditions are unresolved. In a randomized design, we investigated eight healthy subjects after a 72-h fast compared with a 10-h overnight fast. Insulin action on skeletal muscle was assessed by a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp and by determining insulin signaling to glucose transport. In addition, substrate oxidation, skeletal muscle lipid content, regulation of glycogen synthesis, and AMPK signaling were assessed. Skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity was reduced profoundly in response to a 72-h fast and substrate oxidation shifted to predominantly lipid oxidation. This was associated with accumulation of both lipid and glycogen in skeletal muscle. Intracellular insulin signaling to glucose transport was impaired by regulation of phosphorylation at specific sites on AS160 but not TBC1D1, both key regulators of glucose uptake. In contrast, fasting did not impact phosphorylation of AMPK or insulin regulation of Akt, both of which are established upstream kinases of AS160. These findings show that insulin resistance in muscles from healthy individuals is associated with suppression of site-specific phosphorylation of AS160, without Akt or AMPK being affected. This impairment of AS160 phosphorylation, in combination with glycogen accumulation and increased intramuscular lipid content, may provide the underlying mechanisms for resistance to insulin in skeletal muscle after a prolonged fast. PMID:22028408

  4. Fast Langmuir probe sweeping circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Milnes, K.A.; Ehlers, K.W.; Leung, K.N.; Owren, H.M.; Williams, M.D.

    1980-06-01

    An inexpensive, simple, and fast Langmuir probe sweeping circuit is presented. This sweeper completes a probe trace in 1.4 ms and has a maximum probe current capability of 5 A. It is suitable for pulsemode plasma operation with density greater than 10/sup 12/ ions/cm/sup 3/.

  5. Enhanced Model for Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Rodney J.

    2010-10-12

    Laser Fusion is a prime candidate for alternate energy production, capable of serving a major portion of the nation's energy needs, once fusion fuel can be readily ignited. Fast Ignition may well speed achievement of this goal, by reducing net demands on laser pulse energy and timing precision. However, Fast Ignition has presented a major challenge to modeling. This project has enhanced the computer code ePLAS for the simulation of the many specialized phenomena, which arise with Fast Ignition. The improved code has helped researchers to understand better the consequences of laser absorption, energy transport, and laser target hydrodynamics. ePLAS uses efficient implicit methods to acquire solutions for the electromagnetic fields that govern the accelerations of electrons and ions in targets. In many cases, the code implements fluid modeling for these components. These combined features, "implicitness and fluid modeling," can greatly facilitate calculations, permitting the rapid scoping and evaluation of experiments. ePLAS can be used on PCs, Macs and Linux machines, providing researchers and students with rapid results. This project has improved the treatment of electromagnetics, hydrodynamics, and atomic physics in the code. It has simplified output graphics, and provided new input that avoids the need for source code access by users. The improved code can now aid university, business and national laboratory users in pursuit of an early path to success with Fast Ignition.

  6. Fast-Track Teacher Recruitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Franklin Dean

    2001-01-01

    Schools need a Renaissance human-resources director to implement strategic staffing and fast-track teacher-recruitment plans. The HR director must attend to customer satisfaction, candidate supply, web-based recruitment possibilities, stabilization of newly hired staff, retention of veteran staff, utilization of retired employees, and latest…

  7. Fast Atom Bombardment Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinehart, Kenneth L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses reactions and characteristics of fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectroscopy in which samples are ionized in a condensed state by bombardment with xenon or argon atoms, yielding positive/negative secondary ions. Includes applications of FAB to structural problems and considers future developments using the technique. (Author/JN)

  8. Fast-response cloud chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, G. L.

    1977-01-01

    Wall structure keeps chambers at constant, uniform temperature, yet allows them to be cooled rapidly if necessary. Wall structure, used in fast-response cloud chamber, has surface heater and coolant shell separated by foam insulation. It is lightweight and requires relatively little power.

  9. Fast Computation of CMH Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Umesh D.; DellaTorre, Edward; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A fast differential equation approach for the DOK model has been extented to the CMH model. Also, a cobweb technique for calculating the CMH model is also presented. The two techniques are contrasted from the point of view of flexibility and computation time.

  10. Fast Neutron Sensitivity with HPGe

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, Allen; Hensley, Walter K.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Pitts, W. K.

    2008-01-22

    In addition to being excellent gamma-ray detectors, germanium detectors are also sensitive to fast neutrons. Incident neutrons undergo inelastic scattering {Ge(n,n')Ge*} off germanium nuclei and the resulting excited states emit gamma rays or conversion electrons. The response of a standard 140% high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector with a bismuth germanate (BGO) anti-coincidence shield was measured for several neutron sources to characterize the ability of the HPGe detector to detect fast neutrons. For a sensitivity calculation performed using the characteristic fast neutron response peak that occurs at 692 keV, the 140% germanium detector system exhibited a sensitivity of ~175 counts / kg of WGPumetal in 1000 seconds at a source-detector distance of 1 meter with 4 in. of lead shielding between source and detector. Theoretical work also indicates that it might be possible to use the shape of the fast-neutron inelastic scattering signatures (specifically, the end-point energy of the long high energy tail of the resulting asymmetric peak) to gain additional information about the energy distribution of the incident neutron spectrum. However, the experimentally observed end-point energies appear to be almost identical for each of the fast neutron sources counted. Detailed MCNP calculations show that the neutron energy distributions impingent on the detector for these sources are very similar in this experimental configuration, due to neutron scattering in a lead shield (placed between the neutron source and HPGe detector to reduce the gamma ray flux), the BGO anti-coincidence detector, and the concrete floor.

  11. A fast meteor detection algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gural, P.

    2016-01-01

    A low latency meteor detection algorithm for use with fast steering mirrors had been previously developed to track and telescopically follow meteors in real-time (Gural, 2007). It has been rewritten as a generic clustering and tracking software module for meteor detection that meets both the demanding throughput requirements of a Raspberry Pi while also maintaining a high probability of detection. The software interface is generalized to work with various forms of front-end video pre-processing approaches and provides a rich product set of parameterized line detection metrics. Discussion will include the Maximum Temporal Pixel (MTP) compression technique as a fast thresholding option for feeding the detection module, the detection algorithm trade for maximum processing throughput, details on the clustering and tracking methodology, processing products, performance metrics, and a general interface description.

  12. Fast track to 340B.

    PubMed

    Gricius, Robert F; Wong, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Hospitals that are newly qualified for the 340B Drug Pricing Program may have an opportunity for fast-track approval to participate in the program. Three steps are required to seize this opportunity: Use data analytics to assess current and future percentages of Medicaid utilization and eligibility for federal SSI cash benefits. Determine the feasibility of early cost report filing. Prepare appropriate documentation and undertake the initial enrollment process. PMID:26863836

  13. Fast quench reactor and method

    SciTech Connect

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.

    2002-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  14. Fast quench reactor and method

    SciTech Connect

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.

    1998-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  15. Fast quench reactor and method

    SciTech Connect

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.

    2002-09-24

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  16. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, B.A.; Donaldson, A.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Kong, P.C.

    1998-05-12

    A fast quench reactor includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This ``freezes`` the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage. 7 figs.

  17. Long range fast tool servo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorefield, G. M., II; Dow, Thomas A.; Falter, Karl J.; Ro, Paul I.

    1993-05-01

    The PEC's MAC 100 Fast Tool Servo (FTS) System has demonstrated the efficacy of fabricating off-axis parabolic segments on axis by utilizing a fast tool motion to machine non-rotationally symmetric surfaces. The key to this technique was a servo for the tool motion that had a high-bandwidth coupled with a small range of motion. The Keck telescope, with its thirty-six (36) 1-meter diameter segments, would have been an excellent application for this technology. Since this technology was not available at the time of construction, each mirror segment was fabricated to its desired shape by loading it to a specified deformed shape and polishing it to a spherical contour, then removing the bending loads to allow the segment to relax to the desired asymmetric shape. If the segments of this optic had been constructed on axis with an FTS, the fabrication of the most extreme segment would have required only about 200 micrometers of non-rotational symmetry. However, the demand for larger displacement actuators is being driven by new applications with nonrotationally symmetric components in the millimeter range. This report describes the search for a suitable actuator for a long range fast tool servo system that would allow the fabrication of non-rotationally symmetric optical surfaces with a 1 mm range of servo motion. To allow cost-effective machining of these surfaces, the actuator must also possess a 50 Hz bandwidth (minimum) and 25 nanometer resolution.

  18. PUBLISHER'S ANNOUNCEMENT: Fast Track Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wald, Robert; Adams, Judith

    2006-12-01

    We are very pleased to announce that Classical and Quantum Gravity will launch a new Fast Track Communications section from January 2007, after which date Letters to the Editor will no longer be published. Fast Track Communications (FTCs) are short, timely papers presenting only the most important new developments. To reflect their high significance FTCs will be published at the front of the journal and will be freely available online to ensure the widest visibility. As with all articles submitted to Classical and Quantum Gravity, there are no page charges, including online colour reproduction and multi-media attachments. Authors who wish to include colour in the print version of their article will, however, be required to cover the costs. Submissions to the new Fast Track Communications section are very welcome. For details of how to submit an FTC please visit IOP Publishing's webpages http://authors.iop.org, or contact the journal at cqg@iop.org. To facilitate refereeing, authors are asked to submit a short statement accompanying their FTC, outlining why they feel that the article merits high-priority publication. Length restrictions will also be applied such that FTCs should be a maximum of 8 journal pages (5000 words) in length. The section will aim to be a high-quality, high-profile outlet for new and important research of interest to the Classical and Quantum Gravity community. We look forward to seeing it grow and take shape over the next year.

  19. A repeating fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  20. Diagnostics for Fast Ignition Science

    SciTech Connect

    MacPhee, A; Akli, K; Beg, F; Chen, C; Chen, H; Clarke, R; Hey, D; Freeman, R; Kemp, A; Key, M; King, J; LePape, S; Link, A; Ma, T; Nakamura, N; Offermann, D; Ovchinnikov, V; Patel, P; Phillips, T; Stephens, R; Town, R; Wei, M; VanWoerkom, L; Mackinnon, A

    2008-05-06

    The concept for Electron Fast Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion demands sufficient laser energy be transferred from the ignitor pulse to the assembled fuel core via {approx}MeV electrons. We have assembled a suite of diagnostics to characterize such transfer. Recent experiments have simultaneously fielded absolutely calibrated extreme ultraviolet multilayer imagers at 68 and 256eV; spherically bent crystal imagers at 4 and 8keV; multi-keV crystal spectrometers; MeV x-ray bremmstrahlung and electron and proton spectrometers (along the same line of sight); nuclear activation samples and a picosecond optical probe based interferometer. These diagnostics allow careful measurement of energy transport and deposition during and following laser-plasma interactions at extremely high intensities in both planar and conical targets. Augmented with accurate on-shot laser focal spot and pre-pulse characterization, these measurements are yielding new insight into energy coupling and are providing critical data for validating numerical PIC and hybrid PIC simulation codes in an area that is crucial for many applications, particularly fast ignition. Novel aspects of these diagnostics and how they are combined to extract quantitative data on ultra high intensity laser plasma interactions are discussed, together with implications for full-scale fast ignition experiments.

  1. A repeating fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star. PMID:26934226

  2. Heterogeneous Transmutation Sodium Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. E. Bays

    2007-09-01

    The threshold-fission (fertile) nature of Am-241 is used to destroy this minor actinide by capitalizing upon neutron capture instead of fission within a sodium fast reactor. This neutron-capture and its subsequent decay chain leads to the breeding of even neutron number plutonium isotopes. A slightly moderated target design is proposed for breeding plutonium in an axial blanket located above the active “fast reactor” driver fuel region. A parametric study on the core height and fuel pin diameter-to-pitch ratio is used to explore the reactor and fuel cycle aspects of this design. This study resulted in both non-flattened and flattened core geometries. Both of these designs demonstrated a high capacity for removing americium from the fuel cycle. A reactivity coefficient analysis revealed that this heterogeneous design will have comparable safety aspects to a homogeneous reactor of comparable size. A mass balance analysis revealed that the heterogeneous design may reduce the number of fast reactors needed to close the current once-through light water reactor fuel cycle.

  3. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  4. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Yehuda; Mahale, Narayan K.

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  5. Dietary Mannoheptulose Increases Fasting Serum Glucagon Like Peptide-1 and Post-Prandial Serum Ghrelin Concentrations in Adult Beagle Dogs

    PubMed Central

    McKnight, Leslie L.; Eyre, Ryan; Gooding, Margaret A.; Davenport, Gary M.; Shoveller, Anna Kate

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary There is increased interest in the use of nutraceuticals for weight management in companion animals. A nutraceutical can broadly be considered a food (or a part of) that provides a health benefit. Mannoheptulose (MH), a sugar found in avocados, is being investigated as a nutraceutical for dogs. In this study, dogs fed a diet containing MH had increased concentrations of blood biomarkers related to energy intake. In addition, dogs fed MH were less physically active than dogs fed a control diet. These findings suggest that dietary MH has the ability to alter energy intake and lower daily energy expenditure. Abstract There is a growing interest in the use of nutraceuticals for weight management in companion animals. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of mannoheptulose (MH), a sugar in avocados that inhibits glycolysis, on energy metabolism in adult Beagle dogs. The study was a double-blind, randomized controlled trial where dogs were allocated to a control (CON, n = 10, 10.1 ± 0.4 kg) or MH containing diet (168 mg/kg, n = 10, 10.3 ± 0.4 kg). Blood was collected after an overnight fast and 1 h post-feeding (week 12) to determine serum satiety related hormones and biochemistry. Resting and post-prandial energy expenditure and respiratory quotient were determined by indirect calorimetry (weeks 4 and 8). Physical activity was measured using an accelerometer (weeks 3, 7, 11). Body composition was assessed using dual X-ray absorptiometry (week 12). MH significantly (p < 0.05) increased fasting serum glucagon-like peptide-1 and post-prandial serum ghrelin. MH tended (p < 0.1) to increase fasting serum gastric inhibitory peptide and decrease physical activity. Together, these findings suggest that dietary MH has the ability to promote satiation and lowers daily energy expenditure. PMID:26479244

  6. Fasting Increases Tobramycin Oral Absorption in Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    De Leo, Luigina; Di Toro, Nicola; Decorti, Giuliana; Malusà, Noelia; Ventura, Alessandro; Not, Tarcisio

    2010-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of the aminoglycoside tobramycin was evaluated after oral administration to fed or fasting (15 h) mice. As expected, under normal feeding conditions, oral absorption was negligible; however, fasting induced a dramatic increase in tobramycin bioavailability. The dual-sugar test with lactulose and l-rhamnose confirmed increased small bowel permeability via the paracellular route in fasting animals. When experiments aimed at increasing the oral bioavailability of hydrophilic compounds are performed, timing of fasting should be extremely accurate. PMID:20086144

  7. The digital backend of FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xinying; Zhang, Xia; Duan, Ran; li, di; Hao, Jie

    2015-08-01

    The receiver system is an important part of FAST (Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope) and plays a key role in determining the performance of the telescope.This research covers three major aspects: establishment of system synchronization and timestamps, field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based data transmission and analysis, and the rear receiver monitoring system. We intend to combine the use of GPS and a frequency standard instrument with network access to Unix timestamps to form actual timestamps. The data are stored with timestamps that contain integer and fractional seconds to be precise and headers, which are primarily intended to distinguish the data from each other.The data analysis procedures includes converting the timestamp information to real-time information, and merging the 8 channels’ data conversion results into frequency and energy data using corresponding conversion formulae. We must develop tailored monitoring software for the FAST receiver to customize the data format and perform data transmission. Signals on the front-end and back-end of the receiver can be monitored and controlled by adjusting the parameters on the software to increase the flexibility of the receiver.Most operations are performed on FPGA board, which can be shown from the figure, including the analog-to-digital conversion (ADC), fast Fourier transform (FFT), and pulse per second (1PPS) and Unix timestamp access operations.When analog data arrive, we initialize two ADCs at a sampling rate of 3Gsps, following by 8-channel FFT parallel processing.In collaboration with the Institute of Automation, we have developed a custom FPGA board which we call "FDB"("FAST Digital Backend"). The board is integrated with two Virtex-6 and one Virtex-5 high-speed Xilinx chips. The main function of the two Virtex-6 devices is to run the FFT and PFB programs, whereas the main function of Virtex-5 is configuration of the board.This research is indispensable for realizing the

  8. Fast neutron imaging device and method

    DOEpatents

    Popov, Vladimir; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Musatov, Igor V.

    2014-02-11

    A fast neutron imaging apparatus and method of constructing fast neutron radiography images, the apparatus including a neutron source and a detector that provides event-by-event acquisition of position and energy deposition, and optionally timing and pulse shape for each individual neutron event detected by the detector. The method for constructing fast neutron radiography images utilizes the apparatus of the invention.

  9. [The design of handheld fast ECG detector].

    PubMed

    Shi, Bo; Zhang, Genxuan; Tsau, Young

    2013-03-01

    A new handheld fast ECG detector based on low gain amplifier, the high resolution analog to digital converter, the real-time digital filter, fast P-QRS-T wave detection and abstraction algorithm was designed. The results showed that the ECG detector can meet the requirements of fast detecting heart rate and ECG P-QRS-T waveforms. PMID:23777065

  10. Fast Foods, Organic Foods, Fad Diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is no standard definition of fast food. Generally, fast food is eaten without cutlery, and fast-food restaurants have no wait staff. Failure to have a standardized definition makes it difficult to compare studies. Foods available outside the home tend to be high in energy and fat compared w...

  11. Comparison of Fast-Food and Non-Fast-Food Children's Menu Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrano, Elena L.; Jedda, Virginia B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Compare the macronutrient content of children's meals sold by fast-food restaurants (FFR) and non-fast-food restaurants (NFF). Design: All restaurants within the designated city limits were surveyed. Non-fast-food children's meals were purchased, weighed, and analyzed using nutrition software. All fast-food children's meals were…

  12. HEND Maps of Fast Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Observations by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft show a global view of Mars in high-energy, or fast, neutrons. These maps are based on data acquired by the high-energy neutron detector, one of the instruments in the gamma ray spectrometer suite. Fast neutrons, like epithermal neutrons, are sensitive to the presence of hydrogen. Unlike epithermal neutrons, however, they are not affected by the presence of carbon dioxide, which at the time of these observations covered the north polar area as 'dry ice' frost. The low flux of fast neutrons (blue and purple colors) in the north polar region suggests an abundance of hydrogen in the soil comparable to that determined in the south from the flux of epithermal neutrons. These observations were acquired during the first two months of mapping operations. Contours of topography are superimposed on these maps for geographic reference.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. Investigators at Arizona State University in Tempe, the University of Arizona in Tucson, and NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, operate the science instruments. The gamma-ray spectrometer was provided by the University of Arizona in collaboration with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, which provided the high-energy neutron detector, and the Los Alamos National Laboratories, New Mexico, which provided the neutron spectrometer. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  13. Fast ignition without hole boring.

    PubMed

    Hain, S; Mulser, P

    2001-02-01

    A fast-ignitor scheme for inertial confinement fusion is proposed which works without hole boring. It is shown that a thermonuclear burn wave starts from the pellet corona when an adequate amount of energy (typically 10 kJ) is deposited in the critical layer by a petawatt laser ("coronal ignition"). Burn efficiencies as high as predicted for standard central spark ignition are achieved. In addition, the scheme is surprisingly insensitive to large deviations from spherical precompression symmetry. It may open a new prospect for direct drive. PMID:11177998

  14. FAMA: Fast Automatic MOOG Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, Laura; Randich, Sofia; Friel, Eileen; Spina, Lorenzo; Jacobson, Heather; Cantat-Gaudin, Tristan; Donati, Paolo; Baglioni, Roberto; Maiorca, Enrico; Bragaglia, Angela; Sordo, Rosanna; Vallenari, Antonella

    2014-02-01

    FAMA (Fast Automatic MOOG Analysis), written in Perl, computes the atmospheric parameters and abundances of a large number of stars using measurements of equivalent widths (EWs) automatically and independently of any subjective approach. Based on the widely-used MOOG code, it simultaneously searches for three equilibria, excitation equilibrium, ionization balance, and the relationship between logn(FeI) and the reduced EWs. FAMA also evaluates the statistical errors on individual element abundances and errors due to the uncertainties in the stellar parameters. Convergence criteria are not fixed "a priori" but instead are based on the quality of the spectra.

  15. Fast pulse nonthermal plasma reactor

    DOEpatents

    Rosocha, Louis A.

    2005-06-14

    A fast pulsed nonthermal plasma reactor includes a discharge cell and a charging assembly electrically connected thereto. The charging assembly provides plural high voltage pulses to the discharge cell. Each pulse has a rise time between one and ten nanoseconds and a duration of three to twenty nanoseconds. The pulses create nonthermal plasma discharge within the discharge cell. Accordingly, the nonthermal plasma discharge can be used to remove pollutants from gases or break the gases into smaller molecules so that they can be more efficiently combusted.

  16. Mechanisms for fast flare reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanhoven, G.; Deeds, D.; Tachi, T.

    1988-01-01

    Normal collisional-resistivity mechanisms of magnetic reconnection have the drawback that they are too slow to explain the fast rise of solar flares. Two methods are examined which are proposed for the speed-up of the magnetic tearing instability: the anomalous enhancement of resistivity by the injection of MHD turbulence and the increase of Coulomb resistivity by radiative cooling. The results are described for nonlinear numerical simulations of these processes which show that the first does not provide the claimed effects, while the second yields impressive rates of reconnection, but low saturated energy outputs.

  17. Fast-acting valve actuator

    DOEpatents

    Cho, Nakwon

    1980-01-01

    A fast-acting valve actuator utilizes a spring driven pneumatically loaded piston to drive a valve gate. Rapid exhaust of pressurized gas from the pneumatically loaded side of the piston facilitates an extremely rapid piston stroke. A flexible selector diaphragm opens and closes an exhaust port in response to pressure differentials created by energizing and de-energizing a solenoid which controls the pneumatic input to the actuator as well as selectively providing a venting action to one side of the selector diaphragm.

  18. Isochoric implosions for fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D S; Tabak, M

    2006-06-05

    Fast Ignition (FI) exploits the ignition of a dense, uniform fuel assembly by an external energy source to achieve high gain. In conventional ICF implosions, however, the fuel assembles as a dense shell surrounding a low density, high-pressure hotspot. Such configurations are far from optimal for FI. Here, it is shown that a self-similar spherical implosion of the type originally studied by Guderley [Luftfahrtforschung 19, 302 (1942).] may be employed to implode a dense, quasi-uniform fuel assembly with minimal energy wastage in forming a hotspot. A scheme for realizing these specialized implosions in a practical ICF target is also described.

  19. Does fast magnetic reconnection exist?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priest, E. R.; Forbes, T. G.

    1992-01-01

    The main features of the Priest-Forbes (1986) and Priest-Lee (1990) models of magnetic reconnection in astrophysical plasmas are discussed, and the Priest-Lee model is generalized to include inflow pressure gradients and thus different regimes of reconnection. It is shown that different scaling results can be obtained depending on the boundary conditions. These results are compared to the ones observed in the numerical experiments of Biskamp (1986) and Lee and Fu (1986). It is concluded that numerical experiments with suitably designed boundary conditions are likely to exhibit fast reconnection, and that such reconnection is a common process in astrophysical and space plasmas.

  20. Fast feedback for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.; Gromme, T.; Grossberg, P.; Himel, T.; Krauter, K.; MacKenzie, R.; Minty, M.; Sass, R.

    1995-05-01

    A fast feedback system provides beam stabilization for the SLC. As the SLC is in some sense a prototype for future linear colliders, this system may be a prototype for future feedbacks. The SLC provides a good base of experience for feedback requirements and capabilities as well as a testing ground for performance characteristics. The feedback system controls a wide variety of machine parameters throughout the SLC and associated experiments, including regulation of beam position, angle, energy, intensity and timing parameters. The design and applications of the system are described, in addition to results of recent performance studies.

  1. Exploiting Resistive Guiding for Fast Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Alex

    2012-10-01

    Devising methods and schemes for controlling fast electron transport remains a major challenge in Fast Ignition research. Realistic estimates of the fast electron divergence angle require this control in order to ensure that the fast electron to hot spot coupling efficiency does not reach excessively low values. Resistivity gradients in the target will lead to strong magnetic field growth (via ∇ηxj) which can be exploited for the purposes of controlling the fast electron propagation (Robinson and Sherlock, PoP (2007)). There are a number of possible schemes which might be considered. Here we will report on numerical simulations that we have carried out on both simple configurations such as parabolic reflectors, and complex arrangements (Robinson, Key and Tabak, PRL (2012)). Substantial improvements to the fast electron to hot spot coupling efficiency have been found even for realistic fast electron divergence angles.

