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Sample records for 12-km resolution north

  1. Twelve-month, 12 km resolution North American WRF-Chem v3.4 air quality simulation: performance evaluation

    DOE PAGES

    Tessum, C. W.; Hill, J. D.; Marshall, J. D.

    2015-04-07

    We present results from and evaluate the performance of a 12-month, 12 km horizontal resolution year 2005 air pollution simulation for the contiguous United States using the WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) meteorology and chemical transport model (CTM). We employ the 2005 US National Emissions Inventory, the Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (RACM), and the Modal Aerosol Dynamics Model for Europe (MADE) with a volatility basis set (VBS) secondary aerosol module. Overall, model performance is comparable to contemporary modeling efforts used for regulatory and health-effects analysis, with an annual average daytime ozone (O3) mean fractional bias (MFB) of 12%more » and an annual average fine particulate matter (PM2.5) MFB of −1%. WRF-Chem, as configured here, tends to overpredict total PM2.5 at some high concentration locations and generally overpredicts average 24 h O3 concentrations. Performance is better at predicting daytime-average and daily peak O3 concentrations, which are more relevant for regulatory and health effects analyses relative to annual average values. Predictive performance for PM2.5 subspecies is mixed: the model overpredicts particulate sulfate (MFB = 36%), underpredicts particulate nitrate (MFB = −110%) and organic carbon (MFB = −29%), and relatively accurately predicts particulate ammonium (MFB = 3%) and elemental carbon (MFB = 3%), so that the accuracy in total PM2.5 predictions is to some extent a function of offsetting over- and underpredictions of PM2.5 subspecies. Model predictive performance for PM2.5 and its subspecies is in general worse in winter and in the western US than in other seasons and regions, suggesting spatial and temporal opportunities for future WRF-Chem model development and evaluation.« less

  2. Twelve-month, 12 km resolution North American WRF-Chem v3.4 air quality simulation: performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessum, C. W.; Hill, J. D.; Marshall, J. D.

    2015-04-01

    We present results from and evaluate the performance of a 12-month, 12 km horizontal resolution year 2005 air pollution simulation for the contiguous United States using the WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) meteorology and chemical transport model (CTM). We employ the 2005 US National Emissions Inventory, the Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (RACM), and the Modal Aerosol Dynamics Model for Europe (MADE) with a volatility basis set (VBS) secondary aerosol module. Overall, model performance is comparable to contemporary modeling efforts used for regulatory and health-effects analysis, with an annual average daytime ozone (O3) mean fractional bias (MFB) of 12% and an annual average fine particulate matter (PM2.5) MFB of -1%. WRF-Chem, as configured here, tends to overpredict total PM2.5 at some high concentration locations and generally overpredicts average 24 h O3 concentrations. Performance is better at predicting daytime-average and daily peak O3 concentrations, which are more relevant for regulatory and health effects analyses relative to annual average values. Predictive performance for PM2.5 subspecies is mixed: the model overpredicts particulate sulfate (MFB = 36%), underpredicts particulate nitrate (MFB = -110%) and organic carbon (MFB = -29%), and relatively accurately predicts particulate ammonium (MFB = 3%) and elemental carbon (MFB = 3%), so that the accuracy in total PM2.5 predictions is to some extent a function of offsetting over- and underpredictions of PM2.5 subspecies. Model predictive performance for PM2.5 and its subspecies is in general worse in winter and in the western US than in other seasons and regions, suggesting spatial and temporal opportunities for future WRF-Chem model development and evaluation.

  3. Extreme precipitation events in southestearn France in a high-resolution regional climate model : comparison of a 12 km and a 50 km hindcast with ALADIN-Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, Jeanne; Déqué, Michel; Sanchez Gomez, Emilia; Somot, Samuel

    2010-05-01

    We present a comparison of the modelling of intense precipitations over France in two regional climate simulations performed with the Limited Area Model (LAM) ALADIN-Climate, run at a 12 km and a 50 km resolution. In both experiments, the model is forced by the ERA40 re-analysis over the 1958-2000 period. We focus on the representation of the highest precipitation extremes occuring in southeastern France in Autumn. These events involve small-scale processes than can be explicitly resolved only with 2-1 km resolution non-hydrostatic models. However, previous studies have shown that regional climate models are able to simulate heavy rainfalls in this area, although the amounts of rain are much smaller than the ones that are actually observed. Here, we further explore the ability of ALADIN-Climate in reproducing these specific events and the possible added-value of a higher resolution regarding this matter. Indeed, driving the LAM with ERA40 allows the LAM to stick to the real chronology and therefore enables us to analyze its results not only from a statistical point of view but also through day-to-day diagnosis. First, we assess the performances of the model at the 12 km and 50 km resolutions by comparing the simulated daily precipitations with observations over the south east part of France. To do so, we use the high-resolution gridded SAFRAN analysis which provides series of hourly fields over the french territory at a 8 km resolution, from 1958 to 2008. We consider the differences in the upper quantiles of precipitations between the model and the data, as well as the time correlations of heavy rainfalls and the spatial rain patterns for given extreme events. Then we compare the performances of ALADIN-Climate in both simulations to the ones obtained with a statistical downscaling method we apply to the last twenty years of the ERA40 period. This method is based on a weather regime approach and uses the analog methodology (Boé and Terray, 2007) to reconstruct

  4. North Twin Peak in super resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This pair of images shows the result of taking a sequence of 25 identical exposures from the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) of the northern Twin Peak, with small camera motions, and processing them with the Super-Resolution algorithm developed at NASA's Ames Research Center.

    The upper image is a representative input image, scaled up by a factor of five, with the pixel edges smoothed out for a fair comparison. The lower image allows significantly finer detail to be resolved.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    The super-resolution research was conducted by Peter Cheeseman, Bob Kanefsky, Robin Hanson, and John Stutz of NASA's Ames Research Center, Mountain View, CA. More information on this technology is available on the Ames Super Resolution home page at

    http://ic-www.arc.nasa.gov/ic/projects/bayes-group/ group/super-res/

  5. Future water availability in North African dams simulated by high-resolution regional climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramblay, Yves; Jarlan, Lionel; Hanich, Lahoucine; Somot, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    In North Africa, the countries of Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia are already experiencing water scarcity and a strong interannual variability of precipitation. To better manage their existing water resources, several dams and reservoirs have been built on most large river catchments. The objective of this study is to provide quantitative scenarios of future changes in water availability for the 47 major dams and reservoirs catchments located in North Africa. An ensemble of regional climate models (RCM) with a spatial resolution of 12km, driven by different general circulation models (GCM), from the EuroCORDEX experiment have been considered to analyze the projected changes on temperature, precipitation and potential evapotranspiration (PET) for two scenarios (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) and two time horizons (2040-2065 and 2065-2090). PET is estimated from RCM outputs either with the FAO-Penman-Monteith (PM) equation, requiring air temperature, relative humidity, net radiation and wind, or with the Hargreave Samani (HS) equation, requiring only air temperature. The water balance is analyzed by comparing the climatic demand and supply of water, considering that for most of these catchments groundwater storage is negligible over long time periods. Results indicated a future temperature increase for all catchments between +1.8° and +4.2°, depending on the emission scenario and the time period considered. Precipitation is projected to decrease between -14% to -27%, mainly in winter and spring, with a strong East to West gradient. PET computed from PM or HS formulas provided very similar estimates and projections, ranging between +7% to +18%. Changes in PET are mostly driven by rising temperatures and are greatest during dry summer months than for the wet winter season. Therefore the increased PET has a lower impact than declining precipitation on future water availability, which is expected to decrease by -19% to -33% on average.

  6. Faraday laser using 1.2 km fiber as an extended cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhiming; Zhang, Xiaogang; Pan, Duo; Chen, Mo; Zhu, Chuanwen; Chen, Jingbiao

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate a Faraday laser using a 1.2 km fiber as an extended cavity, which provides optical feedback and obtains small free spectrum range (FSR) of 83 kHz, and have succeeded in limiting the laser frequency to a crossover transition {5}2{S}1/2,F=2\\to {5}2{P}3/2,F\\prime =1,3 of the natural 87Rb at 780 nm. The Faraday laser is based on a Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) with an ultra-narrow bandwidth and the long fiber extended cavity of 1.2 km. The peak transmission assigned to the crossover transition F=2\\to F\\prime =1,3 in the FADOF is 20.5% with an ultra-narrow bandwidth of 29.1 MHz. The Allan deviation of the Faraday laser is around 6.0× {10}-11 in 0.06 to 1 s sampling time. Laser frequency is always kept in the center of the transmitted peak assigned to F=2\\to F\\prime =1,3. The Faraday laser realized here can provide light exactly resonant with an atomic transition used for atom-photon interaction experiments and is insensitive to diode temperature and injection current fluctuations.

  7. Space-time kriging extension of precipitation variability at 12 km spacing from tree-ring chronologies and its implications for drought analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, F.

    2013-04-01

    Understanding and preparing for future hydroclimatic variability greatly benefits from long (i.e., multi-century) records at seasonal to annual time steps that have been gridded at km-scale spatial intervals over a geographic region. Kriging is a geostatistical technique commonly used for optimal interpolation of environmental data, and space-time geostatistical models can improve kriging estimates when long temporal sequences of observations exist at relatively few points on the landscape. Here I present how a network of 22 tree-ring chronologies from single-leaf pinyon (Pinus monophylla) in the central Great Basin of North America was used to extend hydroclimatic records both temporally and spatially. First, the Line of Organic Correlation (LOC) method was used to reconstruct October-May total precipitation anomalies at each tree-ring site, as these ecotonal environments at the lower forest border are typically moisture limited. Individual site reconstructions were then combined using a hierarchical model of spatio-temporal kriging that produced annual anomaly maps on a 12 × 12 km grid during the period in common among all chronologies (1650-1976). Hydro-climatic episodes were numerically identified and modeled using their duration, magnitude, and peak. Spatial patterns were more variable during wet years than during dry years, and the evolution of drought episodes over space and time could be visualized and quantified. The most remarkable episode in the entire reconstruction was the early 1900s pluvial, followed by the late 1800s drought. The 1930s "Dust Bowl" drought was among the top ten hydroclimatic episodes in the past few centuries. These results directly address the needs of water and natural resource managers with respect to planning for "worst case" scenarios of drought duration and magnitude at the watershed level. For instance, it is possible to analyze which geographical areas are more likely to be impacted by severe and sustained droughts at annual

  8. A parametric study of dissociation and ionization models at 12 km/sec

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Thermochemical nonequilibrium-solution dependence on available models for the chemical reaction rates is examined. Solutions from the Kang and Dunn (1973) reaction-rate set, the Park rate set of 1987, and the Park rate set of 1991 are compared. The blunt-nosed, axisymmetric geometry considered is a 60-deg sphere cone with nose radius of 1.07 m and cicular aft skirt. The nonequilibrium test case is 12 km/sec entry into the earth's atmosphere at 80 km altitude. The model variations are implemented into the Langley aerothermodynamics upwind relaxation algorithm code. While variations in the reaction rates have no effect on the surface pressure distribution and little effect on the convective heating, the effect on degree of ionization and radiative heating can be a factor of three.

  9. High-resolution dynamically downscaled projections of precipitation in the mid and late 21st century over North America

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2015-07-29

    This study performs high-spatial-resolution (12 km) Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) simulations over a very large domain (7200 km × 6180 km, covering much of North America) to explore changes in mean and extreme precipitation in the mid and late 21st century under Representative Concentration Pathways 4.5 (RCP 4.5) and 8.5 (RCP 8.5). We evaluate WRF model performance for a historical simulation and future projections, applying the Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4) as initial and boundary conditions with and without a bias correction. WRF simulations using boundary and initial conditions from both versions of CCSM4 show smaller biases versus evaluation data sets than does CCSM4 over western North America. WRF simulations also improve spatial details of precipitation over much of North America. However, driving the WRF with the bias-corrected CCSM4 does not always reduce the bias. WRF-projected changes in precipitation include decreasing intensity over the southwestern United States, increasing intensity over the eastern United States and most of Canada, and an increase in the number of days with heavy precipitation over much of North America. Projected precipitation changes are more evident in the late 21st century than the mid 21st century, and they are more evident under RCP 8.5 than under RCP 4.5 in the late 21st century. Uncertainties in the projected changes in precipitation due to different warming scenarios are non-negligible. Differences in summer precipitation changes between WRF and CCSM4 are significant over most of the United States.

  10. High-resolution dynamically downscaled projections of precipitation in the mid and late 21st century over North America

    DOE PAGES

    none,

    2015-07-29

    This study performs high-spatial-resolution (12 km) Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) simulations over a very large domain (7200 km × 6180 km, covering much of North America) to explore changes in mean and extreme precipitation in the mid and late 21st century under Representative Concentration Pathways 4.5 (RCP 4.5) and 8.5 (RCP 8.5). We evaluate WRF model performance for a historical simulation and future projections, applying the Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4) as initial and boundary conditions with and without a bias correction. WRF simulations using boundary and initial conditions from both versions of CCSM4 show smaller biasesmore » versus evaluation data sets than does CCSM4 over western North America. WRF simulations also improve spatial details of precipitation over much of North America. However, driving the WRF with the bias-corrected CCSM4 does not always reduce the bias. WRF-projected changes in precipitation include decreasing intensity over the southwestern United States, increasing intensity over the eastern United States and most of Canada, and an increase in the number of days with heavy precipitation over much of North America. Projected precipitation changes are more evident in the late 21st century than the mid 21st century, and they are more evident under RCP 8.5 than under RCP 4.5 in the late 21st century. Uncertainties in the projected changes in precipitation due to different warming scenarios are non-negligible. Differences in summer precipitation changes between WRF and CCSM4 are significant over most of the United States.« less

  11. North American vegetation patterns observed with the NOAA-7 advanced very high resolution radiometer. [North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goward, S. N.; Tucker, C. J.; Dye, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    Spectral vegetation index measurements derived from remotely sensed observations show great promise as a means to improve knowledge of land vegetation patterns. The daily, global observations acquired by the advanced very high resolution radiometer, a sensor on the current series of U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration meteorological satellites, may be particularly well suited for global studies of vegetation. Preliminary results from analysis of North American observations, extending from April to November 1982, show that the vegetation index patterns observed correspond to the known seasonality of North American natural and cultivated vegetation. Integration of the observations over the growing season produced measurements that are related to net primary productivity patterns of the major North American natural vegetation formations. Regions of intense cultivation were observed as anomalous areas in the integrated growing season measurements. Significant information on seasonality, annual extent and interannual variability of vegetation photosynthetic activity at continental and global scales can be derived from these satellite observations.

  12. Towards a high resolution, integrated hydrology model of North America.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, R. M.; Condon, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies demonstrate feedbacks between groundwater dynamics, overland flow, land surface and vegetation processes, and atmospheric boundary layer development that significantly affect local and regional climate across a range of climatic conditions. Furthermore, the type and distribution of vegetation cover alters land-atmosphere water and energy fluxes, as well as runoff generation and overland flow processes. These interactions can result in significant feedbacks on local and regional climate. In mountainous regions, recent research has shown that spatial and temporal variability in annual evapotranspiration, and thus water budgets, is strongly dependent on lateral groundwater flow; however, the full effects of these feedbacks across varied terrain (e.g. from plains to mountains) are not well understood. Here, we present a high-resolution, integrated hydrology model that covers much of continental North America and encompasses the Mississippi and Colorado watersheds. The model is run in a fully-transient manner at hourly temporal resolution incorporating fully-coupled land energy states and fluxes with integrated surface and subsurface hydrology. Connections are seen between hydrologic variables (such as water table depth) and land energy fluxes (such as latent heat) and spatial and temporal scaling is shown to span many orders of magnitude. Using these transient simulations as a proof of concept, we present a vision for future integrated simulation capabilities.

  13. Impact of spatial resolution of ocean models in depicting climate change patterns of the North Sea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Nikesh; Klein, Birgit; Mathis, Moritz; Klein, Holger; Mikolajewicz, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    The impact of enhanced spatial resolution of models in simulating large scale climate change has been of interest for the modeling community for quite some time. It has been noticed in previous studies that the pattern of Sea Surface Temperature anomalies are better captured by higher resolution models. Significant changes in simulating sea-ice loss associated with global warming was also noticed when the spatial resolution of climate models were enhanced. Spatial resolution is a particular important issue in climate change scenarios of shelf seas such as the North Sea. The North Sea is strongly influenced by its water mass exchanges with North Atlantic to the west and north and Baltic Sea to east. Furthermore, local forcing and changes in advected water masses significantly affect the thermodynamics and stratification patterns in the North Sea, making it a challenging area to study. Under the newly started RACE2 project we are looking at global simulations of Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios 4.5 and 8.5 at lower and higher resolutions, performed using the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model (MPIESM). The model resolution is non uniform and achieves the highest resolution over the European Seas by shifting the model poles over Chicago and Central Europe. In the high resolution run, the grid reaches up to a spatial resolution of up to 4 km in part of the German Bight and close to 20 km in the Northern part of North Sea. The placement of model poles at specific locations enables the global model to obtain higher resolution at regional scales (North Sea), without the inherent complications of open boundary conditions. High and low resolution simulations will be compared to determine differences in spatial and temporal pattern of temperature anomalies, fresh water intrusion from the Baltic Sea to North Sea etc. Also taken into consideration will be the changes in simulating local sea level change and response to basin scale oscillations like NAO.

  14. High-resolution Quantification of Turbulent Mixing in the North Indian Ocean During the Monsoons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    High-resolution quantification of turbulent mixing in the North Indian Ocean during the monsoons Sutanu Sarkar Department of Mechanical and...COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High-resolution Quantification of Turbulent Mixing in the North Indian Ocean During the...the upper ocean surface of the Bay of Bengal. Understanding such processes will help improve the parametrization of momentum and heat fluxes across

  15. A seamless, high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the north-central California coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foxgrover, Amy C.; Barnard, Patrick L.

    2012-01-01

    A seamless, 2-meter resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the north-central California coast has been created from the most recent high-resolution bathymetric and topographic datasets available. The DEM extends approximately 150 kilometers along the California coastline, from Half Moon Bay north to Bodega Head. Coverage extends inland to an elevation of +20 meters and offshore to at least the 3 nautical mile limit of state waters. This report describes the procedures of DEM construction, details the input data sources, and provides the DEM for download in both ESRI Arc ASCII and GeoTIFF file formats with accompanying metadata.

  16. Conflict Resolution for Wind-Optimal Aircraft Trajectories in North Atlantic Oceanic Airspace with Wind Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodionova, Olga; Sridhar, Banavar; Ng, Hok K.

    2016-01-01

    Air traffic in the North Atlantic oceanic airspace (NAT) experiences very strong winds caused by jet streams. Flying wind-optimal trajectories increases individual flight efficiency, which is advantageous when operating in the NAT. However, as the NAT is highly congested during peak hours, a large number of potential conflicts between flights are detected for the sets of wind-optimal trajectories. Conflict resolution performed at the strategic level of flight planning can significantly reduce the airspace congestion. However, being completed far in advance, strategic planning can only use predicted environmental conditions that may significantly differ from the real conditions experienced further by aircraft. The forecast uncertainties result in uncertainties in conflict prediction, and thus, conflict resolution becomes less efficient. This work considers wind uncertainties in order to improve the robustness of conflict resolution in the NAT. First, the influence of wind uncertainties on conflict prediction is investigated. Then, conflict resolution methods accounting for wind uncertainties are proposed.

  17. An Observation-base investigation of nudging in WRF for downscaling surface climate information to 12-km Grid Spacing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous research has demonstrated the ability to use the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model and contemporary dynamical downscaling methods to refine global climate modeling results to a horizontal resolution of 36 km. Environmental managers and urban planners have expre...

  18. OMI NO2 column densities over North American urban cities: the effect of satellite footprint resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Cheol; Lee, Pius; Judd, Laura; Pan, Li; Lefer, Barry

    2016-03-01

    Nitrogen dioxide vertical column density (NO2 VCD) measurements via satellite are compared with a fine-scale regional chemistry transport model, using a new approach that considers varying satellite footprint sizes. Space-borne NO2 VCD measurement has been used as a proxy for surface nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission, especially for anthropogenic urban emission, so accurate comparison of satellite and modeled NO2 VCD is important in determining the future direction of NOx emission policy. The NASA Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) NO2 VCD measurements, retrieved by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), are compared with a 12 km Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) simulation from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. We found that the OMI footprint-pixel sizes are too coarse to resolve urban NO2 plumes, resulting in a possible underestimation in the urban core and overestimation outside. In order to quantify this effect of resolution geometry, we have made two estimates. First, we constructed pseudo-OMI data using fine-scale outputs of the model simulation. Assuming the fine-scale model output is a true measurement, we then collected real OMI footprint coverages and performed conservative spatial regridding to generate a set of fake OMI pixels out of fine-scale model outputs. When compared to the original data, the pseudo-OMI data clearly showed smoothed signals over urban locations, resulting in roughly 20-30 % underestimation over major cities. Second, we further conducted conservative downscaling of OMI NO2 VCDs using spatial information from the fine-scale model to adjust the spatial distribution, and also applied averaging kernel (AK) information to adjust the vertical structure. Four-way comparisons were conducted between OMI with and without downscaling and CMAQ with and without AK information. Results show that OMI and CMAQ NO2 VCDs show the best agreement when both downscaling and AK methods are applied, with the correlation

  19. OMI NO2 column densities over North American urban cities: the effect of satellite footprint resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. C.; Lee, P.; Judd, L.; Pan, L.; Lefer, B.

    2015-10-01

    Nitrogen dioxide vertical column density (NO2 VCD) measurements via satellite are compared with a fine-scale regional chemistry transport model, using a new approach that considers varying satellite footprint sizes. Space-borne NO2 VCD measurement has been used as a proxy for surface nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission, especially for anthropogenic urban emission, so accurate comparison of satellite and modeled NO2 VCD is important in determining the future direction of NOx emission policy. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) NO2 VCD measurements, retrieved by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), are compared with a 12 km Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) simulation from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. We found that OMI footprint pixel sizes are too coarse to resolve urban NO2 plumes, resulting in a possible underestimation in the urban core and overestimation outside. In order to quantify this effect of resolution geometry, we have made two estimates. First, we constructed pseudo-OMI data using fine-scale outputs of the model simulation. Assuming the fine-scale model output is a true measurement, we then collected real OMI footprint coverages and performed conservative spatial regridding to generate a set of fake OMI pixels out of fine-scale model outputs. When compared to the original data, the pseudo-OMI data clearly showed smoothed signals over urban locations, resulting in roughly 20-30 % underestimation over major cities. Second, we further conducted conservative downscaling of OMI NO2 VCD using spatial information from the fine-scale model to adjust the spatial distribution, and also applied Averaging Kernel (AK) information to adjust the vertical structure. Four-way comparisons were conducted between OMI with and without downscaling and CMAQ with and without AK information. Results show that OMI and CMAQ NO2 VCDs show the best agreement when both downscaling and AK

  20. Variability of the North Atlantic Current: high resolution model data versus in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breckenfelder, Tilia; Rhein, Monika; Roessler, Achim; Behrens, Erik; Böning, Claus; Biastoch, Arne; Mertens, Christian

    2015-04-01

    The North Atlantic Current (NAC) provides an important heat source for the relatively warm winters in Western Europe by bringing warm and salty tropical/subtropical water into the subpolar gyre of the North Atlantic. The NAC is the northward extension of the Gulfstream and its warm and salty water form the warm upper branch of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). The NAC crosses the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) via the Charlie-Gibbs, Faraday and Maxwell Fracture Zones between 47° and 53°N. Along that section an array of four inverted echo sounders with bottom pressure sensors (PIES) are deployed since 2006 and combined with altimetry to quantify the NAC transport and its variability. The observed transport time series is compared to the high resolution output of the VIKING20 model, a 1/20° North Atlantic model which is embedded in a global model of 1/4° resolution (ORCA25) via a two-way nesting. We compare the horizontal and vertical flow fields, the mean transport and the variability as well as the water mass characteristics.

  1. High-resolution Neogene and Quaternary estimates of Nubia-Eurasia-North America Plate motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.; Iaffaldano, G.; Merkouriev, S.

    2015-10-01

    Reconstructions of the history of convergence between the Nubia and Eurasia plates constitute an important part of a broader framework for understanding deformation in the Mediterranean region and the closing of the Mediterranean Basin. Herein, we combine high-resolution reconstructions of Eurasia-North America and Nubia-North America Plate motions to determine rotations that describe Nubia-Eurasia Plate motion at ˜1 Myr intervals for the past 20 Myr. We apply trans-dimensional hierarchical Bayesian inference to the Eurasia-North America and Nubia-North America rotation sequences in order to reduce noise in the newly estimated Nubia-Eurasia rotations. The noise-reduced rotation sequences for the Eurasia-North America and Nubia-North America Plate pairs describe remarkably similar kinematic histories since 20 Ma, consisting of relatively steady seafloor spreading from 20 to 8 Ma, ˜20 per cent opening-rate slowdowns at 8-6.5 Ma, and steady plate motion from ˜7 Ma to the present. Our newly estimated Nubia-Eurasia rotations predict that convergence across the central Mediterranean Sea slowed by ˜50 per cent and rotated anticlockwise after ˜25 Ma until 13 Ma. Motion since 13 Ma has remained relatively steady. An absence of evidence for a significant change in motion immediately before or during the Messinian Salinity Crisis at 6.3-5.6 Ma argues against a change in plate motion as its causative factor. The detachment of the Arabian Peninsula from Africa at 30-24 Ma may have triggered the convergence rate slowdown before 13 Ma; however, published reconstructions of Nubia-Eurasia motion for times before 20 Ma are too widely spaced to determine with confidence whether the two are correlated. A significant discrepancy between our new estimates of Nubia-Eurasia motion during the past few Myr and geodetic estimates calls for further investigation.

  2. High-resolution atmospheric modeling of fluorotelomer alcohols and perfluorocarboxylic acids in the North American troposphere.

    PubMed

    Yarwood, Greg; Kemball-Cook, Susan; Keinath, Michael; Waterland, Robert L; Korzeniowski, Stephen H; Buck, Robert C; Russell, Mark H; Washburn, Stephen T

    2007-08-15

    A high spatial and temporal resolution atmospheric model is used to evaluate the potential contribution of fluorotelomer alcohol (FTOH) and perfluorocarboxylate (PFCA) emissions associated with the manufacture, use, and disposal of DuPont fluorotelomer-based products in North America to air concentrations of FTOH, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) in North America and the Canadian Arctic. A bottom-up emission inventory for PFCAs and FTOHs was developed from sales and product composition data. A detailed FTOH atmospheric degradation mechanism was developed to simulate FTOH degradation to PFCAs and model atmospheric transport of PFCAs and FTOHs. Modeled PFCA yields from FTOH degradation agree with experimental smog-chamber results supporting the degradation mechanism used. Estimated PFCA and FTOH air concentrations and PFCA deposition fluxes are compared to monitoring data and previous global modeling. Predicted FTOH air concentrations are generally in agreement with available monitoring data. Overall emissions from the global fluorotelomer industry are estimated to contribute approximately 1-2% of the PFCAs in North American rainfall, consistent with previous global emissions estimates. Emission calculations and modeling results indicate that atmospheric inputs of PFCAs in North America from fluorotelomer-based products will decline by an order of magnitude in the near future as a result of current industry commitments to reduce manufacturing emissions and lower the residual fluorotelomer alcohol raw material and trace PFCA product content.

  3. Regional High-resolution Coupled Atmosphere Ocean Modelling in the North Sea Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumenil-Gates, Lydia; Bülow, Katharina; Ganske, Anette; Heinrich, Hartmut; Klein, Birgit; Klein, Holger; Möller, Jens; Rosenhagen, Gudrun; Schade, Nils; Hüttl-Kabus, Sabine; Tinz, Birger

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of climate projections in the North Sea area is one of the research tasks of the research programme KLIWAS of the German Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure. A multi-model ensemble of three coupled regional atmosphere-ocean models was set up comprising very high resolution simulations for the German coastal regions of the North Sea and the Baltic to represent the complex land-sea-atmosphere conditions in the region. The ensemble consists of simulations made in cooperation with the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, the Climate Service Centre and the Max-Planck-Institute for the period of 1950 to 2100. The KLIWAS project thereby adds coupled models to the band-width of possible future climate conditions in the atmosphere as given by the ENSEMBLES project, which were also analyzed. The coupled results are evaluated for present-day climate using a North Sea climatology of maritime conditions at a matching high resolution. In the future climate, while air and water temperatures will rise to the year 2100, the mean wind speed does not show a significant trend, but large decadal variability. The frequency of occurrence of westerly wind directions increases in the majority of simulations and results in an increase of significant wave height in the eastern parts of the North Sea. In an interdisciplinary approach, these results are used to provide regional to local information for the development of adaptation strategies for the estuary, and climate-proofing of infrastructure in the wider context of the project.

  4. A combined full wave equation tomography - full waveform inversion and its application to 12 km long streamer data from offshore western Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Singh, S. C.; Ghosal, D.

    2012-12-01

    near the seafloor. We applied this technique to a part of 12-km-long steamer data acquired by WesternGeco offshore western Sumatra to study the 2004 great Sumatra Andaman earthquake. Along a 60 km long profile at the Sumatra deformation front, the average water depth is 4.5 km, which hinders the refraction waves to be early arrivals and also poses computation burden for inversion if full wavefield inversion methods are adapted. So we downward continued this dataset to a horizon just 200 meters above the seafloor before inversion to enhance long-offset refraction arrivals using a Kirchhoff extrapolation approach. Preliminary inversion result shows qualitative velocity model with much better resolution (up to 150 meters) than previous ray-based tomography result. Generally the velocity increases with depth and fine sedimentary layers are observed in the final model. A small velocity dip across the profile is also observed, which coincides with pre-stack migration image. The result also shows small-scale lateral heterogeneity in the sediment layers. The detail shallow velocity helps to image the deep structure, such as the basement and oceanic Moho, more accurately and hence increases the reliability of interpretation.

  5. Differences between magnitudes and health impacts of BC emissions across the United States using 12 km scale seasonal source apportionment.

    PubMed

    Turner, Matthew D; Henze, Daven K; Hakami, Amir; Zhao, Shunliu; Resler, Jaroslav; Carmichael, Gregory R; Stanier, Charles O; Baek, Jaemeen; Sandu, Adrian; Russell, Armistead G; Nenes, Athanasios; Jeong, Gill-Ran; Capps, Shannon L; Percell, Peter B; Pinder, Rob W; Napelenok, Sergey L; Bash, Jesse O; Chai, Tianfeng

    2015-04-07

    Recent assessments have analyzed the health impacts of PM2.5 from emissions from different locations and sectors using simplified or reduced-form air quality models. Here we present an alternative approach using the adjoint of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, which provides source-receptor relationships at highly resolved sectoral, spatial, and temporal scales. While damage resulting from anthropogenic emissions of BC is strongly correlated with population and premature death, we found little correlation between damage and emission magnitude, suggesting that controls on the largest emissions may not be the most efficient means of reducing damage resulting from anthropogenic BC emissions. Rather, the best proxy for locations with damaging BC emissions is locations where premature deaths occur. Onroad diesel and nonroad vehicle emissions are the largest contributors to premature deaths attributed to exposure to BC, while onroad gasoline emissions cause the highest deaths per amount emitted. Emissions in fall and winter contribute to more premature deaths (and more per amount emitted) than emissions in spring and summer. Overall, these results show the value of the high-resolution source attribution for determining the locations, seasons, and sectors for which BC emission controls have the most effective health benefits.

  6. Effect of horizontal grid resolution on simulations of the subtropical mode water in the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Yeop Kim, Sang; Lee, Kyung Eun

    2016-04-01

    We investigate how the Subtopical Mode Water (STMW) can be simulated differently in the North Pacific using a global Ocean General Circulation Model (OGCM) with non-eddying and eddy permitting resolution. The OGCM used in this study is the MOM version 4.1 and has a total of 50 levels along the vertical direction with enhanced resolution near the surface. The CORE version 2 (normal year forcing) data derived from the air-sea flux climatology averaged over 60 years (1948-2007) are used to calculate heat, salt and momentum fluxes with a bulk formula at the sea surface. The sea surface salinity is restored to the climatological monthly mean surface salinity of the Polar Science Center Hydrographic Climatology on a 60-day timescale, to make up the fresh water flux at the sea surface. Two models that have horizontal resolutions of 1° and 1/4 °, respectively, are integrated during 50 years. The inter-annual variation of the STMW volume was well reproduced with the eddy-permitting grid resolution although the model was forced by a climatological atmospheric forcing. The annual formation and erosion volume of STMW varies by 7% and 9% of the mean volume, respectively.

  7. High resolution near-bed observations in winter near Cape Hatteras, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martini, M.; Armstrong, B.; Warner, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Science Center in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, is leading an effort to understand the regional sediment dynamics along the coastline of North and South Carolina. As part of the Carolinas Coastal Change Processes Project, a geologic framework study in June of 2008 by the Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center's Sea Floor Mapping Group focused on the seaward limit of Diamond Shoals and provided high resolution bathymetric data, surficial sediment characteristics, and subsurface geologic stratigraphy. These data also provided unprecedented guidance to identify deployment locations for tripods and moorings to investigate the processes that control sediment transport at Diamond Shoals. Equipment was deployed at three sites from early January, 2009 through early May, 2009: north and south of the shoals at 15 m depth, and at the tip at 24 m depth. Many strong storm systems were recorded during that time period. Mounted on the tripods were instruments to measure surface waves, pressure, current velocity, bottom turbulence, suspended-sediment profiles, and sea-floor sand-ripple bedforms. Many instruments were designed and programmed to sample in high resolution in time and space, as fast as 8 Hz hourly bursts and as small as 6 cm bin sizes in near bottom profiles. A second tripod at the north site also held a visual camera system and sonar imaging system which document seafloor bedforms. The region is known for its dynamics, and one of the tripods tipped over towards the end of the experiment. A preliminary look at the data suggests the region is characterized by high energy. Raw data from a burst recorded at the south site on Mar. 26th show instantaneous flow speed at 150 cm/s at 0.5 m above the seabed. This paper reports preliminary highlights of the observations, based on raw data, and lessons learned from a deployment of large tripod systems in such a dynamic location. ??2009 MTS.

  8. Evaluation of the two-way coupled WRF-CMAQ modeling system to the 2011 DISCOVER-AQ campaign at 12-km, 4-km and 1-km resolutions

    EPA Science Inventory

    At the 12th Annual CMAS Conference initial results from the application of the coupled WRF-CMAQ modeling system to the 2011 Baltimore-Washington D.C. DISCOVER-AQ campaign were presented, with the focus on updates and new methods applied to the WRF modeling for fine-scale applicat...

  9. A Variable-resolution Surface Wave Dispersion Study of Eurasia, North Africa, and Surrounding Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M E

    2005-03-21

    This paper presents the results of a large-scale study of surface wave dispersion performed across Eurasia and North Africa. Improvements were made to previous surface wave work by enlarging the study region, increasing path density, improving spatial resolution, and expanding the period range. This study expands the coverage area northwards and eastwards relative to a previous dispersion analysis, which covered only North Africa and the Middle East. We have significantly increased the number of seismograms examined and group velocity measurements made. We have now made good quality dispersion measurements for about 30,000 Rayleigh wave and 20,000 Love wave paths, and have incorporated measurements from several other researchers into the study. A conjugate gradient method was employed for the group velocity tomography, which improved the inversion from the previous study by adopting a variable smoothness. This technique allows us to go to higher resolution where the data allow without producing artifacts. The current results include both Love and Rayleigh wave inversions across the region for periods from 7 to 100 seconds at 1{sup o} resolution. Short period group velocities are sensitive to slow velocities associated with large sedimentary features such as the Caspian Sea, West Siberian Platform, Mediterranean Sea, Bay of Bengal, Tarim Basin, and Persian Gulf. Intermediate periods are sensitive to differences in crustal thickness, such as those between oceanic and continental crust or along orogenic zones and continental plateaus. At longer periods, fast velocities are consistently found beneath cratons while slow upper mantle velocities occur along rift systems, subduction zones, and collision zones such as the Tethys Belt. We have compared the group velocities at various periods with features such as sediment thickness, topographic height, crustal thickness, proximity to plate boundaries, lithospheric age and lithospheric thickness, and find significant

  10. Multiple High Resolution Climate Scenarios over North America for Application to Water Resources (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mearns, L. O.

    2009-12-01

    The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) is an international program that is serving the climate scenario needs of the United States, Canada, and northern Mexico. We are systematically investigating the uncertainties in regional scale projections of future climate and producing high resolution climate change scenarios using multiple regional climate models(RCMs)and multiple global model responses to a future emission scenario, by nesting the RCMs within atmosphere ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) forced with the A2 SRES scenario, over a domain covering the conterminous US, northern Mexico, and most of Canada. The project also includes a validation component through nesting the participating RCMs within NCEP reanalyses. The basic spatial resolution of the RCM simulations is 50 km. This program includes RCMs that participated in the European PRUDENCE program (HadRM3 and RegCM), the Canadian regional climate model (CRCM) as well as the NCEP regional spectral model (RSM), the NCAR/PSU MM5, and NCAR WRF. Candidate AOGCMs include the Hadley Centre HadCM3, NCAR CCSM, the Canadian CGCM3 and the GFDL model. The resulting climate model runs form the basis for multiple high resolution climate scenarios that can be used in climate change impacts assessments over North America. High resolution (50 km) global time-slice experiments based on the GFDL atmospheric model and the NCAR atmospheric model (CAM3) have also been produced and will be compared with the simulations of the regional models. There also will be opportunities for double nesting over key regions through which additional modelers in the regional modeling community will be able to participate in NARCCAP. Additional key science issues are being investigated such as the importance of compatible physics in the nested and nesting models. Measures of uncertainty across the multiple runs are being developed by geophysical statisticians. In this overview talk, results from Phase II

  11. Evaluations of three high-resolution dynamical downscaled ensembles over North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobel, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Six 12 kilometer resolution WRF simulations are performed driven by three GCM outputs --- CCSM4, GFDL, and HadGEM --- in 10-yr or 15-yr historical period. The model fidelity is measured in terms of correlations, RMSEs, and probability distribution functions. The model evaluations are conducted over 20 subregions for North America. The 3D and surface variables considered in this study are precipitation, 2m-temperature, tmax/tmin, relative humidity, geopotential height, u-wind/v-wind, and sea-level pressure. We aim to find which downscaled GCM run showed the best skill over each subregion for all the variables. Depending on the variable and type of metric being examined, the output from each historical run will be primarily compared to North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) and Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) data for the statistical analysis. It is important to both evaluate which high resolution ensemble member captures the climatological mean of the variables as well as to determine which run does the best at observing the extremes values, such as maximum/minimum temperature and large precipitation events. High RMSE values frequently occur because of errors in either the seasonal mean, which could indicate a specific bias in the model, or a failure to capture the tails of the PDF correctly, which indicates the model had trouble capturing the seasonal variability. This will give us valuable information at which GCM is the most effective at simulating historical periods using dynamic downscaling over specific regions of the United States and give us added confidence of their ability to forecast future time periods based on model performance.

  12. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Maasakkers, J. D.; Biraud, S. C.; Boesch, H.; Bowman, K. W.; Deutscher, N. M.; Dubey, M. K.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Hase, F.; Kuze, A.; Notholt, J.; Ohyama, H.; Parker, R.; Payne, V. H.; Sussmann, R.; Velazco, V. A.; Warneke, T.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wunch, D.

    2015-02-01

    We use 2009-2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to constrain global and North American inversions of methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. The GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface networks (NOAA, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/DOE, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. The surface and aircraft data are subsequently used for independent evaluation of the methane source inversions. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a total methane source of 539 Tg a-1 and points to a large East Asian overestimate in the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide full error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2-42.7 Tg a-1, as compared to 24.9-27.0 Tg a-1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0-44.5 Tg a-1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the South-Central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands, large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. We attribute 29-44% of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22-31% to oil/gas, 20% to landfills/waste water, and 11-15% to coal with an additional 9.0-10.1 Tg a-1 source from wetlands.

  13. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Maasakkers, J. D.; Lundgren, E.; Andrews, A. E.; Biraud, S. C.; Boesch, H.; Bowman, K. W.; Deutscher, N. M.; Dubey, M. K.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Hase, F.; Kuze, A.; Notholt, J.; Ohyama, H.; Parker, R.; Payne, V. H.; Sussmann, R.; Sweeney, C.; Velazco, V. A.; Warneke, T.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wunch, D.

    2015-06-01

    We use 2009-2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to estimate global and North American methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. GEOS-Chem and GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface and tower networks (NOAA/ESRL, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/ESRL, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a total methane source of 539 Tg a-1 with some important regional corrections to the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2-42.7 Tg a-1, as compared to 24.9-27.0 Tg a-1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0-44.5 Tg a-1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the southern-central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands; large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. Using prior information on source locations, we attribute 29-44 % of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22-31 % to oil/gas, 20 % to landfills/wastewater, and 11-15 % to coal. Wetlands contribute an additional 9.0-10.1 Tg a-1.

  14. First high-resolution stratigraphic column of the Martian north polar layered deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishbaugh, K.E.; Hvidberg, C.S.; Byrne, S.; Russell, P.S.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Winstrup, M.; Kirk, R.

    2010-01-01

    This study achieves the first high-spatial-resolution, layer-scale, measured stratigraphic column of the Martian north polar layered deposits using a 1m-posting DEM. The marker beds found throughout the upper North Polar Layered Deposits range in thickness from 1.6 m-16.0 m +/-1.4 m, and 6 of 13 marker beds are separated by ???25-35 m. Thin-layer sets have average layer separations of 1.6 m. These layer separations may account for the spectral-power-peaks found in previous brightness-profile analyses. Marker-bed layer thicknesses show a weak trend of decreasing thickness with depth that we interpret to potentially be the result of a decreased accumulation rate in the past, for those layers. However, the stratigraphic column reveals that a simple rhythmic or bundled layer sequence is not immediately apparent throughout the column, implying that the relationship between polar layer formation and cyclic climate forcing is quite complex. Copyright ?? 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Mapping of North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution by inversion of SCIAMACHY satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wecht, Kevin J.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Frankenberg, Christian; Jiang, Zhe; Blake, Donald R.

    2014-06-01

    We estimate methane emissions from North America with high spatial resolution by inversion of Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) satellite observations using the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry (GEOS-Chem) chemical transport model and its adjoint. The inversion focuses on summer 2004 when data from the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment-North America (INTEX-A) aircraft campaign over the eastern U.S. are available to validate the SCIAMACHY retrievals and evaluate the inversion. From the INTEX-A data we identify and correct a water vapor-dependent bias in the SCIAMACHY data. We conduct an initial inversion of emissions on the horizontal grid of GEOS-Chem (1/2° × 2/3°) to identify correction tendencies relative to the Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) v4.2 emission inventory used as a priori. We then cluster these grid cells with a hierarchical algorithm to extract the maximum information from the SCIAMACHY observations. A 1000 cluster ensemble can be adequately constrained, providing ~100 km resolution across North America. Analysis of results indicates that the Hudson Bay Lowland wetlands source is 2.1 Tg a-1, lower than the a priori but consistent with other recent estimates. Anthropogenic U.S. emissions are 30.1 ± 1.3 Tg a-1, compared to 25.8 Tg a-1 and 28.3 Tg a-1 in the EDGAR v4.2 and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) inventories, respectively. We find that U.S. livestock emissions are 40% greater than in these two inventories. No such discrepancy is apparent for overall U.S. oil and gas emissions, although this may reflect some compensation between overestimate of emissions from storage/distribution and underestimate from production. We find that U.S. livestock emissions are 70% greater than the oil and gas emissions, in contrast to the EDGAR v4.2 and EPA inventories where these two sources are of comparable magnitude.

  16. High-resolution reconstructions of Pacific-North America plate motion: 20 Ma to present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.; Merkouriev, S.

    2016-11-01

    We present new rotations that describe the relative positions and velocities of the Pacific and North America plates at 22 times during the past 19.7 Myr, offering ≈1-Myr temporal resolution for studies of the geotectonic evolution of western North America and other plate boundary locations. Derived from ≈18 000 magnetic reversal, fracture zone and transform fault identifications from the Pacific-Antarctic-Nubia-North America plate circuit and the velocities of 935 GPS sites on the Pacific and North America plates, the new rotations and GPS-derived angular velocity indicate that the rate of motion between the two plates increased by ≈70 per cent from 19.7 to 9±1 Ma, but changed by less than 2 per cent since 8 Ma and even less since 4.2 Ma. The rotations further suggest that the relative plate direction has rotated clockwise for most of the past 20 Myr, with a possible hiatus from 9 to 5 Ma. This conflicts with previously reported evidence for a significant clockwise change in the plate direction at ≈8-6 Ma. Our new rotations indicate that Pacific plate motion became obliquely convergent with respect to the San Andreas Fault of central California at 5.2-4.2 Ma, in agreement with geological evidence for a Pliocene onset of folding and faulting in central California. Our reconstruction of the northern Gulf of California at 6.3 Ma differs by only 15-30 km from structurally derived reconstructions after including 3-4 km Myr-1 of geodetically measured slip between the Baja California Peninsula and Pacific plate. This implies an approximate 15-30 km upper bound for plate non-rigidity integrated around the global circuit at 6.3 Ma. A much larger 200±54 km discrepancy between our reconstruction of the northern Gulf of California at 12 Ma and that estimated from structural and marine geophysical observations suggests that faults in northwestern Mexico or possibly west of the Baja California Peninsula accommodated large amounts of obliquely divergent dextral shear

  17. High Resolution Multichannel Imaging of Basin Growth Along a Continental Transform: The Marmara Sea Along the North Anatolian Fault in NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckler, M. S.; Çifçi, G.; Demirbağ, E.; Akhun, S. D.; Büyükaşik, E.; Cevatoglu, M.; Coşkun, S.; Diebold, J.; Dondurur, D.; Gürçay, S.; Imren, C.; Kücük, H. M.; Kurt, H.; Özer, P. G.; Perinçek, E.; Seeber, L.; Shillington, D.; Sorlien, C.; Timur, D.

    2008-12-01

    The 1500-km-long North Anatolian continental transform (NAF) accommodates the westward motion of the Anatolian platelet relative to Asia. The Marmara Trough in western Turkey is a large composite Quaternary structure that includes three main extensional basins with water depths reaching ~1200m separated by shallower ridges. Syntectonic sedimentation in the basins with highly variable sea-level-related changes in accumulation rates provide valuable time-space markers for reconstructing structural growth and basin development in the Marmara Sea. The TAMAM (Turkish-American MArmara Multichannel) Project is a collaboration between several US and Turkish research institutes. During July 2008, TAMAM collected ~2700 km of multichannel profiles in the Marmara Sea using the R/V K. Piri Reis. MCS data were sampled with a 1-ms interval on the first 72 channels with 6.25m group spacing in a 600m streamer. The source was a 45/45 cu. in. GI air gun, which was fired every 12.5 or18.75m. The gun-streamer offset was 40 or 100 m depending on water depth. Both the gun and streamer were towed at a depth of 3 or 4m. This configuration yielded high-resolution images of the stratigraphy in the Marmara Sea. TAMAM follows a recent series of impressive seismotectonic studies of the NAF in the Marmara Sea area. Previous seismic cruises focused on deep penetration MCS imaging of the overall basin structure and faulting or very high-resolution imaging of the near-surface faulting. TAMAM fills a gap in resolution imaging the stratigraphy that records the history of deformation in the basins and linkages between faults. We will present preliminary high-resolution images of the stratigraphy and tectonics beneath the Marmara Sea highlighting the following exciting observations and initial results from this experiment: 1) Improved stratigraphic correlations between the major basins, a primary goal of the experiment; 2) Clearer imaging of active faults, including the NAF, the less studied southern

  18. Gulf of Mexico circulation within a high-resolution numerical simulation of the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanou, Anastasia; Chassignet, Eric P.; Sturges, Wilton

    2004-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico circulation is examined from the results of a high-resolution (1/12°) North Atlantic simulation using the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model. The motivation for this paper is twofold: first, we validate the model's performance in the Gulf of Mexico by comparing the model fields to past and recent observations, and second, given the good agreement with the observed Gulf of Mexico surface circulation and Loop Current variability, we expand the discussion and analysis of the model circulation to areas that have not been extensively observed/analyzed, such as the vertical structure of the Loop Current and associated eddies, especially the deep circulation below 1500 m. The interval between successive model eddy sheddings is 3 to 15 months, the eddy diameters range between 140 and 500 km, the life span is about 1 year, and the translational speeds are 2-3 km d-1, in good agreement with observations. Areas of high cyclonic eddy occurrence in the model are southwest of Florida, the Loop Current boundary, and the western Campeche Bay area. The cyclonic eddy diameters range between 50 and 375 km, the orbital speeds range between 1 and 55 cm s-1, the translational speeds range between 0.5 and 14 km d-1, and the eddy life spans range between 1 and 3 months. The vertical structure of the temperature and salinity of each modeled eddy, from the moment it is shed until it disintegrates in the western Gulf of Mexico, is in agreement with the few available observations. Below 1500 m, deep cyclonic eddies are associated with the surface Loop Current anticyclones. The eddy variability is consistent with Rossby waves propagating westward, and there is bottom intensification of the flow close to steep topography. Overall, we show that this very high horizontal resolution isopycnic coordinate ocean model, which is able to produce a quite realistic surface circulation for the North and equatorial Atlantic, is also able to reproduce well the smaller-scale, basin

  19. Using very high resolution satellite images to identify coastal zone dynamics at North Western Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florin Zoran, Liviu; Ionescu Golovanov, Carmen; Zoran, Maria

    2010-05-01

    The availability of updated information about the extension and characteristics of land cover is a crucial issue in the perspective of a correct landscape planning and management of marine coastal zones. Satellite remote sensing data can provide accurate information about land coverage at different scales and the recent availability of very high resolution images definitely improved the precision of coastal zone spatio-temporal changes. The Romanian North Western coastal and shelf zones of the Black Sea and Danube delta are a mosaic of complex, interacting ecosystems, rich natural resources and socio-economic activity. Dramatic changes in the Black Sea's ecosystem and resources are due to natural and anthropogenic causes (increase in the nutrient and pollutant load of rivers input, industrial and municipal wastewater pollution along the coast, and dumping on the open sea). A scientific management system for protection, conservation and restoration must be based on reliable information on bio-geophysical and geomorphologic processes, coastal erosion, sedimentation dynamics, mapping of macrophyte fields, water quality, and climatic change effects. Use of satellite images is of great help for coastal zone monitoring and environmental impact assessment. Synergetic use of in situ measurements with multisensors satellite data could provide a complex assessment of spatio-temporal changes. In this study was developed a method for extracting coastal zone features information as well as landcover dynamics from IKONOS, very high resolution images for North-Western Black Sea marine coastal zone. The main objective was obtaining reliable data about the spatio-temporal coastal zone changes in two study areas located in Constanta urban area and Danube Delta area. We used an object-oriented approach based on preliminary segmentation and classification of the resulting object. First of all, segmentation parameters were tested and selected comparing segmented polygons with

  20. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    DOE PAGES

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; ...

    2015-06-30

    We use 2009–2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to estimate global and North American methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. GEOS-Chem and GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface and tower networks (NOAA/ESRL, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/ESRL, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a totalmore » methane source of 539 Tg a−1 with some important regional corrections to the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2–42.7 Tg a−1, as compared to 24.9–27.0 Tg a−1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0–44.5 Tg a−1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the southern–central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands; large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. Using prior information on source locations, we attribute 29–44 % of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22–31 % to oil/gas, 20 % to landfills/wastewater, and 11–15 % to coal. Wetlands contribute an additional 9.0–10.1 Tg a−1.« less

  1. Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data

    DOE PAGES

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; ...

    2015-02-18

    We use 2009–2011 space-borne methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to constrain global and North American inversions of methane emissions with 4° × 5° and up to 50 km × 50 km spatial resolution, respectively. The GOSAT data are first evaluated with atmospheric methane observations from surface networks (NOAA, TCCON) and aircraft (NOAA/DOE, HIPPO), using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as a platform to facilitate comparison of GOSAT with in situ data. This identifies a high-latitude bias between the GOSAT data and GEOS-Chem that we correct via quadratic regression. The surface and aircraft data are subsequently usedmore » for independent evaluation of the methane source inversions. Our global adjoint-based inversion yields a total methane source of 539 Tg a−1 and points to a large East Asian overestimate in the EDGARv4.2 inventory used as a prior. Results serve as dynamic boundary conditions for an analytical inversion of North American methane emissions using radial basis functions to achieve high resolution of large sources and provide full error characterization. We infer a US anthropogenic methane source of 40.2–42.7 Tg a−1, as compared to 24.9–27.0 Tg a−1 in the EDGAR and EPA bottom-up inventories, and 30.0–44.5 Tg a−1 in recent inverse studies. Our estimate is supported by independent surface and aircraft data and by previous inverse studies for California. We find that the emissions are highest in the South-Central US, the Central Valley of California, and Florida wetlands, large isolated point sources such as the US Four Corners also contribute. We attribute 29–44% of US anthropogenic methane emissions to livestock, 22–31% to oil/gas, 20% to landfills/waste water, and 11–15% to coal with an additional 9.0–10.1 Tg a−1 source from wetlands.« less

  2. Revisiting the Submerged Paleo Elbe Valley (S North Sea) with High-Resolution Shallow Seismics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papenmeier, S.; Hass, H. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Elbe paleo valley is the most prominent subsurface structure in the southern North Sea (~10,000 km²) and constitutes an important part of Germany's largest marine Natura 2000-Reserve "Sylter Außenriff" (European environmental protection area). It is supposed that the valley was formed by epeirogenic movement during the Tertiary. The depression developed to its present form during the Weichselian sea-level lowstand (-130 m below present). Melt waters that discharged in north-westerly directions fed the paleo Elbe at that time. During the Holocene the valley drowned in the rising sea. A narrow raster of new shallow seismic data combined with high resolution sidescan sonar data is used to shed new light on the Holocene development of the paleo Elbe valley and its adjacent regions in detail. Cross sections distributed with transect distances of 400 and 800 m, respectively, over a length of 100 km (approximately one third of the total valley length) enable a good comprehensive analysis of the historical process of sedimentary valley infill and coastal evolution with the successive Holocene sea level rise. The eastern flank of the valley is characterized by a relatively steep slope with one or more terraces, representing moraine deposits which are today still present at the seafloor surface, partly covered with Holocene marine deposits. The western slip-off slope of the valley is much smoother than the eastern undercut slope. West of the valley, sediment cores show peat and tidal flat sediments. Shallow seismic data show the base of the valley. There are conspicuous internal seismic reflectors above the base, inclined in northeastern direction. They indicate a sedimentary infill of the valley from the southwest when the southern part of the Dogger Bank was flooded during the early Holocene sea-level rise. In this process the steeper eastern slope acted as a natural barrier towards the northeast, averted sediment transport beyond the eastern boundary of the paleo

  3. Stratigraphy of the north polar layered deposits of Mars from high-resolution topography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becerra, Patricio; Byrne, Shane; Sori, Michael M.; Sutton, Sarah; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    The stratigraphy of the layered deposits of the polar regions of Mars is theorized to contain a record of recent climate change linked to insolation changes driven by variations in the planet's orbital and rotational parameters. In order to confidently link stratigraphic signals to insolation periodicities, a description of the stratigraphy is required based on quantities that directly relate to intrinsic properties of the layers. We use stereo Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) to derive a characteristic of North Polar Layered Deposits (NPLD) strata that can be correlated over large distances: the topographic protrusion of layers exposed in troughs, which is a proxy for the layers’ resistance to erosion. Using a combination of image analysis and a signal-matching algorithm to correlate continuous depth-protrusion signals taken from DTMs at different locations, we construct a stratigraphic column that describes the upper ~500 m of at least 7% of the area of the NPLD, and find accumulation rates that vary by factors of up to two. We find that, when coupled with observations of exposed layers in orbital images, the topographic expression of the strata is consistently continuous through large distances in the top 300 – 500 m of the NPLD, suggesting it is better related to intrinsic layer properties than brightness alone.

  4. High Resolution Modelling of Mantle Convective Flow Below the North American Plate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, A. M.; Moucha, R.; Simmons, N. A.; Grand, S. P.; Rowley, D. B.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Quéré, S.

    2008-12-01

    Recent progress in joint seismic-geodynamic tomographic imaging of both thermal and compositional anomalies in Earth's mantle allows us to carry out new high-resolution calculations of the present-day mantle convective flow at all depths, from the lithosphere down to the core-mantle boundary. We are therefore able to delineate the detailed connections between fundamental geological and geophysical surface processes and the underlying mantle convection. We employ these convection calculations to consider North American continental dynamics, with a special focus on the detailed relationship between flow in upper mantle, especially in the asthenosphere, and the impact on present-day dynamic topography as well as its rate-of- change. The surface dynamics that we obtain show a clear and detailed connection to the mantle flow driven by the descent of the ancient Kula-Farallon plate system and a buoyant, actively ascending hot upwelling under the western US. Of particular importance is the relationship of the deep-seated upwelling under the Colorado Plateau as a driving force for current rifting in the Rio Grande River valley. This rifting and its temporal evolution bears a strong resemblance to the convection-induced rifting our convection model also predicts under the East African Rift system. The close similarity between these two rifts, in terms of asthenospheric flow dynamics, will be discussed.

  5. Rapid Holocene coastal change revealed by high-resolution micropaleontological analysis, Pamlico Sound, North Carolina, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand Pre, Candace; Culver, Stephen J.; Mallinson, David J.; Farrell, Kathleen M.; Corbett, D. Reide; Horton, Benjamin P.; Hillier, Caroline; Riggs, Stanley R.; Snyder, Scott W.; Buzas, Martin A.

    2011-11-01

    Foraminiferal analyses of 404 contiguous samples, supported by diatom, lithologic, geochronologic and seismic data, reveal both rapid and gradual Holocene paleoenvironmental changes in an 8.21-m vibracore taken from southern Pamlico Sound, North Carolina. Data record initial flooding of a latest Pleistocene river drainage and the formation of an estuary 9000 yr ago. Estuarine conditions were punctuated by two intervals of marine influence from approximately 4100 to 3700 and 1150 to 500 cal yr BP. Foraminiferal assemblages in the muddy sand facies that accumulated during these intervals contain many well-preserved benthic foraminiferal species, which occur today in open marine settings as deep as the mid shelf, and significant numbers of well-preserved planktonic foraminifera, some typical of Gulf Stream waters. We postulate that these marine-influenced units resulted from temporary destruction of the southern Outer Banks barrier islands by hurricanes. The second increase in marine influence is coeval with increased rate of sea-level rise and a peak in Atlantic tropical cyclone activity during the Medieval Climate Anomaly. This high-resolution analysis demonstrates the range of environmental variability and the rapidity of coastal change that can result from the interplay of changing climate, sea level and geomorphology in an estuarine setting.

  6. Stratigraphy of the north polar layered deposits of Mars from high-resolution topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, Patricio; Byrne, Shane; Sori, Michael M.; Sutton, Sarah; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.

    2016-08-01

    The stratigraphy of the layered deposits in the polar regions of Mars is theorized to contain a record of recent climate change linked to insolation changes driven by variations in the planet's orbital and rotational parameters. In order to confidently link stratigraphic signals to insolation periodicities, a description of the stratigraphy is required based on quantities that directly relate to intrinsic properties of the layers. We use stereo digital terrain models (DTMs) from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment to derive a characteristic of north polar layered deposit (NPLD) strata that can be correlated over large distances: the topographic protrusion of layers exposed in troughs, which is a proxy for the layers' resistance to erosion. Using a combination of image analysis and a signal-matching algorithm to correlate continuous depth-protrusion signals taken from DTMs at different locations, we construct a stratigraphic column that describes the upper 500 m of at least 7% of the area of the NPLD and find accumulation rates that vary by factors of up to 2. We find that, when coupled with observations of exposed layers in images, the topographic expression of the strata is consistently continuous across large distances in the top 300-500 m of the NPLD, suggesting that it is better related to intrinsic layer properties than the brightness of exposed layers alone.

  7. Rapid Holocene coastal change revealed by high-resolution micropaleontological analysis, Pamlico Sound, North Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grand, Pre C.; Culver, S.J.; Mallinson, D.J.; Farrell, K.M.; Corbett, D.R.; Horton, B.P.; Hillier, C.; Riggs, S.R.; Snyder, S.W.; Buzas, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Foraminiferal analyses of 404 contiguous samples, supported by diatom, lithologic, geochronologic and seismic data, reveal both rapid and gradual Holocene paleoenvironmental changes in an 8.21-m vibracore taken from southern Pamlico Sound, North Carolina. Data record initial flooding of a latest Pleistocene river drainage and the formation of an estuary 9000. yr ago. Estuarine conditions were punctuated by two intervals of marine influence from approximately 4100 to 3700 and 1150 to 500. cal. yr BP. Foraminiferal assemblages in the muddy sand facies that accumulated during these intervals contain many well-preserved benthic foraminiferal species, which occur today in open marine settings as deep as the mid shelf, and significant numbers of well-preserved planktonic foraminifera, some typical of Gulf Stream waters. We postulate that these marine-influenced units resulted from temporary destruction of the southern Outer Banks barrier islands by hurricanes. The second increase in marine influence is coeval with increased rate of sea-level rise and a peak in Atlantic tropical cyclone activity during the Medieval Climate Anomaly. This high-resolution analysis demonstrates the range of environmental variability and the rapidity of coastal change that can result from the interplay of changing climate, sea level and geomorphology in an estuarine setting. ?? 2011 University of Washington.

  8. High-resolution and Deep Crustal Imaging Across The North Sicily Continental Margin (southern Tyrrhenian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agate, M.; Bertotti, G.; Catalano, R.; Pepe, F.; Sulli, A.

    Three multichannel seismic reflection profiles across the North Sicily continental mar- gin have been reprocessed and interpreted. Data consist of an unpublished high pene- tration seismic profile (deep crust Italian CROP Project) and a high-resolution seismic line. These lines run in the NNE-SSW direction, from the Sicilian continental shelf to the Tyrrhenian abyssal plain (Marsili area), and are tied by a third, high penetration seismic line MS104 crossing the Sisifo High. The North Sicily continental margin represents the inner sector of the Sicilian-Maghrebian chain that is collapsed as con- sequence of extensional tectonics. The chain is formed by a tectonic wedge (12-15 km thick. It includes basinal Meso-Cenozoic carbonate units overthrusting carbonate platform rock units (Catalano et al., 2000). Presently, main culmination (e.g. Monte Solunto) and a number of tectonic depressions (e.g. Cefalù basin), filled by >1000 m thick Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary wedge, are observed along the investigated tran- sect. Seismic attributes and reflector pattern depicts a complex crustal structure. Be- tween the coast and the M. Solunto high, a transparent to diffractive band (assigned to the upper crust) is recognised above low frequency reflective layers (occurring be- tween 9 and 11 s/TWT) that dips towards the North. Their bottom can be correlated to the seismological (African?) Moho discontinuity which is (26 km deep in the Sicilian shelf (Scarascia et al., 1994). Beneath the Monte Solunto ridge, strongly deformed re- flectors occurring between 8 to 9.5 s/TWT (European lower crust?) overly the African (?) lower crust. The resulting geometry suggests underplating of the African crust respect to the European crust (?). The already deformed crustal edifice is dissected by a number of N-dipping normal faults that open extensional basins and are associ- ated with crustal thinning. The Plio-Pleistocene fill of the Cefalù basin can be subdi- vided into three subunits by

  9. Towards a high resolution inventory of anthropogenic deformation in North America using InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Lohman, R. B.; Taylor, H.; Semple, A.; Valentino, B.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic surface deformation is important to measure for several reasons -- 1) it could be a hazard to infrastructure; 2) it could contaminate precise measurements of other types of deformation (e.g., magmatic or tectonic); and 3) the deformation can provide otherwise inaccessible information about the subsurface as we measure the Earth's response to known pumping, surface change, or mining activity. While there are studies at individual sites in North America that demonstrate these three types of studies, we lack a continental synoptic view of anthropogenic deformation and its significance. To fill this gap, we use satellite Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data to image ground deformation across the continent with a spatial resolution of 1 km/pixel or better using results from the literature as well as new analysis of more than 5000 interferograms from the ERS, Envisat, and ALOS satellites, which collectively span 1992-2011. Our compilation is not complete in terms of spatially or temporal coverage nor is it uniform in quality over the region -- certainly we have missed some areas of deformation. Most of the data analyzed is in the western US, but ALOS observations east of the Rocky Mountains are of good quality even in vegetated and snowy areas and we document mining subsidence greater than several cm per year in NY, PA, and WV. We catalog more than 200 anthropogenic deformation signals, including about 45 that are not previously reported. The majority of these deformation sources can be attributed to groundwater extraction (66%), 8% to geothermal activity, 13% to hydrocarbon extraction, 11% to mining activity, and 2% to other sources such as lake loading. In a few areas, the source of deformation is not yet determined. As expected, most deformation is time dependent and so continuous monitoring is needed. In some areas, comparisonbetween pumping records and surface deformation reveals some suprises. For example, at the East Mesa Geothermal

  10. Fluid flow along North American Cordillera detachments determined from stable isotope and high resolution chemical analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quilichini, A.; Teyssier, C.; Mulch, A.; Nachlas, W.

