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Sample records for 12-pound solid steel

  1. Solid-state joining of ultrahigh carbon steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sunwoo, A.J.

    1993-04-22

    A joining study of these steels was initiated to determine the feasibility of using ultrahigh carbon steels in structural applications. The high carbon content (1.5 wt%) in these steels and the desire to maintain the superplastic microstructure limit the use of conventional arc-welding processes. We chose two solid-state joining processes: diffusion bonding and inertia friction welding. Preliminary results show that sound bonds can be obtained with tensile properties nearly equal to those of the base metal. Of three UHC steels bonded by both inertia-friction welding and diffusion- bonding processes, the one with the lowest aluminum content had the best overall properties. Diffusion bonding with a nickel interlayer showed the most promising results for the UHC steel containing 1.6 wt% aluminum. The properties of inertia-friction-welded steels can be improved by a post-weld heat treatment.

  2. SOLID STATE JOINING OF MAGNESIUM TO STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, Saumyadeep; Hovanski, Yuri; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Field, David P.; Yu, Hao; Pan, Tsung-Yu; Santella, M. L.

    2012-06-04

    Friction stir welding and ultrasonic welding techniques were applied to join automotive magnesium alloys to steel sheet. The effect of tooling and process parameters on the post-weld microstructure, texture and mechanical properties was investigated. Static and dynamic loading were utilized to investigate the joint strength of both cast and wrought magnesium alloys including their susceptibility and degradation under corrosive media. The conditions required to produce joint strengths in excess of 75% of the base metal strength were determined, and the effects of surface coatings, tooling and weld parameters on weld properties are presented.

  3. Solid recovered fuels in the steel industry.

    PubMed

    Kepplinger, Werner L; Tappeiner, Tamara

    2012-04-01

    By using waste materials as alternative fuels in metallurgical plants it is possible to minimize the traditionally used reducing agents, such as coke, coal, oil or natural gas. Moreover, by using waste materials in the metallurgical industry it is feasible to recover these materials as far as possible. This also represents another step towards environmental protection because carbon dioxide emissions can be reduced, if the H(2) content of the waste material is greater in comparison with that of the substituted fuel and the effects of global warming can therefore be reduced. In the present article various solid recovered fuels and their applications in the metallurgical industry are detailed.

  4. Cracking of high-solids epoxy coatings on steel structures in The Netherlands

    SciTech Connect

    Bijen, J. ); Montfort, J. van

    1999-05-01

    High-solids epoxy coatings on steel flood barriers in The Netherlands showed cracking shortly after application. An investigation revealed the cause of cracking. It appeared that shrinkage-induced stresses caused the coatings to fail. Two cracking phenomena are described and simulated by an accelerated test and computer modeling.

  5. Polydopamine supported preparation method for solid-phase microextraction coatings on stainless steel wire.

    PubMed

    Feng, Juanjuan; Sun, Min; Li, Jubai; Xu, Lili; Liu, Xia; Jiang, Shengxiang

    2011-06-10

    In this paper, we introduced a novel and versatile route to prepare solid-phase microextraction coatings on the chemically inert stainless steel wire. Polydopamine films can be created on metallic substrates by an oxidant-induced polymerization and subsequently support various secondary reactions to prepare functional surfaces. In the present work, polydopamine-bioactivated stainless steel wire was successfully modified by nanostructured hydroxyapatite. Extraction performance of the fiber was assessed on several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water solutions. Extraction mechanism was suggested based on the correlation of partition coefficients and LogPs. Both aqueous and solid real life samples were used to test the reliability of the solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography method; some analytes were detected and quantified.

  6. Development of microstructure in high-alloy steel K390 using semi-solid forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opatova, K.; Aisman, D.; Rubesova, K.; Ibrahim, K.; Jenicek, S.

    2016-03-01

    Semi-solid processing of light alloys, namely aluminium and magnesium alloys, is a widely known and well-established process. By contrast, processing of powder steels which have high levels of alloying elements is a rather new subject of research. Thixoforming of high-alloy steels entails a number of technical difficulties. If these are overcome, the method can offer a variety of benefits. First of all, the final product shape and the desired mechanical properties can be obtained using a single forming operation. Semi-solid forming can produce unusual powder steel microstructures unattainable by any other route. Generally, the microstructures, which are normally found in thixoformed steels, consist of large fractions of globular or polygonal particles of metastable austenite embedded in a carbide network. An example is the X210Cr12 steel which is often used for semi-solid processing experiments. A disadvantage of the normal microstructure configuration is the brittleness of the carbide network, in which cracks initiate and propagate, causing low energy fractures. However, there is a newly-developed mini-thixoforming route which produces microstructures with an inverted configuration. Here, the material chosen for this purpose was K390 steel, in which the content of alloying elements is up to 24%. Its microstructure which was obtained by mini- thixoforming did not contain polyhedral austenite grains but hard carbides embedded in a ductile austenitic matrix. This provided the material with improved toughness. The spaces between the austenite grains were filled with a eutectic in which chromium, molybdenum and cobalt were distributed uniformly. After the processing parameters were optimized, complexshaped demonstration products were manufactured by this route. These products showed an extraordinary compressive strength and high wear resistance, thanks to the hardness of their microstructure constituents, predominantly the carbides.

  7. Hydrofluoric acid etched stainless steel wire for solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hua-Ling; Li, Yan; Jiang, Dong-Qing; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2009-06-15

    Stainless steel wire has been widely used as the substrate of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers to overcome the shortcomings of conventional silica fibers such as fragility, by many researchers. However, in previous reports various sorbent coatings are always required in conjunction with the stainless steel wire for SPME. In this work, we report the bare stainless steel wire for SPME without the need for any additional coatings taking advantage of its high mechanical and thermal stability. To evaluate the performance of stainless steel wire for SPME, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, chlorobenzene, n-propylbenzene, aniline, phenol, n-hexane, n-octane, n-decane, n-undecane, n-dodecane, chloroform, trichloroethylene, n-octanol, and butanol were tested as analytes. Although the stainless steel wire had almost no extraction capability toward the tested analytes before etching, it did exhibit high affinity to the tested PAHs after etching with hydrofluoric acid. The etched stainless steel wire gave a much bigger enhancement factor (2541-3981) for the PAHs than the other analytes studied (< or = 515). Etching with hydrofluoric acid produced a porous and flower-like structure with Fe(2)O(3), FeF(3), Cr(2)O(3), and CrF(2) on the surface of the stainless steel wire, giving high affinity to the PAHs due to cation-pi interaction. On the basis of the high selectivity of the etched stainless steel wire for PAHs, a new SPME method was developed for gas chromatography with flame ionization detection to determine PAHs with the detection limits of 0.24-0.63 microg L(-1). The precision for six replicate extractions using one SPME fiber ranged from 2.9% to 5.3%. The fiber-to-fiber reproducibility for three parallel prepared fibers was 4.3-8.8%. One etched stainless steel wire can stand over 250 cycles of SPME without significant loss of extraction efficiency. The developed etched stainless steel wire is very stable, highly selective, and

  8. Direct gas-solid carbonation kinetics of steel slag and the contribution to in situ sequestration of flue gas CO(2) in steel-making plants.

    PubMed

    Tian, Sicong; Jiang, Jianguo; Chen, Xuejing; Yan, Feng; Li, Kaimin

    2013-12-01

    Direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag under various operational conditions was investigated to determine the sequestration of the flue gas CO2 . X-ray diffraction analysis of steel slag revealed the existence of portlandite, which provided a maximum theoretical CO2 sequestration potential of 159.4 kg CO 2 tslag (-1) as calculated by the reference intensity ratio method. The carbonation reaction occurred through a fast kinetically controlled stage with an activation energy of 21.29 kJ mol(-1) , followed by 10(3) orders of magnitude slower diffusion-controlled stage with an activation energy of 49.54 kJ mol(-1) , which could be represented by a first-order reaction kinetic equation and the Ginstling equation, respectively. Temperature, CO2 concentration, and the presence of SO2 impacted on the carbonation conversion of steel slag through their direct and definite influence on the rate constants. Temperature was the most important factor influencing the direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag in terms of both the carbonation conversion and reaction rate. CO2 concentration had a definite influence on the carbonation rate during the kinetically controlled stage, and the presence of SO2 at typical flue gas concentrations enhanced the direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag. Carbonation conversions between 49.5 % and 55.5 % were achieved in a typical flue gas at 600 °C, with the maximum CO2 sequestration amount generating 88.5 kg CO 2 tslag (-1) . Direct gas-solid carbonation of steel slag showed a rapid CO2 sequestration rate, high CO2 sequestration amounts, low raw-material costs, and a large potential for waste heat utilization, which is promising for in situ carbon capture and sequestration in the steel industry.

  9. [Riboflavin-radical formation by mechanochemical solid-state reaction using stainless steel vessel].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Shin-ichi; Furuta, Youji; Okita, Shintarou; Sasai, Yasushi; Aramaki, Hideki; Kuzuya, Masayuki

    2004-03-01

    The mechanochemical reaction of free riboflavin (FR) due to vibratory ball milling was carried out in a stainless steel vessel at room temperature under anaerobic conditions. The ESR of the fractured sample showed a broad single-line spectrum. It is suggested that the solid-state single-electron transfer (SSET) reaction from the surface of the stainless steel vessel to FR proceeded during the vibratory milling, resulting in the formation of the corresponding anion radicals. When the mechanochemical reaction of FR in the presence of calcium pantothenate (PC) was carried out, the radical concentration increased with the increasing PC content. It was shown that the anion radical in the metal complex was stable for a lengthy period of time even in highly humid air. PMID:15049132

  10. Oxidation Resistance of Low Carbon Stainless Steel for Applications in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Matthes, Steven A.; Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.; Singh, P.

    2003-10-01

    Alloys protected from corrosion by Cr2O3 (chromia) are recognized as potential replacements for LaCrO3–based ceramic materials currently used as bipolar separators (interconnects) in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Stainless steels gain their corrosion resistance from the formation of chromia, when exposed to oxygen at elevated temperatures. Materials for interconnect applications must form uniform conductive oxide scales at 600–800o C while simultaneously exposed to air on the cathode side and mixtures of H2 - H2O, and, possibly, CHx and CO - CO2 on the anode side. In addition, they must possess good physical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Type 316L stainless steel was selected for the baseline study and development of an understanding of corrosion processes in complex gas environments. This paper discusses the oxidation resistance of 316L stainless steel exposed to dual SOFC environment for ~100 hours at ~900oK. The dual environment consisted of dry air on the cathode side of the specimen and a mixture of H2 and 3% H2O on the anode side. Post - corrosion surface evaluation involved the use of optical and scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analyses.

  11. Protective/conductive coatings for ferritic stainless steel interconnects used in solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaigan, Nima

    Ferritic stainless steels are the most commonly used materials for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect application. Although these alloys may meet the criteria for interconnect application for short periods of service, their application is limited for long-term use (i.e., 40,000 h) due to poor oxidation behaviour that results in a rapid increase in contact resistance. In addition, volatile Cr species migrating from the chromia scale can poison the cathode resulting in a considerable drop in performance of the cell. Coatings and surface modifications have been developed in order to mitigate the abovementioned problems. In this study, composite electrodeposition of reactive element containing particles in a metal matrix was considered as a solution to the interconnect problems. Nickel and Co were used as the metal matrix and LaCrO3 particles as the reactive element containing particles. The role of the particles was to improve the oxidation resistance and oxide scale adhesion, while the role of Ni or Co was to provide a matrix for embedding of the particles. Also, oxidation of the Ni or Co matrix led to the formation of conductive oxides. Moreover, as another part of this study, the effect of substrate composition on performance of steel interconnects was investigated. Numerous experimental techniques were used to study and characterise the oxidation behaviour of the composite coatings, as well as the metal-oxide scale interface properties. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX), as well as surface analysis techniques including Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), were used for the purpose of characterization. The substrate used for coating was AISI-SAE 430 stainless steel that is considered as a typical, formerly used interconnect material. Also, for the purpose of the metal-oxide scale interfacial study, ZMG232 stainless steel that is a specially

  12. Thermophysical Properties of a Chromium Nickel Molybdenum Steel in the Solid and Liquid Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilthan, B.; Reschab, H.; Tanzer, R.; Schützenhöfer, W.; Pottlacher, Gernot

    2008-02-01

    Numerical simulation of vacuum arc re-melting, pressurized or protective electro-slag re-melting, and ingot casting have become quite important in the metal industry. However, a major drawback of these simulation techniques is the lack of accurate thermophysical properties for temperatures above 1,500 K. Heat capacity, heat of fusion, density, and thermal conductivity are important input parameters for the heat transfer equation. Since, direct measurements of thermal conductivity of alloys in the liquid state are almost impossible, its estimation from electrical conductivity using the Wiedemann Franz law is very useful. The afore-mentioned thermophysical properties of several steels are investigated within the context of an ongoing project. Here, we present a full set of thermophysical data for the chromium nickel molybdenum steel meeting the standard DIN 1.4435 (X2CrNiMo18-14-3); these values will be used by our partner to simulate various re-melting and solidification processes. Wire-shaped samples of the steel are resistively volume-heated, as part of a fast capacitor discharge circuit. Time-resolved measurements with sub-μs resolution of current through the specimen are performed with a Pearson probe. The voltage drop across the specimen is measured with knife-edge contacts and ohmic voltage dividers, the temperature of the sample with a pyrometer, and the volumetric expansion of the wire with a fast acting CCD camera. These measurements enable the heat of fusion, the heat capacity, and the electrical resistivity to be determined as a function of temperature in the solid and liquid phases. The thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity are estimated via the Wiedemann Franz law.

  13. Brazing of Stainless Steel to Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Using Gold-Based Brazes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, T. P.; Asthana, R.

    2007-01-01

    Two gold-base active metal brazes (gold-ABA and gold-ABA-V) were evaluated for oxidation resistance to 850 C, and used to join yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to a corrosion-resistant ferritic stainless steel for possible use in solid oxide fuel cells. Thermogravimetric analysis and optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to evaluate the braze oxidation behavior, and microstructure and composition of the YSZ/braze/steel joints. Both gold-ABA and gold-ABA-V exhibited nearly linear oxidation kinetics at 850 C, with gold-ABA-V showing faster oxidation than gold-ABA. Both brazes produced metallurgically sound YSZ/steel joints due to chemical interactions of Ti and V with the YSZ and steel substrates.

  14. Corrosive characteristics of surface-modified stainless steel bipolar plate in solid polymer fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaowen; Wang, Lixia; Sun, Juncai

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, corrosion behavior of an AISI 304 stainless steel modified by niobium or niobium nitride (denoted as niobized 304 SS and Nb-N 304 SS, respectively) is investigated in simulated solid polymer fuel cell (SPFC) operating conditions. Potentiodynamic polarizations show that the corrosion potentials of surface modified 304 SS shift to positive direction while the corrosion current densities decrease greatly comparing with the bare 304 SS in simulated anodic SPFC environments. The order of corrosive resistance in corrosive potential, corrosive current density and pitting potential is: Nb-N 304 SS > niobized 304 SS > bare 304 SS. In the methanol-fueled SPFC operating conditions, the results show that the corrosion resistance of bare and niobized 304 SS increases with the methanol concentration increasing in the test solutions.

  15. Brazing of Stainless Steels to Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shpargel, Tarah P.; Needham, Robert J.; Singh, M.; Kung, Steven C.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, there has been a great deal of interest in research, development, and commercialization of solid oxide fuel cells. Joining and sealing are critical issues that will need to be addressed before SOFC's can truly perform as expected. Ceramics and metals can be difficult to join together, especially when the joint must withstand up to 900 C operating temperature of the SOFC's. The goal of the present study is to find the most suitable braze material for joining of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to stainless steels. A number of commercially available braze materials TiCuSil, TiCuNi, Copper-ABA, Gold-ABA, and Gold-ABA-V have been evaluated. The oxidation behavior of the braze materials and steel substrates in air was also examined through thermogravimetric analysis. The microstructure and composition of the brazed regions have been examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy and EDS analysis. Effect of braze composition and processing conditions on the interfacial microstructure and composition of the joint regions will be presented.

  16. Thermal Diffusivity and Thermal Conductivity of Five Different Steel Alloys in the Solid and Liquid Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilthan, B.; Schützenhöfer, W.; Pottlacher, G.

    2015-08-01

    The need for characterization of thermophysical properties of steel and nickel-based alloys was addressed in the FFG-Bridge Project 810999 in cooperation with a partner from industry, Böhler Edelstahl GmbH & Co KG. To optimize numerical simulations of production processes, such as remelting or plastic deformation, additional, and more accurate data were necessary for the alloys under investigation. With a fast ohmic pulse heating circuit system, the temperature-dependent specific electrical resistivity, density, and specific heat capacity for a set of five high alloyed steels were measured. Hence, using the Wiedemann-Franz law with a Lorenz number of , the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity could be calculated for the solid and liquid phases up to temperatures of 2500 K. This experimental approach is limited by the following requirements for the specimens: they have to be electrically conducting, the melting point has to be high enough for the implemented pyrometric temperature measurement, and one has to be able to draw wires of the material. The latter restriction is technologically challenging with some of the materials being very brittle. For all samples, electrical and temperature signals are recorded and a fast shadowgraph method is used to measure the volume expansion. For each material under investigation, a set of data including the chemical composition, the density at room temperature, solidus and liquidus temperatures, and the change of enthalpy, resistivity, density, thermal conductivity, and thermal diffusivity as a function of temperature is reported.

  17. Long term high temperature oxidation characteristics of La and Cu alloyed ferritic stainless steels for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Srinivasan; Lee, Young-Su; Kim, Dong-Ik

    2016-09-01

    To ensure the best performance of solid oxide fuel cell metallic interconnects, the Fe-22 wt.% Cr ferritic stainless steels with various La contents (0.006-0.6 wt.%) and Cu addition (1.57 wt.%), are developed. Long-term isothermal oxidation behavior of these steels is investigated in air at 800 °C, for 2700 h. Chemistry, morphology, and microstructure of the thermally grown oxide scale are examined using XPS, SEM-EDX, and XRD techniques. Broadly, all the steels show a double layer consisting of an inner Cr2O3 and outer (Mn, Cr)3O4. Distinctly, in the La-added steels, binary oxides of Cr, Mn and Ti are found at the oxide scale surface together with (Mn, Cr)3O4. Furthermore, all La-varied steels possess the metallic Fe protrusions along with discontinuous (Mn, Cr)3O4 spinel zones at the oxide scale/metal interface and isolated precipitates of Ti-oxides in the underlying matrix. Increase of La content to 0.6 wt.% is detrimental to the oxidation resistance. For the Cu-added steel, Cu is found to segregate strongly at the oxide scale/metal interface which inhibits the ingress of oxygen thereby suppressing the subscale formation of (Mn, Cr)3O4. Thus, Cu addition to the Fe-22Cr ferritic stainless steels benefits the oxidation resistance.

  18. Palladium-coated stainless-steel wire as a solid-phase microextraction fiber.

    PubMed

    Sun, Min; Feng, Juanjuan; Bu, Yanan; Wang, Xiaojiao; Duan, Huimi; Luo, Chuannan

    2015-05-01

    A novel palladium solid-phase microextraction coating was fabricated on a stainless-steel wire by a simple in situ oxidation-reduction process. The palladium coating exhibited a rough microscaled surface and its thickness was about 2 μm. Preparation conditions (reaction time and concentration of palladium chloride and hydrochloric acid) were optimized in detail to achieve sufficient extraction efficiency. Extraction properties of the fiber were investigated by direct immersion solid-phase microextraction of several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and phthalate esters in aqueous samples. The extracted analytes were transferred into a gas chromatography system by thermal desorption. The effect of extraction and desorption conditions on extraction efficiency were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, good linearity was obtained and correlation coefficients between 0.9908 and 0.9990 were obtained. Limits of detection were 0.05-0.10 μg/L for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and 0.3 μg/L for phthalate esters. Their recoveries for real aqueous samples were in the range from 97.1 to 121% and from 89.1 to 108%, respectively. The intra- and interday tests were also investigated with three different addition levels, and satisfactory results were also obtained.

  19. Summary and evaluation of low-velocity impact tests of solid steel billet onto concrete pads

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, M.C.; Hovingh, W.J.; Mok, G.C.; Murty, S.S.; Chen, T.F.; Fischer, L.E.

    1998-02-01

    Spent fuel storage casks intended for use at independent spent fuel storage installations are evaluated during the application and review process for low-velocity impacts representative of possible handling accidents. In the past, the analyses involved in these evaluations have assumed that the casks dropped or tipped onto an unyielding surface - a conservative and simplifying assumption. Since 10 CFR Part 72, the regulation imposed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), does not require this assumption, applicants are currently seeking a more realistic model for the analyses to predict the effect of a cask dropping onto a reinforced concrete pad, including energy absorbing aspects such as cracking and flexure. To develop data suitable for benchmarking these analyses, the NRC has conducted several series of drop-test studies of a solid steel billet and of a near-full-scale empty cask. This report contains a summary and evaluation of all steel billet testing conducted by Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A series of finite element analyses of the billet testing is described and benchmarked against the test data. A method to apply the benchmarked finite element model of the soil and concrete pad to an analysis of a full-size storage cask is provided. In addition, an application to a {open_quotes}generic{close_quotes} full-size cask is presented for side and end drops, and tipover events. The primary purpose of this report is to provide applicants for an NRC license under 10 CFR Part 72 with a method for evaluating storage casks for low-velocity impact conditions.

  20. Thermo-mechanical fatigue properties of a ferritic stainless steel for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Yung-Tang; Lin, Chih-Kuang

    2012-12-01

    Thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) behavior of a newly developed ferritic stainless steel (Crofer 22 H) for planar solid oxide fuel cell (pSOFC) interconnect is investigated. TMF tests under various combinations of cyclic mechanical and thermal loadings are conducted in air at a temperature range of 25oC-800 °C. Experimental results show the number of cycles to failure for non-hold-time TMF loading is decreased with an increase in the minimum stress applied at 800 °C. There is very little effect of maximum stress applied at 25 °C on the number of cycles to failure. The non-hold-time TMF life is dominated by a fatigue mechanism involving cyclic high-temperature softening plastic deformation. A hold-time of 100 h for the minimum stress applied at 800 °C causes a significant drop of number of cycles to failure due to a synergistic action of fatigue and creep. Creep and creep-fatigue interaction mechanisms are the two primary contributors to the hold-time TMF damage. The creep damage ratio in the hold-time TMF damage is increased with a decrease in applied stress at 800 °C and an increase in number of cycles to failure.

  1. Graphene coating bonded onto stainless steel wire as a solid-phase microextraction fiber.

    PubMed

    Sun, Min; Feng, Juanjuan; Bu, Yanan; Wang, Xiaojiao; Duan, Huimin; Luo, Chuannan

    2015-03-01

    A graphene coating bonded onto stainless steel wire was fabricated and investigated as a solid-phase microextraction fiber. The coating was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The coating with rough and crinkled structure was about 1 μm. These characteristics were helpful for promoting extraction. Using five n-alkanes (n-undecane, n-dodecane, n-tridecane, n-tetradecane and n-hexadecane) as analytes, the fiber was evaluated in direct-immersion mode by coupling with gas chromatography (GC). Through optimizing extraction and desorption conditions, a sensitive SPME-GC analytical method was established. SPME-GC method provided wide linearity range (0.2-150 μg L(-1)) and low limits of determination (0.05-0.5 μg L(-1)). It was applied to analyze rain water and a soil sample, and analytes were quantified in the range of 0.85-1.96 μg L(-1) and 0.09-3.34 μg g(-1), respectively. The recoveries of samples spiked at 10 μg L(-1) were in the range of 90.1-120% and 80.6-94.2%, respectively. The fiber also exhibited high thermal and chemical stability, due to the covalent bonds between graphene coating and wire, and the natural resistance of graphene for thermal, acid and basic conditions. PMID:25618658

  2. Graphene coating bonded onto stainless steel wire as a solid-phase microextraction fiber.

    PubMed

    Sun, Min; Feng, Juanjuan; Bu, Yanan; Wang, Xiaojiao; Duan, Huimin; Luo, Chuannan

    2015-03-01

    A graphene coating bonded onto stainless steel wire was fabricated and investigated as a solid-phase microextraction fiber. The coating was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The coating with rough and crinkled structure was about 1 μm. These characteristics were helpful for promoting extraction. Using five n-alkanes (n-undecane, n-dodecane, n-tridecane, n-tetradecane and n-hexadecane) as analytes, the fiber was evaluated in direct-immersion mode by coupling with gas chromatography (GC). Through optimizing extraction and desorption conditions, a sensitive SPME-GC analytical method was established. SPME-GC method provided wide linearity range (0.2-150 μg L(-1)) and low limits of determination (0.05-0.5 μg L(-1)). It was applied to analyze rain water and a soil sample, and analytes were quantified in the range of 0.85-1.96 μg L(-1) and 0.09-3.34 μg g(-1), respectively. The recoveries of samples spiked at 10 μg L(-1) were in the range of 90.1-120% and 80.6-94.2%, respectively. The fiber also exhibited high thermal and chemical stability, due to the covalent bonds between graphene coating and wire, and the natural resistance of graphene for thermal, acid and basic conditions.

  3. Manganese-Cobalt Mixed Spinel Oxides as Surface Modifiers for Stainless Steel Interconnects of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Gordon; Yang, Z Gary; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2006-11-06

    Ferritic stainless steels are promising candidates for interconnect applications in low- and mid-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). A couple of issues however remain for the particular application, including the chromium poisoning due to chromia evaporation, and long-term surface and electrical stability of the scale grown on these steels. Application of a manganese colbaltite spinel protection layer on the steels appears to be an effective approach to solve the issues. For an optimized performance, Mn{sub 1+x}Co{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} (-1 {le} x {le} 2) spinels were investigated against properties relative for protection coating applications on ferritic SOFC interconnects. Overall it appears that the spinels with x around 0.5 demonstrate a good CTE match to ceramic cell components, a relative high electrical conductivity, and a good thermal stability up to 1,250 C. This was confirmed by a long-term test on the Mn{sub 1.5}Co{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} protection layer that was thermally grown on Crofer22 APU, indicating the spinel protection layer not only significantly decreased the contact resistance between a LSF cathode and the stainless steel interconnects, but also inhibited the sub-scale growth on the stainless steels.

  4. Investigation of iron-chromium-niobium-titanium ferritic stainless steel for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guan-Guang; Wang, Chong-Min; Nie, Zimin; Templeton, Joshua; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    As part of an effort to develop cost-effective ferritic stainless steel-based interconnects for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks, both bare AISI441 and AISI441 coated with (Mn,Co) 3O 4 protection layers were studied in terms of its metallurgical characteristics, oxidation behavior, and electrical performance. The addition of minor alloying elements, in particular Nb, led to formation of Laves phases both inside grains and along grain boundaries. In particular, the Laves phase which precipitated out along grain boundaries during exposure at intermediate SOFC operating temperatures was found to be rich in both Nb and Si. The capture of Si in the Laves phase minimized the Si activity in the alloy matrix and prevented formation of an insulating silica layer at the scale/metal interface, resulting in a reduction in area-specific electrical resistance (ASR). However, the relatively high oxidation rate of the steel, which leads to increasing ASR over time, and the need to prevent volatilization of chromium from the steel necessitates the application of a conductive protection layer on the steel. In particular, the application of a Mn 1.5Co 1.5O 4 spinel protection layer substantially improved the electrical performance of the 441 by reducing the oxidation rate.

  5. Mechanism and Kinetics of Solid-State Transformation in High-Temperature Processed Linepipe Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Pei; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.

    2013-12-01

    A relatively new class of linepipe steels with yield strength greater than 500 MPa created for thermomechanical processing at temperatures in excess of 1473 K (1200 °C) has established a firm foothold in the market for modern, large diameter, and high-pressure gas transmission systems. The design concept for the steels takes advantage of the enhanced role which higher levels of niobium can play in very low carbon steels, during the plate manufacturing process. The transformation products observed after cooling have been interpreted in conflicting ways in the literature, using ambiguous terms which are not established rigorously. Revealing characterization experiments have therefore been conducted to establish that the principal transformation product grows by a displacive transformation mechanism, and that it is properly identified as bainite. The implications of this, on both the interpretation of microstructure and on the processing of the steel, are discussed.

  6. Ordered mesoporous polymers in situ coated on a stainless steel wire for a highly sensitive solid phase microextraction fibre.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Juan; Liang, Yeru; Liu, Shuqin; Ding, Yajuan; Shen, Yong; Luan, Tiangang; Zhu, Fang; Jiang, Ruifen; Wu, Dingcai; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2015-07-21

    Development of facile and effective methods for fabrication of high-performance solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibres remains a great challenge. Herein, a new class of ordered mesoporous polymers (OMPs) in situ coated on a stainless steel wire were successfully developed and utilized as a highly sensitive and stable SPME fibre for the first time. Because of the highly ordered mesoporous structure of its OMP coating, the π-π interactions and the dispersion forces, the OMP-coated SPME fibre exhibited much better extraction properties as compared to the commercial PDMS fibre. The findings could provide a new benchmark for preparing well-defined porous materials for the SPME application.

  7. Research options for the development of sensors to measure the thermal state of solid steel bodies.

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, T.A.; Lownie, H.W. Jr.

    1983-02-01

    The purpose of the study reported here is to assist Battelle's Pcacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in planning a research and development program to develop temperature sensors for metal and ceramic industries. This study focuses on sensors to measure internal temperatures within bodies of hot steel. A series of literature surveys, interviews, field visits, and meetings with steel-industry organizations was conducted in seeking answers to questions posed by PNL. These questions, with responses, are summarized.

  8. Avoiding chromium transport from stainless steel interconnects into contact layers and oxygen electrodes in intermediate temperature solid oxide electrolysis stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlupp, Meike V. F.; Kim, Ji Woo; Brevet, Aude; Rado, Cyril; Couturier, Karine; Vogt, Ulrich F.; Lefebvre-Joud, Florence; Züttel, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the ability of (La0.8Sr0.2)(Mn0.5Co0.5)O3-δ (LSMC) and La(Ni0.6Fe0.4)O3-δ (LNF) contact coatings to avoid the transport of Cr from steel interconnects to solid oxide electrolysis electrodes, especially to the anode. The transport of chromium from commercial Crofer 22 APU (ThyssenKrupp) and K41X (AISI441, Aperam Isbergues) steels through LSMC and LNF contact coatings into adjacent (La0.8Sr0.2)MnO3-δ (LSM) oxygen electrodes was investigated in an oxygen atmosphere at 700 °C. Chromium concentrations of up to 4 atom% were detected in the contact coatings after thermal treatments for 3000 h, which also lead to the presence of chromium in adjacent LSM electrodes. Introduction of a dense (Co,Mn)3O4 coating between steel and contact coating was necessary to prevent the diffusion of chromium into contact coatings and electrodes and should lead to extended stack performance and lifetime.

  9. Micro solid oxide fuel cell fabricated on porous stainless steel: a new strategy for enhanced thermal cycling ability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun Joong; Park, Byung Hyun; Kim, Sun Jae; Lee, Younki; Bae, Hongyeul; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2016-03-01

    Miniaturized solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs) are being extensively studied as a promising alternative to Li batteries for next generation portable power. A new micro-SOFC is designed and fabricated which shows enhanced thermal robustness by employing oxide-based thin-film electrode and porous stainless steel (STS) substrate. To deposit gas-tight thin-film electrolyte on STS, nano-porous composite oxide is proposed and applied as a new contact layer on STS. The micro-SOFC fabricated on composite oxide- STS dual layer substrate shows the peak power density of 560 mW cm(-2) at 550 °C and maintains this power density during rapid thermal cycles. This cell may be suitable for portable electronic device that requires high power-density and fast thermal cycling.

  10. The effect of temperature on chromium vaporization and oxide scale growth on interconnect steels for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk-Windisch, Hannes; Svensson, Jan Erik; Froitzheim, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Chromium vaporization and oxide scale growth are probably the two most important degradation mechanisms associated with the interconnect in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) when Cr2O3-forming alloys are used as the interconnect material. This study examines the influence of temperature on both mechanisms. Two commercially available steels; Crofer 22 H and Sanergy HT, were isothermally exposed at 650, 750 and 850 °C in an air-3% H2O atmosphere with a high flow rate. Volatile chromium species were collected using the denuder technique. The microstructure of thermally grown oxide scales was characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDX) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The findings of this study show that although Cr evaporation is reduced with lower temperature, its relative importance compared to oxide scale growth is greater.

  11. Using CrAlN multilayer coatings to improve oxidation resistance of steel interconnects for solid oxide fuel cell stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. J.; Tripp, C.; Knospe, A.; Ramana, C. V.; Kayani, A.; Gorokhovsky, Vladimir; Shutthanandan, V.; Gelles, D. S.

    2004-06-01

    The requirements of low-cost and high-temperature corrosion resistance for bipolar interconnect plates in solid oxide fuel cell stacks has directed attention to the use of metal plates with oxidation resistant coatings. The performance of steel plates with multilayer coatings, consisting of CrN for electrical conductivity and CrAlN for oxidation resistance, was investigated. The coatings were deposited using large area filtered arc deposition technology, and subsequently annealed in air for up to 25 hours at 800 °C. The composition, structure, and morphology of the coated plates were characterized using Rutherford backscattering, nuclear reaction analysis, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. By altering the architecture of the layers within the coatings, the rate of oxidation was reduced by more than an order of magnitude. Electrical resistance was measured at room temperature.

  12. Micro solid oxide fuel cell fabricated on porous stainless steel: a new strategy for enhanced thermal cycling ability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kun Joong; Park, Byung Hyun; Kim, Sun Jae; Lee, Younki; Bae, Hongyeul; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2016-01-01

    Miniaturized solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs) are being extensively studied as a promising alternative to Li batteries for next generation portable power. A new micro-SOFC is designed and fabricated which shows enhanced thermal robustness by employing oxide-based thin-film electrode and porous stainless steel (STS) substrate. To deposit gas-tight thin-film electrolyte on STS, nano-porous composite oxide is proposed and applied as a new contact layer on STS. The micro-SOFC fabricated on composite oxide- STS dual layer substrate shows the peak power density of 560 mW cm−2 at 550 °C and maintains this power density during rapid thermal cycles. This cell may be suitable for portable electronic device that requires high power-density and fast thermal cycling. PMID:26928921

  13. Preparation of temperature sensitive molecularly imprinted polymer for solid-phase microextraction coatings on stainless steel fiber to measure ofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tong; Guan, Xiujuan; Tang, Wanjin; Ma, Ying; Zhang, Haixia

    2015-01-01

    A kind of new temperature sensitive molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) with ofloxacin (OFL) as template was prepared for the coating of solid phase microextraction (SPME). Dopamine was self-polymerized on stainless steel fiber (SSF) as the SPME support followed by silanization. Then MIP was synthesized as SPME coating on the modified SSF in a capillary, with N-isopropyl acrylamide as temperature sensitive monomer and methacrylic acid as functional monomer. The synthesis could be well repeated with multiple capillaries putting in the same reaction solution. The obtained MIP fiber was evaluated in detail with different techniques and various adsorption experiments. At last the MIP fiber was used to extract the OFL in milk. Satisfied recoveries between 89.7 and 103.4% were obtained with the limit of quantification (LOQLC) of 0.04 μg mL(-1) by the method of SPME coupled with high performance of liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  14. Micro solid oxide fuel cell fabricated on porous stainless steel: a new strategy for enhanced thermal cycling ability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun Joong; Park, Byung Hyun; Kim, Sun Jae; Lee, Younki; Bae, Hongyeul; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2016-01-01

    Miniaturized solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs) are being extensively studied as a promising alternative to Li batteries for next generation portable power. A new micro-SOFC is designed and fabricated which shows enhanced thermal robustness by employing oxide-based thin-film electrode and porous stainless steel (STS) substrate. To deposit gas-tight thin-film electrolyte on STS, nano-porous composite oxide is proposed and applied as a new contact layer on STS. The micro-SOFC fabricated on composite oxide- STS dual layer substrate shows the peak power density of 560 mW cm(-2) at 550 °C and maintains this power density during rapid thermal cycles. This cell may be suitable for portable electronic device that requires high power-density and fast thermal cycling. PMID:26928921

  15. Micro solid oxide fuel cell fabricated on porous stainless steel: a new strategy for enhanced thermal cycling ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kun Joong; Park, Byung Hyun; Kim, Sun Jae; Lee, Younki; Bae, Hongyeul; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2016-03-01

    Miniaturized solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs) are being extensively studied as a promising alternative to Li batteries for next generation portable power. A new micro-SOFC is designed and fabricated which shows enhanced thermal robustness by employing oxide-based thin-film electrode and porous stainless steel (STS) substrate. To deposit gas-tight thin-film electrolyte on STS, nano-porous composite oxide is proposed and applied as a new contact layer on STS. The micro-SOFC fabricated on composite oxide- STS dual layer substrate shows the peak power density of 560 mW cm-2 at 550 °C and maintains this power density during rapid thermal cycles. This cell may be suitable for portable electronic device that requires high power-density and fast thermal cycling.

  16. Numerical estimation of phase transformations in solid state during Yb:YAG laser heating of steel sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Kubiak, Marcin Piekarska, Wiesława; Domański, Tomasz; Saternus, Zbigniew; Stano, Sebastian

    2015-03-10

    This work concerns the numerical modeling of heat transfer and phase transformations in solid state occurring during the Yb:YAG laser beam heating process. The temperature field is obtained by the numerical solution into transient heat transfer equation with convective term. The laser beam heat source model is developed using the Kriging interpolation method with experimental measurements of Yb:YAG laser beam profile taken into account. Phase transformations are calculated on the basis of Johnson - Mehl - Avrami (JMA) and Koistinen - Marburger (KM) kinetics models as well as continuous heating transformation (CHT) and continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams for S355 steel. On the basis of developed numerical algorithms 3D computer simulations are performed in order to predict temperature history and phase transformations in Yb:YAG laser heating process.

  17. Using CrAIN Multilayer Coatings to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Steel Interconnects for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Richard J.; Tripp, C.; Knospe, Anders; Ramana, C. V.; Gorokhovsky, Vladimir I.; Shutthanandan, V.; Gelles, David S.

    2004-06-01

    The requirements of low cost and high-tempurature corrosion resistance for bipolar interconnect plates in solid oxide fuel cell stacks has directed attention to the use of metal plates with oxidation resistant coatings. We have investigatedt he performance of steel plates with multilayer coatings consisting of CrN for electrical conductivity and CrAIN for oxidation resistance. The coatings were deposited usin large area filterd arc deposition technolgy, and subsequently annealed in air for up to 25 hours at 800 degrees celsius. The composition, structer and morphology of the coated plates were characterized using RBS, nuclear reaction analysis, AFM and TEM techniques. By altering the architecture of the layers within the coatings, the rate of oxidation was reduced by more than an order of magnitute. Electrical resistance was measured at room temperature.