  2. RCD+: Fast loop modeling server

    PubMed Central

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Canosa-Valls, Alejandro Jesús; Li, Yaohang; Chacón, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Modeling loops is a critical and challenging step in protein modeling and prediction. We have developed a quick online service (http://rcd.chaconlab.org) for ab initio loop modeling combining a coarse-grained conformational search with a full-atom refinement. Our original Random Coordinate Descent (RCD) loop closure algorithm has been greatly improved to enrich the sampling distribution towards near-native conformations. These improvements include a new workflow optimization, MPI-parallelization and fast backbone angle sampling based on neighbor-dependent Ramachandran probability distributions. The server starts by efficiently searching the vast conformational space from only the loop sequence information and the environment atomic coordinates. The generated closed loop models are subsequently ranked using a fast distance-orientation dependent energy filter. Top ranked loops are refined with the Rosetta energy function to obtain accurate all-atom predictions that can be interactively inspected in an user-friendly web interface. Using standard benchmarks, the average root mean squared deviation (RMSD) is 0.8 and 1.4 Å for 8 and 12 residues loops, respectively, in the challenging modeling scenario in where the side chains of the loop environment are fully remodeled. These results are not only very competitive compared to those obtained with public state of the art methods, but also they are obtained ∼10-fold faster. PMID:27151199

  3. RCD+: Fast loop modeling server.

    PubMed

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Canosa-Valls, Alejandro Jesús; Li, Yaohang; Chacón, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Modeling loops is a critical and challenging step in protein modeling and prediction. We have developed a quick online service (http://rcd.chaconlab.org) for ab initio loop modeling combining a coarse-grained conformational search with a full-atom refinement. Our original Random Coordinate Descent (RCD) loop closure algorithm has been greatly improved to enrich the sampling distribution towards near-native conformations. These improvements include a new workflow optimization, MPI-parallelization and fast backbone angle sampling based on neighbor-dependent Ramachandran probability distributions. The server starts by efficiently searching the vast conformational space from only the loop sequence information and the environment atomic coordinates. The generated closed loop models are subsequently ranked using a fast distance-orientation dependent energy filter. Top ranked loops are refined with the Rosetta energy function to obtain accurate all-atom predictions that can be interactively inspected in an user-friendly web interface. Using standard benchmarks, the average root mean squared deviation (RMSD) is 0.8 and 1.4 Å for 8 and 12 residues loops, respectively, in the challenging modeling scenario in where the side chains of the loop environment are fully remodeled. These results are not only very competitive compared to those obtained with public state of the art methods, but also they are obtained ∼10-fold faster. PMID:27151199

  4. Manybeam velocimeter for fast surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Goosman, D.; Avara, G.; Steinmetz, L.; Lai, C.; Perry, S.

    1996-09-01

    For the past 5 years, we have conceived, built and successfully used a new 10 beam laser velocimeter for monitoring velocity vs time histories of fast moving surfaces, and will have a 20 beam capability soon. We conceived a method to multiplex 5 to 10 beams through a single Fabry-Perot interferometer, without losing any light that our equivalently-performing single beam system could use, and with negligible cross- talk. This saves the cost of 16 interferometers, simplifies operation and takes less space than without multiplexing. We devised special efficient light collecting probes, streak cameras that change sweep speed during the course of the record, and a new double cavity interferometer which is better, cheaper and more flexible than our previous versions. With the 10 recorders, we conceived and employ a method of using both a fast and a slow streak camera on each of 5 beams without reducing the light that is available to either camera separately. Five new galvanometrically-driven triggerable CCD streak cameras will be installed soon.

  5. Fast magnetic fluctuation diagnostics for Alfvén eigenmode and magnetohydrodynamics studies at the Joint European Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeter, R. F.; Fasoli, A. F.; Ali-Arshad, S.; Moret, J. M.

    2000-11-01

    Alfvén eigenmodes and other magnetohydrodynamic phenomena have been studied in tokamak plasmas at the Joint European Torus (JET) using a new eight-channel, 4 s, 1 MHz, 12-bit data acquisition system (KC1F) in conjunction with the JET fast Mirnov magnetic fluctuation pickup coils. To this end, the JET magnetic pickup coils were calibrated in the range 30-460 kHz using a new remote calibration technique which accounts for the presence of the first few LRC circuit resonances. Signal processing software has been developed to implement the calibration via digital filtering. A data analysis program has been written which produces spectrograms of fluctuation amplitude and toroidal mode number versus frequency and time, both interactively and for automatic overnight analyses. Modes with amplitudes δB/B⩾10-8 and toroidal mode numbers |n|<32 are now routinely detected. Since KC1F data are now available for over 4000 JET discharges, a pulse-characterization database has been developed to help select pulses of interest for detailed analysis.

  6. Fast and Efficient non-reduced Lys-C digest using pressure cycling technology for antibody disulfide mapping by LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ying; Chen, Yonghong; Yu, Christopher

    2016-09-10

    Conventional sample preparation for antibody disulfide mapping often requires relatively long digestion time (from several hours to overnight) and relatively high endoproteinase concentration. These conditions are typically necessitated by the fact that antibody molecules are not sufficiently denatured under non-reduced conditions and chaotropic agents are used during digestion to achieve optimal denaturation. Disulfide scrambling can occur as artifacts of digestion as proteins are incubated for extended periods, often at neutral to slightly alkaline pH conditions. Shortening digestion time and lowering the pH during digestion frequently result in incomplete peptide cleavages or variable recoveries. Here, we report the development of a fast and efficient non-reduced Lys-C digestion method based on pressure cycling technology (PCT) and its application in determining disulfide-linkages in monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Conditions were optimized to ensure complete digestion of the mAb with minimal sample preparation-related disulfide scrambling. The PCT-based method was able to generate up to 10-fold signal increase for some disulfide peptides in a 1h Lys-C digestion compared to the conventional bench-top digestion method. As a result of the shorter digestion time, disulfide scrambling that is seen as a major assay artifact of the conventional method was reduced to less than 0.05% in tested molecules. The results show that the PCT-based method offers fast digestion in a shorter time for all the mAbs tested. PMID:27429370

  7. Development of a method for fast and automatic radiocarbon measurement of aerosol samples by online coupling of an elemental analyzer with a MICADAS AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, G.; Zhang, Y. L.; Agrios, K.; Szidat, S.

    2015-10-01

    A fast and automatic method for radiocarbon analysis of aerosol samples is presented. This type of analysis requires high number of sample measurements of low carbon masses, but accepts precisions lower than for carbon dating analysis. The method is based on online Trapping CO2 and coupling an elemental analyzer with a MICADAS AMS by means of a gas interface. It gives similar results to a previously validated reference method for the same set of samples. This method is fast and automatic and typically provides uncertainties of 1.5-5% for representative aerosol samples. It proves to be robust and reliable and allows for overnight and unattended measurements. A constant and cross contamination correction is included, which indicates a constant contamination of 1.4 ± 0.2 μg C with 70 ± 7 pMC and a cross contamination of (0.2 ± 0.1)% from the previous sample. A Real-time online coupling version of the method was also investigated. It shows promising results for standard materials with slightly higher uncertainties than the Trapping online approach.

  8. Response to fifty grams oral glucose challenge test and pattern of preceding fasting plasma glucose in normal pregnant Nigerians

    PubMed Central

    Ajayi, Godwin Olufemi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus in pregnancy has profound implications for the baby and mother and thus active screening for this is desirable. Method: Fifty grams oral glucose challenge test was administered after obtaining consent to 222 women in good health with singleton pregnancies without diabetes mellitus at 24 to 28 weeks gestation after an overnight fast. Venous blood sample was obtained before and 1 hour after the glucose load. A diagnostic 3-hour 100 g oral glucose tolerance test was subsequently performed in all. Results: Two hundred and ten women had a normal response to oral glucose tolerance test i.e. venous plasma glucose below these cut-off levels: fasting 95 mg/dl (5.3 mmol/l), 1 hour 180 mg/dl (10.0 mmol/l), 2 hours 155 mg/dl (8.6 mmol/l) and 3 hours 140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/l), while 12 were found to have gestational diabetes mellitus and were subsequently excluded from the study. They were appropriately managed. The mean maternal age was 30.9 ± 4.1 years (range 19 to 45 years) and the mean parity was 1.2 ± 1.1 (range 0 to 5). The mean fasting plasma glucose was 74.5 ± 11.5 mg/dl (range 42 to 117 mg/dl), while the mean plasma glucose 1 hour after 50 g glucose challenge test was 115.3 ± 19.1 mg/dl (range 56 to 180 mg/dl). Conclusions: The mean fasting plasma glucose in normal pregnant Nigerians was 74.5 ± 11.5 mg/dl (range 42 to 117 mg/dl). There is a need to re-appraise and possibly review downwards the World Health Organization fasting plasma glucose diagnostic criteria in pregnant Nigerians for better detection of gestational diabetes mellitus. Pregnant women with venous plasma glucose greater than 153.5 mg/dl (8.5 mmol/l) 1 hour after 50 g glucose challenge test are strongly recommended for diagnostic test of gestational diabetes mellitus.

  9. Rotor for centrifugal fast analyzers

    DOEpatents

    Lee, N.E.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is an improved photometric analyzer of the rotary cuvette type, the analyzer incorporating a multicuvette rotor of novel design. The rotor (a) is leaktight, (b) permits operation in the 90/sup 0/ and 180/sup 0/ excitation modes, (c) is compatible with extensively used Centrifugal Fast Analyzers, and (d) can be used thousands of times. The rotor includes an assembly comprising a top plate, a bottom plate, and a central plate, the rim of the central plate being formed with circumferentially spaced indentations. A uv-transmitting ring is sealably affixed to the indented rim to define with the indentations an array of cuvettes. The ring serves both as a sealing means and an end window for the cuvettes.

  10. Rotor for centrifugal fast analyzers

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Norman E.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is an improved photometric analyzer of the rotary cuvette type, the analyzer incorporating a multicuvette rotor of novel design. The rotor (a) is leaktight, (b) permits operation in the 90.degree. and 180.degree. excitation modes, (c) is compatible with extensively used Centrifugal Fast Analyzers, and (d) can be used thousands of times. The rotor includes an assembly comprising a top plate, a bottom plate, and a central plate, the rim of the central plate being formed with circumferentially spaced indentations. A UV-transmitting ring is sealably affixed to the indented rim to define with the indentations an array of cuvettes. The ring serves both as a sealing means and an end window for the cuvettes.

  11. Fast data parallel polygon rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, F.A.; Hansen, C.D.

    1993-09-01

    This paper describes a parallel method for polygonal rendering on a massively parallel SIMD machine. This method, based on a simple shading model, is targeted for applications which require very fast polygon rendering for extremely large sets of polygons such as is found in many scientific visualization applications. The algorithms described in this paper are incorporated into a library of 3D graphics routines written for the Connection Machine. The routines are implemented on both the CM-200 and the CM-5. This library enables a scientists to display 3D shaded polygons directly from a parallel machine without the need to transmit huge amounts of data to a post-processing rendering system.

  12. Fast breeder reactor protection system

    DOEpatents

    van Erp, J.B.

    1973-10-01

    Reactor protection is provided for a liquid-metal-fast breeder reactor core by measuring the coolant outflow temperature from each of the subassemblies of the core. The outputs of the temperature sensors from a subassembly region of the core containing a plurality of subassemblies are combined in a logic circuit which develops a scram alarm if a predetermined number of the sensors indicate an over temperature condition. The coolant outflow from a single subassembly can be mixed with the coolant outflow from adjacent subassemblies prior to the temperature sensing to increase the sensitivity of the protection system to a single subassembly failure. Coherence between the sensors can be required to discriminate against noise signals. (Official Gazette)

  13. Fast track management and control

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, M.D.O.

    1996-12-31

    This paper, one of a group of papers describing the development of BP`s West of Shetland Foinaven field will set-out the challenges experienced in managing a fast-track project from system design through to offshore installation. ABB Seatec Limited (formerly GEC Marconi Oil and Gas) were commissioned to provide a Multiplexed Electro-Hydraulic Subsea Control System designed for deepwater and for installation/retrieval in a hostile environment. The paper will address the projects critical phase, the project controls implemented, the practical working methods used within a Subsea Alliance and those involved in Client Interaction, Concurrent Engineering, Team Coaching, Internal Procedures and Interface Management in order to meet the exacting schedule for First Oil deliveries. The Project is currently proceeding on routine production deliveries to complete the field development requirements.

  14. On fast reactor kinetics studies

    SciTech Connect

    Seleznev, E. F.; Belov, A. A.; Matveenko, I. P.; Zhukov, A. M.; Raskach, K. F.

    2012-07-01

    The results and the program of fast reactor core time and space kinetics experiments performed and planned to be performed at the IPPE critical facility is presented. The TIMER code was taken as computation support of the experimental work, which allows transient equations to be solved in 3-D geometry with multi-group diffusion approximation. The number of delayed neutron groups varies from 6 to 8. The code implements the solution of both transient neutron transfer problems: a direct one, where neutron flux density and its derivatives, such as reactor power, etc, are determined at each time step, and an inverse one for the point kinetics equation form, where such a parameter as reactivity is determined with a well-known reactor power time variation function. (authors)

  15. Hydrodynamic assembly for Fast Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabak, Max; Clark, Daniel; Town, Richard; Hatchett, Stephen

    2007-11-01

    We present directly and indirectly driven implosion designs for Fast Ignition. Directly driven designs using various laser illumination wavelengths are described. We compare these designs with simple hydrodynamic efficiency models. Capsules illuminated with less than 1 MJ of light with perfect zooming at low intensity and low contrast ratio in power can assemble 4 mg of fuel to column density in excess of 3 g/cm^2. We contrast these designs with more optimized designs that lead to Guderley-style self similar implosions. Indirectly driven capsules absorbing 75 kJ of xrays can assemble 0.7 mg to column density 2.7 g/cm^2 in 1D simulations. We describe 2-D simulations including both capsules and attached cones driven by radiation. We describe issues in assembling fuel near the cone tip and cone disruption.

  16. Fast Steerable Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhizhen; Shkolnisky, Yoel; Singer, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy nowadays often requires the analysis of hundreds of thousands of 2-D images as large as a few hundred pixels in each direction. Here, we introduce an algorithm that efficiently and accurately performs principal component analysis (PCA) for a large set of 2-D images, and, for each image, the set of its uniform rotations in the plane and their reflections. For a dataset consisting of n images of size L × L pixels, the computational complexity of our algorithm is O(nL3 + L4), while existing algorithms take O(nL4). The new algorithm computes the expansion coefficients of the images in a Fourier–Bessel basis efficiently using the nonuniform fast Fourier transform. We compare the accuracy and efficiency of the new algorithm with traditional PCA and existing algorithms for steerable PCA. PMID:27570801

  17. Should Type 1 diabetics fast in Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Fauzia; Azad, Kishwar; Zabeen, Bedowra; Tayyeb, Samin; Baki, Abdul; Nahar, Nazmun

    2015-05-01

    Fasting during the holy month of Ramadan is obligatory for all healthy adult and adolescent Muslims from the age of 12 years. This involves abstaining from eating or drinking from early dawn (Suhur/Sehri) till sunset (Iftar).Fasting is not meant to create excessive hardships or impart any adverse effect to the Muslim individual. As such, Islam has exempted certain categories of people from fasting including young children, travelers, the sick, the elderly,and pregnant and lactating women. According to expert opinion, people with type 1 diabetes who fast during Ramadan are at very high risk of metabolic deterioration. However, some recent studies have demonstrated that individuals with type 1 diabetes who are otherwise healthy and stable, can fast during Ramadan provided they comply with the Ramadan focused management plan and are under close professional supervision. This article discusses how to assess, counsel, monitor and manage people with type 1 diabetes who wish to fast during Ramadan. PMID:26013779

  18. Heterogeneous Recycling in Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Forget, Benoit; Pope, Michael; Piet, Steven J.; Driscoll, Michael

    2012-07-30

    Current sodium fast reactor (SFR) designs have avoided the use of depleted uranium blankets over concerns of creating weapons grade plutonium. While reducing proliferation risks, this restrains the reactor design space considerably. This project will analyze various blanket and transmutation target configurations that could broaden the design space while still addressing the non-proliferation issues. The blanket designs will be assessed based on the transmutation efficiency of key minor actinide (MA) isotopes and also on mitigation of associated proliferation risks. This study will also evaluate SFR core performance under different scenarios in which depleted uranium blankets are modified to include minor actinides with or without moderators (e.g. BeO, MgO, B4C, and hydrides). This will be done in an effort to increase the sustainability of the reactor and increase its power density while still offering a proliferation resistant design with the capability of burning MA waste produced from light water reactors (LWRs). Researchers will also analyze the use of recycled (as opposed to depleted) uranium in the blankets. The various designs will compare MA transmutation efficiency, plutonium breeding characteristics, proliferation risk, shutdown margins and reactivity coefficients with a current reference sodium fast reactor design employing homogeneous recycling. The team will also evaluate the out-of-core accumulation and/or burn-down rates of MAs and plutonium isotopes on a cycle-by-cycle basis. This cycle-by-cycle information will be produced in a format readily usable by the fuel cycle systems analysis code, VISION, for assessment of the sustainability of the deployment scenarios.

  19. FastBit Reference Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kesheng

    2007-08-02

    An index in a database system is a data structure that utilizes redundant information about the base data to speed up common searching and retrieval operations. Most commonly used indexes are variants of B-trees, such as B+-tree and B*-tree. FastBit implements a set of alternative indexes call compressed bitmap indexes. Compared with B-tree variants, these indexes provide very efficient searching and retrieval operations by sacrificing the efficiency of updating the indexes after the modification of an individual record. In addition to the well-known strengths of bitmap indexes, FastBit has a special strength stemming from the bitmap compression scheme used. The compression method is called the Word-Aligned Hybrid (WAH) code. It reduces the bitmap indexes to reasonable sizes and at the same time allows very efficient bitwise logical operations directly on the compressed bitmaps. Compared with the well-known compression methods such as LZ77 and Byte-aligned Bitmap code (BBC), WAH sacrifices some space efficiency for a significant improvement in operational efficiency. Since the bitwise logical operations are the most important operations needed to answer queries, using WAH compression has been shown to answer queries significantly faster than using other compression schemes. Theoretical analyses showed that WAH compressed bitmap indexes are optimal for one-dimensional range queries. Only the most efficient indexing schemes such as B+-tree and B*-tree have this optimality property. However, bitmap indexes are superior because they can efficiently answer multi-dimensional range queries by combining the answers to one-dimensional queries.

  20. Fast decoding algorithms for coded aperture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byard, Kevin

    2014-08-01

    Fast decoding algorithms are described for a number of established coded aperture systems. The fast decoding algorithms for all these systems offer significant reductions in the number of calculations required when reconstructing images formed by a coded aperture system and hence require less computation time to produce the images. The algorithms may therefore be of use in applications that require fast image reconstruction, such as near real-time nuclear medicine and location of hazardous radioactive spillage. Experimental tests confirm the efficacy of the fast decoding techniques.

  1. Physiological changes during fasting in Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Hassan, Asim

    2015-05-01

    Fasting during Ramadan is one of the five fundamental pillars of Islam and mandatory for all healthy adult Muslims to fast from sunrise to sunset for a period of a month. During fasting, Muslims are required to refrain from all intakes of food, water, beverages, smoking and from sexual intercourse. Ramadan fasting causes many physiological, biochemical, metabolic and spiritual changes in the body. Ramadan Fasting increases the Red Blood Cells (RBCs), White Blood Cells (WBCs), platelet (PLT) count, High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol (HDL-c), and decreases the blood cholesterol, triglycerides, Low Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol (LDL-c) and Very Low Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol (VLDL-c). Moreover, it reduces body weight, waist circumference, body mass index, body fat, blood glucose, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and anxiety levels. Furthermore, Ramadan fasting decreases the inflammation, pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1b, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor a and cancer promotion. Among healthy adults, there are no adverse effects of Ramadan fasting on the brain, heart, lung, liver, kidney, haematologic, endocrine profile and cognitive functions. Ramadan fasting is a healthy non pharmacological means for minimizing the risk factors and improving health. Although Ramadan fasting is safe for all healthy individuals, but those with various illnesses such as diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, renal and eye illness should consult their physicians and firmly follow the scientific recommendations. PMID:26013791

  2. Fasting: molecular mechanisms and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Longo, Valter D; Mattson, Mark P

    2014-02-01

    Fasting has been practiced for millennia, but, only recently, studies have shed light on its role in adaptive cellular responses that reduce oxidative damage and inflammation, optimize energy metabolism, and bolster cellular protection. In lower eukaryotes, chronic fasting extends longevity, in part, by reprogramming metabolic and stress resistance pathways. In rodents intermittent or periodic fasting protects against diabetes, cancers, heart disease, and neurodegeneration, while in humans it helps reduce obesity, hypertension, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis. Thus, fasting has the potential to delay aging and help prevent and treat diseases while minimizing the side effects caused by chronic dietary interventions. PMID:24440038

  3. Fasting: Molecular Mechanisms and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Valter D.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    Fasting has been practiced for millennia, but only recently studies have shed light on its role in adaptive cellular responses that reduce oxidative damage and inflammation, optimize energy metabolism and bolster cellular protection. In lower eukaryotes, chronic fasting extends longevity in part by reprogramming metabolic and stress resistance pathways. In rodents intermittent or periodic fasting protects against diabetes, cancers, heart disease and neurodegeneration, while in humans it helps reduce obesity, hypertension, asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. Thus, fasting has the potential to delay aging and help prevent and treat diseases while minimizing the side effects caused by chronic dietary interventions. PMID:24440038

  4. Relationship of attitudes toward fast food and frequency of fast-food intake in adults.

    PubMed

    Dave, Jayna M; An, Lawrence C; Jeffery, Robert W; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the association between attitudes toward fast food and the frequency of fast-food intake in adults. This study is a cross-sectional evaluation of random digit-dial telephone surveys to identify patterns of eating away from home and attitudes toward it. Participants included 530 adults (94% white, 65% women, 70% married, 42% with college educated). Attitudes toward fast food was measured using an 11-item, 4-dimensional scale: perceived convenience of fast food (alpha=0.56); fast food is fun and social (alpha=0.55); fast food perceived as unhealthful (alpha=0.45); and dislike toward cooking (alpha=0.52). Frequency of fast-food intake was found to be significantly associated with age (odds ratios (OR)=0.981, P=0.001), gender (men>women), and marital status of the participants (single>married/partnered and divorced/separated/widowed). Additionally, frequency of fast-food intake was also found to be significantly associated with perceived convenience of fast food (OR=1.162, P<0.001) and dislike toward cooking (OR=1.119, P<0.001) but not with perceived unhealthfulness of fast food (OR=0.692, P=0.207). These findings suggest public education regarding the unhealthfulness of fast food may not influence fast food consumption. Interventions targeting the issue of convenience and quick or efficient preparation of nutritious alternatives to fast food could be more promising. PMID:19247277

  5. TiO{sub 2} nanorods branched on fast-synthesized large clearance TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays for dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Anzheng; Li Haina; Jia Zhiyong; Xia Zhengcai

    2011-11-15

    A large clearance TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays (LTAs) has been synthesized by a not more than 12 h anodization duration and based on this a branched TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays (BLTs) has been achieved through TiO{sub 2} nanorods branch-like grown on the LTAs. Some key factors and probable mechanisms of the fabrication processes on two novel nanoarchitectures are discussed. Exhilaratingly, it is found that the obtained LTAs has demonstrated large pore diameter and void spaces (pore diameter {approx}350 nm; void spaces {approx}160 nm; and tube length {approx}3.5 {mu}m), and the synthesized hierarchical BLTs, compared with conventional TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays, has shown a much stronger dye absorption performance and an approximately double of the solar cell efficiency (in our case from 1.62% to 3.18% under simulated AM 1.5 conditions). - Graphical Abstract: The schematic diagram of synthesis process for LTAs and BLTs is on the above and the corresponding FESEM images of obtained photoanodes samples are shown below. Highlights: > Large clearance TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays (LTAs) was synthesized by a fast anodization process of 12 h. > Anodization time of 12 h is just 10% of about 120 h reported in the previous references. > Branch-like TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays (BLTs) was achieved by growing TiO{sub 2} nanorods on the LTAs. > Obtained BLTs and LTAs show impressive morphology and noticeable improvement of surface area. > BLTs shows about more than 1 times higher solar cell efficiency than that of TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays.

  6. Fast ion JET diagnostics: confinement and losses

    SciTech Connect

    Kiptily, V. G.; Pinches, S. D.; Sharapov, S. E.; Syme, D. B.; Cecconello, M.; Darrow, D.; Hill, K.; Goloborod'ko, V.; Yavorskij, V.; Johnson, T.; Murari, A.; Reich, M.; Gorini, G.; Zoita, V.