    2009-12-01

    Fluid flow is likely a major parameter controlling the dynamics of extensional detachment zones. Buoyancy-driven fluid flow is generated by high heat flow beneath the detachment zone, where heat is advected by crustal thinning and magma intrusions. This hydrothermal convective flow is focused in the detachment zone for the duration of activity of the detachment at relatively high temperature (300-500°C), resulting in very significant fluid-rock interaction and isotopic exchange. Quantifying sources and fluid flux in detachments is a challenge because permeability of ductilely deforming rocks is poorly understood. In order to solve these problems, we studied two different Eocene extensional systems in the North American Cordillera: the quartzitic detachment which borders the Kettle dome metamorphic core complex (WA), and the quartzo-feldspathic Bitterroot shear zone along the Idaho batholith (MT). The Kettle Dome detachment provides a continuous section of ~200 m thick quartzite mylonite where high-resolution sampling (~5 m) indicates that Deuterium isotopic ratios that are obtained from synkinematic muscovite grains are consistent with a meteoric fluid source (-130 per mil). In the Bitterroot shear zone, Coyner (2003) reported similar Deuterium isotopic ratios (down to -140 per mil) in muscovite from mylonites and ultramylonites. Microprobe analyses were obtained for white mica porphyroclasts by performing transects perpendicular to the basal (001) cleavage in order to determine intragrain chemical zoning. Preliminary results for the Kettle dome indicate increasing phengite composition with depth, suggesting enhanced activity of the Tschermak exchange. The variations of the phengitic signature in muscovite indicates that temperature diminuish downsection, which is contradictory with the results obtained by the Qz-Ms oxygen isotope thermometer along the Kettle section. Our recent work provides geologic data for numerical models that address the permeability of

  11. Genomic scans detect signatures of selection along a salinity gradient in populations of the intertidal seaweed Fucus serratus on a 12 km scale.

    PubMed

    Coyer, J A; Hoarau, G; Pearson, G; Mota, C; Jüterbock, A; Alpermann, T; John, U; Olsen, J L

    2011-03-01

    Detecting natural selection in wild populations is a central challenge in evolutionary biology and genomic scans are an important means of detecting allele frequencies that deviate from neutral expectations among marker loci. We used nine anonymous and 15 EST-linked microsatellites, 362 AFLP loci, and several neutrality tests, to identify outlier loci when comparing four populations of the seaweed Fucus serratus spaced along a 12km intertidal shore with a steep salinity gradient. Under criteria of at least two significant tests in at least two population pairs, three EST-derived and three anonymous loci revealed putative signatures of selection. Anonymous locus FsB113 was a consistent outlier when comparing least saline to fully marine sites. Locus F37 was an outlier when comparing the least saline to more saline areas, and was annotated as a polyol transporter/putative mannitol transporter - an important sugar-alcohol associated with osmoregulation by brown algae. The remaining loci could not be annotated using six different data bases. Exclusion of microsatellite outlier loci did not change either the degree or direction of differentiation among populations. In one outlier test, the number of AFLP outlier loci increased as the salinity differences between population pairs increased (up to 14); only four outliers were detected with the second test and only one was consistent with both tests. Consistency may be improved with a much more rigorous approach to replication and/or may be dependent upon the class of marker used.

  12. Three-mode mode-division-multiplexing passive optical network over 12-km low mode-crosstalk FMF using all-fiber mode MUX/DEMUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Fang; Li, Juhao; Wu, Zhongying; Hu, Tao; Yu, Jinyi; Mo, Qi; He, Yongqi; Chen, Zhangyuan; Li, Zhengbin

    2017-01-01

    We propose three-mode mode-division-multiplexing passive optical network (MDM-PON) based on low mode-crosstalk few-mode fiber (FMF) and all-fiber mode multiplexer/demultiplexer (MUX/DEMUX). The FMF with step-index profile is designed and fabricated for effectively three-independent-spatial-mode transmission and low mode-crosstalk for MDM-PON transmission. The all-fiber mode MUX/DEMUX are composed of cascaded mode selective couplers (MSCs), which simultaneously multiplex or demultiplex multiple modes. Based on the low mode-crosstalk of the FMF and all-fiber mode MUX/DEMUX, each optical network unit (ONU) communicates with the optical line terminal (OLT) independently utilizing a different optical linearly polarized (LP) spatial mode in MDM-PON system. We experimentally demonstrate MDM-PON transmission of three independent-spatial-modes over 12-km FMF with 10-Gb/s optical on-off keying (OOK) signal and direct detection.

  13. Solving cryptogenic histories using host and parasite molecular genetics: the resolution of Littorina littorea's North American origin.

    PubMed

    Blakeslee, April M H; Byers, James E; Lesser, Michael P

    2008-08-01

    Even after decades of investigation using multiple sources of evidence, the natural histories of some species remain unclear (i.e. cryptogenic). A key example is Littorina littorea, the most abundant intertidal snail in northeastern North America. Native to Europe, the snail's ecological history in North America has been debated for over 100 years with no definitive resolution. To resolve its cryptogenic status, we used molecular genetics from a novel combination of the snail and a highly associated trematode parasite, Cryptocotyle lingua. Based on mitochondrial sequences of 370 L. littorea and 196 C. lingua individuals, our results demonstrate a significant reduction in genetic diversity in North America vs. Europe, North American haplotypes nested within European haplotypes, and mean divergence estimates of approxiamtely 500 years ago from Europe for both host and parasite--thus supporting a recent introduction of both host and parasite to North America from Europe. Our study therefore resolves not only a specific cryptogenic history, but it also demonstrates the success of our approach generally and could be used in resolving difficult invasion histories worldwide.

  14. Tropical cyclones over the North Indian Ocean: experiments with the high-resolution global icosahedral grid point model GME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumkar, Yogesh V.; Sen, P. N.; Chaudhari, Hemankumar S.; Oh, Jai-Ho

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, an attempt has been made to conduct a numerical experiment with the high-resolution global model GME to predict the tropical storms in the North Indian Ocean during the year 2007. Numerical integrations using the icosahedral hexagonal grid point global model GME were performed to study the evolution of tropical cyclones, viz., Akash, Gonu, Yemyin and Sidr over North Indian Ocean during 2007. It has been seen that the GME model forecast underestimates cyclone's intensity, but the model can capture the evolution of cyclone's intensity especially its weakening during landfall, which is primarily due to the cutoff of the water vapor supply in the boundary layer as cyclones approach the coastal region. A series of numerical simulation of tropical cyclones have been performed with GME to examine model capability in prediction of intensity and track of the cyclones. The model performance is evaluated by calculating the root mean square errors as cyclone track errors.

  15. High cesium concentrations in groundwater in the upper 1.2 km of fractured crystalline rock - Influence of groundwater origin and secondary minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathurin, Frédéric A.; Drake, Henrik; Tullborg, Eva-Lena; Berger, Tobias; Peltola, Pasi; Kalinowski, Birgitta E.; Åström, Mats E.

    2014-05-01

    Dissolved and solid phase cesium (Cs) was studied in the upper 1.2 km of a coastal granitoid fracture network on the Baltic Shield (Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory and Laxemar area, SE Sweden). There unusually high Cs concentrations (up to 5-6 μg L-1) occur in the low-temperature (<20 °C) groundwater. The material includes water collected in earlier hydrochemical monitoring programs and secondary precipitates (fracture coatings) collected on the fracture walls, as follows: (a) hydraulically pristine fracture groundwater sampled through 23 surface boreholes equipped for the retrieval of representative groundwater at controlled depths (Laxemar area), (b) fracture groundwater affected by artificial drainage collected through 80 boreholes drilled mostly along the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (underground research facility), (c) surface water collected in local streams, a lake and sea bay, and shallow groundwater collected in 8 regolith boreholes, and (d) 84 new specimens of fracture coatings sampled in cores from the Äspö HRL and Laxemar areas. The groundwater in each area is different, which affects Cs concentrations. The highest Cs concentrations occurred in deep-seated saline groundwater (median Äspö HRL: 4.1 μg L-1; median Laxemar: 3.7 μg L-1) and groundwater with marine origin (Äspö HRL: 4.2 μg L-1). Overall lower, but variable, Cs concentrations were found in other types of groundwater. The similar concentrations of Cs in the saline groundwater, which had a residence time in the order of millions of years, and in the marine groundwater, which had residence times in the order of years, shows that duration of water-rock interactions is not the single and primary control of dissolved Cs in these systems. The high Cs concentrations in the saline groundwater is ascribed to long-term weathering of minerals, primarily Cs-enriched fracture coatings dominated by illite and mixed-layer clays and possibly wall rock micaceous minerals. The high Cs concentrations in the groundwater of marine origin are, in contrast, explained by relatively fast cation exchange reactions. As indicated by the field data and predicted by 1D solute transport modeling, alkali cations with low-energy hydration carried by intruding marine water are capable of (NH4+ in particular and K+ to some extent) replacing Cs+ on frayed edge (FES) sites on illite in the fracture coatings. The result is a rapid and persistent (at least in the order of decades) buildup of dissolved Cs concentrations in fractures where marine water flows downward. The identification of high Cs concentrations in young groundwater of marine origin and the predicted capacity of NH4+ to displace Cs from fracture solids are of particular relevance in the disposal of radioactive nuclear waste deep underground in crystalline rock.

  16. Ultra-deep Large Binocular Camera U-band Imaging of the GOODS-North Field: Depth vs. Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashcraft, Teresa; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Jansen, Rolf A.; Cohen, Seth H.; Grazian, Andrea; Boutsia, Konstantina; Fontana, Adriano; Giallongo, Emanuele; O'Connell, Robert W.; Paris, Diego; Rutkowski, Michael J.; Scarlata, Claudia; Testa, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    We present a study of the trade-off between depth and resolution using a large number of U-band images in the GOODS-North field obtained with the Large Binocular Camera (LBC) on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). Having acquired over 30 hours of total exposure time (315 images, each 5-6 min), we generated multiple image mosaics, starting with the subset of images with the best (FWHM < 0."8) atmospheric seeing (~10% of the total data set). For subsequent mosaics, we added in data with larger seeing values until the final, deepest mosaic included all images with FWHM < 1."8 (~94% of the total data set). For each mosaic, we created object catalogs to compare the optimal-resolution, yet shallower image to the low-resolution but deeper image and found the number counts for both images are ~90% complete to AB = 26 mag. In the optimal-resolution image, object counts start to drop-off dramatically, fainter than AB ~ 27 mag, while in the deepest image the drop is more gradual because of the better surface-brightness sensitivity ( SB ~ 32 mag arcsec-2). We conclude that for studies of brighter galaxies and features within them, the optimal-resolution image should be used. However, to fully explore and understand the faintest objects, the deeper imaging with lower resolution are also required. We also discuss how high-resolution F336W HST data complements our LBT mosaics.For 220 brighter galaxies with U < 24 mag, we find only marginal differences (< 0.07 mag in total integrated flux) between the optimal-resolution and low-resolution light-profiles to SB ~ 32 mag arcsec-2. This helps constrain how much flux can be missed in galaxy outskirts, which is important for studies of Extragalactic Background Light.In the future, we will expand our analysis of the GOODS-N field to ~26 hours of LBT/LBC R-band surface photometry to similar depths.

  17. Seasonal variability of eddy kinetic energy in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre: A high-resolution ocean model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieck, Jan Klaus; Böning, Claus W.; Greatbatch, Richard J.; Scheinert, Markus

    2016-04-01

    A global ocean model with 1/12° horizontal resolution is used to assess the seasonal cycle of surface eddy kinetic energy (EKE) in the North Atlantic. The model reproduces the salient features of the observed mean surface EKE, including amplitude and phase of its seasonal cycle in most parts of the basin. In the interior North Atlantic subtropical gyre, EKE peaks in summer down to a depth of ˜200 m, below which the seasonal cycle is weak. Investigation of the possible driving mechanisms reveals the seasonal changes in the thermal interactions with the atmosphere to be the most likely cause of the summer maximum of EKE. The development of the seasonal thermocline in spring and summer is accompanied by stronger mesoscale variations in the horizontal temperature gradients near the surface which corresponds, by thermal wind balance, to an intensification of mesoscale velocity anomalies toward the surface. An extension of the analysis leads to similar results in the South Atlantic, North Pacific and South Pacific subtropical gyres.

  18. A composite annual-resolution stalagmite record of North Atlantic climate over the last three millennia

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Andy; C. Hellstrom, John; Kelly, Bryce F. J.; Mariethoz, Gregoire; Trouet, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Annually laminated stalagmites can be used to construct a precise chronology, and variations in laminae thickness provide an annual growth-rate record that can be used as a proxy for past climate and environmental change. Here, we present and analyse the first composite speleothem annual growth-rate record based on five stalagmites from the same cave system in northwest Scotland, where precipitation is sensitive to North Atlantic climate variability and the winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Our 3000-year record confirms persistently low growth-rates, reflective of positive NAO states, during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA). Another persistently low growth period occurring at 290-550 CE coincides with the European Migration Period, and a subsequent period of sustained fast growth-rate (negative NAO) from 600-900 AD provides the climate context for the Viking Age in northern and western Europe. PMID:26068805

  19. Development of a Dynamic Barrier Island (Sylt, Eastern North Sea) Based on High-Resolution Aerial Photographs and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolch, T.; Hass, H. C.

    2004-12-01

    Wind and currents are the driving forces for the morphological development of coastlines and islands by giving them their shape, run and structure. This is especially true in highly dynamic areas such as the Wadden Sea in North-Western Europe. In this unique environment changes are continuous and distinct developments can be noticed within decades. The Island of Sylt, located in the Wadden Sea near the German-Danish border, is a sandy barrier island that protects the mainland against storm floods and waves. Thus, it experiences strong erosion (about 1 m coastal retreat per year). The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), that controls the atmospheric circulation over the North Sea, and northerly currents are the driving forces for the morphological development. Rising sea-level due to global change amplifies the erosion processes and forces people to protect the coastline (in this case beach nourishment). The Koenigshafen, a protected, semi-enclosed bay in the north of the Island of Sylt, can be regarded as representative for the study of many coastal processes that affect the island. In this case study, a long-term series of high resolution aerial photographs of the Koenigshafen (starting in 1936) shows the development of the survey area. Wind and currents affect not only the run of the coastline but also sediment composition and biodynamics in the bay. Looking at the hydrodynamics governing the bay, it should have mostly muddy sediments. Strong westerly winds, however, supply the bay with large amounts of sand from inland dunes and create sandy tidal flats. The long-term development of seagrass and mussel beds can also be retrieved from aerial photographs. In both cases a distinct decline in size can be noticed. Remote sensing and GIS techniques allow monitoring the conditions as well as to reconstruct the past development and to predict future developments.

  20. A resolution celebrating the 60th anniversary of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Voinovich, George V. [R-OH

    2009-01-26

    04/01/2009 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S4227; text as passed Senate: CR S4227) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  1. High-resolution area-wide sea-floor mapping: The paleo Elbe valley (S North Sea) revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papenmeier, Svenja; Hass, H. Christian

    2014-05-01

    The North Sea Basin is shaped by multiple glacial advances and retreats that left complex sequences of glacio-fluvial and sub-glacial deposits, cut by sub-glacial tunnel valleys. Today, the submerged valley of the Elbe forms one of the most prominent structures of the southern North Sea. Flanked by huge moraine deposits of older glacials, the valley developed to its present form during the Weichselian sea-level lowstand (-130 m below present). Melt waters that discharged in north-westerly directions along the Scandinavian Ice Sheet fed the paleo Elbe at that time. During the Holocene the valley drowned in the rising sea. Here we present an area-wide high-resolution map of the seafloor and high-resolution shallow seismic data covering 1,600 km2 of the paleo Elbe valley (PEV) including its eastern levee. The data allow to shed new light on the PEV development including the historical process of sedimentary infill with the successive Holocene sea level rise in detail. Shallow seismic data with transect distances of 400 m and several cross sections allow 3-D visualization. The eastern flank of the valley is characterized by a relatively steep slope with one or more terraces. At its levee a significant sediment change is present on the modern sea floor, representing moraine and marine deposits. High resolution sidescan sonar data of this area show a much higher heterogeneity and complexity in sediment and habitat distribution as assumed before. Holocene marine sediments form a patchy and thin drape east of the valley floor. The western slip-off slope of the valley slope is much smoother than the eastern undercut slope. As yet, significant sedimentological changes at the present seafloor are not known for the western side of the PEV. Shallow seismic data show the base of the PEV. There are conspicuous internal seismic reflectors above the base, inclined in northeastern direction. They indicate a sedimentary infill of the valley from the southwest when the southern part

  2. Forest responses to late Holocene climate change in north-central Wisconsin: a high- resolution study from Hell's Kitchen Lake.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, M. A.; Booth, R. K.; Jackson, S. T.; Minckley, T. A.

    2007-12-01

    Forest dynamics at centennial to millennial timescales can be identified using paleoecological records with high spatial, temporal, and taxonomic resolution. These dynamics are linked to climate changes by comparing the paleoecological records with independent paleoclimate records of complementary sensitivity and temporal resolution. We analyzed plant macrofossils at contiguous 1cm intervals (representing 5 to 35 yr/cm) from late Holocene sediments of Hell's Kitchen Lake (3 ha) in north-central Wisconsin. Most of the plant macrofossils derive from trees growing on the slopes directly adjacent to the lake, and were identified to the species. We also analyzed pollen at an approximately100 year resolution to provide a regionally integrated record of forest composition. We then compared the macrofossil and pollen records with independent records of climate change in the region, particularly paleohydrological records from kettle bogs. The most notable feature of the late Holocene record occurs between 2300-2000 cal yr BP. During this period yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis) macrofossils first appear in the record, along with a corresponding increase in pollen percentages. Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) macrofossils and pollen also show a marked increase at this time. These changes coincide with a major transition towards wetter conditions recorded in the testate amoebae record of Hornet Bog (~200km northwest) and in a number of other kettle bog records from the region. Directly following this transition, tamarack (Larix laricina) and Sphagnum macrofossils at Hell's Kitchen Lake increase dramatically, likely representing the initiation of bog-mat growth along the southwest margin of the lake during the wet period. . We are continuing our high-resolution sampling downcore at Hell's Kitchen Lake. This will permit us to examine additional ecologic and climatic events in the early and mid-Holocene.

  3. The Effect of Saharan Dust on North Atlantic Hydroclimate and Tropical Cyclones in a High-Resolution GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, J. D.; Vecchi, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    Climate of the tropical North Atlantic and West Africa is sensitive to dust optical properties as shown by our previous work (Strong et al., 2015) using a fully coupled global climate model (GCM). However, that study was limited by the relatively coarse resolution of the GCM which could not resolve explicitly sub-scale processes important to the simulation of tropical cyclones (TCs).Using simulations with the higher resolution, fully coupled GFDL Climate Model 2.5, Forecast-oriented Low Ocean Resolution version (CM2.5-FLOR), for several realistic sets of optical properties, we investigate the climatic response across the tropical Atlantic basin to an idealized aerosol radiative forcing from Saharan-born mineral dust, comparable to the observed changes between the 1960s and 1990s, with a focus on the hydrological cycle and TCs. CM2.5-FLOR has a higher resolution atmosphere which is able to resolve TCs and has been shown to accurately reproduce the observed tropical cyclone climatology.In the first part, we will show that the sign of the radiative response at the top of the atmosphere (ToA) changes between the more absorbing dust and more scattering dust simulations, in agreement with previous studies. Conversely, the radiative response at the surface is generally comparable between sets of optical properties. These differences result in opposing regional hydrologic and thermodynamic effects of dust both in the atmosphere and in the upper ocean. In the second part, the effect of Saharan-born mineral dust on TCs will be analyzed. In all simulations, dust causes a decrease in tropical cyclone activity in the North Atlantic with the largest response occurring in the most absorbing and scattering optical regimes. We also note significant changes in the West Pacific in these simulations. The changes in tropical cyclone activity are found to not be explained by common genesis potential indexes, but a relationship between accumulated cyclone energy and ToA radiative flux

  4. A high-resolution model for Eurasia-North America plate kinematics since 20 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkouriev, S.; DeMets, C.

    2008-06-01

    We derive the first chronologically detailed model of Eurasia-North America plate motion since 20 Ma from ship and airplane surveys of the well-expressed magnetic lineations along this slowly spreading plate boundary, including previously unavailable dense Russian magnetic data from the southern Reykjanes Ridge and northern Mid-Atlantic ridge near the Charlie Gibbs fracture zone. From more than 7000 crossings of 21 magnetic anomalies from Anomaly 1n (0.78 Ma) to Anomaly 6n (19.7 Ma), we estimate best-fitting finite rotations and realistic uncertainties. Linear regressions of total opening distances versus their reversal ages at different locations along the plate boundary show that reversal boundaries are shifted systematically outwards from the spreading axis with respect to their idealized locations, with the outward shift ranging from more than 5 km between Iceland and the Charlie Gibbs fracture zone to ~2 km elsewhere. This outward displacement, which is a consequence of the finite zone of seafloor accretion, degrades estimates of the underlying plate motion and is thus removed for the ensuing kinematic analysis. The corrected plate motion rotations reveal surprising, previously unrecognized features in the relative motions of these two plates. Within the uncertainties, motion was steady from 20 to 8 Ma around a pole that was located ~600 km north of the present pole, with seafloor spreading rates that changed by no more than 5 per cent (1 mm yr-1) along the Reykjanes Ridge during this period. Seafloor spreading rates decreased abruptly by 20 +/- 2 per cent at 7.5-6.5 Ma, coinciding with rapid southward migration of the pole of rotation and a 5°-10° counter-clockwise change in the plate slip direction. Eurasia-North America plate motion since 6.7 Ma has remained remarkably steady, with an apparently stationary axis of rotation and upper limit of +/-2 per cent on any variations in the rate of angular rotation during this period. Based on the good agreement

  5. Estimation of heat and freshwater transports in the North Pacific using high-resolution expendable bathythermograph data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Hiroki; Kizu, Shoichi; Hanawa, Kimio; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Roemmich, Dean

    2008-02-01

    The mean heat and freshwater transports in the North Pacific subtropical gyre during 1998-2002 are estimated. High-resolution expendable bathythermograph/expendable conductivity-temperature-depth (XBT/XCTD) transects (PX-40, Honolulu to Japan; PX-37, San Francisco to Honolulu; PX-10, Honolulu to Guam; PX-44, Guam to Taiwan/Hong Kong) are used to calculate geostrophic transport across each of the ship tracks. Ekman transport is estimated from satellite-scatterometer wind stress. The mean heat and freshwater transport convergences into the northern box bounded by the PX-40/37 transects and the Tsushima and Bering Straits are 0.26 ± 0.16 pW (pW = 1015 W) and -0.26 ± 0.11 Sv (Sv = 106 m3/s), respectively. Heat and freshwater transport convergences into the western box bounded by the PX-40/10/44 transects and the Tsushima Strait are estimated to be 0.32 ± 0.17 pW and 0.08 ± 0.07 Sv, respectively. In both boxes, warmer waters transported inward by the Ekman flow and by the Kuroshio are compensated by the export of waters at cooler temperatures, whose peaks are found in the temperatures of the mode waters formed in the North Pacific. The salt budget is also described to consider the mechanisms of freshwater transport. Since the western box includes the region with the strongest heat loss to the atmosphere and is possibly a key region for climatic decadal variation, it is necessary to continue the high-resolution XBT/XCTD measurement and to make an effort at improving the estimation of heat and freshwater transports in order to contribute to advancing climate studies.

  6. Determining Methane Emissions From the Elgin North Sea Rig Using Ship-track Measurements and High Resolution Mesoscale Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, A. T.; Hensen, A.; Bulk, P. V.; Rodink, R.

    2012-12-01

    On 27 March 2012 the natural gas exploitation rig "Elgin" on the North Sea, operated by Total, started leaking considerable amounts (company estimate 200 000 m3 per day) of methane to the atmosphere. A passenger ferry, daily sailing between IJmuiden (Netherlands) and Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom) on a track just South of the Elgin rig was equipped with a high precision CRDS CH4/CO2 monitor. During April 2012 several cruises were made where the Elgin methane plume could be identified next to methane plumes from other rigs on the North Sea. Also at some land based observatories in NW Europe the Elgin methane plume could be detected. In this paper we deploy two high resolution models, WRF V3 and Flexpart, to derive emission estimates based on the observations. Despite the unique opportunity of trying to detect a single large point source on a relatively homogeneous surface, considerable model uncertainties remain; implications for inverse emission verification on more complex surface (land) areas will be discussed.

  7. Linking the North Atlantic to central Europe: a high-resolution Holocene tephrochronological record from northern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bogaard, Christel; Schmincke, Hans-Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    A high-resolution Holocene tephrochronology for northern Germany has been established based on systematic tephrostratigraphical analysis of three peat bogs. Microscopic volcanic ash layers have been traced and characterised petrographically and by the chemical composition of the glass shards. At least 37 ash horizons representing 16 different explosive volcanic eruptions have been identified and many can be correlated between the three sites, up to 100 km apart. The tephra layers can be related to Icelandic volcanic sources and some correlated to the eruptions of Askja 1875, Hekla 3, Hekla Selsund, Hekla 4 and Hekla 5, as well as to unspecified eruptions of Icelandic volcanic systems, e.g. Torfajökull. The source volcanoes for some tephra layers remain unidentified. Some tephra layers were known previously from the North Atlantic region (e.g. Sluggan, Glen Garry), others have not been recorded previously in the literature (e.g. microlite tephra). This study provides the first comprehensive Holocene tephrostratigraphical record for northern Germany, complementing the North Atlantic tephrostratigraphical dating framework, effectively extending it into central Europe. The study shows that Icelandic ash layers are even more widespread than hitherto thought.

  8. Moderate-resolution sea surface temperature data for the nearshore North Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payne, Meredith C.; Reusser, Deborah A.; Lee, Henry; Brown, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Coastal sea surface temperature (SST) is an important environmental characteristic in determining the suitability of habitat for nearshore marine and estuarine organisms. This publication describes and provides access to an easy-to-use coastal SST dataset for ecologists, biogeographers, oceanographers, and other scientists conducting research on nearshore marine habitats or processes. The data cover the Temperate Northern Pacific Ocean as defined by the 'Marine Ecosystems of the World' (MEOW) biogeographic schema developed by The Nature Conservancy. The spatial resolution of the SST data is 4-km grid cells within 20 km of the shore. The data span a 29-year period - from September 1981 to December 2009. These SST data were derived from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument measurements compiled into monthly means as part of the Pathfinder versions 5.0 and 5.1 (PFSST V50 and V51) Project. The processing methods used to transform the data from their native Hierarchical Data Format Scientific Data Set (HDF SDS) to georeferenced, spatial datasets capable of being read into geographic information systems (GIS) software are explained. In addition, links are provided to examples of scripts involved in the data processing steps. The scripts were written in the Python programming language, which is supported by ESRI's ArcGIS version 9 or later. The processed data files are also provided in text (.csv) and Access 2003 Database (.mdb) formats. All data except the raster files include attributes identifying realm, province, and ecoregion as defined by the MEOW classification schema.

  9. Study of Regional Volcanic Impact on the Middle East and North Africa using high-resolution global and regional models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Sergey; Dogar, Mohammad; Stenchikov, Georgiy

    2016-04-01

    High-latitude winter warming after strong equatorial volcanic eruptions caused by circulation changes associated with the anomalously positive phase of Arctic Oscillation is a subject of active research during recent decade. But severe winter cooling in the Middle East observed after the Mt. Pinatubo eruption of 1991, although recognized, was not thoroughly investigated. These severe regional climate perturbations in the Middle East cannot be explained by solely radiative volcanic cooling, which suggests that a contribution of forced circulation changes could be important and significant. To better understand the mechanisms of the Middle East climate response and evaluate the contributions of dynamic and radiative effects we conducted a comparative study using Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory global High Resolution Atmospheric Model (HiRAM) with the effectively "regional-model-resolution" of 25-km and the regional Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model focusing on the eruption of Mount Pinatubo on June 15, 1991 followed by a pronounced positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation. The WRF model has been configured over the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. The WRF code has been modified to interactively account for the radiative effect of volcanic aerosols. Both HiRAM and WRF capture the main features of the MENA climate response and show that in winter the dynamic effects in the Middle East prevail the direct radiative cooling from volcanic aerosols.

  10. Probing the intrinsically oil-wet surfaces of pores in North Sea chalk at subpore resolution

    PubMed Central

    Hassenkam, T.; Skovbjerg, L. L.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2009-01-01

    Pore surface properties control oil recovery. This is especially true for chalk reservoirs, where pores are particularly small. Wettability, the tendency for a surface to cover itself with fluid, is traditionally defined by the angle a droplet makes with a surface, but this macroscopic definition is meaningless when the particles are smaller than even the smallest droplet. Understanding surface wetting, at the pore scale, will provide clues for more effective oil recovery. We used a special mode of atomic force microscopy and a hydrophobic tip to collect matrices of 10,000 force curves over 5- × 5-μm2 areas on internal pore surfaces and constructed maps of topography, adhesion, and elasticity. We investigated chalk samples from a water-bearing formation in the Danish North Sea oil fields that had never seen oil. Wettability and elasticity were inhomogeneous over scales of 10s of nanometers, smaller than individual chalk particles. Some areas were soft and hydrophobic, whereas others showed no correlation between hardness and adhesion. We conclude that the macroscopic parameter, “wetting,” averages the nanoscopic behavior along fluid pathways, and “mixed-wet” samples have patches with vastly different properties. Development of reservoir hydrophobicity has been attributed to infiltrating oil, but these new results prove that wettability and elasticity are inherent properties of chalk. Their variability, even on single particles, must result from material originally present during sedimentation or material sorbed from the pore fluid some time later. PMID:19321418

  11. A novel technique for studying F-region ionization patches with the Resolute Bay Incoherent Scatter Radar - North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, G. W.; Hosokawa, K.; St-Maurice, J.; Shiokawa, K.

    2013-12-01

    The northward facing Resolute Bay Incoherent Scatter Radar - North (RISR-N) and the soon to be operational southward facing RISR-Canada (RISR-C) systems are both exceptional platforms for investigating F-region ionization patches and the polar ionosphere. To advance patch research using these systems, an algorithm has been developed for detecting F-region ionization patches with the RISR-N system. The algorithm is based on the definition of a patch put forward by Crowley [1996]: a volume of F-region plasma with a density that is twice that of the background ionosphere. In this work, the algorithm is applied to the sizeable RISR-N dataset, providing valuable insight into the prevalence of patches over Resolute Bay over a time frame of several years. Additional questions concerning patches are also addressed using the algorithm, including: when compared to each other, do the occurrence rates of patches identified by the Optical Mesosphere and Thermosphere Imagers (OMTI), Polar Dual Auroral Radar Network (PolarDARN) and RISR-N instruments (whose fields-of-view overlap over Resolute Bay) agree? Namely, for every patch that is detected with RISR-N and/or PolarDARN, is there a corresponding patch seen optically? Lastly, using the algorithm, is it possible to advance our ability to distinguish patches from other coherent backscatter echoes detected by PolarDARN? Crowley, G. (1996), Critical review of ionospheric patches and blobs, in Review of Radio Science: 1993-1996, edited by W. R. Stone, pp. 619 648, Oxford Univ. Press, Oxford, U. K.

  12. High-resolution mapping of glacial landforms in the North Alpine Foreland, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcher, Bernhard C.; Hinsch, Ralph; Wagreich, Michael

    2010-10-01

    In this study results from traditional field mapping were merged with precise elevation information from airborne LiDAR (Light detection and ranging) surveys. Morphological and sedimentological data provide new results from the Austrian (eastern) part of the Salzach piedmont glacier during times of and shortly after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The variations in meltwater discharge had a major impact on the development of glacial landforms. In areas with high meltwater supply erosional or debris reworking processes play a major role, represented by drainage channels, drumlins and kettled, low relief hummocky moraine with low slope angles. Low discharge areas are associated with distinct depositional forms such as high relief end moraines (up to 30 m) and hummocky moraine (averaging 20 m) with high slope angles. Isolated conical kames may reach heights up to 45 m. Fluvial activity is supposed to rise towards the end of the glacial cycle causing high melting rates and comprehensive debris reworking. The formation of terminal lakes and associated widespread, inorganic lake clays are the last deposits within the study area before the Salzach Glacier completely receded to its main valley. The survey of glacial landforms through the combination of field mapping and high-resolution DEM derived from airborne LiDAR missions gives precise information on transport and deposition during the last glacial cycle of the eastern Salzach Glacier piedmont lobe.

  13. Availability and Use of Instructional Materials in the Teaching of Conflict and Conflict Resolution in Primary Schools in Nandi North District, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuimur, Hilda Ng'etich; Chemwei, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the availability and use of instructional resources necessary for teaching Conflict and Conflict Resolution as a topic in Social Studies subject in primary schools in Nandi North District in Kenya. The study was carried out through descriptive survey. The study population included Social Studies teachers in Kosirai Division of…

  14. High resolution study of petroleum source rock variation, Lower Cretaceous (Hauterivian and Barremian) of Mikkelsen Bay, North Slope, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keller, Margaret A.; Macquaker, Joe H.S.; Lillis, Paul G.

    2001-01-01

    Open File Report 01-480 was designed as a large format poster for the Annual Meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists and the Society for Sedimentary Geology in Denver Colorado in June 2001. It is reproduced here in digital format to make widely available some unique images of mudstones. The images include description, interpretation, and Rock-Eval data that resulted from a high-resolution study of petroleum source rock variation of the Lower Cretaceous succession of the Mobil-Phillips Mikkelsen Bay State #1 well on the North Slope of Alaska. Our mudstone samples with Rock-Eval data plus color images are significant because they come from one of the few continuously cored and complete intervals of the Lower Cretaceous succession on the North Slope. This succession, which is rarely preserved in outcrop and very rarely cored in the subsurface, is considered to include important petroleum source rocks that have not previously been described nor explained Another reason these images are unique is that the lithofacies variability within mudstone dominated successions is relatively poorly known in comparison with that observed in coarser clastic and carbonate successions. They are also among the first published scans of thin sections of mudstone, and are of excellent quality because the sections are well made, cut perpendicular to bedding, and unusually thin, 20 microns. For each of 15 samples, we show a thin section scan (cm scale) and an optical photomicrograph (mm scale) that illustrates the variability present. Several backscattered SEM images are also shown. Rock-Eval data for the samples can be compared with the textures and mineralogy present by correlating sample numbers and core depth.

  15. High-resolution palynological analysis in Lake Sapanca as a tool to detect recent earthquakes on the North Anatolian Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Suzanne A. G.; Boyraz, Sonay; Gürbüz, Alper

    2009-12-01

    High-resolution palynological analysis of a 38-cm long core collected from Lake Sapanca, northwest Turkey, reveals large earthquakes that occurred during the second half of the 20th century along the North Anatolian Fault Zone. Four events have disturbed the lacustrine sedimentary sequence. Three of the four events are historical earthquakes in 1999 in Izmit, 1967 in Mudurnu and 1957 in Abant. These events are recorded in the core by turbiditic deposits and reworked sediment and by low overall palynomorph concentrations but high values of thick-exined pollen, fern spores and fungal spores. Palynomorphs in the event beds have been grouped based on their associations in modern moss, river and lake samples. The inferred mechanisms of transport and sources for the palynomorphs are: 1- lake sediment displaced by slump, 2- collapsed shoreline sediment owing to seiche, waves and sudden lake level changes, 3- subsidence of deltas and 4- river-transported soil and sediment from upland areas. The 1999 Izmit earthquake is only weakly recorded by palynomorphs, probably due to recent engineering control on the rivers. The 1967 Mudurnu earthquake had the strongest effect on the lake, introducing successive packages of sediment to the centre of the lake from underwater slopes, the lakeshore and rivers.

  16. Reconstruction of vegetation and lake level at Moon Lake, North Dakota, from high-resolution pollen and diatom data

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, E.C.; Laird, K.R.; Mueller, P.G. |

    1995-06-01

    High-resolution fossil-pollen and diatom data from Moon Lake, North Dakota, reveal major climate and vegetation changes near the western margin of the tall-grass prairie. Fourteen AMS radiocarbon dates provide excellent time control for the past {approximately}11,800 {sup 14}C years B.P. Picea dominated during the late-glacial until it abruptly declined {approximately}10,300 B.P. During the early Holocene ({approximately}10,300-8000 B.P.), deciduous trees and shrubs (Populus, Betula, Corylus, Quercus, and especially Ulmus) were common, but prairie taxa (Poaceae, Artemisia, and Chenopodiaceae/Amaranthaceae) gradually increased. During this period the diatoms indicate the lake becoming gradually more saline as water-level fell. By {approximately}8000 B.P., salinity had increased to the point that the diatoms were no longer sensitive to further salinity increases. However, fluctuating pollen percentages of mud-flat weeds (Ambrosia and Iva) indicate frequently changing water levels during the mid-Holocene ({approximately}8000-5000 B.P.). The driest millennium was 7000-6000 B.P., when Iva annua was common. After {approximately}3000 B.P. the lake became less-saline, and the diatoms were again sensitive to changing salinity. The Medieval Warm Period and Little Ice Age are clearly evident in the diatom data.

  17. Spontaneous interannual to decadal scale variations in the Kuroshio and its recirculation in a high-resolution North Pacific Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, I.; Ishizaki, H.

    2004-12-01

    Interannual to decadal scale variations of the Kuroshio and its recirculation are investigated using an eddy-permitting North Pacific numerical model. The model is a z-coordinate free-surface OGCM (one version of MRI.COM; MRI Community Ocean Model). Horizontal resolution is 1/6o in the latitudinal and 1/4o in the longitudinal direction, with 44 vertical levels. The model domain is the Pacific north of 15oS. Integration is carried out for 150 years, including the initial restoring body forcing of temperature and salinity to the observed state for the first six years. Data from the last 50 years of integration are used for analysis. The model is forced by climatological wind stresses, and the temperature and salinity are restored to climatology at the surface, at the southern boundary, and in the Okhotsk and Bering Seas. Without interannual change in the forcing, it is found that there are variations of about three-year period in mass transports of the Kuroshio through the Tokara Strait and the Ryukyu Current, flowing northeastward east of the Ryukyu Islands. The Tokara transport lags that of the Ryukyu Current for about 9 months. The Tokara transport is also found to be in opposite phase with the extent of the recirculation gyre, which is defined here as an area encircled by some closed contour of the barotropic stream function. During the analysis period, the Kuroshio south of Japan takes the large meander path, the strait path, or unstable paths. The path variation is rather irregular in comparison with the mass transport described above. The stable large meander path that persists for longer than a couple of years appears four times within the fifty-year period. Thus, the periods between the transitions from the strait path ( or unstable paths ) to the large meander path are about twelve years on average, which is longer than the time scale of the mass transport variation, and the path variation looks uncorrelated to the mass transport.

  18. High-resolution single-channel seismic reflection surveys of Orange Lake and other selected sites of north central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kindinger, Jack G.; Davis, Jeffrey B.; Flocks, James G.

    1994-01-01

    The potential fluid exchange between lakes of north central Florida and the Floridan aquifer and the process by which exchange occurs is of critical concern to the St. Johns Water Management District. High-resolution seismic tools with relatively new digital technology were utilized in collecting geophysical data from Orange, Kingsley, Lowry and Magnolia Lakes, and the Drayton Island area of St. Johns River. The data collected shows the application of these techniques in understanding the formation of individual lakes, thus aiding in the management of these natural resources by identifying breaches or areas where the confining units are thin or absent between the water bodies and the Floridan aquifer. Orange Lake, the primary focus of the study, is a shallow flooded plain that was formed essentially as an erosional depression in the clayey Hawthorn formation. The primary karstic features identified in the lake were cover subsidence, cover collapse and buried sinkholes structures in various sizes and stages of development. Orange Lake was divided into three areas southeast, southwest, and north-central. Karst features within the southeast area of Orange Lake are mostly cover subsidence sinkholes and associated features. Many of the subsidence features found are grouped together to form larger composite sinkholes, some greater than 400 m in diameter. The size of these composite sinkholes and the number of buried subsidence sinkholes distinguish the southeast area from the others. The potential of lake waters leaking to the aquifer in the southeast area is probably controlled by the permeability of the cover sediments or by fractures that penetrate the lake floor. The lake bottom and subsurface of the north-central areas are relatively subsidence sinkholes that have no cover sediments overlying them, implying that the sinks have been actively subsiding with some seepage into the aquifer from the lake in this area due to the possible presence of the active subsidence

  19. The influence of model resolution on the simulated sensitivity of North Atlantic tropical cyclone maximum intensity to sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strazzo, S. E.; Elsner, J. B.; LaRow, T. E.; Murakami, H.; Wehner, M.; Zhao, M.

    2016-09-01

    Global climate models (GCMs) are routinely relied upon to study the possible impacts of climate change on a wide range of meteorological phenomena, including tropical cyclones (TCs). Previous studies addressed whether GCMs are capable of reproducing observed TC frequency and intensity distributions. This research builds upon earlier studies by examining how well GCMs capture the physically relevant relationship between TC intensity and SST. Specifically, the influence of model resolution on the ability of a GCM to reproduce the sensitivity of simulated TC intensity to SST is examined for the MRI-AGCM (20 km), the GFDL-HiRAM (50 km), the FSU-COAPS (0.94°) model, and two versions of the CAM5 (1° and 0.25°). Results indicate that while a 1°C increase in SST corresponds to a 5.5-7.0 m s-1 increase in observed maximum intensity, the same 1°C increase in SST is not associated with a statistically significant increase in simulated TC maximum intensity for any of the models examined. However, it also is shown that the GCMs all capably reproduce the observed sensitivity of potential intensity to SST. The models generate the thermodynamic environment suitable for the development of strong TCs over the correct portions of the North Atlantic basin, but strong simulated TCs do not develop over these areas, even for models that permit Category 5 TCs. This result supports the notion that direct simulation of TC eyewall convection is necessary to accurately represent TC intensity and intensification processes in climate models, although additional explanations are also explored.

  20. A high-resolution ocean and sea-ice modelling system for the Arctic and North Atlantic Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, F.; Higginson, S.; Bourdallé-Badie, R.; Lu, Y.; Roy, F.; Smith, G. C.; Lemieux, J.-F.; Garric, G.; Davidson, F.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the CONCEPTS (Canadian Operational Network of Coupled Environmental PredicTion Systems) initiative, The Government of Canada is developing a high resolution (1/12°) ice-ocean regional model covering the North Atlantic and the Arctic oceans. The objective is to provide Canada with short-term ice-ocean predictions and hazard warnings in ice infested regions. To evaluate the modelling component (as opposed to the analysis - or data-assimilation - component), a series of hindcasts for the period 2003-2009 is carried out, forced at the surface by the Canadian Global Re-Forecasts. These hindcasts test how the model represent upper ocean characteristics and ice cover. Each hindcast implements a new aspect of the modelling or the ice-ocean coupling. Notably, the coupling to the multi-category ice model CICE is tested. The hindcast solutions are then assessed using a validation package under development, including in-situ and satellite ice and ocean observations. The conclusions are: (1) the model reproduces reasonably well the time mean, variance and skewness of sea surface height. (2) The model biases in temperature and salinity show that while the mean properties follow expectations, the Pacific Water signature in the Beaufort Sea is weaker than observed. (3) However, the modelled freshwater content of the Arctic agrees well with observational estimates. (4) The distribution and volume of the sea ice is shown to be improved in the latest hindcast thanks to modifications to the drag coefficients and to some degree as well to the ice thickness distribution available in CICE. (5) On the other hand, the model overestimates the ice drift and ice thickness in the Beaufort Gyre.

  1. A new high-resolution Holocene tephra stratigraphy in eastern Iceland: Improving the Icelandic and North Atlantic tephrochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsdóttir, Esther Ruth; Larsen, Gudrún; Björck, Svante; Ingólfsson, Ólafur; Striberger, Johan

    2016-10-01

    A new and improved Holocene tephra stratigraphy and tephrochronological framework for eastern and northern Iceland is presented. Investigations of a sediment sequence from Lake Lögurinn have revealed a comprehensive tephra record spanning the last 10.200 years. A total of 157 tephra layers have been identified, whereof 149 tephra layers have been correlated to its source volcanic system using geochemistry, stratigraphy and age. Fifteen layers have chemical composition of two affinities that possibly represent two very closely spaced eruptions. Thus, these 157 tephra layers are believed to represent 172 explosive eruptions. Nineteen tephra marker layers have been identified in the Lake Lögurinn record (G1922, A1875, V1477, V1410, H1636, K1625, Ö1362, G1354, K1262, V874, Hrafnkatla, Sn-1, Grákolla, HY, H3, H4, HÖ, LL1755 and Reitsvík-8 tephra markers). New potential tephra markers are the silicic Askja L (∼9400 cal BP), the low titanium basalt layers, LL 1774 (∼10.150 cal BP) and LL 1755 (∼9990 cal BP), assigned to Veidivötn-Bárdarbunga and the tephra layers, LL 1527.8 (∼7850 cal BP), LL 911.2 (∼2370 cal BP), LL 908.4 (∼2350 cal BP), LL 781.9 (∼1930 cal BP), LL 644.4 (∼1480 cal BP), not yet correlated to a source volcanic system. A silicic tephra marker layer, Reitsvík 8, correlated to the Fosen tephra in Norway has been identified in Lake Lögurinn. The Lake Lögurinn tephra record has been connected and integrated with the Icelandic terrestrial tephrochronology and stratigraphy through 102 tephra layers, the marine tephra stratigraphy through 39 layers and overseas through 9 tephra layers. This record is the first high-resolution tephra stratigraphical and chronological framework for the Holocene in eastern Iceland as well as the most detailed and continuous record, and has considerable potential to serve as a key section or a stratotype for the Holocene in eastern Iceland and the North Atlantic.

  2. The impact of resolution on meteorological, chemical and aerosol properties in regional simulations with WRF-Chem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crippa, Paola; Sullivan, Ryan C.; Thota, Abhinav; Pryor, Sara C.

    2017-01-01

    Limited area (regional) models applied at high resolution over specific regions of interest are generally expected to more accurately capture the spatiotemporal variability of key meteorological and climate parameters. However, improved performance is not inevitable, and there remains a need to optimize use of numerical resources and to quantify the impact on simulation fidelity that derives from increased resolution. The application of regional models for climate forcing assessment is currently limited by the lack of studies quantifying the sensitivity to horizontal spatial resolution and the physical-dynamical-chemical schemes driving the simulations. Here we investigate model skill in simulating meteorological, chemical and aerosol properties as a function of spatial resolution, by applying the Weather Research and Forecasting model with coupled Chemistry (WRF-Chem) over eastern North America at different resolutions. Using Brier skill scores and other statistical metrics it is shown that enhanced resolution (from 60 to 12 km) improves model performance for all of the meteorological parameters and gas-phase concentrations considered, in addition to both mean and extreme aerosol optical depth (AOD) in three wavelengths in the visible relative to satellite observations, principally via increase of potential skill. Some of the enhanced model performance for AOD appears to be attributable to improved simulation of meteorological conditions and the concentration of key aerosol precursor gases (e.g., SO2 and NH3). Among other reasons, a dry bias in the specific humidity in the boundary layer and a substantial underestimation of total monthly precipitation in the 60 km simulations are identified as causes for the better performance of WRF-Chem simulations at 12 km.

  3. A high resolution estimate of the inorganic nitrogen flux from the Scheldt estuary to the coastal North Sea during a nitrogen-limited algal bloom, spring 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Regnier, P. |; Steefel, C.I.

    1999-05-01

    Massive short-term (4--8 wk) blooms of Phaeocystis have been observed in coastal North Sea waters in the spring for a number of years now. Researchers have shown that these algal blooms, which lead to eutrophication of the local water mass, are limited by the supply of inorganic nitrogen from the various bordering estuaries. The authors demonstrate using the case of a typical heavily polluted macrotidal estuary, the Scheldt in Belgium and the Netherlands, that the short duration of the algal blooms requires estuarine flux estimation methods with a high temporal resolution. They use the fully transient, multicomponent reactive transport model CONTRASTE to compute inorganic nitrogen fluxes through the mouth of the Scheldt estuary into the North Sea. The model simulations use a detailed dataset of upstream river discharges and solute concentrations along with tidal forcings for a 210 day period between December 1, 1994 and June 30, 1995. The temporally resolved estimate shows that widely used estuarine flux estimation methods which rely on a steady-state approximation underestimate the inorganic nitrogen loading available to sustain primary production in the North Sea during the period of the algal bloom by 100%.

  4. A High-Resolution Multi-Proxy Lake Sediment Record from Torfdalsvatn Suggests an Enhanced Temperature Gradient Between North and South Iceland During the Early Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florian, Christopher; Geirsdóttir, Áslaug; Miller, Gifford; Axford, Yarrow

    2015-04-01

    Torfdalsvatn (66° 3'41.73"N, 20°23'14.26"W) is a relatively small (0.4 km2) and shallow (z=5.8 m) lake on the Skagi Peninsula of northern Iceland approximately 0.5 km from the modern coastline. This location is ideal for comparison with the many marine core records from the North Iceland Shelf that record variability in the northern extent of the warm Irminger Current, one of the primary controls on regional climate. To develop a record of north Iceland Holocene terrestrial climate, we analyzed a 8.4 m sediment core at 15-30 year resolution from approximately 12 ka to present using multiple proxies including sedimentary pigments, organic carbon flux, carbon to nitrogen ratio and stable isotopes, as well as biogenic silica measured by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR-S). Results show gradual warming during the early Holocene, with stable soil development and peak aquatic productivity not occurring until after 8 ka. Increased aquatic productivity and a stable terrestrial environment between 6 and 2 ka indicate peak Holocene warmth in this interval. Aquatic productivity abruptly decreases at 1.8 ka associated with an increase in minerogenic material from landscape destabilization in the catchment with the onset of late Holocene cooling. At 1ka, the proportion of terrestrially-derived organic matter deposited in the lake sediment increases, indicating significant destabilization of soil horizons due to continued cooling and potential human settlement. This record is in good agreement with composite north Iceland chironomid-inferred July air temperatures from Axford et al. (2007), which show peak summer temperatures occurring between approximately 5 and 2 ka. The time of peak warmth at Torfdalsvatn is associated with peak biogenic carbonate concentration in the marine core MD99-2269, indicating an influx of warm Irminger waters. This is in contrast with Holocene climate records obtained from lakes in south and west Iceland, implying that there was an

  5. High resolution dating of moraines on Kodiak Island, Alaska links Atlantic and North Pacific climatic changes during the late glacial

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, D.H. . Alaska Quaternary Center)

    1992-01-01

    Much less is known about the paleoclimate and paleoceanography of the North Pacific than the North Atlantic despite the North Pacific's important role in the global ocean-climate system. Kodiak Island lies in the northwestern Gulf of Alaska astride the eastern end of the Aleutian Low. On southwestern Kodiak Island, coastal bluffs section a series of moraines, kettle ponds, and bogs formed between 15 and 9 ka BP. Distinctive tephras from volcanoes on the Alaska Peninsula provide time-lines within the stratigraphy. Deformation events recorded in sediment stacks from basins within glaciotectonic landforms allows precise dating of glacial events. An ice cap occupied the Kodiak archipelago during the last glaciation. Three glacial advances of the southwestern margin of this ice cap occurred after 15 ka BP. At 13.4 ka, piedmont ice lobes formed large push moraines extending into Shelikof Strait during the Low Cape Advance. The less-extensive Tundra Advance culminated between 12 and 11.7 ka BP followed by glacier retreat then readvance to form the prominent Olga Moraine system between 11 and 10 ka BP. The timing of the Tundra and Olga Advances correlates closely with that of the Older and Younger Dryas cold episodes in northwestern Europe suggesting that these climatic oscillations were synchronous throughout the northern hemisphere.

  6. Evidence of added value in North American regional climate model hindcast simulations using ever-increasing horizontal resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas-Picher, Philippe; Laprise, René; Winger, Katja

    2016-07-01

    The study of regional rainfall trends over South Asia is critically important for food security and economy, as both these factors largely depend on the availability of water. In this study, South Asian summer monsoon rainfall trends on seasonal and monthly (June-September) time scales have been investigated using three observational data sets. Our analysis identify a dipole-type structure in rainfall trends over the region north of the Indo-Pak subcontinent, with significant increasing trends over the core monsoon region of Pakistan and significant decreasing trends over the central-north India and adjacent areas. The dipole is also evident in monthly rainfall trend analyses, which is more prominent in July and August. We show, in particular, that the strengthening of northward moisture transport over the Arabian Sea is a likely reason for the significant positive trend of rainfall in the core monsoon region of Pakistan. In contrast, over the central-north India region, the rainfall trends are significantly decreasing due to the weakening of northward moisture transport over the Bay of Bengal. The leading empirical orthogonal functions clearly show the strengthening (weakening) patterns of vertically integrated moisture transport over the Arabian Sea (Bay of Bengal) in seasonal and monthly interannual time scales. The regression analysis between the principal components and rainfall confirm the dipole pattern over the region. Our results also suggest that the extra-tropical phenomena could influence the mean monsoon rainfall trends over Pakistan by enhancing the cross-equatorial flow of moisture into the Arabian Sea.

  7. Sensitivity of Tropical Cyclones to Resolution, Convection Scheme and Ocean Flux Parameterization over Eastern Tropical Pacific and Tropical North Atlantic Oceans in RegCM4 Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes-Franco, Ramon; Giorgi, Filippo; Coppola, Erika; Zimmermann, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    The sensitivity of simulated tropical cyclones (TC) to resolution and convection scheme parameterization is investigated over the CORDEX Central America domain. The performance of the simulations, performed for a ten-year period (1989-1998) using ERA-Interim reanalysis as boundary and initial conditions, is assessed considering 50 km and 25 km resolution, and the use of two different convection schemes: Emanuel (Em) and Kain-Fritsch (KF). Two ocean surface fluxes are also compared as well: the Monin-Obukhov scheme, and the one proposed by Zeng et al. (1998). By comparing with observations, for the whole period we assess the spatial representation of the TC, and their intensity. At interannual scale we assess the representation of their variability and at daily scale we compare observed and simulated tracks in order to establish a measure of how similar to observed are the simulated tracks. In general the simulations using KF convection scheme show higher TC density, as well as longer-duration TC (up to 15 days) with stronger winds (> 50ms-1) than those using Em (<40ms-1). Similar results were found for simulations using 25 km respect to 50 km resolution. All simulations show a better spatial representation of simulated TC density and its interannual variability over the Tropical North Atlantic Ocean (TNA) than over the Eastern Tropical Pacific Ocean (ETP). The 25 km resolution simulations show an overestimation of TC density compared to observations over ETP off the coast of Mexico. The duration of the TC in simulations using 25km resolution is similar to the observations, while is underestimated by the 50km resolution. The Monin-Obukhov ocean flux overestimates the number of TCs, while Zeng parameterization give a number similar to observations in both oceans. At daily scale, in general all simulations capture the density of cyclones during highly active TC seasons over the TNA, however the tracks generally are not coincident with observations, except for highly

  8. Using multi-satellite data fusion to estimate daily high spatial resolution evapotranspiration over a forested site in North Carolina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse model and associated disaggregation scheme (ALEXI/DisALEXI). Satellite-based ET retrievals from both the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectoradiometer (MODIS; 1km, daily) and Landsat (30m, bi-weekly) are fused with The Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflective Fusion ...

  9. Rocks, resolution, and the record at the terrestrial K/T boundary, eastern Montana and western North Dakota

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fastovsky, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Reconstructions of mass extinction events are based upon faunal patterns, reconstructed from numerical and diversity data ultimately derived from rocks. It follows that geological complexity must not be subsumed in the desire to establish patterns. This is exemplified at the Terrestrial Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) boundary in eastern Montana and western North Dakota, where there are represented all of the major indicators of the terrestrial K/T transition: dinosaurian and non-dinosaurian vertebrate faunas, pollen, a megaflora, iridium, and shocked quartz. It is the patterns of these indicators that shape ideas about the terrestrial K/T transition. In eastern Montana and western North Dakota, the K/T transition is represented lithostratigraphically by the Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation, and the Tertiary Tullock Formation. Both of these are the result of aggrading, meandering, fluvial systems, a fact that has important consequences for interpretations of fossils they contain. Direct consequences of the fluvial depositional environments are: facies are lenticular, interfingering, and laterally discontinuous; the occurrence of fossils in the Hell Creek and Tullock formations is facies-dependent; and the K/T sequence in eastern Montana and western North Dakota is incomplete, as indicated by repetitive erosional contacts and soil successions. The significance for faunal patterns of lenticular facies, facies-dependent preservation, and incompleteness is discussed. A project attempting to reconstruct vertebrate evolution in a reproducible manner in Hell Creek-type sediments must be based upon a reliable scale of correlations, given the lenticular nature of the deposits, and a recognition of the fact that disparate facies are not comparable in terms of either numbers of preserved vertebrates or depositional rates.

  10. High-Resolution Satellite-Derived PM2.5 from Optimal Estimation and Geographically Weighted Regression over North America.

    PubMed

    van Donkelaar, Aaron; Martin, Randall V; Spurr, Robert J D; Burnett, Richard T

    2015-09-01

    We used a geographically weighted regression (GWR) statistical model to represent bias of fine particulate matter concentrations (PM2.5) derived from a 1 km optimal estimate (OE) aerosol optical depth (AOD) satellite retrieval that used AOD-to-PM2.5 relationships from a chemical transport model (CTM) for 2004-2008 over North America. This hybrid approach combined the geophysical understanding and global applicability intrinsic to the CTM relationships with the knowledge provided by observational constraints. Adjusting the OE PM2.5 estimates according to the GWR-predicted bias yielded significant improvement compared with unadjusted long-term mean values (R(2) = 0.82 versus R(2) = 0.62), even when a large fraction (70%) of sites were withheld for cross-validation (R(2) = 0.78) and developed seasonal skill (R(2) = 0.62-0.89). The effect of individual GWR predictors on OE PM2.5 estimates additionally provided insight into the sources of uncertainty for global satellite-derived PM2.5 estimates. These predictor-driven effects imply that local variability in surface elevation and urban emissions are important sources of uncertainty in geophysical calculations of the AOD-to-PM2.5 relationship used in satellite-derived PM2.5 estimates over North America, and potentially worldwide.

  11. Open-System Magma Reservoir Affects Gas Segregation, Vesiculation, Fragmentation and Lava/Pyroclast Dispersal During the 1.2 km-deep 2007-2010 Submarine Eruption at West Mata Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, K. H.; Clague, D. A.; Embley, R. W.; Hellebrand, E.; Soule, S. A.; Resing, J.

    2014-12-01

    West Mata, a small, active rear-arc volcano in the NE Lau Basin, erupts crystal and gas rich boninite magma. Eruptions were observed at the summit (1.2 km water depth) during 5 ROV Jason dives in 2009 (the deepest erupting submarine volcano observed to date). Subsequent ROV and ship-based bathymetric mapping revealed that a pit crater formed and the summit eruption ceased in 2010, with roughly simultaneous eruptions along the SW rift zone. During the summit eruption, a combination of water depth, H2O-CO2-rich and high crystallinity magma, a split in the conduit to feed two vent sites, and waxing/waning magma supply led to a range of effusive/explosive eruption styles and volcanic deposit types. The 2-3 vent Hades cluster and the lone Prometheus vent had different eruption characteristics. Petrographic, petrologic and geochemical studies of erupted products indicate a change in magma composition in time and space over a period of 3.5 yrs, suggesting a small, open-system magma reservoir within the volcano. Prometheus (1174m depth) produced mostly pyroclastic material during our observations (e.g., highly vesicular glowing fluidal ejecta that cooled in the water column and rounded recycled dense clasts), but sampling and 210Po radiometric dating show that several months prior pillowed lava flows, subsequently covered with cm-sized pyroclasts, had flowed >50m from the vent. In contrast, vents at Hades (1200m depth) cycled between lava production and vigorous degassing, 10-20m high fire fountains and bursts of glowing lava-skinned bubbles, the products of which froze/broke in the water column, forming unstable cones of spatter and scoria near the vents. We hypothesize that bubbles collapse rather than form lava balloons because of skin brittleness (from high crystal content) and hydrostatic pressure. Clast settling times and patterns suggest >100m water column rise height for 10+ cm-sized fragments. Pillow flows were also observed to be issuing from the base of the Hades cones some 30-50m below, and had traveled 100 m from the vent in the months before. This, plus hydrophone and water column data (Embley et al., G3, in review), and the occurrence of extensive deposits of young, glassy, identical composition cm-sized fragmental material 250 m from Hades suggest an earlier more vigorous phase of the eruption.

  12. High-resolution geophysical data from the Inner Continental Shelf: South of Martha's Vineyard and north of Nantucket, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Seth D.; Brothers, Laura L.; Foster, David S.; Andrews, Brian D.; Baldwin, Wayne E.; Schwab, William C.

    2016-10-28

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management have cooperated to map approximately 185 square kilometers of the inner continental shelf south of Martha’s Vineyard and north of Nantucket, Massachusetts. This report contains geophysical data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey during a survey in 2013. The geophysical data include (1) swath bathymetry collected by using interferometric sonar, (2) acoustic backscatter from the interferometric sonar, and (3) seismic-reflection profiles from a chirp subbottom profiler. These spatial data support research on the Quaternary evolution of coastal Massachusetts, the influence of sea-level change and sediment supply on coastal evolution, and efforts to understand the type, distribution, and quality of subtidal marine habitats in the coastal ocean of Massachusetts.

  13. Mechanisms of decadal variability in the Labrador Sea and the wider North Atlantic in a high-resolution climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Pablo; Robson, Jon; Sutton, Rowan T.; Andrews, Martin B.

    2016-12-01

    A necessary step before assessing the performance of decadal predictions is the evaluation of the processes that bring memory to the climate system, both in climate models and observations. These mechanisms are particularly relevant in the North Atlantic, where the ocean circulation, related to both the Subpolar Gyre and the Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), is thought to be important for driving significant heat content anomalies. Recently, a rapid decline in observed densities in the deep Labrador Sea has pointed to an ongoing slowdown of the AMOC strength taking place since the mid 90s, a decline also hinted by in-situ observations from the RAPID array. This study explores the use of Labrador Sea densities as a precursor of the ocean circulation changes, by analysing a 300-year long simulation with the state-of-the-art coupled model HadGEM3-GC2. The major drivers of Labrador Sea density variability are investigated, and are characterised by three major contributions. First, the integrated effect of local surface heat fluxes, mainly driven by year-to-year changes in the North Atlantic Oscillation, which accounts for 62% of the total variance. Additionally, two multidecadal-to-centennial contributions from the Greenland-Scotland Ridge outflows are quantified; the first associated with freshwater exports via the East Greenland Current, and the second with density changes in the Denmark Strait Overflow. Finally, evidence is shown that decadal trends in Labrador Sea densities are followed by important atmospheric impacts. In particular, a positive winter NAO response appears to follow the negative Labrador Sea density trends, and provides a phase reversal mechanism.