  18. Co/LaCrO 3 composite coatings for AISI 430 stainless steel solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaigan, Nima; Ivey, Douglas G.; Chen, Weixing

    Rapidly decreasing electronic conductivity, chromium volatility and poisoning of the cathode material are the major problems associated with inevitable growth of chromia on ferritic stainless steel interconnects of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). This work evaluates the performance of a novel, electrodeposited composite Co/LaCrO 3 coating for AISI 430 stainless steel. The oxidation behaviour of the Co/LaCrO 3-coated AISI 430 substrates is studied in terms of scale microstructure and growth kinetics. Area-specific resistance (ASR) of the coated substrates has also been tested. The results showed that the Co/LaCrO 3 coating forms a triple-layer scale consisting of a chromia-rich subscale, a Co-Fe spinel mid-layer and a Co 3O 4 spinel top layer at 800 °C in air. This scale is protective, acts as an effective barrier against chromium migration into the outer oxide layer and exhibits a low, stable ASR of ∼0.02 Ω cm 2 after 900 h at 800 °C in air.

  19. Behavior of nonmetallic inclusions in front of the solid-liquid interface in low-carbon steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Sei; Nabeshima, Y.; Nakajima, K.; Mizoguchi, S.

    2000-10-01

    The present study is concerned with the interaction phenomena of nonmetallic inclusions in front of a moving solid-liquid interface. The in situ observation was done in a high-temperature experiment by using a laser microscope. Alumina inclusions in an aluminum-killed steel with low oxygen content exhibited the well-known clustering behavior. The velocity of the advancing interface first increased while approaching the particle, but became stagnant during engulfment and increased again after that. Alumina-magnesia complex inclusions in a magnesium-added steel with high oxygen content were very finely dispersed in the molten pool. These inclusions escaped from the advancing interface during solidification, but gathered again at the retreating interface during remelting. The tiny inclusions were thought to behave just as tracer particles of a local flow. The velocity of particles was measured on a video image, and the significant acceleration or deceleration was found near the interface. It was concluded that the flow was induced by the Marangoni effect due to the local difference in temperature and oxygen content in front of the interface, particularly in the case of a higher oxygen content. However, the flow was weak in the case of a low oxygen content.

  20. Graphene oxide decorated with silver nanoparticles as a coating on a stainless-steel fiber for solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Licheng; Hou, Xiudan; Li, Jubai; Liu, Shujuan; Guo, Yong

    2015-07-01

    A novel graphene oxide decorated with silver nanoparticles coating on a stainless-steel fiber for solid-phase microextraction was prepared. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the coating surface and showed that silver nanoparticles were dispersed on the wrinkled graphene oxide surface. Coupled to gas chromatography with flame ionization detection, the extraction abilities of the fiber for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were examined in the headspace solid-phase microextraction mode. The extraction parameters including adsorption time, adsorption temperature, salt concentration, desorption time and desorption temperature were investigated. Under the optimized condition, wide linearity with low limits of detection from 2 to 10 ng/L was obtained. The relative standard deviations for single-fiber repeatability and fiber-to-fiber reproducibility were less than 10.6 and 17.5%, respectively. The enrichment factors were from 1712.5 to 4503.7, showing the fiber has good extraction abilities. Moreover, the fiber exhibited a good stability and could be reused for more than 120 times. The established method was also applied for determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in two real water samples and the recoveries of analytes ranged from 84.4-116.3% with relative standard deviations less than 16.2%.

  1. Special Features of Fracture of a Solid-State Titanium Alloy - Nickel - Stainless Steel Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazgaliev, R. G.; Mukhametrakhimov, M. Kh.; Imaev, M. F.; Shayakhmetov, R. U.; Mulyukov, R. R.

    2015-10-01

    Microstructure, nanohardness, and special features of fracture of three-phase titanium alloy and stainless steel joint through a nanostructural nickel foil are investigated. Uniformly distributed microcracks are observed in Ti2Ni and TiN3 layers joined at temperatures above T = 700°C, whereas no microcracks are observed in the TiNi layer. This suggests that the reason for microcracking is an anomalously large change in the linear expansion coefficient of the TiNi layer during austenitic-martensitic transformation. Specimens subjected to mechanical tests at T = 20°C are fractured along different layers of the material, namely, in the central part of the specimen they are fractured along the Ti2Тi/TiNi interface, whereas at the edge they are fractured along the TiNi/TiNi3 interface.

  2. The Performance of Ce Surface Treated Ferritic Stainless Steels for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2007-09-01

    This research deals with the effect of a Ce surface treatment on the behavior of Fe-Cr-Mn ferritic stainless steels which may have application in SOFC technology. This treatment consisted of applying a slurry of CeO2 and a halide activator to the surface of coupons. After the slurry dried the coupons were heated to 900C in a controlled atmosphere furnace for 12 hours. The effectiveness of the treatment on commercial (Type 409 (12Cr), Type 430 (18Cr), Crofer 22APU (22Cr), Type 446(26Cr)) and experimental (NETL F9 (12Cr) and NETL F5 (22Cr)) alloys as a function of Cr content will be presented. The oxidation behavior of the alloys was assessed by exposing coupons (untreated and treated) to moist air at 800C. Area specific resistance (ASR) was measured at 800C. In general, the rare earth treatment effectively reduced the oxidation rate, resulting in thinner oxide scales and less internal oxidation.

  3. A review of recent progress in coatings, surface modifications and alloy developments for solid oxide fuel cell ferritic stainless steel interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaigan, Nima; Qu, Wei; Ivey, Douglas G.; Chen, Weixing

    Ferritic stainless steels have become the standard material for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnect applications. The use of commercially available ferritic stainless steels, not specifically designed for interconnect application, however, presents serious issues leading to premature degradation of the fuel cell stack, particularly on the cathode side. These problems include rapidly increasing contact resistance and volatilization of Cr from the oxide scales, resulting in cathode chromium poisoning and cell malfunction. To overcome these issues, a variety of conductive/protective coatings, surface treatments and modifications as well as alloy development have been suggested and studied over the past several years. This paper critically reviews the attempts performed thus far to mitigate the issues associated with the use of ferritic stainless steels on the cathode side. Different approaches are categorized and summarized and examples for each case are provided. Finally, directions and recommendations for the future studies are presented.

  4. CNT-TiO2 coating bonded onto stainless steel wire as a novel solid-phase microextraction fiber.

    PubMed

    Sun, Min; Feng, Juanjuan; Qiu, Huamin; Fan, Lulu; Li, Xiangjun; Luo, Chuannan

    2013-09-30

    A novel solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber based on carbon nanotubes-titanium oxide (CNT-TiO2) composite coating bonded onto stainless steel wire was prepared via electroless plating and sol-gel techniques. The SPME coating was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman microscopy. Coupled to gas chromatography (GC), the fiber was investigated with seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in direct-immersion mode. The SPME-GC analytical method was evaluated under optimized extraction conditions. Compared with other reports, higher sensitivity (LODs, 0.002-0.004 μg L(-1)) and better linear range (0.01-100 and 0.01-200 μg L(-1)) were obtained by the proposed method. The fiber exhibited high thermal stability to 300 °C and excellent durability in HCl and NaOH solutions. The as-established SPME-GC method was used to analyze the real water samples and satisfactory results were obtained.

  5. CO2 sequestration using accelerated gas-solid carbonation of pre-treated EAF steel-making bag house dust.

    PubMed

    El-Naas, Muftah H; El Gamal, Maisa; Hameedi, Suhaib; Mohamed, Abdel-Mohsen O

    2015-06-01

    Mineral CO2 sequestration is a promising process for the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. In this paper, alkaline calcium-rich dust particles collected from bag filters of electric arc furnaces (EAF) for steel making were utilized as a viable raw material for mineral CO2 sequestration. The dust particles were pre-treated through hydration, drying and screening. The pre-treated particles were then subjected to direct gas-solid carbonation reaction in a fluidized-bed reactor. The carbonated products were characterized to determine the overall sequestration capacity and the mineralogical structures. Leaching tests were also performed to measure the extracted minerals from the carbonated dust and evaluate the carbonation process on dust stabilization. The experimental results indicated that CO2 could be sequestered using the pre-treated bag house dust. The maximum sequestration of CO2 was 0.657 kg/kg of dust, based on the total calcium content. The highest degree of carbonation achieved was 42.5% and the carbonation efficiency was 69% at room temperature.

  6. Preparation and performances of Co-Mn spinel coating on a ferritic stainless steel interconnect material for solid oxide fuel cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. H.; Zeng, C. L.

    2014-04-01

    Ferritic stainless steels have become the candidate materials for interconnects of intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The present issues to be solved urgently for the application of ferritic stainless steel interconnects are their rapid increase in contact resistance and Cr poisoning. In the present study, a chloride electrolyte suspension has been developed to electro-deposit a Co-Mn alloy on a type 430 stainless steel, followed by heat treatment at 750 °C in argon and at 800 °C in air to obtain Co-Mn spinel coatings. The experimental results indicate that an adhesive and compact Co-Mn alloy layer can be deposited in the chloride solution. After heat treatment, a complex coating composed of an external MnCo2O4 layer and an inner Cr-rich oxide layer has been formed on 430SS. The coating improves the oxidation resistance of the steel at 800 °C in air, especially in wet air, and inhibits the outward diffusion of Cr from the Cr-rich scale. Moreover, a low contact resistance has been achieved with the application of the spinel coatings.

  7. Microstructure of X210Cr12 steel after the forming in semi-solid state visualized by very low energy SEM in ultra high vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikmeková, Š.; Mašek, B.; Jirková, H.; Aišman, D.; Müllerová, I.; Frank, L.

    2013-06-01

    Progress in materials science is inseparably connected with development of new analytical methods which make possible to observe the materials microstructure with high sensitivity. The aim of the present study is shown that scanning low energy electron microscopy (SLEEM) has a significant impact in advance of a fundamental understanding of the evolution of microstructure upon semi-solid processing. This paper deals with the application of the ultra high vacuum scanning low energy electron microscopy (UHV SLEEM) to the study of microstructure of X210Cr12 steel after the formation in semi-solid state and the study of the annealing of deformed metastable austenite. Examples from these specimens show that the contrast between differently oriented grains in polycrystalline materials is very sensitive to the parameters such as energy of the primary beam, working distance and detection of high angle backscattered electrons.

  8. Direct measurement of solids: High temperature sensing: Phase 2, Experimental development and testing on furnace-heated steel blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.K.; Daly, D.S.

    1985-12-01

    Using average velocity measurements to estimate average profile temperature shows promise and merits further investigation. The current generation of electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) can transmit and detect signals in steel below the magnetic transition temperature. Techniques for calibrating ultrasonic velocity to internal temperature need further development. EMATs are inadequate ultrasonic transmitters for these applications. A high-energy, pulsed laser capable of generating more intense ultrasonic signals should be investigated as a transmitter. Recommendations are given for further work.

  9. In situ hydrothermal growth of ytterbium-based metal-organic framework on stainless steel wire for solid-phase microextraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiu-Lin; Wang, Xia; Chen, Xiang-Feng; Wang, Ming-Lin; Zhao, Ru-Song

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we report the use of a porous ytterbium-based metal-organic framework (Yb-MOF) coating material with good thermal stability for the headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from environmental samples. The Yb-MOF thin films, grown in situ on stainless steel wire in solution, exhibited high selectivity and sensitivity toward PAHs. Under the optimal conditions, the novel fibers achieved large enrichment factors (130-2288), low limits of detection (0.07-1.67ngL(-1)), and wide range of linearity (10-1000ngL(-1)) for 16 PAHs in the tested samples. The novel fiber was successfully used in the analysis of PAHs in real environmental samples. These results demonstrated that Yb-MOF is a promising coating material for the SPME of PAHs at trace levels from environmental samples.

  10. Au-coated ZnO nanorods on stainless steel fiber for self-cleaning solid phase microextraction-surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Shi, Yu-E; Cui, Jingcheng; Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhan, Jinhua

    2016-06-01

    Solid phase microextraction-surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SPME-SERS), combining the pretreatment and determination functions, has been successfully used in environmental analysis. In this work, Au-coated ZnO nanorods were fabricated on stainless steel fiber as a self-cleaning SERS-active SPME fiber. The ZnO nanorods grown on stainless steel fiber were prepared via a simple hydrothermal approach. Then the obtained nanostructures were decorated with Au nanoparticles through ion-sputtering at room temperature. The obtained SERS-active SPME fiber is a reproducible sensitivity sensor. Taking p-aminothiophenol as the probe molecule, the RSD value of the SERS-active SPME fiber was 8.9%, indicating the fiber owned good uniformity. The qualitative and quantitative detection of crystal violet and malachite green was also achieved. The log-log plot of SERS intensity to crystal violet and malachite green concentration showed a good linear relationship. Meanwhile, this SERS-active SPME fiber can achieve self-cleaning owning to the excellent photocatalytic performance of ZnO nanorods. Crystal violet was still successfully detected even after five cycles, which indicated the high reproducibility of this SERS-active SPME fiber.

  11. Investigation into the diffusion and oxidation behavior of the interface between a plasma-sprayed anode and a porous steel support for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu; Liu, Meilin; Yang, Guan-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Porous metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have attracted much attention because their potential to dramatically reduce the cost while enhancing the robustness and manufacturability. In particular, 430 ferritic steel (430L) is one of the popular choice for SOFC support because of its superior performance and low cost. In this study, we investigate the oxidation and diffusion behavior of the interface between a Ni-based anode and porous 430L support exposed to a humidified (3% H2O) hydrogen atmosphere at 700 °C. The Ni-GDC (Ce0.8Gd0.2O2-δ) cermet anodes are deposited on the porous 430L support by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS). The effect of exposure time on the microstructure and phase structure of the anode and the supports is studied and the element diffusion across the support/anode interface is characterized. Results indicate that the main oxidation product of the 430L support is Cr2O3, and that Cr and Fe will diffuse to the anode and the diffusion thickness increases with the exposure time. The diffusion thickness of Cr and Fe reach about 5 and 2 μm, respectively, after 1000 h exposure. However, the element diffusion and oxidation has little influence on the area-specific resistance, indicating that the porous 430L steel and plasma sprayed Ni-GDC anode are promising for durable SOFCs.

  12. Electrodeposition of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) on a stainless steel wire for solid phase microextraction and GC determination of some esters with high boiling points.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuyu; Zhao, Faqiong; Zeng, Baizhao

    2013-01-30

    In this work, 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) emulsion is prepared by ultrasonication agitation and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) coating is fabricated on a stainless steel wire by electrochemical method from a 0.10M sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate aqueous solution containing EDOT. The coating is characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry, and it presents cauliflower-like structure. When the resulted PEDOT/steel fiber is used for the headspace solid phase-microextraction of some esters (i.e. methyl anthranilate, dimethyl phthalate, ethyl-o-aminobenzoate, methyl laurate and diethyl phthalate) and their GC detection, the limits of detection (LOD) are ca. 7.8-31 ng L(-1) (S/N=3) and the linear ranges are 0.25-800 μg L(-1). The fiber shows high thermal stability (up to 320 °C), good reproducibility and long lifetime (more than 183 times). It also has good chemical stability. After it is immersed in acid, alkali and dichloromethane for 4h its extraction efficiency remains almost unchanged. Besides esters the fiber also exhibits high extraction efficiency for alcohols and aromatic compounds. PMID:23597884

  13. Au-coated ZnO nanorods on stainless steel fiber for self-cleaning solid phase microextraction-surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Shi, Yu-E; Cui, Jingcheng; Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhan, Jinhua

    2016-06-01

    Solid phase microextraction-surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SPME-SERS), combining the pretreatment and determination functions, has been successfully used in environmental analysis. In this work, Au-coated ZnO nanorods were fabricated on stainless steel fiber as a self-cleaning SERS-active SPME fiber. The ZnO nanorods grown on stainless steel fiber were prepared via a simple hydrothermal approach. Then the obtained nanostructures were decorated with Au nanoparticles through ion-sputtering at room temperature. The obtained SERS-active SPME fiber is a reproducible sensitivity sensor. Taking p-aminothiophenol as the probe molecule, the RSD value of the SERS-active SPME fiber was 8.9%, indicating the fiber owned good uniformity. The qualitative and quantitative detection of crystal violet and malachite green was also achieved. The log-log plot of SERS intensity to crystal violet and malachite green concentration showed a good linear relationship. Meanwhile, this SERS-active SPME fiber can achieve self-cleaning owning to the excellent photocatalytic performance of ZnO nanorods. Crystal violet was still successfully detected even after five cycles, which indicated the high reproducibility of this SERS-active SPME fiber. PMID:27155303

  14. Elastic Constants at High Pressure, Solid-Liquid Phase Boundaries and Equations of State for Solid and Liquid Copper and 316-Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Dennis

    1999-06-01

    Prior accurate measurements of sound speed on the Hugoniot for copper and 316-SS are used to construct complete equations of state for solid and liquid phases. Differences between calculated bulk and observed elastic sound-speed in the solid are used to infer high-pressure elastic constants. At higher pressures, where the shocked state is entirely liquid, data are sufficient to construct the EOS including an accurate estimate for Grüneisen's ratio. The liquid EOS also reasonably describes some low-pressure, high-temperature properties, including density, sound speed, variation of sound speed with temperature, and thermal expansion, lending confidence to its accuracy. Results are comparable for each metal: the shear modulus increases along the Hugoniot and then drops precipitously toward zero as the pressure nears the liquid-phase boundary. In the liquid, Grüneisen's ratio is observed to be constant and agrees with the value measured for the liquid at zero pressure. The state below which this constancy holds is identified as the smallest pressure on the Hugoniot at which melting is complete. The gap between pure solid and pure liquid is identified as the mixed-phase region and in the case of copper, its size and location are in reasonable agreement with published ab initio calculations of Moriarty. Confidence in calculated temperature and entropy is less then that in pressure, volume and energy owing to uncertainties in specific heats.

  15. Long-term oxidation behavior of spinel-coated ferritic stainless steel for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guanguang; Nie, Zimin; Templeton, Joshua D.

    2013-06-01

    Long-term tests (>8,000 hours) indicate that AISI 441 ferritic stainless steel coated with a Mn-Co spinel protection layer is a promising candidate material system for IT-SOFC interconnect applications. While uncoated AISI 441 showed a substantial increase in area-specific electrical resistance (ASR), spinel-coated AISI 441 exhibited much lower ASR values (11-13 mOhm-cm2). Formation of an insulating silica sublayer beneath the native chromia-based scale was not observed, and the spinel coatings reduced the oxide scale growth rate and blocked outward diffusion of Cr from the alloy substrate. The structure of the scale formed under the spinel coatings during the long term tests differed from that typically observed on ferritic stainless steels after short term oxidation tests. While short term tests typically indicate a dual layer scale structure consisting of a chromia layer covered by a layer of Mn-Cr spinel, the scale grown during the long term tests consisted of a chromia matrix with discrete regions of Mn-Cr spinel distributed throughout the matrix. The presence of Ti in the chromia scale matrix and/or the presence of regions of Mn-Cr spinel within the scale may have increased the scale electrical conductivity, which would explain the fact that the observed ASR in the tests was lower than would be expected if the scale consisted of pure chromia.

  16. Utilization of steel, pulp and paper industry solid residues in forest soil amendment: relevant physicochemical properties and heavy metal availability.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, Mikko; Watkins, Gary; Pöykiö, Risto; Nurmesniemi, Hannu; Dahl, Olli

    2012-03-15

    Industrial residue application to soil was investigated by integrating granulated blast furnace or converter steel slag with residues from the pulp and paper industry in various formulations. Specimen analysis included relevant physicochemical properties, total element concentrations (HCl+HNO3 digestion, USEPA 3051) and chemical speciation of chosen heavy metals (CH3COOH, NH2OH·HCl and H2O2+H2O2+CH3COONH4, the BCR method). Produced matrices showed liming effects comparable to commercial ground limestone and included significant quantities of soluble vital nutrients. The use of converter steel slag, however, led to significant increases in the total concentrations of Cr and V. Subsequently, total Cr was attested to occur as Cr(III) by Na2CO3+NaOH digestion followed by IC UV/VIS-PCR (USEPA 3060A). Additionally, 80.6% of the total concentration of Cr (370 mg kg(-1), d.w.) occurred in the residual fraction. However, 46.0% of the total concentration of V (2470 mg kg(-1), d.w.) occurred in the easily reduced fraction indicating potential bioavailability.

  17. Evaluation of Incoherent Interface Strength of Solid-State-Bonded Ti64/Stainless Steel Under Dynamic Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Devendra; Singh, Jogender; Varma, Amit H.; Tomar, Vikas

    2015-08-01

    Ti/steel interfaces are produced using field-assisted sintering technology, a technique known to bring about full consolidation of materials using much lower sintering temperatures and durations. The interface thickness is verified using the energy-dispersive x-ray analysis exhibiting the extent of diffusion in interface regions. The interface mechanical strength is characterized using dynamic indentation experiments at strain rates approaching 400 s-1. The experiments were conducted on the interfaces within the spatial error tolerance of less than 3 µm. The measurements of dynamic hardness values, strain rates, and plastic-residual depths were correlated to show the relation of interface mechanical strength with the bulk-phase mechanical strength properties of Ti and steel. The Johnson-Cook model is fitted to the obtained interface normal stress-normal strain data based on the nanoimpact experiments. The coefficient of restitution in the mechanical loading and its dependence on the interface dynamic hardness and interface impact velocity validate the experimental results. The results show that interfacial properties are affected by the rate of loading and are largely dependent upon the interface structural inhomogeneity.

  18. Electroplating of nanostructured polyaniline-polypyrrole composite coating in a stainless-steel tube for on-line in-tube solid phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Asiabi, Hamid; Yamini, Yadollah; Seidi, Shahram; Esrafili, Ali; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2015-06-01

    In this work, a novel and efficient on-line in-tube solid phase microextraction method followed by high performance liquid chromatography was developed for preconcentration and determination of trace amounts of parabens. A nanostructured polyaniline-polypyrrole composite was electrochemically deposited on the inner surface of a stainless steel tube and used as the extraction phase. Several important factors that influence the extraction efficiency, including type of solid-phase coating, extraction and desorption times, flow rates of the sample solution and eluent, pH, and ionic strength of the sample solution were investigated and optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the limits of detection were in the range of 0.02-0.04 μg L(-1). This method showed good linearity for parabens in the range of 0.07-50 μg L(-1), with coefficients of determination better than 0.998. The intra- and inter-assay precisions (RSD%, n=3) were in the range of 5.9-7.0% and 4.4-5.7% at three concentration levels of 2, 10, and 20 μg L(-1), respectively. The extraction recovery values for the spiked samples were in the acceptable range of 80.3-90.2%. The validated method was successfully applied for analysis of methyl-, ethyl-, and propyl parabens in some water, milk, and juice samples.

  19. Articles comprising ferritic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Rakowski, James M.

    2016-06-28

    An article of manufacture comprises a ferritic stainless steel that includes a near-surface region depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the ferritic stainless steel. The article has a reduced tendency to form an electrically resistive silica layer including silicon derived from the steel when the article is subjected to high temperature oxidizing conditions. The ferritic stainless steel is selected from the group comprising AISI Type 430 stainless steel, AISI Type 439 stainless steel, AISI Type 441 stainless steel, AISI Type 444 stainless steel, and E-BRITE.RTM. alloy, also known as UNS 44627 stainless steel. In certain embodiments, the article of manufacture is a fuel cell interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell.

  20. Comment on "Origin of low-temperature shoulder internal friction peak of Snoek-Köster peak in a medium carbon high alloyed steel" by Lu et al. [Solid State Communications 195 (2014) 31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyos, J. J.; Mari, D.

    2016-01-01

    We want to discuss the interpretation of low-temperature shoulder internal friction peak of Snoek-Köster peak (LTS-SK). Lu et al. (2015) [1] attributed it to the interaction between the carbon atoms and twin boundaries in martensite. Nevertheless, the decrease of the amplitude of LTS-SK peak due to carbon segregation is correlated with the interstitial carbon content in solid solution in martensite (Hoyos et al., 2015 [2]). Therefore, this peak can also be attributed to the presence of an internal friction athermal background, which is proportional to the concentration of interstitial carbon in solid solution (Tkalcec et al., 2015 [2,3]). In addition, they used an alloyed steel, in which ε carbide precipitated above of the LTS-SK peak temperature. As this behavior cannot be generalized for carbon and high alloyed steels, the carbide precipitates could made an additional contribution to the internal friction.

  1. Graphene oxide based sol-gel stainless steel fiber for the headspace solid-phase microextraction of organophosphate ester flame retardants in water samples.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tingting; Cheng, Jing; Cai, Cuicui; Cheng, Min; Wu, Shiju; Zhou, Hongbin

    2016-07-29

    In this paper, graphene oxide was coated onto a stainless steel wire through sol-gel technique and it was used as a solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber. The prepared fiber was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which displayed that the fiber had crinkled surface and porous structure The application of the fiber was evaluated through the headspace SPME of nine organophosphate ester flame retardants (OPFRs) with different characteristics in water samples followed by gas chromatography and nitrogen-phosphorous detector (GC/NPD). The major factors influencing the extraction efficiency, including the extraction and desorption conditions, were studied and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the proposed method was evaluated, and applied to the analysis of organophosphate ester flame retardants in real environmental water samples. The results demonstrated the HS-SPME method based on GO sol-gel fiber had good linearity (R>0.9928), and limits of detection (1.4-135.6ngL(-1)), high repeatability (RSD<9.8%) and good recovery (76.4-112.4%). The GO based sol-gel fiber displayed bigger extraction capability than the commercial PDMS fiber and the pure sol-gel fiber for both polar and apolar organophosphate esters, especially for the OPFRs containing benzene rings. PMID:27371020

  2. Graphene oxide based sol-gel stainless steel fiber for the headspace solid-phase microextraction of organophosphate ester flame retardants in water samples.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tingting; Cheng, Jing; Cai, Cuicui; Cheng, Min; Wu, Shiju; Zhou, Hongbin

    2016-07-29

    In this paper, graphene oxide was coated onto a stainless steel wire through sol-gel technique and it was used as a solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber. The prepared fiber was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which displayed that the fiber had crinkled surface and porous structure The application of the fiber was evaluated through the headspace SPME of nine organophosphate ester flame retardants (OPFRs) with different characteristics in water samples followed by gas chromatography and nitrogen-phosphorous detector (GC/NPD). The major factors influencing the extraction efficiency, including the extraction and desorption conditions, were studied and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the proposed method was evaluated, and applied to the analysis of organophosphate ester flame retardants in real environmental water samples. The results demonstrated the HS-SPME method based on GO sol-gel fiber had good linearity (R>0.9928), and limits of detection (1.4-135.6ngL(-1)), high repeatability (RSD<9.8%) and good recovery (76.4-112.4%). The GO based sol-gel fiber displayed bigger extraction capability than the commercial PDMS fiber and the pure sol-gel fiber for both polar and apolar organophosphate esters, especially for the OPFRs containing benzene rings.

  3. Mn1.4Co1.4Cu0.2O4 spinel protective coating on ferritic stainless steels for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guoyi; Xin, Xianshuang; Luo, Ting; Liu, Leimin; Zhou, Yuchun; Yuan, Chun; Lin, Chucheng; Zhan, Zhongliang; Wang, Shaorong

    2015-03-01

    In an attempt to reduce the oxidation and Cr evaporation rates of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), Mn1.4Co1.4Cu0.2O4 spinel coating is developed on the Crofer22 APU ferritic stainless steel substrate by a powder reduction technique. Doping of Cu into Mn-Co spinels improves electrical conductivity as well as thermal expansion match with the Crofer22 APU interconnect. Good adhesion between the coating and the alloy substrate is achieved by the reactive sintering process using the reduced powders. Long-term isothermal oxidation experiment and area specific resistance (ASR) measurement are investigated. The ASR is less than 4 mΩ cm2 even though the coated alloy undergoes oxidation at 800 °C for 530 h and four thermal cycles from 800 °C to room temperature. The Mn1.4Co1.4Cu0.2O4 spinel coatings demonstrate excellent anti-oxidation performance and long-term stability. It exhibits a promising prospect for the practical application of SOFC alloy interconnect.

  4. Development of Cu1.3Mn1.7O4 spinel coating on ferritic stainless steel for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, N.; Abbasi, M. H.; Karimzadeh, F.; Choi, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    To protect solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) from chromium poisoning and to improve area specific resistance (ASR), Cu1.3Mn1.7O4 is thermally grown on AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel. The samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (FESEM-EDS) and 4-probe ASR tests. The results show that the coating not only decreases the ASR considerably, but also acts as a barrier to mitigate the sub-scale growth and to prevent chromium migration through the coating and the cathode. The EDS analysis reveals that a mixed spinel region is formed between the coating and oxide scale after 500 h oxidation at 750 °C causing a noticeable decrease in oxygen diffusivity through this layer and subsequent decline in sub-scale growth rate. The ASR of uncoated sample is measured to be 63.5 mΩ cm2 after 500 h oxidation, while the Cu1.3Mn1.7O4 spinel coated sample shows a value of 19.3 mΩ cm2 representing ∼70% reduction compared to the uncoated sample. It is proposed that the high electrical conductivity of Cu1.3Mn1.7O4 (140 S cm-1), reduction of oxide scale growth, and good bonding between the coating and substrate contribute to the substantial ASR reduction for the coated sample.

  5. Preparation of a polyacrylonitrile/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization on a stainless steel wire for solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Minet, Isabelle; Hevesi, Laszlo; Azenha, Manuel; Delhalle, Joseph; Mekhalif, Zineb

    2010-04-23

    We report on the fabrication and performances of a solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber based on a stainless steel wire coated with a covalently attached polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composite. This new coating is obtained by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of acrylonitrile mixed with MWCNTs. ATRP is initiated from 11-(2-bromo-2-methylpropionyloxy)-undecyl-phosphonic acid molecules grafted on the wire surface via the phosphonic acid group. The extraction performances of the fibers are assessed on different classes of compounds (polar, non-polar, aromatic, etc.) from water solutions by headspace extraction. The optimization of the parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of the target compounds was studied as well as the reproducibility and the repeatability of the fiber. The fibers sustain more than 200 extractions during which they remain chemically stable and maintain good performances (detection limits lower than 2 microg/l, repeatability, etc.). Considering their robustness together with their easy and inexpensive fabrication, these fibers could constitute promising alternatives to existing products. PMID:20299016

  6. Metal-organic framework UiO-66 coated stainless steel fiber for solid-phase microextraction of phenols in water samples.

    PubMed

    Shang, Hai-Bo; Yang, Cheng-Xiong; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2014-08-29

    Effective solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of polar phenols from water samples is usually difficult due to the strong interaction between polar phenols and aqueous matrix. Here, we report the fabrication of a metal-organic framework UiO-66 coated stainless steel fiber via physical adhesion for the SPME of polar phenols (phenol, o-cresol, p-cresol, 2,6-dimethylphenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol and 2,6-dichlorophenol) in water samples before gas chromatographic separation with flame ionic detection. Headspace SPME of 10mL sample solution with the fabricated UiO-66 coated fiber gave the enhancement factors of 160 (phenol) - 3769 (2,4-dichlorophenol), and the linear ranges of 1-1000μgL(-1) (2,6-dimethylphenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol and 2,6-dichlorophenol), 1-500μgL(-1) (o-cresol and p-cresol) and 5-500μgL(-1) (phenol). The detection limits ranged from 0.11μgL(-1) (2,6-dimethylphenol) to 1.23μgL(-1) (phenol). The precision (relative standard deviations, RSDs) for six replicate determinations of the analytes at 100μgL(-1) using a single UiO-66 coated fiber ranged from 2.8% to 6.2%. The fiber-to-fiber reproducibility (RSDs) for three parallel UiO-66 coated fibers varied from 5.9% to 10%. The recoveries obtained by spiking 5μgL(-1) of the phenols in the water samples ranged from 80% to 115%.

  7. Fabrication and application of zinc-zinc oxide nanosheets coating on an etched stainless steel wire as a selective solid-phase microextraction fiber.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenlan; Guo, Mei; Zhang, Yida; Zhang, Min; Wang, Xuemei; Du, Xinzhen

    2015-03-01

    A novel zinc-zinc oxide (Zn-ZnO) nanosheets coating was directly fabricated on an etched stainless steel wire substrate as solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber via previous electrodeposition of robust Zn coating. The scanning electron micrograph of the Zn-ZnO nanosheets coated fiber exhibits a flower-like nanostructure with high surface area. The SPME performance of as-fabricated fiber was investigated for the concentration and determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalates and ultraviolet (UV) filters coupled to high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection (HPLC-UV). It was found that the Zn-ZnO nanosheets coating exhibited high extraction capability, good selectivity and rapid mass transfer for some UV filters. The main parameters affecting extraction performance were investigated and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration graphs were linear over the range of 0.1-200μgL(-1). The limits of detection of the proposed method were 0.052-0.084μgL(-1) (S/N=3). The single fiber repeatability varied from 5.18% to 7.56% and the fiber-to-fiber reproducibility ranged from 6.74% to 8.83% for the extraction of spiked water with 50μgL(-1) UV filters (n=5). The established SPME-HPLC-UV method was successfully applied to the selective concentration and sensitive determination of target UV filters from real environmental water samples with recoveries from 85.8% to 105% at the spiking level of 10μgL(-1) and 30μgL(-1). The relative standard deviations were below 9.7%.

  8. Solid-phase microextraction of phthalate esters from aqueous media by electrophoretically deposited TiO₂ nanoparticles on a stainless steel fiber.

    PubMed

    Banitaba, Mohammad Hossein; Davarani, Saied Saeed Hosseiny; Pourahadi, Ahmad

    2013-03-29

    A novel SPME fiber was prepared by electrophoretic deposition of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) on a stainless steel wire. It was used in the direct immersion solid-phase microextraction (DI-SPME) of four phthalate esters from aqueous samples prior to gas chromatographic (GC) analysis. The effects of various parameters on the efficiency of the SPME process such as the mode of extraction, extraction temperature, film thickness of the SPME fiber, salt content, extraction time and stirring rate were investigated. The comparison of the fiber with another homemade poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-TiO2 (PEDOT-TiO2) nanocomposite fiber and a commercial polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber showed the better extraction efficiency of the nano-TiO2 fiber for phthalate esters. Under optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for the phthalate esters varied between 0.05 and 0.12μgL(-1). The inter-day and intra-day relative standard deviations for various phthalate esters at 10μgL(-1) concentration level (n=6) using a single fiber were 6.6-7.5% and 8.3-11.1%, respectively. The fiber to fiber repeatabilities (n=4), expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD%), were between 8.9% and 10.2% at 10μgL(-1) concentration level. The linear ranges varied between 0.5 and 1000μgL(-1). The method was successfully applied to the analysis of the bottled mineral water sample with recoveries from 86 to 107%.

  9. Evaluation of low-velocity impact tests of solid steel billet onto concrete pads, and application to generic ISFSI storage cask for tipover and side drop

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, M. C.; Chen, T.F.; Mok, G.C.; Murty, S.S.; Fischer, L.E.

    1997-03-01

    Spent Fuel Storage Casks intended for use at Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installations (ISFSIS) typically are evaluated during the application and review process for low-energy impacts representative of possible handling accidents including tipover events. In the past, the analyses involved in these evaluations have assumed that the casks dropped or tipped onto an unyielding surface, a conservative and simplifying assumption. Since 10 CFR Part 72`, the regulation imposed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), does not require this assumption, applicants are currently seeking a more realistic model for the analyses and are using analytical models which predict the effect of a cask dropping onto a reinforced concrete pad, including energy absorbing aspects such as cracking and flexure. In order to develop data suitable for benchmarking these analyses, the NRC has conducted several series of drop-test studies. The tests described in this report were primarily intended to determine the response characteristics of concrete pads during tipover and side impacts of a solid steel billet onto the pads. This series of tests is fourth in a program of tests funded by the NRC; all four series of tests address issues of impact involving spent fuel storage casks. The first series was performed in March 1993 by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and involved five end-drops of a billet, nearly identical to the one used in the present series, onto a variety of surfaces from a height of 18 inches. The second series of tests was performed between July and October 1993, and involved four end- drops of a near-full-scale empty Excellox 3A cask onto a full-scale concrete pad and foundation, or onto an essentially unyielding surface, from heights ranging from 18 inches to 60 inches, and was conducted by the British Nuclear Fuels Limited in Winfrith, England. (Two of the drops in the second series were sponsored by Electric Power Research Institute.) The third test series was

  10. 29 CFR 1926.757 - Open web steel joists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Open web steel joists. 1926.757 Section 1926.757 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.757 Open web steel joists... and columns are not framed in at least two directions with solid web structural steel members, a...

  11. 29 CFR 1926.757 - Open web steel joists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Open web steel joists. 1926.757 Section 1926.757 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.757 Open web steel joists... and columns are not framed in at least two directions with solid web structural steel members, a...

  12. A solid-phase microextraction platinized stainless steel fiber coated with a multiwalled carbon nanotube-polyaniline nanocomposite film for the extraction of thymol and carvacrol in medicinal plants and honey.

    PubMed

    Ghiasvand, Alireza; Dowlatshah, Samira; Nouraei, Nadia; Heidari, Nahid; Yazdankhah, Fatemeh

    2015-08-01

    A mechanically hard and cohesive porous fiber, with large surface area, for more strong attachment of the coating was provided by platinizing a stainless steel wire. Then, the platinized stainless steel fiber was coated with a multiwalled carbon nanotube/polyaniline (MWCNT/PANI) nanocomposite using electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method and applied for the extraction of thymol and carvacrol with direct-immersion solid-phase microextraction (DI-SPME) method followed by high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV) quantification. To provide a larger coarse surface for the tightened attachment of coating on the fiber, a stainless steel wire was platinized using a suitable optimized EPD method. Different experimental parameters were studied and the optimal conditions were obtained as: pH of the sample solution: 2; extraction time: 60min; salt content in the sample solution: 1% w/v NaNO3; desorption time: 60min; type and volume of the desorption solvent: acetonitrile, 100μL. Under the optimized conditions, limits of detection (LODs) were 0.6 and 0.8μgmL(-1) for thymol and carvacrol, respectively. Linear dynamic range (LDR) for the calibration curves of both analytes were 1-80μgmL(-1). Relative standard deviation (RSD%, n=6) was 6.8 for thymol and 12.7 for carvacrol. The proposed fiber was successfully applied for the recovery and determination of thymol and carvacrol in thyme, savory, and honey samples.

