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Sample records for 12-mer random peptide

  1. Discovery of 12-mer peptides that bind to wood lignin.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Asako; Isozaki, Katsuhiro; Nakamura, Masaharu; Takaya, Hikaru; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-02-23

    Lignin, an abundant terrestrial polymer, is the only large-volume renewable feedstock composed of an aromatic skeleton. Lignin has been used mostly as an energy source during paper production; however, recent interest in replacing fossil fuels with renewable resources has highlighted its potential value in providing aromatic chemicals. Highly selective degradation of lignin is pivotal for industrial production of paper, biofuels, chemicals, and materials. However, few studies have examined natural and synthetic molecular components recognizing the heterogeneous aromatic polymer. Here, we report the first identification of lignin-binding peptides possessing characteristic sequences using a phage display technique. The consensus sequence HFPSP was found in several lignin-binding peptides, and the outer amino acid sequence affected the binding affinity of the peptides. Substitution of phenylalanine7 with Ile in the lignin-binding peptide C416 (HFPSPIFQRHSH) decreased the affinity of the peptide for softwood lignin without changing its affinity for hardwood lignin, indicating that C416 recognised structural differences between the lignins. Circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated that this peptide adopted a highly flexible random coil structure, allowing key residues to be appropriately arranged in relation to the binding site in lignin. These results provide a useful platform for designing synthetic and biological catalysts selectively bind to lignin.

  2. Discovery of 12-mer peptides that bind to wood lignin

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Asako; Isozaki, Katsuhiro; Nakamura, Masaharu; Takaya, Hikaru; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Lignin, an abundant terrestrial polymer, is the only large-volume renewable feedstock composed of an aromatic skeleton. Lignin has been used mostly as an energy source during paper production; however, recent interest in replacing fossil fuels with renewable resources has highlighted its potential value in providing aromatic chemicals. Highly selective degradation of lignin is pivotal for industrial production of paper, biofuels, chemicals, and materials. However, few studies have examined natural and synthetic molecular components recognizing the heterogeneous aromatic polymer. Here, we report the first identification of lignin-binding peptides possessing characteristic sequences using a phage display technique. The consensus sequence HFPSP was found in several lignin-binding peptides, and the outer amino acid sequence affected the binding affinity of the peptides. Substitution of phenylalanine7 with Ile in the lignin-binding peptide C416 (HFPSPIFQRHSH) decreased the affinity of the peptide for softwood lignin without changing its affinity for hardwood lignin, indicating that C416 recognised structural differences between the lignins. Circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated that this peptide adopted a highly flexible random coil structure, allowing key residues to be appropriately arranged in relation to the binding site in lignin. These results provide a useful platform for designing synthetic and biological catalysts selectively bind to lignin. PMID:26903196

  3. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus; identification of M protein-binding peptide ligands with antiviral and diagnostic potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The membrane (M) protein is one of the major structural proteins of coronavirus particles. In this study, the M protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was used to biopan a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. Three phages expressing TGEV-M-binding peptides were identified and ...

  4. Identification of polypeptides with selective affinity to intact mouse cerebellar granule neurons from a random peptide-presenting phage library.

    PubMed

    Hou, Sheng T; Dove, Mike; Anderson, Erica; Zhang, Jiangbing; MacKenzie, C Roger

    2004-09-30

    Targeting of postmitotic neurons selectively for gene delivery poses a challenge. One way to achieve such a selective targeting is to link the gene delivery vector with small ligand-binding polypeptides which have selective affinity to intact neurons. In order to identify such novel neuron selective polypeptides, we screened a phage-display library displaying random 12-mer polypeptides and subtractively bio-panned for clones having selectivity towards cultured mouse cerebellar granule neurons. The selected phage clones were amplified and sequenced. Affinities of these clones to neurons were determined by the visible presence or absence of fluorescence of phage particles as detected by immunocytochemistry using an antibody to M-13 phage. This affinity was further qualified by how much phage was bound, and where in or on the cell it tended to accumulate. The selectivity of binding to neurons was determined by the negative binding of these clones to several cultured non-neuronal cells, including, primary glial cells, NT2 cells, human embryonic kidney 293 cells, neuroblastoma cells, and mouse 3T3 cells. Among the 46 clones that we have sequenced and characterized, four clones appeared to have excellent selectivity in binding to neurons. Homology comparison of these polypeptides revealed that three of them contained a consensus D(E)-W(F)-I(N)-D-W motif. This motif was also present in the Bdm1 gene product which was predominantly expressed in postnatal brains. Further characterizations of these polypeptides are required to reveal the utilities of these peptides to function as an effective linker to facilitate gene transfer selectively to neurons.

  5. Identification of a Conserved B-cell Epitope on Reticuloendotheliosis Virus Envelope Protein by Screening a Phage-displayed Random Peptide Library

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mei; Shi, Xingming; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Yan; Cui, Hongyu; Hu, Shunlei; Gao, Hongbo; Cui, Xianlan; Wang, Yun-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Background The gp90 protein of avian reticuloendotheliosis-associated virus (REV-A) is an important envelope glycoprotein, which is responsible for inducing protective antibody immune responses in animals. B-cell epitopes on the gp90 protein of REV have not been well studied and reported. Methods and Results This study describes the identification of a linear B-cell epitope on the gp90 protein by screening a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library with the neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) A9E8 directed against the gp90. The mAb A9E8 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motif SVQYHPL. Amino acid sequence of the motif exactly matched 213SVQYHPL219 of the gp90. Further identification of the displayed B cell epitope was conducted using a set of truncated peptides expressed as GST fusion proteins and the Western blot results indicated that 213SVQYHPL219 was the minimal determinant of the linear B cell epitope recognized by the mAb A9E8. Moreover, an eight amino acid peptide SVQYHPLA was proven to be the minimal unit of the epitope with the maximal binding activity to mAb A9E8. The REV-A-positive chicken serum reacted with the minimal linear epitopes in Western blot, revealing the importance of the eight amino acids of the epitope in antibody-epitope binding activity. Furthermore, we found that the epitope is a common motif shared among REV-A and other members of REV group. Conclusions and Significance We identified 213SVQYHPL219 as a gp90-specific linear B-cell epitope recognized by the neutralizing mAb A9E8. The results in this study may have potential applications in development of diagnostic techniques and epitope-based marker vaccines against REV-A and other viruses of the REV group. PMID:23185456

  6. Phage-displayed peptide library screening for preferred human substrate peptide sequences for transglutaminase 7.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Katsuma; Yamasaki, Risa; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Hitomi, Kiyotaka

    2013-09-01

    Transglutaminases are a family of enzymes that catalyze cross-linking reactions between proteins. Among the members, there is currently no information regarding the substrate preferences of transglutaminase 7 (TG7), that would clarify its physiological significance. We previously obtained several highly reactive substrate peptide sequences of transglutaminases from a random peptide library. In this study, we screened for preferred substrate sequences for TG7 from a phage-displayed 12-mer peptide library. The most preferred sequence was selected based on reactivity and isozyme specificity. We firstly exhibited the tendency for the preference of substrate sequence for TG7. Then, using the most efficient peptide, Z3S, we established an in vitro assay system to assess enzymatic activity of TG7.

  7. Identification of peptide motif that binds to the surface of zirconia.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kazuhiko; Yoshinari, Masao; Matsuzaka, Kenichi; Shiba, Kiyotaka; Inoue, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A zirconia-binding peptide motif was identified using a peptide phage display system. Yttria stabilized zirconia beads and discs were used as the target. Quartz crystal microbalance was used to monitor the binding of phages to zirconia. Starting from a library of phages displaying random sequences of 12-mer peptides, we repeated cycles of biopanning against zirconia beads. After four cycles of biopanning, we isolated a phage clone Φ#17. DNA sequencing of the corresponding portion of Φ#17 unexpectedly revealed that it displayed a 58-mer peptide (amino acid sequence: WMPSDVDINDPQGGGSRPNLHQPKPAAEAASKKKSENRKVPFYSHSWY-SSMSEDKRGW). We found that Φ#17 had a 300-fold, significantly higher binding affinity for zirconia discs than phages displaying no peptide. In quartz crystal microbalance assay, a rapid increase in energy dissipation was observed from Φ#17 but not from the control phages, indicating that Φ#17 binds to the surface of zirconia via its displayed peptide. We successfully identified a peptide motif that binds zirconia.

  8. Identification of two linear B-cell epitopes from West Nile virus NS1 by screening a phage-displayed random peptide library

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The West Nile virus (WNV) nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is an important antigenic protein that elicits protective antibody responses in animals and can be used for the serological diagnosis of WNV infection. Although previous work has demonstrated the vital role of WNV NS1-specific antibody responses, the specific epitopes in the NS1 have not been identified. Results The present study describes the identification of two linear B-cell epitopes in WNV NS1 through screening a phage-displayed random 12-mer peptide library with two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) 3C7 and 4D1 that directed against the NS1. The mAbs 3C7 and 4D1 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motifs LTATTEK and VVDGPETKEC, respectively. Exact sequences of both motifs were found in the NS1 (895LTATTEK901 and 925VVDGPETKEC934). Further identification of the displayed B cell epitopes were conducted using a set of truncated peptides expressed as MBP fusion proteins. The data indicated that 896TATTEK901 and925VVDGPETKEC934 are minimal determinants of the linear B cell epitopes recognized by the mAbs 3C7 and 4D1, respectively. Antibodies present in the serum of WNV-positive horses recognized the minimal linear epitopes in Western blot analysis, indicating that the two peptides are antigenic in horses during infection. Furthermore, we found that the epitope recognized by 3C7 is conserved only among WNV strains, whereas the epitope recognized by 4D1 is a common motif shared among WNV and other members of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) serocomplex. Conclusions We identified TATTEK and VVDGPETKEC as NS1-specific linear B-cell epitopes recognized by the mAbs 3C7 and 4D1, respectively. The knowledge and reagents generated in this study may have potential applications in differential diagnosis and the development of epitope-based marker vaccines against WNV and other viruses of JEV serocomplex. PMID:21729328

  9. Phages Bearing Affinity Peptides to Bovine Rotavirus Differentiate the Virus from Other Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Li, Guangxing; Ren, Yudong; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify potential ligands and develop a novel diagnostic test to pathogenic bovine rotavirus (BRV) using phage display technology. The viruses were used as an immobilized target followed by incubation with a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. After five rounds of biopanning, phages had a specific binding activity to BRV were isolated. DNA sequencing indicated that phage displayed peptides HVHPPLRPHSDK, HATNHLPTPHNR or YPTHHAHTTPVR were potential ligands to BRV. Using the specific peptide-expressing phages, we developed a phage-based ELISA to differentiate BRV from other viruses. Compared with quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), the phage-mediated ELISA was more suitable for the capture of BRV and the detection limitation of this approach was 0.1 µg/ml of samples. The high sensitivity, specificity and low cross-reactivity for the phage-based ELISA were confirmed in receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. PMID:22163050

  10. Screening of a specific peptide binding to esophageal squamous carcinoma cells from phage displayed peptide library.

    PubMed

    Ma, Caixia; Li, Chunyan; Jiang, Dongliang; Gao, Xiaojie; Han, Juanjuan; Xu, Nan; Wu, Qiong; Nie, Guochao; Chen, Wei; Lin, Fenghuei; Hou, Yingchun

    2015-06-01

    To select a specifically binding peptide for imaging detection of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), a phage-displayed 12-mer peptide library was used to screen the peptide that bind to ESCC cells specifically. After four rounds of bio-panning, the phage recovery rate gradually increased, and specific phage clones were effectively enriched. The 60 randomly selected phage clones were tested using cellular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and 41 phage clones were identified as positive clones with the over 2.10 ratio of absorbance higher than other clones, IRP and PBS controls. From the sequencing results of the positive clones, 14 peptide sequences were obtained and ESCP9 consensus sequence was identified as the peptide with best affinity to ESCC cells via competitive inhibition, fluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry. The results indicate that the peptide ESCP9 can bind to ESCC cells specifically and sensitively, and it is a potential candidate to be developed as an useful molecule to the imaging detection and targeting therapy for ESCC.

  11. Identification of high-affinity VEGFR3-binding peptides through a phage-displayed random peptide library

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Li, Cai-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) interaction with its receptor, VEGFR-3/Flt-4, regulates lymphangiogenesis. VEGFR-3/Flt-4 expression in cancer cells has been correlated with clinical stage, lymph node metastasis, and lymphatic invasion. The objective of this study is to identify a VEGFR-3/Flt-4-interacting peptide that could be used to inhibit VEGFR-3 for ovarian cancer therapy. Methods The extracellular fragment of recombinant human VEGFR-3/Flt-4 (rhVEGFR-3/Flt-4) fused with coat protein pIII was screened against a phage-displayed random peptide library. Using affinity enrichment and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screening, positive clones of phages were amplified. Three phage clones were selected after four rounds of biopanning, and the specific binding of the peptides to rhVEGFR-3 was detected by ELISA and compared with that of VEGF-D. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses of ovarian cancer tissue sections was undertaken to demonstrate the specificity of the peptides. Results After four rounds of biopanning, ELISA confirmed the specificity of the enriched bound phage clones for rhVEGFR-3. Sequencing and translation identified three different peptides. Non-competitive ELISA revealed that peptides I, II, and III had binding affinities for VEGFR-3 with Kaff (affinity constant) of 16.4±8.6 µg/mL (n=3), 9.2±2.1 µg/mL (n=3), and 174.8±31.1 µg/mL (n=3), respectively. In ovarian carcinoma tissue sections, peptide III (WHWLPNLRHYAS), which had the greatest binding affinity, also co-localized with VEGFR-3 in endothelial cells lining lymphatic vessels; its labeling of ovarian tumors in vivo was also confirmed. Conclusion These finding showed that peptide III has high specificity and activity and, therefore, may represent a potential therapeutic approach to target VEGF-VEGFR-3 signaling for the treatment or diagnosis of ovarian cancer. PMID:26197772

  12. Identification and immunogenicity of an immunodominant mimotope of Avibacterium paragallinarum from a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjun; Gao, Yaping; Gong, Yumei; Chen, Xiaoling; Liu, Chuan; Zhou, Xuemei; Blackall, P J; Zhang, Peijun; Yang, Hanchun

    2007-01-31

    Avibacterium paragallinarum is the causative agent of infectious coryza. The protective antigens of this important pathogen have not yet been clearly identified. In this paper, we applied phage display technique to screen the immunodominant mimotopes of a serovar A strain of A. paragallinarum by using a random 12-peptide library, and evaluated the immunogenicity in chickens of the selected mimotope. Polyclonal antibody directed against A. paragallinarum strain 0083 (serovar A) was used as the target antibody and phage clones binding to this target were screened from the 12-mer random peptide library. More than 50% of the phage clones selected in the third round carried the consensus peptide motif sequence A-DP(M)L. The phage clones containing the peptide motif reacted with the target antibody and this interaction could be blocked, in a dose-dependent manner, by A. paragallinarum. One of the peptide sequences, YGLLAVDPLFKP, was selected and the corresponding oligonucleotide sequence was synthesized and then inserted into the expression vector pFliTrx. The recombinant plasmid was transferred into an expression host Escherichia coli GI826 by electroporation, resulting in a recombinant E. coli expressing the peptide on the bacterial surface. Intramuscular injection of the epitope-expressing recombinant bacteria into chickens induced a specific serological response to serovar A. A. paragallinarum. The chickens given the recombinant E. coli showed significant protection against challenge with A. paragallinarum 0083. These results indicated a potential for the use of the mimotope in the development of molecular vaccines for infectious coryza.

  13. Screening specific polypeptides of breast cancer stem cells from a phage display random peptide library

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Qi, Chun-Ling; Kong, Mian; Liu, Ting-Ting; Li, Lei; Li, Bao-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify polypeptides that specifically bond to breast cancer stem cells from a phage display random 12 peptide library, in addition to the affinity and specificity of polypeptides. A phage display random 12 peptide library was screened using breast cancer stem cells as targets isolated from the MDA-MB-231 cell line using the serum-free culture technique with hs578bst and MDA-MB-231 cells as subtract-screening cells. Positive and specific binding clones were amplified and sent for sequencing. The affinity and specificity of the positive clones were subsequently identified by ELISA and 3,3′-diaminobenzidine staining. The results demonstrated that phages were gathered ~500 times following three rounds of biopanning. ELISA identified that the affinity to breast cancer stem cells of the no. 6 phage was 6.14 times higher than that in the control group. In addition, immunohistochemistry observed that the no. 6 phage exhibited high-specificity bonding to breast cancer stem cells, and the peptide sequence of the positive phage was GYSASRSTIPGK following DNA sequencing and translation. Thus, the present study isolated a specific peptide that bonds to breast cancer stem cells from a phage display random peptide library, which may facilitate further studies regarding the stem cell-targeted therapy of breast cancer. PMID:28105180

  14. Chemokine CCR3 ligands-binding peptides derived from a random phage-epitope library.

    PubMed

    Houimel, Mehdi; Mazzucchelli, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophils are major effectors cells implicated in a number of chronic inflammatory diseases in humans, particularly bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis. The human chemokine receptor C-C receptor 3 (hCCR3) provides a mechanism for the recruitment of eosinophils into tissue and thus has recently become an attractive biological target for therapeutic intervention. In order to develop peptides antagonists of hCCR3-hCCL11 (human eotaxin) interactions, a random bacteriophage hexapeptide library was used to map structural features of hCCR3 by determining the epitopes of neutralizing anti-hCCR3 mAb 7B11. This mAb t is selective for hCCR3 and exhibit potent antagonist activity in receptor binding and functional assays. After three rounds of biopanning, four mAb7B11-binding peptides were identified from a 6-mer linear peptide library. The phage bearing the peptides showed specific binding to immobilized mAb 7B11 with over 94% of phages bound being competitively inhibited by free synthetic peptides. In FACScan analysis all selected phage peptides were able to strongly inhibit the binding of mAb 7B11 to hCCR3-transfected preB-300-19 murine cells. Furthermore, synthetic peptides of the corresponding phage epitopes were effective in blocking the antibody-hCCR3 interactions and to inhibit the binding of hCCL11 to hCCR3 transfectants. Chemically synthesized peptides CKGERF, FERKGK, SSMKVK and RHVSSQ, effectively competed for (125)I-hCCL11 binding to hCCR3 with IC(50) ranging from 3.5 to 9.7μM. Calcium release and chemotaxis of hCCR3 transfectants or human eosinophils were inhibited by all peptides in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, they showed inhibitory effects on chemotaxis of human eosinophils induced by hCCL11, hCCL5, hCCL7, hCCL8, and hCCL24. Specificities of all selected peptides were assessed with hCXCR1, hCXCR2, hCXCR3, and hCCR5 receptors. Peptides CKGERF and FERKGK showed inhibitory effects on eosinophil chemotaxis in a murine model of mCCL11-induced

  15. Direct selection of targeted adenovirus vectors by random peptide display on the fiber knob.

    PubMed

    Miura, Y; Yoshida, K; Nishimoto, T; Hatanaka, K; Ohnami, S; Asaka, M; Douglas, J T; Curiel, D T; Yoshida, T; Aoki, K

    2007-10-01

    Targeting of gene transfer at the level of cell entry is one of the most attractive challenges in vector development. However, attempts to redirect adenovirus vectors to alternative receptors by engineering the capsid-coding region have shown limited success because proper targeting ligand-receptor systems on the cells of interest are generally unknown. Systematic approaches to generate adenovirus vectors targeting any given cell type need to be developed to achieve this goal. Here, we constructed an adenovirus library that was generated by a Cre-lox-mediated in vitro recombination between an adenoviral fiber-modified plasmid library and genomic DNA to display random peptides on a fiber knob. As proof of concept, we screened the adenovirus display library on a glioma cell line and observed selection of several particular peptide sequences. The targeted vector carrying the most frequently isolated peptide significantly enhanced gene transduction in the glioma cell line but not in many other cell lines. Because the insertion of a pre-selected peptide into a fiber knob often fails to generate an adenovirus vector, the selection of targeting peptides is highly useful in the context of the adenoviral capsid. This vector-screening system can facilitate the development of a targeted adenovirus vector for a variety of applications in medicine.

  16. K-Ras(G12D)-selective inhibitory peptides generated by random peptide T7 phage display technology.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kotaro; Kamada, Yusuke; Sameshima, Tomoya; Yaguchi, Masahiro; Niida, Ayumu; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Miwa, Masanori; Ohkubo, Shoichi; Sakamoto, Jun-Ichi; Kamaura, Masahiro; Cho, Nobuo; Tani, Akiyoshi

    2017-03-11

    Amino-acid mutations of Gly(12) (e.g. G12D, G12V, G12C) of V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (K-Ras), the most promising drug target in cancer therapy, are major growth drivers in various cancers. Although over 30 years have passed since the discovery of these mutations in most cancer patients, effective mutated K-Ras inhibitors have not been marketed. Here, we report novel and selective inhibitory peptides to K-Ras(G12D). We screened random peptide libraries displayed on T7 phage against purified recombinant K-Ras(G12D), with thorough subtraction of phages bound to wild-type K-Ras, and obtained KRpep-2 (Ac-RRCPLYISYDPVCRR-NH2) as a consensus sequence. KRpep-2 showed more than 10-fold binding- and inhibition-selectivity to K-Ras(G12D), both in SPR analysis and GDP/GTP exchange enzyme assay. KD and IC50 values were 51 and 8.9 nM, respectively. After subsequent sequence optimization, we successfully generated KRpep-2d (Ac-RRRRCPLYISYDPVCRRRR-NH2) that inhibited enzyme activity of K-Ras(G12D) with IC50 = 1.6 nM and significantly suppressed ERK-phosphorylation, downstream of K-Ras(G12D), along with A427 cancer cell proliferation at 30 μM peptide concentration. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a K-Ras(G12D)-selective inhibitor, contributing to the development and study of K-Ras(G12D)-targeting drugs.

  17. Identification of distinct antibody epitopes and mimotopes from a peptide array of 5520 randomly generated sequences.

    PubMed

    Reineke, Ulrich; Ivascu, Claudia; Schlief, Marén; Landgraf, Christiane; Gericke, Seike; Zahn, Grit; Herzel, Hanspeter; Volkmer-Engert, Rudolf; Schneider-Mergener, Jens

    2002-09-01

    We used a relatively small library of 5520 randomly generated single 15-mer peptides prepared by SPOT synthesis as an array of 28.5x19.0 cm to identify epitopes for three distinct monoclonal antibodies, namely anti-p24 (human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1) monoclonal anibody (mab) CB4-1, anti-interleukin-10 (IL-10) mab CB/RS/13, and anti-transforming growth factor alpha (TGFalpha) mab Tab2. Initially identified peptide ligands mostly had very low affinities for the antibodies with dissociation constants around 10(-4) M. Subsequent identification of residues critical for the antibody interactions involved complete L-amino acid substitutional analyses. Several substitutions resulted in analogs with dissociation constants in the low micromolar and high nanomolar range. Specifically binding peptides with key residue patterns matching the wild-type epitopes were identified for all three antibodies. In addition, for antibody CB4-1 mimotopes that showed no homology to the known epitope were selected. Our results suggest that a very limited library diversity, although far from covering the entire sequence repertoire, can suffice to rapidly and economically select peptidic antibody epitopes and mimotopes.

  18. Epitope prediction based on random peptide library screening: benchmark dataset and prediction tools evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pingping; Chen, Wenhan; Huang, Yanxin; Wang, Hongyan; Ma, Zhiqiang; Lv, Yinghua

    2011-06-16

    Epitope prediction based on random peptide library screening has become a focus as a promising method in immunoinformatics research. Some novel software and web-based servers have been proposed in recent years and have succeeded in given test cases. However, since the number of available mimotopes with the relevant structure of template-target complex is limited, a systematic evaluation of these methods is still absent. In this study, a new benchmark dataset was defined. Using this benchmark dataset and a representative dataset, five examples of the most popular epitope prediction software products which are based on random peptide library screening have been evaluated. Using the benchmark dataset, in no method did performance exceed a 0.42 precision and 0.37 sensitivity, and the MCC scores suggest that the epitope prediction results of these software programs are greater than random prediction about 0.09-0.13; while using the representative dataset, most of the values of these performance measures are slightly improved, but the overall performance is still not satisfactory. Many test cases in the benchmark dataset cannot be applied to these pieces of software due to software limitations. Moreover chances are that these software products are overfitted to the small dataset and will fail in other cases. Therefore finding the correlation between mimotopes and genuine epitope residues is still far from resolved and much larger dataset for mimotope-based epitope prediction is desirable.

  19. Screening and evaluating the mimic peptides as a useful serum biomarker of ankylosing spondylitis using a phage display technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Li, Xianping; Chen, Jingwei; Zhou, Yong; Cao, Hong; Wu, Xiang; Jiang, Hongmin

    2011-08-01

    To screen specific serum biomarker for ankylosing spondylitis (AS) using a phage random peptide library. A phage random peptide library of random peptide 12-mers was immunoscreened with purified immunoglobulin (Ig) G from sera of AS patients. Positive clones obtained after three rounds of biopanning were detected with ELISA and sequenced. Reaction of the screened positive clones with sera from AS patients, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, osteoarthritis (OA) patients and healthy controls was detected using phage ELISA. Correlation among erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and the absorbance value of the positive clone in phage ELISA was examined in AS patients. Seventeen out of twenty randomly selected phage clones exhibited specific reaction with purified sera IgG from AS patients, among them seven coming from the same clone whose inserted peptide sequence was LALPPLAPNHHH (named "AS1"). Phage ELISA results showed that the positive reaction rate of the AS1 clone was 92.0% with AS patients, significantly different (P < 0.01) from those with SLE patients (56.7%), RA patients (50.0%), OA patients (13.3%), and healthy controls (14.0%). Absorbance value of the AS1 clone in phage ELISA was significantly higher than those in the other groups (P < 0.05). In addition, the absorbance value of the AS1 clone showed no statistically significant correlation with ESR and CRP in AS patients, suggesting that AS1 detects AS patients through a unique mechanism other than inflammation. The short peptide AS1 obtained through screening of a phage random peptide library with purified serum IgG from AS patients can specifically react with the sera of AS patients, and thereby may be a candidate of AS-specific serum biomarkers.

  20. Screening of randomly mutagenized glucagon-like peptide-1 library by using an integrated yeast-mammalian assay system.

    PubMed

    Shigemori, Tomohiro; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-09-10

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) is a 30-amino acid peptide hormone activating the GLP1 receptor (GLP1R), a class B G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), and is considered to be effective for treating diabetes and other metabolic diseases. Phage display is the first innovative technology in order to prepare and screen a large polypeptide library including GLP1R agonists, but this methodology is not as effective in discovering functional peptides such as activators for GPCRs. Here, we report a novel functional screening system for GPCR-acting peptides, which integrates a yeast peptide secretion system into a biological detection system with GPCR-producing mammalian cells. Using this screening system, we found attractive GLP1R agonists with several substitutions from a random mutant GLP1 library which was secreted by yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This system established here not only enables peptides to be analyzed in the soluble form but also needs no chemical synthesis, purification, and condensation of peptides of interests, and therefore, can be widely applied to the discovery of novel bioactive peptides acting on GPCRs.

  1. Identification of gliadin-binding peptides by phage display

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Coeliac disease (CD) is a common and complex disorder of the small intestine caused by intolerance to wheat gluten and related edible cereals like barley and rye. Peptides originating from incomplete gliadin digestion activate the lamina propria infiltrating T cells to release proinflammatory cytokines, which in turn cause profound tissue remodelling of the small intestinal wall. There is no cure for CD except refraining from consuming gluten-containing products. Results Phage from a random oligomer display library were enriched by repeated pannings against immobilised gliadin proteins. Phage from the final panning round were plated, individual plaques picked, incubated with host bacteria, amplified to a population size of 1011 to 1012 and purified. DNA was isolated from 1000 purified phage populations and the region covering the 36 bp oligonucleotide insert from which the displayed peptides were translated, was sequenced. Altogether more than 150 different peptide-encoding sequences were identified, many of which were repeatedly isolated under various experimental conditions. Amplified phage populations, each expressing a single peptide, were tested first in pools and then one by one for their ability to inhibit binding of human anti-gliadin antibodies in ELISA assays. These experiments showed that several of the different peptide-expressing phage tested inhibited the interaction between gliadin and anti-gliadin antibodies. Finally, four different peptide-encoding sequences were selected for further analysis, and the corresponding 12-mer peptides were synthesised in vitro. By ELISA assays it was demonstrated that several of the peptides inhibited the interaction between gliadin molecules and serum anti-gliadin antibodies. Moreover, ELISA competition experiments as well as dot-blot and western blot revealed that the different peptides interacted with different molecular sites of gliadin. Conclusions We believe that several of the isolated and

  2. Types of pediatric diabetes mellitus defined by anti-islet autoimmunity and random C-peptide at diagnosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that anti-islet autoantibody expression and random serum C-peptide obtained at diagnosis define phenotypes of pediatric diabetes with distinct clinical features. We analyzed 607 children aged <19 yr consecutively diagnosed with diabetes after ex...

  3. Phage Displayed Peptides to Avian H5N1 Virus Distinguished the Virus from Other Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chengfeng; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to identify potential ligands and develop a novel diagnostic test to highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus (HPAI), subtype H5N1 viruses using phage display technology. The H5N1 viruses were used as an immobilized target in a biopanning process using a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. After five rounds of panning, three phages expressing peptides HAWDPIPARDPF, AAWHLIVALAPN or ATSHLHVRLPSK had a specific binding activity to H5N1 viruses were isolated. Putative binding motifs to H5N1 viruses were identified by DNA sequencing. In terms of the minimum quantity of viruses, the phage-based ELISA was better than antiserum-based ELISA and a manual, semi-quantitative endpoint RT-PCR for detecting H5N1 viruses. More importantly, the selected phages bearing the specific peptides to H5N1 viruses were capable of differentiating this virus from other avian viruses in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. PMID:21887228

  4. Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of Multimodality Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Scheinberg DA. Vaccination with Synthetic Analog Peptides Derived from WT1 Oncoprotein Induces T Cell Responses in Patients with Complete Remission ...TITLE:Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of...TITLE:Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of Multimodality

  5. Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of Multimodality Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    10-1-0699 TITLE: Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 W81XWH-10-1-0699 Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant... peptides that are given together with Montanide and GM-CSF as immunologic adjuvants. This WT1 vaccine was previously tested in a small pilot trial

  6. Anti‐microbial peptide gene expression during oral vaccination: analysis of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Simuyandi, M.; Kapulu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary We have observed previously that micronutrient supplementation ameliorated suppression of α‐defensin expression during diarrhoea. However, how interactions between anti‐microbial peptide (AMP) expression and diarrhoeal disease are altered by micronutrient supplementation remain unclear. Using oral vaccination as a model of intestinal infection, we measured changes in AMP expression during multiple micronutrient supplementation. In the first part, volunteers underwent duodenal jejunal biopsy before and at 1, 2, 4 or 7 days after administration of one of three live, attenuated oral vaccines against rotavirus, typhoid and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. In the second part, participants were randomized to receive a multiple micronutrient supplement or placebo for 6 weeks before undergoing intestinal biopsy, vaccination against typhoid and rebiopsy after 14 days. Expression of human alpha‐defensin (HD)5, HD6, hBD1, hBD2 and LL‐37 was measured by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Taken together, the bacterial vaccines, but not rotavirus vaccine, reduced HD5 expression (P = 0·02, signed‐rank test) and reduced LL‐37 expression in seven of the eight individuals whose biopsies had expression prevaccination (P = 0·03). hBD2 was not detected. In the controlled trial, HD5 and HD6 expression after vaccination was lower [median ratio 0·5, interquartile range (IQR) = 0·07–2·2 and 0·58, IQR = 0·13–2·3, respectively] than before vaccination. There was no significant effect detected of micronutrient supplementation on expression of HD5, HD6, hBD1 or LL‐37. We conclude that live attenuated bacterial vaccines, but not rotavirus vaccine, can reduce intestinal α‐defensins, and typhoid vaccine reduced LL‐37 expression. We found no evidence that micronutrient supplementation in the short term had any impact on anti‐microbial peptide expression. PMID:27465597

  7. Molecular mechanism of selective binding of peptides to silicon surface.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Sathish Kumar; Martin, Marta; Cloitre, Thierry; Firlej, Lucyna; Gergely, Csilla

    2014-07-28

    Despite extensive recent research efforts on material-specific peptides, the fundamental problem to be explored yet is the molecular interactions between peptides and inorganic surfaces. Here we used computer simulations (density functional theory and classical molecular dynamics) to investigate the adsorption mechanism of silicon-binding peptides and the role of individual amino acids in the affinity of peptides for an n-type silicon (n(+)-Si) semiconductor. Three silicon binding 12-mer peptides previously elaborated using phage display technology have been studied. The peptides' conformations close to the surface have been determined and the best-binding amino acids have been identified. Adsorption energy calculations explain the experimentally observed different degrees of affinity of the peptides for n(+)-Si. Our residual scanning analysis demonstrates that the binding affinity relies on both the identity of the amino acid and its location in the peptide sequence.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of spontaneous fibril formation by random-coil peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Hall, Carol K.

    2004-11-01

    Assembly of normally soluble proteins into amyloid fibrils is a cause or associated symptom of numerous human disorders, including Alzheimer's and the prion diseases. We report molecular-level simulation of spontaneous fibril formation. Systems containing 12-96 model polyalanine peptides form fibrils at temperatures greater than a critical temperature that decreases with peptide concentration and exceeds the peptide's folding temperature, consistent with experimental findings. Formation of small amorphous aggregates precedes ordered nucleus formation and subsequent rapid fibril growth through addition of -sheets laterally and monomeric peptides at fibril ends. The fibril's structure is similar to that observed experimentally. amyloid | protein aggregation

  9. Analysis and prediction of the critical regions of antimicrobial peptides based on conditional random fields.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kuan Y; Lin, Tung-pei; Shih, Ling-Yi; Wang, Chien-Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are potent drug candidates against microbes such as bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses. The size of AMPs ranges from less than ten to hundreds of amino acids. Often only a few amino acids or the critical regions of antimicrobial proteins matter the functionality. Accurately predicting the AMP critical regions could benefit the experimental designs. However, no extensive analyses have been done specifically on the AMP critical regions and computational modeling on them is either non-existent or settled to other problems. With a focus on the AMP critical regions, we thus develop a computational model AMPcore by introducing a state-of-the-art machine learning method, conditional random fields. We generate a comprehensive dataset of 798 AMPs cores and a low similarity dataset of 510 representative AMP cores. AMPcore could reach a maximal accuracy of 90% and 0.79 Matthew's correlation coefficient on the comprehensive dataset and a maximal accuracy of 83% and 0.66 MCC on the low similarity dataset. Our analyses of AMP cores follow what we know about AMPs: High in glycine and lysine, but low in aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and methionine; the abundance of α-helical structures; the dominance of positive net charges; the peculiarity of amphipathicity. Two amphipathic sequence motifs within the AMP cores, an amphipathic α-helix and an amphipathic π-helix, are revealed. In addition, a short sequence motif at the N-terminal boundary of AMP cores is reported for the first time: arginine at the P(-1) coupling with glycine at the P1 of AMP cores occurs the most, which might link to microbial cell adhesion.

  10. Collection of phage-peptide probes for HIV-1 immunodominant loop-epitope.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Rodríguez, Yadira; Gazarian, Tatiana; Rowley, Merrill; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham; Gazarian, Karlen

    2007-02-01

    Early diagnosis and prevention of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection, which remains a serious public health threat, is inhibited by the lack of reagents that elicit antiviral responses in the immune system. To create mimotopes (peptide models of epitopes) of the most immunodominant epitope, CSGKLIC, that occurs as a loop on the envelope gp41 glycoprotein and is a key participant in infection, we used phage-display technology involving biopanning of large random libraries with IgG of HIV-1-infected patients. Under the conditions used, library screening with IgG from patient serum was directed to the CSGKLIC epitope. Three rounds of selection converted a 12 mer library of 10(9) sequences into a population in which up to 79% of phage bore a family of CxxKxxC sequences ("x" designates a non-epitope amino acid). Twenty-one phage clones displaying the most frequently selected peptides were obtained and were shown to display the principal structural (sequence and conformational), antigenic and immunogenic features of the HIV-1 immunodominant loop-epitope. Notably, when the mixture of the phage mimotopes was injected into mice, it induced 2- to 3-fold higher titers of antibody to the HIV-1 epitope than could be induced from individual mimotopes. The described approach could be applicable for accurately reproducing HIV-1 epitope structural and immunological patterns by generation of specialized viral epitope libraries for use in diagnosis and therapy.

  11. Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of Multimodality Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Analog Peptides Derived from WT1 Oncoprotein Induces T Cell Responses in Patients with Complete Remission from Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML), Blood 2010...10-1-0699 TITLE: Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after...vaccine comprised of four WT1 heteroclitic peptides that are given together with Montanide and GM- CSF as immunologic adjuvants. This WT1 vaccine was

  12. Identification and characterization of a peptide affinity reagent for detection of noroviruses in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jennifer D; Ajami, Nadim J; Fryszczyn, Bartlomiej G; Estes, Mary K; Atmar, Robert L; Palzkill, Timothy

    2013-06-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is the most common agent of nonbacterial epidemic gastroenteritis and is estimated to cause 21 million cases of the disease in the United States annually. The antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) currently available for NoV diagnosis detect only certain strains and are approved for use in the United States only in epidemics where NoV is suspected. There is a clear need for simpler, more rapid, and more reliable diagnostic tools for the detection of NoV. In this study, phage display technology was used to screen a library of phage displaying random 12-mer peptides for those that bind to Norwalk virus virus-like particles (NV VLPs). Three phage clones displaying unique peptides were identified, and both the peptide-displaying phages and the peptides were confirmed to bind specifically to NV VLPs. The peptide displayed on phage clone NV-N-R5-1 was determined to bind to the protruding domain of the VP1 capsid protein. This phage also bound to NV VLPs seeded into NoV-negative stool with a limit of detection of 1.56 ng NV VLP. This value was comparable to monoclonal antibody (MAb) 3912, which is currently used in commercially available assays. Furthermore, the NV-N-R5-1 phage exhibited high specificity by detecting NV only in previously characterized NV-positive stool samples in contrast to no detection in NV-negative stool samples. These data demonstrate that the further development of NV-N-R5-1 phage as a diagnostic reagent is possible and might offer several distinct advantages over antibodies, such as decreases in the time and cost of production and ease of isolating phage against other epidemic strains currently circulating as well as those that are emerging.

  13. Purification of polyclonal anti-conformational antibodies for use in affinity selection from random peptide phage display libraries: A study using the hydatid vaccine EG95

    PubMed Central

    Read, A.J.; Gauci, C.G.; Lightowlers, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    The use of polyclonal antibodies to screen random peptide phage display libraries often results in the recognition of a large number of peptides that mimic linear epitopes on various proteins. There appears to be a bias in the use of this technology toward the selection of peptides that mimic linear epitopes. In many circumstances the correct folding of a protein immunogen is required for conferring protection. The use of random peptide phage display libraries to identify peptide mimics of conformational epitopes in these cases requires a strategy for overcoming this bias. Conformational epitopes on the hydatid vaccine EG95 have been shown to result in protective immunity in sheep, whereas linear epitopes are not protective. In this paper we describe a strategy that results in the purification of polyclonal antibodies directed against conformational epitopes while eliminating antibodies directed against linear epitopes. These affinity purified antibodies were then used to select a peptide from a random peptide phage display library that has the capacity to mimic conformational epitopes on EG95. This peptide was subsequently used to affinity purify monospecific antibodies against EG95. PMID:19349218

  14. A randomized phase II trial of personalized peptide vaccine with low dose cyclophosphamide in biliary tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Shirahama, Takahisa; Muroya, Daisuke; Matsueda, Satoko; Yamada, Akira; Shichijo, Shigeki; Naito, Masayasu; Yamashita, Takuto; Sakamoto, Shinjiro; Okuda, Koji; Itoh, Kyogo; Sasada, Tetsuro; Yutani, Shigeru

    2017-02-11

    Since the prognosis of advanced biliary tract cancer (aBTC) still remains very poor, new therapeutic approaches, including immunotherapies, need to be developed. In the current study, we conducted an open-label randomized phase II study to test whether low dose cyclophosphamide (CPA) could improve antigen-specific immune responses and clinical efficacy of personalized peptide vaccination (PPV) in 49 previously treated aBTC patients. Patients with aBTC refractory to at least one regimen of chemotherapies were randomly assigned to receive PPV with low dose CPA (100 mg/ day for 7 days before vaccination) (PPV/CPA, n=24) or PPV alone (n=25). A maximum of four HLA-matched peptides were selected based on the pre-existing peptide-specific IgG responses, followed by subcutaneous administration. T cell responses to the vaccinated peptides in the PPV/CPA arm tended to be greater than those in the PPV alone arm. The PPV/CPA arm showed significantly better progression-free survival (median time: 6.1 vs 2.9 months; hazard ratio (HR): 0.427; P = 0.008) and overall survival (median time: 12.1 vs 5.9 months; HR: 0.376; P = 0.004), compared to the PPV alone arm. The PPV alone arm, but not the PPV/CPA arm, showed significant increase in plasma IL-6 after vaccinations, which might be associated with inhibition of antigen-specific T cell responses. These results suggested that combined treatment with low dose CPA could provide clinical benefits in aBTC patients under PPV, possibly through prevention of IL-6-mediated immune suppression. Further clinical studies would be recommended to clarify the clinical efficacy of PPV/CPA in aBTC patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Affinity selection of Nipah and Hendra virus-related vaccine candidates from a complex random peptide library displayed on bacteriophage virus-like particles

    DOEpatents

    Peabody, David S.; Chackerian, Bryce; Ashley, Carlee; Carnes, Eric; Negrete, Oscar

    2017-01-24

    The invention relates to virus-like particles of bacteriophage MS2 (MS2 VLPs) displaying peptide epitopes or peptide mimics of epitopes of Nipah Virus envelope glycoprotein that elicit an immune response against Nipah Virus upon vaccination of humans or animals. Affinity selection on Nipah Virus-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies using random sequence peptide libraries on MS2 VLPs selected peptides with sequence similarity to peptide sequences found within the envelope glycoprotein of Nipah itself, thus identifying the epitopes the antibodies recognize. The selected peptide sequences themselves are not necessarily identical in all respects to a sequence within Nipah Virus glycoprotein, and therefore may be referred to as epitope mimics VLPs displaying these epitope mimics can serve as vaccine. On the other hand, display of the corresponding wild-type sequence derived from Nipah Virus and corresponding to the epitope mapped by affinity selection, may also be used as a vaccine.

  16. Internally quenched fluorescent peptide libraries with randomized sequences designed to detect endopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Lilian C G; Silva, Vinícius O; Okamoto, Debora N; Kondo, Marcia Y; Santos, Saara M B; Hirata, Isaura Y; Vallim, Marcelo A; Pascon, Renata C; Gouvea, Iuri E; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz

    2012-02-01

    Identification of synthetic peptide substrates for novel peptidases is an essential step for their study. With this purpose we synthesized fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) peptide libraries Abz (or MCA)-GXXXXXQ-EDDnp and Abz (or MCA)-GXXZXXQ-EDDnp, where X consists of an equimolar mixture of all amino acids, the Z position is fixed with one of the proteinogenic amino acids (cysteine was excluded), Abz (ortho-aminobenzoic acid) or MCA ([7-amino-4-methyl]coumarin) is the fluorescence donor and Q-EDDnp (glutamine-[N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-ethylenediamine]) is the fluorescence acceptor. The peptide libraries MCA-GXXX↓XXQ-EDDnp and MCA-GXXZ↓XXQ-EDDnp were cleaved as indicated (↓) by trypsin, chymotrypsin, cathepsin L, pepsin A, and Eqolisin as confirmed by Edman degradation of the products derived from the digestion of these libraries. The best hydrolyzed Abz-GXXZXXQ-EDDnp sublibraries by these proteases, including Dengue 2 virus NS2B-NS3 protease, contained amino acids at the Z position that are reported to be well accepted by their S(1) subsite. The pH profiles of the hydrolytic activities of these canonical proteases on the libraries were similar to those reported for typical substrates. The FRET peptide libraries provide an efficient and simple approach for detecting nanomolar concentrations of endopeptidases and are useful for initial specificity characterization as performed for two proteases secreted by a Bacillus subtilis.

  17. Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of Multimodality Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    1 Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0699 TITLE: Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural...WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of Multimodality Therapy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), and is a rational target for immunotherapy. We have developed a vaccine comprised of four WT1 heteroclitic

  18. Phage Display against Corneal Epithelial Cells Produced Bioactive Peptides That Inhibit Aspergillus Adhesion to the Corneas

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ge; Li, Siyuan; Zhao, Wei; He, Kun; Xi, Haijie; Li, Weihua; Zhou, Qingjun; Wang, Yiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Dissection of host-pathogen interactions is important for both understanding the pathogenesis of infectious diseases and developing therapeutics for the infectious diseases like various infectious keratitis. To enhance the knowledge about pathogenesis infectious keratitis, a random 12-mer peptide phage display library was screened against cultured human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC). Fourteen sequences were obtained and BLASTp analysis showed that most of their homologue counterparts in GenBank were for defined or putative proteins in various pathogens. Based on known or predicted functions of the homologue proteins, ten synthetic peptides (Pc-A to Pc-J) were measured for their affinity to bind cells and their potential efficacy to interfere with pathogen adhesion to the cells. Besides binding to HCEC, most of them also bound to human corneal stromal cells and umbilical endothelial cells to different extents. When added to HCEC culture, the peptides induced expression of MyD88 and IL-17 in HCEC, and the stimulated cell culture medium showed fungicidal potency to various extents. While peptides Pc-C and Pc-E inhibited Aspergillus fumigatus (A.f) adhesion to HCEC in a dose-dependent manner, the similar inhibition ability of peptides Pc-A and Pc-B required presence of their homologue ligand Alb1p on A.f. When utilized in an eyeball organ culture model and an in vivo A.f keratitis model established in mouse, Pc-C and Pc-E inhibited fungal adhesion to corneas, hence decreased corneal disruption caused by inflammatory infiltration. Affinity pull-down of HCEC membrane proteins with peptide Pc-C revealed several molecules as potential receptors for this peptide. In conclusion, besides proving that phage display-selected peptides could be utilized to interfere with adhesion of pathogens to host cells, hence could be exploited for managing infectious diseases including infectious keratitis, we also proposed that the phage display technique and the resultant peptides could

  19. Whole-Proteome Peptide Microarrays for Profiling Autoantibody Repertoires within Multiple Sclerosis and Narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Zandian, Arash; Forsström, Björn; Häggmark-Månberg, Anna; Schwenk, Jochen M; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter; Ayoglu, Burcu

    2017-02-09

    The underlying molecular mechanisms of autoimmune diseases are poorly understood. To unravel the autoimmune processes across diseases, comprehensive and unbiased analyses of proteins targets recognized by the adaptive immune system are needed. Here we present an approach starting from high-density peptide arrays to characterize autoantibody repertoires and to identify new autoantigens. A set of ten plasma and serum samples from subjects with multiple sclerosis, narcolepsy, and without any disease diagnosis were profiled on a peptide array representing the whole proteome, hosting 2.2 million 12-mer peptides with a six amino acid lateral shift. On the basis of the IgG reactivities found on these whole-proteome peptide microarrays, a set of 23 samples was then studied on a targeted array with 174 000 12-mer peptides of single amino acid lateral shift. Finally, verification of IgG reactivities was conducted with a larger sample set (n = 448) using the bead-based peptide microarrays. The presented workflow employed three different peptide microarray formats to discover and resolve the epitopes of human autoantibodies and revealed two potentially new autoantigens: MAP3K7 in multiple sclerosis and NRXN1 in narcolepsy. The presented strategy provides insights into antibody repertoire reactivity at a peptide level and may accelerate the discovery and validation of autoantigens in human diseases.

  20. Randomized Multicenter Trial of the Effects of Melanoma-Associated Helper Peptides and Cyclophosphamide on the Immunogenicity of a Multipeptide Melanoma Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Slingluff, Craig L.; Petroni, Gina R.; Chianese-Bullock, Kimberly A.; Smolkin, Mark E.; Ross, Merrick I.; Haas, Naomi B.; von Mehren, Margaret; Grosh, William W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This multicenter randomized trial was designed to test whether melanoma-associated helper peptides augment CD8+ T-cell responses to a melanoma vaccine and whether cyclophosphamide (CY) pretreatment augments CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell responses to that vaccine. Patients and Methods In all, 167 eligible patients with resected stage IIB to IV melanoma were randomly assigned to four vaccination study arms. Patients were vaccinated with 12 class I major histocompatibility complex–restricted melanoma peptides (12MP) to stimulate CD8+ T cells and were randomly assigned to receive a tetanus helper peptide or a mixture of six melanoma-associated helper peptides (6MHP) to stimulate CD4+ T cells. Before vaccination, patients were also randomly assigned to receive CY pretreatment or not. T-cell responses were assessed by an ex vivo interferon gamma ELISpot assay. Clinical outcomes and toxicities were recorded. Results Vaccination with 12MP plus tetanus induced CD8+ T-cell responses in 78% of patients and CD4+ T-cell responses to tetanus peptide in 93% of patients. Vaccination with 12MP plus 6MHP induced CD8+ responses in 19% of patients and CD4+ responses to 6MHP in 48% of patients. CY had no significant effect on T-cell responses. Overall 3-year survival was 79% (95% CI, 71% to 86%), with no significant differences (at this point) by study arm. Conclusion Melanoma-associated helper peptides paradoxically decreased CD8+ T-cell responses to a melanoma vaccine (P < .001), and CY pretreatment had no immunologic or clinical effect. Prior work showed immunologic and clinical activity of 6MHP alone. Possible explanations for negative effects on CD8 responses include modulation of homing receptor expression or induction of antigen-specific regulatory T cells. PMID:21690475

  1. Development of a novel efficient method to construct an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Goto, Naoko; Miura, Kazuki; Narumi, Kenta; Ohnami, Shumpei; Uchida, Hiroaki; Miura, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masato; Aoki, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    Redirection of adenovirus vectors by engineering the capsid-coding region has shown limited success because proper targeting ligands are generally unknown. To overcome this limitation, we constructed an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob, and its screening led to successful selections of several particular targeted vectors. In the previous library construction method, the full length of an adenoviral genome was generated by a Cre-lox mediated in vitro recombination between a fiber-modified plasmid library and the enzyme-digested adenoviral DNA/terminal protein complex (DNA-TPC) before transfection to the producer cells. In this system, the procedures were complicated and time-consuming, and approximately 30% of the vectors in the library were defective with no displaying peptide. These may hinder further extensive exploration of cancer-targeting vectors. To resolve these problems, in this study, we developed a novel method with the transfection of a fiber-modified plasmid library and a fiberless adenoviral DNA-TPC in Cre-expressing 293 cells. The use of in-cell Cre recombination and fiberless adenovirus greatly simplified the library-making steps. The fiberless adenovirus was useful in suppressing the expansion of unnecessary adenovirus vectors. In addition, the complexity of the library was more than a 104 level in one well in a 6-well dish, which was 10-fold higher than that of the original method. The results demonstrated that this novel method is useful in producing a high quality live adenovirus library, which could facilitate the development of targeted adenovirus vectors for a variety of applications in medicine. PMID:24380399

  2. Plasticity in protein-peptide recognition: crystal structures of two different peptides bound to concanavalin A.

    PubMed Central

    Jain, D; Kaur, K J; Salunke, D M

    2001-01-01

    The structures of concanavalin A (ConA) in complex with two carbohydrate-mimicking peptides, 10-mer (MYWYPYASGS) and 15-mer (RVWYPYGSYLTASGS) have been determined at 2.75 A resolution. In both crystal structures four independent peptide molecules bind to each of the crystallographically independent subunits of ConA tetramer. The peptides exhibit small but significant variability in conformations and interactions while binding to ConA. The crystal structure of another similar peptide, 12-mer (DVFYPYPYASGS), in complex with ConA has been determined (Jain, D., K. J. Kaur, B. Sundaravadivel, and D. M. Salunke. 2000. Structural and functional consequences of peptide-carbohydrate mimicry. J. Biol. Chem. 275:16098-16102). Comparison of the three complexes shows that the peptides bind to ConA at a common binding site, using different contacting residues and interactions depending on their sequence and the local environment at the binding site. The binding is also optimized by corresponding plasticity of the peptide binding site on ConA. The diversity in conformation and interactions observed here are in agreement with the structural leeway concerning plasticity of specific molecular recognition in biological processes. The adaptability of peptide-ConA interactions may also be correlated with the carbohydrate-mimicking property of these peptides. PMID:11371463

  3. A Conserved Epitope Mapped with a Monoclonal Antibody against the VP3 Protein of Goose Parvovirus by Using Peptide Screening and Phage Display Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenxi; Liu, Hongyu; Li, Jinzhe; Liu, Dafei; Meng, Runze; Zhang, Qingshan; Shaozhou, Wulin; Bai, Xiaofei; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background Waterfowl parvovirus (WPV) infection causes high mortality and morbidity in both geese (Anser anser) and Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata), resulting in significant losses to the waterfowl industries. The VP3 protein of WPV is a major structural protein that induces neutralizing antibodies in the waterfowl. However, B-cell epitopes on the VP3 protein of WPV have not been characterized. Methods and Results To understand the antigenic determinants of the VP3 protein, we used the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4A6 to screen a set of eight partially expressed overlapping peptides spanning VP3. Using western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we localized the VP3 epitope between amino acids (aa) 57 and 112. To identify the essential epitope residues, a phage library displaying 12-mer random peptides was screened with mAb 4A6. Phage clone peptides displayed a consensus sequence of YxRFHxH that mimicked the sequence 82Y/FNRFHCH88, which corresponded to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of VP3 protein of WPVs. mAb 4A6 binding to biotinylated fragments corresponding to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of the VP3 protein verified that the 82FxRFHxH88 was the VP3 epitope and that amino acids 82F is necessary to retain maximal binding to mAb 4A6. Parvovirus-positive goose and duck sera reacted with the epitope peptide by dot blotting assay, revealing the importance of these amino acids of the epitope in antibody-epitope binding reactivity. Conclusions and Significance We identified the motif FxRFHxH as a VP3-specific B-cell epitope that is recognized by the neutralizing mAb 4A6. This finding might be valuable in understanding of the antigenic topology of VP3 of WPV. PMID:27191594

  4. Membrane permeability of hydrocarbon-cross-linked peptides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tzu-Lin; Sun, Yen; Lee, Chang-Chun; Huang, Huey W

    2013-05-07

    Schafmeister, Po, and Verdine (another study) introduced a method using a hydrocarbon linker (staple) to stabilize a peptide in a helical configuration. One intended goal of this scheme is to facilitate the delivery of peptide drugs into target cells. Here, we investigate whether stapled peptides are intrinsically membrane permeable, by performing a case study on a stapled 12-mer peptide named NYAD-1. We found that the native peptide CAI (an HIV-1 inhibitor) does not bind to lipid bilayers, however NYAD-1 indeed permeates through lipid bilayers even at low solution concentrations. To understand the reason for the membrane permeability, we investigated the physical properties of NYAD-1 as a function of bound peptide/lipid molar ratio P/L. We found that NYAD-1 spontaneously binds to a lipid bilayer. At low P/L, the peptide primarily binds on the polar-apolar interface with its helical axis parallel to the bilayer, which has the effect of stretching the membrane area and thinning the membrane. The membrane thinning reaches its maximum at P/L ∼1/15-1/12 in DOPC bilayers. Additional bound peptides have little thinning effect and their helical axes are normal to the plane of bilayers. Thus, the stapled peptide has a membrane interaction behavior similar to helical antimicrobial peptides, such as magainin and melittin. We emphasize that not all peptides that bind to lipid bilayers in the α-helical form behave this way.

  5. Screening of Random Peptide Library of Hemagglutinin from Pandemic 2009 A(H1N1) Influenza Virus Reveals Unexpected Antigenically Important Regions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wanghui; Han, Lu; Lin, Zhanglin

    2011-01-01

    The antigenic structure of the membrane protein hemagglutinin (HA) from the 2009 A(H1N1) influenza virus was dissected with a high-throughput screening method using complex antisera. The approach involves generating yeast cell libraries displaying a pool of random peptides of controllable lengths on the cell surface, followed by one round of fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) against antisera from mouse, goat and human, respectively. The amino acid residue frequency appearing in the antigenic peptides at both the primary sequence and structural level was determined and used to identify “hot spots” or antigenically important regions. Unexpectedly, different antigenic structures were seen for different antisera. Moreover, five antigenic regions were identified, of which all but one are located in the conserved HA stem region that is responsible for membrane fusion. Our findings are corroborated by several recent studies on cross-neutralizing H1 subtype antibodies that recognize the HA stem region. The antigenic peptides identified may provide clues for creating peptide vaccines with better accessibility to memory B cells and better induction of cross-neutralizing antibodies than the whole HA protein. The scheme used in this study enables a direct mapping of the antigenic regions of viral proteins recognized by antisera, and may be useful for dissecting the antigenic structures of other viral proteins. PMID:21437206

  6. Mendelian Randomization Study of B-Type Natriuretic Peptide and Type 2 Diabetes: Evidence of Causal Association from Population Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, Roman; Sharp, Stephen; Luben, Robert; Welsh, Paul; Barroso, Inês; Salomaa, Veikko; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Sattar, Naveed; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic and epidemiological evidence suggests an inverse association between B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels in blood and risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D), but the prospective association of BNP with T2D is uncertain, and it is unclear whether the association is confounded. Methods and Findings We analysed the association between levels of the N-terminal fragment of pro-BNP (NT-pro-BNP) in blood and risk of incident T2D in a prospective case-cohort study and genotyped the variant rs198389 within the BNP locus in three T2D case-control studies. We combined our results with existing data in a meta-analysis of 11 case-control studies. Using a Mendelian randomization approach, we compared the observed association between rs198389 and T2D to that expected from the NT-pro-BNP level to T2D association and the NT-pro-BNP difference per C allele of rs198389. In participants of our case-cohort study who were free of T2D and cardiovascular disease at baseline, we observed a 21% (95% CI 3%–36%) decreased risk of incident T2D per one standard deviation (SD) higher log-transformed NT-pro-BNP levels in analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, smoking, family history of T2D, history of hypertension, and levels of triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The association between rs198389 and T2D observed in case-control studies (odds ratio = 0.94 per C allele, 95% CI 0.91–0.97) was similar to that expected (0.96, 0.93–0.98) based on the pooled estimate for the log-NT-pro-BNP level to T2D association derived from a meta-analysis of our study and published data (hazard ratio = 0.82 per SD, 0.74–0.90) and the difference in NT-pro-BNP levels (0.22 SD, 0.15–0.29) per C allele of rs198389. No significant associations were observed between the rs198389 genotype and potential confounders. Conclusions Our results provide evidence for a potential causal role of the BNP

  7. The role of anchor residues in the binding of peptides to HLA-A*1101 molecules.

    PubMed

    Chujoh, Y; Sobao, Y; Miwa, K; Kaneko, Y; Takiguchi, M

    1998-12-01

    The binding of 136 8- to 12-mer peptides carrying anchor residues at position 2 (P2) and the C-terminus to HLA-A*1101 molecules was analyzed by a stabilization assay using RMA-S transfectants expressing HLA-A*1101 and human beta2-microglobulin. 72.1% of these peptides bound to HLA-A*1101 molecules. Two known HLA-All-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope peptides showed high affinity to HLA-A*1101. The results confirmed a previous pool sequencing study of HLA-A*1101 binding self-peptides, which showed that Lys at the C-terminus and Val, Ile, Phe, Tyr, and Thr at P2 are anchor residues for HLA-A*1101. Thr and aliphatic hydrophobic residues Val, Ile, and Leu at P2 are stronger anchor residues than the aromatic hydrophobic residues Phe and Tyr. In addition, hydrophobic residues Leu, Phe, Tyr, Ile, and Ala at position 3 (P3) are secondary anchors but are weaker than those at P2. The affinities of the 8- and 12-mer peptides were significantly lower than those of 9- to 11-mer peptides. There was however no difference in affinity between 9-, 10- and 11-mer peptides. Furthermore, the analysis using peptides mutated at the C-terminus showed that HLA-A*1101 molecules can bind peptides carrying another positively charged residue, Arg. The present study clarified the role of the anchor residues at P2, P3 and the C-terminus in the binding of HLA-A*1101 molecules.

  8. A randomized pilot phase I study of modified carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) peptide (CAP1-6D)/montanide/GM-CSF-vaccine in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background CEA is expressed in >90% of pancreatic cancers (PC) and may be an appropriate immunotherapy target. CEA is poorly immunogenic due to immune tolerance; CAP1-6D, an altered peptide ligand can help bypass tolerance. We conducted a pilot randomized phase I trial in PC patients to determine the peptide dose required to induce an optimal CD8+ T cell response. Methods Patients with a PS 0-1, HLA-A2+ and CEA-expressing, previously-treated PC were randomized to receive 10 μg (arm A), 100 μg (arm B) or 1000 μg (arm C) of CEA peptide emulsified in Montanide and GM-CSF, given every 2 weeks until disease progression. Results Sixty-six patients were screened and 19 enrolled of whom 14 received at least 3 doses of the vaccine and thus evaluated for the primary immunologic endpoint. A median of 4 cycles (range 1-81) was delivered. Median and mean peak IFN-γ T cell response by ELISPOT (spots per 104 CD8+ cells, Arm A/B/C) was 11/52/271 (A vs. C, p = 0.028) for medians and 37/148/248 (A vs. C, p = 0.032) for means. T cell responses developed or increased in 20%/60%/100% of pts in Arms A/B/C. Seven of the 19 patients remain alive at a minimum 32 months from trial initiation, including three with unresectable disease. Conclusions The T cell response in this randomized phase I trial was dose-dependent with the 1 mg CEA peptide dose eliciting the most robust T cell responses. A signal of clinical benefit was observed and no significant toxicity was noted. Further evaluation of 1 mg CEA peptide with stronger adjuvants, and/or combined with agents to overcome immune inhibitory pathways, may be warranted in PC pts. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00203892 PMID:24829746

  9. Identification of peptides that bind to irradiated pancreatic tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Canhui; Liu, Xiang Y.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Lawrence, Theodore S. . E-mail: tsl@med.umich.edu

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: Peptides targeting tumor vascular cells or tumor cells themselves have the potential to be used as vectors for delivering either DNA in gene therapy or antitumor agents in chemotherapy. We wished to determine if peptides identified by phage display could be used to target irradiated pancreatic cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Irradiated Capan-2 cells were incubated with 5 x 10{sup 12} plaque-forming units of a phage display library. Internalized phage were recovered and absorbed against unirradiated cells. After five such cycles of enrichment, the recovered phage were subjected to DNA sequencing analysis and synthetic peptides made. The binding of both phage and synthetic peptides was evaluated by fluorescence staining and flow cytometry in vitro and in vivo. Results: We identified one 12-mer peptide (PA1) that binds to irradiated Capan-2 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells but not to unirradiated cells. The binding of peptide was significant after 48 h incubation with cells. In vivo experiments with Capan-2 xenografts in nude mice demonstrated that these small peptides are able to penetrate tumor tissue after intravenous injections and bind specifically to irradiated tumor cells. Conclusion: These data suggest that peptides can be identified that target tumors with radiation-induced cell markers and may be clinically useful.