  14. Sensitivity of advective transfer times across the North Atlantic Ocean to the temporal and spatial resolution of model velocity data: Implication for European eel larval transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanke, Bruno; Bonhommeau, Sylvain; Grima, Nicolas; Drillet, Yann

    2012-05-01

    European eel (Anguilla anguilla) larvae achieve one of the longest larval migrations of the marine realm, i.e., more than 6000 km from their spawning grounds in the Sargasso Sea to European continental shelves. The duration of this migration remains debated, between 7 months and 3 years. This information is, however, crucial since it determines the period over which larvae are affected by environmental conditions and hence the subsequent recruitment success. We investigate the pathways and duration of trans-Atlantic connections using 3 years of high-resolution (daily, 1/12°) velocity fields available from a Mercator-Océan model configuration without data assimilation. We study specifically the effect of spatial and temporal resolutions on our estimates by applying various filters in time (from daily to 12-day averages) and space (from 1/12° to 1° gridcell aggregation) to the nominal model outputs. Numerical particles are released in the presumed European eel spawning area and considered as passive tracers at three specific depths (around 0, 50, and 200 m). We diagnose particularly the intensity of the water transfer between suitable control sections that encompass the eel larva distribution. Transit ages are also investigated, with a particular focus on the pathways that minimize the connection times between the western and eastern North Atlantic. We show that small-scale structures (eddies and filaments) contribute to faster connections though they also correspond to additional complexity in trajectories. The shortest pathways mostly follow the Gulf Stream and the North Atlantic Drift, whereas interior connections require longer transfers that prove less compatible with biological observations.

  15. Tomography-based, high-resolution modelling of mantle flow under North America: Implications for surface stress in the central and eastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, A. M.; Moucha, R.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Simmons, N. A.; Grand, S. P.

    2009-05-01

    Plate tectonics is fundamentally a 3-D process and the mantle convection stresses that drive the horizontal motions of plates also produce vertical bending stresses that generate large (km-scale) topographic undulations. The impact of these bending stresses in continental interiors is not generally recognised or well understood and yet they can provide a large (order 10 MPa) contribution to the ambient tectonic stress field. Depending on the geometrical relationship with pre-existing crustal weak zones or faults, the convection- induced surface stresses can be potentially important contributors to intraplate seismic activity, particularly in the central and eastern portions of North America. These stresses, and the associated surface undulations, evolve slowly on geological (Myr) time scales and it is therefore difficult to resolve them using space-based geodesy (e.g. GPS). We determine the impact of mantle convection on intraplate stresses in North America using a mantle flow calculation that is based on a new high-resolution tomography model that is constrained by simultaneously inverting global seismic and mantle-convection data sets (Simmons et al. 2009). The mantle flow model adopts a depth dependent mantle viscosity structure which reconciles both glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) and convection data (Mitrovica and Forte 2004). The flow model successfully reproduces plate velocities and observations of surface gravity and topography. We find a large region of maximum compressive stress in the central portion of North America that is largely driven by viscous flow coupled to density anomalies associated with the descent of the ancient Kula-Farallon plate system. These flow calculations also show the long lived nature of the convection-driven compressive stresses under the Mississippi Valley region, extending from the southern Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico.

  16. High-resolution record of geomagnetic excursions in the Matuyama chron constrains the ages of the Feiliang and Lanpo Paleolithic sites in the Nihewan Basin, North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Hong; An, Zhisheng; Dekkers, Mark J.; Wei, Qi; Pei, Shuwen; Zhao, Hui; Zhao, Hongli; Xiao, Guoqiao; Qiang, Xiaoke; Wu, Dacheng; Chang, Hong

    2012-08-01

    The Nihewan Basin (40°N) in North China is a rich source of Early Pleistocene Paleolithic sites and thus a key area for studying early human evolution in high-latitude (from an early human perspective) East Asia. Here a high-resolution magnetostratigraphic investigation is carried out on a fluvio-lacustrine section in the northeastern Nihewan Basin, which contains the Feiliang and Lanpo Paleolithic sites. Paleomagnetic results suggest that this section records the lower portion of the Brunhes polarity chron and the upper Matuyama polarity chron. Furthermore, the Jaramillo polarity subchron and seven of the nine validated geomagnetic excursions within the Matuyama polarity chron are identified, including the Kamikatsura, Santa Rosa, Intra-Jaramillo, Cobb Mountain, Bjorn, Gardar and Gilsa excursions. The Feiliang artifact layer is located just at the bottom of the Cobb Mountain excursion, thus its age is estimated to be ˜1.2 Ma. The Lanpo artifact layer appears to be coeval with the Gilsa excursion, yielding an estimated age of ˜1.6 Ma. This study provides new evidence for the presence of early humans in North China before 1.5 Ma and documents the powerful role of geomagnetic excursions: they provide valuable age control points for ongoing efforts to date the early Paleolithic sites.

  17. High-resolution digital elevation model of Mount St. Helens crater and upper North Fork Toutle River basin, Washington, based on an airborne lidar survey of September 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosbrucker, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The lateral blast, debris avalanche, and lahars of the May 18th, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, dramatically altered the surrounding landscape. Lava domes were extruded during the subsequent eruptive periods of 1980–1986 and 2004–2008. More than three decades after the emplacement of the 1980 debris avalanche, high sediment production persists in the North Fork Toutle River basin, which drains the northern flank of the volcano. Because this sediment increases the risk of flooding to downstream communities on the Toutle and Cowlitz Rivers, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), under the direction of Congress to maintain an authorized level of flood protection, built a sediment retention structure on the North Fork Toutle River in 1989 to help reduce this risk and to prevent sediment from clogging the shipping channel of the Columbia River. From September 16–20, 2009, Watershed Sciences, Inc., under contract to USACE, collected high-precision airborne lidar (light detection and ranging) data that cover 214 square kilometers (83 square miles) of Mount St. Helens and the upper North Fork Toutle River basin from the sediment retention structure to the volcano's crater. These data provide a digital dataset of the ground surface, including beneath forest cover. Such remotely sensed data can be used to develop sediment budgets and models of sediment erosion, transport, and deposition. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used these lidar data to develop digital elevation models (DEMs) of the study area. DEMs are fundamental to monitoring natural hazards and studying volcanic landforms, fluvial and glacial geomorphology, and surface geology. Watershed Sciences, Inc., provided files in the LASer (LAS) format containing laser returns that had been filtered, classified, and georeferenced. The USGS produced a hydro-flattened DEM from ground-classified points at Castle, Coldwater, and Spirit Lakes. Final results averaged about five laser last

  18. Role of dust direct radiative effect on the tropical rain belt over Middle East and North Africa: A high-resolution AGCM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangalath, Hamza Kunhu; Stenchikov, Georgiy

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the influence of direct radiative effect of dust on the tropical summer rain belt across the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), the present study utilizes the high-resolution capability of an Atmospheric General Circulation Model, the High-Resolution Atmospheric Model. Ensembles of Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project style simulations have been conducted with and without dust radiative impacts, to differentiate the influence of dust on the tropical rain belt. The analysis focuses on summer season. The results highlight the role of dust-induced responses in global- and regional-scale circulations in determining the strength and the latitudinal extent of the tropical rain belt. A significant response in the strength and position of the local Hadley circulation is predicted in response to meridionally asymmetric distribution of dust and the corresponding radiative effects. Significant responses are also found in regional circulation features such as African Easterly Jet and West African Monsoon circulation. Consistent with these dynamic responses at various scales, the tropical rain belt across MENA strengthens and shifts northward. Importantly, the summer precipitation over the semiarid strip south of Sahara, including Sahel, increases up to 20%. As this region is characterized by the "Sahel drought," the predicted precipitation sensitivity to the dust loading over this region has a wide range of socioeconomic implications. Overall, the study demonstrates the extreme importance of incorporating dust radiative effects and the corresponding circulation responses at various scales, in the simulations and future projections of this region's climate.

  19. Towards a high resolution, integrated hydrology model of North America: Diagnosis of feedbacks between groundwater and land energy fluxes at continental scales.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Reed; Condon, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies demonstrate feedbacks between groundwater dynamics, overland flow, land surface and vegetation processes, and atmospheric boundary layer development that significantly affect local and regional climate across a range of climatic conditions. Furthermore, the type and distribution of vegetation cover alters land-atmosphere water and energy fluxes, as well as runoff generation and overland flow processes. These interactions can result in significant feedbacks on local and regional climate. In mountainous regions, recent research has shown that spatial and temporal variability in annual evapotranspiration, and thus water budgets, is strongly dependent on lateral groundwater flow; however, the full effects of these feedbacks across varied terrain (e.g. from plains to mountains) are not well understood. Here, we present a high-resolution, integrated hydrology model that covers much of continental North America and encompasses the Mississippi and Colorado watersheds. The model is run in a fully-transient manner at hourly temporal resolution incorporating fully-coupled land energy states and fluxes with integrated surface and subsurface hydrology. Connections are seen between hydrologic variables (such as water table depth) and land energy fluxes (such as latent heat) and spatial and temporal scaling is shown to span many orders of magnitude. Model results suggest that partitioning of plant transpiration to bare soil evaporation is a function of water table depth and later groundwater flow. Using these transient simulations as a proof of concept, we present a vision for future integrated simulation capabilities.

  20. High-resolution dating of Cenozoic sediments from northern North Sea using /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Rundberg, Y.; Smalley, P.C.

    1989-03-01

    The authors demonstrate the potential of Sr isotope stratigraphy as a tool in basin analysis by dating bioclastic carbonate and phosphate fragments from eight seismic units in Cenozoic sedimentary rocks along two east-west profiles in the northern North Sea. The dates, which agree well with available Rb/Sr glauconite dates, have precisions in the range /+-/0.5 to 3 m.y., thereby providing important chronostratigraphic information for sediments that otherwise are difficult to date. Basinward (southwest) in this area, the most important seismic sequence boundaries are dated at approximately 53 Ma, 33 Ma, 22 Ma, 8 Ma, and 2 Ma. Northeastward toward the basin margin, these boundaries represent important periods of erosion or nondeposition. Deep-water sedimentation predominated from the Paleocene until the early Oligocene (33 Ma), a time of high global sea levels. Close to the basin margin, local tectonic activity contributed turbiditic clastic sediments. An important sequence boundary at 30 Ma involves erosion in the northern area and correlates with a sharp eustatic drop in sea level. Post-early Oligocene seismic sequence boundaries are controlled mainly by basin-margin tectonics related to uplift events in Fennoscandia and in the Shetland Platform area. 7 figures, 3 tables.

  1. High-resolution well-log derived dielectric properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments, Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Y.; Goldberg, D.; Collett, T.; Hunter, R.

    2011-01-01

    A dielectric logging tool, electromagnetic propagation tool (EPT), was deployed in 2007 in the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well (Mount Elbert Well), North Slope, Alaska. The measured dielectric properties in the Mount Elbert well, combined with density log measurements, result in a vertical high-resolution (cm-scale) estimate of gas hydrate saturation. Two hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs about 20 m thick were identified using the EPT log and exhibited gas-hydrate saturation estimates ranging from 45% to 85%. In hydrate-bearing zones where variation of hole size and oil-based mud invasion are minimal, EPT-based gas hydrate saturation estimates on average agree well with lower vertical resolution estimates from the nuclear magnetic resonance logs; however, saturation and porosity estimates based on EPT logs are not reliable in intervals with substantial variations in borehole diameter and oil-based invasion.EPT log interpretation reveals many thin-bedded layers at various depths, both above and below the thick continuous hydrate occurrences, which range from 30-cm to about 1-m thick. Such thin layers are not indicated in other well logs, or from the visual observation of core, with the exception of the image log recorded by the oil-base microimager. We also observe that EPT dielectric measurements can be used to accurately detect fine-scale changes in lithology and pore fluid properties of hydrate-bearing sediments where variation of hole size is minimal. EPT measurements may thus provide high-resolution in-situ hydrate saturation estimates for comparison and calibration with laboratory analysis. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Sensitivity of tropical cyclones to resolution, convection scheme and ocean flux parameterization over Eastern Tropical Pacific and Tropical North Atlantic Oceans in the RegCM4 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes-Franco, Ramón; Giorgi, Filippo; Coppola, Erika; Zimmermann, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    The sensitivity of simulated tropical cyclones (TCs) to resolution, convection scheme and ocean surface flux parameterization is investigated with a regional climate model (RegCM4) over the CORDEX Central America domain, including the Tropical North Atlantic (TNA) and Eastern Tropical Pacific (ETP) basins. Simulations for the TC seasons of the ten-year period (1989-1998) driven by ERA-Interim reanalysis fields are completed using 50 and 25 km grid spacing, two convection schemes (Emanuel, Em; and Kain-Fritsch, KF) and two ocean surface flux representations, a Monin-Obukhov scheme available in the BATS land surface package (Dickinson et al. 1993), and the scheme of Zeng et al. (J Clim 11(10):2628-2644, 1998). The model performance is assessed against observed TC characteristics for the simulation period. In general, different sensitivities are found over the two basins investigated. The simulations using the KF scheme show higher TC density, longer TC duration (up to 15 days) and stronger peak winds (>50 ms-1) than those using Em (<40 ms-1). All simulations show a better spatial representation of simulated TC density and interannual variability over the TNA than over the ETP. The 25 km resolution simulations show greater TC density, duration and intensity compared to the 50 km resolution ones, especially over the ETP basin, and generally more in line with observations. Simulated TCs show a strong sensitivity to ocean fluxes, especially over the TNA basin, with the Monin-Obukhov scheme leading to an overestimate of the TC number, and the Zeng scheme being closer to observations. All simulations capture the density of cyclones during active TC seasons over the TNA, however, without data assimilation, the tracks of individual events do not match closely the corresponding observed ones. Overall, the best model performance is obtained when using the KF and Zeng schemes at 25 km grid spacing.

  3. Identifying Erosional Hotspots in Streams Along the North Shore of Lake Superior, Minnesota using High-Resolution Elevation and Soils Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wick, Molly J.

    Many streams on the North Shore of Lake Superior, Minnesota, USA, are impaired for turbidity driven by excess fine sediment loading. The goal of this project was to develop a GIS-based model using new, openly-available, high-resolution remote datasets to predict erosional hotspots at a reach scale, based on three study watersheds: Amity Creek, the Talmadge River, and the French River. The ability to identify erosional hotspots, or locations that are highly susceptible to erosion, using remote data would be helpful for watershed managers in implementing practices to reduce turbidity in these streams. Erosion in streams is a balance between driving forces, largely controlled by topography; and resisting forces, controlled by the materials that make up a channel's bed and banks. New high-resolution topography and soils datasets for the North Shore provide the opportunity to extract these driving and resisting forces from remote datasets and possibly predict erosion potential and identify erosional hotspots. We used 3-meter LiDAR-derived DEMs to calculate a stream power-based erosion index, to identify stream reaches with high radius of curvature, and to identify stream reaches proximal to high bluffs. We used the Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) Database to investigate changes in erodibility along the channel. Because bedrock exposure significantly limits erodibility, we investigated bedrock exposure using bedrock outcrop maps made available by the Minnesota Geological Survey (MGS, Hobbs, 2002; Hobbs, 2009), and by using a feature extraction tool to remotely map bedrock exposure using high-resolution air photos and LiDAR data. Predictions based on remote data were compared with two datasets. Bank Erosion Hazard Index surveys, which are surveys designed to evaluate erosion susceptibility of banks, were collected along the three streams. In addition, a 500-year flood event during our field season gave us the opportunity to collect erosion data after a major event and

  4. REE and Y in groundwater in the upper 1.2 km of Proterozoic granitoids (Eastern Sweden) - Assessing the role of composition and origin of groundwaters, geochemistry of fractures, and organic/inorganic aqueous complexation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathurin, Frédéric A.; Åström, Mats E.; Drake, Henrik; Maskenskaya, Olga M.; Kalinowski, Birgitta E.

    2014-11-01

    Yttrium and rare earth elements (YREEs) are studied in groundwater in the shallow regolith aquifer and the fracture networks of the upper 1.2 km of Paleoproterozoic granitoids in boreal Europe (Laxemar and Forsmark areas, Sweden). The study includes groundwater sampled via a total of 34 shallow boreholes reaching the bottom of the regolith aquifer, and 72 deep boreholes with equipment designed for retrieval of representative groundwater at controlled depths in the fractured bedrock. The groundwater composition differs substantially between regolith and fracture groundwater and between areas, which affects the dissolved YREE features, including concentrations and NASC normalized patterns. In the fresh groundwater in the regolith aquifers, highest YREE concentrations occur (10th and 90th percentile; Laxemar: 4.4-82 μg L-1; Forsmark: 1.9-19 μg L-1), especially in the slightly acidic groundwater (pH: 6.3-7.2 - Laxemar), where the normalized YREE patterns are slightly enriched in light REEs (LaNASC/YNASC: 1.1-2.4). In the recharge areas, where redox potentials of the regolith groundwater is more moderate, negative Ce anomaly (Laxemar: 0.37-0.45; Forsmark: 0.15-0.92) and positive Y anomaly (mainly in Forsmark: 1.0-1.7) are systematically more pronounced than in discharge areas. The significant correlations between the YREE features and dissolved organic carbon, minor elements, and somewhat pH suggest a strong control of humic substances (HSs) together with Al rich colloids and redox sensitive Fe-Mn hydrous precipitates on the dissolved YREE pools. In the bedrock fractures, the groundwater is circumneutral to slightly basic and displays YREE concentrations that are at least one order of magnitude lower than the regolith groundwater, and commonly below detection limit in the deep brackish and saline groundwater, with some exceptions such as La and Y. At intermediate depth (>50 m), where groundwater of meteoric origin percolates, the LaNASC/YNASC values moderately to substantially decrease (Laxemar: 0.24-2.65; Forsmark: 0.02-0.06) and Y and Ce anomalies are negligible as compared to the regolith groundwater. Aqueous speciation modeling predicts substantial binding of dissolved Y and La, respectively, to HSs. This, in turn, suggests that the features of the YREE pool in the meteoric fracture groundwater are dominantly controlled by the capacity of fracture minerals to sorb HS ligands inherited from the overlying terrestrial regolith. In the deep bedrock fractures (>100/200 m), the YREE features vary substantially with the groundwater paleo-origin. In Laxemar, where groundwater with pronounced glacial origin percolates, the YREE concentrations decrease with increasing mixing fraction of glacial melt water. There, the dissolved YREEs are mostly bound to HSs, and inherited their fractionation features (LaNASC/YNASC: 0.15-2.1) from water-rock interaction in the intermediate bedrock fractures. In Forsmark, the YREE and heavy REE enrichment (LaNASC/YNASC: 0.007-0.23) are more systematic in the groundwater with pronounced marine origin, due to water-mineral interactions in the sea sediment and in the fractures while infiltrating and percolating. YREE features significantly change in the deep saline groundwater with a long residence time, which displays LaNASC/YNASC similar to those of the local bedrock. The findings of this study are relevant in terms of safety assessment for nuclear waste disposal in crystalline rock carrying groundwater influenced by various paleo-climatic recharges.

  5. High-resolution water column survey to identify active sublacustrine hydrothermal discharge zones within Lake Rotomahana, North Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Sharon L.; de Ronde, Cornel E. J.; Fornari, Daniel; Tivey, Maurice A.; Stucker, Valerie K.

    2016-03-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles were used to conduct a high-resolution water column survey of Lake Rotomahana using temperature, pH, turbidity, and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) to identify active hydrothermal discharge zones within the lake. Five areas with active sublacustrine venting were identified: (1) the area of the historic Pink Terraces; (2) adjacent to the western shoreline subaerial "Steaming Cliffs," boiling springs and geyser; (3) along the northern shoreline to the east of the Pink Terrace site; (4) the newly discovered Patiti hydrothermal system along the south margin of the 1886 Tarawera eruption rift zone; and (5) a location in the east basin (northeast of Patiti Island). The Pink Terrace hydrothermal system was active prior to the 1886 eruption of Mount Tarawera, but venting along the western shoreline, in the east basin, and the Patiti hydrothermal system appear to have been initiated in the aftermath of the eruption, similar to Waimangu Valley to the southwest. Different combinations of turbidity, pH anomalies (both positive and negative), and ORP responses suggest vent fluid compositions vary over short distances within the lake. The seasonal period of stratification limits vertical transport of heat to the surface layer and the hypolimnion temperature of Lake Rotomahana consequently increases with an average warming rate of ~ 0.010 °C/day due to both convective hydrothermal discharge and conductive geothermal heating. A sudden temperature increase occurred during our 2011 survey and was likely the response to an earthquake swarm just 11 days prior.

  6. Past variability of the North American Monsoon: ultrahigh resolution records from the lower Gulf of California for the last 6 Ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herguera, J. C.; Nava Fernandez, C.; Bernal, G.; Paull, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    The North American Monsoon regime results from an interplay between the ocean, atmosphere and continental topography though there is an ongoing debate as to the relative importance of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the NE tropical Pacific warm water lens region, solar radiation variability, land snow cover and soil moisture over the Western North America mountain ranges and the strength and spatial patterns of the dominant winds. The links between these factors and the monsoonal variability appear to be of variable importance during the short instrumental record, and hampers any prediction on the future evolution of this climatic regime in a warming climate. The terrigenous component in very-high sedimentation rate sediments on the margins of the Gulf of California links monsoonal precipitation patterns on land with the varying importance of the lithogenic component in these margin sediments. Here we use the elemental composition of Si and Fe in these margin sediments, as a proxy for the lithogenic component in a collection of box and kasten cores from the eastern and western margins of the lower Gulf of California. This region shows a strong tropical influence during the summer, as part of the northernmost extension of the eastern tropical Pacific warm water lens region. A period when the southwestern winds bring moist air masses inland enhancing the monsoonal rains on the eastern reaches of Sierra Madre Occidental. High resolution XRF results allow us to explore the relationships between different elemental ratios in these sediments and the available instrumental record and several paleo-reconstructions to evaluate the possible links between external forcings and internal feedback effects, to help to understand the controls on the evolution of the monsoonal regime in this region.

  7. High-resolution records of Bonneville Basin paleohydrology offer new insights into changing atmospheric circulation patterns over North America from 26 ka through the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steponaitis, E.; McGee, D.; Quade, J.; Andrews, A.; Edwards, R.; Hsieh, Y.; Broecker, W. S.; Cheng, H.

    2013-12-01

    The tremendous lateral extent of the Bonneville Basin, which covers much of western Utah, makes paleoclimate records from this region highly sensitive to global-scale changes in atmospheric circulation and hydrology. New paleoclimate records from speleothems and lacustrine carbonates offer insight into the hydrology the Bonneville Basin spanning from 26 ka through the Holocene. Anchored by high-precision U-Th dates, Sr records from crystalline lacustrine carbonates from throughout the basin provide a mechanism for constraining zonal variations in precipitation over time. To accomplish this, we exploit spatial variations in the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of fluvial inputs to Lake Bonneville (Hart et al. 2004). Paired with stable isotope records, these Sr records give a spatially detailed view of the response of Great Basin to global climate change, and by extension, insight into atmospheric circulation patterns over North America during abrupt climate changes. Stable isotope and trace metal records from Lehman Cave speleothems provide a high-resolution extension of these Great Basin hydrological records into the Holocene. Here we provide an overview of these unique paired records, focusing particular attention on the region's response to the Younger Dryas and Heinrich events 1 and 2. Hart, W.S. et al., The 87Sr/86Sr ratios of lacustrine carbonates and lake-level history of the Bonneville paleolake system. GSA Bulletin. 2004; 116: 1107-1119.

  8. Four micron high-resolution spectra of Jupiter in the North Equatorial Belt: H3(+) emissions and the C-12/C-13 ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marten, A.; De Bergh, C.; Owen, T.; Gautier, D.; Maillard, J. P.; Drossart, P.; Lutz, B. L.; Orton, G. S.

    1994-01-01

    Spectra of the North Equatorial Belt of Jupiter were obtained in March 1992 at an unapodized resolution of 0.1/cm between 2450 and 2600/cm with the Fourier Transform Spectrometer at the 3.6 m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) on Mauna Kea. Several emissions from the nu(sub 2) band of H3(+) were detected. The excitation temperature derived from the relative intensities of these emissions averaged over a wide range of longitudes is 800 +/- 100 K, and the H3(+) column density is 1.56(sup +1.0)(sub -0.5) x 10(exp 11)/sq. cm. In addition, several strong absorption features due to (13)CH4 were observed. A comparison between (12)CH4 and (13)CH4 absorptions allowed us to obtain a new measurement of the C-12/C-13 ratio. We found that this ratio, estimated for the first time in this spectral range, is 89 (+/- 25), in agreement with the terrestrial value.

  9. Modulation of Heavy Rainfall in the Middle East and North Africa by Madden-Julian Oscillation Using High Resolution Atmospheric General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, L.; Stenchikov, G. L.; McCabe, M. F.; Bangalath, H. K.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, the modulation of subtropical rainfall by the dominant tropical intraseasonal signal of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), has been explored through the discussion of the MJO-convection-induced Kelvin and Rossby wave related teleconnection patterns. Our study focuses on characterizing the modulation of heavy rainfall in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region by the MJO, using the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) global High Resolution Atmospheric Model (HIRAM) simulations (25-km; 1979-2012) and a combination of available atmospheric products from satellite, in-situ and reanalysis data. The observed Hadley Centre Global Sea Ice and Sea Surface Temperature (HadISST) and the simulated SST from GFDL's global coupled carbon-climate Earth System Models (ESM2M) are employed in HIRAM to investigate the sensitivity of the simulated heavy rainfall and MJO to SST. The future trend of the extreme rainfalls and their links to the MJO response to climate change are examined using HIRAM simulations of 2012-2050 with the RCP4.5 and RCP 8.5 scenarios to advance the possibility of characterization and forecasting of future extreme rainfall events in the MENA region.

  10. Finely Resolved On-Road PM2.5 and Estimated Premature Mortality in Central North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shih Ying; Vizuete, William; Serre, Marc; Vennam, Lakshmi Pradeepa; Omary, Mohammad; Isakov, Vlad; Breen, Michael; Arunachalam, Saravanan

    2017-02-28

    To quantify the on-road PM2.5 -related premature mortality at a national scale, previous approaches to estimate concentrations at a 12-km × 12-km or larger grid cell resolution may not fully characterize concentration hotspots that occur near roadways and thus the areas of highest risk. Spatially resolved concentration estimates from on-road emissions to capture these hotspots may improve characterization of the associated risk, but are rarely used for estimating premature mortality. In this study, we compared the on-road PM2.5 -related premature mortality in central North Carolina with two different concentration estimation approaches-(i) using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to model concentration at a coarser resolution of a 36-km × 36-km grid resolution, and (ii) using a hybrid of a Gaussian dispersion model, CMAQ, and a space-time interpolation technique to provide annual average PM2.5 concentrations at a Census-block level (∼105,000 Census blocks). The hybrid modeling approach estimated 24% more on-road PM2.5 -related premature mortality than CMAQ. The major difference is from the primary on-road PM2.5 where the hybrid approach estimated 2.5 times more primary on-road PM2.5 -related premature mortality than CMAQ due to predicted exposure hotspots near roadways that coincide with high population areas. The results show that 72% of primary on-road PM2.5 premature mortality occurs within 1,000 m from roadways where 50% of the total population resides, highlighting the importance to characterize near-road primary PM2.5 and suggesting that previous studies may have underestimated premature mortality due to PM2.5 from traffic-related emissions.

  11. Local-area-enhanced, 2.5-meter resolution natural-color and color-infrared satellite-image mosaics of the North Bamyan mineral district in Afghanistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Philip A.; Davis, Philip A.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Defense Task Force for Business and Stability Operations, prepared databases for mineral-resource target areas in Afghanistan. The purpose of the databases is to (1) provide useful data to ground-survey crews for use in performing detailed assessments of the areas and (2) provide useful information to private investors who are considering investment in a particular area for development of its natural resources. The set of satellite-image mosaics provided in this Data Series (DS) is one such database. Although airborne digital color-infrared imagery was acquired for parts of Afghanistan in 2006, the image data have radiometric variations that preclude their use in creating a consistent image mosaic for geologic analysis. Consequently, image mosaics were created using ALOS (Advanced Land Observation Satellite; renamed Daichi) satellite images, whose radiometry has been well determined (Saunier, 2007a,b). This part of the DS consists of the locally enhanced ALOS image mosaics for the North Bamyan mineral district, which has copper deposits. ALOS was launched on January 24, 2006, and provides multispectral images from the AVNIR (Advanced Visible and Near-Infrared Radiometer) sensor in blue (420–500 nanometer, nm), green (520–600 nm), red (610–690 nm), and near-infrared (760–890 nm) wavelength bands with an 8-bit dynamic range and a 10-meter (m) ground resolution. The satellite also provides a panchromatic band image from the PRISM (Panchromatic Remote-sensing Instrument for Stereo Mapping) sensor (520–770 nm) with the same dynamic range but a 2.5-m ground resolution. The image products in this DS incorporate copyrighted data provided by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (©JAXA,2006,2007, 2008), but the image processing has altered the original pixel structure and all image values of the JAXA ALOS data, such that original image values cannot be recreated from this DS. As such

  12. Shallow subsurface morpho-tectonics at the Northern offshore Sumatra subduction system using high resolution reflection and refraction seismics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, D.; Dibakar Ghosal*, S. C. Singh, A. P. S. Chauhan, H. Carton, N. D. Hananto

    2011-12-01

    The oblique subduction of Indo-Australian plate below the Eurosian plate regulates the subsurface geology of the Sumatra subduction system from south to north. Although many geological, geophysical and geodetic studies have been carried over since several decades nevertheless a high resolution subsurface image describing the detailed structural features over the Northern Sumatra is still missing. To scrutinize the northern part of this subduction system we had carried out a multi channel seismic (MCS) and OBS survey using a 12 km long streamer and 56 ocean bottom seismometers in 2006 and procured a high resolution deep seismic reflection and refraction data over a 500 km long profile mapping the whole subduction setting from the subduction front, forearc high and basin, Sumatra platform, Sumatra fault and volcanic arc. The acoustic basement along the profile is very complex because of its extremities lies in a range of 300 m to 5000 m. In order to overcome the imaging-intricacies caused due to the abrupt changes of water depth, we have downward continued the 12 km streamer data to the seafloor, which provides refraction arrivals from near zero offsets to 12 km, and subsequently a high-resolution travel time tomography keeping node spacing of 50m x 50m has accomplished to procure a detail velocity structure along the profile. We have conducted our analysis in two important areas at northern offshore Sumatra: (1) subduction front and accretionary settings and (2) forearc high and West Anadman Fault. Our main goal lies to observe the nature of shallow subsurface velocity distribution over these regions. Tomographic result of the subduction front demonstrates the changes in velocity gradient along up-dip. The 1D velocity gradients become shallower toward the subduction trench inferring the fact of lithification of accreted sediments around the accretionary wedge. At the forearc high adjacent to the Aceh basin a pile of 1 km thick low velocity sediments is underlain by

  13. Statistical-dynamical seasonal forecast of western North Pacific and East Asia landfalling tropical cyclones using the high-resolution GFDL FLOR coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Villarini, Gabriele; Vecchi, Gabriel A.; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Gudgel, Richard

    2016-06-01

    This study examines the seasonal prediction of western North Pacific [WNP) and East Asia landfalling tropical cyclones (TCs) using the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory(GFDL) Forecast-oriented Low Ocean Resolution version of CM2.5 with Flux Adjustment (FLOR-FA) and finite-mixture-model (FMM)-based statistical cluster analysis. Using the FMM-based cluster analysis, seven clusters are identified from the historical and FLOR-FA-predicted TC tracks for the period 1980-2013. FLOR-FA has significant skill in predicting year-to-year variations in the frequency of TCs within clusters 1 (recurving TCs) and 5 (straight-moving TCs). By building Poisson regression models for each cluster using key predictors (i.e., sea surface temperature, 500 hPa geopotential height, and zonal vertical wind shear), the predictive skill for almost all the clusters at all initialization months improves with respect to the dynamic prediction. The prediction of total WNP TC frequency made by combining hybrid predictions for each of the seven clusters in the hybrid model shows skill higher than what achieved using the TC frequency directly from FLOR-FA initialized from March to July. However, the hybrid predictions for total WNP TC frequency initialized from January to February exhibit lower skill than FLOR-FA. The prediction of TC landfall over East Asia made by combining the hybrid models of TC frequency in each cluster and its landfall rate over East Asia also outperforms FLOR-FA for all initialization months January through July.

  14. Influence of air quality model resolution on uncertainty associated with health impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, T. M.; Selin, N. E.

    2012-10-01

    We use regional air quality modeling to evaluate the impact of model resolution on uncertainty associated with the human health benefits resulting from proposed air quality regulations. Using a regional photochemical model (CAMx), we ran a modeling episode with meteorological inputs simulating conditions as they occurred during August through September 2006 (a period representative of conditions leading to high ozone), and two emissions inventories (a 2006 base case and a 2018 proposed control scenario, both for Houston, Texas) at 36, 12, 4 and 2 km resolution. The base case model performance was evaluated for each resolution against daily maximum 8-h averaged ozone measured at monitoring stations. Results from each resolution were more similar to each other than they were to measured values. Population-weighted ozone concentrations were calculated for each resolution and applied to concentration response functions (with 95% confidence intervals) to estimate the health impacts of modeled ozone reduction from the base case to the control scenario. We found that estimated avoided mortalities were not significantly different between the 2, 4 and 12 km resolution runs, but the 36 km resolution may over-predict some potential health impacts. Given the cost/benefit analysis requirements motivated by Executive Order 12866 as it applies to the Clean Air Act, the uncertainty associated with human health impacts and therefore the results reported in this study, we conclude that health impacts calculated from population weighted ozone concentrations obtained using regional photochemical models at 36 km resolution fall within the range of values obtained using fine (12 km or finer) resolution modeling. However, in some cases, 36 km resolution may not be fine enough to statistically replicate the results achieved using 2, 4 or 12 km resolution. On average, when modeling at 36 km resolution, an estimated 5 deaths per week during the May through September ozone season are avoided

  15. Improving Numerical Weather Predictions of Summertime Precipitation Over the Southeastern U.S. Through a High-Resolution Initialization of the Surface State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Krikishen, Jayanthi; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2011-01-01

    It is hypothesized that high-resolution, accurate representations of surface properties such as soil moisture and sea surface temperature are necessary to improve simulations of summertime pulse-type convective precipitation in high resolution models. This paper presents model verification results of a case study period from June-August 2008 over the Southeastern U.S. using the Weather Research and Forecasting numerical weather prediction model. Experimental simulations initialized with high-resolution land surface fields from the NASA Land Information System (LIS) and sea surface temperature (SST) derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are compared to a set of control simulations initialized with interpolated fields from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction 12-km North American Mesoscale model. The LIS land surface and MODIS SSTs provide a more detailed surface initialization at a resolution comparable to the 4-km model grid spacing. Soil moisture from the LIS spin-up run is shown to respond better to the extreme rainfall of Tropical Storm Fay in August 2008 over the Florida peninsula. The LIS has slightly lower errors and higher anomaly correlations in the top soil layer, but exhibits a stronger dry bias in the root zone. The model sensitivity to the alternative surface initial conditions is examined for a sample case, showing that the LIS/MODIS data substantially impact surface and boundary layer properties.

  16. High-resolution sequence stratigraphy of lower Paleozoic sheet sandstones in central North America: The role of special conditions of cratonic interiors in development of stratal architecture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, Anthony C.; Miller, J.F.; McKay, R.M.; Palmer, A.R.; Taylor, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Well-known difficulties in applying sequence stratigraphic concepts to deposits that accumulated across slowly subsiding cratonic interior regions have limited our ability to interpret the history of continental-scale tectonism, oceanographic dynamics of epeiric seas, and eustasy. We used a multi-disciplinary approach to construct a high-resolution stratigraphic framework for lower Paleozoic strata in the cratonic interior of North America. Within this framework, these strata proved readily amenable to modern sequence stratigraphic techniques that were formulated based on successions along passive margins and in foreland basins, settings markedly different from the cratonic interior. Parasequences, parasequence stacking patterns, systems tracts, maximum flooding intervals, and sequence-bounding unconformities can be confidently recognized in the cratonic interior using mostly standard criteria for identification. The similarity of cratonic interior and foreland basin successions in size, geometry, constituent facies, and local stacking patterns of nearshore parasequences is especially striking. This similarity indicates that the fundamental processes that establish shoreface morphology and determine the stratal expression of retreat and progradation were likewise generally the same, despite marked differences in tectonism, physiography, and bathymetry between the two settings. Our results do not support the widespread perception that Paleozoic cratonic interior successions are so anomalous in stratal geometries, and constitute such a poor record of time, that they are poorly suited for modern sequence stratigraphic analyses. The particular arrangement of stratal elements in the cratonic interior succession we studied is no more anomalous or enigmatic than the variability in architecture that sets all sedimentary successions apart from one another. Thus, Paleozoic strata of the cratonic interior are most appropriately considered as a package that belongs in a

  17. Sub-glacial processes interpreted from 3D and high-resolution 2D seismic data from the Central North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Francis

    2013-04-01

    A near complete record of Quaternary deposition, comprising more than 1000m of sediments, is preserved within the Central North Sea (CNS). This study presents evidence interpreted from seismic data of sub-glacial processes at a variety of scales for several Pleistocene glacial events. The study area has been the subject of hydrocarbon exploration since the mid 1960s and is covered by 3D seismic datasets up to 1000km2 as well as high-resolution 2D (HR2D) seismic datasets covering areas of 1-25km2. These data have been examined using a variety of techniques and attributes, including time-slicing, horizon slicing, topographic mapping and attribute analysis, to map erosion surfaces, depositional bodies, sedimentary textures and deformation events. An Early Pleistocene seismic event has been identified on 3D data, at 800-1000m MSL, within the southern part of the CNS, which marks the first appearance of iceberg ploughmarks. This event has been traced into the northern part of the study area, where iceberg ploughmarks are absent, but a set of mega-scale lineations at 700-800ms TWT are interpreted as ice-stream scour marks. A series of complex seismic events overlying the ice-scoured surface are interpreted as glacial deposits, at the top of which a network of channels, interpreted to be the result of glacial meltwaters, is associated with features interpreted as over-bank sand bodies. Higher in the sequence, timeslice images of Early to Middle Pleistocene deposits show trains of sub-parallel, curvi-linear, events, several km in length and 50-300m in width. Analysis of these events on HR2D data reveals them to consist of series of short, imbricated, dipping reflectors, terminated by complex, mounded structures. Individual sheets display up to 60ms TWT (55m) vertical displacement over horizontal distances of 200-250m. Two deformed packages are evident on HR2D data. A lower sequence, consisting of discrete thrust sheets lies above an erosion or dislocation surface (MP1

  18. Evaluation of the COSMO-CLM high-resolution climate simulations over West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieng, Diarra; Smiatek, Gerhard; Bliefernicht, Jan; Heinzeller, Dominikus; Sarr, A.; Gaye, A. T.; Kunstmann, Harald

    2017-02-01

    The evaluation of a high-resolution simulation at 0.11° (12 km) with the COnsortium for Small-scale MOdelling in CLimate Mode (CCLM) regional climate model, applied over West Africa, is presented. This simulation is nested in a CCLM run at resolution of 0.44°, driven with boundary forcing data from the ERA-Interim reanalysis, and covers the period from 1981 to 2010. The simulated temperature and precipitation are evaluated using three selected climate indices for temperature and eight indices for precipitation in five different regions against a new, daily precipitation climatology covering West Africa and against other state of the art climatologies. The obtained results indicate that CCLM is able to reproduce the observed major climate characteristics including the West African Monsoon within the range of comparable regional climate modeling evaluations studies, but substantial uncertainties remain, especially in the Sahel zone. The seasonal mean temperature bias for the rainy season from June to September ranges from -0.8°C to -1.1°C. The CCLM simulations also underestimate the observed precipitation with biases in precipitation reaching -10% in the high-resolution and -20% in the low-resolution model runs. CCLM extends the monsoon precipitation belt too far north, which results in an overestimation of precipitation in the Sahel zone of up to 60%. In the coastal zone, the precipitation is underestimated by up to -90%. These biases in precipitation amounts are associated with errors in the precipitation seasonality. The added value of the higher resolution of the nested run is reflected in a smaller bias in extreme precipitation statistics with respect to the reference data.

  19. Spatio-Temporal Variability of Atmospheric CO2 as Observed from In-Situ Measurements over North America during NASA Field Campaigns (2004-2008)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Yonghoon; Vay, Stephanie A.; Woo, Jung-Hun; Choi, Kichul; Diskin, Glenn S.; Sachse, G. W.; Vadrevu, Krishna P.; Czech, E.

    2009-01-01

    Regional-scale measurements were made over the eastern United States (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment - North America (INTEX-NA), summer 2004); Mexico (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO), March 2006); the eastern North Pacific and Alaska (INTEX-B May 2006); and the Canadian Arctic (Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS), spring and summer 2008). For these field campaigns, instrumentation for the in situ measurement of CO2 was integrated on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft providing high-resolution (1 second) data traceable to the WMO CO2 mole fraction scale. These observations provide unique and definitive data sets via their intermediate-scale coverage and frequent vertical profiles (0.1 - 12 km) for examining the variability CO2 exhibits above the Earth s surface. A bottom-up anthropogenic CO2 emissions inventory (1deg 1deg) and processing methodology has also been developed for North America in support of these airborne science missions. In this presentation, the spatio-temporal distributions of CO2 and CO column values derived from the campaign measurements will be examined in conjunction with the emissions inventory and transport histories to aid in the interpretation of the CO2 observations.

  20. Investigation of aerosol-precipitation interactions in North-Eastern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashayekhi, R.; Sloan, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we report an investigation of the effects of changes in aerosols on clouds and precipitation patterns in North America. The online meteorology/chemistry Weather, Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) version 3.2 is used in the simulation. The domain of our study covers the Eastern parts of Canada and U.S. with a 12-km grid resolution. The purpose of the study is to asses the effects on meteorology (especially clouds and precipitation) of changes in aerosols that may occur due to future changes in population and emissions regulations. The first task is the creation of a series of emission scenarios reflecting the expected changes in these parameters. In order to prepare the anthropogenic and biogenic hourly emissions for the WRF-Chem simulations, we began with the annual, state or county wide total emission inventories for area, point and mobile sources in 2008, which are available from the U.S. EPA website and the corresponding Canadian emission inventories for year 2006, provided by Environment Canada. Surrogate files for the allocation of emissions from area and mobile sources were generated by processing a set of GIS shape files using the Surrogate Generator Tool. The raw emission inventories were then processed using the Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) system version 2.7 to generate the speciated, gridded and hourly emission data needed for the WRF-Chem simulation. Several one-month simulations were conducted to investigate the performance of the model, followed by preliminary studies of the effects of anthropogenic and biogenic aerosols on precipitation patterns. For these initial studies, scenarios were carried out assuming zero emissions, biogenic-only emissions and biogenic plus anthropogenic emissions. The results of these studies will be discussed in this report, along with their implications for the design of the more detailed scenarios to follow. In the latter, we will address the effect of changes in aerosols due to

  1. Refinement of horizontal resolution in dynamical downscaling of climate information using WRF: Costs, benefits, and lessons learned

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dynamical downscaling techniques have previously been developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) using a nested WRF at 108- and 36-km. Subsequent work extended one-way nesting down to 12-km resolution. Recently, the EPA Office of Research and Development used com...

  2. North Sea development activity surges

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-10

    This paper reports that operators in the North Sea have reported a burst of upstream activity. Off the U.K.: Amoco (U.K.) Exploration Co. installed three jackets in its North Everest and Lomond fields. It also completed laying the Central Area Transmission System (CATS) pipeline, which will carry the fields' gas to shore. BP Exploration Operating Co. Ltd. installed the jacket for it Unity riser platform 5 {1/2} km from its Forties Charlie platform. Conoco (U.K.) Ltd. tested a successful appraisal well in Britannia field in Block 15/30, about 130 miles northeast of Aberdeen. In the Norwegian North Sea, Saga Petroleum AS placed Snorre oil and gas field on production 6 weeks ahead of schedule and 1.5 billion kroner under budget at a cost of 16.6 billion kroner; and downstream off the U.K., Phillips Petroleum Co. (U.K.) Ltd. awarded Allseas Marine Contractors SA, Essen, Belgium, a pipelay and trenching contract for its Ann field development project in Block 49/6a.

  3. Toward variational assimilation of SARAL/Altika altimeter data in a North Atlantic circulation model at eddy-permitting resolution: assessment of a NEMO-based 4D-VAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouttier, Pierre-Antoine; Brankart, Jean-Michel; Candille, Guillem; Vidard, Arthur; Blayo, Eric; Verron, Jacques; Brasseur, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    In this project, the response of a variational data assimilation system based on NEMO and its linear tangent and adjoint model is investigated using a 4DVAR algorithm into a North-Atlantic model at eddy-permitting resolution. The assimilated data consist of Jason-2 and SARAL/AltiKA dataset collected during the 2013-2014 period. The main objective is to explore the robustness of the 4DVAR algorithm in the context of a realistic turbulent oceanic circulation at mid-latitude constrained by multi-satellite altimetry missions. This work relies on two previous studies. First, a study with similar objectives was performed based on academic double-gyre turbulent model and synthetic SARAL/AltiKA data, using the same DA experimental framework. Its main goal was to investigate the impact of turbulence on variational DA methods performance. The comparison with this previous work will bring to light the methodological and physical issues encountered by variational DA algorithms in a realistic context at similar, eddy-permitting spatial resolution. We also have demonstrated how a dataset mimicking future SWOT observations improves 4DVAR incremental performances at eddy-permitting resolution. Then, in the context of the OSTST and FP7 SANGOMA projects, an ensemble DA experiment based on the same model and observational datasets has been realized (see poster by Brasseur et al.). This work offers the opportunity to compare efficiency, pros and cons of both DA methods in the context of KA-band altimetric data, at spatial resolution commonly used today for research and operational applications. In this poster we will present the validation plan proposed to evaluate the skill of variational experiment vs. ensemble assimilation experiments covering the same period using independent observations (e.g. from Cryosat-2 mission).

  4. Characterization of organic material in ice core samples from North America, Greenland, and Antarctica using ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzano, V.; Grannas, A. M.; Sleighter, R. L.; Hatcher, P. G.

    2013-12-01

    Historically, it has been an analytical challenge to detect and identify the organic components present in ice cores, due to the low abundance of organic carbon. In order to detect and characterize the small amounts of organic matter in ice cores, ultra high resolution instrumentation is required. Here we report the use of ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, coupled with electrospray ionization, to identify the molecular formulas and compound classes of organic matter in both modern and ancient ice core and glacial samples from Wyoming, Greenland, and Antarctica. A suite of 21 samples were analyzed and thousands of distinct molecular species were identified in each sample, providing clues to the nature and sources of organic matter in these regions. Major biochemical classes of compounds were detected such as lignins, tannins, carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, unsaturated hydrocarbons, and condensed aromatic compounds. We will compare the nature of the organic matter present in the samples in order to determine the differences in dominant organic compound classes and in heteroatom (nitrogen and sulfur) abundance. By analyzing these differences, it is possible to investigate the historical patterns of organic matter deposition/source, and begin to investigate the influence of climate change, volcanism, and onset of the industrial revolution on the nature of organic matter preserved in ice cores.

  5. The effect of grid resolution on estimates of the burden of ozone and fine particulate matter on premature mortality in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Punger, Elizabeth M.; West, J. Jason

    2013-01-01

    Assessments of human health impacts associated with outdoor air pollution often use air quality models to represent exposure, but involve uncertainties due to coarse model resolution. Here we quantify how estimates of mortality in the United States attributable to ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) at coarse resolution differ from those at finer resolution. Using the finest modeled concentrations (12 km), we estimate that 66,000 (95% CI, 39,300 – 84,500) all-cause and 21,400 (5,600 – 34,200) respiratory deaths per year are attributable to PM2.5 and O3 concentrations above low-concentration thresholds, respectively. Using model results at 36 km resolution gives mortality burdens that are 11% higher for PM2.5 and 12% higher for O3 than the 12 km estimates, suggesting a modest positive bias. We also scale modeled concentrations at 12 km to coarser resolutions by simple averaging, and repeat the mortality assessment at multiple resolutions from 24 to 408 km, including the resolutions of global models; in doing so, we account for the effect of resolution on population exposure. Coarse grid resolutions produce mortality estimates that are substantially biased low for PM2.5 (30–40% lower than the 12 km estimate at >250 km resolution), but less than 6% higher for O3 at any resolution. Mortality estimates for primary PM2.5 species show greater bias at coarse resolution than secondary species. These results suggest that coarse resolution global models (>100 km) are likely biased low for PM2.5 health effects. For ozone, biases due to coarse resolution may be much smaller, and the effect on modeled chemistry likely dominates. PMID:24348882

  6. Evaluating Changes in Extreme Weather During the North American Monsoon in the Southwest U.S. Using High Resolution, Convective-Permitting Regional Atmospheric Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, C. L.; Chang, H. I.; Luong, T. M.; Lahmers, T.; Jares, M.; Mazon, J.; Carrillo, C. M.; Adams, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    The North American monsoon (NAM) is the principal driver of summer severe weather in the Southwest U.S. Monsoon convection typically initiates during daytime over the mountains and may organize into mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). Most monsoon-related severe weather occurs in association with organized convection, including microbursts, dust storms, flash flooding and lightning. A convective resolving grid spacing (on the kilometer scale) model is required to explicitly represent the physical characteristics of organized convection, for example the presence of leading convective lines and trailing stratiform precipitation regions. Our objective is to analyze how monsoon severe weather is changing in relation to anthropogenic climate change. We first consider a dynamically downscaled reanalysis during a historical period 1948-2010. Individual severe weather event days, identified by favorable thermodynamic conditions, are then simulated for short-term, numerical weather prediction-type simulations of 30h at a convective-permitting scale. Changes in modeled severe weather events indicate increases in precipitation intensity in association with long-term increases in atmospheric instability and moisture, particularly with organized convection downwind of mountain ranges. However, because the frequency of synoptic transients is decreasing during the monsoon, organized convection is less frequent and convective precipitation tends to be more phased locked to terrain. These types of modeled changes also similarly appear in observed CPC precipitation, when the severe weather event days are selected using historical radiosonde data. Next, we apply the identical model simulation and analysis procedures to several dynamically downscaled CMIP3 and CMIP5 models for the period 1950-2100, to assess how monsoon severe weather may change in the future with respect to occurrence and intensity and if these changes correspond with what is already occurring in the historical

  7. High-resolution carbon isotope records of the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (Early Jurassic) from North America and implications for the global drivers of the Toarcian carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Them, T. R.; Gill, B. C.; Caruthers, A. H.; Gröcke, D. R.; Tulsky, E. T.; Martindale, R. C.; Poulton, T. P.; Smith, P. L.

    2017-02-01

    The Mesozoic Era experienced several instances of abrupt environmental change that are associated with instabilities in the climate, reorganizations of the global carbon cycle, and elevated extinction rates. Often during these perturbations, oxygen-deficient conditions developed in the oceans resulting in the widespread deposition of organic-rich sediments - these events are referred to as Oceanic Anoxic Events or OAEs. Such events have been linked to massive injections of greenhouse gases into the ocean-atmosphere system by transient episodes of voluminous volcanism and the destabilization of methane clathrates within marine environments. Nevertheless, uncertainty surrounds the specific environmental drivers and feedbacks that occurred during the OAEs that caused perturbations in the carbon cycle; this is particularly true of the Early Jurassic Toarcian OAE (∼183.1 Ma). Here, we present biostratigraphically constrained carbon isotope data from western North America (Alberta and British Columbia, Canada) to better assess the global extent of the carbon cycle perturbations. We identify the large negative carbon isotope excursion associated with the OAE along with high-frequency oscillations and steps within the onset of this excursion. We propose that these high-frequency carbon isotope excursions reflect changes to the global carbon cycle and also that they are related to the production and release of greenhouse gases from terrestrial environments on astronomical timescales. Furthermore, increased terrestrial methanogenesis should be considered an important climatic feedback during Ocean Anoxic Events and other similar events in Earth history after the proliferation of land plants.

  8. A Prospective Comparative Study of High Resolution Ultrasound and MRI in the Diagnosis of Rotator Cuff Tears in a Tertiary Hospital of North India

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Narvir Singh; Ahluwalia, Ajay; Sharma, Yash Paul; Thakur, Lokesh

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background To evaluate the accuracy of high resolution ultrasound (USG) and MRI in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears (RCT) and to determine if high resolution USG compares favorably in sensitivity and specificity to MRI in the diagnosis of rotator cuff injury. Material/Methods In this prospective comparative study, 40 patients with clinically suspected rotator cuff tears underwent both ultrasound and MRI of the shoulder. Out of these 40 patients, 31 patients who had positive findings for rotator cuff tears on ultrasound and/or MRI were finally included in the study while the remaining 9 patients with negative or unrelated findings were excluded. The USG and MRI were interpreted by two radiologists experienced in musculoskeletal radiology and blinded to findings of each other. Comparison was done using MRI as a standard reference. Results The agreement between USG and MRI for diagnosis of RCTs was statistically excellent; USG showed a sensitivity of 86.7% and a specificity of 100% for full-thickness tears, and a sensitivity of 89.7% and a specificity of 98.8% for partial-thickness tears; observed accuracy for full thickness tears was 98.4% and 95.9% for partial thickness tears. The Kappa coefficient of association was 0.91 for full thickness tears and 0.90 for partial thickness tears. Conclusions Considering the comparable diagnostic accuracy of USG and MRI, the former modality can be used as a first-line investigation for diagnosis of RCT. MRI should be used secondarily as a problem-solving tool either following an equivocal shoulder USG or for delineation of anatomy in cases where surgical correction is needed. PMID:27800039

  9. Glacitectonic rafting and associated deformation of mid-Pleistocene glacigenic sediments, near Central Graben, central North Sea; results of a 2D High-Resolution Geophysical Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan-Hirsch, David

    2013-04-01

    Glacitectonic rafts are defined as dislocated slabs of bedrock or unconsolidated sediments, transported from their original position by glacial action. These relatively thin, slab-like bodies feature transport distances ranging from tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers. They occur as either single rafts, or multiple stacked bodies associated with a variety of ice-pushed landforms. Internally, rafts frequently appear undeformed although at a larger scale, they may be folded or cut by shear zones and brittle faults. However, the processes leading to the detachment, transport and subsequent emplacement of the rafts remain uncertain. This work describes the results of a geophysical 2D seismic survey of thrust-bound glacitectonic rafts and associated deformation structures, occurring within mid-Pleistocene glacigenic sediments of the Central Graben, central North Sea. The total shortened length of the rafted section is 2.4km, comprising a series of nine discrete rafts which individually range from 235m to 1018m in length. The principle basal detachment occurs at the erosive contact between Aberdeen Ground Formation and overlying Ling Bank Formation. The ice-proximal (northern) limit of rafting is defined by the presence of a large-scale palaeo-channel oriented perpendicular to the direction of rafting, composed of sediments of the Ling Bank Formation and the Forth Formation. The observed deformation structures infer a mean tectonic direction of 178°, indicating that they are associated with an active glacial advance from the north. The resulting deformation creates a minimum lateral shortening throughout the observed sequence of 35%, typifying a strongly compressional regieme associated with rafting. Throughout the surveyed area, structurally younger rafts are found to be emplaced towards the south, compared to the structurally older rafts which are emplaced towards the south-east. This distinction is suggested to be caused by early rafts creating an obstacle to

  10. Deposition of sedimentary organic matter in black shale facies indicated by the geochemistry and petrography of high-resolution samples, blake nose, western North Atlantic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, C.E.; Pawlewicz, M.; Cobabe, E.A.

    2001-01-01

    A transect of three holes drilled across the Blake Nose, western North Atlantic Ocean, retrieved cores of black shale facies related to the Albian Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAE) lb and ld. Sedimentary organic matter (SOM) recovered from Ocean Drilling Program Hole 1049A from the eastern end of the transect showed that before black shale facies deposition organic matter preservation was a Type III-IV SOM. Petrography reveals that this SOM is composed mostly of degraded algal debris, amorphous SOM and a minor component of Type III-IV terrestrial SOM, mostly detroinertinite. When black shale facies deposition commenced, the geochemical character of the SOM changed from a relatively oxygen-rich Type III-IV to relatively hydrogen-rich Type II. Petrography, biomarker and organic carbon isotopic data indicate marine and terrestrial SOM sources that do not appear to change during the transition from light-grey calcareous ooze to the black shale facies. Black shale subfacies layers alternate from laminated to homogeneous. Some of the laminated and the poorly laminated to homogeneous layers are organic carbon and hydrogen rich as well, suggesting that at least two SOM depositional processes are influencing the black shale facies. The laminated beds reflect deposition in a low sedimentation rate (6m Ma-1) environment with SOM derived mostly from gravity settling from the overlying water into sometimes dysoxic bottom water. The source of this high hydrogen content SOM is problematic because before black shale deposition, the marine SOM supplied to the site is geochemically a Type III-IV. A clue to the source of the H-rich SOM may be the interlayering of relatively homogeneous ooze layers that have a widely variable SOM content and quality. These relatively thick, sometimes subtly graded, sediment layers are thought to be deposited from a Type II SOM-enriched sediment suspension generated by turbidities or direct turbidite deposition.

  11. High-resolution stratigraphy of a Mississippi subdelta-lobe progradation in the Barataria Bight, north-central Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flocks, J.G.; Ferina, N.F.; Dreher, C.; Kindinger, J.L.; FitzGerald, D.M.; Kulp, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    The coastal zone of southeastern Louisiana is the product of numerous cycles of progradation, abandonment, and marine transgression of the Mississippi River delta. Currently, the shoreline in the Barataria Bight is undergoing significant erosion and retreat, and understanding its evolution is crucial in stabilization efforts. This study uses an extensive collection of geophysical and sediment core data from Barataria Bay and offshore to develop a geologic model of the shallow (< 10 m) subsurface. The purpose of the model is twofold: (1) establish the stratigraphic architecture of a subdelta lobe of the Bayou des Families delta, deposited by the Mississippi River approximately 4000 years before present; and (2) provide a high-resolution description of the geologic framework in a context that can be applied to coastal management issues in similar fluvially dominated coastal environments worldwide. The results of the study demonstrate how high-quality geologic data from the coastal environment can be used not only to further our understanding of shoreline evolution but also to provide pertinent information for coastal management needs.

  12. New mESYLIDAR system testing measurements: first results considering meteorological context in North East region of Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazacu, M. M.; Timofte, A.; Mark, P.; Tudose, O.; Gurlui, S.; Dorohoi, D. O.; Balin, I.

    2010-05-01

    Aiming the remote sensing low cost, up-gradable and modular tools development for monitoring relevant atmospheric parameters processes in whole troposphere (100 m to 12-15 Km ASL), the new mini LIDAR system i.e mESYLIDAR, dedicated for tropospheric aerosols and clouds high temporal (minutes) and spatial resolutions (meters) investigations is described. The up-gradable configuration of mESYLIDAR is based on a powerful Nd:YAG 30 Hz pulsed laser (35 mJ at 355 nm, 100 mJ at 532 nm, 200 mJ at 1064 nm), a 40 cm Newtonian telescope and on an new opto-mechanics detection module built in an "eye geometry" considerations. First measurements, performed on the site of Science and Technology Park TehnopolIS (IASI city), located on the North Eastern region of Romania, using a basic configuration with elastic detection at 532 nm with depolarization study module were performed. Different types of clouds (altocumulus, cirrus and cirrostratus) up to 12 km in daylight are highlighted using profiles obtained with mESYLIDAR system, confirmed also by satellite imagery. The PBL height over the Iasi region was first time determined from the LIDAR data as well as the aerosols load and dynamics. The HYSPLIT model (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model) was used to confirm the backward trajectories of aerosols and mixed depth layer. Synoptic situations and satellite data are useful for LIDAR data validation i.e. clouds occurrence.

  13. An Objective Verification of the North American Mesoscale Model for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2010-01-01

    The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers (LWO's) use the 12-km resolution North American Mesoscale (NAM) model (MesoNAM) text and graphical product forecasts extensively to support launch weather operations. However, the actual performance of the model at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) has not been measured objectively. In order to have tangible evidence of model performance, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU; Bauman et ai, 2004) to conduct a detailed statistical analysis of model output compared to observed values. The model products are provided to the 45 WS by ACTA, Inc. and include hourly forecasts from 0 to 84 hours based on model initialization times of 00, 06, 12 and 18 UTC. The objective analysis compared the MesoNAM forecast winds, temperature (T) and dew pOint (T d), as well as the changes in these parameters over time, to the observed values from the sensors in the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network shown in Table 1. These objective statistics give the forecasters knowledge of the model's strengths and weaknesses, which will result in improved forecasts for operations.

  14. An Objective Verification of the North American Mesoscale Model for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2010-01-01

    The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers use the 12-km resolution North American Mesoscale (NAM) model (MesoNAM) text and graphical product forecasts extensively to support launch weather operations. However, the actual performance of the model at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) has not been measured objectively. In order to have tangible evidence of model performance, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit to conduct a detailed statistical analysis of model output compared to observed values. The model products are provided to the 45 WS by ACTA, Inc. and include hourly forecasts from 0 to 84 hours based on model initialization times of 00, 06, 12 and 18 UTC. The objective analysis compared the MesoNAM forecast winds, temperature and dew point, as well as the changes in these parameters over time, to the observed values from the sensors in the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network. Objective statistics will give the forecasters knowledge of the model's strength and weaknesses, which will result in improved forecasts for operations.

  15. Improving High-resolution Weather Forecasts using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model with Upgraded Kain-Fritsch Cumulus Scheme

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-resolution weather forecasting is affected by many aspects, i.e. model initial conditions, subgrid-scale cumulus convection and cloud microphysics schemes. Recent 12km grid studies using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model have identified the importance of inco...