    2008-03-12

    A study of magnetically confined fast ions in tokamaks plays an important role in burning plasma research. To reach ignition and steady burning of a reactor plasma an adequate confinement of energetic ions produced by NBI heating, accelerated with ICRF and born in fusion reactions is essential to provide efficient heating of the bulk plasma. Thus, investigation of the fast ion behaviour is an immediate task for present-day large machines, such as JET, in order to understand the main mechanisms of slowing down, redistribution and losses, and to develop optimal plasma scenarios. Today's JET has an enhanced suite of fast ion diagnostics both of confined and lost ions that enable to significantly contribute to this important area of research. Fast ion populations of p, d, t, {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He, made with ICRF, NBI, and fusion reactions have been investigated in experiments on JET with sophisticated diagnostics in conventional and shear-reversed plasmas, exploring a wide range of effects. This paper will introduce to the JET fast-ion diagnostic techniques and will give an overview of recent observations. A synergy of the unique diagnostic set was utilised in JET, and studies of the response of fast ions to MHD modes (e.g. tornado modes, sawtooth crashes), fast {sup 3}He-ions behaviour in shear-reversed plasmas are impressive examples of that. Some results on fast ion losses in JET experiments with various levels of the toroidal field ripple will be demonstrated.

  7. Nutrient quality of fast food kids meals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposure of children to kids’ meals at fast food restaurants is high; however, the nutrient quality of such meals has not been systematically assessed. We assessed the nutrient quality of fast food meals marketed to young children, i.e., "kids meals". The nutrient quality of kids’ meals was assessed...

  8. Fast Mapping in Late-Talking Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weismer, Susan Ellis; Venker, Courtney E.; Evans, Julia L.; Moyle, Maura Jones

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated fast mapping in late-talking (LT) toddlers and toddlers with normal language (NL) development matched on age, nonverbal cognition, and maternal education. The fast-mapping task included novel object labels and familiar words. The LT group scored significantly lower than the NL group on novel word comprehension and…

  9. Analytical model for fast-shock ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Ghasemi, S. A. Farahbod, A. H.; Sobhanian, S.

    2014-07-15

    A model and its improvements are introduced for a recently proposed approach to inertial confinement fusion, called fast-shock ignition (FSI). The analysis is based upon the gain models of fast ignition, shock ignition and considerations for the fast electrons penetration into the pre-compressed fuel to examine the formation of an effective central hot spot. Calculations of fast electrons penetration into the dense fuel show that if the initial electron kinetic energy is of the order ∼4.5 MeV, the electrons effectively reach the central part of the fuel. To evaluate more realistically the performance of FSI approach, we have used a quasi-two temperature electron energy distribution function of Strozzi (2012) and fast ignitor energy formula of Bellei (2013) that are consistent with 3D PIC simulations for different values of fast ignitor laser wavelength and coupling efficiency. The general advantages of fast-shock ignition in comparison with the shock ignition can be estimated to be better than 1.3 and it is seen that the best results can be obtained for the fuel mass around 1.5 mg, fast ignitor laser wavelength ∼0.3  micron and the shock ignitor energy weight factor about 0.25.

  10. Optical imaging of fast, dynamic neurophysiological function.

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, D. M.; Carter, K. M.; Yao, X.; George, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    Fast evoked responses were imaged from rat dorsal medulla and whisker barrel cortex. To investigate the biophysical mechanisms involved, fast optical responses associated with isolated crustacean nerve stimulation were recorded using birefringence and scattered light. Such studies allow optimization of non-invasive imaging techniques being developed for use in humans.

  11. FAST User's Guide - Updated August 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Jonkman, J. M.; Buhl, M. L. Jr.

    2005-10-01

    The FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures, and Turbulence) Code is a comprehensive aeroelastic simulator capable of predicting both the extreme and fatigue loads of two- and three-bladed horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). This document covers the features of FAST and outlines its operating procedures.

  12. Magnetic Booster Fast Ignition Macron Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Friedwardt Winterberg

    2007-10-01

    Fast Impact ignition using the magnetic booster target concept is studied for isentropic compression and for thermonuclear micro-detonation. Fast ignition of a dense beam-magnetized cylindrical pure D target by multi-megampere GeV proton beams generated with a Super Marx Generator is studied. Shear flow stabilization of think cylindrical axial current confined DT detonation targets.

  13. Fast Mapping Verb Meaning from Argument Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Valerie E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine lexical knowledge in children through a fast mapping task. Method: This study compared the performance of 60 African American English-speaking and general American English-speaking children between the ages of 4 and 6 years. They were presented with a comprehension task involving the fast mapping of novel verbs in 4 different…

  14. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Durst, Philip C.; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Boyer, Brian; Wallace, Rick L.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Kovacic, Don N.; Tolk, K.

    2007-12-15

    This third report in the series reviews possible safeguards approaches for new fast reactors in general, and the ABR in particular. Fast-neutron spectrum reactors have been used since the early 1960s on an experimental and developmental level, generally with fertile blanket fuels to “breed” nuclear fuel such as plutonium. Whether the reactor is designed to breed plutonium, or transmute and “burn” actinides depends mainly on the design of the reactor neutron reflector and the whether the blanket fuel is “fertile” or suitable for transmutation. However, the safeguards issues are very similar, since they pertain mainly to the receipt, shipment and storage of fresh and spent plutonium and actinide-bearing “TRU”-fuel. For these reasons, the design of existing fast reactors and details concerning how they have been safeguarded were studied in developing advanced safeguards approaches for the new fast reactors. In this regard, the design of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II “EBR-II” at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was of interest, because it was designed as a collocated fast reactor with a pyrometallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication line – a design option being considered for the ABR. Similarly, the design of the Fast Flux Facility (FFTF) on the Hanford Site was studied, because it was a successful prototype fast reactor that ran for two decades to evaluate fuels and the design for commercial-scale fast reactors.

  15. Advances by the Integral Fast Reactor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lineberry, M.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Walters, L.C.; Cahalan, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    The advances by the Integral Fast Reactor Program at Argonne National Laboratory are the subject of this paper. The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The advances stressed in the paper include fuel irradiation performance, improved passive safety, and the development of a prototype fuel cycle facility. 14 refs.

  16. Research Program of a Super Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Yoshiaki; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Liu, Jie; Terai, Takayuki; Nagasaki, Shinya; Muroya, Yusa; Abe, Hiroaki; Akiba, Masato; Akimoto, Hajime; Okumura, Keisuke; Akasaka, Naoaki; GOTO, Shoji

    2006-07-01

    Research program of a supercritical-pressure light water cooled fast reactor (Super Fast Reactor) is funded by MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) in December 2005 as one of the research programs of Japanese NERI (Nuclear Energy Research Initiative). It consists of three programs. (1) development of Super Fast Reactor concept; (2) thermal-hydraulic experiments; (3) material developments. The purpose of the concept development is to pursue the advantage of high power density of fast reactor over thermal reactors to achieve economic competitiveness of fast reactor for its deployment without waiting for exhausting uranium resources. Design goal is not breeding, but maximizing reactor power by using plutonium from spent LWR fuel. MOX will be the fuel of the Super Fast Reactor. Thermal-hydraulic experiments will be conducted with HCFC22 (Hydro chlorofluorocarbons) heat transfer loop of Kyushu University and supercritical water loop at JAEA. Heat transfer data including effect of grid spacers will be taken. The critical flow and condensation of supercritical fluid will be studied. The materials research includes the development and testing of austenitic stainless steel cladding from the experience of PNC1520 for LMFBR. Material for thermal insulation will be tested. SCWR (Supercritical-Water Cooled Reactor) of GIF (Generation-4 International Forum) includes both thermal and fast reactors. The research of the Super Fast Reactor will enhance SCWR research and the data base. The research period will be until March 2010. (authors)

  17. Fasting during Ramadan in adolescents with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zabeen, Bedowra; Tayyeb, Samin; Benarjee, Biplob; Baki, Abdul; Nahar, Jebun; Mohsin, Fauzia; Nahar, Nazmun; Azad, Kishwar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fasting (Sawm) during Ramadan, one of the five pillars of Islam is obligatory for all healthy adult and adolescent Muslims from the age of 12 years. Some children with diabetes, despite their exemption insist on fasting in Ramadan. We evaluated the safety of fasting among children with type 1 diabetes. Materials and Mathods: A prospective observational study was designed for diabetic children and adolescents who wish to fast during Ramadan 2012. Patients with their caregivers were given intensive education and instructions were provided by diabetic educators, dieticians and physicians on insulin adjustment, home blood glucose monitoring and dietary adjustments prior to Ramadan. Results: A total of 33 children and adolescents were included in this study. Of these, 16 were male and 17 were female. Majority (60.6%) of the patients could complete their fasting during the Ramadan. Patients were divided into two groups, those who completed fasting were considered as Group-I, whereas patients who broke the fast were in Group-ll. Blood glucose, hemoglobin A1c weight, and insulin dose before and after Ramadan in two groups showed no significant difference. Conclusion: Children older than 11 years of age with type 1 diabetes mellitus with conventional twice-a-day regimen can fast safely during Ramadan provided they have proper education and intensive follow-up during Ramadan. PMID:24701429

  18. Can Fast and Slow Intelligence Be Differentiated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partchev, Ivailo; De Boeck, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Responses to items from an intelligence test may be fast or slow. The research issue dealt with in this paper is whether the intelligence involved in fast correct responses differs in nature from the intelligence involved in slow correct responses. There are two questions related to this issue: 1. Are the processes involved different? 2. Are the…

  19. Fasting: The History, Pathophysiology and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Kerndt, Peter R.; Naughton, James L.; Driscoll, Charles E.; Loxterkamp, David A.

    1982-01-01

    An appreciation of the physiology of fasting is essential to the understanding of therapeutic dietary interventions and the effect of food deprivation in various diseases. The practice of prolonged fasting for political or religious purposes is increasing, and a physician is likely to encounter such circumstances. Early in fasting weight loss is rapid, averaging 0.9 kg per day during the first week and slowing to 0.3 kg per day by the third week; early rapid weight loss is primarily due to negative sodium balance. Metabolically, early fasting is characterized by a high rate of gluconeogenesis with amino acids as the primary substrates. As fasting continues, progressive ketosis develops due to the mobilization and oxidation of fatty acids. As ketone levels rise they replace glucose as the primary energy source in the central nervous system, thereby decreasing the need for gluconeogenesis and sparing protein catabolism. Several hormonal changes occur during fasting, including a fall in insulin and T3 levels and a rise in glucagon and reverse T3 levels. Most studies of fasting have used obese persons and results may not always apply to lean persons. Medical complications seen in fasting include gout and urate nephrolithiasis, postural hypotension and cardiac arrhythmias. ImagesFigure 4. PMID:6758355

  20. Fast Robust PCA on Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Nauman; Perraudin, Nathanael; Kalofolias, Vassilis; Puy, Gilles; Vandergheynst, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    Mining useful clusters from high dimensional data has received significant attention of the computer vision and pattern recognition community in the recent years. Linear and non-linear dimensionality reduction has played an important role to overcome the curse of dimensionality. However, often such methods are accompanied with three different problems: high computational complexity (usually associated with the nuclear norm minimization), non-convexity (for matrix factorization methods) and susceptibility to gross corruptions in the data. In this paper we propose a principal component analysis (PCA) based solution that overcomes these three issues and approximates a low-rank recovery method for high dimensional datasets. We target the low-rank recovery by enforcing two types of graph smoothness assumptions, one on the data samples and the other on the features by designing a convex optimization problem. The resulting algorithm is fast, efficient and scalable for huge datasets with O(nlog(n)) computational complexity in the number of data samples. It is also robust to gross corruptions in the dataset as well as to the model parameters. Clustering experiments on 7 benchmark datasets with different types of corruptions and background separation experiments on 3 video datasets show that our proposed model outperforms 10 state-of-the-art dimensionality reduction models. Our theoretical analysis proves that the proposed model is able to recover approximate low-rank representations with a bounded error for clusterable data.

  1. Impulsively generated fast coronal pulsations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwin, P. M.; Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid oscillations in the corona are discussed from a theoretical standpoint, developing some previous work on ducted, fast magnetoacoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium. In the theory, impulsively (e.g., flare) generated mhd (magnetohydrodynamic) waves are ducted by regions of low Alfven speed (high density) such as coronal loops. Wave propagation in such ducts is strongly dispersive and closely akin to the behavior of Love waves in seismology, Pekeris waves in oceanography and guided waves in fiber optics. Such flare-generated magnetoacoustic waves possess distinctive temporal signatures consisting of periodic, quasi-periodic and decay phases. The quasi-periodic phase possesses the strongest amplitudes and the shortest time scales. Time scales are typically of the order of a second for inhomogeneities (coronal loop width) of 1000 km and Alfven speeds of 1000/kms, and pulse duration times are of tens of seconds. Quasi-periodic signatures have been observed in radio wavelengths for over a decade and more recently by SMM. It is hoped that the theoretical ideas outlined may be successfully related to these observations and thus aid the interpretation of oscillatory signatures recorded by SMM. Such signatures may also provide a diagnostic of coronal conditions. New aspects of the ducted mhd waves, for example their behavior in smoothly varying as opposed to tube-like inhomogeneities, are currently under investigation. The theory is not restricted to loops but applied equally to open field regions.

  2. Fast approach for toner saving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, Ilia V.; Kurilin, Ilya V.; Rychagov, Michael N.; Lee, Hokeun; Kim, Sangho; Choi, Donchul

    2011-01-01

    Reducing toner consumption is an important task in modern printing devices and has a significant positive ecological impact. Existing toner saving approaches have two main drawbacks: appearance of hardcopy in toner saving mode is worse in comparison with normal mode; processing of whole rendered page bitmap requires significant computational costs. We propose to add small holes of various shapes and sizes to random places inside a character bitmap stored in font cache. Such random perforation scheme is based on processing pipeline in RIP of standard printer languages Postscript and PCL. Processing of text characters only, and moreover, processing of each character for given font and size alone, is an extremely fast procedure. The approach does not deteriorate halftoned bitmap and business graphics and provide toner saving for typical office documents up to 15-20%. Rate of toner saving is adjustable. Alteration of resulted characters' appearance is almost indistinguishable in comparison with solid black text due to random placement of small holes inside the character regions. The suggested method automatically skips small fonts to preserve its quality. Readability of text processed by proposed method is fine. OCR programs process that scanned hardcopy successfully too.

  3. Fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Z.; Falkowski, P.

    1997-02-11

    A fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher is described suitable for high flash photolysis including kinetic chemical and biological analysis. The flasher includes a power supply, a discharge capacitor operably connected to be charged by the power supply, and a flash lamp for producing a series of flashes in response to discharge of the discharge capacitor. A triggering circuit operably connected to the flash lamp initially ionizes the flash lamp. A current switch is operably connected between the flash lamp and the discharge capacitor. The current switch has at least one insulated gate bipolar transistor for switching current that is operable to initiate a controllable discharge of the discharge capacitor through the flash lamp. Control means connected to the current switch for controlling the rate of discharge of the discharge capacitor thereby to effectively keep the flash lamp in an ionized state between successive discharges of the discharge capacitor. Advantageously, the control means is operable to discharge the discharge capacitor at a rate greater than 10,000 Hz and even up to a rate greater than about 250,000 Hz. 14 figs.

  4. Isochoric Implosions for Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D S; Tabak, M

    2007-04-04

    Various gain models have shown the potentially great advantages of Fast Ignition (FI) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) over its conventional hot spot ignition counterpart [e.g., S. Atzeni, Phys. Plasmas 6, 3316 (1999); M. Tabak et al., Fusion Sci. & Technology 49, 254 (2006)]. These gain models, however, all assume nearly uniform-density fuel assemblies. In contrast, conventional ICF implosions yield hollowed fuel assemblies with a high-density shell of fuel surrounding a low-density, high-pressure hot spot. Hence, to realize fully the advantages of FI, an alternative implosion design must be found which yields nearly isochoric fuel assemblies without substantial hot spots. Here, it is shown that a self-similar spherical implosion of the type originally studied by Guderley [Luftfahrtforschung 19, 302 (1942)] may be employed to yield precisely such quasi-isochoric imploded states. The difficulty remains, however, of accessing these self-similarly imploding configurations from initial conditions representing an actual ICF target, namely a uniform, solid-density shell at rest. Furthermore, these specialized implosions must be realized for practicable drive parameters and at the scales and energies of interest in ICF. A direct-drive implosion scheme is presented which meets all of these requirements and reaches a nearly isochoric assembled density of 300 g=cm{sup 3} and areal density of 2.4 g=cm{sup 2} using 485 kJ of laser energy.

  5. Fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Zbigniew; Falkowski, Paul

    1997-02-11

    A fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher suitable for high flash photolysis including kinetic chemical and biological analysis. The flasher includes a power supply, a discharge capacitor operably connected to be charged by the power supply, and a flash lamp for producing a series of flashes in response to discharge of the discharge capacitor. A triggering circuit operably connected to the flash lamp initially ionizes the flash lamp. A current switch is operably connected between the flash lamp and the discharge capacitor. The current switch has at least one insulated gate bipolar transistor for switching current that is operable to initiate a controllable discharge of the discharge capacitor through the flash lamp. Control means connected to the current switch for controlling the rate of discharge of the discharge capacitor thereby to effectively keep the flash lamp in an ionized state between Successive discharges of the discharge capacitor. Advantageously, the control means is operable to discharge the discharge capacitor at a rate greater than 10,000 Hz and even up to a rate greater than about 250,000 Hz.

  6. Fast perception of binocular disparity.

    PubMed

    Caziot, Baptiste; Valsecchi, Matteo; Gegenfurtner, Karl R; Backus, Benjamin T

    2015-08-01

    Is depth perception from binocular disparities-stereopsis-slow or fast? Many of the temporal properties of stereopsis are known. For example, rapidly changing disparities are perceptually difficult to track, which suggests that stereopsis is generally slow. But, remarkably, this basic question has not yet been addressed. We compared speed-accuracy trade-off functions between 2 forced-choice discriminations: 1 based on stereoscopic depth and 1 based on luminance. Unexpectedly, both speed-accuracy trade-off functions deviated from chance levels of accuracy at the same response time-approximately 200 ms-with stereo accuracy increasing, on average, more slowly than luminance accuracy after this initial delay. Thus, the initial processing of disparity for perceived depth took no longer than the initial processing of luminance for perceived brightness. This finding, that binocular disparities are available early during visual processing, means that depth is perceived quickly, and, intriguingly, that disparities may be more important for everyday visual function than previously thought. PMID:26121497

  7. Fast evaluation of polarizable forces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Skeel, Robert D

    2005-10-22

    Polarizability is considered to be the single most significant development in the next generation of force fields for biomolecular simulations. However, the self-consistent computation of induced atomic dipoles in a polarizable force field is expensive due to the cost of solving a large dense linear system at each step of a simulation. This article introduces methods that reduce the cost of computing the electrostatic energy and force of a polarizable model from about 7.5 times the cost of computing those of a nonpolarizable model to less than twice the cost. This is probably sufficient for the routine use of polarizable forces in biomolecular simulations. The reduction in computing time is achieved by an efficient implementation of the particle-mesh Ewald method, an accurate and robust predictor based on least-squares fitting, and non-stationary iterative methods whose fast convergence is accelerated by a simple preconditioner. Furthermore, with these methods, the self-consistent approach with a larger timestep is shown to be faster than the extended Lagrangian approach. The use of dipole moments from previous timesteps to calculate an accurate initial guess for iterative methods leads to an energy drift, which can be made acceptably small. The use of a zero initial guess does not lead to perceptible energy drift if a reasonably strict convergence criterion for the iteration is imposed. PMID:16268681

  8. Fast MR imaging in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Masako; Watanabe, Yuji; Okumura, Akira; Amoh, Yoshiki; Nakashita, Satoru; Dodo, Yoshihiro

    2002-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is the initial imaging modality of choice for evaluation of patients in obstetrics. However, the results of US are not always sufficient. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, which uses no ionizing radiation, may be an ideal method for further evaluation. Although MR imaging is not recommended during the first trimester and use of contrast material is not recommended in pregnant patients, fast MR imaging is useful in various obstetric settings and can provide more specific information with excellent tissue contrast and multiplanar views. In pregnant patients with acute conditions, various diseases (eg, red degeneration of a uterine leiomyoma) may be diagnosed. MR imaging allows characterization of pelvic masses discovered during pregnancy and diagnosis of postpartum complications (eg, abscess, hematoma, ovarian vein thrombosis). In pregnant patients with hydronephrosis, MR urography can demonstrate the site of obstruction and the cause (eg, a ureteral stone). MR pelvimetry may be beneficial in cases of breech presentation. Contrast material-enhanced dynamic MR imaging allows one to evaluate the vascularity of a placental polyp, detect the viable component of a gestational trophoblastic tumor, and diagnose a uterine arteriovenous malformation. MR imaging enables diagnosis of rare forms of ectopic pregnancy and early diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy. PMID:12006687

  9. [Fast neutron cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.

    1992-10-26

    From its inception, the Nuclear Data Project at the University of Michigan has concentrated on two major objectives: (1) to carry out carefully controlled nuclear measurements of the highest possible reliability in support of the national nuclear data program, and (2) to provide an educational opportunity for students with interests in experimental nuclear science. The project has undergone a successful transition from a primary dependence on our photoneutron laboratory to one in which our current research is entirely based on a unique pulsed 14 MeV fast neutron facility. The new experimental facility is unique in its ability to provide nanosecond bursts of 14 MeV neutrons under conditions that are clean'' and as scatter-free as possible, and is the only one of its type currently in operation in the United States. It has been designed and put into operation primarily by graduate students, and has met or exceeded all of its important initial performance goals. We have reached the point of its routine operation, and most of the data are now in hand that will serve as the basis for the first two doctoral dissertations to be written by participating graduate students. Our initial results on double differential neutron cross sections will be presented at the May 1993 Fusion Reactor Technology Workshop. We are pleased to report that, after investing several years in equipment assembly and optimization, the project has now entered its data production'' phase.

  10. Isochoric Implosions for Fast Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Daniel; Tabak, Max

    2006-10-01

    Various gain models have shown the potentially great advantages of Fast Ignition (FI) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) over its conventional hotspot ignition counterpart. These gain models, however, all assume nearly uniform-density fuel assemblies. By contrast, typical ICF implosions yield hollowed fuel assemblies with a high-density shell of fuel surrounding a low-density, high-pressure hotspot. To realize fully the advantages of FI, then, an alternative implosion design must be found which yields nearly isochoric fuel assemblies without substantial hotspots. Here, it is shown that a self-similar spherical implosion of the type originally studied by Guderley [Luftfahrtforschung 19, 302 (1942)] may be employed to yield precisely such quasi-isochoric imploded states. The difficulty remains, however, of accessing these self-similarly imploding configurations from initial conditions representing an actual ICF target, namely a uniform, solid-density shell at rest. Furthermore, these specialized implosions must be realized for practicable drive parameters, i.e., accessible peak pressures, shell aspect ratios, etc. An implosion scheme is presented which meets all of these requirements, suggesting the possibility of genuinely isochoric implosions for FI.

  11. Fast Edge-Searching and Related Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Boting

    Given a graph G = (V,E) in which a fugitive hides on vertices or along edges, graph searching problems are usually to find the minimum number of searchers required to capture the fugitive. In this paper, we consider the problem of finding the minimum number of steps to capture the fugitive. We introduce the fast edge-searching problem in the edge search model, which is the problem of finding the minimum number of steps (called the fast edge-search time) to capture the fugitive. We establish relations between the fast edge-search time and the fast search number. While the family of graphs whose fast search number is at most k is not minor-closed for any positive integer k ≥ 2, we show that the family of graphs whose fast edge-search time is at most k is minor-closed. We establish relations between the fast (edge-)searching and the node searching. These relations allow us to transform the problem of computing node search numbers to the problem of computing fast edge-search time or fast search numbers. Using these relations, we prove that the problem of deciding, given a graph G and an integer k, whether the fast (edge-)search number of G is less than or equal to k is NP-complete; and it remains NP-complete for Eulerian graphs. We also prove that the problem of determining whether the fast (edge-)search number of G is a half of the number of odd vertices in G is NP-complete; and it remains NP-complete for planar graphs with maximum degree 4. We present a linear time approximation algorithm for the fast edge-search time that always delivers solutions of at most (1+|V|-1/|E|+1) times the optimal value. This algorithm also gives us a tight upper bound on the fast search number of the graph. We also show a lower bound on the fast search number using the minimum degree and the number of odd vertices.

  12. FAST Spacecraft Battery Design and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, David S.; Rao, Gopalakrishna; Ahmad, Anisa

    1997-01-01

    The Fast Auroral Snapshot (FAST) Explorer spacecraft is to study the physical processes that produce the aurora borealis and aurora australis. It is a unique plasma physics experiment that will take fundamental measurements of the magnetic and electrical fields. This investigation will add significantly to our understanding of the near-earth space environments and its effect. The FAST has a 1 year requirement and 3-year goal for its mission life in low earth orbit. The FAST power power system topology is a Direct Energy Transfer (DET) system based on the SAMPEX design. The FAST flight battery supplies power to the satellite during pre-launch operations, the launch phase, the eclipse periods for all mission phases, and when the load is about 50 watts.