  13. Y0.08Sr0.88TiO3-CeO2 composite as a diffusion barrier layer for stainless-steel supported solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kun Joong; Kim, Sun Jae; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2016-03-01

    A new diffusion barrier layer (DBL) is proposed for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) supported on stainless-steel where DBL prevents inter-diffusion of atoms between anode and stainless steel (STS) support during fabrication and operation of STS-supported SOFCs. Half cells consisting of dense yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, porous Ni-YSZ anode layer, and ferritic STS support, with or without Y0.08Sr0.88TiO3-CeO2 (YST-CeO2) composite DBL, are prepared by tape casting and co-firing at 1250 and 1350 °C, respectively, in reducing (H2) atmosphere. The porous YST-CeO2 layer (t ∼ 60 μm) blocks inter-diffusion of Fe and Ni, and captures the evaporated Cr during cell fabrication (1350 °C). The cell with DBL and La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) cathode achieved a maximum power density of ∼220 mW cm-2 which is stable at 700 °C. In order to further improve the power performance, Ni coarsening in anode during co-firing must be prevented or alternative anode which is resistive to coarsening is suggested. This study demonstrates that the new YST-CeO2 layer is a promising as a DBL for stainless-steel-supported SOFCs fabricated with co-firing process.

  14. Gas-Solid Interactions During Nonisothermal Heat Treatment of a High-Strength CrMnCN Austenitic Steel Powder: Influence of Atmospheric Conditions and Heating Rate on the Densification Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasokha, Nikolaj; Weber, Sebastian; Huth, Stephan; Zumsande, Kathrin; Theisen, Werner

    2012-11-01

    This work deals with gas-solid interactions between a high-alloyed steel powder and the surrounding atmosphere during continuous heating. It is motivated by the recently developed corrosion-resistant CrMnCN austenitic cast steels. Here, powder metallurgical processing would be desirable to manufacture highly homogeneous parts and/or novel corrosion-resistant metal-matrix composites. However, the successful use of this new production route calls for a comprehensive investigation of interactions between the sintering atmosphere and the metallic powder to prevent undesirable changes to the chemical composition, e.g., degassing of nitrogen or evaporation of manganese. In this study, dilatometric measurements combined with residual gas analysis, high-temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations provided detailed information about the influence of different atmospheric conditions on the microstructure, constitution, and densification behavior of a gas-atomized CrMnCN steel powder during continuous heating. Intensive desorption of nitrogen led to the conclusion that a vacuum atmosphere is not suitable for powder metallurgical (PM) processing. Exposure to an N2-containing atmosphere resulted in the formation of nitrides and lattice expansion. Experimental findings have shown that the N content can be controlled by the nitrogen partial pressure. Furthermore, the reduction of surface oxides because of a carbothermal reaction at elevated temperatures and the resulting enhancement of the powder's densification behavior are discussed in this work.

  15. A solid-phase microextraction platinized stainless steel fiber coated with a multiwalled carbon nanotube-polyaniline nanocomposite film for the extraction of thymol and carvacrol in medicinal plants and honey.

    PubMed

    Ghiasvand, Alireza; Dowlatshah, Samira; Nouraei, Nadia; Heidari, Nahid; Yazdankhah, Fatemeh

    2015-08-01

    A mechanically hard and cohesive porous fiber, with large surface area, for more strong attachment of the coating was provided by platinizing a stainless steel wire. Then, the platinized stainless steel fiber was coated with a multiwalled carbon nanotube/polyaniline (MWCNT/PANI) nanocomposite using electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method and applied for the extraction of thymol and carvacrol with direct-immersion solid-phase microextraction (DI-SPME) method followed by high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV) quantification. To provide a larger coarse surface for the tightened attachment of coating on the fiber, a stainless steel wire was platinized using a suitable optimized EPD method. Different experimental parameters were studied and the optimal conditions were obtained as: pH of the sample solution: 2; extraction time: 60min; salt content in the sample solution: 1% w/v NaNO3; desorption time: 60min; type and volume of the desorption solvent: acetonitrile, 100μL. Under the optimized conditions, limits of detection (LODs) were 0.6 and 0.8μgmL(-1) for thymol and carvacrol, respectively. Linear dynamic range (LDR) for the calibration curves of both analytes were 1-80μgmL(-1). Relative standard deviation (RSD%, n=6) was 6.8 for thymol and 12.7 for carvacrol. The proposed fiber was successfully applied for the recovery and determination of thymol and carvacrol in thyme, savory, and honey samples. PMID:26138604

  16. Welding tritium exposed stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1994-11-01

    Stainless steels that are exposed to tritium become unweldable by conventional methods due to buildup of decay helium within the metal matrix. With longer service lives expected for tritium containment systems, methods for welding on tritium exposed material will become important for repair or modification of the systems. Solid-state resistance welding and low-penetration overlay welding have been shown to mitigate helium embrittlement cracking in tritium exposed 304 stainless steel. These processes can also be used on stainless steel containing helium from neutron irradiation, such as occurs in nuclear reactors.

  17. Development of a solid-phase microextraction fiber by the chemical binding of graphene oxide on a silver-coated stainless-steel wire with an ionic liquid as the crosslinking agent.

    PubMed

    Sun, Min; Feng, Juanjuan; Bu, Yanan; Duan, Huimin; Wang, Xiaojiao; Luo, Chuannan

    2014-12-01

    Graphene oxide was bonded onto a silver-coated stainless-steel wire using an ionic liquid as the crosslinking agent by a layer-by-layer strategy. The novel solid-phase microextraction fiber was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Raman microscopy. A multilayer graphene oxide layer was closely coated onto the supporting substrate. The thickness of the coating was about 4 μm. Coupled with gas chromatography, the fiber was evaluated using five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (fluorene, anthracene, fluoranthene, 1,2-benzophenanthrene, and benzo(a)pyrene) as model analytes in direct-immersion mode. The main conditions (extraction time, extraction temperature, ionic strength, and desorption time) were optimized by a factor-by-factor optimization. The as-established method exhibited a wide linearity range (0.5-200 μg/L) and low limits of determination (0.05-0.10 μg/L). It was applied to analyze environmental water samples of rain and river water. Three kinds of the model analytes were quantified and the recoveries of samples spiked at 10 μg/L were in the range of 92.3-120 and 93.8-115%, respectively. The obtained results indicated the fiber was efficient for solid-phase microextraction analysis.

  18. STEFINS: a steel freezing integral simulation program

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, M.V.

    1980-09-01

    STEFINS (STEel Freezing INtegral Simulation) is a computer program for the calculation of the rate of solidification of molten steel on solid steel. Such computations arize when investigating core melt accidents in fast reactors. In principle this problem involves a coupled two-dimensional thermal and hydraulic approach. However, by physically reasonable assumptions a decoupled approach has been developed. The transient solidification of molten steel on a cold wall is solved in the direction normal to the molten steel flow and independent from the solution for the molten steel temperature and Nusselt number along the direction of flow. The solutions to the applicable energy equations have been programmed in cylindrical and slab geometries. Internal gamma heating of steel is included.

  19. A Virtual Steel Sculpture for Structural Engineering Education: Development and Initial Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dib, Hazar Nicholas; Adamo-Villani, Nicoletta

    2016-01-01

    We describe the development and evaluation of a virtual steel sculpture for engineering education. A good connection design requires the engineer to have a solid understanding of the mechanics and steel behavior. To help students better understand various connection types, many schools have acquired steel sculptures. A steel sculpture is a…

  20. Application of sol-gel technique to synthesis of copper-cobalt spinel on the ferritic stainless steel used for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paknahad, Pouyan; Askari, Masoud; Ghorbanzadeh, Milad

    2014-11-01

    The conductive CuCo2O4 spinel coating is applied on the surface of the AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel by the dip-coating sol-gel process and it is evaluated in terms of the microstructure, oxidation resistance and electrical conductivity. The results show that the CuCO2O4 coating forms a double-layer scale consisting of a Cr, Fe-rich subscale and Cu-Co spinel top layer after 500 h in air at 800 °C. This scale is protective, acts as an effective barrier against Cr migration into the outer oxide layer and alleviates the cathode Cr-poisoning. The oxidation resistance is significantly enhanced by the protective coating with a parabolic rate constant of 5.8 × 10-13 gr2 cm-4 s-1, meanwhile the electrical conductivity is considerably improved due to inhibited growth of resistive Cr2O3 oxide scale. The area specific resistance at temperatures between 550 and 800 °C is in the range of 11.5 and 22.2 mΩ cm2.

  1. Stainless steel-supported solid oxide fuel cell with La0.2Sr0.8Ti0.9Ni0.1O3-δ/yttria-stabilized zirconia composite anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayaghi, Amir Masoud; Kim, Kun Joong; Kim, Sunwoong; Park, Juahn; Kim, Sun Jae; Park, Byung Hyun; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2016-08-01

    A metal-supported solid oxide fuel cell (MS-SOFC) is fabricated by co-firing stainless steel (STS) support with a new reduction-resistant oxide-anode and yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte. La and Ni co-doped SrTiO3 (La0.2Sr0.8Ti0.9Ni0.1O3-δ, LSTN) which shows Ni exsolution capability is composited with Y0.16Zr0.84O2-δ (YSZ) electrolyte to form a new LSTN-YSZ anode. A cermet layer composed of STS and YSZ (STS-YSZ) is inserted between a porous STS support and a new LSTN-YSZ composite anode for stable contact. With La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) cathode and Ce0.8Gd0.2O2-δ (GDC) interlayer coated on top of co-fired half-cell, YSZ/LSTN-YSZ/STS-YSZ/STS, a newly designed and fabricated cell achieved maximum power density of 185 mW cm-2 at 650 °C. This power density is an improvement over many conventional co-fired MS-SOFCs that use a Ni-cermet anode.

  2. Stainless steel-supported solid oxide fuel cell with La0.2Sr0.8Ti0.9Ni0.1O3-δ/yttria-stabilized zirconia composite anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayaghi, Amir Masoud; Kim, Kun Joong; Kim, Sunwoong; Park, Juahn; Kim, Sun Jae; Park, Byung Hyun; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2016-08-01

    A metal-supported solid oxide fuel cell (MS-SOFC) is fabricated by co-firing stainless steel (STS) support with a new reduction-resistant oxide-anode and yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte. La and Ni co-doped SrTiO3 (La0.2Sr0.8Ti0.9Ni0.1O3-δ, LSTN) which shows Ni exsolution capability is composited with Y0.16Zr0.84O2-δ (YSZ) electrolyte to form a new LSTN-YSZ anode. A cermet layer composed of STS and YSZ (STS-YSZ) is inserted between a porous STS support and a new LSTN-YSZ composite anode for stable contact. With La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) cathode and Ce0.8Gd0.2O2-δ (GDC) interlayer coated on top of co-fired half-cell, YSZ/LSTN-YSZ/STS-YSZ/STS, a newly designed and fabricated cell achieved maximum power density of 185 mW cm-2 at 650 °C. This power density is an improvement over many conventional co-fired MS-SOFCs that use a Ni-cermet anode.

  3. Covalent Bonding of Metal-Organic Framework-5/Graphene Oxide Hybrid Composite to Stainless Steel Fiber for Solid-Phase Microextraction of Triazole Fungicides from Fruit and Vegetable Samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuaihua; Yang, Qian; Wang, Wenchang; Wang, Chun; Wang, Zhi

    2016-04-01

    A hybrid material of the zinc-based metal-organic framework-5 and graphene oxide (metal-organic framework-5/graphene oxide) was prepared as a novel fiber coating material for solid-phase microextraction (SPME). The SPME fibers were fabricated by covalent bonding via chemical cross-linking between the coating material metal-organic framework-5/graphene oxide and stainless steel wire. The prepared fiber was used for the extraction of five triazole fungicides from fruit and vegetable samples. Gas chromatography coupled with microelectron capture detector (GC-μECD) was used for quantification. The developed method gave a low limit of detection (0.05-1.58 ng g(-1)) and good linearity (0.17-100 ng g(-1)) for the determination of the triazole fungicides in fruit and vegetable samples. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for five replicate extractions of the triazole fungicides ranged from 3.7 to 8.9%. The method recoveries for spiked fungicides (5, 20, and 50 ng g(-1)) in grape, apple, cucumber, celery cabbage, pear, cabbage, and tomato samples were in the range of 85.6-105.8% with the RSDs ranging from 3.6 to 11.4%, respectively, depending on both the analytes and samples. The metal-organic framework-5/graphene oxide coated fiber was stable enough for 120 extraction cycles without a significant loss of extraction efficiency. The method was suitable for the determination of triazole fungicides in fruit and vegetable samples. PMID:26998567

  4. Covalent Bonding of Metal-Organic Framework-5/Graphene Oxide Hybrid Composite to Stainless Steel Fiber for Solid-Phase Microextraction of Triazole Fungicides from Fruit and Vegetable Samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuaihua; Yang, Qian; Wang, Wenchang; Wang, Chun; Wang, Zhi

    2016-04-01

    A hybrid material of the zinc-based metal-organic framework-5 and graphene oxide (metal-organic framework-5/graphene oxide) was prepared as a novel fiber coating material for solid-phase microextraction (SPME). The SPME fibers were fabricated by covalent bonding via chemical cross-linking between the coating material metal-organic framework-5/graphene oxide and stainless steel wire. The prepared fiber was used for the extraction of five triazole fungicides from fruit and vegetable samples. Gas chromatography coupled with microelectron capture detector (GC-μECD) was used for quantification. The developed method gave a low limit of detection (0.05-1.58 ng g(-1)) and good linearity (0.17-100 ng g(-1)) for the determination of the triazole fungicides in fruit and vegetable samples. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for five replicate extractions of the triazole fungicides ranged from 3.7 to 8.9%. The method recoveries for spiked fungicides (5, 20, and 50 ng g(-1)) in grape, apple, cucumber, celery cabbage, pear, cabbage, and tomato samples were in the range of 85.6-105.8% with the RSDs ranging from 3.6 to 11.4%, respectively, depending on both the analytes and samples. The metal-organic framework-5/graphene oxide coated fiber was stable enough for 120 extraction cycles without a significant loss of extraction efficiency. The method was suitable for the determination of triazole fungicides in fruit and vegetable samples.

  5. Irradiation effects in ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechtenberg, Thomas

    1985-08-01

    Since 1979 the Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance (ADIP) task funded by the US Department of Energy has been studying the 2-12Cr class of ferritic steels to establish the feasibility of using them in fusion reactor first wall/breeding blanket (FW/B) applications. The advantages of ferritic steels include superior swelling resistance, low thermal stresses compared to austenitic stainless steels, attractive mechanical properties up to 600°C. and service histories exceeding 100 000 h. These steels are commonly used in a range of microstructural conditions which include ferritic, martensitic. tempered martensitic, bainitic etc. Throughout this paper where the term "ferritic" is used it should be taken to mean any of these microstructures. The ADIP task is studying several candidate alloy systems including 12Cr-1MoWV (HT-9), modified 9Cr-1MoVNb, and dual-phased steels such as EM-12 and 2 {1}/{4}Cr-Mo. These materials are ferromagnetic (FM), body centered cubic (bcc), and contain chromium additions between 2 and 12 wt% and molybdenum additions usually below 2%. The perceived issues associated with the application of this class of steel to fusion reactors are the increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) with neutron damage, the compatibility of these steels with liquid metals and solid breeding materials, and their weldability. The ferromagnetic character of these steels can also be important in reactor design. It is the purpose of this paper to review the current understanding of these bcc steels and the effects of irradiation. The major points of discussion will be irradiation-induced or -enhanced dimensional changes such as swelling and creep, mechanical properties such as tensile strength and various measurements of toughness, and activation by neutron interactions with structural materials.

  6. Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: Combined stability in isothermal ageing and thermal cycling with YSZ coated ferritic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Thomsen, E. C.; Choi, J.-P.; Stevenson, J. W.

    2012-01-01

    An alkali silicate glass (SCN-1) is being evaluated as a candidate sealant for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass contains about 17 wt.% alkalis (K + Na) and has low glass transition and softening temperatures. It remains vitreous and compliant after sealing without substantial crystallization, as contrary to conventional glass-ceramic sealant. The glassy nature and low characteristic temperatures can reduce residual stresses and result in the potential for crack healing. In a previous study, the glass was found to have good thermal cycle stability and was chemically compatible with yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating during short term testing. In this study, the compliant glass was further evaluated in a more realistic way in that the sealed couples were first isothermally aged for 1000 h followed by thermal cycling. High temperature leakage was measured. Chemical compatibility was also investigated with powder mixtures to enhance potential interfacial reaction. In addition, interfacial microstructure was examined with scanning electron microscopy and evaluated with regard to the leakage and chemical compatibility results. Overall the compliant sealing glass showed desirable chemical compatibility with YSZ coated metallic interconnect of minimum reaction and hermetic behavior at 700-750 °C in dual environment.

  7. Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: Combined stability in isothermal ageing and thermal cycling with YSZ coated ferritic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2012-01-01

    An alkali-containing silicate glass (SCN-1) is currently being evaluated as a candidate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass contains about 17 mole% alkalis (K+Na) and has low glass transition and softening temperatures. It remains vitreous and compliant around 750-800oC after sealing without substantial crystallization, as contrary to conventional glass-ceramic sealants, which experience rapid crystallization after the sealing process. The glassy nature and low characteristic temperatures can reduce residual stresses and result in the potential for crack healing. In a previous study, the glass was found to have good thermal cycle stability and was chemically compatible with YSZ coating during short term testing. In the current study, the compliant glass was further evaluated in a more realistic way in that the sealed glass couples were first isothermally aged for 1000h followed by thermal cycling. High temperature leakage was measured. The chemical compatibility was also investigated with powder mixtures at 700 and 800oC to enhance potential interfacial reaction. In addition, interfacial microstructure was examined with scanning electron microscopy and evaluated with regard to the leakage and chemical compatibility results.

  8. Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

    2012-09-26

    The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of

  9. Microstructural Evolution of DP980 Steel during Friction Bit Joining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, T.; Sato, Y. S.; Kokawa, H.; Miles, M. P.; Kohkonen, K.; Siemssen, B.; Steel, R. J.; Packer, S.

    2009-12-01

    The authors study a new solid-state spot joining process, friction bit joining (FBJ), which relies on the use of a consumable joining bit. It has been reported that FBJ is feasible for the joining of steel/steel and aluminum/steel, but the metallurgical characteristics of the joint for enhancement of the properties and reliability remain unclear. Therefore, this study produced friction bit joints in DP980 steel and then examined the microstructures in the joint precisely. In this article, the microstructure distribution associated with hardness in the friction-bit-joined DP980 steel and the microstructural evolution during FBJ are reported.

  10. Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) steel drum

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, W.A.

    1998-09-29

    This Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) provides the analyses and evaluations necessary to demonstrate that the steel drum packaging system meets the transportation safety requirements of HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments, for an onsite packaging containing Type B quantities of solid and liquid radioactive materials. The basic component of the steel drum packaging system is the 208 L (55-gal) steel drum.

  11. Ultrahigh carbon steels, Damascus steels, and superplasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Sherby, O.D.; Wadsworth, J.

    1997-04-01

    The processing properties of ultrahigh carbon steels (UHCSs) have been studied at Stanford University over the past twenty years. These studies have shown that such steels (1 to 2.1% C) can be made superplastic at elevated temperature and can have remarkable mechanical properties at room temperature. It was the investigation of these UHCSs that eventually brought us to study the myths, magic, and metallurgy of ancient Damascus steels, which in fact, were also ultrahigh carbon steels. These steels were made in India as castings, known as wootz, possibly as far back as the time of Alexander the Great. The best swords are believed to have been forged in Persia from Indian wootz. This paper centers on recent work on superplastic UHCSs and on their relation to Damascus steels. 32 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Making Solid Geometry Solid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartz, Viggo

    1981-01-01

    Allowing students to use a polystyrene cutter to fashion their own three-dimensional models is suggested as a means of allowing individuals to experience problems and develop ideas related to solid geometry. A list of ideas that can lead to mathematical discovery is provided. (MP)

  13. Weldability charts for constructional steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ion, J. C.; Ashby, M. F.

    2012-02-01

    The weldability of materials is still a poorly understood concept; a quantitative assessment remains elusive. The variables associated with welding are reduced here into two groups - processing parameters and material properties - from which two characteristic indices are defined and used as the basis of weldability charts. For the case of constructional steels, a carbon equivalent characterises both heat affected zone hardenability and the maximum hardness developed after solid state phase transformations. The welding process is characterised by its energy input. A mathematical model is used to establish relationships between the indices, which are displayed on charts as contours of microstructure and hardness.

  14. Clean Steel: Advancing the State of the Art (TRP 0003)

    SciTech Connect

    Sridhar Seetharaman; Alan W. Cramb

    2004-05-19

    This project had 3 objectives: (1) to determine the kinetic factors governing inclusion removal from liquid steels at a slag metal interface; (2) to develop a methodology to enable steels of less than 1 ppm total oxygen to be produced with an average inclusion diameter of less than 5 {micro}m; and, (3) to determine the slag-metal interface conditions necessary for ultra clean steels. In objectives 1, and 3, the major finding was that dissolution rates of solid particles in slags were found to be significant in both ladle and tundish slags and must be included in a model to predict steel cleanliness. The work towards objective 2 indicated that liquid steel temperature was a very significant factor in our understanding of clean steel potential and that undercooled steels equilibrated with low oxygen potential inert gases have the potential to be significantly cleaner than current steels. Other work indicated that solidification front velocity could be used to push particles to produce clean steels and that reoxidation must be severely curtailed to allow the potential for clean steels to be realized.

  15. Screen-printed (La,Sr)CrO3 coatings on ferritic stainless steel interconnects for solid oxide fuel cells using nanopowders prepared by means of ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brylewski, Tomasz; Dabek, Jaroslaw; Przybylski, Kazimierz; Morgiel, Jerzy; Rekas, Mieczyslaw

    2012-06-01

    In order to protect the cathode from chromium poisoning and improve electrical resistance, a perovskite (La,Sr)CrO3 coating was deposited on the surface of a DIN 50049 ferritic stainless steel by means of the screen-printing method, using a paste composed of an ultra-fine powder prepared via ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. Investigations of the oxidation process of the coated steel in air and the Ar-H2-H2O gas mixture at 1073 K for times up to 820 h showed high compactness of the protective film, good adhesion to the metal substrate, as well as area specific resistance (ASR) at a level acceptable for metallic SOFC interconnect materials. The microstructure, nanostructure, phase composition of the thick film, and in particular the film/substrate interface, were examined via chemical analyses by means of SEM-EDS and TEM-SAD. It was shown that the (La,Sr)CrO3 coating interacts with the steel during long-term thermal oxidation in the afore-mentioned conditions and intermediate, chromia-rich and/or spinel multilayer interfacial zones are formed. Cr-vaporization tests showed that the (La,Sr)CrO3 coating may play the role of barriers that decrease the volatilization rate of chromia species.

  16. Comminuting irradiated ferritic steel

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Roger E.; Straalsund, Jerry L.; Chin, Bryan A.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of comminuting irradiated ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other irradiated components.

  17. The steel scrap age.

    PubMed

    Pauliuk, Stefan; Milford, Rachel L; Müller, Daniel B; Allwood, Julian M

    2013-04-01

    Steel production accounts for 25% of industrial carbon emissions. Long-term forecasts of steel demand and scrap supply are needed to develop strategies for how the steel industry could respond to industrialization and urbanization in the developing world while simultaneously reducing its environmental impact, and in particular, its carbon footprint. We developed a dynamic stock model to estimate future final demand for steel and the available scrap for 10 world regions. Based on evidence from developed countries, we assumed that per capita in-use stocks will saturate eventually. We determined the response of the entire steel cycle to stock saturation, in particular the future split between primary and secondary steel production. During the 21st century, steel demand may peak in the developed world, China, the Middle East, Latin America, and India. As China completes its industrialization, global primary steel production may peak between 2020 and 2030 and decline thereafter. We developed a capacity model to show how extensive trade of finished steel could prolong the lifetime of the Chinese steelmaking assets. Secondary steel production will more than double by 2050, and it may surpass primary production between 2050 and 2060: the late 21st century can become the steel scrap age.

  18. The steel scrap age.

    PubMed

    Pauliuk, Stefan; Milford, Rachel L; Müller, Daniel B; Allwood, Julian M

    2013-04-01

    Steel production accounts for 25% of industrial carbon emissions. Long-term forecasts of steel demand and scrap supply are needed to develop strategies for how the steel industry could respond to industrialization and urbanization in the developing world while simultaneously reducing its environmental impact, and in particular, its carbon footprint. We developed a dynamic stock model to estimate future final demand for steel and the available scrap for 10 world regions. Based on evidence from developed countries, we assumed that per capita in-use stocks will saturate eventually. We determined the response of the entire steel cycle to stock saturation, in particular the future split between primary and secondary steel production. During the 21st century, steel demand may peak in the developed world, China, the Middle East, Latin America, and India. As China completes its industrialization, global primary steel production may peak between 2020 and 2030 and decline thereafter. We developed a capacity model to show how extensive trade of finished steel could prolong the lifetime of the Chinese steelmaking assets. Secondary steel production will more than double by 2050, and it may surpass primary production between 2050 and 2060: the late 21st century can become the steel scrap age. PMID:23442209

  19. Methods of forming steel

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Burch, Joseph V.

    2001-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention encompasses a method of forming a steel. A metallic glass is formed and at least a portion of the glass is converted to a crystalline steel material having a nanocrystalline scale grain size. In another aspect, the invention encompasses another method of forming a steel. A molten alloy is formed and cooled the alloy at a rate which forms a metallic glass. The metallic glass is devitrified to convert the glass to a crystalline steel material having a nanocrystalline scale grain size. In yet another aspect, the invention encompasses another method of forming a steel. A first metallic glass steel substrate is provided, and a molten alloy is formed over the first metallic glass steel substrate to heat and devitrify at least some of the underlying metallic glass of the substrate.

  20. The Iron-Iron Carbide Phase Diagram: A Practical Guide to Some Descriptive Solid State Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Gary J.; Leighly, H. P., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the solid state chemistry of iron and steel in terms of the iron-iron carbide phase diagram. Suggests that this is an excellent way of introducing the phase diagram (equilibrium diagram) to undergraduate students while at the same time introducing the descriptive solid state chemistry of iron and steel. (Author/JN)

  1. Phase Transformation in Cast Superaustenitic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Phillips, Nathaniel Steven

    2006-01-01

    Superaustenitic stainless steels constitute a group of Fe-based alloys that are compositionally balanced to have a purely austenitic matrix and exhibit favorable pitting and crevice corrosion resistant properties and mechanical strength. However, intermetallic precipitates such as sigma and Laves can form during casting or exposure to high-temperature processing, which degrade the corrosion and mechanical properties of the material. The goal of this study was to accurately characterize the solid-solid phase transformations seen in cast superaustenitic stainless steels. Heat treatments were performed to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formations in alloys CN3MN and CK3MCuN. Microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, WDS). The equilibrium microstructures, composed primarily of sigma and Laves within purely austenitic matrices, showed slow transformation kinetics. Factors that determine the extent of transformation, including diffusion, nucleation, and growth, are discussed.

  2. X-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lily L; Berry, Phillip C

    2009-01-01

    Stainless steel vessels are used to enclose solid materials for studying x-ray radiolysis that involves gas release from the materials. Commercially available stainless steel components are easily adapted to form a static or a dynamic condition to monitor the gas evolved from the solid materials during and after the x-ray irradiation. Experimental data published on the x-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel, however, are very scarce, especially over a wide range of x-ray energies. The objective of this work was to obtain experimental data that will be used to determine how a poly-energetic x-ray beam is attenuated by the stainless steel container wall. The data will also be used in conjunction with MCNP (Monte Carlos Nuclear Particle) modeling to develop an accurate method for determining energy absorbed in known solid samples contained in stainless steel vessels. In this study, experiments to measure the attenuation properties of stainless steel were performed for a range of bremsstrahlung x-ray beams with a maximum energy ranging from 150 keV to 10 MeV. Bremsstrahlung x-ray beams of these energies are commonly used in radiography of engineering and weapon components. The weapon surveillance community has a great interest in understanding how the x-rays in radiography affect short-term and long-term properties of weapon materials.

  3. Solid propellants.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr.; Hutchison, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    The basic principles underlying propulsion by rocket motor are examined together with the configuration of a solid propellant motor. Solid propellants and their preparation are discussed, giving attention to homogeneous propellants, composite propellants, energetic considerations in choosing a solid propellant, the processing of composite propellants, and some examples of new developments. The performance of solid propellants is investigated, taking into account characteristics velocity, the specific impulse, and performance calculations. Aspects of propellant development considered include nonperformance requirements for solid propellants, the approach to development, propellant mechanical properties, and future trends.

  4. Evaluation of Steel Cleanliness in a Steel Deoxidized Using Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Cedeño, Edgar-Ivan; Herrera-Trejo, Martín; Castro-Román, Manuel; Castro-Uresti, Fabián; López-Cornejo, Monserrat

    2016-06-01

    The effect of magnesium in the aluminum used as a deoxidizer on the cleanliness of steel was studied throughout a steelmaking route for the production of thin slabs. Two deoxidizers with different Mg contents were used. The Mg content of a "typical" deoxidizer was ~0.5 wt pct Mg, whereas that for an alternative deoxidizer was ~2 wt pct Mg. The inclusion population at different stages of the steelmaking process was characterized in terms of chemical composition, number, and size distribution. The inclusion modification path shows that the solid Al2O3 and Al2O3-MgO inclusions formed in the early stage of the steel ladle treatment are modified into Al2O3-MgO-CaO liquid and MgO-Al2O3-liquid inclusions. Although some slight differences were observed in the ladle furnace samples, the chemical composition of inclusions was similar in the samples taken at the mold of the continuous casting, regardless of the deoxidizer used. Gumbel, generalized extreme value (GEV), and generalized Pareto (GP) distributions were used for the description of the size distribution. The GEV and GP distributions resulted in proper distributions to describe the evolution of size distribution throughout the steelmaking process. Furthermore, no statistically significant differences between inclusion size distributions resulting from the use of either deoxidizer were found.

  5. Solid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1991-01-01

    The state of knowledge of solid lubricants is reviewed. The results of research on solid lubricants from the 1940's to the present are presented from a historical perspective. Emphasis is placed largely, but not exclusively, on work performed at NASA Lewis Research Center with a natural focus on aerospace applications. However, because of the generic nature of the research, the information presented in this review is applicable to most areas where solid lubricant technology is useful.

  6. Modern Steel Framed Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Inst. of Steel Construction, Inc., New York, NY.

    In view of the cost of structural framing for school buildings, ten steel-framed schools are examined to review the economical advantages of steel for school construction. These schools do not resemble each other in size, shape, arrangement or unit cost; some are original in concept and architecture, and others are conservative. Cost and…

  7. Steel Industry Wastes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidtke, N. W.; Averill, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastes from steel industry, covering publications of 1976-77. This review covers: (1) coke production; (2) iron and steel production; (3) rolling operations; and (4) surface treatment. A list of 133 references is also presented. (NM)

  8. The Steel Band.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weil, Bruce

    1996-01-01

    Describes studying the steel drum, an import from Trinidad, as an instrument of intellectual growth. Describes how developing a steel drum band provided Montessori middle school students the opportunity to experience some important feelings necessary to emotional growth during this difficult age: competence, usefulness, independence, and…

  9. Recycling steel from grinding swarf

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, H.; Matthews, M.A.; Warner, L.S.

    1998-12-31

    Two cleaning processes have been investigated for removing contaminants (cutting oil with phosphorus ester) from high speed steel (HSS) griding swarf. One process uses an aqueous surfactant washing technique, and the second process uses supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO{sub 2}) extraction. Both technical and preliminary financial analysis are performed to have a better evaluation of these two competing cleaning technologies. Bench scale aqueous washings have shown that the required phosphorus removal is easily obtained, but a sufficient oil removal is more difficult. The experimental results also indicate a strong dependence of the aqueous washing efficiency on the choice of a suitable surfactant. SCCO{sub 2} extraction at 80 C and 340 atm shows that approximately 80% of the oil can be removed from swarf during a 60-minute process to produce a batch of recyclable steel, and that the phosphorus removal also reaches the required level. The cost of processing swarf using either aqueous surfactant washing or SCCO{sub 2} extraction in a 3,000,000 lbs per year plant is analyzed and the market forces impacting the feasibility of recycling on a commercial basis are reviewed. Commercial scale recycling is, in part, dependent upon resolution of regulatory uncertainty on the definition of swarf. States regulating swarf as hazardous provide a significant financial incentive to recycle. In states that regulate swarf as a solid waste, low disposal costs provide a disincentive that must be balanced with the possible hidden, future liabilities of landfill disposal.

  10. EAST ELEVATION, LTV STEEL (FORMERLY REPUBLIC STEEL), 8" BAR MILL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST ELEVATION, LTV STEEL (FORMERLY REPUBLIC STEEL), 8" BAR MILL, BUFFALO PLANT. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM ROLL SHOP. 8" BAR MILL DESIGNED AND BUILT BY DONNER STEEL CO. (PREDECESSOR OF REPUBLIC), 1919-1920. FOR DESCRIPTION OF ORIGINAL MILL SEE "IRON AGE", 116\\4 (23 JULY 1925): 201-204. - LTV Steel, 8-inch Bar Mill, Buffalo Plant, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  11. Nuclear transmutation in steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belozerova, A. R.; Shimanskii, G. A.; Belozerov, S. V.

    2009-05-01

    The investigations of the effects of nuclear transmutation in steels that are widely used in nuclear power and research reactors and in steels that are planned for the application in thermonuclear fusion plants, which are employed under the conditions of a prolonged action of neutron irradiation with different spectra, made it possible to study the effects of changes in the isotopic and chemical composition on the tendency of changes in the structural stability of these steels. For the computations of nuclear transmutation in steels, we used a program complex we have previously developed on the basis of algorithms for constructing branched block-type diagrams of nuclide transformations and for locally and globally optimizing these diagrams with the purpose of minimizing systematic errors in the calculation of nuclear transmutation. The dependences obtained were applied onto a Schaeffler diagram for steels used for structural elements of reactors. For the irradiation in fission reactors, we observed only a weak influence of the effects of nuclear transmutation in steels on their structural stability. On the contrary, in the case of irradiation with fusion neutrons, a strong influence of the effects of nuclear transmutation in steels on their structural stability has been noted.

  12. Thermodynamics of Complex Sulfide Inclusion Formation in Ca-Treated Al-Killed Structural Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yin-tao; He, Sheng-ping; Chen, Gu-jun; Wang, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Controlling the morphology of the sulfide inclusion is of vital importance in enhancing the properties of structural steel. Long strip-shaped sulfides in hot-rolled steel can spherize when, instead of the inclusion of pure single-phase MnS, the guest is a complex sulfide, such as an oxide-sulfide duplex and a solid-solution sulfide particle. In this study, the inclusions in a commercial rolled structural steel were investigated. Spherical and elongated oxide-sulfide duplex as well as single-phase (Mn,Ca)S solid solution inclusions were observed in the steel. A thermodynamic equilibrium between the oxide and sulfide inclusions was proposed to understand the oxide-sulfide duplex inclusion formation. Based on the equilibrium solidification principle, thermodynamic discussions on inclusion precipitation during the solidification process were performed for both general and resulfurized structural steel. The predicted results of the present study agreed well with the experimental ones.

  13. Oxidation Potentials in Iron and Steel Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matousek, J. W.

    2013-11-01

    The state of oxidation of a pyrometallurgical process given by the partial pressure of oxygen and the temperature (the oxidation potential) is one of the important properties monitored and controlled in the smelting and refining of iron and the nonferrous metals. Solid electrolyte sensors based on ZrO2 and a reference electrode such as Cr/Cr2O3 to measure the oxygen pressure found early application in the steel industry, followed soon after in copper, nickel, lead, and zinc smelting. Similar devices are installed in automobile postcombustion/exhaust trains as part of emission control systems. The current discussion reviews this technology as applied in the primary steps of iron and steel making and refining.

  14. Glass Stronger than Steel

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Yarris, Lynn

    2011-03-28

    A new type of damage-tolerant metallic glass, demonstrating a strength and toughness beyond that of steel or any other known material, has been developed and tested by a collaboration of researchers from Berkeley Lab and Caltech.

  15. Structural Amorphous Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z. P.; Liu, C. T.; Thompson, J. R.; Porter, W. D.

    2004-06-01

    Recent advancement in bulk metallic glasses, whose properties are usually superior to their crystalline counterparts, has stimulated great interest in fabricating bulk amorphous steels. While a great deal of effort has been devoted to this field, the fabrication of structural amorphous steels with large cross sections has remained an alchemist’s dream because of the limited glass-forming ability (GFA) of these materials. Here we report the discovery of structural amorphous steels that can be cast into glasses with large cross-section sizes using conventional drop-casting methods. These new steels showed interesting physical, magnetic, and mechanical properties, along with high thermal stability. The underlying mechanisms for the superior GFA of these materials are discussed.

  16. Life after Steel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Bobby Curran grew up in a working-class neighborhood in Baltimore, finished high school, and followed his grandfather's steel-toed bootprints straight to Sparrows Point, a 3,000-acre sprawl of industry on the Chesapeake Bay. College was not part of the plan. A gritty but well-paying job at the RG Steel plant was Mr. Curran's ticket to a secure…

  17. Preparation, characterization, and applications of a novel solid-phase microextraction fiber by sol-gel technology on the surface of stainless steel wire for determination of poly cyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aquatic environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Es-haghi, Ali; Hosseininasab, Valiallah; Bagheri, Habib

    2014-02-27

    A novel solid-phase microextraction(SPME) fiber was prepared using sol-gel technology with ethoxylated nonylphenol as a fiber coating material. The fiber was employed to develop a headspace SPME-GC-MS method suitable for quantification of 13 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water samples. Surface characteristics of the fibers were inspected by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy as well as by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM measurements showed the presence of highly porous nano-sized particles in the coating. Important parameters affecting the extraction efficiency such as extraction temperature and time, desorption conditions as well as ionic strength have been evaluated and optimized. In the next step, the validation of the new method have been performed, finding it to be specific in the trace analysis of PAHs, with the limit of detection (LOD) ranging from 0.01 to 0.5 μg L(-1) and the linear range from the respective LOD to 200 μg L(-1) with RSD amounting to less than 8%. The thermal stability of the fibers was investigated as well and they were found to be durable at 280°C for 345 min. Furthermore, the proposed method was successfully applied for quantification of PAHs in real water samples.

  18. Waste product profile: Steel cans

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.

    1996-07-01

    Steel cans are made from tinplate steel, which is produced in basic oxygen furnaces. A thin layer of tin is applied to the can`s inner and outer surfaces to prevent rusting and protect food and beverage flavors. As a result, steel cans are often called tin cans. Steel mills are the largest market for steel cans. Integrated mills use the basic oxygen process to manufacture tinplate, appliances, car bodies, and steel framing. Electric arc furnaces use 100% scrap to produce steel shapes such as railroad ties and bridge spans. Electric arc furnaces are more geographically diverse and tend to have smaller capacities than basic oxygen furnaces. Detinners remove the tin from steel cans for resale to tin using industries. Continued decreases in the amount of tin used in steel cans has lessened the importance of this market. Foundries use scrap as a raw material in making castings and molds for industrial users.