  16. Non-linear Holocene climate evolution in the North Atlantic: a high-resolution, multi-proxy record of glacier activity and environmental change from Hvítárvatn, central Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Darren J.; Miller, Gifford H.; Geirsdóttir, Áslaug; Ólafsdóttir, Sædís

    2012-04-01

    Iceland is well situated to monitor North Atlantic Holocene climate variability. Terrestrial sites there offer the potential for well-dated, high-resolution, continuous records of environmental change and/or glacier activity. Laminated sediments from the proglacial lake Hvítárvatn provide a continuous record of environmental change and the development of the adjacent Langjökull ice cap for the past 10.2 ka. Replicate lake sediment cores, collected from multiple locations in the basin, are placed in a secure geochronology by splicing a varve chronology for the past 3 ka with a tephra-constrained, paleomagnetic secular variation derived chronology for older sediments. Multiple proxies, including sedimentation rate, bulk density, ice-rafted debris, sediment organic matter, biogenic silica, and diatom abundance, allow annual to multi-decadal resolution and reveal a dynamic Holocene terrestrial climate. Following regional deglaciation of the main Iceland Ice Sheet, summer temperatures were high enough that mountain ice caps had already melted, or were contributing insignificant sediment to the lake. Pronounced increases in sedimentation rate, sediment density, and the influx of terrestrial organic matter, between 8.7 and 7.9 ka suggest early Holocene warmth was interrupted by two distinct pulses of cold summers leading to widespread landscape destabilization and possibly glacier growth. The Holocene thermal maximum (HTM; 7.9 to 5.5 ka) was characterized by high within-lake productivity and ice-free conditions in the watershed. Neoglaciation is recorded as a non-linear transition toward cooler summers, landscape destabilization, and the inception and expansion of Langjökull beginning ca 5.5 ka, with notable increases in ice cap size and landscape instability at 4.2 and 3.0 ka. The past two millennia are characterized by the abrupt onset of sustained cold periods at ca 550 and 1250 AD, separated by an interval of relative warmth from ca 950 to 1150 AD. The greatest

  17. Relationships between Greenland and lower latitude climate over the last glacial period from new high resolution measurements of 17O-excess and d-excess on the NorthGRIP ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landais, Amaelle; Prie, Frederic; Minster, Benedicte; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie; Vinther, Bo; Popp, Trevor; Rhodes, Rachael; Dahl-Jensen, Dorther

    2016-04-01

    Greenland ice cores have long revealed the abrupt climatic variability characterizing the last glacial period (succession of Dansgaard-Oeschger events). Since then, many other continental and marine records have shown the northern hemispheric extent of these abrupt events with an associated signature in the southern hemisphere. While the water isotopic records (d18O or dD) records of Greenland ice cores have long been used as references for the northern hemisphere climatic variability, more and more pieces of evidence point to some decoupling between the climate variability in Greenland and the climate variability in lower latitudes. In particular, the Greenland temperature records derived from water and air isotopes do not exhibit any signature for the Heinrich events. We present here new high resolution measurements of 17O-excess and d-excess from the NorthGRIP ice core covering the abrupt climatic variability of the last deglaciation and the last glacial period. These second order parameters are particularly useful to decipher the local from the distant effect on the water isotopic records in polar ice cores since they are sensitive to climatic conditions at the oceanic evaporative regions and to the trajectories of the water mass toward the polar precipitation sites. These new measurements clearly highlight a decoupling between Greenland and lower latitudes between the cold phases (stadials) of the Dansgaard-Oeschger events that can be due to sea-ice extent or other modifications in the oceanic surface climatic conditions. A comparison between the d-excess records of the GRIP and NGRIP ice core highlight different behaviours in the trajectories of moisture toward different regions Greenland that can again be linked to regional differences in sea-ice extent. Finally, our new sets of data also exhibit a particular behavior of the Greenland vs lower latitude climate during very short Dansgaard-Oeschger events.

  18. Anisotropic 2.5D Inversion of Towed Streamer EM Data from Three North Sea Fields Using Parallel Adaptive Finite Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, K.; Du, Z.

    2014-12-01

    We present anisotropic inversion results from towed streamer electromagnetic (EM) surveys of the Bressay, Bentley and Kraken (BBK) heavy oil fields in the North Sea. The BBK discoveries pose several challenges to conventional controlled-source EM surveying since the relatively shallow water dampens the anomaly magnitudes due to airwave coupling, and the reservoirs are in close proximity to other resistive features. The 160 m spacing of the 44 receiver bipoles on the towed streamer offers much higher data density than is typically achieved with conventional seafloor receiver surveys. We tested the resolving capabilities of the towed-streamer by inverting the survey data using a new code based on a 2.5D parallel goal-oriented adaptive finite element method and a modified implementation of the Occam inversion algorithm. The inversion successfully images the 1-2 km wide Bressay and ~5 km wide Bentley reservoirs, illustrating that the high data density of the towed streamer offers improved resolution over sparsely sampled nodal seafloor receiver data. The results also demonstrate the importance of allowing for anisotropy when inverting data from this region. Whereas anisotropic inversion clearly recovers the lateral edges of the known reservoirs, isotropic inversion results in inter-bedding of resistive and conductive layers that conceal the reservoirs.

  19. Local-area-enhanced, 2.5-meter resolution natural-color and color-infrared satellite-image mosaics of the North Takhar mineral district in Afghanistan: Chapter D in Local-area-enhanced, high-resolution natural-color and color-infrared satellite-image mosaics of mineral districts in Afghanistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Philip A.; Cagney, Laura E.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Defense Task Force for Business and Stability Operations, prepared databases for mineral-resource target areas in Afghanistan. The purpose of the databases is to (1) provide useful data to ground-survey crews for use in performing detailed assessments of the areas and (2) provide useful information to private investors who are considering investment in a particular area for development of its natural resources. The set of satellite-image mosaics provided in this Data Series (DS) is one such database. Although airborne digital color-infrared imagery was acquired for parts of Afghanistan in 2006, the image data have radiometric variations that preclude their use in creating a consistent image mosaic for geologic analysis. Consequently, image mosaics were created using ALOS (Advanced Land Observation Satellite; renamed Daichi) satellite images, whose radiometry has been well determined (Saunier, 2007a,b). This part of the DS consists of the locally enhanced ALOS image mosaics for the North Takhar mineral district, which has placer gold deposits. ALOS was launched on January 24, 2006, and provides multispectral images from the AVNIR (Advanced Visible and Near-Infrared Radiometer) sensor in blue (420–500 nanometer, nm), green (520–600 nm), red (610–690 nm), and near-infrared (760–890 nm) wavelength bands with an 8-bit dynamic range and a 10-meter (m) ground resolution. The satellite also provides a panchromatic band image from the PRISM (Panchromatic Remote-sensing Instrument for Stereo Mapping) sensor (520–770 nm) with the same dynamic range but a 2.5-m ground resolution. The image products in this DS incorporate copyrighted data provided by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (©JAXA,2006,2008), but the image processing has altered the original pixel structure and all image values of the JAXA ALOS data, such that original image values cannot be recreated from this DS. As such

  20. Defrosting North

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    15 June 2004 Spring is upon the martian northern hemisphere, and the north polar cap is shrinking. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image, acquired on 12 June 2004, shows the retreating edge of the seasonal north polar cap near 70oN, 209oW. Low clouds and fogs stream away from the cap edge as it sublimes away. North is approximately up and the image covers an area roughly 500 km (311 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left. The crater containing a thick mound of material near the right-center of the image is Korolev.

  1. North Polar Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    25 December 2004 For 25 December, the MOC team thought that a visit to a north polar site would be timely. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows, at about 1.5 meters per pixel (5 feet per pixel) resolution, a view of the north polar ice cap of Mars. That the material includes water ice has been known since the mid-1970s, when Viking orbiter observations confirmed that the cap gives off water vapor in the summertime, as the ice is subliming away. The surface shown here, observed by MOC during northern summer in November 2004, is pitted and somewhat grooved. Dark material on pit floors might be trapped, windblown dust. The picture covers an area about 1 km (0.62 mi) across, and is located near 86.8oN, 293.1oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  2. 84. INTERIOR, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH ENTRANCE, NORTH LOBBY, NORTH WALL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    84. INTERIOR, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH ENTRANCE, NORTH LOBBY, NORTH WALL, BRONZE DOUBLE DOORS (4' x 5' negative; 8' x 10' print) - U.S. Department of the Interior, Eighteenth & C Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. True North

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Jo-Anne Mary

    2007-01-01

    For Americans wanting to explore beyond their frontiers, their neighbor to the north is an ideal destination. Much of Canada's population is concentrated near the shared border, mostly in Ontario and Quebec. While nature is an obvious draw, Canada's dynamic urban centers present their own sophisticated enticements, and the country's ten provinces…

  4. Conflict resolution.

    PubMed

    Levin, Roger

    2006-03-01

    The sooner conflict is identified and confronted, the more quickly it can be resolved (and the sooner, the better). When this is accomplished calmly and objectively, many areas of conflict will be eliminated. Addressing conflict as it arises also sends a clear message to the team that the practice seeks resolution, not punishment or negative consequences. In addition, the dentist and the office manager need to lead by example by avoiding gossip and encouraging open communication. The goal is to go from a parent-child relationship with the dental team to an adult-adult relationship using this series of managerial conflict resolution steps.

  5. High-Resolution Geophysical Constraints on Late Pleistocene-Present Deformation History, Seabed Morphology, and Slip-Rate along the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather Fault, Offshore Southeastern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, D. S.; Haeussler, P. J.; Dartnell, P.; Conrad, J. E.; Kluesner, J. W.; Hart, P. E.; Witter, R. C.; Balster-Gee, A. F.; Maier, K. L.; Watt, J. T.; East, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    The Queen Charlotte-Fairweather Fault (QCFF) of southeastern Alaska and British Columbia is the dominant fault along the 1200 km-long transform boundary between the Pacific and North American plates. More than 900 km of the QCFF lies offshore where the style and rates of deformation are poorly constrained due to a lack of high-resolution marine geophysical data. In May 2015, the USGS acquired ~900 km2 of high-resolution multibeam bathymetry data and >2000 line-km of high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection profiles between Cross Sound, Yakobi Sea Valley, and Icy Point (the northernmost offshore section of the QCFF) using a 24-ch streamer and 500 Joule minisparker source. During a second cruise in August 2015 we conducted targeted multichannel seismic and subbottom CHIRP profiling in the same region. The new data reveal a single trace of the QCFF expressed as a clear and remarkably straight seafloor lineation for >60 km. Subtle jogs in the fault (<3 degrees) are associated with pop-up structures and en echelon pull-apart basins. The near surface deformation along the fault never exceeds a width of 1.2 km. Northward, as the fault approaches Icy Point and a restraining bend, it splays into multiple strands and displays evidence for uplift and transpression. The fault appears to transition from almost purely strike-slip in the south to oblique-convergence as it steps onshore to the north. The QCFF cuts through the Yakobi Sea Valley and Cross Sound, two elongate bathymetric troughs that were filled with glaciers as recently as 17-19 ka. The southern wall of the Yakobi Sea Valley is offset 890±30 m by the QCFF, providing a late Pleistocene-present slip-rate estimate of 45-54 mm/yr. This suggests that nearly the entire plate boundary slip budget is confined to a single, narrow, strike-slip fault zone, which may have implications for models of plate boundary strain localization.

  6. High resolution kilometric range optical telemetry in air by radio frequency phase measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillory, Joffray; Šmíd, Radek; García-Márquez, Jorge; Truong, Daniel; Alexandre, Christophe; Wallerand, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    We have developed an optical Absolute Distance Meter (ADM) based on the measurement of the phase accumulated by a Radio Frequency wave during its propagation in the air by a laser beam. In this article, the ADM principle will be described and the main results will be presented. In particular, we will emphasize how the choice of an appropriate photodetector can significantly improve the telemeter performances by minimizing the amplitude to phase conversion. Our prototype, tested in the field, has proven its efficiency with a resolution better than 15 μm for a measurement time of 10 ms and distances up to 1.2 km.

  7. NCAI Resolutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal of the Institute for the Development of Indian Law, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Five Major Policy Resolutions were adopted, without objection, at the 33rd Annual Convention of the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) held in Salt Lake City, Utah, in October 1976. The issues involved were: Treaties and Trust Responsibilities, Tribal Government, Jurisdiction, Federal Administration and Structure of Indian Affairs, and…

  8. A resolution honoring and supporting women in North Africa and the Middle East whose bravery, compassion, and commitment to putting the wellbeing of others before their own have proven that courage can be contagious.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Snowe, Olympia J. [R-ME

    2011-03-28

    04/14/2011 Resolution agreed to in Senate with an amendment and an amended preamble by Unanimous Consent. (text: CR S2552-2553) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. A resolution expressing the sense of the Senate in support of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the NATO summit to be held in Chicago, Illinois from May 20 through 21, 2012.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Durbin, Richard [D-IL

    2012-03-13

    03/29/2012 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and an amended preamble by Voice Vote. (consideration: CR S2279-2280; text of measure as reported in Senate: CR S2279; text as passed Senate: CR S2279-2280) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. Anaglyph, North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This anaglyph (stereoscopic view) of North America was generated with data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). It is best viewed at or near full resolution with anaglyph glasses. For this broad view the resolution of the data was first reduced to 30 arcseconds (about 928 meters north-south and 736 meters east-west in central North America), matching the best previously existing global digital topographic data set called GTOPO30. The data were then resampled to a Mercator projection with approximately square pixels (about one kilometer, or 0.6 miles, on each side). Even at this decreased resolution the variety of landforms comprising the North American continent is readily apparent.

    Active tectonics (structural deformation of the Earth's crust) along and near the Pacific North American plate boundary creates the great topographic relief seen along the Pacific coast. Earth's crustal plates converge in southern Mexico and in the northwest United States, melting the crust and producing volcanic cones. Along the California coast, the plates are sliding laterally past each other, producing a pattern of slices within the San Andreas fault system. And, where the plates are diverging, the crust appears torn apart as one huge tear along the Gulf of California (northwest Mexico), and as the several fractures comprising the Basin and Range province (in and around Nevada).

    Across the Great Plains, erosional patterns dominate, with stream channels surrounding and penetrating the remnants of older smooth slopes east of the Rocky Mountains. This same erosion process is exposing the bedrock structural patterns of the Black Hills in South Dakota and the Ozark Mountains in Arkansas. Lateral erosion and sediment deposition by the Mississippi River has produced the flatlands of the lower Mississippi Valley and the Mississippi Delta.

    To the north, evidence of the glaciers of the last ice age is widely found, particularly east of the Canadian Rocky Mountains and

  11. Structure of the Hat Creek graben region: Implications for the structure of the Hat Creek graben and transfer of right-lateral shear from the Walker Lane north of Lassen Peak, northern California, from gravity and magnetic anomalies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, Victoria; Jachens, Robert C.; Clynne, Michael A.; Muffler, L. J. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation of magnetic and new gravity data provides constraints on the geometry of the Hat Creek Fault, the amount of right-lateral offset in the area between Mt. Shasta and Lassen Peak, and confirmation of the influence of pre-existing structure on Quaternary faulting. Neogene volcanic rocks coincide with short-wavelength magnetic anomalies of both normal and reversed polarity, whereas a markedly smoother magnetic field occurs over the Klamath Mountains and its Paleogene cover. Although the magnetic field over the Neogene volcanic rocks is complex, the Hat Creek Fault, which is one of the most prominent normal faults in the region and forms the eastern margin of the Hat Creek Valley, is marked by the eastern edge of a north-trending magnetic and gravity high 20-30 km long. Modeling of these anomalies indicates that the fault is a steeply dipping (~75-85°) structure. The spatial relationship of the fault as modeled by the potential-field data, the youngest strand of the fault, and relocated seismicity suggests that deformation continues to step westward across the valley, consistent with a component of right-lateral slip in an extensional environment. Filtered aeromagnetic data highlight a concealed magnetic body of Mesozoic or older age north of Hat Creek Valley. The body’s northwest margin strikes northeast and is linear over a distance of ~40 km. Within the resolution of the aeromagnetic data (1-2 km), we discern no right-lateral offset of this body. Furthermore, Quaternary faults change strike or appear to end, as if to avoid this concealed magnetic body and to pass along its southeast edge, suggesting that pre-existing crustal structure influenced younger faulting, as previously proposed based on gravity data.

  12. Assessment of the effects of horizontal grid resolution on long ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The objective of this study is to determine the adequacy of using a relatively coarse horizontal resolution (i.e. 36 km) to simulate long-term trends of pollutant concentrations and radiation variables with the coupled WRF-CMAQ model. WRF-CMAQ simulations over the continental United State are performed over the 2001 to 2010 time period at two different horizontal resolutions of 12 and 36 km. Both simulations used the same emission inventory and model configurations. Model results are compared both in space and time to assess the potential weaknesses and strengths of using coarse resolution in long-term air quality applications. The results show that the 36 km and 12 km simulations are comparable in terms of trends analysis for both pollutant concentrations and radiation variables. The advantage of using the coarser 36 km resolution is a significant reduction of computational cost, time and storage requirement which are key considerations when performing multiple years of simulations for trend analysis. However, if such simulations are to be used for local air quality analysis, finer horizontal resolution may be beneficial since it can provide information on local gradients. In particular, divergences between the two simulations are noticeable in urban, complex terrain and coastal regions. The National Exposure Research Laboratory’s Atmospheric Modeling Division (AMAD) conducts research in support of EPA’s mission to protect human health and the environment.

  13. Winter extreme precipitation along the North American west coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Michael D.

    primarily associated with thermodynamic changes related to future IWV increases due to warming. The dynamically downscaled NCEP-NCAR reanalysis-driven WRF model, run with a 36-km resolution outer domain and a 12-km nest, contains more realistic terrain than most GCMs and highlights the spatial precipitation distribution over the Pacific Northwest. Winter precipitation in the Pacific Northwest correlates well with offshore daily IVT (as high as ˜0.8) with spatial signatures indicative of frequent coastal mid-latitude cyclones impacting the coast. However, the most extreme AR events did not correlate as highly as expected with daily precipitation (as high as ˜0.4), despite ARs accounting for 8% or more of the total winter precipitation. When wind direction was taken into account, the correlations were much higher (˜0.7-0.8), indicating wind direction is an important factor when extreme precipitation occurs along the coast.

  14. [CO2 Budget and Atmospheric Rectification (COBRA) Over North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the CO2 Budget and Rectification Airborne (COBRA) study was to assess terrestrial sources and sinks of carbon dioxide using an air-borne study. The study was designed to address the measurement gap between plot-scale direct flux measurements and background hemispheric-scale constraints and to refine techniques for measuring terrestrial fluxes at regional to continental scales. The initial funded effort (reported on here) was to involve two air-borne campaigns over North America, one in summer and one in winter. Measurements for COBRA (given the acronym C02BAR in the initial proposal) were conducted from the University of North Dakota Citation 11, a twin-engine jet aircraft capable of profiling from the surface to 12 km and cruising for up to 4 hours and 175m/s. Onboard instrumentation measured concentrations of CO2, CO, and H2O, and meteorological parameters at high rates. In addition, two separate flask sampling systems collected discrete samples for laboratory analysis of CO2,CO, CH4, N2O, SF6, H2, 13CO2, C18O16O,O2/N2, and Ar/N2. The project involved a collaboration between a number of institutions, including (but not limited to) Harvard, NOAA-CMDL, the University of North Dakota, and Scripps.

  15. Remote Sensing of Aerosol Backscatter and Earth Surface Targets By Use of An Airborne Focused Continuous Wave CO2 Doppler Lidar Over Western North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Airborne lidar systems are used to determine wind velocity and to measure aerosol or cloud backscatter variability. Atmospheric aerosols, being affected by local and regional sources, show tremendous variability. Continuous wave (cw) lidar can obtain detailed aerosol loading with unprecedented high resolution (3 sec) and sensitivity (1 mg/cubic meter) as was done during the 1995 NASA Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) mission over western North America and the Pacific Ocean. Backscatter variability was measured at a 9.1 micron wavelength cw focused CO2 Doppler lidar for approximately 52 flight hours, covering an equivalent horizontal distance of approximately 30,000 km in the troposphere. Some quasi-vertical backscatter profiles were also obtained during various ascents and descents at altitudes that ranged from approximately 0.1 to 12 km. Similarities and differences for aerosol loading over land and ocean were observed. Mid-tropospheric aerosol backscatter background mode was approximately 6 x 10(exp -11)/ms/r, consistent with previous lidar datasets. While these atmospheric measurements were made, the lidar also retrieved a distinct backscatter signal from the Earth's surface from the unfocused part of the focused cw lidar beam during aircraft rolls. Atmospheric backscatter can be highly variable both spatially and temporally, whereas, Earth-surface backscatter is relatively much less variant and can be quite predictable. Therefore, routine atmospheric backscatter measurements by an airborne lidar also give Earth surface backscatter which can allow for investigating the Earth terrain. In the case where the Earth's surface backscatter is coming from a well-known and fairly uniform region, then it can potentially offer lidar calibration opportunities during flight. These Earth surface measurements over varying Californian terrain during the mission were compared with laboratory backscatter measurements using the same lidar of various

  16. North Polar Erg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

    This VIS image was taken at 82 degrees North latitude during Northern spring. As with yesterday's image, the dunes are still partially frost covered. This region is part of the north polar erg (sand sea), note the complexity and regional coverage of the dunes.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 81.2, Longitude 118.2 East (241.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  17. North Polar Erg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

    This VIS image was taken at 81 degrees North latitude during Northern spring. This region of the north polar erg is dominated by a different form of dunes than yesterday's image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 81.4, Longitude 121.9 East (238.1 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  18. North Atlantic Bloom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Reminiscent of the distinctive swirls in a Van Gogh painting, millions of microscopic plants color the waters of the North Atlantic with strokes of blue, turquoise, green, and brown. Fed by nutrients that have built up during the winter and the long, sunlit days of late spring and early summer, the cool waters of the North Atlantic come alive every year with a vivid display of color. The microscopic plants, called phytoplankton, that give the water this color are the base of the marine food chain. Some species of phytoplankton are coated with scales of calcium (chalk), which turn the water electric blue. Chlorophyll and other light-capturing pigments in others give the water a deep green hue. The proliferation of many different species in various stages of growth and decay provides many nuances of color in this concentrated bloom. The bloom stretches across hundreds of kilometers, well beyond the edges of this photo-like image, captured on June 23, 2007, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flying aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. The upper left edge of the image is bounded by Greenland. Iceland is in the upper right. Plumes of dust are blowing off the island, probably adding nutrients to the surface waters to its south. NASA image courtesy Norman Kuring, Ocean Color Group at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

  19. North Polar Ice Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    North polar ice cap of Mars, as seen during mid summer in the northern hemisphere. The reddish areas consist of eolian dust, bright white areas consist of a mixture of water ice and dust, and the dark blue areas consist of sand dunes forming a huge 'collar' around the polar ice cap. (The colors have been enhanced with a decorrelation stretch to better show the color variability.) Shown here is an oblique view of the polar region, as seen with the Viking 1 spacecraft orbiting Mars over latitude 39 degrees north. The spiral bands consist of valleys which form by a combination of the Coriolis forces, wind erosion, and differential sublimation and condensation. In high-resolution images the polar caps are seen to consist of thick sequences of layered deposits, suggesting that cyclical climate changes have occurred on Mars. Cyclical climate changes are readily explained by quasi-periodic changes in the amount and distribution of solar heating resulting from perturbations in orbital and axial elements. Variations in the Earth's orbit have also been linked to the terrestrial climate changes during the ice ages.

  20. MODIS Views North Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image over the North Pole was acquired by the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard the Terra spacecraft, on May 5, 2000. The scene was received and processed by Norway's MODIS Direct Broadcast data receiving station, located in Svalbard, within seconds of photons hitting the sensor's detectors. (Click for more details about MODIS Direct Broadcast data.) In this image, the sea ice appears white and areas of open water, or recently refrozen sea surface, appear black. The irregular whitish shapes toward the bottom of the image are clouds, which are often difficult to distinguish from the white Arctic surface. Notice the considerable number of cracks, or 'leads,' in the ice that appear as dark networks of lines. Throughout the region within the Arctic Circle leads are continually opening and closing due to the direction and intensity of shifting wind and ocean currents. Leads are particularly common during the summer, when temperatures are higher and the ice is thinner. In this image, each pixel is one square kilometer. Such true-color views of the North Pole are quite rare, as most of the time much of the region within the Arctic Circle is cloaked in clouds. Image by Allen Lunsford, NASA GSFC Direct Readout Laboratory; Data courtesy Tromso receiving station, Svalbard, Norway

  1. Cloud Microphysics in Hurricane Outflows: Observations in 'Bonnie' (1998) at 12 km Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Hallett, J.; Strawa, A. W.; Ferry, G. V.; Bui, T. P.; Condon, Estelle P. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The water balance of a hurricane is controlled by boundary layer inflow, near vertical motion in the eyewall causing coalescence precipitation at above and residual ice precipitation at below freezing temperatures, and cirrus outflow at below -40 C aloft. In this paper we address the question of efficiency of water removal by this cirrus outflow which is important for the release of latent heat at high altitudes and its role in the dynamic flow at that level. During NASA's 1998 Convection and Moisture Experiment campaign we acquired microphysical outflow data in order to (1) determine the release and redistribution of latent heat near the top of hurricanes, (2) aid in TRMM algorithm development for remote sensing of precipitation, and (3) determine the optical/radiative characteristics of hurricane outflow. The data were acquired with Particle Measuring Systems two dimensional imaging spectrometers. On 23 August and again during the hurricane's landfall on 26 August, 1998, the NASA DC-8 aircraft penetrated hurricane 'Bonnie' four times each near 200 hPa pressure altitude. The eye crossing times were determined by (1) zero counts of cloud particles, (2) approximately 5 C increases in static and potential temperatures, and (3) minima in speeds and changes of direction of horizontal winds. The vertical winds showed shear between -6 m per second and +4 m per second and tangential winds approached 30 m per second in the eyewall. The particle volumes in the eyewall (determined by the pixels the particles shadowed in the direction of flight [x-direction] and normally to it by the number of diodes that they shadowed [y-direction]) ranged between 0.5 and 5.0 cubic centimeters per cubic meter. With a particle density near 0.2 g per cubic centimeter (determined from in situ melting and evaporation on a surface collector), the 1.0 g per meter corresponding mass of cloud ice ranged between 0.27 and 2.7 g per kilograms yielding horizontal fluxes between 8.1 and 81 g per square meters per second. The outflow ice was concentrated in crystals of a modal size of 190 micrometers. The particle size distributions were heavily skewed toward sizes with 98% of all cirrus particles smaller than the modal size comprising, however, only 20% of the mass. Thus the smaller than modal size particles dominantly affected the optical/radiative characteristics of the cloud, whereas the larger than modal size crystals determined the ice mass, hence dominated latent heating. Questions to be addressed relate to the origin of individual ice particles as the hurricane evolved and the likelihood of pristine and aggregate particle formation under the complicated conditions of rotation and outflow in the eyewall.

  2. High-spatial-resolution isotope geochemistry of monazite (U-Pb & Sm-Nd) and zircon (U-Pb & Lu-Hf) in the Old Woman and North Piute Mountains, Mojave Desert, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Stacy E.; Hanchar, John M.; Miller, Calvin F.; Fisher, Christopher M.; Lancaster, Penny J.; Darling, James R.

    2014-05-01

    Recent improvements in analytical capabilities allow us to reveal details of magmatic processes at an increasingly finer spatial and temporal scale. In situ analyses of the isotopic and trace element composition of accessory minerals at the sub-grain scale have proven to be effective tools for solving a wide range of geological problems. This study presents new data on accessory minerals including monazite & zircon, examined by in situ LA-ICP-MS and Laser Ablation Split Stream (LASS) techniques, analyzing multiple isotopic systems (U-Pb + Sm-Nd, and U-Pb + Lu-Hf in monazite and zircon, respectively) in order to track geochemical changes over time through a magmatic system. The late Cretaceous granitoids of the Old Woman Mountains in the Mojave Desert, California, provide an excellent opportunity to apply these analytical techniques. The peraluminous granites of the Sweetwater Wash, Painted Rock, and North Piute plutons represent different depths of the magmatic system, and are well understood in terms of field relations and whole-rock geochemistry. A preliminary study on the Sweetwater Wash monazites (Fisher et al., in preparation) has revealed significant inter-grain isotopic heterogeneity in the ɛNd composition of the source region (~1700 Ma); however, the U-Pb ages show an isotopic resetting during emplacement at ~75 Ma. This decoupling of U-Pb and Sm-Nd isotopic systems is suggested by Fisher et al. to be due to recrystallisation and/or dissolution-reprecipitation of monazite. If grain boundary diffusion of Pb overrides the more kinetically limited volume diffusion, then the U-Pb systematics will be reset while Sm and Nd remain immobile in the monazite structure as essential structural components of the lattice. This new data will allow the further investigation of these preliminary results, providing new insights into the observed isotopic disequilibrium, with the LASS technique accurately linking the multiple isotopic systems. This will provide important

  3. A shallow high-resolution seismic reflection study of dudley ridge, south-east missouri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, M.; Vaughn, J. D.; Anderson, N. L.; Hoffman, D.; Palmer, J. R.

    1997-12-01

    Dudley Ridge is an arcuate, north-trending terrace remnant of Wisconsinan (late Quaternary) outwash in the Western Lowlands of southeast Missouri. The ridge, an elongate topographic bulge, is approximately 12 km long and 2 km wide with up to 5 m of relief. Previous workers have attributed the ridge to fluvial erosion, or to a combination of fluvial erosion and tectonic deformation during the late Quaternary. The Commerce geophysical lineament, which is a major northeast-trending basement feature, is located a few kilometers to the southeast, and swarms of paleoliquefaction and possible neotectonic deformations have been reported in nearby areas of the Western Lowlands. To test the tectonic hypothesis, in 1994 and 1995 we acquired two west-east high-resolution seismic reflection profiles along the crest and western flank of Dudley Ridge to determine whether Paleozoic, Cretaceous and shallow Quaternary strata are faulted or folded. Profile SPB-1 shows several near-vertical faults indicative of at least three periods of movement: Paleozoic to middle Mesozoic; late Cretaceous to Tertiary; and early to late Wisconsinan (late Quaternary). Profile SPB-2 shows three ambiguous fault-like features which cut Cretaceous and Quaternary reflectors, but cannot be interpreted unequivocally to extend down into the Paleozoic section. These new seismic reflection data are interpreted to show that at least three major periods of faulting have disrupted Paleozoic, Cretaceous and Quaternary strata beneath Dudley Ridge, with the most recent faulting being early to late Wisconsinan in age and producing about 6-8 m (8-10 ms) of near-vertical displacement. Because Quaternary reflectors cannot be resolved above about 30-40 ms, the seismic data alone do not reveal whether or not the Wisconsinan deformation affected the surface of Dudley Ridge or whether the faults may have died out as they propagated up through the soft, saturated Wisconsinan outwash. However, the presence of the Farmdale

  4. Resolving mesoscale variation in aerosol fields from satellite: Is fine resolution worth the hassle? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remer, L. A.; Munchak, L. A.; Huang, J.; Levy, R. C.; Mattoo, S.

    2013-12-01

    In early 2000 we began receiving global aerosol products from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) at nominal 10 km and 17.5 km resolution, respectively. Aerosol products derived from other satellite sensors such as the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) with spatial resolution nominally at 13 x 12 km later joined these data. Suddenly the global aerosol system popped into focus. For global-scale science, a 10 km product appeared to be adequate. Questions concerning the adequacy of this moderate resolution data set began to arise as the community's interest in satellite-derived aerosol products branched towards more local questions. As of Collection 6, the MODIS aerosol product will now include a fine resolution product at nominal 3 km resolution. What can we learn about mesoscale variation in aerosol fields from this new product? Was the effort worth it? We take advantage of the AERONET DRAGON networks in the mid-Atlantic region of the U.S., in Korea and in California to compare the accuracy of the MODIS 3 km product with the MODIS 10 km product, and just for fun, with the 6 km Visible Infrared Imager Suite (VIIRS) aerosol product. Do the finer resolution aerosol products show us aerosol features unobtainable by the coarser resolution products? Are the finer resolution products worth the hassle?

  5. North Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Nicod, M.A.

    1981-10-01

    The total area covered by petroleum rights in the six countries described in this paper increased by more than 17% in 1980 compared to 1979. Joint venture agreements were finalized for 19 blocks over 94,000 km/sup 2/ in the Algerian venture. Although official information is scarce for Algeria and Libya, seismic activity probably increased in 1980 compared to 1979. Exploration drilling activity increased with 121 wildcats drilled compared to 93 during the previous year. This effort led to 40 discoveries, a 34.5% success ratio. Chevron was especially successful in wildcatting, with 6 oil discoveries for 8 wells drilled in the interior basins of Sudan. One Moroccan discovery can be considered as a highlight: the BRPM Meskala 101 well in the Essaouira basin found an apparently large amount of gas in Triassic sandstones. This discovery deserves special attention, since the gas has been found in Triassic pays rather than in the usual Jurassic pays in the Essaouira basin. Oil production in North Africa decreased from about 13.5% in 1980, with about 3,405,000 barrels of oil per day compared to 3,939,500 barrels of oil per day in 1979. When oil output strongly decreased in Algeria (-16.4%) and Libya (-15.6%), Tunisian production peaked at 116,287 barrels of oil per day and Egypt production also peaked at 584,148 barrels of oil per day. Total gas production in 1980 strongly declined from 44%, mostly due to the decline of the Algerian gas production. 8 figures, 40 tables.

  6. Assessing resolution in super-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Demmerle, Justin; Wegel, Eva; Schermelleh, Lothar; Dobbie, Ian M

    2015-10-15

    Resolution is a central concept in all imaging fields, and particularly in optical microscopy, but it can be easily misinterpreted. The mathematical definition of optical resolution was codified by Abbe, and practically defined by the Rayleigh Criterion in the late 19th century. The limit of conventional resolution was also achieved in this period, and it was thought that fundamental constraints of physics prevented further increases in resolution. With the recent development of a range of super-resolution techniques, it is necessary to revisit the concept of optical resolution. Fundamental differences in super-resolution modalities mean that resolution is not a directly transferrable metric between techniques. This article considers the issues in resolution raised by these new technologies, and presents approaches for comparing resolution between different super-resolution methods.

  7. Multidimensional High Spatiotemporal Resolution InSAR Time Series Assist Interdisciplinary Space- And Ground-Based Monitoring To Reveal Pre-Eruptive Signals At Nyamulagira Volcano (North Kivu, D.R.C.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Oreye, N.; Smets, B.; Kervyn, F.; Kervyn, M.; Albino, F.; Arellano, S. R.; Arjona, A. A.; Carn, S. A.; Fernandez, J.; Galle, B.; Gonzalez, P. J.; Head, E.; Pallero, J.; Prieto, J. F.; Samsonov, S. V.; Tedesco, D.; Tiampo, K. F.; Wauthier, C.

    2013-12-01

    Interdisciplinary space- and ground-based monitoring systems allowed the quantitative and detailed study of the Nyamulagira 2010 eruption (Congo). Field observations revealed the event as 4 eruptive phases delimited by major changes in effusive activity. Signals from ground deformation, seismicity, SO2 emission and thermal flux correlate with these eruptive phases. Moreover, MSBAS InSAR time series combining data acquired under different geometries and with different satellites (Samsonov and d'Oreye, 2012) allowed the detection of pre-, co- and inter-eruptive deformation in the Nyamulagira volcanic field. Using 8 years of ENVISAT, RADARSAT2 and ALOS data, the MSBAS method reveals the first unambiguous pre-eruptive ground deformations in the Virunga Volcanic Province. Precursory ground deformations are detected up to 3 weeks prior the onset of the 2010 eruption by images acquired by 3 different sensors in different geometries. These deformations took place in the main crater and along the SE flank of the volcano, where eruptive fractures will ultimately opened. Deformations coincide with small, though clear, increase of the short period seismicity and SO2 emissions.These seismic and SO2 variations alone were too small, however, to raise attention. The pre-eruptive ground deformation signals revealed by InSAR are of about the same amplitude and spatial extent as atmospheric noise and therefore cannot be identified on individual differential interferograms. Conventional time-series methods based on single acquisition geometry do not have a sufficient time resolution to discriminate such a precursory signal from an atmospheric artifact. The 3-week precursors detected at Nyamulagira contrast with the only precursory signal previously recognized so far in the Virunga, namely the increase of tremors and long period seismicity no more than few hours or days before the eruption onset. In January 2010, such short-term seismic precursors were detected less than two hours

  8. Dealing with North Korea: Maintenance of Diplomacy and Military Credibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-06

    resolution of this issue and are currently stalled because of a US freeze on North Korean assets at the Bank of Macau . Presently, it would be...because of a US freeze on North Korean assets at the Bank of Macau for counterfeiting activities. They do, however, represent the best chance for a...of Macau . It is dearly hoped that continued negotiations can yield a breakthrough, as they represent the best hope for a suitable resolution, but

  9. North Korea’s Nuclear Weapons Development and Diplomacy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-04

    tested a plutonium nuclear device in October 2006. U.S. officials have cited evidence that North Korea also operates a secret highly enriched...programs. It cited as the reason for its decision a statement approved by the United Nations Security Council criticizing North Korea’s test launch...the missile test violated Security Resolution 1718 of October 2006, which banned tests of long-range North Korean missiles. The statement called on

  10. Fargo, North Dakota, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated version Click on the image for high resolution TIFF file

    Why does Fargo flood? The Red River of the North, which forms the border between North Dakota and Minnesota, has a long history of severe floods. Major floods include those of 1826, 1897, 1950, 1997, and now 2009. The 1997 flood caused billions of dollars of damage, with greatest impact to the city of Grand Forks, north of and downstream from Fargo. The 2009 flood, which has primarily impacted Fargo, appears to have peaked early on March 28.

    Several factors combine to cause floods. Obviously, rainfall and snowmelt rates (and their geographic distribution) are the fundamental variables that create flooding in some years and not others. But the repetition of flooding in Fargo (and areas downstream), rather than in adjacent regions, can be attributed largely to its topographic setting and geologic history.

    The formation of landforms in the geologic past is often interpretable from digital topographic data, such as that supplied by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). This image, covering parts of North Dakota, Minnesota, and South Dakota, displays ground elevation as brightness (higher is brighter) plus has simulated shading (with illumination from the north) to enhance topographic detail such as stream channels, ridges, and cliffs.

    The Red River of the North is the only major river that flows northward from the United States into Canada. In this scene it flows almost straight north from Fargo. North of this image it continues past the city of Winnipeg, Manitoba, and into Lake Winnipeg, which in turn drains to Hudson Bay. In the United States, the river lies in a trough that was shaped by continental glaciers that pushed south from Canada during the Pleistocene epoch, up to about 10,000 years ago. This trough is about 70 km (45 miles) wide and tens of meters (very generally about 100 feet) deep. Here near Fargo it lies on

  11. North Polar False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    This full resolution image contains dunes, and small areas of 'blue' which may represent fresh (ie. not dust covered) frost or ice.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 85, Longitude 235.8 East (124.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Pervasive post-Eocene faulting and folding in unconsolidated sediments of the Mississippi River, Central U.S. as imaged by high-resolution CHIRP seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fave, X. J.; Magnani, M.; Waldron, B. A.; McIntosh, K. D.; Saustrup, S.; Guo, L.

    2010-12-01

    Despite being located in the stable continental interior of the North American plate, in 1811-1812 the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) experienced among the largest magnitude historical earthquakes that ever occurred in the U.S. Paleoseismological evidence shows that large earthquakes have been occurring every 500 yr in the region for the past few thousand years, and historical and instrumental seismicity demonstrate that the NMSZ fault system is actively deforming today. By contrast, motion rates emerging from almost twenty years of geodetic observations substantiate a very slow rate of deformation across the NMSZ faults, suggesting that present velocities are not representative of the long-term deformation rate of the NMSZ fault system, and that deformation has likely been accommodated along structures additional to the NMSZ. In the summer of 2010, a high-resolution marine seismic reflection survey was carried out along the Mississippi River as part of a multi-year cooperative effort to investigate the spatial and temporal distribution of deformation in the Mississippi Embayment. Coincident to the seismic reflection profile, the survey also acquired ~300 km of CHIRP (Edgetech SB-512i) data from Cape Girardeau, MO to Caruthersville, MO. The CHIRP used a 0.7-1.2 kHz source pulse and recorded to a depth of 5-50 m sub-bottom. Here we present the preliminary interpretation of part of the CHIRP profile along the Mississippi River north of Hickman, KY, where the survey imaged a highly reflective sedimentary package down to a depth of ~50 m. The sedimentary sequence is about 20 m thick and appears to be bounded at the top and at the bottom by angular unconformities. The package is mildly folded and pervasively faulted, in some cases by extensional faults that exhibit up to 2 m of displacement and that reach the riverbed. Based on exposure of Eocene deposits 7 km to the east of the study area, and on the correlation of electric and gamma logs of nearby oil, gas and water

  13. North Korean Relationships

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-18

    21 Figure 5: China’s Food Aid to North Korea...discount alone exceeds aid provided by any other country (Bajora 2). Beyond the trade discount, China also provides North Korea with food aid. China’s...fluctuating food aid totals to North Korea can be seen in Figure 5. 23 Energy Like much of North Korea’s economy, energy is provided both in the

  14. 2. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING NORTH. CHICAGO & NORTH WESTERN RAILWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING NORTH. CHICAGO & NORTH WESTERN RAILWAY BRIDGE IS AT BOTTOM OF FRAME. - Chicago & North Western Railway, Kinzie Street Bridge, Spanning North Branch of Chicago River, South of Kinzie Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  15. 8. INTERIOR, NORTH WING, VIEW THROUGH DOORWAY IN NORTH WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. INTERIOR, NORTH WING, VIEW THROUGH DOORWAY IN NORTH WALL OF SOUTHEAST ROOM, SHOWING FENESTRATED NORTH WALL (BASEMENT THROUGH SECOND LEVELS) OF NORTH-CENTRAL ROOM - Bulows Minde Estate House, Bulows Minde, Bulows Minde, St. Croix, VI

  16. Differential Brillouin gain for improving the temperature accuracy and spatial resolution in a long-distance distributed fiber sensor.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yongkang; Bao, Xiaoyi; Li, Wenhai

    2009-08-01

    We demonstrate a 12 km differential pulse-width pair Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (DPP-BOTDA) using 40 ns and 50 ns pulses with DC-coupled detection. A spatial resolution of 1 m and a narrowband Brillouin gain spectrum of 33 MHz are obtained simultaneously compared with 88 MHz with the use of 10 ns pulses in a conventional BOTDA. The experimental results show that the differential Brillouin gain of a 40/50 ns pulse pair is 7 times stronger than the direct Brillouin gain of BOTDA with the use of a 10 ns pulse, and the temperature uncertainty is 0.25 degrees C compared with 1.8 degrees C for a 10 ns pulse. As the pulse-width difference decreases from 10 ns to 1 ns, corresponding to a spatial resolution from 1 m to 10 cm, the prediction of temperature uncertainty will only increase from 0.25 degrees C to 0.8 degrees C for DPP-BOTDA over a 12 km long single-mode fiber.

  17. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This week we will be looking at five examples of laminar wind flow on the north polar cap. On Earth, gravity-driven south polar cap winds are termed 'catabatic' winds. Catabatic winds begin over the smooth expanse of the cap interior due to temperature differences between the atmosphere and the surface. Once begun, the winds sweep outward along the surface of the polar cap toward the sea. As the polar surface slopes down toward sealevel, the wind speeds increase. Catabatic wind speeds in the Antartic can reach several hundreds of miles per hour.

    In the images of the Martian north polar cap we can see these same type of winds. Notice the streamers of dust moving downslope over the darker trough sides, these streamers show the laminar flow regime coming off the cap. Within the trough we see turbulent clouds of dust, kicked up at the trough base as the winds slow down and enter a chaotic flow regime.

    The horizontal lines in these images are due to framelet overlap and lighting conditions over the bright polar cap.

    Image information:VIS instrument. Latitude 86.5, longitude 57.4 East (302.6 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is

  18. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This week we will be looking at five examples of laminar wind flow on the north polar cap. On Earth, gravity-driven south polar cap winds are termed 'catabatic' winds. Catabatic winds begin over the smooth expanse of the cap interior due to temperature differences between the atmosphere and the surface. Once begun, the winds sweep outward along the surface of the polar cap toward the sea. As the polar surface slopes down toward sealevel, the wind speeds increase. Catabatic wind speeds in the Antartic can reach several hundreds of miles per hour.

    In the images of the Martian north polar cap we can see these same type of winds. Notice the streamers of dust moving downslope over the darker trough sides, these streamers show the laminar flow regime coming off the cap. Within the trough we see turbulent clouds of dust, kicked up at the trough base as the winds slow down and enter a chaotic flow regime.

    The horizontal lines in these images are due to framelet overlap and lighting conditions over the bright polar cap.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 86.5, Longitude 64.5 East (295.5 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation

  19. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This week we will be looking at five examples of laminar wind flow on the north polar cap. On Earth, gravity-driven south polar cap winds are termed 'catabatic' winds. Catabatic winds begin over the smooth expanse of the cap interior due to temperature differences between the atmosphere and the surface. Once begun, the winds sweep outward along the surface of the polar cap toward the sea. As the polar surface slopes down toward sealevel, the wind speeds increase. Catabatic wind speeds in the Antartic can reach several hundreds of miles per hour.

    In the images of the Martian north polar cap we can see these same type of winds. Notice the streamers of dust moving downslope over the darker trough sides, these streamers show the laminar flow regime coming off the cap. Within the trough we see turbulent clouds of dust, kicked up at the trough base as the winds slow down and enter a chaotic flow regime.

    The horizontal lines in these images are due to framelet overlap and lighting conditions over the bright polar cap.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 84.2, Longitude 57.4 East (302.6 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation

  20. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This week we will be looking at five examples of laminar wind flow on the north polar cap. On Earth, gravity-driven south polar cap winds are termed 'catabatic' winds. Catabatic winds begin over the smooth expanse of the cap interior due to temperature differences between the atmosphere and the surface. Once begun, the winds sweep outward along the surface of the polar cap toward the sea. As the polar surface slopes down toward sealevel, the wind speeds increase. Catabatic wind speeds in the Antartic can reach several hundreds of miles per hour.

    In the images of the Martian north polar cap we can see these same type of winds. Notice the streamers of dust moving downslope over the darker trough sides, these streamers show the laminar flow regime coming off the cap. Within the trough we see turbulent clouds of dust, kicked up at the trough base as the winds slow down and enter a chaotic flow regime.

    The horizontal lines in these images are due to framelet overlap and lighting conditions over the bright polar cap.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 84.3, Longitude 314.4 East (45.6 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation

  1. North Nilosyrtis Mensae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image was obtained during the first week of June 1999. It shows a portion of the Nilosyrtis Mensae region, located north of Syrtis Major and southwest of Utopia Planitia. This region is part of a planet-wide transition zone that separates the high, cratered terrain of the southern two thirds of Mars from the low, relatively uncratered northern plains. Old remnants of the cratered highlands are common in this transition zone, and they are usually in the form of mesas and buttes.

    The MOC image shows several low, flat-topped mesas. Although flat at large scale, their surfaces are quite rough and bumpy at smaller scales. Many of these bumps might be boulders, but the resolution of this particular image (4.5 meters--15 feet--per pixel) is not high enough to be certain. The lowlands surrounding the mesas are cracked and pitted--especially the darker surfaces on the right side of the image. The cause of the pitting is not known and can only be speculated upon (because the material removed from each pit is now gone). Possible origins for the pits include removal of dust or sand by wind and/or sublimation of ice from the near subsurface. The picture covers an area 3 kilometers (1.9 miles) wide and is illuminated from the left.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  2. High Resolution Downscaling For Mesoamerica And The Caribbean Of CMIP5 Global Model Simulations: Identifying Vulnerability And Adaptation Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oglesby, R. J.; Rowe, C. M.; Hays, C.

    2012-12-01

    High-resolution (4-12 km) dynamical downscaling simulations of future climate change between now and 2060 have been made for Mesoamerica and the Caribbean. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional climate model to downscale results from the NCAR CCSM4 CMIP5 RCP8.5 global simulation. The entire region is covered at 12 km horizontal spatial resolution, with as much as possible (especially in mountainous regions) at 4 km. We compare a control period (2006-2010) with 50 years into the future (2056-2060). The motivation for making these computationally-demanding model simulations is to better define local and regional climate change effects so as to better identify and quantify impacts and associated vulnerabilities. This is an essential precursor to developing robust adaptation strategies. These simulations have been made in conjunction with our partners from the countries involved. As expected, all areas warm, with the warming in general largest in inland regions, and less towards coastal regions. Higher elevation regions also tend to warm somewhat more than lower elevation regions, a result that could not be reliably obtained, in detail, from coarse-scale global models. The precipitation signal is much more mixed, and demonstrates more clearly the need for high resolution. The effects of changes in the large-scale trade wind regime tend to be restricted to the immediate Atlantic coast, while the interior is less-well posed, with some indication of a northward shift in precipitation regime, due to changes both in the large-scale ITCZ, and the regional scale Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico low-level jets. Topographic resolution continues to play a key role. The new results are currently being used by both climate scientists and policy makers to evaluate vulnerabilities, and hence develop adaptation strategies for the affected countries.

  3. The Role of Convection in Redistributing Formaldehyde to the Upper Troposphere Over North America and the North Atlantic during the Summer 2004 INTEX Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fried, Alan; Olson, Jennifer R.; Walega, Jim; Crawford, Jim H.; Chen, Gao; Weibring, Petter; Richter, Dirk; Roller, Chad; Tittel, Frank; Porter, Michael; Fuelberg, Henry; Halland, Jeremy; Bertram, Timothy H.; Cohen, Ronald C.; Pickering, Kenneth; Heikes, Brian G.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of CH2O from a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) were acquired onboard the NASA DC-8 during the summer 2004 INTEX-NA (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment - North America) campaign to test our understanding of convection and production mechanisms in the upper troposphere (UT, 6-12-km) over continental North America and the North Atlantic Ocean. Point-by-point comparisons with box model calculations, when MHP (CH3OOH) measurements were available for model constraint, resulted in a median CH2O measurement/model ratio of 0.91 in the UT. Multiple tracers were used to arrive at a set of UT CH2O background and perturbed air mass periods, and 46% of the TDLAS measurements fell within the latter category. At least 66% to 73% of these elevated UT observations were caused by enhanced production from CH2O precursors rather than direct transport of CH2O from the boundary layer. This distinction is important, since the effects from the former can last for over a week or more compared to one day or less in the case of convective transport of CH2O itself. In general, production of CH2O from CH4 was found to be the dominant source term, even in perturbed air masses. This was followed by production from MHP, methanol, PAN type compounds, and ketones, in descending order of their contribution. In the presence of elevated NO from lightning and potentially from the stratosphere, there was a definite trend in the CH2O discrepancy, which for the highest NO mixing ratios produced a median CH2O measurement/model ratio of 3.9 in the 10-12-km range. Discrepancies in CH2O and HO2 in the UT with NO were highly correlated and this provided further information as to the possible mechanism(s) responsible. These discrepancies with NO are consistent with additional production sources of both gases involving CH3O2 + NO reactions, most likely caused by unmeasured hydrocarbons.

  4. Case Resolution Manual

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Case Resolution Manual (CRM) is intended to provide procedural guidance to ECRCO case managers to ensure EPA’s prompt, effective, and efficient resolution of civil rights cases consistent with science and the civil rights laws.

  5. North American Biome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The North America biome includes the major ecoregions that make up the land area of Canada, the United States, Mexico, and countries in Central America. The biome is bordered to the north by the Arctic Ocean, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, to the west and south by the Pacific Ocean, and to the s...

  6. 17. Interior first level view looking north within forward (north) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Interior first level view looking north within forward (north) section of firing pier. - Naval Torpedo Station, Firing Pier, North end of Gould Island in Narragansett Bay, Newport, Newport County, RI

  7. North view; Canopy detail and platformlevel freight elevator North ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North view; Canopy detail and platform-level freight elevator - North Philadelphia Station, 2900 North Broad Street, on northwest corner of Broad Street & Glenwood Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. NORTH GATE AT 11TH AVENUE (490 NORTH & 900 EAST), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH GATE AT 11TH AVENUE (490 NORTH & 900 EAST), SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT CEMETERY'S NORTH GATE (WPA PROJECT, 1938-1941). - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  9. WEST PIER OF NORTH GATE (490 NORTH & 900 EAST), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WEST PIER OF NORTH GATE (490 NORTH & 900 EAST), SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT THE WEST PIER OF THE CEMETERY'S NORTH GATE. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  10. INTERIOR VIEW, NORTH QUARRY, AN ACTIVE DOLOMITE QUARRY, LOOKING NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, NORTH QUARRY, AN ACTIVE DOLOMITE QUARRY, LOOKING NORTH TO THE POWER PLANT OF THE HISTORIC THOMAS COKEWORKS SITE. - Wade Sand & Gravel Company, North Quarry, State Highway 78, Thomas, Jefferson County, AL

  11. 626628 North Eutaw Street (Commercial Building), 626628 North Eutaw Street ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    626-628 North Eutaw Street (Commercial Building), 626-628 North Eutaw Street & 400-412 Druid Hill Avenue on a block bounded by North Eutaw Street, George Street, Jaspar Street, & Druid Hill Avenue, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  12. Detail; Street Car Waiting House window, north wall North ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail; Street Car Waiting House window, north wall - North Philadelphia Station, Street Car Waiting House, 2900 North Broad Street, on northwest corner of Broad Street & Glenwood Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  13. Towards a 1km resolution global flood risk model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Paul; Neal, Jeff; Sampson, Chris; Smith, Andy

    2014-05-01

    Recent advances in computationally efficient numerical algorithms and new High Performance Computing architectures now make high (1-2km) resolution global hydrodynamic models a realistic proposition. However in many areas of the world the data sets and tools necessary to undertake such modelling do not currently exist. In particular, five major problems need to be resolved: (1) the best globally available terrain data (SRTM) was generated from X-band interferometric radar data which does not penetrate vegetation canopies and which has significant problems in determining ground elevations in urban areas; (2) a global river bathymetry data set does not currently exist; (3) most river channels globally are less than the smallest currently resolvable grid scale (1km) and therefore require a sub-grid treatment; (4) a means to estimate the magnitude of the T year flood at any point along the global river network does not currently exist; and (5) a large proportion of flood losses are generated by off-floodplain surface water flows which are not well represented in current hydrodynamic modelling systems. In this paper we propose solutions to each of these five issues as part of a concerted effort to develop a 1km (or better) resolution global flood hazard model. We describe the new numerical algorithms, computer architectures and computational resources used, and demonstrate solutions to the five previously intractable problems identified above. We conduct a validation study of the modelling against satellite imagery of major flooding on the Mississippi-Missouri confluence plain in the central USA before outlining a proof-of-concept regional study for SE Asia as a step towards a global scale model. For SE Asia we simulate flood hazard for ten different flood return periods over the entire Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia and Laos region at 1km resolution and show that the modelling produces coherent, consistent and sensible simulations of extent and water depth.

  14. Resolution with Limited Factoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dafa

    The resolution principle was originally proposed by J.A. Robinson. Resolution with factoring rule is complete for the first-order logic. However, unlimited applications of factoring rule may generate many irrelevant and redundant clauses. Noll presented resolution rule with half-factoring. In this paper, we demonstrate how to eliminate the half-factoring.

  15. Coherence versus interferometric resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Luis, Alfredo

    2010-06-15

    We examine the relation between second-order coherence and resolution in the interferometric detection of phase shifts. While for classical thermal light resolution and second-order coherence are synonymous, we show that for quantum light beams reaching optimum precision second-order coherence and resolution become antithetical.

  16. 52. GREAT HALL, LOOKING NORTH THROUGH STAIR HALL TO NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. GREAT HALL, LOOKING NORTH THROUGH STAIR HALL TO NORTH VESTIBULE DOORS - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  17. EAST (FRONT) AND NORTH SIDE OF DOUBLE FURNACE AND NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST (FRONT) AND NORTH SIDE OF DOUBLE FURNACE AND NORTH SIDE OF SINGLE FURNACE, SOUTHWEST. - Tannehill Furnace, 12632 Confederate Parkway, Tannehill Historical State Park, Bucksville, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  18. Integrating reconstructed scatterometer and advanced very high resolution radiometer data for tropical forest inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, Perry J.; Long, David G.

    1995-11-01

    A scientific effort is currently underway to assess tropical forest degradation and its potential impact on Earth's climate. Because of the large continental regions involved, Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) imagery and its derivative vegetation index products with resolutions between 1 and 12 km are typically used to inventory the Earth's equatorial vegetation. Archival AVHRR imagery is also used to obtain a temporal baseline of historical forest extent. Recently however, 50-km Seasat-A Scatterometer (SASS) Ku-band imagery (acquired in 1978) has been reconstructed to approximately equals 4-km resolution, making it a supplement to AVHRR imagery for historical vegetation assessment. In order to test the utility of reconstructed Ku-band scatterometer imagery for this purpose, seasonal AVHRR vegetation index and SASS images of identical resolutions were constructed. Using the imagery, discrimination experiments involving 18 vegetation categories were conducted for a central South America study area. The results of these experiments indicate that AVHRR vegetation- index images are slightly superior to reconstructed SASS images for differentiating between equatorial vegetation classes when used alone. However, combining the scatterometer imagery with the vegetation-index images provides discrimination superior to any other combination of the data sets. Using the two data sets together, 90.3% of the test data could be correctly classified into broad classes of equatorial forest, degraded woodland/forest, woodland/savanna, and caatinga.

  19. Poet North Manchester Approval

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This update August 9, 2016 letter from EPA approves, with modifications, the petition from Poet Biorefining-North Manchester, LLC, regarding non-grandfathered ethanol produced through a dry mill process, qualifying under the Clean Air Act for renewable

  20. Interior, north end of building, looking north. At left is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, north end of building, looking north. At left is the threading machine and the cutout in the wall for a long tube in the machine is on the north wall beyond the machine. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Shops Building, Northwest Corner of West Pennington Avenue, & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. North Korean plutonium production

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, D.

    1994-12-01

    In 1992, as part of its obligations under the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, North Korea declared that it had earlier separated about 100 grams of plutonium from damaged fuel rods removed from a 25 megawatt-thermal (MW{sub t}) gas-graphite reactor at Yongbyon. The plutonium was separated at the nearby {open_quotes}Radiochemical Laboratory.{close_quotes} Separated plutonium is the raw ingredient for making nuclear weapons, but 100 grams is too little to make a crude bomb. Based on intelligence reports and IAEA inspections, North Korea may have separated enough plutonium for a nuclear weapon. Regardless of whether this is true, there is no doubt that North Korea has enough weapons-grade plutonium in spent fuel to make four or five nuclear weapons. But it cannot turn this plutonium into nuclear weapons unless it separates the plutonium from the spent fuel. Preventing the North from separating any more plutonium must remain a global priority. The IAEA must also be able to verify North Korea`s past nuclear activities and determine the amount of plutonium North Korea may have diverted in the past.

  2. USGS aerial resolution targets.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Salamonowicz, P.H.

    1982-01-01

    It is necessary to measure the achievable resolution of any airborne sensor that is to be used for metric purposes. Laboratory calibration facilities may be inadequate or inappropriate for determining the resolution of non-photographic sensors such as optical-mechanical scanners, television imaging tubes, and linear arrays. However, large target arrays imaged in the field can be used in testing such systems. The USGS has constructed an array of resolution targets in order to permit field testing of a variety of airborne sensing systems. The target array permits any interested organization with an airborne sensing system to accurately determine the operational resolution of its system. -from Author

  3. North Dakota Wetlands Discovery Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, Nancy J., Ed.; Aadland, Hope, Ed.

    This guide facilitates and promotes awareness, appreciation, and knowledge of North Dakota's wetland resources. It is an interdisciplinary wetland activity guide for kindergarten through 12th grade teachers. It was developed specifically for North Dakota educators by North Dakota education and natural resource professionals about North Dakota's…

  4. Air quality resolution for health impact assessment: influence of regional characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, T. M.; Saari, R. K.; Selin, N. E.

    2014-01-01

    several individual concentration-response functions varied by a larger amount than the impacts calculated using results modeled at different resolutions. Given that changes in PM2.5 dominate the human health impacts, and given the uncertainty associated with human health response to changes in air pollution, we conclude that, when estimating the human health benefits associated with decreases in ozone and PM2.5 together, the benefits calculated at 36 km resolution agree, within errors, with the benefits calculated using fine (12 km or finer) resolution modeling when using the current methodology for assessing policy decisions.

  5. Geographic distribution and dispersal of normapolles genera in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tschudy, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Normapolles pollen have been found in North America in Cretaceous and Lower Tertiary rocks from the eastern Atlantic Seaboard, the Mississippi embayment region and from the states and provinces from western North America as far north as the District of Mackenzie, Northwest Territories. Previous postulates relating to the Normapolles floral province (western Europe-eastern North America) were re-examined in the light of new finds of Normapolles genera in rocks from west of the Cretaceous epeiric seaway which separated the Normapolles province from the western North American Aquilapollenites province. A study of published occurrences of Normapolles genera and U.S. Geological Survey Denver Laboratory Normapolles records revealed that of the approximately 60 Normapolles genera recognized from western Europe, only 26 of these have been recognized from eastern North America. These data suggest that Normapolles-producing plants originated in western Europe and migrated to eastern North America prior to the opening of the north Atlantic seaway. Ten of these 26 genera also have been found in rocks from west of the Cretaceous epeiric seaway, suggesting that these genera were the only ones able to cross this barrier. At least six genera having Normapolles characteristics occur in eastern North America but have not yet been recorded from Europe. Two additional genera with Normapolles characteristics have been reported only from the Aquilapollenites province of western North America. Several discrepancies in the record need resolution, such as the latitudinal restriction of Thomsonipollis and Nudopollis to areas south 40??N latitude, the absence of records of Thomsonipollis east and north of central Georgia, and the absence of records of Kyandopollenites and Choanopollenites west of eastern Texas. These data show that the known boundaries of the Normapolles province are somewhat hazy and that firm conclusions regarding the geographic distribution and history of dispersal of

  6. Holocene Geomagnetic Change in the Northern North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoner, J. S.; Channell, J. E.; Mazaud, A.; Xuan, C.; Strano, S. E.; Olafsdottir, S.; Jennings, A. E.

    2012-12-01

    High-resolution and well-dated paleomagnetic records constrain the geomagnetism of the Holocene North Atlantic. These records comprise ultra-high resolution sediment records from lakes (Haukadalsvatn, Iceland) and from continental margins (MD99-2269, N Iceland shelf; MD99-2322, E. Greenland), and from high accumulating (>50 cm/kyr) deep-sea sediments from the Eirik Drift, Labrador Sea (IODP Site U1305). Similarities among these directional paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) records from very different environments imply that the records provide robust reconstructions of the paleo-geomagnetic field. Assuming that the age of magnetization is best defined by PSV in the highest sedimentation rate (>200 cm /kyr) records, allows us to place northern North Atlantic PSV and relative paleointensity (RPI) into a regional context. Northern North Atlantic PSV and RPI are more consistent with European than North American records, and the evolution of virtual geomagnetic poles (VGP) are temporally and longitudinally similar too global reconstructions, though with much larger latitudinal variations. The largest deviation from a geocentric axial dipole, in contrast to the usual assumption, is observed during times of highest field intensities in the North Atlantic and globally, while the highest rates of VGP change are associated with North Atlantic field intensity lows. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that PSV results from temporal oscillations of flux concentrations (lobes) at a few recurrent locations.

  7. Diagnosing overflow waters in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chuncheng; Ilicak, Mehmet; Bentsen, Mats; Fer, Ilker

    2015-04-01

    Danmark Strait overflow water (DSOW) and Iceland Faroe overflow water (ISOW) are important for the formation and transformation of deep waters in the North Atlantic. In this work the volume transport, variability, and pathways of DSOW and ISOW are diagnosed using the one degree ocean-ice coupled Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM) that is forced by CORE2 inter-annual forcing. The oceanic component (MICOM) features an isopycnal coordinate that is referenced to 2000 db. The issues related to the coarse resolution such as the southward transport of ISOW to the western European Basin, the lack of overflow water in the western North Atlantic, and the western boundary detachment of the deep western boundary current are addressed. The effects of diapycnal mixing on the behavior of overflow descent at Denmark Strait and Faroe Bank Channel and its downstream evolution are examined.

  8. A Conflict Resolution Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, John; Wood, Christine

    2004-01-01

    The Conflict Resolution Model was formulated by a group of Australian psychologists who set about integrating the literature on achieving mutually beneficial outcomes in a conflict situation in order to create a best-practice prescriptive process for conflict resolution. A number of experimental studies conducted at the University of Tasmania with…

  9. Automated conflict resolution issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wike, Jeffrey S.

    1991-01-01

    A discussion is presented of how conflicts for Space Network resources should be resolved in the ATDRSS era. The following topics are presented: a description of how resource conflicts are currently resolved; a description of issues associated with automated conflict resolution; present conflict resolution strategies; and topics for further discussion.