  10. Phage-free peptide ELISA for ochratoxin A detection based on biotinylated mimotope as a competing antigen.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xuqiang; Chen, Chaochao; Huang, Xiaolin; Chen, Xuelan; Wang, Lv; Xiong, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    To perform the biopanning of a mimotope peptide with reduced affinity to anti-ochratoxin A (OTA) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), we executed two improved biopanning approaches with a commercial 7-mer peptide library. In the first approach, anti-mouse IgG antibodies were used to erect the anti-OTA mAbs; in the second approach, an ultralow OTA concentration (0.1 ng/mL) was used to perform the competitive elution of phage particles. After the fourth round of biopanning was completed, 30 identified clones were positive phage particles; of these phage particles, 16 exhibited strong competitive inhibition with a low OTA concentration of 0.1 ng/mL. DNA sequencing results revealed that the 16 phage particles represented six different peptide sequences. Among these particles, the phage particle with a peptide sequence of "GMVQTIF" showed the highest sensitivity to OTA detection. The biotinylated 12-mer peptide "GMVQTIF-GGGSK-biotin" was designed as a competing antigen to develop a competitive peptide ELISA. Under the optimal parameters, the proposed peptide ELISA with the biotinylated 12-mer peptide as a competing antigen exhibited good dynamic linear detection for OTA in the range of 0.005 ng/mL-0.2 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.001 ng/mL. The median inhibition concentration of OTA was 0.024 ng/mL (n=6), which is approximately fivefold more efficient as a competing antigen than the OTA-HRP conjugates. Reaction kinetics revealed that the biotinylated 12-mer peptide exhibited lower affinity to anti-OTA mAbs than the conventional chemical OTA antigen. The practicality of the proposed peptide ELISA was compared with a conventional ELISA method. In summary, this study demonstrated a novel concept of the development of phage-free peptide ELISA for the detection of OTA by using a biotinylated mimotope peptide as a competing antigen. This novel strategy can be applied to sensitively detect other toxic small molecules during food safety monitoring.

  11. Eight at one stroke - a synthetic tetra-disulfide peptide epitope.

    PubMed

    Schrimpf, Andreas; Linne, Uwe; Geyer, Armin

    2017-02-13

    We have designed a cysteine-rich β-hairpin peptide which dimerises spontaneously to the antiparallel double β-hairpin motif C1-C12', C1'-C12, C5-C8, C5'-C8'-tricyclo-(CHWECCitGCRLVC)2. The highly regioselective oxidation of eight cysteines yields an intermolecular bi-disulfide 24mer hinge peptide from two individual 12mer β-hairpins, each rigidified by an additional intramolecular disulfide bond - all in all a tetra-disulfide. The reaction kinetics of air-oxidation were followed by HPLC and the constitutional isomer was identified by mass spectrometry. The hairpin conformation was characterised in detail by NMR spectroscopy and the opening angle of the antiparallel hinge was estimated from drift times obtained by ion-mobility spectrometry. Based on a set of investigated disulfide motifs, we are able to rationalise how the unbalanced number of bonded and non-bonded hydrogen pairs in a 12 mer hairpin causes their dimerisation. The unique dimeric bi-/tetra-disulfides provide systematic insights into β-hairpin formation. They can serve as a standalone structural element for the oligomerisation of peptide epitopes where structural diversity is generated from a minimal number of amino acids.

  12. Biomaterials functionalization using a novel peptide that selectively binds to a conducting polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanghvi, Archit B.; Miller, Kiley P.-H.; Belcher, Angela M.; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2005-06-01

    The goal in biomaterial surface modification is to retain a material's bulk properties while modifying only its surface to possess desired recognition and specificity. Here we develop a unique strategy for surface functionalization of an electrically conductive polymer, chlorine-doped polypyrrole (PPyCl), which has been widely researched for various electronic and biomedical applications. An M13 bacteriophage library was used to screen 109 different 12-mer peptide inserts against PPyCl. A binding phage (ϕT59) was isolated, and its binding stability and specificity to PPyCl was assessed using fluorescence microscopy and titer count analysis. The relative binding strength and mechanism of the corresponding 12-mer peptide and its variants was studied using atomic force microscopy and fluorescamine assays. Further, the T59 peptide was joined to a cell adhesive sequence and used to promote cell attachment on PPyCl. This strategy can be extended to immobilize a variety of molecules to PPyCl for numerous applications. In addition, phage display can be applied to other polymers to develop bioactive materials without altering their bulk properties.

  13. Selection of Peptide Mimics of HIV-1 Epitope Recognized by Neutralizing Antibody VRC01

    PubMed Central

    Chikaev, Anton N.; Bakulina, Anastasiya Yu.; Burdick, Ryan C.; Karpenko, Larisa I.; Pathak, Vinay K.; Ilyichev, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to induce anti-HIV-1 antibodies that can neutralize a broad spectrum of viral isolates from different subtypes seems to be a key requirement for development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. The epitopes recognized by the most potent broadly neutralizing antibodies that have been characterized are largely discontinuous. Mimetics of such conformational epitopes could be potentially used as components of a synthetic immunogen that can elicit neutralizing antibodies. Here we used phage display technology to identify peptide motifs that mimic the epitope recognized by monoclonal antibody VRC01, which is able to neutralize up to 91% of circulating primary isolates. Three rounds of biopanning were performed against 2 different phage peptide libraries for this purpose. The binding specificity of selected phage clones to monoclonal antibody VRC01 was estimated using dot blot analysis. The putative peptide mimics exposed on the surface of selected phages were analyzed for conformational and linear homology to the surface of HIV-1 gp120 fragment using computational analysis. Corresponding peptides were synthesized and checked for their ability to interfere with neutralization activity of VRC01 in a competitive inhibition assay. One of the most common peptides selected from 12-mer phage library was found to partially mimic a CD4-binding loop fragment, whereas none of the circular C7C-mer peptides was able to mimic any HIV-1 domains. However, peptides identified from both the 12-mer and C7C-mer peptide libraries showed rescue of HIV-1 infectivity in the competitive inhibition assay. The identification of epitope mimics may lead to novel immunogens capable of inducing broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies. PMID:25785734

  14. A randomized phase II clinical trial of personalized peptide vaccination with metronomic low-dose cyclophosphamide in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Masanori; Moriya, Fukuko; Koga, Noriko; Matsueda, Satoko; Sasada, Tetsuro; Yamada, Akira; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Itoh, Kyogo

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of metronomic cyclophosphamide (CPA) in combination with personalized peptide vaccination (PPV) on regulatory T cells (Treg) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and whether it could improve the antitumor effect of PPV. Seventy patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive PPV plus oral low-dose CPA (50 mg/day), or PPV alone. PPV treatment used a maximum of four peptides chosen from 31 pooled peptides according to human leukocyte antigen types and antigen-specific humoral immune responses before PPV, for 8 subcutaneous weekly injections. Peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and immunoglobulin G responses were measured before and after PPV. The incidence of grade 3 or 4 hematologic adverse events was higher in the PPV plus CPA arm than in the PPV alone arm. Decrease in Treg and increase in MDSC were more pronounced in PPV plus CPA treatment than in PPV alone (p = 0.036 and p = 0.048, respectively). There was no correlation between the changes in Treg or MDSC and CTL response. There was no difference in positive immune responses between the two arms, although overall survival in patients with positive immune responses was longer than in those with negative immune responses (p = 0.001). Significant differences in neither progression-free survival nor overall survival were observed between the two arms. Low-dose CPA showed no change in the antitumor effect of PPV, possibly due to the simultaneous decrease in Treg and increase in MDSC, in patients under PPV.

  15. Lateral flow assay for rapid detection of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) using a phage-displayed peptide as bio-recognition probe.

    PubMed

    Kulabhusan, Prabir Kumar; Rajwade, Jyutika M; Sahul Hameed, A S; Paknikar, Kishore M

    2017-03-27

    White spot disease caused by the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) has a major socio-economic impact on shrimp farming in India. It has been realized that a field-usable diagnostic capable of rapid detection of WSSV can prevent huge economic losses in disease outbreaks. In this work, we explored the possibility of using a peptide as bio-recognition probe in a field-usable device for the detection of WSSV from infected shrimps and prawns. A commercially available random phage-display library was screened against rVP28 (a major structural protein of WSSV, expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli). A bacteriophage clone VP28-4L was obtained, and its binding to purified rVP28 protein as well as WSSV from infected shrimp Litopaeneus vannamei tissue was confirmed by ELISA and western blot. The apparent equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd,app) was calculated to be 810 nM. VP28-4L did not show cross-reactivity with any other shrimp viruses. A 12-mer peptide (pep28, with the sequence 'TFQAFDLSPFPS') displayed on the VP28-4L was synthesized, and its diagnostic potential was evaluated in a lateral flow assay (LFA). Visual detection of WSSV could be achieved using biotinylated-pep28 and streptavidin-conjugated gold nanoparticles. In LFA, 12.5 μg/mL of the virus could be detected from L. vannamei gill tissue homogenate within 20 min. Pep28 thus becomes an attractive candidate in bio-recognition of WSSV in field-usable diagnostic platforms benefitting the aquaculture sector.

  16. A biologically active peptide mimetic of N-acetylgalactosamine/galactose

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, Laura L; Hoober, J Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Background Glycosylated proteins and lipids are important regulatory factors whose functions can be altered by addition or removal of sugars to the glycan structure. The glycans are recognized by sugar-binding lectins that serve as receptors on the surface of many cells and facilitate initiation of an intracellular signal that changes the properties of the cells. We identified a peptide that mimics the ligand of an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-specific lectin and asked whether the peptide would express specific biological activity. Findings A 12-mer phage display library was screened with a GalNAc-specific lectin to identify an amino acid sequence that binds to the lectin. Phage particles that were eluted from the lectin with free GalNAc were considered to have been bound to a GalNAc-binding site. Peptides were synthesized with the selected sequence as a quadravalent structure to facilitate receptor crosslinking. Treatment of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells for 24 h with the peptide stimulated secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) but not of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The secretion of IL-21 was stimulated as strongly with the peptide as with interferon-γ. Conclusion The data indicate that the quadravalent peptide has biological activity with a degree of specificity. These effects occurred at concentrations in the nanomolar range, in contrast to free sugars that generally bind to proteins in the micro- to millimolar range. PMID:19284521

  17. Identification of a Conserved Linear B-Cell Epitope of Streptococcus dysgalactiae GapC Protein by Screening Phage-Displayed Random Peptide Library

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ziyao; Zhou, Xue; Yu, Liquan; Sun, Hunan; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Song, Baifen; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Wang, Xintong; Zhu, Zhanbo; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    The GapC of Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) is a highly conserved surface protein that can induce protective humoral immune response in animals. However, B-cell epitopes on the S. dysgalactiae GapC have not been well identified. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb5B7) against the GapC1-150 protein was prepared. After passive transfer, mAb5B7 could partially protect mice against S. dysgalactiae infection. Eleven positive phage clones recognized by mAb5B7 were identified by screening phage-displayed random 12-peptide library, most of which matched the consensus motif DTTQGRFD. The motif sequence exactly matches amino acids 48-55 of the S. dysgalactiae GapC protein. In addition, the motif 48DTTQGRFD55 shows high homology among various streptococcus species. Site-directed mutagenic analysis further confirmed that residues D48, T50, Q51, G52 and F54 formed the core motif of 48DTTQGRFD55. This motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb5B7. As expected, epitope-peptide evoked protective immune response against S. dysgalactiae infection in immunized mice. Taken together, this identified conserved B-cell epitope within S. dysgalactiae GapC could provide very valuable insights for vaccine design against S. dysgalactiae infection. PMID:26121648

  18. Screening of paclitaxel-binding molecules from a library of random peptides displayed on T7 phage particles using paclitaxel-photoimmobilized resin.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Sota; Morohashi, Kengo; Sunoki, Takashi; Kuramochi, Kouji; Kobayashi, Susumu; Sugawara, Fumio

    2007-01-01

    Paclitaxel (Taxol), an effective anticancer agent, is known to bind to tubulin and induce tubulin polymerization. Several other binding proteins of paclitaxel, such as Bcl-2, heat shock proteins, and NSC-1, have also been reported. Here, we describe a T7 phage-based display to screen for paclitaxel-binding molecules from a random peptide library using paclitaxel-photoimmobilized TentaGel resin. Specific phage particles that bind the paclitaxel-immobilized resin were obtained. Among them, two phage clones included the same consensus amino acid sequence (KACGRTRVTS). Analysis of the protein database using BLAST revealed that a portion of this sequence is conserved in the zinc finger domain of human NFX1. Binding affinity of paclitaxel against the partial recombinant protein of NFX1 (424aa-876aa) was confirmed by pull-down assays and surface plasmon resonance analyses.

  19. The identification of affinity peptide ligands specific to the variable region of human antibodies.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yasuto; Miyata, Haruo; Komiyama, Masaru; Nogami, Masahiro; Ozawa, Kazumichi; Oshita, Chie; Kume, Akiko; Ashizawa, Tadashi; Sakura, Naoki; Mochizuki, Tohru; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Of all potential biological therapeutics, monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based therapies are becoming the dominant focus of clinical research. In particular, smaller recombinant antibody fragments such as single-chain variable fragments (scFv) have become the subject of intense focus. However, an efficient affinity ligand for antibody fragment purification has not been developed. In the present study, we designed a consensus sequence for the human antibody heavy or light chain-variable regions (Fv) based on the antibody sequences available in the ImMunoGeneTics information system (IMGT), and synthesized these consensus sequences as template Fv antibodies. We then screened peptide ligands that specifically bind to the repertoire-derived human Fv consensus antibody using a 12-mer-peptide library expressed-phage display method. Subsequently, 1 peptide for the VH template and 8 peptides for the VK template were selected as the candidate ligands after 4 rounds of panning the phage display. Using peptide-bead-based immunoprecipitation, the code-4 and code-13 peptides showed recovery rates of the VH and VK templates that were 20-30% and 40-50%, respectively. Both peptides exhibited better recovery rates for trastuzumab scFv (approximately 40%). If it were possible to identify the best combination of VH and VK-binding peptides among the ligand peptides suitable for the human mAb Fv sequence, the result could be a promising purification tool that might greatly improve the cost efficiencies of the purification process.

  20. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists and Cardiovascular Events: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Monami, Matteo; Cremasco, Francesco; Lamanna, Caterina; Colombi, Claudia; Desideri, Carla Maria; Iacomelli, Iacopo; Marchionni, Niccolò; Mannucci, Edoardo

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Data from randomized clinical trials with metabolic outcomes can be used to address concerns about potential issues of cardiovascular safety for newer drugs for type 2 diabetes. This meta-analysis was designed to assess cardiovascular safety of GLP-1 receptor agonists. Design and Methods. MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched for randomized trials of GLP-1 receptor agonists (versus placebo or other comparators) with a duration ≥12 weeks, performed in type 2 diabetic patients. Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio with 95% confidence interval (MH-OR) was calculated for major cardiovascular events (MACE), on an intention-to-treat basis, excluding trials with zero events. Results. Out of 36 trials, 20 reported at least one MACE. The MH-OR for all GLP-1 receptor agonists was 0.74 (0.50–1.08), P = .12 (0.85 (0.50–1.45), P = .55, and 0.69 (0.40–1.22), P = .20, for exenatide and liraglutide, resp.). Corresponding figures for placebo-controlled and active comparator studies were 0.46 (0.25–0.83), P = .009, and 1.05 (0.63–1.76), P = .84, respectively. Conclusions. To date, results of randomized trials do not suggest any detrimental effect of GLP-1 receptor agonists on cardiovascular events. Specifically designed longer-term trials are needed to verify the possibility of a beneficial effect. PMID:21584276

  1. The effects of wenxin keli on left ventricular ejection fraction and brain natriuretic Peptide in patients with heart failure: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Xiong, Xingjiang; Wang, Chunmei; Wang, Chenggang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Xingyong; Gao, Yonghong; Xing, Yanhui; Li, Jun; Wang, Jie; Liu, Xiaoqiu; Xing, Yanwei

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the beneficial and adverse effects of Wenxin Keli (WXKL), either alone or in combination with Western medicine, on the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in the treatment of heart failure (HF). Methods. Seven major electronic databases were searched to retrieve potential randomized controlled trials (RCTs) designed to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of WXKL, either alone or in combination with Western medicine, for HF, with the LVEF or BNP after eight weeks of treatment as main outcome measures. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using criteria from the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Review of Interventions, Version 5.1.0, and analyzed using RevMan 5.1.0 software. Results. Eleven RCTs of WXKL were included. The methodological quality of the trials was generally evaluated as low. The risk of bias was high. The results of the meta-analysis showed that WXKL, either alone or in combination with Western medicine, was more effective in LVEF and BNP, compared with no medicine or Western medicine alone, in patients with HF or HF complicated by other diseases. Five of the trials reported adverse events, while the others did not mention them, indicating that the safety of WXKL remains uncertain. Conclusions. WXKL, either alone or in combination with Western medicine, appears to be more effective in improving the LVEF and BNP in patients with HF and HF complications.

  2. The Effects of Wenxin Keli on Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction and Brain Natriuretic Peptide in Patients with Heart Failure: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Xiong, Xingjiang; Wang, Chunmei; Wang, Chenggang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Xingyong; Gao, Yonghong; Xing, Yanhui; Li, Jun; Wang, Jie; Liu, Xiaoqiu; Xing, Yanwei

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the beneficial and adverse effects of Wenxin Keli (WXKL), either alone or in combination with Western medicine, on the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in the treatment of heart failure (HF). Methods. Seven major electronic databases were searched to retrieve potential randomized controlled trials (RCTs) designed to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of WXKL, either alone or in combination with Western medicine, for HF, with the LVEF or BNP after eight weeks of treatment as main outcome measures. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using criteria from the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Review of Interventions, Version 5.1.0, and analyzed using RevMan 5.1.0 software. Results. Eleven RCTs of WXKL were included. The methodological quality of the trials was generally evaluated as low. The risk of bias was high. The results of the meta-analysis showed that WXKL, either alone or in combination with Western medicine, was more effective in LVEF and BNP, compared with no medicine or Western medicine alone, in patients with HF or HF complicated by other diseases. Five of the trials reported adverse events, while the others did not mention them, indicating that the safety of WXKL remains uncertain. Conclusions. WXKL, either alone or in combination with Western medicine, appears to be more effective in improving the LVEF and BNP in patients with HF and HF complications. PMID:24868236

  3. Risk of bone fractures associated with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists' treatment: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Su, Bin; Sheng, Hui; Zhang, Manna; Bu, Le; Yang, Peng; Li, Liang; Li, Fei; Sheng, Chunjun; Han, Yuqi; Qu, Shen; Wang, Jiying

    2015-02-01

    Traditional anti-diabetic drugs may have negative or positive effects on risk of bone fractures. Yet the relationship between the new class glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RA) and risk of bone fractures has not been established. We performed a meta-analysis including randomized controlled trials (RCT) to study the risk of bone fractures associated with liraglutide or exenatide, compared to placebo or other active drugs. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and clinical trial registration websites for published or unpublished RCTs comparing the effects of liraglutide or exenatide with comparators. Only studies with disclosed bone fracture data were included. Separate pooled analysis was performed for liraglutide or exenatide, respectively, by calculating Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio (MH-OR). 16 RCTs were identified including a total of 11,206 patients. Liraglutide treatment was associated with a significant reduced risk of incident bone fractures (MH-OR=0.38, 95% CI 0.17-0.87); however, exenatide treatment was associated with an elevated risk of incident bone fractures (MH-OR=2.09, 95% CI 1.03-4.21). Publication bias and heterogeneity between studies were not observed. Our study demonstrated a divergent risk of bone fractures associated with different GLP-1 RA treatments. The current findings need to be confirmed by future well-designed prospective or RCT studies.

  4. Probing the mechanism of material specific peptides for optical biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Sathish K.; Estephan, Elias; Martin, Marta; Cloitre, Thierry; Gergely, Csilla

    2013-05-01

    The possibility to engineer bio-nanomaterials with programmed synthesis and controlled immobilization of biomolecules through biomimetic molecular evolution approach has been demonstrated. Material specific peptides with exquisite molecular recognition function were used as a linker for the attachment of biomolecules. Exploring the origin of peptide material specificity not only opens up rational design approach with precise control over biomimetic bio-sensor design, but more importantly provides a new route of functionalizing for various material surfaces with enhanced sensitivity over classical grafting chemistry. To study the fine prints of experimentally obtained peptides, theoretical understanding of surface interactions may serve as important clues for further refinement. By taking advantage of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and density functional theory (DFT), we investigated the origin of this smart recognition function through the strength of interaction of experimentally selected 12mer peptides revealing high binding affinity towards n+-Si(100). Here, we attempt for the very first time to model the interaction of the peptides (in buffer solution) with semiconductors and we calculate their binding energies at the atomic level, enabling thereby linking direct evidence to our experimental evidence. Several peptide conformations have been taken into account simultaneously upon the surface. Our studies demonstrate that the peptides possess certain recognition function and their high interaction energy with the surface makes them unique among the populations. Our work is a step towards the understanding of the interactions between peptides and semiconductor surfaces that is a highly relevant challenge in the development of novel devices with a high degree of biocompatibility as well.

  5. Sequence requirements and an optimization strategy for short antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Hilpert, Kai; Elliott, Melissa R; Volkmer-Engert, Rudolf; Henklein, Peter; Donini, Oreola; Zhou, Qun; Winkler, Dirk F H; Hancock, Robert E W

    2006-10-01

    Short antimicrobial host-defense peptides represent a possible alternative as lead structures to fight antibiotic resistant bacterial infections. Bac2A is a 12-mer linear variant of the naturally occurring bovine host defense peptide, bactenecin, and demonstrates moderate, broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as against the yeast Candida albicans. With the assistance of a method involving peptide synthesis on a cellulose support, the primary sequence requirements for antimicrobial activity against the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa of 277 Bac2A variants were investigated by using a luciferase-based assay. Sequence scrambling of Bac2A led to activities ranging from superior or equivalent to Bac2A to inactive, indicating that good activity was not solely dependent on the composition of amino acids or the overall charge or hydrophobicity, but rather required particular linear sequence patterns. A QSAR computational analysis was applied to analyze the data resulting in a model that supported this sequence pattern hypothesis. The activity of selected peptides was confirmed by conventional minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) analyses with a panel of human pathogen bacteria and fungi. Circular-dichroism (CD) spectroscopy with selected peptides in liposomes and membrane depolarization assays were consistent with a relationship between structure and activity. An additional optimization process was performed involving systematic amino acid substitutions of one of the optimal scrambled peptide variants, resulting in superior active peptide variants. This process provides a cost and time effective enrichment of new candidates for drug development, increasing the chances of finding pharmacologically relevant peptides.

  6. Identification, Design and Synthesis of Tubulin-Derived Peptides as Novel Hyaluronan Mimetic Ligands for the Receptor for Hyaluronan-Mediated Motility (RHAMM/HMMR)

    PubMed Central

    Esguerra, Kenneth V. N.; Tolg, Cornelia; Akentieva, Natalia; Price, Matthew; Cho, Choi-Fong; Lewis, John D.; McCarthy, James B.; Turley, Eva A.; Luyt, Leonard G.

    2016-01-01

    Fragments of the extracellular matrix component hyaluronan (HA) promote tissue inflammation, fibrosis and tumor progression. HA fragments act through HA receptors including CD44, LYVE1, TLR2,4 and the receptor for hyaluronan mediated motility (RHAMM/HMMR). RHAMM is a multifunctional protein with both intracellular and extracellular roles in cell motility and proliferation. Extracellular RHAMM binds directly to HA fragments while intracellular RHAMM binds directly to ERK1 and tubulin. Both HA and regions of tubulin (s-tubulin) are anionic and bind to basic amino acid-rich regions in partner proteins, such as in HA and tubulin binding regions of RHAMM. We used this as a rationale for developing bioinformatics and SPR (surface plasmon resonance) based screening to identify high affinity anionic RHAMM peptide ligands. A library of 12-mer peptides was prepared based on the carboxyl terminal tail sequence of s-tubulin isoforms and assayed for their ability to bind to the HA/tubulin binding region of recombinant RHAMM using SPR. This approach resulted in the isolation of three 12-mer peptides with nanomolar affinity for RHAMM. These peptides bound selectively to RHAMM but not to CD44 or TLR2,4 and blocked RHAMM:HA interactions. Furthermore, fluorescein-peptide uptake by PC3MLN4 prostate cancer cells was blocked by RHAMM mAb but not by CD44 mAb. These peptides also reduced the ability of prostate cancer cells to degrade collagen type I. The selectivity of these novel HA peptide mimics for RHAMM suggest their potential for development as HA mimetic imaging and therapeutic agents for HA-promoted disease. PMID:26456171

  7. Primary analysis of a prospective, randomized, single-blinded phase II trial evaluating the HER2 peptide GP2 vaccine in breast cancer patients to prevent recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Ardavanis, Alexandros; Litton, Jennifer K.; Shumway, Nathan M.; Hale, Diane F.; Murray, James L.; Perez, Sonia A.; Ponniah, Sathibalan; Baxevanis, Constantin N.; Papamichail, Michael

    2016-01-01

    GP2 is a HER2-derived, HLA-A2+ restricted peptide. Phase I studies showed GP2 administered with GM-CSF to be safe and immunogenic. Here we report the primary analysis of a prospective, randomized, multicenter phase II adjuvant trial conducted to determine the vaccine's efficacy. The trial enrolled HLA-A2+, clinically disease-free, node-positive and high-risk node-negative breast cancer patients with tumors expressing HER2 (immunohistochemistry[IHC] 1+-3+). Patients were randomized to GP2+GM-CSF versus GM-CSF alone. Disease-free survival (DFS) was analyzed in intention-to-treat (ITT) and per-treatment cohorts; pre-specified subgroup analyses were performed for patients with IHC 3+ or FISH+ disease. The trial enrolled 180 patients; 89 received GP2+GM-CSF and 91 received GM-CSF alone. The groups were well-matched for clinicopathologic characteristics. Toxicities have been minimal. The Kaplan-Meier estimated 5-year DFS rate in the ITT analyses was 88% (95% CI:78-94%) in vaccinated vs. 81% (95% CI:69-89%) (P = 0.43) in control patients after a 34 month median follow-up. In the per-treatment analysis, the estimated 5-year DFS rates were 94% (95% CI:83-98%) and 85% (73-92%) (P = 0.17). In IHC 3+/FISH+ patients, the estimated 5-year DFS rate was 94% (82-98%) in vaccinated patients (n = 51) vs. 89% (71-96%) in control patients (n = 50), (P = 0.86) in the ITT analyses and 100% vs. 89% (71-96%) in vaccinated vs. control patients in the per-treatment analyses (P = 0.08). While the overall ITT analysis did not demonstrate benefit to vaccination, this trial confirmed that the GP2 vaccine is safe and suggests that vaccination may have clinical activity, particularly in patients with HER2 overexpression who received the full vaccine series (ie per-treatment group). PMID:27589688

  8. Chemical genomic screening of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomewide mutant collection reveals genes required for defense against four antimicrobial peptides derived from proteins found in human saliva.

    PubMed

    Lis, Maciej; Bhatt, Sanjay; Schoenly, Nathan E; Lee, Anna Y; Nislow, Corey; Bobek, Libuse A

    2013-02-01

    To compare the effects of four antimicrobial peptides (MUC7 12-mer, histatin 12-mer, cathelicidin KR20, and a peptide containing lactoferricin amino acids 1 to 11) on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we employed a genomewide fitness screen of combined collections of mutants with homozygous deletions of nonessential genes and heterozygous deletions of essential genes. When an arbitrary fitness score cutoffs of 1 (indicating a fitness defect, or hypersensitivity) and -1 (indicating a fitness gain, or resistance) was used, 425 of the 5,902 mutants tested exhibited altered fitness when treated with at least one peptide. Functional analysis of the 425 strains revealed enrichment among the identified deletions in gene groups associated with the Gene Ontology (GO) terms "ribosomal subunit," "ribosome biogenesis," "protein glycosylation," "vacuolar transport," "Golgi vesicle transport," "negative regulation of transcription," and others. Fitness profiles of all four tested peptides were highly similar, particularly among mutant strains exhibiting the greatest fitness defects. The latter group included deletions in several genes involved in induction of the RIM101 signaling pathway, including several components of the ESCRT sorting machinery. The RIM101 signaling regulates response of yeasts to alkaline and neutral pH and high salts, and our data indicate that this pathway also plays a prominent role in regulating protective measures against all four tested peptides. In summary, the results of the chemical genomic screens of S. cerevisiae mutant collection suggest that the four antimicrobial peptides, despite their differences in structure and physical properties, share many interactions with S. cerevisiae cells and consequently a high degree of similarity between their modes of action.

  9. A Randomized Phase II Trial of Multi-epitope Vaccination with Melanoma Peptides for Cytotoxic T-Cells and Helper T-Cells for Patients with Metastatic Melanoma (E1602)

    PubMed Central

    Slingluff, Craig L.; Lee, Sandra; Zhao, Fengmin; Chianese-Bullock, Kimberly A.; Olson, Walter; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Whiteside, Theresa; Leming, Philip D.; Kirkwood, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This multicenter randomized trial was designed to evaluate whether melanoma helper peptides augment cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses to a melanoma vaccine and improve clinical outcome in patients with advanced melanoma. Patients and Methods One hundred seventy-five patients with measurable stage IV melanoma were enrolled into 4 treatment groups, vaccinated with 12 MHC Class I-restricted melanoma peptides (12MP) to stimulate CTL (group A), plus a tetanus peptide (group B) or a mixture of 6 melanoma helper peptides (6MHP, group C) to stimulate helper T lymphocytes (HTL), or with 6MHP alone (group D), in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA) plus GM-CSF. CTL responses were assessed using an in vitro stimulated IFN-gamma ELIspot assay, and HTL responses using proliferation assay. Results In groups A–D, respectively, CTL response rates to 12MP were 43%, 47%, 28%, and 5%, and HTL response rates to 6MHP were in 3%, 0%, 40% and 41%. Best clinical response was partial response (PR) in 7/148 evaluable patients (4.7%) without significant difference among study arms. Median overall survival (OS) was 11.8 months. Immune response to 6MHP was significantly associated with both clinical response (p=0.036) and OS (p=0.004). Conclusion Each vaccine regimen was immunogenic, but melanoma helper peptides did not augment CTL responses to 12MP. The association of survival and immune response to 6MHP supports further investigation of helper peptide vaccines. For patients with advanced melanoma, multipeptide vaccines should be studied in combination with other potentially synergistic active therapies. PMID:23653149

  10. Immunogenic peptides from phage display libraries with potential of protecting mice against the Pseudorabies virus.

    PubMed

    Gazarian, Karlen; Gazarian, Tatiana; Betancourt, José Iván Sánchez; Alonso Morales, Rogelio A

    2011-12-29

    Phage display selection of combinatorial peptide libraries has demonstrated its almost unlimited potential in identifying binding ligands for many targets. The method shows promise for selection of immunogenic peptides against pathogens by antibodies. We have undertaken a study designed to select such mimics for one of the representatives of Herpesviridae, the Pseudorabies virus (PrV), infecting pigs and causing severe neurological complications known as Aujeszky's disease. By screening a 12mer linear and a 7mer cysteine-constrained libraries with immunoglobulins of a rabbit immunized with the virus, a family of 10 antigenic and immunogenic peptides was derived sharing a sequence motif K(L/P/V)GDP(R/K/L). Groups of six C57BL/6 mice were immunized with bacteriophages expressing peptides with this motif sequences. Some of the mice were found to be positive in seroneutralization assay; in a challenge setting, all but two immunized mice survived, albeit presenting some disease symptoms. We discuss the perspectives and limits of generating peptide leads by library screening with immune polyclonal antiserum for designing pure epitope-based vaccines to PrV in the future.

  11. Analysis of the CD2 and spliceosomal Sm B/B' polyproline-arginine motifs defined by a monoclonal antibody using a phage-displayed random peptide library.

    PubMed

    Monos, Dimitri; Heliopoulos, John; Argyris, Elias; Cordopatis, Paul; Zompra, Aikaterini; Kamoun, Malek

    2006-01-01

    The cytoplasmic region of the CD2 receptor of lymphocytes contains proline-rich motifs, which are involved in T cell activation and interleukin-2 production. An intracellular CD2 binding protein, CD2BP2, interacts with two tandem PPPPGHR segments of the CD2 tail. CD2BP2 contains a GYF (glycine-tyrosine-phenylalanine) domain that confers binding to these proline-rich sequences. Monoclonal antibody 3E10 that was previously raised against a peptide containing the CD2 PPPPGHR segment reacts with the native CD2 molecule and spliceosomal Sm B/B' proteins. To identify the exact epitope on the CD2 peptide recognized by 3E10, a phage-displayed combinatorial peptide library was used. Analysis of the selected clones revealed that the mAb 3E10 binds preferentially to the motif PxxPPGxR. Experiments using amino acid substitutions with synthetic peptides confirmed the reactivity of mAb 3E10 with this motif. In addition, we show that several similarities exist between this motif and the CD2BP2-GFY recognition motif PPGxR/K. Binding of antibody 3E10 indicates some degree of degeneracy, which is consistent with its ability to recognize structurally related polyproline-arginine motifs found in intracellular proteins including Sm B/B' proteins and other RNA binding proteins. Thus, mAb 3E10 can be used to specifically identify a sub-class of proline-rich motifs, and as such can be used to study the potential role of these proline-rich sequences in mediating protein-protein interactions.

  12. T cell epitopes of the major fraction of rye grass Lolium perenne (Lol p I) defined using overlapping peptides in vitro and in vivo. I. Isoallergen clone1A.

    PubMed

    Bungy Poor Fard, G A; Latchman, Y; Rodda, S; Geysen, M; Roitt, I; Brostoff, J

    1993-10-01

    One hundred and fifteen overlapping synthetic peptides spanning the entire sequence of the iso-allergen clone1A of Lol p I from rye grass Lolium perenne were synthesized by the multi-pin technique. The peptides were overlapping 12mers, offset by two residues and overlapping by 10 residues. Sets of six adjacent overlapping peptides (except pool-1, 15, 20) were pooled and were used in vitro and in vivo to map the T cell epitopes on Lol p I. Six atopics who were skin test and RAST positive to rye grass showed T cell responses to L. perenne extract (LPE) and its major fraction (Lol p I). Five out of six showed T cell responses in vitro to peptide pool-17, while five non-atopics did not respond to any of the peptide pools. By testing the individual peptides of pool-17, we have located the T cell epitope on Lol p I. Interestingly, when we tested pool-17 and its single peptides in vivo by intradermal skin testing we found in one patient a typical DTH after 24-48 h to pool-17 and its peptides (peptides 3 and 4) which exactly matched the in vitro responses. By defining the T cell epitopes in this way a greater understanding of the allergic response to pollen will be obtained, and a more effective and less dangerous vaccine may be possible for treating patients with hay fever.

  13. A randomized, controlled comparative study of the wrinkle reduction benefits of a cosmetic niacinamide/peptide/retinyl propionate product regimen vs. a prescription 0·02% tretinoin product regimen

    PubMed Central

    Fu, JJJ; Hillebrand, GG; Raleigh, P; Li, J; Marmor, MJ; Bertucci, V; Grimes, PE; Mandy, SH; Perez, MI; Weinkle, SH; Kaczvinsky, JR

    2010-01-01

    Background Tretinoin is considered the benchmark prescription topical therapy for improving fine facial wrinkles, but skin tolerance issues can affect patient compliance. In contrast, cosmetic antiwrinkle products are well tolerated but are generally presumed to be less efficacious than tretinoin. Objectives To compare the efficacy of a cosmetic moisturizer regimen vs. a prescription regimen with 0·02% tretinoin for improving the appearance of facial wrinkles. Methods An 8-week, randomized, parallel-group study was conducted in 196 women with moderate to moderately severe periorbital wrinkles. Following 2 weeks washout, subjects on the cosmetic regimen (n=99) used a sun protection factor (SPF) 30 moisturizing lotion containing 5% niacinamide, peptides and antioxidants, a moisturizing cream containing niacinamide and peptides, and a targeted wrinkle product containing niacinamide, peptides and 0·3% retinyl propionate. Subjects on the prescription regimen (n=97) used 0·02% tretinoin plus moisturizing SPF 30 sunscreen. Subject cohorts (n=25) continued treatment for an additional 16 weeks. Changes in facial wrinkling were assessed by both expert grading and image analysis of digital images of subjects’ faces and by self-assessment questionnaire. Product tolerance was assessed via clinical erythema and dryness grading, subject self-assessment, and determinations of skin barrier integrity (transepidermal water loss) and stratum corneum protein changes. Results The cosmetic regimen significantly improved wrinkle appearance after 8 weeks relative to tretinoin, with comparable benefits after 24 weeks. The cosmetic regimen was significantly better tolerated than tretinoin through 8 weeks by all measures. Conclusions An appropriately designed cosmetic regimen can improve facial wrinkle appearance comparably with the benchmark prescription treatment, with improved tolerability. PMID:20374604

  14. In vitro evaluation of the L-peptide modified magnetic lipid nanoparticles as targeted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent for the nasopharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Chu; Min, Chia-Na; Wu, Han-Chung; Lin, Chin-Tarng; Hsieh, Wen-Yuan

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the encapsulation of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) by the lipid nanoparticle conjugated with the 12-mer peptides (RLLDTNRPLLPY, L-peptide), and the delivery of this complex into living cells. The lipid nanoparticles employed in this work were highly hydrophilic, stable, and contained poly(ethylene-glycol) for conjugation to the bioactive L-peptide. The particle sizes of two different magnetic lipid nanoparticles, L-peptide modified (LML) and non-L-peptide modified (ML), were both around 170 nm with a narrow range of size disparity. The transversal relaxivity, r2, for both LML and ML nanoparticles were found to be significantly higher than the longitudinal relaxivity r1 (r2/r1 > 20). The in vitro tumor cell targeting efficacy of the LML nanoparticles were evaluated and compared to the ML nanoparticles, upon observing cellular uptake of magnetic lipid nanoparticles by the nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells, which express cell surface specific protein for the L-peptide binding revealed. In the Prussian blue staining experiment, cells incubated with LML nanoparticles indicated much higher intracellular iron density than cells incubated with only the ML and SPION nanoparticles. In addition, the MTT assay showed the negligible cell cytotoxicity for LML, ML and SPION nanoparticles. The MR imaging studies demonstrate the better T2-weighted images for the LML-nanoparticle-loaded nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells than the ML- and SPION-loaded cells.

  15. Lattice model for amyloid peptides: OPEP force field parametrization and applications to the nucleus size of Alzheimer's peptides.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thanh Thuy; Nguyen, Phuong H; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2016-05-28

    Coarse-grained protein lattice models approximate atomistic details and keep the essential interactions. They are, therefore, suitable for capturing generic features of protein folding and amyloid formation at low computational cost. As our aim is to study the critical nucleus sizes of two experimentally well-characterized peptide fragments Aβ16-22 and Aβ37-42 of the full length Aβ1-42 Alzheimer's peptide, it is important that simulations with the lattice model reproduce all-atom simulations. In this study, we present a comprehensive force field parameterization based on the OPEP (Optimized Potential for Efficient protein structure Prediction) force field for an on-lattice protein model, which incorporates explicitly the formation of hydrogen bonds and directions of side-chains. Our bottom-up approach starts with the determination of the best lattice force parameters for the Aβ16-22 dimer by fitting its equilibrium parallel and anti-parallel β-sheet populations to all-atom simulation results. Surprisingly, the calibrated force field is transferable to the trimer of Aβ16-22 and the dimer and trimer of Aβ37-42. Encouraged by this finding, we characterized the free energy landscapes of the two decamers. The dominant structure of the Aβ16-22 decamer matches the microcrystal structure. Pushing the simulations for aggregates between 4-mer and 12-mer suggests a nucleus size for fibril formation of 10 chains. In contrast, the Aβ37-42 decamer is largely disordered with mixed by parallel and antiparallel chains, suggesting that the nucleus size is >10 peptides. Our refined force field coupled to this on-lattice model should provide useful insights into the critical nucleation number associated with neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Lattice model for amyloid peptides: OPEP force field parametrization and applications to the nucleus size of Alzheimer's peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Thanh Thuy; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    Coarse-grained protein lattice models approximate atomistic details and keep the essential interactions. They are, therefore, suitable for capturing generic features of protein folding and amyloid formation at low computational cost. As our aim is to study the critical nucleus sizes of two experimentally well-characterized peptide fragments Aβ16-22 and Aβ37-42 of the full length Aβ1-42 Alzheimer's peptide, it is important that simulations with the lattice model reproduce all-atom simulations. In this study, we present a comprehensive force field parameterization based on the OPEP (Optimized Potential for Efficient protein structure Prediction) force field for an on-lattice protein model, which incorporates explicitly the formation of hydrogen bonds and directions of side-chains. Our bottom-up approach starts with the determination of the best lattice force parameters for the Aβ16-22 dimer by fitting its equilibrium parallel and anti-parallel β-sheet populations to all-atom simulation results. Surprisingly, the calibrated force field is transferable to the trimer of Aβ16-22 and the dimer and trimer of Aβ37-42. Encouraged by this finding, we characterized the free energy landscapes of the two decamers. The dominant structure of the Aβ16-22 decamer matches the microcrystal structure. Pushing the simulations for aggregates between 4-mer and 12-mer suggests a nucleus size for fibril formation of 10 chains. In contrast, the Aβ37-42 decamer is largely disordered with mixed by parallel and antiparallel chains, suggesting that the nucleus size is >10 peptides. Our refined force field coupled to this on-lattice model should provide useful insights into the critical nucleation number associated with neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Effect of Teduglutide, a Glucagon-like Peptide 2 Analog, on Citrulline Levels in Patients With Short Bowel Syndrome in Two Phase III Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Seidner, Douglas L; Joly, Francisca; Youssef, Nader N

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In clinical trials, treatment with the glucagon-like peptide 2 analog teduglutide was associated with improved fluid and nutrient absorption and increased intestinal villus height and crypt depth in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Plasma citrulline, an amino acid produced by enterocytes, is considered a measure of enterocyte mass. This analysis assessed changes in plasma citrulline levels in patients with SBS in 2 phase III clinical studies of teduglutide. Methods: Both teduglutide studies (0.05 or 0.10 mg/kg/day in CL0600-004 and 0.05 mg/kg/day in CL0600-020) were phase III, 24-week, double-blind, and placebo controlled. Plasma citrulline levels were analyzed and validated by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Results: In both the CL0600-004 and CL0600-020 studies, change in mean plasma citrulline concentrations at Week 24 vs. baseline was significantly greater with teduglutide compared with placebo (10.9 (0.05-mg/kg/day dose) and 15.7 (0.10-mg/kg/day dose) vs. 2.0 μmol/L and 20.6 vs. 0.7 μmol/L, respectively, for each study (P≤0.0001 for each comparison with placebo)). Teduglutide treatment was associated with reductions from baseline in PS (parenteral support) volume requirements; however, a significant correlation between PS reduction and increase in plasma citrulline at Week 24 was observed in only one out of the three teduglutide treatment groups. Conclusions: In 2 phase III studies, patients receiving teduglutide had significant increases in plasma citrulline at Week 24 compared with patients receiving placebo. Increases in plasma citrulline concentrations likely reflect enterocyte mass expansion, but no clear correlation was detected between change in plasma citrulline and change in weekly PS volume. PMID:26111125

  18. In Silico Models for Designing and Discovering Novel Anticancer Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Atul; Kapoor, Pallavi; Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, G. P. S.

    2013-10-01

    Use of therapeutic peptides in cancer therapy has been receiving considerable attention in the recent years. Present study describes the development of computational models for predicting and discovering novel anticancer peptides. Preliminary analysis revealed that Cys, Gly, Ile, Lys, and Trp are dominated at various positions in anticancer peptides. Support vector machine models were developed using amino acid composition and binary profiles as input features on main dataset that contains experimentally validated anticancer peptides and random peptides derived from SwissProt database. In addition, models were developed on alternate dataset that contains antimicrobial peptides instead of random peptides. Binary profiles-based model achieved maximum accuracy 91.44% with MCC 0.83. We have developed a webserver, which would be helpful in: (i) predicting minimum mutations required for improving anticancer potency; (ii) virtual screening of peptides for discovering novel anticancer peptides, and (iii) scanning natural proteins for identification of anticancer peptides (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/anticp/).

  19. Peptide array-based characterization and design of ZnO-high affinity peptides.

    PubMed

    Okochi, Mina; Sugita, Tomoya; Furusawa, Seiji; Umetsu, Mitsuo; Adschiri, Tadafumi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2010-08-15

    Peptides with both an affinity for ZnO and the ability to generate ZnO nanoparticles have attracted attention for the self-assembly and templating of nanoscale building blocks under ambient conditions with compositional uniformity. In this study, we have analyzed the specific binding sites of the ZnO-binding peptide, EAHVMHKVAPRP, which was identified using a phage display peptide library. The peptide binding assay against ZnO nanoparticles was performed using peptides synthesized on a cellulose membrane using the spot method. Using randomized rotation of amino acids in the ZnO-binding peptide, 125 spot-synthesized peptides were assayed. The peptide binding activity against ZnO nanoparticles varied greatly. This indicates that ZnO binding does not depend on total hydrophobicity or other physical parameters of these peptides, but rather that ZnO recognizes the specific amino acid alignment of these peptides. In addition, several peptides were found to show higher binding ability compared with that of the original peptides. Identification of important binding sites in the EAHVMHKVAPRP peptide was investigated by shortened, stepwise sequence from both termini. Interestingly, two ZnO-binding sites were found as 6-mer peptides: HVMHKV and HKVAPR. The peptides identified by amino acid substitution of HKVAPR were found to show high affinity and specificity for ZnO nanoparticles.

  20. Novel T-cell epitopes of ovalbumin in BALB/c mouse: Potential for peptide-immunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Marie; Mine, Yoshinori

    2009-01-09

    The identification of food allergen T-cell epitopes provides a platform for the development of novel immunotherapies. Despite extensive knowledge of the physicochemical properties of hen ovalbumin (OVA), a major egg allergen, the complete T-cell epitope map of OVA has surprisingly not been defined in the commonly used BALB/c mouse model. In this study, spleen cells obtained from OVA-sensitized mice were incubated in the presence of 12-mer overlapping synthetic peptides, constructed using the SPOTS synthesis method. Proliferative activity was assessed by 72-h in vitro assays with use of the tetrazolium salt WST-1 and led to identification of four mitogenic sequences, i.e., A39R50, S147R158, K263E274, and A329E340. ELISA analyses of interferon (IFN)-{gamma} and interleukin (IL)-4 productions in cell culture supernatants upon stimulation with increasing concentrations of peptides confirmed their immunogenicity. Knowledge of the complete T-cell epitope map of OVA opens the way to a number of experimental investigations, including the exploration of peptide-based immunotherapy.

  1. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  2. Effects of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide on the prognosis of patients with acute anterior myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention: a prospective, multi-center, randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Ai-Jie; Zang, Hong-Yun; Huang, Ru-Gang; Zheng, Xiao-Qun; Lin, Hai-Long; Wang, Wei; Hou, Ping; Xia, Fei; Li, Zhan-Quan

    2017-01-01

    Background This study aims to investigate the effects of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide (rhBNP) on serum enzyme data, cardiac function parameters and cardiovascular events in patients with acute anterior myocardial infarction (MI). Methods A total of 421 patients with acute anterior or extensive anterior MI were collected from 20 hospitals. These patients were randomly divided into two groups: rhBNP and control groups. Both groups of patients received primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within the effective time window. In the rhBNP group, rhBNP administration (0.01 µg/kg/min, 48–72 successive hours) was performed as early as possible after hospital admission. Prior to and one or seven days after PCI, serum concentrations of cardiac troponin (cTnT), creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) were measured. At seven days and 6 months after PCI, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDd) and stroke volume (SV) were measured using 2D Doppler echocardiography. MACEs that occurred during hospitalization and within 6 months after PCI were recorded. Results At postoperative days one and seven, serum concentrations of cTnT were significantly lower in the rhBNP group than in the control group. At postoperative day one, serum concentrations of CK-MB were significantly lower in the rhBNP group than in the control group. At postoperative day seven, serum concentrations of NT-proBNP were significantly lower in the rhBNP group than in the control group, and LVEF was significantly greater in the rhBNP group than in the control group. At postoperative 6 months, LVEDd was significantly lower in the rhBNP group compared with the control group. In addition, SV and LVEF were significantly greater in the rhBNP group than in the control group. By postoperative month 6, the incidence of composite cardiovascular events (16.0% vs. 26.0%, P=0.012), cardiac death (7.0% vs.13

  3. Identification of oligomerizing peptides.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, A; Rodgers, M E; Schleif, R

    2001-06-08

    The AraC DNA binding domain is inactive in a monomeric form but can activate transcription from the arabinose operon promoters upon its dimerization. We used this property to identify plasmids encoding peptide additions to the AraC DNA binding domain that could dimerize the domain. We generated a high diversity library of plasmids by inserting 90-base oligonucleotides of random sequence ahead of DNA coding for the AraC DNA binding domain in an expression vector, transforming, and selecting colonies containing functional oligomeric peptide-AraC DNA binding domain chimeric proteins by their growth on minimal arabinose medium. Six of seven Ara(+) candidates were partially characterized, and one was purified. Equilibrium analytical centrifugation experiments showed that it dimerizes with a dissociation constant of approximately 2 micrometer.

  4. Anionic phospholipids modulate peptide insertion into membranes.

    PubMed

    Liu, L P; Deber, C M

    1997-05-06

    While the insertion of a hydrophobic peptide or membrane protein segment into the bilayer can be spontaneous and driven mainly by the hydrophobic effect, anionic lipids, which comprise ca. 20% of biological membranes, provide a source of electrostatic attractions for binding of proteins/peptides into membranes. To unravel the interplay of hydrophobicity and electrostatics in the binding of peptides into membranes, we designed peptides de novo which possess the typical sequence Lys-Lys-Ala-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Ala-Trp-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Al a-Ala-Lys-Lys-Lys-Lys-amide, where X residues correspond to "guest" residues which encompass a range of hydrophobicity (Leu, Ile, Gly, and Ser). Circular dichroism spectra demonstrated that peptides were partially (40-90%) random in aqueous buffer but were promoted to form 100% alpha-helical structures by anionic lipid micelles. In neutral lipid micelles, only the relatively hydrophobic peptides (X = L and I) spontaneously adopted the alpha-helical conformation, but when 25% of negatively charged lipids were mixed in to mimic the content of anionic lipids in biomembranes, the less hydrophobic (X = S and G) peptides then formed alpha-helical conformations. Consistent with these findings, fluorescence quenching by the aqueous-phase quencher iodide indicated that in anionic (dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol) vesicles, the peptide Trp residue was buried in the lipid vesicle hydrophobic core, while in neutral (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) vesicles, only hydrophobic (X = L and I) peptides were shielded from the aqueous solution. Trp emission spectra of peptides in the presence of phospholipids doxyl-labeled at the 5-, 7-, 10-, 12-, and 16-fatty acid positions implied not only a transbilayer orientation for inserted peptides but also that mixed peptide populations (transbilayer + surface-associated) may arise. Overall results suggest that for hydrophobic peptides with segmental threshold hydrophobicity below that which

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics). PMID:24287494

  6. Combinatorial discovery of tumor targeting peptides using phage display.

    PubMed

    Landon, Linda A; Deutscher, Susan L

    2003-10-15

    Peptides possess appropriate pharmacokinetic properties to serve as cancer imaging or therapeutic targeting agents. Currently, only a small number of rationally-derived, labeled peptide analogues that target only a limited subset of antigens are available. Thus, finding new cancer targeting peptides is a central goal in the field of molecular targeting. Novel tumor-avid peptides can be efficiently identified via affinity selections using complex random peptide libraries containing millions of peptides that are displayed on bacteriophage. In vitro and in situ affinity selections may be used to identify peptides with high affinity for the target antigen in vitro. Unfortunately, it has been found that peptides selected in vitro or in situ may not effectively target tumors in vivo due to poor peptide stability and other problems. To improve in vivo targeting, methodological combinatorial chemistry innovations allow selections to be conducted in the environment of the whole animal. Thus, new targeting peptides with optimal in vivo properties can be selected in vivo in tumor-bearing animals. In vivo selections have been proven successful in identifying peptides that target the vasculature of specific organs. In addition, in vivo selections have identified peptides that bind specifically to the surface of or are internalized into tumor cells. In the future, direct selection of peptides for cancer imaging may be expedited using genetically engineered bacteriophage libraries that encode peptides with intrinsic radiometal-chelation or fluorescent sequences.

  7. C-Peptide Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... vital for the body to use its main energy source, glucose . Since C-peptide and insulin are produced ... these cases, C-peptide measurement is a useful alternative to testing for insulin. C-peptide measurements can ...

  8. Inorganic binding peptides designed by phage display techniques for biotechnology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chih-Wei

    separation of francolite particles from dolomitic particles within Florida phosphate ore. A phage clone with a 12-mer francolite binding peptide of WSITTYHDRAIV was able to concentrate the content of francolite from 25% to 42% in a bench-top flotation process of mixed minerals. The first system demonstrates an advanced technology application of the biopanning approach for the development of novel biosensors, while the second system demonstrates application of the biotechnology approach to a commodity industry.

  9. Development of a multi-mimotope peptide as a vaccine immunogen for infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-shan; Fan, Hong-jie; Li, Yin; Shi, Zheng-liang; Pan, Ying; Lu, Cheng-ping

    2007-05-30

    To explore the mimotope vaccine approach against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), five IBDV-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were prepared and their binding peptides were screened against a phage-displayed 12-mer peptide library. After three rounds of biopanning, 12 phages were selected for each mAbs and their specificity to IBDV was verified by sandwich and competitive inhibition ELISAs. Seven phages per mAb were sequenced and their amino acid sequences were deduced. The five representative sequences of mimotopes corresponding mAbs were determined. An artificial gene, designated 5epis (5 epitopes) and consisting of the five mimotopes arranged in tandem (F1-F7-B34-2B1-2G8) with four GGGS spacers, was chemically synthesized and cloned into a prokaryotic expression plasmid pET28b. The protein, designated r5EPIS, was efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli and showed a size of 10kDa in SDS-PAGE. The r5EPIS protein reacted with anti-IBDV mAbs and polyclonal antibodies in Western blot immunoassays. Immunization of SPF chickens with r5EPIS protein (with Freund adjuvant, 50mug per injection on day 0 and 14) evoked high levels of antibody (12,800 by ELISA/1600 by virus neutralizing assay at day 21) and protected 100% of the chickens against a challenge of 200 ELD(50) of IBDV GX8/99 strain, which sharply contrasted with the, respectively, 13.3% and 6.6% survival rate in the adjuvant group and the untreated group. The multi-mimotope protein r5EPIS promises to be a novel subunit vaccine candidate for IBDV.

  10. A novel Chk1-binding peptide that enhances genotoxic sensitivity through the cellular redistribution of nuclear Chk1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Seok; Choi, Kyu Jin; Bae, Sangwoo

    2016-01-01

    Since checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is an essential factor for cell viability following DNA damage, the inhibition of Chk1 has been a major focus of pharmaceutical development to enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemo- and radiotherapy that damage DNA. However, due to the off-target effects of conventional Chk1-targeting strategies and the toxicity of Chk1 inhibitors, alternative strategies are required to target Chk1. To facilitate such efforts, in this study, we identified a specific Chk1-binding 12-mer peptide from the screening of a phage display library and characterized the peptide in terms of cellular cytotoxicity, and in terms of its effect on Chk1 activity and sensitivity to genotoxic agents. This peptide, named N-terminal Chk1-binding peptide (Chk1-NP), bound the kinase domain of Chk1. Simulation of the binding revealed that the very N-terminus of the Chk1 kinase domain is the potential peptide binding site. Of note, the polyarginine-mediated internalization of Chk1-NP redistributed nuclear Chk1 with a prominent decrease in the nucleus in the absence of DNA damage. Treatment with Chk1-NP peptide alone decreased the viability of p53-defective HeLa cells, but not that of p53-functional NCI-H460 cells under normal conditions. The treatment of HeLa or NCI-H460 cells with the peptide significantly enhanced radiation sensitivity following ionizing radiation (IR) with a greater enhancement observed in HeLa cells. Moreover, the IR-induced destabilization of Chk1 was aggravated by treatment with Chk1-NP. Therefore, the decreased nuclear localization and protein levels of Chk1 seem to be responsible for the enhanced cancer cell killing following combined treatment with IR and Chk1-NP. The approach using the specific Chk1-binding peptide may facilitate the mechanistic understanding and potential modulation of Chk1 activities and may provide a novel rationale for the development of specific Chk1-targeting agents. PMID:28025997

  11. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is capable of enhancing hammerhead ribozyme activity with long but not with short RNA substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Jankowsky, E; Strunk, G; Schwenzer, B

    1997-01-01

    Long RNA substrates are inefficiently cleaved by hammerhead ribozymes in trans. Oligonucleotide facilitators capable of affecting the ribozyme activity by interacting with the substrates at the termini of the ribozyme provide a possibility to improve ribozyme mediated cleavage of long RNA substrates. We have examined the effect of PNA as facilitator in vitro in order to test if even artificial compounds have facilitating potential. Effects of 12mer PNA- (peptide nucleic acid), RNA- and DNA-facilitators of identical sequence were measured with three substrates containing either 942, 452 or 39 nucleotides. The PNA facilitator enhances the ribozyme activity with both, the 942mer and the 452mer substrate to a slightly smaller extent than RNA and DNA facilitators. This effect was observed up to PNA facilitator:substrate ratios of 200:1. The enhancement becomes smaller as the PNA facilitator:substrate ratio exceeds 200:1. With the 39mer substrate, the PNA facilitator decreases the ribozyme activity by more than 100-fold, even at PNA facilitator:substrate ratios of 1:1. Although with long substrates the effect of the PNA facilitator is slightly smaller than the effect of identical RNA or DNA facilitators, PNA may be a more practical choice for potential applications in vivo because PNA is much more resistant to degradation by cellular enzymes. PMID:9207013

  12. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested.

  13. Production and Evaluation of Antibodies and Phage Display-Derived Peptide Ligands for Immunomagnetic Separation of Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Linda D.; McNair, James; McCallan, Lyanne; Thompson, Suzan; Kulakov, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the development and optimization of an immunomagnetic separation (IMS) method to isolate Mycobacterium bovis cells from lymph node tissues. Gamma-irradiated whole M. bovis AF2122/97 cells and ethanol-extracted surface antigens of such cells were used to produce M. bovis-specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in rabbits and mice. They were also used to generate M. bovis-specific peptide ligands by phage display biopanning. The various antibodies and peptide ligands obtained were used to coat MyOne tosyl-activated Dynabeads (Life Technologies), singly or in combination, and evaluated for IMS. Initially, M. bovis capture from Middlebrook 7H9 broth suspensions (concentration range, 10 to 105 CFU/ml) was evaluated by IMS combined with an M. bovis-specific touchdown PCR. IMS-PCR results and, subsequently, IMS-culture results indicated that the beads with greatest immunocapture capability for M. bovis in broth were those coated simultaneously with a monoclonal antibody and a biotinylated 12-mer peptide. These dually coated beads exhibited minimal capture (mean of 0.36% recovery) of 12 other Mycobacterium spp. occasionally encountered in veterinary tuberculosis (TB) diagnostic laboratories. When the optimized IMS method was applied to various M. bovis-spiked lymph node matrices, it demonstrated excellent detection sensitivities (50% limits of detection of 3.16 and 57.7 CFU/ml of lymph node tissue homogenate for IMS-PCR and IMS-culture, respectively). The optimized IMS method therefore has the potential to improve isolation of M. bovis from lymph nodes and hence the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis. PMID:22322353

  14. Screening a Phage Display Library for Two Novel OmpU-Binding Peptides with Adhesion Antagonistic Activity against Vibrio mimicus

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Huizhu; Xiao, Ning; Li, Jinnian; Kong, Lingyan; Hou, Liting

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio mimicus is a pathogen that causes ascites disease in fish. We have previously demonstrated that the outer membrane protein U (OmpU) is an important adhesin in V. mimicus. Here eight specific OmpU-binding phage clones, which presented three different OmpU-binding peptides (designated P1, P2, P3), were screened from a commercially available phage displayed 12-mer peptide library using rOmpU protein as target. Then, synthetic OmpU-binding peptides were measured for their adhesion antagonistic activity and binding affinity via adhesion inhibition test and non-competitive ELISA, respectively. The results showed that after co-incubated with the mixture of rOmpU and P3, visible green fluorescence could be observed on the epithelioma papulosum cyprinidi (EPC) cells surface; while the EPC cells co-incubated with the mixture of rOmpU and P1/P2 exhibited little green fluorescence. The average adhesion number of V. mimicus 04–14 isolate before and after treatment with peptide was 21.4 ± 1.5, 20.8 ± 0.8 (irrelevant peptide), 20.2 ± 0.5 (P3), 5.1 ± 0.7 (P1) and 3.4 ± 0.8 (P2), respectively. There was a significant decrease in the adhesive level of 04–14 isolate treated with P1/ P2 compared to the untreated isolate (p<0.01). The affinity constants of P1 and P2 were (6.17 ± 0.19) × 108 L/mol and (1.24 ± 0.56) × 109 L/mol, respectively. Furthermore, protective effects of P1 and P2 on grass carps challenged with V. mimicus were preliminary detected. It was found there was delayed death of fish in the groups treated with P1/P2, and the survival rate of challenged fish improved with the increase of the dose of adhesion antagonistic peptide. Taken together, two novel OmpU-binding peptides, which possessed adhesion antagonistic activity, high affinity and a certain degree of antibacterial activity against V. mimicus, were screened and identified. PMID:27832083

  15. Simulation of Peptides at Aqueous Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, M.; Chipot, C.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Behavior of peptides at water-membrane interfaces is of great interest in studies on cellular transport and signaling, membrane fusion, and the action of toxins and antibiotics. Many peptides, which exist in water only as random coils, can form sequence-dependent, ordered structures at aqueous interfaces, incorporate into membranes and self-assembly into functional units, such as simple ion channels. Multi -nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to study the mechanism and energetics of interfacial folding of both non-polar and amphiphilic peptides, their insertion into membranes and association into higher-order structures. The simulations indicate that peptides fold non-sequentially, often through a series of amphiphilic intermediates. They further incorporate into the membrane in a preferred direction as folded monomers, and only then aggregate into dimers and, possibly, further into "dimers of dimers".