  19. Profiles in garbage: Steel cans

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.

    1998-02-01

    Steel mills are the largest market for steel cans. Integrated mills use the basic oxygen process to manufacture tinplate, appliances, car bodies, and steel framing. Electric arc furnaces use 100% scrap to produce steel shapes such as railroad ties and bridge spans. Electric arc furnaces are more geographically diverse and tend to have smaller capacities than basic oxygen furnaces. Detinners remove the tin from steel cans for resale to tin using industries. With less tin use in steel cans, the importance of the detinning market has declined substantially. Foundries use scrap as a raw material in making castings and molds for industrial users.

  20. Test Of Protective Coatings On Carbon Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, Louis

    1993-01-01

    Report describes results of tests in which carbon-steel panels coated with one-or two-component solvent-based inorganic zinc primers and top-coated with inorganic topcoat or any of various organic topcoats, placed on outdoor racks at beach at Kennedy Space Center for 5 years. From time to time, slurry of Al(2)O(3) in 10-percent HCI solution applied to some of panels to simulate corrosive effect of effluent from solid-fuel rocket booster engines. Panels coated with inorganic topcoat performed much better than organic-topcoated panels.

  1. A discussion on improving hydration activity of steel slag by altering its mineral compositions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Yan, Peiyu; Feng, Jianwen

    2011-02-28

    This study aims to investigate the ways to improve the cementitious properties of steel slag. The results show that the cementitious phase of steel slag is composed of silicate and aluminate, but the large particles of these phases make a very small contribution to the cementitious properties of steel slag. RO phase (CaO-FeO-MnO-MgO solid solution), Fe(3)O(4), C(2)F and f-CaO make no contribution to the cementitious properties of steel slag. A new kind of steel slag with more cementitious phase and less RO phase can be obtained by removing some large particles. This new steel slag possesses better cementitious properties than the original steel slag. The large particles can be used as fine aggregates for concrete. Adding regulating agent high in CaO and SiO(2) during manufacturing process of steel slag to increase the cementitious phase to inert phase ratio is another way to improve its cementitious properties. The regulating agent should be selected to adapt to the specific steel slag and the alkalinity should be increased as high as possible on the premise that the f-CaO content does not increase. The cooling rate should be enhanced to improve the hydration activity of the cementitious phase at the early ages and the grindability of steel slag.

  2. Strength analysis of laser welded lap joint for ultra high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Young Cheol; Kim, Cheol Hee; Cho, Young Tae; Jung, Yoon Gyo

    2013-12-01

    Several industries including the automotive industry have recently applied the process of welding high strength steel. High strength steel is steel that is harder than normal high strength steel, making it much stronger and stiffer. HSS can be formed in pieces that can be up to 10 to 15 percent thinner than normal steel without sacrificing strength, which enables weight reduction and improved fuel economy. Furthermore, HSS can be formed into complex shapes that can be welded into structural areas. This study is based on previous experiments and is aimed at establishing the stress distribution for laser welded high strength steel. Research on the stress distribution for laser welded high strength steel is conducted by using Solid Works, a program that analyzes the stress of a virtual model. In conclusion, we found that the stress distribution is changed depending on the shape of welded lap joint. In addition, the Influence of the stress distribution on welded high strength steel can be used to standard for high energy welding of high strength steel, and we can also predict the region in welded high strength steel that may cracked.

  3. View northwest, wharf A, sheet steel bulkhead, steel lift tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View northwest, wharf A, sheet steel bulkhead, steel lift tower - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  4. Solid electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, Kuzhikalail M.; Alamgir, Mohamed

    1993-06-15

    This invention pertains to Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized (encapsulated) in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing complexes (solvates) formed between a Li salt such as LiAsF.sub.6, LiCF.sub.3 SO.sub.3 or LiClO.sub.4 and a mixture of aprotic organic solvents having high dielectric constants such as ethylene carbonate (EC) (dielectric constant=89.6) and propylene carbonate (PC) (dielectric constant=64.4) in a polymer matrix such as polyacrylonitrile, poly(tetraethylene glycol diacrylate), or poly(vinyl pyrrolidinone).

  5. Semi-solid processing and its as yet unexplored potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisman, D.; Rubesova, K.; Masek, B.

    2016-03-01

    Thanks to the available advanced control technology, manufacturing processes which have been described in the past but their hidden potential remained untapped are now continuing to be developed. As a result, even conventional materials which have been around for years can be manipulated to obtain unusual microstructures with specific mechanical and physical properties. Semi-solid processing belongs to the above-described group: it had been studied in the past but, due to complicated process control, it gradually lost its appeal. However, advanced techniques of temperature field control enable engineers to control this complex process accurately. One of the innovative methods of semi-solid processing is mini- thixoforming. As it focuses on very small-size products, it offers very steep heating curves and extremely high solidification and cooling rates, when compared to conventional thixoforming. The capabilities of this process were tested on X210Cr12 ledeburitic tool steel. After the optimum processing conditions were found, additional materials were tried, ranging from low- carbon microalloyed steels through medium-alloy steels to high-alloy tool steels. The microstructure evolution upon the mini-thixoforming process is an issue of its own. The final microstructure of X210Cr12 consisted of more than 90% of austenite and chromium carbides. Semi-solid processing of a steel with a high vanadium content led to a microstructure comprising MA matrix and globular vanadium carbides. In a low-alloy steel, martensitic microstructure was obtained.

  6. Superclean steel development

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, R.H.; McNaughton, W.P. )

    1989-12-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute has actively encouraged and sponsored a number of research projects to develop a superclean 3.5NiCrMoV steel for low pressure turbine rotors. Such steel is highly resistant to temper embrittlement and will thus facilitate increased efficiency in electricity generation through the use of higher operating temperatures and improvements in design. The objective of this interim report was to integrate the results that have been generated to date worldwide in the pursuit of superclean steel. The report contains detailed findings that enable the interested utility to evaluate how the results affect utility decision making. A companion document has been written to summarize the findings from this technical report. The results indicate that steels with impurity contents typical of the superclean specification can be manufactured for production rotors with properties that equal or exceed those for conventional 3.5NiCrMoV rotors in every detail. Of particular interest are the results that the superclean steels appear to be virtually resistant to temper embrittlement to a temperature of 500 {degrees}C. 109 refs., 51 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Brazing titanium to stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batista, R. I.

    1980-01-01

    Titanium and stainless-steel members are usually joined mechanically for lack of any other effective method. New approach using different brazing alloy and plating steel member with nickel resolves problem. Process must be carried out in inert atmosphere.

  8. Continuous steel production and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Peaslee, Kent D.; Peter, Jorg J.; Robertson, David G. C.; Thomas, Brian G.; Zhang, Lifeng

    2009-11-17

    A process for continuous refining of steel via multiple distinct reaction vessels for melting, oxidation, reduction, and refining for delivery of steel continuously to, for example, a tundish of a continuous caster system, and associated apparatus.

  9. A-3 steel work completed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Stennis Space Center engineers celebrated a key milestone in construction of the A-3 Test Stand on April 9 - completion of structural steel work. Workers with Lafayette (La.) Steel Erector Inc. placed the last structural steel beam atop the stand during a noon ceremony attended by more than 100 workers and guests.

  10. Strain Hardening of Hadfield Manganese Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P. H.; Olson, G. B.; Owen, W. S.

    1986-10-01

    The plastic flow behavior of Hadfield manganese steel in uniaxial tension and compression is shown to be greatly influenced by transformation plasticity phenomena. Changes in the stress-strain (σ-ɛ) curves with temperature correlate with the observed extent of deformation twinning, consistent with a softening effect of twinning as a deformation mechanism and a hardening effect of the twinned microstructure. The combined effects give upward curvature to the σ-ɛ curve over extensive ranges of plastic strain. A higher strain hardening in compression compared with tension appears to be consistent with the observed texture development. The composition dependence of stacking fault energy computed using a thermodynamic model suggests that the Hadfield composition is optimum for a maximum rate of deformation twinning. Comparisons of the Hadfield steel with a Co-33Ni alloy exhibiting similar twinning kinetics, and an Fe-21Ni-lC alloy deforming by slip indicate no unusual strain hardening at low strains where deformation is controlled by slip, but an unusual amount of structural hardening associated with the twin formation in the Hadfield steel. A possible mechanism of anomalous twin hardening is discussed in terms of modified twinning behavior (pseudotwinning) in nonrandom solid solutions.

  11. Antimicrobial Cu-bearing stainless steel scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Ren, Ling; Li, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Shuyuan; Sercombe, Timothy B; Yang, Ke

    2016-11-01

    Copper-bearing stainless steel scaffolds with two different structures (Body Centered Cubic and Gyroid labyrinth) at two solid fractions (25% and 40%) were fabricated from both 316L powder and a mixture of 316L and elemental Cu powder using selective laser melting, and relative 316L scaffolds were served as control group. After processing, the antimicrobial testing demonstrated that the 316L-Cu scaffolds presented excellent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, and the cell viability assay indicated that there was no cytotoxic effect of 316L-Cu scaffolds on rat marrow mesenchymal stem cells. As such, these have the potential to reduce implant-associated infections. The Cu was also found to homogeneously distribute within the microstructure by scanning electronic microcopy. The addition of Cu would not significantly affect its strength and stiffness compared to 316L scaffold, and the stiffness of all the scaffolds (3-20GPa) is similar to that of bone and much less than that of bulk stainless steel. Consequently, fabrication of such low stiffness porous structures, especially coupled with the addition of antimicrobial Cu, may provide a new direction for medical stainless steels. PMID:27524049

  12. Microbial-Influenced Corrosion of Corten Steel Compared with Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel in Oily Wastewater by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansouri, Hamidreza; Alavi, Seyed Abolhasan; Fotovat, Meysam

    2015-07-01

    The microbial corrosion behavior of three important steels (carbon steel, stainless steel, and Corten steel) was investigated in semi petroleum medium. This work was done in modified nutrient broth (2 g nutrient broth in 1 L oily wastewater) in the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and mixed culture (as a biotic media) and an abiotic medium for 2 weeks. The behavior of corrosion was analyzed by spectrophotometric and electrochemical methods and at the end was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the degree of corrosion of Corten steel in mixed culture, unlike carbon steel and stainless steel, is less than P. aeruginosa inoculated medium because some bacteria affect Corten steel less than other steels. According to the experiments, carbon steel had less resistance than Corten steel and stainless steel. Furthermore, biofilm inhibits separated particles of those steels to spread to the medium; in other words, particles get trapped between biofilm and steel.

  13. Advanced Solid Rocket Motor case design status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, G. L.; Cash, S. F.; Beck, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) case design aimed at achieving a safer and more reliable solid rocket motor for the Space Shuttle system is considered. The ASRM case has a 150.0 inch diameter, three equal length segment, and 9Ni-4CO-0.3C steel alloy. The major design features include bolted casebolted case joints which close during pressurization, plasma arc welded factory joints, integral stiffener for splash down and recovery, and integral External Tank attachment rings. Each mechanical joint has redundant and verifiable o-ring seals.

  14. Braze alloy spreading on steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siewert, T. A.; Heine, R. W.; Lagally, M. G.

    1978-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron microscopy (AEM) were employed to observe elemental surface decomposition resulting from the brazing of a copper-treated steel. Two types of steel were used for the study, stainless steel (treated with a eutectic silver-copper alloy), and low-carbon steel (treated with pure copper). Attention is given to oxygen partial pressure during the processes; a low enough pressure (8 x 10 to the -5th torr) was found to totally inhibit the spreading of the filler material at a fixed heating cycle. With both types of steel, copper treatment enhanced even spreading at a decreased temperature.

  15. Sensitization of stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, James P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this experiment is to determine the corrosion rates of 18-8 stainless steels that have been sensitized at various temperatures and to show the application of phase diagrams. The laboratory instructor will assign each student a temperature, ranging from 550 C to 1050 C, to which the sample will be heated. Further details of the experimental procedure are detailed.

  16. Fabricating the Solid Core Heatpipe Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ring, Peter J.; Sayre, Edwin D.; Houts, Mike

    2006-01-20

    The solid core heatpipe nuclear reactor has the potential to be the most dependable concept for the nuclear space power system. The design of the conversion system employed permits multiple failure modes instead of the single failure mode of other concepts. Regardless of the material used for the reactor, either stainless steel, high-temperature alloys, Nb1Zr, Tantalum Alloys or MoRe Alloys, making the solid core by machining holes in a large diameter billet is not satisfactory. This is because the large diameter billet will have large grains that are detrimental to the performance of the reactor due to grain boundary diffusion. The ideal fabrication method for the solid core is by hot isostatic pressure diffusion bonding (HIPing). By this technique, wrought fine-grained tubes of the alloy chosen are assembled into the final shape with solid cusps and seal welded so that there is a vacuum in between all surfaces to be diffusion bonded. This welded structure is then HIPed for diffusion bonding. A solid core made of Type 321 stainless steel has been satisfactorily produced by Advanced Methods and Materials and is undergoing evaluation by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.

  17. Rarefied solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, D. A.; Nikora, V. I.

    1994-01-01

    One important limit to creating low density materials is the objects' own weight. As a solid or colloidal matrix becomes more rarefied, gravity acts destructively to compress its suporting skeleton. We describe experimental results and propose a model which matches the low gravity behavior of rarefied or fractal solids. On parabolic airplane flights, we sought to demonstrate a key component of producing higher surface area fractals. Flight paths were selected to give a range of gravity levels: 0.01 g/g(sub 0) (low), 0.16 g(sub 0) (Lunar), 0.33 g/g(sub 0) (Martian), 1 g/g(sub 0) (Earth) and 1.8 g/g(sub 0) (high) (where g(sub 0) = 980 cm/sq s). Results using the model material of hydrophobic silica indicated that stable agglomeration of such tenuous objects can increase markedly in reduced gravity. Optical characterization revealed that fractal dimension changed directly with varying gravity. As measured by fractal dimension, effective surface area and roughness increased by 40% in low gravity. This finding supports the conclusion that relieving internal weight stresses on delicate aggregates can enhance their overall size (by two orders of magnitude) and internal surface area. We conclude that gravitational restructuring limits the overall size and void content of low-density solids. These sparse colloidal regimes may present new and technologically attractive physics, ranging from improved insulators, liquid-like tension in a 'solid' matrix, and characteristically low conductivities for sound and (8 to 14 micrometers wavelength) infrared radiation.

  18. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    2015-09-01

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this work, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW on grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.

  19. Corrosion monitoring of reinforcing steel in concrete by electrochemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Guofu; Hong, Yi; Ou, Jinping

    2010-04-01

    Health degradation by corrosion of steel in civil engineering, especially in rough environment, is a persistent problem. Structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques can lead to improved estimates of structural safety and serviceability. A novel all solid state-current confined corrosion sensor has been developed to provide the platform for corrosion monitoring of the steel bar in concrete beam by electrochemical method. Finite element method has been used to certify the current confined effect of the sensor. The sensors have been used in concrete beams to monitor the corrosion of the steel bar. Also, half-cell potential of the beam has obtained. The results shows that the corrosion sensor can effectively confine the current in the fixed area which is 45mm×π×Dsteel bar and the monitoring results of the corrosion sensor are accurate.

  20. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    2015-09-14

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this paper, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW onmore » grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Finally, post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.« less

  1. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    2015-09-14

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this paper, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW on grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Finally, post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.

  2. Special steel production on common carbon steel production line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Huachun; Han, Jingtao; Hu, Haiping; Bian, Ruisheng; Kang, Jianjun; Xu, Manlin

    2004-06-01

    The equipment and technology of small bar tandem rolling line of Shijiazhuang Iron & Steel Co. in China has reached the 90's international advanced level in the 20th century, but products on the line are mostly of common carbon steel. Currently there are few steel plants in China to produce 45 steel bars for cold drawing, which is a kind of shortage product. Development of 45 steel for cold drawing has a wide market outlook in China. In this paper, continuous cooling transformation (CCT) curve of 45 steel for cold drawing used for rolling was set out first. According to the CCT curve, we determined some key temperature points such as Ac3 temperature and Ac1 temperature during the cooling procedure and discussed the precipitation microstructure at different cooling rate. Then by studying thermal treatment process of 45 steel bars for cold drawing, the influence of cooling time on microstructure was analyzed and the optimum cooling speed has been found. All results concluded from the above studies are the basis of regulating controlled cooling process of 45 steel bars for cold drawing. Finally, the feasible production process of 45 steel bars for cold drawing on common carbon steel production line combined with the field condition was recommended.

  3. New martensitic steels for fossil power plant: Creep resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaybyshev, R. O.; Skorobogatykh, V. N.; Shchenkova, I. A.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, we consider the origin of high-temperature strength of heat-resistant steels belonging to martensitic class developed on the basis of the Fe—9%Cr alloy for the boiler pipes and steam pipelines of power plants at steam temperatures of up to 620°C and pressures to 300 atm. In addition, we give a brief information on the physical processes that determine the creep strength and consider the alloying philosophy of traditional heat-resistant steels. The effect of the chemical and phase composition of heat-resistant steels and their structure on creep strength is analyzed in detail. It is shown that the combination of the solid-solution alloying by elements such as W and Mo, as well as the introduction of carbides of the MX type into the matrix with the formation of a dislocation structure of tempered martensite, ensures a significant increase in creep resistance. The steels of the martensitic class withstand creep until an extensive polygonization starts in the dislocation structure of the tempered martensite(“troostomartensite”), which is suppressed by V(C,N) and Nb(C,N) dispersoids. Correspondingly, the service life of these steels is determined by the time during which the dispersed nanocarbonitrides withstand coalescence, while tungsten and molybdenum remain in the solid solution. The precipitation of the Laves phases Fe2(W,Mo) and the coalescence of carbides lead to the development of migration of low-angle boundaries, and the steel loses its ability to resist creep.

  4. Effect of recycling on residuals, processing, and properties of carbon and low-alloy steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, E. T.

    1983-02-01

    Because of the continuing increase in electric furnace steelmaking, which is a scrap-intensive process, and also in view of future new sources of scrap, such as municipal solid wastes, it is important to develop more knowledge about: (a) the effects of residual elements on steel, (b) processing strategies for producing high-residual steels, and (c) products in which residuals could be used to advantage. This review will first identify the important residual elements and the trends in their use and levels in steels. The effect of these elements on the processing phenomena and product properties of carbon and low-alloy steels will be discussed in detail. These phenomena and properties include hot shortness, scale adherence, room temperature tensile properties, impact resistance, and hardenability. Also discussed are examples of specific problems that residual elements present, both now and with emerging trends, for steel processing and applications, and the ways of using residuals to advantage.

  5. Microstructure and properties of pure iron/copper composite cladding layers on carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Long; Huang, Yong-xian; Lü, Shi-xiong; Huang, Ti-fang; Lü, Zong-liang

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, pure iron/copper composite metal cladding was deposited onto carbon steel by tungsten inert gas welding. The study focused on interfacial morphological, microstructural, and mechanical analyses of the composite cladding layers. Iron liquid-solid-phase zones were formed at copper/steel and iron interfaces because of the melting of the steel substrate and iron. Iron concentrated in the copper cladding layer was observed to exhibit belt, globule, and dendrite morphologies. The appearance of iron-rich globules indicated the occurrence of liquid phase separation (LPS) prior to solidification, and iron-rich dendrites crystallized without the occurrence of LPS. The maximum microhardness of the iron/steel interface was lower than that of the copper/steel interface because of the diffusion of elemental carbon. All samples fractured in the cladding layers. Because of a relatively lower strength of the copper layer, a short plateau region appeared when shear movement was from copper to iron.

  6. Ferritic steel melt and FLiBe/steel experiment : melting ferritic steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Troncosa, Kenneth P.; Smith, Brandon M.; Tanaka, Tina Joan

    2004-11-01

    In preparation for developing a Z-pinch IFE power plant, the interaction of ferritic steel with the coolant, FLiBe, must be explored. Sandia National Laboratories Fusion Technology Department was asked to drop molten ferritic steel and FLiBe in a vacuum system and determine the gas byproducts and ability to recycle the steel. We tried various methods of resistive heating of ferritic steel using available power supplies and easily obtained heaters. Although we could melt the steel, we could not cause a drop to fall. This report describes the various experiments that were performed and includes some suggestions and materials needed to be successful. Although the steel was easily melted, it was not possible to drip the molten steel into a FLiBe pool Levitation melting of the drop is likely to be more successful.

  7. 46 CFR 59.20-1 - Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Castings § 59.20-1 Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. Defects in carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings may be repaired by welding. The...

  8. 46 CFR 59.20-1 - Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Castings § 59.20-1 Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. Defects in carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings may be repaired by welding. The...

  9. 46 CFR 59.20-1 - Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Castings § 59.20-1 Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. Defects in carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings may be repaired by welding. The...

  10. 46 CFR 59.20-1 - Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Castings § 59.20-1 Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. Defects in carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings may be repaired by welding. The...

  11. 46 CFR 59.20-1 - Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Castings § 59.20-1 Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. Defects in carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings may be repaired by welding. The...

  12. Pulsed Magnetic Welding for Advanced Core and Cladding Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Guoping; Yang, Yong

    2013-12-19

    To investigate a solid-state joining method, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW), for welding the advanced core and cladding steels to be used in Generation IV systems, with a specific application for fuel pin end-plug welding. As another alternative solid state welding technique, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW) has not been extensively explored on the advanced steels. The resultant weld can be free from microstructure defects (pores, non-metallic inclusions, segregation of alloying elements). More specifically, the following objectives are to be achieved: 1. To design a suitable welding apparatus fixture, and optimize welding parameters for repeatable and acceptable joining of the fuel pin end-plug. The welding will be evaluated using tensile tests for lap joint weldments and helium leak tests for the fuel pin end-plug; 2 Investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties changes in PMW weldments of proposed advanced core and cladding alloys; 3. Simulate the irradiation effects on the PWM weldments using ion irradiation.

  13. History of ultrahigh carbon steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, J.; Sherby, O.D.

    1997-06-20

    The history and development of ultrahigh carbon steels (i.e., steels containing between 1 and 2.l percent C and now known as UHCS) are described. The early use of steel compositions containing carbon contents above the eutectoid level is found in ancient weapons from around the world. For example, both Damascus and Japanese sword steels are hypereutectoid steels. Their manufacture and processing is of interest in understanding the role of carbon content in the development of modern steels. Although sporadic examples of UHCS compositions are found in steels examined in the early part of this century, it was not until the mid-1970s that the modern study began. This study had its origin in the development of superplastic behavior in steels and the recognition that increasing the carbon content was of importance in developing that property. The compositions that were optimal for superplasticity involved the development of steels that contained higher carbon contents than conventional modern steels. It was discovered, however, that the room temperature properties of these compositions were of interest in their own right. Following this discovery, a period of intense work began on understanding their manufacture, processing, and properties for both superplastic forming and room temperature applications. The development of superplastic cast irons and iron carbides, as well as those of laminated composites containing UHCS, was an important part of this history.

  14. Respiratory status of stainless steel and mild steel welders.

    PubMed

    Kalliomäki, P L; Kalliomäki, K; Korhonen, O; Nordman, H; Rahkonen, E; Vaaranen, V

    1982-01-01

    Eighty-three full-time stainless steel and 29 mild steel welders from one shipyard were examined clinically, and their lung function was measured. The stainless steel welders had used both tungsten inert-gas (low-fume concentration) and manual metal-arc (MMA) (high-fume concentration) welding methods. The individual exposure of the welders was estimated based on the time spent doing MMA welding, the amount of retained contaminants in the lungs (magnetopulmography), and urinary chromium excretion. The results suggest that there is a greater prevalence of small airway disease among shipyard mild steel MMA welders than among stainless steel welders. Among the stainless steel welders the impairment of lung function parameters was associated with the MMA welding method. The type of welding, then, is important when the health hazards of welders are studied, and welders cannot be regarded as a single, homogeneous group. PMID:7100838

  15. Work of adhesion of dairy products on stainless steel surface

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes, Patrícia Campos; Araújo, Emiliane Andrade; dos Santos Pires, Ana Clarissa; Queiroz Fialho Júnior, José Felício; Lelis, Carini Aparecida; de Andrade, Nélio José

    2012-01-01

    The adhesion of the solids presents in food can difficult the process of surface cleaning and promotes the bacterial adhesion process and can trigger health problems. In our study, we used UHT whole milk, chocolate based milk and infant formula to evaluate the adhesion of Enterobacter sakazakii on stainless steel coupons, and we determine the work of adhesion by measuring the contact angle as well as measured the interfacial tension of the samples. In addition we evaluated the hydrophobicity of stainless steel after pre-conditioning with milk samples mentioned. E. sakazakii was able to adhere to stainless steel in large numbers in the presence of dairy products. The chocolate based milk obtained the lower contact angle with stainless steel surface, higher interfacial tension and consequently higher adhesion work. It was verified a tendency of decreasing the interfacial tension as a function of the increasing of protein content. The preconditioning of the stainless steel coupons with milk samples changed the hydrophobic characteristics of the surfaces and became them hydrophilic. Therefore, variations in the composition of the milk products affect parameters important that can influence the procedure of hygiene in surface used in food industry. PMID:24031951

  16. Stainless Steel Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in materials is critical to predicting tritium transport in structural metals (at high pressure), estimating tritium losses during production (fission environment), and predicting in-vessel inventory for future fusion devices (plasma driven permeation). Current models often assume equilibrium diffusivity and solubility for a class of materials (e.g. stainless steels or aluminum alloys), neglecting trapping effects or, at best, considering a single population of trapping sites. Permeation and trapping studies of the particular castings and forgings enable greater confidence and reduced margins in the models. For FY15, we have continued our investigation of the role of ferrite in permeation for steels of interest to GTS, through measurements of the duplex steel 2507. We also initiated an investigation of the permeability in work hardened materials, to follow up on earlier observations of unusual permeability in a particular region of 304L forgings. Samples were prepared and characterized for ferrite content and coated with palladium to prevent oxidation. Issues with the poor reproducibility of measurements at low permeability were overcome, although the techniques in use are tedious. Funding through TPBAR and GTS were secured for a research grade quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and replacement turbo pumps, which should improve the fidelity and throughput of measurements in FY16.

  17. 7. Credit BG. View looking west into small solid rocket ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Credit BG. View looking west into small solid rocket motor testing bay of Test Stand 'E' (Building 4259/E-60). Motors are mounted on steel table and fired horizontally toward the east. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand E, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. Process for dezincing galvanized steel

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, William A.; Dudek, Frederick J.; Daniels, Edward J.

    1998-01-01

    A process for removing zinc from galvanized steel. The galvanized steel is immersed in an electrolyte containing at least about 15% by weight of sodium or potassium hydroxide and having a temperature of at least about 75.degree. C. and the zinc is galvanically corroded from the surface of the galvanized steel. The material serving as the cathode is principally a material having a standard electrode potential which is intermediate of the standard electrode potentials of zinc and cadmium in the electrochemical series. The corrosion rate may be accelerated by (i) increasing the number density of corrosion sites in the galvanized steel by mechanically abrading or deforming the galvanized steel, (ii) heating the galvanized steel to form an alloy of zinc on the surface of the galvanized steel, (iii) mixing the galvanized steel with a material having a standard electrode potential which is intermediate of the standard electrode potentials of zinc and cadmium in the electrochemical series, or (iv) moving the galvanized steel relative to itself and to the electrolyte while immersed in the electrolyte.

  19. Process for dezincing galvanized steel

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, W.A.; Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J.

    1998-07-14

    A process is described for removing zinc from galvanized steel. The galvanized steel is immersed in an electrolyte containing at least about 15% by weight of sodium or potassium hydroxide and having a temperature of at least about 75 C and the zinc is galvanically corroded from the surface of the galvanized steel. The material serving as the cathode is principally a material having a standard electrode potential which is intermediate of the standard electrode potentials of zinc and cadmium in the electrochemical series. The corrosion rate may be accelerated by (1) increasing the number density of corrosion sites in the galvanized steel by mechanically abrading or deforming the galvanized steel, (2) heating the galvanized steel to form an alloy of zinc on the surface of the galvanized steel, (3) mixing the galvanized steel with a material having a standard electrode potential which is intermediate of the standard electrode potentials of zinc and cadmium in the electrochemical series, or (4) moving the galvanized steel relative to itself and to the electrolyte while immersed in the electrolyte. 1 fig.

  20. Induction heat treatment of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Semiatin, S.L.; Stutz, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the induction heating. After reviewing heat treating operations for steel and the principles of the heat treatment of steel, an overview of induction heat treating is provided. Next, consideration is given to equipment and equipment selection, coil design, power requirements and temperature control. A discussion of surface and through hardening of steel is provided, including information on frequency and power selection and quenching apparatus. Tempering is considered, followed by information on control of residual stresses, cracking, temper brittleness and the important metallurgical and hardness differences between induction and furnace treated steel.

  1. High strength, tough alloy steel

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other substitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  2. Stress corrosion cracking of stainless steels in NaCl solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speidel, Markus O.

    1981-05-01

    The metallurgical influences on the stress corrosion resistance of many commercial stainless steels have been studied using the fracture mechanics approach. The straight-chromium ferritic stainless steels, two-phase ferritic-austenitic stainless steels and high-nickel solid solutions (like alloys 800 and 600) investigated are all fully resistant to stress corrosion cracking at stress intensity (K1) levels ≤ MN • m-3/2 in 22 pct NaCl solutions at 105 °C. Martensitic stainless steels, austenitic stainless steels and precipitation hardened superalloys, all with about 18 pct chromium, may be highly susceptible to stress corrosion cracking, depending on heat treatment and other alloying elements. Molybdenum additions improve the stress corrosion cracking resistance of austenitic stainless steels significantly. The fracture mechanics approach to stress corrosion testing of stainless steels yields results which are consistent with both the service experience and the results from testing with smooth specimens. In particular, the well known “Copson curve” is reproduced by plotting the stress corrosion threshold stress intensity (ATISCC) vs the nickel content of stainless steels with about 18 pct chromium.

  3. Phase equilibria in the UO 2-austenitic steel system up to 3000°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleykamp, Heiko

    1997-08-01

    The pseudobinary UO 2-austenitic steel system was investigated by DTA up to 1500°C, by isothermal annealing up to 2000°C, by induction heating up to 2850°C and by arc melting up to about 3000°C. The system is characterized by a degenerate eutectic at 1433°C on the steel side and a monotectic at 2830°C and about 1 mol% steel. The maximum solubility of steel in solid U0 2 is 0.6 mol%, that in liquid U0 2 at 3000°C is about 4 mol%. U0 2 and steel form (Fe, Mn, Cr) 2O 3 precipitates between 1300 and 2600°C as U02 becomes hypostoichiometric. Liquid steel is stabilized to higher temperatures above its boiling point at 2790°C by dissolution of uranium and decomposes peritectically to liquid UO 2-χ and gas at estimated 3200°C. The critical data of the single-phase U0 2-steel melt based on the application of the Redlich-Kister model are Tc = 4900°C, Pc = 300 bar and χ c, steel = 0.41.

  4. Stress-corrosion cracking of steels in ammonia with consideration given to OTEC design: a survey

    SciTech Connect

    Teel, R.B.

    1980-03-01

    Carbon steel, alloy steel, and high-strength, quenched and tempered steel, when under applied or residual stress and especially when cold formed and/or welded without subsequent thermal stress relief, are subject to failure by stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in air-contaminated dry ammonia. Water as well as hydrazine when present in small amounts have been shown to be effective inhibitors in an all steel system. Galvanic corrosion between dissimilar metals and/or accelerated failure by SCC of stressed steel as a result of galvanic coupling may be of concern. Where water has proven effective as an inhibitor of SCC in an all steel system, it may not be adequate in a mixed metal system. With aluminum tubes, the tube sheet will either have to be solid aluminum, aluminum clad steel or some nonconductive coating will be necessary to effectively remove the cathodic alloy from the galvanic circuit. Research is required to determine the severity of the coupling effect between dissimilar alloys in ammonia under OTEC conditions; especially the possibility of accelerated SCC failures of stressed steel where the presence of an inhibitor in the ammonia may not be sufficient to override the galvanic coupling effect.

  5. Surface decontamination of solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, M.W.; Allen, R.P.; Arrowsmith, H.W.

    1980-04-01

    This paper summarizes work in progress at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop vibratory finishing into a large-scale decontamination system that can minimize the volume of surface-contaminated metallic and nonmetallic waste requiring geologic disposal. Vibratory finishing is a mass finishing process used in the metal finishing industry to debur, clean and improve surface finishes. The process combines a mechanical scrubbing action of a solid medium with the cleaning action of a liquid compound. The process takes place in a vibrating tub. Tests have demonstrated the ability to rapidly reduce contamination levels of transuranic-contaminated waste to substantially less than 10 nCi/g, the current limit for transuranic waste. The process is effective on a wide range of materials including stainless steel, Plexiglas, Neoprene, and Hypalon, the principal materials in Hanford glove boxes.

  6. The industrial ecology of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Considine, Timothy J.; Jablonowski, Christopher; Considine, Donita M.M.; Rao, Prasad G.

    2001-03-26

    This study performs an integrated assessment of new technology adoption in the steel industry. New coke, iron, and steel production technologies are discussed, and their economic and environmental characteristics are compared. Based upon detailed plant level data on cost and physical input-output relations by process, this study develops a simple mathematical optimization model of steel process choice. This model is then expanded to a life cycle context, accounting for environmental emissions generated during the production and transportation of energy and material inputs into steelmaking. This life-cycle optimization model provides a basis for evaluating the environmental impacts of existing and new iron and steel technologies. Five different plant configurations are examined, from conventional integrated steel production to completely scrap-based operations. Two cost criteria are used to evaluate technology choice: private and social cost, with the latter including the environmental damages associated with emissions. While scrap-based technologies clearly generate lower emissions in mass terms, their emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides are significantly higher. Using conventional damage cost estimates reported in the literature suggests that the social costs associated with scrap-based steel production are slightly higher than with integrated steel production. This suggests that adopting a life-cycle viewpoint can substantially affect environmental assessment of new technologies. Finally, this study also examines the impacts of carbon taxes on steel production costs and technology choice.

  7. Nanoscale Cementite Precipitates and Comprehensive Strengthening Mechanism of Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jie; Li, Guangqiang; Mao, Xinping; Fang, Keming

    2011-12-01

    This article summarizes the state of the art of the comprehensive strengthening mechanism of steel. By using chemical phase analysis, X-ray small-angle scattering (XSAS), room temperature organic (RTO) solution electrolysis and metal embedded sections micron-nano-meter characterization method, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation, the properties of nanoscale cementite precipitates in Ti microalloyed high-strength weathering steels produced by the thin slab continuous casting and rolling process were analyzed. Except nanoscale TiC, cementite precipitates with size less than 36 nm and high volume fraction were also found in Ti microalloyed high-strength weathering steels. The volume fraction of cementite with size less than 36 nm is 4.4 times as much as that of TiC of the same size. Cementite with high volume fraction has a stronger precipitation strengthening effect than that of nanoscale TiC, which cannot be ignored. The precipitation strengthening contributions of nanoscale precipitates of different types and sizes should be calculated, respectively, according to the mechanisms of shearing and dislocation bypass, and then be added with the contributions of solid solution strengthening and grain refinement strengthening. A formula for calculating the yield strength of low-carbon steel was proposed; the calculated yield strength considering the precipitation strengthening contributions of nanoscale precipitates and the comprehensive strengthening mechanism of steels matches the experimental results well. The calculated σ s = 630 to 676 MPa, while the examined σ s = 630 to 680 MPa. The reason that "ultrafine grain strengthening can not be directly added with dislocation strengthening or precipitation strengthening" and the influence of the phase transformation on steel strength were discussed. The applications for comprehensive strengthening theory were summarized, and several scientific questions for further study were pointed out.