  10. Morphotectonic analysis of the Hazara arc region of the Himalayas, north Pakistan and northwest India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gornitz, Vivien; Seeber, Leonard

    1981-04-01

    In the Hazara arc region of northern Pakistan, some of the active basements structures buried below a thick, detached sedimentary layer are inferred from the distribution of lineaments and the drainage patterns, as viewed in Landsat satellite imagery and from river profiles. A prominent set of NW-trending lineaments seen on satellite imagery, coincides approximately with the southwest or updip side of the Indus—Kohistan seismic zone (IKSZ) —the most active basement structure of the region, even though this structure is buried beneath and decoupled from a 12 km thick sedimentary layer. The IKSZ has been interpreted as an extension of the Himalayan Basement Thrust, and is also associated with a prominent topographic "step". Knickpoints on major rivers in the region lie on or north of the IKSZ. All Indus River tributaries, examined north of the IKSZ, show prominent knickpoints, while two tributaries draining south of the IKSZ have no knickpoints. These results suggest ongoing uplift above and north of the IKSZ, and are consistent with the tectonic model obtained from the seismic data. Another prominent lineament set is detected along the north—south section of the Indus River. This set is probably related to the Indus River horst—anticline and associated reentrant. One of the two highest lineament concentrations occurs at the intersection between the NW-trending IKSZ lineament and the N-trending Indus River lineament. The other is along the west bank of the Indus Valley, 25 km north of Tarbela Dam. A topographic ridge (Swabi—Nowshera ridge) appears to be forming along the west side of the Indus River, in the Peshawar Basin. The rising ridge is ponding the Kabul River upstream of Nowshera, where the drainage is braided.

  11. Aircraft observations of aerosol and trace gas concentrations in the tropical troposphere up to 12 km during the INCA campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minikin, A.; Baehr, J.; Krejci, R.; Schlager, H.; van Velthoven, P.; Seifert, M.; Ström, J.; Petzold, A.; Schumann, U.

    2003-04-01

    During the EU funded project INCA (Interhemispheric differences in cirrus properties from anthropogenic emissions) the DLR Falcon 20, a German research aircraft with a maximum ceiling of 13~km, carried out measurements of aerosol and trace gas concentrations during transfer from Europe to South America and back in order to obtain meridional cross sections between 50^o~N and 50^o~S. At tropical latitudes the southbound transfer flights were directed along the west coast of South America, whereas the northbound transfer flights passed over Brazil and the central Atlantic Ocean. We report on observational data of number concentrations of Aitken and accumulation mode particles, the fractionation between volatile and non-volatile particles, as well as mixing ratios of carbon monoxide, reactive nitrogen species and ozone. In the tropics aerosol number concentrations above 9~km altitude increase by one order of magnitude, if compared to the sub-tropics and mid-latitudes, most pronounced for refractory particles. These elevated aerosol concentrations occur where 3-dimensional back trajectories originate from the central South American continent (Amazon basin) and have undergone systematic uplifting. The very high fraction of refractory particles, up to 50--60~% of total condensation nuclei, may indicate a strong contribution of continental ground sources. The INCA measurements confirm earlier TROPOZ II observations of an extended upper tropospheric layer of enhanced CO and NO over tropical South America during the wet season. Vertical distributions show a striking increase of CO mixing ratios above 6~km. Corresponding increases of NO and NOy and decreases of ozone were also found. During INCA an anticyclonic flow over tropical South America was persistent in the upper troposphere. This upper-level anticyclone is associated with intense convective activity over the Amazon basin and redistributes the convectively lifted air masses over a large area in the tropical middle troposphere.

  12. Empirical prediction models for hole and crack size in space station shielding from 6 to 12 km/sec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamsen, Joel E.; Grosch, Donald J.; Schonberg, William P.

    1996-10-01

    Long duration spacecraft in low earth orbit, such as the International Space Station Alpha (ISSA), are highly susceptible to hypervelocity impacts by pieces of debris from past earth-orbiting missions. With this increased likelihood of debris impact over time comes a responsibility on the part of a spacecraft design engineer to quantify, and subsequently reduce, the hazardous effects on the spacecraft and its crew should a penetration occur. Among the various hazards that accompany the penetration of a pressurized manned spacecraft module are critical crack propagation in the module wall (i.e. the so-called 'unzipping' of the module) and depressurization-related phenomena, such as crew hypoxia and uncontrolled thrust due to air rushing out of the module wall hole. These phenomena are directly related to the hole size and crack lengths that result in a spacecraft wall following a penetration. As a result, accurate models for hole size and crack size resulting in thin-walled spacecraft structures following hypervelocity impact penetration are required for accurate spacecraft quantitative risk assessments. This paper presents the results of a study whose objectives were to develop semi- empirical models of hole size and tip-to-tip crack length for some of the multi-wall shielding systems being developed for ISSA. The empirical models were developed using light gas gun test data at impact velocities around 6.5 km/sec, and inhibited shaped charge test data at an impact velocity of 11.3 km/sec. The significance of the work performed is that these models can be incorporated directly into a survivability analysis to determine whether or not module unzipping would occur under a specific set of impact conditions. In addition, the prediction of hole size can be used as part of a survivability analysis to determine the time available for module evacuation prior to the onset of incapacitation due to air loss.

  13. A UV fluorescence bio-detector that works ; reminiscing about the>12 km LANL bio-lidar system @ 200 ACPLA

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, R. R. , Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Sixteen years ago US army ERDEC had the Los Alamos National Laboratory build and operate a portable ultraviolet Lidar for the detection of biological simulants. We were directed to choose a laser that could excite the peak absorption for most simulants in the vicinity of 275 nm. A survey revealed that the lasers available were very complex and of low reliability with low pulse energy from inefficient multi-step conversion systems in the 260- 280 nm region. We realized that signal averaging could not overcome the small signals from low laser energies, and more alarmingly the strong ozone attenuation of the atmosphere would limit any operation to very short ranges. We chose to move to longer wavelengths away from the ozone darkening region and found the very high energy, high efficiency, and simple to operate 800 mJ 200 Hz XeCl Excimer laser. The 307 nm laser wavelength was strongly absorbed by the simulants without photo induced dissociation, and therefore gave very high fluorescent efficiencies and range capabilities over 10 km from a single shot.

  14. Differences Between Magnitudes and Health Impacts of BC Emissions Across the United States Using 12 km Scale Seasonal Source Apportionment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent assessments have analyzed the health impacts of PM2.5 from emissions from different locations and sectors using simplified or reduced-form air quality models. Here we present an alternative approach using the adjoint of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, wh...

  15. Enhanced ClO from 10 to 12 km Near the Winter Polar Tropopause During SOLVE/THESEO-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toohey, Darin W.; Thornton, Brett F.; Avery, Melody A.; Avallone, Linnea M.; Harder, Hartwig; Martinez, Monica; Simpas, James B.; Brune, William H.

    2002-01-01

    Abundances of chlorine oxide have been measured in situ near the tropopause from the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the SOLVE/THESEO-2000 campaign. Significant abundances, averaging 15-20 parts per trillion, were observed throughout the lowermost stratosphere at high latitudes during winter. Mixing ratios of ClO generally increased with increasing ozone (the latter an indicator of stratospheric air) as has been observed at other latitudes and seasons. However, the ratio of ClO to inorganic chlorine ([ClO]/[Cl(sub y)]) was found to be largest in air characterized by low abundances of ozone (approximately l00-250). It was within this range of ozone values that cirrus clouds were also observed occasionally throughout the measurement period, although distinct enhancements of ClO were not commonly observed directly within cirrus clouds. Elevated abundances of ClO were also apparently observed in polar darkness. However, we attribute these measurements to OClO, a species that can also be detected by the DC-8 instrument under the conditions encountered during SOLVE/THESEO-2000. Using a photochemical box model constrained by daytime abundances of ClO, we infer that BrO mixing ratios in this region were approximately 2-4 ppt, consistent with previous measurements from balloon-borne remote sensors.

  16. Video resolution enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Richard R.; Stevenson, Robert L.

    1995-03-01

    With the advent of High Definition Television, it will become desirable to convert existing video sequence data into higher-resolution formats. This conversion process already occurs within the human visual system to some extent, since the perceived spatial resolution of a sequence appears much higher than the actual spatial resolution of an individual frame. This paper addresses how to utilize both the spatial and temporal information present in a sequence in order to generate high-resolution video. A novel observation model based on motion compensated subsampling is proposed for a video sequence. Since the reconstruction problem is ill-posed, Bayesian restoration with a discontinuity-preserving prior image model is used to extract high-resolution image sequences will be shown, with dramatic improvements provided over various single frame interpolation methods.

  17. Perianal North American blastomycosis.

    PubMed

    Taub, Abigail L; Nelsen, David D; Nasser, Rana; Stratman, Erik J

    2015-08-01

    Cutaneous North American blastomycosis most often results from the hematogenous spread of Blastomyces dermatitidis following pulmonary infection. Cutaneous lesions, which may be either verrucous or ulcerative plaques, commonly occur on or around orifices contiguous to the respiratory tract. We report the case of a 57-year-old man with cutaneous North American blastomycosis who presented with a well-demarcated, firm, moist, verrucous perianal plaque 4 months following the onset of a prolonged upper respiratory tract infection. Dissemination of B dermatitidis to the perianal skin is rare, but North American blastomycosis should be considered in the broad differential diagnosis of perianal lesions in any patients who have lived in or traveled to endemic regions.

  18. What North Korea wants. [North Korean nuclear policy

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, P. )

    1993-12-01

    In this article the author draws upon his experiences from his four trips to North Korea, during which he discussed nuclear issues with North Korean leaders, to help explain part of the North Korean reasoning behind its threats to withdraw from the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and its gyrating nuclear policies. In essence, the author believes that North Korean nuclear policy is a result of Kim Jong Il's attempt to maintain the loyalty and obeisance of the elite. The article describes the political and economic factors which lead to North Korea's confrontation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and then discusses North Korea's immediate nuclear strategy.

  19. Air quality resolution for health impacts assessment: influence of regional characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, T. M.; Saari, R. K.; Selin, N. E.

    2013-05-01

    health impacts we conclude that human health benefits associated with decreases in ozone plus PM2.5, when calculated at 36 km resolution are indistinguishable from the benefits calculated using fine (12 km or finer) resolution modeling in the context of policy decisions.

  20. Late orogenic mafic magmatism in the North Cascades, Washington: Petrology and tectonic setting of the Skymo layered intrusion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, D.L.; Tepper, J.H.; Hirschmann, M.M.; Hurlow, H.A.

    2008-01-01

    The Skymo Complex in the North Cascades, Washington, is a layered mafic intrusion within the Ross Lake fault zone, a major orogen-parallel structure at the eastern margin of the Cascades crystalline core. The complex is composed dominantly of troctolite and gabbro, both with inclusions of primitive olivine gabbro. Low-pressure minerals in the metasedimentary contact aureole and early crystallization of olivine + plagioclase in the mafic rocks indicate the intrusion was emplaced at shallow depths (<12 km). The Skymo rocks have trace-element characteristics of arc magmas, but the association of Mg-rich olivine (Fo88-80) with relatively sodic plagioclase (An75-60) and the Al/Ti ratios of clinopyroxene are atypical of arc gabbros and more characteristic of rift-related gabbros. A Sm-Nd isochron indicates crystallization in the early Tertiary (ca. 50 Ma), coeval with the nearby Golden Horn alkaline granite. Mantle melting to produce Skymo magma likely occurred in a mantle wedge with a long history of arc magmatism. The Skymo mafic complex and the Golden Horn granite were emplaced during regional extension and collapse of the North Cascades orogen and represent the end of large-scale magmatism in the North Cascades continental arc. ?? 2008 Geological Society of America.

  1. North Polar Scarp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    3 March 2004 The north polar cap of Mars overlies a series of layered materials. The upper-most layers are light-toned and may include ice and perhaps dust. The lower layers may be less icy and contain some amount of dark sand. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an exposure of north polar layers located near 83.9oN, 237.9oW. This view covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  2. Highest Resolution Image of Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During its twelfth orbit around Jupiter, on Dec. 16, 1997, NASA's Galileo spacecraft made its closest pass of Jupiter's icy moon Europa, soaring 200 kilometers (124 miles) kilometers above the icy surface. This image was taken near the closest approach point, at a range of 560 kilometers (335 miles) and is the highest resolution picture of Europa that will be obtained by Galileo. The image was taken at a highly oblique angle, providing a vantage point similar to that of someone looking out an airplane window. The features at the bottom of the image are much closer to the viewer than those at the top of the image. Many bright ridges are seen in the picture, with dark material in the low-lying valleys. In the center of the image, the regular ridges and valleys give way to a darker region of jumbled hills, which may be one of the many dark pits observed on the surface of Europa. Smaller dark, circular features seen here are probably impact craters.

    North is to the right of the picture, and the sun illuminates the surface from that direction. This image, centered at approximately 13 degrees south latitude and 235 degrees west longitude, is approximately 1.8 kilometers (1 mile) wide. The resolution is 6 meters (19 feet) per picture element. This image was taken on December 16, 1997 by the solid state imaging system camera on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  3. North Atlantic westerlies during the last millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasskog, Kristian; Bakke, Jostein; Ringkjøb Nielsen, Pål; Meidell, Susanne

    2015-04-01

    Understanding North Atlantic decadal-scale climate variability is crucial in order to make projections of future climate change and to assess anthropogenic impacts on climate. However, reconstructing past changes in atmospheric circulation patterns from proxy data is particularly challenging, and different proxy reconstructions often show conflicting results. Winter accumulation dominates the annual mass-balance of glaciers along the west coast of Norway, and because the winter accumulation is highly sensitive to changes in the strength of wintertime westerly winds, these glaciers are potentially valuable recorders of past atmospheric circulation. Here we present a 1200-year long spatiotemporal reconstruction of Nordfonna, a maritime plateau glacier in western Norway, based on an integrated study of terrestrial moraine sequences, sub-glacial topography, and multi-proxy records from two distal glacier-fed lakes located at the opposite sides of the glacier in a west-east transect. We use temporal changes in the west-to-east tilt of the Equilibrium-Line-Altitude (ELA) across the ice cap to infer the strength of North-Atlantic westerly winds over the past 1200 years, and validate our high-resolution (5-yr) record against instrumental data. While multidecadal fluctuations in the regional ELA can be explained largely by changes in North Atlantic sea surface temperatures (i.e. the AMO), our data suggests that the local 'Little Ice Age' maximum glacier expansion (AD 1700-1750) was caused mainly by strengthened wintertime westerlies. The wintertime westerlies over southern Norway are closely linked to the leading mode of atmospheric variability in the North Atlantic, known as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and our record therefore represents a unique proxy of past changes in the NAO.

  4. 6. WEST END OF NORTH TRAINING WALL, LOOKING NORTH FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. WEST END OF NORTH TRAINING WALL, LOOKING NORTH FROM THE WATER, ALSO SHOWING FOUNDATIONS FOR AN UNIDENTIFIED STRUCTURE AT RIGHT. - Oakland Harbor Training Walls, Mouth of Federal Channel to Inner Harbor, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  5. location map, floor plan, north elevation, north elevation with porch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    location map, floor plan, north elevation, north elevation with porch removed, south elevation, building section - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area - Cabin Camp 1, Help's Quarters, Prince William Forest Park, Triangle, Prince William County, VA

  6. 26. Central compression lock, north span facing north. Compression lock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Central compression lock, north span facing north. Compression lock locks two spans together at highest point. There are three compression locks. - Henry Ford Bridge, Spanning Cerritos Channel, Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Lock 1 View north of north wall with concrete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock 1 - View north of north wall with concrete foundation for coal unloader and gate pocket at left. - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  8. 8. GROUND FLOOR, NORTH ROOM, NORTH WALL, VIEW OF ROOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. GROUND FLOOR, NORTH ROOM, NORTH WALL, VIEW OF ROOM LOOKING TOWARDS FIREPLACE, SHOWING PROJECTING CHIMNEY, WINDOW EMBRASURES ON EITHER SIDE AND PANELING - Ocean Hall, Bushwood, St. Mary's County, MD

  9. Life sciences building, north rear, also showing north hall to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Life sciences building, north rear, also showing north hall to the right, and the library in the center distance. - San Bernardino Valley College, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  10. 2. VIEW OF NORTH SPAN TRUSS, SHOWING CAUSEWAY BETWEEN NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF NORTH SPAN TRUSS, SHOWING CAUSEWAY BETWEEN NORTH AND SOUTH TRUSS, LOOKING FROM SOUTHWEST TO NORTHEAST - Marathon City Bridge, Spanning Big Rib River, on state Trunk Highway 107, Marathon, Marathon County, WI

  11. 1. GENERAL VIEW, NORTH SIDE OF CANNERY Looking north along ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW, NORTH SIDE OF CANNERY Looking north along main canning area. Retorts were located under the wooden frame work on the right. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  12. Detail of north wing with rollup door on north elevation; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of north wing with roll-up door on north elevation; camera facing south. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Defense Electronics Equipment Operating Center, I Street, terminus west of Cedar Avenue, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  13. Lincoln's Spot Resolutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Jean West; Schamel, Wynell Burroughs

    1988-01-01

    Examines the events leading to and immediately following the declaration of war on Mexico in 1846. Includes the second and third pages of Abraham Lincoln's "Spot Resolutions" and presents teaching suggestions for interpreting the document and assessing public opinion. (GEA)

  14. News from the North.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Sarah

    1987-01-01

    Reports on three new illustrated children's books with settings in the frozen Far North: "Zoom Away" by Tim Wynne-Jones and Ken Nutt, "The Cremation of Sam McGee" by Ted Harrison, and "A Candle for Christmas" by Jean Speare and Ann Blades. (NKA)

  15. Indians of North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A brief historical review of the Cherokee Indians from the mid-sixteenth century to modern day depicts an industrious tribe adversely affected by the settlement movement only to make exceptional economic advancements with the aid of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Civic pride and self-leadership among the Cherokee Indians in North Carolina has…

  16. North Korean Policy Elites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    news. III-1 A. BACKGROUND AND DEFINITIONS As a foreign visitor to North Korea marveled, “There are no shopping malls or advertising... Shopping Mall , and Restaurant in Downtown Pyongyang, December 2003...INTERNET CAFÉ AT THE TAESONG SHOPPING MALL , AND RESTAURANT IN DOWNTOWN PYONGYANG, DECEMBER 2003 V

  17. The North End Boston.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connally, Nicole; And Others

    Goals and objectives, student activities, and evaluations are contained in this guide for a one-day scavenger hunt through the North End of Boston. The culmination of a unit involving urban planning and land-use problems, the field trip is intended to give students first-hand experience with city life and a better understanding of urban issues…

  18. Emplacement and Growth of the August 2014 to February 2015 Nornahraun Lava Flow Field North Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thordarson, T.; Hoskuldsson, A.; Jónsdottir, I.; Pedersen, G.; Gudmundsson, M. T.; Dürig, T.; Riishuus, M. S.; Moreland, W.; Gudnason, J.; Gallagher, C. R.; Askew, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The 31.08.2014 to 27.02.2015 Nornahraun eruption in North Iceland is the largest eruption in Iceland in 232 years, producing an 85km2 lava flow field with a volume of 1.5-2km3. The eruption began on a 2 km long fissure that cut through the 1797AD Holuhraun vent system, spreading lava onto the flat (slope <0.4°) Dyngjujokull outwash plane. At mean magma discharge of 250 m3 the lava was transported from the vents via a 3.5km long lava channel, feeding a 1-2km wide rubbly pāhoehoe to 'a'a flow front advancing to the NE at rate of 1-2 km/day. This lava flow came to halt on 12 September at a distance of 18km from the vents and for the next 5 days it was subjected to endogenous growth reaching a mean thickness 12m and a volume 0.35km3. Mean magma discharge dropped to 150 m3/s on 18th and the vent activity was reduced to a 500 m long central segment of the fissure. A new lava flow formed, advancing along the southern margins of the first, coming to rest on 22 September at 11.5 km from the vents (vol. 0.09km3). On 23rd the third flow formed, advanced along south and north margins of the flow field, reaching a maximum length of 6.7 km as it came to rest on the 26th (vol. 0.06km3). Increase in magma discharge to about 220 m3/s is observed between 27 September and 8 October forming the 4th lava flow along the south margins of the flow field. This flow surged out to a distance of 15km in 12 days (vol. 0.22km3). Flow 5 formed between 9 to 30 October at mean discharge of 140 m3/s, advancing along the south side of flow 4 and reaching length of 11 km (vol. 0.30km3). Similarly, the sixth flow formed along flow 5 between 1-14 November at mean discharge of 110 m3/s and reaching length of 7.5km (vol. 0.11km3). This signaled the end of this gradual clockwise widening of the flow field, which coincided with partial crusting over of the lava channel and initiation of insulated flows that were emplaced on top of the earlier formed flows for the reminder of the eruption.

  19. High-Resolution Autoradiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towe, George C; Gomberg, Henry J; Freemen, J W

    1955-01-01

    This investigation was made to adapt wet-process autoradiography to metallurgical samples to obtain high resolution of segregated radioactive elements in microstructures. Results are confined to development of the technique, which was perfected to a resolution of less than 10 microns. The radioactive samples included carbon-14 carburized iron and steel, nickel-63 electroplated samples, a powder product containing nickel-63, and tungsten-185 in N-155 alloy.

  20. Ultra high resolution tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, W.S.

    1994-11-15

    Recent work and results on ultra high resolution three dimensional imaging with soft x-rays will be presented. This work is aimed at determining microscopic three dimensional structure of biological and material specimens. Three dimensional reconstructed images of a microscopic test object will be presented; the reconstruction has a resolution on the order of 1000 A in all three dimensions. Preliminary work with biological samples will also be shown, and the experimental and numerical methods used will be discussed.

  1. High Resolution Computed Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-31

    samples. 14. SUBJECTTERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 38 High Resolution, Microfocus , Characterization, X - Ray , Micrography, Computed Tomography (CT), Failure...high resolutions (50 g.tm feature sensitivity) when a small field of view (50 mm) is used [11]. Specially designed detectors and a microfocus X - ray ...Wright Laboratories. Feldkamp [14] at Ford used a microfocus X - ray source and an X - ray image intensifier to develop a system capable of 20 g.m

  2. 19. Interior first level view looking north within forward (north) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Interior first level view looking north within forward (north) section of firing pier. Objects pictured include torpedo cart (left), floor-mounted roller tray (extending to lower right), and (at center rear), deck-type firing tube. - Naval Torpedo Station, Firing Pier, North end of Gould Island in Narragansett Bay, Newport, Newport County, RI

  3. North portal and deck view, from north, showing inclined endposts, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North portal and deck view, from north, showing inclined endposts, Pratt through trusses, north portal strut, overhead bracing, pipe rails and posts, and concrete deck with bituminous wearing surface - Castle Garden Bridge, Township Route 343 over Bennetts Branch of Sinnemahoning Creek, Driftwood, Cameron County, PA

  4. 49. Machinery rooms on north tower. Facing north. Machinery rooms ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. Machinery rooms on north tower. Facing north. Machinery rooms contain all motors, motor controllers, and gears for operating one span, in this case, the north span. Note bell with continuous operating clapper for use as fog signals. - Henry Ford Bridge, Spanning Cerritos Channel, Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. 8. NORTH CENTER ROOM, FIRST FLOOR, NORTH WALL. Originally this ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. NORTH CENTER ROOM, FIRST FLOOR, NORTH WALL. Originally this room had three doors to the portico, two windows on north side and one window on east and west sides - Stephan Williams House, U.S. Route 176, Holly Hill, Orangeburg County, SC

  6. North of Wood Street Monitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Located at the far northern end of the upper harbor is the North of Wood Street study area. This area extends for about a quarter of a mile north of the Wood Street Bridge between New Bedford and Acushnet, Massachusetts.

  7. Urban Stormwater Modeling: Ultra-High-Resolution Evaluation of Best Management Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, S. R.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    Urban infrastructures affect drainage networks, alter flow paths, change feedbacks to the atmosphere and enhance contaminant transport. Urban stormwater either floods a system due to poor drainage and impervious surfaces, or is quickly transported out of the system in channels that then carry contaminants to downstream ecosystems with potentially harmful impacts. To mitigate these impacts, developers often use best management practices (BMPs) such as pervious pavement, infiltration basins, rain gardens or engineered wetlands. BMPs are typically represented using conceptually-based, coarse resolution hydrologic models; however, to effectively capture the flow dynamics, trace non-source pollutants and test BMP types and distributions, a high-resolution hydrologic model is needed. The goal of this work is to develop a novel approach to evaluate BMP implementation using an ultra-high-resolution hydrologic model. This study domain is located in Aurora, CO, in an area characterized by growing urban development. The ultra-high-resolution domain was constructed using LIDAR imagery and consisted of 1m x 1m horizontal resolution over a ~12 km by 4.5 km lateral extent up to 1m in the subsurface, with a domain totaling more than 108 unknowns. This analysis was performed using ParFlow, a physically-based, parallel hydrologic model that simulates surface and subsurface water interactions. Extreme wet, dry and normal storms events were coupled with three types of pervious pavement, amounting to 9 simulation scenarios. We investigated changes to stormwater routing and infiltration with and without BMP implementation. Contaminant transport is also included in this analysis via a Lagrangian, particle tracking approach, that allows for complex, contaminant-loading scenarios common in the urban environment. Future work includes investigating implications of alternate BMPs also used within urban developments.

  8. High Resolution Camera for Mapping Titan Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, Bianca

    2011-01-01

    Titan, Saturn's largest moon, has a dense atmosphere and is the only object besides Earth to have stable liquids at its surface. The Cassini/Huygens mission has revealed the extraordinary breadth of geological processes shaping its surface. Further study requires high resolution imaging of the surface, which is restrained by light absorption by methane and scattering from aerosols. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft has demonstrated that Titan's surface can be observed within several windows in the near infrared, allowing us to process several regions in order to create a geological map and to determine the morphology. Specular reflections monitored on the lakes of the North Pole show little scattering at 5 microns, which, combined with the present study of Titan's northern pole area, refutes the paradigm that only radar can achieve high resolution mapping of the surface. The present data allowed us to monitor the evolution of lakes, to identify additional lakes at the Northern Pole, to examine Titan's hypothesis of non-synchronous rotation and to analyze the albedo of the North Pole surface. Future missions to Titan could carry a camera with 5 micron detectors and a carbon fiber radiator for weight reduction.

  9. Conflict Prevention and Resolution Center

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Conflict Prevention and Resolution Center is EPA's primary resource for services and expertise in the areas of consensus-building, collaborative problem solving, alternative dispute resolution, and environmental collaboration and conflict resolution.

  10. Resolving North America`s environmental disputes

    SciTech Connect

    Mauseth, M.

    1998-12-31

    Seventeen years ago John E. Carroll and Newell B. Mack analyzed the then-current status of environmental protection mechanisms used between Canada and the United States. They criticized the ad hoc nature of North America`s history of environmental dispute resolution, which they dubbed ``ad hockery,`` and believed the present ambiguity hurt business, diplomatic relations, and the citizenry`s environment. Since that publication, increasing efforts to incorporate environmental concerns into Conventions have resulted in several multilateral agreements focusing on environmental protection and dispute resolution. Part 2 of this paper introduces a few of these recent agreements and the mechanisms they have established to monitor environmental damage and to enforce the goals of the agreements. The agreements discussed include: Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer; Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer; Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer; Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal; Canada-United States: Agreement on Air Quality; Rio Declaration on Environment and Development; Framework Convention on Climate Change; Convention on Biological Diversity; and the North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation. Part 3 discusses the general concern related to economic development (with the need to maintain ``sustainable development``), the possible environmental impact of NAFTA, and the Supplemental Agreement`s strengths and weaknesses.

  11. Nephelinite lavas at early stage of rift initiation (Hanang volcano, North Tanzanian Divergence)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudouin, Céline; Parat, Fleurice; Denis, Carole M. M.; Mangasini, Fredrik

    2016-07-01

    North Tanzanian Divergence is the first stage of continental break-up of East African Rift (<6 Ma) and is one of the most concentrated areas of carbonatite magmatism on Earth, with singular Oldoinyo Lengai and Kerimasi volcanoes. Hanang volcano is the southernmost volcano in the North Tanzanian Divergence and the earliest stage of rift initiation. Hanang volcano erupted silica-undersaturated alkaline lavas with zoned clinopyroxene, nepheline, andradite-schorlomite, titanite, apatite, and pyrrhotite. Lavas are low MgO-nephelinite with low Mg# and high silica content (Mg# = 22.4-35.2, SiO2 = 44.2-46.7 wt%, respectively), high incompatible element concentrations (e.g. REE, Ba, Sr) and display Nb-Ta fractionation (Nb/Ta = 36-61). Major elements of whole rock are consistent with magmatic differentiation by fractional crystallization from a parental melt with melilititic composition. Although fractional crystallization occurred at 9-12 km and can be considered as an important process leading to nephelinite magma, the complex zonation of cpx (e.g. abrupt change of Mg#, Nb/Ta, and H2O) and trace element patterns of nephelinites recorded magmatic differentiation involving open system with carbonate-silicate immiscibility and primary melilititic melt replenishment. The low water content of clinopyroxene (3-25 ppm wt. H2O) indicates that at least 0.3 wt% H2O was present at depth during carbonate-rich nephelinite crystallization at 340-640 MPa and 1050-1100 °C. Mg-poor nephelinites from Hanang represent an early stage of the evolution path towards carbonatitic magmatism as observed in Oldoinyo Lengai. Paragenesis and geochemistry of Hanang nephelinites require the presence of CO2-rich melilititic liquid in the southern part of North Tanzanian Divergence and carbonate-rich melt percolations after deep partial melting of CO2-rich oxidized mantle source.

  12. Proterozoic metamorphism and uplift history of the north-central Laramie Mountains, Wyoming, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patel, S.C.; Frost, B.R.; Chamberlain, K.R.; Snyder, G.L.

    1999-01-01

    The Laramie Mountains of south-eastern Wyoming contain two metamorphic domains that are separated by the 1.76 Ga. Laramie Peak shear zone (LPSZ). South of the LPSZ lies the Palmer Canyon block, where apatite U-Pb ages are c. 1745 Ma and the rocks have undergone Proterozoic kyanite-grade Barrovian metamorphism. In contrast, in the Laramie Peak block, north of the shear zone, the U-Pb apatite ages are 2.4-2.1 Ga, the granitic rocks are unmetamorphosed and supracrustal rocks record only low-T amphibolite facies metamorphism that is Archean in age. Peak mineral assemblages in the Palmer Canyon block include (a) quartz-biotite-plagioclase-garnet-staurolite-kyanite in the pelitic schists; (b) quartz-biotite-plagioclase-low-Ca amphiboles-kyanite in Mg-Al-rich schists, and locally (c) hornblende-plagioclase-garnet in amphibolites. All rock types show abundant textural evidence of decompression and retrograde re-equilibration. Notable among the texturally late minerals are cordierite and sapphirine, which occur in coronas around kyanite in Mg-Al-rich schists. Thermobarometry from texturally early and late assemblages for samples from different areas within the Palmer Canyon block define decompression from > 7 kbar to < 3 kbar. The high-pressure regional metamorphism is interpreted to be a response to thrusting associated with the Medicine Bow orogeny at c. 1.78-1.76 Ga. At this time, the north-central Laramie Range was tectonically thickened by as much as 12 km. This crustal thickening extended for more than 60 km north of the Cheyenne belt in southern Wyoming. Late in the orogenic cycle, rocks of the Palmer Canyon block were uplifted and unroofed as the result of transpression along the Laramie Peak shear zone to produce the widespread decompression textures. The Proterozoic tectonic history of the central Laramie Range is similar to exhumation that accompanied late-orogenic oblique convergence in many Phanerozoic orogenic belts.

  13. High Resolution Projection of Future Air Quality in South Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Pfister, G.; Lamarque, J. F.; Walters, S.; Naja, M. K.; Ghude, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    About one seventh of the world's population living in South Asia faces the risk of severe air pollution due to high anthropogenic emissions of air pollutants. Recent studies have shown that exposure to present day air pollution in South Asia is sufficient enough to reduce the lifespan of about 660 million people by about 3 years, destroy food that can feed about 94 million poor people and cause economic loss of several billion dollars. This problem may worsen in the future as anthropogenic emissions are expected to increase due to rapid economic growth in South Asia, and climate change is expected to lead to atmospheric conditions conducive for the production and accumulation of air pollutants. In order to predict how air quality will change in South Asia in future (2050), we are conducting high resolution air quality simulations for the present day (2005-2014) and future (2046-2055) time periods using the Nested Regional Climate Model coupled with Chemistry (NRCM-Chem). The model domain covers entire South Asia at a horizontal grid spacing of 60 km with a nested domain over the densely populated and polluted Indo-Gangetic Plain region at a horizontal grid spacing of 12 km. The model results are being evaluated with available in situ and satellite based observations and the evaluation results show that NRCM-Chem model is able to capture several important features of the observed spatial and temporal distribution of key meteorological parameters and air pollutants. Initial model results show that annual average surface ozone and PM2.5 concentrations may increase by up to 15 ppbv and 25 μg m-3, respectively with highest increase in the Indo-Gangetic Plain.

  14. High resolution dating of young magmatic oceanic crust using near-seafloor magnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyment, J.; Kitazawa, M.; Hemond, C.; Guillou, H.; Chauvin, A.; Ravilly, M.; Honsho, C.

    2015-12-01

    We compare two independent dating methods on a section of oceanic crust created within the last million year on the Central Indian Ridge axis at 19°10'S, an area affected by the Reunion hotspot. First, near-seafloor magnetic anomalies display characteristic sequences of magnetic intensity variations that we confidently identified by comparison with published paleointensity curves for the Brunhes period and used as a dating tool. This approach is further confirmed by the linear trend relating the NRM (Natural Remanent Magnetization) and paleointensity measured on rock samples along the same section. Second, valid K-Ar and Ar-Ar ages are determined on enriched basalt samples collected by deep-sea submersible. They show an excellent coincidence with the magnetic ages and support the use of high-resolution, near-seafloor marine magnetic anomalies as an efficient tool to date the young magmatic oceanic crust, where radiometric methods are generally unpractical, with unprecedented resolution. The ages obtained on the CIR reveal a 150-200 kyr cyclicity in the magmatic and tectonic processes of seafloor formation, two ridge jumps of 2.5 km and 1.2 km, respectively, and a systematic spreading asymmetry in favor to the Indian flank which may result from the interaction of the CIR with the Reunion hotspot.

  15. INTERMEDIATE RESOLUTION NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF 36 LATE M DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, R.; Martin, E. L.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Bouy, H.; Montgomery, M. M.; Rodler, F.; Del Burgo, C.; Phan Bao, N.; Lyubchik, Y.; Pavlenko, Y.; Tata, R.

    2012-10-01

    We present observations of 36 late M dwarfs obtained with the Keck II/NIRSPEC in the J band at a resolution of {approx}20,000. We have measured projected rotational velocities, absolute radial velocities, and pseudo-equivalent widths of atomic lines. Twelve of our targets did not have previous measurements in the literature. For the other 24 targets, we confirm previously reported measurements. We find that 13 stars from our sample have v sin i below our measurement threshold (12 km s{sup -1}) whereas four of our targets are fast rotators (v sin i > 30 km s{sup -1}). As fast rotation causes spectral features to be washed out, stars with low projected rotational velocities are sought for radial velocity surveys. At our intermediate spectral resolution, we have confirmed the identification of neutral atomic lines reported in McLean et al. We also calculated pseudo-equivalent widths of 12 atomic lines. Our results confirm that the pseudo-equivalent width of K I lines is strongly dependent on spectral types. We observe that the pseudo-equivalent width of Fe I and Mn I lines remains fairly constant with later spectral type. We suggest that these lines are particularly suitable for deriving metallicities for late M dwarfs.

  16. North Polar Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    28 November 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows banded terrain of the north polar region of Mars. The bands are exposures of layered material, possibly composed of dust and ice. The dark, rounded to elliptical mounds in this image might be the locations of ancient sand dunes that were completely buried in the north polar layered material. In more recent times, these mounds have been exhumed from within the layered material. Alternatively, the dark features are not ancient, exhumed dunes, but perhaps the remnants of a dark layer of material that once covered the entire area shown in the image. These features are located near 79.9oN, 31.4oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  17. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    7 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a 1.4 m/pixel (5 ft/pixel) view of a typical martian north polar ice cap texture. The surface is pitted and rough at the scale of several meters. The north polar residual cap of Mars consists mainly of water ice, while the south polar residual cap is mostly carbon dioxide. This picture is located near 85.2oN, 283.2oW. The image covers an area approximately 1 km wide by 1.4 km high (0.62 by 0.87 miles). Sunlight illuminates this scene from the lower left.

  18. Moon - North Pole Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This view of the Moon's north pole is a mosaic assembled from 18 images taken by Galileo's imaging system through a green filter as the spacecraft flew by on December 7, 1992. The left part of the Moon is visible from Earth; this region includes the dark, lava-filled Mare Imbrium (upper left); Mare Serenitatis (middle left); Mare Tranquillitatis (lower left), and Mare Crisium, the dark circular feature toward the bottom of the mosaic. Also visible in this view are the dark lava plains of the Marginis and Smythii Basins at the lower right. The Humboldtianum Basin, a 650-kilometer (400-mile) impact structure partly filled with dark volcanic deposits, is seen at the center of the image. The Moon's north pole is located just inside the shadow zone, about a third of the way from the top left of the illuminated region.

  19. North Pacific Bloom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Many images are made of relatively bright phytoplankton blooms. However, not all such blooms reflect more light than they absorb. SeaWiFS collected this image of a patch in the north Pacific that had been darkened because the photosynthetic pigments of the phytoplankton living there had absorbed more of the incoming solar radiation than the relatively phytoplankton-poor surrounding waters. The Hawaiian islands can be seen through the clouds about 1000 kilometers to the southwest of the patch.

  20. Workforce: North Dakota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Between 2002 and 2012, the rate of job growth in North Dakota will be modest: under 1 percent annually. However, a large number of positions-close to a quarter of all jobs in the state-will open up for hiring due to retirements and separations. In addition, the demand for well-educated employees will only increase over the next several years. In…

  1. Moon - North Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This view of the north polar region of the Moon was obtained by Galileo's camera during the spacecraft's flyby of the Earth-Moon system on December 7 and 8, 1992. The north pole is to the lower right of the image. The view in the upper left is toward the horizon across the volcanic lava plains of Mare Imbrium. The prominent crater with the central peak is Pythagoras, an impact crater some 130 kilometers (80 miles) in diameter. The image was taken at a distance of 121,000 kilometers (75,000 miles) from the Moon through the violet filter of Galileo's imaging system. According to team scientists, the viewing geometry provided by the spacecraft's pass over the north pole and the low sun-angle illumination provide a unique opportunity to assess the geologic relationships among the smooth plains, cratered terrain and impact ejecta deposits in this region of the Moon. JPL manages the Galileo Project for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  2. Effects of chemistry on convective and non-convective precipitation over North Eastern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashayekhi, R.; Sloan, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    The change in convective and non-convective (microphysically-induced) precipitation due to the influence of chemistry - and particularly that of anthropogenic aerosols - is investigated in this study. The overall effect of chemistry is deduced from a comparison of the results from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF v3.4) model and its corresponding chemistry version (WRF/Chem v3.4). Simulations are conducted for a five-month period from April to August 2009 in a domain covering North Eastern North America with 12 km grid spacing. We created the temporally and spatially distributed anthropogenic emissions from area, point and mobile sources using the Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE v2.7) modeling system by processing the total annual county or province-based inventories for the U.S. and Canada using the appropriate temporal, chemical speciation and spatial surrogate cross-reference files. This study shows that convective precipitation dominates in the summer and in the southern part of the domain due to greater tropospheric instability in warmer periods. Non-convective precipitation becomes more significant during the spring, but it contributes much less in total rain. Both WRF and WRF/Chem models overpredict the mean total daily precipitation, with a positive bias that increases as the convective precipitation increases in warmer months. This appears to be a common problem with the prediction of convective precipitation; it is associated with its high spatial variability. The comparison of WRF/Chem results with those of WRF shows that a non-negligible change in both convective and cloud-resolved (non-convective) precipitation is caused by chemistry (including aerosols) over most parts of the domain. These changes can be attributed to both radiative and microphysical causes. A chemistry-induced change of approximately 15% is found in the five-month mean daily convective precipitation over areas with high convective rain. This can be traced to

  3. Paleoseismologic Studies of the North Anatolian Fault, Cukurcimen and Ulaslar, North-Central Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartleb, R. D.; Dolan, J. F.; Kozaci, O.; Seitz, G. G.; Akyuz, H. S.; Barka, A. A.

    2001-12-01

    The central North Anatolian fault (NAF) is a model opportunity to study long-term behavior of continental transforms because of its relative mechanical simplicity and long historic record of earthquakes. We excavated three trenches across the NAF at Cukurcimen, near Refahiye in north-central Turkey on the eastern part of the 1939 M7.9 surface rupture. Measurement of a nearby offset dirt road, together with interviews with residents, indicates that ~9 - 14 m of dextral slip occurred at the site during the 1939 event. Trench stratigraphy is superb, with alternating fine-scale alluvial and marsh deposits, including abundant, laterally-continuous peat horizons. These in-situ peat deposits provide excellent chronological control, which we are utilizing by strategic sampling and AMS 14C analysis. We identified evidence for at least two, and perhaps four, surface ruptures at Cukurcimen. Two distinct event horizons were recognized in trench 1 on the basis of upward fault terminations. The most recent event in trench 1 occurred shortly after deposition of a thin peat horizon (1332 - 1481 AD). We do not have an upper age limit for this event, but the event horizon lies ~75 cm below ground surface. We believe that this is the historical 1583 earthquake which razed Erzincan, and that the 1939 event is not recorded in trench 1. An older, clearly-defined event in trench 1 occurred shortly after deposition of another thin peat horizon (795 - 1022 AD), and before the 1583 (?) event. We suspect that this event is the historical 1045 earthquake. There is also equivocal evidence in trench 1 for an older event that occurred after deposition of a peat dated at BC 538 - 260, and before 795 - 1022 AD. Trench 2 revealed evidence for one event (1939?), peat dates are pending. Trench 3 revealed evidence for two events (probably 1939 and 1583). Additional excavations are planned at this site. We excavated two trenches across the NAF near Ulaslar, 12 km east of Gerede, on the 1944 M7

  4. The resolution of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Christopher D; Gilroy, Derek W; Serhan, Charles N; Stockinger, Brigitta; Tak, Paul P

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, Nature Reviews Immunology organized a conference that brought together scientists and clinicians from both academia and industry to discuss one of the most pressing questions in medicine--how do we turn off rampant, undesirable inflammation? There is a growing appreciation that, similarly to the initiation of inflammation, the resolution of inflammation is an intricate and active process. Can we therefore harness the mediators involved in resolution responses to treat patients with chronic inflammatory or autoimmune diseases? Here, we ask five of the speakers from the conference to share their thoughts on this emerging field.

  5. High resolution drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    1985-07-01

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 ..mu..m resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Antenna performance and resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    The performance of the antenna throughout SL-2, SL-3, and SL-4 was investigated along with the antenna resolution of brightness temperature during flight. The target area selected for the test flights was the Gulf of California, as it offered land/water interface. The coordinate transformations and antenna orientation, flight path simulation, and integration over the radiometric target are discussed.

  7. Conflict Resolution Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busselle, Tish

    This 7-day unit, intended for use with secondary students, contains a statement of rationale and objectives, lesson plans, class assignments, teacher and student bibliographies, and suggestions for instructional materials on conflict resolution between individuals, groups, and nations. Among the six objectives listed for the unit are: 1) explain…

  8. Coreference Resolution With Reconcile

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Procedure (RAP). JavaRap resolves only pronouns and, thus, it is not directly comparable to Reconcile. GuiTaR (Poesio and Kabadjov, 2004) and BART...Versley et al., 2008) (which can be considered a succes- sor of GuiTaR ) are both modular systems that tar- get the full coreference resolution task. As such

  9. High-resolution headlamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gut, Carsten; Cristea, Iulia; Neumann, Cornelius

    2016-04-01

    The following article shall describe how human vision by night can be influenced. At first, front lighting systems that are already available on the market will be described, followed by their analysis with respect to the positive effects on traffic safety. Furthermore, how traffic safety by night can be increased since the introduction of high resolution headlamps shall be discussed.

  10. INTERIOR VIEW, NORTH QUARRY, LOOKING NORTH TOWARDS THE SITE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, NORTH QUARRY, LOOKING NORTH TOWARDS THE SITE OF THE HISTORIC THOMAS FURNACES WITH ACTIVE DOLOMITE EXTRACTION ONGOING IN THE FOREGROUND. FURNACE FOUNDATION RUINS ARE PICTURED ON THE TOP LEDGE (CENTER LEFT) OF THE QUARRY. ALSO PICTURED IS THE HISTORIC THOMAS COKEWORKERS WITH (LEFT TO RIGHT) THE POWER PLANT, BOILER HOUSE, AND COKEWORKS. JUST SOUTH OF THE COKEWORKS, IS AN ACTIVE DOLOMITE CRUSHING, SIZING, AND SCREENING PLANT - Wade Sand & Gravel Company, North Quarry, State Highway 78, Thomas, Jefferson County, AL

  11. INTERIOR VIEW, NORTH QUARRY, LOOKING NORTH TOWARDS THE SITE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, NORTH QUARRY, LOOKING NORTH TOWARDS THE SITE OF THE HISTORIC THOMAS FURNACES WITH ACTIVE DOLOMITE EXTRACTION ONGOING IN THE FOREGROUND. FURNACE FOUNDATION RUINS ARE PICTURED ON THE TOP LEDGE (CENTER LEFT) OF THE QUARRY. ALSO PICTURED IS THE HISTORIC THOMAS COKEWORKS WITH (LEFT TO RIGHT) THE POWER PLANT, BOILER HOUSE, AND COKEWORKS. JUST SOUTH OF THE COKEWORKS IS AN ACTIVE DOLOMITE CRUSHING, SIZING, AND SCREENING PLANT. - Wade Sand & Gravel Company, North Quarry, State Highway 78, Thomas, Jefferson County, AL

  12. 3. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTH OF NORTH PART OF COAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. AERIAL VIEW TO NORTH OF NORTH PART OF COAST GUARD AIR STATION SAN FRANCISCO, SHOWING PAN AMERICAN WORLD AIRWAYS HANGAR IN BACKGROUND. 8X10 black and white silver gelatin print. United States Coast Guard Official Photograph, 12th District, File No. 62751-21 A.S. Date unknown. - U.S. Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco, 1020 North Access Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  13. North America: Chapter 5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, Mark D.; Beaubien, Elisabeth G.; Crimmins, Theresa M.; Weltzin, Jake F.; Edited by Schwartz, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Plant phenological observations and networks in North America have been largely local and regional in extent until recent decades. In the USA, cloned plant monitoring networks were the exception to this pattern, with data collection spanning the late 1950s until approximately the early 1990s. Animal observation networks, especially for birds have been more extensive. The USA National Phenology Network (USA-NPN), established in the mid-2000s is a recent effort to operate a comprehensive national-scale network in the United States. In Canada, PlantWatch, as part of Nature Watch, is the current national-scale plant phenology program.

  14. North Polar Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image illustrates very well the detailed, pitted nature of the north polar residual ice cap. As water ice sublimes away a little bit each summer, dark-floored pits have formed, trapping dust and other debris.

    Location near: 85.1oN, 284.6oW 200 m scale bar = 219 yards Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Summer

  15. Assessing the Sensitivity of Simulated East Coast Winter Storms to Horizontal Resolution Using Variable-Resolution CAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarzycki, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    East Coast winter storms can have a broad range of impacts on densely populated regions of eastern North America. These systems can pose threats to health and safety, significantly disrupt transportation infrastructure, and result in long-term national and global economic consequences. While considerable efforts have been made in the short-term forecasting of these storms, less investigation has detailed their representation in free-running climate simulations at seasonal to multi-year timescales, in part due to the relatively low resolution of traditional global general circulation models (GCMs). However, aspects of these systems determining local impacts include mesoscale storm dynamics, orography, and land surface properties, which require higher horizontal resolution for increased realism. Recently, variable-resolution GCMs have become more widely used as a method of targeting computing resources to regionally increase resolution while maintaining a global modeling framework. These techniques allow for the elimination of boundary conditions and the more physically consistent treatment of subgrid parameterizations. In this presentation we assess the impact of model resolution on winter storm characteristics by using a hierarchy of variable-resolution Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) simulations. Regional refinement is added within CAM over the eastern portions of North America. An automated detection scheme has been developed to objectively find and track storms in output data. In addition, implementation of precipitation type and snow liquid water equivalent algorithms allow for simulated snow, freezing rain, sleet, and mixed precipitation to be assessed in a climatological sense. We pay particular attention to changes in storm intensity and shifts in precipitation distribution as horizontal resolution is increased from typical GCM grid spacings (1°, ~110 km) to resolutions more typical of numerical weather prediction (0.125°, ~14km). Novel methods

  16. Assessment of the effects of horizontal grid resolution on long-term air quality trends using coupled WRF-CMAQ simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Chuen-Meei; Hogrefe, Christian; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Xing, Jia; Wong, David; Gilliam, Robert; Pouliot, George; Wei, Chao

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the adequacy of using a relatively coarse horizontal resolution (i.e. 36 km) to simulate long-term trends of pollutant concentrations and radiation variables with the coupled WRF-CMAQ model. WRF-CMAQ simulations over the continental United State are performed over the 2001 to 2010 time period at two different horizontal resolutions of 12 and 36 km. Both simulations used the same emission inventory and model configurations. Model results are compared both in space and time to assess the potential weaknesses and strengths of using coarse resolution in long-term air quality applications. The results show that the 36 km and 12 km simulations are comparable in terms of trends analysis for both pollutant concentrations and radiation variables. The advantage of using the coarser 36 km resolution is a significant reduction of computational cost, time and storage requirement which are key considerations when performing multiple years of simulations for trend analysis. However, if such simulations are to be used for local air quality analysis, finer horizontal resolution may be beneficial since it can provide information on local gradients. In particular, divergences between the two simulations are noticeable in urban, complex terrain and coastal regions.

  17. A super resolution framework for low resolution document image OCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Di; Agam, Gady

    2013-01-01

    Optical character recognition is widely used for converting document images into digital media. Existing OCR algorithms and tools produce good results from high resolution, good quality, document images. In this paper, we propose a machine learning based super resolution framework for low resolution document image OCR. Two main techniques are used in our proposed approach: a document page segmentation algorithm and a modified K-means clustering algorithm. Using this approach, by exploiting coherence in the document, we reconstruct from a low resolution document image a better resolution image and improve OCR results. Experimental results show substantial gain in low resolution documents such as the ones captured from video.

  18. Particle detector spatial resolution

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-12-15

    Method and apparatus for producing separated columns of scintillation layer material, for use in detection of X-rays and high energy charged particles with improved spatial resolution is disclosed. A pattern of ridges or projections is formed on one surface of a substrate layer or in a thin polyimide layer, and the scintillation layer is grown at controlled temperature and growth rate on the ridge-containing material. The scintillation material preferentially forms cylinders or columns, separated by gaps conforming to the pattern of ridges, and these columns direct most of the light produced in the scintillation layer along individual columns for subsequent detection in a photodiode layer. The gaps may be filled with a light-absorbing material to further enhance the spatial resolution of the particle detector. 12 figs.

  19. High resolution data acquisition

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, G.W.; Fuller, K.R.

    1993-04-06

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock, pulse train, and analog circuitry for generating a triangular wave synchronously with the pulse train (as seen in diagram on patent). The triangular wave has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter counts the clock pulse train during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  20. High resolution data acquisition

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, Glenn W.; Fuller, Kenneth R.

    1993-01-01

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock (38) pulse train (37) and analog circuitry (44) for generating a triangular wave (46) synchronously with the pulse train (37). The triangular wave (46) has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter (18, 32) forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter (26) counts the clock pulse train (37) during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer (52) then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  1. Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2012

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Rogers, Harold [R-KY-5

    2011-09-14

    09/15/2011 Rules Committee Resolution H. Res. 399 Reported to House. Rule provides for consideration of H.J. Res. 79 with 1 hour of general debate. Previous question shall be considered as ordered without intervening motions except motion to recommit with or without instructions... (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. Optical resolution of rotenoids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abidi, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    Optical resolution of selected rotenoids containing 1-3 asymmetric centers in dihydrobenzopyranofuroben-zopyranone and dihydrobisbenzopyranopyranone series has been achieved on two chiral high-performance liquid chromatographic (hplc) stationary phases. In most cases, the absolute stereochemistry at the cis-B/C ring junction of the rotenoidal antipodes can be related to their elution order. Generally, the 6aα,12aα-enantiomers were more strongly retained by the chiral substrate than their corresponding optical antipodes. The elution-configuration relationship provides potential utility for predicting the absolute configuration of related rotenoidal compounds. Chiral phase hplc on amino-acid-bonded-silica yielded results explicable in terms of Pirkle's bonding schemes for chiral recognition. Resolution data for 12a-hydroxy-, 12a-methoxy-, and 12-hydroxyiminorotenoids further corroborate the mechanistic rationale, and demonstrate that nonpolar π-π interactions appeared to be important for enantiomeric separation on helic poly-triphenylmethylacryl-ate-silica (CPOT). In the latter system, steric effects and conformational factors in association with the modification of E-ring structures might play significant roles in the chiral separation process in view of the reversal to the elution order observed for all methoxylated rotenoids and elliptone derivatives including the parent deguelin. The unique separability (α = 1.44) of 12a-hydroxyelliptone on CPOT was suggestive of structural effects of the 5-side chain on the resolution of the rotenoids having a five-membered-E-ring. The results obtained with two different types of chiral phases are complementary and useful for optical resolution of a wide variety of natural and synthetic rotenoidal compounds.

  3. House Resolutions of Inquiry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-05-12

    14 Two years later, the House made another change to its rules governing resolutions of inquiry, requiring not merely a day’s delay but also...of Government “does not necessarily belong to the province of legislation. It does not profess to be asked for that object.”42 Second, if the House ...recognized that the power of impeachment gives the House “the right to investigate the conduct of all public officers under the Government . This is

  4. Role of convection in redistributing formaldehyde to the upper troposphere over North America and the North Atlantic during the summer 2004 INTEX campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Alan; Olson, Jennifer R.; Walega, James G.; Crawford, Jim H.; Chen, Gao; Weibring, Petter; Richter, Dirk; Roller, Chad; Tittel, Frank; Porter, Michael; Fuelberg, Henry; Halland, Jeremy; Bertram, Timothy H.; Cohen, Ronald C.; Pickering, Kenneth; Heikes, Brian G.; Snow, Julie A.; Shen, Haiwei; O'Sullivan, Daniel W.; Brune, William H.; Ren, Xinrong; Blake, Donald R.; Blake, Nicola; Sachse, Glen; Diskin, Glenn S.; Podolske, James; Vay, Stephanie A.; Shetter, Richard E.; Hall, Samuel R.; Anderson, Bruce E.; Thornhill, Lee; Clarke, Antony D.; McNaughton, Cameron S.; Singh, Hanwant B.; Avery, Melody A.; Huey, Gregory; Kim, Saewung; Millet, Dylan B.

    2008-09-01

    Measurements of formaldehyde (CH2O) from a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) were acquired onboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the summer 2004 INTEX-NA campaign to test our understanding of convection and CH2O production mechanisms in the upper troposphere (UT, 6-12 km) over continental North America and the North Atlantic Ocean. The present study utilizes these TDLAS measurements and results from a box model to (1) establish sets of conditions by which to distinguish "background" UT CH2O levels from those perturbed by convection and other causes; (2) quantify the CH2O precursor budgets for both air mass types; (3) quantify the fraction of time that the UT CH2O measurements over North America and North Atlantic are perturbed during the summer of 2004; (4) provide estimates for the fraction of time that such perturbed CH2O levels are caused by direct convection of boundary layer CH2O and/or convection of CH2O precursors; (5) assess the ability of box models to reproduce the CH2O measurements; and (6) examine CH2O and HO2 relationships in the presence of enhanced NO. Multiple tracers were used to arrive at a set of UT CH2O background and perturbed air mass periods, and 46% of the TDLAS measurements fell within the latter category. In general, production of CH2O from CH4 was found to be the dominant source term, even in perturbed air masses. This was followed by production from methyl hydroperoxide, methanol, PAN-type compounds, and ketones, in descending order of their contribution. At least 70% to 73% of the elevated UT observations were caused by enhanced production from CH2O precursors rather than direct transport of CH2O from the boundary layer. In the presence of elevated NO, there was a definite trend in the CH2O measurement-model discrepancy, and this was highly correlated with HO2 measurement-model discrepancies in the UT.

  5. High resolution telescope

    DOEpatents

    Massie, Norbert A.; Oster, Yale

    1992-01-01

    A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employs speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1 m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12 m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by an electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activites. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes.

  6. Resolution for color photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubel, Paul M.; Bautsch, Markus

    2006-02-01

    Although it is well known that luminance resolution is most important, the ability to accurately render colored details, color textures, and colored fabrics cannot be overlooked. This includes the ability to accurately render single-pixel color details as well as avoiding color aliasing. All consumer digital cameras on the market today record in color and the scenes people are photographing are usually color. Yet almost all resolution measurements made on color cameras are done using a black and white target. In this paper we present several methods for measuring and quantifying color resolution. The first method, detailed in a previous publication, uses a slanted-edge target of two colored surfaces in place of the standard black and white edge pattern. The second method employs the standard black and white targets recommended in the ISO standard, but records these onto the camera through colored filters thus giving modulation between black and one particular color component; red, green, and blue color separation filters are used in this study. The third method, conducted at Stiftung Warentest, an independent consumer organization of Germany, uses a whitelight interferometer to generate fringe pattern targets of varying color and spatial frequency.

  7. NorthEast view; Platform, canopy, and freight elevator North Philadelphia ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North-East view; Platform, canopy, and freight elevator - North Philadelphia Station, 2900 North Broad Street, on northwest corner of Broad Street & Glenwood Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. Environmental impact and recovery at two dumping sites for dredged material in the North Sea.

    PubMed

    Stronkhorst, J; Ariese, F; van Hattum, B; Postma, J F; de Kluijver, M; Den Besten, P J; Bergman, M J N; Daan, R; Murk, A J; Vethaak, A D

    2003-01-01

    The environmental impact and recovery associated with the long and uninterrupted disposal of large volumes of moderately contaminated dredged material from the port of Rotterdam was studied at nearby dumping sites in the North Sea. Observations were made on sediment contamination, ecotoxicity, biomarker responses and benthic community changes shortly after dumping at the 'North' site had ceased and at the start of disposal at the new dumping site 'Northwest'. During the period of dumping, very few benthic invertebrates were found at the North site. Concentrations of cadmium, mercury, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and tributyltin (TBT) in the fine sediment fraction (<63 microm) from this site were 2-3 times higher than at the reference site. In four different bioassays with marine invertebrates the sediments showed no acute toxic effects. In tissue (pyloric caeca) of resident starfish Asterias rubens, residual levels of mercury, zinc, PCBs and dioxin-like activity were never more than twice those at the reference site. Four different biomarkers (DNA integrity, cytochrome P450 content, benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase activity and acetylcholinesterase inhibition) were used on the starfish tissues, but no significant differences were found between North and the reference site. Minor pathological effects were observed in resident dab Limanda limanda. One year after dumping had ceased at the North site, a significant increase in the species richness and abundance of benthic invertebrates and a concomitant decrease in the fine sediment fraction of the seabed were observed. After 8.2 million m3 of moderately contaminated dredged material had been dumped at the new dumping site Northwest, the species richness and abundance of benthic invertebrates declined over an area extending about 1-2 km eastwards. This correlated with a shift in sediment texture from sand to silt. The contamination of the fine sediment fraction at the Northwest location

  9. Submicrometer aerosol particle distributions in the upper troposphere over the mid-latitude North Atlantic-results from the third route of `CARIBIC'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, M.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Slemr, F.; Heintzenberg, J.; Martinsson, B. G.; Schlager, H.; van Velthoven, P. F. J.; Wiedensohler, A.; Zahn, A.; Ziereis, H.

    2008-02-01

    Particle number and mass concentrations of submicrometer aerosol particles were determined for the upper troposphere over the mid-latitude North Atlantic within the Civil Aircraft for Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container project (CARIBIC, http://www.caribic-atmospheric.com). Between May 2001 and April 2002, 22 flights from Germany to the Caribbean were conducted using an automated measurement container on a B767 passenger aircraft. Spatial and seasonal probability distributions for ultrafine and Aitken mode particles as well as mass concentrations of particulate sulphur in 8-12 km altitude are presented. High particle number concentrations (mostly 2500-15 000 particles cm-3 STP) are particularly found in summer over the western North Atlantic Ocean close to the North American continent. The distributions together with an analysis of particle source processes show that deep vertical transport is the dominant process leading to most of the events with high particle number concentrations (>~8000 particles cm-3 STP) for ultrafine particles as well as for Aitken mode particles. This study emphasizes the importance of deep vertical transport and cloud processing for the concentration of aerosol particles in the upper troposphere.

  10. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF EAST AND NORTH SIDES OF NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF EAST AND NORTH SIDES OF NORTH WING; NOTE PLYWOOD COVERED WINDOWS DUE TO EXPLOSION ON LAUNCH PAD A IN MARCH 1997 WITH FIERY RAIN OF SOLID ROCKET FUEL AND PROLONGED CONCUSSION WAVES; VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 36001, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  11. 37. NORTH TO BINS ALONG NORTH WALL OF FACTORY BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. NORTH TO BINS ALONG NORTH WALL OF FACTORY BUILDING WHICH REMAIN FILLED WITH NEW OLD STOCK AND USED PARTS FOR ELI WINDMILLS. THE ROPE AT THE LOWER FOREGROUND WAS USED IN ERECTING WINDMILLS AND TOWERS FOR CUSTOMERS. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  12. Exterior view of leanto addition off the north side. North ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior view of lean-to addition off the north side. North side wall of the original structure to the left. Photograph taken facing west - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Woodworking Shop, Seventh Street near Avenue E, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  13. 4. VIEW NORTH, YARD NORTH OF ENGINE HOUSE, SHOWING WATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW NORTH, YARD NORTH OF ENGINE HOUSE, SHOWING WATER TANK AND SHOP Photocopy of photograph, 1941 (Courtesy of Chesapeake Beach Railway Museum; L. W. Rice, photographer) - Chesapeake Beach Railroad Engine House, 21 Yost Place, Seat Pleasant, Prince George's County, MD

  14. North Central Thailand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This radar image shows the dramatic landscape in the Phang Hoei Range of north central Thailand, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) northeast of the city of Lom Sak. The plateau, shown in green to the left of center, is the area of Phu Kradung National Park. This plateau is a remnant of a once larger plateau, another portion of which is seen along the right side of the image. The plateaus have been dissected by water erosion over thousands of years. Forest areas appear green on the image; agricultural areas and settlements appear as red and blue. North is toward the lower right. The area shown is 38 by 50 kilometers (24 by 31 miles) and is centered at 16.96 degrees north latitude, 101.67 degrees east longitude. Colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations as follows: red is L-band horizontally transmitted and horizontally received; green is L-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received; blue is C-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture (SIR-C/X-SAR) imaging radar on October 3, 1994, when it flew aboard the space shuttle Endeavour. SIR-C/X-SAR is a joint mission of the U.S./German and Italian space agencies.

    Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by

  15. Songbirds tradeoff auditory frequency resolution and temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Henry, Kenneth S; Gall, Megan D; Bidelman, Gavin M; Lucas, Jeffrey R

    2011-04-01

    Physical tradeoffs may in some cases constrain the evolution of sensory systems. The peripheral auditory system, for example, performs a spectral decomposition of sound that should result in a tradeoff between frequency resolution and temporal resolution. We assessed temporal resolution in three songbird species using auditory brainstem responses to paired click stimuli. Temporal resolution was greater in house sparrows (Passer domesticus) than Carolina chickadees (Poecile carolinensis) and white-breasted nuthatches (Sitta carolinensis), as predicted based on previous observations of broader auditory filters (lower frequency resolution) in house sparrows. Furthermore, within chickadees, individuals with broader auditory filters had greater temporal resolution. In contrast to predictions however, temporal resolution was similar between chickadees and nuthatches despite broader auditory filters in chickadees. These results and the results of a model simulation exploring the effect of broadened auditory filter bandwidth on temporal resolution in the auditory periphery strongly suggest that frequency resolution constrains temporal resolution in songbirds. Furthermore, our results suggest that songbirds have greater temporal resolution than some mammals, in agreement with recent behavioral studies. Species differences in temporal resolution may reflect adaptations for efficient processing of species-specific vocalizations, while individual differences within species may reflect experience-based developmental plasticity or hormonal effects.