  16. Advancement and applications of peptide phage display technology in biomedical science.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Hsun; Liu, I-Ju; Lu, Ruei-Min; Wu, Han-Chung

    2016-01-19

    Combinatorial phage library is a powerful research tool for high-throughput screening of protein interactions. Of all available molecular display techniques, phage display has proven to be the most popular approach. Screening phage-displayed random peptide libraries is an effective means of identifying peptides that can bind target molecules and regulate their function. Phage-displayed peptide libraries can be used for (i) B-cell and T-cell epitope mapping, (ii) selection of bioactive peptides bound to receptors or proteins, disease-specific antigen mimics, peptides bound to non-protein targets, cell-specific peptides, or organ-specific peptides, and (iii) development of peptide-mediated drug delivery systems and other applications. Targeting peptides identified using phage display technology may be useful for basic research and translational medicine. In this review article, we summarize the latest technological advancements in the application of phage-displayed peptide libraries to applied biomedical sciences.

  17. Peptide Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Jenssen, Håvard; Hamill, Pamela; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial host defense peptides are produced by all complex organisms as well as some microbes and have diverse and complex antimicrobial activities. Collectively these peptides demonstrate a broad range of antiviral and antibacterial activities and modes of action, and it is important to distinguish between direct microbicidal and indirect activities against such pathogens. The structural requirements of peptides for antiviral and antibacterial activities are evaluated in light of the diverse set of primary and secondary structures described for host defense peptides. Peptides with antifungal and antiparasitic activities are discussed in less detail, although the broad-spectrum activities of such peptides indicate that they are important host defense molecules. Knowledge regarding the relationship between peptide structure and function as well as their mechanism of action is being applied in the design of antimicrobial peptide variants as potential novel therapeutic agents. PMID:16847082

  18. Peptides specific for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection: diagnostic potential.

    PubMed

    Casey, J L; Sanalla, A M; Tamvakis, D; Thalmann, C; Carroll, E L; Parisi, K; Coley, A M; Stewart, D J; Vaughan, J A; Michalski, W P; Luke, R; Foley, M

    2011-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map) is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD). Current serological diagnostic tests for JD are limited by their sensitivity when used in sub-clinical stages of the disease. Our objective was to identify peptides that mimic diagnostically important Map epitopes that might be incorporated into a new-generation JD diagnostic. Four peptides were isolated from a phage-displayed random peptide library by screening on antibodies derived from Map-infected goats. The peptides were recognised by antibodies from Map-infected goats but not by antibodies from uninfected goats. The peptides elicited immune responses in rabbits, which reacted strongly with bona fide Map antigens proving the peptides were true epitope mimics. To assess the diagnostic value a panel of goat sera was screened for reactivity's with peptides. The peptides were recognised by antibodies from a proportion of goats infected with Map compared with control animals with a diagnostic specificity of 100% and the sensitivity ranged from 50 to 75%. Combinations of any two peptides improved sensitivity 62.5-87.5% and 100% sensitivity was achieved with three of the four peptides in combination. These data suggest peptides representing diagnostically important Map epitopes could be incorporated into a sensitive diagnostic test.

  19. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  20. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  1. Early peptidic enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brack, André; Barbier, Bernard

    Oligopeptides supposed to be essential to primitive living cells could not be obtained by a prebiotic organic chemistry working mainly at random. Selection pathways were required. Experimental evidence is given for selective condensation of amino-acids in water as well as for selective resistance to degradation. Polycationic polypeptides containing lysyl (or arginyl) and hydrophobic residues strongly accelerate the hydrolysis of oligoribonucleotides. A ionic complex is first formed and the polypeptides are particularly active when they adopt a stable conformation, β-sheet or α-helix, in the complex. Well-defined short peptides were synthesized in order to determine the critical chain-length required for chemical activity. In a contemporary cell, proteins represent about 40 % of the dry weight. They fulfil a structural role and they are particularly helpful as chemical catalysts (enzymes). They can be represented as long chains made of twenty different building blocks, the amino-acids NH2-CHR-COOH, which differ by the side-chain R. Proteins are remarkable in the sense that they use amino-acids having only one carbon atom between the -NH2 and -COOH functions. The central carbon atom has always the same spatial asymmetry (chirality) and always bears a hydrogen atom. When the side-chain R is a hydrocarbon, it is branched. When R contains a chemical function, the side functions do not participate to the peptide bond construction. The protein chain results from the condensation of amino-acids, i.e. water molecules are removed between molecules in a medium which is mainly aqueous (the cell contains 75 % of water). The protein chains adopt rigid asymmetric conformations (α-helices, β-sheet structures) which are essential for the protein functions. Proteins, even the smallest ones, are too sophisticated entities to be considered as the products of an organic chemistry working at random, without any chemical selection. The chemist has therefore to understand, with simple

  2. A switchable stapled peptide.

    PubMed

    Kalistratova, Aleksandra; Legrand, Baptiste; Verdié, Pascal; Naydenova, Emilia; Amblard, Muriel; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    The O-N acyl transfer reaction has gained significant popularity in peptide and medicinal chemistry. This reaction has been successfully applied to the synthesis of difficult sequence-containing peptides, cyclic peptides, epimerization-free fragment coupling and more recently, to switchable peptide polymers. Herein, we describe a related strategy to facilitate the synthesis and purification of a hydrophobic stapled peptide. The staple consists of a serine linked through an amide bond formed from its carboxylic acid function and the side chain amino group of diaminopropionic acid and through an ester bond formed from its amino group and the side chain carboxylic acid function of aspartic acid. The α-amino group of serine was protonated during purification. Interestingly, when the peptide was placed at physiological pH, the free amino group initiated the O-N shift reducing the staple length by one atom, leading to a more hydrophobic stapled peptide.

  3. A Multiscale Approach to Characterize the Early Aggregation Steps of the Amyloid-Forming Peptide GNNQQNY from the Yeast Prion Sup-35

    PubMed Central

    Nasica-Labouze, Jessica; Meli, Massimiliano; Derreumaux, Philippe; Colombo, Giorgio; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-01-01

    The self-organization of peptides into amyloidogenic oligomers is one of the key events for a wide range of molecular and degenerative diseases. Atomic-resolution characterization of the mechanisms responsible for the aggregation process and the resulting structures is thus a necessary step to improve our understanding of the determinants of these pathologies. To address this issue, we combine the accelerated sampling properties of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations based on the OPEP coarse-grained potential with the atomic resolution description of interactions provided by all-atom MD simulations, and investigate the oligomerization process of the GNNQQNY for three system sizes: 3-mers, 12-mers and 20-mers. Results for our integrated simulations show a rich variety of structural arrangements for aggregates of all sizes. Elongated fibril-like structures can form transiently in the 20-mer case, but they are not stable and easily interconvert in more globular and disordered forms. Our extensive characterization of the intermediate structures and their physico-chemical determinants points to a high degree of polymorphism for the GNNQQNY sequence that can be reflected at the macroscopic scale. Detailed mechanisms and structures that underlie amyloid aggregation are also provided. PMID:21625573

  4. A multiscale approach to characterize the early aggregation steps of the amyloid-forming peptide GNNQQNY from the yeast prion sup-35.

    PubMed

    Nasica-Labouze, Jessica; Meli, Massimiliano; Derreumaux, Philippe; Colombo, Giorgio; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-05-01

    The self-organization of peptides into amyloidogenic oligomers is one of the key events for a wide range of molecular and degenerative diseases. Atomic-resolution characterization of the mechanisms responsible for the aggregation process and the resulting structures is thus a necessary step to improve our understanding of the determinants of these pathologies. To address this issue, we combine the accelerated sampling properties of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations based on the OPEP coarse-grained potential with the atomic resolution description of interactions provided by all-atom MD simulations, and investigate the oligomerization process of the GNNQQNY for three system sizes: 3-mers, 12-mers and 20-mers. Results for our integrated simulations show a rich variety of structural arrangements for aggregates of all sizes. Elongated fibril-like structures can form transiently in the 20-mer case, but they are not stable and easily interconvert in more globular and disordered forms. Our extensive characterization of the intermediate structures and their physico-chemical determinants points to a high degree of polymorphism for the GNNQQNY sequence that can be reflected at the macroscopic scale. Detailed mechanisms and structures that underlie amyloid aggregation are also provided.

  5. Construction and immunogenicity of a recombinant swinepox virus expressing a multi-epitope peptide for porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huixing; Ma, Zhe; Hou, Xin; Chen, Lei; Fan, Hongjie

    2017-01-01

    To characterize neutralizing mimotopes, phages were selected from a 12-mer phage display library using three anti-porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) neutralizing monoclonal antibodies: (1) A1; (2) A2; and (3) A7. Of these, A2 and A7 recognize the mimotope, P2, which contains the SRHDHIH motif, which has conserved consensus sequences from amino acid positions 156 to 161 in the N-terminal ectodomain of GP3. The artificial multi-epitope gene, mp2, was designed by combining three repeats of the mimotope P2. The resulting sequence was inserted into the swinepox virus (SPV) genome to construct a recombinant swinepox virus (rSPV-mp2). The rSPV-mp2 was able to stably express the multi-epitope peptide, mP2, in vitro. The rSPV-mp2 immunized pigs exhibited a significantly shorter fever duration compared with the wtSPV treated group (P < 0.05). There was an enhanced humoral and cellular immune response, decreased number of PRRSV genomic copies, and a significant reduction in the gross lung pathology (P < 0.05) was observed following PRRSV infection in rSPV-mp2-immunized animals. The results suggest that the recombinant rSPV-mp2 provided pigs with significant protection against PRRSV infection. PMID:28272485

  6. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions.

  7. Polycyclic peptide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Heinis, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Owing to their excellent binding properties, high stability, and low off-target toxicity, polycyclic peptides are an attractive molecule format for the development of therapeutics. Currently, only a handful of polycyclic peptides are used in the clinic; examples include the antibiotic vancomycin, the anticancer drugs actinomycin D and romidepsin, and the analgesic agent ziconotide. All clinically used polycyclic peptide drugs are derived from natural sources, such as soil bacteria in the case of vancomycin, actinomycin D and romidepsin, or the venom of a fish-hunting coil snail in the case of ziconotide. Unfortunately, nature provides peptide macrocyclic ligands for only a small fraction of therapeutic targets. For the generation of ligands of targets of choice, researchers have inserted artificial binding sites into natural polycyclic peptide scaffolds, such as cystine knot proteins, using rational design or directed evolution approaches. More recently, large combinatorial libraries of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides have been generated de novo and screened by phage display. In this Minireview, the properties of existing polycyclic peptide drugs are discussed and related to their interesting molecular architectures. Furthermore, technologies that allow the development of unnatural polycyclic peptide ligands are discussed. Recent application of these technologies has generated promising results, suggesting that polycyclic peptide therapeutics could potentially be developed for a broad range of diseases.

  8. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  9. The natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Gary F

    2004-03-01

    The natriuretic peptides are a family of widely distributed, but evolutionarily conserved, polypeptide mediators that exert a range of actions throughout the body. In cardiovascular homeostasis, the endocrine roles of the cardiac-derived atrial and B-type natriuretic peptide (ANP and BNP) in regulating central fluid volume and blood pressure have been recognised for two decades. However, there is a growing realisation that natriuretic peptide actions go far beyond their volume regulating effects. These pleiotropic actions include local (autocrine/paracrine) regulatory actions of ANP and BNP within the heart, and of another natriuretic peptide, CNP, within the vessel wall. Effects on function and growth of the local tissue environment are likely to be of great importance, especially in disease states where tissue and circulating levels of ANP and BNP rise markedly. At present, the relevance of other natriuretic peptides (notably uroguanylin and DNP) to human physiology and pathology remain uncertain. Other articles in this issue of Basic Research in Cardiology review the molecular physiology of natriuretic peptide signalling, with a particular emphasis on the lessons from genetically targetted mice; the vascular activity of natriuretic peptides; the regulation and roles of natriuretic peptides in ischaemic myocardium; and the diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic roles of natriuretic peptides in heart failure.

  10. Randomization Strategies.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Christopher K

    2017-04-01

    An understanding of randomization is important both for study design and to assist medical professionals in evaluating the medical literature. Simple randomization can be done through a variety of techniques, but carries a risk of unequal distribution of subjects into treatment groups. Block randomization can be used to overcome this limitation by ensuring that small subgroups are distributed evenly between treatment groups. Finally, techniques can be used to evenly distribute subjects between treatment groups while accounting for confounding variables, so as to not skew results when there is a high index of suspicion that a particular variable will influence outcome.

  11. Random thoughts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ajansen; kwhitefoot; panteltje1; edprochak; sudhakar, the

    2014-07-01

    In reply to the physicsworld.com news story “How to make a quantum random-number generator from a mobile phone” (16 May, http://ow.ly/xFiYc, see also p5), which describes a way of delivering random numbers by counting the number of photons that impinge on each of the individual pixels in the camera of a Nokia N9 smartphone.

  12. Peptide bioregulators inhibit apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V K; Kvetnoii, I M

    2000-12-01

    The effects of peptide bioregulators epithalon and vilon on the dynamics of irradiation-induced apoptotic death of spleen lymphocytes in rats indicate that these agents inhibit physiologically programmed cell death. The antiapoptotic effect of vilon was more pronounced, which corroborates the concept on tissue-specific effect of peptide bioregulators.

  13. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  14. Analysis of physical interactions between peptides and HLA molecules and application to the detection of human immunodeficiency virus 1 antigenic peptides

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The physical association of 40 antigenic peptides and purified HLA class I and class II molecules was monitored using a direct peptide binding assay (PBA) in solid phase and an inhibition peptide binding assay (IPBA) in which the competing peptide was present in a soluble phase. We also examined the ability of different peptides to inhibit the lytic activity of human antiviral cytolytic T cells towards cells incubated with the corresponding target peptide. Our results showed that: (a) Binding of a given human T cell-recognized peptide to several HLA class I and class II molecules occurred frequently. Nevertheless, preferential binding of peptides to their respective restriction molecules was also observed. (b) Binding of HLA molecules to peptides recognized by murine T cells occurred less frequently. (c) 11 of 24 (46%) randomly selected HIV-1 peptides contained agretopic residues allowing their binding to HLA molecules. (d) The kinetics of HLA/peptide association depended on the peptide tested and were faster than or similar to those reported for Ia molecules. Dissociation of these complexes was very low. (e) Peptide/HLA molecule binding was dependent on length, number of positive charges, and presence of hydrophobic residue in the peptide. (f) A correlation was demonstrated between a peptide inhibitory effect in the IPBA and its blocking effect in the cytolytic test. Our data indicated that the restriction phenomenon observed in T cell responses was not strictly related to either an elective HLA/peptide association, or a high binding capacity of a peptide to HLA molecules. These data also showed that the PBA and IPBA are appropriate for the detection of agretopic residues within HIV- 1 proteins. PMID:2388036

  15. Dinosaur Peptides Suggest Mechanisms of Protein Survival

    SciTech Connect

    San Antonio, James D.; Schweitzer, Mary H.; Jensen, Shane T.; Kalluri, Raghu; Buckley, Michael; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.

    2011-09-16

    Eleven collagen peptide sequences recovered from chemical extracts of dinosaur bones were mapped onto molecular models of the vertebrate collagen fibril derived from extant taxa. The dinosaur peptides localized to fibril regions protected by the close packing of collagen molecules, and contained few acidic amino acids. Four peptides mapped to collagen regions crucial for cell-collagen interactions and tissue development. Dinosaur peptides were not represented in more exposed parts of the collagen fibril or regions mediating intermolecular cross-linking. Thus functionally significant regions of collagen fibrils that are physically shielded within the fibril may be preferentially preserved in fossils. These results show empirically that structure-function relationships at the molecular level could contribute to selective preservation in fossilized vertebrate remains across geological time, suggest a 'preservation motif', and bolster current concepts linking collagen structure to biological function. This non-random distribution supports the hypothesis that the peptides are produced by the extinct organisms and suggests a chemical mechanism for survival.

  16. Antimicrobial Peptides from Fish

    PubMed Central

    Masso-Silva, Jorge A.; Diamond, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found widely distributed through Nature, and participate in the innate host defense of each species. Fish are a great source of these peptides, as they express all of the major classes of AMPs, including defensins, cathelicidins, hepcidins, histone-derived peptides, and a fish-specific class of the cecropin family, called piscidins. As with other species, the fish peptides exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, killing both fish and human pathogens. They are also immunomodulatory, and their genes are highly responsive to microbes and innate immuno-stimulatory molecules. Recent research has demonstrated that some of the unique properties of fish peptides, including their ability to act even in very high salt concentrations, make them good potential targets for development as therapeutic antimicrobials. Further, the stimulation of their gene expression by exogenous factors could be useful in preventing pathogenic microbes in aquaculture. PMID:24594555

  17. Preparation of peptides which mimic glycosphingolipids by using phage peptide library and their modulation on beta-galactosidase activity.

    PubMed

    Taki, T; Ishikawa, D; Hamasaki, H; Handa, S

    1997-11-24

    We describe the use of a phage-displayed random pentadecamer peptide library for searching glycosphingolipid mimicking peptides. Two phage clones (AD-1 and AD-2) were selected by biopanning using monoclonal antibody AD117m, directed to lactotetraosylceramide (Lc4Cer). The amino acid sequences of the selected clones showed high homology (VPPXFXXXY) in 9-mer. Three phage clones were selected by using monoclonal antibody H11, directed to neolactotetraosylceramide (nLc4Cer), the linkage isomer of Lc4Cer, and the displayed amino acid sequences were compared. One of these peptides showed the same amino acid sequence as that of AD-2 except for one amino acid substitution. Pentadecamer, 9-mer and point mutated 9-mer peptides were synthesized on the basis of the displayed amino acid sequences. Binding activity of the peptides to the monoclonal antibodies or Ricinus communis lectin showed that 9-mer peptides are enough to mimic the epitope carbohydrate structure. Furthermore, six of the synthesized peptides inhibited Jack bean beta-galactosidase activity towards nLc4Cer at a high concentration of the enzyme, whereas at lower enzyme concentrations some peptides showed potent activation of the enzyme activity. This is the first report of carbohydrate mimicking peptides which modulate glycosidase activity.

  18. Intracellular Production of Cyclic Peptide Libraries with SICLOPPS.

    PubMed

    Osher, Eliot L; Tavassoli, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Cyclic peptides are an important class of molecules that are increasingly viewed as an ideal scaffold for inhibition of protein-protein interactions (PPI). Here we detail an approach that enables the intracellular synthesis of cyclic peptide libraries of around 10(8) members. The method utilizes split intein mediated circular ligation of peptides and proteins (SICLOPPS), taking advantage of split intein splicing to cyclize a library of peptide sequences. SICLOPPS allows the ring size, set residues and number of random residues within a library to be predetermined by the user. SICLOPPS libraries have been combined with a variety of cell-based screens to identify cyclic peptide inhibitors of a variety of enzymes and protein-protein interactions.

  19. Development of a Small Peptide Tag for Covalent Labeling of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Fujie; Fuller, Roberta; Asawapornmongkol, Lily; Warsinke, Axel; Gobuty, Sarah; Barbas, Carlos F.

    2008-01-01

    A 21-mer peptide that can be used to covalently introduce synthetic molecules into proteins has been developed. Phage displayed peptide libraries were subjected to reaction-based selection with 1,3-diketones. The peptide was further evolved by addition of a randomized region and reselection for improved binding. The resulting 21-mer peptide had a reactive amino group that formed an enaminone with 1,3-diketone and was used as a tag for labeling of maltose binding protein. Using this peptide tag and 1,3-diketone derivatives, a variety of molecules such as reporter probes and functionalities may be covalently introduced into proteins of interest. PMID:17602682

  20. Antimicrobial peptides: a review of how peptide structure impacts antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Jason W.; Mello, Charlene M.

    2004-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been discovered in insects, mammals, reptiles, and plants to protect against microbial infection. Many of these peptides have been isolated and studied exhaustively to decipher the molecular mechanisms that impart protection against infectious bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Unfortunately, the molecular mechanisms are still being debated within the scientific community but valuable clues have been obtained through structure/function relationship studies1. Biophysical studies have revealed that cecropins, isolated from insects and pigs, exhibit random structure in solution but undergo a conformational change to an amphipathic α-helix upon interaction with a membrane surface2. The lack of secondary structure in solution results in an extremely durable peptide able to survive exposure to high temperatures, organic solvents and incorporation into fibers and films without compromising antibacterial activity. Studies to better understand the antimicrobial action of cecropins and other AMPs have provided insight into the importance of peptide sequence and structure in antimicrobial activities. Therefore, enhancing our knowledge of how peptide structure imparts function may result in customized peptide sequences tailored for specific applications such as targeted cell delivery systems, novel antibiotics and food preservation additives. This review will summarize the current state of knowledge with respect to cell binding and antimicrobial activity of AMPs focusing primarily upon cecropins.

  1. [Biologically Active Peptides Isolated from Dill Anethum graveolens L].

    PubMed

    Kulikova, O G; Maltsev, D I; Ilyina, A P; Burdina, A V; Yamskova, V P; Yamskov, I A

    2015-01-01

    Peptide mixtures with molecular weights of 1000-2000 Da and in vivo membrano-trophic activity against mouse hepatocyte culture at very low concentrations were isolated from dill Anethum graveolens L. leaves. It has been found that plant peptides in aqueous solution formed larger nanosized particles of approximately 90 nm with a secondary structure mainly composed of β-structures and random coil structures. We demonstrated that peptides isolated from A. graveolens in vitro at an ultra-low dosage affected the size of the area of pigmented cells of amphibian liver, which are analogous to Kupffer cells of the mammalian liver, using roller organotypic newt liver culture models.

  2. Endothelial cell migration on surfaces modified with immobilized adhesive peptides.

    PubMed

    Kouvroukoglou, S; Dee, K C; Bizios, R; McIntire, L V; Zygourakis, K

    2000-09-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) migration has been studied on aminophase surfaces with covalently bound RGDS and YIGSRG cell adhesion peptides. The fluorescent marker dansyl chloride was used to quantify the spatial distribution of the peptides on the modified surfaces. Peptides appeared to be distributed in uniformly dispersed large clusters separated by areas of lower peptide concentrations. We employed digital time-lapse video microscopy and image analysis to monitor EC migration on the modified surfaces and to reconstruct the cell trajectories. The persistent random walk model was then applied to analyze the cell displacement data and compute the mean root square speed, the persistence time, and the random motility coefficient of EC. We also calculated the time-averaged speed of cell locomotion. No differences in the speed of cell locomotion on the various substrates were noted. Immobilization of the cell adhesion peptides (RGDS and YIGSRG), however, significantly increased the persistence of cell movement and, thus, the random motility coefficient. These results suggest that immobilization of cell adhesion peptides on the surface of implantable biomaterials may lead to enhanced endothelization rates.

  3. Model peptide studies of sequence regions in the elastomeric biomineralization protein, Lustrin A. I. The C-domain consensus-PG-, -NVNCT-motif.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Wustman, Brandon A; Morse, Daniel; Evans, John Spencer

    2002-05-01

    The lustrin superfamily represents a unique group of biomineralization proteins localized between layered aragonite mineral plates (i.e., nacre layer) in mollusk shell. Recent atomic force microscopy (AFM) pulling studies have demonstrated that the lustrin-containing organic nacre layer in the abalone, Haliotis rufescens, exhibits a typical sawtooth force-extension curve with hysteretic recovery. This force extension behavior is reminiscent of reversible unfolding and refolding in elastomeric proteins such as titin and tenascin. Since secondary structure plays an important role in force-induced protein unfolding and refolding, the question is, What secondary structure(s) exist within the major domains of Lustrin A? Using a model peptide (FPGKNVNCTSGE) representing the 12-residue consensus sequence found near the N-termini of the first eight cysteine-rich domains (C-domains) within the Lustrin A protein, we employed CD, NMR spectroscopy, and simulated annealing/minimization to determine the secondary structure preferences for this sequence. At pH 7.4, we find that the 12-mer sequence adopts a loop conformation, consisting of a "bend" or "turn" involving residues G3-K4 and N7-C8-T9, with extended conformations arising at F1-G3; K4-V6; T9-S10-G11 in the sequence. Minor pH-dependent conformational effects were noted for this peptide; however, there is no evidence for a salt-bridge interaction between the K4 and E12 side chains. The presence of a loop conformation within the highly conserved -PG-, -NVNCT- sequence of C1-C8 domains may have important structural and mechanistic implications for the Lustrin A protein with regard to elastic behavior.

  4. Purification of anti-MUC1 antibodies by peptide mimotope affinity chromatography using peptides derived from a polyvalent phage display library.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard G; Missailidis, Sotiris; Price, Michael R

    2002-01-05

    A polyvalent, lytic phage display system (T7Select415-1b) displaying a random peptide library has been investigated for its ability to discover novel mimotopes reactive with the therapeutic monoclonal antibody C595. Sequence analysis of enriched phage lead to the identification of a predominant sequence RNREAPRGKICS, and two other consensus sequences RXXP and RXP. The novel synthetic peptide RNREAPRGKICS was linked to beaded agarose and the performance as a mimotope affinity chromatography matrix evaluated. Antibody purified using the novel matrix was found to be of higher specific reactivity than antibody purified using the conventional epitope matrix (peptide APDTRPAPG). The RNREAPRGKICS peptide binding to C595 demonstrated a higher equilibrium association constant (K(A)=0.75 x 10(6)) than the epitope peptide (K(A)=0.16 x 10(6)). Circular dichroism showed that the novel peptide had a more highly ordered structure at 4 degrees C and room temperature, than the epitope peptide.

  5. Cyclic Opioid Peptides.

    PubMed

    Remesic, Michael; Lee, Yeon Sun; Hruby, Victor J

    2016-01-01

    For decades the opioid receptors have been an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of pain. Since the first discovery of enkephalin, approximately a dozen endogenous opioid peptides have been known to produce opioid activity and analgesia, but their therapeutics have been limited mainly due to low blood brain barrier penetration and poor resistance to proteolytic degradation. One versatile approach to overcome these drawbacks is the cyclization of linear peptides to cyclic peptides with constrained topographical structure. Compared to their linear parents, cyclic analogs exhibit better metabolic stability, lower offtarget toxicity, and improved bioavailability. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies have uncovered promising compounds for the treatment of pain as well as further elucidate structural elements required for selective opioid receptor activity. The benefits that come with employing cyclization can be further enhanced through the generation of polycyclic derivatives. Opioid ligands generally have a short peptide chain and thus the realm of polycyclic peptides has yet to be explored. In this review, a brief history of designing ligands for the opioid receptors, including classic linear and cyclic ligands, is discussed along with recent approaches and successes of cyclic peptide ligands for the receptors. Various scaffolds and approaches to improve bioavailability are elaborated and concluded with a discourse towards polycyclic peptides.

  6. Epitope Mapping with Random Phage Display Library

    PubMed Central

    Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi; Goldblum, Randall M.

    2017-01-01

    Random phage display library is used to map conformational as well as linear epitopes. These libraries are available in varying lengths and with circularization. We provide here a protocol conveying our experience using a commercially available peptide phage display library, which in our hands provides good results. PMID:24515483

  7. Definition of Proteasomal Peptide Splicing Rules for High-Efficiency Spliced Peptide Presentation by MHC Class I Molecules.

    PubMed

    Berkers, Celia R; de Jong, Annemieke; Schuurman, Karianne G; Linnemann, Carsten; Meiring, Hugo D; Janssen, Lennert; Neefjes, Jacques J; Schumacher, Ton N M; Rodenko, Boris; Ovaa, Huib

    2015-11-01

    Peptide splicing, in which two distant parts of a protein are excised and then ligated to form a novel peptide, can generate unique MHC class I-restricted responses. Because these peptides are not genetically encoded and the rules behind proteasomal splicing are unknown, it is difficult to predict these spliced Ags. In the current study, small libraries of short peptides were used to identify amino acid sequences that affect the efficiency of this transpeptidation process. We observed that splicing does not occur at random, neither in terms of the amino acid sequences nor through random splicing of peptides from different sources. In contrast, splicing followed distinct rules that we deduced and validated both in vitro and in cells. Peptide ligation was quantified using a model peptide and demonstrated to occur with up to 30% ligation efficiency in vitro, provided that optimal structural requirements for ligation were met by both ligating partners. In addition, many splicing products could be formed from a single protein. Our splicing rules will facilitate prediction and detection of new spliced Ags to expand the peptidome presented by MHC class I Ags.

  8. Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Phase III Trial of Yeast-Derived Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Versus Peptide Vaccination Versus GM-CSF Plus Peptide Vaccination Versus Placebo in Patients With No Evidence of Disease After Complete Surgical Resection of Locally Advanced and/or Stage IV Melanoma: A Trial of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group–American College of Radiology Imaging Network Cancer Research Group (E4697)

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, David H.; Lee, Sandra; Zhao, Fengmin; Tarhini, Ahmad A.; Margolin, Kim A.; Ernstoff, Marc S.; Atkins, Michael B.; Cohen, Gary I.; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Kirkwood, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and peptide vaccination (PV) on relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with resected high-risk melanoma. Patients and Methods Patients with completely resected stage IV or high-risk stage III melanoma were grouped by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) -A2 status. HLA-A2–positive patients were randomly assigned to receive GM-CSF, PV, both, or placebo; HLA-A2–negative patients, GM-CSF or placebo. Treatment lasted for 1 year or until recurrence. Efficacy analyses were conducted in the intent-to-treat population. Results A total of 815 patients were enrolled. There were no significant improvements in OS (stratified log-rank P = .528; hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% repeated CI, 0.77 to 1.15) or RFS (P = .131; hazard ratio, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.74 to 1.04) in the patients assigned to GM-CSF (n = 408) versus those assigned to placebo (n = 407). The median OS times with GM-CSF versus placebo treatments were 69.6 months (95% CI, 53.4 to 83.5 months) versus 59.3 months (95% CI, 44.4 to 77.3 months); the 5-year OS probability rates were 52.3% (95% CI, 47.3% to 57.1%) versus 49.4% (95% CI, 44.3% to 54.3%), respectively. The median RFS times with GM-CSF versus placebo were 11.4 months (95% CI, 9.4 to 14.8 months) versus 8.8 months (95% CI, 7.5 to 11.2 months); the 5-year RFS probability rates were 31.2% (95% CI, 26.7% to 35.9%) versus 27.0% (95% CI, 22.7% to 31.5%), respectively. Exploratory analyses showed a trend toward improved OS in GM-CSF–treated patients with resected visceral metastases. When survival in HLA-A2–positive patients who received PV versus placebo was compared, RFS and OS were not significantly different. Treatment-related grade 3 or greater adverse events were similar between GM-CSF and placebo groups. Conclusion Neither adjuvant GM-CSF nor PV significantly improved RFS or OS in patients with high

  9. Random Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messaro. Semma; Harrison, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Ares I Zonal Random vibration environments due to acoustic impingement and combustion processes are develop for liftoff, ascent and reentry. Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components are developed by enveloping the applicable zonal environments where each component is located. Random vibration tests will be conducted to assure that these components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments. Methodology: Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components were desired that would envelope all the applicable environments where each component was located. Applicable Ares I Vehicle drawings and design information needed to be assessed to determine the location(s) for each component on the Ares I Upper Stage. Design and test criteria needed to be developed by plotting and enveloping the applicable environments using Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet Software and documenting them in a report Using Microsoft Word Processing Software. Conclusion: Random vibration liftoff, ascent, and green run design & test criteria for the Upper Stage Pyrotechnic Components were developed by using Microsoft Excel to envelope zonal environments applicable to each component. Results were transferred from Excel into a report using Microsoft Word. After the report is reviewed and edited by my mentor it will be submitted for publication as an attachment to a memorandum. Pyrotechnic component designers will extract criteria from my report for incorporation into the design and test specifications for components. Eventually the hardware will be tested to the environments I developed to assure that the components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments.

  10. Anti-antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Lloyd; Lamarre, Baptiste; Diu, Ting; Ravi, Jascindra; Judge, Peter J.; Temple, Adam; Carr, Matthew; Cerasoli, Eleonora; Su, Bo; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Martyna, Glenn; Crain, Jason; Watts, Anthony; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial or host defense peptides are innate immune regulators found in all multicellular organisms. Many of them fold into membrane-bound α-helices and function by causing cell wall disruption in microorganisms. Herein we probe the possibility and functional implications of antimicrobial antagonism mediated by complementary coiled-coil interactions between antimicrobial peptides and de novo designed antagonists: anti-antimicrobial peptides. Using sequences from native helical families such as cathelicidins, cecropins, and magainins we demonstrate that designed antagonists can co-fold with antimicrobial peptides into functionally inert helical oligomers. The properties and function of the resulting assemblies were studied in solution, membrane environments, and in bacterial culture by a combination of chiroptical and solid-state NMR spectroscopies, microscopy, bioassays, and molecular dynamics simulations. The findings offer a molecular rationale for anti-antimicrobial responses with potential implications for antimicrobial resistance. PMID:23737519

  11. Melanins from opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Rosei, M A

    1996-12-01

    Opioid peptides and other Tyr-NH2-terminal peptides are substrates in vitro for mushroom and sepia tyrosine, giving rise to synthetic melanins retaining the peptide moiety (opiomelanins). The melanopeptides are characterized by a total solubility in hydrophylic solvents at neutral and basic pH. Opioid peptides (enkephalins, endorphins, and esorphins), if oxidized by tyrosinase in the presence of Dopa, are easily incorporated into Dopa-melanin, producing mixed-type pigments that can also be solubilized in hydrophylic solvents. Melanins derived from opioid peptides exhibit paramagnetism, as evidenced by an EPR spectrum identical to that of Dopa-melanin. However, the presence of the linked peptide chain is able to influence dramatically the electron transfer properties and the oxidizing behaviour of the melanopeptides, so that whereas Tyr-Gly-melanin appears to behave as Dopa-melanin, Enk-melanin does not exhibit any oxidizing activity. Opiomelanins are characterized by a peculiar UV-VIS spectrum; that is, by the presence of a distinct peak (330 nm) that disappears upon chemical treatment by acid hydrolysis. Opiomelanins are stable pigments at neutral and basic pH in the dark, whereas the addition of H2O2 leads to a 15% degradation. Under stimulated solar illumination, opiomelanins are more easily destroyed with respect to Dopa-melanin, with increasing degradation when exposed to increased hydrogen peroxide concentrations and more alkaline pH. Some speculations on the possible existence and role of opiomelanins have been outlined.

  12. Peptide Optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Amir; Apter, Boris; Shostak, Tamar; Rosenman, Gil

    2017-02-01

    Small-scale optical devices, designed and fabricated onto one dielectric substrate, create integrated optical chip like their microelectronic analogues. These photonic circuits, based on diverse physical phenomena such as light-matter interaction, propagation of electromagnetic waves in a thin dielectric material, nonlinear and electro-optical effects, allow transmission, distribution, modulation, and processing of optical signals in optical communication systems, chemical and biological sensors, and more. The key component of these optical circuits providing both optical processing and photonic interconnections is light waveguides. Optical confinement and transmitting of the optical waves inside the waveguide material are possible due to the higher refractive index of the waveguides in comparison with their surroundings. In this work, we propose a novel field of bionanophotonics based on a new concept of optical waveguiding in synthetic elongated peptide nanostructures composed of ordered peptide dipole biomolecules. New technology of controllable deposition of peptide optical waveguiding structures by nanofountain pen technique is developed. Experimental studies of refractive index, optical transparency, and linear and nonlinear waveguiding in out-of-plane and in-plane diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes have been conducted. Optical waveguiding phenomena in peptide structures are simulated by the finite difference time domain method. The advantages of this new class of bio-optical waveguides are high refractive index contrast, wide spectral range of optical transparency, large optical nonlinearity, and electro-optical effect, making them promising for new applications in integrated multifunctional photonic circuits. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Novel peptides functionally targeting in vivo human lung cancer discovered by in vivo peptide displayed phage screening.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Jin; Lee, Jae Hee; Chung, Hye Kyung; Choi, Jinhyang; Park, Jaesook; Park, Seok Soon; Ju, Eun Jin; Park, Jin; Shin, Seol Hwa; Park, Hye Ji; Ko, Eun Jung; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, InKi; Hwang, Jung Jin; Song, Si Yeol; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2015-02-01

    Discovery of the cancer-specific peptidic ligands have been emphasized for active targeting drug delivery system and non-invasive imaging. For the discovery of useful and applicable peptidic ligands, in vivo peptide-displayed phage screening has been performed in this study using a xenograft mouse model as a mimic microenvironment to tumor. To seek human lung cancer-specific peptides, M13 phage library displaying 2.9 × 10(9) random peptides was intravenously injected into mouse model bearing A549-derived xenograft tumor through the tail vein. Then the phages emerged from a course of four rounds of biopanning in the xenograft tumor tissue. Novel peptides were categorized into four groups according to a sequence-homology phylogenicity, and in vivo tumor-targeting capacity of these peptides was validated by whole body imaging with Cy5.5-labeled phages in various cancer types. The result revealed that novel peptides accumulated only in adenocarcinoma lung cancer cell-derived xenograft tissue. For further confirmation of the specific targeting ability, in vitro cell-binding assay and immunohistochemistry in vivo tumor tissue were performed with a selected peptide. The peptide was found to bind intensely to lung cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, which was efficiently compromised with unlabeled phages in an in vitro competition assay. In conclusion, the peptides specifically targeting human lung cancer were discovered in this study, which is warranted to provide substantive feasibilities for drug delivery and imaging in terms of a novel targeted therapeutics and diagnostics.

  14. Discovery and dimeric approach of novel Natriuretic Peptide Receptor A (NPR-A) agonists.

    PubMed

    Iwaki, Takehiko; Oyama, Yoshiaki; Tomoo, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Taisaku; Okamura, Yoshihiko; Sugiyama, Masako; Yamaki, Akira; Furuya, Mayumi

    2017-03-15

    Novel agonists of the Natriuretic Peptide Receptor A (NPR-A) were obtained through random screening and subsequent structural modification of triazine derivatives. The key structural feature to improve in vitro activity was the dimerization of triazine monomer derivatives. The non peptide derivative 7c and 13a showed highly potent NPR-A agonistic activity in vitro and diuretic activity in vivo. These results implied that non-peptidic small molecules open the possibility of new therapy for congestive heart failure.

  15. Fractional randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapiero, Charles S.; Vallois, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The premise of this paper is that a fractional probability distribution is based on fractional operators and the fractional (Hurst) index used that alters the classical setting of random variables. For example, a random variable defined by its density function might not have a fractional density function defined in its conventional sense. Practically, it implies that a distribution's granularity defined by a fractional kernel may have properties that differ due to the fractional index used and the fractional calculus applied to define it. The purpose of this paper is to consider an application of fractional calculus to define the fractional density function of a random variable. In addition, we provide and prove a number of results, defining the functional forms of these distributions as well as their existence. In particular, we define fractional probability distributions for increasing and decreasing functions that are right continuous. Examples are used to motivate the usefulness of a statistical approach to fractional calculus and its application to economic and financial problems. In conclusion, this paper is a preliminary attempt to construct statistical fractional models. Due to the breadth and the extent of such problems, this paper may be considered as an initial attempt to do so.

  16. Stimuli-responsive self-assembling peptides made from antibacterial peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanfei; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen; Zhao, Xiaojun

    2013-06-01

    How to use bioactive peptide sequences as fundamental building blocks to make hydrogel materials which are stimuli-responsive? In this article, we provide a novel designed peptide comprising two antibacterial peptide sequences (KIGAKI)3-NH2 and a central tetrapeptide linker. Results show that balancing the forces of the electrostatic repulsion of the charged lysine residues against the hydrophobic collapse of the isoleucine and alanine residues and backbone β-sheet hydrogen bonding allows the structural transition and formation of individually dispersed nanofibers. Circular Dichroism (CD) and rheology analysis demonstrated that the designed peptide can undergo an abrupt structural transition from a random coil to a stable unimolecular β-hairpin conformation and subsequently form an elastic hydrogel when exposed to external stimuli such as pH, ionic strength and heat. The assembly kinetics of the obtained antibacterial sequence comprising peptide (ASCP) was studied by time-lapse Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Thioflavin T (ThT) binding assay. In addition, the inherent antibacterial activity of the peptide hydrogel was confirmed by the antibacterial assay against Escherichia coli. This example described epitomizes the use of bioactive peptide sequences in the design of finite self-assembled structures with potential inherent activity. These hydrogel materials may find applications in drug delivery, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.How to use bioactive peptide sequences as fundamental building blocks to make hydrogel materials which are stimuli-responsive? In this article, we provide a novel designed peptide comprising two antibacterial peptide sequences (KIGAKI)3-NH2 and a central tetrapeptide linker. Results show that balancing the forces of the electrostatic repulsion of the charged lysine residues against the hydrophobic collapse of the isoleucine and alanine residues and backbone β-sheet hydrogen bonding allows the structural transition and

  17. Inhibition of multidrug resistant Listeria monocytogenes by peptides isolated from combinatorial phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Flachbartova, Z; Pulzova, L; Bencurova, E; Potocnakova, L; Comor, L; Bednarikova, Z; Bhide, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to isolate and characterize novel antimicrobial peptides from peptide phage library with antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant Listeria monocytogenes. Combinatorial phage-display library was used to affinity select peptides binding to the cell surface of multidrug resistant L. monocytogenes. After several rounds of affinity selection followed by sequencing, three peptides were revealed as the most promising candidates. Peptide L2 exhibited features common to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), and was rich in Asp, His and Lys residues. Peptide L3 (NSWIQAPDTKSI), like peptide L2, inhibited bacterial growth in vitro, without any hemolytic or cytotoxic effects on eukaryotic cells. L1 peptide showed no inhibitory effect on Listeria. Structurally, peptides L2 and L3 formed random coils composed of α-helix and β-sheet units. Peptides L2 and L3 exhibited antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant isolates of L. monocytogenes with no haemolytic or toxic effects. Both peptides identified in this study have the potential to be beneficial in human and veterinary medicine.

  18. Origination of the Protein Fold Repertoire from Oily Pluripotent Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Mannige, Ranjan V.

    2014-01-01

    While the repertoire of protein folds that exists today underlies most of life’s capabilities, our mechanistic picture of protein fold origination is incomplete. This paper discusses a hypothetical mechanism for the emergence of the protein fold repertoire from highly dynamic and collapsed peptides, exemplified by peptides with high oil content or hydrophobicity. These peptides are called pluripotent to emphasize their capacity to evolve into numerous folds transiently available to them. As evidence, the paper will discuss previous simulation work on the superior fold evolvability of oily peptides, trace (“fossil”) evidence within proteomes seen today, and a general relationship between protein dynamism and evolvability. Aside from implications on the origination of protein folds, the hypothesis implies that the vanishing utility of a random peptide in protein origination may be relatively exaggerated, as some random peptides with a certain composition (e.g., oily) may fare better than others. In later sections, the hypothesis is discussed in the context of existing discussions regarding the spontaneous origination of biomolecules. PMID:28250375

  19. Random grammars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshev, V. A.

    1998-04-01

    Contents § 1. Definitions1.1. Grammars1.2. Random grammars and L-systems1.3. Semigroup representations § 2. Infinite string dynamics2.1. Cluster expansion2.2. Cluster dynamics2.3. Local observer § 3. Large time behaviour: small perturbations3.1. Invariant measures3.2. Classification § 4. Large time behaviour: context free case4.1. Invariant measures for grammars4.2. L-systems4.3. Fractal correlation functions4.4. Measures on languages Bibliography

  20. Attaching the phage display-selected GLA peptide to liposomes: factors influencing target binding.

    PubMed

    van Rooy, Inge; Hennink, Wim E; Storm, Gert; Schiffelers, Raymond M; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2012-02-14

    In our previous study, phage display selections were performed by in situ perfusion of a random peptide library through a mouse brain. This yielded two peptides (GLA and GYR) that showed significant binding to human brain endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) when displayed on phage particles, but not to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In the present study, these peptides were produced synthetically and coupled to liposomes to investigate the capacity of the peptides to act as ligands for targeting to hCMEC/D3 cells. Flow cytometry studies showed that these peptides when coupled to liposomes showed weak binding to the target brain endothelial cells. We hypothesized that the weak endothelial cell binding of the selected peptides when coupled to liposomes as compared to the binding of the peptides displayed on phage particles may be ascribed to: change of vehicle shape, change of peptide density, or change of peptide conformation. Peptide density on the liposomes influenced binding of the liposomes to the cells, however, this effect was minor. To study the influence of the peptide conformation, the GLA peptide was recombinantly produced fused to the N1-N2 domains of the phage p3 minor coat protein (p3-GLA) to mimic its conformation when displayed on phage particles. Binding of liposomes modified with either the GLA peptide or the p3-GLA protein to hCMEC/D3 cells was studied, and the p3-GLA-liposomes showed a higher binding to the cells compared to the GLA-liposomes. The experiments demonstrate that bringing the GLA peptide into the original phage protein environment restores and improves the peptide binding capacity and suggest that the GLA peptide, with some modifications, may be used as a brain-targeting ligand in the future.

  1. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  2. Cyclization in opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Piekielna, Justyna; Perlikowska, Renata; Gach, Katarzyna; Janecka, Anna

    2013-06-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides have been studied extensively as potential therapeutics for the treatment of pain. The major problems of using natural opioid peptides as drug candidates are their poor receptor specificity, metabolic instability and inability to reach the brain after systemic administration. A lot of synthetic efforts have been made to opioid analogs with improved pharmacological properties. One important structural modification leading to such analogs is cyclization of linear sequences. Intramolecular cyclization has been shown to improve biological properties of various bioactive peptides. Cyclization reduces conformational freedom responsible for the simultaneous activation of two or more receptors, increases metabolic stability and lipophilicity which may result in a longer half-life and easier penetration across biological membranes. This review deals with various strategies that have been employed to synthesize cyclic analogs of opioid peptides. Discussed are such bridging bonds as amide and amine linkages, sulfur-containing bonds, including monosulfide, disulfide and dithioether bridges, bismethylene bonds, monosulfide bridges of lanthionine and, finally, carbonyl and guanidine linkages. Opioid affinities and activities of cyclic analogs are given and compared with linear opioid peptides. Analgesic activities of analogs evaluated in the in vivo pain tests are also discussed.

  3. Peptides in oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, Alberta; Guida, Agostino; Petruzzi, Massimo; Capone, Giovanni; Laino, Luigi; Serpico, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    The oral cavity is home to numerous viruses and micro-organisms recognized as having a role in various oral diseases as well as in infections in other parts of the body. Indeed, in general a microbial infection underlies or is believed to underlie the ample spectrum of oral diseases, from tooth enamel decay to periodontal lesions, from candidiasis to virus-induced oral squamous cell carcinomas, and bullous autoimmune oral disorders. This clinico-pathological context stresses the need of targeted therapies to specifically kill infectious agents in a complex environment such as the oral cavity, and explains the current interest in exploring peptide-based therapeutic approaches in oral and dental research. Here, we review the therapeutic potential of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, beta defensins, adrenomedullin, histatins, and of various peptides modulating gene expression and immuno-biological interaction(s) in oral diseases.

  4. Molecular modeling of peptides.

    PubMed

    Kuczera, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a review of the field of molecular modeling of peptides. The main focus is on atomistic modeling with molecular mechanics potentials. The description of peptide conformations and solvation through potentials is discussed. Several important computer simulation methods are briefly introduced, including molecular dynamics, accelerated sampling approaches such as replica-exchange and metadynamics, free energy simulations and kinetic network models like Milestoning. Examples of recent applications for predictions of structure, kinetics, and interactions of peptides with complex environments are described. The reliability of current simulation methods is analyzed by comparison of computational predictions obtained using different models with each other and with experimental data. A brief discussion of coarse-grained modeling and future directions is also presented.

  5. Synthetic Peptides as Potential Antigens for Cutaneous Leishmaniosis Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Link, Juliana Seger; Alban, Silvana Maria; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo; Pereira, Gilberto Vinicius Melo

    2017-01-01

    This work's goal was to research new candidate antigens for cutaneous leishmaniosis (CL). In order to reach the goal, we used random peptide phage display libraries screened using antibodies from Leishmania braziliensis patients. After selection, three peptides (P1, P2, and P3) were synthesized using Fmoc chemistry. The peptides individually or a mixture of them (MIX) was subsequently emulsified in complete and incomplete Freund's adjuvant and injected subcutaneously in golden hamsters. Sera from the hamsters administered with P1 presented antibodies that recognized proteins between 76 and 150 kDa from L. braziliensis. Sera from hamsters which had peptides P2 and P3, as well as the MIX, administered presented antibodies that recognized proteins between 52 and 76 kDa of L. braziliensis. The research on the similarity of the peptides' sequences in protein databases showed that they match a 63 kDa glycoprotein. The three peptides and the MIX were recognized by the sera from CL patients by immunoassay approach (ELISA). The peptides' MIX showed the best performance (79% sensitivity) followed by the P1 (72% sensitivity), and the AS presented 91% sensitivity. These results show a new route for discovering molecules for diagnosis or for immunoprotection against leishmaniosis. PMID:28367456

  6. Time-Frequency Analysis of Peptide Microarray Data: Application to Brain Cancer Immunosignatures

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Brian; Maurer, Alexander; Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia; Stafford, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    One of the gravest dangers facing cancer patients is an extended symptom-free lull between tumor initiation and the first diagnosis. Detection of tumors is critical for effective intervention. Using the body’s immune system to detect and amplify tumor-specific signals may enable detection of cancer using an inexpensive immunoassay. Immunosignatures are one such assay: they provide a map of antibody interactions with random-sequence peptides. They enable detection of disease-specific patterns using classic train/test methods. However, to date, very little effort has gone into extracting information from the sequence of peptides that interact with disease-specific antibodies. Because it is difficult to represent all possible antigen peptides in a microarray format, we chose to synthesize only 330,000 peptides on a single immunosignature microarray. The 330,000 random-sequence peptides on the microarray represent 83% of all tetramers and 27% of all pentamers, creating an unbiased but substantial gap in the coverage of total sequence space. We therefore chose to examine many relatively short motifs from these random-sequence peptides. Time-variant analysis of recurrent subsequences provided a means to dissect amino acid sequences from the peptides while simultaneously retaining the antibody–peptide binding intensities. We first used a simple experiment in which monoclonal antibodies with known linear epitopes were exposed to these random-sequence peptides, and their binding intensities were used to create our algorithm. We then demonstrated the performance of the proposed algorithm by examining immunosignatures from patients with Glioblastoma multiformae (GBM), an aggressive form of brain cancer. Eight different frameshift targets were identified from the random-sequence peptides using this technique. If immune-reactive antigens can be identified using a relatively simple immune assay, it might enable a diagnostic test with sufficient sensitivity to detect tumors

  7. Epitope peptides and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Soichi

    2007-02-01

    Allergic diseases affect atopic individuals, who synthesize specific Immunoglobulins E (IgE) to environmental allergens, usually proteins or glycoproteins. These allergens include grass and tree pollens, indoor allergens such as house dust mites and animal dander, and various foods. Because allergen-specific IgE antibodies are the main effector molecules in the immune response to allergens, many studies have focused on the identification of IgE-binding epitopes (called B cell epitopes), specific and minimum regions of allergen molecules that binds to IgE. Our initial studies have provided evidence that only four to five amino acid residues are enough to comprise an epitope, since pentapeptide QQQPP in wheat glutenin is minimally required for IgE binding. Afterwards, various kinds of B cell epitope structures have been clarified. Such information contributes greatly not only to the elucidation of the etiology of allergy, but also to the development of strategies for the treatment and prevention of allergy. Allergen-specific T cells also play an important role in allergy and are obvious targets for intervention in the disease. Currently, the principle approach is to modify B cell epitopes to prevent IgE binding while preserving T cell epitopes to retain the capacity for immunotherapy. There is mounting evidence that the administration of peptide(s) containing immunodominant T cell epitopes from an allergen can induce T cell nonresponsiveness (immunotherapy). There have been clinical studies of peptide immunotherapy performed, the most promising being for bee venom sensitivity. Clinical trials of immunotherapy for cat allergen peptide have also received attention. An alternative strategy for the generation of an effective but hypoallergenic preparation for immunotherapy is to modify T cell epitope peptides by, for example, single amino acid substitution. In this article, I will present an overview of epitopes related to allergic disease, particularly stress on

  8. Is random access memory random?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    Most software is contructed on the assumption that the programs and data are stored in random access memory (RAM). Physical limitations on the relative speeds of processor and memory elements lead to a variety of memory organizations that match processor addressing rate with memory service rate. These include interleaved and cached memory. A very high fraction of a processor's address requests can be satified from the cache without reference to the main memory. The cache requests information from main memory in blocks that can be transferred at the full memory speed. Programmers who organize algorithms for locality can realize the highest performance from these computers.

  9. The epilepsy, the protease inhibitor and the dodecamer: progressive myoclonus epilepsy, cystatin b and a 12-mer repeat expansion.

    PubMed

    Lalioti, M D; Antonarakis, S E; Scott, H S

    2003-01-01

    Progressive myoclonus epilepsy 1 (EPM1) or Unverricht-Lundborg disease is a human autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in cystatin B (CSTB). The CSTB gene maps to human chromosome 21 and encodes an inhibitor of lysosomal cysteine proteases. Five point mutations have been found, two of which are seen in numerous unrelated patients. However, the main CSTB mutation in EPM1, even among patients of different ethnic origins, is an expansion of a dodecamer repeat (CCCCGCCCCGCG) in the 5' flanking area of CSTB. Most normal alleles contain either two or three repeats, while rarer normal alleles that are highly unstable contain between 12 and 17 repeats. Mutant expanded alleles have been reported to contain between 30 and 80 copies and are also highly unstable, particularly via parental transmission. There is no apparent correlation between mutant repeat length and disease phenotype. While the repeat expansion is outside the CSTB transcriptional unit, it results in a marked decrease in CSTB expression, at least in certain cell types in vitro. CSTB homozygous knockout mice show some parallels to the phenotype of human EPM1 including myoclonic seizures, development of ataxia and neuropathological changes associated with cell loss via apoptosis. Loss of CSTB function due to mutations is consistent with the observed neurodegenerative pathology and phenotype, but the functional link to the epileptic phenotype of EPM1 remains largely unknown.

  10. Related impurities in peptide medicines.

    PubMed

    D'Hondt, Matthias; Bracke, Nathalie; Taevernier, Lien; Gevaert, Bert; Verbeke, Frederick; Wynendaele, Evelien; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2014-12-01

    Peptides are an increasingly important group of pharmaceuticals, positioned between classic small organic molecules and larger bio-molecules such as proteins. Currently, the peptide drug market is growing twice as fast as other drug markets, illustrating the increasing clinical as well as economical impact of this medicine group. Most peptides today are manufactured by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). This review will provide a structured overview of the most commonly observed peptide-related impurities in peptide medicines, encompassing the active pharmaceutical ingredients (API or drug substance) as well as the finished drug products. Not only is control of these peptide-related impurities and degradants critical for the already approved and clinically used peptide-drugs, these impurities also possess the capability of greatly influencing initial functionality studies during early drug discovery phases, possibly resulting in erroneous conclusions. The first group of peptide-related impurities is SPPS-related: deletion and insertion of amino acids are related to inefficient Fmoc-deprotection and excess use of amino acid reagents, respectively. Fmoc-deprotection can cause racemization of amino acid residues and thus diastereomeric impurities. Inefficient deprotection of amino acid side chains results into peptide-protection adducts. Furthermore, unprotected side chains can react with a variety of reagents used in the synthesis. Oxidation of amino acid side chains and dimeric-to-oligomeric impurities were also observed. Unwanted peptide counter ions such as trifluoroacetate, originating from the SPPS itself or from additional purification treatments, may also be present in the final peptide product. Contamination of the desired peptide product by other unrelated peptides was also seen, pointing out the lack of appropriate GMP. The second impurity group results from typical peptide degradation mechanisms such as β-elimination, diketopiperazine, pyroglutamate

  11. A peptide study of the relationship between the collagen triple-helix and amyloid.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Avanish S; Nunes, Ana Monica; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2012-10-01

    Type XXV collagen, or collagen-like amyloidogenic component, is a component of amyloid plaques, and recent studies suggest this collagen affects amyloid fibril elongation and has a genetic association with Alzheimer's disease. The relationship between the collagen triple helix and amyloid fibrils was investigated by studying peptide models, including a very stable triple helical peptide (Pro-Hyp-Gly)₁₀ , an amyloidogenic peptide GNNQQNY, and a hybrid peptide where the GNNQQNY sequence was incorporated between (GPO)(n) domains. Circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy showed the GNNQQNY peptide formed a random coil structure, whereas the hybrid peptide contained a central disordered GNNQQNY region transitioning to triple-helical ends. Light scattering confirmed the GNNQQNY peptide had a high propensity to form amyloid fibrils, whereas amyloidogenesis was delayed in the hybrid peptide. NMR data suggested the triple-helix constraints on the GNNQQNY sequence within the hybrid peptide may disfavor the conformational change necessary for aggregation. Independent addition of a triple-helical peptide to the GNNQQNY peptide under aggregating conditions delayed nucleation and amyloid fibril growth. The inhibition of amyloid nucleation depended on the Gly-Xaa-Yaa sequence and required the triple-helix conformation. The inhibitory effect of the collagen triple-helix on an amyloidogenic sequence, when in the same molecule or when added separately, suggests Type XXV collagen, and possibly other collagens, may play a role in regulating amyloid fibril formation.

  12. A novel method to identify and characterise peptide mimotopes of heat shock protein 70-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Arnaiz, Blanca; Madrigal-Estebas, Laura; Todryk, Stephen; James, Tharappel C; Doherty, Derek G; Bond, Ursula

    2006-04-08

    The heat shock protein, Hsp70, has been shown to play an important role in tumour immunity. Vaccination with Hsp70-peptide complexes (Hsp70-PCs), isolated from autologous tumour cells, can induce protective immune responses. We have developed a novel method to identify synthetic mimic peptides of Hsp70-PCs and to test their ability to activate T-cells. Peptides (referred to as "recognisers") that bind to Hsp70-PCs from the human breast carcinoma cell line, MDA-MB-231, were identified by bio-panning a random peptide M13 phage display library. Synthetic recogniser peptides were subsequently used as bait in a reverse bio-panning experiment to identify potential Hsp70-PC mimic peptides. The ability of the recogniser and mimic peptides to prime human lymphocyte responses against tumour cell antigens was tested by stimulating lymphocytes with autologous peptide-loaded monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Priming and subsequent stimulation with either the recogniser or mimic peptide resulted in interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) secretion by the lymphocytes. Furthermore, DCs loaded with Hsp70, Hsp70-PC or the recogniser or the mimic peptide primed the lymphocytes to respond to soluble extracts from breast cells. These results highlight the potential application of synthetic peptide-mimics of Hsp70-PCs, as modulators of the immune response against tumours.

  13. A novel family of antimicrobial peptides from the skin of Amolops loloensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aili; Wang, Jiyuan; Hong, Jing; Feng, Hao; Yang, Hailong; Yu, Xiaodong; Ma, Yufang; Lai, Ren

    2008-06-01

    While conducting experiments to investigate antimicrobial peptides of amphibians living in the Yunnan-Sichuan region of southwest China, a new family of antimicrobial peptides was identified from skin secretions of the rufous-spotted torrent frog, Amolops loloensis. Members of the new peptide family named amolopins are composed of 18 amino acids with a unique sequence, for example, NILSSIVNGINRALSFFG. By BLAST search, amolopins did no show similarity to any known peptides. Among the tested microorganisms, native and synthetic peptides only showed antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC2592 and Bacillus pumilus, no effects on other microorganisms. The CD spectroscopy showed that it adopted a structure of random combined with beta-sheet in water, Tris-HCl or Tris-HCl-SDS. Several cDNAs encoding amolopins were cloned from the skin cDNA library of A. loloensis. The precursors of amolopin are composed of 62 amino acid residues including predicted signal peptides, acidic propieces, and mature antimicrobial peptides. The preproregion of amolopin precursor comprises a hydrophobic signal peptide of 22 residues followed by an 18 residue acidic propiece which terminates by a typical prohormone processing signal Lys-Arg. The preproregions of precursors are very similar to other amphibian antimicrobial peptide precursors but the mature amolopins are different from other antimicrobial peptide families. The remarkable similarity of preproregions of precursors that give rise to very different antimicrobial peptides in distantly related frog species suggests that the corresponding genes form a multigene family originating from a common ancestor.

  14. Collision-induced dissociation of Lys-Lys intramolecular crosslinked peptides.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Amadeu H; Santos, Luiz F A; Gozzo, Fabio C

    2009-04-01

    The use of chemical crosslinking is an attractive tool that presents many advantages in the application of mass spectrometry to structural biology. The correct assignment of crosslinked peptides, however, is still a challenge because of the lack of detailed fragmentation studies on resultant species. In this work, the fragmentation patterns of intramolecular crosslinked peptides with disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS) has been devised by using a set of versatile, model peptides that resemble species found in crosslinking experiments with proteins. These peptides contain an acetylated N-terminus followed by a random sequence of residues containing two lysine residues separated by an arginine. After the crosslinking reaction, controlled trypsin digestion yields both intra- and intermolecular crosslinked peptides. In the present study we analyzed the fragmentation of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-generated peptides crosslinked with DSS in which both lysines are found in the same peptide. Fragmentation starts in the linear moiety of the peptide, yielding regular b and y ions. Once it reaches the cyclic portion of the molecule, fragmentation was observed to occur either at the following peptide bond or at the peptide crosslinker amide bond. If the peptide crosslinker bond is cleaved, it fragments as a regular modified peptide, in which the DSS backbone remains attached to the first lysine. This fragmentation pattern resembles the fragmentation of modified peptides and may be identified by common automated search engines using DSS as a modification. If, on the other hand, fragmentation happens at the peptide bond itself, rearrangement of the last crosslinked lysine is observed and a product ion containing the crosslinker backbone and lysine (m/z 222) is formed. The detailed identification of fragment ions can help the development of softwares devoted to the MS/MS data analysis of crosslinked peptides.

  15. Peptide -- Silica Hybrid Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altunbas, Aysegul; Sharma, Nikhil; Nagarkar, Radhika; Schneider, Joel; Pochan, Darrin

    2010-03-01

    In this study, a bio-inspired route was used to fabricate scaffolds that display hierarchical organization of an inorganic layer around an organic self-assembled peptide fibril template. The 20 amino acid peptide used in this study intramolecular folds into a beta-hairpin conformation on addition of a desired solution stimulus. This intramolecular folding is followed by intermolecular self-assembly of the peptides into a three dimensional network of entangled fibrils rich in beta-sheet with a high density of lysine groups exposed on the fibril-surfaces. The lysine-rich surface chemistry was utilized to create a silica shell around the fibrils. The mineralization process of the fibrils results in a rigid, porous silica network that retains the microscale and nanoscale structure of the peptide fibril network. Structural characterization via Transmission Electron Microscopy, cryogenic-Scanning Electron Microscopy, mechanical characterization via oscillatory rheology, Small Angle X-ray and Neutron Scattering of the silicified hydrogels will be presented.