  8. ISRO's solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagappa, R.; Kurup, M. R.; Muthunayagam, A. E.

    1989-08-01

    Solid rocket motors have been the mainstay of ISRO's sounding rockets and the first generation satellite launch vehicles. For the new launch vehicle under development also, the solid rocket motors contribute significantly to the vehicle's total propulsive power. The rocket motors in use and under development have been developed for a variety of applications and range in size from 30 mm dia employing 450 g of solid propellant—employed for providing a spin to the apogee motors—to the giant 2.8 m dia motor employing nearly 130 tonnes of solid propellant. The initial development, undertaken in 1967 was of small calibre motor of 75 mm dia using a double base charge. The development was essentially to understand the technological elements. Extruded aluminium tubes were used as a rocket motor casing. The fore and aft closures were machined from aluminium rods. The grain was a seven-pointed star with an enlargement of the port at the aft end and was charged into the chamber using a polyester resin system. The nozzle was a metallic heat sink type with graphite throat insert. The motor was ignited with a black powder charge and fired for 2.0 s. Subsequent to this, further developmental activities were undertaken using PVC plastisol based propellants. A class of sounding rockets ranging from 125 to 560 mm calibre were realized. These rocket motors employed improved designs and had delivered lsp ranging from 2060 to 2256 Ns/kg. Case bonding could not be adopted due to the higher cure temperatures of the plastisol propellants but improvements were made in the grain charging techniques and in the design of the igniters and the nozzle. Ablative nozzles based on asbestos phenolic and silica phenolic with graphite inserts were used. For the larger calibre rocket motors, the lsp could be improved by metallic additives. In the early 1970s designs were evolved for larger and more efficient motors. A series of 4 motors for the country's first satellite launch vehicle SLV-3 were

  9. Microbial Methane Production Associated with Carbon Steel Corrosion in a Nigerian Oil Field.

    PubMed

    Mand, Jaspreet; Park, Hyung S; Okoro, Chuma; Lomans, Bart P; Smith, Seun; Chiejina, Leo; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in oil field pipeline systems can be attributed to many different types of hydrogenotrophic microorganisms including sulfate reducers, methanogens and acetogens. Samples from a low temperature oil reservoir in Nigeria were analyzed using DNA pyrotag sequencing. The microbial community compositions of these samples revealed an abundance of anaerobic methanogenic archaea. Activity of methanogens was demonstrated by incubating samples anaerobically in a basal salts medium, in the presence of carbon steel and carbon dioxide. Methane formation was measured in all enrichments and correlated with metal weight loss. Methanogens were prominently represented in pipeline solids samples, scraped from the inside of a pipeline, comprising over 85% of all pyrosequencing reads. Methane production was only witnessed when carbon steel beads were added to these pipeline solids samples, indicating that no methane was formed as a result of degradation of the oil organics present in these samples. These results were compared to those obtained for samples taken from a low temperature oil field in Canada, which had been incubated with oil, either in the presence or in the absence of carbon steel. Again, methanogens present in these samples catalyzed methane production only when carbon steel was present. Moreover, acetate production was also found in these enrichments only in the presence of carbon steel. From these studies it appears that carbon steel, not oil organics, was the predominant electron donor for acetate production and methane formation in these low temperature oil fields, indicating that the methanogens and acetogens found may contribute significantly to MIC. PMID:26793176

  10. Microbial Methane Production Associated with Carbon Steel Corrosion in a Nigerian Oil Field

    PubMed Central

    Mand, Jaspreet; Park, Hyung S.; Okoro, Chuma; Lomans, Bart P.; Smith, Seun; Chiejina, Leo; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in oil field pipeline systems can be attributed to many different types of hydrogenotrophic microorganisms including sulfate reducers, methanogens and acetogens. Samples from a low temperature oil reservoir in Nigeria were analyzed using DNA pyrotag sequencing. The microbial community compositions of these samples revealed an abundance of anaerobic methanogenic archaea. Activity of methanogens was demonstrated by incubating samples anaerobically in a basal salts medium, in the presence of carbon steel and carbon dioxide. Methane formation was measured in all enrichments and correlated with metal weight loss. Methanogens were prominently represented in pipeline solids samples, scraped from the inside of a pipeline, comprising over 85% of all pyrosequencing reads. Methane production was only witnessed when carbon steel beads were added to these pipeline solids samples, indicating that no methane was formed as a result of degradation of the oil organics present in these samples. These results were compared to those obtained for samples taken from a low temperature oil field in Canada, which had been incubated with oil, either in the presence or in the absence of carbon steel. Again, methanogens present in these samples catalyzed methane production only when carbon steel was present. Moreover, acetate production was also found in these enrichments only in the presence of carbon steel. From these studies it appears that carbon steel, not oil organics, was the predominant electron donor for acetate production and methane formation in these low temperature oil fields, indicating that the methanogens and acetogens found may contribute significantly to MIC. PMID:26793176

  11. Microbial Methane Production Associated with Carbon Steel Corrosion in a Nigerian Oil Field.

    PubMed

    Mand, Jaspreet; Park, Hyung S; Okoro, Chuma; Lomans, Bart P; Smith, Seun; Chiejina, Leo; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in oil field pipeline systems can be attributed to many different types of hydrogenotrophic microorganisms including sulfate reducers, methanogens and acetogens. Samples from a low temperature oil reservoir in Nigeria were analyzed using DNA pyrotag sequencing. The microbial community compositions of these samples revealed an abundance of anaerobic methanogenic archaea. Activity of methanogens was demonstrated by incubating samples anaerobically in a basal salts medium, in the presence of carbon steel and carbon dioxide. Methane formation was measured in all enrichments and correlated with metal weight loss. Methanogens were prominently represented in pipeline solids samples, scraped from the inside of a pipeline, comprising over 85% of all pyrosequencing reads. Methane production was only witnessed when carbon steel beads were added to these pipeline solids samples, indicating that no methane was formed as a result of degradation of the oil organics present in these samples. These results were compared to those obtained for samples taken from a low temperature oil field in Canada, which had been incubated with oil, either in the presence or in the absence of carbon steel. Again, methanogens present in these samples catalyzed methane production only when carbon steel was present. Moreover, acetate production was also found in these enrichments only in the presence of carbon steel. From these studies it appears that carbon steel, not oil organics, was the predominant electron donor for acetate production and methane formation in these low temperature oil fields, indicating that the methanogens and acetogens found may contribute significantly to MIC.

  12. Solid oxide fuel cell matrix and modules

    DOEpatents

    Riley, B.

    1988-04-22

    Porous refractory ceramic blocks arranged in an abutting, stacked configuration and forming a three dimensional array provide a support structure and coupling means for a plurality of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The stack of ceramic blocks is self-supporting, with a plurality of such stacked arrays forming a matrix enclosed in an insulating refractory brick structure having an outer steel layer. The necessary connections for air, fuel, burnt gas, and anode and cathode connections are provided through the brick and steel outer shell. The ceramic blocks are so designed with respect to the strings of modules that by simple and logical design the strings could be replaced by hot reloading if one should fail. The hot reloading concept has not been included in any previous designs. 11 figs.

  13. Connections: Superplasticity, Damascus Steels, Laminated Steels, and Carbon Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a description is given of the connections that evolved from the initial development of a family of superplastic plain carbon steels that came to be known as Ultra-High Carbon Steels (UHCS). It was observed that their very high carbon contents were similar, if not identical, to those of Damascus steels. There followed a series of attempts to rediscover how the famous patterns found on Damascus steels blades were formed. At the same time, in order to improve the toughness at room temperature of the newly-developed UHCS, laminated composites were made of alternating layers of UHCS and mild steel (and subsequently other steels and other metals). This led to a study of ancient laminated composites, the motives for their manufacture, and the plausibility of some of the claims relating to the number of layers in the final blades. One apparently ancient laminated composite, recovered in 1837 from the great pyramid of Giza which was constructed in about 2750 B.C., stimulated a carbon dating study of ancient steels. The modern interest in "Bladesmithing" has connections back to many of these ancient weapons.

  14. Effect of the dendritic morphology on hot tearing of carbon steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridolfi, M. R.

    2016-03-01

    Hot tears form during solidification in the brittle region of the dendritic front. Most hot tearing criteria are based on solid and fluid mechanics, being the phenomenon strictly depending on the solid resistance to applied strains and on the liquid capability of filling the void spaces. Modelling both mechanisms implies the precise description of the dendritic morphology. To this scope, the theory of coalescence of the dendritic arms at grain boundaries of Rappaz et al. has been applied, in this work, to the columnar growth of carbon steels by means of a simple mathematical model. Depending on the alloy composition, solid bridging starts at solid fractions down to about 0.8 and up to above 0.995 (very low carbon). The morphology of the brittle region changes drastically with increasing carbon and adding other solutes. In particular, ferritic dendrites, typical of low carbon steels, tend to offer short and wide interdendritic spaces to the surrounding liquid making possible their complete filling, and few solid bridges; peritectic steels show the rise of austenite growing and bridging rapidly in the interdendritic spaces, preventing void formation; austenitic dendrites form long and narrow interdendritic spaces difficult to reach for the liquid and with a lot of solid bridges. Sulphur addition mainly acts in delaying the coalescence end, more markedly in ferritic dendrites.

  15. Occupational Profiles in the European Steel Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franz, Hans-Werner; And Others

    The steel industry in Europe has faced great changes, with resulting layoffs and restructuring. Now that the most basic changes seem to be over, it has become evident that the remaining steel industry requires more highly trained workers than was the case previously. Although steel maintenance employees were always highly skilled, steel production…

  16. Improving the toughness of ultrahigh strength steel

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Koji

    2002-08-15

    The ideal structural steel combines high strength with high fracture toughness. This dissertation discusses the toughening mechanism of the Fe/Co/Ni/Cr/Mo/C steel, AerMet 100, which has the highest toughness/strength combination among all commercial ultrahigh strength steels. The possibility of improving the toughness of this steel was examined by considering several relevant factors.

  17. Thermodynamic-kinetic simulation of constrained dendrite growth in steels

    SciTech Connect

    Miettinen, J.

    2000-04-01

    A model of constrained dendritic growth for steels, based on thermodynamic and kinetic theory, is presented. The model links thermodynamic chemical potential-equality equations to an existing, approximate treatment of constrained dendritic growth in multicomponent steels, taking into account the deviation from the local thermodynamic equilibrium of the phase interface caused by interface friction, capillarity, and solute trapping. Due to the thermodynamic approach, with a thermodynamic model and recently assessed data, the present treatment yields a more accurate determination of phase stabilities than the earlier methods. Depending on the steel composition and the growth conditions (growth rate and temperature gradient), the model determines the dendrite tip undercooling, the primary solid phase (ferrite or austenite), the stability of that phase, certain dimensions of the microstructure, and the solute accumulation ahead of the dendrite tip. A special optional calculations is that of the equally probable formation of ferrite and austenite in stainless steels. Calculations for testing the model and for validation it with experimental data are presented.

  18. Modelling macrosegregation in a 2.45 ton steel ingot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Wu, M.; Ludwig, A.; Kharicha, A.

    2012-07-01

    A three phase model for the mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification was proposed by the current authors [Wu and Ludwig 2006 Metall. Mater. Trans. 37A 1613-31]. The main features of the mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification are considered: the growth of the columnar dendrite trunks from the ingot surface, the nucleation and growth of the equiaxed crystals, the sedimentation of the equiaxed crystals, the thermal and solutal buoyancy flow and its interactions with the growing crystals, the solute partitioning at the solid-liquid interface during solidification, the solute transport due to melt convection and equiaxed sedimentation, the mechanical interaction/impingement between columnar and equiaxed crystals and the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET). However, due to the model complexity and the limited computational capability the model has not yet applied to the large steel ingots of engineering scale. This paper is going to simulate a 2.45 ton big-end-up industry steel ingot, for which some experimental results were reported [Marburg 1926 Iron Steel Inst. 113 39-176]. Here a simplified binary phase diagram for the steel (Fe-0.45 wt. %C) is considered. Comparison of the modelling results such as as-cast columnar and equiaxed zones, macrosegregation with the experimental results is made. Details about the formation sequence of the distinguished crystal zones and segregation patterns are analyzed.

  19. Solidification structures grown under induced flow and continuous casting of steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsavaras, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    The use of induced flow as a means to control solidification structures in strand cast steel is investigated. The quality problems in strand cast steel stemming from columnar growth can be partially controlled, by Electro Magnetic Stirring (EMS). Induced flow changes the normal morphology of dendrites. Solids grown under intense stirring conditions show both negative and positive segregation which is considered unacceptable by some steel producers. The inclusion size and population is strongly affected by induced flow (EMS). Laboratory and industrial data show substantial reduction in inclusion size and content, but the overall effect of flow on inclusions is affected by the particular type of flow patterns utilized in each case. Productivity and quality are raised substantially in steel strand casting by utilizing EMS.

  20. Mathematical modeling and validation of the carburizing of low carbon steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Mariaca, A.; Cendales, E. D.; Chamarraví, O.

    2016-02-01

    This paper shows the mathematical modeling of heat and mass transfer in transient state of cylindrical bars of low carbon steel subjected to carburizing process. The model solution for the two phenomena was performed using a one-dimensional analysis in the radius direction, using the numerical method of finite differences; also a sensitivity analysis by varying the coefficient of convective heat transfer (h) is performed. The modeling results show that this carburization steel is strongly dependent on h. These results suggest that if it can increase the value of h in this kind of process could reduce the time of process for this heat treatment. Additionally, an experimental procedure was established by carburization of a steel AISI SAE 1010, which develops cementing solid phase and the specimen steel and micrographic hardness profiles obtained from samples of the specimen analysis was performed, to determine the penetration depth of the carbon and validate this result over the values obtained by the computer model.

  1. Effect of alloying on the fatigue resistance of steel 110G13L

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, A.P.; Bodrova, T.V.; Kashirina, T.K.; Levin, B.M.; Mamqeva, E.I.

    1986-05-01

    A Study was made of the effect of additional alloying of steel 110G13L with vanadium and molybdenum on the fatigue resistance and cyclic crack resistance. Fatigue tests for specimens of steels 110G13L, 110F13FL, and 110G13ML were carried out in a UP-50 machine in pure bending. Testing was done for crack growth in a universal electrohydraulic machine HUS 1025 of the firm MFL (FRG) with axial tension and a loading frequency of 20 Hz. On adding 0.75% Mo to steel 110G13L there is precipitation of finely dispersed uniformly distributed molybdenum carbide in the structure and alloying of the solid solution, which leads to an increase in the fatigue resistance of the steel both in the stage of fatigue crack initiation and in the propagation stage.

  2. Cycles for Science: Biology Curriculum Supplement for Grades 9-12. A Steel Cycles Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Diana; Laymon, Carol

    This document contains project-oriented lessons and hands-on activities developed to integrate steel recycling, natural resource conservation, and solid waster management into science learning. It is designed to assist secondary teachers and students (grades 9-12) in meeting state and local goals for learning in biology, chemistry, general science…

  3. NDE of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor field joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Patrick H.

    1987-01-01

    One of the most critical areas for inspection in the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motors is the bond between the steel case and rubber insulation in the region of the field joints. The tang-and-clevis geometry of the field joints is sufficiently complex to prohibit the use of resonance-based techniques. One approach we are investigating is to interrogate the steel-insulation bondline in the tang and clevis regions using surface-travelling waves. A low-frequency contact surface wave transmitting array transducer is under development at our laboratory for this purpose. The array is placed in acoustic contact with the steel and surface waves are launched on the inside surface or the clevis leg which propagate along the steel-insulation interface. As these surface waves propagate along the bonded surface, the magnitude of the ultrasonic energy leaking into the steel is monitored on the outer surface of the case. Our working hypothesis is that the magnitude of energy received at the outer surface of the case is dependent upon the integrity of the case-insulation bond, with less attenuation for propagation along a disbond due to imperfect acoustic coupling between the steel and rubber. Measurements on test specimens indicate a linear relationship between received signal amplitude and the length of good bend between the transmitter and receiver, suggesting the validity of this working hypothesis.

  4. NDE of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor field joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Patrick H.

    One of the most critical areas for inspection in the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motors is the bond between the steel case and rubber insulation in the region of the field joints. The tang-and-clevis geometry of the field joints is sufficiently complex to prohibit the use of resonance-based techniques. One approach we are investigating is to interrogate the steel-insulation bondline in the tang and clevis regions using surface-travelling waves. A low-frequency contact surface wave transmitting array transducer is under development at our laboratory for this purpose. The array is placed in acoustic contact with the steel and surface waves are launched on the inside surface or the clevis leg which propagate along the steel-insulation interface. As these surface waves propagate along the bonded surface, the magnitude of the ultrasonic energy leaking into the steel is monitored on the outer surface of the case. Our working hypothesis is that the magnitude of energy received at the outer surface of the case is dependent upon the integrity of the case-insulation bond, with less attenuation for propagation along a disbond due to imperfect acoustic coupling between the steel and rubber. Measurements on test specimens indicate a linear relationship between received signal amplitude and the length of good bend between the transmitter and receiver, suggesting the validity of this working hypothesis.

  5. Advanced steel reheat furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Moyeda, D.; Sheldon, M.; Koppang, R.; Lanyi, M.; Li, X.; Eleazer, B.

    1997-10-01

    Energy and Environmental Research Corp. (EER) under a contract from the Department of Energy is pursuing the development and demonstration of an Advanced Steel Reheating Furnace. This paper reports the results of Phase 1, Research, which has evaluated an advanced furnace concept incorporating two proven and commercialized technologies previously applied to other high temperature combustion applications: EER`s gas reburn technology (GR) for post combustion NOx control; and Air Product`s oxy-fuel enrichment air (OEA) for improved flame heat transfer in the heating zones of the furnace. The combined technologies feature greater production throughput with associated furnace efficiency improvements; lowered NOx emissions; and better control over the furnace atmosphere, whether oxidizing or reducing, leading to better control over surface finish.

  6. 2169 steel waveform experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, Michael David; Alexander, C. Scott; Reinhart, William Dodd; Brown, Justin L.

    2012-11-01

    In support of LLNL efforts to develop multiscale models of a variety of materials, we have performed a set of eight gas gun impact experiments on 2169 steel (21% Cr, 6% Ni, 9% Mn, balance predominantly Fe). These experiments provided carefully controlled shock, reshock and release velocimetry data, with initial shock stresses ranging from 10 to 50 GPa (particle velocities from 0.25 to 1.05 km/s). Both windowed and free-surface measurements were included in this experiment set to increase the utility of the data set, as were samples ranging in thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Target physical phenomena included the elastic/plastic transition (Hugoniot elastic limit), the Hugoniot, any phase transition phenomena, and the release path (windowed and free-surface). The Hugoniot was found to be nearly linear, with no indications of the Fe phase transition. Releases were non-hysteretic, and relatively consistent between 3- and 5-mmthick samples (the 3 mm samples giving slightly lower wavespeeds on release). Reshock tests with explosively welded impactors produced clean results; those with glue bonds showed transient releases prior to the arrival of the reshock, reducing their usefulness for deriving strength information. The free-surface samples, which were steps on a single piece of steel, showed lower wavespeeds for thin (1 mm) samples than for thicker (2 or 4 mm) samples. A configuration used for the last three shots allows release information to be determined from these free surface samples. The sample strength appears to increase with stress from ~1 GPa to ~ 3 GPa over this range, consistent with other recent work but about 40% above the Steinberg model.

  7. EXPERIMENTAL METHODS TO ESTIMATE ACCUMULATED SOLIDS IN NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.; Steeper, T.; Steimke, J.

    2012-12-10

    The Department of Energy has a large number of nuclear waste tanks. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles, e.g., plutonium containing, could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to remove most of the solids. Then the volume and shape of the residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for plutonium were measured. This paper discusses the overall test results, which indicated heavy solids only accumulate during the first few transfer cycles, along with the techniques and equipment designed and employed in the test. Those techniques include: Magnetic particle separator to remove stainless steel solids, the plutonium surrogate from a flowing stream; Magnetic wand used to manually remove stainless steel solids from samples and the tank heel; Photographs were used to determine the volume and shape of the solids mounds by developing a composite of topographical areas; Laser rangefinders to determine the volume and shape of the solids mounds; Core sampler to determine the stainless steel solids distribution within the solids mounds; Computer driven positioner that placed the laser rangefinders and the core sampler over solids mounds that accumulated on the bottom of a scaled staging tank in locations where jet velocities were low. These

  8. Slurry Erosion Studies on Surface Modified 13Cr-4Ni Steels: Effect of Angle of Impingement and Particle Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manisekaran, T.; Kamaraj, M.; Sharrif, S. M.; Joshi, S. V.

    2007-10-01

    Hydroturbine steels, such as 13Cr-4Ni martensitic steels, are generally subjected to heavy-erosive wear and loss of efficiency due to solid particulate entrainment in the water. Surface-modified steels have proven to give better performance in terms of erosive wear resistance. In the present study, an attempt is made to investigate the effect of angle of impingement and particle size on slurry-jet erosion behavior of pulsed plasma nitrided and laser hardened 13Cr-4Ni steels. Laser hardening process has shown good performance at all angles of impingement due to martensitic transformation of retained austenite. Plastic deformation mode of material removal was also an evident feature of all laser-hardened surface damage locations. However, pulsed-plasma nitrided steels have exhibited chip formation and micro-cutting mode of erosive wear. Erosion with 150-300 μm size was twice compared to 150 μm size slurry particulates.

  9. Corrosion of Steels in Steel Reinforced Concrete in Cassava Juice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oluwadare, G. O.; Agbaje, O.

    The corrosion of two types of construction steels, ST60Mn and RST37-2♦, in a low cyanide concentration environment (cassava juice) and embedded in concrete had been studied. The ST60 Mn was found to be more corrosion resistant in both ordinary water and the cassava juice environment. The cyanide in cassava juice does not attack the steel but it provides an environment of lower pH around the steel in the concrete which leads to breakdown of the passivating film provided by hydroxyl ions from cement. Other factors such as the curing time of the concrete also affect the corrosion rates of the steel in the concrete. The corrosion rate of the steel directly exposed to cassava juice i.e., steel not embedded in concrete is about twice that in concrete. Long exposure of concrete structure to cassava processing effluent might result in deterioration of such structures. Careful attention should therefore be paid to disposal of cassava processing effluents, especially in a country like Nigeria where such processing is now on the increase.

  10. SolidShperal

    2013-12-22

    SolidSpheral is an extension of the Spheral open source meshless hydrodynamics method. SolidSpheral adds the capability to model solid materials using analytic equations of state, and a simple damage model to allow for the modeled materials to undergo dynamic damage evolution. SolidSpheral is a distributed parallel code employing MPI for the parallel framework.

  11. Great Lakes Steel -- PCI facility

    SciTech Connect

    Eichinger, F.T.; Dake, S.H.; Wagner, E.D.; Brown, G.S.

    1997-12-31

    This paper discusses the planning, design, and start-up of the 90 tph PCI facility for National Steel`s Great Lakes Steel Division in River Rouge, MI. This project is owned and operated by Edison Energy Services, and was implemented on a fast-track basis by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Babcock Material Handling, and Babcock and Wilcox. This paper presents important process issues, basic design criteria, an the challenges of engineering and building a state-of-the-art PCI facility in two existing plants. Pulverized coal is prepared at the River Rouge Power Plant of Detroit Edison, is pneumatically conveyed 6,000 feet to a storage silo at Great Lakes Steel, and is injected into three blast furnaces.

  12. TIG and HIP joining of Reduced Activation Ferrite/Martensitic steel for the Korean ITER-TBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Duck Young; Oh, Seungjin; Ahn, Mu-Young; Yu, In-Keun; Kim, Duck-Hoi; Cho, Seungyon; Choi, Im-Sub; Kwon, Ki-Bum

    2011-10-01

    Korea is developing a Helium Cooled Solid Breeder Test Blanket Module for ITER. The primary candidate structural material is a Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steel. The complex TBM structure requires developing joining technologies for successful fabrication. The characteristics of Tungsten Inert Gas welding and Hot Isostatic Pressing joining of RAFM steel were investigated. Metallurgical examinations showed that the steel grain size was increased after HIP joining and recovered by post joining heat treatment. Both TIG welding and HIP joining are found to be acceptable for ITER TBM based on mechanical tests and microstructure examination.

  13. Hydrogen embrittlement of structural steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Somerday, Brian P.

    2010-06-01

    Carbon-manganese steels are candidates for the structural materials in hydrogen gas pipelines, however it is well known that these steels are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Decades of research and industrial experience have established that hydrogen embrittlement compromises the structural integrity of steel components. This experience has also helped identify the failure modes that can operate in hydrogen containment structures. As a result, there are tangible ideas for managing hydrogen embrittement in steels and quantifying safety margins for steel hydrogen containment structures. For example, fatigue crack growth aided by hydrogen embrittlement is a key failure mode for steel hydrogen containment structures subjected to pressure cycling. Applying appropriate structural integrity models coupled with measurement of relevant material properties allows quantification of safety margins against fatigue crack growth in hydrogen containment structures. Furthermore, application of these structural integrity models is aided by the development of micromechanics models, which provide important insights such as the hydrogen distribution near defects in steel structures. The principal objective of this project is to enable application of structural integrity models to steel hydrogen pipelines. The new American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) B31.12 design code for hydrogen pipelines includes a fracture mechanics-based design option, which requires material property inputs such as the threshold for rapid cracking and fatigue crack growth rate under cyclic loading. Thus, one focus of this project is to measure the rapid-cracking thresholds and fatigue crack growth rates of line pipe steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas. These properties must be measured for the base materials but more importantly for the welds, which are likely to be most vulnerable to hydrogen embrittlement. The measured properties can be evaluated by predicting the performance of the pipeline

  14. Solids fluidizer-injector

    DOEpatents

    Bulicz, Tytus R.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and process for fluidizing solid particles by causing rotary motion of the solid particles in a fluidizing chamber by a plurality of rotating projections extending from a rotatable cylinder end wall interacting with a plurality of fixed projections extending from an opposite fixed end wall and passing the solid particles through a radial feed orifice open to the solids fluidizing chamber on one side and a solid particle utilization device on the other side. The apparatus and process are particularly suited for obtaining intermittent feeding with continual solids supply to the fluidizing chamber. The apparatus and process are suitable for injecting solid particles, such as coal, to an internal combustion engine.

  15. Physical Principals Plastification of Solid under Pressure and its Applications in the Treatment Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkova, N. V.

    2000-03-01

    Hydrostatic pressure is the powerful method of action on the mechanisms of plastic deformation and fracture of solids. This effect is widely used in the technologies aimed to obtaining specimens with the desired physical and mechanical properties. The processes of hydrostatic treatment of materials is the most promising in this respect. This report presents an effort to formulate physical causes of plastification of solid under deformation by high hydrostatic pressure, which is one of fundamentals for development of the processes of hydrostatic material processing. The obtained theoretical and experimental results give evidence that the tendency to homogenization of the defect structure is the most general relationship under deformation of solids by pressure. The homogenization of the defect structure is realized by different methods depending on the nature of solids and the degree of compression in the experiment. Now we propose the new efficient technologies of hydrostatic treatment of materials and formulate the main principles of regulation by the treatment regimes on the basis of physical models. In particular, we research different technological processes: - the cryoforming of stainless steels on the basis of Fe-Cr-Ni solid solution under pressure; - the warm hydropressing of maraging steels and high-strenght steels containing the ageing austenite; - the treatment technologies of metastable steels on the basis of Fe-Mn and Fe-Mn-Cr solid solution with the application of both warm hydropressing and the back-pressure effect.

  16. Wear of steel by rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gent, A. N.; Pulford, C. T. R.

    1978-01-01

    Wear of a steel blade used as a scraper to abrade rubber surfaces has been found to take place much more rapidly on a cis-polyisoprene (natural rubber) surface than on a cis-polybutadiene surface, and much more rapidly in an inert atmosphere than in air. These observations are attributed to the direct attack upon steel of free-radical species generated by mechanical rupture of elastomer molecules during abrasion.

  17. Fatigue handbook: Offshore steel structures

    SciTech Connect

    Almarnaess, A.

    1985-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Overview of Offshore Steel Structures; Loads on Ocean Structures; Fracture Mechanics As a Tool in Fatigue Analysis; Basic Fatigue Properties of Welded Joints; Significance of Defects; Improving the Fatigue Strength of Welded Joints; Effects of Marine Environment and Cathodic Protection on Fatigue of Structural Steels Fatigue of Tubular Joints; Unstable Fracture; Fatigue Life Calculations; and Fatigue in Building Codes Background and Applications.

  18. Development of New Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Robert F. Buck

    2005-08-30

    A new family of innovative martensitic stainless steels, 521-A, 521-B, and 521-C has been developed by Advanced Steel Technology, LLC (Trafford, PA) as high strength fastener (bolt) materials for use at moderate temperatures in turbine engines, including steam turbines, gas turbines, and aircraft engines. The primary objective of the development program was to create a martensitic stainless steel with high strength at moderate temperatures, and which could replace the expensive nickel-based superalloy IN 718 in some fasteners applications. A secondary objective was to replace conventional 12Cr steels such as AISI 422 used as blades, buckets and shafts that operate at intermediate temperatures in turbine engines with stronger steel. The composition of the new alloys was specifically designed to produce excellent mechanical properties while integrating heat treatment steps into production to reduce energy consumption during manufacturing. As a result, production costs and energy consumption during production of rolled bar products is significantly lower than conventional materials. Successful commercialization of the new alloys would permit the installed cost of certain turbine engines to be reduced without sacrificing high availability or operational flexibility, thereby enhancing the global competitiveness of U.S. turbine engine manufacturers. Moreover, the domestic specialty steel industry would also benefit through increased productivity and reduced operating costs, while increasing their share of the international market for turbine engine fasteners, blades, buckets and shafts.

  19. Solids mass flow determination

    DOEpatents

    Macko, Joseph E.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the mass flow rate of solids mixed with a transport fluid to form a flowing mixture. A temperature differential is established between the solids and fluid. The temperature of the transport fluid prior to mixing, the temperature of the solids prior to mixing, and the equilibrium temperature of the mixture are monitored and correlated in a heat balance with the heat capacities of the solids and fluid to determine the solids mass flow rate.

  20. Hydrogen Permeation in Nanostructured Bainitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazum, Oluwole; Beladi, Hossein; Timokhina, Ilana B.; He, Yinghe; Bobby Kannan, M.

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogen permeation of nanostructured bainitic steel, produced at two different transformation temperatures, i.e., 473.15 K (200 °C) BS-200 and 623.15 K (350 °C) BS-350, was determined using Devanathan-Stachurski hydrogen permeation cell and compared with that of mild steel. Nanostructured bainitic steel showed lower effective diffusivity of hydrogen as compared to the mild steel. The BS-200 steel, which exhibited higher volume fraction of bainitic ferrite phase, showed lower effective diffusivity than BS-350 steel. The finer microstructural constituents (bainitic ferrite laths and retained austenite films) and higher dislocation density in the bainitic ferrite phase of BS-200 steel can be attributed to its lower effective diffusivity as compared to BS-350 steel and mild steel.

  1. Hydrogen Permeation in Nanostructured Bainitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazum, Oluwole; Beladi, Hossein; Timokhina, Ilana B.; He, Yinghe; Bobby Kannan, M.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen permeation of nanostructured bainitic steel, produced at two different transformation temperatures, i.e., 473.15 K (200 °C) BS-200 and 623.15 K (350 °C) BS-350, was determined using Devanathan-Stachurski hydrogen permeation cell and compared with that of mild steel. Nanostructured bainitic steel showed lower effective diffusivity of hydrogen as compared to the mild steel. The BS-200 steel, which exhibited higher volume fraction of bainitic ferrite phase, showed lower effective diffusivity than BS-350 steel. The finer microstructural constituents (bainitic ferrite laths and retained austenite films) and higher dislocation density in the bainitic ferrite phase of BS-200 steel can be attributed to its lower effective diffusivity as compared to BS-350 steel and mild steel.

  2. High-power laser applications in Nippon Steel Corporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamida, Katsuhiro

    2000-02-01

    The laser, which was invented in 1960, has been developed using various substances of solids, liquids, gases and semiconductors as laser active media. Applications of laser utilizing the coherent properties of laser light and the high power density light abound in many industries and in heavy industries respectively. The full-scale use of lasers in the steel industry began nearly 23 years ago with their applications as controllable light sources. Its contribution to the increase in efficiency and quality of the steel making process has been important and brought us the saving of the energy, the resource and the labor. Laser applications in the steel making process generally require high input energy, so it is essential to consider the interaction between the laser beam and the irradiated material. In particular, the reflectivity of the laser beam on the surface of material and the quantity of the laser-induced plasma are critical parameters for high efficient processes with low energy losses. We have developed plenty of new laser systems for the steel making process with their considerations in mind. A review of the following high-power-laser applications is given in the present paper: (1) Use of plasma as a secondary heat source in CO2 laser welding for connecting steel sheets of various grades. (2) Laser-assisted electric resistance welding of pipes. (3) New type all-laser-welded honeycomb panels for high-speed transport. (4) Laser flying welder for continuous hot rolling mill using two 45 kW CO2 lasers.

  3. Austenite Static Recrystallization Kinetics in Microalloyed B Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrañaga-Otegui, Ane; Pereda, Beatriz; Jorge-Badiola, Denis; Gutiérrez, Isabel

    2016-06-01

    Boron is added to steels to increase hardenability, substituting of more expensive elements. Moreover, B acts as a recrystallization delaying element when it is in solid solution. However, B can interact with N and/or C to form nitrides and carbides at high temperatures, limiting its effect on both phase transformation and recrystallization. On the other hand, other elements like Nb and Ti are added due to the retarding effect that they exert on the austenite softening processes, which results in pancaked austenite grains and refined room microstructures. In B steels, Nb and Ti are also used to prevent B precipitation. However, the complex interaction between these elements and its effect on the austenite microstructure evolution during hot working has not been investigated in detail. The present work is focused on the effect the B exerts on recrystallization when added to microalloyed steels. Although B on its own leads to retarded static recrystallization kinetics, when Nb is added a large delay in the static recrystallization times is observed in the 1273 K to 1373 K (1000 °C to 1100 °C) temperature range. The effect is larger than that predicted by a model developed for Nb-microalloyed steels, which is attributed to a synergistic effect of both elements. However, this effect is not so prominent for Nb-Ti-B steels. The complex effect of the composition on recrystallization kinetics is explained as a competition between the solute drag and precipitation pinning phenomena. The effect of the microalloying elements is quantified, and a new model for the predictions of recrystallization kinetics that accounts for the B and Nb+B synergetic effects is proposed.

  4. Electrophoretically-deposited solid film lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, M.T.; Panitz, J.K.J.; Vanecek, C.W.

    1995-04-01

    An aqueous-based process that uses electrophoresis to attract powdered lubricant in suspension to a charged target was developed. The deposition process yields coatings with low friction, complies with environmental safety regulations, requires minimal equipment, and has several advantages over processes involving organic binders or vacuum techniques. This work focuses on development of the deposition process, includes an analysis of the friction coefficient of the material in sliding contact with stainless steel under a range of conditions, and a functional evaluation of coating performance in a precision mechanical device application. Results show that solid lubricant films with friction coefficients as low as 0.03 can be produced. A 0.03 friction coefficient is superior to solid lubricants with binder systems and is comparable to friction coefficients generated with more costly vacuum techniques.

  5. [Methodological approaches to the development of environmentally benign technology for the use of solid waste in iron metallurgy].

    PubMed

    Pugin, K G; Vaĭsman, Ia I

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of the life cycle of materials, containing wastes of iron and steel industry, new methodological approaches to the assessment of technologies of the secondary use of wastes are developed A complex criteria for selection of the technology for the use of resource potential of solid waste of iron and steel industry are developed with taking into account environmental, technological and economic indices. The technology of the use of wastes of ferrovanadium industry as bulk solid materials at the solid waste landfill is shown.

  6. Review on Cold-Formed Steel Connections

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Cher Siang; Mohammad, Shahrin; Md Tahir, Mahmood; Shek, Poi Ngian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connections, particularly for screw connections, storage rack connections, welded connections, and bolted connections. The performance of these connections in the design of cold-formed steel structures is discussed. PMID:24688448

  7. Review on cold-formed steel connections.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeong Huei; Tan, Cher Siang; Mohammad, Shahrin; Tahir, Mahmood Md; Shek, Poi Ngian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connections, particularly for screw connections, storage rack connections, welded connections, and bolted connections. The performance of these connections in the design of cold-formed steel structures is discussed.

  8. Review on cold-formed steel connections.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeong Huei; Tan, Cher Siang; Mohammad, Shahrin; Tahir, Mahmood Md; Shek, Poi Ngian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connections, particularly for screw connections, storage rack connections, welded connections, and bolted connections. The performance of these connections in the design of cold-formed steel structures is discussed. PMID:24688448

  9. 38. Photocopy of photograph. STEEL PLANT, BOILERS UNDER CONSTRUCTION IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Photocopy of photograph. STEEL PLANT, BOILERS UNDER CONSTRUCTION IN BOILER PLANT LOCATED EAST OF MAIN STEEL PLANT, 1909. (From the Bethlehem Steel Corporation collection, Seattle, WA) - Irondale Iron & Steel Plant, Port Townsend, Jefferson County, WA

  10. Martensitic transformations in high-strength steels at aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezovskaya, V. V.; Bannykh, O. A.

    2011-04-01

    The effect of heat treatment and elastic stresses on the texture of maraging NiTi-steels is studied. The interruption of the decomposition of martensite at the early stages is shown to be accompanied by the γ → α transformation, which proceeds upon cooling from the aging temperature and under elastic (σ < σ0.2) tensile stresses. The martensite has a crystallographic texture, which is caused by the evolution of hot-deformation texture as a result of quenching and decomposition of a supersaturated α solid solution.

  11. Microstructures of laser deposited 304L austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    BROOKS,JOHN A.; HEADLEY,THOMAS J.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.

    2000-05-22

    Laser deposits fabricated from two different compositions of 304L stainless steel powder were characterized to determine the nature of the solidification and solid state transformations. One of the goals of this work was to determine to what extent novel microstructure consisting of single-phase austenite could be achieved with the thermal conditions of the LENS [Laser Engineered Net Shape] process. Although ferrite-free deposits were not obtained, structures with very low ferrite content were achieved. It appeared that, with slight changes in alloy composition, this goal could be met via two different solidification and transformation mechanisms.

  12. Advanced processing technology for high-nitrogen steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunning, John S.; Simmons, John W.; Rawers, James C.

    1994-03-01

    Both high-and low-pressure processing techniques can be employed to add nitrogen to iron-based alloys at levels in excess of the equilibrium, ambient-pressure solubility limits. High-pressure techniques include high-pressure melting-solidification; powder atomization; and high-pressure, solid-state diffusion. Low-pressure techniques are centrifugal powder atomization and mechanical alloying. This article describes U.S. Bureau of Mines research on a range of processing technologies for nitrogen steels and references thermodynamic and materials characterization studies that have been completed on these materials.

  13. Corrosion Performance of Ferritic Steel for SOFC Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Jablonski, P.D.; Alman, D.E.

    2006-11-01

    Ferritic stainless steels have been identified as potential candidates for interconnects in planar-type solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) operating below 800ºC. Crofer 22 APU was selected for this study. It was studied under simulated SOFC-interconnect dual environment conditions with humidified air on one side of the sample and humidified hydrogen on the other side at 750ºC. The surfaces of the oxidized samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with microanalytical capabilities. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was also used in this study.

  14. Characterization of steel fiber and/or polymer concrete mixes and applications to slender rectangular and I-beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Ashraf Ibrahim

    This dissertation presents results from experimental studies related to polymer modified concrete, steel fiber reinforced concrete, and steel fiber/polymer modified concrete. As a first stage of this research, the properties of different concrete mixes were characterized. These mixes were: plain concrete, steel fiber concrete with fiber volume fraction of 1%, polymer modified concrete with 1% to 7.5% solids of polymer, and steel fiber/polymer modified concrete with 1% to 7.5% polymer solids and I% steel fiber fraction. Concrete cylinders and 4 x 4 inches beams were tested under compressive, tensile, flexural, and bar pull-out loadings. In the second phase of this research, slender beams with a depth to width ratio of three were tested under four point loading for shear and flexure. Half I-beams, with gross aspect ratio of four and web aspect ratio of three were tested under the combined loading of bending, shear, and torsion. Lateral eccentric loads were applied transversely in the shallow direction to the 3 x 9 inches beams and the half I-beams. Dog bone shaped reinforced and un-reinforced specimens with 3 x 3 inches square sections were tested under pure torsional loading. The addition of 1% steel fibers alone or with 5% solids of polymers to concrete mixes improved their toughness and ductility. The contribution of steel fibers to bending, shear, and torsion in slender and half I-beams is presented. The ACI code methods for calculating the torsional, shear, and flexural resistance of beams are compared to the experimental results. Post crack analysis performed on the slender beams and half I-beams indicated that the tested specimens could carry 70% of the maximum applied loads after initial concrete cracking and failure. The reduction in the tensile stresses of stirrups and longitudinal reinforcing bars, due to the steel fibers and polymer, are presented. Fibers and polymers increase bending and toughness in concrete.

  15. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1992-09-01

    Two legal-weight truck casks the GA-4 and GA-9, will carry four PWR and nine BWR spent fuel assemblies, respectively. Each cask has a solid neutron shielding material separating the steel body and the outer steel skin. In the thermal accident specified by NRC regulations in 10CFR Part 71, the cask is subjected to an 800[degree]C environment for 30 minutes. The neutron shield need not perform any shielding function during or after the thermal accident, but its behavior must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-AL 9897, R. H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series, a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280[degree]F. The neutron shield materials tested were boronated (0.8--4.5%) polymers (polypropylene, HDPE, NS-4). The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found.