  13. Exercise in the fasted state facilitates fibre type-specific intramyocellular lipid breakdown and stimulates glycogen resynthesis in humans

    PubMed Central

    De Bock, K; Richter, EA; Russell, AP; Eijnde, BO; Derave, W; Ramaekers, M; Koninckx, E; Léger, B; Verhaeghe, J; Hespel, P

    2005-01-01

    The effects were compared of exercise in the fasted state and exercise with a high rate of carbohydrate intake on intramyocellular triglyceride (IMTG) and glycogen content of human muscle. Using a randomized crossover study design, nine young healthy volunteers participated in two experimental sessions with an interval of 3 weeks. In each session subjects performed 2 h of constant-load bicycle exercise (∼ 75% ), followed by 4 h of controlled recovery. On one occasion they exercised after an overnight fast (F), and on the other (CHO) they received carbohydrates before (∼ 150 g) and during (1 g (kg bw)−1 h−1) exercise. In both conditions, subjects ingested 5 g carbohydrates per kg body weight during recovery. Fibre type-specific relative IMTG content was determined by Oil red O staining in needle biopsies from m. vastus lateralis before, immediately after and 4 h after exercise. During F but not during CHO, the exercise bout decreased IMTG content in type I fibres from 18 ± 2% to 6 ± 2% (P = 0.007) area lipid staining. Conversely, during recovery, IMTG in type I fibres decreased from 15 ± 2% to 10 ± 2% in CHO, but did not change in F. Neither exercise nor recovery changed IMTG in type IIa fibres in any experimental condition. Exercise-induced net glycogen breakdown was similar in F and CHO. However, compared with CHO (11.0 ± 7.8 mmol kg−1 h−1), mean rate of postexercise muscle glycogen resynthesis was 3-fold greater in F (32.9 ± 2.7 mmol kg−1 h−1, P = 0.01). Furthermore, oral glucose loading during recovery increased plasma insulin markedly more in F (+46.80 μU ml−1) than in CHO (+14.63 μU ml−1, P = 0.02). We conclude that IMTG breakdown during prolonged submaximal exercise in the fasted state takes place predominantly in type I fibres and that this breakdown is prevented in the CHO-fed state. Furthermore, facilitated glucose-induced insulin secretion may contribute to enhanced muscle glycogen resynthesis following exercise in the fasted

  14. Fast response liquid crystal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yung-Hsun

    Liquid crystal (LC) has been widely used for displays, spatial light modulators, variable optical attenuators (VOAs) and other tunable photonic devices. The response time of these devices is mainly determined by the employed liquid crystal material. The response time of a LC device depends on the visco-elastic coefficient (gamma1/K11), LC cell gap (d), and applied voltage. Hence, low visco-elastic coefficient LC materials and thinner cell gap are favorable for reducing the response time. However, low visco-elastic coefficient LCs are usually associated with a low birefringence because of shorter molecular conjugation. For display applications, such as LCD TVs, low birefringence (Deltan<0.1) LCs are commonly used. However, for optical communications at 1550 nm, low birefringence requires to a thick cell gap which, in turn, increases the response time. How to obtain fast response for the LC devices is a fundamentally important and technically challenging task. In this dissertation, we investigate several methods to improve liquid crystal response time, for examples, using dual-frequency liquid crystals, polymer stabilized liquid crystals, and sheared polymer network liquid crystals. We discover a new class of material, denoted as sheared polymer network liquid crystal (SPNLC) which exhibits a submillisecond response time. Moreover, this response time is insensitive to the LC cell gap. This is the first LC device exhibiting such an interesting property. Chapters 1 and 2 describe the motivation and background of this dissertation. From chapter 3 to chapter 6, dual-frequency liquid crystals and polymer network methods are demonstrated as examples for the variable optical attenuators. Variable optical attenuator (VOA) is a key component in optical communications. Especially, the sheared PNLC VOA shows the best result; its dynamic range reaches 43 dB while the response time is in the submillisecond range at 1550 nm wavelength, which is 50 times faster than the commercial

  15. A portable device for fast analysis of explosives in the environment.

    PubMed

    Čapka, Lukáš; Večeřa, Zbyněk; Mikuška, Pavel; Šesták, Jozef; Kahle, Vladislav; Bumbová, Alena

    2015-04-01

    A novel portable device for fast and sensitive analysis of explosives in environmental samples is presented. The developed system consists of miniaturized microcolumn liquid chromatograph, photolytic converter and chemiluminescence detector. The device is able to determine selectively nitramine- and nitroester- and most of nitroaromates-based explosives as well as inorganic nitrates at trace concentrations in water or soil extracts in less than 8 min. The device allows to analyze various environmental samples such as soils or water materials without previous preconcentration. Because of internal power supply, the device ensures 12h of continuous operation. Limits of detection of compounds of interest are in the range of concentrations from 5.0 × 10(-9)M to 8.0 × 10(-5)M for a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. Limits of quantification are in the range of concentrations from 1.7 × 10(-8)M to 2.7 × 10(-4)M for a signal-to-noise ratio of 10. The repeatability of the method (RSD=2.9-5.6%) was determined by repeated injections (n=10) of the standard samples during 4h. PMID:25736306

  16. Neighborhood fast food restaurants and fast food consumption: A national study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that neighborhood fast food restaurant availability is related to greater obesity, yet few studies have investigated whether neighborhood fast food restaurant availability promotes fast food consumption. Our aim was to estimate the effect of neighborhood fast food availability on frequency of fast food consumption in a national sample of young adults, a population at high risk for obesity. Methods We used national data from U.S. young adults enrolled in wave III (2001-02; ages 18-28) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (n = 13,150). Urbanicity-stratified multivariate negative binomial regression models were used to examine cross-sectional associations between neighborhood fast food availability and individual-level self-reported fast food consumption frequency, controlling for individual and neighborhood characteristics. Results In adjusted analysis, fast food availability was not associated with weekly frequency of fast food consumption in non-urban or low- or high-density urban areas. Conclusions Policies aiming to reduce neighborhood availability as a means to reduce fast food consumption among young adults may be unsuccessful. Consideration of fast food outlets near school or workplace locations, factors specific to more or less urban settings, and the role of individual lifestyle attitudes and preferences are needed in future research. PMID:21740571

  17. Complications of fast neutron therapy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, L

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the tissues and organs at risk following high-energy neutron-beam therapy for selected radioresistant tumors, estimating the separate probabilities of both normal tissue injury and of tumor recurrence, each in relation to the absorbed dose. Published statistical and anecdotal reports on the incidence of serious complications observed following fast neutron treatment directed to the cranium, head and neck, chest, upper abdomen, pelvis, and extremities are reviewed and dose-response parameters derived using bivariate probit or logistic analyses. We then calculate the conditional probability of uncomplicated control (PUC) at various doses, assuming that tumor cure and late injury are stochastically independent events. The median effective doses and coefficients of variation, derived for neutron irradiation of human brain and spinal cord, oropharynx, lung, stomach and bowel, rectum and bladder, and extremities, are tabulated and tentative "tolerance limits" estimated. Tolerance doses are shown to depend on several factors including beam quality, chemical composition, cell cycling rate, fraction-size, and follow-up time. In patients followed over 5 years, safe tolerance doses appear to range from < 14 GY for the central nervous system up to 22 GY in the oropharynx and mandible. Given well-determined dose-response data for specific normal tissues and the associated tumors, the separate probabilities of tumor control and of normal tissue injury at a given dose can be estimated. The particular treatment scheme yielding the highest PUC can usually be identified. The maximum PUC for neutron therapy, compared with other modalities, is a measure of both efficacy and safety for the procedure under study and thus provides a useful guide for comparing various modalities and treatment plans and for designing more effective treatment strategies. PMID:9670290

  18. Mutual colliding impact fast ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2014-09-01

    It is proposed to apply the well established colliding beam technology of high energy physics to the fast hot spot ignition of a highly compressed DT (deuterium-tritium) target igniting a larger D (deuterium) burn, by accelerating a small amount of solid deuterium, and likewise a small amount of tritium, making a head-on collision in the center of the target, projecting them through conical ducts situated at the opposite side of the target and converging in its center. In their head-on collision, the relative collision velocity is 5/3 times larger compared to the collision velocity of a stationary target. The two pieces have for this reason to be accelerated to a smaller velocity than would otherwise be needed to reach upon impact the same temperature. Since the velocity distribution of the two head-on colliding projectiles is with its two velocity peaks non-Maxwellian, the maximum cross section velocity product turns out to be substantially larger than the maximum if averaged over a Maxwellian. The D and T projectiles would have to be accelerated with two sabots driven by powerful particle or laser beams, permitting a rather large acceleration length. With the substantially larger cross section-velocity product by virtue of the non-Maxwellian velocity distribution, a further advantage is that the head-on collision produces a large magnetic field by the thermomagnetic Nernst effect, enhancing propagating burn. With this concept, the ignition of the neutron-less hydrogen-boron (HB11) reaction might even be possible in a heterogeneous assembly of the hydrogen and the boron to reduce the bremsstrahlung-losses, resembling the heterogeneous assembly in a graphite-natural uranium reactor, there to reduce the neutron losses.

  19. Mutual colliding impact fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2014-09-15

    It is proposed to apply the well established colliding beam technology of high energy physics to the fast hot spot ignition of a highly compressed DT (deuterium-tritium) target igniting a larger D (deuterium) burn, by accelerating a small amount of solid deuterium, and likewise a small amount of tritium, making a head-on collision in the center of the target, projecting them through conical ducts situated at the opposite side of the target and converging in its center. In their head-on collision, the relative collision velocity is 5/3 times larger compared to the collision velocity of a stationary target. The two pieces have for this reason to be accelerated to a smaller velocity than would otherwise be needed to reach upon impact the same temperature. Since the velocity distribution of the two head-on colliding projectiles is with its two velocity peaks non-Maxwellian, the maximum cross section velocity product turns out to be substantially larger than the maximum if averaged over a Maxwellian. The D and T projectiles would have to be accelerated with two sabots driven by powerful particle or laser beams, permitting a rather large acceleration length. With the substantially larger cross section-velocity product by virtue of the non-Maxwellian velocity distribution, a further advantage is that the head-on collision produces a large magnetic field by the thermomagnetic Nernst effect, enhancing propagating burn. With this concept, the ignition of the neutron-less hydrogen-boron (HB{sup 11}) reaction might even be possible in a heterogeneous assembly of the hydrogen and the boron to reduce the bremsstrahlung-losses, resembling the heterogeneous assembly in a graphite-natural uranium reactor, there to reduce the neutron losses.

  20. Fasts, feasts and festivals in diabetes-1: Glycemic management during Hindu fasts

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Bajaj, Sarita; Gupta, Yashdeep; Agarwal, Pankaj; Singh, S. K.; Julka, Sandeep; Chawla, Rajeev; Agrawal, Navneet

    2015-01-01

    This communication is the first of a series on South Asian fasts, festivals, and diabetes, designed to spread awareness and stimulate research on this aspect of diabetes and metabolic care. It describes the various fasts observed as part of Hindu religion and offers a classification scheme for them, labeling them as infrequent and frequent. The infrequent fasts are further sub-classified as brief and prolonged, to facilitate a scientific approach to glycemic management during these fasts. Pre-fast counseling, non-pharmacological therapy, pharmacological modification, and post-fast debriefing are discussed in detail. All available drug classes and molecules are covered in this article, which provides guidance about necessary changes in dosage and timing of administration. While in no way exhaustive, the brief review offers a basic framework which diabetes care professionals can use to counsel and manage persons in their care who wish to observe various Hindu fasts. PMID:25729681

  1. Fasts, feasts and festivals in diabetes-1: Glycemic management during Hindu fasts.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Bajaj, Sarita; Gupta, Yashdeep; Agarwal, Pankaj; Singh, S K; Julka, Sandeep; Chawla, Rajeev; Agrawal, Navneet

    2015-01-01

    This communication is the first of a series on South Asian fasts, festivals, and diabetes, designed to spread awareness and stimulate research on this aspect of diabetes and metabolic care. It describes the various fasts observed as part of Hindu religion and offers a classification scheme for them, labeling them as infrequent and frequent. The infrequent fasts are further sub-classified as brief and prolonged, to facilitate a scientific approach to glycemic management during these fasts. Pre-fast counseling, non-pharmacological therapy, pharmacological modification, and post-fast debriefing are discussed in detail. All available drug classes and molecules are covered in this article, which provides guidance about necessary changes in dosage and timing of administration. While in no way exhaustive, the brief review offers a basic framework which diabetes care professionals can use to counsel and manage persons in their care who wish to observe various Hindu fasts. PMID:25729681

  2. An overnight habitat for expanding lunar surface exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, Samuel S.; Setterfield, Timothy P.; Roberson, Daniel R.; Putbrese, Benjamin; Kotowick, Kyle; Vanegas, Morris D.; Curry, Mike; Geiger, Lynn M.; Barmore, David; Foley, Jordan J.; LaTour, Paul A.; Hoffman, Jeffrey A.; Head, James W.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the conceptual design and analysis of a system intended to increase the range, scientific capability, and safety of manned lunar surface exploration, requiring only a modest increase in capability over the Apollo mission designs. The system is intended to enable two astronauts, exploring with an unpressurized rover, to remove their space suits for an 8-h rest away from the lunar base and then conduct a second day of surface exploration before returning to base. This system is composed of an Environmental Control and Life Support System on the rover, an inflatable habitat, a solar shield and a solar power array. The proposed system doubles the distance reachable from the lunar base, thus increasing the area available for science and exploration by a factor of four. In addition to increasing mission capability, the proposed system also increases fault tolerance with an emergency inflatable structure and additional consumables to mitigate a wide range of suit or rover failures. The mass, volume, and power analyses of each subsystem are integrated to generate a total system mass of 124 kg and a volume of 594 L, both of which can be accommodated on the Apollo Lunar Roving Vehicle with minor improvements.

  3. Learning Word Meanings: Overnight Integration and Study Modality Effects

    PubMed Central

    van der Ven, Frauke; Takashima, Atsuko; Segers, Eliane; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2015-01-01

    According to the complementary learning systems (CLS) account of word learning, novel words are rapidly acquired (learning system 1), but slowly integrated into the mental lexicon (learning system 2). This two-step learning process has been shown to apply to novel word forms. In this study, we investigated whether novel word meanings are also gradually integrated after acquisition by measuring the extent to which newly learned words were able to prime semantically related words at two different time points. In addition, we investigated whether modality at study modulates this integration process. Sixty-four adult participants studied novel words together with written or spoken definitions. These words did not prime semantically related words directly following study, but did so after a 24-hour delay. This significant increase in the magnitude of the priming effect suggests that semantic integration occurs over time. Overall, words that were studied with a written definition showed larger priming effects, suggesting greater integration for the written study modality. Although the process of integration, reflected as an increase in the priming effect over time, did not significantly differ between study modalities, words studied with a written definition showed the most prominent positive effect after a 24-hour delay. Our data suggest that semantic integration requires time, and that studying in written format benefits semantic integration more than studying in spoken format. These findings are discussed in light of the CLS theory of word learning. PMID:25992958

  4. Ascent to moderate altitude impairs overnight memory improvements.

    PubMed

    Tesler, Noemi; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Lo Cascio, Christian M; Stadelmann, Katrin; Stoewhas, Anne-Christin; Kohler, Malcolm; Bloch, Konrad E; Achermann, Peter; Huber, Reto

    2015-02-01

    Several studies showed beneficial effects of sleep on memory performance. Slow waves, the electroencephalographic characteristic of deep sleep, reflected on the neuronal level by synchronous slow oscillations, seem crucial for these benefits. Traveling to moderate altitudes decreases deep sleep. In a randomized cross-over design healthy male subjects performed a visuo-motor learning task in Zurich (490 m) and at Davos Jakobshorn (2590 m) in random order. Memory performance was assessed immediately after learning, before sleep, and in the morning after a night of sleep. Sleep EEG recordings were performed during the nights. Our findings show an altitude induced reduction of sleep dependent memory performance. Moreover, this impaired sleep dependent memory performance was associated with reduced slow wave derived measures of neuronal synchronization. Our results are consistent with a critical role of slow waves for the beneficial effects of sleep on memory that is susceptible to natural environmental influences. PMID:25449393

  5. Keeping time in your sleep: overnight consolidation of temporal rhythm.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Penelope A; Couch, Tom J; Walker, Matthew P

    2011-01-01

    Temporal processing forms the basis of a vast number of human behaviours, from simple perception and action to tasks like locomotion, playing a musical instrument, and understanding language. Growing evidence suggests that these procedural skills are consolidated during sleep, however investigation of such learning has focused upon the order in which movements are made rather than their temporal dynamics. Here, we use psychophysics and neuroimaging to explore the possibility that temporal aspects of such skills are also enhanced over a period of sleep. Behaviourally, our examinations of motor (tapping a finger in time with a temporal rhythm) and perceptual (monitoring a temporal rhythm for deviants) tasks reveal post-sleep improvements in both domains. Functionally, we show that brain-state during retention (sleep or wake) modulates subsequent responses in the striatum, supplementary motor area, and lateral cerebellum during motor timing, and in the posterior hippocampus during perceptual timing. Our data support the proposal that these two forms of timing draw on different brain mechanisms, with motor timing using a more automatic system while perceptual timing of the same rhythm is more closely associated with cognitive processing. PMID:20974158

  6. Overnight Therapy? The Role of Sleep in Emotional Brain Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Matthew P.; van Der Helm, Els

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive neuroscience continues to build meaningful connections between affective behavior and human brain function. Within the biological sciences, a similar renaissance has taken place, focusing on the role of sleep in various neurocognitive processes and, most recently, on the interaction between sleep and emotional regulation. This review…

  7. Parallel Visualization Co-Processing of Overnight CFD Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David E.; Haimes, Robert

    1999-01-01

    An interactive visualization system pV3 is being developed for the investigation of advanced computational methodologies employing visualization and parallel processing for the extraction of information contained in large-scale transient engineering simulations. Visual techniques for extracting information from the data in terms of cutting planes, iso-surfaces, particle tracing and vector fields are included in this system. This paper discusses improvements to the pV3 system developed under NASA's Affordable High Performance Computing project.

  8. Fast magnetoacoustic wave trains in coronal holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoe, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Kupriyanova, E. G.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Rapidly propagating coronal EUV disturbances recently discovered in the solar corona are interpreted in terms of guided fast magnetoacoustic waves. Fast magnetoacoustic waves experience geometric dispersion in waveguides, which causes localised, impulsive perturbations to develop into quasi-periodic wave trains. Aims: We consider the formation of fast wave trains in a super-radially expanding coronal hole modelled by a magnetic funnel with a field-aligned density profile that is rarefied in comparison to the surrounding plasma. This kind of structure is typical of coronal holes, and it forms a fast magnetoacoustic anti-waveguide as a local maximum in the Alfvén speed. Methods: We performed 2D MHD numerical simulations for impulsively generated perturbations to the system. Both sausage and kink perturbations are considered and the role of the density contrast ratio investigated. Results: The anti-waveguide funnel geometry refracts wave energy away from the structure. However, in this geometry the quasi-periodic fast wave trains are found to appear, too, and so can be associated with the observed rapidly propagating coronal EUV disturbances. The wave trains propagate along the external edge of the coronal hole. The fast wave trains generated in coronal holes exhibit less dispersive evolution than in the case of a dense waveguide. Conclusions: We conclude that an impulsive energy release localised in a coronal plasma inhomogeneity develops into a fast wave train for both kink and sausage disturbances and for both waveguide and anti-waveguide transverse plasma profiles.

  9. Fasting headache, weight loss, and dehydration.

    PubMed

    Mosek, A; Korczyn, A D

    1999-03-01

    Recently, we showed that fasting is a strong headache precipitator unrelated to coffee, tea, or smoking withdrawal or to oversleeping. In the current study, we evaluated the role of dehydration as a possible precipitator of fasting headache. The effects of a 25-hour fast of the Jewish Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement) were studied in women who participated in our previous Yom Kippur study. We asked the subjects to weigh themselves at the beginning and at the end of the Yom Kippur fast, assuming that the weight loss would largely reflect dehydration. In all but 1 of the 56 participants, the fast resulted in weight loss but only 28 (50%) reported headache. The average weight loss was 1.4 +/- 0.8 kg in those who developed headache and 1.2 +/- 0.5 kg in those who did not. This small difference was not statistically significant. We conclude that dehydration, as reflected by acute weight loss, is an unlikely cause of headache during a single day of fasting. The mechanism of fasting headache remains unclear. PMID:15613218

  10. Fast Physics Testbed for the FASTER Project

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.; Liu, Y.; Hogan, R.; Neggers, R.; Jensen, M.; Fridlind, A.; Lin, Y.; Wolf, A.

    2010-03-15

    This poster describes the Fast Physics Testbed for the new FAst-physics System Testbed and Research (FASTER) project. The overall objective is to provide a convenient and comprehensive platform for fast turn-around model evaluation against ARM observations and to facilitate development of parameterizations for cloud-related fast processes represented in global climate models. The testbed features three major components: a single column model (SCM) testbed, an NWP-Testbed, and high-resolution modeling (HRM). The web-based SCM-Testbed features multiple SCMs from major climate modeling centers and aims to maximize the potential of SCM approach to enhance and accelerate the evaluation and improvement of fast physics parameterizations through continuous evaluation of existing and evolving models against historical as well as new/improved ARM and other complementary measurements. The NWP-Testbed aims to capitalize on the large pool of operational numerical weather prediction products. Continuous evaluations of NWP forecasts against observations at ARM sites are carried out to systematically identify the biases and skills of physical parameterizations under all weather conditions. The highresolution modeling (HRM) activities aim to simulate the fast processes at high resolution to aid in the understanding of the fast processes and their parameterizations. A four-tier HRM framework is established to augment the SCM- and NWP-Testbeds towards eventual improvement of the parameterizations.

  11. Development and Characterization of Pharmacokinetic Parameters of Fast-Dissolving Films Containing Levocetirizine

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Dhagla R.; Patel, Vishnu A.; Chhalotiya, Usmangani K.; Patel, Harsha V.; Kundawala, Aliasgar J.

    2012-01-01

    A fast-dissolving film containing levocetirizine, a non-sedative antihistamine drug, was developed using pullulan, xanthan gum, propylene glycol, and tween 80 as the base materials. The drug content of the prepared films was within an acceptable limit as prescribed by the USP. The film exhibited excellent stability for four months when stored at 40 °C and 75% humidity. In vitro dissolution studies suggested a rapid disintegration, in which most of levocetirizine (93.54 ± 3.9%) dissolved within 90 seconds after insertion into the medium. Subsequently, Sprague–Dawley rats were used to compare the pharmacokinetic properties of the film preparation administered to the oral cavity, to those with oral administration of the pure drug solution. The pharmacokinetic parameters were similar between the two groups in which AUC0–t (ng h/ml), AUC0–∞ (ng h/ml) Cmax (ng/ml), Tmax (min), Kel (h−1), and t1/2 (h) of the reference were 452.033 ± 43.68, 465.78 ± 48.16, 237.16 ± 19.87, 30, 0.453 ± 0.051, and 1.536 ± 0.118, respectively, for the film formulation 447.233 ± 46.24, 458.22 ± 46.74, 233.32 ± 17.19, 30, 0.464 ± 0.060, and 1.496 ± 0.293, respectively. These results suggest that the present levocetirizine containing fast-dissolving film is likely to become one of the choices to treat different allergic conditions. PMID:23008821

  12. Development and characterization of pharmacokinetic parameters of fast-dissolving films containing levocetirizine.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Dhagla R; Patel, Vishnu A; Chhalotiya, Usmangani K; Patel, Harsha V; Kundawala, Aliasgar J

    2012-09-01

    A fast-dissolving film containing levocetirizine, a non-sedative antihistamine drug, was developed using pullulan, xanthan gum, propylene glycol, and tween 80 as the base materials. The drug content of the prepared films was within an acceptable limit as prescribed by the USP. The film exhibited excellent stability for four months when stored at 40 °C and 75% humidity. In vitro dissolution studies suggested a rapid disintegration, in which most of levocetirizine (93.54 ± 3.9%) dissolved within 90 seconds after insertion into the medium. Subsequently, Sprague-Dawley rats were used to compare the pharmacokinetic properties of the film preparation administered to the oral cavity, to those with oral administration of the pure drug solution. The pharmacokinetic parameters were similar between the two groups in which AUC(0-t) (ng h/ml), AUC(0-∞) (ng h/ml) C(max) (ng/ml), T(max) (min), K(el) (h(-1)), and t(1/2) (h) of the reference were 452.033 ± 43.68, 465.78 ± 48.16, 237.16 ± 19.87, 30, 0.453 ± 0.051, and 1.536 ± 0.118, respectively, for the film formulation 447.233 ± 46.24, 458.22 ± 46.74, 233.32 ± 17.19, 30, 0.464 ± 0.060, and 1.496 ± 0.293, respectively. These results suggest that the present levocetirizine containing fast-dissolving film is likely to become one of the choices to treat different allergic conditions. PMID:23008821

  13. A model for fast axonal transport.

    PubMed

    Blum, J J; Reed, M C

    1985-01-01

    A model for fast axonal transport is developed in which the essential features are that organelles may interact with mechanochemical cross-bridges that in turn interact with microtubules, forming an organelle-engine-microtubule complex which is transported along the microtubules. Computer analysis of the equations derived to describe such a system show that most of the experimental observations on fast axonal transport can be simulated by the model, indicating that the model is useful for the interpretation and design of experiments aimed at clarifying the mechanism of fast axonal transport. PMID:2416456

  14. The fast debris evolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, H. G.; Swinerd, G. G.; Newland, R. J.; Saunders, A.