  16. Brain Peptides and Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arehart-Treichel, Joan

    1976-01-01

    Proteins isolated from the brain and used as drugs can improve and apparently even transfer mental states and behavior. Much of the pioneering work and recent research with humans and animals is reviewed and crucial questions that are being posed about the psychologically active peptides are related. (BT)

  17. Peptide Nanofilament Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    This laboratory studied four systems involving molecular self-assembly during this project period. Each system will open a new avenue of research in developing novel applications for use in biomedical engineering and materials science. These systems include self-assembling oligopeptides that form stable beta sheets in water, peptides that form inter- and

  18. Bioinformatic identification of plant peptides.

    PubMed

    Lease, Kevin A; Walker, John C

    2010-01-01

    Plant peptides play a number of important roles in defence, development and many other aspects of plant physiology. Identifying additional peptide sequences provides the starting point to investigate their function using molecular, genetic or biochemical techniques. Due to their small size, identifying peptide sequences may not succeed using the default bioinformatic approaches that work well for average-sized proteins. There are two general scenarios related to bioinformatic identification of peptides to be discussed in this paper. In the first scenario, one already has the sequence of a plant peptide and is trying to find more plant peptides with some sequence similarity to the starting peptide. To do this, the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) is employed, with the parameters adjusted to be more favourable for identifying potential peptide matches. A second scenario involves trying to identify plant peptides without using sequence similarity searches to known plant peptides. In this approach, features such as protein size and the presence of a cleavable amino-terminal signal peptide are used to screen annotated proteins. A variation of this method can be used to screen for unannotated peptides from genomic sequences. Bioinformatic resources related to Arabidopsis thaliana will be used to illustrate these approaches.

  19. Identification of a conserved JEV serocomplex B-cell epitope by screening a phage-display peptide library with a mAb generated against West Nile virus capsid protein

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The West Nile virus (WNV) capsid (C) protein is one of the three viral structural proteins, encapsidates the viral RNA to form the nucleocapsid, and is necessary for nuclear and nucleolar localization. The antigenic sites on C protein that are targeted by humoral immune responses have not been studied thoroughly, and well-defined B-cell epitopes on the WNV C protein have not been reported. Results In this study, we generated a WNV C protein-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) and defined the linear epitope recognized by the mAb by screening a 12-mer peptide library using phage-display technology. The mAb, designated as 6D3, recognized the phages displaying a consensus motif consisting of the amino acid sequence KKPGGPG, which is identical to an amino acid sequence present in WNV C protein. Further fine mapping was conducted using truncated peptides expressed as MBP-fusion proteins. We found that the KKPGGPG motif is the minimal determinant of the linear epitope recognized by the mAb 6D3. Western blot (WB) analysis demonstrated that the KKPGGPG epitope could be recognized by antibodies contained in WNV- and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV)-positive equine serum, but was not recognized by Dengue virus 1-4 (DENV1-4)-positive mice serum. Furthermore, we found that the epitope recognized by 6D3 is highly conserved among the JEV serocomplex of the Family Flaviviridae. Conclusion The KKPGGPG epitope is a JEV serocomplex-specific linear B-cell epitope recognized by the 6D3 mAb generated in this study. The 6D3 mAb may serve as a novel reagent in development of diagnostic tests for JEV serocomplex infection. Further, the identification of the B-cell epitope that is highly conserved among the JEV serocomplex may support the rationale design of vaccines against viruses of the JEV serocomplex. PMID:21375771

  20. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  1. A Peptide Filtering Relation Quantifies MHC Class I Peptide Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Leonard D.; Howarth, Mark; Cardelli, Luca; Emmott, Stephen; Elliott, Tim; Werner, Joern M.

    2011-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules enable cytotoxic T lymphocytes to destroy virus-infected or cancerous cells, thereby preventing disease progression. MHC class I molecules provide a snapshot of the contents of a cell by binding to protein fragments arising from intracellular protein turnover and presenting these fragments at the cell surface. Competing fragments (peptides) are selected for cell-surface presentation on the basis of their ability to form a stable complex with MHC class I, by a process known as peptide optimization. A better understanding of the optimization process is important for our understanding of immunodominance, the predominance of some T lymphocyte specificities over others, which can determine the efficacy of an immune response, the danger of immune evasion, and the success of vaccination strategies. In this paper we present a dynamical systems model of peptide optimization by MHC class I. We incorporate the chaperone molecule tapasin, which has been shown to enhance peptide optimization to different extents for different MHC class I alleles. Using a combination of published and novel experimental data to parameterize the model, we arrive at a relation of peptide filtering, which quantifies peptide optimization as a function of peptide supply and peptide unbinding rates. From this relation, we find that tapasin enhances peptide unbinding to improve peptide optimization without significantly delaying the transit of MHC to the cell surface, and differences in peptide optimization across MHC class I alleles can be explained by allele-specific differences in peptide binding. Importantly, our filtering relation may be used to dynamically predict the cell surface abundance of any number of competing peptides by MHC class I alleles, providing a quantitative basis to investigate viral infection or disease at the cellular level. We exemplify this by simulating optimization of the distribution of peptides derived from Human

  2. Protein minimization by random fragmentation and selection.

    PubMed

    Rudgers, G W; Palzkill, T

    2001-07-01

    Protein-protein interactions are involved in most biological processes and are important targets for drug design. Over the past decade, there has been increased interest in the design of small molecules that mimic functional epitopes of protein inhibitors. BLIP is a 165 amino acid protein that is a potent inhibitor of TEM-1 beta-lactamase (K(i) = 0.1 nM). To aid in the development of new inhibitors of beta-lactamase, the gene encoding BLIP was randomly fragmented and DNA segments encoding peptides that retain the ability to bind TEM-1 beta-lactamase were isolated using phage display. The selected peptides revealed a common, overlapping region that includes BLIP residues C30-D49. Synthesis and binding analysis of the C30-D49 peptide indicate that this peptide inhibits TEM-1 beta-lactamase. Therefore, a peptide derivative of BLIP that has been reduced in size by 88% compared with wild-type BLIP retains the ability to bind and inhibit beta-lactamase.

  3. Concepts for Biologically Active Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kastin, Abba J.; Pan, Weihong

    2012-01-01

    Here we review a unique aspect of CNS research on biologically active peptides that started against a background of prevalent dogmas but ended by exerting considerable influence on the field. During the course of refuting some doctrines, we introduced several concepts that were unconventional and paradigm-shifting at the time. We showed that (1) hypothalamic peptides can act ‘up’ on the brain as well as ‘down’ on the pituitary, (2) peripheral peptides can affect the brain, (3) peptides can cross the blood-brain barrier, (4) the actions of peptides can persist longer than their half-lives in blood, (5) perinatal administration of peptides can exert actions persisting into adulthood, (6) a single peptide can have more than one action, (7) dose-response relationships of peptides need not be linear, (8) the brain produces antiopiate as well as opiate peptides, (9) there is a selective high affinity endogenous peptide ligand for the mu-opiate receptor, (10) a peptide’s name does not restrict its effects, and (11) astrocytes assume an active role in response to metabolic disturbance and hyperleptinemia. The evolving questions in our laboratories reflect the diligent effort of the neuropeptide community to identify the roles of peptides in the CNS. The next decade is expected to see greater progress in the following areas: (a) interactions of peptides with other molecules in the CNS; (b) peptide involvement in cell-cell interactions; and (c) peptides in neuropsychiatric, autoimmune, and neurodegenerative diseases. The development of peptidomics and gene silencing approaches will expedite the formation of many new concepts in a new era. PMID:20726835

  4. Photolysis Accompanying Peptide Absorption in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, W. David; Foster, Joseph F.

    1972-01-01

    Exposure of proteins and polypeptides to ultraviolet radiation below 240 nm produces peptide cleavage which may or may not be accompanied by observable changes in conformation and optical rotary dispersion (ORD) properties, depending on the stability of the secondary and tertiary structure of the macromolecule under the experimental conditions. Helical and coiled forms of poly-L-glutamic acid undergo degradation at similar rates but only the helical form shows a significant change in rotatory properties. The helical form of poly-L-lysine, but neither the coiled nor β forms, shows a change in [α]233 on irradiation at 233 nm. β-Lactoglobulin shows essentially no change in [α]233 on irradiation in either dilute salt solution or 4 M urea at room temperature; however, in 4 M urea at 56°C a large change occurs. A model is developed which shows that studies of the effect of radiation on ORD properties may be useful in providing information on possible intermediate steps in protein denaturation. The method is illustrated with results on bovine plasma albumin. A quantum yield, 4.3 × 10-3 moles/einstein, was obtained for peptide cleavage in this protein at 225 nm. These studies, based on gel electrophoresis, also showed that the fragments produced are essentially random, suggesting that transfer of energy from aromatic residues is not an important contributor to the peptide photolysis. Possible errors which could arise in ORD and other studies involving intense ultraviolet radiation are considered. PMID:5063838

  5. Peptide mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Thiede, Bernd; Höhenwarter, Wolfgang; Krah, Alexander; Mattow, Jens; Schmid, Monika; Schmidt, Frank; Jungblut, Peter R

    2005-03-01

    Peptide mass fingerprinting by MALDI-MS and sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry have evolved into the major methods for identification of proteins following separation by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE or liquid chromatography. One main technological goal of proteome analyses beside high sensitivity and automation was the comprehensive analysis of proteins. Therefore, the protein species level with the essential information on co- and post-translational modifications must be achieved. The power of peptide mass fingerprinting for protein identification was described here, as exemplified by the identification of protein species with high molecular masses (spectrin alpha and beta), low molecular masses (elongation factor EF-TU fragments), splice variants (alpha A crystallin), aggregates with disulfide bridges (alkylhydroperoxide reductase), and phosphorylated proteins (heat shock protein 27). Helpful tools for these analyses were the use of the minimal protein identifier concept and the software program MS-Screener to remove mass peaks assignable to contaminants and neighbor spots.

  6. Avian host defense peptides.

    PubMed

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; Coorens, Maarten; van Dijk, Albert; Haagsman, Henk P

    2013-11-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are important effector molecules of the innate immune system of vertebrates. These antimicrobial peptides are also present in invertebrates, plants and fungi. HDPs display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and fulfill an important role in the first line of defense of many organisms. It is becoming increasingly clear that in the animal kingdom the functions of HDPs are not confined to direct antimicrobial actions. Research in mammals has indicated that HDPs have many immunomodulatory functions and are also involved in other physiological processes ranging from development to wound healing. During the past five years our knowledge about avian HDPs has increased considerably. This review addresses our current knowledge on the evolution, regulation and biological functions of HDPs of birds.

  7. Molecular Dynamics of Peptide Folding at Aqueous Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Chipot, Christophe; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Even though most monomeric peptides are disordered in water they can adopt sequence-dependent, ordered structures, such as a-helices, at aqueous interfaces. This property is relevant to cellular signaling, membrane fusion, and the action of toxins and antibiotics. The mechanism of folding nonpolar peptides at the water-hexane interface was studied in the example of an 11-mer, of poly-L-leucine. Initially placed as a random coil on the water side of the interface, the peptide folded into an a-helix in 36 ns. Simultaneously, the peptide translocated into the hexane side of the interface. Folding was not sequential and involved a 3/10-helix as an intermediate. The folded peptide was either parallel to the interface or had its C-terminus exposed to water. An 11-mer, LQQLLQQLLQL, composed of leucine (L) and glutamine (G), was taken as a model amphiphilic peptide. It rapidly adopted an amphiphilic, disordered structure at the interface. Further folding proceeded through a series of amphiphilic intermediates.

  8. Screening for voltage-gated sodium channel interacting peptides.

    PubMed

    Meng, Er; Cai, Tian-Fu; Zhang, Hui; Tang, Si; Li, Meng-Jie; Li, Wen-Ying; Huang, Peng-Fei; Liu, Kai; Wu, Lei; Zhu, Ling-Yun; Liu, Long; Peng, Kuan; Dai, Xian-Dong; Jiang, Hui; Zeng, Xiong-Zhi; Liang, Song-Ping; Zhang, Dong-Yi

    2014-04-02

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) interacting peptide is of special interest for both basic research and pharmaceutical purposes. In this study, we established a yeast-two-hybrid based strategy to detect the interaction(s) between neurotoxic peptide and the extracellular region of VGSC. Using a previously reported neurotoxin JZTX-III as a model molecule, we demonstrated that the interactions between JZTX-III and the extracellular regions of its target hNav1.5 are detectable and the detected interactions are directly related to its activity. We further applied this strategy to the screening of VGSC interacting peptides. Using the extracellular region of hNav1.5 as the bait, we identified a novel sodium channel inhibitor SSCM-1 from a random peptide library. This peptide selectively inhibits hNav1.5 currents in the whole-cell patch clamp assays. This strategy might be used for the large scale screening for target-specific interacting peptides of VGSCs or other ion channels.

  9. Antimicrobial Peptides and Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Samantha; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Koon, Hon Wai

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important components of innate immunity. They are often expressed in response to colonic inflammation and infection. Over the last several years, the roles of several antimicrobial peptides have been explored. Gene expression of many AMPs (beta defensin HBD2-4 and cathelicidin) is induced in response to invasion of gut microbes into the mucosal barrier. Some AMPs are expressed in a constitutive manner (alpha defensin HD 5-6 and beta defensin HBD1), while others (defensin and bactericidal/permeability increasing protein BPI) are particularly associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) due to altered defensin expression or development of autoantibodies against Bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI). Various AMPs have different spectrum and strength of antimicrobial effects. Some may play important roles in modulating the colitis (cathelicidin) while others (lactoferrin, hepcidin) may represent biomarkers of disease activity. The use of AMPs for therapeutic purposes is still at an early stage of development. A few natural AMPs were shown to be able to modulate colitis when delivered intravenously or intracolonically (cathelicidin, elafin and SLPI) in mouse colitis models. New AMPs (synthetic or artificial non-human peptides) are being developed and may represent new therapeutic approaches against colitis. This review discusses the latest research developments in the AMP field with emphasis in innate immunity and pathophysiology of colitis. PMID:22950497

  10. Serum peptide reactivities may distinguish neuromyelitis optica subgroups and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Imke; Beißbarth, Tim; Ellenberger, David; Pache, Florence; Stork, Lidia; Ringelstein, Marius; Aktas, Orhan; Jarius, Sven; Wildemann, Brigitte; Dihazi, Hassan; Friede, Tim; Ruprecht, Klemens; Paul, Friedemann

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess in an observational study whether serum peptide antibody reactivities may distinguish aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibody (Ab)–positive and -negative neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) and relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Methods: We screened 8,700 peptides that included human and viral antigens of potential relevance for inflammatory demyelinating diseases and random peptides with pooled sera from different patient groups and healthy controls to set up a customized microarray with 700 peptides. With this microarray, we tested sera from 66 patients with AQP4-Ab-positive (n = 16) and AQP4-Ab-negative (n = 19) NMOSD, RRMS (n = 11), and healthy controls (n = 20). Results: Differential peptide reactivities distinguished NMOSD subgroups from RRMS in 80% of patients. However, the 2 NMOSD subgroups were not well-discriminated, although those patients are clearly separated by their antibody reactivities against AQP4 in cell-based assays. Elevated reactivities to myelin and Epstein-Barr virus peptides were present in RRMS and to AQP4 and AQP1 peptides in AQP4-Ab-positive NMOSD. Conclusions: While AQP4-Ab-positive and -negative NMOSD subgroups are not well-discriminated by peptide antibody reactivities, our findings suggest that peptide antibody reactivities may have the potential to distinguish between both NMOSD subgroups and MS. Future studies should thus concentrate on evaluating peptide antibody reactivities for the differentiation of AQP4-Ab-negative NMOSD and MS. PMID:26894206

  11. [Hydrolysis of peptides by immobilized bacterial peptide hydrolases].

    PubMed

    Nekliudov, A D; Deniakina, E K

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of hydrolysis of a mixture of peptides with an enzyme from the bacterium Xanthomonas rubrilineans, displaying a peptidase activity and immobilized on aluminum oxide, was studied. Kinetic schemes and equations allowing for approaching quantitative description of peptide hydrolysis in complex mixtures containing free amino acids and peptides were obtained. It was demonstrated that as a result of hydrolysis, the content of free amino acids in hydrolysates decreased 2.5- to 3-fold and the molecular weight of the constituent peptides, 2-fold.

  12. Generation of bioactive peptides by biological libraries.

    PubMed

    Mersich, Christa; Jungbauer, Alois

    2008-01-15

    Biological libraries are powerful tools for discovery of new ligands as well as for identification of cellular interaction partners. Since the first development of the first biological libraries in form of phage displays, numerous biological libraries have been developed. For the development of new ligands, the usage of synthetic oligonucleotides is the method of choice. Generation of random oligonucleotides has been refined and various strategies for random oligonucleotide design were developed. We trace the progress and design of new strategies for the generation of random oligonucleotides, and include a look at arising diversity biases. On the other hand, genomic libraries are widely employed for investigation of cellular protein-protein interactions and targeted search of proteomic binding partners. Expression of random peptides and proteins in a linear form or integrated in a scaffold can be facilitated both in vitro and in vivo. A typical in vitro system, ribosome display, provides the largest available library size. In vivo methods comprise smaller libraries, the size of which depends on their transformation efficiency. Libraries in different hosts such as phage, bacteria, yeast, insect cells, mammalian cells exhibit higher biosynthetic capabilities. The latest library systems are compared and their strengths and limitations are reviewed.

  13. Discovery of macrocyclic peptides armed with a mechanism-based warhead: isoform-selective inhibition of human deacetylase SIRT2.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Jumpei; Hayashi, Yuuki; Suga, Hiroaki

    2012-04-02

    Designed to inhibit: by using the random nonstandard peptide integrated discovery (RaPID) system, highly potent isoform-selective inhibitors can be identified from a library of nonstandard macrocyclic peptides. These inhibitors, which contain a mechanism-based warhead residue, are active against the human deacetylase SIRT2, with IC(50) values in the low nanomolar region.

  14. Predicting three-dimensional conformations of peptides constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine.

    PubMed

    Oda, Akifumi; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    The GADV hypothesis is a form of the protein world hypothesis, which suggests that life originated from proteins (Lacey et al. 1999; Ikehara 2002; Andras 2006). In the GADV hypothesis, life is thought to have originated from primitive proteins constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine ([GADV]-proteins). In this study, the three-dimensional (3D) conformations of randomly generated short [GADV]-peptides were computationally investigated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (Sugita and Okamoto 1999). Because the peptides used in this study consisted of only 20 residues each, they could not form certain 3D structures. However, the conformational tendencies of the peptides were elucidated by analyzing the conformational ensembles generated by REMD simulations. The results indicate that secondary structures can be formed in several randomly generated [GADV]-peptides. A long helical structure was found in one of the hydrophobic peptides, supporting the conjecture of the GADV hypothesis that many peptides aggregated to form peptide multimers with enzymatic activity in the primordial soup. In addition, these results indicate that REMD simulations can be used for the structural investigation of short peptides.

  15. Predicting Three-Dimensional Conformations of Peptides Constructed of Only Glycine, Alanine, Aspartic Acid, and Valine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Akifumi; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    The GADV hypothesis is a form of the protein world hypothesis, which suggests that life originated from proteins (Lacey et al. 1999; Ikehara 2002; Andras 2006). In the GADV hypothesis, life is thought to have originated from primitive proteins constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine ([GADV]-proteins). In this study, the three-dimensional (3D) conformations of randomly generated short [GADV]-peptides were computationally investigated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (Sugita and Okamoto 1999). Because the peptides used in this study consisted of only 20 residues each, they could not form certain 3D structures. However, the conformational tendencies of the peptides were elucidated by analyzing the conformational ensembles generated by REMD simulations. The results indicate that secondary structures can be formed in several randomly generated [GADV]-peptides. A long helical structure was found in one of the hydrophobic peptides, supporting the conjecture of the GADV hypothesis that many peptides aggregated to form peptide multimers with enzymatic activity in the primordial soup. In addition, these results indicate that REMD simulations can be used for the structural investigation of short peptides.

  16. Macrocyclization of Unprotected Peptide Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander A; Choo, Zi-Ning; Totaro, Kyle A; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-03-18

    A chemistry for the facile two-component macrocyclization of unprotected peptide isocyanates is described. Starting from peptides containing two glutamic acid γ-hydrazide residues, isocyanates can be readily accessed and cyclized with hydrazides of dicarboxylic acids. The choice of a nucleophilic linker allows for the facile modulation of biochemical properties of a macrocyclic peptide. Four cyclic NYAD-1 analogues were synthesized using the described method and displayed a range of biological activities.

  17. Biodiscovery of Aluminum Binding Peptides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high...scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the self- sustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high...removal. An eCPX peptide display library was grown and induced as described in the paragraph above. After rinsing samples briefly in PBS, the aluminum

  18. Peptides actively transported across the tympanic membrane: Functional and structural properties

    PubMed Central

    Kurabi, Arwa; Beasley, Kerry A.; Chang, Lisa; McCann, James; Pak, Kwang; Ryan, Allen F.

    2017-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is the most common infectious disease of children under six, causing more antibiotic prescriptions and surgical procedures than any other pediatric condition. By screening a bacteriophage (phage) library genetically engineered to express random peptides on their surfaces, we discovered unique peptides that actively transport phage particles across the intact tympanic membrane (TM) and into the middle ear (ME). Herein our goals were to characterize the physiochemical peptide features that may underlie trans-TM phage transport; assess morphological and functional effects of phage peptides on the ME and inner ear (IE); and determine whether peptide-bearing phage transmigrate from the ME into the IE. Incubation of five peptide-bearing phage on the TM for over 4hrs resulted in demonstrably superior transport of one peptide, in level and in exponential increase over time. This suggests a preferred peptide motif for TM active transport. Functional and structural comparisons revealed unique features of this peptide: These include a central lysine residue, isoelectric point of 0.0 at physiological pH and a hydrophobic C-terminus. When the optimal peptide was applied to the TM independent of phage, similar transport was observed, indicating that integration into phage is not required. When 109 particles of the four different trans-TM phage were applied directly into the ME, no morphological effects were detected in the ME or IE when compared to saline or wild-type (WT) phage controls. Comparable, reversible hearing loss was observed for saline controls, WT phage and trans-TM peptide phage, suggesting a mild conductive hearing loss due to ME fluid. Perilymph titers after ME incubation established that few copies of trans-TM peptide phage crossed into the IE. The results suggest that, within the parameters tested, trans-TM peptides are safe and could be used as potential agents for noninvasive delivery of drugs, particles and gene therapy vectors to the ME

  19. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology.

  20. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  1. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  2. Antitumor Peptides from Marine Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lan-Hong; Wang, Yue-Jun; Sheng, Jun; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Yuan; Lin, Xiu-Kun; Sun, Mi

    2011-01-01

    The biodiversity of the marine environment and the associated chemical diversity constitute a practically unlimited resource of new antitumor agents in the field of the development of marine bioactive substances. In this review, the progress on studies of antitumor peptides from marine sources is provided. The biological properties and mechanisms of action of different marine peptides are described; information about their molecular diversity is also presented. Novel peptides that induce apoptosis signal pathway, affect the tubulin-microtubule equilibrium and inhibit angiogenesis are presented in association with their pharmacological properties. It is intended to provide useful information for further research in the fields of marine antitumor peptides. PMID:22072999

  3. The PeptideAtlas Project.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Eric W

    2010-01-01

    PeptideAtlas is a multi-species compendium of peptides observed with tandem mass spectrometry methods. Raw mass spectrometer output files are collected from the community and reprocessed through a uniform analysis and validation pipeline that continues to advance. The results are loaded into a database and the information derived from the raw data is returned to the community via several web-based data exploration tools. The PeptideAtlas resource is useful for experiment planning, improving genome annotation, and other data mining projects. PeptideAtlas has become especially useful for planning targeted proteomics experiments.

  4. Antitumor peptides from marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lan-Hong; Wang, Yue-Jun; Sheng, Jun; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Yuan; Lin, Xiu-Kun; Sun, Mi

    2011-01-01

    The biodiversity of the marine environment and the associated chemical diversity constitute a practically unlimited resource of new antitumor agents in the field of the development of marine bioactive substances. In this review, the progress on studies of antitumor peptides from marine sources is provided. The biological properties and mechanisms of action of different marine peptides are described; information about their molecular diversity is also presented. Novel peptides that induce apoptosis signal pathway, affect the tubulin-microtubule equilibrium and inhibit angiogenesis are presented in association with their pharmacological properties. It is intended to provide useful information for further research in the fields of marine antitumor peptides.

  5. Concentration dependence of hydration water in a model peptide.

    PubMed

    Comez, Lucia; Perticaroli, Stefania; Paolantoni, Marco; Sassi, Paola; Corezzi, Silvia; Morresi, Assunta; Fioretto, Daniele

    2014-06-28

    The molecular dynamics of aqueous solutions of a model amphiphilic peptide is studied as a function of concentration by broad-band light scattering experiments. Similarly to protein aqueous solutions, a considerable retardation, of about a factor 6-8, of hydration water dynamics with respect to bulk water is found, showing a slight dependence on solute concentration. Conversely, the average number of water molecules perturbed by the presence of peptide, i.e. the hydration number, appears to be strongly modified by adding solute. Its behaviour, decreasing upon increasing concentration, can be interpreted considering the random close-to-contact condition experienced by solute particles. Overall, the present findings support the view of a "long range" effect of peptides on the surrounding water, extending beyond the first two hydration shells.

  6. Identification of Mimotope Peptides Which Bind to the Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol-Specific Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qiaoping; Pestka, James J.; Hespenheide, Brandon M.; Kuhn, Leslie A.; Linz, John E.; Hart, L. Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody 6F5 (mAb 6F5), which recognizes the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) (vomitoxin), was used to select for peptides that mimic the mycotoxin by employing a library of filamentous phages that have random 7-mer peptides on their surfaces. Two phage clones selected from the random peptide phage-displayed library coded for the amino acid sequences SWGPFPF and SWGPLPF. These clones were designated DONPEP.2 and DONPEP.12, respectively. The results of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) suggested that the two phage displayed peptides bound to mAb 6F5 specifically at the DON binding site. The amino acid sequence of DONPEP.2 plus a structurally flexible linker at the C terminus (SWGPFPFGGGSC) was synthesized and tested to determine its ability to bind to mAb 6F5. This synthetic peptide (designated peptide C430) and DON competed with each other for mAb 6F5 binding. When translationally fused with bacterial alkaline phosphatase, DONPEP.2 bound specifically to mAb 6F5, while the fusion protein retained alkaline phosphatase activity. The potential of using DONPEP.2 as an immunochemical reagent in a DON immunoassay was evaluated with a DON-spiked wheat extract. When peptide C430 was conjugated to bovine serum albumin, it elicited antibody specific to peptide C430 but not to DON in both mice and rabbits. In an in vitro translation system containing rabbit reticulocyte lysate, synthetic peptide C430 did not inhibit protein synthesis but did show antagonism toward DON-induced protein synthesis inhibition. These data suggest that the peptides selected in this study bind to mAb 6F5 and that peptide C430 binds to ribosomes at the same sites as DON. PMID:10427007

  7. Peptides and food intake.

    PubMed

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  8. Peptide Amyloid Surface Display

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Homomeric self-assembly of peptides into amyloid fibers is a feature of many diseases. A central role has been suggested for the lateral fiber surface affecting gains of toxic function. To investigate this, a protein scaffold that presents a discrete, parallel β-sheet surface for amyloid subdomains up to eight residues in length has been designed. Scaffolds that present the fiber surface of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) were prepared. The designs show sequence-specific surface effects apparent in that they gain the capacity to attenuate rates of IAPP self-assembly in solution and affect IAPP-induced toxicity in insulin-secreting cells. PMID:25541905

  9. Plant antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Nawrot, Robert; Barylski, Jakub; Nowicki, Grzegorz; Broniarczyk, Justyna; Buchwald, Waldemar; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a component of barrier defense system of plants. They have been isolated from roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves of a wide variety of species and have activities towards phytopathogens, as well as against bacteria pathogenic to humans. Thus, plant AMPs are considered as promising antibiotic compounds with important biotechnological applications. Plant AMPs are grouped into several families and share general features such as positive charge, the presence of disulfide bonds (which stabilize the structure), and the mechanism of action targeting outer membrane structures.

  10. Peptides and Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  11. Recognition of Bacterial Signal Peptides by Mammalian Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bufe, Bernd; Schumann, Timo; Kappl, Reinhard; Bogeski, Ivan; Kummerow, Carsten; Podgórska, Marta; Smola, Sigrun; Hoth, Markus; Zufall, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G-protein-coupled receptors that function as chemoattractant receptors in innate immune responses. Here we perform systematic structure-function analyses of FPRs from six mammalian species using structurally diverse FPR peptide agonists and identify a common set of conserved agonist properties with typical features of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Guided by these results, we discover that bacterial signal peptides, normally used to translocate proteins across cytoplasmic membranes, are a vast family of natural FPR agonists. N-terminally formylated signal peptide fragments with variable sequence and length activate human and mouse FPR1 and FPR2 at low nanomolar concentrations, thus establishing FPR1 and FPR2 as sensitive and broad signal peptide receptors. The vomeronasal receptor mFpr-rs1 and its sequence orthologue hFPR3 also react to signal peptides but are much more narrowly tuned in signal peptide recognition. Furthermore, all signal peptides examined here function as potent activators of the innate immune system. They elicit robust, FPR-dependent calcium mobilization in human and mouse leukocytes and trigger a range of classical innate defense mechanisms, such as the production of reactive oxygen species, metalloprotease release, and chemotaxis. Thus, bacterial signal peptides constitute a novel class of immune activators that are likely to contribute to mammalian immune defense against bacteria. This evolutionarily conserved detection mechanism combines structural promiscuity with high specificity and enables discrimination between bacterial and eukaryotic signal sequences. With at least 175,542 predicted sequences, bacterial signal peptides represent the largest and structurally most heterogeneous class of G-protein-coupled receptor agonists currently known for the innate immune system. PMID:25605714

  12. A Web Server and Mobile App for Computing Hemolytic Potency of Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Singh, Sandeep; Tuknait, Abhishek; Gautam, Ankur; Mathur, Deepika; Anand, Priya; Varshney, Grish C.; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous therapeutic peptides do not enter the clinical trials just because of their high hemolytic activity. Recently, we developed a database, Hemolytik, for maintaining experimentally validated hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides. The present study describes a web server and mobile app developed for predicting, and screening of peptides having hemolytic potency. Firstly, we generated a dataset HemoPI-1 that contains 552 hemolytic peptides extracted from Hemolytik database and 552 random non-hemolytic peptides (from Swiss-Prot). The sequence analysis of these peptides revealed that certain residues (e.g., L, K, F, W) and motifs (e.g., “FKK”, “LKL”, “KKLL”, “KWK”, “VLK”, “CYCR”, “CRR”, “RFC”, “RRR”, “LKKL”) are more abundant in hemolytic peptides. Therefore, we developed models for discriminating hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides using various machine learning techniques and achieved more than 95% accuracy. We also developed models for discriminating peptides having high and low hemolytic potential on different datasets called HemoPI-2 and HemoPI-3. In order to serve the scientific community, we developed a web server, mobile app and JAVA-based standalone software (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/hemopi/). PMID:26953092

  13. A Web Server and Mobile App for Computing Hemolytic Potency of Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Singh, Sandeep; Tuknait, Abhishek; Gautam, Ankur; Mathur, Deepika; Anand, Priya; Varshney, Grish C.; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2016-03-01

    Numerous therapeutic peptides do not enter the clinical trials just because of their high hemolytic activity. Recently, we developed a database, Hemolytik, for maintaining experimentally validated hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides. The present study describes a web server and mobile app developed for predicting, and screening of peptides having hemolytic potency. Firstly, we generated a dataset HemoPI-1 that contains 552 hemolytic peptides extracted from Hemolytik database and 552 random non-hemolytic peptides (from Swiss-Prot). The sequence analysis of these peptides revealed that certain residues (e.g., L, K, F, W) and motifs (e.g., “FKK”, “LKL”, “KKLL”, “KWK”, “VLK”, “CYCR”, “CRR”, “RFC”, “RRR”, “LKKL”) are more abundant in hemolytic peptides. Therefore, we developed models for discriminating hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides using various machine learning techniques and achieved more than 95% accuracy. We also developed models for discriminating peptides having high and low hemolytic potential on different datasets called HemoPI-2 and HemoPI-3. In order to serve the scientific community, we developed a web server, mobile app and JAVA-based standalone software (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/hemopi/).

  14. A Web Server and Mobile App for Computing Hemolytic Potency of Peptides.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Singh, Sandeep; Tuknait, Abhishek; Gautam, Ankur; Mathur, Deepika; Anand, Priya; Varshney, Grish C; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2016-03-08

    Numerous therapeutic peptides do not enter the clinical trials just because of their high hemolytic activity. Recently, we developed a database, Hemolytik, for maintaining experimentally validated hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides. The present study describes a web server and mobile app developed for predicting, and screening of peptides having hemolytic potency. Firstly, we generated a dataset HemoPI-1 that contains 552 hemolytic peptides extracted from Hemolytik database and 552 random non-hemolytic peptides (from Swiss-Prot). The sequence analysis of these peptides revealed that certain residues (e.g., L, K, F, W) and motifs (e.g., "FKK", "LKL", "KKLL", "KWK", "VLK", "CYCR", "CRR", "RFC", "RRR", "LKKL") are more abundant in hemolytic peptides. Therefore, we developed models for discriminating hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides using various machine learning techniques and achieved more than 95% accuracy. We also developed models for discriminating peptides having high and low hemolytic potential on different datasets called HemoPI-2 and HemoPI-3. In order to serve the scientific community, we developed a web server, mobile app and JAVA-based standalone software (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/hemopi/).

  15. Clinical uses of gut peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, J; Pappas, T N

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors review clinical applications of gut-derived peptides as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: An increasing number of gut peptides have been evaluated for clinical use. Earlier uses as diagnostic agents have been complemented more recently by increasing application of gut peptides as therapeutic agents. METHOD: The authors conducted a literature review. RESULTS: Current experience with clinical use of gut peptides is described. Initial clinical applications focused on using secretomotor effects of gut peptides in diagnostic tests, many of which have now fallen into disuse. More recently, attention has been directed toward harnessing these secretomotor effects for therapeutic use in a variety of disorders, and also using the trophic effects of gut peptides to modulate gut mucosal growth in benign and malignant disease. Gut peptides have been evaluated in a variety of other clinical situations including use as adjuncts to imaging techniques, and modification of behaviors such as feeding and panic disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Gut peptides have been used successfully in an increasing variety of clinical conditions. Further refinements in analogue and antagonist design are likely to lead to even more selective agents that may have important clinical applications. Further studies are needed to identity and evaluate these new agents. PMID:9065291

  16. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  17. Bioactive peptides derived from food.

    PubMed

    Rutherfurd-Markwick, Kay J; Moughan, Paul J

    2005-01-01

    As interest in the ability of functional foods to impact on human health has grown over the past decade, so has the volume of knowledge detailing the beneficial roles of food-derived bioactive peptides. Bioactive peptides from both plant and animal proteins have been discovered, with to date, by far the most being isolated from milk-based products. A wide range of activities has been described, including antimicrobial and antifungal properties, blood pressure-lowering effects, cholesterol-lowering ability, antithrombotic effects, enhancement of mineral absorption, immunomodulatory effects, and localized effects on the gut. Although there is still considerable research to be performed in the area of food-derived bioactive peptides, it is clear that the generation of bioactive peptides from dietary proteins during the normal digestive process is of importance. Therefore, it will become necessary when determining dietary protein quality to consider the potential effects of latent bioactive peptides that are released during digestion of the protein.

  18. Microscopic characterization of peptide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Mammadov, Rashad; Tekinay, Ayse B; Dana, Aykutlu; Guler, Mustafa O

    2012-02-01

    Peptide-based nanomaterials have been utilized for various applications from regenerative medicine to electronics since they provide several advantages including easy synthesis methods, numerous routes for functionalization and biomimicry of secondary structures of proteins which leads to design of self-assembling peptide molecules to form nanostructures. Microscopic characterization at nanoscale is critical to understand processes directing peptide molecules to self-assemble and identify structure-function relationship of the nanostructures. Here, fundamental studies in microscopic characterization of peptide nanostructures are discussed to provide insights in widely used microscopy tools. In this review, we will encompass characterization studies of peptide nanostructures with modern microscopes, such as TEM, SEM, AFM, and advanced optical microscopy techniques. We will also mention specimen preparation methods and describe interpretation of the images.

  19. Molecular basis for the broad substrate selectivity of a peptide prenyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yue; Pierce, Elizabeth; Roe, Daniel; Morita, Maho; McIntosh, John A; Agarwal, Vinayak; Cheatham, Thomas E; Schmidt, Eric W; Nair, Satish K

    2016-12-06

    The cyanobactin prenyltransferases catalyze a series of known or unprecedented reactions on millions of different substrates, with no easily observable recognition motif and exquisite regioselectivity. Here we define the basis of broad substrate tolerance for the otherwise uncharacterized TruF family. We determined the structures of the Tyr-prenylating enzyme PagF, in complex with an isoprenoid donor analog and a panel of linear and macrocyclic peptide substrates. Unexpectedly, the structures reveal a truncated barrel fold, wherein binding of large peptide substrates is necessary to complete a solvent-exposed hydrophobic pocket to form the catalytically competent active site. Kinetic, mutational, chemical, and computational analyses revealed the structural basis of selectivity, showing a small motif within peptide substrates that is sufficient for recognition by the enzyme. Attaching this 2-residue motif to two random peptides results in their isoprenylation by PagF, demonstrating utility as a general biocatalytic platform for modifications on any peptide substrate.

  20. A new approach to quantification of mAb aggregates using peptide affinity probes

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Crystal S. F.; Anderson, Kyle W.; Patel, Pooja M.; Cade, Keale L.; Phinney, Karen W.; Turko, Illarion V.

    2017-01-01

    Using mAbs as therapeutic molecules is complicated by the propensity of mAbs to aggregate at elevated concentrations, which can lead to a variety of adverse events in treatment. Here, we describe a proof-of-concept for new methodology to detect and quantify mAb aggregation. Assay development included using an aggregated mAb as bait for screening of phage display peptide library and identifying those peptides with random sequence which can recognize mAb aggregates. Once identified, the selected peptides can be used for developing quantitative methods to assess mAb aggregation. Results indicate that a peptide binding method coupled with mass spectrometric detection of bound peptide can quantify mAb aggregation and potentially be useful for monitoring aggregation propensity of therapeutic protein candidates. PMID:28186164

  1. A new approach to quantification of mAb aggregates using peptide affinity probes.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Crystal S F; Anderson, Kyle W; Patel, Pooja M; Cade, Keale L; Phinney, Karen W; Turko, Illarion V

    2017-02-10

    Using mAbs as therapeutic molecules is complicated by the propensity of mAbs to aggregate at elevated concentrations, which can lead to a variety of adverse events in treatment. Here, we describe a proof-of-concept for new methodology to detect and quantify mAb aggregation. Assay development included using an aggregated mAb as bait for screening of phage display peptide library and identifying those peptides with random sequence which can recognize mAb aggregates. Once identified, the selected peptides can be used for developing quantitative methods to assess mAb aggregation. Results indicate that a peptide binding method coupled with mass spectrometric detection of bound peptide can quantify mAb aggregation and potentially be useful for monitoring aggregation propensity of therapeutic protein candidates.

  2. Enriching Peptide Libraries for Binding Affinity and Specificity Through Computationally Directed Library Design.

    PubMed

    Foight, Glenna Wink; Chen, T Scott; Richman, Daniel; Keating, Amy E

    2017-01-01

    Peptide reagents with high affinity or specificity for their target protein interaction partner are of utility for many important applications. Optimization of peptide binding by screening large libraries is a proven and powerful approach. Libraries designed to be enriched in peptide sequences that are predicted to have desired affinity or specificity characteristics are more likely to yield success than random mutagenesis. We present a library optimization method in which the choice of amino acids to encode at each peptide position can be guided by available experimental data or structure-based predictions. We discuss how to use analysis of predicted library performance to inform rounds of library design. Finally, we include protocols for more complex library design procedures that consider the chemical diversity of the amino acids at each peptide position and optimize a library score based on a user-specified input model.

  3. Glucagon-like peptide-1: effect on pro-atrial natriuretic peptide in healthy males.

    PubMed

    Skov, Jeppe; Holst, Jens Juul; Gøtze, Jens Peter; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    2014-01-01

    The antihypertensive actions of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) receptor agonists have been linked to the release of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in mice. Whether a GLP1-ANP axis exists in humans is unknown. In this study, we examined 12 healthy young males in a randomized, controlled, double-blinded, single-day, cross-over study to evaluate the effects of a 2-h native GLP1 infusion. Plasma proANP concentrations were measured by an automated mid-region-directed proANP immunoassay and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) on Roche Modular E170. Urine was collected for measurements of sodium excretion. Although GLP1 infusion increased the urinary sodium excretion markedly, there were no significant changes in either proANP or proBNP concentrations. When GLP1 infusion was stopped, sodium excretion declined rapidly. As proANP concentration reflects ANP secretion, our data could not confirm the existence of a GLP1-ANP axis in humans. Especially, the natriuretic effects of GLP1 seem unlikely to be mediated exclusively via ANP.

  4. Random broadcast on random geometric graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Elsasser, Robert; Friedrich, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we consider the random broadcast time on random geometric graphs (RGGs). The classic random broadcast model, also known as push algorithm, is defined as: starting with one informed node, in each succeeding round every informed node chooses one of its neighbors uniformly at random and informs it. We consider the random broadcast time on RGGs, when with high probability: (i) RGG is connected, (ii) when there exists the giant component in RGG. We show that the random broadcast time is bounded by {Omicron}({radical} n + diam(component)), where diam(component) is a diameter of the entire graph, or the giant component, for the regimes (i), or (ii), respectively. In other words, for both regimes, we derive the broadcast time to be {Theta}(diam(G)), which is asymptotically optimal.

  5. Peptide sequences identified by phage display are immunodominant functional motifs of Pet and Pic serine proteases secreted by Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri.

    PubMed

    Ulises, Hernández-Chiñas; Tatiana, Gazarian; Karlen, Gazarian; Guillermo, Mendoza-Hernández; Juan, Xicohtencatl-Cortes; Carlos, Eslava

    2009-12-01

    Plasmid-encoded toxin (Pet) and protein involved in colonization (Pic), are serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) secreted by enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), which display the GDSGSG sequence or the serine motif. Our research was directed to localize functional sites in both proteins using the phage display method. From a 12mer linear and a 7mer cysteine-constrained (C7C) libraries displayed on the M13 phage pIII protein we selected different mimotopes using IgG purified from sera of children naturally infected with EAEC producing Pet and Pic proteins, and anti-Pet and anti-Pic IgG purified from rabbits immunized with each one of these proteins. Children IgG selected a homologous group of sequences forming the consensus sequence, motif, PQPxK, and the motifs PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC were selected by the rabbit anti-Pet and anti-Pic IgGs, respectively. Analysis of the amino terminal region of a panel of SPATEs showed the presence in all of them of sequences matching the PGxI/LN or CxPDDSSxC motifs, and in a three-dimensional model (Modeller 9v2) designed for Pet, both these motifs were found in the globular portion of the protein, close to the protease active site GDSGSG. Antibodies induced in mice by mimotopes carrying the three aforementioned motifs were reactive with Pet, Pic, and with synthetic peptides carrying the immunogenic mimotope sequences TYPGYINHSKA and LLPQPPKLLLP, thus confirming that the peptide moiety of the selected phages induced the antibodies specific for the toxins. The antibodies induced in mice to the PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC mimotopes inhibited fodrin proteolysis and macrophage chemotaxis biological activities of Pet. Our results showed that we were able to generate, by a phage display procedure, mimotopes with sequence motifs PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC, and to identify them as functional motifs of the Pet, Pic and other SPATEs involved in their biological activities.

  6. Asymmetric Peptide Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhilin; Tantakitti, Faifan; Palmer, Liam C; Stupp, Samuel I

    2016-11-09

    Asymmetry in chemical structure or shape at molecular, nanoscale, or microscopic levels is essential to a vast number of functionalities in both natural and artificial systems. Bottom-up approaches to create asymmetric supramolecular nanostructures are considered promising but this strategy suffers from the potentially dynamic nature of noncovalent interactions. We report here on supramolecular self-assembly of asymmetric peptide amphiphiles consisting of two different molecularly linked domains. We found that strong noncovalent interactions and a high degree of internal order among the asymmetric amphiphiles lead to nanoribbons with asymmetric faces due to the preferential self-association of the two domains. The capture of gold nanoparticles on only one face of the nanoribbons demonstrates symmetry breaking in these supramolecular structures.

  7. Antimicrobial peptides: therapeutic potentials.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Jin; Park, Sung Jean; Mishig-Ochir, Tsogbadrakh; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2014-12-01

    The increasing appearance of multidrug-resistant pathogens has created an urgent need for suitable alternatives to current antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which act as defensive weapons against microbes, have received great attention because of broad-spectrum activities, unique action mechanisms and rare antibiotic-resistant variants. Despite desirable characteristics, they have shown limitations in pharmaceutical development due to toxicity, stability and manufacturing costs. Because of these drawbacks, only a few AMPs have been tested in Phase III clinical trials and no AMPs have been approved by the US FDA yet. However, these obstacles could be overcome by well-known methods such as changing physicochemical characteristics and introducing nonnatural amino acids, acetylation or amidation, as well as modern techniques like molecular targeted AMPs, liposomal formulations and drug delivery systems. Thus, the current challenge in this field is to develop therapeutic AMPs at a reasonable cost as well as to overcome the limitations.

  8. Peptide-formation on cysteine-containing peptide scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, B. C.; Orgel, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    Monomeric cysteine residues attached to cysteine-containing peptides by disulfide bonds can be activated by carbonyldiimidazole. If two monomeric cysteine residues, attached to a 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Glyn-Cys-Glu10, (n = 0, 1, 2, 3) are activated, they react to form the dipeptide Cys-Cys. in 25-65% yield. Similarly, the activation of a cysteine residue attached to the 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Gly-Glu10 in the presence of Arg5 leads to the formation of Cys-Arg5 in 50% yield. The significance of these results for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  9. How random is a random vector?

    SciTech Connect

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2015-12-15

    Over 80 years ago Samuel Wilks proposed that the “generalized variance” of a random vector is the determinant of its covariance matrix. To date, the notion and use of the generalized variance is confined only to very specific niches in statistics. In this paper we establish that the “Wilks standard deviation” –the square root of the generalized variance–is indeed the standard deviation of a random vector. We further establish that the “uncorrelation index” –a derivative of the Wilks standard deviation–is a measure of the overall correlation between the components of a random vector. Both the Wilks standard deviation and the uncorrelation index are, respectively, special cases of two general notions that we introduce: “randomness measures” and “independence indices” of random vectors. In turn, these general notions give rise to “randomness diagrams”—tangible planar visualizations that answer the question: How random is a random vector? The notion of “independence indices” yields a novel measure of correlation for Lévy laws. In general, the concepts and results presented in this paper are applicable to any field of science and engineering with random-vectors empirical data.

  10. Epimerization in peptide thioester condensation.

    PubMed

    Teruya, Kenta; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Kawakami, Toru; Akaji, Kenichi; Aimoto, Saburo

    2012-11-01

    Peptide segment couplings are now widely utilized in protein chemical synthesis. One of the key structures for the strategy is the peptide thioester. Peptide thioester condensation, in which a C-terminal peptide thioester is selectively activated by silver ions then condensed with an amino component, is a powerful tool. But the amino acid adjacent to the thioester is at risk of epimerization. During the preparation of peptide thioesters by the Boc solid-phase method, no substantial epimerization of the C-terminal amino acid was detected. Epimerization was, however, observed during a thioester-thiol exchange reaction and segment condensation in DMSO in the presence of a base. In contrast, thioester-thiol exchange reactions in aqueous solutions gave no epimerization. The epimerization during segment condensation was significantly suppressed with a less polar solvent that is applicable to segments in thioester peptide condensation. These results were applied to a longer peptide thioester condensation. The epimer content of the coupling product of 89 residues was reduced from 27% to 6% in a condensation between segments of 45 and 44 residues for the thioester and the amino component, respectively.

  11. Configurational subdiffusion of peptides: A network study

    SciTech Connect

    Neusius, Thomas; Diadone, Isabella; Sokolov, Igor; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of linear peptides reveals configurational subdiffusion at equilibrium extending from 10-12 to 10-8 s. Rouse chain and continuous-time random walk models of the subdiffusion are critically discussed. Network approaches to analyzing MD simulations are shown to reproduce the time dependence of the subdiffusive mean squared displacement, which is found to arise from the fractal-like geometry of the accessible volume in the configuration space. Convergence properties of the simulation pertaining to the subdiffusive dynamics are characterized and the effect on the subdiffusive properties of representing the solvent explicitly or implicitly is compared. Non-Markovianity and other factors limiting the range of applicability of the network models are examined.

  12. Multidimensional peptide separations in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Link, Andrew J

    2002-12-01

    Multidimensional peptide separation will play an increasingly important role in the drive to identify and quantitate the proteome. By increasing the peak and load capacity, multidimensional approaches increase the number and dynamic range of peptides that can be analyzed in a complex biological organism. Separation methods using different physical properties of peptides have been combined with varying degrees of success. The ultimate goal is a rapid separation strategy that can be coupled with analytical methods, such as mass spectrometry, to provide comprehensive monitoring of the changing concentration, interactions, and structures of proteins in the proteome.

  13. Directed random walk with random restarts: The Sisyphus random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, Miquel; Villarroel, Javier

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we consider a particular version of the random walk with restarts: random reset events which suddenly bring the system to the starting value. We analyze its relevant statistical properties, like the transition probability, and show how an equilibrium state appears. Formulas for the first-passage time, high-water marks, and other extreme statistics are also derived; we consider counting problems naturally associated with the system. Finally we indicate feasible generalizations useful for interpreting different physical effects.

  14. Directed random walk with random restarts: The Sisyphus random walk.

    PubMed

    Montero, Miquel; Villarroel, Javier

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we consider a particular version of the random walk with restarts: random reset events which suddenly bring the system to the starting value. We analyze its relevant statistical properties, like the transition probability, and show how an equilibrium state appears. Formulas for the first-passage time, high-water marks, and other extreme statistics are also derived; we consider counting problems naturally associated with the system. Finally we indicate feasible generalizations useful for interpreting different physical effects.

  15. All-atom simulations and free-energy calculations of coiled-coil peptides with lipid bilayers: binding strength, structural transition, and effect on lipid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Sun Young; Lee, Hwankyu

    2016-01-01

    Peptides E and K, which are synthetic coiled-coil peptides for membrane fusion, were simulated with lipid bilayers composed of lipids and cholesterols at different ratios using all-atom models. We first calculated free energies of binding from umbrella sampling simulations, showing that both E and K peptides tend to adsorb onto the bilayer surface, which occurs more strongly in the bilayer composed of smaller lipid headgroups. Then, unrestrained simulations show that K peptides more deeply insert into the bilayer with partially retaining the helical structure, while E peptides less insert and predominantly become random coils, indicating the structural transition from helices to random coils, in quantitative agreement with experiments. This is because K peptides electrostatically interact with lipid phosphates, as well as because hydrocarbons of lysines of K peptide are longer than those of glutamic acids of E peptide and thus form stronger hydrophobic interactions with lipid tails. This deeper insertion of K peptide increases the bilayer dynamics and a vacancy below the peptide, leading to the rearrangement of smaller lipids. These findings help explain the experimentally observed or proposed differences in the insertion depth, binding strength, and structural transition of E and K peptides, and support the snorkeling effect. PMID:26926570

  16. All-atom simulations and free-energy calculations of coiled-coil peptides with lipid bilayers: binding strength, structural transition, and effect on lipid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sun Young; Lee, Hwankyu

    2016-03-01

    Peptides E and K, which are synthetic coiled-coil peptides for membrane fusion, were simulated with lipid bilayers composed of lipids and cholesterols at different ratios using all-atom models. We first calculated free energies of binding from umbrella sampling simulations, showing that both E and K peptides tend to adsorb onto the bilayer surface, which occurs more strongly in the bilayer composed of smaller lipid headgroups. Then, unrestrained simulations show that K peptides more deeply insert into the bilayer with partially retaining the helical structure, while E peptides less insert and predominantly become random coils, indicating the structural transition from helices to random coils, in quantitative agreement with experiments. This is because K peptides electrostatically interact with lipid phosphates, as well as because hydrocarbons of lysines of K peptide are longer than those of glutamic acids of E peptide and thus form stronger hydrophobic interactions with lipid tails. This deeper insertion of K peptide increases the bilayer dynamics and a vacancy below the peptide, leading to the rearrangement of smaller lipids. These findings help explain the experimentally observed or proposed differences in the insertion depth, binding strength, and structural transition of E and K peptides, and support the snorkeling effect.

  17. All-atom simulations and free-energy calculations of coiled-coil peptides with lipid bilayers: binding strength, structural transition, and effect on lipid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sun Young; Lee, Hwankyu

    2016-03-01

    Peptides E and K, which are synthetic coiled-coil peptides for membrane fusion, were simulated with lipid bilayers composed of lipids and cholesterols at different ratios using all-atom models. We first calculated free energies of binding from umbrella sampling simulations, showing that both E and K peptides tend to adsorb onto the bilayer surface, which occurs more strongly in the bilayer composed of smaller lipid headgroups. Then, unrestrained simulations show that K peptides more deeply insert into the bilayer with partially retaining the helical structure, while E peptides less insert and predominantly become random coils, indicating the structural transition from helices to random coils, in quantitative agreement with experiments. This is because K peptides electrostatically interact with lipid phosphates, as well as because hydrocarbons of lysines of K peptide are longer than those of glutamic acids of E peptide and thus form stronger hydrophobic interactions with lipid tails. This deeper insertion of K peptide increases the bilayer dynamics and a vacancy below the peptide, leading to the rearrangement of smaller lipids. These findings help explain the experimentally observed or proposed differences in the insertion depth, binding strength, and structural transition of E and K peptides, and support the snorkeling effect.

  18. Secondary structure formation and LCST behavior of short elastin-like peptides.

    PubMed

    Nuhn, Harald; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2008-10-01

    This contribution investigates the effects of chain length and chemical composition on the secondary structure and LCST behavior of a library of short, elastin-like peptides based on the GVGVP motif. CD experiments revealed that most of the investigated peptides showed the typical elastin conformational behavior with a decrease in random coil and an increase in beta-turn character with increasing temperature. For several peptides, LCST behavior was observed in aqueous NaCl solutions containing 10 mg/mL peptide. By extrapolation of the LCSTs measured at different NaCl concentrations to zero-salt concentration, apparent LCSTs were determined. The apparent LCST was found to decrease with increasing peptide chain length, which correlated well with the trend in the predicted partition coefficients. The apparent LCST of the peptides could be manipulated by successive replacement of the valine residues by more hydrophobic isoleucine, leucine, or phenylalanine residues. Within a particular series of variants, the apparent LCST was found to decrease with an increasing number of valine replacements, which also correlated well with the predicted evolution of the partition coefficient. Although the relative importance of the overall peptide hydrophobicity and the conformational preferences of the constituent amino acids on the LCST behavior still remains an open question, the results described in this contribution clearly demonstrate that short, elastin-like peptides are potentially attractive building blocks for a range of materials applications in biomedicine and engineering.

  19. An in vitro polysome display system for identifying ligands from very large peptide libraries.

    PubMed Central

    Mattheakis, L C; Bhatt, R R; Dower, W J

    1994-01-01

    We have used an in vitro protein synthesis system to construct a very large library of peptides displayed on polysomes. A pool of DNA sequences encoding 10(12) random decapeptides was incubated in an Escherichia coli S30 coupled transcription/translation system. Polysomes were isolated and screened by affinity selection of the nascent peptides on an immobilized monoclonal antibody specific for the peptide dynorphin B. The mRNA from the enriched pool of polysomes was recovered, copied into cDNA, and amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to produce template for the next round of in vitro synthesis and selection. A portion of the amplified template from each round was cloned into a filamentous phagemid vector to determine the specificity of peptide binding by phage ELISA and to sequence the DNA. After four rounds of affinity selection, the majority of clones encoded peptides that bound specifically to the antibody and contained a consensus sequence that is similar to the known epitope for the antibody. Synthetic peptides corresponding to several of these sequences have binding affinities ranging from 7 to 140 nM. The in vitro system described here has the potential to screen peptide libraries that are three to six orders of magnitude larger than current biological peptide display systems. Images PMID:7522328

  20. Examining Docking Interactions on ERK2 with Modular Peptide Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sunbae; Warthaka, Mangalika; Yan, Chunli; Kaoud, Tamer S; Ren, Pengyu; Dalby, Kevin N

    2012-01-01

    ERK2 primarily recognizes substrates through two recruitment sites, which lie outside the active site cleft of the kinase. These recruitment sites bind modular-docking sequences called docking sites and are potentially attractive sites for the development of non-ATP competitive inhibitors. The D-recruitment site (DRS) and the F-recruitment site (FRS) bind D-sites and F-sites, respectively. For example, peptides that target the FRS have been proposed to inhibit all ERK2 activity (J. Biol. Chem. 2001, 276, 965-973), however it has not been established whether this inhibition is steric or allosteric in origin. To facilitate inhibitor design and to examine potential coupling of recruitment sites to other ligand recognition sites within ERK2 Energetic coupling within ERK2 was investigated using two new modular peptide substrates for ERK2. Modeling shows that one peptide (Sub-D) recognizes the DRS, while the other peptide (Sub-F) binds the FRS. A steady-state kinetic analysis reveals little evidence of thermodynamic linkage between peptide substrate and ATP. Both peptides are phosphorylated through a random-order sequential mechanism with a kcat/Km comparable to Ets-1, a bona fide ERK2 substrate. Occupancy of the FRS with a peptide containing a modular docking sequence has no effect on the intrinsic ability of ERK2 to phosphorylate Sub-D. Occupancy of the DRS with a peptide containing a modular docking sequence has a slight effect (1.3 ± 0.1-fold increase in kcat) on the intrinsic ability of ERK2 to phosphorylate Sub-F. These data suggest that while docking interactions at the DRS and the FRS are energetically uncoupled, the DRS can exhibit weak communication to the active site. In addition, they suggest that peptides bound to the FRS inhibit the phosphorylation of protein substrates through a steric mechanism. The modeling and kinetic data suggest that the recruitment of ERK2 to cellular locations via its DRS may facilitate the formation of F-site selective ERK2

  1. Synthetic Peptides as Protein Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Groß, Andrea; Hashimoto, Chie; Sticht, Heinrich; Eichler, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    The design and generation of molecules capable of mimicking the binding and/or functional sites of proteins represents a promising strategy for the exploration and modulation of protein function through controlled interference with the underlying molecular interactions. Synthetic peptides have proven an excellent type of molecule for the mimicry of protein sites because such peptides can be generated as exact copies of protein fragments, as well as in diverse chemical modifications, which includes the incorporation of a large range of non-proteinogenic amino acids as well as the modification of the peptide backbone. Apart from extending the chemical and structural diversity presented by peptides, such modifications also increase the proteolytic stability of the molecules, enhancing their utility for biological applications. This article reviews recent advances by this and other laboratories in the use of synthetic protein mimics to modulate protein function, as well as to provide building blocks for synthetic biology. PMID:26835447

  2. Marine Peptides: Bioactivities and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Ng, Tzi Bun; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-01-01

    Peptides are important bioactive natural products which are present in many marine species. These marine peptides have high potential nutraceutical and medicinal values because of their broad spectra of bioactivities. Their antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor, antioxidative, cardioprotective (antihypertensive, antiatherosclerotic and anticoagulant), immunomodulatory, analgesic, anxiolytic anti-diabetic, appetite suppressing and neuroprotective activities have attracted the attention of the pharmaceutical industry, which attempts to design them for use in the treatment or prevention of various diseases. Some marine peptides or their derivatives have high commercial values and had reached the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical markets. A large number of them are already in different phases of the clinical and preclinical pipeline. This review highlights the recent research in marine peptides and the trends and prospects for the future, with special emphasis on nutraceutical and pharmaceutical development into marketed products. PMID:26132844

  3. Antimicrobial peptides: properties and applicability.

    PubMed

    van 't Hof, W; Veerman, E C; Helmerhorst, E J; Amerongen, A V

    2001-04-01

    All organisms need protection against microorganisms, e. g. bacteria, viruses and fungi. For many years, attention has been focused on adaptive immunity as the main antimicrobial defense system. However, the adaptive immune system, with its network of humoral and cellular responses is only found in higher animals, while innate immunity is encountered in all living creatures. The turning point in the appreciation of the innate immunity was the discovery of antimicrobial peptides in the early eighties. In general these peptides act by disrupting the structural integrity of the microbial membranes. It has become clear that membrane-active peptides and proteins play a crucial role in both the innate and the adaptive immune system as antimicrobial agents. This review is focused on the functional and structural features of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides, and discusses their potential as therapeutics.

  4. Moonlighting Peptides with Emerging Function

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Villalón Rojas, Amanda; Herrera, Sur; Garza-Ramos, Georgina; Torres Larios, Alfredo; Amero, Carlos; Zarraga Granados, Gabriela; Gutiérrez Aguilar, Manuel; Lara Ortiz, María Teresa; Polanco Gonzalez, Carlos; Uribe Carvajal, Salvador; Coria, Roberto; Peña Díaz, Antonio; Bredesen, Dale E.; Castro-Obregon, Susana; del Rio, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Hunter-killer peptides combine two activities in a single polypeptide that work in an independent fashion like many other multi-functional, multi-domain proteins. We hypothesize that emergent functions may result from the combination of two or more activities in a single protein domain and that could be a mechanism selected in nature to form moonlighting proteins. We designed moonlighting peptides using the two mechanisms proposed to be involved in the evolution of such molecules (i.e., to mutate non-functional residues and the use of natively unfolded peptides). We observed that our moonlighting peptides exhibited two activities that together rendered a new function that induces cell death in yeast. Thus, we propose that moonlighting in proteins promotes emergent properties providing a further level of complexity in living organisms so far unappreciated. PMID:22808104

  5. Borinic acid catalysed peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    El Dine, Tharwat Mohy; Rouden, Jacques; Blanchet, Jérôme

    2015-11-18

    The catalytic synthesis of peptides is a major challenge in the modern organic chemistry hindered by the well-established use of stoichiometric coupling reagents. Herein, we describe for the first time that borinic acid is able to catalyse this reaction under mild conditions with an improved activity compared to our recently developed thiophene-based boronic acid. This catalyst is particularly efficient for peptide bond synthesis affording dipeptides in good yields without detectable racemization.

  6. Biodegradable Peptide-Silica Nanodonuts.

    PubMed

    Maggini, Laura; Travaglini, Leana; Cabrera, Ingrid; Castro-Hartmann, Pablo; De Cola, Luisa

    2016-03-07

    We report hybrid organosilica toroidal particles containing a short peptide sequence as the organic component of the hybrid systems. Once internalised in cancer cells, the presence of the peptide allows for interaction with peptidase enzymes, which attack the nanocarrier effectively triggering its structural breakdown. Moreover, these biodegradable nanovectors are characterised by high cellular uptake and exocytosis, showing great potential as biodegradable drug carriers. To demonstrate this feature, doxorubicin was employed and its delivery in HeLa cells investigated.