  16. North Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    3 December 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an exposure of finely-detailed layers in the martian north polar region. The polar ice cap, which is made up of frozen water (whereas the south polar cap is mostly frozen carbon dioxide), is underlain by a thick sequence of layers. Some have speculated that these layers may record the history of changes in martian climate during the past few hundreds of millions of years. This picture is located near 86.0oN, 30.2oW, and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  17. Phoenix Animation Looking North

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation

    This animation is a series of images, taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager, combined into a panoramic view looking north from the lander. The area depicted is beyond the immediate workspace of the lander and shows a system of polygons and troughs that connect with the ones Phoenix will be investigating in depth.

    The images were taken on sol 14 (June 8, 2008) or the 14th Martian day after landing.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. Dunes of the North

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    30 March 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows linear and barchan sand dunes in Chasma Boreale, a broad erosional trough in the martian north polar region. Winds responsible for these dunes generally blow from upper right toward the lower left. Martian dunes tend to be darker than their counterparts on Earth because they are composed of darker, iron-bearing minerals and rock fragments.

    Location near: 84.2oN, 37.9oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Summer

  19. Reactive Nitrogen Distribution and Partitioning in the North American Troposphere and Lowermost Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, H. B.; Salas, L.; Herlth, D.; Kolyer, R.; Czech, E.; Crawford, J. H.; Pierce, R. B.; Sachse, G. W.; Blake, D. R.; Cohen, R. C.; Bertram, T. H.; Perring, A.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Dibb, J.; Huey, G.; Hudman, R. C.; Turquety, S.; Emmons, L. K.; Flocke, F.; Tang, Y.; Carmichael, G. R.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive group of reactive nitrogen species (NO, NOz, HN03, HOzN02, PANs, alkyl nitrates, and aerosol-NO3) were measured over North America during July/August 2004 from the NASA DC-8 platform (0.1 - 12 km). Nitrogen containing tracers of biomass combustion (HCN and CH3CN) were also measured along with a host of other gaseous (CO, VOC, OVOC, halocarbon) and aerosol tracers. Clean background air as well as air with influences from biogenic emissions, anthropogenic pollution, biomass combustion, convection, lightning, and the stratosphere was sampled over the continental United States, the Atlantic, and the Pacific. The North American upper troposphere (UT) was found to be greatly influenced by both lightning NO, and surface pollution lofted via convection and contained elevated concentrations of PAN, ozone, hydrocarbons, and NO,. Observational data suggest that lightning was a far greater contributor to NO, in the UT than previously believed. PAN provided a dominant reservoir of reactive nitrogen in the UT while nitric acid dominated in the lower troposphere (LT). Peroxynitric acid (H02N02) was present in sizable concentrations peaking at around 8 km. Aerosol nitrate appeared to be mostly contained in large soil based particles in the LT. Plumes from Alaskan fires contained large amounts of PAN and aerosol nitrate but little enhancement in ozone. A comparison of observed data with simulations from four 3-D models shows significant differences between observations and models as well as among models. We investigate the partitioning and interplay of the reactive nitrogen species within characteristic air masses and further examine their role in ozone formation.

  20. Improving North American gross primary production (GPP) estimates using atmospheric measurements of carbonyl sulfide (COS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huilin; Montzka, Steve; Andrews, Arlyn; Sweeney, Colm; Jacobson, Andy; Miller, Ben; Masarie, Ken; Jung, Martin; Gerbig, Christoph; Campbell, Elliott; Abu-Naser, Mohammad; Berry, Joe; Baker, Ian; Tans, Pieter

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the responses of gross primary production (GPP) to climate change is essential for improving our prediction of climate change. To this end, it is important to accurately partition net ecosystem exchange of carbon into GPP and respiration. Recent studies suggest that carbonyl sulfide is a useful tracer to provide a constraint on GPP, based on the fact that both COS and CO2 are simultaneously taken up by plants and the quantitative correlation between GPP and COS plant uptake. We will present an assessment of North American GPP estimates from the Simple Biosphere (SiB) model, the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CASA) model, and the MPI-BGC model through atmospheric transport simulations of COS in a receptor oriented framework. The newly upgraded Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model (HYSPLIT) will be employed to compute the influence functions, i.e. footprints, to link the surface fluxes to the concentration changes at the receptor observations. The HYSPLIT is driven by the 3-hourly archived NAM 12km meteorological data from NOAA NCEP. The background concentrations are calculated using empirical curtains along the west coast of North America that have been created by interpolating in time and space the observations at the NOAA/ESRL marine boundary layer stations and from aircraft vertical profiles. The plant uptake of COS is derived from GPP estimates of biospheric models. The soil uptake and anthropogenic emissions are from Kettle et al. 2002. In addition, we have developed a new soil flux map of COS based on observations of molecular hydrogen (H2), which shares a common soil uptake term but lacks a vegetative sink. We will also improve the GPP estimates by assimilating atmospheric observations of COS in the receptor oriented framework, and then present the assessment of the improved GPP estimates against variations of climate variables such as temperature and precipitation.

  1. Resolution in Electromagnetic Prospecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, D. F.; Bartel, L. C.; Knox, H. A.; Schramm, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    Low-frequency electromagnetic (EM) signals are commonly used in geophysical exploration of the shallow subsurface. Sensitivity to conductivity implies they are particularly useful for inferring fluid content of porous media. However, low-frequency EM wavefields are diffusive, and have significantly larger wavelengths compared to seismic signals of equal frequency. The wavelength of a 30 Hz sinusoid propagating with seismic velocity 3000 m/s is 100 m, whereas an analogous EM signal diffusing through a conductive body of 0.1 S/m (clayey shale) has wavelength 1825 m. The larger wavelength has implications for resolution of the EM prospecting method. We are investigating resolving power of the EM method via theoretical and numerical experiments. Normal incidence plane wave reflection/transmission by a thin geologic bed is amenable to analytic solution. Responses are calculated for beds that are conductive or resistive relative to the host rock. Preliminary results indicate the classic seismic resolution/detection limit of bed thickness ~1/8 wavelength is not achieved. EM responses for point or line current sources recorded by general acquisition geometries are calculated with a 3D finite-difference algorithm. These exhibit greater variability which may allow inference of bed thickness. We also examine composite responses of two point scatterers with separation when illuminated by an incident EM field. This is analogous to the Rayleigh resolution problem of estimating angular separation between two light sources. The First Born Approximation implies that perturbations in permittivity, permeability, and conductivity have different scattering patterns, which may be indicators of EM medium properties. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. High resolution time interval meter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  3. Resolution Enhancement of Multilook Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Galbraith, Amy E.

    2004-07-01

    This dissertation studies the feasibility of enhancing the spatial resolution of multi-look remotely-sensed imagery using an iterative resolution enhancement algorithm known as Projection Onto Convex Sets (POCS). A multi-angle satellite image modeling tool is implemented, and simulated multi-look imagery is formed to test the resolution enhancement algorithm. Experiments are done to determine the optimal con guration and number of multi-angle low-resolution images needed for a quantitative improvement in the spatial resolution of the high-resolution estimate. The important topic of aliasing is examined in the context of the POCS resolution enhancement algorithm performance. In addition, the extension of the method to multispectral sensor images is discussed and an example is shown using multispectral confocal fluorescence imaging microscope data. Finally, the remote sensing issues of atmospheric path radiance and directional reflectance variations are explored to determine their effect on the resolution enhancement performance.

  4. North Korea: A Geographical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palka, Eugene J., Ed.; Galgano, Francis A., Ed.

    North Korea is a country about the size of the state of New York, inhabited by about 23 million people. It came into existence after the conclusion of World War II following decades of occupation of the Korean Peninsula by the Japanese empire. Dividing the peninsula into North and South Korea was the politically expedient solution to one of the…

  5. North Dakota Dance Performance Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Sue; Farrell, Renee; Robbins, Susan; Stanley, Melissa

    This document outlines the performance standards for dance in North Dakota public schools, grades K-12. Four levels of performance are provided for each benchmark by North Dakota educators for K-4, 5-8, and 9-12 grade levels. Level 4 describes advanced proficiency; Level 3, proficiency; Level 2, partial proficiency; and Level 1, novice. Each grade…

  6. North Dakota Music Content Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppang, Angie; Loe, Linda; Neumann, Scott; Stordalen, Emilie; Vranna, Jeff; Hagen, Sarah; Odegaard, Denese

    The standards in this document are intended to provide every student in North Dakota's public schools with a set of skills that will enable him or her to participate in lifelong leisure, avocational, or professional music pursuits. To help all students achieve the standards outlined in the booklet, North Dakota educators must continue to ensure…

  7. Europa Ice Cliffs-High Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This view of the Conamara Chaos region on Jupiter's moon Europa shows cliffs along the edges of high-standing ice plates. The washboard texture of the older terrain has been broken into plates which are separated by material with a jumbled texture. The cliffs themselves are rough and broadly scalloped, and smooth debris shed from the cliff faces is piled along the base. For scale, the height of the cliffs and size of the scalloped indentations are comparable to the famous cliff face of Mount Rushmore in South Dakota.

    This image was taken on December 16, 1997 at a range of 900 kilometers (540 miles) by the solid state imaging system (camera) on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. North is to the top right of the picture, and the sun illuminates the surface from the east. This image, centered at approximately 8 degrees north latitude and 273 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 1.5 kilometers by 4 kilometers (0.9 miles by 2.4 miles). The resolution is 9 meters (30 feet) per picture element.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  8. Performance Summary of the 2006 Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Simulation for the AQMEII Project: North American Application

    EPA Science Inventory

    The CMAQ modeling system has been used to simulate the CONUS using 12-km by 12-km horizontal grid spacing for the entire year of 2006 as part of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International initiative (AQMEII). The operational model performance for O3 and PM2.5<...

  9. NOrth AMerica Soil (NOAM-SOIL) Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, D. A.; Waltman, S. W.; Geng, X.; James, D.; Hernandez, L.

    2009-05-01

    NOAM-SOIL is being created by combining the CONUS-SOIL database with pedon data and soil geographic data coverages from Canada and Mexico. Completion of the in-progress NOrth AMerica Soil (NOAM-SOIL) database will provide complete North America coverage comparable to CONUS. Canadian pedons, which number more than 500, have been painstakingly transcribed to a common format, from hardcopy, and key- entered. These data, along with map unit polygons from the 1:1,000,000 Soil Landscapes of Canada, will be used to create the required spatial data coverages. The Mexico data utilizes the INEGI 1:1,000,000 scale soil map that was digitized by U. S. Geological Survey EROS Data Center in the mid 1990's plus about 20,000 pedons. The pedon data were published on the reverse side of the paper 1:250,000 scale Soil Map of Mexico and key entered by USDA and georeferenced by Penn State to develop an attribute database that can be linked to the 1:1,000,000 scale Soil Map of Mexico based on taxonomic information and geographic proximity. The essential properties that will be included in the NOAM-SOIL data base are: layer thickness (depth to bedrock or reported soil depth); available water capacity; sand, silt, clay; rock fragment volume; and bulk density. For quality assurance purposes, Canadian and Mexican soil scientists will provide peer review of the work. The NOAM-SOIL project will provide a standard reference dataset of soil properties for use at 1km resolution by NACP modelers for all of North America. All data resources, including metadata and selected raw data, will be provided through the Penn State web site: Soil Information for Environmental Modeling and Ecosystem Management (www.soilinfo.psu.edu). Progress on database completion is reported.

  10. Phytoplankton Bloom in North Sea off Scotland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The northern and western highlands of Scotland were still winter-brown and even dusted with snow in places, but the waters of the North Sea were blooming with phytoplankton on May 8, 2008, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the region and captured this image. The tiny, plant-like organisms swirled in the waters off the country's east coast, coloring the shallow coastal waters shades of bright blue and green. Phytoplankton are tiny organisms--many are just a single cell--that use chlorophyll and other pigments to capture light for photosynthesis. Because these pigments absorb sunlight, they change the color of the light reflected from the sea surface back to the satellite. Scientists have used observations of 'ocean color' from satellites for more than 20 years to track worldwide patterns in phytoplankton blooms. Phytoplankton are important to the Earth system for a host of reasons, including their status as the base of the ocean food web. In the North Sea, they are the base of the food web that supports Scotland's commercial fisheries, including monkfish and herring. As photosynthesizers, they also play a crucial role in the carbon cycle, removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Some oceanographers are concerned that rising ocean temperatures will slow phytoplankton growth rates, harming marine ecosystems and causing carbon dioxide to accumulate more rapidly in the atmosphere.

  11. Autumn Frost, North Polar Sand Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Autumn in the martian northern hemisphere began around August 1, 1999. Almost as soon as northern fall began, the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) started documenting the arrival of autumn frost--a precursor to the cold winter that will arrive in late December 1999. The first features to become covered by frost were the sand dunes that surround the north polar ice cap. The dunes seen here would normally appear very dark--almost black--except when covered by frost. Why the dunes begin to frost sooner than the surrounding surfaces is a mystery: perhaps the dunes contain water vapor that emerges from the sand during the day and condenses again at night. This picture shows dunes near 74.7oN, 61.4oW at a resolution of about 7.3 meters (24 feet) per pixel. The area covered is about 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated from the upper right. The picture appears to be somewhat fuzzy and grainy because the dunes here are seen through the thin haze of the gathering north polar winter hood (i.e., clouds).

  12. Application of high-resolution depositional modeling to reservoir characterisation

    SciTech Connect

    Keyu, L.; Paterson, L.

    1995-08-01

    As hydrocarbon producing basins and fields become more intensely developed, conventional stratigraphic analysis methods can sometimes no longer meet the resolution required by petroleum geologists and engineers. High-resolution depositional modeling provides a quantitative alternative to the conventional approach of sequence stratigraphic analysis. A computer program, SEDPAK, which was designed primarily according to the basic premise of the sequence stratigraphic concept, was here used to conduct high-resolution simulations for two sedimentary sequences. One is a Pliocene to Recent shelf margin sediment sequence of the offshore Sydney Basin continental shelf, Australia; the other is the Early Cretaceous (Aptian) Windalia Sand reservoir of the Barrow Island Field, North West Shelf, Australia. In both instances, the simulations have well mimicked the variations of the sedimentary facies temporally and spatially in fine detail with each time step representing 10 ka and a vertical resolution of one meter. The reservoir heterogeneities and the observed cyclicity in the Windalia Sand were particularly well documented by the SEDPAK simulation using a locally derived sealevel curve. The simulation result suggested that high-frequency sealevel variations ?associated with Milankovitch cyclicity were probably the primary cause that controlled the reservoir heterogeneities of the Windalia Sand. This finding provides a working model for the Cretaceous coeval reservoirs in the North West Shelf, Australia.

  13. The North Sea - A shelf sea in the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emeis, Kay-Christian; van Beusekom, Justus; Callies, Ulrich; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Kannen, Andreas; Kraus, Gerd; Kröncke, Ingrid; Lenhart, Hermann; Lorkowski, Ina; Matthias, Volker; Möllmann, Christian; Pätsch, Johannes; Scharfe, Mirco; Thomas, Helmuth; Weisse, Ralf; Zorita, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Global and regional change clearly affects the structure and functioning of ecosystems in shelf seas. However, complex interactions within the shelf seas hinder the identification and unambiguous attribution of observed changes to drivers. These include variability in the climate system, in ocean dynamics, in biogeochemistry, and in shelf sea resource exploitation in the widest sense by societies. Observational time series are commonly too short, and resolution, integration time, and complexity of models are often insufficient to unravel natural variability from anthropogenic perturbation. The North Sea is a shelf sea of the North Atlantic and is impacted by virtually all global and regional developments. Natural variability (from interannual to multidecadal time scales) as response to forcing in the North Atlantic is overlain by global trends (sea level, temperature, acidification) and alternating phases of direct human impacts and attempts to remedy those. Human intervention started some 1000 years ago (diking and associated loss of wetlands), expanded to near-coastal parts in the industrial revolution of the mid-19th century (river management, waste disposal in rivers), and greatly accelerated in the mid-1950s (eutrophication, pollution, fisheries). The North Sea is now a heavily regulated shelf sea, yet societal goals (good environmental status versus increased uses), demands for benefits and policies diverge increasingly. Likely, the southern North Sea will be re-zoned as riparian countries dedicate increasing sea space for offshore wind energy generation - with uncertain consequences for the system's environmental status. We review available observational and model data (predominantly from the southeastern North Sea region) to identify and describe effects of natural variability, of secular changes, and of human impacts on the North Sea ecosystem, and outline developments in the next decades in response to environmental legislation, and in response to

  14. Automating the conflict resolution process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wike, Jeffrey S.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose is to initiate a discussion of how the conflict resolution process at the Network Control Center can be made more efficient. Described here are how resource conflicts are currently resolved as well as the impacts of automating conflict resolution in the ATDRSS era. A variety of conflict resolution strategies are presented.

  15. Resolution of Praziquantel

    PubMed Central

    Woelfle, Michael; Seerden, Jean-Paul; de Gooijer, Jesse; Pouwer, Kees; Olliaro, Piero; Todd, Matthew H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Praziquantel remains the drug of choice for the worldwide treatment and control of schistosomiasis. The drug is synthesized and administered as a racemate. Use of the pure active enantiomer would be desirable since the inactive enantiomer is associated with side effects and is responsible for the extremely bitter taste of the pill. Methodology/Principal Findings We have identified two resolution approaches toward the production of praziquantel as a single enantiomer. One approach starts with commercially available praziquantel and involves a hydrolysis to an intermediate amine, which is resolved with a derivative of tartaric acid. This method was discovered through an open collaboration on the internet. The second method, identified by a contract research organisation, employs a different intermediate that may be resolved with tartaric acid itself. Conclusions/Significance Both resolution procedures identified show promise for the large-scale, economically viable production of praziquantel as a single enantiomer for a low price. Additionally, they may be employed by laboratories for the production of smaller amounts of enantiopure drug for research purposes that should be useful in, for example, elucidation of the drug's mechanism of action. PMID:21949890

  16. North Pacific Mesoscale Coupled Air-Ocean Simulations Compared with Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Cerovecki, Ivana; McClean, Julie; Koracin, Darko

    2014-11-14

    The overall objective of this study was to improve the representation of regional ocean circulation in the North Pacific by using high resolution atmospheric forcing that accurately represents mesoscale processes in ocean-atmosphere regional (North Pacific) model configuration. The goal was to assess the importance of accurate representation of mesoscale processes in the atmosphere and the ocean on large scale circulation. This is an important question, as mesoscale processes in the atmosphere which are resolved by the high resolution mesoscale atmospheric models such as Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF), are absent in commonly used atmospheric forcing such as CORE forcing, employed in e.g. the Community Climate System Model (CCSM).

  17. High-resolution calculations of asteroid impacts into the Venusian atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Korycansky, D G; Zahnle, K J; Mac Law, M M

    2000-08-01

    We present results from a number of 2D high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of asteroids striking the atmosphere of Venus. These cover a wide range of impact parameters (velocity, size, and incidence angle), but the focus is on 2-3 km diameter asteroids, as these are responsible for most of the impact craters on Venus. Asteroids in this size range are disintegrated, ablated, and significantly decelerated by the atmosphere, yet they retain enough impetus to make large craters when they meet the surface. We find that smaller impactors (diameter <1-2 km) are better described by a "pancaking" model in which the impactor is compressed and distorted, while for larger impactors (>2-3 km) fragmentation by mechanical ablation is preferred. The pancaking model has been modified to take into account effects of hydrodynamical instabilities. The general observation that most larger impactors disintegrate by shedding fragments generated from hydrodynamic instabilities spurs us to develop a simple heuristic model of the mechanical ablation of fragments based on the growth rates of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Although in principle the model has many free parameters, most of these have little effect provided that they are chosen reasonably. In practice the range of model behavior can be described with one free parameter. The resulting model reproduces the mass and momentum fluxes rather well, doing so with reasonable values of all physical parameters.

  18. Double Bright Band Observations with High-Resolution Vertically Pointing Radar, Lidar, and Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emory, Amber E.; Demoz, Belay; Vermeesch, Kevin; Hicks, Michael

    2014-01-01

    On 11 May 2010, an elevated temperature inversion associated with an approaching warm front produced two melting layers simultaneously, which resulted in two distinct bright bands as viewed from the ER-2 Doppler radar system, a vertically pointing, coherent X band radar located in Greenbelt, MD. Due to the high temporal resolution of this radar system, an increase in altitude of the melting layer of approximately 1.2 km in the time span of 4 min was captured. The double bright band feature remained evident for approximately 17 min, until the lower atmosphere warmed enough to dissipate the lower melting layer. This case shows the relatively rapid evolution of freezing levels in response to an advancing warm front over a 2 h time period and the descent of an elevated warm air mass with time. Although observations of double bright bands are somewhat rare, the ability to identify this phenomenon is important for rainfall estimation from spaceborne sensors because algorithms employing the restriction of a radar bright band to a constant height, especially when sampling across frontal systems, will limit the ability to accurately estimate rainfall.

  19. Multi-resolution analysis of high density spatial and temporal cloud inhomogeneity fields from HOPE campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi Madhavan, Bomidi; Deneke, Hartwig; Macke, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Clouds are the most complex structures in both spatial and temporal scales of the Earth's atmosphere that effect the downward surface reaching fluxes and thus contribute to large uncertainty in the global radiation budget. Within the framework of High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2) Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE), a high density network of 99 pyranometer stations was set up around Jülich, Germany (~ 10 × 12 km2 area) during April to July 2013 to capture the small-scale variability in cloud induced radiation fields at the surface. In this study, we perform multi-resolution analysis of the downward solar irradiance variability at the surface from the pyranometer network to investigate the dependence of temporal and spatial averaging scales on the variance and spatial correlation for different cloud regimes. Preliminary results indicate that correlation is strongly scale-dependent where as the variance is dependent on the length of averaging period. Implications of our findings will be useful for quantifying the effect of spatial collocation while validating the satellite inferred solar irradiance estimates, and also to explore the link between cloud structure and radiation. We will present the details of our analysis and results.

  20. 31 CFR 500.554 - Gifts of North Korean, North Vietnamese, Cambodian, or South Vietnamese origin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gifts of North Korean, North... § 500.554 Gifts of North Korean, North Vietnamese, Cambodian, or South Vietnamese origin. (a) Except as... importation of North Korean, North Vietnamese, Cambodian, or South Vietnamese origin goods sent as gifts...

  1. Paleoclimate. Synchronization of North Pacific and Greenland climates preceded abrupt deglacial warming.

    PubMed

    Praetorius, Summer K; Mix, Alan C

    2014-07-25

    Some proposed mechanisms for transmission of major climate change events between the North Pacific and North Atlantic predict opposing patterns of variations; others suggest synchronization. Resolving this conflict has implications for regulation of poleward heat transport and global climate change. New multidecadal-resolution foraminiferal oxygen isotope records from the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) reveal sudden shifts between intervals of synchroneity and asynchroneity with the North Greenland Ice Core Project (NGRIP) δ(18)O record over the past 18,000 years. Synchronization of these regions occurred 15,500 to 11,000 years ago, just prior to and throughout the most abrupt climate transitions of the last 20,000 years, suggesting that dynamic coupling of North Pacific and North Atlantic climates may lead to critical transitions in Earth's climate system.

  2. Clouds Over the North Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 29 June 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    Like yesterday's image, the linear 'ripples' are water-ice clouds. As spring is deepening at the North Pole these clouds are becoming more prevalent.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.9, Longitude 135.5 East (224.5 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter

  3. The Alboran Sea mesoscale in a long term high resolution simulation: Statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peliz, Alvaro; Boutov, Dmitri; Teles-Machado, Ana

    2013-12-01

    We analyze the Alboran Sea mesoscale variability in a 2-decade high resolution (2 km) simulation. The circulation modes and eddies are described from a statistical perspective. The double-gyre quasi-steady state is confirmed as the most common circulation mode in the Alboran Sea (48% of the time), followed by single-gyre mode in about 24% of the situations. These persistent modes are compared in terms of structure, frequency of occurrence and seasonality, energetics, and their links to inflow variability and wind forcing. The double-gyre state is the most stable situation with higher kinetic and potential energy and lower eddy kinetic energy and seems to be limited by a critical value of the Rossby radius (∼12 km). The transitions between the quasi-steady states are studied and typified with a particular focus on the Western Alboran Gyre migration which stands out as the major contributor for flow transitions. A typical sequence of flow types and transients is proposed: The double-gyre is usually canceled after a migration event occurring in late summer or autumn. The Western Alboran Gyre is not immediately replaced by a new born anticyclone. Instead, there is a cycle of migration-merging events with the Eastern Alboran Gyre which eventually force the latter to move westward and form a single-gyre situation. The generation of a second Eastern Alboran Gyre in spring-early summer sets the beginning of a new double-gyre stable period. An analysis of coherent mesoscale eddies is conducted and their statistics, sites and processes of generation are described. Cyclones (anticyclones) mean radius are in the range of ∼12 km (∼15 km), they are much more frequent in winter time and cyclones significantly outnumber the anticyclones. The link of mesoscale processes and transients (in particular of migrations) with the inflow is analyzed, and no clear relationship of transient events with inflow magnitude is disclosed. On the other hand, the large majority of transitions

  4. Lexical ambiguity resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Small, S.; Cottrell, G.; Tanenhaus, M.

    1987-01-01

    This book collects much of the best research currently available on the problem of lexical ambiguity resolution in the processing of human language. When taken out of context, sentences are usually ambiguous. When actually uttered in a dialogue or written in text, these same sentences often have unique interpretations. The inherent ambiguity of isolated sentences, becomes obvious in the attempt to write a computer program to understand them. Different views have emerged on the nature of context and the mechanisms by which it directs unambiguous understanding of words and sentences. These perspectives are represented and discussed. Eighteen original papers from a valuable source book for cognitive scientists in AI, psycholinguistics, neuropsychology, or theoretical linguistics.

  5. High resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    F. Garibaldi

    2005-02-01

    Hypernuclear spectroscopy provides fundamental information for understanding the effective ?-Nucleon interaction. Jefferson Laboratory experiment E94-107 was designed to perform high resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy by electroproduction of strangeness in four 1p-shell nuclei: 12C, 9Be, 16O, and 7Li. The first part of the experiment on 12C and 9Be has been performed in January and April-May 2004 in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. Significant modifications were made to the standard Hall A apparatus for this challenging experiment: two septum magnets and a RICH detector have been added to get reasonable counting rates and excellent particle identification, as required for the experiment. A description of the apparatus and the preliminary analysis results are presented here.

  6. High resolution ultrasonic densitometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dress, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    The velocity of torsional stress pulses in an ultrasonic waveguide of non-circular cross section is affected by the temperature and density of the surrounding medium. Measurement of the transit times of acoustic echoes from the ends of a sensor section are interpreted as level, density, and temperature of the fluid environment surrounding that section. This paper examines methods of making these measurements to obtain high resolution, temperature-corrected absolute and relative density and level determinations of the fluid. Possible applications include on-line process monitoring, a hand-held density probe for battery charge state indication, and precise inventory control for such diverse fluids as uranium salt solutions in accountability storage and gasoline in service station storage tanks.

  7. Atomic resolution holography.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kouichi

    2014-11-01

    Atomic resolution holography, such as X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH)[1] and photoelectron holography (PH), has the attention of researcher as an informative local structure analysis, because it provides three dimensional atomic images around specific elements within a range of a few nanometers. It can determine atomic arrangements around a specific element without any prior knowledge of structures. It is considered that the atomic resolution holographic is a third method of structural analysis at the atomic level after X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). As known by many researchers, XRD and XAFS are established methods that are widespread use in various fields. XRD and XAFS provide information on long-range translational periodicities and very local environments, respectively, whereas the atomic resolution holography gives 3D information on the local order and can visualize surrounding atoms with a large range of coordination shells. We call this feature "3D medium-range local structure observation".In addition to this feature, the atomic resolution holography is very sensitive to the displacement of atoms from their ideal positions, and one can obtain quantitative information about local lattice distortions by analyzing reconstructed atomic images[2] When dopants with different atomic radii from the matrix elements are present, the lattices around the dopants are distorted. However, using the conventional methods of structural analysis, one cannot determine the extent to which the local lattice distortions are preserved from the dopants. XFH is a good tool for solving this problem.Figure 1 shows a recent achievement on a relaxor ferroelectric of Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 (PMN) using XFH. The structural studies of relaxor ferroelectrics have been carried out by X-ray or neutron diffractions, which suggested rhombohedral distortions of their lattices. However, their true pictures have not been obtained, yet. The Nb Kα holograms showed

  8. View of Callisto at Increasing Resolutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    These four views of Jupiter's second largest moon, Callisto, highlight how increasing resolutions enable interpretation of the surface. In the global view (top left) the surface is seen to have many small bright spots, while the regional view (top right) reveals the spots to be the larger craters. The local view (bottom right) not only brings out smaller craters and detailed structure of larger craters, but also shows a smooth dark layer of material that appears to cover much of the surface. The close-up frame (bottom left) presents a surprising smoothness in this highest resolution (30 meters per picture element) view of Callisto's surface.

    North is to the top of these frames which were taken by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft between November 1996 and November 1997. Even higher resolution images (better than 20 meters per picture element) of Callisto will be taken on June 30, 1999 during the 21st orbit of the spacecraft around Jupiter.

    The top left frame is scaled to 10 kilometers (km) per picture element (pixel) and covers an area about 4400 by 2500 km. The moon Callisto, which has a diameter of 4806 km, appears to be peppered with many bright spots. Images at this resolution of other cratered moons in the Solar System indicate that the bright spots could be impact craters. The ring structure of Valhalla, the largest impact structure on Callisto, is visible in the center of the frame. This color view combines images obtained in November 1997 taken through the green, violet, and 1 micrometer filters of the SSI system.

    The top right frame is ten times higher resolution (about 1 km per pixel) and covers an area approximately 440 by 250 km. Craters, which are clearly recognizable, appear to be the dominant landform on Callisto. The crater rims appear bright, while the adjacent area and the crater interiors are dark. This resolution is comparable to the best data available from the 1979 flyby's of NASA's two Voyager

  9. 8 January 2013 Mw=5.7 North Aegean Sea Earthquake Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürçer, Akın; Yalçın, Hilal; Gülen, Levent; Kalafat, Doǧan

    2014-05-01

    The deformation of the North Aegean Sea is mainly controlled by the westernmost segments of North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ). On January 8, 2013, a moderate earthquake (Mw= 5.7) occurred in the North Aegean Sea, which may be considered to be a part of westernmost splay of the NAFZ. A series of aftershocks were occurred within four months following the mainschock, which have magnitudes varying from 1.9 to 5.0. In this study, a total of 23 earthquake moment tensor solutions that belong to the 2013 earthquake sequence have been obtained by using KOERI and AFAD seismic data. The most widely used Gephart & Forsyth (1984) and Michael (1987) methods have been used to carry out stress tensor inversions. Based on the earthquake moment tensor solutions, distribution of epicenters and seismotectonic setting, the source of this earthquake sequence is a N75°E trending pure dextral strike-slip fault. The temporal and spatial distribution of earthquakes indicate that the rupture unilaterally propagated from SW to NE. The length of the fault has been calculated as approximately 12 km. using the afterschock distribution and empirical equations, suggested by Wells and Coppersmith (1994). The stress tensor analysis indicate that the dominant faulting type in the region is strike-slip and the direction of the regional compressive stress is WNW-ESE. The 1968 Aghios earthquake (Ms=7.3; Ambraseys and Jackson, 1998) and 2013 North Aegean Sea earthquake sequences clearly show that the regional stress has been transferred from SW to NE in this region. The last historical earthquake, the Bozcaada earthquake (M=7.05) had been occurred in the northeast of the 2013 earthquake sequence in 1672. The elapsed time (342 year) and regional stress transfer point out that the 1672 earthquake segment is probably a seismic gap. According to the empirical equations, the surface rupture length of the 1672 Earthquake segment was about 47 km, with a maximum displacement of 170 cm and average displacement

  10. North Sea platforms revamped

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hare, J.

    1999-12-01

    Many of the early North Sea platforms are reaching their end-of-field life. Most are still equipped with their original drilling package. In a few cases the package has either been removed or decommissioned. The early installations were designed for much simpler and less demanding wells than the horizontal, extended-reach or designer wells common today. Extended-reach wells now can be drilled realistically from ageing platforms, without incurring massive capital expenditure. This can be achieved using the existing drilling package to the limit of its capabilities and supplementing where necessary with relatively minor upgrades or the use of temporary equipment. Drilling even a few more wells from existing platforms not only prolongs field life, it enables any surplus processing capacity to be made available to develop near-field potential with extended-reach drilling (ERD) or by tying back subsea satellite wells, or for processing third-party fluids. The paper describes well design, surface equipment, mud pumps, shakers and solids control equipment, drill cuttings disposal systems, derrick and hoisting system, top drive and drillstring, downhole equipment, well planning, casing wear, logistics, rig preparations, and ERD vs. subsea tie-backs.

  11. Resolution of October 1987.

    PubMed

    1988-01-01

    This document contains portions of a 1987 Resolution, approved at the 78th Inter-Parliamentary Conference, relating to "the respect for the fundamental principles, treaties and obligations governing relations among nations, in order to solve the problem of refugees and displaced persons." The resolution urges all governments to help find a lasting solution to the problem of refugees and displaced persons. All parliamentarians and governments should fulfill their responsibility to protect refugees. Governments should ratify international instruments regarding refugees and displaced persons and withdraw any reservations limiting their obligations. Bilateral agreements which aim to restrict the rights or asylum and freedom of movement are denounced. Better efforts of coordination of asylum procedures are called for as is the conclusion of a "Convention on Territorial Asylum" to improve the legal status of refugees. In addition, consideration should be given to redefining the terms "refugee" and "country of first asylum." Parliaments are asked to make formal determinations of refugee status, states are asked to share the burden and to help receiving countries, and the international community is asked to assist whole populations which have been dispossessed in order to reduce the number of refugees and displaced persons. Parliaments are asked to help create conditions in countries of origin which will help refugees return. State are asked to consider drafting international legal instruments to protect refugees and to find ways to protect prisoners of war, detainees, and civilian populations in war zones. The international humanitarian organizations are commended for their work as are nongovernmental organizations which provide relief. States are asked to increase their support for such organizations.

  12. Resolution of anisotropic and shielded highly conductive layers using 2-D electromagnetic modelling in the Rhine Graben and Black Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezkan, Bülent; Červ, Václav; Pek, Josef

    1992-12-01

    Anisotropy in magnetotelluric (MT) data has been found very often and has been explained as the result of local structures of different conductivities. In this paper, an observed anisotropy in MT data is not interpreted qualitatively in terms of local structures but is modelled quantitatively by a quasi-anisotropic layer. Besides the MT transfer functions, measurements of the vertical magnetic component are required. The second goal of this paper is to describe a method which permits the resolution of mid-crustal conductive layers in the presence of an additional high-conductivity layer at the surface. This method is possible in a two-dimensional (2-D) situation that limits the spatial extension of the surface structure. Again, vertical magnetic field recordings are necessary, but the phase of the E-polarization with respect to the 2-D structure is the most sensitive parameter. Using two field sites in Southern Germany, it has been possible to give a quantitative explanation of anisotropy and an improved depth resolution, and to derive an integrated conductivity of the highly conductive mid-crustal layers using MT and geomagnetic depth sounding data. The anisotropic highly conductive layer is located 12 km beneath the poorly conductive Black Forest crystalline rocks, whereas it is at a depth of 6 km beneath the highly conductive Rhine Graben sediments.

  13. Two Methods to Derive Ground-level Concentrations of PM2.5 with Improved Accuracy in the North China, Calibrating MODIS AOD and CMAQ Model Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Baolei; Hu, Yongtao; Chang, Howard; Russell, Armistead; Bai, Yuqi

    2016-04-01

    Reliable and accurate characterizations of ground-level PM2.5 concentrations are essential to understand pollution sources and evaluate human exposures etc. Monitoring network could only provide direct point-level observations at limited locations. At the locations without monitors, there are generally two ways to estimate the pollution levels of PM2.5. One is observations of aerosol properties from the satellite-based remote sensing, such as Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol optical depth (AOD). The other one is from deterministic atmospheric chemistry models, such as the Community Multi-Scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ). In this study, we used a statistical spatio-temporal downscaler to calibrate the two datasets to monitor observations to derive fine-scale ground-level concentrations of PM2.5 with improved accuracy. We treated both MODIS AOD and CMAQ model predictions as biased proxy estimations of PM2.5 pollution levels. The downscaler proposed a Bayesian framework to model the spatially and temporally varying coefficients of the two types of estimations in the linear regression setting, in order to correct biases. Especially for calibrating MODIS AOD, a city-specific linear model was established to fill the missing AOD values, and a novel interpolation-based variable, i.e. PM2.5 Spatial Interpolator, was introduced to account for the spatial dependence among grid cells. We selected the heavy polluted and populated North China as our study area, in a grid setting of 81×81 12-km cells. For the evaluation of calibration performance for retrieved MODIS AOD, the R2 was 0.61 by the full model with PM2.5 Spatial Interpolator being presented, and was 0.48 with PM2.5 Spatial Interpolator not being presented. The constructed AOD values effectively predicted PM2.5 concentrations under our model structure, with R2=0.78. For the evaluation of calibrated CMAQ predictions, the R2 was 0.51, a little less than that of calibrated AOD. Finally we

  14. Blogging from North Pond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marziali, C. G.; Edwards, K. J.

    2009-12-01

    Sea going research expeditions provide an ideal opportunity for outreach through blogs: the finite duration limits the author's commitment; scientists are usually in a remote location with fewer distractions; and fieldwork is visual and interesting to describe. Over four weeks this winter, Katrina Edwards of USC authored a blog about her deep-sea drilling expedition to North Pond, a depression in the ocean crust in the mid-Atlantic. She emailed daily dispatches and photos to USC Media Relations, which maintained a (still accessible) blog. Written for the general public, the blog quickly attracted interest from lay readers as well as from media organizations. Scientific American carried the blog on its web site, and the National Science Foundation linked to it in its "Science 360" electronic news digest. The blog also led to a Q&A with Edwards in the widely-read "Behind the Scenes" feature of LiveScience. Interest from science bloggers and National Geographic towards the end suggests that the blog could have expanded its reach given more time: expeditions lasting between six weeks and three months, such as occur during ocean drilling expeditions, would appear to be ideal candidates for a blog. Most importantly, the blog educated readers about the importance to planetary life of what Edwards calls the "intraterrestrials": the countless microbes that inhabit the oceanic crust and influence major chemical and biological cycles. Considering that the subjects of the expedition were invisible critters in a pitch-dark place, the blog shows what can be accomplished by scientists and institutions committed to public outreach.

  15. North Atlantic Coastal Tidal Wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    The book chapter provides college instructors, researchers, graduate and advanced undergraduate students, and environmental consultants interested in wetlands with foundation information on the ecology and conservation concerns of North Atlantic coastal wetlands. The book c...

  16. North Atlantic Deep Water Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, T. (Editor); Broecker, W. S. (Editor); Hansen, J. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Various studies concerning differing aspects of the North Atlantic are presented. The three major topics under which the works are classified include: (1) oceanography; (2) paleoclimate; and (3) ocean, ice and climate modeling.

  17. North Atlantic forcing of tropical Indian Ocean climate.

    PubMed

    Mohtadi, Mahyar; Prange, Matthias; Oppo, Delia W; De Pol-Holz, Ricardo; Merkel, Ute; Zhang, Xiao; Steinke, Stephan; Lückge, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    The response of the tropical climate in the Indian Ocean realm to abrupt climate change events in the North Atlantic Ocean is contentious. Repositioning of the intertropical convergence zone is thought to have been responsible for changes in tropical hydroclimate during North Atlantic cold spells, but the dearth of high-resolution records outside the monsoon realm in the Indian Ocean precludes a full understanding of this remote relationship and its underlying mechanisms. Here we show that slowdowns of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation during Heinrich stadials and the Younger Dryas stadial affected the tropical Indian Ocean hydroclimate through changes to the Hadley circulation including a southward shift in the rising branch (the intertropical convergence zone) and an overall weakening over the southern Indian Ocean. Our results are based on new, high-resolution sea surface temperature and seawater oxygen isotope records of well-dated sedimentary archives from the tropical eastern Indian Ocean for the past 45,000 years, combined with climate model simulations of Atlantic circulation slowdown under Marine Isotope Stages 2 and 3 boundary conditions. Similar conditions in the east and west of the basin rule out a zonal dipole structure as the dominant forcing of the tropical Indian Ocean hydroclimate of millennial-scale events. Results from our simulations and proxy data suggest dry conditions in the northern Indian Ocean realm and wet and warm conditions in the southern realm during North Atlantic cold spells.

  18. Foreign Assistance to North Korea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-26

    population is chronically malnourished .10 A 2004 nutritional survey conducted by the North Korean government and sponsored by the United Nations also... malnourished and approximately one-third of North Korean mothers are malnourished and anemic.11 The northern and northeastern provinces have been particularly...Farmers’ incomes appear to have increased now that they are permitted to maintain private plots and/or sell above-quota produce on the open market

  19. North American LNG Project Sourcebook

    SciTech Connect

    2007-06-15

    The report provides a status of the development of LNG Import Terminal projects in North America, and includes 1-2 page profiles of 63 LNG projects in North America which are either in operation, under construction, or under development. For each project, the sourcebook provides information on the following elements: project description, project ownership, project status, projected operation date, storage capacity, sendout capacity, and pipeline interconnection.

  20. Effect of chemistry-transport model scale and resolution on population exposure to PM 2.5 from aircraft emissions during landing and takeoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunachalam, Saravanan; Wang, Binyu; Davis, Neil; Baek, Bok Haeng; Levy, Jonathan I.

    2011-06-01

    Atmospheric chemistry-transport models are often used to determine the marginal impact of emissions on air quality and public health, but the uncertainties related to modeling assumptions are rarely formally characterized from the perspective of health impact calculations. Aviation emissions are of increasing interest, due to the projected growth in aviation transport coupled with the decreasing emissions from other anthropogenic sources, but the geographic scale and resolution necessary to accurately characterize public health impacts from aviation are unclear, given the unique spatio-temporal pattern of aviation emissions. In this study, we estimate the incremental contribution of commercial aviation emissions during landing and takeoff (LTO) cycles from three U.S. airports - Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson, Chicago's O'Hare, and Providence's T.F. Green - to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) levels using the Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ), a comprehensive chemistry-transport air quality model. To evaluate the significance of model resolution and geographic scale, we ran a one-atmosphere version of CMAQ at 36-, 12-, and 4-km resolutions, and calculated the total population health risks at various distances from each airport. In spite of significant differences in maximum concentrations attributable to aviation emissions, total population health risks over the entire model domain were largely unaffected by model resolution, with a 2% difference in estimated mortality risks between the 36-km and 12-km resolution outputs. Analyses of model scale indicated that a 108 × 108 km domain centered on the airport captured most population exposure for primary components of PM2.5, but total public health risks were dominated by populations at greater distances from the airport, given the contribution from secondary ammonium sulfate and nitrate, with 28-35% of health risks occurring more than 300 km from the airports. Our findings provide insight about the model

  1. Ultrahigh Resolution Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Chen, Yu; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Považay, Boris; Unterhuber, Angelika; Fujimoto, James G.

    Since its invention in the late 1980s [1-4] and early 1990s [5-7], the original idea of OCT was to enable noninvasive optical biopsy, i.e., the in situ imaging of tissue microstructure with a resolution approaching that of histology, but without the need for tissue excision and post-processing. An important advance toward this goal was the introduction of ultrahigh-resolution OCT (UHR OCT). By improving axial OCT resolution by one order of magnitude from the 10 to 15 μm to the sub-μm region [8-11], UHR OCT enables superior visualization of tissue microstructure, including all major intraretinal layers in ophthalmic applications as well as cellular resolution OCT imaging in nontransparent tissue. This chapter reviews state-of-the-art technology that enables ultrahigh-resolution OCT covering the entire wavelength region from 500 to 1,600 nm and discusses fundamental limitations of OCT image resolution.

  2. Seismicity of California's north coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakun, W.H.

    2000-01-01

    At least three moment magnitude (M) 7 earthquakes occurred along California's north coast in the second half of the nineteenth century. The M 7.3 earthquake on 23 November 1873 occurred near the California-Oregon coast and likely was located on the Cascadia subduction zone or within the North American plate. The M 7.0 + earthquake on 9 May 1878 was located about 75 km offshore near the Mendocino fault. The surface-wave magnitude (M(s)) 7.0 earthquake on 16 April 1899 was located about 150 km offshore within the Gorda plate. There were at least three M 7 north-coast earthquakes in the 35 years before 1906, two M 7 earthquakes in the 20 years after 1906, no M 7 earthquakes from 1923 until 1980, and four M 7 earthquakes since 1980. The relative seismic quiescence after 1906 for M 7 earthquakes along California's north coast mimics the post-1906 seismic quiescence in the San Francisco Bay area for M 6 earthquakes. The post-1906 relative quiescence did not extend to lower magnitudes in either area. The 18 April 1906 earthquake apparently influenced the rate of occurrence of M 7 north-coast earthquakes as it apparently influenced the rate of M 6 earthquakes in the San Francisco Bay area. The relative seismic quiescence along the California north-coast region after 1906 should be taken into account when evaluating seismic hazards in northwest California.

  3. Direct Experimental Assessment of Microbial Activity in North Pond Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdelman, T. G.; Picard, A.; Morando, M.; Ziebis, W.

    2009-12-01

    North Pond, an isolated sediment pond located at 22°45’N on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, offered the opportunity to study microbial activities in deeply-buried low-activity sediments. About 8 x 15 km in size with sediment maximum thickness of about 300 m, North Pond is completely surrounded by exposed 7 Ma old basement. North Pond lies above the carbonate compensation depth at a water depth about 4500 m; hydrostatic pressure at the seafloor is about 45 MPa and the temperature is near 2°C. During the a R/V MS Merian cruise (MSM-11/1) in February -March 2009, 14 gravity cores of up to 9 m length were successfully obtained, from which samples were taken with 1-m resolution for experimental activity measurements. The goal of the experimental work was 1) to examine potential metabolic pathways in North Pond sediments and carbon assimilation pathways in this low-energy environment, and 2) explore the effects of pressure on microbial metabolic activities. As dissolved oxygen penetrated through all depths, sediments were aerobically sampled, processed and incubated at 4°C. Selected samples were immediately stored at in situ pressure until further use. The microbial uptake of both organic and inorganic carbon in selected North Pond sediment samples was investigated by following the fate of 14C in radio-labeled organic and organic compounds in North Pond sediment slurry incubations. Shipboard and on-shore experiments using 14C-leucine, 14C-glucose and 14C-bicarbonate were performed on selected cores. Day- to month- incubations were performed at 4°C. Parallel incubations were conducted at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa) and in situ pressure (~45 MPa). Either whole cell extraction (Kallmeyer et al., Limnol. Oceanogr.: Methods 6, 2008, 238-245) or protein-DNA extraction was carried on after various incubations to determine the fraction of 14C incorporated into cellular components. Formation of 14C-labeled CO2 was determined on samples incubated with 14C

  4. Algorithm for IAU north poles and rotation parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieske, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    In 1970 the International Astronomical Union (IAU) defined any object's north pole to be that axis of rotation which lies north of the solar system's invariable plane. A competing definition in widespread use at some institutions followed the 'right hand rule' whereby the 'north' axis of rotation was generally said to be that of the rotational angular momentum. In the case of the latter definition, the planet Neptune and its satellite Triton would have their 'north' poles in opposite hemispheres because Triton's angular momentum vector is in the hemisphere opposite from that of Neptune's rotation angular momentum. The IAU resolutions have been somewhat controversial in some quarters ever since their adoption. A Working Group has periodically updated the recommended values of planet and satellite poles and rotation rates in accordance with the IAU definition of north and the IAU definition of prime meridian. Neither system is completely satisfactory in the perception of all scientists, and some confusion has been generated by publishing data in the two different systems. In this paper we review the IAU definitions of north and of the location of prime meridian and we present the algorithm which has been employed in determining the rotational parameters of the natural satellites. The IAU definition of the prime meridian contains some ambiguities which in practice have been 'specified' by the numerical values published by the IAU working group but which have not yet been explicitly documented. The purpose of this paper is to explicitly document the algorithm employed by the IAU working group in specifying satellite poles and rotation rates.

  5. High Resolution Laboratory Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brünken, S.; Schlemmer, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this short review we will highlight some of the recent advancements in the field of high-resolution laboratory spectroscopy that meet the needs dictated by the advent of highly sensitive and broadband telescopes like ALMA and SOFIA. Among these is the development of broadband techniques for the study of complex organic molecules, like fast scanning conventional absorption spectroscopy based on multiplier chains, chirped pulse instrumentation, or the use of synchrotron facilities. Of similar importance is the extension of the accessible frequency range to THz frequencies, where many light hydrides have their ground state rotational transitions. Another key experimental challenge is the production of sufficiently high number densities of refractory and transient species in the laboratory, where discharges have proven to be efficient sources that can also be coupled to molecular jets. For ionic molecular species sensitive action spectroscopic schemes have recently been developed to overcome some of the limitations of conventional absorption spectroscopy. Throughout this review examples demonstrating the strong interplay between laboratory and observational studies will be given.

  6. High Resolution Doppler Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Paul B.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on UARS spacecraft during the period 4/l/96 - 3/31/99. During this period, HRDI operation, data processing, and data analysis continued, and there was a high level of vitality in the HRDI project. The HRDI has been collecting data from the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere since instrument activation on October 1, 1991. The HRDI team has stressed three areas since operations commenced: 1) operation of the instrument in a manner which maximizes the quality and versatility of the collected data; 2) algorithm development and validation to produce a high-quality data product; and 3) scientific studies, primarily of the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. There has been no significant degradation in the HRDI instrument since operations began nearly 8 years ago. HRDI operations are fairly routine, although we have continued to look for ways to improve the quality of the scientific product, either by improving existing modes, or by designing new ones. The HRDI instrument has been programmed to collect data for new scientific studies, such as measurements of fluorescence from plants, measuring cloud top heights, and lower atmosphere H2O.

  7. Resolution in Photovoltaic Potential Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, N.; Coors, V.; Zlatanova, S.; Oosterom, P. J. M.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, an analysis of the effect of the various types of resolution involved in photovoltaic potential computation is presented. To calculate solar energy incident on a surface, shadow from surrounding buildings has been considered. The incident energy on a surface has been calculated taking the orientation, tilt and position into consideration. Different sky visibility map has been created for direct and diffuse radiation and only the effect of resolution of the factors has been explored here. The following four resolutions are considered: 1. temporal resolution (1, 10, 60 minutes time interval for calculating visibility of sun), 2. object surface resolution (0.01, 0.1, 0.375, 0.75, 1.25, 2.5 and 5 m2 as maximum triangle size of a surface to be considered), 3. blocking obstacle resolution (number of triangles from LoD1, LoD2, or LoD3 CityGML building models), and 4. sky resolution (ranging from 150 to 600 sky-patches used to divide the sky-dome). Higher resolutions result in general in more precise estimation of the photovoltaic potential, but also the computation time is increasing, especially as realizes that this computation has to be done for every building with its object surface (both roofs and façades). This paper is the first in depth analysis ever of the effect of resolution and will help to configure the proper settings for effective photovoltaic potential computations.

  8. Morphology of the Alarcón Rise spreading axis from 1-m resolution AUV bathymetry surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caress, D. W.; Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Martin, J. F.; Thomas, H.; Thompson, D.; Nieves-Cardoso, C.; Santa Rosa-del Rio, M.

    2012-12-01

    -relief pillow mounds, a few of which post-date the most recent faulting. Along the western boundary fault is a rugged ridge punctuated by three volcanic domes, one of which was found by Clague et al. (this session) to be rhyolitic. This morphology extends southward for 9 km to 23°30.7'N, the northern limit of sheet flows. Between 23°24.5'N and 23°30.7'N (12 km) the neovolcanic zone is covered by a combination of sheet flows, pillow mounds, and two larger edifices. The low relief northern edifice is a 4-km long, 70-m high shield volcano with a 200-m wide, 25 m deep summit crater. The southern edifice is a 100 m high, 800 m wide, flat-topped cone centered on the east side of the axial graben and located at the center of the overall segment. From 23°23.8'N to 23°19.0'N (11 km), the axis is dominated by a single sheet flow that erupted from an 8.5-km long fissure system also located on the east side of the axial graben. This voluminous, unfaulted flow fills the graben, extends to the north and south of the eruptive fissure, and spills down the east side of the axial high beyond the high resolution bathymetric coverage. South of this flow, the axis is characterized by discrete pillow mounds, occasional sheet flows, and fault trends that curve southeastward into the Tamayo Fracture Zone. The southern terminus is less tectonized and has lower relief pillow mounds than the northern end of the segment.

  9. Daucus for the flora of North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Flora of North America Project will treat more than 20,000 species of plants native or naturalized in North America north of Mexico, about 7% of the world's total. This contribution presents a floristic account of the two species of wild carrots (Daucus) occurring in North America, Daucus carota...

  10. High Resolution SOFIA/EXES Spectroscopy of CH4 and SO2 toward Massive Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boogert, Abraham C. A.; Richter, Matt; DeWitt, Curtis; Indriolo, Nick; Neufeld, David A.; Karska, Agata; Bergin, Edwin A.; Smith, Rachel L.; Montiel, Edward

    2017-01-01

    The ro-vibrational transitions of molecules in the near to mid-infrared are excellent tracers of the composition, dynamics, and excitation of the inner regions of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs). They sample a wide range of excitations in a short wavelength range, they can be seen in absorption against strong hot dust continuum sources, and they trace molecules without permanent dipole moment not observable at radio wavelengths. In particular, at high infrared spectral resolution, spatial scales smaller than those imaged by millimeter wave interferometers can be studied dynamically.We present high resolution (R=λ/Δλ˜50,000-100,000 6-12 km/s) infrared (7-8 μm) spectra of massive YSOs observed with the Echelon-Cross-Echelle Spectrograph (EXES) on the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). Absorption lines of gas phase methane (CH4) are detected in our Cycle 2 observations. CH4 is thought to be a starting point of the formation of carbon chain molecules. Abundances are derived in the different dynamical regions along the sight-line towards the central star by comparing the line profiles to those of CO and other species observed at ground based facilities such as EXES' sister instrument TEXES at IRTF and Gemini. A search is also conducted for sulfur-dioxide, using data from our ongoing Cycle 4 program. SO2 was previously detected towards these massive YSOs with the space-based ISO/SWS instrument (Keane et al. 2001, A&A 376, L5) at much lower spectral resolution (R˜2,000). At high spectral resolution we should be able to pin-point the dynamical location of this SO2 gas. Up to 98% of the sulfur in dense clouds and protostellar envelopes is presently missing, and we are searching for that with the EXES/SOFIA observations.

  11. High spatial resolution imaging of methane and other trace gases with the airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulley, Glynn C.; Duren, Riley M.; Hopkins, Francesca M.; Hook, Simon J.; Vance, Nick; Guillevic, Pierre; Johnson, William R.; Eng, Bjorn T.; Mihaly, Jonathan M.; Jovanovic, Veljko M.; Chazanoff, Seth L.; Staniszewski, Zak K.; Kuai, Le; Worden, John; Frankenberg, Christian; Rivera, Gerardo; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Miller, Charles E.; Malakar, Nabin K.; Sánchez Tomás, Juan M.; Holmes, Kendall T.

    2016-06-01

    Currently large uncertainties exist associated with the attribution and quantification of fugitive emissions of criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases such as methane across large regions and key economic sectors. In this study, data from the airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) have been used to develop robust and reliable techniques for the detection and wide-area mapping of emission plumes of methane and other atmospheric trace gas species over challenging and diverse environmental conditions with high spatial resolution that permits direct attribution to sources. HyTES is a pushbroom imaging spectrometer with high spectral resolution (256 bands from 7.5 to 12 µm), wide swath (1-2 km), and high spatial resolution (˜ 2 m at 1 km altitude) that incorporates new thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing technologies. In this study we introduce a hybrid clutter matched filter (CMF) and plume dilation algorithm applied to HyTES observations to efficiently detect and characterize the spatial structures of individual plumes of CH4, H2S, NH3, NO2, and SO2 emitters. The sensitivity and field of regard of HyTES allows rapid and frequent airborne surveys of large areas including facilities not readily accessible from the surface. The HyTES CMF algorithm produces plume intensity images of methane and other gases from strong emission sources. The combination of high spatial resolution and multi-species imaging capability provides source attribution in complex environments. The CMF-based detection of strong emission sources over large areas is a fast and powerful tool needed to focus on more computationally intensive retrieval algorithms to quantify emissions with error estimates, and is useful for expediting mitigation efforts and addressing critical science questions.

  12. Multi-resolution processing for fractal analysis of airborne remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaggi, S.; Quattrochi, D.; Lam, N.

    1992-01-01

    Fractal geometry is increasingly becoming a useful tool for modeling natural phenomenon. As an alternative to Euclidean concepts, fractals allow for a more accurate representation of the nature of complexity in natural boundaries and surfaces. Since they are characterized by self-similarity, an ideal fractal surface is scale-independent; i.e. at different scales a fractal surface looks the same. This is not exactly true for natural surfaces. When viewed at different spatial resolutions parts of natural surfaces look alike in a statistical manner and only for a limited range of scales. Images acquired by NASA's Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner are used to compute the fractal dimension as a function of spatial resolution. Three methods are used to determine the fractal dimension - Schelberg's line-divider method, the variogram method, and the triangular prism method. A description of these methods and the results of applying these methods to a remotely-sensed image is also presented. Five flights were flown in succession at altitudes of 2 km (low), 6 km (mid), 12 km (high), and then back again at 6 km and 2 km. The area selected was the Ross Barnett reservoir near Jackson, Mississippi. The mission was flown during the predawn hours of 1 Feb. 1992. Radiosonde data was collected for that duration to profile the characteristics of the atmosphere. This corresponds to 3 different pixel sizes - 5m, 15m, and 30m. After, simulating different spatial sampling intervals within the same image for each of the 3 image sets, the results are cross-correlated to compare the extent of detail and complexity that is obtained when data is taken at lower spatial intervals.

  13. Late Cenozoic Temporal Evolution of North American Dynamic Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moucha, R.; Forte, A. M.; Rowley, D. B.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Simmons, N. A.; Grand, S. P.

    2008-12-01

    The Farallon plate was completely overridden by the North American plate by mid-Cenozoic. Although the Farallon plate ceased to exist on the surface, it continues to have a significant tectonic impact on North America. At the present time, the subducted Farallon plate drives a large-scale thermal convective cell below the southern half of North America, where downward flow in the east is driven by the dense Farallon slab and upward flow in the west is a combination of local, buoyancy-driven hot upwelling and large-scale return flow. Herein, we will explore the geodynamic implications of this convective flow throughout the late Cenozoic by carrying out backward mantle flow simulations starting with present-day heterogeneity derived from a high resolution joint seismic-geodynamic tomography model (Simmons et al., 2007) that yields excellent fits to present day surface observables (e.g. dynamic topography and the geoid). Our proposed temporal model of late Cenozoic North American mantle dynamics brings together the uplift of the Colorado Plateau in the southwestern US and offers an explanation for present-day seismicity at the New Madrid seismic zone. Furthermore, we consider the impact of this model on inferences of eustatic sea level change from measurements at the New Jersey passive margin.

  14. The Mackenzie River magnetic anomaly, Yukon and Northwest Territories, Canada-Evidence for Early Proterozoic magmatic arc crust at the edge of the North American craton

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pilkington, M.; Saltus, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    We characterize the nature of the source of the high-amplitude, long-wavelength, Mackenzie River magnetic anomaly (MRA), Yukon and Northwest Territories, Canada, based on magnetic field data collected at three different altitudes: 300??m, 3.5??km and 400??km. The MRA is the largest amplitude (13??nT) satellite magnetic anomaly over Canada. Within the extent of the MRA, source depth estimates (8-12??km) from Euler deconvolution of low-altitude aeromagnetic data show coincidence with basement depths interpreted from reflection seismic data. Inversion of high-altitude (3.5??km) aeromagnetic data produces an average magnetization of 2.5??A/m within a 15- to 35-km deep layer, a value typical of magmatic arc complexes. Early Proterozoic magmatic arc rocks have been sampled to the southeast of the MRA, within the Fort Simpson magnetic anomaly. The MRA is one of several broad-scale magnetic highs that occur along the inboard margin of the Cordillera in Canada and Alaska, which are coincident with geometric changes in the thrust front transition from the mobile belt to stable cratonic North America. The inferred early Proterozoic magmatic arc complex along the western edge of the North American craton likely influenced later tectonic evolution, by acting as a buttress along the inboard margin of the Cordilleran fold-and-thrust belt. Crown Copyright ?? 2008.

  15. High Resolution Maps of the Moon Surface with AMIE/SMART-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despan, Daniela; Erard, S.; Barucci, A.; Josset, J. L.; Beauvivre, S.; Chevrel, S.; Pinet, P.; Koschny, D.; Almeida, M.; Grieger, B.; Foing, B.; AMIE Team

    2008-09-01

    The Advanced Moon micro-Imager Experiment (AMIE) on board the ESA lunar mission Smart-1 has performed colour imaging of the lunar surface using various filters in the visible and NIR range. This micro-camera provided high resolution images of selected parts of the lunar surface, including the North and South pole areas. Being give that the SMART-1 mission was in a 300km x 300km orbit with perilune over the South pole, the coverage between the North and the South regions is different. The AMIE images were obtained using a tele-objective with 5.3° x 5.3° field of view and a sensor of 1024 x 1024 pixels. The output images have resolution 45m/pixel at 500km, and are encoded with 10 bits/pixel. The data for the North pole were obtained at a much higher altitude than the South pole data. From the 300 Km pericenter altitude, the same field of view corresponds to a spatial resolution about 27 m/pixel. The high resolution imaging of the Moon surface makes possible detailed analysis of the morphological features and physical characteristics of the lunar surface. In order to construct AMIE data maps, systematic analysis and processing is being carried on using the whole data set. Geometrical analysis of AMIE images relies on the SPICE system: image coordinates are computed to get precise projection at the surface, and illumination angles are computed to analyze the photometric sequences. Using this method, high resolution mosaics were constructed then compared to lower resolution Clementine UV-Vis and NIR images. Maps of both North and South pole were obtained as well as other regions of interest. Eventually, this method will be applied in all areas where AMIE has provided high resolution observations of the surface, typically a factor of 3 higher than the Clementine UV-Vis camera. New results will be presented at the conference.

  16. North Polar Cliff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This full HiRISE image shows a cliff-face that has been eroded into the ice-rich polar layered deposits at the head of the large canyon, Chasma Boreale. In a similar way to layers in the Earth's ice caps, these Martian layers are thought to record variations in climate, which makes them very interesting to scientists. This particular cliff-face is several hundred meters high and the layers exposed here are the deepest (and so the oldest) in the polar layered deposits. The lower layers exposed in this scarp appear to be rich in dark sand, and erosion of these layers has produced the sand dunes that cover sections of this cliff-face. A close examination of the layers in the center of the image shows they have curved shapes and intersect each other. Scientists call this cross-bedding and it may indicate that these sandy layers were laid down as a large dunefield before being buried. At the bottom of the image, the floor of Chasma Boreale in this area appears to have been swept clean of sandy material. There is a complex history of erosion and deposition of material at this location. On the right of the image one can see a smooth material that covers the lower layers and which must have been deposited after the main cliff face was initially eroded. Closer to the center of the image, this smooth mantling material is in turn being eroded away to once again expose the layers beneath it.