    2009-09-01

    The 'particles-in-a-box' (PIB) model introduced by Talent [Talent, D.L. Analytic model for orbital debris environmental management. J. Spacecraft Rocket, 29 (4), 508-513, 1992.] removed the need for computer-intensive Monte Carlo simulation to predict the gross characteristics of an evolving debris environment. The PIB model was described using a differential equation that allows the stability of the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment to be tested by a straightforward analysis of the equation's coefficients. As part of an ongoing research effort to investigate more efficient approaches to evolutionary modelling and to develop a suite of educational tools, a new PIB model has been developed. The model, entitled Fast Debris Evolution (FADE), employs a first-order differential equation to describe the rate at which new objects ⩾10 cm are added and removed from the environment. Whilst Talent [Talent, D.L. Analytic model for orbital debris environmental management. J. Spacecraft Rocket, 29 (4), 508-513, 1992.] based the collision theory for the PIB approach on collisions between gas particles and adopted specific values for the parameters of the model from a number of references, the form and coefficients of the FADE model equations can be inferred from the outputs of future projections produced by high-fidelity models, such as the DAMAGE model. The FADE model has been implemented as a client-side, web-based service using JavaScript embedded within a HTML document. Due to the simple nature of the algorithm, FADE can deliver the results of future projections immediately in a graphical format, with complete user-control over key simulation parameters. Historical and future projections for the ⩾10 cm LEO debris environment under a variety of different scenarios are possible, including business as usual, no future launches, post-mission disposal and remediation. A selection of results is presented with comparisons with predictions made using the DAMAGE environment model

  15. The Fast Debris Evolution Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Hugh G.; Swinerd, Graham; Newland, Rebecca; Saunders, Arrun

    The ‘Particles-in-a-box' (PIB) model introduced by Talent (1992) removed the need for computerintensive Monte Carlo simulation to predict the gross characteristics of an evolving debris environment. The PIB model was described using a differential equation that allows the stability of the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment to be tested by a straightforward analysis of the equation's coefficients. As part of an ongoing research effort to investigate more efficient approaches to evolutionary modelling and to develop a suite of educational tools, a new PIB model has been developed. The model, entitled Fast Debris Evolution (FaDE), employs a first-order differential equation to describe the rate at which new objects (˜ 10 cm) are added and removed from the environment. Whilst Talent (1992) based the collision theory for the PIB approach on collisions between gas particles and adopted specific values for the parameters of the model from a number of references, the form and coefficients of the FaDE model equations can be inferred from the outputs of future projections produced by high-fidelity models, such as the DAMAGE model. The FaDE model has been implemented as a client-side, web-based service using Javascript embedded within a HTML document. Due to the simple nature of the algorithm, FaDE can deliver the results of future projections immediately in a graphical format, with complete user-control over key simulation parameters. Historical and future projections for the ˜ 10 cm low Earth orbit (LEO) debris environment under a variety of different scenarios are possible, including business as usual, no future launches, post-mission disposal and remediation. A selection of results is presented with comparisons with predictions made using the DAMAGE environment model. The results demonstrate that the FaDE model is able to capture comparable time-series of collisions and number of objects as predicted by DAMAGE in several scenarios. Further, and perhaps more importantly

  16. Fast-Food Environments and Family Fast-Food Intake in Nonmetropolitan Areas

    PubMed Central

    Longacre, Meghan R.; Drake, Keith M.; MacKenzie, Todd A.; Gibson, Lucinda; Owens, Peter; Titus, Linda J.; Beach, Michael L.; Dalton, Madeline A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the influence of in-town fast-food availability on family-level fast-food intake in nonmetropolitan areas. Purpose The purpose of the current study was to determine whether the presence of chain fast-food outlets was associated with fast-food intake among adolescents and parents, and to assess whether this relationship was moderated by family access to motor vehicles. Methods Telephone surveys were conducted with 1547 adolescent–parent dyads in 32 New Hampshire and Vermont communities between 2007 and 2008. Fast-food intake in the past week was measured through self-report. In-town fast-food outlets were located and enumerated using an onsite audit. Family motor vehicle access was categorized based on the number of vehicles per licensed drivers in the household. Poisson regression was used to determine unadjusted and adjusted risk ratios (RRs). Analyses were conducted in 2011. Results About half (52.1%) of adolescents and 34.7% of parents consumed fast food at least once in the past week. Adolescents and parents who lived in towns with five or more fast-food outlets were about 30% more likely to eat fast food compared to those in towns with no fast-food outlets, even after adjusting for individual, family, and town characteristics (RR=1.29, 95% CI= 1.10, 1.51; RR=1.32, 95% CI=1.07,1.62, respectively). Interaction models demonstrated that the influence of in-town fast-food outlets on fast-food intake was strongest among families with low motor vehicle access. Conclusions In nonmetropolitan areas, household transportation should be considered as an important moderator of the relationship between in-town fast-food outlets and family intake. PMID:22608373

  17. Fast ion loss diagnostic plans for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Darrow; R. Bell; D. W. Johnson; H. Kugel; J. R. Wilson; F. E. Cecil; R. Maingi; A. Krasilnikov; A. Alekseyev

    2000-06-13

    The prompt loss of neutral beam ions from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is expected to be between 12% and 42% of the total 5 MW of beam power. There may, in addition, be losses of fast ions arising from high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating. Most of the lost ions will strike the HHFW antenna or the neutral beam dump. To measure these losses in the 2000 experimental campaign, thermocouples in the antenna, several infrared camera views, and a Faraday cup lost ion probe will be employed. The probe will measure loss of fast ions with E > 1 keV at three radial locations, giving the scrape-off length of the fast ions.

  18. Cosmology: Home of a fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorimer, Duncan

    2016-02-01

    Our understanding of fast radio bursts -- intense pulses of radio waves -- and their use as cosmic probes promises to be transformed now that one burst has been associated with a galaxy of known distance from Earth. See Letter p.453

  19. [FAST TRACK CONCEPT IN MODERN NEUROANESTHESIOLOGY].

    PubMed

    Kulikov, A S; Lubnin, A Yu

    2016-01-01

    The concept of fast-track is one of the most discussed trends in the development of modern surgery. According to supporters of this ideology, the use of fast-track leads to the reduction ofhospital stay without increasing in readmission, reducing the frequency of postoperative complications, which is reflected in the decrease in the cost of the treatment and social expenses, due to earlier return of patients to normal life. The authors of this review discuss different anesthetic issues of fast-track approach (early awakening, postoperative analgesia, prevention of PONV; neuromuscular block reversion). The paper contains also valuable reasons for using fast-track in neurosurgery, as well as contraindications to the use of this approach. PMID:27468505

  20. Fast internal dynamics in alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Monkenbusch, M.; Stadler, A. Biehl, R.; Richter, D.; Ollivier, J.; Zamponi, M.

    2015-08-21

    Large-scale domain motions in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) have been observed previously by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). We have extended the investigation on the dynamics of ADH in solution by using high-resolution neutron time-of-flight (TOF) and neutron backscattering (BS) spectroscopy in the incoherent scattering range. The observed hydrogen dynamics were interpreted in terms of three mobility classes, which allowed a simultaneous description of the measured TOF and BS spectra. In addition to the slow global protein diffusion and domain motions observed by NSE, a fast internal process could be identified. Around one third of the protons in ADH participate in the fast localized diffusive motion. The diffusion coefficient of the fast internal motions is around two third of the value of the surrounding D{sub 2}O solvent. It is tempting to associate the fast internal process with solvent exposed amino acid residues with dangling side chains.

  1. Fast Action Can Prevent Sepsis Death: CDC

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_160574.html Fast Action Can Prevent Sepsis Death: CDC Know the signs of extreme response to ... treated long before it causes severe illness or death, U.S. health officials report. Sepsis, or septicemia, occurs ...

  2. Using Fast Food Restaurants for Consumer Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koorland, Mark A.; Cooke, Janice C.

    1990-01-01

    This article describes how classroom discussion and field trips can be used to teach students with disabilities to engage in comparative shopping and informed choice making when they dine in fast food restaurants. (JDD)

  3. FastBit: Interactively Searching Massive Data

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kesheng; Ahern, Sean; Bethel, E. Wes; Chen, Jacqueline; Childs, Hank; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Geddes, Cameron; Gu, Junmin; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Koegler, Wendy; Lauret, Jerome; Meredith, Jeremy; Messmer, Peter; Otoo, Ekow; Perevoztchikov, Victor; Poskanzer, Arthur; Prabhat,; Rubel, Oliver; Shoshani, Arie; Sim, Alexander; Stockinger, Kurt; Weber, Gunther; Zhang, Wei-Ming

    2009-06-23

    As scientific instruments and computer simulations produce more and more data, the task of locating the essential information to gain insight becomes increasingly difficult. FastBit is an efficient software tool to address this challenge. In this article, we present a summary of the key underlying technologies, namely bitmap compression, encoding, and binning. Together these techniques enable FastBit to answer structured (SQL) queries orders of magnitude faster than popular database systems. To illustrate how FastBit is used in applications, we present three examples involving a high-energy physics experiment, a combustion simulation, and an accelerator simulation. In each case, FastBit significantly reduces the response time and enables interactive exploration on terabytes of data.

  4. Fast internal dynamics in alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Monkenbusch, M; Stadler, A; Biehl, R; Ollivier, J; Zamponi, M; Richter, D

    2015-08-21

    Large-scale domain motions in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) have been observed previously by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). We have extended the investigation on the dynamics of ADH in solution by using high-resolution neutron time-of-flight (TOF) and neutron backscattering (BS) spectroscopy in the incoherent scattering range. The observed hydrogen dynamics were interpreted in terms of three mobility classes, which allowed a simultaneous description of the measured TOF and BS spectra. In addition to the slow global protein diffusion and domain motions observed by NSE, a fast internal process could be identified. Around one third of the protons in ADH participate in the fast localized diffusive motion. The diffusion coefficient of the fast internal motions is around two third of the value of the surrounding D2O solvent. It is tempting to associate the fast internal process with solvent exposed amino acid residues with dangling side chains. PMID:26298156

  5. Fast and practical parallel polynomial interpolation

    SciTech Connect

    Egecioglu, O.; Gallopoulos, E.; Koc, C.K.

    1987-01-01

    We present fast and practical parallel algorithms for the computation and evaluation of interpolating polynomials. The algorithms make use of fast parallel prefix techniques for the calculation of divided differences in the Newton representation of the interpolating polynomial. For n + 1 given input pairs the proposed interpolation algorithm requires 2 (log (n + 1)) + 2 parallel arithmetic steps and circuit size O(n/sup 2/). The algorithms are numerically stable and their floating-point implementation results in error accumulation similar to that of the widely used serial algorithms. This is in contrast to other fast serial and parallel interpolation algorithms which are subject to much larger roundoff. We demonstrate that in a distributed memory environment context, a cube connected system is very suitable for the algorithms' implementation, exhibiting very small communication cost. As further advantages we note that our techniques do not require equidistant points, preconditioning, or use of the Fast Fourier Transform. 21 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Sociodemographic differences in fast food price sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Katie A.; Guilkey, David K.; Ng, Shu Wen; Duffey, Kiyah J.; Popkin, Barry M.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; Steffen, Lyn M.; Shikany, James M.; Gordon-Larsen, Penny

    2014-01-01

    Importance Fiscal food policies (e.g., taxation) are increasingly proposed to improve population-level health, but their impact on health disparities is unknown. Objective We estimated subgroup-specific effects of fast food price changes on fast food consumption and cardio-metabolic outcomes, hypothesizing inverse associations between fast food price with fast food consumption, BMI, and insulin resistance and stronger associations among blacks (vs. whites) and participants with relatively lower education or income. Design 20-year follow-up (5 exams) in a biracial U.S. prospective cohort: Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) (1985/86–2005/06, baseline n=5,115). Participants Aged 18–30 at baseline; designed for equal recruitment by race (black/white), educational attainment, age, and gender. Exposures Community-level price data from the Council for Community and Economic Research (C2ER) temporally- and geographically-linked to study participants’ home address at each exam. Main outcome and measures Participant-reported number of fast food eating occasions per week; BMI (kg/m2) from clinical assessment of weight and height; homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) from fasting glucose and insulin. Covariates included individual- and community-level social and demographic factors. Results In repeated measures regression, multivariable-adjusted associations between fast food price and consumption were non-linear (quadratic, p<0.001), with significant inverse estimated effects on consumption at higher prices; estimates varied according to race (interaction term p=0.04), income (p=0.07), and education (p=0.03). For example, at the 10th percentile of price ($1.25/serving), blacks and whites had mean fast food consumption (times/week) of 2.2 (95% CI: 2.1–2.3) and 1.6 (1.5–1.7), respectively, while at the 90th percentile of price ($1.53/serving), respective mean consumption estimates were 1.9 (1.8–2.0) and 1.5 (1.4–1.6). We

  7. International Symposium on Fast Glacier Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingle, Craig S.

    1990-01-01

    Cryospheric Sciences Program "International Symposium on Fast Glacier Flow" (PI, C. Lingle) provided partial support for publication of Annals of Glaciology 36 by the International Glaciological Society. Annals of Glaciology is a peer-reviewed journal. Annals 36, which was published in 2003, contains 39 peer-reviewed and edited papers from the International Symposium on Fast Glacier Flow, which was held in Yakutat, Alaska, 10-14 June 2002.

  8. Fast imaging system on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Geraud, A.; Salasca, S.; Verger, J. M.; Alarcon, T.; Agarici, G.; Bremond, S.; Chenevois, J. P.; Geynet, M.; Migozzi, J. B.; Reux, C.

    2009-03-15

    A new endoscope aiming at transferring the image of a poloidal section of the Tore Supra plasma to a fast camera able to record frames at a speed up to 4800 frames per second at full resolution, or much faster for a limited number of pixel, has been installed on Tore Supra. First movies showing the light emission associated to fast phenomena such as plasma start up, disruptions or gas and pellet injections have been produced.

  9. COUPLED FAST-THERMAL POWER BREEDER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Avery, R.

    1961-07-18

    A nuclear reactor having a region operating predominantly on fast neutrons and another region operating predominantly on slow neutrons is described. The fast region is a plutonium core and the slow region is a natural uranium blanket around the core. Both of these regions are free of moderator. A moderating reflector surrounds the uranium blanket. The moderating material and thickness of the reflector are selected so that fissions in the uranium blanket make a substantial contribution to the reactivity of the reactor.

  10. Fast mapping by bilingual preschool children.

    PubMed

    Kan, Pui Fong; Kohnert, Kathryn

    2008-08-01

    Previous studies show that young monolingual children's ability to 'fast map' new word forms is closely associated with both their age and existing vocabulary knowledge. In this study we investigate potential relationships between age, fast mapping skills and existing vocabulary knowledge in both languages of developing bilingual preschool children. Participants were twenty-six typically developing children, ages 3 ; 0 to 5 ; 3. All children learned Hmong as their primary home language (L1) and English as a second language (L2). Fast mapping and vocabulary knowledge tasks were administered in L1 and L2. For vocabulary knowledge, scores were comparable in L1 and L2; for fast mapping, scores were somewhat greater in L1 than L2. In contrast to previous findings with monolingual children, fast mapping performance was not related to age or existing vocabulary knowledge in either Hmong or English. There were, however, significant positive and negative cross-language correlations between L1 fast mapping and L2 vocabulary. PMID:18588712

  11. A fast and flexible reactor physics model for simulating neutron spectra and depletion in fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recktenwald, Geoff; Deinert, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Determining the time dependent concentration of isotopes within a nuclear reactor core is central to the analysis of nuclear fuel cycles. We present a fast, flexible tool for determining the time dependent neutron spectrum within fast reactors. The code (VBUDS: visualization, burnup, depletion and spectra) uses a two region, multigroup collision probability model to simulate the energy dependent neutron flux and tracks the buildup and burnout of 24 actinides, as well as fission products. While originally developed for LWR simulations, the model is shown to produce fast reactor spectra that show high degree of fidelity to available fast reactor benchmarks.

  12. Metabolism of normothermic woodchucks during prolonged fasting.

    PubMed

    Reidy, Shannon P; Weber, Jean-Michel

    2004-12-01

    The energy metabolism of hibernators has not been characterized for normothermic fasting, and our goal was to quantify oxidative fuel selection of non-hibernating woodchucks Marmota monax during prolonged food deprivation. Indirect calorimetry and nitrogen excretion measurements were used to assess changes in metabolic rate (VO2), fuel selection and composition of nitrogen wastes, as well as seasonal differences. For reference, matching experiments were also performed on rabbits. The results show that woodchucks have a higher metabolic rate in summer (271 micromol O2 kg(-1) min(-1)) than in spring (200 micromol O2 kg(-1) min(-1)) and that fasting-induced metabolic depression is only possible in summer (-25% in 14 days). The metabolic rate of rabbits is high at all times (383 micromol O2 kg(-1) min(-1)), but they show a more rapid depression in response to fasting (-32% in 7 days). Woodchucks have a naturally low reliance on proteins in the fed state (accounting for 8% VO2) in spring; 17% VO2 in summer; vs 28% VO2 in rabbits) and are able to decrease it even further during fasting (spring, 5% VO2); summer, 6% VO2; vs 20% VO2 in rabbits). This study shows that, apart from their notorious capacity for hibernation, woodchucks are particularly well adapted for normothermic fasting. Their ability to cope with prolonged food deprivation is based on a series of integrated responses eliciting deep metabolic depression and a rapid change in fuel selection to spare limited protein reserves. Information presently available on prolonged fasting suggests that such an ability for metabolic depression, possibly down to minimal levels still compatible with normothermic life, may be common among mammals. In contrast, the extreme protein sparing demonstrated in woodchucks is a unique metabolic feature of fasting champions. PMID:15579548

  13. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changjun; Wang, Huamin; Karim, Ayman M; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-21

    Increasing energy demand, especially in the transportation sector, and soaring CO2 emissions necessitate the exploitation of renewable sources of energy. Despite the large variety of new energy carriers, liquid hydrocarbon still appears to be the most attractive and feasible form of transportation fuel taking into account the energy density, stability and existing infrastructure. Biomass is an abundant, renewable source of energy; however, utilizing it in a cost-effective way is still a substantial challenge. Lignocellulose is composed of three major biopolymers, namely cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Fast pyrolysis of biomass is recognized as an efficient and feasible process to selectively convert lignocellulose into a liquid fuel-bio-oil. However bio-oil from fast pyrolysis contains a large amount of oxygen, distributed in hundreds of oxygenates. These oxygenates are the cause of many negative properties, such as low heating value, high corrosiveness, high viscosity, and instability; they also greatly limit the application of bio-oil particularly as transportation fuel. Hydrocarbons derived from biomass are most attractive because of their high energy density and compatibility with the existing infrastructure. Thus, converting lignocellulose into transportation fuels via catalytic fast pyrolysis has attracted much attention. Many studies related to catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass have been published. The main challenge of this process is the development of active and stable catalysts that can deal with a large variety of decomposition intermediates from lignocellulose. This review starts with the current understanding of the chemistry in fast pyrolysis of lignocellulose and focuses on the development of catalysts in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recent progress in the experimental studies on catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass is also summarized with the emphasis on bio-oil yields and quality. PMID:24801125

  14. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Changjun; Wang, Huamin; Karim, Ayman M.; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-21

    Increasing energy demand, especially in the transportation sector, and soaring CO2 emissions necessitate the exploitation of renewable sources of energy. Despite the large variety of new energy Q3 carriers, liquid hydrocarbon still appears to be the most attractive and feasible form of transportation fuel taking into account the energy density, stability and existing infrastructure. Biomass is an abundant, renewable source of energy; however, utilizing it in a cost-effective way is still a substantial challenge. Lignocellulose is composed of three major biopolymers, namely cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Fast pyrolysis of biomass is recognized as an efficient and feasible process to selectively convert lignocellulose into a liquid fuel—bio-oil. However bio-oil from fast pyrolysis contains a large amount of oxygen, distributed in hundreds of oxygenates. These oxygenates are the cause of many negative properties, such as low heating values, high corrosiveness, high viscosity, and instability; they also greatly Q4 limit the application of bio-oil particularly as transportation fuel. Hydrocarbons derived from biomass are most attractive because of their high energy density and compatibility with the existing infrastructure. Thus, converting lignocellulose into transportation fuels via catalytic fast pyrolysis has attracted much attention. Many studies related to catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass have been published. The main challenge of this process is the development of active and stable catalysts that can deal with a large variety of decomposition intermediates from lignocellulose. This review starts with the current understanding of the chemistry in fast pyrolysis of lignocellulose and focuses on the development of catalysts in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recent progress in the experimental studies on catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass is also summarized with the emphasis on bio-oil yields and quality.

  15. Stationary Liquid Fuel Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Won Sik; Grandy, Andrew; Boroski, Andrew; Krajtl, Lubomir; Johnson, Terry

    2015-09-30

    For effective burning of hazardous transuranic (TRU) elements of used nuclear fuel, a transformational advanced reactor concept named SLFFR (Stationary Liquid Fuel Fast Reactor) was proposed based on stationary molten metallic fuel. The fuel enters the reactor vessel in a solid form, and then it is heated to molten temperature in a small melting heater. The fuel is contained within a closed, thick container with penetrating coolant channels, and thus it is not mixed with coolant nor flow through the primary heat transfer circuit. The makeup fuel is semi- continuously added to the system, and thus a very small excess reactivity is required. Gaseous fission products are also removed continuously, and a fraction of the fuel is periodically drawn off from the fuel container to a processing facility where non-gaseous mixed fission products and other impurities are removed and then the cleaned fuel is recycled into the fuel container. A reference core design and a preliminary plant system design of a 1000 MWt TRU- burning SLFFR concept were developed using TRU-Ce-Co fuel, Ta-10W fuel container, and sodium coolant. Conservative design approaches were adopted to stay within the current material performance database. Detailed neutronics and thermal-fluidic analyses were performed to develop a reference core design. Region-dependent 33-group cross sections were generated based on the ENDF/B-VII.0 data using the MC2-3 code. Core and fuel cycle analyses were performed in theta-r-z geometries using the DIF3D and REBUS-3 codes. Reactivity coefficients and kinetics parameters were calculated using the VARI3D perturbation theory code. Thermo-fluidic analyses were performed using the ANSYS FLUENT computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. Figure 0.1 shows a schematic radial layout of the reference 1000 MWt SLFFR core, and Table 0.1 summarizes the main design parameters of SLFFR-1000 loop plant. The fuel container is a 2.5 cm thick cylinder with an inner radius of 87.5 cm. The fuel

  16. FAST - FREEDOM ASSEMBLY SEQUENCING TOOL PROTOTYPE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borden, C. S.

    1994-01-01

    FAST is a project management tool designed to optimize the assembly sequence of Space Station Freedom. An appropriate assembly sequence coordinates engineering, design, utilization, transportation availability, and operations requirements. Since complex designs tend to change frequently, FAST assesses the system level effects of detailed changes and produces output metrics that identify preferred assembly sequences. FAST incorporates Space Shuttle integration, Space Station hardware, on-orbit operations, and programmatic drivers as either precedence relations or numerical data. Hardware sequencing information can either be input directly and evaluated via the "specified" mode of operation or evaluated from the input precedence relations in the "flexible" mode. In the specified mode, FAST takes as its input a list of the cargo elements assigned to each flight. The program determines positions for the cargo elements that maximize the center of gravity (c.g.) margin. These positions are restricted by the geometry of the cargo elements and the location of attachment fittings both in the orbiter and on the cargo elements. FAST calculates every permutation of cargo element location according to its height, trunnion fitting locations, and required intercargo element spacing. Each cargo element is tested in both its normal and reversed orientation (rotated 180 degrees). The best solution is that which maximizes the c.g. margin for each flight. In the flexible mode, FAST begins with the first flight and determines all feasible combinations of cargo elements according to mass, volume, EVA, and precedence relation constraints. The program generates an assembly sequence that meets mass, volume, position, EVA, and precedence constraints while minimizing the total number of Shuttle flights required. Issues associated with ground operations, spacecraft performance, logistics requirements and user requirements will be addressed in future versions of the model. FAST is written in C

  17. Antiproton fast ignition for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L.J.

    1997-10-24

    With 180MJ/{micro}g, antiprotons offer the highest stored energy per unit mass of any known entity. We investigate the use of antiprotons to promote fast ignition in an ICF capsule and seek high gains with only modest compression of the main fuel. Unlike standard fast ignition where the ignition energy is supplied by an energetic, short pulse laser, the energy here is supplied through the ionization energy deposited when antiprotons annihilate at the center of a compressed fuel capsule. In the first of two candidate fast ignition schemes, the antiproton package is delivered by a low energy external ion beam. In the second, ''autocatalytic'' scheme, the antiprotons are pre-emplaced at the center of the capsule prior to compression. In both schemes, we estimate that {approximately}3x10{sup 13} antiprotons are required to initiate fast ignition in a typical ICF capsule and show that incorporation of a thin, heavy metal shell is desirable to enhance energy deposition in the igniter zone. In addition to obviating the need for a second energetic fast laser and vulnerable final optics, this scheme would achieve central without reliance on laser channeling through halo plasma or houlrahm debris. However, in addition to the unknowns involved in the storage and manipulation of antiprotons at low energy, the other large uncertainty for the practicality of such a scheme is the ultimate efficiency of antiproton production in, an external, optimized facility.