  7. Peptides and proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Bachovchin, W.W.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1994-12-01

    Advances in magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopy make it possible to derive detailed structural information about biomolecular structures in solution. These techniques are critically dependent on the availability of labeled compounds. For example, NMR techniques used today to derive peptide and protein structures require uniformity {sup 13}C-and {sup 15}N-labeled samples that are derived biosynthetically from (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. These experiments are possible now because, during the 1970s, the National Stable Isotope Resource developed algal methods for producing (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. If NMR techniques are to be used to study larger proteins, we will need sophisticated labelling patterns in amino acids that employ a combination of {sup 2}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N labeling. The availability of these specifically labeled amino acids requires a renewed investment in new methods for chemical synthesis of labeled amino acids. The development of new magnetic resonance or vibrational techniques to elucidate biomolecular structure will be seriously impeded if we do not see rapid progress in labeling technology. Investment in labeling chemistry is as important as investment in the development of advanced spectroscopic tools.

  8. Design of Responsive Peptide-based Hydrogels as Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Joel

    2008-03-01

    Hydrogels composed of self-assembled peptides have been designed to allow minimally invasive delivery of cells in-vivo. These peptides undergo sol-gel phase transitions in response to biological media enabling the three-dimensional encapsulation of cells. Peptides are designed such that when dissolved in aqueous solution, exist in an ensemble of random coil conformations rendering them fully soluble. The addition of an exogenous stimulus results in peptide folding into beta-hairpin conformation. This folded structure undergoes rapid self-assembly into a highly crosslinked hydrogel network whose nanostructure is defined and controllable. This mechanism, which links intramolecular peptide folding to self-assembly, allows temporally resolved material formation. In general, peptides can be designed to fold and assemble affording hydrogel in response to changes in pH or ionic strength, the addition of heat or even light. In addition to these stimuli, DMEM cell culture media is able to initiate folding and consequent self-assembly. DMEM-induced gels are cytocompatible towards NIH 3T3 murine fibroblasts, mesenchymal stem cells, hepatocytes, osteoblasts and chondrocytes. As an added bonus, many of these hydrogels possess broad spectrum antibacterial activity suggesting that adventitious bacterial infections that may occur during surgical manipulations and after implantation can be greatly reduced. Lastly, when hydrogelation is triggered in the presence of cells, gels become impregnated and can serve as a delivery vehicle. A unique characteristic of these gels is that when an appropriate shear stress is applied, the gel will shear-thin, becoming an injectable low viscosity gel. However, after the application of shear has stopped, the material quickly self-heals producing a gel with mechanical rigidity nearly identical to the original hydrogel. This attribute allows cell-impregnated gels to be delivered to target tissues via syringe where they quickly recover complementing

  9. Isolation and characterization of an antibacterial peptide fraction from the pepsin hydrolysate of half-fin anchovy (Setipinna taty).

    PubMed

    Song, Ru; Wei, Rong-Bian; Luo, Hong-Yu; Wang, Dong-Feng

    2012-03-09

    Enzymatic proteolysis of food proteins is considered a promising method to generate antibacterial peptides. The objective of the present study was to isolate and characterize peptide fraction from the pepsin hydrolysate of half-fin anchovy (Setipinna taty) with antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli. The most active peptide fraction HAHp2-3-I was isolated by a series of chromatographic methods, including Sephadex G-25 chromatography, reverse high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and Source 5RPC ST. Peptides identification of HAHp2-3-I was carried out using UPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. HAHp2-3-I contained five cationic peptides (MLTTPPHAKYVLQW, SHAATKAPPKNGNY, PTAGVANALQHA, QLGTHSAQPVPF and VNVDERWRKL) and three anionic peptides (LATVSVGAVELCY, NPEFLASGDHLDNLQ and PEVVYECLHW). Prediction of peptide secondary structure indicated that these anionic peptides should have extended strand and random coil structures, whereas cationic peptides PTAGVANALQHA and VNVDERWRKL could form alpha helixes. In addition, results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that treatment by HAHp2-3-I could cause the morphological changes of E. coli and destruction of the cell integrity via irreversible membrane damage. The results could provide information for investigating the antibacterial model of antibacterial peptides derived from fish protein hydrolysates.

  10. Spectroscopy with Random and Displaced Random Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velázquez, V.; Zuker, A. P.

    2002-02-01

    Because of the time reversal invariance of the angular momentum operator J2, the average energies and variances at fixed J for random two-body Hamiltonians exhibit odd-even- J staggering that may be especially strong for J = 0. It is shown that upon ensemble averaging over random runs, this behavior is reflected in the yrast states. Displaced (attractive) random ensembles lead to rotational spectra with strongly enhanced B(E2) transitions for a certain class of model spaces. It is explained how to generalize these results to other forms of collectivity.

  11. On Gaussian random supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Thomas C.

    2014-04-01

    We study the distribution of metastable vacua and the likelihood of slow roll inflation in high dimensional random landscapes. We consider two examples of landscapes: a Gaussian random potential and an effective supergravity potential defined via a Gaussian random superpotential and a trivial Kähler potential. To examine these landscapes we introduce a random matrix model that describes the correlations between various derivatives and we propose an efficient algorithm that allows for a numerical study of high dimensional random fields. Using these novel tools, we find that the vast majority of metastable critical points in N dimensional random supergravities are either approximately supersymmetric with | F| ≪ M susy or supersymmetric. Such approximately supersymmetric points are dynamical attractors in the landscape and the probability that a randomly chosen critical point is metastable scales as log( P ) ∝ - N. We argue that random supergravities lead to potentially interesting inflationary dynamics.

  12. Prediction of Nucleotide Binding Peptides Using Star Graph Topological Indices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Munteanu, Cristian R; Fernández Blanco, Enrique; Tan, Zhiliang; Santos Del Riego, Antonino; Pazos, Alejandro

    2015-11-01

    The nucleotide binding proteins are involved in many important cellular processes, such as transmission of genetic information or energy transfer and storage. Therefore, the screening of new peptides for this biological function is an important research topic. The current study proposes a mixed methodology to obtain the first classification model that is able to predict new nucleotide binding peptides, using only the amino acid sequence. Thus, the methodology uses a Star graph molecular descriptor of the peptide sequences and the Machine Learning technique for the best classifier. The best model represents a Random Forest classifier based on two features of the embedded and non-embedded graphs. The performance of the model is excellent, considering similar models in the field, with an Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUROC) value of 0.938 and true positive rate (TPR) of 0.886 (test subset). The prediction of new nucleotide binding peptides with this model could be useful for drug target studies in drug development.

  13. Cyclic peptide therapeutics: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Deyle, Kaycie; Heinis, Christian

    2017-02-26

    Cyclic peptides combine several favorable properties such as good binding affinity, target selectivity and low toxicity that make them an attractive modality for the development of therapeutics. Over 40 cyclic peptide drugs are currently in clinical use and around one new cyclic peptide drug enters the market every year on average. The vast majority of clinically approved cyclic peptides are derived from natural products, such as antimicrobials or human peptide hormones. New powerful techniques based on rational design and in vitro evolution have enabled the de novo development of cyclic peptide ligands to targets for which nature does not offer solutions. A look at the cyclic peptides currently under clinical evaluation shows that several have been developed using such techniques. This new source for cyclic peptide ligands introduces a freshness to the field, and it is likely that de novo developed cyclic peptides will be in clinical use in the near future.

  14. Exploration of the Medicinal Peptide Space.

    PubMed

    Gevaert, Bert; Stalmans, Sofie; Wynendaele, Evelien; Taevernier, Lien; Bracke, Nathalie; D'Hondt, Matthias; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-01-01

    The chemical properties of peptide medicines, known as the 'medicinal peptide space' is considered a multi-dimensional subset of the global peptide space, where each dimension represents a chemical descriptor. These descriptors can be linked to biofunctional, medicinal properties to varying degrees. Knowledge of this space can increase the efficiency of the peptide-drug discovery and development process, as well as advance our understanding and classification of peptide medicines. For 245 peptide drugs, already available on the market or in clinical development, multivariate dataexploration was performed using peptide relevant physicochemical descriptors, their specific peptidedrug target and their clinical use. Our retrospective analysis indicates that clusters in the medicinal peptide space are located in a relatively narrow range of the physicochemical space: dense and empty regions were found, which can be explored for the discovery of novel peptide drugs.

  15. Epitope Fingerprinting for Recognition of the Polyclonal Serum Autoantibodies of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira-Júnior, Luiz Carlos; Araújo Santos, Fabiana de Almeida; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Ueira-Vieira, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Autoantibodies (aAb) associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not been sufficiently characterized and their exact involvement is undefined. The use of information technology and computerized analysis with phage display technology was used, in the present research, to map the epitope of putative self-antigens in AD patients. A 12-mer random peptide library, displayed on M13 phages, was screened using IgG from AD patients with two repetitions. Seventy-one peptides were isolated; however, only 10 were positive using the Elisa assay technique (Elisa Index > 1). The results showed that the epitope regions of the immunoreactive peptides, identified by phage display analysis, were on the exposed surfaces of the proteins. The putative antigens MAST1, Enah, MAO-A, X11/MINT1, HGF, SNX14, ARHGAP 11A, APC, and CENTG3, which have been associated with AD or have functions in neural tissue, may indicate possible therapeutic targets. PMID:26417591

  16. Quantum random number generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; Zhang, Zhen; Qi, Bing

    2016-06-28

    Quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which play important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness -- coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. Based on the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at a high speed by properly modeling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, where verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category which provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.

  17. Quantum random number generation

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; ...

    2016-06-28

    Quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which play important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness -- coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. Based on the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at a highmore » speed by properly modeling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, where verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category which provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.« less

  18. Quantum random number generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; Qi, Bing; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-06-01

    Quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which have important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness—coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. On the basis of the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at a high speed by properly modelling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, in which verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category that provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.

  19. Twilight reloaded: the peptide experience

    PubMed Central

    Weichenberger, Christian X.; Pozharski, Edwin; Rupp, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    The de facto commoditization of biomolecular crystallography as a result of almost disruptive instrumentation automation and continuing improvement of software allows any sensibly trained structural biologist to conduct crystallo­graphic studies of biomolecules with reasonably valid outcomes: that is, models based on properly interpreted electron density. Robust validation has led to major mistakes in the protein part of structure models becoming rare, but some depositions of protein–peptide complex structure models, which generally carry significant interest to the scientific community, still contain erroneous models of the bound peptide ligand. Here, the protein small-molecule ligand validation tool Twilight is updated to include peptide ligands. (i) The primary technical reasons and potential human factors leading to problems in ligand structure models are presented; (ii) a new method used to score peptide-ligand models is presented; (iii) a few instructive and specific examples, including an electron-density-based analysis of peptide-ligand structures that do not contain any ligands, are discussed in detail; (iv) means to avoid such mistakes and the implications for database integrity are discussed and (v) some suggestions as to how journal editors could help to expunge errors from the Protein Data Bank are provided. PMID:28291756

  20. Peptide Vaccine: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weidang; Joshi, Medha D.; Singhania, Smita; Ramsey, Kyle H.; Murthy, Ashlesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional vaccine strategies have been highly efficacious for several decades in reducing mortality and morbidity due to infectious diseases. The bane of conventional vaccines, such as those that include whole organisms or large proteins, appear to be the inclusion of unnecessary antigenic load that, not only contributes little to the protective immune response, but complicates the situation by inducing allergenic and/or reactogenic responses. Peptide vaccines are an attractive alternative strategy that relies on usage of short peptide fragments to engineer the induction of highly targeted immune responses, consequently avoiding allergenic and/or reactogenic sequences. Conversely, peptide vaccines used in isolation are often weakly immunogenic and require particulate carriers for delivery and adjuvanting. In this article, we discuss the specific advantages and considerations in targeted induction of immune responses by peptide vaccines and progresses in the development of such vaccines against various diseases. Additionally, we also discuss the development of particulate carrier strategies and the inherent challenges with regard to safety when combining such technologies with peptide vaccines. PMID:26344743

  1. Antimicrobial Peptides Under Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Greber, Katarzyna E; Dawgul, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Today microbial drug resistance has become a serious problem not only within inpatient setting but also within outpatient setting. Repeated intake and unnecessary usage of antibiotics as well as the transfer of resistance genes are the most important factors that make the microorganisms resistant to conventional antibiotics. A large number of antimicrobials successfully used for prophylaxis and therapeutic purposes have now become ineffective [1, 2]. Therefore, new molecules are being studied to be used in the treatment of various diseases. Some of these molecules are structural compounds based on a combination of peptides, for example, naturally occurring endogenous peptide antibiotics and their synthetic analogues or molecules designed de novo using QSAR (quantitative structureproperty relationships)-based methods [3]. Trying to exploit numerous advantages of antimicrobial peptides such as high potency and selectivity, broad range of targets, potentially low toxicity and low accumulation in tissues, pharmaceutical industry aims to develop them as commercially available drugs and appropriate clinical trials are being conducted [4]. In this paper we define clinical trials steps and describe current status of several antimicrobial peptides under clinical development as well as briefly depict peptide drug formulation.

  2. Natriuretic peptide metabolism, clearance and degradation.

    PubMed

    Potter, Lincoln R

    2011-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide, B-type natriuretic peptide and C-type natriuretic peptide constitute a family of three structurally related, but genetically distinct, signaling molecules that regulate the cardiovascular, skeletal, nervous, reproductive and other systems by activating transmembrane guanylyl cyclases and elevating intracellular cGMP concentrations. This review broadly discusses the general characteristics of natriuretic peptides and their cognate signaling receptors, and then specifically discusses the tissue-specific metabolism of natriuretic peptides and their degradation by neprilysin, insulin-degrading enzyme, and natriuretic peptide receptor-C.

  3. Structure-Activity Relations of Myxinidin, an Antibacterial Peptide Derived from the Epidermal Mucus of Hagfish

    PubMed Central

    Cantisani, Marco; Leone, Marilisa; Mignogna, Eleonora; Kampanaraki, Katerina; Falanga, Annarita; Morelli, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    The structure-activity relations of myxinidin, a peptide derived from epidermal mucus of hagfish, Myxine glutinosa L., were investigated. Analysis of key residues allowed us to design new peptides with increased efficiency. Antimicrobial activity of native and modified peptides demonstrated the key role of uncharged residues in the sequence; the loss of these residues reduces almost entirely myxinidin antimicrobial activity, while insertion of arginine at charged and uncharged position increases antimicrobial activity compared with that of native myxinidin. Particularly, we designed a peptide capable of achieving a high inhibitory effect on bacterial growth. Experiments were conducted using both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies showed that myxinidin is able to form an amphipathic α-helical structure at the N terminus and a random coil region at the C terminus. PMID:24002100

  4. Peptide phage display as a tool for drug discovery: targeting membrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Molek, Peter; Strukelj, Borut; Bratkovic, Tomaz

    2011-01-21

    Ligands selected from phage-displayed random peptide libraries tend to be directed to biologically relevant sites on the surface of the target protein. Consequently, peptides derived from library screenings often modulate the target protein's activity in vitro and in vivo and can be used as lead compounds in drug design and as alternatives to antibodies for target validation in both genomics and drug discovery. This review discusses the use of phage display to identify membrane receptor modulators with agonistic or antagonistic activities. Because isolating or producing recombinant membrane proteins for use as target molecules in library screening is often impossible, innovative selection strategies such as panning against whole cells or tissues, recombinant receptor ectodomains, or neutralizing antibodies to endogenous binding partners were devised. Prominent examples from a two-decade history of peptide phage display will be presented, focusing on the design of affinity selection experiments, methods for improving the initial hits, and applications of the identified peptides.

  5. Dietary bioactive peptides: Human studies.

    PubMed

    Bouglé, Dominique; Bouhallab, Saïd

    2017-01-22

    Current opinion strongly links nutrition and health. Among nutrients, proteins, and peptides which are encrypted in their sequences and released during digestion could play a key role in improving health. These peptides have been claimed to be active on a wide spectrum of biological functions or diseases, including blood pressure and metabolic risk factors (coagulation, obesity, lipoprotein metabolism, and peroxidation), gut and neurological functions, immunity, cancer, dental health, and mineral metabolism. A majority of studies involved dairy peptides, but the properties of vegetal, animal, and sea products were also assessed. However, these allegations are mainly based on in vitro and experimental studies which are seldom confirmed in humans. This review focused on molecules which were tested in humans, and on the mechanisms explaining discrepancies between experimental and human studies.

  6. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Cui, Wenxuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Guo, Yao

    2008-08-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10 5 kDa, 5 1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10 5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides from Marine Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Desriac, Florie; Jégou, Camille; Balnois, Eric; Brillet, Benjamin; Le Chevalier, Patrick; Fleury, Yannick

    2013-01-01

    After years of inadequate use and the emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains, the efficiency of “classical” antibiotics has decreased significantly. New drugs to fight MDR strains are urgently needed. Bacteria hold much promise as a source of unusual bioactive metabolites. However, the potential of marine bacteria, except for Actinomycetes and Cyanobacteria, has been largely underexplored. In the past two decades, the structures of several antimicrobial compounds have been elucidated in marine Proteobacteria. Of these compounds, polyketides (PKs), synthesised by condensation of malonyl-coenzyme A and/or acetyl-coenzyme A, and non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs), obtained through the linkage of (unusual) amino acids, have recently generated particular interest. NRPs are good examples of naturally modified peptides. Here, we review and compile the data on the antimicrobial peptides isolated from marine Proteobacteria, especially NRPs. PMID:24084784

  8. Selection of phage-displayed peptides that bind to a particular ligand-bound antibody.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Fujie; Hu, Yunfeng; Sutton, Jori; Asawapornmongkol, Lily; Fuller, Roberta; Olson, Arthur J; Barbas, Carlos F; Lerner, Richard A

    2008-06-01

    Phage-displayed peptides that selectively bind to aldolase catalytic antibody 93F3 when bound to a particular 1,3-diketone hapten derivative have been developed using designed selection strategies with libraries containing 7-12 randomized amino acid residues. These phage-displayed peptides discriminated the particular 93F3-diketone complex from ligand-free 93F3 and from 93F3 bound to other 1,3-diketone hapten derivatives. By altering the selection procedures, phage-displayed peptides that bind to antibody 93F3 in the absence of 1,3-diketone hapten derivatives have also been developed. With using these phage-displayed peptides, ligand-bound states of the antibody were distinguished from each other. A docking model of one of the peptides bound to the antibody 93F3-diketone complex was created using a sequential divide-and-conquer peptide docking strategy; the model suggests that the peptide interacts with both the antibody and the ligand through a delicate hydrogen bonding network.

  9. Preventive Effects of Collagen Peptide from Deer Sinew on Bone Loss in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, He; Dong, Ying; Qi, Bin; Liu, Li; Zhou, Guangxin; Bai, Xueyuan; Yang, Chunhui; Zhao, Daqing; Zhao, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Deer sinew (DS) has been used traditionally for various illnesses, and the major active constituent is collagen. In this study, we assessed the effects of collagen peptide from DS on bone loss in the ovariectomized rats. Wister female rats were randomly divided into six groups as follows: sham-operated (SHAM), ovariectomized control (OVX), OVX given 1.0 mg/kg/week nylestriol (OVX + N), OVX given 0.4 g/kg/day collagen peptide (OVX + H), OVX given 0.2 g/kg/day collagen peptide (OXV + M), and OVX given 0.1 g/kg/day collagen peptide (OXV + L), respectively. After 13 weeks of treatment, the rats were euthanized, and the effects of collagen peptide on body weight, uterine weight, bone mineral density (BMD), serum biochemical indicators, bone histomorphometry, and bone mechanics were observed. The data showed that BMD and concentration of serum hydroxyproline were significantly increased and the levels of serum calcium, phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase were decreased. Besides, histomorphometric parameters and mechanical indicators were improved. However, collagen peptide of DS has no effect on estradiol level, body weight, and uterine weight. Therefore, these results suggest that the collagen peptide supplementation may also prevent and treat bone loss. PMID:25101135

  10. Membrane Perturbation Induced by Interfacially Adsorbed Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zemel, Assaf; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; May, Sylvio

    2004-01-01

    The structural and energetic characteristics of the interaction between interfacially adsorbed (partially inserted) α-helical, amphipathic peptides and the lipid bilayer substrate are studied using a molecular level theory of lipid chain packing in membranes. The peptides are modeled as “amphipathic cylinders” characterized by a well-defined polar angle. Assuming two-dimensional nematic order of the adsorbed peptides, the membrane perturbation free energy is evaluated using a cell-like model; the peptide axes are parallel to the membrane plane. The elastic and interfacial contributions to the perturbation free energy of the “peptide-dressed” membrane are evaluated as a function of: the peptide penetration depth into the bilayer's hydrophobic core, the membrane thickness, the polar angle, and the lipid/peptide ratio. The structural properties calculated include the shape and extent of the distorted (stretched and bent) lipid chains surrounding the adsorbed peptide, and their orientational (C-H) bond order parameter profiles. The changes in bond order parameters attendant upon peptide adsorption are in good agreement with magnetic resonance measurements. Also consistent with experiment, our model predicts that peptide adsorption results in membrane thinning. Our calculations reveal pronounced, membrane-mediated, attractive interactions between the adsorbed peptides, suggesting a possible mechanism for lateral aggregation of membrane-bound peptides. As a special case of interest, we have also investigated completely hydrophobic peptides, for which we find a strong energetic preference for the transmembrane (inserted) orientation over the horizontal (adsorbed) orientation. PMID:15189858

  11. Humoral immune response against proteophosphoglycan surface antigens of Entamoeba histolytica elicited by immunization with synthetic mimotope peptides.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Helen; Baier, Karin; Felici, Franco; von Specht, Bernd Ulrich; Wiedermann, Gerhard; Kollaritsch, Herwig; Wiedermann, Ursula; Duchêne, Michael

    2003-07-15

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica, which is responsible for intestinal amebiasis and amebic liver abscess, is causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Proteophosphoglycans (PPGs, also known as lipophosphoglycans, LPGs, or lipopeptidophosphoglycans, LPPGs) are major surface components of E. histolytica. Passive immunization with a monoclonal antibody (EH5) directed against the PPGs protected severe combined immune-deficient mice from amebic liver abscess. The structure of the PPGs is very complex and only known in part. To find peptide mimics of E. histolytica PPG antigens, we had screened phage-displayed random peptide libraries with the antibody EH5. We identified various peptide mimics of E. histolytica PPGs, all sharing a consensus sequence Gly-Thr-His-Pro-X-Leu. Several of the phage clones induced a significant, specific IgG response against membrane antigens of E. histolytica after immunization of mice with whole phage particles. In the present work, in order to avoid the use of phage particles for immunization, we coupled two selected chemically synthesized peptides to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). The two KLH-conjugated peptides were immunogenic in mice and induced the production of high titers of anti-peptide antibodies, and one of the two peptides was also able to induce significant titers of antibodies against E. histolytica PPGs. Our results demonstrate that the KLH-conjugated peptides are able to mimic the EH5 epitope without the M13 phage sequences flanking the peptide inserts and independent of the structural framework of the phage.

  12. Antagonistic effect of disulfide-rich peptide aptamers selected by cDNA display on interleukin-6-dependent cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Nemoto, Naoto; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Yamaguchi, Junichi; Ueno, Shingo; Machida, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Toshikatsu; Sakai, Takafumi

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disulfide-rich peptide aptamer inhibits IL-6-dependent cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disulfide bond of peptide aptamer is essential for its affinity to IL-6R. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibitory effect of peptide depends on number and pattern of its disulfide bonds. -- Abstract: Several engineered protein scaffolds have been developed recently to circumvent particular disadvantages of antibodies such as their large size and complex composition, low stability, and high production costs. We previously identified peptide aptamers containing one or two disulfide-bonds as an alternative ligand to the interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). Peptide aptamers (32 amino acids in length) were screened from a random peptide library by in vitro peptide selection using the evolutionary molecular engineering method 'cDNA display'. In this report, the antagonistic activity of the peptide aptamers were examined by an in vitro competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and an IL-6-dependent cell proliferation assay. The results revealed that a disulfide-rich peptide aptamer inhibited IL-6-dependent cell proliferation with similar efficacy to an anti-IL-6R monoclonal antibody.

  13. Novel Formulations for Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; Carrasco, Letícia Dias de Melo

    2014-01-01

    Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy. PMID:25302615

  14. Novel formulations for antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; de Melo Carrasco, Letícia Dias

    2014-10-09

    Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy.

  15. Peptides and the new endocrinology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwyzer, Robert

    1982-01-01

    The discovery of regulatory peptides common to the nervous and the endocrine systems (brain, gut, and skin) has brought about a revolution in our concepts of endocrinology and neurology. We are beginning to understand some of the complex interrelationships between soma and psyche that might, someday, be important for an integrated treatment of diseases. Examples of the actions of certain peptides in the periphery and in the central nervous system are given, and their biosynthesis and molecular anatomy as carriers for information are discussed.

  16. Quantum random number generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Collantes, Miguel; Garcia-Escartin, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Random numbers are a fundamental resource in science and engineering with important applications in simulation and cryptography. The inherent randomness at the core of quantum mechanics makes quantum systems a perfect source of entropy. Quantum random number generation is one of the most mature quantum technologies with many alternative generation methods. This review discusses the different technologies in quantum random number generation from the early devices based on radioactive decay to the multiple ways to use the quantum states of light to gather entropy from a quantum origin. Randomness extraction and amplification and the notable possibility of generating trusted random numbers even with untrusted hardware using device-independent generation protocols are also discussed.

  17. Study on CCR5 analogs and affinity peptides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingping; Deng, Riqiang; Wu, Wenyan

    2012-03-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor of human chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a key target in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection process due to its major involvement in binding to the HIV type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 and facilitating virus entry into the cells. The identification of naturally occurring CCR5 mutations (especially CCR5 delta-32) has allowed us to address the CCR5 molecule as a promising target to prevent or resist HIV infection in vivo. To obtain high-affinity peptides that can be used to block CCR5, CCR5 analogs with high conformational similarity are required. In this study, two recombinant proteins named CCR5 N-Linker-E2 and CCR5 mN-E1-E2 containing the fragments of the CCR5 N-terminal, the first extracellular loop or the second extracellular loop are cloned from a full-length human CCR5 cDNA. The recombinant human CCR5 analogs with self-cleavage activity of the intein Mxe or Ssp in the vector pTwinI were then produced with a high-yield expression and purification system in Escherichia coli. Experiments of extracellular epitope-activity identification (such as immunoprecipitation and indirective/competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) confirmed the close similarity between the epitope activity of the CCR5 analogs and that of the natural CCR5, suggesting the applicability of the recombinant CCR5 analogs as antagonists of the chemokine ligands. Subsequent screening of high-affinity peptides from the phage random-peptides library acquired nine polypeptides, which could be used as CCR5 peptide antagonists. The CCR5 analogs and affinity peptides elucidated in this paper provide us with a basis for further study of the mechanism of inhibition of HIV-1 infection.

  18. Invitation to Random Tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurau, Razvan

    2016-09-01

    This article is preface to the SIGMA special issue ''Tensor Models, Formalism and Applications'', http://www.emis.de/journals/SIGMA/Tensor_Models.html. The issue is a collection of eight excellent, up to date reviews on random tensor models. The reviews combine pedagogical introductions meant for a general audience with presentations of the most recent developments in the field. This preface aims to give a condensed panoramic overview of random tensors as the natural generalization of random matrices to higher dimensions.

  19. Peptide Antibodies: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Houen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Peptide antibodies recognize epitopes with amino acid residues adjacent in sequence ("linear" epitopes). Such antibodies can be made to virtually any sequence and have been immensely important in all areas of molecular biology and diagnostics due to their versatility and to the rapid growth in protein sequence information. Today, peptide antibodies can be routinely and rapidly made to large numbers of peptides, including peptides with posttranslationally modified residues, and are used for immunoblotting, immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and immunoassays. In the future, peptide antibodies will continue to be immensely important for molecular biology, TCR- and MHC-like peptide antibodies may be produced routinely, peptide antibodies with predetermined conformational specificities may be designed, and peptide-based vaccines may become part of vaccination programs.

  20. Computational approach for designing tumor homing peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arun; Kapoor, Pallavi; Gautam, Ankur; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Rahul; Chauhan, Jagat Singh; Tyagi, Atul; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor homing peptides are small peptides that home specifically to tumor and tumor associated microenvironment i.e. tumor vasculature, after systemic delivery. Keeping in mind the huge therapeutic importance of these peptides, we have made an attempt to analyze and predict tumor homing peptides. It was observed that certain types of residues are preferred in tumor homing peptides. Therefore, we developed support vector machine based models for predicting tumor homing peptides using amino acid composition and binary profiles of peptides. Amino acid composition, dipeptide composition and binary profile-based models achieved a maximum accuracy of 86.56%, 82.03%, and 84.19% respectively. These methods have been implemented in a user-friendly web server, TumorHPD. We anticipate that this method will be helpful to design novel tumor homing peptides. TumorHPD web server is freely accessible at http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/tumorhpd/. PMID:23558316

  1. Membrane disruption mechanism of antimicrobial peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ka Yee

    2012-04-01

    Largely distributed among living organisms, antimicrobial peptides are a class of small (<100 residues) host defense peptides that induce selective membrane lytic activity against microbial pathogens. The permeabilizing behavior of these diverse peptides has been commonly attributed to the formation of pores, and such pore formation has been categorized as barrel-stave, toroidal, or carpet-like. With the continuing discovery of new peptide species, many are uncharacterized and the exact mechanism is unknown. Through the use of atomic force microscopy, the disruption of supported lipid bilayer patches by protegrin-1 is concentration-dependent. The intercalation of antimicrobial peptide into the bilayer results in structures beyond that of pore formation, but with the formation of worm-like micelles at high peptide concentration. Our results suggest that antimicrobial peptide acts to lower the interfacial energy of the bilayer in a way similar to detergents. Antimicrobial peptides with structural differences, magainin-1 and aurein 1.1, exhibit a mechanistic commonality.

  2. Stapled peptide induces cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Jo

    2004-11-01

    Hydrocarbon stapling could enable peptides from the key domains of natural proteins to be used therapeutically. Using the technique on a peptide involved in apoptosis, researchers have succeeded in destroying cancer cells in a mouse model of leukaemia.

  3. Investigating Endogenous Peptides and Peptidases using Peptidomics

    PubMed Central

    Tinoco, Arthur D.; Saghatelian, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Rather than simply being protein degradation products, peptides have proven to be important bioactive molecules. Bioactive peptides act as hormones, neurotransmitters and antimicrobial agents in vivo. The dysregulation of bioactive peptide signaling is also known to be involved in disease, and targeting peptide hormone pathways has been successful strategy in the development of novel therapeutics. The importance of bioactive peptides in biology has spurred research to elucidate the function and regulation of these molecules. Classical methods for peptide analysis have relied on targeted immunoassays, but certain scientific questions necessitated a broader and more detailed view of the peptidome–all the peptides in a cell, tissue or organism. In this review we discuss how peptidomics has emerged to fill this need through the application of advanced liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods that provide unique insights into peptide activity and regulation. PMID:21786763

  4. Identification of tissue-specific targeting peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunkyoung; Lee, Nam Kyung; Kang, Sang-Kee; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Daejin; Park, Kisoo; Choi, Kihang; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Jung, Dong Hyun

    2012-11-01

    Using phage display technique, we identified tissue-targeting peptide sets that recognize specific tissues (bone-marrow dendritic cell, kidney, liver, lung, spleen and visceral adipose tissue). In order to rapidly evaluate tissue-specific targeting peptides, we performed machine learning studies for predicting the tissue-specific targeting activity of peptides on the basis of peptide sequence information using four machine learning models and isolated the groups of peptides capable of mediating selective targeting to specific tissues. As a representative liver-specific targeting sequence, the peptide "DKNLQLH" was selected by the sequence similarity analysis. This peptide has a high degree of homology with protein ligands which can interact with corresponding membrane counterparts. We anticipate that our models will be applicable to the prediction of tissue-specific targeting peptides which can recognize the endothelial markers of target tissues.

  5. Boosting production yield of biomedical peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manatt, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique is employed to monitor synthesis of biomedical peptides. Application of NMR technique may improve production yields of insulin, ACTH, and growth hormones, as well as other synthesized biomedical peptides.

  6. Streptavidin-binding peptides and uses thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szostak, Jack W. (Inventor); Wilson, David S. (Inventor); Keefe, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention provides peptides with high affinity for streptavidin. These peptides may be expressed as part of fusion proteins to facilitate the detection, quantitation, and purification of proteins of interest.

  7. Streptavidin-binding peptides and uses thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szostak, Jack W. (Inventor); Wilson, David S. (Inventor); Keefe, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The invention provides peptides with high affinity for streptavidin. These peptides may be expressed as part of fusion proteins to facilitate the detection, quantitation, and purification of proteins of interest.

  8. Carbohydrates in peptide and protein design.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Knud J; Brask, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    Monosaccharides and amino acids are fundamental building blocks in the assembly of nature's polymers. They have different structural aspects and, to a significant extent, different functional groups. Oligomerization gives rise to oligosaccharides and peptides, respectively. While carbohydrates and peptides can be found conjoined in nature, e.g., in glycopeptides, the aim of this review is the radical redesign of peptide structures using carbohydrates, particularly monosaccharides and cyclic oligosaccharides, to produce novel peptides, peptidomimetics, and abiotic proteins. These hybrid molecules, chimeras, have properties arising largely from the combination of structural characteristics of carbohydrates with the functional group diversity of peptides. This field includes de novo designed synthetic glycopeptides, sugar (carbohydrate) amino acids, carbohydrate scaffolds for nonpeptidal peptidomimetics of cyclic peptides, cyclodextrin functionalized peptides, and carboproteins, i.e., carbohydrate-based proteinmimetics. These successful applications demonstrate the general utility of carbohydrates in peptide and protein architecture.

  9. Digesting New Elements in Peptide Transport.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Joseph A; Nissen, Poul

    2015-10-06

    In this issue of Structure, Beale et al. (2015) define structurally and functionally a large extracellular domain unique to mammalian peptide transporters and its implications for the transport of basic di- and tri-peptides (Beale et al., 2015).

  10. Randomized SUSAN edge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Ping; Gao, Ying-Hui; Wang, Peng

    2011-11-01

    A speed up technique for the SUSAN edge detector based on random sampling is proposed. Instead of sliding the mask pixel by pixel on an image as the SUSAN edge detector does, the proposed scheme places the mask randomly on pixels to find edges in the image; we hereby name it randomized SUSAN edge detector (R-SUSAN). Specifically, the R-SUSAN edge detector adopts three approaches in the framework of random sampling to accelerate a SUSAN edge detector: procedure integration of response computation and nonmaxima suppression, reduction of unnecessary processing for obvious nonedge pixels, and early termination. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  11. Random Packing and Random Covering Sequences.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-24

    obtained by appeain~g to a result due to Marsaglia [39, and de Finetti [8]. Their result states that if (XI. X2 .. X,) is a random point on the simplex {X E...to sequeil~ coverage problems. J. App). Prob. 11. 281-293. [81 de Finetti . B. (1964). Alcune ossevazioni in tema de "suddivisione casuale." Giornale I

  12. Two-dimensional self-assembly of amphiphilic peptides; adsorption-induced secondary structural transition on hydrophilic substrate.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masayoshi; Abiko, Souhei; Himeiwa, Takahiro; Kinoshita, Takatoshi

    2015-03-15

    Adsorption of sequential amphiphilic peptides on solid substrates triggered the spontaneous construction of nanoscaled architecture. An amphiphilic peptide designed with a cationic amino acid as a hydrophilic residue turned an anionic mica substrate into a water-repellent surface, simply by adsorbing it on the substrate surface. In contrast, an amphiphilic peptide designed with an anionic amino-acid residue formed a precisely controlled fiber array comprising a β-sheet fiber monolayer at the anionic substrate/water interface. This phenomenon was based on the secondary structural transition from random-coil to β-sheet, which occurred specifically when amphiphilic peptide adsorbed on the substrate surface. Such surface-specific nonorder/order transition was implemented by exploiting the strength of adsorption between the peptide and the substrate. A strategic design exploiting weak bonding such as hydrophobic interactions is essential for constructing precisely controlled nano-architectures in two dimensions.

  13. Fluctuation power spectra reveal dynamical heterogeneity of peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Bhavin; Yew, Zu Thur; Krivov, Sergei; McLeish, Tom; Paci, Emanuele

    2010-07-01

    Characterizing the conformational properties and dynamics of biopolymers and their relation to biological activity and function is an ongoing challenge. Single molecule techniques have provided a rich experimental window on these properties, yet they have often relied on simple one-dimensional projections of a multidimensional free energy landscape for a practical interpretation of the results. Here, we study three short peptides with different structural propensity (α helical, β hairpin, and random coil) in the presence (or absence) of a force applied to their ends using Langevin dynamics simulation and an all-atom model with implicit solvation. Each peptide produces fluctuation power spectra with a characteristic dynamic fingerprint consistent with persistent structural motifs of helices, hairpins, and random coils. The spectra for helix formation shows two well-defined relaxation modes, corresponding to local relaxation and cooperative coil to uncoil interconversion. In contrast, both the hairpin and random coil are polymerlike, showing a broad and continuous range of relaxation modes giving characteristic power laws of ω-5/4 and ω-3/2, respectively; the -5/4 power law for hairpins is robust and has not been previously observed. Langevin dynamics simulations of diffusers on a potential of mean force derived from the atomistic simulations fail to reproduce the fingerprints of each peptide motif in the power spectral density, demonstrating explicitly that such information is lacking in such one-dimensional projections. Our results demonstrate the yet unexploited potential of single molecule fluctuation spectroscopy to probe more fine scaled properties of proteins and biological macromolecules and how low dimensional projections may cause the loss of relevant information.

  14. The evolution of peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Niall, H D

    1982-01-01

    Despite limitations in our present knowledge it is already possible to discern the main features of peptide hormone evolution, since the same mechanisms (and indeed the same hormone molecules) function in many different ways. This underlying unity of organization has its basis in the tendency of biochemical networks, once established, to survive and diversify. The most surprising recent findings in endocrinology have been the discovery of vertebrate peptide hormones in multiple sites within the same organism, and the reports, persuasive but requiring confirmation, of vertebrate hormones in primitive unicellular organisms (20, 20a). Perhaps the major challenge for the future is to define the roles and interactions of the many peptide hormones identified in brain (18). The most primitive bacteria and the human brain, though an enormous evolutionary distance apart, may have more in common than we have recognized until now. As Axelrod & Hamilton have pointed out in a recent provocative article, "The Evolution of Cooperation" (1), bacteria, though lacking a brain, are capable of adaptive behavior that can be analysed in terms of game theory. It is clear that we can learn a great deal about the whole evolutionary process from a study of the versatile and durable peptide hormones molecules.

  15. Acyclic peptide inhibitors of amylases.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Nicola

    2005-12-01

    In this issue of Chemistry and Biology, a library screening approach reveals a linear octapeptide inhibitor of alpha-amylases reached by de novo design . The selected molecule shares characteristics with naturally occurring protein inhibitors -- a result that suggests general rules for the design of peptide-based amylase inhibitors may be achievable.

  16. Bi- or multifunctional peptide drugs

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Peter W.

    2009-01-01

    Strategies for the design of bi- or multifunctional drugs are reviewed. A distinction is made between bifunctional drugs interacting in a monovalent fashion with two targets and ligands containing two distinct pharmacophores binding in a bivalent mode to the two binding sites in a receptor heterodimer. Arguments are presented to indicate that some of the so-called “bivalent” ligands reported in the literature are unlikely to simultaneously interact with two binding sites. Aspects related to the development of bi- or multifunctional drugs are illustrated with examples from the field of opioid analgesics. The drug-like properties of the tetrapeptide Dmt1[DALDA] with triple action as a μ opioid agonist, norepinephrine uptake inhibitor and releaser of endogenous opioid peptides to produce potent spinal analgesia are reviewed. Rationales for the development of opioid peptides with mixed agonist/antagonist profiles as analgesics with reduced side effects are presented. Progress in the development of mixed μ opioid agonist/δ opioid antagonists with low propensity to produce tolerance and physical dependence is reviewed. Efforts to develop bifunctional peptides containing a μ opioid agonist and a cholecystokinin antagonist or an NK1 receptor antagonist as analgesics expected to produce less tolerance and dependence are also reviewed. A strategy to improve the drug-like properties of bifunctional opioid peptide analgesics is presented. PMID:19285088

  17. Free-living nematode peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    All nematodes employ a wide array of peptide messengers to control nearly all aspects of the life cycle, including hatching, locomotion, feeding, defense, mating, reproduction, and other behavioral and metabolic events. There are molecular and biological similarities, as well as significant differen...

  18. Toxins and antimicrobial peptides: interactions with membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Gable, Jonathan E.; Kim, Judy E.

    2009-08-01

    The innate immunity to pathogenic invasion of organisms in the plant and animal kingdoms relies upon cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as the first line of defense. In addition to these natural peptide antibiotics, similar cationic peptides, such as the bee venom toxin melittin, act as nonspecific toxins. Molecular details of AMP and peptide toxin action are not known, but the universal function of these peptides to disrupt cell membranes of pathogenic bacteria (AMPs) or a diverse set of eukaryotes and prokaryotes (melittin) is widely accepted. Here, we have utilized spectroscopic techniques to elucidate peptide-membrane interactions of alpha-helical human and mouse AMPs of the cathelicidin family as well as the peptide toxin melittin. The activity of these natural peptides and their engineered analogs was studied on eukaryotic and prokaryotic membrane mimics consisting of <200-nm bilayer vesicles composed of anionic and neutral lipids as well as cholesterol. Vesicle disruption, or peptide potency, was monitored with a sensitive fluorescence leakage assay. Detailed molecular information on peptidemembrane interactions and peptide structure was further gained through vibrational spectroscopy combined with circular dichroism. Finally, steady-state fluorescence experiments yielded insight into the local environment of native or engineered tryptophan residues in melittin and human cathelicidin embedded in bilayer vesicles. Collectively, our results provide clues to the functional structures of the engineered and toxic peptides and may impact the design of synthetic antibiotic peptides that can be used against the growing number of antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  19. Identification of multifunctional peptides from human milk.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Bharti, Rashmi; Porto, William F; Gauri, Samiran S; Mandal, Mahitosh; Franco, Octavio L; Ghosh, Ananta K

    2014-06-01

    Pharmaceutical industries have renewed interest in screening multifunctional bioactive peptides as a marketable product in health care applications. In this context, several animal and plant peptides with potential bioactivity have been reported. Milk proteins and peptides have received much attention as a source of health-enhancing components to be incorporated into nutraceuticals and functional foods. By using this source, 24 peptides have been fractionated and purified from human milk using RP-HPLC. Multifunctional roles including antimicrobial, antioxidant and growth stimulating activity have been evaluated in all 24 fractions. Nevertheless, only four fractions show multiple combined activities among them. Using a proteomic approach, two of these four peptides have been identified as lactoferrin derived peptide and kappa casein short chain peptide. Lactoferrin derived peptide (f8) is arginine-rich and kappa casein derived (f12) peptide is proline-rich. Both peptides (f8 and f12) showed antimicrobial activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Fraction 8 (f8) exhibits growth stimulating activity in 3T3 cell line and f12 shows higher free radical scavenging activity in comparison to other fractions. Finally, both peptides were in silico evaluated and some insights into their mechanism of action were provided. Thus, results indicate that these identified peptides have multiple biological activities which are valuable for the quick development of the neonate and may be considered as potential biotechnological products for nutraceutical industry.

  20. Metabolism of Peptides by Rumen Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Wright, D. E.

    1967-01-01

    Rumen microorganisms utilize tryptic peptides from Chlorella protein, forming carbon dioxide, volatile fatty acids, and bacterial protein. Peptide carbon is more efficiently converted into bacterial protein than is amino acid carbon. A progressive degradation of the peptides was demonstrated by use of columns of Sephadex G-25. PMID:6035045

  1. Modifying Hydroxyapatite Nucleating Peptides to Form Novel Boron Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    buffer (either 0.77g Borax or 0.12g Boric acid with 0.2g thymol filtered through a 0.22 um filter) was added to the solution. The pH was adjusted to...either 30mM CaC1 solution or 30 mM Boric acid solution. Samples were analyzed in Tris (5mM or 100amM) buffer, NaCl buffer, or MQ water alone. Circular...a high degree of random coil. The addition of calcium or boric acid to any of the peptides showed little if any discernible difference on the CD

  2. Quantum random number generator

    DOEpatents

    Pooser, Raphael C.

    2016-05-10

    A quantum random number generator (QRNG) and a photon generator for a QRNG are provided. The photon generator may be operated in a spontaneous mode below a lasing threshold to emit photons. Photons emitted from the photon generator may have at least one random characteristic, which may be monitored by the QRNG to generate a random number. In one embodiment, the photon generator may include a photon emitter and an amplifier coupled to the photon emitter. The amplifier may enable the photon generator to be used in the QRNG without introducing significant bias in the random number and may enable multiplexing of multiple random numbers. The amplifier may also desensitize the photon generator to fluctuations in power supplied thereto while operating in the spontaneous mode. In one embodiment, the photon emitter and amplifier may be a tapered diode amplifier.

  3. Randomness: Quantum versus classical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Recent tremendous development of quantum information theory has led to a number of quantum technological projects, e.g. quantum random generators. This development had stimulated a new wave of interest in quantum foundations. One of the most intriguing problems of quantum foundations is the elaboration of a consistent and commonly accepted interpretation of a quantum state. Closely related problem is the clarification of the notion of quantum randomness and its interrelation with classical randomness. In this short review, we shall discuss basics of classical theory of randomness (which by itself is very complex and characterized by diversity of approaches) and compare it with irreducible quantum randomness. We also discuss briefly “digital philosophy”, its role in physics (classical and quantum) and its coupling to the information interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM).

  4. Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloulian, George K.; Woo, Simon S.; Chow, Edward T.

    2013-01-01

    Net-centric networking environments are often faced with limited resources and must utilize bandwidth as efficiently as possible. In networking environments that span wide areas, the data transmission has to be efficient without any redundant or exuberant metadata. The Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer software provides an extra level of security on top of existing data encryption methods. Randomizing the data s byte stream adds an extra layer to existing data protection methods, thus making it harder for an attacker to decrypt protected data. Based on a generated crypto-graphically secure random seed, a random sequence of numbers is used to intelligently and efficiently swap the organization of bytes in data using the unbiased and memory-efficient in-place Fisher-Yates shuffle method. Swapping bytes and reorganizing the crucial structure of the byte data renders the data file unreadable and leaves the data in a deconstructed state. This deconstruction adds an extra level of security requiring the byte stream to be reconstructed with the random seed in order to be readable. Once the data byte stream has been randomized, the software enables the data to be distributed to N nodes in an environment. Each piece of the data in randomized and distributed form is a separate entity unreadable on its own right, but when combined with all N pieces, is able to be reconstructed back to one. Reconstruction requires possession of the key used for randomizing the bytes, leading to the generation of the same cryptographically secure random sequence of numbers used to randomize the data. This software is a cornerstone capability possessing the ability to generate the same cryptographically secure sequence on different machines and time intervals, thus allowing this software to be used more heavily in net-centric environments where data transfer bandwidth is limited.

  5. Future directions for peptide therapeutics development.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Allan A; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-09-01

    The notable expansion of peptide therapeutics development in the late 1990s and the 2000s led to an unprecedented number of marketing approvals in 2012 and has provided a robust pipeline that should deliver numerous approvals during the remainder of the 2010s. To document the current status of the pipeline, we collected data for peptide therapeutics in clinical studies and regulatory review, as well as those recently approved. In this Foundation review, we provide an overview of the pipeline, including therapeutic area and molecular targets, with a focus on glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists. Areas for potential expansion, for example constrained peptides and peptide-drug conjugates, are profiled.

  6. Peptides and Peptidomimetics for Antimicrobial Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Mojsoska, Biljana; Jenssen, Håvard

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce and highlight a few classes of traditional antimicrobial peptides with a focus on structure-activity relationship studies. After first dissecting the important physiochemical properties that influence the antimicrobial and toxic properties of antimicrobial peptides, the contributions of individual amino acids with respect to the peptides antibacterial properties are presented. A brief discussion of the mechanisms of action of different antimicrobials as well as the development of bacterial resistance towards antimicrobial peptides follows. Finally, current efforts on novel design strategies and peptidomimetics are introduced to illustrate the importance of antimicrobial peptide research in the development of future antibiotics. PMID:26184232

  7. Fabrication of Odor Sensor Using Peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotokebuchi, Yuta; Hayashi, Kenshi; Toko, Kiyoshi; Chen, Ronggang; Ikezaki, Hidekazu

    We report fabrication of an odor sensor using peptides. Peptides were designed to acquire the specific reception for a target odor molecule. Au surface of the sensor electrode was coated by the designed peptide using the method of self assembled monolayers (SAMs). Functionalized Au surfaces by the peptides were confirmed by ellipsometry and cyclic voltammetry. The odorants of vanillin, phenethyl alcohol and hexanol were discriminated by QCM sensor with the peptide surface. Moreover, we verified specific interaction between amino acid (Trp) and vanillin by fluorescence assay.

  8. Isoelectric focusing of proteins and peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egen, N.

    1979-01-01

    Egg-white solution was chosen as the reference solution in order to assess the effects of operational parameters (voltage, flow rate, ampholine pH range and concentration, and protein concentration) of the RIEF apparatus on protein resolution. Topics of discussion include: (1) comparison of RIEF apparatus to conventional IEF techniques (column and PAG) with respect to resolution and throughput; (2) peptide and protein separation (AHF, Thymosin - Fraction 5, vasoactive peptide, L-asparaginase and ACP); and (3) detection of peptides - dansyl derivatives of amino acids and peptides, post-focusing fluorescent labeling of amino acids, peptides and proteins, and ampholine extraction from focused gels.

  9. The First Salamander Defensin Antimicrobial Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ke; Rong, Mingqiang; Lai, Ren

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have been widely identified from amphibian skins except salamanders. A novel antimicrobial peptide (CFBD) was isolated and characterized from skin secretions of the salamander, Cynops fudingensis. The cDNA encoding CFBD precursor was cloned from the skin cDNA library of C. fudingensis. The precursor was composed of three domains: signal peptide of 17 residues, mature peptide of 41 residues and intervening propeptide of 3 residues. There are six cysteines in the sequence of mature CFBD peptide, which possibly form three disulfide-bridges. CFBD showed antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli. This peptide could be classified into family of β-defensin based on its seqeuence similarity with β-defensins from other vertebrates. Evolution analysis indicated that CFBD was close to fish β-defensin. As far as we know, CFBD is the first β-defensin antimicrobial peptide from salamanders. PMID:24386139

  10. Biology of the CAPA peptides in insects.

    PubMed

    Predel, R; Wegener, C

    2006-11-01

    CAPA peptides have been isolated from a broad range of insect species as well as an arachnid, and can be grouped into the periviscerokinin and pyrokinin peptide families. In insects, CAPA peptides are the characteristic and most abundant neuropeptides in the abdominal neurohemal system. In many species, CAPA peptides exert potent myotropic effects on different muscles such as the heart. In others, including blood-sucking insects able to transmit serious diseases, CAPA peptides have strong diuretic or anti-diuretic effects and thus are potentially of medical importance. CAPA peptides undergo cell-type-specific sorting and packaging, and are the first insect neuropeptides shown to be differentially processed. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on the structure, distribution, receptors and physiological actions of the CAPA peptides.

  11. The first salamander defensin antimicrobial peptide.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ping; Yang, Shilong; Shen, Chuanbin; Jiang, Ke; Rong, Mingqiang; Lai, Ren

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have been widely identified from amphibian skins except salamanders. A novel antimicrobial peptide (CFBD) was isolated and characterized from skin secretions of the salamander, Cynops fudingensis. The cDNA encoding CFBD precursor was cloned from the skin cDNA library of C. fudingensis. The precursor was composed of three domains: signal peptide of 17 residues, mature peptide of 41 residues and intervening propeptide of 3 residues. There are six cysteines in the sequence of mature CFBD peptide, which possibly form three disulfide-bridges. CFBD showed antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli. This peptide could be classified into family of β-defensin based on its sequence similarity with β-defensins from other vertebrates. Evolution analysis indicated that CFBD was close to fish β-defensin. As far as we know, CFBD is the first β-defensin antimicrobial peptide from salamanders.

  12. Therapeutic uses of gastrointestinal peptides.

    PubMed

    Redfern, J S; O'Dorisio, T M

    1993-12-01

    The GI tract is one of nature's great pharmacies. Most, if not all, biologically active peptides can be found there, and it is quite likely that others remain to be discovered. Our ability to exploit this resource has expanded considerably over the past two decades. Advances in analytical techniques have allowed investigators to rapidly isolate and purify new compounds from tissue extracts. Sequencing and de novo synthesis of newly discovered peptides are now routine, and the structural modifications required to alter activity and tailor a compound to a particular use are easily made. A number of gastrointestinal peptides or their analogues for use in clinical studies are available from commercial sources (see Table 7). Somatostatin is the first gut peptide to successfully complete development and yield a pharmaceutical compound with a broad range of action. Several of the peptides discussed in this article have similar potential. TRH stands out as a candidate because of its effectiveness in the treatment of experimental spinal cord injury and a variety of shock states. Such a broad range of action in critical fields may justify the intensive development required to yield potent, long-acting, and highly specific analogues. Similarly, the antimetastatic and immunostimulant properties of the enkephalins offer promise for new therapies in the treatment of AIDS, ARC, and cancer. Studies with amylin may lead to new and more precise regimens of blood sugar control in insulin-dependent diabetics and could in turn, prevent some of the worst long-term effects of the disease. The development of effective intranasal forms of GHRH could spare children with GH-GHRH deficiency the distress of repeated injections and help to prevent excessive GH blood levels. Secretin, glucagon, or CGRP might be used one day in cardiovascular emergencies, and VIP or its analogues could prove effective in the treatment of asthma. Although preliminary results with many of these peptides are

  13. Proven in vitro evolution of protease cathepsin E-inhibitors and -activators at pH 4.5 using a paired peptide method.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Koichiro; Komatsu, Masayuki; Biyani, Madhu; Futakami, Masae; Kawakubo, Tomoyo; Yamamoto, Kenji; Nishigaki, Koichi

    2012-12-01

    Improving a particular function of molecules is often more difficult than identifying such molecules ab initio. Here, a method to acquire higher affinity and/or more functional peptides was developed as a progressive library selection method. The primary library selection products were utilized to build a secondary library composed of blocks of 4 amino acids, of which selection led to peptides with increased activity. These peptides were further converted to randomly generate paired peptides. Cathepsin E-inhibitors thus obtained exhibited the highest activities and affinities (pM order). This was also the case with cathepsin E-activating peptides, proving the methodological effectiveness. The primary, secondary, and tertiary library selections can be regarded as module-finding, module-shuffling, and module-pairing, respectively, which resembles the progression of the natural evolution of proteins. The mode of peptide binding to their target proteins is discussed in analogy to antibodies and epitopes of an antigen.

  14. RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates.

    PubMed

    Osugi, Tomohiro; Son, You Lee; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Satake, Honoo; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Since a peptide with a C-terminal Arg-Phe-NH2 (RFamide peptide) was first identified in the ganglia of the venus clam in 1977, RFamide peptides have been found in the nervous system of both invertebrates and vertebrates. In vertebrates, the RFamide peptide family includes gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), neuropeptide FF (NPFF), prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP), pyroglutamylated RFamide peptide/26RFamide peptide (QRFP/26RFa), and kisspeptins (kiss1 and kiss2). They are involved in important functions such as the release of hormones, regulation of sexual or social behavior, pain transmission, reproduction, and feeding. In contrast to tetrapods and jawed fish, the information available on RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates is limited, thus preventing further insights into the evolution of RFamide peptides in vertebrates. In this review, we focus on the previous research and recent advances in the studies on RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates. In agnathans, the genes encoding GnIH, NPFF, and PrRP precursors and the mature peptides have been identified in lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) and hagfish (Paramyxine atami). Putative kiss1 and kiss2 genes have also been found in the genome database of lamprey. In basal chordates, namely, in amphioxus (Branchiostoma japonicum), a common ancestral form of GnIH and NPFF genes and their mature peptides, as well as the ortholog of the QRFP gene have been identified. The studies revealed that the number of orthologs of vertebrate RFamide peptides present in agnathans and basal chordates is greater than expected, suggesting that the vertebrate RFamide peptides might have emerged and expanded at an early stage of chordate evolution.

  15. Can Natriuretic Peptides be Used to Guide Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Lupón, Josep; Jaffe, Allan S.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, the hypothesis that intensified treatment directed at reducing natriuretic peptide (NP) concentrations may improve the outcomes of patients with heart failure (HF) has been scrutinized in several prospective clinical trials, with conflicting results. Collectively, however, the data suggest that NP concentrations may be useful in guiding HF management and improving HF-related morbidity and mortality. In this review, we summarize the existing data investigating the use of NPs as targets for outpatient HF therapy. We focus on the information gathered in randomized clinical trials and comprehensive meta-analyses, and also on the recommendations of international guidelines (primarily guidelines from the European Society of Cardiology and the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association). Although the results for this approach are promising overall, additional well-designed prospective randomized controlled trials (e.g., the GUIDE-IT trial) are necessary to confirm or refute the utility of NP-guided outpatient HF management. PMID:27683534

  16. Optofluidic random laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivakiran Bhaktha, B. N.; Bachelard, Nicolas; Noblin, Xavier; Sebbah, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    Random lasing is reported in a dye-circulated structured polymeric microfluidic channel. The role of disorder, which results from limited accuracy of photolithographic process, is demonstrated by the variation of the emission spectrum with local-pump position and by the extreme sensitivity to a local perturbation of the structure. Thresholds comparable to those of conventional microfluidic lasers are achieved, without the hurdle of state-of-the-art cavity fabrication. Potential applications of optofluidic random lasers for on-chip sensors are discussed. Introduction of random lasers in the field of optofluidics is a promising alternative to on-chip laser integration with light and fluidic functionalities.

  17. Inhibition of peptide aggregation by means of enzymatic phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Folmert, Kristin; Broncel, Malgorzata; v. Berlepsch, Hans; Ullrich, Christopher Hans; Siegert, Mary-Ann

    2016-01-01

    As is the case in numerous natural processes, enzymatic phosphorylation can be used in the laboratory to influence the conformational populations of proteins. In nature, this information is used for signal transduction or energy transfer, but has also been shown to play an important role in many diseases like tauopathies or diabetes. With the goal of determining the effect of phosphorylation on amyloid fibril formation, we designed a model peptide which combines structural characteristics of α-helical coiled-coils and β-sheets in one sequence. This peptide undergoes a conformational transition from soluble structures into insoluble amyloid fibrils over time and under physiological conditions and contains a recognition motif for PKA (cAMP-dependent protein kinase) that enables enzymatic phosphorylation. We have analyzed the pathway of amyloid formation and the influence of enzymatic phosphorylation on the different states along the conformational transition from random-coil to β-sheet-rich oligomers to protofilaments and on to insoluble amyloid fibrils, and we found a remarkable directing effect from β-sheet-rich structures to unfolded structures in the initial growth phase, in which small oligomers and protofilaments prevail if the peptide is phosphorylated. PMID:28144314

  18. Identification of peptide sequences that target to the brain using in vivo phage display.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingwei; Zhang, Qizhi; Pang, Zhiqing; Wang, Yuchen; Liu, Qingfeng; Guo, Liangran; Jiang, Xinguo

    2012-06-01

    Phage display technology could provide a rapid means for the discovery of novel peptides. To find peptide ligands specific for the brain vascular receptors, we performed a modified phage display method. Phages were recovered from mice brain parenchyma after administrated with a random 7-mer peptide library intravenously. A longer circulation time was arranged according to the biodistributive brain/blood ratios of phage particles. Following sequential rounds of isolation, a number of phages were sequenced and a peptide sequence (CTSTSAPYC, denoted as PepC7) was identified. Clone 7-1, which encodes PepC7, exhibited translocation efficiency about 41-fold higher than the random library phage. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that Clone 7-1 had a significant superiority on transport efficiency into the brain compared with native M13 phage. Clone 7-1 was inhibited from homing to the brain in a dose-dependent fashion when cyclic peptides of the same sequence were present in a competition assay. Interestingly, the linear peptide (ATSTSAPYA, Pep7) and a scrambled control peptide PepSC7 (CSPATSYTC) did not compete with the phage at the same tested concentration (0.2-200 pg). Labeled by Cy5.5, PepC7 exhibited significant brain-targeting capability in in vivo optical imaging analysis. The cyclic conformation of PepC7 formed by disulfide bond, and the correct structure itself play a critical role in maintaining the selectivity and affinity for the brain. In conclusion, PepC7 is a promising brain-target motif never been reported before and it could be applied to targeted drug delivery into the brain.

  19. Characterization of the Antimicrobial Peptide Penisin, a Class Ia Novel Lantibiotic from Paenibacillus sp. Strain A3

    PubMed Central

    Baindara, Piyush; Chaudhry, Vasvi; Mittal, Garima; Liao, Luciano M.; Matos, Carolina O.; Khatri, Neeraj; Franco, Octavio L.; Patil, Prabhu B.

    2015-01-01

    Attempts to isolate novel antimicrobial peptides from microbial sources have been on the rise recently, despite their low efficacy in therapeutic applications. Here, we report identification and characterization of a new efficient antimicrobial peptide from a bacterial strain designated A3 that exhibited highest identity with Paenibacillus ehimensis. Upon purification and subsequent molecular characterization of the antimicrobial peptide, referred to as penisin, we found the peptide to be a bacteriocin-like peptide. Consistent with these results, RAST analysis of the entire genome sequence revealed the presence of a lantibiotic gene cluster containing genes necessary for synthesis and maturation of a lantibiotic. While circular dichroism and one-dimension nuclear magnetic resonance experiments confirmed a random coil structure of the peptide, similar to other known lantibiotics, additional biochemical evidence suggests posttranslational modifications of the core peptide yield six thioether cross-links. The deduced amino acid sequence of the putative biosynthetic gene penA showed approximately 74% similarity with elgicin A and 50% similarity with the lantibiotic paenicidin A. Penisin effectively killed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and did not exhibit hemolysis activity. Unlike other lantibiotics, it effectively inhibited the growth of Gram-negative bacteria. Furthermore, 80 mg/kg of body weight of penisin significantly reduced bacterial burden in a mouse thigh infection model and protected BALB/c mice in a bacteremia model entailing infection with Staphylococcus aureus MTCC 96, suggesting that it could be a promising new antimicrobial peptide. PMID:26574006

  20. Assessing high affinity binding to HLA-DQ2.5 by a novel peptide library based approach.

    PubMed

    Jüse, Ulrike; Arntzen, Magnus; Højrup, Peter; Fleckenstein, Burkhard; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2011-04-01

    Here we report on a novel peptide library based method for HLA class II binding motif identification. The approach is based on water soluble HLA class II molecules and soluble dedicated peptide libraries. A high number of different synthetic peptides are competing to interact with a limited amount of HLA molecules, giving a selective force in the binding. The peptide libraries can be designed so that the sequence length, the alignment of binding registers, the numbers and composition of random positions are controlled, and also modified amino acids can be included. Selected library peptides bound to HLA are then isolated by size exclusion chromatography and sequenced by tandem mass spectrometry online coupled to liquid chromatography. The MS/MS data are subsequently searched against a library defined database using a search engine such as Mascot, followed by manual inspection of the results. We used two dodecamer and two decamer peptide libraries and HLA-DQ2.5 to test possibilities and limits of this method. The selected sequences which we identified in the fraction eluted from HLA-DQ2.5 showed a higher average of their predicted binding affinity values compared to the original peptide library. The eluted sequences fit very well with the previously described HLA-DQ2.5 peptide binding motif. This novel method, limited by library complexity and sensitivity of mass spectrometry, allows the analysis of several thousand synthetic sequences concomitantly in a simple water soluble format.