    Image PSP_001334_2645 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on November 8, 2006. The complete image is centered at 84.4 degrees latitude, 343.5 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 317.4 km (198.4 miles). At this distance the image scale ranges from 31.8 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) to 63.5 cm/pixel (with 2 x 2 binning). The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel. The image was taken at a local Mars time of 1:38 PM and the scene is illuminated from the

  17. Crop Monitoring Using European and Chinese Medium Resolution Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jinlong; Defourny, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    The European medium resolution satellite data ENVISAT/MERIS were available in 2002 while the Chinese medium resolution spectrometer data with 5 bands in 250m spatial resolution and 15 bands in 1000m onboard Fengyun 3 series satellites became a new data source at the end of the year 2008. Under the framework of Dragon program 3, both teams demonstrated the utilization of medium resolution satellite data in crop monitoring. The Chinese team has made efforts to improve the processing of the Chinese Medium resolution satellite data (MERSI) in order to promote its applications in crop monitoring. The European team has checked and evaluated the processed FY3A/3B MERSI data and inspiring findings have found in terms of the imaging quality and the performance of retrieving LAI and GAI etc. The Chinese team has mapped the winter wheat area in North China Plain in the growing season from 2009 to 2014 with the finely processed FY3A MERSI 250m data. The LAI retrieval algorithm with the FY3 MERSI data was developed based on the in-situ data and other satellite products. The participation of young scientists is critical for the implementation of the project. 4 Chinese master students were involving in this project and the Chinese team hosted a European young master student to carry out research in China in the spring of 2014. Both research teams are looking forward to successful and productive achievements for this Dragon project and new deep cooperation in Dragon 4.

  18. A high-resolution regional reanalysis for the European CORDEX region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollmeyer, Christoph; Keller, Jan; Ohlwein, Christian; Wahl, Sabrina

    2015-04-01

    Within the Hans-Ertel-Centre for Weather Research (HErZ), the climate monitoring branch concentrates efforts on the assessment and analysis of regional climate in Germany and Europe. In joint cooperation with DWD (German Weather Service), a high-resolution reanalysis system based on the COSMO model has been developed. Reanalyses gain more and more importance as a source of meteorological information for many purposes and applications. Several global reanalyses projects (e.g., ERA, MERRA, CSFR, JMA9) produce and verify these data sets to provide time series as long as possible combined with a high data quality. Due to a spatial resolution down to 50-70km and 3-hourly temporal output, they are not suitable for small scale problems (e.g., regional climate assessment, meso-scale NWP verification, input for subsequent models such as river runoff simulations, renewable energy applications). The implementation of regional reanalyses based on a limited area model along with a data assimilation scheme is able to generate reanalysis data sets with high spatio-temporal resolution. The work presented here focuses on two regional reanalyses for Europe and Germany. The European reanalysis COSMO-REA6 matches the CORDEX EURO-11 specifications, albeit at a higher spatial resolution, i.e., 0.055° (6km) instead of 0.11° (12km). Nested into COSMO-REA6 is COSMO-REA2, a convective-scale reanalysis with 2km resolution for Germany. COSMO-REA6 comprises the assimilation of observational data using the existing nudging scheme of COSMO and is complemented by a special soil moisture analysis and boundary conditions given by ERA-Interim data. COSMO-REA2 also uses the nudging scheme complemented by a latent heat nudging of radar information. The reanalysis data set currently covers 17 years (1997-2013) for COSMO-REA6 and 4 years (2010-2013) for COSMO-REA2 with a very large set of output variables and a high temporal output step of hourly 3D-fields and quarter-hourly 2D-fields. The evaluation

  19. New evidence for early presence of hominids in North China.

    PubMed

    Ao, Hong; Dekkers, Mark J; Wei, Qi; Qiang, Xiaoke; Xiao, Guoqiao

    2013-01-01

    The Nihewan Basin in North China has a rich source of Early Pleistocene Paleolithic sites. Here, we report a high-resolution magnetostratigraphic dating of the Shangshazui Paleolithic site that was found in the northeastern Nihewan Basin in 1972. The artifact layer is suggested to be located in the Matuyama reversed polarity chron just above the upper boundary of the Olduvai polarity subchron, yielding an estimated age of ca 1.7-1.6 Ma. This provides new evidence for hominid occupation in North China in the earliest Pleistocene. The earliest hominids are argued to have lived in a habitat of open grasslands mixed with patches of forests close to the bank of the Nihewan paleolake as indicated from faunal compositions. Hominid migrations to East Asia during the Early Pleistocene are suggested to be a consequence of increasing cooling and aridity in Africa and Eurasia.

  20. NLDAS Views of North American 2011 Extreme Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rui, Hualan; Teng, William; Vollmer, Bruce; Mocko, David; Lei, Guang-Dih

    2012-01-01

    2011 was marked as one of the most extreme years in recent history. Over the course of the year, weather-related extreme events, such as floods, heat waves, blizzards, tornadoes, and wildfires, caused tremendous loss of human life and property. The North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS, http://ldas.gsfc.nasa.gov/nldas/) data set, with high spatial and temporal resolutions (0.125? x 0.125?, hourly) and various water- and energy-related variables, is an excellent data source for case studies of extreme events. This presentation illustrates some extreme events from 2011 in North America, including the Groundhog Day Blizzard, the July heat wave, Hurricane Irene, and Tropical Storm Lee, all utilizing NLDAS Phase 2 (NLDAS-2) data.

  1. NLDAS Views of North American 2011 Extreme Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rui, Hualan; Teng, William L.; Vollmer, Bruce; Mocko, David; Lei, Guang-Dih

    2014-01-01

    2011 was marked as one of the most extreme years in recent history. Over the course of the year, weather-related extreme events, such as floods, heat waves, blizzards, tornadoes, and wildfires, caused tremendous loss of human life and property. The North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS, http:ldas.gsfc.nasa.govnldas) data set, with high spatial and temporal resolutions (0.125 x 0.125, hourly) and various water- and energy-related variables, is an excellent data source for case studies of extreme events. This presentation illustrates some extreme events from 2011 in North America, including the Groundhog Day Blizzard, the July heat wave, Hurricane Irene, and Tropical Storm Lee, all utilizing NLDAS Phase 2 (NLDAS-2) data.

  2. Laser Provides First 3-D View of Mars' North Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This first three-dimensional picture of Mars' north pole enables scientists to estimate the volume of its water ice cap with unprecedented precision, and to study its surface variations and the heights of clouds in the region for the first time.

    Approximately 2.6 million of these laser pulse measurements were assembled into a topographic grid of the north pole with a spatial resolution of 0.6 miles (one kilometer) and a vertical accuracy of 15-90 feet (5-30 meters).

    The principal investigator for MOLA is Dr. David E. Smith of Goddard. The MOLA instrument was designed and built by the Laser Remote Sensing Branch of Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics at Goddard. The Mars Global Surveyor Mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for the NASA Office of Space Science.

  3. High Resolution Frequency Swept Imaging.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-30

    recording configuration similar to that of a lensless Fourier transform hologram, the resolution and spacial sampling requirement from the recording...a lensless Fourier Transform hologram, the resolution requirements from the recording device are greatly !.4 + ’+:::,,,. :,;,,,,o...n X-Ray Crytallography and Electron Microscopy By Reduction to Two-Dimensional Holographic Implementation", Trans. Amr. Crytallographic Assoc., Vol

  4. Nonviolent Conflict Resolution in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretherton, Diane

    1996-01-01

    Explores some of the research that describes the process of growing up to be violent, reviews a typical conflict-resolution program in the schools, and describes an action research project that provides some pointers on the development of conflict-resolution programs that address the problem of violence in greater depth. (SM)

  5. High Resolution Orientation Imaging Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-02

    Functions, ICCES 2010, Las Vegas. 17. David Fullwood, Brent Adams, Mike Miles, Stuart Rogers, Ali Khosravani, Raj Mishra, Design for Ductility : Defect... Pseudo -Symmetries by High Resolution EBSD Methods, MS&T. 2009: Pittsburgh. 27. Oliver Johnson, Calvin Gardner, David Fullwood, Brent Adams, George...applied to strain measurements ................................... 6 2.3 Recovery of Lattice Tetragonality and Pseudo -Symmetry Resolution

  6. North European Transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korja, Annakaisa; Heikkinen, Pekka J.; Roslov, Yuri; Ivanova, Nina; Verba, Marc; Sakoulina, Tamara

    2010-05-01

    A nearly continuous, 3600 km long, NE-running North European Transect (NET) is combined from the existing deep seismic reflection data sets in the Baltic Sea (BABEL, 1600 km), Northern Finland (FIRE 4-4A, 580 km) and Barents Sea (1-AR, 1440 km;). The reflective image of the deep crust is highly dependent on the thickness of the sedimentary cover. The cover is few hundred meters in the Baltic sea, few tens of meters in the land areas and few kilometers in the Barents Sea area. In the Barents Sea area, the seismic image is dominated by the layered structure of the sedimentary basins and the middle and lower crust are poorly imaged. Therefore the Moho boundary in the Barents Sea has been determined from wide-angle reflections. Geologically the transect covers the transition from Phanerozoic Europe to Precambrian Europe and back to the Phanerozoic Barents Sea Shelf. It displays how Northern Europe grew around Baltica in several tectonic episodes involving the formation and destruction of Columbia/Hudsonland, Rodinia and Pangea supercontinents. The paleo plateboundaries are traversed by subvertical transparent zones suggesting transpressional and trantensional environments. The BABEL lines image how the core of Baltica was formed by sequential accretion of microcontinents and arc terranes at the old continental margin during the Svecofennian Orogeny ~1.9-1.8 Ga .When Baltica joined the Columbia supercontinent, new terranes were added to its southern edge in the Sveocbaltic Orogeny (~1.8 Ga). During the dispersal of the Columbia, the Baltic Sea failed rift was formed, rapakivi granitoids were intruded and sedimentary basins were developed. An extended plate margin structure has been imposed on the Rodinian (Sveconorwegian) and Pangean additions (Variscan-Caledonian). Major crustal thinning takes place along a series of subvertical faults across the Trans-European Suture Zone marking the transition from Phanerozoic to Proterozoic Europe. The FIRE lines in Northen Finland

  7. Momentum resolution in inverse photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Zumbülte, A.; Schmidt, A. B.; Donath, M.

    2015-01-15

    We present a method to determine the electron beam divergence, and thus the momentum resolution, of an inverse-photoemission setup directly from a series of spectra measured on Cu(111). Simulating these spectra with different beam divergences shows a distinct influence of the divergence on the appearance of the Shockley surface state. Upon crossing the Fermi level, its rise in intensity can be directly linked with the beam divergence. A comparison of measurement and simulation enables us to quantify the momentum resolution independent of surface quality, energy resolution, and experimental geometry. With spin resolution, a single spectrum taken around the Fermi momentum of a spin-split surface state, e.g., on Au(111), is sufficient to derive the momentum resolution of an inverse-photoemission setup.

  8. How Attention Affects Spatial Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Marisa; Barbot, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    We summarize and discuss a series of psychophysical studies on the effects of spatial covert attention on spatial resolution, our ability to discriminate fine patterns. Heightened resolution is beneficial in most, but not all, visual tasks. We show how endogenous attention (voluntary, goal driven) and exogenous attention (involuntary, stimulus driven) affect performance on a variety of tasks mediated by spatial resolution, such as visual search, crowding, acuity, and texture segmentation. Exogenous attention is an automatic mechanism that increases resolution regardless of whether it helps or hinders performance. In contrast, endogenous attention flexibly adjusts resolution to optimize performance according to task demands. We illustrate how psychophysical studies can reveal the underlying mechanisms of these effects and allow us to draw linking hypotheses with known neurophysiological effects of attention. PMID:25948640

  9. Enhanced High Resolution RBS System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Thomas J.; Hass, James A.; Klody, George M.

    2011-06-01

    Improvements in full spectrum resolution with the second NEC high resolution RBS system are summarized. Results for 50 Å TiN/HfO films on Si yielding energy resolution on the order of 1 keV are also presented. Detector enhancements include improved pulse processing electronics, upgraded shielding for the MCP/RAE detector, and reduced noise generated from pumping. Energy resolution measurements on spectra front edge coupled with calculations using 0.4mStr solid angle show that beam energy spread at 400 KeV from the Pelletron® accelerator is less than 100 eV. To improve user throughput, magnet control has been added to the automatic data collection. Depth profiles derived from experimental data are discussed. For the thin films profiled, depth resolutions were on the Angstrom level with the non-linear energy/channel conversions ranging from 100 to 200 eV.

  10. Enhanced High Resolution RBS System

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Thomas J.; Hass, James A.; Klody, George M.

    2011-06-01

    Improvements in full spectrum resolution with the second NEC high resolution RBS system are summarized. Results for 50 A ring TiN/HfO films on Si yielding energy resolution on the order of 1 keV are also presented. Detector enhancements include improved pulse processing electronics, upgraded shielding for the MCP/RAE detector, and reduced noise generated from pumping. Energy resolution measurements on spectra front edge coupled with calculations using 0.4mStr solid angle show that beam energy spread at 400 KeV from the Pelletron registered accelerator is less than 100 eV. To improve user throughput, magnet control has been added to the automatic data collection. Depth profiles derived from experimental data are discussed. For the thin films profiled, depth resolutions were on the Angstrom level with the non-linear energy/channel conversions ranging from 100 to 200 eV.

  11. Interferometric resolution boosting for spectrographs

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J; Edelstein, J

    2004-05-25

    Externally dispersed interferometry (EDI) is a technique for enhancing the performance of spectrographs for wide bandwidth high resolution spectroscopy and Doppler radial velocimetry. By placing a small angle-independent interferometer near the slit of a spectrograph, periodic fiducials are embedded on the recorded spectrum. The multiplication of the stellar spectrum times the sinusoidal fiducial net creates a moir{acute e} pattern, which manifests high detailed spectral information heterodyned down to detectably low spatial frequencies. The latter can more accurately survive the blurring, distortions and CCD Nyquist limitations of the spectrograph. Hence lower resolution spectrographs can be used to perform high resolution spectroscopy and radial velocimetry. Previous demonstrations of {approx}2.5x resolution boost used an interferometer having a single fixed delay. We report new data indicating {approx}6x Gaussian resolution boost (140,000 from a spectrograph with 25,000 native resolving power), taken by using multiple exposures at widely different interferometer delays.

  12. 1. VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, NORTH OF PORTAL 1, JUST INSIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, NORTH OF PORTAL 1, JUST INSIDE THE PROTECTED AREA. ON THE LEFT SIDE OF THE PHOTOGRAPH IS BUILDING 709, THE COOLING TOWER FOR BUILDING 707, AND BEHIND BUILDING 709 IS BUILDING 707, THE NEWEST OF THE PLUTONIUM FABRICATION BUILDINGS. IN THE RIGHT FOREGROUND IS BUILDING 763, A BREEZEWAY FOR PEDESTRIANS. IN THE FAR LEFT OF THE PHOTOGRAPH ARE THE T750 TRAILERS AND BUILDING 750, THE PRODUCTION SUPPORT ENGINEERING FACILITY. - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  13. Decadal prediction skill using a high-resolution climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monerie, Paul-Arthur; Coquart, Laure; Maisonnave, Éric; Moine, Marie-Pierre; Terray, Laurent; Valcke, Sophie

    2017-02-01

    The ability of a high-resolution coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (with a horizontal resolution of a quarter of a degree in the ocean and of about 0.5° in the atmosphere) to predict the annual means of temperature, precipitation, sea-ice volume and extent is assessed based on initialized hindcasts over the 1993-2009 period. Significant skill in predicting sea surface temperatures is obtained, especially over the North Atlantic, the tropical Atlantic and the Indian Ocean. The Sea Ice Extent and volume are also reasonably predicted in winter (March) and summer (September). The model skill is mainly due to the external forcing associated with well-mixed greenhouse gases. A decrease in the global warming rate associated with a negative phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation is simulated by the model over a suite of 10-year periods when initialized from starting dates between 1999 and 2003. The model ability to predict regional change is investigated by focusing on the mid-90's Atlantic Ocean subpolar gyre warming. The model simulates the North Atlantic warming associated with a meridional heat transport increase, a strengthening of the North Atlantic current and a deepening of the mixed layer over the Labrador Sea. The atmosphere plays a role in the warming through a modulation of the North Atlantic Oscillation: a negative sea level pressure anomaly, located south of the subpolar gyre is associated with a wind speed decrease over the subpolar gyre. This leads to a reduced oceanic heat-loss and favors a northward displacement of anomalously warm and salty subtropical water that both concur to the subpolar gyre warming. We finally conclude that the subpolar gyre warming is mainly triggered by ocean dynamics with a possible contribution of atmospheric circulation favoring its persistence.

  14. A high resolution water level forecast for the German Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niehüser, Sebastian; Dangendorf, Sönke; Arns, Arne; Jensen, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Many coastal regions worldwide are potentially endangered by storm surges which can cause disastrous damages and loss of life. Due to climate change induced sea level rise, an accumulation of such events is expected by the end of the 21th century. Therefore, advanced storm surge warnings are needed to be prepared when another storm surge hits the coast. In the shallow southeastern North Sea these storm surge warnings are nowadays routinely provided for selected tide gauge locations along a coastline through state-of-the-art forecast systems, which are based on a coupled system of empirical tidal predictions and numerical storm surge forecasts. Along the German North Sea coastline, the Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency in cooperation with the German Weather Service is responsible for the storm surge warnings. They provide accurate, high frequency and real-time water level forecasts for up to six days ahead at selected tide gauge sites via internet, telephone and broadcast. Since water levels along the German North Sea coastline are dominated by shallow water effects and a very complex bathymetric structure of the seabed, the pointwise forecast is not necessarily transferable to un-gauged areas between the tide gauges. Here we aim to close this existing gap and develop water level forecasts with a high spatial (continuously with a resolution of at least 1 kilometer) as well as a high temporal (at least 15-minute values) resolution along the entire German North Sea coastline. We introduce a new methodology for water level forecasts which combines empirical or statistical and numerical models. While the tidal forecast is performed by non-parametric interpolation techniques between un-gauged and gauged sites, storm surges are estimated on the basis of statistical/empirical storm surge formulas taken from a numerical model hindcast. The procedure will be implemented in the operational mode forced with numerical weather forecasts.

  15. High Resolution Formaldehyde Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernest, C. T.; Bauer, D.; Hynes, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant and most important organic carbonyl compound in the atmosphere. The sources of formaldehyde are the oxidation of methane, isoprene, acetone, and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); fossil fuel combustion; and biomass burning. The dominant loss mechanism for formaldehyde is photolysis which occurs via two pathways: (R1) HCHO + hv → HCO + H (R2) HCHO + hv → H2 + CO The first pathway (R1) is referred to as the radical channel, while the second pathway (R2) is referred to as the molecular channel. The products of both pathways play a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. The CO that is produced in the molecular channel undergoes further oxidation to produce CO2. Under atmospheric conditions, the H atom and formyl radical that are produced in the radical channel undergo rapid reactions with O2 to produce the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) via (R3) and (R4). (R3) HCO + O2 → HO2 + CO (R4) H + O2 → HO2 Thus, for every photon absorbed, the photolysis of formaldehyde can contribute one CO2 molecule to the global greenhouse budget or two HO2 radicals to the tropospheric HOx (OH + HO2) cycle. The HO2 radicals produced during formaldehyde photolysis have also been implicated in the formation of photochemical smog. The HO2 radicals act as radical chain carriers and convert NO to NO2, which ultimately results in the catalytic production of O3. Constraining the yield of HO2 produced via HCHO photolysis is essential for improving tropospheric chemistry models. In this study, both the absorption cross section and the quantum yield of the radical channel (R1) were measured at high resolution over the tropospherically relevant wavelength range 304-330 nm. For the cross section measurements a narrow linewidth Nd:YAG pumped dye laser was used with a multi-pass cell. Partial pressures of HCHO were kept below 0.3 torr. Simultaneous measurement of OH LIF in a flame allowed absolute calibration of the wavelength scale. Pressure

  16. Resolution enhancement techniques in microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Christoph; Masters, Barry R.

    2013-05-01

    We survey the history of resolution enhancement techniques in microscopy and their impact on current research in biomedicine. Often these techniques are labeled superresolution, or enhanced resolution microscopy, or light-optical nanoscopy. First, we introduce the development of diffraction theory in its relation to enhanced resolution; then we explore the foundations of resolution as expounded by the astronomers and the physicists and describe the conditions for which they apply. Then we elucidate Ernst Abbe's theory of optical formation in the microscope, and its experimental verification and dissemination to the world wide microscope communities. Second, we describe and compare the early techniques that can enhance the resolution of the microscope. Third, we present the historical development of various techniques that substantially enhance the optical resolution of the light microscope. These enhanced resolution techniques in their modern form constitute an active area of research with seminal applications in biology and medicine. Our historical survey of the field of resolution enhancement uncovers many examples of reinvention, rediscovery, and independent invention and development of similar proposals, concepts, techniques, and instruments. Attribution of credit is therefore confounded by the fact that for understandable reasons authors stress the achievements from their own research groups and sometimes obfuscate their contributions and the prior art of others. In some cases, attribution of credit is also made more complex by the fact that long term developments are difficult to allocate to a specific individual because of the many mutual connections often existing between sometimes fiercely competing, sometimes strongly collaborating groups. Since applications in biology and medicine have been a major driving force in the development of resolution enhancing approaches, we focus on the contribution of enhanced resolution to these fields.

  17. Exploring a Multi-resolution Approach Using AMIP Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, Koichi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Zhao, Chun; Yang, Qing; Lu, Jian; Hagos, Samson M.; Rauscher, Sara; Dong, Li; Ringler, Todd; Lauritzen, P. H.

    2015-07-31

    This study presents a diagnosis of a multi-resolution approach using the Model for Prediction Across Scales - Atmosphere (MPAS-A) for simulating regional climate. Four AMIP experiments are conducted for 1999-2009. In the first two experiments, MPAS-A is configured using global quasi-uniform grids at 120 km and 30 km grid spacing. In the other two experiments, MPAS-A is configured using variable-resolution (VR) mesh with local refinement at 30 km over North America and South America embedded inside a quasi-uniform domain at 120 km elsewhere. Precipitation and related fields in the four simulations are examined to determine how well the VR simulations reproduce the features simulated by the globally high-resolution model in the refined domain. In previous analyses of idealized aqua-planet simulations, the characteristics of the global high-resolution simulation in moist processes only developed near the boundary of the refined region. In contrast, the AMIP simulations with VR grids are able to reproduce the high-resolution characteristics across the refined domain, particularly in South America. This indicates the importance of finely resolved lower-boundary forcing such as topography and surface heterogeneity for the regional climate, and demonstrates the ability of the MPAS-A VR to replicate the large-scale moisture transport as simulated in the quasi-uniform high-resolution model. Outside of the refined domain, some upscale effects are detected through large-scale circulation but the overall climatic signals are not significant at regional scales. Our results provide support for the multi-resolution approach as a computationally efficient and physically consistent method for modeling regional climate.

  18. Modelling coastal low-level wind-jets: does horizontal resolution matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjha, Raza; Tjernström, Michael; Svensson, Gunilla; Semedo, Alvaro

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric flows in coastal regions are impacted by land-sea temperature contrasts, complex terrain, shape of the coastline, among many things. Along the west coast of central North America, winds in the boundary layer are mainly from north or northwest, roughly parallel to the coastline. Frequently, the coastal low-level wind field is characterized by a sharp wind maximum along the coast in the lowest kilometre. This feature, commonly referred to as a coastal low-level jet (CLLJ), has significant impact on the climatology of the coastal region and affects many human activities in the littoral zone. Hence, a good understanding and forecasting of CLLJs are vital. This study evaluates the issue of proper mesoscale numerical model resolution to describe the physics of a CLLJ, and its impact on the upper ocean. The COAMPS® model is used for a summer event to determine the realism of the model results compared to observations, from an area of supercritical flow adjustment between Pt. Sur and Pt. Conception, California. Simulations at different model horizontal resolutions, from 54 to 2 km are performed. While the model produces realistic results with increasing details at higher resolution, the results do not fully converge even at a resolution of only few kilometres and an objective analysis of model errors do not show an increased skill with increasing resolution. Based on all available information, a compromise resolution appears to be at least 6 km. New methods may have to be developed to evaluate models at very high resolution.

  19. SNAP sky background at the north ecliptic pole

    SciTech Connect

    Aldering, Greg

    2002-07-01

    I summarize the extant direct and indirect data on the sky background SNAP will see at the North Ecliptic Pole over the wavelength range 0.4 < {lambda} < 1.7 {micro}m. At the spatial resolution of SNAP the sky background due to stars and galaxies is resolved, so the only source considered is zodiacal light. Several models are explored to provide interpolation in wavelength between the broadband data from HST and COBE observations. I believe the input data are now established well enough that the accuracy of the sky background presented here is sufficient for SNAP simulations, and that it will stand up to scrutiny by reviewers.

  20. NorthEast view; Mechanical Building, south and west elevations North ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North-East view; Mechanical Building, south and west elevations - North Philadelphia Station, Mechanical Building, 2900 North Broad Street, on northwest corner of Broad Street & Glenwood Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  1. GENERAL VIEW OF NORTH VEHICLE ACCESS PLATFORMS, HB3, FACING NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF NORTH VEHICLE ACCESS PLATFORMS, HB-3, FACING NORTH TOWARDS FLOOR - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  2. Summertime influence of Asian pollution in the free troposphere over North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Q.; Jaeglé, L.; Hudman, R. C.; Turquety, S.; Jacob, D. J.; Avery, M. A.; Browell, E. V.; Sachse, G. W.; Blake, D. R.; Brune, W.; Ren, X.; Cohen, R. C.; Dibb, J. E.; Fried, A.; Fuelberg, H.; Porter, M.; Heikes, B. G.; Huey, G.; Singh, H. B.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2007-06-01

    We analyze aircraft observations obtained during INTEX-A (1 July to 14 August 2004) to examine the summertime influence of Asian pollution in the free troposphere over North America. By applying correlation analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) to the observations between 6 and 12 km, we find dominant influences from recent convection and lightning (13% of observations), Asia (7%), the lower stratosphere (7%), and boreal forest fires (2%), with the remaining 71% assigned to background. Asian air masses are marked by high levels of CO, O3, HCN, PAN, C2H2, C6H6, methanol, and SO42-. The partitioning of NOy species in the Asian plumes is dominated by PAN (˜600 pptv), with varying NOx/HNO3 ratios in individual plumes, consistent with individual transit times of 3-9 days. Export of Asian pollution occurred in warm conveyor belts of midlatitude cyclones, deep convection, and in typhoons. Compared to Asian outflow measurements during spring, INTEX-A observations display lower levels of anthropogenic pollutants (CO, C3H8, C2H6, C6H6) due to shorter summer lifetimes; higher levels of biogenic tracers (methanol and acetone) because of a more active biosphere; and higher levels of PAN, NOx, HNO3, and O3 reflecting active photochemistry, possibly enhanced by efficient NOy export and lightning. The high ΔO3/ΔCO ratio (0.76 mol/mol) in Asian plumes during INTEX-A is due to strong photochemical production and, in some cases, mixing with stratospheric air along isentropic surfaces. The GEOS-Chem global model captures the timing and location of the Asian plumes. However, it significantly underestimates the magnitude of observed enhancements in CO, O3, PAN and NOx.

  3. Summertime Influence of Asian Pollution in the Free Troposphere over North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Q.; Jaegle, Lyatt; Hudman, Rynda C.; Turquety, Solene; Jacob, Daniel J.; Avery, Melody A.; Blake, Donald R.; Browell, Edward V.; Sachse, Glen W.; Brune, W. H.; Ren, Xinrong; Clarke, A.; Cohen, R.; Dibb, Jack; Fried, Alan; Fuelberg, Henry; Porter, M.; Heikes, Brian; Huey, Greg; Singh, H. B.; Wennberg, Paul

    2007-01-01

    We analyze aircraft observations obtained during INTEX-A (1 July 14 - August 2004) to examine the summertime influence of Asian pollution in the free troposphere over North America. By applying correlation analysis and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to the observations between 6-12 km, we find dominant influences from recent convection and lightning (13 percent of observations), Asia (7 percent), the lower stratosphere (7 percent), and boreal forest fires (2 percent), with the remaining 71 percent assigned to background. Asian airmasses are marked by high levels of CO, O3, HCN, PAN, acetylene, benzene, methanol, and SO4(2-). The partitioning of reactive nitrogen species in the Asian plumes is dominated by peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) (approximately 600 pptv), with varying NO(x)/HNO3 ratios in individual plumes consistent with different plumes ages ranging from 3 to 9 days. Export of Asian pollution in warm conveyor belts of mid-latitude cyclones, deep convection, and lifting in typhoons all contributed to the five major Asian pollution plumes. Compared to past measurement campaigns of Asian outflow during spring, INTEX-A observations display unique characteristics: lower levels of anthropogenic pollutants (CO, propane, ethane, benzene) due to their shorter summer lifetimes; higher levels of biogenic tracers (methanol and acetone) because of a more active biosphere; as well as higher levels of PAN, NO(x), HNO3, and O3 (more active photochemistry possibly enhanced by injection of lightning NO(x)). The high delta O3/delta CO ratio (0.76 mol mol(exp -1)) of Asian plumes during INTEX-A is due to a combination of strong photochemical production and mixing with stratospheric air along isentropic surfaces. The GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model captures the timing and location of the Asian plumes remarkably well. However, it significantly underestimates the magnitude of the enhancements.

  4. Comparison of numerical hindcasted severe waves with Doppler radar measurements in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce de León, Sonia; Bettencourt, João H.; Dias, Frederic

    2017-01-01

    Severe sea states in the North Sea present a challenge to wave forecasting systems and a threat to offshore installations such as oil and gas platforms and offshore wind farms. Here, we study the ability of a third-generation spectral wave model to reproduce winter sea states in the North Sea. Measured and modeled time series of integral wave parameters and directional wave spectra are compared for a 12-day period in the winter of 2013-2014 when successive severe storms moved across the North Atlantic and the North Sea. Records were obtained from a Doppler radar and wave buoys. The hindcast was performed with the WAVEWATCH III model (Tolman 2014) with high spectral resolution both in frequency and direction. A good general agreement was obtained for integrated parameters, but discrepancies were found to occur in spectral shapes.

  5. Resolution analysis by random probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simutė, S.; Fichtner, A.; van Leeuwen, T.

    2015-12-01

    We develop and apply methods for resolution analysis in tomography, based on stochastic probing of the Hessian or resolution operators. Key properties of our methods are (i) low algorithmic complexity and easy implementation, (ii) applicability to any tomographic technique, including full-waveform inversion and linearized ray tomography, (iii) applicability in any spatial dimension and to inversions with a large number of model parameters, (iv) low computational costs that are mostly a fraction of those required for synthetic recovery tests, and (v) the ability to quantify both spatial resolution and inter-parameter trade-offs. Using synthetic full-waveform inversions as benchmarks, we demonstrate that auto-correlations of random-model applications to the Hessian yield various resolution measures, including direction- and position-dependent resolution lengths, and the strength of inter-parameter mappings. We observe that the required number of random test models is around 5 in one, two and three dimensions. This means that the proposed resolution analyses are not only more meaningful than recovery tests but also computationally less expensive. We demonstrate the applicability of our method in 3D real-data full-waveform inversions for the western Mediterranean and Japan. In addition to tomographic problems, resolution analysis by random probing may be used in other inverse methods that constrain continuously distributed properties, including electromagnetic and potential-field inversions, as well as recently emerging geodynamic data assimilation.

  6. Preparing for Upheaval in North Korea: Assuming North Korean Regime Collapse

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    defense agreement between North Korea and China but also pro-Chinese North Korean elites’ requests for Chinese help are likely to justify Chinese...PREPARING FOR UPHEAVAL IN NORTH KOREA : ASSUMING NORTH KOREAN REGIME COLLAPSE by Kwonwoo Kim December 2013 Thesis Advisor: Wade Huntley Second...REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE PREPARING FOR UPHEAVAL IN NORTH KOREA : ASSUMING NORTH KOREAN REGIME COLLAPSE 5

  7. Angular resolution of the Ohya air shower detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsui, K.; Aoki, T.; Okada, A.; Ohashi, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Shibata, S.; Nakamura, I.; Kojima, H.; Kitamura, T.; Minorikawa, Y.; Kato, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Higashi, S.; Kobayakawa, K.; Kamiya, Y.

    1990-05-01

    Accurate measurements of the total number of muons in an air shower are important for the discrimination of showers produced by astronomical gamma rays from those produced by protons. In order to perform this discrimination, muon detectors with a total area of about 400 m2 have been constructed in the Ohya stone mine. At ground level, scintillation detectors have been distributed for determining the total number of electrons in the air shower. The arrival direction of the air shower determined by usual timing information was examined using independent data on the arrival direction determined by muons in the shower. The angular resolution thus obtained at the shower maximum is 1.7° in the south-north plane and 2° in the east-west plane. The difference of the resolution is due to the asymmetric arrangement of scintillation detectors.

  8. Ameliorating the spatial resolution of Hyperion hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakopoulos, Konstantinos G.; Tsombos, Panagiotis I.; Skianis, George A.; Vaiopoulos, Dimitrios A.

    2009-09-01

    In this study seven fusion techniques and more especially the Ehlers, Gram-Schmidt, High Pass Filter, Local Mean Matching (LMM), Local Mean and Variance Matching (LMVM), Pansharp and PCA, were used for the fusion of Hyperion hyperspectral data with ALI panchromatic data. Both sensors are onboard on EO-1 satellite and the data are collected simultaneously. The panchromatic data has a spatial resolution of 10m while the hyperspectral data has a spatial resolution of 30m. All the fusion techniques are designed for use with classical multispectral data. Thus, it is quite interesting to investigate the assessment of the common used fusion algorithms with the hyperspectral data. The area of study is the broader area of North Western Athens near to Thrakomakedones village.

  9. A magmatic probe of dynamic topography beneath western North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klöcking, M.; White, N. J.; Maclennan, J.

    2014-12-01

    A region centered on the Yellowstone hotspot and encompassing the Colorado Plateau sits at an elevation 2 km higher than the cratonic North America. This difference broadly coincides with tomographically observed variations in lithospheric thickness: ~120 km beneath western North America, ~240 km beneath the craton. Thermochronology of the Grand Canyon area, sedimentary flux to the Gulf of Mexico, and river profile inversion all suggest that regional uplift occurred in at least two separate stages. High resolution seismic tomographic models, using USArray data, have identified a ring of low velocity material beneath the edges of the Colorado Plateau. Magmatism coincides with these low velocity zones and shows distinct phases: an overall increase in volume around 40 Ma and a change from lithospheric to asthenospheric signatures around 5 Ma. Volcanism is also observed to migrate north-east with time. Here, we attempt to integrate these different observations with lithospheric thickness. A dynamic topography model of progressive lithospheric erosion over a hot mantle plume might account for uplift as well as the temporal and spatial distribution of magmatism across western North America. Thinning of the lithosphere around the edges of the Colorado Plateau in combination with the hotter mantle potential temperature of a plume could create isostatic and dynamic uplift as well as allowing for melt production. To test this model, we have analysed around 100 samples from volcanic centers across western North America by ICP-MS for rare earth elements (REE). Most of the samples are younger than 5 Ma, and all of them have previously been analysed by XRF. Using trace element ratios such as La/Yb and Nb/Y we assess depth of melting and melt fraction, respectively. In addition, we use REE inversion modelling to estimate melt fractions as a function of depth and temperature of melting. The results are compared to existing constraints on lithospheric thickness and mantle potential

  10. Cenozoic stratigraphic evolution, North Sea and Labrador Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Gradstein, F.M.; Grant, A.C.; Mudford, B.S. ); Berggren, W.A. ); Kaminski, M.A. ); D'Lorio, M.A. ); Cloetingh, S. ); Griffiths, C.M. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors are studying Cenozoic correlation patterns, burial trends, and subsidence history of the Central North Sea, Labrador, and Orphan basins. The authors objectives are (1) to detail intraregional mid-high latitude biozonations using noise filtering and probabilistic zonation techniques; (2) to detail paleobathymetric trends from basin margins to centers; (3) to apply this knowledge to model basin evolution, in the perspective of the evolving North Atlantic Ocean; (4) to evaluate causes for the occurrence of major hiatuses and rapid changes of subsidence; and (5) to relate rapid changes in sedimentation in the last few millions of years to model observed undercompaction trends. Cenozoic microfossil assemblages in these basins are similar, related to similarities in sedimentary and paleoeceanographic conditions. In more basinal wells, flysch-type agglutinated foraminiferal assemblages occur, also known from Carpathians, Trinidad, and Moroccan foredeeps. Over 90% of agglutinated taxa are common between these basins, although local stratigraphic ranges vary sufficiently to rely on the concept of average ranges, rather than total ones for correlations. Cenozoic stratigraphic resolution in the North Sea and Labrador basins generally is in 3-5-Ma units. and paleobathymetric zonations define a minimum of five niches, from inner shelf to middle slope regimes. Significant hiatuses occurred in the late Eocene through the Miocene, particularly in northern Labrador and northern North Sea. Subsidence in the Labrador/Grand Banks passive margin half grabens was strongly influenced by Labrador Sea opening between anomalies 34 (Campanian) and 13 (early Oligocene), when subsidence exceeded sedimentation and bathyal conditions prevailed along the margin. Thermally induced subsidence in the central North Sea grabens was considerable in the late Paleocene, when the Norwegian Sea started to open.

  11. EPA Alternative Dispute Resolution Contacts

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The success of EPA's ADR efforts depends on a network of talented and experienced professionals in Headquarters offices and EPA Regions. For Agency-wide ADR information, please contact the Conflict Prevention and Resolution Center.

  12. North Dakota Dance Content Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Sue; Farrell, Renee; Robbins, Susan; Simonson, Paula; Stanley, Melissa

    Dance should be seen as an authentic avenue for allowing students to learn kinesthetically by using movement that is essential to brain development. Ideally students would be exposed to dance forms and patterns in other art forms like music and drama as well as units within physical education classes. These North Dakota standards may be taught…

  13. Tall Tales of North America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fresno City Unified School District, CA.

    Designed for use in junior high school language arts classes, this learning activity packet introduces students to North American folklore. Selected readings cover Indian tales, real folk heroes (Davy Crockett and John Henry), imaginary folk heroes (Paul Bunyan and Pecos Bill), Black folk stories (Brer Rabbit), and tales of Washington Irving. Each…

  14. North Dakota to Central Quebec

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video was taken by the crew of Expedition 30 onboard the International Space Station. The sequence of shots was taken January 26, 2012 from 10:04:56 to 10:10:42 GMT, on a pass from North Dakot...

  15. Conservation Agriculture in North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation agriculture (CA) is a production paradigm that groups reduced tillage, mulching with crop residues or cover crops, and diversified crop rotations, especially those that incorporate leguminous crops. In North America, reduced tillage is the most widely-adopted practice that seeks the ide...

  16. The Flooding of North America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennert, James W.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a game, designed for use with primary grade level children, which uses a raised plastic relief map of North America to demonstrate the effect of a rising sea level in order to help the students focus on the variety and location of elevation changes in Canada and the northern United States. (JDH)

  17. Occupational injury in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Dawn N; Higgins, Sheila

    2010-01-01

    In 2008,161 North Carolina workers died from work-related injuries, 3,324 were hospitalized, and 119,000 reported work-related injuries. Workers' compensation costs in the state exceeded $1.3 billion in 2007. Concerted efforts by the private and public sectors will be needed to reach goals to reduce the incidence of occupational injuries.

  18. The North Korean Missile Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, David

    2001-04-01

    In recent years, the development of ballistic missiles by North Korea has been a key motivation for US efforts to stem missile proliferation and to develop defenses against intermediate and long-range missiles. In the 1980s, North Korea reverse-engineered short-range Soviet Scud missiles and began to produce and sell them. In 1993, it flight-tested a missile reported to have a range of up to 1,300 kilometers, which would allow it to target most of Japan. In 1998, it launched a multi-stage missile over Japan; it later announced that the launch had been an attempt to place a satellite in orbit. An important question is what these tests imply for its current capability and its possible future missile development. Since North Korea has sold missiles to countries in the Middle East and South Asia and is reported to be assisting Iran's missile development program, understanding its capabilities is relevant to security concerns in several parts of the world. In this talk I will discuss my analysis of the publicly available information about North Korea's missile tests, and my conclusions about possible future developments. This includes estimates of ranges and payloads of its next potential generation of missiles, and comments about their potential military utility.

  19. Resolution enhancement in tilted coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri Naghadeh, Diako; Keith Morley, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    Deconvolution is applied to remove source wavelet effects from seismograms. The results are resolution enhancement that enables detection of thin layers. Following enhancement of resolution, low frequency and high angle reflectors, particularly at great depth, appear as low amplitude and semi-invisible reflectors that are difficult to track and pick. A new approach to enhance resolution is introduced that estimates a derivative using continuous wavelet transform in tilted coordinates. The results are compared with sparse spike deconvolution, curvelet deconvolution and inverse quality filtering in wavelet domain. The positive consequence of the new method is to increase sampling of high dip features by changing the coordinate system from Cartesian to tilted. To compare those methods a complex data set was chosen that includes high angle faults and chaotic mass transport complex. Image enhancement using curvelet deconvolution shows a chaotic system as a non-chaotic one. The results show that sparse spike deconvolution and inverse quality filtering in wavelet domain are able to enhance resolution more than curvelet deconvolution especially at great depth but it is impossible to follow steep dip reflectors after resolution enhancement using these methods, especially when their apparent dips are more than 45°. By estimating derivatives in a continuous wavelet transform from tilted data sets similar resolution enhancement as the other deconvolution methods is achieved but additionally steep dipping reflectors are imaged much better than others. Subtracted results of the enhanced resolution data set using new method and the other introduced methods show that steeply dipping reflectors are highlighted as a particular ability of the new method. The results show that high frequency recovery in Cartesian co-ordinate is accompanied by inability to image steeply dipping reflectors especially at great depths. Conversely recovery of high frequency data and imaging of the data

  20. Superfine resolution acoustooptic spectrum analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Homayoon; Lesh, James R.

    1991-01-01

    High resolution spectrum analysis of RF signals is required in applications such as the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, RF interference monitoring, or general purpose decomposition of signals. Sub-Hertz resolution in three-dimensional acoustooptic spectrum analysis is theoretically and experimentally demonstrated. The operation of a two-dimensional acoustooptic spectrum analyzer is extended to include time integration over a sequence of CCD frames.

  1. Resolution analysis of bistatic SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garza, Guillermo; Qiao, Zhijun

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we analyze the resolution of bistatic synthetic aperture radar (BISAR) imaging for stationary objects. In particular, we analyze the resolution of images reconstructed by the method of a filtered backprojection inversion, an inversion method which is derived from a scalar wave equation model. In this context we are able to account for the effects of antenna beam patterns and arbitrary flight trajectories. The analysis is done by examining the data collection manifold for different experiment geometries and system parameters.

  2. The High Resolution Tropospheric Ozone Residual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.

    2006-01-01

    The co-flight of the MLS stratospheric limb sounder and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) provides the capability of computing the Tropospheric Ozone Residual (TOR) in much greater detail [Ziemke et al., 2006]. Using forward trajectory calculations of MLS ozone measurements combined with OMI column ozone we have developed a high horizontal resolution tropospheric ozone residual (HTOR) which can provide even more detail than the standard TOR product. HTOR is especially useful for extra-tropical studies of tropospheric ozone transport. We find that both the Pacific pollution corridor (East Asia to Alaska) and the Atlantic pollution corridor (North America east coast to Europe) are also preferred locations for strat-trop folds leading to systematic overestimates of pollution amounts. In fact, fold events appear to dominate extra-tropical Northern Hemisphere day-to-day maps of HTOR. Model estimates of the tropospheric column are in reasonable agreement with the HTOR amounts when offsets due to different tropopause height calculations are taken into consideration.

  3. The High Resolution Tropospheric Ozone Residual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeberl, M. R.; Ziemke, J.; Bhartia, P.; Froidevaux, L.; Levelt, P.

    2006-12-01

    The co-flight of the MLS stratospheric limb sounder and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) provides the capability of computing the Tropospheric Ozone Residual (TOR) in much greater detail [Ziemke et al., 2006]. Using forward trajectory calculations of MLS ozone measurements combined with OMI column ozone we have developed a high horizontal resolution tropospheric ozone residual (HTOR) which can provide even more detail than the standard TOR product. HTOR is especially useful for extra-tropical studies of tropospheric ozone transport. We find that both the Pacific pollution corridor (East Asia to Alaska) and the Atlantic pollution corridor (North America east coast to Europe) are also preferred locations for strat-trop folds leading to systematic over-estimates of pollution amounts. In fact, fold events appear to dominate extra-tropical Northern Hemisphere day-to-day maps of HTOR. Model estimates of the tropospheric column are in reasonable agreement with the HTOR amounts when offsets due to different tropopause height calculations are taken into consideration.

  4. High resolution digital delay timer

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Albert D.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay (20) provides a first output signal (24) at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits (26, 28) latch the high resolution data (24) to form a first synchronizing data set (60). A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters (142, 146, 154) and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses (32, 34) count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an interval which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD (184) corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD (74) to generate a second set of synchronizing data (76) which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data (60) for presentation to logic circuits (64). The logic circuits (64) further delay the internal output signal (72) to obtain a proper phase relationship of an output signal (80) with the internal pulses (32, 34). The final delayed output signal (80) thereafter enables the output pulse generator (82) to produce the desired output pulse (84) at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse (10, 12).

  5. Clementine High Resolution Camera Mosaicking Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This report constitutes the final report for NASA Contract NASW-5054. This project processed Clementine I high resolution images of the Moon, mosaicked these images together, and created a 22-disk set of compact disk read-only memory (CD-ROM) volumes. The mosaics were produced through semi-automated registration and calibration of the high resolution (HiRes) camera's data against the geometrically and photometrically controlled Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Basemap Mosaic produced by the US Geological Survey (USGS). The HiRes mosaics were compiled from non-uniformity corrected, 750 nanometer ("D") filter high resolution nadir-looking observations. The images were spatially warped using the sinusoidal equal-area projection at a scale of 20 m/pixel for sub-polar mosaics (below 80 deg. latitude) and using the stereographic projection at a scale of 30 m/pixel for polar mosaics. Only images with emission angles less than approximately 50 were used. Images from non-mapping cross-track slews, which tended to have large SPICE errors, were generally omitted. The locations of the resulting image population were found to be offset from the UV/Vis basemap by up to 13 km (0.4 deg.). Geometric control was taken from the 100 m/pixel global and 150 m/pixel polar USGS Clementine Basemap Mosaics compiled from the 750 nm Ultraviolet/Visible Clementine imaging system. Radiometric calibration was achieved by removing the image nonuniformity dominated by the HiRes system's light intensifier. Also provided are offset and scale factors, achieved by a fit of the HiRes data to the corresponding photometrically calibrated UV/Vis basemap, that approximately transform the 8-bit HiRes data to photometric units. The sub-polar mosaics are divided into tiles that cover approximately 1.75 deg. of latitude and span the longitude range of the mosaicked frames. Images from a given orbit are map projected using the orbit's nominal central latitude. Polar mosaics are tiled into squares 2250 pixels on a

  6. The north Sulu Sea productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Z.

    2009-12-01

    The Sulu Sea is a part of the western North Pacific. It is a closed sea for its deep water and a semi-closed sea for its upper layer. The Sulu Sea exchanges mainly surface waters with the South China Sea and the Celebes Sea. The Sulu Sea is more productive than the adjacent South China Sea (Jones, 2002). On the basis of MERIS satellite observations from 2002 to 2008, we focus on the high-chlorophyll area as an indicator of the abundance of primary productivity in the Sulu Sea. Strong chlorophyll concentration in the north Sulu Sea close to the Mindoro Strait mainly occurs from December to March and low chlorophyll concentration happens in April to November. The adjacent South China Sea on the other side of Mindoro Strait has shown persistent signs of low chlorophyll concentration. Based on 1/8° Global Navy Coastal Ocean Model, the intrusion of the South China Sea waters through the Mindoro Strait to the Sulu Sea from April to November is the main reason for the low chlorophyll concentration observed in the north Sulu Sea. During April to November, the South China Sea waters flow through the Mindoro Strait and stay on the surface of the north Sulu Sea because of their low density. The north Sulu Sea waters mix with fresher waters coming from the South China Sea without new nutrients supply. When the inflow from South China Sea to Sulu Sea ceases in December to March, the upwelling due to the summer monsoon wind becomes an important mechanism supplying deep nutrients to the surface water which lead to high chlorophyll concentration. Jones, I.S.F., 2002. Primary production in the Sulu Sea. Proceedings of the Indian Academy of Sciences-Earth and Planetary Sciences 111, 209-213.

  7. Chasma Boreale in the North Polar Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This images shows a Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) full-resolution 'targeted image' of the edge of Mars' north polar cap. The region in the image, Chasma Boreale, is a valley several kilometers or miles deep that cuts about 400 kilometers (about 250 miles) into the edge of the cap.

    This image was acquired at 0851 UTC (4:51 a.m. EDT) on Oct. 1, 2006, near 84.6 degrees north latitude, 3.6 degrees east longitude. It covers an area about 13 kilometers (8 miles) long and, at the narrowest point, about 9 kilometers (5.6 miles) wide. At the center of the image the spatial resolution is as good as 18 meters (60 feet) per pixel. The image was taken in 544 colors covering wavelengths of 0.36 to 3.92 micrometers. Two renderings of the data are shown here, both draped over topography without vertical exaggeration, and then viewed from a perspective diagonally above the site. The top view is an approximately true-color representation. The bottom view, constructed from infrared wavelengths, shows strength of the spectral signature of ice. Brighter areas are rich in ice, and dark areas have little ice.

    The polar cap has long been recognized to contain layers composed of dust and ice, and hence has been named the polar layered deposit. This sits atop an underlying 'basal unit.' The upper part of the basal unit is dark at visible wavelengths and steeply sloped, whereas the lower part of the basal unit is brighter, redder, and layered like the polar layered deposits. The chasma floor is cratered, and in the foreground it is covered by dunes that are outliers of a north polar sand sea that surrounds the polar cap. The polar layered deposits and the basal unit form a steeply sloping scarp about 1.1 kilometers (0.7 miles) high.

    CRISM's image of this region shows a number of previously unrecognized characteristics of the polar layered deposits and the basal unit. First, the ice-rich polar layered deposits exhibit coherent banding both at

  8. 26. 100 Second Avenue, North, detail of 'Silver Dollars' on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. 100 Second Avenue, North, detail of 'Silver Dollars' on southeast side - Second Avenue North, Commercial District, Second Avenue North between Broadway & Church Streets, Nashville, Davidson County, TN

  9. Using High Resolution Regional Climate Models to Quantify the Snow Albedo Feedback in a Region of Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letcher, T.; Minder, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution regional climate models are used to characterize and quantify the snow albedo feedback (SAF) over the complex terrain of the Colorado Headwaters region. Three pairs of 7-year control and pseudo global warming simulations (with horizontal grid spacings of 4, 12, and 36 km) are used to study how the SAF modifies the regional climate response to a large-scale thermodynamic perturbation. The SAF substantially enhances warming within the Headwaters domain, locally as much as 5 °C in regions of snow loss. The SAF also increases the inter-annual variability of the springtime warming within Headwaters domain under the perturbed climate. Linear feedback analysis is used quantify the strength of the SAF. The SAF attains a maximum value of 4 W m-2 K-1 during April when snow loss coincides with strong incoming solar radiation. On sub-seasonal timescales, simulations at 4 km and 12 km horizontal grid-spacing show good agreement in the strength and timing of the SAF, whereas a 36km simulation shows greater discrepancies that are tired to differences in snow accumulation and ablation caused by smoother terrain. An analysis of the regional energy budget shows that transport by atmospheric motion acts as a negative feedback to regional warming, damping the effects of the SAF. On the mesoscale, this transport causes non-local warming in locations with no snow. The methods presented here can be used generally to quantify the role of the SAF in other regional climate modeling experiments.

  10. North Atlantic Finite Element Ocean Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veluthedathekuzhiyil, Praveen

    This thesis presents a modified version of the Finite Element Ocean Model (FEOM) developed at Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) for the North Atlantic Ocean. A reasonable North Atlantic Ocean simulation is obtained against the observational data sets in a Control simulation (CS) where the surface boundary conditions are relaxed to a climatology. The vertical mixing in the model was tuned to represent convection in the model, also the horizontal mixing and diffusion coefficients to represent the changes in the resolution of the model’s unstructured grid. In addition, the open boundaries in the model are treated with a sponge layer where tracers are relaxed to climatology. The model is then further modified to accept the atmospheric flux forcing at the surface boundary with an added net heat flux correction and freshwater forcing from major rivers that are flowing into the North Atlantic Ocean. The impact of this boundary condition on the simulation results is then analyzed and shows many improvements albeit the drift in tracer properties around the Gulf Stream region remains as that of the CS case. However a comparison of the vertical sections at Cape Desolation and Cape Farewell with the available observational data sets shows many improvements in this simulation compared to that of the CS case. But the freshwater content in the Labrador Sea interior shows a continued drift as that of the CS case with an improvement towards the 10th model year. A detailed analysis of the boundary currents around the Labrador Sea shows the weak offshore transport of freshwater from the West Greenland Current (WGC) as one of the causes. To further improve the model and reasonably represent the boundary currents and associated sub-grid scale eddies in the model, a modified sub-grid scale parameterization based on Gent and McWilliams, (1990) is adopted. The sensitivity of using various approaches in the thickness diffusion parameter ( Kgm) for this

  11. Very High Resolution Image of Icy Cliffs on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This image, taken by the camera onboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft, is a very high resolution view of the Conamara Chaos region on Jupiter's moon Europa. It shows an area where icy plates have been broken apart and moved around laterally. The top of this image is dominated by corrugated plateaus ending in icy cliffs over a hundred meters (a few hundred feet) high. Debris piled at the base of the cliffs can be resolved down to blocks the size of a house. A fracture that runs horizontally across and just below the center of the Europa image is about the width of a freeway.

    North is to the top right of the image, and the sun illuminates the surface from the east. The image is centered at approximately 9 degrees north latitude and 274 degrees west longitude. The image covers an area approximately 1.7 kilometers by 4 kilometers (1 mile by 2.5 miles). The resolution is 9 meters (30 feet) per picture element. This image was taken on December 16, 1997 at a range of 900 kilometers (540 miles) by Galileo's solid state imaging system.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  12. SENDIT: North Dakota's K-12 Telecommunications Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sackman, Gleason

    SENDIT is a telecommunications network for North Dakota educators and students in the K-12 environment. Through SENDIT, both teachers and students have access to the Internet, and some of the isolation associated with the rurality of North Dakota has been diminished. SENDIT was developed by the North Dakota State University School of Education and…

  13. Climatic Variability over the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurrell, J.; Hoerling, M. P.; Folland, C. K.

    INTRODUCTION WHAT IS THE NORTH ATLANTIC OSCILLATION AND HOW DOES IT IMPACT REGIONAL - CLIMATE? WHAT ARE THE MECHANISMS THAT GOVERN NORTH ATLANTIC OSCILLATION VARIABILITY? Atmospheric Processes Ocean Forcing of the Atmosphere CONCLUDING COMMENTS ON THE OTHER ASPECTS OF NORTH ATLANTIC CLIMATE - VARIABILITY REFERENCES

  14. 27 CFR 9.30 - North Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false North Coast. 9.30 Section... Coast. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “North Coast.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the North Coast viticultural area...

  15. 27 CFR 9.30 - North Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false North Coast. 9.30 Section... Coast. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “North Coast.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the North Coast viticultural area...

  16. 27 CFR 9.30 - North Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false North Coast. 9.30 Section... Coast. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “North Coast.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the North Coast viticultural area...

  17. 27 CFR 9.30 - North Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false North Coast. 9.30 Section... Coast. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “North Coast.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the North Coast viticultural area...

  18. 27 CFR 9.30 - North Coast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false North Coast. 9.30 Section... Coast. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “North Coast.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the North Coast viticultural area...

  19. 76 FR 35740 - North Korea Sanctions Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ... Part 510 North Korea Sanctions Regulations AGENCY: Office of Foreign Assets Control, Treasury. ACTION... amending the North Korea Sanctions Regulations to implement Executive Order 13570 of April 18, 2011. OFAC..., the Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control published the North Korea...

  20. 15 CFR 746.4 - North Korea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false North Korea. 746.4 Section 746.4... CONTROLS § 746.4 North Korea. (a) Licensing Requirements. As authorized by section 6 of the Export... Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea), except food and medicines classified as...

  1. Conservation of North American rallids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eddleman, William R.; Knopf, Fritz L.; Manley, Brooke; Reid, Frederic A.; Zembal, Richard

    1988-01-01

    The Rallidae are a diverse group in their habitat selection, yet most North American species occur in or near wetlands As a consequence, most species are subject to habitat enhancement or perturbation from waterfowl management programs. The overall effects of these management programs relative to rallid conservation have been assessed for few species, and there is a need for synthesis of such information. In the cases of some species or raves, population status is not known, and suggested directions for conservation and management are needed. Rare, endangered, or status undetermined species or races often occur in areas where related species are classified as game birds, and the effects of such hunting on rarer forms are not known. Their generally secretive nature, the endangered status of several races and populations, and continued loss of habitat and threats to present habitat, warrant an examination of the conservation status of the North American taxa in this group. In 1977, a committee of the International Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies summarized available information on management and biology of American Coots (Fulica americana), rails, and gallinules in North America (Holliman 1977). That summary was intended to provide relatively complete information on conservation of these species, and also to provide guidance for research within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's (FWS) Accelerated Research Program for Webless Migratory Shore and Upland Game Birds (ARP). Subsequently, a number of rallid studies were funded under this program. The program was eliminated in 1982, following substantial research activities on North American rallids. Since the demise of the ARP, additional research on rallids in North America has focused on an area the International Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies report failed to cover in detail--that of endangered rallids in the U.S. and their possessions. Most of these studies have been of threatened and endangered

  2. 76 FR 14101 - Bruss North America; Russell Springs, KY; Bruss North America; Orion, MI; Amended Revised...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... Employment and Training Administration Bruss North America; Russell Springs, KY; Bruss North America; Orion... on Reconsideration on February 2, 2011, applicable to workers of Bruss North ] America, Russell... production of automobile parts at the Russell Springs, Kentucky location of Bruss North America. The...

  3. Towards a North Atlantic Marine Radiocarbon Calibration Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, William; Reimer, Paula; Blaauw, Maarten; Bryant, Charlotte; Rae, James; Burke, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Service du dejeuner! Twenty years ago, in 1995, I sailed as a post-doctoral researcher based at the University of Edinburgh (UK) on the first scientific mission of the new Marion Dufresne II. In this presentation, I will provide an update on the work that first quantified North Atlantic marine radiocarbon reservoir ages, highlighting how advances in marine tephrochronology over the last twenty years have significantly improved our understanding (and ability to test) land-ice-ocean linkages. The mechanistic link that connects marine radiocarbon reservoir ages to ocean ventilation state will also be discussed with reference to the Younger Dryas climate anomaly, where models and data have been successfully integrated. I will discuss the use of reference chronologies in the North Atlantic region and evaluate the common practice of climate synchronization between the Greenland ice cores and some of the key MD records that are now available. The exceptional quality of the MD giant piston cores and their potential to capture high-resolution last glacial sediment records from the North Atlantic provides an exciting opportunity to build new regional marine radiocarbon calibration curves. I will highlight new efforts by my co-authors and others to build such curves, setting-out a new agenda for the next twenty years of the IMAGES programme.

  4. Sensors detect biological change in mid-latitude North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polovina, Jeffrey J.; Seki, Michael P.; Howell, Evan

    High temporal and spatial resolution ocean color data for the global ocean were collected for January-June 1997 by the Ocean Color and Temperature Scanner (OCTS) from the Japanese ADEOS satellite and for September 1997 to the present by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view sensor (SeaWiFS). These sensors show the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre characterized by surface chlorophyll less than 0.15 mg/m3, while to the north, the Transition Zone and Subarctic Gyre exhibit surface chlorophyll in excess of 0.25 mg/m3 (Figure 1). The boundary between the low and high chlorophyll domains can be characterized by the 0.2 mg/m3 chlorophyll contour line (Figure l). This boundary is termed the Transition Zone Chlorophyll Front (TZCF) because it moves seasonally between the southern and northern limits of the Transition Zone, coinciding with the convergence of cool, vertically mixed, high chlorophyll water found to the north with warmer, stratified, low chlorophyll water on the south. In addition to simply marking the separation between high and low chlorophyll regions, the TZCF is used as a migratory and forage habitat by apex predators including sea turtles and tunas [Polovina et al., 2000].

  5. A Landsat Record of North American Forest Disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masek, J.; Hall, F. G.; Huang, C.; Wolfe, R.

    2005-12-01

    The Landsat Ecosystem Disturbance Adaptive Processing System (LEDAPS) is generating a decadal, wall-to-wall analysis of forest disturbance and recovery from Landsat satellite imagery for the period 1975-2000. The intent is to provide an accurate, high-resolution view of forest disturbance to support biogeochemical modeling and carbon accounting for the North American Carbon Program (NACP). Through the NASA Science Data Purchase program, substantially cloud-free Landsat MSS, TM, and ETM+ data were selected from the global archive and orthorectified to a UTM map base. The LEDAPS project has calibrated and atmospherically corrected these data (~2100 TM and ETM+ scenes to date) using the MODIS/6S radiative transfer approach. Forest disturbance and recovery is then calculated from the surface reflectance images using change detection techniques. An empirical spectral index (the `Disturbance Index') is used to classify pixels into classes exhibiting high rates of biomass loss over ten years (disturbance) or high rates of biomass gain (recovery). Initial results from North America show good correlation with areas of known harvest activity (Southeastern US, Maine, Pacific Northwest) and fire activity (Boreal forests). Additional work is concentrating on the use of canopy reflectance models to quantify changes in canopy properties in order to identify more subtle changes due to partial harvest and thinning. Initial versions of the surface reflectance and Disturbance Index products were released during 2005 (http://ledaps.nascom.nasa.gov/ledaps/ledaps_NorthAmerica.html).

  6. Quantification of dissolved iron sources to the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Tim M.; John, Seth G.

    2014-07-01

    Dissolved iron is an essential micronutrient for marine phytoplankton, and its availability controls patterns of primary productivity and carbon cycling throughout the oceans. The relative importance of different sources of iron to the oceans is not well known, however, and flux estimates from atmospheric dust, hydrothermal vents and oceanic sediments vary by orders of magnitude. Here we present a high-resolution transect of dissolved stable iron isotope ratios (δ56Fe) and iron concentrations ([Fe]) along a section of the North Atlantic Ocean. The different iron sources can be identified by their unique δ56Fe signatures, which persist throughout the water column. This allows us to calculate the relative contribution from dust, hydrothermal venting and reductive and non-reductive sedimentary release to the dissolved phase. We find that Saharan dust aerosol is the dominant source of dissolved iron along the section, contributing 71-87 per cent of dissolved iron. Additional sources of iron are non-reductive release from oxygenated sediments on the North American margin (10-19 per cent), reductive sedimentary dissolution on the African margin (1-4 per cent) and hydrothermal venting at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (2-6 per cent). Our data also indicate that hydrothermal vents in the North Atlantic are a source of isotopically light iron, which travels thousands of kilometres from vent sites, potentially influencing surface productivity. Changes in the relative importance of the different iron sources through time may affect interactions between the carbon cycle and climate.

  7. Daily precipitation statistics in a EURO-CORDEX RCM ensemble: added value of raw and bias-corrected high-resolution simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanueva, A.; Kotlarski, S.; Herrera, S.; Fernández, J.; Gutiérrez, J. M.; Boberg, F.; Colette, A.; Christensen, O. B.; Goergen, K.; Jacob, D.; Keuler, K.; Nikulin, G.; Teichmann, C.; Vautard, R.