  18. Subwavelength nanobrush target to collimate fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zongqing; Cao, Lihua; Cao, Leifeng; Zhou, Weimin; Wu, Yuchi; Zhu, Bin; Dong, Kegong; Zhang, Baohan; Ding, Yongkun; Gu, Yuqiu

    2011-10-01

    A subwavelength nanobrush target was proposed to collimate fast electrons in laser plasma interaction, which consists of a 5 μm copper underlay covered with a 20 μm thick layer of metallic fibers. The diameter of the individual fibers is about 200 nm and the spacing between them is about 150 nm. The experiment was hold at SILEX-I laser facility (10 J, 31 fs, 300 TW). When a subwavelength nanobrush target interacts with ultraintense laser of 7.9*1018/cm2, highly collimated fast electron beam with divergence angle nearly zero whereas the divergence of the plane target is 40 degree. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations show that the fast electrons will be accelerated and guided by strong transient electromagnetic fields created at the wall surfaces of nanobrushs. Both experiment and simulation show that the subwavelength nanobrush target can indeed generate fast electrons more efficiency and collimate them. The scheme should be useful for fast ignition and K α source research in inertial confinement fusion.

  19. FAST MOLECULAR SOLVATION ENERGETICS AND FORCE COMPUTATION.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Chandrajit; Zhao, Wenqi

    2010-01-20

    The total free energy of a molecule includes the classical molecular mechanical energy (which is understood as the free energy in vacuum) and the solvation energy which is caused by the change of the environment of the molecule (solute) from vacuum to solvent. The solvation energy is important to the study of the inter-molecular interactions. In this paper we develop a fast surface-based generalized Born method to compute the electrostatic solvation energy along with the energy derivatives for the solvation forces. The most time-consuming computation is the evaluation of the surface integrals over an algebraic spline molecular surface (ASMS) and the fast computation is achieved by the use of the nonequispaced fast Fourier transform (NFFT) algorithm. The main results of this paper involve (a) an efficient sampling of quadrature points over the molecular surface by using nonlinear patches, (b) fast linear time estimation of energy and inter-molecular forces, (c) error analysis, and (d) efficient implementation combining fast pairwise summation and the continuum integration using nonlinear patches. PMID:20200598

  20. Large Deviations in Fast-Slow Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, Freddy; Grafke, Tobias; Tangarife, Tomás; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric

    2016-02-01

    The incidence of rare events in fast-slow systems is investigated via analysis of the large deviation principle (LDP) that characterizes the likelihood and pathway of large fluctuations of the slow variables away from their mean behavior—such fluctuations are rare on short time-scales but become ubiquitous eventually. Classical results prove that this LDP involves an Hamilton-Jacobi equation whose Hamiltonian is related to the leading eigenvalue of the generator of the fast process, and is typically non-quadratic in the momenta—in other words, the LDP for the slow variables in fast-slow systems is different in general from that of any stochastic differential equation (SDE) one would write for the slow variables alone. It is shown here that the eigenvalue problem for the Hamiltonian can be reduced to a simpler algebraic equation for this Hamiltonian for a specific class of systems in which the fast variables satisfy a linear equation whose coefficients depend nonlinearly on the slow variables, and the fast variables enter quadratically the equation for the slow variables. These results are illustrated via examples, inspired by kinetic theories of turbulent flows and plasma, in which the quasipotential characterizing the long time behavior of the system is calculated and shown again to be different from that of an SDE.

  1. The Physics of Fast Z Pinches

    SciTech Connect

    RYUTOV,D.D.; DERZON,MARK S.; MATZEN,M. KEITH

    1999-10-25

    The spectacular progress made during the last few years in reaching high energy densities in fast implosions of annular current sheaths (fast Z pinches) opens new possibilities for a broad spectrum of experiments, from x-ray generation to controlled thermonuclear fusion and astrophysics. Presently Z pinches are the most intense laboratory X ray sources (1.8 MJ in 5 ns from a volume 2 mm in diameter and 2 cm tall). Powers in excess of 200 TW have been obtained. This warrants summarizing the present knowledge of physics that governs the behavior of radiating current-carrying plasma in fast Z pinches. This survey covers essentially all aspects of the physics of fast Z pinches: initiation, instabilities of the early stage, magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the implosion phase, formation of a transient quasi-equilibrium near the stagnation point, and rebound. Considerable attention is paid to the analysis of hydrodynamic instabilities governing the implosion symmetry. Possible ways of mitigating these instabilities are discussed. Non-magnetohydrodynamic effects (anomalous resistivity, generation of particle beams, etc.) are summarized. Various applications of fast Z pinches are briefly described. Scaling laws governing development of more powerful Z pinches are presented. The survey contains 36 figures and more than 300 references.

  2. The physics of fast Z pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D.D.; Derzon, M.S.; Matzen, M.K.

    1998-07-01

    The spectacular progress made during the last few years in reaching high energy densities in fast implosions of annular current sheaths (fast Z pinches) opens new possibilities for a broad spectrum of experiments, from x-ray generation to controlled thermonuclear fusion and astrophysics. Presently Z pinches are the most intense laboratory X ray sources (1.8 MJ in 5 ns from a volume 2 mm in diameter and 2 cm tall). Powers in excess of 200 TW have been obtained. This warrants summarizes the present knowledge of physics that governs the behavior of radiating current-carrying plasma in fast Z-pinches. This survey covers essentially all aspects of the physics of fast Z pinches: initiation, instabilities of the early stage, magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the implosion phase, formation of a transient quasi-equilibrium near the stagnation point, and rebound. Considerable attention is paid to the analysis of hydrodynamic instabilities governing the implosion symmetry. Possible ways of mitigating these instabilities are discussed. Non-magnetohydrodynamic effects (anomalous resistivity, generation of particle beams, etc.) are summarized. Various applications of fast Z pinches are briefly described. Scaling laws governing development of more powerful Z pinches are presented. The survey contains 52 figures and nearly 300 references.

  3. Fast-track surgery in India.

    PubMed

    Nanavati, Aditya J; Nagral, Sanjay; Prabhakar, Subramaniam

    2014-01-01

    Fast-track surgery or 'enhanced recovery after surgery' or 'multimodal rehabilitation after surgery' is a form of protocol-based perioperative care programme. It is an amalgamation of evidence-based practices that have been proven to improve patient outcome independently and exert a synergistic effect when applied together. The philosophy is to treat the patient's pathology with minimal disturbance to the physiology. Several surgical subspecialties have now adopted such protocols with good results. The role of fast-track surgery in colorectal procedures has been well demonstrated. Its application to other major abdominal surgical procedures is not as well defined but there are encouraging results in the few studies conducted. There has been resistance to several aspects of this programme among gastrointestinal and general surgeons. There is little data from India in the available literature on the application of fast-tracking in gastrointestinal surgery. In a country such as India the existing healthcare structure stands to gain the most by widespread adoption of fast-track methods. Early discharge, early ambulation, earlier return to work and increased hospital efficiency are some of the benefits. The cost gains derived from this programme stand to benefit the patient, doctor and government as well. The practice and implementation of fast-track surgery involves a multidisciplinary team approach. It requires policy formation at an institutional level and interdepartmental coordination. More research is required in areas like implementation of such protocols across India to derive the maximum benefit from them. PMID:25471759

  4. PROLONGED FASTING AND CORTISOL REDUCE MYOSTATIN MRNA LEVELS IN TILAPIA LARVAE, SHORT-TERM FASTING ELEVATES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Myostatin negatively regulates muscle growth and development and has recently been characterized in several fishes. We measured fasting myostatin mRNA levels in adult tilapia skeletal muscle and in whole larvae. Although fasting reduced some growth indices in adults, skeletal muscle myostatin mRNA...

  5. Fasting Ramadan in diabetic patients: When is fasting not advisable in a person with diabetes?

    PubMed

    Aziz El-Sayed, Adel Abdel; Sabet, Eman Ahmad

    2015-05-01

    Ramadan Fasting is one of the five pillars of Islam, but there is a clear exemption in holy Qur'an for those who are temporarily or permanently ill. Diabetes Mellitus is one of the most prevalent chronic illnesses globally; it is associated with metabolic risks that might be augmented with fasting. In spite of this risk many Muslims prefer to fast considering not fasting is a great sin and shameful. Defining the situations when fasting is not advisable in a diabetic patient is an important issue which has to be clearly determined on bases of solid evidence whenever possible. The recommendations have to be agreed between experts of physicians and Islamic Religion scientists. The advances in diabetes management necessitate continuous updating of the recommendations to match with Islamic legitimacy. The role of healthcare providers is neither recommending nor preventing a patient from fasting, their role is just to explore risks and provide medical advice for safe fasting. This review summarizes previous trials for risk stratifications and recommendations for fasting in diabetic patients. PMID:26013778

  6. Insight into the structures of [M(C5H4I)(CO)3] and [M 2(C12H8)(CO)6] (M = Mn and Re) containing strong I⋯O and π(CO)–π(CO) inter­actions

    PubMed Central

    Romanov, Alexander S.; Mulroy, Joseph M.; Antipin, Mikhail Yu.; Timofeeva, Tatiana V.

    2009-01-01

    The compounds tricarbonyl(η5-1-iodo­cyclo­penta­dienyl)­man­gan­ese(I), [Mn(C5H4I)(CO)3], (I), and tricarbonyl(η5-1-iodo­cyclo­penta­dienyl)rhenium(I), [Re(C5H4I)(CO)3], (III), are isostructural and isomorphous. The compounds [μ-1,2(η5)-acetyl­enedicyclo­penta­dienyl]bis­[tricarbonyl­manganese(I)] or bis­(cymantrenyl)acetyl­ene, [Mn2(C12H8)(CO)6], (II), and [μ-1,2(η5)-acetyl­enedicyclo­penta­dienyl]bis­[tri­carbonyl­rhenium(I)], [Re2(C12H8)(CO)6], (IV), are isostructural and isomorphous, and their mol­ecules display inversion symmetry about the mid-point of the ligand C C bond, with the (CO)3 M(C5H4) (M = Mn and Re) moieties adopting a transoid conformation. The mol­ecules in all four compounds form zigzag chains due to the formation of strong attractive I⋯O [in (I) and (III)] or π(CO)–π(CO) [in (I) and (IV)] inter­actions along the crystallographic b axis. The zigzag chains are bound to each other by weak inter­molecular C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds for (I) and (III), while for (II) and (IV) the chains are bound to each other by a combination of weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds and π(Csp 2)–π(Csp 2) stacking inter­actions between pairs of mol­ecules. The π(CO)–π(CO) contacts in (II) and (IV) between carbonyl groups of neighboring mol­ecules, forming pairwise inter­actions in a sheared anti­parallel dimer motif, are encountered in only 35% of all carbonyl inter­actions for transition metal–carbonyl compounds. PMID:19893226

  7. 48 CFR 52.213-1 - Fast Payment Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fast Payment Procedure. 52....213-1 Fast Payment Procedure. As prescribed in 13.404, insert the following clause: Fast Payment... contract, order, or blanket purchase agreement; and (ii) Display prominently on the invoice “FAST...

  8. Fast neutron detection with a segmented spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, T. J.; Bass, C. D.; Beise, E. J.; Breuer, H.; Erwin, D. K.; Heimbach, C. R.; Nico, J. S.

    2015-01-01

    A fast neutron spectrometer consisting of segmented plastic scintillator and 3He proportional counters was constructed for the measurement of neutrons in the energy range 1-200 MeV. We discuss its design, principles of operation, and the method of analysis. The detector is capable of observing very low neutron fluxes in the presence of ambient gamma background and does not require scintillator pulse-shape discrimination. The spectrometer was characterized for its energy response in fast neutron fields of 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV, and the results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. Measurements of the fast neutron flux and energy response at 120 m above sea-level (39.130°N, 77.218°W) and at a depth of 560 m in a limestone mine are presented. Finally, the design of a spectrometer with improved sensitivity and energy resolution is discussed.

  9. Slow and fast light switching in ruby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Rajitha P.; Riesen, Hans

    2015-05-01

    Studies about light propagation have been undertaken for more than a century. It is now well established that any material that has normal or anomalous dispersion generates slow or fast light. In this paper, we demonstrate an experimental technique to rapidly switch between slow and fast light in ruby. The experiment utilizes transient holeburning to create drastic variation in refractive index of ruby to produce slow as well as fast light. Transient hole-burning involves the depletion of the ground state leading to a highly populated excited state by single frequency laser excitation. This leads to a hole in the absorption spectrum when readout by a laser. We observed a delay of 29 ns and advancement of -11 ns in an external magnetic field of B║c = 12 mT corresponding to a group velocity of c/961 and negative group velocity of -c/365 respectively.

  10. Fasting in Ramadan with an insulin pump.

    PubMed

    Kesavadev, Jothydev

    2015-05-01

    A good majority of subjects with diabetes on insulin therapies observe fasting during Ramadan. The challenge for the physician and the patient is to manage diabetes without an interruption to fasting by avoiding hypoglycaemia and simultaneously ensuring that blood glucose remain at acceptable safe levels. Insulin Pumps differ from syringes and insulin pens in that it offers a variable basal rate, different type of boluses and associated calculators. The technological advances that pumps offer, help educated subjects pre-programme a reduced basal rate throughout the day. Pumps ensure avoidance of hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia and preserve quality of life and enhance confidence in patients during fasting. Due to multiple benefits, insulin pumps are considered the best delivery systems for insulin during the holy month of Ramadan, despite the prerequisites for its optimal output and cost concerns. PMID:26013786

  11. Coherent emission in fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, J. I.

    2014-05-01

    The fast (ms) radio bursts reported by Lorimer et al. Science 318, 777 (2007) and Thornton et al. Science 341, 53 (2013) have extremely high brightness temperatures if at the inferred cosmological distances. This implies coherent emission by "bunches" of charges. Fast radio bursts, like the giant pulses of the Crab pulsar, display banded spectra that may be harmonics of plasma frequency emission by plasma turbulence and are inconsistent with emission by charge distributions moving relativistically. We model the emission region as a screen of half-wave dipole radiators resonant around the frequencies of observation, the maximally bright emission mechanism of nonrelativistic charges, and calculate the implied charge bunching. From this we infer the minimum electron energy required to overcome electrostatic repulsion. If fast radio bursts are the counterparts of Galactic events, their Galactic counterparts may be detected from any direction above the horizon by radio telescopes in their far sidelobes or by small arrays of dipoles.

  12. Fast and Reliable Quantitative Peptidomics with labelpepmatch.

    PubMed

    Verdonck, Rik; De Haes, Wouter; Cardoen, Dries; Menschaert, Gerben; Huhn, Thomas; Landuyt, Bart; Baggerman, Geert; Boonen, Kurt; Wenseleers, Tom; Schoofs, Liliane

    2016-03-01

    The use of stable isotope tags in quantitative peptidomics offers many advantages, but the laborious identification of matching sets of labeled peptide peaks is still a major bottleneck. Here we present labelpepmatch, an R-package for fast and straightforward analysis of LC-MS spectra of labeled peptides. This open-source tool offers fast and accurate identification of peak pairs alongside an appropriate framework for statistical inference on quantitative peptidomics data, based on techniques from other -omics disciplines. A relevant case study on the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria proves our pipeline to be a reliable tool for quick but thorough explorative analyses. PMID:26828777

  13. FFTLog: Fast Fourier or Hankel transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Andrew J. S.

    2015-12-01

    FFTLog is a set of Fortran subroutines that compute the fast Fourier or Hankel (= Fourier-Bessel) transform of a periodic sequence of logarithmically spaced points. FFTLog can be regarded as a natural analogue to the standard Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), in the sense that, just as the normal FFT gives the exact (to machine precision) Fourier transform of a linearly spaced periodic sequence, so also FFTLog gives the exact Fourier or Hankel transform, of arbitrary order m, of a logarithmically spaced periodic sequence.

  14. A fast chopper for medium energy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrak, R.; Wildman, D.

    2014-10-01

    The key elements have been constructed for a fast chopper system capable of removing single 2.5 MeV proton bunches spaced at 325 MHz. The average chopping rate is ~ 1 MHz. The components include a pulse delaying microstrip structure for deflecting the beam, high voltage (1.2 kV) fast (ns rise time) pulsers, and an associated wideband combiner. Various designs for the deflecting structures have been studied. Measurements of the microstrip structures' coverage factors and pulse shapes are presented.

  15. A pragmatic overview of fast multipole methods

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.H.; Baty, R.S.

    1995-12-01

    A number of physics problems can be modeled by a set of N elements which have pair-wise interactions with one another. A direct solution technique requires computational effort which is O(N{sup 2}). Fast multipole methods (FMM) have been widely used in recent years to obtain solutions to these problems requiring a computational effort of only 0 (N lnN) or O (N). In this paper we present an overview of several variations of the fast multipole method along with examples of its use in solving a variety of physical problems.

  16. Fast Fourier Transform algorithm design and tradeoffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamin, Ray A., III; Adams, George B., III

    1988-01-01

    The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is a mainstay of certain numerical techniques for solving fluid dynamics problems. The Connection Machine CM-2 is the target for an investigation into the design of multidimensional Single Instruction Stream/Multiple Data (SIMD) parallel FFT algorithms for high performance. Critical algorithm design issues are discussed, necessary machine performance measurements are identified and made, and the performance of the developed FFT programs are measured. Fast Fourier Transform programs are compared to the currently best Cray-2 FFT program.

  17. Fast arithmetic in MacLISP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, G. L., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    MacLISP provides a compiler which produces numerical code competitive in speed with some FORTRAN implementations and yet compatible with the rest of the MacLISP system. All numerical programs can be run under the MacLISP interpreter. Additional declarations to the compiler specify type information which allows the generation of optimized numerical code which generally does not require the garbage collection of temporary numerical results. Array accesses are almost as fast as in FORTRAN, and permit the use of dynamically allocated arrays of varying dimensions. The implementation decisions regarding user interface, data representations, and interfacing conventions are discussed which allow the generation of fast numerical LISP code.

  18. Slow and fast light in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedgwick, Forrest Grant

    Slow and fast light are the propagation of optical signals at group velocities below and above the speed of light in a given medium. There has been great interest in the use of nonlinear optics to engineer slow and fast light dispersion for applications in optical communications and radio-frequency or microwave photonics. Early results in this field were primarily confined to dilute atomic systems. While these results were impressive, they had two major barriers to practical application. First, the wavelengths were not compatible with fiber optic telecommunications. More importantly, the bandwidth obtainable in these experiments was inherently low; 100 kHz or less. Within the last five years slow and fast light effects have been observed and engineered in a much wider variety of systems. In this work, we detail our efforts to realize slow and fast light in semiconductor systems. There are three primary advantages of semiconductor systems: fiber-compatible wavelengths, larger bandwidth, and simplification of integration with other optical components. In this work we will explore three different types of physical mechanisms for implementing slow and fast light. The first is electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). In transporting this process to semiconductors, we initially turn our attention to quantum dots or "artificial atoms". We present simulations of a quantum dot EIT-based device within the context of an optical communications link and we derive results which are generally applicable to a broad class of slow light devices. We then present experimental results realizing EIT in quantum wells by using long-lived electron spin coherence. The second mechanism we will explore is coherent population oscillations (CPO), also known as carrier density pulsations (CDP). We examine for the first time how both slow and fast light may be achieved in a quantum well semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) while operating in the gain regime. Again, we simulate the device

  19. Ionic crystals based on Keggin anion and mixed-valent diruthenium tetracetate: [Ru2(CH3COO)4(H2O)2]2[HnXW12O40]·[Ru2(CH3COO)4(H2O)Cl]·12H2O (X = B, Si, Ge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuemei; Liu, Bin; Xue, Ganglin

    2012-05-01

    Three new ionic crystals based on Keggin anion and mixed-valent diruthenium tetracetate, [Ru2(CH3CO2)4(H2O)2]2[HnXW12O40]·[Ru2(CH3CO2)4(H2O)Cl]·12H2O {X = B, n = 3 (1); X = Si, n = 2 (2); X = Ge, n = 2 (3)}, have been prepared in acidic aqueous solution at about pH 3.0 by reaction of K4BW12O40·mH2O, K8SiW11O39·mH2O and K8GeW11O39·mH2O with diruthenium tetracetate Ru2(CH3COO)4Cl, respectively, and their structures were determined by X-Ray diffraction analysis. They are isostructural structure with the ratio of heteropolytungstate anion, Ru2(CH3CO2)4+ cation and neutral molecular Ru2(CH3CO2)4Cl of 1:2:1. The cyclic voltammetry in 0.5 M KNO3 aqueous solution at pH 3.0 show the respective electrochemical behaviors of the W-centers and Ru2-centers for these three complexes. Magnetic data analysis shows that diruthenium units display the ground state electronic configuration π*2δ* with large positive D value.

  20. Association between proximity to and coverage of traditional fast-food restaurants and non-traditional fast-food outlets and fast-food consumption among rural adults

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to examine the relationship between residential exposure to fast-food entrées, using two measures of potential spatial access: proximity (distance to the nearest location) and coverage (number of different locations), and weekly consumption of fast-food meals. Methods Traditional fast-food restaurants and non-traditional fast-food outlets, such as convenience stores, supermarkets, and grocery stores, from the 2006 Brazos Valley Food Environment Project were linked with individual participants (n = 1409) who completed the nutrition module in the 2006 Brazos Valley Community Health Assessment. Results Increased age, poverty, increased distance to the nearest fast food, and increased number of different traditional fast-food restaurants, non-traditional fast-food outlets, or fast-food opportunities were associated with less frequent weekly consumption of fast-food meals. The interaction of gender and proximity (distance) or coverage (number) indicated that the association of proximity to or coverage of fast-food locations on fast-food consumption was greater among women and opposite of independent effects. Conclusions Results provide impetus for identifying and understanding the complex relationship between access to all fast-food opportunities, rather than to traditional fast-food restaurants alone, and fast-food consumption. The results indicate the importance of further examining the complex interaction of gender and distance in rural areas and particularly in fast-food consumption. Furthermore, this study emphasizes the need for health promotion and policy efforts to consider all sources of fast-food as part of promoting healthful food choices. PMID:21599955

  1. Fast-ion Dα measurements of the fast-ion distribution (invited).

    PubMed

    Heidbrink, W W

    2010-10-01

    The fast-ion Dα (FIDA) diagnostic is an application of charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy. Fast ions that neutralize in an injected neutral beam emit Balmer-α light with a large Doppler shift. The spectral shift is exploited to distinguish the FIDA emission from other bright sources of Dα light. Background subtraction is the main technical challenge. A spectroscopic diagnostic typically achieves temporal, energy, and transverse spatial resolution of ∼1 ms, ∼10 keV, and ∼2 cm, respectively. Installations that use narrow-band filters achieve high spatial and temporal resolution at the expense of spectral information. For high temporal resolution, the bandpass-filtered light goes directly to a photomultiplier, allowing detection of ∼50 kHz oscillations in FIDA signal. For two-dimensional spatial profiles, the bandpass-filtered light goes to a charge-coupled device camera; detailed images of fast-ion redistribution at instabilities are obtained. Qualitative and quantitative models relate the measured FIDA signals to the fast-ion distribution function. The first quantitative comparisons between theory and experiment found excellent agreement in beam-heated magnetohydrodynamics (MHD)-quiescent plasmas. FIDA diagnostics are now in operation at magnetic-fusion facilities worldwide. They are used to study fast-ion acceleration by ion cyclotron heating, to detect fast-ion transport by MHD modes and microturbulence, and to study fast-ion driven instabilities. PMID:21033920

  2. Fast Moccasin: A Story of Arapaho Kinship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodenlegs, Martha

    The story of Fast Moccasin, a 14-year-old Arapaho youth anxiously awaiting the annual Arapaho Pow-wow, is used to portray the kinship relationships of the Arapaho. Following the story is a 30-item quiz concerning relationships or relationship equivalents (blood relations, extended families, adopted families), naming procedures, and courtesies…

  3. CANCER CONTROL AND POPULATION SCIENCES FAST STATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fast Stats links to tables, charts, and graphs of cancer statistics for all major cancer sites by age, sex, race, and geographic area. The statistics include incidence, mortality, prevalence, and the probability of developing or dying from cancer. A large set of statistics is ava...