  1. Encapsulation of bioactive whey peptides in soy lecithin-derived nanoliposomes: Influence of peptide molecular weight.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Aishwarya; McClements, David Julian; Udenigwe, Chibuike C

    2016-12-15

    Encapsulation of peptides can be used to enhance their stability, delivery and bioavailability. This study focused on the effect of the molecular weight range of whey peptides on their encapsulation within soy lecithin-derived nanoliposomes. Peptide molecular weight did not have a major impact on encapsulation efficiency or liposome size. However, it influenced peptide distribution amongst the surface, core, and bilayer regions of the liposomes, as determined by electrical charge (ζ-potential) and FTIR analysis. The liposome ζ-potential depended on peptide molecular weight, suggesting that the peptide charged groups were in different locations relative to the liposome surfaces. FTIR analysis indicated that the least hydrophobic peptide fractions interacted more strongly with choline on the liposome surfaces. The results suggested that the peptides were unequally distributed within the liposomes, even at the same encapsulation efficiency. These findings are important for designing delivery systems for commercial production of encapsulated peptides with improved functional attributes.

  2. Taylor Dispersion Analysis as a promising tool for assessment of peptide-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Høgstedt, Ulrich B; Schwach, Grégoire; van de Weert, Marco; Østergaard, Jesper

    2016-10-10

    Protein-protein and peptide-peptide (self-)interactions are of key importance in understanding the physiochemical behavior of proteins and peptides in solution. However, due to the small size of peptide molecules, characterization of these interactions is more challenging than for proteins. In this work, we show that protein-protein and peptide-peptide interactions can advantageously be investigated by measurement of the diffusion coefficient using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. Through comparison to Dynamic Light Scattering it was shown that Taylor Dispersion Analysis is well suited for the characterization of protein-protein interactions of solutions of α-lactalbumin and human serum albumin. The peptide-peptide interactions of three selected peptides were then investigated in a concentration range spanning from 0.5mg/ml up to 80mg/ml using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. The peptide-peptide interactions determination indicated that multibody interactions significantly affect the PPIs at concentration levels above 25mg/ml for the two charged peptides. Relative viscosity measurements, performed using the capillary based setup applied for Taylor Dispersion Analysis, showed that the viscosity of the peptide solutions increased with concentration. Our results indicate that a viscosity difference between run buffer and sample in Taylor Dispersion Analysis may result in overestimation of the measured diffusion coefficient. Thus, Taylor Dispersion Analysis provides a practical, but as yet primarily qualitative, approach to assessment of the colloidal stability of both peptide and protein formulations.

  3. Peptides and methods against diabetes

    DOEpatents

    Albertini, Richard J.; Falta, Michael T.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to methods of preventing or reducing the severity of diabetes. In one embodiment, the method involves administering to the individual a peptide having substantially the sequence of a on-conserved region sequence of a T cell receptor present on the surface of T cells mediating diabetes or a fragment thereof, wherein the peptide or fragment is capable of causing an effect on the immune system to regulate the T cells. In particular, the T cell receptor has the V.beta. regional V.beta.6 or V.beta.14. In another embodiment, the method involves gene therapy. The invention also relates to methods of diagnosing diabetes by determining the presence of diabetes predominant T cell receptors.

  4. Fabrication of nanofibrous electrospun scaffolds from a heterogeneous library of co- and self-assembling peptides.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Mahboubeh; Natalello, Antonino; Pugliese, Raffaele; Gelain, Fabrizio

    2017-03-15

    Self-assembling (SAPs) and co-assembling peptides (CAPs) are driving increasing enthusiasm as synthetic but biologically inspired biomaterials amenable of easy functionalization for regenerative medicine. On the other hand, electrospinning (ES) is a versatile technique useful for tailoring the nanostructures of various biomaterials into scaffolds resembling the extracellular matrices found in organs and tissues. The synergistic merging of these two approaches is a long-awaited advance in nanomedicine that has not been deeply documented so far. In the present work, we describe the successful ES of a library of diverse SAPs and CAPs into biomimetic nanofibrous mats. Our results suggest that suitable ES solutions are characterized by high concentrations of peptides, providing backbone physical chain entanglements, and by random coil/α-helical conformations while β-sheet aggregation may be detrimental to spinnability. The resulting peptide fibers feature interconnected seamless mats with nanofibers average diameters ranging from ∼100nm to ∼400nm. Also, peptide chemical nature and ES set up parameters play pivotal roles in determining the conformational transitions and morphological properties of the produced nanofibers. Far from being an exhaustive description of the just-opened novel field of ES-assembled peptides, this seminal work aims at shining a light on a still missing general theory for the production of electrospun peptidic biomaterials bringing together the spatial, biochemical and biomimetic of these two techniques into unique scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  5. C-terminal Amidation of an Osteocalcin-derived Peptide Promotes Hydroxyapatite Crystallization*

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Samaneh; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein; Mountassif, Driss; Cerruti, Marta; Vali, Hojatollah; Faghihi, Shahab

    2013-01-01

    Genesis of natural biocomposite-based materials, such as bone, cartilage, and teeth, involves interactions between organic and inorganic systems. Natural biopolymers, such as peptide motif sequences, can be used as a template to direct the nucleation and crystallization of hydroxyapatite (HA). In this study, a natural motif sequence consisting of 13 amino acids present in the first helix of osteocalcin was selected based on its calcium binding ability and used as substrate for nucleation of HA crystals. The acidic (acidic osteocalcin-derived peptide (OSC)) and amidic (amidic osteocalcin-derived peptide (OSN)) forms of this sequence were synthesized to investigate the effects of different C termini on the process of biomineralization. Electron microscopy analyses show the formation of plate-like HA crystals with random size and shape in the presence of OSN. In contrast, spherical amorphous calcium phosphate is formed in the presence of OSC. Circular dichroism experiments indicate conformational changes of amidic peptide to an open and regular structure as a consequence of interaction with calcium and phosphate. There is no conformational change detectable in OSC. It is concluded that HA crystal formation, which only occurred in OSN, is attributable to C-terminal amidation of a natural peptide derived from osteocalcin. It is also proposed that natural peptides with the ability to promote biomineralization have the potential to be utilized in hard tissue regeneration. PMID:23362258

  6. Computer-aided designing of immunosuppressive peptides based on IL-10 inducing potential

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Gandharva; Usmani, Salman Sadullah; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Kaur, Harpreet; Singh, Sandeep; Sharma, Meenu; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2017-01-01

    In the past, numerous methods have been developed to predict MHC class II binders or T-helper epitopes for designing the epitope-based vaccines against pathogens. In contrast, limited attempts have been made to develop methods for predicting T-helper epitopes/peptides that can induce a specific type of cytokine. This paper describes a method, developed for predicting interleukin-10 (IL-10) inducing peptides, a cytokine responsible for suppressing the immune system. All models were trained and tested on experimentally validated 394 IL-10 inducing and 848 non-inducing peptides. It was observed that certain types of residues and motifs are more frequent in IL-10 inducing peptides than in non-inducing peptides. Based on this analysis, we developed composition-based models using various machine-learning techniques. Random Forest-based model achieved the maximum Matthews’s Correlation Coefficient (MCC) value of 0.59 with an accuracy of 81.24% developed using dipeptide composition. In order to facilitate the community, we developed a web server “IL-10pred”, standalone packages and a mobile app for designing IL-10 inducing peptides (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/IL-10pred/). PMID:28211521

  7. Binding of Hemagglutinin and Influenza Virus to a Peptide-Conjugated Lipid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Teruhiko; Shibata, Rabi; Sato, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) plays an important role in the first step of influenza virus (IFV) infection because it initiates the binding of the virus to the sialylgalactose linkages of the receptors on the host cells. We herein demonstrate that a HA-binding peptide immobilized on a solid support is available to bind to HA and IFV. We previously obtained a HA-binding pentapeptide (Ala-Arg-Leu-Pro-Arg), which was identified by phage-display selection against HAs from random peptide libraries. This peptide binds to the receptor-binding site of HA by mimicking sialic acid. A peptide-conjugated lipid (pep-PE) was chemically synthesized from the peptide and a saturated phospholipid. A lipid bilayer composed of pep-PE and an unsaturated phospholipid (DOPC) was immobilized on a mica plate; and the interaction between HA and the pep-PE/DOPC membrane was investigated using atomic force microscopy. The binding of IFV to the pep-PE/DOPC membrane was detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time reverse transcription PCR. Our results indicate that peptide-conjugated lipids are a useful molecular device for the detection of HA and IFV. PMID:27092124

  8. Antimicrobial Peptides in Human Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lukas; van Meegern, Anne; Doemming, Sabine; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) were identified as an important part of innate immunity. They exist in species from bacteria to mammals and can be isolated in body fluids and on surfaces constitutively or induced by inflammation. Defensins have anti-bacterial effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as anti-viral and anti-yeast effects. Human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1–3 and human beta-defensins (HBDs) 1–3 are some of the most important defensins in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated higher levels of HNP 1–3 and HBD-2 in sepsis. The bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) attenuates local inflammatory response and decreases systemic toxicity of endotoxins. Moreover, BPI might reflect the severity of organ dysfunction in sepsis. Elevated plasma lactoferrin is detected in patients with organ failure. HNP 1–3, lactoferrin, BPI, and heparin-binding protein are increased in sepsis. Human lactoferrin peptide 1–11 (hLF 1–11) possesses antimicrobial activity and modulates inflammation. The recombinant form of lactoferrin [talactoferrin alpha (TLF)] has been shown to decrease mortality in critically ill patients. A phase II/III study with TLF in sepsis did not confirm this result. The growing number of multiresistant bacteria is an ongoing problem in sepsis therapy. Furthermore, antibiotics are known to promote the liberation of pro-inflammatory cell components and thus augment the severity of sepsis. Compared to antibiotics, AMPs kill bacteria but also neutralize pathogenic factors such as lipopolysaccharide. The obstacle to applying naturally occurring AMPs is their high nephro- and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the challenge is to develop peptides to treat septic patients effectively without causing harm. This overview focuses on natural and synthetic AMPs in human and experimental sepsis and their potential to provide significant improvements in the treatment of critically ill with severe infections

  9. Imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry of solid-phase peptide syntheses.

    PubMed

    Aubagnac, J L; Enjalbal, C; Drouot, C; Combarieu, R; Martinez, J

    1999-07-01

    Imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) of solid-phase peptide syntheses carried out by the Merrifield and Sheppard strategies is described. Mixtures of resin beads mixed at random from batch syntheses or obtained in combinatorial chemistry by the mix and split technique, where each bead is functionalized by a unique peptide, were analyzed directly without any chemical cleavage of the growing chains to assess the nature of the growing structure on any bead of the mixture without its isolation.

  10. Antihypertensive Peptides from Milk Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jäkälä, Pauliina; Vapaatalo, Heikki

    2010-01-01

    Dietary proteins possess a wide range of nutritional and functional properties. They are used as a source of energy and amino acids, which are needed for growth and development. Many dietary proteins, especially milk proteins, contain physiologically active peptides encrypted in the protein sequence. These peptides may be released during gastrointestinal digestion or food processing and once liberated, cause different physiological functions. Milk-derived bioactive peptides are shown to have antihypertensive, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, antioxidative and mineral-binding properties. During the fermentation of milk with certain lactobacilli, two interesting tripeptides Ile-Pro-Pro and Val-Pro-Pro are released from casein to the final product. These lactotripeptides have attenuated the development of hypertension in several animal models and lowered blood pressure in clinical studies. They inhibit ACE in vitro at micromolar concentrations, protect endothelial function in vitro and reduce arterial stiffness in humans. Thus, milk as a traditional food product can after certain processing serve as a functional food and carry specific health-promoting effects, providing an option to control blood pressure. PMID:27713251

  11. Recent Advances in Peptide Immunomodulators.

    PubMed

    Zerfas, Breanna L; Gao, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    With the continued rise in antibiotic-resistant bacteria, there is an immense need for the development of new therapeutic agents. Host-defense peptides (HDPs) offer a unique alternative to many of the current approved antibiotics. By targeting the host rather than the pathogen, HDPs offer several benefits over traditional small molecule drug treatments, such as a slower propensity towards resistance, broad-spectrum activity and lower risk of patients developing sepsis. However, natural peptide structures have many disadvantages as well, including susceptibility to proteolytic degradation, significant costs of synthesis and host toxicity. For this reason, much work has been done to examine peptidomimetic structures, in the hopes of finding a structure with all of the desired qualities of an antibiotic drug. Recently, this research has included synthetic constructs that mimic the behavior of HDPs but have no structural similarity to peptides. This review article focuses on the progression of this field of research, beginning with an analysis of a few prominent examples of natural HDPs and moving on to describe how the information learned by studying them have led to the current design platforms.

  12. Random array grid collimator

    DOEpatents

    Fenimore, E.E.

    1980-08-22

    A hexagonally shaped quasi-random no-two-holes touching grid collimator. The quasi-random array grid collimator eliminates contamination from small angle off-axis rays by using a no-two-holes-touching pattern which simultaneously provides for a self-supporting array increasng throughput by elimination of a substrate. The presentation invention also provides maximum throughput using hexagonally shaped holes in a hexagonal lattice pattern for diffraction limited applications. Mosaicking is also disclosed for reducing fabrication effort.

  13. Peptide mimics selected from immune sera using phage display technology can replace native antigens in the diagnosis of Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Casey, J L; Coley, A M; Parisi, K; Foley, M

    2009-02-01

    There is an expanding area of small molecule discovery, especially in the area of peptide mimetics. Peptide sequences can be used to substitute for the entire native antigen for use in diagnostic assays. Our approach is to select peptides that mimic epitopes of the natural immune response to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) that may be recognised by antibodies typically produced after infection with EBV. We screened a random peptide library on sera from rabbits immunised with a crude preparation of EBV and serum antibodies from a patient with a high titer of EBV antibodies. We selected four peptides (Eb1-4) with the highest relative binding affinity with immune rabbit sera and a single peptide with high affinity to human serum antibodies. The peptides were coupled to the carrier molecule BSA and the recognition of the peptides by IgM antibodies in clinical samples after infection with EBV was measured. The sensitivities were Eb1 94%, Eb2, 3, 4 88%, H1 81% and all had 100% specificity. This study illustrates that the phage display approach to select epitope mimics can be applied to polyclonal antibodies and peptides that represent several diagnostically important epitopes can be selected simultaneously. This panel of EBV peptides representing a wide coverage of immunodominant epitopes could replace crude antigen preparations currently used for capture in commercial diagnostic tests for EBV.

  14. Peptide mimics selected from immune sera using phage display technology can replace native antigens in the diagnosis of Epstein–Barr virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Casey, J.L.; Coley, A.M.; Parisi, K.; Foley, M.

    2009-01-01

    There is an expanding area of small molecule discovery, especially in the area of peptide mimetics. Peptide sequences can be used to substitute for the entire native antigen for use in diagnostic assays. Our approach is to select peptides that mimic epitopes of the natural immune response to Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) that may be recognised by antibodies typically produced after infection with EBV. We screened a random peptide library on sera from rabbits immunised with a crude preparation of EBV and serum antibodies from a patient with a high titer of EBV antibodies. We selected four peptides (Eb1–4) with the highest relative binding affinity with immune rabbit sera and a single peptide with high affinity to human serum antibodies. The peptides were coupled to the carrier molecule BSA and the recognition of the peptides by IgM antibodies in clinical samples after infection with EBV was measured. The sensitivities were Eb1 94%, Eb2, 3, 4 88%, H1 81% and all had 100% specificity. This study illustrates that the phage display approach to select epitope mimics can be applied to polyclonal antibodies and peptides that represent several diagnostically important epitopes can be selected simultaneously. This panel of EBV peptides representing a wide coverage of immunodominant epitopes could replace crude antigen preparations currently used for capture in commercial diagnostic tests for EBV. PMID:19073711

  15. Stability of peptide drugs in the colon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Yadav, Vipul; Smart, Alice L; Tajiri, Shinichiro; Basit, Abdul W

    2015-10-12

    This study was the first to investigate the colonic stability of 17 peptide molecules (insulin, calcitonin, glucagon, secretin, somatostatin, desmopressin, oxytocin, Arg-vasopressin, octreotide, ciclosporin, leuprolide, nafarelin, buserelin, histrelin, [D-Ser(4)]-gonadorelin, deslorelin, and goserelin) in a model of the large intestine using mixed human faecal bacteria. Of these, the larger peptides - insulin, calcitonin, somatostatin, glucagon and secretin - were metabolized rapidly, with complete degradation observed within 5 min. In contrast, a number of the smaller peptides - Arg-vasopressin, desmopressin, oxytocin, gonadorelin, goserelin, buserelin, leuprolide, nafarelin and deslorelin - degraded more slowly, while octreotide, histrelin and ciclosporin were seen to be more stable as compared to the other small peptides under the same conditions. Peptide degradation rate was directly correlated to peptide lipophilicity (logP); those peptides with a higher logP were more stable in the colonic model (R(2)=0.94). In the absence of human faecal bacteria, all peptides were stable. This study highlights the impact of the colonic environment - in particular, the gut microbiota - on the metabolism of peptide drugs, and identifies potential peptide candidates for drug delivery to the colon.

  16. Structure-function relationships of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Hwang, P M; Vogel, H J

    1998-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are ubiquitously produced throughout nature. Many of these relatively short peptides (6-50 residues) are lethal towards bacteria and fungi, yet they display minimal toxicity towards mammalian cells. All of the peptides are highly cationic and hydrophobic. It is widely believed that they act through nonspecific binding to biological membranes, even though the exact nature of these interactions is presently unclear. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has contributed greatly to knowledge in this field, providing insight about peptide structure in aqueous solution, in organic cosolvents, and in micellar systems. Solid-state NMR can provide additional information about peptide-membrane binding. Here we review our current knowledge about the structure of antimicrobial peptides. We also discuss studies pertaining to the mechanism of action. Despite the different three-dimensional structural motifs of the various classes, they all have similar amphiphilic surfaces that are well-suited for membrane binding. Many antimicrobial peptides bind in a membrane-parallel orientation, interacting only with one face of the bilayer. This may be sufficient for antimicrobial action. At higher concentrations, peptides and phospholipids translocate to form multimeric transmembrane channels that seem to contribute to the peptide's hemolytic activity. An understanding of the key features of the secondary and tertiary structures of the antimicrobial peptides and their effects on bactericidal and hemolytic activity can aid the rational design of improved analogs for clinical use.

  17. Bioprospecting open reading frames for peptide effectors.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ling; Scott, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Recent successes in the development of small-molecule antagonists of protein-protein interactions designed based on co-crystal structures of peptides bound to their biological targets confirm that short peptides derived from interacting proteins can be high-value ligands for pharmacologic validation of targets and for identification of druggable sites. Evolved sequence space is likely to be enriched for interacting peptides, but identifying minimal peptide effectors within genomic sequence can be labor intensive. Here we describe the use of incremental truncation to diversify genetic material on the scale of open reading frames into comprehensive libraries of constituent peptides. The approach is capable of generating peptides derived from both continuous and discontinuous sequence elements, and is compatible with the expression of free linear or backbone cyclic peptides, with peptides tethered to amino- or carboxyl-terminal fusion partners or with the expression of peptides displayed within protein scaffolds (peptide aptamers). Incremental truncation affords a valuable source of molecular diversity to interrogate the druggable genome or evaluate the therapeutic potential of candidate genes.

  18. Predicting protein-peptide interactions from scratch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chengfei; Xu, Xianjin; Zou, Xiaoqin; Zou lab Team

    Protein-peptide interactions play an important role in many cellular processes. The ability to predict protein-peptide complex structures is valuable for mechanistic investigation and therapeutic development. Due to the high flexibility of peptides and lack of templates for homologous modeling, predicting protein-peptide complex structures is extremely challenging. Recently, we have developed a novel docking framework for protein-peptide structure prediction. Specifically, given the sequence of a peptide and a 3D structure of the protein, initial conformations of the peptide are built through protein threading. Then, the peptide is globally and flexibly docked onto the protein using a novel iterative approach. Finally, the sampled modes are scored and ranked by a statistical potential-based energy scoring function that was derived for protein-peptide interactions from statistical mechanics principles. Our docking methodology has been tested on the Peptidb database and compared with other protein-peptide docking methods. Systematic analysis shows significantly improved results compared to the performances of the existing methods. Our method is computationally efficient and suitable for large-scale applications. Nsf CAREER Award 0953839 (XZ) NIH R01GM109980 (XZ).

  19. Isolation of peptide aptamers that inhibit intracellular processes

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Jonathan H.; Dove, Simon L.; Hochschild, Ann; Mekalanos, John J.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a method for isolation of random peptides that inhibit intracellular processes in bacteria. A library of random peptides expressed as fusions to Escherichia coli thioredoxin (aptamers) were expressed under the tight control of the arabinose-inducible PBAD promoter. A selection was applied to the library to isolate aptamers that interfered with the activity of thymidylate synthase (ThyA) in vivo. Expression of an aptamer isolated by this method resulted in a ThyA− phenotype that was suppressed by simultaneous overexpression of ThyA. Two-hybrid analysis showed that this aptamer is likely to interact with ThyA in vivo. The library also was screened for aptamers that inhibited growth of bacteria expressing them, and five such aptamers were characterized. Four aptamers were bacteriostatic when expressed, whereas one showed a bactericidal effect. Introduction of translational stop codons into various aptamers blocked their activity, suggesting that their biological effects were likely to be due to protein aptamer rather than RNA. Combinatorial aptamers provide a new genetic and biochemical tool for identifying targets for antibacterial drug development. PMID:10688899

  20. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun

    2014-01-01

    As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32) can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized medicine to

  1. Thermodynamics and dynamics of amyloid peptide oligomerization are sequence dependent.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Derreumaux, Philippe; Guo, Zhi; Mousseau, Normand; Wei, Guanghong

    2009-06-01

    Aggregation of the full-length amyloid-beta (Abeta) and beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) proteins is associated with Alzheimer's disease and dialysis-related amyloidosis, respectively. This assembly process is not restricted to full-length proteins, however, many short peptides also assemble into amyloid fibrils in vitro. Remarkably, the kinetics of amyloid-fibril formation of all these molecules is generally described by a nucleation-polymerization process characterized by a lag phase associated with the formation of a nucleus, after which fibril elongation occurs rapidly. In this study, we report using long molecular dynamics simulations with the OPEP coarse-grained force field, the thermodynamics and dynamics of the octamerization for two amyloid 7-residue peptides: the beta2m83-89 NHVTLSQ and Abeta16-22 KLVFFAE fragments. Based on multiple trajectories run at 310 K, totaling 2.2 mus (beta2m83-89) and 4.8 mus (Abeta16-22) and starting from random configurations and orientations of the chains, we find that the two peptides not only share common but also very different aggregation properties. Notably, an increase in the hydrophobic character of the peptide, as observed in Abeta16-22 with respect to beta2m83-89 impacts the thermodynamics by reducing the population of bilayer beta-sheet assemblies. Higher hydrophobicity is also found to slow down the dynamics of beta-sheet formation by enhancing the averaged lifetime of all configuration types (CT) and by reducing the complexity of the CT transition probability matrix. Proteins 2009. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Tuning β-sheet peptide self-assembly and hydrogelation behavior by modification of sequence hydrophobicity and aromaticity.

    PubMed

    Bowerman, Charles J; Liyanage, Wathsala; Federation, Alexander J; Nilsson, Bradley L

    2011-07-11

    Peptide self-assembly leading to cross-β amyloid structures is a widely studied phenomenon because of its role in amyloid pathology and the exploitation of amyloid as a functional biomaterial. The self-assembly process is governed by hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic, aromatic π-π, and electrostatic Coulombic interactions. A role for aromatic π-π interactions in peptide self-assembly leading to amyloid has been proposed, but the relative contributions of π-π versus general hydrophobic interactions in these processes are poorly understood. The Ac-(XKXK)(2)-NH(2) peptide was used to study the contributions of aromatic and hydrophobic interactions to peptide self-assembly. Position X was globally replaced by valine (Val), isoleucine (Ile), phenylalanine (Phe), pentafluorophenylalanine (F(5)-Phe), and cyclohexylalanine (Cha). At low pH, these peptides remain monomeric because of repulsion of charged lysine (Lys) residues. Increasing the solvent ionic strength to shield repulsive charge-charge interactions between protonated Lys residues facilitated cross-β fibril formation. It was generally found that as peptide hydrophobicity increased, the required ionic strength to induce self-assembly decreased. At [NaCl] ranging from 0 to 1000 mM, the Val sequence failed to assemble. Assembly of the Phe sequence commenced at 700 mM NaCl and at 300 mM NaCl for the less hydrophobic Ile variant, even though it displayed a mixture of random coil and β-sheet secondary structures over all NaCl concentrations. β-Sheet formation for F(5)-Phe and Cha sequences was observed at only 20 and 60 mM NaCl, respectively. Whereas self-assembly propensity generally correlated to peptide hydrophobicity and not aromatic character the presence of aromatic amino acids imparted unique properties to fibrils derived from these peptides. Nonaromatic peptides formed fibrils of 3-15 nm in diameter, whereas aromatic peptides formed nanotape or nanoribbon architectures of 3-7 nm widths. In addition, all

  3. The Contribution of DOPA to Substrate-Peptide Adhesion and Internal Cohesion of Mussel-Inspired Synthetic Peptide Films.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Travers H; Yu, Jing; Estrada, Abril; Hammer, Malte U; Waite, J Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2010-12-08

    Mussels use a variety of 3, 4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine (DOPA) rich proteins specifically tailored to adhering to wet surfaces. Synthetic polypeptide analogues of adhesive mussel foot proteins (specifically mfp-3) are used to study the role of DOPA in adhesion. The mussel-inspired peptide is a random copolymer of DOPA and N(5) -(2-hydroxyethyl)-l-glutamine synthesized with DOPA concentrations of 0-27 mol% and molecular weights of 5.9-7.1 kDa. Thin films (3-5 nm thick) of the mussel-inspired peptide are used in the surface forces apparatus (SFA) to measure the force-distance profiles and adhesion and cohesion energies of the films in an acetate buffer. The adhesion energies of the mussel-inspired peptide films to mica and TiO(2) surfaces increase with DOPA concentration. The adhesion energy to mica is 0.09 μJ m(-2) mol(DOPA) (-1) and does not depend on contact time or load. The adhesion energy to TiO(2) is 0.29 μJ m(-2) mol(DOPA) (-1) for short contact times and increases to 0.51 μJ m(-2) mol(DOPA) (-1) for contact times >60 min in a way suggestive of a phase transition within the film. Oxidation of DOPA to the quinone form, either by addition of periodate or by increasing the pH, increases the thickness and reduces the cohesion of the films. Adding thiol containing polymers between the oxidized films recovers some of the cohesion strength. Comparison of the mussel-inspired peptide films to previous studies on mfp-3 thin films show that the strong adhesion and cohesion in mfp-3 films can be attributed to DOPA groups favorably oriented within or at the interface of these films.

  4. Anti-angiogenic peptides for cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Rosca, Elena V.; Koskimaki, Jacob E.; Rivera, Corban G.; Pandey, Niranjan B.; Tamiz, Amir P.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2011-01-01

    Peptides have emerged as important therapeutics that are being rigorously tested in angiogenesis-dependent diseases due to their low toxicity and high specificity. Since the discovery of endogenous proteins and protein fragments that inhibit microvessel formation (thrombospondin, endostatin) several peptides have shown promise in pre-clinical and clinical studies for cancer. Peptides have been derived from thrombospondin, collagens, chemokines, coagulation cascade proteins, growth factors, and other classes of proteins and target different receptors. Here we survey recent developments for anti-angiogenic peptides with length not exceeding 50 amino acid residues that have shown activity in pre-clinical models of cancer or have been tested in clinical trials; some of the peptides have been modified and optimized, e.g., through L-to-D and non-natural amino acid substitutions. We highlight technological advances in peptide discovery and optimization including computational and bioinformatics tools and novel experimental techniques. PMID:21470139

  5. Formulation strategies to improve oral peptide delivery.

    PubMed

    Maher, Sam; Ryan, Ben; Duffy, Aoife; Brayden, David J

    2014-05-01

    Delivery of peptides by the oral route greatly appeals due to commercial, patient convenience and scientific arguments. While there are over 60 injectable peptides marketed worldwide, and many more in development, most delivery strategies do not yet adequately overcome the barriers to oral delivery. Peptides are sensitive to chemical and enzymatic degradation in the intestine, and are poorly permeable across the intestinal epithelium due to sub-optimal physicochemical properties. A successful oral peptide delivery technology should protect potent peptides from presystemic degradation and improve epithelial permeation to achieve a target oral bioavailability with acceptable intra-subject variability. This review provides a comprehensive up-to-date overview of the current status of oral peptide delivery with an emphasis on patented formulations that are yielding promising clinical data.

  6. Ribosomally encoded cyclic peptide toxins from mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Walton, Jonathan D; Luo, Hong; Hallen-Adams, Heather

    2012-01-01

    The cyclic peptide toxins of poisonous Amanita mushrooms are chemically unique among known natural products. Furthermore, they differ from other fungal cyclic peptides in being synthesized on ribosomes instead of by nonribosomal peptide synthetases. Because of their novel structures and biogenic origins, elucidation of the biosynthetic pathway of the Amanita cyclic peptides presents both challenges and opportunities. In particular, a full understanding of the pathway should lead to the ability to direct synthesis of a large number of novel cyclic peptides based on the Amanita toxin scaffold by genetic engineering of the encoding genes. Here, we highlight some of the principal methods for working with the Amanita cyclic peptides and the known steps in their biosynthesis.

  7. Cryptic Peptides from Collagen: A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Pradipta; Shanthi, C

    2016-01-01

    Collagen, a predominant structural protein in extracellular matrix (ECM), is now considered to have probable roles in many biological activities and hence, in different forms have found application as nutraceutical or pharmaceutical therapy option. Many of the biological properties are believed to be due to small hidden peptide residues in the collagen molecules, which come into play after the biodegradation or biosorption of the parent molecule. These peptide regions are called cryptic peptides or by some, as cryptides. The proteolytic hydrolysis of the ECM protein releases the cryptic peptides with many novel biological activities not exhibited directly by the parental protein which include angiogenic, antimicrobial, mitogenic and chemotactic properties. The research for understanding the role of these cryptic peptide regions and making use of them in medical field is very active. Such an understanding could lead to the development of peptide supplements for many biomedical applications. The prolific research in this area is reviewed in this paper.

  8. Peptide YY receptors in the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, A.; Oya, M.; Okita, M.; Inoue, T.; Sakatani, N.; Morioka, H.; Shii, K.; Yokono, K.; Mizuno, N.; Baba, S.

    1988-01-15

    Radiolabelled ligand binding studies demonstrated that specific receptors for peptide YY are present in the porcine as well as the canine brains. Peptide YY was bound to brain tissue membranes via high-affinity (dissociation constant, 1.39 X 10(-10)M) and low-affinity (dissociation constant, 3.72 X 10(-8)M) components. The binding sites showed a high specificity for peptide YY and neuropeptide Y, but not for pancreatic polypeptide or structurally unrelated peptides. The specific activity of peptide YY binding was highest in the hippocampus, followed by the pituitary gland, the hypothalamus, and the amygdala of the porcine brain, this pattern being similarly observed in the canine brain. The results suggest that peptide YY and neuropeptide Y may regulate the function of these regions of the brain through interaction with a common receptor site.

  9. Toward structure prediction of cyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongtao; Lin, Yu-Shan

    2015-02-14

    Cyclic peptides are a promising class of molecules that can be used to target specific protein-protein interactions. A computational method to accurately predict their structures would substantially advance the development of cyclic peptides as modulators of protein-protein interactions. Here, we develop a computational method that integrates bias-exchange metadynamics simulations, a Boltzmann reweighting scheme, dihedral principal component analysis and a modified density peak-based cluster analysis to provide a converged structural description for cyclic peptides. Using this method, we evaluate the performance of a number of popular protein force fields on a model cyclic peptide. All the tested force fields seem to over-stabilize the α-helix and PPII/β regions in the Ramachandran plot, commonly populated by linear peptides and proteins. Our findings suggest that re-parameterization of a force field that well describes the full Ramachandran plot is necessary to accurately model cyclic peptides.

  10. Synthesis of peptide .alpha.-thioesters

    DOEpatents

    Camarero, Julio A.; Mitchell, Alexander R.; De Yoreo, James J.

    2008-08-19

    Disclosed herein is a new method for the solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) of C-terminal peptide .alpha. thioesters using Fmoc/t-Bu chemistry. This method is based on the use of an aryl hydrazine linker, which is totally stable to conditions required for Fmoc-SPPS. When the peptide synthesis has been completed, activation of the linker is achieved by mild oxidation. The oxidation step converts the acyl-hydrazine group into a highly reactive acyl-diazene intermediate which reacts with an .alpha.-amino acid alkylthioester (H-AA-SR) to yield the corresponding peptide .alpha.-thioester in good yield. A variety of peptide thioesters, cyclic peptides and a fully functional Src homology 3 (SH3) protein domain have been successfully prepared.

  11. Anti-angiogenic peptides for cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rosca, Elena V; Koskimaki, Jacob E; Rivera, Corban G; Pandey, Niranjan B; Tamiz, Amir P; Popel, Aleksander S

    2011-08-01

    Peptides have emerged as important therapeutics that are being rigorously tested in angiogenesis-dependent diseases due to their low toxicity and high specificity. Since the discovery of endogenous proteins and protein fragments that inhibit microvessel formation (thrombospondin, endostatin) several peptides have shown promise in pre-clinical and clinical studies for cancer. Peptides have been derived from thrombospondin, collagens, chemokines, coagulation cascade proteins, growth factors, and other classes of proteins and target different receptors. Here we survey recent developments for anti-angiogenic peptides with length not exceeding 50 amino acid residues that have shown activity in pre-clinical models of cancer or have been tested in clinical trials; some of the peptides have been modified and optimized, e.g., through L-to-D and non-natural amino acid substitutions. We highlight technological advances in peptide discovery and optimization including computational and bioinformatics tools and novel experimental techniques.

  12. Use of artificial intelligence in the design of small peptide antibiotics effective against a broad spectrum of highly antibiotic-resistant superbugs.

    PubMed

    Cherkasov, Artem; Hilpert, Kai; Jenssen, Håvard; Fjell, Christopher D; Waldbrook, Matt; Mullaly, Sarah C; Volkmer, Rudolf; Hancock, Robert E W

    2009-01-16

    Increased multiple antibiotic resistance in the face of declining antibiotic discovery is one of society's most pressing health issues. Antimicrobial peptides represent a promising new class of antibiotics. Here we ask whether it is possible to make small broad spectrum peptides employing minimal assumptions, by capitalizing on accumulating chemical biology information. Using peptide array technology, two large random 9-amino-acid peptide libraries were iteratively created using the amino acid composition of the most active peptides. The resultant data was used together with Artificial Neural Networks, a powerful machine learning technique, to create quantitative in silico models of antibiotic activity. On the basis of random testing, these models proved remarkably effective in predicting the activity of 100,000 virtual peptides. The best peptides, representing the top quartile of predicted activities, were effective against a broad array of multidrug-resistant "Superbugs" with activities that were equal to or better than four highly used conventional antibiotics, more effective than the most advanced clinical candidate antimicrobial peptide, and protective against Staphylococcus aureus infections in animal models.

  13. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    DOEpatents

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2017-03-21

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  14. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    DOEpatents

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  15. Analysis of peptide uptake and location of root hair-promoting peptide accumulation in plant roots.

    PubMed

    Matsumiya, Yoshiki; Taniguchi, Rikiya; Kubo, Motoki

    2012-03-01

    Peptide uptake by plant roots from degraded soybean-meal products was analyzed in Brassica rapa and Solanum lycopersicum. B. rapa absorbed about 40% of the initial water volume, whereas peptide concentration was decreased by 75% after 24 h. Analysis by reversed-phase HPLC showed that number of peptides was absorbed by the roots during soaking in degraded soybean-meal products for 24 h. Carboxyfluorescein-labeled root hair-promoting peptide was synthesized, and its localization, movement, and accumulation in roots were investigated. The peptide appeared to be absorbed by root hairs and then moved to trichoblasts. Furthermore, the peptide was moved from trichoblasts to atrichoblasts after 24 h. The peptide was accumulated in epidermal cells, suggesting that the peptide may have a function in both trichoblasts and atrichoblasts.

  16. Current scenario of peptide-based drugs: the key roles of cationic antitumor and antiviral peptides

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Kelly C. L.; Lima, Loiane A.; Miranda, Vivian J.; Dias, Simoni C.; Franco, Octávio L.

    2013-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and host defense peptides (HDPs) show vast potential as peptide-based drugs. Great effort has been made in order to exploit their mechanisms of action, aiming to identify their targets as well as to enhance their activity and bioavailability. In this review, we will focus on both naturally occurring and designed antiviral and antitumor cationic peptides, including those here called promiscuous, in which multiple targets are associated with a single peptide structure. Emphasis will be given to their biochemical features, selectivity against extra targets, and molecular mechanisms. Peptides which possess antitumor activity against different cancer cell lines will be discussed, as well as peptides which inhibit virus replication, focusing on their applications for human health, animal health and agriculture, and their potential as new therapeutic drugs. Moreover, the current scenario for production and the use of nanotechnology as delivery tool for both classes of cationic peptides, as well as the perspectives on improving them is considered. PMID:24198814

  17. GAMPMS: Genetic algorithm managed peptide mutant screening.

    PubMed

    Long, Thomas; McDougal, Owen M; Andersen, Tim

    2015-06-30

    The prominence of endogenous peptide ligands targeted to receptors makes peptides with the desired binding activity good molecular scaffolds for drug development. Minor modifications to a peptide's primary sequence can significantly alter its binding properties with a receptor, and screening collections of peptide mutants is a useful technique for probing the receptor-ligand binding domain. Unfortunately, the combinatorial growth of such collections can limit the number of mutations which can be explored using structure-based molecular docking techniques. Genetic algorithm managed peptide mutant screening (GAMPMS) uses a genetic algorithm to conduct a heuristic search of the peptide's mutation space for peptides with optimal binding activity, significantly reducing the computational requirements of the virtual screening. The GAMPMS procedure was implemented and used to explore the binding domain of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α3β2-isoform with a library of 64,000 α-conotoxin (α-CTx) MII peptide mutants. To assess GAMPMS's performance, it was compared with a virtual screening procedure that used AutoDock to predict the binding affinity of each of the α-CTx MII peptide mutants with the α3β2-nAChR. The GAMPMS implementation performed AutoDock simulations for as few as 1140 of the 64,000 α-CTx MII peptide mutants and could consistently identify a set of 10 peptides with an aggregated binding energy that was at least 98% of the aggregated binding energy of the 10 top peptides from the exhaustive AutoDock screening.

  18. Insect inducible antimicrobial peptides and their applications.

    PubMed

    Ezzati-Tabrizi, Reyhaneh; Farrokhi, Naser; Talaei-Hassanloui, Reza; Alavi, Seyed Mehdi; Hosseininaveh, Vahid

    2013-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found as important components of the innate immune system (host defense) of all invertebrates. These peptides can be constitutively expressed or induced in response to microbial infections. Indeed, they vary in their amino acid sequences, potency and antimicrobial activity spectra. The smaller AMPs act greatly by disrupting the structure or function of microbial cell membranes. Here, the insect innate immune system with emphasis on inducible antimicrobial peptide properties against microbial invaders has been discussed.

  19. Turning peptides in comb silicone polymers.

    PubMed

    Jebors, Said; Pinese, Coline; Nottelet, Benjamin; Parra, Karine; Amblard, Muriel; Mehdi, Ahmad; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles

    2015-03-01

    We have recently reported on a new class of silicone-peptide' biopolymers obtained by polymerization of di-functionalized chlorodimethylsilyl hybrid peptides. Herein, we describe a related strategy based on dichloromethylsilane-derived peptides, which yield novel polymers with a polysiloxane backbone, comparable with a silicone-bearing pendent peptide chains. Interestingly, polymerization is chemoselective toward amino acids side-chains and proceeds in a single step in very mild conditions (neutral pH, water, and room temperature). As potential application, a cationic sequence was polymerized and used for antibacterial coating.

  20. Synthesis of stabilized alpha-helical peptides.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Federico; Katz, Samuel G

    2014-01-01

    Stabilized alpha-helical (SAH) peptides are valuable laboratory tools to explore important protein-protein interactions. Whereas most peptides lose their secondary structure when isolated from the host protein, stapled peptides incorporate an all-hydrocarbon "staple" that reinforces their natural alpha-helical structure. Thus, stapled peptides retain their functional ability to bind their native protein targets and serve multiple experimental uses. First, they are useful for structural studies such as NMR or crystal structures that map and better define binding sites. Second, they can be used to identify small molecules that specifically target that interaction site. Third, stapled peptides can be used to test the importance of specific amino acid residues or posttranslational modifications to the binding. Fourth, they can serve as structurally competent bait to identify novel binding partners to specific alpha-helical motifs. In addition to markedly improved alpha-helicity, stapled peptides also display resistance to protease cleavage and enhanced cell permeability. Most importantly, they are useful for intracellular experiments that explore the functional consequences of blocking particular protein interactions. Because of their remarkable stability, stapled peptides can be applied to whole-animal, in vivo studies. Here we describe a protocol for the synthesis of a peptide that incorporates an all-hydrocarbon "staple" employing a ring-closing olefin metathesis reaction. With proper optimization, stapled peptides can be a fundamental, accurate laboratory tool in the modern chemical biologist's armory.

  1. A regularized method for peptide quantification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Yang, Can; Yu, Weichuan

    2010-05-07

    Peptide abundance estimation is generally the first step in protein quantification. In peptide abundance estimation, peptide overlapping and peak intensity variation are two challenges. The main objective of this paper is to estimate peptide abundance by taking advantage of peptide isotopic distribution and smoothness of peptide elution profile. Our method proposes to solve the peptide overlapping problem and provides a way to control the variance of estimation. We compare our method with a commonly used method on simulated data sets and two real data sets of standard protein mixtures. The results show that our method achieves more accurate estimation of peptide abundance on different samples. In our method, there is a variance-related parameter. Considering the well-known trade-off between the variance and the bias of estimation, we should not only focus on reducing the variance in real applications. A suggestion about parameter selection is given based on the discussion of variance and bias. Matlab source codes and detailed experimental results are available at http://bioinformatics.ust.hk/PeptideQuant/peptidequant.htm.

  2. (Lipo)polysaccharide interactions of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Schmidtchen, Artur; Malmsten, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Due to rapidly increasing resistance development against conventional antibiotics, as well as problems associated with diseases either triggered or deteriorated by infection, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory peptides have attracted considerable interest during the last few years. While there is an emerging understanding of the direct antimicrobial function of such peptides through bacterial membrane destabilization, the mechanisms of their anti-inflammatory function are less clear. We here summarize some recent results obtained from our own research on anti-inflammatory peptides, with focus on peptide-(lipo)polysaccharide interactions.

  3. Second harmonic generation from tyrosine containing peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, M. N.; Bergmann, E.; Benichou, E.; Russier-Antoine, I.; Lascoux, N.; Jonin, Ch.; Besson, F.; Brevet, P. F.

    2013-10-01

    The Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) response from Tyrosine-containing peptides at the air-water interface is presented. First, the quadratic hyperpolarizability of the aromatic amino acid Tyrosine obtained by Hyper Rayleigh Scattering is reported, demonstrating its potentiality as an endogenous molecular probe for SHG studies. Then, the single Tyrosine antimicrobial peptide Mycosubtilin is monitored at the air-water interface and compared to another peptide, Surfactin, lacking a Tyrosine residue. Adsorption kinetics and polarization analysis of the SHG intensity for the peptide monolayers clearly demonstrate that the SHG response from Mycosubtilin arises from Tyrosine. Besides, it confirms that indeed Tyrosine can be targeted as an endogenous molecular probe.

  4. Antimicrobial peptides: clinical relevance and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro da Silva, Fabiano; Machado, Marcel Cerqueira César

    2012-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are molecules that provide protection against environmental pathogens, acting against a large number of microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi, yeast, virus and others. Two major groups of antimicrobial peptides are found in humans: cathelicidins and defensins. Recently, several studies have furnished information that besides their role in infection diseases, antimicrobial peptides play a role in diseases as diverse as inflammatory disorders, autoimmunity and cancer. Here, we discuss the role of antimicrobial peptides and vitamin D have in such complex diseases and propose their use should be more explored in the diagnosis and treatment of such conditions.

  5. Application of capillary isotachophoresis in peptide analysis.

    PubMed

    Kasicka, V; Prusík, Z

    1991-09-13

    This paper gives a broad and detailed review of the applications of one of the modern high-performance electromigration separation techniques--capillary isotachophoresis (ITP)--in peptide analysis. Examples are presented of the utilization of capillary ITP for peptide analysis in the fields of chemistry, general and clinical biochemistry, biology, biotechnology, pharmacy and the food industry. The complete composition of all the electrolyte systems used for peptide ITP analyses in both cationic and anionic techniques is given in tabular form. According to the purpose of analysis the applications are divided into several sections: model studies, determination of physico-chemical characteristics, purity control of both intermediate and final peptide preparations, including the determination of low-molecular-mass ionogenic admixtures, and the analysis of peptides in biological fluids and tissue extracts. In addition to the main applications the theoretical and methodological aspects of peptide ITP analysis are discussed. The basic electromigration properties of peptides (their polyampholyte character, effective and absolute mobilities, acid-base equilibria) are explained and the selection of parameters for peptide ITP analysis is described in detail. The advantages and disadvantages of ITP compared with other electrophoretic and chromatographic methods used for peptide analysis are discussed.

  6. Metal-triggered collagen peptide disk formation.

    PubMed

    Przybyla, David E; Chmielewski, Jean

    2010-06-16

    A collagen peptide was designed for metal-triggered, hierarchical assembly through a radial growth mechanism. To achieve radial assembly, H-(byp)(2) containing Pro-Hyp-Gly repeating sequences and two staggered bipyridine ligands within the peptide was synthesized. Triple helix formation resulted in the placement of six bipyridine ligands along the triple helix, and the addition of metal ions resulted in the formation of nanometer-sized collagen peptide disks. These structures were found to disassemble upon the addition of EDTA, demonstrating that radial assembly of collagen peptide triple helices could be realized with the addition of metal ions.

  7. Endomorphins and related opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yoshio; Tsuda, Yuko; Bryant, Sharon D; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2002-01-01

    Opioid peptides and their G-protein-coupled receptors (delta, kappa, mu) are located in the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. The opioid system has been studied to determine the intrinsic mechanism of modulation of pain and to develop uniquely effective pain-control substances with minimal abuse potential and side effects. Two types of endogenous opioid peptides exist, one containing Try-Gly-Gly-Phe as the message domain (enkephalins, endorphins, dynorphins) and the other containing the Tyr-Pro-Phe/Trp sequence (endomorphins-1 and -2). Endomorphin-1 (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH2), which has high mu receptor affinity (Ki = 0.36 nM) and remarkable selectivity (4000- and 15,000-fold preference over the delta and kappa receptors, respectively), was isolated from bovine and human brain. In addition, endomorphin-2 (Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2), isolated from the same sources, exhibited high mu receptor affinity (Ki = 0.69 nM) and very high selectivity (13,000- and 7500-fold preference relative to delta and kappa receptors, respectively). Both opioids bind to mu-opioid receptors, thereby activating G-proteins, resulting in regulation of gastrointestinal motility, manifestation of antinociception, and effects on the vascular systems and memory. To develop novel analgesics with less addictive properties, evaluation of the structure-activity relationships of the endomorphins led to the design of more potent and stable analgesics. Opioidmimetics and opioid peptides containing the amino acid sequence of the message domain of endomorphins, Tyr-Pro-Phe/Trp, could exhibit unique binding activity and lead to the development of new therapeutic drugs for controlling pain.

  8. Phage display as a technology delivering on the promise of peptide drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Hamzeh-Mivehroud, Maryam; Alizadeh, Ali Akbar; Morris, Michael B; Church, W Bret; Dastmalchi, Siavoush

    2013-12-01

    Phage display represents an important approach in the development pipeline for producing peptides and peptidomimetics therapeutics. Using randomly generated DNA sequences and molecular biology techniques, large diverse peptide libraries can be displayed on the phage surface. The phage library can be incubated with a target of interest and the phage which bind can be isolated and sequenced to reveal the displayed peptides' primary structure. In this review, we focus on the 'mechanics' of the phage display process, whilst highlighting many diverse and subtle ways it has been used to further the drug-development process, including the potential for the phage particle itself to be used as a drug carrier targeted to a particular pathogen or cell type in the body.

  9. Selection of ganglioside GM1-binding peptides by using a phage library.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, T; Ishikawa, D; Taki, T; Okahata, Y; Sato, T

    1999-08-06

    Ganglioside Gal beta1 --> 3GalNAc beta1 --> 4(NeuAc alpha2 --> 3) Gal beta1 --> 4Glc beta1 -->1'Cer (GM1)-binding peptides were obtained from a phage-displayed pentadecapeptide library by an affinity selection. The selection processes were in situ-monitored by a quartz-crystal microbalance method, on which a ganglioside GM1 monolayer was transferred. After five rounds of biopanning, the DNA sequencing of 18 selected phages showed that only three individual clones were selected. The peptide sequences of the random region were found to be DFRRLPGAFWQLRQP, GWWYKGRARPVSAVA and VWRLLAPPFSNRLLP. Binding constants of these phage clones to the GM1 monolayer were 10(10) M(-1). Three synthetic pentadecapeptides inhibited the binding of cholera toxin B subunit to the GM1 monolayer with an IC50 of 24, 13 and 1.0 microM, respectively. These peptides will be useful for searching functional roles of ganglioside GMI.

  10. Effects of a spleen peptide preparation as supportive therapy in inoperable head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Borghardt, J; Rosien, B; Görtelmeyer, R; Lindemann, S; Hartleb, M; Klingmüller, M

    2000-02-01

    Patients with inoperable head and neck cancer were treated with a spleen peptide preparation (Polyerga) in a phase III randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind study during chemotherapy (cisplatin/carboplatin, 5-fluorouracil) to investigate further the efficacy of this peptide preparation as supportive treatment under chemotherapy. Immunological changes as well as quality of life aspects were examined. Forty patients were included in this study. The peptide preparation had a significant stabilizing effect on the peripheral blood lymphocyte status during chemotherapy cycles (Student t-test, p = 0.05) and tended to stabilize the shift of granulocyte count (Student t-test, p = 0.18). In addition, the group receiving the verum showed a remarkable stabilization of body weight (Mann-Whitney U-test, p = 0.17) during chemotherapy treatment and the generally observed increase of fatigue-inertia during the chemotherapy cycles was significantly reduced (Student t-test, p = 0.01).

  11. On Utilizing Optimal and Information Theoretic Syntactic Modeling for Peptide Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aygün, Eser; Oommen, B. John; Cataltepe, Zehra

    Syntactic methods in pattern recognition have been used extensively in bioinformatics, and in particular, in the analysis of gene and protein expressions, and in the recognition and classification of bio-sequences. These methods are almost universally distance-based. This paper concerns the use of an Optimal and Information Theoretic (OIT) probabilistic model [11] to achieve peptide classification using the information residing in their syntactic representations. The latter has traditionally been achieved using the edit distances required in the respective peptide comparisons. We advocate that one can model the differences between compared strings as a mutation model consisting of random Substitutions, Insertions and Deletions (SID) obeying the OIT model. Thus, in this paper, we show that the probability measure obtained from the OIT model can be perceived as a sequence similarity metric, using which a Support Vector Machine (SVM)-based peptide classifier, referred to as OIT_SVM, can be devised.

  12. Multicanonical simulations of some peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkın, H.; Yaşar, F.; Çelik, T.; Berg, B. A.; Meirovitch, H.

    2002-08-01

    A brief discussion of the multicanonical simulation method is given and the results of our simulations of the peptides Leu-enkephalin and deltorphin (in vacuum) are presented. For Leu-enkephalin the determination of the a priori unknown multicanonical weight factors by a recursion is demonstrated, a comparison to the canonical simulations at fixed temperature is done and the effectiveness of the multicanonical simulation method is discussed. Ramachandran plots are shown for deltorphin and interpreted in favor of a funnel kind of picture.

  13. Tunable random fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Babin, S. A.; Podivilov, E. V.; El-Taher, A. E.; Harper, P.; Turitsyn, S. K.

    2011-08-15

    An optical fiber is treated as a natural one-dimensional random system where lasing is possible due to a combination of Rayleigh scattering by refractive index inhomogeneities and distributed amplification through the Raman effect. We present such a random fiber laser that is tunable over a broad wavelength range with uniquely flat output power and high efficiency, which outperforms traditional lasers of the same category. Outstanding characteristics defined by deep underlying physics and the simplicity of the scheme make the demonstrated laser a very attractive light source both for fundamental science and practical applications.

  14. Structural insights into Cn-AMP1, a short disulfide-free multifunctional peptide from green coconut water.

    PubMed

    Santana, Mábio J; de Oliveira, Aline L; Queiroz Júnior, Luiz H K; Mandal, Santi M; Matos, Carolina O; Dias, Renata de O; Franco, Octavio L; Lião, Luciano M

    2015-02-27

    Multifunctional and promiscuous antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) can be used as an efficient strategy to control pathogens. However, little is known about the structural properties of plant promiscuous AMPs without disulfide bonds. CD and NMR were used to elucidate the structure of the promiscuous peptide Cn-AMP1, a disulfide-free peptide isolated from green coconut water. Data here reported shows that peptide structure is transitory and could be different according to the micro-environment. In this regard, Cn-AMP1 showed a random coil in a water environment and an α-helical structure in the presence of SDS-d25 micelles. Moreover, deuterium exchange experiments showed that Gly4, Arg5 and Met9 residues are less accessible to solvent, suggesting that flexibility and cationic charges seem to be essential for Cn-AMP1 multiple activities.

  15. A mimotope from a solid-phase peptide library induces a measles virus-neutralizing and protective antibody response.

    PubMed

    Steward, M W; Stanley, C M; Obeid, O E

    1995-12-01

    A solid-phase 8-mer random combinatorial peptide library was used to generate a panel of mimotopes of an epitope recognized by a monoclonal antibody to the F protein of measles virus (MV). An inhibition immunoassay was used to show that these peptides were bound by the monoclonal antibody with different affinities. BALB/c mice were coimmunized with the individual mimotopes and a T-helper epitope peptide (from MV fusion protein), and the reactivity of the induced anti-mimotope antibodies with the corresponding peptides and with MV was determined. The affinities of the antibodies with the homologous peptides ranged from 8.9 x 10(5) to 4.4 x 10(7) liters/mol. However, only one of the anti-mimotope antibodies cross-reacted with MV in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and inhibited MV plaque formation. Coimmunization of mice with this mimotope and the T-helper epitope peptide induced an antibody response which conferred protection against fatal encephalitis induced following challenge with MV and with the structurally related canine distemper virus. These results indicate that peptide libraries can be used to identify mimotopes of conformational epitopes and that appropriate immunization with these mimotopes can induce protective antibody responses.

  16. CABS-dock web server for the flexible docking of peptides to proteins without prior knowledge of the binding site

    PubMed Central

    Kurcinski, Mateusz; Jamroz, Michal; Blaszczyk, Maciej; Kolinski, Andrzej; Kmiecik, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Protein–peptide interactions play a key role in cell functions. Their structural characterization, though challenging, is important for the discovery of new drugs. The CABS-dock web server provides an interface for modeling protein–peptide interactions using a highly efficient protocol for the flexible docking of peptides to proteins. While other docking algorithms require pre-defined localization of the binding site, CABS-dock does not require such knowledge. Given a protein receptor structure and a peptide sequence (and starting from random conformations and positions of the peptide), CABS-dock performs simulation search for the binding site allowing for full flexibility of the peptide and small fluctuations of the receptor backbone. This protocol was extensively tested over the largest dataset of non-redundant protein–peptide interactions available to date (including bound and unbound docking cases). For over 80% of bound and unbound dataset cases, we obtained models with high or medium accuracy (sufficient for practical applications). Additionally, as optional features, CABS-dock can exclude user-selected binding modes from docking search or to increase the level of flexibility for chosen receptor fragments. CABS-dock is freely available as a web server at http://biocomp.chem.uw.edu.pl/CABSdock. PMID:25943545

  17. Expression, purification and characterization of a group of lectin-like peptides from the spider Ornithoctonus huwena.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liping; Peng, Li; Zhang, Yongqun; Chen, Jinjun; Zhang, Dongyi; Liang, Songping

    2009-04-01

    By sequencing random clones from the venom gland cDNA library of the spider Ornithoctonus huwena, a transcript, named SHL-Ib1, encoding a lectin-like peptide was cloned. The amino acid sequence of the putative mature peptide of SHL-Ib1 is identical, except for seven different residues, with that of SHL-I, a lectin found in the venom of O. huwena. The mature peptides of SHL-Ib1b and SHL-Ib1c are the mutants of SHL-Ib1 with two or three amino acid residues truncated at the C-terminal. The recombinant SHL-Ib1b and SHL-Ib1c were expressed successfully by the yeast expression system and purified by using a combination of ion-exchange and reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The molecular masses of the two expressed peptides were identified by mass spectrometry, indicating that the C-terminals of the two peptides were not amidated. The two peptides can agglutinate human erythrocytes at minimal concentrations of 0.75 and 1.475mg/ml, respectively. Structure modeling of SHL-Ib1 has given a clue to the low agglutination bioactivities of these recombinant toxins. These lectin-like peptides, due to the small molecular sizes, may have the advantage to investigate the binding mechanism of the lectin and have the potential to be the carrier for drug delivery.

  18. CABS-dock web server for the flexible docking of peptides to proteins without prior knowledge of the binding site.

    PubMed

    Kurcinski, Mateusz; Jamroz, Michal; Blaszczyk, Maciej; Kolinski, Andrzej; Kmiecik, Sebastian

    2015-07-01

    Protein-peptide interactions play a key role in cell functions. Their structural characterization, though challenging, is important for the discovery of new drugs. The CABS-dock web server provides an interface for modeling protein-peptide interactions using a highly efficient protocol for the flexible docking of peptides to proteins. While other docking algorithms require pre-defined localization of the binding site, CABS-dock does not require such knowledge. Given a protein receptor structure and a peptide sequence (and starting from random conformations and positions of the peptide), CABS-dock performs simulation search for the binding site allowing for full flexibility of the peptide and small fluctuations of the receptor backbone. This protocol was extensively tested over the largest dataset of non-redundant protein-peptide interactions available to date (including bound and unbound docking cases). For over 80% of bound and unbound dataset cases, we obtained models with high or medium accuracy (sufficient for practical applications). Additionally, as optional features, CABS-dock can exclude user-selected binding modes from docking search or to increase the level of flexibility for chosen receptor fragments. CABS-dock is freely available as a web server at http://biocomp.chem.uw.edu.pl/CABSdock.

  19. Randomness Of Amoeba Movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashiguchi, S.; Khadijah, Siti; Kuwajima, T.; Ohki, M.; Tacano, M.; Sikula, J.

    2005-11-01

    Movements of amoebas were automatically traced using the difference between two successive frames of the microscopic movie. It was observed that the movements were almost random in that the directions and the magnitudes of the successive two steps are not correlated, and that the distance from the origin was proportional to the square root of the step number.

  20. Random lattice superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Haidong; Siegel, Warren

    2006-08-15

    We propose some new simplifying ingredients for Feynman diagrams that seem necessary for random lattice formulations of superstrings. In particular, half the fermionic variables appear only in particle loops (similarly to loop momenta), reducing the supersymmetry of the constituents of the type IIB superstring to N=1, as expected from their interpretation in the 1/N expansion as super Yang-Mills.

  1. Generating "Random" Integers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Martin

    2011-01-01

    One of the author's undergraduate students recently asked him whether it was possible to generate a random positive integer. After some thought, the author realised that there were plenty of interesting mathematical ideas inherent in her question. So much so in fact, that the author decided to organise a workshop, open both to undergraduates and…

  2. Randomization and sampling issues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geissler, P.H.

    1996-01-01

    The need for randomly selected routes and other sampling issues have been debated by the Amphibian electronic discussion group. Many excellent comments have been made, pro and con, but we have not reached consensus yet. This paper brings those comments together and attempts a synthesis. I hope that the resulting discussion will bring us closer to a consensus.

  3. On Random Numbers and Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Ari, Morechai

    2004-01-01

    The term "random" is frequently used in discussion of the theory of evolution, even though the mathematical concept of randomness is problematic and of little relevance in the theory. Therefore, since the core concept of the theory of evolution is the non-random process of natural selection, the term random should not be used in teaching the…

  4. Peptides and the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2015-10-01

    The demonstration that peptides and regulatory proteins can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is one of the major contributions of Dr. Abba J. Kastin. He was the first to propose that peptides could cross the BBB, the first to show that an endogenous peptide did so, and the first to describe a saturable transport system at the BBB for peptides. His work shows that in crossing the BBB, peptides and regulatory proteins act as informational molecules, informing the brain of peripheral events. Brain-to-blood passage helps to control levels of peptides with the brain and can deliver information in the brain-to-blood direction. He showed that the transporters for peptides and proteins are not static, but respond to developmental and physiological changes and are affected by disease states. As such, the BBB is adaptive to the needs of the CNS, but when that adaption goes awry, the BBB can be a cause of disease. The mechanisms by which peptides and proteins cross the BBB offer opportunities for drug delivery of these substances or their analogs to the brain in the treatment of diseases of the central nervous system.