  16. Anodized Steel Electrodes for Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Sagu, Jagdeep S; Wijayantha, K G Upul; Bohm, Mallika; Bohm, Siva; Kumar Rout, Tapan

    2016-03-01

    Steel was anodized in 10 M NaOH to enhance its surface texture and internal surface area for application as an electrode in supercapacitors. A mechanism was proposed for the anodization process. Field-emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEGSEM) studies of anodized steel revealed that it contains a highly porous sponge like structure ideal for supercapacitor electrodes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements showed that the surface of the anodized steel was Fe2O3, whereas X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements indicated that the bulk remained as metallic Fe. The supercapacitor performance of the anodized steel was tested in 1 M NaOH and a capacitance of 18 mF cm(-2) was obtained. Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed that there was a large psueudocapacitive contribution which was due to oxidation of Fe to Fe(OH)2 and then further oxidation to FeOOH, and the respective reduction of these species back to metallic Fe. These redox processes were found to be remarkably reversible as the electrode showed no loss in capacitance after 10000 cycles. The results demonstrate that anodization of steel is a suitable method to produce high-surface-area electrodes for supercapacitors with excellent cycling lifetime. PMID:26891093

  17. Anodized Steel Electrodes for Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Sagu, Jagdeep S; Wijayantha, K G Upul; Bohm, Mallika; Bohm, Siva; Kumar Rout, Tapan

    2016-03-01

    Steel was anodized in 10 M NaOH to enhance its surface texture and internal surface area for application as an electrode in supercapacitors. A mechanism was proposed for the anodization process. Field-emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEGSEM) studies of anodized steel revealed that it contains a highly porous sponge like structure ideal for supercapacitor electrodes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements showed that the surface of the anodized steel was Fe2O3, whereas X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements indicated that the bulk remained as metallic Fe. The supercapacitor performance of the anodized steel was tested in 1 M NaOH and a capacitance of 18 mF cm(-2) was obtained. Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed that there was a large psueudocapacitive contribution which was due to oxidation of Fe to Fe(OH)2 and then further oxidation to FeOOH, and the respective reduction of these species back to metallic Fe. These redox processes were found to be remarkably reversible as the electrode showed no loss in capacitance after 10000 cycles. The results demonstrate that anodization of steel is a suitable method to produce high-surface-area electrodes for supercapacitors with excellent cycling lifetime.

  18. Ductile-to-Brittle transition in <111> hadfield steel single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafurova, E. G.; Chumlyakov, Yu. I.

    2010-10-01

    The deformation mechanism and the character of fracture of <111> austenitic Hadfield steel single crystals are studied during tension in the temperature range 77-673 K by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. It is found that a change in the fracture mechanism from ductile to brittle fracture according to the fractography criterion takes place at a higher temperature than that determined from a change in the elongation to failure of the single crystals. The ductile-to-brittle transition in the Hadfield steel single crystals is shown to be related to a high level of deforming stresses induced by solid-solution hardening and to mechanical twinning.

  19. Friction-induced structural transformations of the carbide phase in Hadfield steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, L. G.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Chernenko, N. L.; Shabashov, V. A.

    2015-08-01

    Structural transformations of the carbide phase in Hadfield steel (110G13) that occur upon plastic deformation by dry sliding friction have been studied by methods of optical metallography, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Deformation is shown to lead to the refinement of the particles of the carbide phase (Fe, Mn)3C to a nanosized level. The effect of the deformation-induced dissolution of (Fe, Mn)3C carbides in austenite of 110G13 (Hadfield) steel has been revealed, which manifests in the appearance of new lines belonging to austenite with an unusually large lattice parameter ( a = 0.3660-0.3680 nm) in the X-ray diffraction patterns of steel tempered to obtain a fine-lamellar carbide phase after deformation. This austenite is the result of the deformation-induced dissolution of disperse (Fe, Mn)3C particles, which leads to the local enrichment of austenite with carbon and manganese. The tempering that leads to the formation of carbide particles in 110G13 steel exerts a negative influence on the strain hardening of the steel, despite the increase in the hardness of steel upon tempering and the development of the processes of the deformation-induced dissolution of the carbide phase, which leads to the strengthening of the γ solid solution.

  20. Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Pan, Tsung-Yu

    2012-04-16

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is applied to join advanced high strength steels (AHSS): galvannealed dual phase 780 MPa steel (DP780GA), transformation induced plasticity 780 MPa steel (TRIP780), and hot-stamped boron steel (HSBS). A low-cost Si3N4 ceramic tool was developed and used for making welds in this study instead of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) material used in earlier studies. FSSW has the advantages of solid-state, low-temperature process, and the ability of joining dissimilar grade of steels and thicknesses. Two different tool shoulder geometries, concave with smooth surface and convex with spiral pattern, were used in the study. Welds were made by a 2-step displacement control process with weld time of 4, 6, and 10 seconds. Static tensile lap-shear strength achieved 16.4 kN for DP780GA-HSBS and 13.2kN for TRIP780-HSBS, above the spot weld strength requirements by AWS. Nugget pull-out was the failure mode of the joint. The joining mechanism was illustrated from the cross-section micrographs. Microhardness measurement showed hardening in the upper sheet steel (DP780GA or TRIP780) in the weld, but softening of HSBS in the heat-affect zone (HAZ). The study demonstrated the feasibility of making high-strength AHSS spot welds with low-cost tools.

  1. Precipitates in Nb and Nb-V microalloyed X80 pipeline steel.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongyi; Liu, Delu; Zhang, Jianping; Tian, Wenhuai

    2013-08-01

    Precipitates in two X80 pipeline steels were studied by transmission electron microscopy equipped with an energy filtering system. The steels are microalloyed with niobium and niobium-vanadium (Nb-V), respectively, and produced by continuous hot rolling. Besides the precipitates TiN and (Ti, Nb) (C, N), which were 10-100 nm in size, a large number of precipitates smaller than 10 nm distributed in the two steels have been observed. In the Nb-V microalloyed steel, only a few titanium nitrides covered by vanadium compounds on the surface have been observed. It is inferred that the vanadium exists mainly in the matrix as a solid solution element. The fact has been accepted that there was no contribution to the precipitation strengthening of the X80 steel by adding 0.04-0.06% vanadium under the present production process. By contrast, the toughness of the Nb-V steel is deteriorated. Therefore, a better toughness property of the Nb microalloyed X80 results from the optimum microalloying composition design and the suitable accelerating cooling after hot rolling.

  2. Dynamics of solid lubrication as observed by optical microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1976-01-01

    A bench metallograph was converted into a 'micro contact imager' by the addition of a tribometer employing a steel ball in sliding contact with a glass disk. The sliding contact was viewed in real time by means of projection microscope optics. The dynamics of abrasive particles and of solid lubricant particles within the contact were observed in detail. The contact was characterized by a constantly changing pattern of elastic strain with the passage of surface discontinuities and solid particles. Abrasive particles fragmented upon entering the contact, embedded in one surface and scratched the other; in contrast, the solid lubricant particles flowed plastically into thin films. The rheological behavior of the lubricating solids gave every appearance of a paste-like consistency within the Hertzian contact.

  3. Dynamics of solid lubrication as observed by optical microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1976-01-01

    A bench metallograph was converted into a micro contact imager by the addition of a tribometer employing a steel ball in sliding contact with a glass disk. The sliding contact was viewed in real time by means of projection microscope optics. The dynamics of abrasive particles and of solid lubricant particles within the contact were observed in detail. The contact was characterized by a constantly changing pattern of elastic strain with the passage of surface discontinuities and solid particles. Abrasive particles fragmented upon entering the contact, embedded in one surface and scratched the other; in contrast, the solid lubricant particles flowed plastically into thin films. The rheological behavior of the lubricating solids gave every appearance of a paste-like consistency within the Hertzian contact.

  4. High-temperature brazing of stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Heisman, R. M.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Prevention of iron contamination of platens is eliminated by placing alumina/silica ceramic-fiber blankets between platens and carbon-steel plate. Carbon-steel plates provide rigidity and improve heat transfer.

  5. Steel erected at A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Workers erect the first fabricated steel girders to arrive at the A-3 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center. Steel work began at the construction site Oct. 29 and is scheduled to continue into next spring.

  6. Corrosion control of steel-reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, D. D. L.

    2000-10-01

    The methods and materials for corrosion control of steel-reinforced concrete are reviewed. The methods are steel surface treatment, the use of admixtures in concrete, surface coating on concrete, and cathodic protection.

  7. Solid Rocket Booster Hydraulic Pump Port Cap Joint Load Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamwell, W. R.; Murphy, N. C.

    2004-01-01

    The solid rocket booster uses hydraulic pumps fabricated from cast C355 aluminum alloy, with 17-4 PH stainless steel pump port caps. Corrosion-resistant steel, MS51830 CA204L self-locking screw thread inserts are installed into C355 pump housings, with A286 stainless steel fasteners installed into the insert to secure the pump port cap to the housing. In the past, pump port cap fasteners were installed to a torque of 33 Nm (300 in-lb). However, the structural analyses used a significantly higher nut factor than indicated during tests conducted by Boeing Space Systems. When the torque values were reassessed using Boeing's nut factor, the fastener preload had a factor of safety of less than 1, with potential for overloading the joint. This paper describes how behavior was determined for a preloaded joint with a steel bolt threaded into steel inserts in aluminum parts. Finite element models were compared with test results. For all initial bolt preloads, bolt loads increased as external applied loads increased. For higher initial bolt preloads, less load was transferred into the bolt, due to external applied loading. Lower torque limits were established for pump port cap fasteners and additional limits were placed on insert axial deformation under operating conditions after seating the insert with an initial preload.

  8. Laser cooling of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, Richard I; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

  9. ROTARY BULK SOLIDS DIVIDER

    DOEpatents

    Maronde, Carl P.; Killmeyer JR., Richard P.

    1992-03-03

    An apparatus for the disbursement of a bulk solid sample comprising, a gravity hopper having a top open end and a bottom discharge end, a feeder positioned beneath the gravity hopper so as to receive a bulk solid sample flowing from the bottom discharge end, and a conveyor receiving the bulk solid sample from the feeder and rotating on an axis that allows the bulk solid sample to disperse the sample to a collection station.

  10. Rotary bulk solids divider

    DOEpatents

    Maronde, Carl P.; Killmeyer, Jr., Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for the disbursement of a bulk solid sample comprising, a gravity hopper having a top open end and a bottom discharge end, a feeder positioned beneath the gravity hopper so as to receive a bulk solid sample flowing from the bottom discharge end, and a conveyor receiving the bulk solid sample from the feeder and rotating on an axis that allows the bulk solid sample to disperse the sample to a collection station.

  11. Tetraphenylborate Solids Stability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1997-06-25

    Tetraphenylborate solids are a potentially large source of benzene in the slurries produced in the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process. The stability of the solids is an important consideration in the safety analysis of the process and we desire an understanding of the factors that influence the rate of conversion of the solids to benzene. This report discusses current testing of the stability of tetraphenylborate solids.

  12. ESF GROUND SUPPORT - STRUCTURAL STEEL ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    T. Misiak

    1996-06-26

    The purpose and objective of this analysis are to expand the level of detail and confirm member sizes for steel sets included in the Ground Support Design Analysis, Reference 5.20. This analysis also provides bounding values and details and defines critical design attributes for alternative configurations of the steel set. One possible configuration for the steel set is presented. This analysis covers the steel set design for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) entire Main Loop 25-foot diameter tunnel.

  13. Tetraphenylborate Solids Stability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.; Edwards, T.B.

    1997-12-19

    Tetraphenylborate solids provide a potentially large source of benzene in the slurries produced in the In-Tank Precipitation process. The stability of the solids is an important consideration in the safety analysis of the process and we desire an understanding of the factors that influence the rate of conversion of the solids to benzene.

  14. Thermal dryers for solids

    SciTech Connect

    Billings, C.H.

    1993-12-01

    This article describes an indirect thermal dryer added to dewater solids before incineration of sewage sludge at a Buffalo, New York waste water treatment plant. In the first three months of operation, the solids inventory was reduced from about 799 tons to 250 tons. The solids processed in the plant's multiple hearth incinerators varied from 12 to 14 tons per hour.

  15. Solid State Division

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1989-08-01

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces. (LSP)

  16. Improved solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1988-07-19

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  17. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, Donald S.; Schober, Robert K.; Beller, John

    1992-01-01

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

  18. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1992-03-17

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration is disclosed. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  19. Steel erected at A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Fabricated steel began arriving by truck Oct. 24 for construction of the A-3 Test Stand that will be used to test the engine for the nation's next generation of moon rockets. Within days workers from Lafayette Steel Erector Inc. began assembling the 16 steel stages needed on the foundation and footings poured in the previous year.

  20. Steeling and Resilience in Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heise, Donalyn

    2014-01-01

    Steel is an incredibly strong alloy of iron and carbon. Due to its incredible strength and durability, this resilient material is commonly used for constructing buildings. The transitive verb "steeling" is defined in Miriam-Webster dictionary as "to fill with resolution or determination, as in, she 'steeled herself to face the…

  1. Metallography of maraging 350 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, S.M.; Merten, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    A technique for etching maraging 350 steel with Glyceregia is described. Surface activation procedures are integral to this technique. Microstructural features revealed by this technique are compared with those obtained with Kalling's reagent, Fry's reagent, and 5% Nital, three etchants commonly used to reveal microstructures of maraging steels. Features which may be simultaneously revealed using Glyceregia include prior austenite grain boundaries, martensitic structure, precipitates, titanium carbo-nitrides, and reverted austenite. The other etchants examined in this investigation typically reveal only a few of the microstructural features detailed above at any one time. 11 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Accelerated carbonation of steel slags in a landfill cover construction.

    PubMed

    Diener, S; Andreas, L; Herrmann, I; Ecke, H; Lagerkvist, A

    2010-01-01

    Steel slags from high-alloyed tool steel production were used in a full scale cover construction of a municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill. In order to study the long-term stability of the steel slags within the final cover, a laboratory experiment was performed. The effect on the ageing process, due to i.e. carbonation, exerted by five different factors resembling both the material characteristics and the environmental conditions is investigated. Leaching behaviour, acid neutralization capacity and mineralogy (evaluated by means of X-ray diffraction, XRD, and thermogravimetry/differential thermal analysis, TG/DTA) are tested after different periods of ageing under different conditions. Samples aged for 3 and 10 months were evaluated in this paper. Multivariate data analysis was used for data evaluation. The results indicate that among the investigated factors, ageing time and carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere were able to exert the most relevant effect. However, further investigations are required in order to clarify the role of the temperature. PMID:19836224

  3. High-pressure stainless steel active membrane microvalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, G.; Svensson, S.; Ogden, S.; Klintberg, L.; Hjort, K.

    2011-07-01

    In this work, high-pressure membrane microvalves have been designed, manufactured and evaluated. The valves were able to withstand back-pressures of 200 bar with a response time of less than 0.6 s. These stainless steel valves, manufactured with back-end batch production, utilize the large volume expansion coupled to the solid-liquid phase transition in paraffin wax. When membrane materials were evaluated, parylene coated stainless steel was found to be the best choice as compared to polydimethylsiloxane and polyimide. Also, the influence of the orifice placement and diameter is included in this work. If the orifice is placed too close to the rim of the membrane, the valve can stay sealed even after turning the power off, and the valve will not open until the pressure in the system is released. The developed steel valves, evaluated for both water and air, provide excellent properties in terms of mechanical stability, ease of fabrication, and low cost. Possible applications include sampling at high pressures, chemical microreactors, high performance liquid chromatography, pneumatics, and hydraulics.

  4. Austenitic stainless steel patterning by plasma assisted diffusion treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czerwiec, T.; Marcos, G.; Thiriet, T.; Guo, Y.; Belmonte, T.

    2009-09-01

    The new concept of surface texturing or surface patterning on austenitic stainless steel by plasma assisted diffusion treatment is presented in this paper. It allows the creation of uniform micro or nano relief with regularly shaped asperities or depressions. Plasma assisted diffusion treatments are based on the diffusion of nitrogen and/or carbon in a metallic material at moderate to elevated temperatures. Below 420°C, a plasma assisted nitriding treatment of austenitic stainless steel produces a phase usually called expanded austenite. Expanded austenite is a metastable nitrogen supersaturated solid solution with a disordered fcc structure and a distorted lattice. The nitrided layer with the expanded austenite is highly enriched in nitrogen (from 10 to 35 at%) and submitted to high compressive residual stresses. From mechanical consideration, it is shown that the only possible deformation occurs in the direction perpendicular to the surface. Such an expansion of the layer from the initial surface of the substrate to the gas phase is used here for surface patterning of stainless steel parts. The surface patterning is performed by using masks (TEM grid) and multi-dipolar plasmas.

  5. Temperature Controlled Laser Joining of Aluminum to Galvanized Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Daniel; Simon, Jörg; Stritt, Peter; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas; Bezençon, Cyrille; Bassi, Corrado

    Reliable joining of 6000 series aluminum alloy to galvanized steel is a challenge for current manufacturing technologies. To control and limit the formation of brittle intermetallic phases, mixing of both metals in liquid state has to be avoided. It has been shown that laser weld-brazing is a possible process. Thereby the aluminum and zinc layer of the galvanized steel are molten and the steel remains solid during the process. In addition, to avoid zinc degassing, the aluminum melt bath temperature has to be below zinc boiling temperature of 907°C. To meet these requirements a temperature controlled laser process was developed, allowing to join the two materials without flux and filler material. The thickness of the intermetallic layer shows a dependency on the set temperature used to control the process. At optimum set temperature the thickness of intermetallic phases can be limited to about 5 μm. Tensile strengths of the joints of up to 75% of the aluminum base material were achieved.

  6. Accelerated carbonation of steel slags in a landfill cover construction

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, S.; Andreas, L.; Herrmann, I.; Ecke, H.; Lagerkvist, A.

    2010-01-15

    Steel slags from high-alloyed tool steel production were used in a full scale cover construction of a municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill. In order to study the long-term stability of the steel slags within the final cover, a laboratory experiment was performed. The effect on the ageing process, due to i.e. carbonation, exerted by five different factors resembling both the material characteristics and the environmental conditions is investigated. Leaching behaviour, acid neutralization capacity and mineralogy (evaluated by means of X-ray diffraction, XRD, and thermogravimetry/differential thermal analysis, TG/DTA) are tested after different periods of ageing under different conditions. Samples aged for 3 and 10 months were evaluated in this paper. Multivariate data analysis was used for data evaluation. The results indicate that among the investigated factors, ageing time and carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere were able to exert the most relevant effect. However, further investigations are required in order to clarify the role of the temperature.

  7. Mechanical alloying of lanthana-bearing nanostructured ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Somayeh Paseban; Indrajit Charit; Yaqiao Q. Wu; Jatuporn Burns; Kerry N. Allahar; Darryl P. Butt; James I. Cole

    2013-09-01

    A novel nanostructured ferritic steel powder with the nominal composition Fe–14Cr–1Ti–0.3Mo–0.5La2O3 (wt.%) was developed via high energy ball milling. La2O3 was added to this alloy instead of the traditionally used Y2O3. The effects of varying the ball milling parameters, such as milling time, steel ball size and ball to powder ratio, on the mechanical properties and micro structural characteristics of the as-milled powder were investigated. Nanocrystallites of a body-centered cubic ferritic solid solution matrix with a mean size of approximately 20 nm were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Nanoscale characterization of the as-milled powder by local electrode atom probe tomography revealed the formation of Cr–Ti–La–O-enriched nanoclusters during mechanical alloying. The Cr:Ti:La:O ratio is considered “non-stoichiometric”. The average size (radius) of the nanoclusters was about 1 nm, with number density of 3.7 1024 m3. The mechanism for formation of nanoclusters in the as-milled powder is discussed. La2O3 appears to be a promising alternative rare earth oxide for future nanostructured ferritic steels.

  8. Kinetics of steel slag leaching: Batch tests and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    De Windt, Laurent; Chaurand, Perrine; Rose, Jerome

    2011-02-15

    Reusing steel slag as an aggregate for road construction requires to characterize the leaching kinetics and metal releases. In this study, basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steel slag were subjected to batch leaching tests at liquid to solid ratios (L/S) of 10 and 100 over 30 days; the leachate chemistry being regularly sampled in time. A geochemical model of the steel slag is developed and validated from experimental data, particularly the evolution with leaching of mineralogical composition of the slag and trace element speciation. Kinetics is necessary for modeling the primary phase leaching, whereas a simple thermodynamic equilibrium approach can be used for secondary phase precipitation. The proposed model simulates the kinetically-controlled dissolution (hydrolysis) of primary phases, the precipitation of secondary phases (C-S-H, hydroxide and spinel), the pH and redox conditions, and the progressive release of major elements as well as the metals Cr and V. Modeling indicates that the dilution effect of the L/S ratio is often coupled to solubility-controlled processes, which are sensitive to both the pH and the redox potential. A sensitivity analysis of kinetic uncertainties on the modeling of element releases is performed.

  9. Kinetics of steel slag leaching: Batch tests and modeling.

    PubMed

    De Windt, Laurent; Chaurand, Perrine; Rose, Jerome

    2011-02-01

    Reusing steel slag as an aggregate for road construction requires to characterize the leaching kinetics and metal releases. In this study, basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steel slag were subjected to batch leaching tests at liquid to solid ratios (L/S) of 10 and 100 over 30 days; the leachate chemistry being regularly sampled in time. A geochemical model of the steel slag is developed and validated from experimental data, particularly the evolution with leaching of mineralogical composition of the slag and trace element speciation. Kinetics is necessary for modeling the primary phase leaching, whereas a simple thermodynamic equilibrium approach can be used for secondary phase precipitation. The proposed model simulates the kinetically-controlled dissolution (hydrolysis) of primary phases, the precipitation of secondary phases (C-S-H, hydroxide and spinel), the pH and redox conditions, and the progressive release of major elements as well as the metals Cr and V. Modeling indicates that the dilution effect of the L/S ratio is often coupled to solubility-controlled processes, which are sensitive to both the pH and the redox potential. A sensitivity analysis of kinetic uncertainties on the modeling of element releases is performed.

  10. Teaching Steel Connections Using an Interactive Virtual Steel Sculpture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moaveni, Saeed; Chou, Karen C.

    2015-01-01

    Steel connections play important roles in the integrity of a structure, and many structural failures are attributed to connection failures. Connections are the glue that holds a structure together. The failures of the Hartford Coliseum in 1977, the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Kansas City in 1980, and the I-35W Bridge in Minneapolis in 2007 are all…

  11. Combustibility of tetraphenylborate solids

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1989-05-03

    Liquid slurries expected under normal in-tank processing (ITP) operations are not ignitible because of their high water content. However, deposits of dry solids from the slurries are combustible and produce dense, black smoke when burned. The dry solids burn similarly to Styrofoam and more easily than sawdust. It is the opinion of fire hazard experts that a benzene vapor deflagration could ignite the dry solids. A tetraphenylborate solids fire will rapidly plug the waste tank HEPA ventilation filters due to the nature of the smoke produced. To prevent ignition and combustion of these solids, the waste tanks have been equipped with a nitrogen inerting system.

  12. Solid expellant plasma generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Nobie H. (Inventor); Poe, Garrett D. (Inventor); Rood, Robert (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved solid expellant plasma generator has been developed. The plasma generator includes a support housing, an electrode rod located in the central portion of the housing, and a mass of solid expellant material that surrounds the electrode rod within the support housing. The electrode rod and the solid expellant material are made of separate materials that are selected so that the electrode and the solid expellant material decompose at the same rate when the plasma generator is ignited. This maintains a point of discharge of the plasma at the interface between the electrode and the solid expellant material.

  13. Subdue solids in towers

    SciTech Connect

    Sloley, A.W.; Martin, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    Many distillation, absorption, and stripping columns operate with solids present in the system. The presence of solids may be either intentional or unintentional. But, in all cases, the solids must be handled or tolerated by the vapor/liquid mass-transfer equipment. Such solids should be dealt with by a combination of four methods. From most favorable to least favorable, these are: (1) keep the solids out; (2) keep the solids moving; (3) put the solids somewhere harmless; and (4) make it easier to clean the hardware. The key precept for all these approaches is the realization that solids present in a system just don't disappear. In this article, the authors review the techniques and design issues involved in making a vapor/liquid mass-transfer system operate with solids present. They assume that the solids cannot be kept out, eliminating the first choice. The type of mass-transfer service does not matter. The same principles apply equally well to distillation, adsorption, and stripping. They include equipment design criteria based on the methods outlined above, as well as detailed recommendations for each of the major equipment choices that can be made for mass-transfer devices. Then, they illustrate the approach via an example--a vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) unit having solids as an inherent part of its feed.

  14. Superhard Nanocrystalline Homometallic Stainless Steel on Steel for Seamless Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, Eric J.; Hafley, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to deposit nanocrystalline stainless steel onto steel substrates (homometallic) for enhanced wear and corrosion resistance. Homometallic coatings provide superior adhesion, and it has been shown that ultrafine-grained materials exhibit the increased hardness and decreased permeability desired for protective coatings. Nanocrystals will be produced by controlling nucleation and growth and use of an ion beam during deposition by e-beam evaporation or sputtering. Phase I is depositing 31 6L nanocrystalline stainless steel onto 31 6L stainless steel substrates. These coatings exhibit hardnesses comparable to those normally obtained for ceramic coatings such ZrO2, and possess the superior adhesion of seamless, homometallic coatings. Hardening the surface with a similar material also enhances adhesion, by avoiding problems associated with thermal and lattice mismatch. So far we have deposited nanocrystalline homometallic 316L stainless steel coatings by varying the ions and the current density of the ion beams. For all deposition conditions we have produced smooth, uniform, superhard coatings. All coatings exhibit hardness of at least 200% harder than that of bulk materials. Our measurements indicate that there is a direct relationship between nanohardness and the current density of the ion beam. Stress measurements indicate that stress in the films is increasingly proportional to current density of the ion beam. TEM, XPS, and XRD results indicate that the coated layers consist of FCC structure nanocrystallites with a dimension of about 10 to 20 nm. The Ni and Mo concentration of these coating are lower than those of bulk 316L but the concentration of Cr is higher.

  15. Solids fluidizer-injector

    DOEpatents

    Bulicz, T.R.

    1990-04-17

    An apparatus and process are described for fluidizing solid particles by causing rotary motion of the solid particles in a fluidizing chamber by a plurality of rotating projections extending from a rotatable cylinder end wall interacting with a plurality of fixed projections extending from an opposite fixed end wall and passing the solid particles through a radial feed orifice open to the solids fluidizing chamber on one side and a solid particle utilization device on the other side. The apparatus and process are particularly suited for obtaining intermittent feeding with continual solids supply to the fluidizing chamber. The apparatus and process are suitable for injecting solid particles, such as coal, to an internal combustion engine. 3 figs.

  16. NASA's Advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) will not only bring increased safety, reliability and performance for the Space Shuttle Booster, it will enhance overall Shuttle safety by effectively eliminating 174 failure points in the Space Shuttle Main Engine throttling system and by reducing the exposure time to aborts due to main engine loss or shutdown. In some missions, the vulnerability time to Return-to-Launch Site aborts is halved. The ASRM uses case joints which will close or remain static under the effects of motor ignition and pressurization. The case itself is constructed of the weldable steel alloy HP 9-4-0.30, having very high strength and with superior fracture toughness and stress corrosion resistance. The internal insulation is strip-wound and is free of asbestos. The nozzle employs light weight ablative parts and is some 5,000 pounds lighter than the Shuttle motor used to date. The payload performance of the ASRM-powered Shuttle is 12,000 pounds higher than that provided by the present motor. This is of particular benefit for payloads delivered to higher inclinations and/or altitudes. The ASRM facility uses state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, including continuous propellant mixing and direct casting.

  17. NASA's Advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) will not only bring increased safety, reliability and performance for the Space Shuttle Booster, it will enhance overall Shuttle safety by effectively eliminating 174 failure points in the Space Shuttle Main Engine throttling system and by reducing the exposure time to aborts due to main engine loss or shutdown. In some missions, the vulnerability time to Return-to-Launch Site aborts is halved. The ASRM uses case joints which will close or remain static under the effects of motor ignition and pressurization. The case itself is constructed of the weldable steel alloy HP 9-4-0.30, having very high strength and with superior fracture toughness and stress corrosion resistance. The internal insulation is strip-wound and is free of asbestos. The nozzle employs light weight ablative parts and is some 5,000 pounds lighter than the Shuttle motor used to date. The payload performance of the ASRM-powered Shuttle is 12,000 pounds higher than that provided by the present motor. This is of particular benefit for payloads delivered to higher inclinations and/or altitudes. The ASRM facility uses state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, including continuous propellant mixing and direct casting.

  18. Preformed posterior stainless steel crowns: an update.

    PubMed

    Croll, T P

    1999-02-01

    For almost 50 years, dentists have used stainless steel crowns for primary and permanent posterior teeth. No other type of restoration offers the convenience, low cost, durability, and reliability of such crowns when interim full-coronal coverage is required. Preformed stainless steel crowns have improved over the years. Better luting cements have been developed and different methods of crown manipulation have evolved. This article reviews stainless steel crown procedures for primary and permanent posterior teeth. Step-by-step placement of a primary molar stainless steel crown is documented and permanent molar stainless steel crown restoration is described. A method for repairing a worn-through crown also is reviewed.

  19. Advanced sheet steels for automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, James R.; Strugala, Donald C.; Yao, Zhicong

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum degassing has recently been used by sheet steel producers to improve their products' ductility and strength. Carbon contents can be reduced by an order of magnitude to less than 0.0030 wt.%. Through careful alloying and processing, a range of new steel products has been developed for the automotive industry. These products include interstitial-free, deep-drawing-quality steels; formable, high-strength, interstitial-free steels; and bake-hardenable steels. This article summarizes the chemistry and processing needed to produce these products.

  20. Imaging molten steel flow profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binns, R.; Lyons, A. R. A.; Peyton, A. J.; Pritchard, W. D. N.

    2001-08-01

    Control of delivery of molten steel in continuous casting is critical in order to ensure stability of the meniscus and satisfactory mould flow patterns, which in turn are determinants of cleanness and surface quality of steel. Considerable effort has been expended over the last ten years on optimizing the design of the metal delivery system, particularly the pouring nozzle, in order to allow the consistent production of high quality steel at a high throughput. This paper looks forward to possible systems that are capable of tomographically imaging the distribution of molten steel flows in these applications. The paper will concentrate on the feasibility of using electromagnetic methods. The paper will present some initial results; an overview of the applied image reconstruction process will also be included. The paper will conclude with a discussion of possible future developments, such as the use of a tomographic or multi-frequency approach, future research on the reconstruction image procedures and the potential for visualization and flow measurement. There is a need for further research in this area and some priority areas for future work will be suggested.

  1. Precision machining of steel decahedrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernathy, W. J.; Sealy, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Production of highly accurate decahedron prisms from hardened stainless steel is discussed. Prism is used to check angular alignment of mounting pads of strapdown inertial guidance system. Accuracies obtainable using recommended process and details of operation are described. Photographic illustration of production device is included.

  2. Welding Behavior of Free Machining Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    BROOKS,JOHN A.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.; HEADLEY,THOMAS J.; MICHAEL,JOSEPH R.

    2000-07-24

    The weld solidification and cracking behavior of sulfur bearing free machining austenitic stainless steel was investigated for both gas-tungsten arc (GTA) and pulsed laser beam weld processes. The GTA weld solidification was consistent with those predicted with existing solidification diagrams and the cracking response was controlled primarily by solidification mode. The solidification behavior of the pulsed laser welds was complex, and often contained regions of primary ferrite and primary austenite solidification, although in all cases the welds were found to be completely austenite at room temperature. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) pattern analysis indicated that the nature of the base metal at the time of solidification plays a primary role in initial solidification. The solid state transformation of austenite to ferrite at the fusion zone boundary, and ferrite to austenite on cooling may both be massive in nature. A range of alloy compositions that exhibited good resistance to solidification cracking and was compatible with both welding processes was identified. The compositional range is bounded by laser weldability at lower Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} ratios and by the GTA weldability at higher ratios. It was found with both processes that the limiting ratios were somewhat dependent upon sulfur content.

  3. Oxidation in HVOF-sprayed steel

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.F.; Neiser, R.A.; Dykhuizen, R.C.

    1997-08-01

    It is widely held that most of the oxidation in thermally sprayed coatings occurs on the surface of the droplet after it has flattened. The evidence in this paper suggests that, for the conditions studied here, oxidation of the top surface of flattened droplets is not the dominant oxidation mechanism. In this study, a mild steel wire (AISI 1025) was sprayed using a high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) torch onto copper and aluminum substrates. Ion milling and Auger spectroscopy were used to examine the distribution of oxides within individual splats. Conventional metallographic analysis was also used to study oxide distributions within coatings that were sprayed under the same conditions. An analytical model for oxidation of the exposed surface of a splat is presented. Based on literature data, the model assumes that diffusion of iron through a solid FeO layer is the rate limiting factor in forming the oxide on the top surface of a splat. An FeO layer only a few thousandths of a micron thick is predicted to form on the splat surface as it cools. However, the experimental evidence shows that the oxide layers are typically 100x thicker than the predicted value. These thick, oxide layers are not always observed on the top surface of a splat. Indeed, in some instances the oxide layer is on the bottom, and the metal is on the top. The observed oxide distributions are more consistently explained if most of the oxide formed before the droplets impact the substrate.

  4. 60 Years of duplex stainless steel applications

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, J.; Liljas, M.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the history of wrought duplex stainless steel development and applications is described. Ferritic-austenitic stainless steels were introduced only a few decades after stainless steels were developed. The paper gives details from the first duplex stainless steels in the 1930`s to the super duplex stainless steel development during the 1980`s. During the years much effort has been devoted to production and welding metallurgy as well as corrosion research of the duplex stainless steels. Therefore, duplex stainless steels are to-day established in a wide product range. Numerous important applications are exemplified. In most cases the selection of a duplex steel has been a result of the combination high strength excellent corrosion resistance. In the pulp and paper industry the most interesting use is as vessel material in digesters. For chemical process industry, the duplex steels are currently used in heat exchangers. The largest application of duplex steels exists in the oil and gas/offshore industry. Hundreds of kms of pipelines are installed and are still being installed. An increased use of duplex steels is foreseen in areas where the strength is of prime importance.

  5. Corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of ferritic/martensitic steel in super critical pressurized water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, T.; Shiba, K.; Enoeda, M.; Akiba, M.

    2007-08-01

    A water-cooled solid breeder (WCSB) blanket cooled by high temperature SCPW (super critical pressurized water) is a practical option of DEMO reactor. Therefore, it is necessary to check the compatibility of the steel with SCPW. In this work, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F82H has been tested through slow strain rate tests (SSRT) in 23.5 MPa SCPW. And weight change behavior was measured up to 1000 h. F82H did not demonstrated stress corrosion cracking and its weight simply increased with surface oxidation. The weight change of F82H was almost same as commercial 9%-Cr steels. According to a cross-sectional analysis and weight change behavior, corrosion rate of F82H in the 823 K SCPW is estimated to be 0.04 mm/yr.

  6. An On-Heating Dilation Conversional Model for Austenite Formation in Hypoeutectoid Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seok-Jae; Clarke, Kester D.; van Tyne, Chester J.

    2010-09-01

    Dilatometry is often used to study solid-state phase transformations. While most steel transformation studies focus on the decomposition of austenite, this article presents an on-heating dilation conversional model to determine phase fraction based on measured volume changes during the formation of austenite in ferrite-pearlite hypoeutectoid steels. The effect of alloying elements on the transformation strain is incorporated into the model. Comparison of the conversional model predictions to measured transformation temperature ( A c3) shows excellent agreement. The pearlite decomposition finish temperature ( A pf ) predicted by the conversional model more closely matches experimental results when compared to standard lever rule calculations. Results show that including the effects of substitutional alloying elements (in addition to carbon) improves phase fraction predictions. The conversional model can be used to quantitatively predict intercritical austenite fraction with application to modeling, induction heating, intercritical annealing, and more complex heat treatments for hypoeutectoid steels.

  7. Behavior of AISI SAE 1020 Steel Implanted by Titanium and Exposed to Bacteria Sulphate Deoxidizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niño, Ely Dannier V.; Garnica, Hernán; Dugar-Zhabon, Veleriy; Castillo, Genis

    2014-05-01

    A hybrid technology to treat solid surfaces with the pulse high voltage and electric arc discharges of low pressure with a three-dimensional ion implantation technique (3DII) is applied. This technology is used to protect AISI SAE 1020 steel against a microbiological corrosion. The titanium ion implanted steel samples (coupons) are subjected to a medium of bacteria sulphate deoxidizer (BSD) which are very typical of the hydrocarbon industry and are potentially harmful for structures when are in contact with petroleum and some of its derivatives. The used technology aims to find an effective hybrid procedure to minimize the harmful effects of bacteria on AISI SAE 1020 steel. The hybrid technology efficiency of superficial titanium implantation is estimated through the measurements of the point corrosion characteristics obtained after testing both the treated and non-treated coupons. The three-dimensional surface structures of the samples are reconstructed with help of a confocal microscope.

  8. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-B-6, 108-B Solid Waste Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    M. L. Proctor

    2006-06-13

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-B-6, 108-B Solid Waste Burial Ground. The 118-B-6 site consisted of 2 concrete pipes buried vertically in the ground and capped by a concrete pad with steel lids. The site was used for the disposal of wastes from the "metal line" of the P-10 Tritium Separation Project.

  9. MTR, TRA603. BASEMENT DECONTAMINATION ROOM DETAILS. WALLS OF SOLID CONCRETE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. BASEMENT DECONTAMINATION ROOM DETAILS. WALLS OF SOLID CONCRETE MASONRY. STAINLESS STEEL WORK BENCH, FLOOR COVING AND DRAINS. "WARM" FLOOR DRAIN. OVERHEAD SHOWER WITH CHAIN PULL. IDO MTR-603-IDO-4, 12/1952. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-396-110468, REV. 1. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. Thermal dryer dewaters solids

    SciTech Connect

    DiMascio, F.J.; Burrowes, P.A.

    1993-09-01

    Solids incineration is traditionally an energy-intensive solids handling process at wastewater treatment plants. To reduce energy costs, the Buffalo (N.Y.) Sewer Authority has added an indirect thermal dryer to its treatment plant to dewater solids before incineration. In the first 3 months of operation, the authority reduced its solids inventory from 634,400 to 227,300 kg. Solids processed in the plant`s multiple-hearth incinerators varied from 11 to 12.75 wet Mg/hr at feed concentrations averaging 21% total solids. And, the dryer was operated with less than 5% downtime. The cost of this indirect thermal dryer system, including construction and equipment, was $995,000. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Comparative Structural Strength Research of Hardened Carbon Steel and Hot-Rolled Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomolov, A. V.; Zhakupov, A. N.; Kanayev, A. T.; Sikach, I. A.; Tugumov, K. K.