  4. Fast-tracking in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Aps, C

    Fast-tracking in cardiac surgery evolved as the pressure on bed space in intensive therapy units (ITU) grew and clinical management improved. It relies on achieving a patient condition that allows for earlier extubation and postoperative management in alternative facilities to the ITU. PMID:7582363

  5. Fast Faraday Cup With High Bandwidth

    DOEpatents

    Deibele, Craig E [Knoxville, TN

    2006-03-14

    A circuit card stripline Fast Faraday cup quantitatively measures the picosecond time structure of a charged particle beam. The stripline configuration maintains signal integrity, and stitching of the stripline increases the bandwidth. A calibration procedure ensures the measurement of the absolute charge and time structure of the charged particle beam.

  6. Fast response densitometer for measuring liquid density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Densitometer was developed which produces linear voltage proportional to changes in density of flowing liquid hydrogen. Unit has fast response time and good system stability, statistical variation, and thermal equilibrium. System accuracy is 2 percent of total density span. Basic design may be altered to include measurement of other flowing materials.

  7. Fast Food and Body Weight among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Cody; Parks, Sue

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine (1) the association between consumption of fast food and sweets on overweight among U.S. adolescents; and (2) how consumption of different types of food and physical exercise is associated with parental education and other background variables. The data were based on cross-sectional, national survey study…

  8. FAST IR ORBIT FEEDBACK AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG, C.; MICHNOFF, R.; SATOGATA, T.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    Mechanical low-{beta} triplet vibrations lead to horizontal jitter of RHIC beams at frequencies around 10 Hz. The resulting beam offsets at the interaction points are considered detrimental to RHIC luminosity performance. To stabilize beam orbits at the interaction points, installation of a fast orbit feedback is foreseen. A prototype of this system is being developed and tested. Recent results will be presented.

  9. High power fast ramping power supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Marneris,I.; Bajon, E.; Bonati, R.; Sandberg, J.; Roser, T.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-05-04

    Hundred megawatt level fast ramping power converters to drive proton and heavy ion machines are under research and development at accelerator facilities in the world. This is a leading edge technology. There are several topologies to achieve this power level. Their advantages and related issues will be discussed.

  10. Beginning Plant Biotechnology Laboratories Using Fast Plants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Mike

    This set of 16 laboratory activities is designed to illustrate the life cycle of Brassicae plants from seeds in pots to pods in 40 days. At certain points along the production cycle of the central core of labs, there are related lateral labs to provide additional learning opportunities employing this family of plants, referred to as "fast plants,"…

  11. Narcotics detection using fast-neutron interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    Fast-neutron interrogation techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in luggage and cargo containers. This paper discusses two different fast-neutron techniques. The first uses a pulsed accelerator or sealed-tube source to produce monoenergetic fast neutrons. Gamma rays characteristic of carbon and oxygen are detected and the elemental densities determined. Spatial localization is accomplished by either time of flight or collimators. This technique is suitable for examination of large containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the high-energy gamma rays. The second technique uses an accelerator to produce nanosecond pulsed beams of deuterons that strike a target to produce a pulsed beam of neutrons with a continuum of energies. Elemental distributions are obtained by measuring the neutron spectrum after the source neutrons pass through the items being interrogated. Spatial variation of elemental densities is obtained by tomographic reconstruction of projection data obtained for three to five angles and relatively low (2 cm) resolution. This technique is best suited for examination of luggage or small containers with average neutron transmissions greater than about 0.01. Analytic and Monte-Carlo models are being used to investigate the operational characteristics and limitations of both techniques.

  12. Accelerated Leadership Development: Fast Tracking School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earley, Peter; Jones, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    "Accelerated Leadership Development" captures and communicates the lessons learned from successful fast-track leadership programmes in the private and public sector, and provides a model which schools can follow and customize as they plan their own leadership development strategies. As large numbers of headteachers and other senior staff retire,…

  13. Fast Food Occupations. Coordinator's Guide. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    This coordinator's guide consists of materials for use in implementing four individualized units that have been developed for students enrolled in cooperative part-time training and are employed in fast food restaurants. Addressed in the individual units are the following occupations: cashier (DOT No. 211.462-010), counter attendant (DOT No.…

  14. Fast transmittance model for satellite sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayer, P. J.

    1995-11-01

    Through the use of new line-by-line spectral calculations in both the infrared and microwave regions, coefficients have been generated for the transmittance stage of the fast radiative transfer model used by the United Kingdom Meteorological Office. These permit the fast model to calculate the transmittance for the high-resolution infrared sounder and the microwave sounding unit instruments aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration polar-orbiting satellite for a given atmospheric profile, simply by taking these coefficients in linear combination with a set of predictors. These are expressed in terms of the deviation of the profile from a reference. However, the method can be applied to any instrument within the range of the spectral calculations, thereby permitting new coefficients to be calculated as soon as the spectral response details for the instrument become available. It also permits effective consideration to be given in the longer term to new line data or improvements in line-shape theory. The process by which these coefficients have been obtained is described, along with a discussion of some of the tests carried out on their installation into the fast model; these tests show that they are suitable for operational use. The predictors employed by the fast model are discussed, and changes are proposed for those that relate to the water-vapor transmittance. In this respect it was found that the inclusion of predictors that depend primarily on the zenith angle of the radiation path leads to improvements in the transmittance calculation.

  15. Fast Reconnection of Weak Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1998-01-01

    Fast magnetic reconnection refers to annihilation or topological rearrangement of magnetic fields on a timescale that is independent (or nearly independent) of the plasma resistivity. The resistivity of astrophysical plasmas is so low that reconnection is of little practical interest unless it is fast. Yet, the theory of fast magnetic reconnection is on uncertain ground, as models must avoid the tendency of magnetic fields to pile up at the reconnection layer, slowing down the flow. In this paper it is shown that these problems can be avoided to some extent if the flow is three dimensional. On the other hand, it is shown that in the limited but important case of incompressible stagnation point flows, every flow will amplify most magnetic fields. Although examples of fast magnetic reconnection abound, a weak, disordered magnetic field embedded in stagnation point flow will in general be amplified, and should eventually modify the flow. These results support recent arguments against the operation of turbulent resistivity in highly conducting fluids.

  16. MOLTEN PLUTONIUM FUELED FAST BREEDER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Kiehn, R.M.; King, L.D.P.; Peterson, R.E.; Swickard, E.O. Jr.

    1962-06-26

    A description is given of a nuclear fast reactor fueled with molten plutonium containing about 20 kg of plutonium in a tantalum container, cooled by circulating liquid sodium at about 600 to 650 deg C, having a large negative temperature coefficient of reactivity, and control rods and movable reflector for criticality control. (AEC)

  17. Global Perspectives on Fast-Food History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Andrew F.

    This social studies curriculum unit teaches students in grades ten through twelve about the history and current impact of the fast food industry. The unit uses a topic familiar to students to foster critical thinking about history, geography, government, and economics. Lessons cover the origins of food, highlighting the Colombian Exchange; the…

  18. Final Technical Report CMS fast optical calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, David R.

    2012-07-12

    This is the final report of CMS FAST OPTICAL CALORIMETRY, a grant to Fairfield University for development, construction, installation and operation of the forward calorimeter on CMS, and for upgrades of the forward and endcap calorimeters for higher luminosity and radiation damage amelioration.

  19. Pulsar Observations with Radio Telescope FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Ren-Dong; Wang, Qi-Ming; Zhu, Li-Chun; Zhu, Wen-Bai; Jin, Cheng-Jin; Gan, Heng-Qian

    2006-12-01

    FAST, Five hundred meter Aperture Spherical Telescope, is the Chinese effort for the international project SKA, Square Kilometer Array. An innovative engineering concept and design pave a new road to realizing huge single dish in the most effective way. Three outstanding features of the telescope are the unique karst depressions as the sites, the active main reflector which corrects spherical aberration on the ground to achieve full polarization and wide band without involving complex feed system, and the light focus cabin driven by cables and servomechanism plus a parallel robot as secondary adjustable system to carry the most precise parts of the receivers. Besides a general coverage of those critical technologies involved in FAST concept, the progresses in demonstrating model being constructed at the Miyun Radio Observatory of the NAOC is introduced. Being the most sensitive radio telescope, FAST will enable astronomers to jumpstart many of science goals, for example, the natural hydrogen line surveying in distant galaxies, looking for the first generation of shining objects, hearing the possible signal from other civilizations, etc. Among these subjects, the most striking one could be pulsar study. Large scale survey by FAST will not only improve the statistics of the pulsar population, but also may offer us a good fortune to pick up more of the most exotic, even unknown types like a sub-millisecond pulsar or a neutron star -- black hole binary as the telescope is put into operation.

  20. Fujita phenomenon in inhomogeneous fast diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinge; Zheng, Sining; Qu, Chengyuan

    2013-04-01

    This paper deals with the Fujita phenomenon for the Cauchy problem of an inhomogeneous fast diffusion system. Both the critical exponent and the second exponent are obtained. We observe that the inhomogeneous terms in the system substantially contribute to the critical exponent, in that the blow-up exponent region is obviously enlarged, with keeping the second critical exponent unchanged for small inhomogeneous sources.

  1. Fast Mapping Skills in the Developing Lexicon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershkoff-Stowe, Lisa; Hahn, Erin R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This preliminary investigation was a longitudinal study of fast mapping skills in normally developing children, 16-18 months of age. The purpose was to examine the effects of practice on the accessibility of words in lexical memory. Method: Eight children were taught the names of 24 unfamiliar objects over 12 weekly training sessions. The…

  2. A Fast-Starting Robotic Fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya; Watts, Matthew; Conte, Joe; Hover, Franz; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2009-11-01

    We have built a simple mechanical system to emulate the fast-start performance of fish. The system consisted of a thin metal beam covered by a urethane rubber fish body. The body form of the mechanical fish in this work was modeled from a pike species, which is the most successfully studied fast-start specialist species. The mechanical fish was held in curvature and hung in water by two restraining lines, which were simultaneously released by pneumatic cutting mechanisms. The potential energy in the beam was transferred into the fluid, thereby accelerating the fish, similar to a pike. We measured the resulting velocity and acceleration, as well as the efficiency of propulsion for the mechanical fish model and also ran a series of flow visualization tests to observe the resulting flow pattern. We also studied the influence of stiffness and geometry of the tail on the efficiency of propulsion and flow pattern. The hydrodynamic efficiency of the fish, calculated by the transfer of energy, was around 10%. Flow visualization of the mechanical fast-start wake was also analyzed, showing that the acceleration is associated with the fast movement of an intense vortex in a near-lateral direction.

  3. Magnetic performance of a fast excitation wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, J.C.; Romano, T.; van Steenbergen, A.

    1993-03-01

    With the objective of performing an inverse free-electron laser accelerator experiment, an iron dominated (Vanadium Permendur), fast excitation, high K planar wiggler has been built and measured. The authors present in this report an analysis of a constant period wiggler and several tapering configurations (gap=4 mm; 3.0 cm < [lambda][sub [omega

  4. Particle Filtration for Ultra Fast Laser Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakschik, S.; Kesslau, D.

    Ultra fast laser processing is marketed for processes which require small thermal impact to the product. The process has its advantages in processing speed and quality. Recent applications have been in photo-voltaic processing, surface treatment or preparation of electrodes for lithium ion batteries. As soon as the fast laser is utilized for ablation, particles are generated. Driven by product quality, tool conservation and governmental restrictions a well-defined air filter is necessary for laser processes. The layout and design of such a filter system is not strait forward. First of all acquisition plays a major role on the overall quality of the system. In addition the filter itself needs to be well defined in terms of deposition rate and endurance. The latter is determined by the generated particles. We present an investigation of particles as generated by ultra fast laser processing of silicon, inox and ceramics. Our investigation proves thermal impact on generated particles by the ultra-fast laser. The particle spectrum is clearly determined by sub micrometer particles, making nano-filtration a necessary step. Based on this investigation an extraction and filter solution was designed and successfully demonstrated on silicon, inox and ceramic process. A filter quality according to governmental regulation is achieved, based on an extraction which delivers best product quality.

  5. Fast Computation of the Inverse CMH Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Umesh D.; Torre, Edward Della; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A fast computational method based on differential equation approach for inverse DOK model has been extended for the inverse CMH model. Also, a cobweb technique for calculating the inverse CMH model is also presented. The two techniques are differed from the point of view of flexibility and computation time.

  6. Hemispherical Capsule Implosions for Fast Ignition*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, D. L.; Vesey, R. A.; Sinars, D. B.; Adams, R. G.; Cuneo, M. E.; Porter, J. L.; Slutz, S. A.; Johnston, R. R.; Wenger, D. F.; Schroen, D. G.

    2003-10-01

    The fast ignitor approach to ICF ignition separates the fuel assembly and fast heating processes. After compressing the fuel with the main driver, the fuel is ignited using a focused electron or ion beam generated by a fast, ultra-high power laser pulse. This significantly relaxes the drive symmetry, energy, and shock timing requirements compared to hot spot ignition. A hemispherical capsule target is a fast ignitor geometry well-adapted to symmetric fuel compression by a single-ended z-pinch radiation drive. The hemispherical capsule implodes radially, constrained at its equator by a flat high-density surface (a special case of the spherical capsule "cone-focus" geometry). This glide plane is mounted on a hollow pedestal that provides a plasma-free, short-pulse laser path to the compressed fuel core region. In experiments on the Z accelerator at Sandia, we are studying implosions of 2.0-mm-diameter, 60-micron-thick hemispherical capsules in cylindrical secondary hohlraums heated to 90-100 eV from one end by a 120 TW wire-array z-pinch. Analysis of ZBL 6.7 keV point-projection backlighter images of pole-hot implosions in a tall secondary and 6.18 keV monochromatic crystal backlighter images of more symmetric implosions in a short secondary will be presented. We will also discuss progress on the development of a cryogenic liquid fuel target for this fast ignitor compression geometry. * Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Comparative pharmacokinetic studies of fast dissolving film and oral solution of ondansetron in rats.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Dhagla R; Patel, Vishnu A; Chhalotiya, Usmangani K; Patel, Harsha V; Kundawala, Aliasgar J

    2013-12-01

    Ondansetron, selective serotonin (5-HT3) receptor blocker, is used in treating chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting in cancer patients. Mouth dissolving films containing ondansetron were developed to have better onset and patient compliances. The drug content of prepared films was within 85%-115%. The films were found to be stable for 4 months when stored at 40 %°C and 75% RH. In-vitro dissolution studies suggested a rapid disintegration, in which most of ondansetron was released (91.5±3.4%) within 90 sec. Subsequently, Sprague-Dawley rats were used to compare pharmacokinetic parameters of the formulated films with oral administration of pure drug solution. Pharmacokinetic parameters were similar between the two groups in which AUC0-t (ng h/ml), AUC0-∞ (ng h/ml), Cmax (ng/ml), Tmax (min), Kel (h(-1)) and t1/2 (h) of reference was 109.091±15.73, 130.32±18.56, 28.5±4.053, 60, 0.1860±0.0226, and 3.771±0.498 respectively; and for formulated film 113.663±16.64, 151.79±16.54, 30±3.51, 60, 0.1521±0.0310 and 4.755±0.653 respectively. These results suggest that the fast dissolving film containing ondansetron is likely to become one of the choices to treat chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting. PMID:23755722

  8. Performance of Fasting Plasma Glucose and Postprandial Urine Glucose in Screening for Diabetes in Chinese High-risk Population

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bing-Quan; Lu, Yang; He, Jia-Jia; Wu, Tong-Zhi; Xie, Zuo-Ling; Lei, Cheng-Hao; Zhou, Yi; Han, Jing; Bian, Mei-Qi; You, Hong; Mei, De-Xian; Sun, Zi-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The conventional approaches to diabetes screening are potentially limited by poor compliance and laboratory demand. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and postprandial urine glucose (PUG) in screening for diabetes in Chinese high-risk population. Methods: Nine hundred and nine subjects with high-risk factors of diabetes underwent oral glucose tolerance test after an overnight fast. FPG, hemoglobin A1c, 2-h plasma glucose (2 h-PG), and 2 h-PUG were evaluated. Diabetes and prediabetes were defined by the American Diabetes Association criteria. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of 2 h-PUG, and the optimal cut-off determined to provide the largest Youden index. Spearman correlation was used for relationship analysis. Results: Among 909 subjects, 33.4% (304/909) of subjects had prediabetes, and 17.2% (156/909) had diabetes. The 2 h-PUG was positively related to FPG and 2 h-PG (r = 0.428 and 0.551, respectively, both P < 0.001). For estimation of 2 h-PG ≥ 7.8 mmol/L and 2 h-PG ≥ 11.1 mmol/L using 2 h-PUG, the area under the ROC curve were 0.772 (95% confidence interval [CI ]: 0.738–0.806) and 0.885 (95% CI: 0.850–0.921), respectively. The corresponding optimal cut-offs for 2 h-PUG were 5.6 mmol/L and 7.5 mmol/L, respectively. Compared with FPG alone, FPG combined with 2 h-PUG had a higher sensitivity for detecting glucose abnormalities (84.1% vs. 73.7%, P < 0.001) and diabetes (82.7% vs. 48.1%, P < 0.001). Conclusion: FPG combined with 2 h-PUG substantially improves the sensitivity in detecting prediabetes and diabetes relative to FPG alone, and may represent an efficient layperson-oriented diabetes screening method. PMID:26668139

  9. Bath Breakfast Project (BBP) - Examining the role of extended daily fasting in human energy balance and associated health outcomes: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN31521726

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Current guidance regarding the role of daily breakfast in human health is largely grounded in cross-sectional observations. However, the causal nature of these relationships has not been fully explored and what limited information is emerging from controlled laboratory-based experiments appears inconsistent with much existing data. Further progress in our understanding therefore requires a direct examination of how daily breakfast impacts human health under free-living conditions. Methods/Design The Bath Breakfast Project (BBP) is a randomised controlled trial comparing the effects of daily breakfast consumption relative to extended fasting on energy balance and human health. Approximately 70 men and women will undergo extensive laboratory-based assessments of their acute metabolic responses under fasted and post-prandial conditions, to include: resting metabolic rate, substrate oxidation, dietary-induced thermogenesis and systemic concentrations of key metabolites/hormones. Physiological and psychological indices of appetite will also be monitored both over the first few hours of the day (i.e. whether fed or fasted) and also following a standardised test lunch used to assess voluntary energy intake under controlled conditions. Baseline measurements of participants' anthropometric characteristics (e.g. DEXA) will be recorded prior to intervention, along with an oral glucose tolerance test and acquisition of adipose tissue samples to determine expression of key genes and estimates of tissue-specific insulin action. Participants will then be randomly assigned either to a group prescribed an energy intake of ≥3000 kJ before 1100 each day or a group to extend their overnight fast by abstaining from ingestion of energy-providing nutrients until 1200 each day, with all laboratory-based measurements followed-up 6 weeks later. Free-living assessments of energy intake (via direct weighed food diaries) and energy expenditure (via combined heart

  10. Dietary proteins improve endothelial function under fasting conditions but not in the postprandial state, with no effects on markers of low-grade inflammation.

    PubMed

    Teunissen-Beekman, Karianna F M; Dopheide, Janneke; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Bakker, Stephan J L; Brink, Elizabeth J; de Leeuw, Peter W; Schalkwijk, Casper G; van Baak, Marleen A

    2015-12-14

    Endothelial dysfunction (ED) and low-grade inflammation (LGI) have a role in the development of CVD. The two studies reported here explored the effects of dietary proteins and carbohydrates on markers of ED and LGI in overweight/obese individuals with untreated elevated blood pressure. In the first study, fifty-two participants consumed a protein mix or maltodextrin (3×20 g/d) for 4 weeks. Fasting levels and 12 h postprandial responses of markers of ED (soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (sVCAM), soluble endothelial selectin and von Willebrand factor) and markers of LGI (serum amyloid A, C-reactive protein and sICAM) were evaluated before and after intervention. Biomarkers were also combined into mean Z-scores of ED and LGI. The second study compared 4 h postprandial responses of ED and LGI markers in forty-eight participants after ingestion of 0·6 g/kg pea protein, milk protein and egg-white protein. In addition, postprandial responses after maltodextrin intake were compared with a protein mix and sucrose. The first study showed significantly lower fasting ED Z-scores and sICAM after 4 weeks on the high-protein diet (P≤0·02). The postprandial studies found no clear differences of ED and LGI between test meals. However, postprandial sVCAM decreased more after the protein mix compared with maltodextrin in both studies (P≤0·04). In conclusion, dietary protein is beneficial for fasting ED, but not for fasting LGI, after 4 weeks of supplementation. On the basis of Z-scores, postprandial ED and LGI were not differentially affected by protein sources or carbohydrates. PMID:26400262

  11. Optical imaging of fast light-evoked fast neural activation in amphibian retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xin-Cheng; George, John S.

    2006-02-01

    High performance functional imaging is needed for dynamic measurements of neural processing in retina. Emerging techniques of visual prosthesis also require advanced methodology for reliable validation of electromagnetic stimulation of the retina. Imaging of fast intrinsic optical responses associated with neural activation promises a variety of technical advantages over traditional single and multi-channel electrophysiological techniques for these purposes, but the application of fast optical signals for neural imaging has been limited by low signal to noise ratio and high background light intensity. However, using optimized near infrared probe light and improved optical systems, we have improved the optical signals substantially, allowing single pass measurements. Fast photodiode measurements typically disclose dynamic transmitted light changes of whole retina at the level of 10 -4 dI/I, where dI is the dynamic optical change and I is the baseline light intensity. Using a fast high performance CCD, we imaged fast intrinsic optical responses from isolated retina activated by a visible light flash. Fast, high resolution imaging disclosed larger local optical responses, and showed evidence of multiple response components with both negative- and positive-going signals, on different timescales. Darkfield imaging techniques further enhanced the sensitivity of optical measurements. At single cell resolution, brightfield imaging disclosed maxima of optical responses ~5% dI/I, while darkfield imaging showed maxima of optical responses exceeding 10% dI/I. In comparison with simultaneous electrophysiological recording, optical imaging provided much better localized patterns of response over the activated area of the retina.

  12. Fast Flux Watch: A mechanism for online detection of fast flux networks

    PubMed Central

    Al-Duwairi, Basheer N.; Al-Hammouri, Ahmad T.

    2014-01-01

    Fast flux networks represent a special type of botnets that are used to provide highly available web services to a backend server, which usually hosts malicious content. Detection of fast flux networks continues to be a challenging issue because of the similar behavior between these networks and other legitimate infrastructures, such as CDNs and server farms. This paper proposes Fast Flux Watch (FF-Watch), a mechanism for online detection of fast flux agents. FF-Watch is envisioned to exist as a software agent at leaf routers that connect stub networks to the Internet. The core mechanism of FF-Watch is based on the inherent feature of fast flux networks: flux agents within stub networks take the role of relaying client requests to point-of-sale websites of spam campaigns. The main idea of FF-Watch is to correlate incoming TCP connection requests to flux agents within a stub network with outgoing TCP connection requests from the same agents to the point-of-sale website. Theoretical and traffic trace driven analysis shows that the proposed mechanism can be utilized to efficiently detect fast flux agents within a stub network. PMID:25685515

  13. Fast Flux Watch: A mechanism for online detection of fast flux networks.

    PubMed

    Al-Duwairi, Basheer N; Al-Hammouri, Ahmad T

    2014-07-01

    Fast flux networks represent a special type of botnets that are used to provide highly available web services to a backend server, which usually hosts malicious content. Detection of fast flux networks continues to be a challenging issue because of the similar behavior between these networks and other legitimate infrastructures, such as CDNs and server farms. This paper proposes Fast Flux Watch (FF-Watch), a mechanism for online detection of fast flux agents. FF-Watch is envisioned to exist as a software agent at leaf routers that connect stub networks to the Internet. The core mechanism of FF-Watch is based on the inherent feature of fast flux networks: flux agents within stub networks take the role of relaying client requests to point-of-sale websites of spam campaigns. The main idea of FF-Watch is to correlate incoming TCP connection requests to flux agents within a stub network with outgoing TCP connection requests from the same agents to the point-of-sale website. Theoretical and traffic trace driven analysis shows that the proposed mechanism can be utilized to efficiently detect fast flux agents within a stub network. PMID:25685515

  14. Burovaite-Ca, (Na,K)4Ca2(Ti,Nb)8[Si4O12]4(OH,O)8·12H2O, a new labuntsovite-group mineral species and its place in low-temperature mineral formation in pegmatites of the Khibiny pluton, Kola Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarova, Yu. V.; Shlyukova, Z. V.; Zolotarev, A. A.; Organova, N. I.