  5. C-peptide and diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, N J

    2017-01-01

    Kidney disease is a serious development in diabetes mellitus and poses an increasing clinical problem. Despite increasing incidence and prevalence of diabetic kidney disease, there have been no new therapies for this condition in the last 20 years. Mounting evidence supports a biological role for C-peptide, and findings from multiple studies now suggest that C-peptide may beneficially affect the disturbed metabolic and pathophysiological pathways leading to the development of diabetic nephropathy. Studies of C-peptide in animal models and in humans with type 1 diabetes all suggest a renoprotective effect for this peptide. In diabetic rodents, C-peptide reduces glomerular hyperfiltration and albuminuria. Cohort studies of diabetic patients with combined islet and kidney transplants suggest that maintained C-peptide secretion is protective of renal graft function. Further, in short-term studies of patients with type 1 diabetes, administration of C-peptide is also associated with a lowered hyperfiltration rate and reduced microalbuminuria. Thus, the available information suggests that type 1 diabetes should be regarded as a dual hormone deficiency disease and that clinical trials of C-peptide in diabetic nephropathy are both justified and urgently required.

  6. A femtomolar-acting neuroprotective peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Brenneman, D E; Gozes, I

    1996-01-01

    A novel 14-amino acid peptide, with stress-protein-like sequences, exhibiting neuroprotection at unprecedented concentrations, is revealed. This peptide prevented neuronal cell death associated with the envelope protein (GP 120) from HIV, with excitotoxicity (N-methyl d-aspartate), with the beta amyloid peptide (putative cytotoxin in Alzheimer's disease), and with tetrodotoxin (electrical blockade). The peptide was designed to contain a sequence derived from a new neuroprotective protein secreted by astroglial cells in the presence of vasoactive intestinal peptide. The neurotrophic protein was isolated by sequential chromatographic methods combining ion exchange, size separation, and hydrophobic interaction. The protein (mol mass, 14 kD and pI, 8.3 +/- 0.25) was named activity-dependent neurotrophic factor, as it protected neurons from death associated with electrical blockade. Peptide sequencing led to the synthesis of the novel 14-amino acid peptide that was homologous, but not identical, to an intracellular stress protein, heat shock protein 60. Neutralizing antiserum to heat shock protein 60 produced neuronal cell death that could be prevented by cotreatment with the novel protein, suggesting the existence of extracellular stress-like proteins with neuroprotective properties. These studies identify a potent neuroprotective glial protein and an active peptide that provide a basis for developing treatments of currently intractable neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:8636410

  7. Structure and Design of Multipotent Peptide Microbicides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    Project goal. ~$e goal of this project is to design novel peptide antibiotics using a naturally occurring family of peptides, known as defensins, as...coupling of taurine , glycinamide, and arginine amide. " 3. Solution Structures. in collaborative studies performed with Arthur Pardi, we have

  8. Experimental validation of peptide immunohistochemistry controls.

    PubMed

    Bogen, Steven A; Vani, Kodela; McGraw, Brian; Federico, Vin; Habib, Iqbal; Zeheb, Ron; Luther, Ed; Tristram, Colin; Sompuram, Seshi R

    2009-05-01

    Peptide immunohistochemistry (IHC) controls are a new quality control format for verifying proper IHC assay performance, offering advantages in high throughput automated manufacture and standardization. We previously demonstrated that formalin-fixed peptide epitopes, covalently attached to glass microscope slides, behaved (immunochemically) in a similar fashion to the native protein in tissue sections. To convert this promising idea into a practical clinical laboratory quality control tool, we tested the hypothesis that the quality assurance information provided by peptide IHC controls accurately reflects IHC staining performance among a diverse group of clinical laboratories. To test the hypothesis, we first designed and built an instrument for reproducibly printing the controls on microscope slides and a simple software program to measure the color intensity of stained controls. Automated printing of peptide spots was reproducible, with coefficients of variation of 4% to 8%. Moreover, the peptide controls were stable at peptide controls to their ability in properly staining a 3+ HER-2 formalin-fixed tissue section mounted on the same slide (r=0.87). Therefore, peptide IHC controls accurately reflect the analytical component of an IHC stain, including antigen retrieval. Besides its use in proficiency survey testing, we also demonstrate the feasibility of applying peptide IHC controls for verifying intralaboratory IHC staining consistency, using Levy-Jennings charting.

  9. Constrained Peptides as Miniature Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the recent developments of protein engineering using both covalent and noncovalent bonds to constrain peptides, forcing them into designed protein secondary structures. These constrained peptides subsequently can be used as peptidomimetics for biological functions such as regulations of protein-protein interactions. PMID:25969758

  10. Hydrophobic peptide auxotrophy in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Brãnes, L V; Somers, J M; Kay, W W

    1981-01-01

    The growth of a pleiotropic membrane mutant of Salmonella typhimurium with modified lipopolysaccharide composition was found to be strictly dependent on the peptone component of complex media. Nutritional Shiftdown into minimal media allowed growth for three to four generations. Of 20 commercial peptones, only enzymatic digests supported growth to varying degrees. Neither trace cations, amino acids, vitamins, carbohydrates, lipids, glutathione, polyamines, carbodimides, nor synthetic peptides stimulated growth; however, cells still metabolized carbohydrates, and amino acid transport systems were shown to be functional. A tryptic digest of casein was fractionated into four electrophoretically different peptide fractions of 1,000 to 1,200 molecular weight which supported growth to varying degrees. The best of these was further fractionated to two highly hydrophopic peptides. N-terminal modifications eliminated biological activity. Fluorescein-conjugated goat antibody to rabbit immunoglobulin G was used as a probe to detect antipeptide antibody-peptide complexes on membrane preparations. Cells grown on peptone distributed the peptide into both inner and outer membranes. The peptide could be removed with chaotropic agents, and cells had to be pregrown in peptone-containing media to bind the hydrophobic peptide. The gene (hyp) responsible for peptide auxotrophy was mapped at 44 to 45 units by conjugation. Images PMID:7024254

  11. B-Type allatostatins and sex peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In many species, mating induces a number of behavioral changes in the female. For Drosophila melanogaster, the sex peptide (SP) has been identified as the main molecular factor behind these responses. Recently, the sex peptide receptor (SPR), a GPCR activated by SP has also been characterized as res...

  12. Peptide Mass Fingerprinting of Egg White Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alty, Lisa T.; LaRiviere, Frederick J.

    2016-01-01

    Use of advanced mass spectrometry techniques in the undergraduate setting has burgeoned in the past decade. However, relatively few undergraduate experiments examine the proteomics tools of protein digestion, peptide accurate mass determination, and database searching, also known as peptide mass fingerprinting. In this experiment, biochemistry…

  13. Biologically active peptides: prospects for drug development.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J

    1980-08-11

    Biologically active peptides aree typified by their unbiquity of distribution, their high receptor affinity and an almost infinite diversity of structure. For these reasons, considerable effort is now being expended to elucidate the possible role of peptides in brain function. This effort has been stimulated by the discovery of a number of new endogenous peptides, such as the enkephalins, endorphins, vasoactive intestinal peptide and neurotensin. At present, there is no clearly defined role for these peptides, although they may form an important basis for the chemical coding of various brain functions, including pain, mood and memory. At present, the potential for drug development of peptide agonists remains in fairly circumscribed areas such as analgesia, pituitary hormone control, and gastrointestinal motor and secretory control. Peptide antagonists may provide a vast field for future development, although only one area, that of antifertility drugs based on LHRH antagonists, shows any promise of immediate success. Industrial research approaches to new peptide agonists and antagonists mainly rely at present on rational drug design through structural analogies. Other fruitful approaches to be considered are the screening of natural microbial and plant products and the possible application of genetic engineering techniques.

  14. Peptide mimotopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis carbohydrate immunodeterminants

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Cell-surface saccharides of Mycobacterium tuberculosis appear to be crucial factors in tuberculosis pathogenicity and could be useful antigens in tuberculosis immunodiagnosis. In the present study, we report the successful antigenic and immunogenic mimicry of mannose-containing cell-wall compounds of M. tuberculosis by dodecamer peptides identified by phage-display technology. Using a rabbit antiserum raised against M. tuberculosis cell-surface saccharides as a target for biopanning, peptides with three different consensus sequences were identified. Phage-displayed and chemically synthesized peptides bound to the anticarbohydrate antiserum. Rabbit antibodies elicited against the peptide QEPLMGTVPIRAGGGS recognize the mannosylated M. tuberculosis cell-wall antigens arabinomannan and lipoarabinomannan, and the glycosylated recombinant protein alanine/proline-rich antigen. Furthermore, antibodies were also able to react with mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but not with phosphatidylinositol dimannosides or arabinogalactan from mycobacteria. These results suggest that the immunogenic peptide mimics oligomannosidic epitopes. Interestingly, this report provides evidence that, in contrast with previously known carbohydrate mimotopes, no aromatic residues are necessary in a peptide sequence for mimicking unusual glycoconjugates synthesized by mycobacteria. The possible usefulness of the identified peptide mimotopes as surrogate reagents for immunodiagnosis and for the study of functional roles of the native non-peptide epitopes is discussed. PMID:15560754

  15. Small wonders: peptides for disease control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book is the result of the symposium “Small Wonders: Peptides for Disease Control” held at the 240th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Boston, MA, August 22-26, 2010. This is the first book that covers a broad range of peptide technology and its practical application in the ag...

  16. Peptides and the blood–brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Banks, William A.

    2016-01-01

    The demonstration that peptides and regulatory proteins can cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is one of the major contributions of Dr. Abba J. Kastin. He was the first to propose that peptides could cross the BBB, the first to show that an endogenous peptide did so, and the first to describe a saturable transport system at the BBB for peptides. His work shows that in crossing the BBB, peptides and regulatory proteins act as informational molecules, informing the brain of peripheral events. Brain-to-blood passage helps to control levels of peptides with the brain and can deliver information in the brain-to-blood direction. He showed that the transporters for peptides and proteins are not static, but respond to developmental and physiological changes and are affected by disease states. As such, the BBB is adaptive to the needs of the CNS, but when that adaption goes awry, the BBB can be a cause of disease. The mechanisms by which peptides and proteins cross the BBB offer opportunities for drug delivery of these substances or their analogs to the brain in the treatment of diseases of the central nervous system. PMID:25805003

  17. Role of peptide bond in the realization of biological activity of short peptides.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V Kh; Tarnovskaya, S I; Lin'kova, N S; Chervyakova, N A; Nichik, T E; Elashkina, E V; Chalisova, N I

    2015-02-01

    We performed a comparative analysis of biological activity of Lys-Glu peptide and its amino acid constituents. It was established that Lys-Glu stimulated proliferation of splenic cells in organotypic culture, while the mixture of glutamic acid and lysine inhibited culture growth. Using the method of molecular docking, we showed that glutamic acid, lysine, and Lys-Glu peptide can interact with different DNA sequences. The energy of interaction and the most beneficial localization of glutamic acid, lysine, and Lys-Glu peptide in DNA molecule was calculated. We demonstrated the interaction of the peptide and amino acids with DNA along the minor groove. The energy of DNA interaction with the peptide is higher than with individual amino acids. The peptide bonds increase the interaction of Lys-Glu peptide with DNA, which potentiates the biological effect on cell proliferation in organotypic culture of splenic cells.

  18. Use of Peptide Libraries for Identification and Optimization of Novel Antimicrobial Peptides.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Martin; Petkova, Asya; Gani, Jurnorain; Mikut, Ralf; Hilpert, Kai

    2017-01-01

    The increasing rates of resistance among bacteria and to a lesser extent fungi have resulted in an urgent need to find new molecules that hold therapeutic promise against multidrug-resistant strains. Antimicrobial peptides have proven very effective against a variety of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Additionally, the low levels of resistance reported towards these molecules are an attractive feature for antimicrobial drug development. Here we summarise information on diverse peptide libraries used to discover or to optimize antimicrobial peptides. Chemical synthesized peptide libraries, for example split and mix method, tea bag method, multi-pin method and cellulose spot method are discussed. In addition biological peptide library screening methods are summarized, like phage display, bacterial display, mRNA-display and ribosomal display. A few examples are given for small peptide libraries, which almost exclusively follow a rational design of peptides of interest rather than a combinatorial approach.

  19. Molecular and electronic structure of the peptide subunit of Geobacter sulfurreducens conductive pili from first principles.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, Gustavo T; da Silva, Antonio J R; Reguera, Gemma; Artacho, Emilio

    2012-08-02

    The respiration of metal oxides by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens requires the assembly of a small peptide (the GS pilin) into conductive filaments termed pili. We gained insights into the contribution of the GS pilin to the pilus conductivity by developing a homology model and performing molecular dynamics simulations of the pilin peptide in vacuo and in solution. The results were consistent with a predominantly helical peptide containing the conserved α-helix region required for pilin assembly but carrying a short carboxy-terminal random-coiled segment rather than the large globular head of other bacterial pilins. The electronic structure of the pilin was also explored from first principles and revealed a biphasic charge distribution along the pilin and a low electronic HOMO-LUMO gap, even in a wet environment. The low electronic band gap was the result of strong electrostatic fields generated by the alignment of the peptide bond dipoles in the pilin's α-helix and by charges from ions in solution and amino acids in the protein. The electronic structure also revealed some level of orbital delocalization in regions of the pilin containing aromatic amino acids and in spatial regions of high resonance where the HOMO and LUMO states are, which could provide an optimal environment for the hopping of electrons under thermal fluctuations. Hence, the structural and electronic features of the pilin revealed in these studies support the notion of a pilin peptide environment optimized for electron conduction.

  20. Multidrug-resistance drug-binding peptides generated by using a phage display library.

    PubMed

    Popkov, M; Lussier, I; Medvedkine, V; Estève, P O; Alakhov, V; Mandeville, R

    1998-01-15

    A phage display library of random decapeptides was used to generate peptide ligands that can bind multidrug-resistance (MDR) drugs mimicking, in this respect, the drug-binding activity of P-glycoprotein. Seven peptide sequences were identified that specifically bound doxorubicin. Five of these sequences expressed the core consensus motif WXXW. The displacement assay showed that the phages expressing these peptides bound MDR type drugs (vinblastine, doxorubicin, verapamil, and genistein) with the same selectivity as P-glycoprotein and did not interact with non-MDR type drugs, such as arabinosylcytosine (Ara-C) and melphalan. One of the selected peptides that showed a highest capacity for the binding (VCDWWGWGIC) was synthesized and displayed competition with the phage for doxorubicin binding. The structure modeling suggested that all the selected sequences contained a hydrophobic envelope in which MDR drugs could be docked with substantial energy minimization. Western blot analysis showed that monospecific antibody obtained against the phage expressing VCDWWGWGIC peptide could specifically recognize P-glycoprotein in the membrane fraction of MDR phenotype MCF-7ADR cells. The MDR drug-binding sequences generated during this work could provide an important tool for design and screening of new chemotherapeutic agents.

  1. Self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide with controlled polarization for power generation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Vu; Zhu, Ren; Jenkins, Kory; Yang, Rusen

    2016-01-01

    Peptides have attracted considerable attention due to their biocompatibility, functional molecular recognition and unique biological and electronic properties. The strong piezoelectricity in diphenylalanine peptide expands its technological potential as a smart material. However, its random and unswitchable polarization has been the roadblock to fulfilling its potential and hence the demonstration of a piezoelectric device remains lacking. Here we show the control of polarization with an electric field applied during the peptide self-assembly process. Uniform polarization is obtained in two opposite directions with an effective piezoelectric constant d33 reaching 17.9 pm V−1. We demonstrate the power generation with a peptide-based power generator that produces an open-circuit voltage of 1.4 V and a power density of 3.3 nW cm−2. Devices enabled by peptides with controlled piezoelectricity provide a renewable and biocompatible energy source for biomedical applications and open up a portal to the next generation of multi-functional electronics compatible with human tissue. PMID:27857133

  2. Trends in the Binding of Cell Penetrating Peptides to siRNA: A Molecular Docking Study

    PubMed Central

    Gunathunge, B. G. C. M.; Wimalasiri, P. N.; Karunaratne, D. N.

    2017-01-01

    The use of gene therapeutics, including short interfering RNA (siRNA), is limited by the lack of efficient delivery systems. An appealing approach to deliver gene therapeutics involves noncovalent complexation with cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) which are able to penetrate the cell membranes of mammals. Although a number of CPPs have been discovered, our understanding of their complexation and translocation of siRNA is as yet insufficient. Here, we report on computational studies comparing the binding affinities of CPPs with siRNA, considering a variety of CPPs. Specifically, seventeen CPPs from three different categories, cationic, amphipathic, and hydrophobic CPPs, were studied. Molecular mechanics were used to minimize structures, while molecular docking calculations were used to predict the orientation and favorability of sequentially binding multiple peptides to siRNA. Binding scores from docking calculations were highest for amphipathic peptides over cationic and hydrophobic peptides. Results indicate that initial complexation of peptides will likely occur along the major groove of the siRNA, driven by electrostatic interactions. Subsequent binding of CPPs is likely to occur in the minor groove and later on bind randomly, to siRNA or previously bound CPPs, through hydrophobic interactions. However, hydrophobic CPPs do not show this binding pattern. Ultimately binding yields a positively charged nanoparticle capable of noninvasive cellular import of therapeutic molecules. PMID:28321253

  3. Self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide with controlled polarization for power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Vu; Zhu, Ren; Jenkins, Kory; Yang, Rusen

    2016-11-01

    Peptides have attracted considerable attention due to their biocompatibility, functional molecular recognition and unique biological and electronic properties. The strong piezoelectricity in diphenylalanine peptide expands its technological potential as a smart material. However, its random and unswitchable polarization has been the roadblock to fulfilling its potential and hence the demonstration of a piezoelectric device remains lacking. Here we show the control of polarization with an electric field applied during the peptide self-assembly process. Uniform polarization is obtained in two opposite directions with an effective piezoelectric constant d33 reaching 17.9 pm V-1. We demonstrate the power generation with a peptide-based power generator that produces an open-circuit voltage of 1.4 V and a power density of 3.3 nW cm-2. Devices enabled by peptides with controlled piezoelectricity provide a renewable and biocompatible energy source for biomedical applications and open up a portal to the next generation of multi-functional electronics compatible with human tissue.

  4. Self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide with controlled polarization for power generation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vu; Zhu, Ren; Jenkins, Kory; Yang, Rusen

    2016-11-18

    Peptides have attracted considerable attention due to their biocompatibility, functional molecular recognition and unique biological and electronic properties. The strong piezoelectricity in diphenylalanine peptide expands its technological potential as a smart material. However, its random and unswitchable polarization has been the roadblock to fulfilling its potential and hence the demonstration of a piezoelectric device remains lacking. Here we show the control of polarization with an electric field applied during the peptide self-assembly process. Uniform polarization is obtained in two opposite directions with an effective piezoelectric constant d33 reaching 17.9 pm V(-1). We demonstrate the power generation with a peptide-based power generator that produces an open-circuit voltage of 1.4 V and a power density of 3.3 nW cm(-2). Devices enabled by peptides with controlled piezoelectricity provide a renewable and biocompatible energy source for biomedical applications and open up a portal to the next generation of multi-functional electronics compatible with human tissue.

  5. Specific binding of GM1-binding peptides to high-density GM1 in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Teruhiko; Iijima, Kazutoshi; Nakamura, Miwa; Taki, Takao; Okahata, Yoshio; Sato, Toshinori

    2007-01-16

    The ganglioside Galbeta1-3GalNAcbeta1-4(Neu5Acalpha2-3)Galbeta1-4Glcbeta1-1'Cer (GM1) is an important receptor. We have previously identified GM1-binding peptides based on affinity selection from a random peptide library. In the present study, we determined the amino acids essential for binding GM1 and investigated the specific interaction with GM1 in the lipid membrane. Arginines and aromatic amino acids in the consensus sequence (W/F)RxL(xP/Px)xFxx(Rx/xR)xP contributed to the ability of the peptides to bind GM1. The peptide p3, VWRLLAPPFSNRLLP, having the consensus sequence, showed high affinity for GM1 with a dissociation constant of 1.2 microM. Furthermore, the density-dependent binding of p3 was investigated using mixed monolayers of GM1 and Glcbeta1-1'Cer (GlcCer). p3 binds preferentially to high-density GM1, and its interaction with GM1 was found to be cooperative based on a Hill plot. These results indicated that a lateral assembly of GM1 molecules was required for the recognition of carbohydrates by p3. The GM1-binding peptide played a role as a unique anti-GM1 probe differing from the cholera toxin B subunit or antibodies.

  6. Clinical predictive circulating peptides in rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Crotti, Sara; Enzo, Maria Vittoria; Bedin, Chiara; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Maretto, Isacco; Del Bianco, Paola; Traldi, Pietro; Tasciotti, Ennio; Ferrari, Mauro; Rizzolio, Flavio; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Giordano, Antonio; Nitti, Donato; Agostini, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is worldwide accepted as a standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Current standard of treatment includes administration of ionizing radiation for 45-50.4 Gy in 25-28 fractions associated with 5-fluorouracil administration during radiation therapy. Unfortunately, 40% of patients have a poor or absent response and novel predictive biomarkers are demanding. For the first time, we apply a novel peptidomic methodology and analysis in rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Circulating peptides (Molecular Weight <3 kDa) have been harvested from patients' plasma (n = 33) using nanoporous silica chip and analyzed by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time of Flight mass spectrometer. Peptides fingerprint has been compared between responders and non-responders. Random Forest classification selected three peptides at m/z 1082.552, 1098.537, and 1104.538 that were able to correctly discriminate between responders (n = 16) and non-responders (n = 17) before therapy (T0) providing an overall accuracy of 86% and an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.92. In conclusion, the nanoporous silica chip coupled to mass spectrometry method was found to be a realistic method for plasma-based peptide analysis and we provide the first list of predictive circulating biomarker peptides in rectal cancer patients underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy.

  7. PEP-on-DEP: A competitive peptide-based disposable electrochemical aptasensor for renin diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Biyani, Manish; Kawai, Keiko; Kitamura, Koichiro; Chikae, Miyuki; Biyani, Madhu; Ushijima, Hiromi; Tamiya, Eiichi; Yoneda, Takashi; Takamura, Yuzuru

    2016-10-15

    Antibody-based immunosensors are relatively less accessible to a wide variety of unreachable targets, such as low-molecular-weight biomarkers that represent a rich untapped source of disease-specific diagnostic information. Here, we present a peptide aptamer-based electrochemical sensor technology called 'PEP-on-DEP' to detect less accessible target molecules, such as renin, and to improve the quality of life. Peptide-based aptamers represent a relatively smart class of affinity binders and show great promise in biosensor development. Renin is involved in the regulation of arterial blood pressure and is an emerging biomarker protein for predicting cardiovascular risk and prognosis. To our knowledge, no studies have described aptamer molecules that can be used as new potent probes for renin. Here, we describe a portable electrochemical biosensor platform based on the newly identified peptide aptamer molecules for renin. We constructed a randomized octapeptide library pool with diversified sequences and selected renin specific peptide aptamers using cDNA display technology. We identified a few peptide aptamer sequences with a KD in the µM binding affinity range for renin. Next, we grafted the selected peptide aptamers onto gold nanoparticles and detected renin in a one-step competitive assay using our originally developed DEP (Disposable Electrochemical Printed) chip and a USB powered portable potentiostat system. We successfully detected renin in as little as 300ngmL(-1) using the PEP-on-DEP method. Thus, the generation and characterization of novel probes for unreachable target molecules by merging a newly identified peptide aptamer with electrochemical transduction allowed for the development of a more practical biosensor that, in principle, can be adapted to develop a portable, low-cost and mass-producible biosensor for point-of-care applications.

  8. Review stapling peptides using cysteine crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Fairlie, David P; Dantas de Araujo, Aline

    2016-11-01

    Stapled peptides are an emerging class of cyclic peptide molecules with enhanced biophysical properties such as conformational and proteolytic stability, cellular uptake and elevated binding affinity and specificity for their biological targets. Among the limited number of chemistries available for their synthesis, the cysteine-based stapling strategy has received considerable development in the last few years driven by facile access from cysteine-functionalized peptide precursors. Here we present some recent advances in peptide and protein stapling where the side-chains of cysteine residues are covalently connected with a range of different crosslinkers affording bisthioether macrocyclic peptides of varying topology and biophysical properties. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 843-852, 2016.

  9. Chemical Reactions Directed Peptide Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Rasale, Dnyaneshwar B.; Das, Apurba K.

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of self-assembled nanostructures is one of the important aspects in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The study of self-assembled soft materials remains an area of interest due to their potential applications in biomedicine. The versatile properties of soft materials can be tuned using a bottom up approach of small molecules. Peptide based self-assembly has significant impact in biology because of its unique features such as biocompatibility, straight peptide chain and the presence of different side chain functionality. These unique features explore peptides in various self-assembly process. In this review, we briefly introduce chemical reaction-mediated peptide self-assembly. Herein, we have emphasised enzymes, native chemical ligation and photochemical reactions in the exploration of peptide self-assembly. PMID:25984603

  10. Engineering short peptide sequences for uranyl binding.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Colette; Starck, Matthieu; Gathu, Vicky; Chenavier, Yves; Delangle, Pascale

    2014-12-08

    Peptides are interesting tools to rationalize uranyl-protein interactions, which are relevant to uranium toxicity in vivo. Structured cyclic peptide scaffolds were chosen as promising candidates to coordinate uranyl thanks to four amino acid side chains pre-oriented towards the dioxo cation equatorial plane. The binding of uranyl by a series of decapeptides has been investigated with complementary analytical and spectroscopic methods to determine the key parameters for the formation of stable uranyl-peptide complexes. The molar ellipticity of the uranyl complex at 195 nm is directly correlated to its stability, which demonstrates that the β-sheet structure is optimal for high stability in the peptide series. Cyclodecapeptides with four glutamate residues exhibit the highest affinities for uranyl with log KC =8.0-8.4 and, therefore, appear as good starting points for the design of high-affinity uranyl-chelating peptides.

  11. Harnessing supramolecular peptide nanotechnology in biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kiat Hwa; Lee, Wei Hao; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Ni, Ming

    2017-01-01

    The harnessing of peptides in biomedical applications is a recent hot topic. This arises mainly from the general biocompatibility of peptides, as well as from the ease of tunability of peptide structure to engineer desired properties. The ease of progression from laboratory testing to clinical trials is evident from the plethora of examples available. In this review, we compare and contrast how three distinct self-assembled peptide nanostructures possess different functions. We have 1) nanofibrils in biomaterials that can interact with cells, 2) nanoparticles that can traverse the bloodstream to deliver its payload and also be bioimaged, and 3) nanotubes that can serve as cross-membrane conduits and as a template for nanowire formation. Through this review, we aim to illustrate how various peptides, in their various self-assembled nanostructures, possess great promise in a wide range of biomedical applications and what more can be expected. PMID:28223805

  12. Circulating elastin peptides, role in vascular pathology.

    PubMed

    Robert, L; Labat-Robert, J

    2014-12-01

    The atherosclerotic process starts with the degradation of elastic fibers. Their presence was demonstrated in the circulation as well as several of their biological properties elucidated. We described years ago a procedure to obtain large elastin peptides by organo-alkaline hydrolysis, κ-elastin. This method enabled also the preparation of specific antibodies used to determine elastin peptides, as well as anti-elastin antibodies in body fluids and tissue extracts. Elastin peptides were determined in a large number of human blood samples. Studies were carried out to explore their pharmacological properties. Similar recent studies by other laboratories confirmed our findings and arose new interest in circulating elastin peptides for their biological activities. This recent trend justified the publication of a review of the biological and pathological activities of elastin peptides demonstrated during our previous studies, subject of this article.

  13. Peptide bioregulation of aging: results and prospects.

    PubMed

    Anisimov, Vladimir N; Khavinson, Vladimir Kh

    2010-04-01

    The review comprises the results of author's long-term investigation in the mechanisms of aging and a role of peptide bioregulators in prevention of age-related pathology. A number of small peptides have been isolated from different organs and tissues and their analogues (di-, tri-, tetrapeptides) were synthesized from the amino acids. It was shown that long-term treatment with some peptide preparations increased mean life span by 20-40%, slow down the age-related changes in the biomarkers of aging and suppressed development of spontaneous and induced by chemical or radiation carcinogens tumorigenesis in rodents. Possible mechanisms of the biological effects of small peptides are discussed in the paper. The results of clinical applications of peptide preparation during the period of 6-12 years are presented as well.

  14. Antimicrobial peptides: an alternative for innovative medicines?

    PubMed

    da Costa, João Pinto; Cova, Marta; Ferreira, Rita; Vitorino, Rui

    2015-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small molecules with activity against bacteria, yeasts, fungi, viruses, bacteria, and even tumor cells that make these molecules attractive as therapeutic agents. Due to the alarming increase of antimicrobial resistance, interest in alternative antimicrobial agents has led to the exploitation of antimicrobial peptides, both synthetic and from natural sources. Thus, many peptide-based drugs are currently commercially available for the treatment of numerous ailments, such as hepatitis C, myeloma, skin infections, and diabetes. Initial barriers are being increasingly overcome with the development of cost-effective, more stable peptides. Herein, we review the available strategies for their synthesis, bioinformatics tools for the rational design of antimicrobial peptides with enhanced therapeutic indices, hurdles and shortcomings limiting the large-scale production of AMPs, as well as the challenges that the pharmaceutical industry faces on their use as therapeutic agents.

  15. Chemical reactions directed Peptide self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Rasale, Dnyaneshwar B; Das, Apurba K

    2015-05-13

    Fabrication of self-assembled nanostructures is one of the important aspects in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The study of self-assembled soft materials remains an area of interest due to their potential applications in biomedicine. The versatile properties of soft materials can be tuned using a bottom up approach of small molecules. Peptide based self-assembly has significant impact in biology because of its unique features such as biocompatibility, straight peptide chain and the presence of different side chain functionality. These unique features explore peptides in various self-assembly process. In this review, we briefly introduce chemical reaction-mediated peptide self-assembly. Herein, we have emphasised enzymes, native chemical ligation and photochemical reactions in the exploration of peptide self-assembly.

  16. Harnessing supramolecular peptide nanotechnology in biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kiat Hwa; Lee, Wei Hao; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Ni, Ming

    2017-01-01

    The harnessing of peptides in biomedical applications is a recent hot topic. This arises mainly from the general biocompatibility of peptides, as well as from the ease of tunability of peptide structure to engineer desired properties. The ease of progression from laboratory testing to clinical trials is evident from the plethora of examples available. In this review, we compare and contrast how three distinct self-assembled peptide nanostructures possess different functions. We have 1) nanofibrils in biomaterials that can interact with cells, 2) nanoparticles that can traverse the bloodstream to deliver its payload and also be bioimaged, and 3) nanotubes that can serve as cross-membrane conduits and as a template for nanowire formation. Through this review, we aim to illustrate how various peptides, in their various self-assembled nanostructures, possess great promise in a wide range of biomedical applications and what more can be expected.

  17. Periodic Patterns in Distributions of Peptide Masses

    PubMed Central

    Hubler, Shane L.; Craciun, Gheorghe

    2015-01-01

    We are investigating the distribution of the number of peptides for given masses, and especially the observation that peptide density reaches a local maximum approximately every 14 Daltons. This wave pattern exists across species (e.g. human or yeast) and enzyme digestion techniques. To analyze this phenomenon we have developed a mathematical method for computing the mass distributions of peptides, and we present both theoretical and empirical evidence that this 14-Dalton periodicity does not arise from species selection of peptides but from the number-theoretic properties of the masses of amino acid residues. We also describe other, more subtle periodic patterns in the distribution of peptide masses. We also show that these periodic patterns are robust under a variety of conditions, including the addition of amino acid modifications and selection of mass accuracy scale. The method used here is also applicable to any family of sequential molecules, such as linear hydrocarbons, RNA, single- and double-stranded DNA. PMID:22579741

  18. Supramolecular Nanofibers of Peptide Amphiphiles for Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Matthew J.; Berns, Eric J.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2014-01-01

    Peptide nanostructures are an exciting class of supramolecular systems that can be designed for novel therapies with great potential in advanced medicine. This paper reviews progress on nanostructures based on peptide amphiphiles capable of forming one-dimensional assemblies that emulate in structure the nanofibers present in extracellular matrices. These systems are highly tunable using supramolecular chemistry, and can be designed to signal cells directly with bioactive peptides. Peptide amphiphile nanofibers can also be used to multiplex functions through co-assembly and designed to deliver proteins, nucleic acids, drugs, or cells. We illustrate here the functionality of these systems describing their use in regenerative medicine of bone, cartilage, the nervous system, the cardiovascular system, and other tissues. In addition, we highlight recent work on the use of peptide amphiphile assemblies to create hierarchical biomimetic structures with order beyond the nanoscale, and also discuss the future prospects of these supramolecular systems. PMID:24532851

  19. Chapter 14. Biosynthesis of nonribosomal peptide precursors.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Barrie; Micklefield, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Nonribosomal peptides are natural products typically of bacterial and fungal origin. These highly complex molecules display a broad spectrum of biological activities, and have been exploited for the development of immunosuppressant, antibiotic, anticancer, and other therapeutic agents. The nonribosomal peptides are assembled by nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) enzymes comprising repeating modules that are responsible for the sequential selection, activation, and condensation of precursor amino acids. In addition to this, fatty acids, alpha-keto acids and alpha-hydroxy acids, as well as polyketide derived units, can also be utilized by NRPS assembly lines. Final tailoring-steps, including glycosylation and prenylation, serve to further decorate the nonribosomal peptides produced. The wide range of experimental methods that are employed in the elucidation of nonribosomal peptide precursor biosynthesis will be discussed, with particularly emphasis on genomics based approaches which have become wide spread over the last 5 years.

  20. Engineering RNA phage MS2 virus-like particles for peptide display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Sheldon Keith

    Phage display is a powerful and versatile technology that enables the selection of novel binding functions from large populations of randomly generated peptide sequences. Random sequences are genetically fused to a viral structural protein to produce complex peptide libraries. From a sufficiently complex library, phage bearing peptides with practically any desired binding activity can be physically isolated by affinity selection, and, since each particle carries in its genome the genetic information for its own replication, the selectants can be amplified by infection of bacteria. For certain applications however, existing phage display platforms have limitations. One such area is in the field of vaccine development, where the goal is to identify relevant epitopes by affinity-selection against an antibody target, and then to utilize them as immunogens to elicit a desired antibody response. Today, affinity selection is usually conducted using display on filamentous phages like M13. This technology provides an efficient means for epitope identification, but, because filamentous phages do not display peptides in the high-density, multivalent arrays the immune system prefers to recognize, they generally make poor immunogens and are typically useless as vaccines. This makes it necessary to confer immunogenicity by conjugating synthetic versions of the peptides to more immunogenic carriers. Unfortunately, when introduced into these new structural environments, the epitopes often fail to elicit relevant antibody responses. Thus, it would be advantageous to combine the epitope selection and immunogen functions into a single platform where the structural constraints present during affinity selection can be preserved during immunization. This dissertation describes efforts to develop a peptide display system based on the virus-like particles (VLPs) of bacteriophage MS2. Phage display technologies rely on (1) the identification of a site in a viral structural protein that is

  1. Entropy reduction in unfolded peptides (and proteins) due to conformational preferences of amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Toal, Siobhan E

    2014-11-07

    As established by several groups over the last 20 years, amino acid residues in unfolded peptides and proteins do not exhibit the unspecific random distribution as assumed by the classical random coil model. Individual amino acid residues in small peptides were found to exhibit different conformational preferences. Here, we utilize recently obtained conformational distributions of guest amino acid residues in GxG peptides to estimate their conformational entropy, which we find to be significantly lower than the entropy of an assumed random coil like distribution. Only at high temperature do backbone entropies approach random coil like values. We utilized the obtained backbone entropies of the investigated amino acid residues to estimate the loss of conformational entropy caused by a coil → helix transition and identified two subsets of amino acid residues for which the thus calculated entropy losses correlate well with the respective Gibbs energy of helix formation obtained for alanine based host-guest systems. Calculated and experimentally derived entropic losses were found to be in good agreement. For most of the amino acid residues investigated entropic losses derived from our GxG distributions correlate very well with corresponding values recently obtained from MD simulations biased by conformational propensities derived from truncated coil libraries. Both, conformational entropy and the entropy of solvation exhibit a strong, residue specific temperature dependence, which can be expected to substantially affect the stability of unfolded states. Altogether, our results provide strong evidence for the notion that conformational preferences of amino acid residues matter with regard to the thermodynamics of peptide and protein folding.

  2. Modelling water molecules inside cyclic peptide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiangtrong, Prangsai; Thamwattana, Ngamta; Baowan, Duangkamon

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic peptide nanotubes occur during the self-assembly process of cyclic peptides. Due to the ease of synthesis and ability to control the properties of outer surface and inner diameter by manipulating the functional side chains and the number of amino acids, cyclic peptide nanotubes have attracted much interest from many research areas. A potential application of peptide nanotubes is their use as artificial transmembrane channels for transporting ions, biomolecules and waters into cells. Here, we use the Lennard-Jones potential and a continuum approach to study the interaction of a water molecule in a cyclo[(- D-Ala- L-Ala)_4-] peptide nanotube. Assuming that each unit of a nanotube comprises an inner and an outer tube and that a water molecule is made up of a sphere of two hydrogen atoms uniformly distributed over its surface and a single oxygen atom at the centre, we determine analytically the interaction energy of the water molecule and the peptide nanotube. Using this energy, we find that, independent of the number of peptide units, the water molecule will be accepted inside the nanotube. Once inside the nanotube, we show that a water molecule prefers to be off-axis, closer to the surface of the inner nanotube. Furthermore, our study of two water molecules inside the peptide nanotube supports the finding that water molecules form an array of a 1-2-1-2 file inside peptide nanotubes. The theoretical study presented here can facilitate thorough understanding of the behaviour of water molecules inside peptide nanotubes for applications, such as artificial transmembrane channels.

  3. Random matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelman, Alan; Rao, N. Raj

    Random matrix theory is now a big subject with applications in many disciplines of science, engineering and finance. This article is a survey specifically oriented towards the needs and interests of a numerical analyst. This survey includes some original material not found anywhere else. We include the important mathematics which is a very modern development, as well as the computational software that is transforming the theory into useful practice.

  4. Diffusion in random networks

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Duan Z.; Padrino, Juan C.

    2017-06-01

    The ensemble averaging technique is applied to model mass transport by diffusion in random networks. The system consists of an ensemble of random networks, where each network is made of pockets connected by tortuous channels. Inside a channel, fluid transport is assumed to be governed by the one-dimensional diffusion equation. Mass balance leads to an integro-differential equation for the pocket mass density. The so-called dual-porosity model is found to be equivalent to the leading order approximation of the integration kernel when the diffusion time scale inside the channels is small compared to the macroscopic time scale. As a test problem,more » we consider the one-dimensional mass diffusion in a semi-infinite domain. Because of the required time to establish the linear concentration profile inside a channel, for early times the similarity variable is xt$-$1/4 rather than xt$-$1/2 as in the traditional theory. We found this early time similarity can be explained by random walk theory through the network.« less

  5. Encapsulation of Enzymes and Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meesters, Gabrie M. H.

    A large part of formulated peptides and proteins, e.g., enzymes used as food ingredients, are formulated in a liquid form. Often, they are dissolved in water to which glycerol or sorbitol is added to reduce the water activity of the liquid, thus reducing the change of microbial growth. Still, there are reasons to formulate them in a solid form. Often, these reasons are stability, since a dry formulation is often much better than liquid formulations, and less transportation cost, since less mass is transported if one gets rid of the liquid; however, most of the times, the reason is that the product is mixed with a solid powder. Here, a liquid addition would lead to lump formation.

  6. Antimicrobial peptides of multicellular organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasloff, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Multicellular organisms live, by and large, harmoniously with microbes. The cornea of the eye of an animal is almost always free of signs of infection. The insect flourishes without lymphocytes or antibodies. A plant seed germinates successfully in the midst of soil microbes. How is this accomplished? Both animals and plants possess potent, broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides, which they use to fend off a wide range of microbes, including bacteria, fungi, viruses and protozoa. What sorts of molecules are they? How are they employed by animals in their defence? As our need for new antibiotics becomes more pressing, could we design anti-infective drugs based on the design principles these molecules teach us?

  7. Peptide-Based Treatment: A Promising Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yu-Feng; Jie, Meng-Meng; Li, Bo-Sheng; Hu, Chang-Jiang; Xie, Rui; Tang, Bo; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Many new therapies are currently being used to treat cancer. Among these new methods, chemotherapy based on peptides has been of great interest due to the unique advantages of peptides, such as a low molecular weight, the ability to specifically target tumor cells, and low toxicity in normal tissues. In treating cancer, peptide-based chemotherapy can be mainly divided into three types, peptide-alone therapy, peptide vaccines, and peptide-conjugated nanomaterials. Peptide-alone therapy may specifically enhance the immune system's response to kill tumor cells. Peptide-based vaccines have been used in advanced cancers to improve patients' overall survival. Additionally, the combination of peptides with nanomaterials expands the therapeutic ability of peptides to treat cancer by enhancing drug delivery and sensitivity. In this review, we mainly focus on the new advances in the application of peptides in treating cancer in recent years, including diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.

  8. Positional scanning for peptide secondary structure by systematic solid-phase synthesis of amino lactam peptides.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Andrew G; Boutard, Nicolas; Beauregard, Kim; Bodas, Mandar S; Ong, Huy; Quiniou, Christiane; Chemtob, Sylvain; Lubell, William D

    2009-06-10

    Incorporation of amino lactams into biologically active peptides has been commonly used to restrict conformational mobility, enhance selectivity, and increase potency. A solid-phase method using a Fmoc-protection strategy has been developed for the systematic synthesis of peptides containing configurationally defined alpha- and beta-amino gamma-lactams. N-Alkylation of N-silyl peptides with five- and six-member cyclic sulfamidates 9 and 8 minimized bis-alkylation and provided N-alkyl peptides, which underwent lactam annulation under microwave heating. Employing this solid-phase protocol on the growth hormone secretagogue GHRP-6, as well as on the allosteric modulator of the IL-1 receptor 101.10, has furnished 16 lactam derivatives and validated the effectiveness of this approach on peptides bearing aliphatic, aromatic, branched, charged, and heteroatomic side chains. The binding affinity IC(50) values of the GHRP-6 lactam analogues on both the GHS-R1a and CD36 receptors are reported as well as inhibition of thymocyte proliferation measurements for the 101.10 lactam analogues. In these cases, lactam analogues were prepared exhibiting similar or improved properties compared with the parent peptide. Considering the potential for amino lactams to induce peptide turn conformations, the effective method described herein for their supported construction on growing peptides, and for the systematical amino lactam scan of peptides, has proven useful for the rapid identification of the secondary structure necessary for peptide biological activity.

  9. Identification of a novel skin penetration enhancement peptide by phage display peptide library screening.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunny; Sahdev, Preety; Perumal, Omathanu; Tummala, Hemachand

    2012-05-07

    Skin is an important site for local or systemic application of drugs. However, a majority of drugs have poor permeability through the skin's topmost layer, stratum corneum (SC). The aim of this study was to identify safe and smaller peptides that could enhance the skin penetration of drug molecules. By screening phage display peptide library, we have identified a T2 peptide (LVGVFH), which enhanced the penetration of bacteriophages (~800 nm long bacterial viruses) across porcine and mouse skin. Pretreating the skin with synthetic T2 peptide at pH 4.5 resulted in significant penetration enhancement of hydrophilic drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) across skin. FTIR spectroscopy showed that the T2 peptide interacted with skin lipids to enhance the skin penetration. Pretreating the skin with T2 peptide enhanced the partitioning of small molecules with different lipophilicities (5-FU, fluorescein isothiocyanate, and rhodamine 123 hydrochloride) into skin. Fluorescence studies showed that T2 peptide enhanced the diffusion of these molecules into intercellular lipids of SC and thus enhanced the penetration into the skin. Histidine at the c-terminus of T2 peptide was identified to be critical for the skin penetration enhancement. T2 peptide interacted with skin lipids to cause skin penetration enhancement. The study identified a novel, safe, and noninvasive peptide to improve the skin penetration of drugs without chemical conjugation.

  10. Determinants of recombinant production of antimicrobial cationic peptides and creation of peptide variants in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Falla, T; Wu, M; Fidai, S; Burian, J; Kay, W; Hancock, R E

    1998-06-29

    Cationic peptides possessing antibacterial activity are virtually ubiquitous in nature, and offer exciting prospects as new therapeutic agents. We had previously demonstrated that such peptides could be produced by fusion protein technology in bacteria and several carrier proteins had been tested as fusion partners including glutathione-S-transferase, S. aureus protein A, IgG binding protein and P. aeruginosa outer membrane protein OprF. However these fusion partners, while successfully employed in peptide expression, were not optimized for high level production of cationic peptides (Piers, K., Brow, M. L., and Hancock, R. E. W. 1993, Gene 137, 7-13). In this paper we took advantage of a small replication protein RepA from E. coli and used its truncated version to construct fusion partners. The minimal elements required for high level expression of cationic peptide were defined as a DNA sequence encoding a fusion protein comprising, from the N-terminus, a 68 amino acid carrier region, an anionic prepro domain, a single methionine and the peptide of interest. The 68 amino acid carrier region was a block of three polypeptides consisting of a truncated RepA, a synthetic cellulose binding domain and a hexa histidine domain. The improved system showed high level expression and simplified downstream purification. The active peptide could be yielded by CNBr cleavage of the fusion protein. This novel vector was used to express three classes of cationic peptides including the alpha-helical peptide CEMA, the looped peptide bactenecin and the extended peptide indolicidin. In addition, mutagenesis of the peptide gene to produce peptide variants of CEMA and indolicidin using the improved vector system was shown to be successful.

  11. The RANDOM computer program: A linear congruential random number generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, R. F., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The RANDOM Computer Program is a FORTRAN program for generating random number sequences and testing linear congruential random number generators (LCGs). The linear congruential form of random number generator is discussed, and the selection of parameters of an LCG for a microcomputer described. This document describes the following: (1) The RANDOM Computer Program; (2) RANDOM.MOD, the computer code needed to implement an LCG in a FORTRAN program; and (3) The RANCYCLE and the ARITH Computer Programs that provide computational assistance in the selection of parameters for an LCG. The RANDOM, RANCYCLE, and ARITH Computer Programs are written in Microsoft FORTRAN for the IBM PC microcomputer and its compatibles. With only minor modifications, the RANDOM Computer Program and its LCG can be run on most micromputers or mainframe computers.

  12. Controlled delivery of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Degim, I Tuncer; Celebi, Nevin

    2007-01-01

    The final aim/target of Pharmaceutical Sciences is to design successful dosage forms for effective therapy, considering individual patient needs and compliance. Development of new drug entities, particularly using peptides and proteins, is growing in importance and attracting increased interest, as they are specifically effective at a comparably low dose. These very potent and specific peptides and proteins can now be produced in large quantities due to increased knowledge and advancements in biotechnological and pharmaceutical applications. A number of peptide and protein products are now available on the market, and numerous studies investigating them have been published in the literature. Although many peptide/protein like products are generally designed for parenteral administration, some other noninvasive routes have also been used. For example, desmopressin is delivered nasally and deoxyribonuclease by inhalation. Although peptides and proteins are generally orally inactive, cyclosporine is an exception. In order to design and develop long-acting, more effective peptide/protein drugs, the controlled release mechanisms and effective parameters need to be understood and clarified. Therefore, we review herein various peptide/protein delivery systems, including biodegradable and nondegradable microspheres, microcapsules, nanocapsules, injectable implants, diffusion-controlled hydrogels and other hydrophilic systems, microemulsions and multiple emulsions, and the use of iontophoresis or electroporation, and discuss the results of recent researches.

  13. Hydroxyapatite surface-induced peptide folding.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Lisa A; Beebe, Thomas P; Schneider, Joel P

    2007-04-25

    Herein, we describe the design and surface-binding characterization of a de novo designed peptide, JAK1, which undergoes surface-induced folding at the hydroxyapatite (HA)-solution interface. JAK1 is designed to be unstructured in buffered saline solution, yet undergo HA-induced folding that is largely governed by the periodic positioning of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) residues within the primary sequence of the peptide. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation indicate that the peptide remains unfolded and monomeric in solution under normal physiological conditions; however, CD spectroscopy indicates that in the presence of hydroxyapatite, the peptide avidly binds to the mineral surface adopting a helical structure. Adsorption isotherms indicate nearly quantitative surface coverage and Kd = 310 nM for the peptide-surface binding event. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) coupled with the adsorption isotherm data suggests that JAK1 binds to HA, forming a self-limiting monolayer. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using HA surfaces to trigger the intramolecular folding of designed peptides and represents the initial stages of defining the design rules that allow HA-induced peptide folding.

  14. Peptide therapeutics for treating ocular surface infections.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Curtis R

    2014-11-01

    Microbial pathogens-bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites-are significant causes of blindness, particularly in developing countries. For bacterial and some viral infections a number of antimicrobial drugs are available for therapy but there are fewer available for use in treating fungal and parasitic keratitis. There are also problems with current antimicrobials, such as limited efficacy and the presence of drug-resistant microbes. Thus, there is a need to develop additional drugs. Nature has given us an example of 1 potential source of new antimicrobials: antimicrobial peptides and proteins that are either present in bodily fluids and tissues constitutively or are induced upon infection. Given the nature of peptides, topical applications are the most likely use to be successful and this is ideal for treating keratitis. Such peptides would also be active against drug-resistant pathogens and might act synergistically if used in combination therapy. Hundreds of peptides with antimicrobial properties have been isolated or synthesized but only a handful have been tested against ocular pathogens and even fewer have been tested in animal models. This review summarizes the currently available information on the use of peptides to treat keratitis, outlines some of the problems that have been identified, and discusses future studies that will be needed. Most of the peptides that have been tested have shown activity at concentrations that do not warrant further development, but 1 or 2 have promising activity raising the possibility that peptides can be developed to treat keratitis.

  15. Multiplex De Novo Sequencing of Peptide Antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohimani, Hosein; Liu, Wei-Ting; Yang, Yu-Liang; Gaudêncio, Susana P.; Fenical, William; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    Proliferation of drug-resistant diseases raises the challenge of searching for new, more efficient antibiotics. Currently, some of the most effective antibiotics (i.e., Vancomycin and Daptomycin) are cyclic peptides produced by non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways. The isolation and sequencing of cyclic peptide antibiotics, unlike the same activity with linear peptides, is time-consuming and error-prone. The dominant technique for sequencing cyclic peptides is NMR-based and requires large amounts (milligrams) of purified materials that, for most compounds, are not possible to obtain. Given these facts, there is a need for new tools to sequence cyclic NRPs using picograms of material. Since nearly all cyclic NRPs are produced along with related analogs, we develop a mass spectrometry approach for sequencing all related peptides at once (in contrast to the existing approach that analyzes individual peptides). Our results suggest that instead of attempting to isolate and NMR-sequence the most abundant compound, one should acquire spectra of many related compounds and sequence all of them simultaneously using tandem mass spectrometry. We illustrate applications of this approach by sequencing new variants of cyclic peptide antibiotics from Bacillus brevis, as well as sequencing a previously unknown familiy of cyclic NRPs produced by marine bacteria.

  16. Chemotactic peptide receptor modulation in polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The binding of the chemotactic peptide N- formylnorleucylleucylphenylalanine (FNLLP) to its receptor on rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) modulates the number of available peptide receptors. Incubation with FNLLP decreases subsequent binding capacity, a phenomenon that has been termed receptor down regulation. Down regulation of the chemotactic peptide receptor is concentration dependent in both the rate and extent of receptor loss. The dose response parallels that of FNLLP binding to the recptor. The time- course is rapid; even at concentrations of FNLLP as low as 3 x 10(-9) M, the new equilibrium concentration of receptors is reached within 15 min. Down regulation is temperature dependent, but does occur even at 4 degrees C. Concomitant with down regulation, some of the peptide becomes irreversibly cell associated. At 4 degrees C, there is a small accumulation of nondissociable peptide that rapidly reaches a plateau. At higher temperatures, accumulation of nondissociable peptide continues after the rceptor number has reached equilibrium, and the amount accumulated can exceed the initial number of receptors by as much as 300%. The dose response of peptide uptake at 37 degrees C reflects that of binding, suggesting that it is receptor mediated. This uptake may occur via a pinocytosis mechanism. Although PMNs have not been considered to be pinocytic, the addition of FNLLP causes a fourfold stimulation of the rate of pinocytosis as measured by the uptake of [3H]sucrose. PMID:7391138

  17. Novel pH-Sensitive Cyclic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Weerakkody, Dhammika; Moshnikova, Anna; El-Sayed, Naglaa Salem; Adochite, Ramona-Cosmina; Slaybaugh, Gregory; Golijanin, Jovana; Tiwari, Rakesh K.; Andreev, Oleg A.; Parang, Keykavous; Reshetnyak, Yana K.

    2016-01-01

    A series of cyclic peptides containing a number of tryptophan (W) and glutamic acid (E) residues were synthesized and evaluated as pH-sensitive agents for targeting of acidic tissue and pH-dependent cytoplasmic delivery of molecules. Biophysical studies revealed the molecular mechanism of peptides action and localization within the lipid bilayer of the membrane at high and low pHs. The symmetric, c[(WE)4WC], and asymmetric, c[E4W5C], cyclic peptides translocated amanitin, a polar cargo molecule of similar size, across the lipid bilayer and induced cell death in a pH- and concentration-dependent manner. Fluorescently-labelled peptides were evaluated for targeting of acidic 4T1 mammary tumors in mice. The highest tumor to muscle ratio (5.6) was established for asymmetric cyclic peptide, c[E4W5C], at 24 hours after intravenous administration. pH-insensitive cyclic peptide c[R4W5C], where glutamic acid residues (E) were replaced by positively charged arginine residues (R), did not exhibit tumor targeting. We have introduced a novel class of cyclic peptides, which can be utilized as a new pH-sensitive tool in investigation or targeting of acidic tissue. PMID:27515582

  18. Multifunctional Prenylated Peptides for Live Cell Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wollack, James W.; Zeliadt, Nicholette A.; Mullen, Daniel G.; Amundson, Gregg; Geier, Suzanne; Falkum, Stacy; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.; Barany, George; Distefano, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    Protein prenylation is a common post-translational modification present in eukaryotic cells. Many key proteins involved in signal transduction pathways are prenylated and inhibition of prenylation can be useful as a therapeutic intervention. While significant progress has been made in understanding protein prenylation in vitro, we have been interested in studying this process in living cells, including the question of where prenylated molecules localize. Here, we describe the synthesis and live cell analysis of a series of fluorescently labeled multifunctional peptides, based on the C-terminus of the naturally prenylated protein CDC42. A synthetic route was developed that features a key Acm to Scm protecting group conversion. This strategy was compatible with acid-sensitive isoprenoid moieties, and allowed incorporation of an appropriate fluorophore as well as a cell-penetrating sequence (penetratin). These peptides are able to enter cells through different mechanisms, depending on the presence or absence of the penetratin vehicle and the nature of the prenyl group attached. Interestingly, prenylated peptides lacking penetratin are able to enter cells freely through an energy-independent process, and localize in a perinuclear fashion. This effect extends to a prenylated peptide that includes a full “CAAX box” sequence (specifically, CVLL). Hence, these peptides open the door for studies of protein prenylation in living cells, including enzymatic processing and intracellular peptide trafficking. Moreover, the synthetic strategy developed here should be useful for the assembly of other types of peptides that contain acid sensitive functionalities. PMID:19425596

  19. Peptide Therapeutics for Treating Ocular Surface Infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Microbial pathogens—bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites—are significant causes of blindness, particularly in developing countries. For bacterial and some viral infections a number of antimicrobial drugs are available for therapy but there are fewer available for use in treating fungal and parasitic keratitis. There are also problems with current antimicrobials, such as limited efficacy and the presence of drug-resistant microbes. Thus, there is a need to develop additional drugs. Nature has given us an example of 1 potential source of new antimicrobials: antimicrobial peptides and proteins that are either present in bodily fluids and tissues constitutively or are induced upon infection. Given the nature of peptides, topical applications are the most likely use to be successful and this is ideal for treating keratitis. Such peptides would also be active against drug-resistant pathogens and might act synergistically if used in combination therapy. Hundreds of peptides with antimicrobial properties have been isolated or synthesized but only a handful have been tested against ocular pathogens and even fewer have been tested in animal models. This review summarizes the currently available information on the use of peptides to treat keratitis, outlines some of the problems that have been identified, and discusses future studies that will be needed. Most of the peptides that have been tested have shown activity at concentrations that do not warrant further development, but 1 or 2 have promising activity raising the possibility that peptides can be developed to treat keratitis. PMID:25250986

  20. Certified randomness in quantum physics.

    PubMed

    Acín, Antonio; Masanes, Lluis

    2016-12-07

    The concept of randomness plays an important part in many disciplines. On the one hand, the question of whether random processes exist is fundamental for our understanding of nature. On the other, randomness is a resource for cryptography, algorithms and simulations. Standard methods for generating randomness rely on assumptions about the devices that are often not valid in practice. However, quantum technologies enable new methods for generating certified randomness, based on the violation of Bell inequalities. These methods are referred to as device-independent because they do not rely on any modelling of the devices. Here we review efforts to design device-independent randomness generators and the associated challenges.

  1. Certified randomness in quantum physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acín, Antonio; Masanes, Lluis

    2016-12-01

    The concept of randomness plays an important part in many disciplines. On the one hand, the question of whether random processes exist is fundamental for our understanding of nature. On the other, randomness is a resource for cryptography, algorithms and simulations. Standard methods for generating randomness rely on assumptions about the devices that are often not valid in practice. However, quantum technologies enable new methods for generating certified randomness, based on the violation of Bell inequalities. These methods are referred to as device-independent because they do not rely on any modelling of the devices. Here we review efforts to design device-independent randomness generators and the associated challenges.

  2. Conformational Variety of Polyanionic Peptides At Low Salt Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Marylène; Brack, André

    1997-12-01

    Cordially dedicated to Dr. Leslie Orgel on the occasion of his 70th birthday. Sequential oligo- and polypeptides based on glutamic acid and leucine residues have been synthesized. In pure water, they exhibit a random coil conformation. Addition of very small amounts of divalent metallic cations induces the formation of ordered structure in the peptides which remain in solution. Higher salt concentrations precipitate the peptides. Polypeptides with alternating glutamic acid and leucine residues undergo a coil to β-sheet transition in the presence of Ca^2+, Ba^2+, Mn^2+, Co^2+, Zn^2+ and Hg^2+. Addition of Cu^2+ or Fe^3+ induces the formation of an α-helix. Solid amorphous CdS generates water soluble β-sheets, as well. Sequential poly(Leu-Glu-Glu-Leu) adopts an α-helix in the presence of divalent cations. The sequence-dependent conformational diversity was extended to poly(Asp-Leu) and poly(Leu-Asp-Asp-Leu).

  3. Bioactive proteins and peptides in foods.

    PubMed

    Walther, Barbara; Sieber, Robert

    2011-03-01

    Increasing amounts of data demonstrate a bioactive role of proteins and peptides above and beyond their nutritional impact. The focus of the investigations has mainly been on vitamin- and mineral-binding proteins, on antimicrobial, immunosuppressing/-modulatory proteins, and on proteins with enzyme inhibitory activity as well as on hormones and growth factors from different food proteins; most research has been performed on milk proteins. Because of their molecular size, intact absorption of proteins in the human gastrointestinal tract is limited. Therefore, most of the proteins with biological functions show physiological activity in the gastrointestinal tract by enhancing nutrient absorption, inhibiting enzymes, and modulating the immune system to defend against pathogens. Peptides are released during fermentation or digestion from food proteins by proteolytic enzymes; such peptides have been found mainly in milk. Some of these released peptides exert biological activities such as opiate-like, antihypertensive, mineral-binding, antioxidative, antimicrobial, immuno-, and cytomodulating activity. Intact absorption of these smaller peptides is more likely than that of the larger proteins. Consequently, other organs than the gastrointestinal tract are possible targets for their biological functions. Bioactive proteins as well as bioactive peptides are part of a balanced diet. It is possible to accumulate bioactive peptides in food, for example by using specific microorganisms in fermented dairy products. Although bioactive peptides have been the subject of several studies in vitro and in vivo, their health potential is still under investigation. Up to now, the Commission of European Communities has not (yet) authorized any health claims for bioactive proteins and peptides from food.

  4. Is Dissociation of Peptide Radical Cations an Ergodic Process?

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Futrell, Jean H.; Chu, Ivan K.

    2007-08-08

    Achieving a fundamental understanding of the mechanism of unimolecular dissociation of internally excited complex molecules is one of the most important challenges in modern mass spectrometry. One of the central questions is whether the dissociation of large molecules is properly described by statistical theories—RRKM/QET or Phase Space Theories —that have proved to be remarkably successful both for small molecules and a number of small and medium size peptides. The concept question is whether the ergodic assumption that the internal excitation of the ion is randomly redistributed among the vibrational degrees of freedom prior to fragmentation is satisfied for large molecules. The validity of the ergodic hypothesis for dissociation of gas-phase biomolecules has been recently reviewed and will be only briefly discussed here.

  5. Randomizing Roaches: Exploring the "Bugs" of Randomization in Experimental Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagler, Amy; Wagler, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the roles of random selection and random assignment in experimental design is a central learning objective in most introductory statistics courses. This article describes an activity, appropriate for a high school or introductory statistics course, designed to teach the concepts, values and pitfalls of random selection and assignment…

  6. Cysteine-containing peptides having antioxidant properties

    DOEpatents

    Bielicki, John K.

    2008-10-21

    Cysteine containing amphipathic alpha helices of the exchangeable apolipoproteins, as exemplified by apolipoprotein (apo) A-I.sub.Milano (R173C) and apoA-I.sub.Paris, (R151C) were found to exhibit potent antioxidant activity on phospholipid surfaces. The addition of a free thiol, at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of an amphipathic alpha helix of synthetic peptides that mimic HDL-related proteins, imparts a unique antioxidant activity to these peptides which inhibits lipid peroxidation and protects phospholipids from water-soluble free radical initiators. These peptides can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, ischemia, bone disease and other inflammatory related diseases.

  7. Cysteine-containing peptides having antioxidant properties

    DOEpatents

    Bielicki, John K.

    2009-10-13

    Cysteine containing amphipathic alpha helices of the exchangeable apolipoproteins, as exemplified by apolipoprotein (apo) A-I.sub.Milano (R173C) and apoA-I.sub.Paris, (R151C) were found to exhibit potent antioxidant activity on phospholipid surfaces. The addition of a free thiol, at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of an amphipathic alpha helix of synthetic peptides that mimic HDL-related proteins, imparts a unique antioxidant activity to these peptides which inhibits lipid peroxidation and protects phospholipids from water-soluble free radical initiators. These peptides can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, ischemia, bone disease and other inflammatory related diseases.

  8. Immunocytochemical and Immunohistochemical Staining with Peptide Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Friis, Tina; Pedersen, Klaus Boberg; Hougaard, David; Houen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Peptide antibodies are particularly useful for immunocytochemistry (ICC) and immunohistochemistry (IHC), where antigens may denature due to fixation of tissues and cells. Peptide antibodies can be made to any defined sequence, including unknown putative proteins and posttranslationally modified sequences. Moreover, the availability of large amounts of the antigen (peptide) allows inhibition/adsorption controls, which are important in ICC/IHC, due to the many possibilities for false-positive reactions caused by immunoglobulin Fc receptors, nonspecific reactions, and cross-reactivity of primary and secondary antibodies with other antigens and endogenous immunoglobulins, respectively. Here, simple protocols for ICC and IHC are described together with recommendations for appropriate controls.