    2016-08-01

    Daily precipitation statistics as simulated by the ERA-Interim-driven EURO-CORDEX regional climate model (RCM) ensemble are evaluated over two distinct regions of the European continent, namely the European Alps and Spain. The potential added value of the high-resolution 12 km experiments with respect to their 50 km resolution counterparts is investigated. The statistics considered consist of wet-day intensity and precipitation frequency as a measure of mean precipitation, and three precipitation-derived indicators (90th percentile on wet days—90pWET, contribution of the very wet days to total precipitation—R95pTOT and number of consecutive dry days—CDD). As reference for model evaluation high resolution gridded observational data over continental Spain (Spain011/044) and the Alpine region (EURO4M-APGD) are used. The assessment and comparison of the two resolutions is accomplished not only on their original horizontal grids (approximately 12 and 50 km), but the high-resolution RCMs are additionally regridded onto the coarse 50 km grid by grid cell aggregation for the direct comparison with the low resolution simulations. The direct application of RCMs e.g. in many impact modelling studies is hampered by model biases. Therefore bias correction (BC) techniques are needed at both resolutions to ensure a better agreement between models and observations. In this work, the added value of the high resolution (before and after the bias correction) is assessed and the suitability of these BC methods is also discussed. Three basic BC methods are applied to isolate the effect of biases in mean precipitation, wet-day intensity and wet-day frequency on the derived indicators. Daily precipitation percentiles are strongly affected by biases in the wet-day intensity, whereas the dry spells are better represented when the simulated precipitation frequency is adjusted to the observed one. This confirms that there is no single optimal way to correct for RCM biases, since

  8. High angular resolution at LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, A.; Arcidiacono, C.; Bertero, M.; Boccacci, P.; Davies, A. G.; Defrere, D.; de Kleer, K.; De Pater, I.; Hinz, P.; Hofmann, K. H.; La Camera, A.; Leisenring, J.; Kürster, M.; Rathbun, J. A.; Schertl, D.; Skemer, A.; Skrutskie, M.; Spencer, J. R.; Veillet, C.; Weigelt, G.; Woodward, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    High angular resolution from ground-based observatories stands as a key technology for advancing planetary science. In the window between the angular resolution achievable with 8-10 meter class telescopes, and the 23-to-40 meter giants of the future, LBT provides a glimpse of what the next generation of instruments providing higher angular resolution will provide. We present first ever resolved images of an Io eruption site taken from the ground, images of Io's Loki Patera taken with Fizeau imaging at the 22.8 meter LBT [Conrad, et al., AJ, 2015]. We will also present preliminary analysis of two data sets acquired during the 2015 opposition: L-band fringes at Kurdalagon and an occultation of Loki and Pele by Europa (see figure). The light curves from this occultation will yield an order of magnitude improvement in spatial resolution along the path of ingress and egress. We will conclude by providing an overview of the overall benefit of recent and future advances in angular resolution for planetary science.

  9. River pollution remediation monitored by optical and infrared high-resolution satellite images.

    PubMed

    Trivero, Paolo; Borasi, Maria; Biamino, Walter; Cavagnero, Marco; Rinaudo, Caterina; Bonansea, Matias; Lanfri, Sofia

    2013-09-01

    The Bormida River Basin, located in the northwestern region of Italy, has been strongly contaminated by the ACNA chemical factory. This factory was in operation from 1892 to 1998, and contamination from the factory has had deleterious consequences on the water quality, agriculture, natural ecosystems and human health. Attempts have been made to remediate the site. The aims of this study were to use high-resolution satellite images combined with a classical remote sensing methodology to monitor vegetation conditions along the Bormida River, both upstream and downstream of the ACNA chemical factory site, and to compare the results obtained at different times before and after the remediation process. The trends of the Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) along the riverbanks are used to assess the effect of water pollution on vegetation. NDVI and EVI values show that the contamination produced by the ACNA factory had less severe effects in the year 2007, when most of the remediation activities were concluded, than in 2006 and 2003. In 2007, the contamination effects were noticeable up to 6 km downstream of the factory, whereas in 2003 and 2006 the influence range was up to about 12 km downstream of the factory. The results of this study show the effectiveness of remediation activities that have been taking place in this area. In addition, the comparison between NDVI and EVI shows that the EVI is more suitable to characterise the vegetation health and can be considered an additional tool to assess vegetation health and to monitor restoration activities.

  10. [Brazilian migration to North America].

    PubMed

    Goza, F

    1992-01-01

    "This article is a comparative study of Brazilian immigration to Canada and the United States. Analyses of recently collected data, in Toronto, Ontario, as well as in a medium sized U.S. community permit this study to examine the adaptation and adjustment experiences of a new group of immigrants to North America. This article begins with a discussion of the origins of this recent immigrant group, and its rapid expansion. Next, this study focuses on the labor force activities of Brazilian immigrants and compares and contrasts their experiences in the U.S. and Canada. A final section examines social adaptation in North America by exploring linguistic and cultural dimensions." (SUMMARY IN ENG)

  11. Brazilian immigration to North America.

    PubMed

    Goza, F

    1994-01-01

    "This article is a comparative study of Brazilian immigration to Canada and the United States. Analysis of recently collected data in Toronto, Ontario and in a medium-size U.S. community facilitated the examination of the adaptation and adjustment experiences of a new group of immigrants to North America. This article begins with a discussion of the origins of this recent immigrant group and its rapid expansion. Next, it focuses on the labor force activities of Brazilian immigrants and compares and contrasts their experiences in the United States and Canada. A final section examines social adaptation in North America by exploring linguistic and cultural dimensions. This article closes with a section on the future aspirations of these immigrants."

  12. Characterizing the detectability of emission signals from a North Korean nuclear detonation.

    PubMed

    Werth, David; Buckley, Robert

    2017-04-01

    The detectability of emission sources, defined by a low-level of mixing with other sources, was estimated for various locations surrounding the Sea of Japan, including a site within North Korea. A high-resolution meteorological model coupled to a dispersion model was used to simulate plume dynamics for four periods, and two metrics of airborne plume mixing were calculated for each source. While emissions from several known sources in this area tended to blend with others while dispersing downwind, the North Korean plume often remained relatively distinct, thereby making it potentially easier to unambiguously 'backtrack' it to its source.

  13. Modeling Mesoscale Eddies in the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Yi

    1999-01-01

    Ocean modeling plays an important role in understanding the current climatic conditions and predicting the future climate change. Modeling the ocean at eddy-permitting and/or eddy resolving resolutions (1/3 degree or higher) has a two-fold objective. One part is to represent the ocean as realistically as possible, because mesoscale eddies have an impact on the large-scale circulation. The second objective is to learn how to represent effects of mesoscale eddies without explicitly resolving them. This is particularly important for climate models which cannot be run at eddy-resolving resolutions because of the computational constraints. At JPL, a 1/6 degree latitude by 1/6 degree longitude with 37 vertical levels Atlantic Ocean model has been developed. The model is based on the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Using the 256-processor Cray T3D, we have conducted a 40-year integration of this Atlantic eddy-resolving ocean model. A regional analysis demonstrate that many observed features associated with the Caribbean Sea eddies can be realistically simulated by this model. Analysis of this Atlantic eddy-resolving ocean model further suggests that these Caribbean Sea eddies are connected with eddies formed outside the Caribbean Sea at the confluence of the North Brazil Current (NBC) and the North Equatorial Countercurrent. The diagram of the model simulated surface current shows that the Caribbean eddies ultimately originate in the NBC retroflection region, traveling more than a year from the North Brazil coast through the Lesser Antilles into the Caribbean Sea and eventually into the Gulf of Mexico. Additional information is contained in the original.

  14. Reactive Nitrogen Distribution and Partitioning in the North American Troposphere and Lowermost Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, H. B.; Salas, L.; Herlth, D.; Kolyer, R.; Czech, E.; Avery, M.; Crawford, J. H.; Pierce, B.; Sachse, G. W.; Blake, D. R.; Cohen, R. C.; Dibb, J.; Huey, G.; Hudman, R. C.; Turquety, S.; Emmons, L. K.; FLocke, F.; Tang, Y.; Carmichael, G. R.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive group of reactive nitrogen species (NO, NO2, HNO3, HO2NO2, PANs, alkyl nitrates, and aerosol-NO3) were measured in the troposphere and lowermost stratosphere over North America and the Atlantic during July/August 2004 (INTEX-A) from the NASA DC-8 platform (0.1-12 km). Less reactive nitrogen species (HCN and CH3CN), that are also unique tracers of biomass combustion, were also measured along with a host of other gaseous (CO, VOC, OVOC, halocarbon) and aerosol tracers. Clean background air as well as air with influences from biogenic emissions, anthropogenic pollution, biomass combustion, and stratosphere was sampled both over continental U. S., Atlantic and Pacific. The North American upper troposphere was found to be greatly influenced by both lightning NO(x) and surface pollution lofted via convection and contained elevated concentrations of PAN, ozone, hydrocarbons, and NO(x). Under polluted conditions PAN was a dominant carrier of reactive nitrogen in the upper troposphere while nitric acid dominated in the lower troposphere. Peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2) was present in sizable concentrations always peaking at around 8 km. Aerosol nitrate appeared to be mostly contained in large soil based particles in the lower troposphere. Plumes from Alaskan fires contained large amounts of PAN and very little enhancement in ozone. Observational data suggest that lightning was a far greater contributor to NO(x) in the upper troposphere than previously believed. NO(x) and NO(y) reservoir appeared to be in steady state only in the middle troposphere where NO(x)/NO(y) was independent of air mass age. A first comparison of observed data with simulations from four 3-D models shows significant differences between observations and models as well as among models. These uncertainties likely propagate themselves in satellites derived NOx data. Observed data are interpreted to suggest that soil sinks of HCN/CH3CN are at best very small. We investigate the partitioning and

  15. Canada geese in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rusch, Donald H.; Malecki, Richard E.; Trost, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    Market hunting and poor stewardship led to record low numbers of geese in the early 1900's, but regulated seasons including closures, refuges, and law enforcement led to restoration of most populations. Winter surveys were begun to study population trends and set responsible harvest regulations for these long-lived and diverse birds. Winter surveys begun in 1936-37 probably represent the oldest continuing index of migratory birds in North America.

  16. North Korea: Terrorism List Removal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-15

    Second- 28 Yi Sang-il and Chin Se-ku. Yongbyon nuclear facility can be disabled within...The White House, Roundtable Interview of the President by Foreign Print Media, August 30, 3007. 32 Choe Sang- hun and David E. Sanger, North Korea...2006 through the spring of 2007 to smuggle conventional arms, including machine guns , automatic rifles, and anti-tank rocket launchers, to the

  17. North Korea: Terrorism List Removal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-06

    Chin Se-ku. Yongbyon nuclear facility can be disabled within a year. JongAng Ilbo (internet version), March 13, 2007. 30 Abductions by N. Korea not...3007. 33 Choe Sang- hun and David E. Sanger, North Korea claims U.S. will remove sanctions, International Herald Tribune, September 4, 2007, p. 5...spring of 2007 to smuggle conventional arms, including machine guns , automatic rifles, and anti-tank rocket launchers, to the Tamil Tigers in Sri

  18. North Korea: Terrorism List Removal?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-10

    and Chin Se-ku. Yongbyon nuclear facility can be disabled within a year. JongAng Ilbo (internet version), March 13, 2007. Korea’s nuclear programs and...the President by Foreign Print Media, August 30, 3007. 30 Choe Sang- hun and David E. Sanger, North Korea claims U.S. will remove sanctions...including machine guns , automatic rifles, and anti-tank rocket launchers, to the Tamil Tigers in Sri Lanka. The Sri Lankan navy intercepted and

  19. On the North Atlantic circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, W.J. Jr.; McCartney, M.S. )

    1993-02-01

    A summary for North Atlantic circulation is proposed to replace the circulation scheme hypothesized by Worthington in 1976. Divergences from the previous model are in thermohaline circulation, cross-equatorical transport and Florida Current sources, flow in the eastern Atlantic, circulation in the Newfoundland Basin, slope water currents, and flow pattern near the Bahamas. The circulation patterns presented here are consistent with the majority of of published accounts of flow components. 77 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. APL - North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-04

    Acoustic Lab” Encl: (1) Final Technical Report for Subject Grant (2) SF298 for Enclosure Enclosure (1) is the Final Technical Report for the subject...Laboratory (hard copy with SF 298) Defense Technical Information Center (electronic files with SF298) APL - North Pacific Acoustic ...speed perturbations and the characteristics of the ambient acoustic noise field. Scattering and diffraction resulting from internal waves and other

  1. The North Carolina Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, T.R.; Ternes, M.P.

    1990-08-01

    The North Carolina Field Test will test the effectiveness of two weatherization approaches: the current North Carolina Low-Income Weatherization Assistance Program and the North Carolina Field Test Audit. The Field Test Audit will differ from North Carolina's current weatherization program in that it will incorporate new weatherization measures and techniques, a procedure for basing measure selection of the characteristics of the individual house and the cost-effectiveness of the measure, and also emphasize cooling energy savings. The field test will determine the differences of the two weatherization approaches from the viewpoints of energy savings, cost effectiveness, and implementation ease. This Experimental Plan details the steps in performing the field test. The field test will be a group effort by several participating organizations. Pre- and post-weatherization data will be collected over a two-year period (November 1989 through August 1991). The 120 houses included in the test will be divided into a control group and two treatment groups (one for each weatherization procedure) of 40 houses each. Weekly energy use data will be collected for each house representing whole-house electric, space heating and cooling, and water heating energy uses. Corresponding outdoor weather and house indoor temperature data will also be collected. The energy savings of each house will be determined using linear-regression based models. To account for variations between the pre- and post-weatherization periods, house energy savings will be normalized for differences in outdoor weather conditions and indoor temperatures. Differences between the average energy savings of treatment groups will be identified using an analysis of variance approach. Differences between energy savings will be quantified using multiple comparison techniques. 9 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. View south, barn, north elevation Woods Homestead, Barn, County ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View south, barn, north elevation - Woods Homestead, Barn, County Route 12 on north side of North Fork of Hughes River, 2.2 miles north & east of Goose Run Road intersection, Harrisville, Ritchie County, WV

  3. View north, barn, south elevation Woods Homestead, Barn, County ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View north, barn, south elevation - Woods Homestead, Barn, County Route 12 on north side of North Fork of Hughes River, 2.2 miles north & east of Goose Run Road intersection, Harrisville, Ritchie County, WV

  4. 3. NORTH SIDE OF DIVERSION DAM ON THE SNAKE RIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. NORTH SIDE OF DIVERSION DAM ON THE SNAKE RIVER SHOWING HEADGATE ON THE NORTH BANK. VIEW IS TO THE NORTH-NORTHWEST. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  5. 27. View east, foreground north facade of Forest Hall, background ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. View east, foreground north facade of Forest Hall, background north facade of Forest East Suites. - Lake Placid Club, Forest Wing, East side of Mirror Lake Drive, North of State Route 86 & Main, North Elba, Essex County, NY

  6. 19. View west, foreground, north facade of Forest East Suites, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. View west, foreground, north facade of Forest East Suites, background north & east facades of Forest Hall. - Lake Placid Club, Forest Wing, East side of Mirror Lake Drive, North of State Route 86 & Main, North Elba, Essex County, NY

  7. High-resolution instrumentation radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dydbal, Robert B.; Hurlbut, Keith H.; Mori, Tsutomu T.

    1987-03-01

    An instrumentation radar that uses a chirp waveform to achieve high-range resolution is described. High-range-resolution instrumentation radars evaluate the target response to operational waveforms used in high-performance radars and/or obtain a display of the individual target scattering mechanisms to better understand the scattering process. This particular radar was efficiently constructed from a combination of commercially available components and in-house fabricated circuitry. This instrumentation radar operates at X-band and achieves a 4.9-in-range resolution. A key feature of the radar is the combination of amplitude weighting with a high degree of waveform fidelity to achieve a very good range sidelobe performance. This range sidelobe performance is important to avoid masking lower level target returns in the range sidelobes of higher target returns.

  8. High-resolution instrumentation radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybdal, Robert B.; Hurlbut, Keith H.; Mori, Tsutomu T.

    1986-09-01

    The development of an instrumentation radar that uses a chirp waveform to achieve high range resolution is described. Such range resolution capability is required for two reasons: (1) to evaluate the response of targets to the operational waveforms used in high-performance radars; and (2) to obtain a means of separating the individual mechanisms that comprise the target scattering response to better understand the scattering process. This particular radar was efficiently constructed from a combination of commercially available components and in-house-fabricated circuitry. This instrumentation radar operates at X-band and achieves a 4.9-in. range resolution. A key feature of the radar is its ability to combine amplitude weighting with a high degree of waveform fidelity, with the result being very good range sidelobe performance.

  9. KINOFORM LENSES - TOWARD NANOMETER RESOLUTION.

    SciTech Connect

    STEIN, A.; EVANS-LUTTERODT, K.; TAYLOR, A.

    2004-10-23

    While hard x-rays have wavelengths in the nanometer and sub-nanometer range, the ability to focus them is limited by the quality of sources and optics, and not by the wavelength. A few options, including reflective (mirrors), diffractive (zone plates) and refractive (CRL's) are available, each with their own limitations. Here we present our work with kinoform lenses which are refractive lenses with all material causing redundant 2{pi} phase shifts removed to reduce the absorption problems inherently limiting the resolution of refractive lenses. By stacking kinoform lenses together, the effective numerical aperture, and thus the focusing resolution, can be increased. The present status of kinoform lens fabrication and testing at Brookhaven is presented as well as future plans toward achieving nanometer resolution.

  10. High resolution optical DNA mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baday, Murat

    Many types of diseases including cancer and autism are associated with copy-number variations in the genome. Most of these variations could not be identified with existing sequencing and optical DNA mapping methods. We have developed Multi-color Super-resolution technique, with potential for high throughput and low cost, which can allow us to recognize more of these variations. Our technique has made 10--fold improvement in the resolution of optical DNA mapping. Using a 180 kb BAC clone as a model system, we resolved dense patterns from 108 fluorescent labels of two different colors representing two different sequence-motifs. Overall, a detailed DNA map with 100 bp resolution was achieved, which has the potential to reveal detailed information about genetic variance and to facilitate medical diagnosis of genetic disease.

  11. Resolution in forensic microbial genotyping

    SciTech Connect

    Velsko, S P

    2005-08-30

    Resolution is a key parameter for differentiating among the large number of strain typing methods that could be applied to pathogens involved in bioterror events or biocrimes. In this report we develop a first-principles analysis of strain typing resolution using a simple mathematical model to provide a basis for the rational design of microbial typing systems for forensic applications. We derive two figures of merit that describe the resolving power and phylogenetic depth of a strain typing system. Rough estimates of these figures-of-merit for MLVA, MLST, IS element, AFLP, hybridization microarrays, and other bacterial typing methods are derived from mutation rate data reported in the literature. We also discuss the general problem of how to construct a ''universal'' practical typing system that has the highest possible resolution short of whole-genome sequencing, and that is applicable with minimal modification to a wide range of pathogens.

  12. A 200 years record of multidecadal oceanographic changes from offshore North Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perner, Kerstin; Moros, Matthias; Jansen, Eystein

    2016-04-01

    A 200 years record of multidecadal oceanographic changes from offshore North Iceland During the cruise GS15-198 of the RV G.O. Sars in summer 2015, new sediments cores have been collected from the North Iceland shelf at 66°N, an area known for its high sedimentation rates. Here, offshore North Iceland an offshoot of the East Greenland Current, the surface flowing East Icelandic Current (EIC) transports a mixture of cooled Atlantic Water and cold/fresh Polar Water eastwards and at intermediate depths (100-350 m water depth), flows the relatively warm (4-7°C) North Irminger Icelandic Current (NIIC). Beneath this Atlantic Water layer, less saline and cooled (<3°C) Arctic Intermediate Water is found. Our study area offshore North Iceland is suitably located to investigate multidecadal changes in the southward fluxes of freshwater from the EGC, via the EIC and in the relative contribution/water mass characteristics (i.e. temperature and salinity) of the NIIC and shifts in the location of the Polar Front. Oceanographic variability recorded offshore North Iceland is closely linked to broader scale climatic and oceanographic shifts/variations in the North Atlantic region. Samples for foraminiferal analyses were wet sieved at 63 μm and counted at 1-2 cm intervals, which equals a resolution of ~ 2 years. The foraminiferal assemblage is characterized by a divers fauna and a total of 76 foraminiferal species were identified, 6 planktic, 19 agglutinated and 51 calcareous species. The absolute abundance of foraminifera averages 400 specimens per 1g of wet sediment. Our high-resolution palaeoceanographic reconstructions reveal distinct multidecadal oceanographic variability that relate to climatic changes during the last 200 years, i.e. transition from the Little Ice Age into the modern warm phase.

  13. Sensitivity of ocean model simulation in the coastal ocean to the resolution of the meteorological forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, G. I.; Cheng, F.; Thain, R.

    2012-04-01

    The quality of the ocean model simulation depends on a number of factors e.g. approximations in the governing equations, errors introduced by the numerical scheme, and uncertainties in input parameters such as atmospheric forcing. Our previous study (Shapiro et al., 2011) has shown that the basin-wide circulation pattern and the temperature structure in the Black Sea produced by the same model is significantly dependent on the source of the meteorological input. The horizontal resolution was approximately the same, however, the wind and cloudiness patterns provided by the reanalysis data obtained from National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP, USA) and Japanese 25 year Re-Analysis Project (JRA) were sometimes quite different, which resulted directly in different responses of the sea. For the purposes of this study we have chosen the Celtic Sea, where high resolution meteorological data are available from the UK Met office from 2006. The Celtic Sea is a tidally dominated water basin, with the tidal stream amplitude varying from 0.25 m/s in the southwest to 2 m/s in the Bristol Channel. It is also filled with mesoscale eddies which contribute to the formation of the residual (tidally averaged) circulation pattern (Young et al., 2004). The sea is strongly stratified from April to November, which adds to the formation of density driven currents. In this paper we analyse how sensitive the model output is to variations in the spatial resolution of meteorological parameters obtained from the same source, so that any difference in the ocean output is purely linked to variations in resolution. The original resolution of the meteorological parameters was 1/9 of a degree (about 12 km), which was subsampled to create resolutions up to 96 km. The effect of varying the resolution of the meteorological parameters is not obvious a priori. The length scales of most energetic dynamic features in both ocean and atmosphere are defined by the Rossby radius of deformation

  14. Requirements on high resolution detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, A.

    1997-02-01

    For a number of microtomography applications X-ray detectors with a spatial resolution of 1 {mu}m are required. This high spatial resolution will influence and degrade other parameters of secondary importance like detective quantum efficiency (DQE), dynamic range, linearity and frame rate. This note summarizes the most important arguments, for and against those detector systems which could be considered. This article discusses the mutual dependencies between the various figures which characterize a detector, and tries to give some ideas on how to proceed in order to improve present technology.

  15. Quality Control Methodology Of A Surface Wind Observational Database In North Eastern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucio-Eceiza, Etor E.; Fidel González-Rouco, J.; Navarro, Jorge; Conte, Jorge; Beltrami, Hugo

    2016-04-01

    This work summarizes the design and application of a Quality Control (QC) procedure for an observational surface wind database located in North Eastern North America. The database consists of 526 sites (486 land stations and 40 buoys) with varying resolutions of hourly, 3 hourly and 6 hourly data, compiled from three different source institutions with uneven measurement units and changing measuring procedures, instrumentation and heights. The records span from 1953 to 2010. The QC process is composed of different phases focused either on problems related with the providing source institutions or measurement errors. The first phases deal with problems often related with data recording and management: (1) compilation stage dealing with the detection of typographical errors, decoding problems, site displacements and unification of institutional practices; (2) detection of erroneous data sequence duplications within a station or among different ones; (3) detection of errors related with physically unrealistic data measurements. The last phases are focused on instrumental errors: (4) problems related with low variability, placing particular emphasis on the detection of unrealistic low wind speed records with the help of regional references; (5) high variability related erroneous records; (6) standardization of wind speed record biases due to changing measurement heights, detection of wind speed biases on week to monthly timescales, and homogenization of wind direction records. As a result, around 1.7% of wind speed records and 0.4% of wind direction records have been deleted, making a combined total of 1.9% of removed records. Additionally, around 15.9% wind speed records and 2.4% of wind direction data have been also corrected.

  16. Eruption style and flow emplacement in the Submarine North Arch Volcanic Field, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, David A.; Uto, Kozo; Satake, Kenji; Davis, Alicé S.

    The North Arch Volcanic Field covers about 24,000 km2 of seafloor north of Oahu and has an estimated volume between 1,000 and 1,250 km3. The field straddles the Hawaiian flexural arch about 250 km north of the axis of the island chain and surrounds numerous Cretaceous volcanic ridges, circular flat-topped volcanoes, and low-relief regions of sediment-covered seafloor. New SeaBeam bathymetric maps that cover about 1/3 of the flow field reveal nearly 100 volcanic structures ranging from low shields to steep cones. One shield is modified by a pit crater, approximately 1.1×1.25 km and 300 m deep. A lava flow in the SE part of the volcanic field covers about 3,600 km2, has an estimated volume of 36-72 km3, and apparently erupted from a 75-km-long NNW-trending fissure system. A 108-km-long flow advanced north in a graben parallel to the Cretaceous mid-ocean ridge that formed the crust; its surface gradient is 1.9 m/km (slope of 0.1°). Shinkai 6500 submersible dive 502 explored one of the composite volcanoes and observed and collected dense alkalic basalt sheet flows erupted after vesicular basanite pillow basalts and fragmental hyaloclastite that make up the steep-sided cone. Dive 503 collected alkalic basalt sheet flows and pillow basalt from the top 122 m of the southern wall of a pit crater that formed by collapse caused by a decrease in magma volume from a shallow storage chamber located 1-2 km below the surface. The volume change may have been caused by loss of gas bubbles from the stored magma when replenishment ceased at the end of the eruption. The surficial drapery-folded sheet flow is covered by only a few cm of sediment, indicating that it is younger than the 0.5-1.5 Ma ages previously estimated for North Arch flows and vents. The near-vent constructs and flow characteristics indicate that vigorous eruption of highly vesicular lava constructed steep-sided cones of pillow basalt and hyaloclastite whereas steady eruption of dense lava that had lost its bubbles

  17. Geologic map of the north polar region of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Fortezzo, Corey M.

    2012-01-01

    The north polar region of Mars occurs within the central and lowest part of the vast northern plains of Mars and is dominated by the roughly circular north polar plateau, Planum Boreum. The northern plains formed very early in Martian time and have collected volcanic flows and sedimentary materials shed from highland sources. Planum Boreum has resulted from the accumulation of water ice and dust particles. Extensive, uncratered dune fields adjacent to Planum Boreum attest to the active and recent transport and accumulation of sand. Our geologic map of Planum Boreum is the first to record its entire observable stratigraphic record using the various post-Viking image and topography datasets released before 2009. We also provide much more detail in the map than previously published, including some substantial revisions based on new data and observations. The available data have increased and improved immensely in quantity, resolution, coverage, positional accuracy, and spectral range, enabling us to resolve previously unrecognized geomorphic features, stratigraphic relations, and compositional information. We also employ more carefully prescribed and effective mapping methodologies and digital techniques, as well as formatting guidelines. The foremost aspect to our mapping approach is how geologic units are discriminated based primarily on their temporal relations with other units as expressed in unit contacts by unconformities or by gradational relations. Whereas timing constraints of such activity in the north polar region are now better defined stratigraphically, they remain poorly constrained chronologically. The end result is a new reconstruction of the sedimentary, erosional, and structural histories of the north polar region and how they may have been driven by climate conditions, available geologic materials, and eolian, periglacial, impact, magmatic, hydrologic, and tectonic activity.

  18. Sources and Processes Affecting Particulate Matter Pollution over North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Shao, J.; Lu, X.; Zhao, Y.; Gong, S.; Henze, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    Severe fine particulate matter (PM2.5) pollution over North China has received broad attention worldwide in recent years. Better understanding the sources and processes controlling pollution over this region is of great importance with urgent implications for air quality policy. We will present a four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation system using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint model at 0.25° × 0.3125° horizontal resolution, and apply it to analyze the factors affecting PM2.5 concentrations over North China. Hourly surface observations of PM2.5 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) from the China National Environmental Monitoring Center (CNEMC) can be assimilated into the model to evaluate and constrain aerosol (primary and precursors) emissions. Application of the data assimilation system to the APEC period (the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit; 5-11 November 2014) shows that 46% of the PM2.5 pollution reduction during APEC ("The APEC Blue") can be attributed to meteorology conditions and the rest 54% to emission reductions due to strict emission controls. Ammonia emissions are shown to significantly contribute to PM2.5 over North China in the fall. By converting sulfuric acid and nitric acid to longer-lived ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate aerosols, ammonia plays an important role in promoting their regional transport influences. We will also discuss the pathways and mechanisms of external long-range transport influences to the PM2.5 pollution over North China.

  19. Drivers of summer oxygen depletion in the central North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queste, B. Y.; Fernand, L.; Jickells, T. D.; Heywood, K. J.; Hind, A. J.

    2015-06-01

    In stratified shelf seas, oxygen depletion beneath the thermocline is a result of a greater rate of biological oxygen demand than the rate of supply of oxygenated water. Suitably equipped gliders are uniquely placed to observe both the supply through the thermocline and the consumption of oxygen in the bottom layers. A Seaglider was deployed in the shallow (≈ 100 m) stratified North Sea in a region of known low oxygen during August 2011 to investigate the processes regulating supply and consumption of dissolved oxygen below the pycnocline. The first deployment of such a device in this area, it provided extremely high resolution observations, 316 profiles (every 16 min, vertical resolution of 1 m) of CTD, dissolved oxygen concentrations, backscatter and fluorescence during a three day deployment. The high temporal resolution observations revealed occasional small scale events that supply oxygenated water into the bottom layer at a rate of 2±1 μmol dm-3 day-1. Benthic and pelagic oxygen sinks, quantified through glider observations and past studies, indicate more gradual background consumption rates of 2.5±1 μmol dm-3 day-1. This budget revealed that the balance of oxygen supply and demand is in agreement with previous studies of the North Sea. However, the glider data show a net oxygen consumption rate of 2.8±0.3 μmol dm-3 day-1 indicating a localised or short-lived increase in oxygen consumption rates. This high rate of oxygen consumption is indicative of an unidentified oxygen sink. We propose that this elevated oxygen consumption is linked to localised depocentres and rapid remineralisation of resuspensded organic matter. The glider proved to be an excellent tool for monitoring shelf sea processes despite challenges to glider flight posed by high tidal velocities, shallow bathymetry, and very strong density gradients. The direct observation of these processes allows more up to date rates to be used in the development of ecosystem models.

  20. Perspective view of Wilcox Building (7 North E Street), with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of Wilcox Building (7 North E Street), with Eli Cafe (7 North E Street), the Palace Saloon (11 North E Street), and Fetsche's (15 North E Street) to left of frame, view looking north on E Street - Lakeview Downtown Historic District, E, F & G Streets between Second Street North & First Street South, Lakeview, Lake County, OR

  1. High Resolution Near-Bed Observations in Winter Near Cape Hatteras, North Carolina

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    tributyltin leaching rings. Transmissometers with the leaching rings were found to have only a few 1 mm barnacles on the lenses, where untreated sensors...were completely blocked by barnacle encrustation. Data from these barnacle covered transmissometers have not been processed, so their endurance...tripod at 18:55 on Apr. 19, 2009. The animal is clearly visible in spite of numerous barnacles and other growth on the camera window. The sonar system

  2. A resolution commemorating the 125th anniversary of the University of North Carolina at Pembroke.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Burr, Richard [R-NC

    2012-03-29

    03/29/2012 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S2282; text as passed Senate: CR S2282; text of measure as introduced: CR S2258) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. A resolution commending the heroic efforts of the people fighting the floods in North Dakota.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Dorgan, Byron L. [D-ND

    2009-05-06

    05/06/2009 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S5246; text as passed Senate: CR S5246; text of measure as introduced: CR S524) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. Moderate-Resolution Sea Surface Temperature Data for the Nearshore North Pacific

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal sea surface temperature (SST) is an important environmental characteristic defining habitat suitability for nearshore marine and estuarine organisms. The purpose of this publication is to provide access to an easy-to-use coastal SST dataset for ecologists, biogeographers...

  5. North Korea’s Second Nuclear Test: Implications of U.N. Security Council Resolution 1874

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-15

    2006.56 In short, the agricultural sector in the DPRK has recovered somewhat, but the adequacy of basic nutrition still is questionable for millions of...Beverages 5,137,988 5,084,449 6,652,041 33 Perfumery, Cosmetic Products 1,322,454 1,672,327 1,688,481 42 Leather Art; Saddlery, Etc. 772,645 1,441,805

  6. A resolution commemorating the 125th anniversary of North Dakota's Statehood.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Hoeven, John [R-ND

    2014-07-29

    07/29/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S5069-5070; text as passed Senate: CR S5067) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. Searching for Water Ice at the Lunar North Pole Using High-Resolution Images and Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. L.; Lawrence, S. J.; Robinson, M. S.; Speyerer, E. J.; Denevi, B. W.

    2017-01-01

    Permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) at the lunar poles are potential reservoirs of frozen volatiles, and are therefore high-priority exploration targets. PSRs trap water and other volatiles because their annual maximum temperatures (40-100K) are lower than the sublimation temperatures of these species (i.e. H2O approx.104K). Previous studies using various remote sensing techniques have not been able to definitively characterize the distribution or abundance of ice in lunar PSRs. The purpose of this study is to search for signs of ice in PSRs using two complimentary remote sensing techniques: radar and visible images.

  8. Durham, North Carolina, Students Study Martian Volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of the wall of a graben a depressed block of land between two parellel faults in Tyrrhena Terra, in Mars' ancient southern highlands, was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 0914 UTC (4:14 a.m. EST) on February 6, 2008, near 17.3 degrees south latitude, 95.5 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 35 meters (115 feet) across. The region covered is just over 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

    This image was part of an investigation planned by students in four high schools in Durham, North Carolina. The students are working with the CRISM science team in a project called the Mars Exploration Student Data Teams (MESDT), which is part of NASA's Mars Public Engagement Program and Arizona State University's Mars Education Program. Starting with a medium-resolution map of the area, taken as part of CRISM's 'multispectral survey' campaign to map Mars in 72 colors at 200 meters (660 feet) per pixel, the students identified a key rock outcrop to test their hypothesis that the irregular depression was formed by Martian volcanism. They provided the coordinates of the target to CRISM's operations team, who took a high-resolution image of the site. The Context Imager (CTX) accompanied CRISM with a 6 meter (20 feet) per pixel, high-resolution image to sharpen the relationship of spectral variations to the underlying surface structures. The Durham students worked with a mentor on the CRISM team to analyze the data, and presented their results at the 39th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, held in League City, Texas, on March 10-14, 2008.

    The upper panel of the image shows the location of the CRISM data and the surrounding, larger CTX image, overlain on an image mosaic taken by the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on Mars Odyssey. The mosaic has been color-coded for elevation using data from the Mars

  9. Quaternary Evolution of North Core Sound Sound, North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietsche, Andrew

    Northern Core Sound is a shallow lagoonal estuary located behind the Outer Banks barrier islands of eastern North Carolina. Thirty-two vibracores and 155 km of chirp and boomer seismic data have been used to define the geologic framework and establish the Holocene evolution of this back-barrier lagoon. Vibracores have been logged for lithology, and sampled to establish the distribution and abundance of foraminifera. The lithostratigraphy and biofacies could not be directly correlated but when related to the seismic data, apparent patterns could be recognized. The Quaternary stratigraphic framework of North Core Sound consists of five depositional sequences, comprising transgressive, highstand, and falling stage systems tracts. Seismic reflections are prominent and are correlated to the sequence stratigraphic surfaces within Pamlico Sound defined by Mallinson et al. (2010). The late Pleistocene paleotopographic surface dips slightly seaward and is characterized by two or three fluvial channels correlating to modern embayments. These channels are separated by a paleotopographic high that extends from Cedar Island seaward. The channels run northeast in the north and southwest in the south creating two different paleo-environments. The paleotopographic high may have contributed to differing foraminiferal assemblages found within Holocene unit. The Holocene unit is characterized by high salinity estuarine deposits dominated by the foraminifera Elphidium excavatum and Ammonia parkinsoniana. Three very similar biofacies were defined with more abundant Ammonia parkinsoniana where salinities may have been slightly lower. Only a salt marsh facies was significantly different. The biofacies may also represent the two paleo-environments illustrated in the seismic data as one is mainly found to the north of the paleotopographic high and the other to the south. Two seismic reflections, H30 and H60, are interpreted as tidal ravinement surfaces and divide the Holocene into three

  10. Resolution-enhanced Mapping Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumer, J. B.; Aubrun, J. N.; Rosenberg, W. J.; Roche, A. E.

    1993-01-01

    A familiar mapping spectrometer implementation utilizes two dimensional detector arrays with spectral dispersion along one direction and spatial along the other. Spectral images are formed by spatially scanning across the scene (i.e., push-broom scanning). For imaging grating and prism spectrometers, the slit is perpendicular to the spatial scan direction. For spectrometers utilizing linearly variable focal-plane-mounted filters the spatial scan direction is perpendicular to the direction of spectral variation. These spectrometers share the common limitation that the number of spectral resolution elements is given by the number of pixels along the spectral (or dispersive) direction. Resolution enhancement by first passing the light input to the spectrometer through a scanned etalon or Michelson is discussed. Thus, while a detector element is scanned through a spatial resolution element of the scene, it is also temporally sampled. The analysis for all the pixels in the dispersive direction is addressed. Several specific examples are discussed. The alternate use of a Michelson for the same enhancement purpose is also discussed. Suitable for weight constrained deep space missions, hardware systems were developed including actuators, sensor, and electronics such that low-resolution etalons with performance required for implementation would weigh less than one pound.

  11. Passive High Resolution RF Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-02

    sensing applications: 1. Imaging with potential resolution of meters sq. 1.1 Forests areas controlling 1.2 Foliage mass evaluation 1.3...from TOPCON. Currently, work is in progress to study and customise the software and satellite position extraction from the receiver. 6. BRIEF

  12. Teacher Development for Conflict Resolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickmore, Kathy

    1998-01-01

    In an urban elementary school, teachers trained in the Comer school development approach attempted to reform school discipline practices and plan conflict resolution efforts for students. Time constraints and teachers' aversion to coping with conflicting views inhibited the open democratic discussion needed as a foundation of change and limited…

  13. Scoring Conflict-Resolution Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloane, Marie W.

    1998-01-01

    Successful programs for classroom management and discipline treat students as active participants in building positive affective environments. This paper discusses the basic steps of conflict resolution and presents an example of how one elementary school handled a situation in which a group of students who played soccer each day during recess had…

  14. Ambiguity Resolution in Lateralized Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayadre, Manar; Kurzon, Dennis; Peleg, Orna; Zohar, Eviatar

    2015-01-01

    We examined ambiguity resolution in reading in Arabic. Arabic is an abjad orthography and is morphologically similar to Hebrew. However, Arabic literacy occurs in a diglossic context, and its orthography is more visually complex than Hebrew. We therefore tested to see whether hemispheric differences will be similar or different from previous…

  15. Advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The advanced very high resolution radiometer development program is considered. The program covered the design, construction, and test of a breadboard model, engineering model, protoflight model, mechanical structural model, and a life test model. Special bench test and calibration equipment was also developed for use on the program.

  16. Asymmetric response of tropical cyclone activity to global warming over the North Atlantic and western North Pacific from CMIP5 model projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Doo-Sun R.; Ho, Chang-Hoi; Chan, Johnny C. L.; Ha, Kyung-Ja; Kim, Hyeong-Seog; Kim, Jinwon; Kim, Joo-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Recent improvements in the theoretical understanding of the relationship between tropical cyclones (TCs) and their large-scale environments have resulted in significant improvements in the skill for forecasting TC activity at daily and seasonal time-scales. However, future changes in TC activity under a warmer climate remain uncertain, particularly in terms of TC genesis locations and subsequent pathways. Applying a track-pattern-based statistical model to 22 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) model runs for the historical period and the future period corresponding to the Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 emissions scenarios, this study shows that in future climate conditions, TC passage frequency will decrease over the North Atlantic, particularly in the Gulf of Mexico, but will increase over the western North Pacific, especially that hits Korea and Japan. Unlike previous studies based on fine-resolution models, an ensemble mean of CMIP5 models projects an increase in TC activity in the western North Pacific, which is owing to enhanced subtropical deep convection and favorable dynamic conditions therein in conjunction with the expansion of the tropics and vice versa for the North Atlantic. Our results suggest that North America will experience less TC landfalls, while northeast Asia will experience more TCs than in the present-day climate.

  17. Asymmetric response of tropical cyclone activity to global warming over the North Atlantic and western North Pacific from CMIP5 model projections.

    PubMed

    Park, Doo-Sun R; Ho, Chang-Hoi; Chan, Johnny C L; Ha, Kyung-Ja; Kim, Hyeong-Seog; Kim, Jinwon; Kim, Joo-Hong

    2017-01-30

    Recent improvements in the theoretical understanding of the relationship between tropical cyclones (TCs) and their large-scale environments have resulted in significant improvements in the skill for forecasting TC activity at daily and seasonal time-scales. However, future changes in TC activity under a warmer climate remain uncertain, particularly in terms of TC genesis locations and subsequent pathways. Applying a track-pattern-based statistical model to 22 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) model runs for the historical period and the future period corresponding to the Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 emissions scenarios, this study shows that in future climate conditions, TC passage frequency will decrease over the North Atlantic, particularly in the Gulf of Mexico, but will increase over the western North Pacific, especially that hits Korea and Japan. Unlike previous studies based on fine-resolution models, an ensemble mean of CMIP5 models projects an increase in TC activity in the western North Pacific, which is owing to enhanced subtropical deep convection and favorable dynamic conditions therein in conjunction with the expansion of the tropics and vice versa for the North Atlantic. Our results suggest that North America will experience less TC landfalls, while northeast Asia will experience more TCs than in the present-day climate.

  18. Asymmetric response of tropical cyclone activity to global warming over the North Atlantic and western North Pacific from CMIP5 model projections

    PubMed Central

    Park, Doo-Sun R.; Ho, Chang-Hoi; Chan, Johnny C. L.; Ha, Kyung-Ja; Kim, Hyeong-Seog; Kim, Jinwon; Kim, Joo-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Recent improvements in the theoretical understanding of the relationship between tropical cyclones (TCs) and their large-scale environments have resulted in significant improvements in the skill for forecasting TC activity at daily and seasonal time-scales. However, future changes in TC activity under a warmer climate remain uncertain, particularly in terms of TC genesis locations and subsequent pathways. Applying a track-pattern-based statistical model to 22 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) model runs for the historical period and the future period corresponding to the Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 emissions scenarios, this study shows that in future climate conditions, TC passage frequency will decrease over the North Atlantic, particularly in the Gulf of Mexico, but will increase over the western North Pacific, especially that hits Korea and Japan. Unlike previous studies based on fine-resolution models, an ensemble mean of CMIP5 models projects an increase in TC activity in the western North Pacific, which is owing to enhanced subtropical deep convection and favorable dynamic conditions therein in conjunction with the expansion of the tropics and vice versa for the North Atlantic. Our results suggest that North America will experience less TC landfalls, while northeast Asia will experience more TCs than in the present-day climate. PMID:28134343

  19. [United Nations Resolutions. Resolution on Prison Education. Resolution on Basic Principles for the Treatment of Prisoners. Resolution on Criminal Justice Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations, New York, NY.

    This document contains three United Nations resolutions that emphasize the role and practice of prison education. The three resolutions were adopted in 1990: (1) the Economic and Social Council Resolution 1990/20 on prison education; (2) the General Assembly Resolution 45/111 on basic principles for the treatment of prisoners; and (3) General…

  20. HRSC: High resolution stereo camera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neukum, G.; Jaumann, R.; Basilevsky, A.T.; Dumke, A.; Van Gasselt, S.; Giese, B.; Hauber, E.; Head, J. W.; Heipke, C.; Hoekzema, N.; Hoffmann, H.; Greeley, R.; Gwinner, K.; Kirk, R.; Markiewicz, W.; McCord, T.B.; Michael, G.; Muller, Jan-Peter; Murray, J.B.; Oberst, J.; Pinet, P.; Pischel, R.; Roatsch, T.; Scholten, F.; Willner, K.

    2009-01-01

    The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on Mars Express has delivered a wealth of image data, amounting to over 2.5 TB from the start of the mapping phase in January 2004 to September 2008. In that time, more than a third of Mars was covered at a resolution of 10-20 m/pixel in stereo and colour. After five years in orbit, HRSC is still in excellent shape, and it could continue to operate for many more years. HRSC has proven its ability to close the gap between the low-resolution Viking image data and the high-resolution Mars Orbiter Camera images, leading to a global picture of the geological evolution of Mars that is now much clearer than ever before. Derived highest-resolution terrain model data have closed major gaps and provided an unprecedented insight into the shape of the surface, which is paramount not only for surface analysis and geological interpretation, but also for combination with and analysis of data from other instruments, as well as in planning for future missions. This chapter presents the scientific output from data analysis and highlevel data processing, complemented by a summary of how the experiment is conducted by the HRSC team members working in geoscience, atmospheric science, photogrammetry and spectrophotometry. Many of these contributions have been or will be published in peer-reviewed journals and special issues. They form a cross-section of the scientific output, either by summarising the new geoscientific picture of Mars provided by HRSC or by detailing some of the topics of data analysis concerning photogrammetry, cartography and spectral data analysis.

  1. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  2. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  3. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefitted greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  4. Use of Aerial high resolution visible imagery to produce large river bathymetry: a multi temporal and spatial study over the by-passed Upper Rhine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béal, D.; Piégay, H.; Arnaud, F.; Rollet, A.; Schmitt, L.

    2011-12-01

    Aerial high resolution visible imagery allows producing large river bathymetry assuming that water depth is related to water colour (Beer-Bouguer-Lambert law). In this paper we aim at monitoring Rhine River geometry changes for a diachronic study as well as sediment transport after an artificial injection (25.000 m3 restoration operation). For that a consequent data base of ground measurements of river depth is used, built on 3 different sources: (i) differential GPS acquisitions, (ii) sounder data and (iii) lateral profiles realized by experts. Water depth is estimated using a multi linear regression over neo channels built on a principal component analysis over red, green and blue bands and previously cited depth data. The study site is a 12 km long reach of the by-passed section of the Rhine River that draws French and German border. This section has been heavily impacted by engineering works during the last two centuries: channelization since 1842 for navigation purposes and the construction of a 45 km long lateral canal and 4 consecutive hydroelectric power plants of since 1932. Several bathymetric models are produced based on 3 different spatial resolutions (6, 13 and 20 cm) and 5 acquisitions (January, March, April, August and October) since 2008. Objectives are to find the optimal spatial resolution and to characterize seasonal effects. Best performances according to the 13 cm resolution show a 18 cm accuracy when suspended matters impacted less water transparency. Discussions are oriented to the monitoring of the artificial reload after 2 flood events during winter 2010-2011. Bathymetric models produced are also useful to build 2D hydraulic model's mesh.

  5. The 2014 ALMA Long Baseline Campaign: First Results from High Angular Resolution Observations toward the HL Tau Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALMA Partnership; Brogan, C. L.; Pérez, L. M.; Hunter, T. R.; Dent, W. R. F.; Hales, A. S.; Hills, R. E.; Corder, S.; Fomalont, E. B.; Vlahakis, C.; Asaki, Y.; Barkats, D.; Hirota, A.; Hodge, J. A.; Impellizzeri, C. M. V.; Kneissl, R.; Liuzzo, E.; Lucas, R.; Marcelino, N.; Matsushita, S.; Nakanishi, K.; Phillips, N.; Richards, A. M. S.; Toledo, I.; Aladro, R.; Broguiere, D.; Cortes, J. R.; Cortes, P. C.; Espada, D.; Galarza, F.; Garcia-Appadoo, D.; Guzman-Ramirez, L.; Humphreys, E. M.; Jung, T.; Kameno, S.; Laing, R. A.; Leon, S.; Marconi, G.; Mignano, A.; Nikolic, B.; Nyman, L.-A.; Radiszcz, M.; Remijan, A.; Rodón, J. A.; Sawada, T.; Takahashi, S.; Tilanus, R. P. J.; Vila Vilaro, B.; Watson, L. C.; Wiklind, T.; Akiyama, E.; Chapillon, E.; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Di Francesco, J.; Gueth, F.; Kawamura, A.; Lee, C.-F.; Nguyen Luong, Q.; Mangum, J.; Pietu, V.; Sanhueza, P.; Saigo, K.; Takakuwa, S.; Ubach, C.; van Kempen, T.; Wootten, A.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Francke, H.; Gallardo, J.; Garcia, J.; Gonzalez, S.; Hill, T.; Kaminski, T.; Kurono, Y.; Liu, H.-Y.; Lopez, C.; Morales, F.; Plarre, K.; Schieven, G.; Testi, L.; Videla, L.; Villard, E.; Andreani, P.; Hibbard, J. E.; Tatematsu, K.

    2015-07-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations from the 2014 Long Baseline Campaign in dust continuum and spectral line emission from the HL Tau region. The continuum images at wavelengths of 2.9, 1.3, and 0.87 mm have unprecedented angular resolutions of 0.″ 075 (10 AU) to 0.″ 025 (3.5 AU), revealing an astonishing level of detail in the circumstellar disk surrounding the young solar analog HL Tau, with a pattern of bright and dark rings observed at all wavelengths. By fitting ellipses to the most distinct rings, we measure precise values for the disk inclination (46\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 72+/- 0\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 05) and position angle (+138\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 02+/- 0\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 07). We obtain a high-fidelity image of the 1.0 mm spectral index (α), which ranges from α ˜ 2.0 in the optically thick central peak and two brightest rings, increasing to 2.3-3.0 in the dark rings. The dark rings are not devoid of emission, and we estimate a grain emissivity index of 0.8 for the innermost dark ring and lower for subsequent dark rings, consistent with some degree of grain growth and evolution. Additional clues that the rings arise from planet formation include an increase in their central offsets with radius and the presence of numerous orbital resonances. At a resolution of 35 AU, we resolve the molecular component of the disk in HCO+ (1-0) which exhibits a pattern over LSR velocities from 2-12 km s-1 consistent with Keplerian motion around a ˜1.3 {M}⊙ star, although complicated by absorption at low blueshifted velocities. We also serendipitously detect and resolve the nearby protostars XZ Tau (A/B) and LkHα358 at 2.9 mm. .

  6. How much plutonium does North Korea have?

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, D.

    1994-09-01

    U.S. intelligence discovered in the 1980s that North Korea was building a small nuclear reactor. The reactor was described as a gas-cooled, graphite-moderated model similar to those Britian and France used to produce electric power as well as plutonium for nuclear weapons. When Western nations expressed concern about the reactor Russia pressed North Korea to sign the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) which it did on December 12, 1985. However, North Korea stalled on signing the required safeguards agreement that allows the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to inspect nuclear facilities until January 1992. Inspections by the IAEA revealed discrepancies with the amounts of plutonium separated as declared by the North Koreans. The IAEA also received reports that two North Korean waste sites were hidden. By February 1993 the IAEA and the North Koreans has reached an impasse: North Koreas initial declarations of plutonium inventory could not be confirmed and North Korea refused to cooperate. At the least, North Korea admits to having separated 100 grams of plutonium. At the most, worst case estimate, they could have a total of 6 - 13 kilograms of separated plutonium. A first nuclear weapon can require up to 10 kilograms of weapon-grade plutonium. Any settlement needs to include a way to insure that the IAEA can verify North Korea`s past nuclear activities and determine the amount of plutonium that may have been separated in the past. 2 refs.

  7. High-Resolution Data for a Low-Resolution World

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Brendan Williams

    2016-05-10

    In the past 15 years, the upper section of Cañon de Valle has been severely altered by wildfires and subsequent runoff events. Loss of root structures on high-angle slopes results in debris flow and sediment accumulation in the narrow canyon bottom. The original intent of the study described here was to better understand the changes occurring in watershed soil elevations over the course of several post-fire years. An elevation dataset from 5 years post-Cerro Grande fire was compared to high-resolution LiDAR data from 14 years post-Cerro Grande fire (also 3 years post-Las Conchas fire). The following analysis was motivated by a problematic comparison of these datasets of unlike resolution, and therefore focuses on what the data reveals of itself. The objective of this study is to highlight the effects vegetation can have on remote sensing data that intends to read ground surface elevation.

  8. WRF-chem sensitivity to vertical resolution during a saharan dust event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, J. C.; Carvalho, A. C.; Tuccella, Paolo; Curci, Gabriele; Rocha, A.

    2016-08-01

    The Saharan dust event that occurred between the 22nd and 30th of June 2012 influenced the atmospheric radiative properties over North Africa, the Iberian Peninsula, the Western Mediterranean basin, extending its effects to France and Southern England. This event is well documented in satellite imagery, as well as on the air quality stations over the Iberian Peninsula and the AERONET NASA network. In order to assess the effect of the model vertical resolution on the extinction coefficient fields, as a proxy to the particulate matter concentrations in the atmosphere, the WRF-Chem model was applied during this period over a mother domain with a resolution of 18 km, covering Europe and North Africa. To this end five model setups differing in the number of vertical levels were tested. Model skills were evaluated by comparing the model results with CALIPSO and EARLINET LIDAR data. Results show that the model is able to simulate the higher level aerosol transport but it is susceptible to the vertical resolution used. This is due to the thickness of the transport layers which is, eventually, thinner than the vertical resolution of the model. When comparing model results to the observed vertical profiles, it becomes evident that the broad features of the extinction coefficient profile are generally reproduced in all model configurations, but finer details are captured only by the higher resolution simulations.

  9. North Atlantic Nordic Seas exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B.; Østerhus, S.

    2000-02-01

    The northeastern part of the North Atlantic is unique in the sense that it is much warmer in the surface than other ocean areas at similar latitudes. The main reason for this is the large northward transport of heat that extends to high latitudes and crosses the Greenland-Scotland Ridge to enter the Nordic Seas and the Arctic. There the warm Atlantic water is converted to colder water masses that return southwards over the ridge partly as surface outflows and partly as overflows through the deep passages across the ridge. In this paper, the state of knowledge on the exchanges especially across the eastern part of the Greenland-Scotland Ridge is reviewed based on results from the ICES NANSEN (North Atlantic-Norwegian Sea Exchanges) project, from the Nordic WOCE project and from other sources. The accumulated evidence allows us to describe the exchanges in fair detail; the origins of the waters, the patterns of their flow towards and over the ridge and their ultimate fate. There is also increasing information on temporal variations of the exchanges although dynamical changes are still not well understood. Quantitative estimates for the volume transport of most of the overflow branches seem reasonably well established, and transport measurements of the Atlantic inflows to the Nordic Seas are approaching acceptable levels of confidence which allows preliminary budgets to be presented. The deep overflows are driven by pressure gradients set up by the formation of deep and intermediate water. The dominance of deep overflows over surface outflows in the water budget argues that this thermohaline forcing also dominates over direct wind stress and estuarine forcing in driving the Atlantic water inflow across the Greenland-Scotland Ridge, while wind stress seems to influence the characteristics and distribution of the Atlantic water north of the ridge.

  10. Diseases in North Sea fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dethlefsen, V.

    1984-03-01

    Prior to the studies reviewed here, only lymphocystis and skeletal deformities of a variety of fish species and certain diseases of eel were known to occur in the German Bight (North Sea). From 1977 until now, 9 externally visible lesions on North Sea fishes were observed; in addition to those mentioned before, they comprise: fin rot, ulcerations, epidermal papilloma, hyperplasia, pseudobranchial tumour, eye diseases and gill swellings. With the exception of information on changes in frequencies of vertebral deformities of herring from the 1950's to the 1970's, there are no long-term data characterizing changes in frequencies of the diseases under study. For pseudobranchial tumours of cod and epidermal papilloma of dab, information is provided on occurrence and abundance. The distribution pattern of cod afflicted with pseudobranchial tumours is strongly influenced by the migratory behaviour of the fish. Epidermal papillomas of dab were more frequently found at stations within the inner German Bight than in neighbouring areas. The Bight is used for dumping of wastes from titaniumdioxide production. Further disease hot spots are areas off the Humber estuary and the British coast. Analysis of chromium in dab from the German Bight revealed elevated concentrations in epidermal tissues of specimens from the dumping area compared with that found in dab from neighbouring localities. Particulate iron was demonstrated to occur in mucous cells of dab from the dumping area. From increased levels of heavy metals with cancerogenic potential in sensitive target tissues and from increased prevalences of diseased fish in the dumping area it is concluded that these phenomena are possibly causally linked. In the vicinity of the Humber estuary high disease rates were encountered and areas with high prevalences of dab afflicted with epidermal papilloma extended over regions shown to be transport routes for persistent pollutants such as radioactive materials. It is therefore suggested

  11. Heart Failure in North America

    PubMed Central

    Blair, John E. A; Huffman, Mark; Shah, Sanjiv J

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure is a major health problem that affects patients and healthcare systems worldwide. Within the continent of North America, differences in economic development, genetic susceptibility, cultural practices, and trends in risk factors and treatment all contribute to both inter-continental and within-continent differences in heart failure. The United States and Canada represent industrialized countries with similar culture, geography, and advanced economies and infrastructure. During the epidemiologic transition from rural to industrial in countries such as the United States and Canada, nutritional deficiencies and infectious diseases made way for degenerative diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, overweight/obesity, and diabetes. This in turn has resulted in an increase in heart failure incidence in these countries, especially as overall life expectancy increases. Mexico, on the other hand, has a less developed economy and infrastructure, and has a wide distribution in the level of urbanization as it becomes more industrialized. Mexico is under a period of epidemiologic transition and the etiology and incidence of heart failure is rapidly changing. Ethnic differences within the populations of the United States and Canada highlight the changing demographics of each country as well as potential disparities in heart failure care. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction makes up approximately half of all hospital admissions throughout North America; however, important differences in demographics and etiology exist between countries. Similarly, acute heart failure etiology, severity, and management differ between countries in North America. The overall economic burden of heart failure continues to be large and growing worldwide, with each country managing this burden differently. Understanding the inter-and within-continental differences may help improve understanding of the heart failure epidemic, and may aid healthcare systems in delivering

  12. Human tapeworms in north Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Somers, Raf; Dorny, Pierre; Geysen, Dirk; Nguyen, Lan Anh; Thach, Dang Cam; Vercruysse, Jozef; Nguyen, Viet Khong

    2007-03-01

    Sixty-five Taenia samples were collected from patients in a referral hospital in Hanoi, north Vietnam, for species identification by morphological and molecular techniques. PCR-RFLP of a mitochondrial 12S rDNA fragment, developed for this study, allowed direct differentiation between all Taenia spp., overcoming the disadvantages of classical morphological examination, which failed on disintegrated samples. Taenia saginata asiatica was the most common species (55.4%) followed by T. saginata (38.5%) and T. solium (6.2%). This report demonstrates the complexity of the epidemiology of Taenia spp. in Vietnam and the need for further work to reveal transmission patterns of these species.

  13. North Korea: Terrorism List Removal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    version), August 14, 2007. 28 See http://www.state.gov/s/ct/rls/crt/2006/82736.htm at p. 147. 29 Yi Sang-il and Chin Se-ku. Yongbyon nuclear facility...Department spokesman. 32 The White House, Roundtable Interview of the President by Foreign Print Media, August 30, 3007. 33 Choe Sang- hun and David E...several North Korean attempts in late 2006 through the spring of 2007 to smuggle conventional arms, including machine guns , automatic rifles, and anti

  14. North Korea: Terrorism List Removal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-06

    ct/rls/crt/2006/82736.htm] at p. 147. 28 Yi Sang-il and Chin Se-ku. Yongbyon nuclear facility can be disabled within a year. JongAng Ilbo (internet...Interview of the President by Foreign Print Media, August 30, 3007. 32 Choe Sang- hun and David E. Sanger, North Korea claims U.S. will remove sanctions...smuggle conventional arms, including machine guns , automatic rifles, and anti-tank rocket launchers, to the Tamil Tigers in Sri Lanka. The Sri Lankan

  15. North American Natural Gas Markets

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    This report sunnnarizes the research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group's findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

  16. SNOWBIRD ROADLESS AREA, NORTH CAOLINA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lesure, Frank G.; Chatman, Mark L.

    1984-01-01

    The Snowbird Roadless Area includes all the upper reaches of Snowbird Creek and the surrounding rugged ridges of the Unicoi Mountains, North Carolina. Mineral-resource surveys show that the area contains folded metasedimentary rocks of the Great Smoky Group of Late Proterozoic age and that the area has little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. Abundant rock suitable for crushed rock and rough building stone is the only identified mineral resource, but extensive deposits of this commodity occur throughout the region outside the roadless area. Oil and gas and massive sulfide deposits are possible resources.

  17. North Dakota Energy Workforce Development

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Drake

    2014-12-29

    Bismarck State College, along with its partners (Williston State College, Minot State University and Dickinson State University), received funding to help address the labor and social impacts of rapid oilfield development in the Williston Basin of western North Dakota. Funding was used to develop and support both credit and non-credit workforce training as well as four major symposia designed to inform and educate the public; enhance communication and sense of partnership among citizens, local community leaders and industry; and identify and plan to ameliorate negative impacts of oil field development.

  18. Perspective view of Bailey and Massingill Store (4 North E ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of Bailey and Massingill Store (4 North E Street, far right of frame), view looking north on E Street. Also visible are General Merchandise Building (8 North E Street), Ousley Furniture Store ( 12 North E Street), Millenery (18 North E Street), Thornton Drug (26 North E Street), B. Reynolds Building (102-106 North E Street), Saloon (108 North E Street), and Langslet Tailor Shop (110-112 North E Street) - Lakeview Downtown Historic District, E, F & G Streets between Second Street North & First Street South, Lakeview, Lake County, OR

  19. Adaptive resolution simulation of oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netz, Paulo A.; Potestio, Raffaello; Kremer, Kurt

    2016-12-01

    Nucleic acids are characterized by a complex hierarchical structure and a variety of interaction mechanisms with other molecules. These features suggest the need of multiscale simulation methods in order to grasp the relevant physical properties of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and RNA using in silico experiments. Here we report an implementation of a dual-resolution modeling of a DNA oligonucleotide in physiological conditions; in the presented setup only the nucleotide molecule and the solvent and ions in its proximity are described at the atomistic level; in contrast, the water molecules and ions far from the DNA are represented as computationally less expensive coarse-grained particles. Through the analysis of several structural and dynamical parameters, we show that this setup reliably reproduces the physical properties of the DNA molecule as observed in reference atomistic simulations. These results represent a first step towards a realistic multiscale modeling of nucleic acids and provide a quantitatively solid ground for their simulation using dual-resolution methods.

  20. Adaptive resolution simulation of oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Netz, Paulo A; Potestio, Raffaello; Kremer, Kurt

    2016-12-21

    Nucleic acids are characterized by a complex hierarchical structure and a variety of interaction mechanisms with other molecules. These features suggest the need of multiscale simulation methods in order to grasp the relevant physical properties of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and RNA using in silico experiments. Here we report an implementation of a dual-resolution modeling of a DNA oligonucleotide in physiological conditions; in the presented setup only the nucleotide molecule and the solvent and ions in its proximity are described at the atomistic level; in contrast, the water molecules and ions far from the DNA are represented as computationally less expensive coarse-grained particles. Through the analysis of several structural and dynamical parameters, we show that this setup reliably reproduces the physical properties of the DNA molecule as observed in reference atomistic simulations. These results represent a first step towards a realistic multiscale modeling of nucleic acids and provide a quantitatively solid ground for their simulation using dual-resolution methods.