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents data on burovaite-Ca, the first Ti-dominant member of the labuntsovite group with a calcium D-octahedron. The idealized formula of burovaite-Ca is (K,Na)4Ca2(Ti,Nb)8[Si4O12]4(OH,O)8 · 12H2O. The mineral has been found in the hydrothermal zone of aegirine-microcline pegmatite located in khibinite at Mt. Khibinpakhkchorr, the Khibiny pluton, Kola Peninsula, Russia. Radiaxial intergrowths of burovaite-Ca and labuntsovite-Mn associated with lemmleynite-Ba, analcime, and apophyllite have been identified in caverns within microcline. The mean composition of the mineral is as follows, wt %: 3.72 Na2O, 2.76 K2O, 4.22 CaO, 0.47 SrO, 0.23 BaO, 0.01 MnO, 0.30 Fe2O3, 0.14 Al2O3, 42.02 SiO2, 17.30 TiO2, 15.21 Nb2O5, 12.60 H2O (measured); the total is 98.98. Its empirical formula has been calculated on the basis of [(Si,Al)16O48]: {(Na3.10K1.07Ca0.37Sr0.04Ba0.04)4.62}(Ca1.28Zn0.01)1.29(Ti4.97Nb2.56Fe0.08Ta0.02)7.63(Si15.93Al0.07)16O48(OH6.70O0.93)7.63 · 12H2O. The strongest lines in the X-ray powder diffraction pattern of burovaite-Ca ( I-d Å] are as follows: 70-7.08, 40-6.39, 40-4.97, 30-3.92, 40-3.57, 100-3.25, 70-3.11, 50-2.61, 70-2.49, 40-2.15, 50-2.05, 70-1.712, 70-1.577, and 70-1.444. The structure of burovaite-Ca was solved by A.A. Zolotarev, Jr. The mineral is monoclinic, space group C2/ m. The unit-cell dimensions are a = 14.529(3), b = 14.203(3), c = 7.899(1), β = 117.37(1)°, V = 1447.57 Å3. Burovaite-Ca is an isostructural Ti-dominant analogue of karupmøllerite-Ca and gjerdingenite-Ca. Two stages of mineral formation—pegmatite proper and hydrothermal—have been recognized in the host pegmatite. The hydrothermal stage included K-Ba-Na, Na-K-Ca, and Na-Sr substages. Burovaite-Ca is related to the intermediate Na-K-Ca substage. At the first substage, labuntsovite-Mn and lemmleynite-Ba were formed, and tsepinite-Na, paratsepinite-Nd, and tsepinite-Sr were formed at the final substage. Thus, the sequence of crystallization of labuntsovite

  15. Ramadan Fast in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Mehdi; Mirkarimi, SadafSadat; Rahmani, Gita; Hosseinzadeh, Ehsan; Salahi, Navid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fasting during the month of Ramadan is of vital significance amongst Muslims; however, little is known about the effects of this kind of fasting on patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Objectives: This nonrandomized prospective observational pilot study was designed to investigate the effects of Ramadan fast on the symptoms of CAD. Patients and Methods: Patients with documented CAD were consecutively (nonrandomized) included in the study, and those with heart failure (ejection fraction < 50%), renal failure, gout, and insulin-treated diabetes were excluded. Patients had the choice of fasting during Ramadan if they so wished and to break their fast as soon as symptoms such as dyspnea and chest pain occurred (fasting group) or not fasting (control group). Results: A total of 148 patients completed the study. Mean (mean ± SD) age of the patients was 61.5 ± 11.7 years and 50% were male. Finally, 66 patients (44.6%) accomplished Ramadan fast with an average of 22.27 ± 10.46 days of fasting. Occurrence of chest pain was not significantly different between the fasting and non-fasting groups (4 out of 66 [6.1%] vs. 8 out of 82 [9.8%] respectively; P = 0.42). In addition, patients who fasted during Ramadan did not experience a higher frequency of a combined endpoint of chest pain and dyspnea (4 out of 66 cases in the fasting group [6.1%] vs. 11 out of 82 in non-fasting group [13.4%]; P = 0.14). Conclusions: In the present study, the patients with CAD were able to observe Ramadan fast safely and their combined endpoint of chest pain and dyspnea was not significantly different from that of the non-fasting ones. We would suggest that patients with CAD and normal left ventricular function could fast during Ramadan. PMID:25763250

  16. Fast growth of inch-sized single-crystalline graphene from a controlled single nucleus on Cu-Ni alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tianru; Zhang, Xuefu; Yuan, Qinghong; Xue, Jiachen; Lu, Guangyuan; Liu, Zhihong; Wang, Huishan; Wang, Haomin; Ding, Feng; Yu, Qingkai; Xie, Xiaoming; Jiang, Mianheng

    2016-01-01

    Wafer-scale single-crystalline graphene monolayers are highly sought after as an ideal platform for electronic and other applications. At present, state-of-the-art growth methods based on chemical vapour deposition allow the synthesis of one-centimetre-sized single-crystalline graphene domains in ~12 h, by suppressing nucleation events on the growth substrate. Here we demonstrate an efficient strategy for achieving large-area single-crystalline graphene by letting a single nucleus evolve into a monolayer at a fast rate. By locally feeding carbon precursors to a desired position of a substrate composed of an optimized Cu-Ni alloy, we synthesized an ~1.5-inch-large graphene monolayer in 2.5 h. Localized feeding induces the formation of a single nucleus on the entire substrate, and the optimized alloy activates an isothermal segregation mechanism that greatly expedites the growth rate. This approach may also prove effective for the synthesis of wafer-scale single-crystalline monolayers of other two-dimensional materials.

  17. Co-sensitization promoted light harvesting with a new mixed-addenda polyoxometalate [Cu(C12H8N2)2]2[V2W4O19]·4H2O in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sha-Sha; Chen, Wei-Lin; Wang, Yan-Hua; Li, Yang-Guang; Liu, Zhu-Jun; Shan, Chun-Hui; Su, Zhong-Min; Wang, En-Bo

    2015-11-14

    A di-vanadium-substituted Lindqvist-type polyoxometalate [Cu(C12H8N2)2]2[V2W4O19]·4H2O (1) was hydrothermally synthesized and characterized structurally by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy disperse spectroscopy tests further prove the existence of vanadium. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theoretical studies indicate that the energy level of 1 matches well with the conduction band of the TiO2. Furthermore, considering the semiconductor-like nature of 1 and the introduction of transition metal element Cu synchronously extends the absorption to the visible region, which should also be beneficial to the photovoltaic device performance. 1-Doped TiO2 composites (denoted as 1@TiO2) have been successfully fabricated by a simple sol-gel method, and introduced into the dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) as co-sensitizers in N719-sensitized photoanodes by mixing 1@TiO2 with P25 nanoparticles with different weight ratios to enhance the photoelectric conversion efficiency. The investigations show that the DSSC assembled with 1@TiO2/19P25 photoanode has the best performance and the overall improvement of the efficiency is 21.6% compared with pure P25. Furthermore, the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and open-circuit voltage decay investigations show that the cosensitization of 1 and N719 can promote electron transfer and restrain charge recombinations in the DSSCs, resulting in a longer electron lifetime. PMID:26443009

  18. Ultra-fast framing camera tube

    DOEpatents

    Kalibjian, Ralph

    1981-01-01

    An electronic framing camera tube features focal plane image dissection and synchronized restoration of the dissected electron line images to form two-dimensional framed images. Ultra-fast framing is performed by first streaking a two-dimensional electron image across a narrow slit, thereby dissecting the two-dimensional electron image into sequential electron line images. The dissected electron line images are then restored into a framed image by a restorer deflector operated synchronously with the dissector deflector. The number of framed images on the tube's viewing screen is equal to the number of dissecting slits in the tube. The distinguishing features of this ultra-fast framing camera tube are the focal plane dissecting slits, and the synchronously-operated restorer deflector which restores the dissected electron line images into a two-dimensional framed image. The framing camera tube can produce image frames having high spatial resolution of optical events in the sub-100 picosecond range.

  19. REVIEW ARTICLE: Fast light in atomic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akulshin, Alexander M.; McLean, Russell J.

    2010-10-01

    Atomic media have played a major role in studies of fast light. One of their attractive features is the ability to manipulate experimental parameters to control the dispersive properties that determine the group velocity of a propagating light pulse. We give an overview of the experimental methods, based on both linear and nonlinear atom-light interaction, that have produced superluminal propagation in atomic media, and discuss some of the significant theoretical contributions to the issues of pulse preservation and reconciling faster-than-light propagation and the principle of causality. The comparison of storage of light, enhanced Kerr nonlinearity and efficient wave mixing processes in slow and fast light atomic media illustrates their common and distinct features.

  20. Fast magnetic reconnection with large guide fields

    SciTech Connect

    Stanier, A.; Simakov, Andrei N.; Chacón, L.; Daughton, W.

    2015-01-09

    Here, we demonstrate using two-fluid simulations that low-βmagnetic reconnection remains fast, regardless of the presence of fast dispersive waves, which have been previously suggested to play a critical role. In order to understand these results, a discrete model is constructed that offers scaling relationships for the reconnection rate and dissipation region (DR) thickness in terms of the upstream magnetic field and DR length. We verify these scalings numerically and show how the DR self-adjusts to process magnetic flux at the same rate that it is supplied to a larger region where two-fluid effects become important. Ultimately, the rate is independent of the DR physics and is in good agreement with kinetic results.

  1. Fast magnetic reconnection with large guide fields

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stanier, A.; Simakov, Andrei N.; Chacón, L.; Daughton, W.

    2015-01-09

    Here, we demonstrate using two-fluid simulations that low-βmagnetic reconnection remains fast, regardless of the presence of fast dispersive waves, which have been previously suggested to play a critical role. In order to understand these results, a discrete model is constructed that offers scaling relationships for the reconnection rate and dissipation region (DR) thickness in terms of the upstream magnetic field and DR length. We verify these scalings numerically and show how the DR self-adjusts to process magnetic flux at the same rate that it is supplied to a larger region where two-fluid effects become important. Ultimately, the rate is independentmore » of the DR physics and is in good agreement with kinetic results.« less

  2. Nonlinear, inelastic fast reactor subassembly interaction analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, W.H.; Bard, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) core structural design is complicated by the trade-offs associated with keeping the subassemblies closely packed for the neutronic considerations and accommodating the volumetric changes associated with irradiation swelling. The environmental variation across the reactor core results in temperature and neutron flux gradients across the subassemblies which in turn cause the subassemblies to bow as well as dilate and grow volumetrically. These deformations in a tightly packed reactor core cause the subassemblies to interact and can potentially result in excessive withdrawal loads during the refueling operations. ABADAN, a general purpose, nonlinear, inelastic, multi-dimensional finite element structural analysis computer code, was developed for the express purpose of solving large nonlinear problems as typified by the above interaction problems. For the subassembly interaction problem ABADAN has been applied to the solution of an interacting radial row of Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel assemblies.

  3. Pluto Fast Flyby Mission and Science Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, A.

    1993-01-01

    Planning for the Pluto Fast Flyby (PFF) mission centers on the launch of two small (110-160 kg) spacecraft late in the 1990s on fast, 6-8-year trajectories that do not require Jupiter flybys. The cost target of the two-spaceraft PFF mission is $400 million. Scientific payload definition by NASA's Outer Planets Science Working Group (OPSWG) and JPL design studies for the Pluto flyby spacecraft are now being completed, and the program is in Phase A development. Selection of a set of lightweight, low-power instrument demonstrations is planned for May 1993. According to plan, the completion of Phase A and then detailed Phase B spacecraft and payload design work will occur in FY94. The release of an instrument payload AO, followed by the selection of the flight payload, is also scheduled for FY94.

  4. Fast interferometric second harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Couture, Charles-André; Légaré, Katherine; Pinsard, Maxime; Rivard, Maxime; Brown, Cameron; Légaré, François

    2016-01-01

    We report the implementation of fast Interferometric Second Harmonic Generation (I-SHG) microscopy to study the polarity of non-centrosymmetric structures in biological tissues. Using a sample quartz plate, we calibrate the spatially varying phase shift introduced by the laser scanning system. Compensating this phase shift allows us to retrieve the correct phase distribution in periodically poled lithium niobate, used as a model sample. Finally, we used fast interferometric second harmonic generation microscopy to acquire phase images in tendon. Our results show that the method exposed here, using a laser scanning system, allows to recover the polarity of collagen fibrils, similarly to standard I-SHG (using a sample scanning system), but with an imaging time about 40 times shorter. PMID:26977349

  5. Neoplasia in fast neutron-irradiated beagles

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E.W.; Zook, B.C.; Casarett, G.W.; Deye, J.A.; Adoff, L.M.; Rogers, C.C.

    1981-09-01

    One hundred fifty-one beagle dogs were irradiated with either photons or fast neutrons (15 MeV) to one of three dose-limiting normal tissues--spinal cord, lung, or brain. The radiation was given in four fractions per week for 5 weeks (spinal cord), 6 weeks (lung), or 7 weeks (brain) to total doses encompassing those given clinically for cancer management. To date, no nonirradiated dogs or photon-irradiated dogs have developed any neoplasms. Seven dogs receiving fast neutrons have developed 9 neoplasms within the irradiated field. Of the neutron-irradiated dogs at risk, the incidence of neoplasia was 15%. The latent period for radiation-induced cancers has varied from 1 to 4 1/2 years at this time in the study.

  6. Compact fast analyzer of rotary cuvette type

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1976-01-01

    A compact fast analyzer of the rotary cuvette type is provided for simultaneously determining concentrations in a multiplicity of discrete samples using either absorbance or fluorescence measurement techniques. A rigid, generally rectangular frame defines optical passageways for the absorbance and fluorescence measurement systems. The frame also serves as a mounting structure for various optical components as well as for the cuvette rotor mount and drive system. A single light source and photodetector are used in making both absorbance and fluorescence measurements. Rotor removal and insertion are facilitated by a swing-out drive motor and rotor mount. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention relates generally to concentration measuring instruments and more specifically to a compact fast analyzer of the rotary cuvette type which is suitable for making either absorbance or fluorescence measurements. It was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  7. A simulated Antarctic fast ice ecosystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrigo, Kevin R.; Kremer, James N.; Sullivan, Cornelius W.

    1993-01-01

    A 2D numerical ecosystem model of Antarctic land fast ice is developed to elucidate the primary production with the Antarctic sea ice zone. The physical component employs atmospheric data to simulate congelation ice growth, initial brine entrapment, desalination, and nutrient flux. The biological component is based on the concept of a maximum temperature-dependent algal growth rate which is reduced by limitations imposed from insufficient light or nutrients, as well as suboptimal salinity. Preliminary simulations indicate that, during a bloom, microalgae are able to maintain their vertical position relative to the lower congelation ice margin and are not incorporated into the crystal matrix as the ice sheet thickens. It is inferred that land fast sea ice contains numerous microhabitats that are functionally distinct based upon the unique set of processes that control microalgal growth and accumulation within each.

  8. Fast combinatorial optimization using generalized deterministic annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acton, Scott T.; Ghosh, Joydeep; Bovik, Alan C.

    1993-08-01

    Generalized Deterministic Annealing (GDA) is a useful new tool for computing fast multi-state combinatorial optimization of difficult non-convex problems. By estimating the stationary distribution of simulated annealing (SA), GDA yields equivalent solutions to practical SA algorithms while providing a significant speed improvement. Using the standard GDA, the computational time of SA may be reduced by an order of magnitude, and, with a new implementation improvement, Windowed GDA, the time improvements reach two orders of magnitude with a trivial compromise in solution quality. The fast optimization of GDA has enabled expeditious computation of complex nonlinear image enhancement paradigms, such as the Piecewise Constant (PICO) regression examples used in this paper. To validate our analytical results, we apply GDA to the PICO regression problem and compare the results to other optimization methods. Several full image examples are provided that show successful PICO image enhancement using GDA in the presence of both Laplacian and Gaussian additive noise.

  9. Fast Pulsing Neutron Generators for Security Application

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Q.; Regis, M.; Kwan, J. W.

    2009-04-24

    Active neutron interrogation has been demonstrated to be an effective method of detecting shielded fissile material. A fast fall-time/fast pulsing neutron generator is needed primarily for differential die-away technique (DDA) interrogation systems. A compact neutron generator, currently being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, employs an array of 0.6-mm-dia apertures (instead of one 6-mm-dia aperture) such that gating the beamlets can be done with low voltage and a small gap to achieve sub-microsecond ion beam fall time and low background neutrons. Arrays of 16 apertures (4x4) and 100 apertures (10x10) have been designed and fabricated for a beam extraction experiment. The preliminary results showed that, using a gating voltage of 1200 V and a gap distance of 1 mm, the fall time of extracted ion beam pulses is approximately 0.15 mu s at beam energies of 1000 eV.

  10. Fast thought speed induces risk taking.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Jesse J; Pronin, Emily

    2012-04-01

    In two experiments, we tested for a causal link between thought speed and risk taking. In Experiment 1, we manipulated thought speed by presenting neutral-content text at either a fast or a slow pace and having participants read the text aloud. In Experiment 2, we manipulated thought speed by presenting fast-, medium-, or slow-paced movie clips that contained similar content. Participants who were induced to think more quickly took more risks with actual money in Experiment 1 and reported greater intentions to engage in real-world risky behaviors, such as unprotected sex and illegal drug use, in Experiment 2. These experiments provide evidence that faster thinking induces greater risk taking. PMID:22395129

  11. Fast diffusion of water nanodroplets on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ming; Tocci, Gabriele; Michaelides, Angelos; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion across surfaces generally involves motion on a vibrating but otherwise stationary substrate. Here, using molecular dynamics, we show that a layered material such as graphene opens up a new mechanism for surface diffusion whereby adsorbates are carried by propagating ripples in a motion similar to surfing. For water nanodroplets, we demonstrate that the mechanism leads to exceedingly fast diffusion that is 2-3 orders of magnitude faster than the self-diffusion of water molecules in liquid water. We also reveal the underlying principles that regulate this new mechanism for diffusion and show how it also applies to adsorbates other than water, thus opening up the prospect of achieving fast and controllable motion of adsorbates across material surfaces more generally.

  12. Fast thermometry for superconducting rf cavity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Orris, Darryl; Bellantoni, Leo; Carcagno, Ruben H.; Edwards, Helen; Harms, Elvin Robert; Khabiboulline, Timergali N.; Kotelnikov, Sergey; Makulski, Andrzej; Nehring, Roger; Pischalnikov, Yuriy; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Fast readout of strategically placed low heat capacity thermometry can provide valuable information of Superconducting RF (SRF) cavity performance. Such a system has proven very effective for the development and testing of new cavity designs. Recently, several resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) were installed in key regions of interest on a new 9 cell 3.9 GHz SRF cavity with integrated HOM design at FNAL. A data acquisition system was developed to read out these sensors with enough time and temperature resolution to measure temperature changes on the cavity due to heat generated from multipacting or quenching within power pulses. The design and performance of the fast thermometry system will be discussed along with results from tests of the 9 cell 3.9GHz SRF cavity.

  13. Fast diffusion of water nanodroplets on graphene.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming; Tocci, Gabriele; Michaelides, Angelos; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion across surfaces generally involves motion on a vibrating but otherwise stationary substrate. Here, using molecular dynamics, we show that a layered material such as graphene opens up a new mechanism for surface diffusion whereby adsorbates are carried by propagating ripples in a motion similar to surfing. For water nanodroplets, we demonstrate that the mechanism leads to exceedingly fast diffusion that is 2-3 orders of magnitude faster than the self-diffusion of water molecules in liquid water. We also reveal the underlying principles that regulate this new mechanism for diffusion and show how it also applies to adsorbates other than water, thus opening up the prospect of achieving fast and controllable motion of adsorbates across material surfaces more generally. PMID:26480227

  14. Rotary fast tool servo system and methods

    DOEpatents

    Montesanti, Richard C.; Trumper, David L.

    2007-10-02

    A high bandwidth rotary fast tool servo provides tool motion in a direction nominally parallel to the surface-normal of a workpiece at the point of contact between the cutting tool and workpiece. Three or more flexure blades having all ends fixed are used to form an axis of rotation for a swing arm that carries a cutting tool at a set radius from the axis of rotation. An actuator rotates a swing arm assembly such that a cutting tool is moved in and away from the lathe-mounted, rotating workpiece in a rapid and controlled manner in order to machine the workpiece. A pair of position sensors provides rotation and position information for a swing arm to a control system. A control system commands and coordinates motion of the fast tool servo with the motion of a spindle, rotating table, cross-feed slide, and in-feed slide of a precision lathe.

  15. Precision fast kickers for kiloampere electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.; Chen, Y.J.; Weir, J.T.

    1999-10-06

    These kickers will be used to make fast dipoles and quadrupoles which are driven by sharp risetime pulsers to provide precision beam manipulations for high current kA electron beams. This technology will be used on the 2nd axis of the DARHT linac at LANL. It will be used to provide 4 micropulses of pulse width 20 to 120 nsec. selected from a 2 {micro}sec., 2kA, 20MeV macropulse. The fast pulsers will have amplitude modulation capability to compensate for beam-induced steering effects and other slow beam centroid motion to within the bandwidth of the kicker system. Scaling laws derived from theory will be presented along with extensive experimental data obtained on the test bed ETA-II.

  16. Fast atomic transport without vibrational heating

    SciTech Connect

    Torrontegui, E.; Ibanez, S.; Chen Xi; Ruschhaupt, A.; Guery-Odelin, D.; Muga, J. G.

    2011-01-15

    We use the dynamical invariants associated with the Hamiltonian of an atom in a one dimensional moving trap to inverse engineer the trap motion and perform fast atomic transport without final vibrational heating. The atom is driven nonadiabatically through a shortcut to the result of adiabatic, slow trap motion. For harmonic potentials this only requires designing appropriate trap trajectories, whereas perfect transport in anharmonic traps may be achieved by applying an extra field to compensate the forces in the rest frame of the trap. The results can be extended to atom stopping or launching. The limitations due to geometrical constraints, energies, and accelerations involved are analyzed along with the relation to previous approaches based on classical trajectories or ''fast-forward'' and ''bang-bang'' methods, which can be integrated in the invariant-based framework.

  17. Unusual fast secondary relaxation in metallic glass

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q.; Zhang, S.T.; Yang, Y.; Dong, Y.D.; Liu, C.T.; Lu, J.

    2015-01-01

    The relaxation spectrum of glassy solids has long been used to probe their dynamic structural features and the fundamental deformation mechanisms. Structurally complicated glasses, such as molecular glasses, often exhibit multiple relaxation processes. By comparison, metallic glasses have a simple atomic structure with dense atomic packing, and their relaxation spectra were commonly found to be simpler than those of molecular glasses. Here we show the compelling evidence obtained across a wide range of temperatures and frequencies from a La-based metallic glass, which clearly shows two peaks of secondary relaxations (fast versus slow) in addition to the primary relaxation peak. The discovery of the unusual fast secondary relaxation unveils the complicated relaxation dynamics in metallic glasses and, more importantly, provides us the clues which help decode the structural features serving as the ‘trigger' of inelasticity on mechanical agitations. PMID:26204999

  18. Wave modes facilitating fast magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N.

    2011-12-01

    Whistler and kinetic Alfven waves are often invoked to explain fast magnetic reconnection in collsionless plasmas. But how these wave modes facilitate the reconnection has remained unclear. An important unanswered question deals with the meaning of the wave frequency in the context of magnetic reconnection. New measurement on a fast explosive reconnection event in the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) at MIT provides an interesting example of the meaning of the wave mode and the associated frequency directly related to the time scale of the impulsive reconnection. We examine the measurements in VTF in view of the whistler wave mode, showing that the explosive growth in the reconnection is related to the thinning of the current sheet to a few electron skin depths. We further demonstrate that the fastest measured time scale (~ 3 microseconds) and the largest normalized reconnection rate (~0.35) agree with those predicted from the whistler mode dispersion relation.

  19. Fabrication techniques for very fast diffractive lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Anthony M.; Marron, Joseph C.

    1993-01-01

    Aspheric lenses with arbitrary phase functions can be fabricated on thin light weight substrates via the binary optics fabrication technique. However, it is difficult and costly to fabricate a fast lens (f/number less than 1) for use as the shorter wavelengths. The pitch of the masks and the alignment accuracy must be very fine. For a large lens, the space-bandwidth product of the element can also become impractically large. In this paper, two alternate approaches for the fabrication of fast aspheric diffractive lenses are described. The first approach fabricates the diffractive lens interferometrically, utilizing a spherical wavefront to provide the optical power of the lens and a computer generated hologram to create the aspheric components. The second approach fabricates the aspheric diffractive lens in the form if a higher order kinoform which trades groove profile fidelity for coarser feature size. The design and implementation issues for these two fabrication techniques are discussed.

  20. An overview of fast multipole methods

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.H.; Baty, R.S.

    1995-11-01

    A number of physics problems may be cast in terms of Hilbert-Schmidt integral equations. In many cases, the integrals tend to be zero over a large portion of the domain of interest. All of the information is contained in compact regions of the domain which renders their use very attractive from the standpoint of efficient numerical computation. Discrete representation of these integrals leads to a system of N elements which have pair-wise interactions with one another. A direct solution technique requires computational effort which is O(N{sup 2}). Fast multipole methods (FMM) have been widely used in recent years to obtain solutions to these problems requiring a computational effort of only O(Nln N) or O(N). In this paper we present an overview of several variations of the fast multipole method along with examples of its use in solving a variety of physical problems.