  9. SICLOPPS cyclic peptide libraries in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Tavassoli, Ali

    2017-02-28

    Cyclic peptide libraries have demonstrated significant potential when employed against challenging targets such as protein-protein interactions. While a variety of methods for library generation exist, genetically encoded libraries hold several advantages over their chemically synthesized counterparts; they are more readily accessible and allow straightforward hit deconvolution. One method for the intracellular generation of such libraries is split-intein circular ligation of peptides and proteins (SICLOPPS). Here we detail and discuss the deployment of SICLOPPS libraries for the identification of cyclic peptide inhibitors of a variety of targets.

  10. Asymmetric catalysis with short-chain peptides.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Bartosz; Wennemers, Helma

    2014-10-01

    Within this review article we describe recent developments in asymmetric catalysis with peptides. Numerous peptides have been established in the past two decades that catalyze a wide variety of transformations with high stereoselectivities and yields, as well as broad substrate scope. We highlight here catalytically active peptides, which have addressed challenges that had thus far remained elusive in asymmetric catalysis: enantioselective synthesis of atropoisomers and quaternary stereogenic centers, regioselective transformations of polyfunctional substrates, chemoselective transformations, catalysis in-flow and reactions in aqueous environments.

  11. The Potential of Antimicrobial Peptides as Biocides

    PubMed Central

    Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides constitute a diverse class of naturally occurring antimicrobial molecules which have activity against a wide range of pathogenic microorganisms. Antimicrobial peptides are exciting leads in the development of novel biocidal agents at a time when classical antibiotics are under intense pressure from emerging resistance, and the global industry in antibiotic research and development stagnates. This review will examine the potential of antimicrobial peptides, both natural and synthetic, as novel biocidal agents in the battle against multi-drug resistant pathogen infections. PMID:22072905

  12. How Nature Morphs Peptide Scaffolds into Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Elizabeth M.; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2010-01-01

    The conventional notion that peptides are poor candidates for orally available drugs because of protease-sensitive peptide bonds, intrinsic hydrophilicity, and ionic charges contrasts with the diversity of antibiotic natural products with peptide-based frameworks that are synthesized and utilized by Nature. Several of these antibiotics, including penicillin and vancomycin, are employed to treat bacterial infections in humans and have been best-selling therapeutics for decades. Others might provide new platforms for the design of novel therapeutics to combat emerging antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:19058272

  13. Clickable Polymeric Coating for Oriented Peptide Immobilization.

    PubMed

    Sola, Laura; Gori, Alessandro; Cretich, Marina; Finetti, Chiara; Zilio, Caterina; Chiari, Marcella

    2016-01-01

    A new methodology for the fabrication of an high-performance peptide microarray is reported, combining the higher sensitivity of a layered Si-SiO2 substrate with the oriented immobilization of peptides using a N,N-dimethylacrylamide-based polymeric coating that contains alkyne monomers as functional groups. This clickable polymer allows the oriented attachment of azido-modified peptides via a copper-mediated azide/alkyne cycloaddition. A similar coating that does not contain the alkyne functionality has been used as comparison, to demonstrate the importance of a proper orientation for facilitating the probe recognition and interaction with the target antibody.

  14. Peptide mimotopes of rabies virus glycoprotein with immunogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Houimel, Mehdi; Dellagi, Koussay

    2009-07-23

    A random constrained hexapeptide phage display library (Cys-6aa-Cys) was screened with purified neutralizing human anti-rabies virus IgG antibodies (hRABVIgG) to identify peptides that correspond to or mimic natural epitopes on rabies virus glycoprotein (RABVG) and to investigate their immunogenicities in vivo. After four rounds of biopanning, 20 phage clones randomly selected for their specificity to hRABVIgG, effectively blocked the binding of the inactive rabies virus (RABV) to hRABVIgG. The phage clones were sequenced and the deduced amino acid sequences were derived (C-KRDSTW-C; C-KYLWSK-C; C-KYWLSR-C; C-KYWWSK-C; C-KYAWSR-C; C-KYSMSK-C). Alignments to the amino acid sequence of RABVG showed good match with the antigenic site III (at 330-338 aa), indicating that the hRABVIgG antibodies most likely recognize preferentially this antigenic site. The selected mimotopes were able to inhibit the interactions of the hRABVIgG antibodies with RABV in a dose-dependent manner. Subcutaneous administration of phageKRDSTW expressing the RABVG site III mimotope induced an RABVG-specific IgG response in BALB/c mice. The results indicated that peptide mimotopes when displayed on phages, are accessible to the mice immune system to trigger a humoral response and to induce IgG production. The RABVG site III mimotope (C-KRDSTW-C) would provide a new and promising concept for the development of rabies vaccine.

  15. Randomly Hyperbranched Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konkolewicz, Dominik; Gilbert, Robert G.; Gray-Weale, Angus

    2007-06-01

    We describe a model for the structures of randomly hyperbranched polymers in solution, and find a logarithmic growth of radius with polymer mass. We include segmental overcrowding, which puts an upper limit on the density. The model is tested against simulations, against data on amylopectin, a major component of starch, on glycogen, and on polyglycerols. For samples of synthetic polyglycerol and glycogen, our model holds well for all the available data. The model reveals higher-level scaling structure in glycogen, related to the β particles seen in electron microscopy.

  16. Randomly hyperbranched polymers.

    PubMed

    Konkolewicz, Dominik; Gilbert, Robert G; Gray-Weale, Angus

    2007-06-08

    We describe a model for the structures of randomly hyperbranched polymers in solution, and find a logarithmic growth of radius with polymer mass. We include segmental overcrowding, which puts an upper limit on the density. The model is tested against simulations, against data on amylopectin, a major component of starch, on glycogen, and on polyglycerols. For samples of synthetic polyglycerol and glycogen, our model holds well for all the available data. The model reveals higher-level scaling structure in glycogen, related to the beta particles seen in electron microscopy.

  17. Novel anti-inflammatory peptides as cosmeceutical peptides.

    PubMed

    Kang, Youn-A; Na, Jung-Im; Choi, Hye-Ryung; Choi, Jee-Woong; Kang, Hee-Young; Park, Kyoung-Chan

    2011-10-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation induced inflammation plays an important role in the aging of human skin. Prostaglandin (PG) E(2) is the primary mediator of UVB induced photoinflammation. We screened an internal library for dipeptides that inhibited UVB induced PGE(2) synthesis but showed no cytotoxicity toward human keratinocytes. We identified three highly active inhibitory sequences, LE (Leu+Glu), MW (Met+Trp) and MY (Met+Tyr). To evaluate their efficacy in human skin, 24 sites of abdomen skin were irradiated with a 308 nm excimer laser (300 mJ/cm(2)), after which 2% LE, MW, MY or a control were applied to the irradiated sites for 24h. The erythema index (EI) was measured before and 24h after treatment. The results showed that LE and MW significantly decreased UVB induced erythema (p=0.041 and p=0.036, respectively), but ME did not. Overall, LE and MW are candidate cosmeceutical peptides that can protect skin from UVB induced photoinflammation.

  18. Antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity of quorum sensing peptides and Peptide analogues against oral biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed

    LoVetri, Karen; Madhyastha, Srinivasa

    2010-01-01

    Widespread antibiotic resistance is a major incentive for the investigation of novel ways to treat or prevent infections. Much effort has been put into the discovery of peptides in nature accompanied by manipulation of natural peptides to improve activity and decrease toxicity. The ever increasing knowledge about bacteria and the discovery of quorum sensing have presented itself as another mechanism to disrupt the infection process. We have shown that the natural quorum sensing (QS) peptide, competence-stimulating peptide (CSP), used by the caries causing bacteria Streptococcus mutans when used in higher than normally present concentrations can actually contribute to cell death in S. mutans. Using an analogue of this quorum sensing peptide (KBI-3221), we have shown it to be beneficial at decreasing biofilm of various Streptococcus species. This chapter looks at a number of assay methods to test the inhibitory effects of quorum sensing peptides and their analogues on the growth and biofilm formation of oral bacteria.

  19. Copper-Aβ Peptides and Oxidation of Catecholic Substrates: Reactivity and Endogenous Peptide Damage.

    PubMed

    Pirota, Valentina; Dell'Acqua, Simone; Monzani, Enrico; Nicolis, Stefania; Casella, Luigi

    2016-11-14

    The oxidative reactivity of copper complexes with Aβ peptides 1-16 and 1-28 (Aβ16 and Aβ28) against dopamine and related catechols under physiological conditions has been investigated in parallel with the competitive oxidative modification undergone by the peptides. It was found that both Aβ16 and Aβ28 markedly increase the oxidative reactivity of copper(II) towards the catechol compounds, up to a molar ratio of about 4:1 of peptide/copper(II). Copper redox cycling during the catalytic activity induces the competitive modification of the peptide at selected amino acid residues. The main modifications consist of oxidation of His13/14 to 2-oxohistidine and Phe19/20 to ortho-tyrosine, and the formation of a covalent His6-catechol adduct. Competition by the endogenous peptide is rather efficient, as approximately one peptide molecule is oxidized every 10 molecules of 4-methylcatechol.

  20. Structural similarities of the staphylococcin-like peptide Pep-5 to the peptide antibiotic nisin.

    PubMed Central

    Sahl, H G; Grossgarten, M; Widger, W R; Cramer, W A; Brandis, H

    1985-01-01

    The staphylococcin-like peptide Pep-5 was shown to be a complex mixture of closely related and strongly basic peptides. Five peptides were purified by high-pressure liquid chromatography on reversed-phase and gel filtration columns and further characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and amino acid analysis. Four peptides have molecular weights of ca. 3,500, whereas one is of double size. All contain the thioether amino acid lanthionine and a large number of lysine residues per molecule. The amino terminus of the main active peptide is blocked; the carboxy-terminal end is formed by a lysine residue. The data obtained for Pep-5 suggest striking structural similarities to the peptide antibiotics nisin and subtilin. Images PMID:4015073

  1. Peptide synthesis in aqueous environments: the role of extreme conditions on peptide bond formation and peptide hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Eduard; Nair, Nisanth N; Marx, Dominik

    2009-09-30

    The mechanisms and free energetics underlying the formation of peptides from alpha-amino acids and alpha-amino acid N-carboxyanhydrides (NCAs) in bulk water at both ambient and extreme temperature and pressure conditions were investigated using accelerated ab initio molecular dynamics. In particular, peptide bond formation using an activated amino acid in form of its NCA, subsequent decarboxylation, as well as hydrolysis of the formed peptide were studied using glycine. It is shown to what extent thermodynamic conditions affect the reaction mechanisms qualitatively and the energetics quantitatively in solution. In particular, the zwitterionic intermediate in the peptidization step found in ambient water degenerates into a transient species in hot-pressurized water, whereas the hydrolysis reaction is found to follow qualitatively different pathways at ambient and extreme conditions. The work also quantifies the impact of extreme solvent conditions on both peptide bond formation and peptide hydrolysis in aqueous media. Beyond the specific case, the results provide important insights into how elevated temperatures and increased pressures affect organic reactions in aqueous solutions.

  2. Membrane-active peptides from marine organisms--antimicrobials, cell-penetrating peptides and peptide toxins: applications and prospects.

    PubMed

    Ponnappan, Nisha; Budagavi, Deepthi Poornima; Yadav, Bhoopesh Kumar; Chugh, Archana

    2015-03-01

    Marine organisms are known to be a rich and unique source of bioactive compounds as they are exposed to extreme conditions in the oceans. The present study is an attempt to briefly describe some of the important membrane-active peptides (MAPs) such as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and peptide toxins from marine organisms. Since both AMPs and CPPs play a role in membrane perturbation and exhibit interchangeable role, they can speculatively fall under the broad umbrella of MAPs. The study focuses on the structural and functional characteristics of different classes of marine MAPs. Further, AMPs are considered as a potential remedy to antibiotic resistance acquired by several pathogens. Peptides from marine organisms show novel post-translational modifications such as cysteine knots, halogenation and histidino-alanine bridge that enable these peptides to withstand harsh marine environmental conditions. These unusual modifications of AMPs from marine organisms are expected to increase their half-life in living systems, contributing to their increased bioavailability and stability when administered as drug in in vivo systems. Apart from AMPs, marine toxins with membrane-perturbing properties could be essentially investigated for their cytotoxic effect on various pathogens and their cell-penetrating activity across various mammalian cells. The current review will help in identifying the MAPs from marine organisms with crucial post-translational modifications that can be used as template for designing novel therapeutic agents and drug-delivery vehicles for treatment of human diseases.

  3. Random numbers from vacuum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yicheng; Chng, Brenda; Kurtsiefer, Christian

    2016-07-01

    We implement a quantum random number generator based on a balanced homodyne measurement of vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. The digitized signal is directly processed with a fast randomness extraction scheme based on a linear feedback shift register. The random bit stream is continuously read in a computer at a rate of about 480 Mbit/s and passes an extended test suite for random numbers.

  4. A new way to silicone-based peptide polymers.

    PubMed

    Jebors, Said; Ciccione, Jeremie; Al-Halifa, Soultan; Nottelet, Benjamin; Enjalbal, Christine; M'Kadmi, Céline; Amblard, Muriel; Mehdi, Ahmad; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles

    2015-03-16

    We describe a new class of silicone-containing peptide polymers obtained by a straightforward polymerization in water using tailored chlorodimethylsilyl peptide blocks as monomeric units. This general strategy is applicable to any type of peptide sequences, yielding linear or branched polymer chains composed of well-defined peptide sequences.

  5. Instant Random Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, Nils H.

    2010-12-01

    Information is carried by matter or by energy and thus Einstein stated that "no information can travel faster than light." He also was very critical to the "Spooky action at distance" as described in Quantum Physics. However, many verified experiments have proven that the "Spooky actions" not only work at distance but also that they travel at a velocity faster than light, probably at infinite velocity. Examples are Young's fringes at low light levels or entanglements. My explanation is that this information is without energy. In the following I will refer to this spooky information as exformation, where "ex-" refers to existence, the information is not transported in any way, it simply exists. Thus Einstein might have been wrong when he stated that no information can travel faster than light. But he was right in that no detectable information can travel faster than light. Phenomena connected to entanglement appear at first to be exceptions, but in those cases the information can not be reconstructed until energy is later sent in the form of correlation using ordinary information at the velocity of light. In entanglement we see that even if the exformation can not be detected directly because its luck of energy it still can influence what happens at random, because in Quantum Physics there is by definition no energy difference between two states that happen randomly.

  6. Fragmentation of random trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalay, Z.; Ben-Naim, E.

    2015-01-01

    We study fragmentation of a random recursive tree into a forest by repeated removal of nodes. The initial tree consists of N nodes and it is generated by sequential addition of nodes with each new node attaching to a randomly-selected existing node. As nodes are removed from the tree, one at a time, the tree dissolves into an ensemble of separate trees, namely, a forest. We study statistical properties of trees and nodes in this heterogeneous forest, and find that the fraction of remaining nodes m characterizes the system in the limit N\\to ∞ . We obtain analytically the size density {{φ }s} of trees of size s. The size density has power-law tail {{φ }s}˜ {{s}-α } with exponent α =1+\\frac{1}{m}. Therefore, the tail becomes steeper as further nodes are removed, and the fragmentation process is unusual in that exponent α increases continuously with time. We also extend our analysis to the case where nodes are added as well as removed, and obtain the asymptotic size density for growing trees.

  7. Fragmentation of random trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalay, Ziya; Ben-Naim, Eli

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the fragmentation of a random recursive tree by repeated removal of nodes, resulting in a forest of disjoint trees. The initial tree is generated by sequentially attaching new nodes to randomly chosen existing nodes until the tree contains N nodes. As nodes are removed, one at a time, the tree dissolves into an ensemble of separate trees, namely a forest. We study the statistical properties of trees and nodes in this heterogeneous forest. In the limit N --> ∞ , we find that the system is characterized by a single parameter: the fraction of remaining nodes m. We obtain analytically the size density ϕs of trees of size s, which has a power-law tail ϕs ~s-α , with exponent α = 1 + 1 / m . Therefore, the tail becomes steeper as further nodes are removed, producing an unusual scaling exponent that increases continuously with time. Furthermore, we investigate the fragment size distribution in a growing tree, where nodes are added as well as removed, and find that the distribution for this case is much narrower.

  8. Random-walk enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mak, Chi H; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A; Goodman, Myron F

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C→U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  9. Random-walk enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C → U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics. PMID:26465508

  10. Random-walk enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C →U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  11. Randomness and Non-Locality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senno, Gabriel; Bendersky, Ariel; Figueira, Santiago

    2016-07-01

    The concepts of randomness and non-locality are intimately intertwined outcomes of randomly chosen measurements over entangled systems exhibiting non-local correlations are, if we preclude instantaneous influence between distant measurement choices and outcomes, random. In this paper, we survey some recent advances in the knowledge of the interplay between these two important notions from a quantum information science perspective.

  12. Random Numbers and Quantum Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Mark; Glass, David

    2002-01-01

    The topic of random numbers is investigated in such a way as to illustrate links between mathematics, physics and computer science. First, the generation of random numbers by a classical computer using the linear congruential generator and logistic map is considered. It is noted that these procedures yield only pseudo-random numbers since…

  13. Random Selection for Drug Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    Simple random sampling is generally the starting point for a random sampling process. This sampling technique ensures that each individual within a group (population) has an equal chance of being selected. There are a variety of ways to implement random sampling in a practical situation.

  14. Investigating the Randomness of Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendleton, Kenn L.

    2009-01-01

    The use of random numbers is pervasive in today's world. Random numbers have practical applications in such far-flung arenas as computer simulations, cryptography, gambling, the legal system, statistical sampling, and even the war on terrorism. Evaluating the randomness of extremely large samples is a complex, intricate process. However, the…

  15. Wireless Network Security Using Randomness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-19

    REPORT WIRELESS NETWORK SECURITY USING RANDOMNESS 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The present invention provides systems and methods for... securing communications in a wireless network by utilizing the inherent randomness of propagation errors to enable legitimate users to dynamically...Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Patent, security , wireless networks, randomness Sheng Xiao, Weibo Gong

  16. Inhibition of isoflurane-induced increase of cell-surface redistribution and activity of glutamate transporter type 3 by serine 465 sequence-specific peptides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yueming; Li, Liaoliao; Washington, Jacqueline M; Xu, Xuebing; Sando, Julianne J; Lin, Daowei; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2011-03-25

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT) transport glutamate into cells to regulate glutamate neurotransmission and to maintain nontoxic extracellular glutamate levels for neurons. We showed previously that the commonly used volatile anesthetic isoflurane increases the transporting activity of EAAT3, the major neuronal EAAT. This effect requires a protein kinase C (PKC) α-mediated and S465-dependent EAAT3 redistribution to the plasma membrane. Thus, we hypothesize that specific peptides can be designed to block this effect. We conjugated a 10-amino acid synthetic peptide with a sequence identical to that of EAAT3 around the S465 to a peptide that can facilitate permeation of the plasma membrane. This fusion peptide inhibited the isoflurane-increased EAAT3 activity and redistribution to the plasma membrane in C6 cells and hippocampus. It did not affect the basal EAAT3 activity. This peptide also attenuated isoflurane-induced increase of PKCα in the immunoprecipitates produced by an anti-EAAT3 antibody. A scrambled peptide that has the same amino acid composition as the S465 sequence-specific peptide but has a random sequence did not change the effects of isoflurane on EAAT3. The S465 sequence-specific peptide, but not the scrambled peptide, is a good PKCα substrate in in vitro assay. These peptides did not affect cell viability. These results, along with our previous findings, strongly suggest that PKCα interacts with EAAT3 to regulate its functions. The S465 sequence-specific peptide may interrupt this interaction and is an effective inhibitor for the regulation of EAAT3 activity and trafficking by PKCα and isoflurane.

  17. Biologically Active and Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Carlos E.; Badillo-Corona, Jesus A.; Ramírez-Sotelo, Guadalupe; Oliver-Salvador, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are part of an innate response elicited by most living forms. In plants, they are produced ubiquitously in roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves, highlighting their physiological importance. While most of the bioactive peptides produced in plants possess microbicide properties, there is evidence that they are also involved in cellular signaling. Structurally, there is an overall similarity when comparing them with those derived from animal or insect sources. The biological action of bioactive peptides initiates with the binding to the target membrane followed in most cases by membrane permeabilization and rupture. Here we present an overview of what is currently known about bioactive peptides from plants, focusing on their antimicrobial activity and their role in the plant signaling network and offering perspectives on their potential application. PMID:25815307

  18. Peptide platforms for metal ion sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imperiali, Barbara; Pearce, Dierdre A.; Sohna Sohna, Jean-Ernest; Walkup, Grant; Torrado, Alicia

    1999-12-01

    Naturally occurring motifs have been redesigned to product fluorescent peptidyl-chemosensors that sensitively and selectively recognize Cu(II) or Fe(III). The modular nature of peptide architecture allows preparation and evaluation of potential sensors on solid supports.

  19. Electron Transport in Short Peptide Single Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jing; Brisendine, Joseph; Ng, Fay; Nuckolls, Colin; Koder, Ronald; Venkarataman, Latha

    We present a study of the electron transport through a series of short peptides using scanning tunneling microscope-based break junction method. Our work is motivated by the need to gain a better understanding of how various levels of protein structure contribute to the remarkable capacity of proteins to transport charge in biophysical processes such as respiration and photosynthesis. We focus here on short mono, di and tri-peptides, and probe their conductance when bound to gold electrodes in a native buffer environment. We first show that these peptides can bind to gold through amine, carboxyl, thiol and methyl-sulfide termini. We then focus on two systems (glycine and alanine) and show that their conductance decays faster than alkanes terminated by the same linkers. Importantly, our results show that the peptide bond is less conductive than a sigma carbon-carbon bond. This work was supported in part by NSF-DMR 1507440.

  20. Peptide Seems to Boost Human Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1981

    1981-01-01

    This article discusses recent studies which have shown that the peptide hormone vasopressin apparently can stimulate memory and learning in healthy human volunteers and in certain mentally disturbed patients. (ECO)

  1. Tailoring elastase inhibition with synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Andreia; Azoia, Nuno G; Carvalho, Ana C; Gomes, Andreia C; Güebitz, Georg; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2011-09-01

    Chronic wounds are the result of excessive amounts of tissue destructive proteases such as human neutrophil elastase (HNE). The high levels of this enzyme found on those types of wounds inactivate the endogenous inhibitor barrier thus, the search for new HNE inhibitors is required. This work presents two new HNE inhibitor peptides, which were synthesized based on the reactive-site loop of the Bowman-Birk inhibitor protein. The results obtained indicated that these new peptides are competitive inhibitors for HNE and, the inhibitory activity can be modulated by modifications introduced at the N- and C-terminal of the peptides. Furthermore, these peptides were also able to inhibit elastase from a human wound exudate while showing no cytotoxicity against human skin fibroblasts in vitro, greatly supporting their potential application in chronic wound treatment.

  2. Bioactive Proteins and Peptides from Soybeans.

    PubMed

    Agyei, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Dietary proteins from soybeans have been shown to offer health benefits in vivo and/or in vitro either as intact proteins or in partially digested forms also called bioactive peptides. Upon oral administration and absorption, soy-derived bioactive peptides may induce several physiological responses such as antioxidative, antimicrobial, antihypertensive, anticancer and immunomodulatory effects. There has therefore been a mounting research interest in the therapeutic potential of soy protein hydrolysates and their subsequent incorporation in functional foods and 'Food for Specified Health Uses' (FOSHU) related products where their biological activities may assist in the promotion of good health or in the control and prevention of diseases. This mini review discusses relevant patents and gives an overview on bioactive proteins and peptides obtainable from soybeans. Processes for the production and formulation of these peptides are given, together with specific examples of their therapeutic potential and possible areas of application.

  3. Marine bioactive peptides as potential antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Dai-Hung; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-05-01

    Bioactive peptides derived from marine organisms are the focus of current studies because of their numerous health beneficial effects. They exert various biological roles, one of the most crucial of which is the antioxidant effect. Reverse relationship between antioxidant intake and diseases has been approved through plenty of studies. Antioxidant activity of marine peptides can be attributed to in vitro and in vivo free radical scavenging activities. Antioxidant peptides isolated from marine sources may be used as functional ingredients in food formulations to promote consumer health and improve the shelf life of food products. This chapter presents an overview of the antioxidant peptides derived marine resources with the potential utilization in the food as well as pharmaceutical industries.

  4. Advances in synthetic peptides reagent discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial display technology offers a number of advantages over competing display technologies (e.g, phage) for the rapid discovery and development of peptides with interaction targeted to materials ranging from biological hazards through inorganic metals. We have previously shown that discovery of synthetic peptide reagents utilizing bacterial display technology is relatively simple and rapid to make laboratory automation possible. This included extensive study of the protective antigen system of Bacillus anthracis, including development of discovery, characterization, and computational biology capabilities for in-silico optimization. Although the benefits towards CBD goals are evident, the impact is far-reaching due to our ability to understand and harness peptide interactions that are ultimately extendable to the hybrid biomaterials of the future. In this paper, we describe advances in peptide discovery including, new target systems (e.g. non-biological materials), advanced library development and clone analysis including integrated reporting.

  5. Polymer-Peptide Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, He; Shu, Jessica Y.; Xu, Ting

    2010-03-01

    Conjugation of synthetic polymers to peptides offers an efficient way to produce novel supramolecular structures. Herein, we report an attempt to prepare synthetic micellar nanoparticles using amphiphilic peptide-polymer conjugates as molecular building blocks. Spherical nanoparticles were formed upon dissolution of peptides in PBS buffer through the segregation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments. Both molecular and nano- structures were thoroughly investigated by a variety of biophysical techniques, including circular dichroism (CD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), size exclusion chromatography (SEC), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The results demonstrate that structural properties of these biohybrid materials depend on both the geometry of the hydrophobic domain and the size of synthetic polymers. Given the diversity of functional peptide sequences, hydrophilic polymers and hydrophobic moieties, these materials would be expected to self-assemble into various types of nanostructures to cover a wide range of biological applications.

  6. An antifungal peptide from baby lima bean.

    PubMed

    Wang, H X; Ng, T B

    2006-12-01

    A 6-kDa antifungal peptide with inhibitory activity on mycelial growth in Fusarium oxysporum, Mycosphaerella arachidicola, and Physalospora piricola was isolated from baby lima beans. The peptide suppressed growth in M. arachidicola with an IC(50) of 0.87 muM and inhibited activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC(50) of 4 muM. The peptide exhibited an N-terminal amino acid sequence similar to those of leguminous defensins. The isolation procedure comprised ion exchange chromatography on diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on carboxymethyl (CM)-cellulose, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. The peptide was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose and Affi-gel blue gel but was adsorbed on CM-cellulose.

  7. Biologically active and antimicrobial peptides from plants.

    PubMed

    Salas, Carlos E; Badillo-Corona, Jesus A; Ramírez-Sotelo, Guadalupe; Oliver-Salvador, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are part of an innate response elicited by most living forms. In plants, they are produced ubiquitously in roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves, highlighting their physiological importance. While most of the bioactive peptides produced in plants possess microbicide properties, there is evidence that they are also involved in cellular signaling. Structurally, there is an overall similarity when comparing them with those derived from animal or insect sources. The biological action of bioactive peptides initiates with the binding to the target membrane followed in most cases by membrane permeabilization and rupture. Here we present an overview of what is currently known about bioactive peptides from plants, focusing on their antimicrobial activity and their role in the plant signaling network and offering perspectives on their potential application.

  8. Peptide mediated cancer targeting of nanoconjugates

    PubMed Central

    Raha, Sumita; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle

    2013-01-01

    Targeted use of nanoparticles in vitro, in cells and in vivo requires nanoparticle surface functionalization. Moieties that can be used for such a purpose include small molecules as well as polymers made of different biological and organic materials. Short amino acid polymers--peptides can often rival target binding avidity of much larger molecules. At the same time, peptides are smaller than most nanoparticles and thus allow for multiple nanoparticle modifications and creation of pluripotent nanoparticles. Most nanoparticles provide multiple binding sites for different cargo and targeting peptides which can be used for development of novel approaches for cancer targeting, diagnostics and therapy. In this review, we will focus on peptides which have been used for preparation of different nanoparticles designed for cancer research. PMID:21046660

  9. Effects of electron-transfer coupled with collision-induced dissociation (ET/CID) on doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chih-Wei; Lai, Chien-Chen

    2011-01-01

    Electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) is a useful peptide fragmentation technique that can be applied to investigate post-translational modifications (PTMs), the sequencing of highly hydrophilic peptides, and the identification of large peptides and even intact proteins. In contrast to traditional fragmentation methods, such as collision-induced dissociation (CID), ETD produces c- and z(·)-type product ions by randomly cleaving the N-Cα bonds. The disappointing fragmentation efficiency of ETD for doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptide ions has been improved by ETcaD (supplemental activation). However, the ETD data derived from most database search algorithms yield low confidence scores due to the presence of unreacted precursors and charge-reduced ions within MS/MS spectra. In this work, we demonstrate that eight out of ten standard doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptides can be effortlessly identified by electron-transfer coupled with collision-induced dissociation (ET/CID) using the SEQUEST algorithm without further spectral processing. ET/CID was performed with the further dissociation of the charge-reduced ions isolated from ETD ion/ion reactions. ET/CID had high fragmentation efficiency, which elevated the confidence scores of doubly charged peptide and phosphospeptide sequencing. ET/CID was found to be an effective fragmentation strategy in "bottom-up" proteomic analysis.

  10. Effects of Electron-Transfer Coupled with Collision-Induced Dissociation (ET/CID) on Doubly Charged Peptides and Phosphopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Wei; Lai, Chien-Chen

    2011-01-01

    Electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) is a useful peptide fragmentation technique that can be applied to investigate post-translational modifications (PTMs), the sequencing of highly hydrophilic peptides, and the identification of large peptides and even intact proteins. In contrast to traditional fragmentation methods, such as collision-induced dissociation (CID), ETD produces c- and z·-type product ions by randomly cleaving the N-Cα bonds. The disappointing fragmentation efficiency of ETD for doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptide ions has been improved by ETcaD (supplemental activation). However, the ETD data derived from most database search algorithms yield low confidence scores due to the presence of unreacted precursors and charge-reduced ions within MS/MS spectra. In this work, we demonstrate that eight out of ten standard doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptides can be effortlessly identified by electron-transfer coupled with collision-induced dissociation (ET/CID) using the SEQUEST algorithm without further spectral processing. ET/CID was performed with the further dissociation of the charge-reduced ions isolated from ETD ion/ion reactions. ET/CID had high fragmentation efficiency, which elevated the confidence scores of doubly charged peptide and phosphospeptide sequencing. ET/CID was found to be an effective fragmentation strategy in "bottom-up" proteomic analysis.

  11. Control of Viremia and Prevention of AIDS following Immunotherapy of SIV-Infected Macaques with Peptide-Pulsed Blood

    PubMed Central

    De Rose, Robert; Fernandez, Caroline S.; Smith, Miranda Z.; Batten, C. Jane; Alcântara, Sheilajen; Peut, Vivienne; Rollman, Erik; Loh, Liyen; Mason, Rosemarie D.; Wilson, Kim; Law, Matthew G.; Handley, Amanda J.; Kent, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    Effective immunotherapies for HIV are needed. Drug therapies are life-long with significant toxicities. Dendritic-cell based immunotherapy approaches are promising but impractical for widespread use. A simple immunotherapy, reinfusing fresh autologous blood cells exposed to overlapping SIV peptides for 1 hour ex vivo, was assessed for the control of SIVmac251 replication in 36 pigtail macaques. An initial set of four immunizations was administered under antiretroviral cover and a booster set of three immunizations administered 6 months later. Vaccinated animals were randomized to receive Gag peptides alone or peptides spanning all nine SIV proteins. High-level, SIV-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cell immunity was induced following immunization, both during antiretroviral cover and without. Virus levels were durably ∼10-fold lower for 1 year in immunized animals compared to controls, and a significant delay in AIDS-related mortality resulted. Broader immunity resulted following immunizations with peptides spanning all nine SIV proteins, but the responses to Gag were weaker in comparison to animals only immunized with Gag. No difference in viral outcome occurred in animals immunized with all SIV proteins compared to animals immunized against Gag alone. Peptide-pulsed blood cells are an immunogenic and effective immunotherapy in SIV-infected macaques. Our results suggest Gag alone is an effective antigen for T-cell immunotherapy. Fresh blood cells pulsed with overlapping Gag peptides is proceeding into trials in HIV-infected humans. PMID:18451982

  12. cis-Peptide Bonds: A Key for Intestinal Permeability of Peptides? .

    PubMed

    Marelli, Udaya Kiran; Ovadia, Oded; Frank, Andreas Oliver; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Gilon, Chaim; Hoffman, Amnon; Kessler, Horst

    2015-10-19

    Recent structural studies on libraries of cyclic hexapeptides led to the identification of common backbone conformations that may be instrumental to the oral availability of peptides. Furthermore, the observation of differential Caco-2 permeabilities of enantiomeric pairs of some of these peptides strongly supports the concept of conformational specificity driven uptake and also suggests a pivotal role of carrier-mediated pathways for peptide transport, especially for scaffolds of polar nature. This work presents investigations on the Caco-2 and PAMPA permeability profiles of 13 selected N-methylated cyclic pentaalanine peptides derived from the basic cyclo(-D-Ala-Ala4 -) template. These molecules generally showed moderate to low transport in intestinal epithelia with a few of them exhibiting a Caco-2 permeability equal to or slightly higher than that of mannitol, a marker for paracellular permeability. We identified that the majority of the permeable cyclic penta- and hexapeptides possess an N-methylated cis-peptide bond, a structural feature that is also present in the orally available peptides cyclosporine A and the tri-N-methylated analogue of the Veber-Hirschmann peptide. Based on these observations it appears that the presence of N-methylated cis-peptide bonds at certain locations may promote the intestinal permeability of peptides through a suitable conformational preorganization.

  13. CART peptide in the nucleus accumbens regulates psychostimulants: Correlations between psychostimulant and CART peptide effects.

    PubMed

    Job, Martin O; Kuhar, Michael J

    2017-02-16

    In this study, we reexamined the effect of Cocaine-and-Amphetamine-Regulated-Transcript (CART) peptide on psychostimulant (PS)-induced locomotor activity (LMA) in individual rats. The Methods utilized were as previously published. The PS-induced LMA was defined as the distance traveled after PS administration (intraperitoneal), and the CART peptide effect was defined as the change in the PS-induced activity after bilateral intra-NAc administration of CART peptide. The experiments included both male and female Sprague-Dawley rats, and varying the CART peptide dose and the PS dose. While the average effect of CART peptide was to inhibit PS-induced LMA, the effect of CART peptide on individual PS-treated animals was not always inhibitory and sometimes even produced an increase or no change in PS-induced LMA. Upon further analysis, we observed a linear correlation, reported for the first time, between the magnitude of PS-induced LMA and the CART peptide effect. Because CART peptide inhibits PS-induced LMA when it is large, and increases PS-induced LMA when it is small, the peptide can be considered a homeostatic regulator of dopamine (DA)-induced LMA, which supports our earlier homeostatic hypothesis.

  14. Investigating peptide sequence variations for 'double-click' stapled p53 peptides.

    PubMed

    Lau, Yu Heng; de Andrade, Peterson; Sköld, Niklas; McKenzie, Grahame J; Venkitaraman, Ashok R; Verma, Chandra; Lane, David P; Spring, David R

    2014-06-28

    Stapling peptides for inhibiting the p53/MDM2 interaction is a promising strategy for developing anti-cancer therapeutic leads. We evaluate double-click stapled peptides formed from p53-based diazidopeptides with different staple positions and azido amino acid side-chain lengths, determining the impact of these variations on MDM2 binding and cellular activity. We also demonstrate a K24R mutation, necessary for cellular activity in hydrocarbon-stapled p53 peptides, is not required for analogous 'double-click' peptides.

  15. Bachem - insights into peptide chemistry achievements by the world's leading independent manufacturer of peptides.

    PubMed

    Mergler, Monika; Loidl, Günther; Diekmann, Martina; Dick, Fritz

    2013-01-01

    The Swiss fine chemicals company Bachem, pioneer and specialist in the chemical synthesis of peptides, has also become an internationally leading manufacturer of peptide active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). In response to increasing demands in scale and purity, Bachem's research efforts centered on the chemistry involved in solid-phase peptide synthesis and the production of the required amino acid derivatives with the aim of a continuous improvement of the technology. The resulting optimized protocols together with high-throughput equipment enabled us to manufacture long peptide APIs and, more recently, even pharma-grade glycoproteins in industrial scale.

  16. Evolution of Antimicrobial Peptides to Self-Assembled Peptides for Biomaterial Applications

    PubMed Central

    McCloskey, Alice P.; Gilmore, Brendan F.; Laverty, Garry

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterial-related infections are a persistent burden on patient health, recovery, mortality and healthcare budgets. Self-assembled antimicrobial peptides have evolved from the area of antimicrobial peptides. Peptides serve as important weapons in nature, and increasingly medicine, for combating microbial infection and biofilms. Self-assembled peptides harness a “bottom-up” approach, whereby the primary peptide sequence may be modified with natural and unnatural amino acids to produce an inherently antimicrobial hydrogel. Gelation may be tailored to occur in the presence of physiological and infective indicators (e.g. pH, enzymes) and therefore allow local, targeted antimicrobial therapy at the site of infection. Peptides demonstrate inherent biocompatibility, antimicrobial activity, biodegradability and numerous functional groups. They are therefore prime candidates for the production of polymeric molecules that have the potential to be conjugated to biomaterials with precision. Non-native chemistries and functional groups are easily incorporated into the peptide backbone allowing peptide hydrogels to be tailored to specific functional requirements. This article reviews an area of increasing interest, namely self-assembled peptides and their potential therapeutic applications as innovative hydrogels and biomaterials in the prevention of biofilm-related infection. PMID:25436505

  17. Viral morphogenesis is the dominant source of sequence censorship in M13 combinatorial peptide phage display.

    SciTech Connect

    Rodi, D. J.; Soares, A. S.; Makowski, L.; Biosciences Division; BNL

    2002-01-01

    Novel statistical methods have been developed and used to quantitate and annotate the sequence diversity within combinatorial peptide libraries on the basis of small numbers (1-200) of sequences selected at random from commercially available M13 p3-based phage display libraries. These libraries behave statistically as though they correspond to populations containing roughly 4.0{+-}1.6% of the random dodecapeptides and 7.9{+-}2.6% of the random constrained heptapeptides that are theoretically possible within the phage populations. Analysis of amino acid residue occurrence patterns shows no demonstrable influence on sequence censorship by Escherichia coli tRNA isoacceptor profiles or either overall codon or Class II codon usage patterns, suggesting no metabolic constraints on recombinant p3 synthesis. There is an overall depression in the occurrence of cysteine, arginine and glycine residues and an overabundance of proline, threonine and histidine residues. The majority of position-dependent amino acid sequence bias is clustered at three positions within the inserted peptides of the dodecapeptide library, +1, +3 and +12 downstream from the signal peptidase cleavage site. Conformational tendency measures of the peptides indicate a significant preference for inserts favoring a {beta}-turn conformation. The observed protein sequence limitations can primarily be attributed to genetic codon degeneracy and signal peptidase cleavage preferences. These data suggest that for applications in which maximal sequence diversity is essential, such as epitope mapping or novel receptor identification, combinatorial peptide libraries should be constructed using codon-corrected trinucleotide cassettes within vector-host systems designed to minimize morphogenesis-related censorship.

  18. Peptide regulation of Maize defense reponses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ZmPEP1 is a peptide signal encoded by a previously uncharacterized maize gene that we have named ZmPROPEP1. The ZmPROPEP1 gene was identified by homology to the Arabidopsis AtPROPEP1 gene that encodes the precursor protein to the peptide signal AtPEP1. Together with its receptors, AtPEPR1 and AtPEP...

  19. Mechanisms of fragmentation of cationic peptide ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Adams, Jeanette

    1993-06-01

    Fragmentation mechanisms for formation of several commonly occurring product ions in high-energy collision-induced induced decomposition spectra of either (M + Cat2+ - H)+ ions of peptides cationized with alkaline earth metal ions, (M + Ca+)+ ions cationized with alkali metal ions, or (M + H)+ ions are evaluated by using deuterium-labelled peptides. The different sources of hydrogen transferred in the reactions are identified. Our study supports some previously proposed mechanisms but also provides evidence for others.

  20. [Defensins - natural peptide antibiotics of higher eukaryotes].

    PubMed

    Grishin, D V; Sokolov, N N

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this review is to characterize defensins representing an evolutionary the most ancient family of antimicrobial peptides. It gives general information on functional and structural features of defensins as the main components of the first-line defense of higher eukaryote organisms against infectious agents. The review considers not only current situation in the defensin research but also perspectives of creation of recombinant antimicrobial peptides of biomedical application.

  1. Peptide signalling during angiosperm seed development.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Gwyneth; Gutierrez-Marcos, Jose

    2015-08-01

    Cell-cell communication is pivotal for the coordination of various features of plant development. Recent studies in plants have revealed that, as in animals, secreted signal peptides play critical roles during reproduction. However, the precise signalling mechanisms in plants are not well understood. In this review, we discuss the known and putative roles of secreted peptides present in the seeds of angiosperms as key signalling factors involved in coordinating different aspects of seed development.

  2. T-cell epitope peptide vaccines.

    PubMed

    Elsawa, Sherine F; Rodeberg, David A; Celis, Esteban

    2004-10-01

    T-cell immunotherapy is a promising treatment option for cancer. The identification of tumor antigens that are recognized by the immune system has allowed for the generation of vaccines for various malignancies. Due to the ease of manufacturing and characterizating peptide-based vaccines they have been used to stimulate antitumor T-cells. This article will review the use of peptide-based vaccines for the treatment of cancer by inducing antitumor T-lymphocyte responses.

  3. De Novo Design of Potent Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Frecer, V.; Ho, B.; Ding, J. L.

    2004-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), shed by gram-negative bacteria during infection and antimicrobial therapy, may lead to lethal endotoxic shock syndrome. A rational design strategy based on the presumed mechanism of antibacterial effect was adopted to design cationic antimicrobial peptides capable of binding to LPS through tandemly repeated sequences of alternating cationic and nonpolar residues. The peptides were designed to achieve enhanced antimicrobial potency due to initial bacterial membrane binding with a reduced risk of endotoxic shock. The peptides designed displayed binding affinities to LPS and lipid A (LA) in the low micromolar range and by molecular modeling were predicted to form amphipathic β-hairpin-like structures when they bind to LPS or LA. They also exhibited strong effects against gram-negative bacteria, with MICs in the nanomolar range, and low cytotoxic and hemolytic activities at concentrations significantly exceeding their MICs. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis of peptide sequences and their antimicrobial, cytotoxic, and hemolytic activities revealed that site-directed substitutions of residues in the hydrophobic face of the amphipathic peptides with less lipophilic residues selectively decrease the hemolytic effect without significantly affecting the antimicrobial or cytotoxic activity. On the other hand, the antimicrobial effect can be enhanced by substitutions in the polar face with more polar residues, which increase the amphipathicity of the peptide. On the basis of the QSARs, new analogs that have strong antimicrobial effects but that lack hemolytic activity can be proposed. The findings highlight the importance of peptide amphipathicity and allow a rational method that can be used to dissociate the antimicrobial and hemolytic effects of cationic peptides, which have potent antimicrobial properties, to be proposed. PMID:15328096

  4. Antimicrobial peptide action on parasites.

    PubMed

    Torrent, Marc; Pulido, David; Rivas, Luis; Andreu, David

    2012-08-01

    Diseases caused by protozoan parasites can pose a severe thread to human health and are behind some serious neglected tropical diseases like malaria and leishmaniasis. Though several different drugs have been developed in order to eradicate these diseases, a successful candidate has not yet been discovered. Among the most active compounds tested, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are particularly appealing because of their wide spectrum of action. AMPs have been described to perturb protozoan homeostasis by disrupting the cellular membranes but also by interfering with key processes in the parasite metabolism. In this review we describe the diverse mechanisms of action of AMPs on protozoan targets and how they can be exploited to treat diseases. Moreover, we describe with detail the antimicrobial action of AMPs on two major parasitical infections: leishmaniasis and malaria. All the features reviewed here show that AMPs are promising drugs to target protozoan parasites and that further understanding of the mechanism of action of these compounds will lead to improved drugs that could be worth to test in a clinical phase.

  5. Immunoregulatory T cell epitope peptides: the new frontier in allergy therapy

    PubMed Central

    Prickett, S R; Rolland, J M; O'Hehir, R E

    2015-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) has been practised since 1911 and remains the only therapy proven to modify the natural history of allergic diseases. Although efficacious in carefully selected individuals, the currently licensed whole allergen extracts retain the risk of IgE-mediated adverse events, including anaphylaxis and occasionally death. This together with the need for prolonged treatment regimens results in poor patient adherence. The central role of the T cell in orchestrating the immune response to allergen informs the choice of T cell targeted therapies for down-regulation of aberrant allergic responses. Carefully mapped short synthetic peptides that contain the dominant T cell epitopes of major allergens and bind to a diverse array of HLA class II alleles, can be delivered intradermally into non-inflamed skin to induce sustained clinical and immunological tolerance. The short peptides from allergenic proteins are unable to cross-link IgE and possess minimal inflammatory potential. Systematic progress has been made from in vitro human models of allergen T cell epitope-based peptide anergy in the early 1990s, through proof-of-concept murine allergy models and early human trials with longer peptides, to the current randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials with the potential new class of synthetic short immune-regulatory T cell epitope peptide therapies. Sustained efficacy with few adverse events is being reported for cat, house dust mite and grass pollen allergy after only a short course of treatment. Underlying immunological mechanisms remain to be fully delineated but anergy, deletion, immune deviation and Treg induction all seem contributory to successful outcomes, with changes in IgG4 apparently less important compared to conventional AIT. T cell epitope peptide therapy is promising a safe and effective new class of specific treatment for allergy, enabling wider application even for more severe allergic diseases. PMID:25900315

  6. Mapping the Conformational Dynamics and Pathways of Spontaneous Steric Zipper Peptide Oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Matthes, Dirk; Gapsys, Vytautas; Daebel, Venita; de Groot, Bert L.

    2011-01-01

    The process of protein misfolding and self-assembly into various, polymorphic aggregates is associated with a number of important neurodegenerative diseases. Only recently, crystal structures of several short peptides have provided detailed structural insights into -sheet rich aggregates, known as amyloid fibrils. Knowledge about early events of the formation and interconversion of small oligomeric states, an inevitable step in the cascade of peptide self-assembly, however, remains still limited. We employ molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent to study the spontaneous aggregation process of steric zipper peptide segments from the tau protein and insulin in atomistic detail. Starting from separated chains with random conformations, we find a rapid formation of structurally heterogeneous, -sheet rich oligomers, emerging from multiple bimolecular association steps and diverse assembly pathways. Furthermore, our study provides evidence that aggregate intermediates as small as dimers can be kinetically trapped and thus affect the structural evolution of larger oligomers. Alternative aggregate structures are found for both peptide sequences in the different independent simulations, some of which feature characteristics of the known steric zipper conformation (e.g., -sheet bilayers with a dry interface). The final aggregates interconvert with topologically distinct oligomeric states exclusively via internal rearrangements. The peptide oligomerization was analyzed through the perspective of a minimal oligomer, i.e., the dimer. Thereby all observed multimeric aggregates can be consistently mapped onto a space of reduced dimensionality. This novel method of conformational mapping reveals heterogeneous association and reorganization dynamics that are governed by the characteristics of peptide sequence and oligomer size. PMID:21559277

  7. Liquid-phase synthesis of bridged peptides using olefin metathesis of a protected peptide with a long aliphatic chain anchor.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Keisuke; Komiya, Chiaki; Shigenaga, Akira; Inokuma, Tsubasa; Takahashi, Daisuke; Otaka, Akira

    2015-02-06

    Bridged peptides including stapled peptides are attractive tools for regulating protein-protein interactions (PPIs). An effective synthetic methodology in a heterogeneous system for the preparation of these peptides using olefin metathesis and hydrogenation of protected peptides with a long aliphatic chain anchor is reported.

  8. [Peptide phage display in biotechnology and biomedicine].

    PubMed

    Kuzmicheva, G A; Belyavskaya, V A

    2016-07-01

    To date peptide phage display is one of the most common combinatorial methods used for identifying specific peptide ligands. Phage display peptide libraries containing billions different clones successfully used for selection of ligands with high affinity and selectivity toward wide range of targets including individual proteins, bacteria, viruses, spores, different kind of cancer cells and variety of nonorganic targets (metals, alloys, semiconductors etc.) Success of using filamentous phage in phage display technologies relays on the robustness of phage particles and a possibility to genetically modify its DNA to construct new phage variants with novel properties. In this review we are discussing characteristics of the most known non-commercial peptide phage display libraries of different formats (landscape libraries in particular) and their successful applications in several fields of biotechnology and biomedicine: discovery of peptides with diagnostic values against different pathogens, discovery and using of peptides recognizing cancer cells, trends in using of phage display technologies in human interactome studies, application of phage display technologies in construction of novel nano materials.

  9. Peptide Toxins in Solitary Wasp Venoms

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Katsuhiro; Kazuma, Kohei; Nihei, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Solitary wasps paralyze insects or spiders with stinging venom and feed the paralyzed preys to their larva. Accordingly, the venoms should contain a variety of constituents acting on nervous systems. However, only a few solitary wasp venoms have been chemically studied despite thousands of species inhabiting the planet. We have surveyed bioactive substances in solitary wasp venoms found in Japan and discovered a variety of novel bioactive peptides. Pompilidotoxins (PMTXs), in the venoms of the pompilid wasps Anoplius samariensis and Batozonellus maculifrons, are small peptides consisting of 13 amino acids without a disulfide bond. PMTXs slowed Na+ channel inactivation, in particular against neuronal type Na+ channels, and were rather selective to the Nav1.6 channel. Mastoparan-like cytolytic and antimicrobial peptides are the major components of eumenine wasp venoms. They are rich in hydrophobic and basic amino acids, adopting a α-helical secondary structure, and showing mast cell degranulating, antimicrobial and hemolytic activities. The venom of the spider wasp Cyphononyx fulvognathus contained four bradykinin-related peptides. They are hyperalgesic and, dependent on the structure, differently associated with B1 or B2 receptors. Further survey led to the isolation of leucomyosuppressin-like FMRFamide peptides from the venoms of the digger wasps Sphex argentatus and Isodontia harmandi. These results of peptide toxins in solitary wasp venoms from our studies are summarized. PMID:27096870

  10. Effects of opioid peptides on thermoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, W.G.

    1981-11-01

    In a given species, injected opioid peptides usually cause changes in temperature similar to those caused by nonpeptide opioids. The main effect in those species most studied, the cat, rat, and mouse, is an increase in the level about which body temperature is regulated; there is a coordinated change in the activity of thermoregulatory effectors such that hyperthermia is produced in both hot and cold environments. Larger doses may depress thermoregulation, thereby causing body temperature to decrease in the cold. Elicitation of different patterns of response over a range of environmental temperatures and studies with naloxone and naltrexone indicate that stimulation of a number of different receptors by both peptide and nonpeptide opioids can evoke thermoregulatory responses. ..beta..-Endorphin is readily antagonized by naloxone whereas methionine-enkephalin can act on naloxone-insensitive receptors. Moreover, synthetic peptide analogs do not necessarily evoke the same response as does the related endogenous peptide. The lack of effect of naloxone on body temperature of subjects housed at usual laboratory temperature or on pyrogen-induced increases in body temperature indicates that an action of endogenous peptides on naloxone-sensitive receptors plays little, if any, role in normal thermoregulation or in fever. However, there is some evidence that such an action may be involved in responses to restraint or ambient temperature-induced stress. Further evaluation of possible physiological roles of endogenous opioid peptides will be facilitated when specific antagonists at other types of opioid receptors become available.

  11. Protein quantification using a cleavable reporter peptide.

    PubMed

    Duriez, Elodie; Trevisiol, Stephane; Domon, Bruno

    2015-02-06

    Peptide and protein quantification based on isotope dilution and mass spectrometry analysis are widely employed for the measurement of biomarkers and in system biology applications. The accuracy and reliability of such quantitative assays depend on the quality of the stable-isotope labeled standards. Although the quantification using stable-isotope labeled peptides is precise, the accuracy of the results can be severely biased by the purity of the internal standards, their stability and formulation, and the determination of their concentration. Here we describe a rapid and cost-efficient method to recalibrate stable isotope labeled peptides in a single LC-MS analysis. The method is based on the equimolar release of a protein reference peptide (used as surrogate for the protein of interest) and a universal reporter peptide during the trypsinization of a concatenated polypeptide standard. The quality and accuracy of data generated with such concatenated polypeptide standards are highlighted by the quantification of two clinically important proteins in urine samples and compared with results obtained with conventional stable isotope labeled reference peptides. Furthermore, the application of the UCRP standards in complex samples is described.

  12. Biomathematical Description of Synthetic Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Trepel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Libraries of randomised peptides displayed on phages or viral particles are essential tools in a wide spectrum of applications. However, there is only limited understanding of a library's fundamental dynamics and the influences of encoding schemes and sizes on their quality. Numeric properties of libraries, such as the expected number of different peptides and the library's coverage, have long been in use as measures of a library's quality. Here, we present a graphical framework of these measures together with a library's relative efficiency to help to describe libraries in enough detail for researchers to plan new experiments in a more informed manner. In particular, these values allow us to answer-in a probabilistic fashion-the question of whether a specific library does indeed contain one of the "best" possible peptides. The framework is implemented in a web-interface based on two packages, discreteRV and peptider, to the statistical software environment R. We further provide a user-friendly web-interface called PeLiCa (Peptide Library Calculator, http://www.pelica.org), allowing scientists to plan and analyse their peptide libraries. PMID:26042419

  13. Antihypertensive peptides of animal origin: A review.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Zuhaib Fayaz; Kumar, Sunil; Bhat, Hina Fayaz

    2017-02-11

    Many bioactive peptides trigger certain useful antihypertensive activities in the living body system and there is a mounting worldwide interest in the therapeutic potential of these bioactive peptides for exploitation in vivo against the hypertension. Studies suggest the antihypertensive properties for many bioactive peptides of animal origin with underlying mechanisms ranging from inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme to additional mechanisms to lower blood pressure such as opioid-like activities and mineral-binding and antithrombotic properties. Antihypertensive peptides are the most extensively studied of all the bioactivities induced by food protein hydrolysates, highlighting their importance in human health and disease prevention and treatment. There exist enormous opportunities for the production of novel peptide-based products in biopharmaceutical manufacturing industries for the treatment, prevention, and mitigation of hypertension. Numerous products have already struck on the global market and many more are in process. This article focuses on antihypertensive peptides identified in the meat, fish, blood, milk, dairy products, and egg and their probable application as novel ingredients in the development of functional food products as dietary treatment of hypertension.

  14. Bioactive peptides of animal origin: a review.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Z F; Kumar, Sunil; Bhat, Hina Fayaz

    2015-09-01

    Bioactive peptides are specific protein fragments which, above and beyond their nutritional capabilities, have a positive impact on the body's function or condition which may ultimately influence health. Although, inactive within the sequence of the parent proteins, these peptides can be released during proteolysis or fermentation and play an important role in human health by affecting the digestive, endocrine, cardiovascular, immune and nervous systems. Several peptides that are released in vitro or in vivo from animal proteins have been attributed to different health effects, including antimicrobial properties, blood pressure-lowering (ACE inhibitory) effects, cholesterol-lowering ability, antithrombotic and antioxidant activities, opioid activities, enhancement of mineral absorption and/or bioavailability, cytomodulatory and immunomodulatory effects, antiobesity, and anti-genotoxic activity. Several functional foods based on the bioactivities of these peptides with scientifically evidenced health claims are already on the market or under development by food companies. Consumer's increasing interest in these products has given an impetus to the food industry and scientific sector who are continuously exploring the possibilities for the development of new functional products based on these peptides. In this review, we describe above stated properties of bioactive peptides of animal origin.

  15. Neutron diffraction studies of viral fusion peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Jeremy P.; J. M. Darkes, Malcolm; Katsaras, John; Epand, Richard M.

    2000-03-01

    Membrane fusion plays a vital role in a large and diverse number of essential biological processes. Despite this fact, the precise molecular events that occur during fusion are still not known. We are currently engaged on a study of membrane fusion as mediated by viral fusion peptides. These peptides are the N-terminal regions of certain viral envelope proteins that mediate the process of fusion between the viral envelope and the membranes of the host cell during the infection process. As part of this study, we have carried out neutron diffraction measurements at the ILL, BeNSC and Chalk River, on a range of viral fusion peptides. The peptides, from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), influenza A and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV), were incorporated into stacked phospholipid bilayers. Some of the peptides had been specifically deuterated at key amino acids. Lamellar diffraction data were collected and analysed to yield information on the peptide conformation, location and orientation relative to the bilayer.

  16. Confinement-Dependent Friction in Peptide Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Erbaş, Aykut; Netz, Roland R.

    2013-01-01

    Friction within globular proteins or between adhering macromolecules crucially determines the kinetics of protein folding, the formation, and the relaxation of self-assembled molecular systems. One fundamental question is how these friction effects depend on the local environment and in particular on the presence of water. In this model study, we use fully atomistic MD simulations with explicit water to obtain friction forces as a single polyglycine peptide chain is pulled out of a bundle of k adhering parallel polyglycine peptide chains. The whole system is periodically replicated along the peptide axes, so a stationary state at prescribed mean sliding velocity V is achieved. The aggregation number is varied between k = 2 (two peptide chains adhering to each other with plenty of water present at the adhesion sites) and k = 7 (one peptide chain pulled out from a close-packed cylindrical array of six neighboring peptide chains with no water inside the bundle). The friction coefficient per hydrogen bond, extrapolated to the viscous limit of vanishing pulling velocity V → 0, exhibits an increase by five orders of magnitude when going from k = 2 to k = 7. This dramatic confinement-induced friction enhancement we argue to be due to a combination of water depletion and increased hydrogen-bond cooperativity. PMID:23528088

  17. Non-opioid actions of opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Wollemann, Mária; Benyhe, Sándor

    2004-06-04

    Beside the well known actions of opioid peptides on mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptors, increasing amount of pharmacological and biochemical evidence has recently been published about non-opioid actions of various opioid peptides. These effects are not abolished by naloxone treatments. Such non-opioid effects are observed both in nervous tissues and in the cellular elements of the immune system. Peptides exhibiting non-opioid effects include beta-endorphin, dynorphin A, nociceptin/OFQ, endomorphins, hemorphins and a number of Proenkephalin A derived peptides, such as Met-enkephalin, Met-enkephalin-Arg-Phe (MERF) and bovine adrenal medullary peptide (BAM22). Non-opioid actions are exerted through different neuronal receptors, e.g., dynorphin hyperalgesia through NMDA receptor, Met-enkephalin induced regulation of cell growth through zeta receptors, pain modulation by nociceptin through ORL-1 or NOP receptors, while BAM22 acts through sensory neuron specific G protein-coupled receptors (SNSR). We have investigated Met-enkephalin-Arg-Phe (MERF) and its analogues by the means of direct and indirect radioligand binding assays. It has been found that in addition to kappa(2) and delta-opioid receptors, MERF can act also through sigma(2)- or probably via FMRF-NH(2) receptors in rat cerebellum. A role of functionally assembling heterodimer receptors in mediating the non-conventional actions of these peptide ligands can not be excluded as well.

  18. Antimicrobial Cyclic Peptides for Plant Disease Control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Wan; Kim, Beom Seok

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial cyclic peptides derived from microbes bind stably with target sites, have a tolerance to hydrolysis by proteases, and a favorable degradability under field conditions, which make them an attractive proposition for use as agricultural fungicides. Antimicrobial cyclic peptides are classified according to the types of bonds within the ring structure; homodetic, heterodetic, and complex cyclic peptides, which in turn reflect diverse physicochemical features. Most antimicrobial cyclic peptides affect the integrity of the cell envelope. This is achieved through direct interaction with the cell membrane or disturbance of the cell wall and membrane component biosynthesis such as chitin, glucan, and sphingolipid. These are specific and selective targets providing reliable activity and safety for non-target organisms. Synthetic cyclic peptides produced through combinatorial chemistry offer an alternative approach to develop antimicrobials for agricultural uses. Those synthesized so far have been studied for antibacterial activity, however, the recent advancements in powerful technologies now promise to provide novel antimicrobial cyclic peptides that are yet to be discovered from natural resources. PMID:25774105

  19. Peptide pheromone signaling in Streptococcus and Enterococcus

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Laura C.; Federle, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular chemical signaling in bacteria, commonly referred to as quorum sensing (QS), relies on the production and detection of compounds known as pheromones to elicit coordinated responses among members of a community. Pheromones produced by Gram-positive bacteria are comprised of small peptides. Based on both peptide structure and sensory system architectures, Gram-positive bacterial signaling pathways may be classified into one of four groups with a defining hallmark: cyclical peptides of the Agr type, peptides that contain Gly-Gly processing motifs, sensory systems of the RNPP family, or the recently characterized Rgg-like regulatory family. The recent discovery that Rgg family members respond to peptide pheromones increases substantially the number of species in which QS is likely a key regulatory component. These pathways control a variety of fundamental behaviors including conjugation, natural competence for transformation, biofilm development, and virulence factor regulation. Overlapping QS pathways found in multiple species and pathways that utilize conserved peptide pheromones provide opportunities for interspecies communication. Here we review pheromone signaling identified in the genera Enterococcus and Streptococcus, providing examples of all four types of pathways. PMID:24118108

  20. Ubiquitin fusion technology: bioprocessing of peptides.

    PubMed

    Pilon, A; Yost, P; Chase, T E; Lohnas, G; Burkett, T; Roberts, S; Bentley, W E

    1997-01-01

    Ubiquitin fusion technology represents an emerging method for economically producing peptides and small proteins in the bacterium Escherichia coli. Our focus is on peptide production where the need for cost-effective, scaleable processes has recently been highlighted by Kelley (1996). There are two principal features: (1) the expression system consists of a suitable E. coli host strain paired with a plasmid that encodes the ubiquitin fusion and (2) an ubiquitin-specific protease, UCH-L3, which cleaves only C-terminal extensions from ubiquitin. In this work, multigram yields were obtained of four ubiquitin fusions derived from cell paste generated in single 10-L fermentations. All were expressed intracellularly and remained soluble at extremely high levels of expression. Bacterial freeze--thaw lysates contained over 95% pure ubiquitin fusion protein. All four fusions were efficiently cleaved to ubiquitin and the peptide products. In one case, the final yield of peptide was 1.08 g from 3 L of low cell density bacterial culture. The combination of exceptional overexpression of the ubiquitin--peptide fusion proteins and a robust and specific protease are unique advantages contributing to a cost-effective, scaleable, and generic bioprocess for peptide production.