    2016-08-01

    Experiments on quantitative evaluation of fatigue strength showed that St5ps and St5sp carbon steels with A400 strength class can be fully applied for erection of constructions and buildings having cyclical loads during operation. Study of corrosion resistance of hardened carbon steel in comparison with hot-rolled alloy steel consists in difference in structures and hence, difference in intensity of electric and chemical processes featuring presence of steel in concrete. Structure of St5sp steel with A400 strength class in surface area has significantly less corrosion rate than ferritic-perlitic structure of 35GS steel with A400 strength class.

  12. Solid propellant rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowler, W. L.; Shafer, J. I.; Behm, J. W.; Strand, L. D. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The characteristics of a solid propellant rocket engine with a controlled rate of thrust buildup to a desired thrust level are discussed. The engine uses a regressive burning controlled flow solid propellant igniter and a progressive burning main solid propellant charge. The igniter is capable of operating in a vacuum and sustains the burning of the propellant below its normal combustion limit until the burning propellant surface and combustion chamber pressure have increased sufficiently to provide a stable chamber pressure.

  13. Thixoforming of Steel: New Tools Conception to Analyse Thermal Exchanges and Strain Rate Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cezard, P.; Bigot, R.; Becker, E.; Mathieu, S.; Pierret, J. C.; Rassili, A.

    2007-04-01

    Through different papers, authors shown that the influence of thermal exchanges was a first order parameter on the semi-solid steel behaviour, and certainly for every semi-solid metallic materials. These thermal exchanges hide other parameters effect like, for example, the strain rate influence. This paper tries to determine the influence of these two parameters by using a new extrusion device on a hydraulic press. This new tools conception annihilated the influence of the decrease of the punch speed before stopping and permitted to have a constant speed during the experiment. This work also deals with the homogeneous flow during thixoforming of steel and shows the importance to couple initial temperature of the slug with punch speed. This paper presents different conditions which permitted to have a homogeneous flow by keeping a low load.

  14. Erosion and Corrosion Behavior of Laser Cladded Stainless Steels with Tungsten Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Raghuvir; Kumar, Mukesh; Kumar, Deepak; Mishra, Suman K.

    2012-11-01

    Laser cladding of tungsten carbide (WC) on stainless steels 13Cr-4Ni and AISI 304 substrates has been performed using high power diode laser. The cladded stainless steels were characterized for microstructural changes, hardness, solid particle erosion resistance and corrosion behavior. Resistance of the clad to solid particle erosion was evaluated using alumina particles according to ASTM G76 and corrosion behavior was studied by employing the anodic polarization and open circuit potential measurement in 3.5% NaCl solution and tap water. The hardness of laser cladded AISI 304 and 13Cr-4Ni stainless steel was increased up to 815 and 725Hv100 g, respectively. The erosion resistance of the modified surface was improved significantly such that the erosion rate of cladded AISI 304 (at 114 W/mm2) was observed ~0.74 mg/cm2/h as compared to ~1.16 and 0.97 mg/cm2/h for untreated AISI 304 and 13Cr-4Ni, respectively. Laser cladding of both the stainless steels, however, reduced the corrosion resistance in both NaCl and tap water.

  15. Phase Stability under Irradiation of Precipitates and Solid Solutions in Model ALloys and in ODS Alloys Relevant for Gen IV

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur T. Motta; Robert C. Birtcher

    2007-10-17

    The overall objective of this program is to investigate the irradiation-altered phase stability of oxide precipitates in ODS steels and of model alloy solid solutions of associated systems. This information can be used to determine whether the favorable mechanical propertiies of these steels are maintained under irradiation, thus addressing one of the main materials research issues for this class of steels as identified by the GenIV working groups. The research program will also create fundamental understanding of the irradiation precipitation/dissolution problem by studying a "model" system in which the variables can be controlled and their effects understood individually.

  16. Mixed oxide solid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Magno, Scott; Wang, Ruiping; Derouane, Eric

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is a mixed oxide solid solution containing a tetravalent and a pentavalent cation that can be used as a support for a metal combustion catalyst. The invention is furthermore a combustion catalyst containing the mixed oxide solid solution and a method of making the mixed oxide solid solution. The tetravalent cation is zirconium(+4), hafnium(+4) or thorium(+4). In one embodiment, the pentavalent cation is tantalum(+5), niobium(+5) or bismuth(+5). Mixed oxide solid solutions of the present invention exhibit enhanced thermal stability, maintaining relatively high surface areas at high temperatures in the presence of water vapor.

  17. Steel project fact sheet: Steel reheating for further processing

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    Steel reheating is an energy-intensive process requiring uniform temperature distribution within reheating furnaces. Historically, recuperators have ben used to preheat combustion air, thereby conserving energy. More recent innovations include oxygen enrichment and the use of regenerative burners, which provide higher preheat air temperatures than recuperators. These processes have limitations such as equipment deterioration, decreasing energy efficiency over time, high maintenance costs, and increased NO{sub x} emissions with increased air preheat temperature, unless special equipment is used. Praxair, Inc., supplier of oxygen and other industrial gases to the steel industry, proposes to introduce an innovative oxy-fuel burner technology (using 100% oxygen) to the steel reheating industry. Oxy-fuel combustion reduces or eliminates nitrogen in combustion air and substantially reduces waste heat carried out with flue gas. Based on technology currently used in the glass, hazardous waste, and aluminum industries, Praxair has developed and patented low temperature, oxy-fuel burners that can be used in high temperature industrial furnaces where temperature uniformity is critical and extremely low NO{sub x} emissions are desired. The technical goal of the project is to demonstrate the use of oxy-fuel burners in a slab reheat furnace while reducing energy consumption by 45% and NO{sub x} emissions by 90% within the converted furnace zones. Successful implementation of this technology also will eliminate the need to periodically replace recuperators and install NO{sub x} removal equipment.

  18. Enhanced humification by carbonated basic oxygen furnace steel slag--I. Characterization of humic-like acids produced from humic precursors.

    PubMed

    Qi, Guangxia; Yue, Dongbei; Fukushima, Masami; Fukuchi, Shigeki; Nie, Yongfeng

    2012-01-01

    Carbonated basic oxygen furnace steel slag (hereinafter referred to as "steel slag") is generated during iron and steel manufacturing and is often classified as waste. The effect of steel slag on humification process was investigated. Catechol, glycine and glucose were used as model humic precursors from degraded biowastes. To verify that humification occurred in the system, humic-like acids (HLAs) were isolated and characterized structurally by elemental analysis, FTIR spectra, solid-state CP-MAS (13)C NMR spectra, and TMAH-Py-GC/MS. Characteristics of the steel slag-HLA were compared with those of HLAs formed in the presence of zeolite and birnessite, and with that of mature compost humic acid. The results showed that steel slag-HLA, like zeolite- and birnessite-HLA, is complex organic material containing prominent aromatic structures. Steel slag substantially accelerated the humification process, which would be highly significant for accelerating the stabilization of biowastes during composting (e.g. municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, and food waste).

  19. Heat treatment giving a stable high temperature micro-structure in cast austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Anton, Donald L.; Lemkey, Franklin D.

    1988-01-01

    A novel micro-structure developed in a cast austenitic stainless steel alloy and a heat treatment thereof are disclosed. The alloy is based on a multicomponent Fe-Cr-Mn-Mo-Si-Nb-C system consisting of an austenitic iron solid solution (.gamma.) matrix reinforced by finely dispersed carbide phases and a heat treatment to produce the micro-structure. The heat treatment includes a prebraze heat treatment followed by a three stage braze cycle heat treatment.

  20. Microstructural characterization of 5-9% chromium reduced-activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaram, R.; Klueh, R.L.

    1997-08-01

    The microstructures of a 9Cr-2W-0.25-0.1C (9Cr-2WV), a 9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa), a 7Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (7Cr-2WVTa), and a 5Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (5Cr-2WVTa) steel (all compositions are in weight percent) have been characterized by Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) and Atom Probe Field Ion Microscopy (APFIM). The matrix in all four reduced-activation steels was 100% martensite. In the two 9Cr steels, the stable precipitates were blocky M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and small spherical MC. The two lower-chromium steels contained blocky M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and small needle-shaped carbonitrides in addition to M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. AEM and APFIM analysis revealed that in the steels containing tantalum, the majority of the tantalum was in solid solution. The experimental observations were in good agreement with phases and compositions predicted by phase equilibria calculations.

  1. X-mas trees: A new application for duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hochoertler, G.; Zeiler, G.; Haberfellner, K.

    1995-12-31

    The development of fields in severe areas (subsea installations, deserts) necessitates the use of materials which can operate maintenance free in these conditions. Depending on production route and aggressivity of relevant media, the materials used until now, such as AISI 4130, are being superseded by higher alloyed materials such as F6NM, Duplex and Super Duplex Steels. Extensive investigation of metallurgical, mechanical, technological and stress aspects as well as research into the influence of melting, forging and heat treatment processes on high alloyed materials enables ``High Tech`` forgings to be manufactured. Based on investigations and experience gained by previously produced forgings (WYE-piece, Gate Valve components, Swivel forgings, line pipes made of Super Duplex Stainless Steels and Duplex Stainless Steels), the first X-mas trees made of solid Duplex Stainless Steel has been produced. Due to the excellent mechanical and corrosion properties of Duplex Stainless Steel, the expensive and time consuming cladding can be eliminated for most environments, which results in good economy and significantly reduced production time. To obtain information about the quality of such a large forging, samples were taken from one of these X-mas trees and the mechanical and corrosion properties were investigated.

  2. Bond characteristics of steel fiber and deformed reinforcing steel bar embedded in steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslani, Farhad; Nejadi, Shami

    2012-09-01

    Steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC) is a relatively new composite material which congregates the benefits of the self-compacting concrete (SCC) technology with the profits derived from the fiber addition to a brittle cementitious matrix. Steel fibers improve many of the properties of SCC elements including tensile strength, ductility, toughness, energy absorption capacity, fracture toughness and cracking. Although the available research regarding the influence of steel fibers on the properties of SFRSCC is limited, this paper investigates the bond characteristics between steel fiber and SCC firstly. Based on the available experimental results, the current analytical steel fiber pullout model (Dubey 1999) is modified by considering the different SCC properties and different fiber types (smooth, hooked) and inclination. In order to take into account the effect of fiber inclination in the pullout model, apparent shear strengths ( τ ( app)) and slip coefficient ( β) are incorporated to express the variation of pullout peak load and the augmentation of peak slip as the inclined angle increases. These variables are expressed as functions of the inclined angle ( ϕ). Furthurmore, steel-concrete composite floors, reinforced concrete floors supported by columns or walls and floors on an elastic foundations belong to the category of structural elements in which the conventional steel reinforcement can be partially replaced by the use of steel fibers. When discussing deformation capacity of structural elements or civil engineering structures manufactured using SFRSCC, one must be able to describe thoroughly both the behavior of the concrete matrix reinforced with steel fibers and the interaction between this composite matrix and discrete steel reinforcement of the conventional type. However, even though the knowledge on bond behavior is essential for evaluating the overall behavior of structural components containing reinforcement and steel fibers

  3. Bond characteristics of steel fiber and deformed reinforcing steel bar embedded in steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslani, Farhad; Nejadi, Shami

    2012-09-01

    Steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC) is a relatively new composite material which congregates the benefits of the self-compacting concrete (SCC) technology with the profits derived from the fiber addition to a brittle cementitious matrix. Steel fibers improve many of the properties of SCC elements including tensile strength, ductility, toughness, energy absorption capacity, fracture toughness and cracking. Although the available research regarding the influence of steel fibers on the properties of SFRSCC is limited, this paper investigates the bond characteristics between steel fiber and SCC firstly. Based on the available experimental results, the current analytical steel fiber pullout model (Dubey 1999) is modified by considering the different SCC properties and different fiber types (smooth, hooked) and inclination. In order to take into account the effect of fiber inclination in the pullout model, apparent shear strengths (τ (app)) and slip coefficient (β) are incorporated to express the variation of pullout peak load and the augmentation of peak slip as the inclined angle increases. These variables are expressed as functions of the inclined angle (ϕ). Furthurmore, steel-concrete composite floors, reinforced concrete floors supported by columns or walls and floors on an elastic foundations belong to the category of structural elements in which the conventional steel reinforcement can be partially replaced by the use of steel fibers. When discussing deformation capacity of structural elements or civil engineering structures manufactured using SFRSCC, one must be able to describe thoroughly both the behavior of the concrete matrix reinforced with steel fibers and the interaction between this composite matrix and discrete steel reinforcement of the conventional type. However, even though the knowledge on bond behavior is essential for evaluating the overall behavior of structural components containing reinforcement and steel fibers

  4. A mortality study among mild steel and stainless steel welders.

    PubMed

    Moulin, J J; Wild, P; Haguenoer, J M; Faucon, D; De Gaudemaris, R; Mur, J M; Mereau, M; Gary, Y; Toamain, J P; Birembaut, Y

    1993-03-01

    A mortality study was carried out in conjunction with the European mortality study among welders coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The study was aimed at assessing risks for lung cancer in relation to exposure to asbestos, welding fumes containing chromium and nickel, and tobacco smoke. The study included a cohort of 2721 welders and an internal comparison group of 6683 manual workers employed in 13 factories in France. The mortality of the two cohorts was studied from 1975 to 1988 by the historical prospective method. Job histories of welders were traced including welding processes used, metals welded, and proportion of worktime spent in welding. Data on smoking habits were collected from medical records. The observed number of deaths were compared with those expected (standardised mortality ratio (SMR)) based on national rates with adjustments for age, sex, and calendar time. The smoking habits of 87% of the whole study population were known. The distribution of welders and controls according to smoking was not statistically different. The overall mortality was slightly higher for welders (SMR = 1.02, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.89-1.18) than for controls (SMR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.84-0.99). For lung cancer, the SMR was 1.24 (95% CI 0.75-1.94) for welders, whereas the corresponding value was lower for controls (SMR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.68-1.26). The SMR for lung cancer was 1.59 among non-shipyard mild steel welders (95% CI 0.73-3.02). This contrasted with the results for all stainless steel welders (SMR = 0.92, 95% CI 0.19-2.69), and for stainless steel welders predominantly exposed to chromium VI (SMR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.12-3.71). Moreover, SMRs for lung cancer for mild steel welders tended to increase with duration of exposure and time since first exposure, leading to significant excesses for duration > or = 20 years and latency > or = 20 years. Such a pattern was not found for stainless steel welders.

  5. A mortality study among mild steel and stainless steel welders.

    PubMed Central

    Moulin, J J; Wild, P; Haguenoer, J M; Faucon, D; De Gaudemaris, R; Mur, J M; Mereau, M; Gary, Y; Toamain, J P; Birembaut, Y

    1993-01-01

    A mortality study was carried out in conjunction with the European mortality study among welders coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The study was aimed at assessing risks for lung cancer in relation to exposure to asbestos, welding fumes containing chromium and nickel, and tobacco smoke. The study included a cohort of 2721 welders and an internal comparison group of 6683 manual workers employed in 13 factories in France. The mortality of the two cohorts was studied from 1975 to 1988 by the historical prospective method. Job histories of welders were traced including welding processes used, metals welded, and proportion of worktime spent in welding. Data on smoking habits were collected from medical records. The observed number of deaths were compared with those expected (standardised mortality ratio (SMR)) based on national rates with adjustments for age, sex, and calendar time. The smoking habits of 87% of the whole study population were known. The distribution of welders and controls according to smoking was not statistically different. The overall mortality was slightly higher for welders (SMR = 1.02, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.89-1.18) than for controls (SMR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.84-0.99). For lung cancer, the SMR was 1.24 (95% CI 0.75-1.94) for welders, whereas the corresponding value was lower for controls (SMR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.68-1.26). The SMR for lung cancer was 1.59 among non-shipyard mild steel welders (95% CI 0.73-3.02). This contrasted with the results for all stainless steel welders (SMR = 0.92, 95% CI 0.19-2.69), and for stainless steel welders predominantly exposed to chromium VI (SMR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.12-3.71). Moreover, SMRs for lung cancer for mild steel welders tended to increase with duration of exposure and time since first exposure, leading to significant excesses for duration > or = 20 years and latency > or = 20 years. Such a pattern was not found for stainless steel welders. PMID:8457490

  6. Longer Life for Steel Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    IC 531 is a coating manufactured and marketed by Inorganic Coatings, Inc. The coating was developed by Goddard to protect structures at Kennedy Space Center. It is a high ratio potassium silicate formula. The coating is water based, nontoxic, and nonflammable. It generates no volatile organic compounds nor hazardous chemical waste, and bonds to steel in 30 minutes. At the present time, no one can say for sure how long IC 531's effective lifetime is. Some of the original Goddard test applications of 1976 are still going strong after lengthy exposure to the Sun, salt and moisture. Says IC in company literature: 'IC 531 offers virtually permanent protection for steel. We predict it will protect structures for well beyond 25 years. If necessary, it is infinitely maintainable; if damaged, it can easily be touched up with more IC 531.'

  7. Steel Industry Energy Bandwidth Study

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2004-10-01

    ITP conducted a study on energy use and potential savings, or "bandwidth" study, in major steelmaking processes. Intended to provide a realistic estimate of the potential amount of energy that can be saved in an industrial process, the "bandwidth" refers to the difference between the amount of energy that would be consumed in a process using commercially available technology versus the minimum amount of energy needed to achieve those same results based on the 2nd law of thermodynamics. The Steel Industry Energy Bandwidth Study (PDF 133 KB) also estimates steel industry energy use in the year 2010, and uses that value as a basis for comparison against the minimum requirements. This energy savings opportunity for 2010 will aid focus on longer term R&D.

  8. Light microscopy of carbon steels

    SciTech Connect

    Samuels, L.E.

    1998-12-31

    Containing over 1,200 representative micrographs and the information and explanatory text that makes them really useful: composition, condition, etchant, and magnification, and more than 100 graphs and tables, this how to book not only gives everyday working examples, but also discusses the relationship between the constitution, metallurgy, and microstructure of various carbon steel products. Written by a renowned expert in metallography, this definitive work is a must for all those working in this area. Contents include: nomenclature of phases and constituents; phase transformations; low-carbon irons and steels; annealing and normalizing; spheroidization and graphitization; austenitization; transformation of austenite; tempering of martensite; welding; surface oxidation, decarburation; and oxidation scaling; glossary of terms; etching methods; conversion tables.

  9. Welding of high chromium steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W B

    1928-01-01

    A brief description is given of different groups of high chromium steels (rustless iron and stainless steels) according to their composition and more generally accepted names. The welding procedure for a given group will be much the same regardless of the slight variations in chemical composition which may exist within a certain group. Information is given for the tensile properties (yield point and ultimate strength) of metal sheets and welds before and after annealing on coupons one and one-half inches wide. Since welds in rustless iron containing 16 to 18 percent chromium and 7 to 12 percent nickel show the best combination of strength and ductility in the 'as welded' or annealed condition, it is considered the best alloy to use for welded construction.

  10. Shock Hugoniot of 1215 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brar, N. S.; Rosenberg, Z.

    1996-05-01

    1215 steel is almost pure iron with 0.1 percent or less carbon. Information pertaining to deformation of this material under shock loading is useful to simulate penetration of projectiles of different shapes, such as fragments or rods, in propellants storage containments made from almost pure iron. In this paper we present the dynamic response of 1215 steel to shock wave loading to 30 GPa. Manganin gauges were used to record the stress wave profiles in these experiments. The Hugoniot data in the stress-particle velocity plane was obtained to 30 GPa. Hugoniot elastic limit was found to be 1.37±0.05 GPa. Phase transformation (α-ɛ) takes place at about 13.2±0.2 GPa, which agrees with the value determined by Barker and Hollenbach using VISAR. Hugoniot does not show any softening at stresses below 13 GPa.

  11. Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2005-09-01

    The Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Analysis (PDF 347 KB) identifies opportunities for developing advanced technologies and estimates both the necessary funding and the potential payoff. This analysis determines what portion of the energy bandwidth can be captured through the adoption of state-of-the-art technology and practices. R&D opportunities for addressing the remainder of the bandwidth are characterized and plotted on a marginal opportunity curve.

  12. A study of Damascus steel

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P.

    1995-02-16

    The Damascus sword has been an article of fascination for many years to blade collectors and metallurgists alike. The blades were given their name by Europeans who encountered these blades which originated from Damascus, Syria. They are best known for the appearance of the blade face. Genuine Damascus blades show swirling patterns of alternating light and dark regions which are due to the microstructure of the steel. The microstructure consists of arrays of well rounded cementite patterns in a matrix of either pearlite, bainite, or martensite. When this structure is etched the matrix will turn dark leaving the cementite particles light. Although many blades were produced over the centuries, while some of the process is known the making of a genuine Damascus blade today is generally considered a lost art. Many scientists have studied the subject in an attempt to understand the complex process by which the clustered arrays of cementite particles develop in the steel blades. The most prominent theories to date are presented in the General Introduction to this thesis. The thesis is divided into four main parts. In the first part, four proposed mechanisms of cementite cluster sheet formation as they relate to the banding theory are introduced. Experiments to investigate these mechanisms are presented. In Part II, collaborative research focused on the methodology of the reconstructed process for making Damascus steel is presented. In the third part, a study into the graphitization of the reconstructed blades is presented. In Part IV, experimental attempts at producing Damascus steel ingots in the laboratory are presented.

  13. Steel Collet For Welding Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Gutow, David A.; Burley, Richard K.; Fogul, Irving

    1992-01-01

    Improved steel collet holds electrode for tungsten inert-gas welding but allows quick and easy replacement. Also ensures reliable arc starting. Slip-on compression ring compresses tapered section of body of collet around inner end of welding electrode. Collet mounted in receptacle below stack of lenses and filters in coaxial-vision welding torch. Blind hole in collet protects outermost lens from damage by electrode.

  14. Nano-composite stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Blue, Craig A.; Peter, William H.; Chen, Wei; Aprigliano, Louis F.

    2015-07-14

    A composite stainless steel composition is composed essentially of, in terms of wt. % ranges: 25 to 28 Cr; 11 to 13 Ni; 7 to 8 W; 3.5 to 4 Mo; 3 to 3.5 B; 2 to 2.5 Mn; 1 to 1.5 Si; 0.3 to 1.7 C; up to 2 O; balance Fe. The composition has an austenitic matrix phase and a particulate, crystalline dispersed phase.

  15. Nickel: makes stainless steel strong

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boland, Maeve A.

    2012-01-01

    Nickel is a silvery-white metal that is used mainly to make stainless steel and other alloys stronger and better able to withstand extreme temperatures and corrosive environments. Nickel was first identified as a unique element in 1751 by Baron Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, a Swedish mineralogist and chemist. He originally called the element kupfernickel because it was found in rock that looked like copper (kupfer) ore and because miners thought that "bad spirits" (nickel) in the rock were making it difficult for them to extract copper from it. Approximately 80 percent of the primary (not recycled) nickel consumed in the United States in 2011 was used in alloys, such as stainless steel and superalloys. Because nickel increases an alloy's resistance to corrosion and its ability to withstand extreme temperatures, equipment and parts made of nickel-bearing alloys are often used in harsh environments, such as those in chemical plants, petroleum refineries, jet engines, power generation facilities, and offshore installations. Medical equipment, cookware, and cutlery are often made of stainless steel because it is easy to clean and sterilize. All U.S. circulating coins except the penny are made of alloys that contain nickel. Nickel alloys are increasingly being used in making rechargeable batteries for portable computers, power tools, and hybrid and electric vehicles. Nickel is also plated onto such items as bathroom fixtures to reduce corrosion and provide an attractive finish.

  16. Solid Waste: Health Concerns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duel, Ward

    1975-01-01

    In this article the means of disposing solid wastes are discussed with reference to their health hazards and environmental desirability. Included in the discussion are solid waste dumps, landfills, incinerators, and grinders. Some attention is given to the reclamation of mineral resources from trash. (MA)

  17. High solids fermentation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wyman, Charles E.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Richard, Christopher J.

    1993-03-02

    A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

  18. High solids fermentation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wyman, Charles E.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Richard, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

  19. Solid adenocarcinoma —

    Cancer.gov

    Uniformly solid character of the lesions is usually indicative of a well differentiated tumor. No solid adenocarcinomas have observed in our series. However, rare cases have been described by others. In human pathology this diagnosis is usually based on detection of mucin after periodic acid-Schiff reaction with diastase (α-amylase) digestion.

  20. Polyimide Precursor Solid Residuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A polyimide precursor solid residuum is an admixture of an aromatic dianhydride or derivative thereof and an aromatic diamine or derivative thereof plus a complexing agent, which is complexed with the admixture by hydrogen bonding. The polyimide precursor solid residuum is effectively employed in the preparation of polyimide foam and the fabrication of polyimide foam structures.

  1. Utilization of structural steel in buildings.

    PubMed

    Moynihan, Muiris C; Allwood, Julian M

    2014-08-01

    Over one-quarter of steel produced annually is used in the construction of buildings. Making this steel causes carbon dioxide emissions, which climate change experts recommend be reduced by half in the next 37 years. One option to achieve this is to design and build more efficiently, still delivering the same service from buildings but using less steel to do so. To estimate how much steel could be saved from this option, 23 steel-framed building designs are studied, sourced from leading UK engineering firms. The utilization of each beam is found and buildings are analysed to find patterns. The results for over 10 000 beams show that average utilization is below 50% of their capacity. The primary reason for this low value is 'rationalization'-providing extra material to reduce labour costs. By designing for minimum material rather than minimum cost, steel use in buildings could be drastically reduced, leading to an equivalent reduction in 'embodied' carbon emissions.

  2. Lubrication with solids.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Johnson, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Brief discussion of the historical background, variety range, chemistry, physics, and other properties of solid lubricants, and review of their current uses. The widespread use of solid lubricants did not occur until about 1947. At present, they are the object of such interest that a special international conference on their subject was held in 1971. They are used at temperatures beyond the useful range of conventional lubricating oils and greases. Their low volatility provides them with the capability of functioning effectively in vacuum and invites their use in space applications. Their high load carrying ability makes them useful with heavily loaded components. Solid lubricants, however, do lack some of the desirable properties of conventional lubricants. Unlike oils and greases, which have fluidity and can continuously be carried back into contact with lubricated surfaces, solid lubricants, because of their immobility, have finite lives. Also, oils and greases can carry away frictional heat from contacting surfaces, while solid lubricants cannot.

  3. Solid phase microextraction device using aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Fred S.; Andresen, Brian D.

    2005-06-14

    A sample collection substrate of aerogel and/or xerogel materials bound to a support structure is used as a solid phase microextraction (SPME) device. The xerogels and aerogels may be organic or inorganic and doped with metals or other compounds to target specific chemical analytes. The support structure is typically formed of a glass fiber or a metal wire (stainless steel or kovar). The devices are made by applying gel solution to the support structures and drying the solution to form aerogel or xerogel. Aerogel particles may be attached to the wet layer before drying to increase sample collection surface area. These devices are robust, stable in fields of high radiation, and highly effective at collecting gas and liquid samples while maintaining superior mechanical and thermal stability during routine use. Aerogel SPME devices are advantageous for use in GC/MS analyses due to their lack of interfering background and tolerance of GC thermal cycling.

  4. Solid oxide fuel cell matrix and modules

    DOEpatents

    Riley, Brian

    1990-01-01

    Porous refractory ceramic blocks arranged in an abutting, stacked configuration and forming a three dimensional array provide a support structure and coupling means for a plurality of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Each of the blocks includes a square center channel which forms a vertical shaft when the blocks are arranged in a stacked array. Positioned within the channel is a SOFC unit cell such that a plurality of such SOFC units disposed within a vertical shaft form a string of SOFC units coupled in series. A first pair of facing inner walls of each of the blocks each include an interconnecting channel hole cut horizontally and vertically into the block walls to form gas exit channels. A second pair of facing lateral walls of each block further include a pair of inner half circular grooves which form sleeves to accommodate anode fuel and cathode air tubes. The stack of ceramic blocks is self-supporting, with a plurality of such stacked arrays forming a matrix enclosed in an insulating refractory brick structure having an outer steel layer. The necessary connections for air, fuel, burnt gas, and anode and cathode connections are provided through the brick and steel outer shell. The ceramic blocks are so designed with respect to the strings of modules that by simple and logical design the strings could be replaced by hot reloading if one should fail. The hot reloading concept has not been included in any previous designs.

  5. A Method for Imaging Steel Bars Behind a Ferrous Steel Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, B.; Miller, G.; Zaid, M.; Gaydecki, P.

    2006-03-01

    A system for detecting steel objects behind ferrous steel boundaries is described. It may be used to image steel reinforcing bars in concrete, where a steel sheet exists between the bars and the surface. The sensor comprises a transmitter, receiver and a dummy coil, which cancels cross-talk and enhances the signal from the bars. It is possible to penetrate a 2mm thick sheet at 125 Hz and image 16 mm diameter bars placed underneath.

  6. The Structure and Mechanical Properties of Bridge Steel Weldings With Glass-Steel Liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzalev, V. N.; Semukhin, B. S.; Danilov, V. I.

    2016-04-01

    A new technology is developed for welding multi-span bridge constructions. The mechanical properties and structure of the low-carbon bridge steel welds have been studied. The welding parameters and application of steel-glass liners provide for long-term service of steel constructions in conformity with the welding industry specifications.

  7. Welding Metallurgy and Weldability of Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippold, John C.; Kotecki, Damian J.

    2005-03-01

    Welding Metallurgy and Weldability of Stainless Steels, the first book in over twenty years to address welding metallurgy and weldability issues associated with stainless steel, offers the most up-to-date and comprehensive treatment of these topics currently available. The authors emphasize fundamental metallurgical principles governing microstructure evolution and property development of stainless steels, including martensistic, ferric, austenitic, duplex, and precipitation hardening grades. They present a logical and well-organized look at the history, evolution, and primary uses of each stainless steel, including detailed descriptions of the associated weldability issues.

  8. Solidification Microstructure, Segregation, and Shrinkage of Fe-Mn-C Twinning-Induced Plasticity Steel by Simulation and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Peng; Tang, Haiyan; Zhang, Jiaquan

    2016-06-01

    A 3D cellular automaton finite element model with full coupling of heat, flow, and solute transfer incorporating solidification grain nucleation and growth was developed for a multicomponent system. The predicted solidification process, shrinkage porosity, macrosegregation, grain orientation, and microstructure evolution of Fe-22Mn-0.7C twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel match well with the experimental observation and measurement. Based on a new solute microsegregation model using the finite difference method, the thermophysical parameters including solid fraction, thermal conductivity, density, and enthalpy were predicted and compared with the results from thermodynamics and experiment. The effects of flow and solute transfer in the liquid phase on the solidification microstructure of Fe-22Mn-0.7C TWIP steel were compared numerically. Thermal convection decreases the temperature gradient in the liquid steel, leading to the enlargement of the equiaxed zone. Solute enrichment in front of the solid/liquid interface weakens the thermal convection, resulting in a little postponement of columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET). The CET behavior of Fe-Mn-C TWIP steel during solidification was fully described and mathematically quantized by grain morphology statistics for the first time. A new methodology to figure out the CET location by linear regression of grain mean size with least-squares arithmetic was established, by which a composition design strategy for Fe-Mn-C TWIP steel according to solidification microstructure, matrix compactness, and homogeneity was developed.

  9. 37. Photocopy of photograph. STEEL PLANT, OPEN HOUSE INSIDE PLANT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Photocopy of photograph. STEEL PLANT, OPEN HOUSE INSIDE PLANT AT TIME OF ITS OPENING, 1910. (From the Bethlehem Steel Corporation Collection, Seattle, WA) - Irondale Iron & Steel Plant, Port Townsend, Jefferson County, WA

  10. 30. Photocopy of photograph. STEEL PLANT, OPEN HEARTH FURNACE CHARGING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Photocopy of photograph. STEEL PLANT, OPEN HEARTH FURNACE CHARGING CREW, 1910. (From the Bethlehem Steel Corporation Colletion, Seattle, WA) - Irondale Iron & Steel Plant, Port Townsend, Jefferson County, WA

  11. North and west facades of crucible steel building; looking southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North and west facades of crucible steel building; looking southeast - Bethlehem Steel Corporation, South Bethlehem Works, Crucible Steel Plant, Along Lehigh River, North of Fourth Street, West of Minsi Trail Bridge, Bethlehem, Northampton County, PA

  12. Self-Passivating Lithium/Solid Electrolyte/Iodine Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar; Whitcare, Jay; Narayanan, Sekharipuram; West, William

    2006-01-01

    Robust lithium/solid electrolyte/iodine electrochemical cells that offer significant advantages over commercial lithium/ iodine cells have been developed. At room temperature, these cells can be discharged at current densities 10 to 30 times those of commercial lithium/iodine cells. Moreover, from room temperature up to 80 C, the maximum discharge-current densities of these cells exceed those of all other solid-electrolyte-based cells. A cell of this type includes a metallic lithium anode in contact with a commercial flexible solid electrolyte film that, in turn, is in contact with an iodine/ graphite cathode. The solid electrolyte (the chemical composition of which has not been reported) offers the high ionic conductivity needed for high cell performance. However, the solid electrolyte exhibits an undesirable chemical reactivity to lithium that, if not mitigated, would render the solid electrolyte unsuitable for use in a lithium cell. In this cell, such mitigation is affected by the formation of a thin passivating layer of lithium iodide at the anode/electrolyte interface. Test cells of this type were fabricated from iodine/graphite cathode pellets, free-standing solid-electrolyte films, and lithium-foil anodes. The cathode mixtures were made by grinding together blends of nominally 10 weight percent graphite and 90 weight percent iodine. The cathode mixtures were then pressed into pellets at 36 kpsi (248 MPa) and inserted into coin-shaped stainless-steel cell cases that were coated with graphite paste to minimize corrosion. The solid-electrolyte film material was stamped to form circular pieces to fit in the coin cell cases, inserted in the cases, and pressed against the cathode pellets with polyethylene gaskets. Lithium-foil anodes were placed directly onto the electrolyte films. The layers described thus far were pressed and held together by stainless- steel shims, wave springs, and coin cell caps. The assembled cells were then crimped to form hermetic seals

  13. Test Plan - Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.; Fowley, M. D.

    2012-05-10

    This plan documents the highlights of the Solids Accumulations Scouting Studies test; a project, from Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), that began on February 1, 2012. During the last 12 weeks considerable progress has been made to design and plan methods that will be used to estimate the concentration and distribution of heavy fissile solids in accumulated solids in the Hanford double-shell tank (DST) 241-AW-105 (AW-105), which is the primary goal of this task. This DST will be one of the several waste feed delivery staging tanks designated to feed the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Note that over the length of the waste feed delivery mission AW-105 is currently identified as having the most fill empty cycles of any DST feed tanks, which is the reason for modeling this particular tank. At SRNL an existing test facility, the Mixing Demonstration Tank, which will be modified for the present work, will use stainless steel particles in a simulant that represents Hanford waste to perform mock staging tanks transfers that will allow solids to accumulate in the tank heel. The concentration and location of the mock fissile particles will be measured in these scoping studies to produce information that will be used to better plan larger scaled tests. Included in these studies is a secondary goal of developing measurement methods to accomplish the primary goal. These methods will be evaluated for use in the larger scale experiments. Included in this plan are the several pretest activities that will validate the measurement techniques that are currently in various phases of construction. Aspects of each technique, e.g., particle separations, volume determinations, topographical mapping, and core sampling, have been tested in bench-top trials, as discussed herein, but the actual equipment to be employed during the full test will need evaluation after fabrication and integration into the test facility.

  14. Strengthening Mechanisms in Thermomechanically Processed NbTi-Microalloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostryzhev, Andrii G.; Marenych, Olexandra O.; Killmore, Chris R.; Pereloma, Elena V.

    2015-08-01

    The effect of deformation temperature on microstructure and mechanical properties was investigated for thermomechanically processed NbTi-microalloyed steel with ferrite-pearlite microstructure. With a decrease in the finish deformation temperature at 1348 K to 1098 K (1075 °C to 825 °C) temperature range, the ambient temperature yield stress did not vary significantly, work hardening rate decreased, ultimate tensile strength decreased, and elongation to failure increased. These variations in mechanical properties were correlated to the variations in microstructural parameters (such as ferrite grain size, solid solution concentrations, precipitate number density and dislocation density). Calculations based on the measured microstructural parameters suggested the grain refinement, solid solution strengthening, precipitation strengthening, and work hardening contributed up to 32 pct, up to 48 pct, up to 25 pct, and less than 3 pct to the yield stress, respectively. With a decrease in the finish deformation temperature, both the grain size strengthening and solid solution strengthening increased, the precipitation strengthening decreased, and the work hardening contribution did not vary significantly.

  15. Solid propellant motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, J. I.; Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A case bonded end burning solid propellant rocket motor is described. A propellant with sufficiently low modulus to avoid chamber buckling on cooling from cure and sufficiently high elongation to sustain the stresses induced without cracking is used. The propellant is zone cured within the motor case at high pressures equal to or approaching the pressure at which the motor will operate during combustion. A solid propellant motor with a burning time long enough that its spacecraft would be limited to a maximum acceleration of less than 1 g is provided by one version of the case bonded end burning solid propellant motor of the invention.

  16. 77 FR 30589 - SteelRiver Infrastructure Partners LP, SteelRiver Infrastructure Associates LLC, SteelRiver...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board SteelRiver Infrastructure Partners LP, SteelRiver Infrastructure Associates..., referring to Docket No. FD 35622 must be filed with the Surface Transportation Board, 395 E Street...

  17. DWPF DECON FRIT: SUMP AND SLURRY SOLIDS ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Peeler, D.; Click, D.

    2010-10-20

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been requested to perform analyses on samples of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) decon frit slurry (i.e., supernate samples and sump solid samples). Four 1-L liquid slurry samples were provided to SRNL by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) from the 'front-end' decon activities. Additionally, two 1-L sump solids samples were provided to SRNL for compositional and physical analysis. In this report, the physical and chemical characterization results of the slurry solids and sump solids are reported. Crawford et al. (2010) provide the results of the supernate analysis. The results of the sump solids are reported on a mass basis given the samples were essentially dry upon receipt. The results of the slurry solids were converted to a volume basis given approximately 2.4 grams of slurry solids were obtained from the {approx}4 liters of liquid slurry sample. Although there were slight differences in the analytical results between the sump solids and slurry solids the following general summary statements can be made. Slight differences in the results are also captured for specific analysis. (1) Physical characterization - (a) SEM/EDS analysis suggested that the samples were enriched in Li and Si (B and Na not detectable using the current EDS system) which is consistent with two of the four principle oxides of Frit 418 (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}O and SiO{sub 2}). (b) SEM/EDS analysis also identified impurities which were elementally consistent with stainless steel (i.e., Fe, Ni, Cr contamination). (c) XRD results indicated that the sump solids samples were amorphous which is consistent with XRD results expected for a Frit 418 based sample. (d) For the sump solids, SEM/EDS analysis indicated that the particle size of the sump solids were consistent with that of an as received Frit 418 sample from a current DWPF vendor. (e) For the slurry solids, SEM/EDS analysis indicated that the particle size range

  18. Solid and Gaseous Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Hyman; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This review covers methods of sampling, analyzing, and testing coal, coke, and coal-derived solids and methods for the chemical, physical, and instrumental analyses of gaseous fuels. The review covers from October 1986, to September 1988. (MVL)

  19. The solid waste dilemma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amey, E.B.; Russell, J.A.; Hurdelbrink, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    In 1976, the U.S. Congress enacted the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) to further address the problem of increasing industrial and municipal waste. The main objectives of RCRA were to responsibly manage hazardous and solid waste and to procure materials made from recovered wastes. To fulfill these objectives, four main programs of waste management were developed. These programs were defined under Subtitle C, the Hazardous Waste Program; Subtitle D, the Solid Waste Program; Subtitle I, the Underground Storage Tank Program; and Subtitle J, the Medical Waste Program. Subtitle D illustrates the solid waste dilemma occurring in the United States. Under this program, states are encouraged to develop and implement their own waste management plans. These plans include the promotion of recycling solid wastes and the closing and upgrading of all environmentally unsound dumps. ?? 1996 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  20. ELECTRON IRRADIATION OF SOLIDS

    DOEpatents

    Damask, A.C.

    1959-11-01

    A method is presented for altering physical properties of certain solids, such as enhancing the usefulness of solids, in which atomic interchange occurs through a vacancy mechanism, electron irradiation, and temperature control. In a centain class of metals, alloys, and semiconductors, diffusion or displacement of atoms occurs through a vacancy mechanism, i.e., an atom can only move when there exists a vacant atomic or lattice site in an adjacent position. In the process of the invention highenergy electron irradiation produces additional vacancies in a solid over those normally occurring at a given temperature and allows diffusion of the component atoms of the solid to proceed at temperatures at which it would not occur under thermal means alone in any reasonable length of time. The invention offers a precise way to increase the number of vacancies and thereby, to a controlled degree, change the physical properties of some materials, such as resistivity or hardness.

  1. Solid adenoma —

    Cancer.gov

    Round to oval cells fill alveolar spaces. Fixation of the lung without inflation results in predominance of solid over alveolar pattern. Cells usually have abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm with fine granularity and/or vacuoles.

  2. The Organic Solid State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Dwaine O.; Wlygul, Frank M.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews interesting and useful electrical, magnetic, and optical properties of the organic solid state. Offers speculation as to areas of fruitful research. Discusses organic superconductors, conducting organic polymers, organic metals, and traces recent history of creation of organic metals. (JM)

  3. Solid Earth: Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, R.

    1991-10-01

    The principles of the solid Earth program are introduced. When considering the study of solid Earth from space, satellites are used as beacons, inertial references, free fall probes and carrying platforms. The phenomenon measured by these satellites and the processes which can be studied as a result of these measurements are tabulated. The NASA solid Earth program focusses on research into surface kinematics, Earth rotation, land, ice, and ocean monitoring. The ESA solid Earth program identifies as its priority the Aristoteles mission for determining the gravity and magnetic field globally, with high spatial resolution and high accuracy. The Aristoteles mission characteristics and goals are listed. The benefits of the improved gravity information that will be provided by this mission are highlighted. This information will help in the following research: geodesy, orbit mechanics, geodynamics, oceanography, climate sea level, and the atmosphere.

  4. Solid Waste Treatment Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershaft, Alex

    1972-01-01

    Advances in research and commercial solid waste handling are offering many more processing choices. This survey discusses techniques of storage and removal, fragmentation and sorting, bulk reduction, conversion, reclamation, mining and mineral processing, and disposal. (BL)

  5. Corrosion behaviour of galvanized steel and electroplating steel in aqueous solution: AC impedance study and XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrini, M.; Fontaine, G.; Gengembre, L.; Traisnel, M.; Lerasle, O.; Genet, N.

    2008-08-01

    The efficiency of a new triazole derivative, namely, 2-{(2-hydroxyethyl)[(4-methyl-1 H-1,2,3-benzotriazol-1-yl)methyl]amino}ethanol (TTA) has been studied for corrosion inhibition of galvanized steel and electroplating steel in aqueous solution. Corrosion inhibition was studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). These studies have shown that TTA was a very good inhibitor. Data obtained from EIS show a frequency distribution and therefore a modelling element with frequency dispersion behaviour, a constant phase element (CPE) has been used. The corrosion behaviour of galvanized steel and electroplating steel in aqueous solution was also investigated in the presence of 4-methyl-1 H-benzotriazole (TTA unsubstituted) by EIS. These studies have shown that the ability of the molecule to adsorb on the steel surface was dependent on the group in triazole ring substituent. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy surface analysis with TTA shows that it chemisorbed on surface of galvanized steel and electroplating steel.

  6. Corrosion Behavior of IF Steel in Various Media and Its Comparison with Mild Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, G. P.; Moon, A. P.; Sengupta, S.; Deo, G.; Sangal, S.; Mondal, K.

    2015-05-01

    The present work discusses corrosion behavior of an interstitial-free (IF) steel in 0.6 M NaCl, 1 M NaOH, and 1 M HCl solutions, and its comparison with mild steel (MS). Dynamics polarization and AC Impedance Spectroscopy explain different polarization behaviors of the steel samples. All the steels were exposed to open atmosphere for 100 days, and to 0.6 M NaCl salt fog for 30 days. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman and Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy were used to characterize microstructure of the steels, rust constituents, and morphologies. Corrosion behavior of the steels has close relation with the morphology and constituents of the rusts. It has been observed that the corrosion in the IF and MS steels is uniform in nature.

  7. [Initial stages of steel biocorrosion].

    PubMed

    Zhigletsova, S K; Rodin, V B; Kobelev, V S; Aleksandrova, N V; Rasulova, G E; Kholodenko, V P

    2000-01-01

    Initial stages of corrosion of mild steel induced by Klebsiela rhinoscleromatis BO2 were studied in various media. The effect of the microorganism was detected 8-10 h after inoculation. The number of viable cells were virtually unchanged within one month in all media, but the corrosive activity of the strain decreased. The corrosive activity of microorganisms can be determined by spectrophotometry even only after incubation for 24 h. At a low level of organic substrate, even strong colonization with microorganisms does not inevitably result in a significant damage to metals.

  8. Chromizing of 3Cr Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ravi, Vilupanur; Harrison, Bradley; Koch, Jordan; Ly, Alexander; Schissler, Andrew; Pint, Bruce A; Haynes, James A

    2011-01-01

    Grade 315 steel (Fe-2.9 Cr-1.7 W-0.7 Mo-0.3 Mn-0.3 Si-0.2 V-0.1 Ni-0.13 C-0.01 N) was chromized by the halide-activated pack cementation (HAPC) process. Key process parameters, i.e., coating temperatures and pack compositions, were investigated. Ammonium chloride-activated packs in the 700-1000 C range produced coatings nominally in the 1-8 {micro}m range, as determined by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Coatings applied in the 900-1000 C temperature range resulted in Cr-rich coatings. The predominant phase in the coating was identified as Cr23C6 by X-ray diffraction. In addition, the presence of chromium nitride, Cr2N, was observed in the coating. The power generation industry is faced with an ever-increasing demand for energy while simultaneously having to reduce carbon emissions. These goals can be facilitated by increasing plant efficiency through the use of higher operating temperatures and pressures. Traditional construction materials, e.g., the ferritic Grade 22 high strength low alloy steel, are limited to operations below {approx} 550 C. Therefore, new materials are required for future plants designed to operate up to 650 C and possibly higher. These new materials need to have improved tensile strength, ductility, toughness, corrosion resistance, and creep properties at elevated temperatures. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is investigating the oxidation and creep behavior of various coatings on Grade 315 steel (Fe-2.9 Cr-1.7 W-0.7 Mo-0.3 Mn-0.3 Si-0.2 V-0.1 Ni-0.13 C-0.01 N), a super-bainitic steel developed for superior creep properties. Thin, chemical vapor-deposited (CVD) aluminide coatings were used to compensate for the reduced corrosion and oxidation resistance that resulted from the low chromium content of the alloy. However, the aluminized Grade 315 alloys performed less-than-favorably under conditions relevant to fossil boilers, leading to the conclusion that higher chromium contents are required for the formation of

  9. Help for the Steel Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A collaboration between NASA Lewis Research Center (LRC) and Gladwin Engineering resulted in the adaptation of aerospace high temperature metal technology to the continuous casting of steel. The continuous process is more efficient because it takes less time and labor. A high temperature material, once used on the X-15 research plane, was applied to metal rollers by a LRC developed spraying technique. Lewis Research Center also supplied mold prototype of metal composites, reducing erosion and promoting thermal conductivity. Rollers that previously cracked due to thermal fatigue, lasted longer. Gladwin's sales have increased, and additional NASA-developed innovations are anticipated.

  10. Solid polymer electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, K.M.; Alamgir, M.; Choe, H.S.

    1995-12-12

    This invention relates to Li ion (Li{sup +}) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of poly(vinyl sulfone) and lithium salts, and their use in all-solid-state rechargeable lithium ion batteries. The lithium salts comprise low lattice energy lithium salts such as LiN(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2}, LiAsF{sub 6}, and LiClO{sub 4}. 2 figs.

  11. Solid polymer electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, Kuzhikalail M.; Alamgir, Mohamed; Choe, Hyoun S.

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of poly(vinyl sulfone) and lithium salts, and their use in all-solid-state rechargeable lithium ion batteries. The lithium salts comprise low lattice energy lithium salts such as LiN(CF.sub.3 SO.sub.2).sub.2, LiAsF.sub.6, and LiClO.sub.4.

  12. Solid electrolyte cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, R. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A solid electrolyte cell including a body of solid ionized gas-conductive electrolyte having mutually spaced surfaces and on which is deposited a multiplicity of mutually spaced electrodes is described. Strips and of bare substances are interposed between electrodes, so that currents of ionic gas may be established between the electrodes via the bare strips, whereby electrical resistance for the cells is lowered and the gas conductivity is enhanced.

  13. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, Bernard T.; Dreifuerst, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1500 A peak, 1.0 .mu.s pulsewidth, and 4500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry.

  14. METHOD FOR JOINING ALUMINUM TO STAINLESS STEEL

    DOEpatents

    Lemon, L.C.

    1960-05-24

    Aluminum may be joined to stainless steel without the use of flux by tinning the aluminum with a tin solder containing 1% silver and 1% lead, tinning the stainless steel with a 50% lead 50% tin solder, and then sweating the tinned surfaces together.

  15. Chem I Supplement: Chemistry of Steel Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellers, Neal

    1980-01-01

    Provides information about the chemistry of steel making applicable to teaching secondary school science. Generalized chemical reactions describe the manufacture of steel from iron ore. Also discussed are raw materials, processing choices, and how various furnaces (blast, direct reduction, open hearth, basic oxygen, electric) work. (CS)

  16. Steel powder with a metastable austenite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Antsiferov, V.N.; Maslennikov, N.; Shatsov, A.A.

    1994-09-01

    The effect of technological parameters of fabrication on wear resistance and phase transformations in the surface layer of a chromium-nickel steel is studied. A statistical model is proposed for prediction of the content inhomogeneity of the steel. Enhanced abrasive wear resistance is attained by appropriate transformations in the surface layer.

  17. Forming "dynamic" membranes on stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, C. A.; Gaddis, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    "Dynamic" zirconium polyacrylic membrane is formed directly on stainless steel substrate without excessive corrosion of steel. Membrane is potentially useful in removal of contaminated chemicals from solution through reversed osmosis. Application includes use in filtration and desalination equipment, and in textile industry for separation of dyes from aqueous solvents.

  18. Instabilities in stabilized austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayer, Raghavan; Klein, C. F.; Marzinsky, C. N.

    1992-09-01

    The effect of aging on the precipitation of grain boundary phases in three austenitic stainless steels (AISI 347, 347AP, and an experimental steel stabilized with hafnium) was investigated. Aging was performed both on bulk steels as well as on samples which were subjected to a thermal treatment to simulate the coarse grain region of the heat affected zone (HAZ) during welding. Aging of the bulk steels at 866 K for 8000 hours resulted in the precipitation of Cr23C6 carbides, σ, and Fe2Nb phases; the propensity for precipitation was least for the hafnium-stabilized steel. Weld simulation of the HAZ resulted in dissolution of the phases present in the as-received 347 and 347AP steels, leading to grain coarsening. Subsequent aging caused extensive grain boundary Cr23C6 carbides and inhomogeneous matrix precipitation. In addition, steel 347AP formed a precipitate free zone (PFZ) along the grain boundaries. The steel containing hafnium showed the best microstructural stability to aging and welding.

  19. A recycling process for dezincing steel scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J. ); Morgan, W.A.; Kellner, A.W.; Harrison, J. )

    1992-01-01

    In response to the several-fold increase in consumption of galvanized steel in the last decade and the problems associated with refurnacing larger quantities of galvanized steel scrap, a process is being developed to separate and recover the steel and zinc from galvanized ferrous scrap. The zinc is dissolved from the scrap in hot caustic using anodic assistance and is electrowon as dendritic powder. The process is effective for zinc, lead, aluminum, and cadmium removal on loose and baled scrap and on all types of galvanized steel. The process has been pilot tested for batch treatment of 1,000 tons of mostly baled scrap. A pilot plant to continuously treat loose scrap is under construction. Use of degalvanized steel scrap decreases raw materials and environmental compliance costs to steel- and iron-makers, may enable integrated steel producers to recycle furnace dusts to the sinter plant, and may enable EAF production of flat products without use of DRI or pig iron. Recycling the components of galvanized steel scrap saves primary energy, decreases zinc imports, and adds value to the scrap.

  20. Mineral resource of the month: steel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenton, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    About 96 million metric tons of steel was produced in the United States last year — more than any other metal. And the $3.46 billion of iron and steel scrap exported was also the highest of any metal scrap export, helping to reduce the U.S. trade deficit.

  1. Ellie Mannette: Master of the Steel Drum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svaline, J. Marc

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Elliot ("Ellie") Mannette who has played a major role in the development and application of steel drums. States that he has spent most of his life designing and teaching the steel drums. Covers interview topics and background information on Mannette. (CMK)

  2. African Drum and Steel Pan Ensembles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunkett, Mark E.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how to develop both African drum and steel pan ensembles providing information on teacher preparation, instrument choice, beginning the ensemble, and lesson planning. Includes additional information for the drum ensembles. Lists references and instructional materials, sources of drums and pans, and common note layout/range for steel pan…

  3. A recycling process for dezincing steel scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Morgan, W.A.; Kellner, A.W.; Harrison, J.

    1992-08-01

    In response to the several-fold increase in consumption of galvanized steel in the last decade and the problems associated with refurnacing larger quantities of galvanized steel scrap, a process is being developed to separate and recover the steel and zinc from galvanized ferrous scrap. The zinc is dissolved from the scrap in hot caustic using anodic assistance and is electrowon as dendritic powder. The process is effective for zinc, lead, aluminum, and cadmium removal on loose and baled scrap and on all types of galvanized steel. The process has been pilot tested for batch treatment of 1,000 tons of mostly baled scrap. A pilot plant to continuously treat loose scrap is under construction. Use of degalvanized steel scrap decreases raw materials and environmental compliance costs to steel- and iron-makers, may enable integrated steel producers to recycle furnace dusts to the sinter plant, and may enable EAF production of flat products without use of DRI or pig iron. Recycling the components of galvanized steel scrap saves primary energy, decreases zinc imports, and adds value to the scrap.

  4. Stainless steel 4003 in the transportation industry

    SciTech Connect

    Kovacs, H.; Stoeckl, M.

    1998-12-31

    The world today sees a dramatic increase in the number of people and the quantities of articles and products which are to be transported. This results in an ever-increasing demand in the steels used in the transportation industry. Key factors are environmental regulations, safety, and life expectancy and product cost in determining which types steel to use. Especially the ferritic 12% chromium stainless steels has seen a significant development and usage in recent years. Compared to typical carbon steels high strength/low alloy steels and structural steels the 12% chromium steels offers improvement in corrosion and wear resistance and weldability outlining advantages in light weight construction and an overall saving. The paper presents the chemical composition and mechanical properties of grade 4003 which is increasingly used worldwide in areas of public transportation, rail transportation, mining industry and sugar industry, among others. The impact of corrosion and abrasion of this stainless steel versus the standard carbon grades and cost efficiency are discussed.

  5. Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1986-01-01

    Chromium-molybdenum steels exhibit a weakening after welding in an area adjacent to the weld. This invention is an improved method for welding to eliminate the weakness by subjecting normalized steel to a partial temper prior to welding and subsequently fully tempering the welded article for optimum strength and ductility.

  6. Low Mn alloy steel for cryogenic service

    DOEpatents

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Niikura, M.

    A ferritic cryogenic steel which has a relatively low (about 4 to 6%) manganese content and which has been made suitable for use at cryogenic temperatures by a thermal cycling treatment followed by a final tempering. The steel includes 4 to 6% manganese, 0.02 to 0.06% carbon, 0.1 to 0.4% molybdenum and 0 to 3% nickel.

  7. Lyophilization -Solid Waste Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litwiller, Eric; Flynn, Michael; Fisher, John; Reinhard, Martin

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a solid waste treatment system that has been designed for a Mars transit exploration mission. The technology described is an energy-efficient lyophilization technique that is designed to recover water from spacecraft solid wastes. Candidate wastes include feces, concentrated brines from water processors, and other solid wastes that contain free water. The system is designed to operate as a stand-alone process or to be integrated into the International Space Station Waste Collection System. In the lyophilization process, water in an aqueous waste is frozen and then sublimed, separating the waste into a dried solid material and liquid water. The sublimed water is then condensed in a solid ice phase and then melted to generate a liquid product. In the subject system the waste solids are contained within a 0.2 micron bio-guard bag and after drying are removed from the system and stored in a secondary container. This technology is ideally suited to applications such as the Mars Reference Mission, where water recovery rates approaching 100% are desirable but production of CO2 is not. The system is designed to minimize power consumption through the use of thermoelectric heat pumps. The results of preliminary testing of a prototype system and testing of the final configuration are provided. A mathematical model of the system is also described.

  8. Keep solids in suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Gladki, H.Z.

    1997-10-01

    Mixing is an important operation in the CPI. It is not synonymous with agitation. Mixing is a random distribution into and through one another of two or more initially separate phases. Within that broad definition is the important specialty area of liquid-solid dispersion. This paper addresses the dispersion of solids in lower concentrations that don`t affect the rheological properties of the fluid. The just suspended condition represents the lowest grade of complete suspension, but this level of agitation is the most efficient for solids-liquid agitation. Higher mixing speeds waste energy. Undersized mixers need replacing. The top-entering mixer has a long history in the CPI and the environmental area. Many suspension studies were run with this type. These papers result in empirical correlations for just suspension conditions to scale up from laboratory measurement. Variables considered are the agitation speed, liquid and solids physical properties, solids concentration, system geometry and impeller type. Lately, submersible mixers are becoming more popular, but there are no published sizing methods. This article will explain how to define the critical hydraulic conditions in the tank to reach just solids suspension for a submersible agitator of the type described here as FJFA (Free Jet Flow Agitator).

  9. A platinum-chromium steel for cardiovascular stents.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Barry J; Stinson, Jon S; Larsen, Steve R; Eppihimer, Michael J; Carroll, William M

    2010-05-01

    The desire to reduce the strut thickness of cardiovascular stents has driven the development of a new high strength radiopaque alloy, based on additions of platinum to a chromium-rich iron based matrix. This paper reports on initial development of the alloy and the rationale for selection of the composition. Data is presented for tensile and microstructural characterization, surface oxide analysis, corrosion resistance and endothelial cell response of the alloy. The results demonstrate the solid solution strengthening effect of the platinum, with an average yield strength of 480 MPa achieved. The material surface consists of primarily chromium oxide which contributes to the high corrosion resistance observed. The cell assay result suggests that surfaces of this Pt-enhanced alloy endothelialize in a manner comparable to stainless steel.

  10. Forsterite film formation and grain growth in 3% Si steel

    SciTech Connect

    Cunha, M.A.; Cesar, M.G.M.M. )

    1994-11-01

    The forsterite film in 3% Si steel is formed by a solid state reaction of the annealing separator, MgO, with SiO[sub 2] that results from the reduction of the fayalite layer in the hydrogen atmosphere in the high temperature anneal. In this work, secondary recrystallization was about complete at 1,000 C. After that temperature tertiary recrystallization can occur if the boundary drag of the second phase particles can be overcome. Addition of phosphates to the annealing separator affects the morphology of the forsterite film and can have an important effect on tertiary recrystallization by affecting the rate of decrease of the boundary-drag and/or the surface energy relationship.

  11. Diffusion bonding of the oxide dispersion strengthened steel PM2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sittel, Wiebke; Basuki, Widodo W.; Aktaa, Jarir

    2013-11-01

    Ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are well suited as structural materials, e.g. for claddings in fission reactors and for plasma facing components in fusion power plants due to their high mechanical and oxidation stability at high temperatures and their high irradiation resistance. PM2000 is an iron based ODS ferritic steel with homogeneously distributed nanometric yttria particles. Melting joining techniques are not suitable for such ODS materials because of the precipitation and agglomeration of the oxide particles and hence the loss of their strengthening effect. Solid state diffusion bonding is thus chosen to join PM2000 and is investigated in this work with a focus on oxide particles. The diffusion bonding process is aided by the computational modeling, including the influence of the ODS particles. For modeling the microstructure stability and the creep behavior of PM2000 at various, diffusion bonding relevant temperatures (50-80% Tm) are investigated. Particle distribution (TEM), strength (tensile test) and toughness (Charpy impact test) obtained at temperatures relevant for bonding serve as input for the prediction of optimal diffusion bonding parameters. The optimally bonded specimens show comparable strength and toughness relative to the base material.

  12. Monitoring of weathering steel structures. The induction ultrasonic thickness testers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, M.

    Long term corrosion tests carried out in the UK show that weathering steels continue to corrode at a finite rate. It is therefore necessary to use thicker steel and to monitor the corrosion. An ultrasonic instrument to measure residual steel thickness was assessed. This measures steel thickness through a rust layer, requires no couplant to transmit the ultrasound into the steel and gives only the steel thickness not the thickness of the steel plus a layer of rust. This instrument provides a suitable method of measuring the residual steel thickness on weathering steel structures where corrosion has been generally uniform. However, the instrument can give no information on localized roughness or pitting of the underlying steel surface and it would seem worthwhile to include test specimens in any monitoring scheme so that the surface condition of the steel can be assessed.

  13. The comparison of frictional resistance in titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets using stainless steel and TMA archwires: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Syed Altaf; Kumar, Vadivel; Jayaram, Prithviraj

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to compare the frictional resistance of titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA) archwires. Materials and Methods: We compared the frictional resistance in 0.018 slot and 0.022 slot of the three brackets – titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel – using stainless steel archwires and TMA archwires. An in vitro study of simulated canine retraction was undertaken to evaluate the difference in frictional resistance between titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and TMA archwires. Results and Conclusion: We compared the frictional resistance of titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and TMA archwires, with the help of Instron Universal Testing Machine. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Student's “t” test, and post hoc multiple range test at level of <0.05 showed statistically significant difference in the mean values of all groups. Results demonstrated that the titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets of 0.018-inch and 0.022-inch slot had no significant variations in frictional résistance. The self-ligating bracket with TMA archwires showed relatively less frictional resistance compared with the other groups. The titanium bracket with TMA archwires showed relatively less frictional resistance compared with the stainless steel brackets. PMID:23066253

  14. A modification of 4330 alloy steel

    SciTech Connect

    Gogolewski, R.; Cunningham, B.J. ); Gentile, R.; Fleming, S. )

    1990-08-01

    We have developed a modification of 4330 alloy steel which does not have an exact equivalent expressed in any standard specification. When we compare the ballistic performance of our modified cast steel in thicknesses of about 120 mm with that of stacked, 24 mm thick rolled 4340 alloy steel plates of comparable hardness and the same total thickness, we do not find a significant difference in terminal ballistic performance against either heavy metal kinetic energy penetrators or precision shaped charges. This result is surprising in relation to contemporary experience in which cast steel has been found to be ballistically inferior to rolled steel against either kinetic energy projectiles or shaped charge warheads. 1 ref., 9 figs.

  15. Advances in crosswell electromagnetics steel cased boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Harben, P E; Kirkendall, B A; Lewis, J P

    1999-03-01

    The Crosswell electromagnetic (EM) induction technique ideally measures the resistivity distribution between boreholes which may often be cased with carbon steel. Quantification of the effect of such steel casing on the induced field is the most significant limitation of the technique. Recent data acquired at a site in Richmond, California quantify the effect of steel casing on induction measurements and demonstrate this effect to be separable. This unique site contains adjacent steel and plastic wells in which frequency soundings demonstrate low spectrum (1.0 - 50 Hz) measurements an effective means of isolating the casing response from, the formation response. It is also shown that the steel casing effect on the induction coil is highly localized, and limited to less than 0.30 meters above and below the coil.

  16. Aerosol filtration with steel fiber filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, W.; Wilson, K.; Larsen, G.; Lopez, R.

    1993-04-01

    An experimental study has been conducted of aerosol penetration through a new high efficiency steel fiber filter and filter media that was developed in cooperation with Pall Corporation. Previous studies have shown that sintered steel fiber media have significant improvements in higher filter efficiency and lower pressure drop than the previous steel filter technology based on sintered powder metal media. In the present study, measurements were made of the penetration of dioctyl sebacate (DOS) aerosols through flat sheet samples, pleated cartridge filters, and a 1000 cfm filter having 64 cartridges housed in a 2 x 2 x 1 ft. frame. The steel fiber media used in our study consists of 2 micron diameter stainless steel (316 L) fibers sintered together into sheets.

  17. Interaction between stainless steel and plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Dunwoody, John T; Mason, Richard E; Freibert, Franz J; Willson, Stephen P; Veirs, Douglas K; Worl, Laura A; Archuleta, Alonso; Conger, Donald J

    2010-01-01

    Long-term storage of excess plutonium is of great concern in the U.S. as well as abroad. The current accepted configuration involves intimate contact between the stored material and an iron-bearing container such as stainless steel. While many safety scenario studies have been conducted and used in the acceptance of stainless steel containers, little information is available on the physical interaction at elevated temperatures between certain forms of stored material and the container itself. The bulk of the safety studies has focused on the ability of a package to keep the primary stainless steel containment below the plutonium-iron eutectic temperature of approximately 410 C. However, the interactions of plutonium metal with stainless steel have been of continuing interest. This paper reports on a scoping study investigating the interaction between stainless steel and plutonium metal in a pseudo diffusion couple at temperatures above the eutectic melt-point.

  18. CORROSION TESTING OF CARBON STEEL IN OXALIC ACID CHEMICAL CLEANING SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Mickalonis, J.; Subramanian, K.; Ketusky, E.

    2011-10-14

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 60 years at the Savannah River Site. The site is currently in the process of removing the waste from these tanks in order to place it into vitrified, stable state for longer term storage. The last stage in the removal sequence is a chemical cleaning step that breaks up and dissolves metal oxide solids that cannot be easily pumped out of the tank. Oxalic acid has been selected for this purpose because it is an effective chelating agent for the solids and is not as corrosive as other acids. Electrochemical and immersion studies were conducted to investigate the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in simulated chemical cleaning environments. The effects of temperature, agitation, and the presence of sludge solids in the oxalic acid on the corrosion rate and the likelihood of hydrogen evolution were determined. The testing showed that the corrosion rates decreased significantly in the presence of the sludge solids. Corrosion rates increased with agitation, however, the changes were less noticeable.

  19. Detection of Non-metallic Inclusions in Centrifugal Continuous Casting Steel Billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng; Seetharaman, Sridhar; Yang, Shufeng; Yang, Wen; Wang, Yi

    2016-06-01

    In the current study, automated particle analysis was employed to detect non-metallic inclusions in steel during a centrifugal continuous casting process of a high-strength low alloy steel. The morphology, composition, size, area fraction, amount, and spatial distribution of inclusions in steel were obtained. Etching experiment was performed to reveal the dendrite structure of the billet and to discuss the effect of centrifugal force on the distribution of oxide inclusions in the final solidified steel by comparing the solidification velocity with the critical velocity reported in literature. It was found that the amount of inclusions was highest in samples from the tundish (~250 per mm2), followed by samples from the mold (~200 per mm2), and lowest in billet samples (~86 per mm2). In all samples, over 90 pct of the inclusions were smaller than 2μm. In steel billets, the content of oxides, dual-phase oxide-sulfides, and sulfides in inclusions were found to be 10, 30, and 60 pct, respectively. The dual-phase inclusions were oxides with sulfides precipitated on the outer surface. Oxide inclusions consisted of high Al2O3 and high MnO which were solid at the molten steel temperature, implying that the calcium treatment was insufficient. Small oxide inclusions very uniformly distributed on the cross section of the billet, while there were more sulfide inclusions showing a banded structure at the outside 25 mm layer of the billet. The calculated solidification velocity was higher than the upper limit at which inclusions were entrapped by the solidifying front, revealing that for oxide inclusions smaller than 8μm in this study, the centrifugal force had little influence on its final distribution in billets. Instead, oxide inclusions were rapidly entrapped by solidifying front.

  20. Liquid Steel at Low Pressure: Experimental Investigation of a Downward Water Air Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumfart, Maria

    2016-07-01

    In the continuous casting of steel controlling the steel flow rate to the mould is critical because a well-defined flow field at the mould level is essential for a good quality of the cast product. The stopper rod is a commonly used device to control this flow rate. Agglomeration of solid material near the stopper rod can lead to a reduced cross section and thus to a decreased casting speed or even total blockage (“clogging”). The mechanisms causing clogging are still not fully understood. Single phase considerations of the flow in the region of the stopper rod result in a low or even negative pressure at the smallest cross section. This can cause degassing of dissolved gases from the melt, evaporation of alloys and entrainment of air through the porous refractory material. It can be shown that the degassing process in liquid steel is taking place mainly at the stopper rod tip and its surrounding. The steel flow around the stopper rod tip is highly turbulent. In addition refractory material has a low wettability to liquid steel. So the first step to understand the flow situation and transport phenomena which occur near the stopper is to understand the behaviour of this two phase (steel, gas) flow. To simulate the flow situation near the stopper rod tip, water experiments are conducted using a convergent divergent nozzle with three different wall materials and three different contact angles respectively. These experiments show the high impact of the wettability of the wall material on the actual flow structure at a constant gas flow rate.

  1. Effects of strain and strain-induced α'-martensite on passive films in AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jinlong; Luo, Hongyun

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of strain and heat treatment on strain-induced α'-martensite of AISI 304 stainless steel tubes were measured by X-ray diffraction. Moreover, the effects of strain and content of α'-martensite on passivated property on the surface of the material in borate buffer solution were evaluated by electrochemical technique. The results showed that the volume fraction of α'-martensite increased gradually with the increase of tensile strain for as-received and solid solution samples. However, α'-martensite in as-received sample was more than that in the solid solution sample. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results showed that the solid solution treatment improved corrosion resistance of the steel, especially for samples with small strain. Moreover, acceptor densities were always higher than donor densities for as-received and solid solution samples. With the increase of strain, the increase tendency of acceptor density was more significant than that of donor density. We also found that the total density of the acceptor and donor almost increased linearly with the increase of α'-martensite. The present results indicated that the increased acceptor density might lead to the decreased corrosion resistance of the steel.

  2. Experimental Methods to Estimate Accumulated Solids in Nuclear Waste Tanks - 13313

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, Mark R.; Steeper, Timothy J.; Steimke, John L.

    2013-07-01

    The Department of Energy has a large number of nuclear waste tanks. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles, e.g., plutonium containing, could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to remove most of the solids. Then the volume and shape of the residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for plutonium were measured. This paper discusses the overall test results, which indicated heavy solids only accumulate during the first few transfer cycles, along with the techniques and equipment designed and employed in the test. Those techniques include: - Magnetic particle separator to remove stainless steel solids, the plutonium surrogate from a flowing stream. - Magnetic wand used to manually remove stainless steel solids from samples and the tank heel. - Photographs were used to determine the volume and shape of the solids mounds by developing a composite of topographical areas. - Laser range finders to determine the volume and shape of the solids mounds. - Core sampler to determine the stainless steel solids distribution within the solids mounds. - Computer driven positioner that placed the laser range finders and the core sampler over solids mounds that accumulated on the bottom of a scaled staging tank in locations where jet velocities

  3. Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Casuccio; Michael Potter; Fred Schwerer; Dr. Richard J. Fruehan; Dr. Scott Story

    2005-12-30

    The objective of this study was to develop the Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCATTM) to permit steelmakers to evaluate the quality of the steel through the analysis of individual inclusions. By characterizing individual inclusions, determinations can be made as to the cleanliness of the steel. Understanding the complicating effects of inclusions in the steelmaking process and on the resulting properties of steel allows the steel producer to increase throughput, better control the process, reduce remelts, and improve the quality of the product. The ASCAT (Figure 1) is a steel-smart inclusion analysis tool developed around a customized next-generation computer controlled scanning electron microscopy (NG-CCSEM) hardware platform that permits acquisition of inclusion size and composition data at a rate never before possible in SEM-based instruments. With built-in customized ''intelligent'' software, the inclusion data is automatically sorted into clusters representing different inclusion types to define the characteristics of a particular heat (Figure 2). The ASCAT represents an innovative new tool for the collection of statistically meaningful data on inclusions, and provides a means of understanding the complicated effects of inclusions in the steel making process and on the resulting properties of steel. Research conducted by RJLG with AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute) and SMA (Steel Manufactures of America) members indicates that the ASCAT has application in high-grade bar, sheet, plate, tin products, pipes, SBQ, tire cord, welding rod, and specialty steels and alloys where control of inclusions, whether natural or engineered, are crucial to their specification for a given end-use. Example applications include castability of calcium treated steel; interstitial free (IF) degasser grade slag conditioning practice; tundish clogging and erosion minimization; degasser circulation and optimization; quality assessment/steel cleanliness; slab, billet

  4. Impact ignition of new and aged solid explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S.K.; Tarver, C.M.; Lee, C.G.

    1998-07-01

    The critical impact velocities of 60.1 mm diameter steel projectiles required to produce ignition are measured for new and aged confined charges of the HMX-based solid explosives LX-10, LX-04, PBX-9404, and PBX-9501. External blast overpressure gauges are employed to determine the relative violence of the explosive reactions. The experiment is modeled in DYNA2D using recently developed material strength models, and thermal energy deposition thresholds for impact ignition are found. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Plasma arc welding takes on the advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irving, Bob

    1992-12-01

    The general design of the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM), developed with the aim of improving the flight safety, reliability, producibility, and performance of the Space Shuttle Motor, is described. The material for the new ASRM will be the more weldable HP-9-4-30 steel; it will be welded by the plasma arc process used in the straight polarity mode. An HP-9-4-25 filler metal will be used to deposit the fill pass and a cap pass; the welding operation will be computer controlled.

  6. Characterization of solid waste conversion and cogeneration systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-09-01

    Three basic technologies for recovering energy from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) were considered: direct combustion using a waterwall incinerator in which the heat from burning refuse is converted to steam by circulating water in steel tubes jacketing the interior of the incinerator; manufacture of a relatively uniform shredded, pulverized or pelleted refuse-derived fuel (RDF) for supplemental firing in a utility boiler; and pyrolysis or destructive distillation of MSW to extract a low-Btu fuel gas. While resource recovery and energy recovery systems can be installed independently, the processes described include both energy and resource recovery systems as well as necessary pollution control equipment for gaseous emissions.

  7. [Characteristic of Mercury Emissions and Mass Balance of the Typical Iron and Steel Industry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-hui; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Ding-yong; Luo, Cheng-zhong; Yang, Xi; Xu, Feng

    2015-12-01

    To preliminarily discuss the mercury emission characteristics and its mass balance in each process of the iron and steel production, a typical iron and steel enterprise was chosen to study the total mercury in all employed materials and estimate the input and output of mercury during the steel production process. The results showed that the mercury concentrations of input materials in each technology ranged 2.93-159.11 µg · kg⁻¹ with the highest level observed in ore used in blast furnace, followed by coal of sintering and blast furnace. The mercury concentrations of output materials ranged 3.09-18.13 µg · kg⁻¹ and the mercury concentration of dust was the highest, followed by converter slag. The mercury input and the output in the coking plant were 1346.74 g · d⁻¹ ± 36.95 g · d⁻¹ and 177.42 g · d⁻¹ ± 13.73 g · d⁻¹, respectively. In coking process, mercury mainly came from the burning of coking coal. The sintering process was the biggest contributor for mercury input during the iron and steel production with the mercury input of 1075. 27 g · d⁻¹ ± 60.89 g · d⁻¹ accounting for 68.06% of the total mercury input during this production process, and the ore powder was considered as the main mercury source. For the solid output material, the output in the sintering process was 14.15 g · d⁻¹ ± 0.38 g · d⁻¹, accounting for 22.61% of the total solid output. The mercury emission amount from this studied iron and steel enterprise was estimated to be 553.83 kg in 2013 with the emission factor of 0.092 g · t⁻¹ steel production. Thus, to control the mercury emissions, iron and steel enterprises should combine with production practice, further reduce energy consumption of coking and sintering, or improve the quality of raw materials and reduce the input of mercury. PMID:27011969

  8. [Characteristic of Mercury Emissions and Mass Balance of the Typical Iron and Steel Industry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-hui; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Ding-yong; Luo, Cheng-zhong; Yang, Xi; Xu, Feng

    2015-12-01

    To preliminarily discuss the mercury emission characteristics and its mass balance in each process of the iron and steel production, a typical iron and steel enterprise was chosen to study the total mercury in all employed materials and estimate the input and output of mercury during the steel production process. The results showed that the mercury concentrations of input materials in each technology ranged 2.93-159.11 µg · kg⁻¹ with the highest level observed in ore used in blast furnace, followed by coal of sintering and blast furnace. The mercury concentrations of output materials ranged 3.09-18.13 µg · kg⁻¹ and the mercury concentration of dust was the highest, followed by converter slag. The mercury input and the output in the coking plant were 1346.74 g · d⁻¹ ± 36.95 g · d⁻¹ and 177.42 g · d⁻¹ ± 13.73 g · d⁻¹, respectively. In coking process, mercury mainly came from the burning of coking coal. The sintering process was the biggest contributor for mercury input during the iron and steel production with the mercury input of 1075. 27 g · d⁻¹ ± 60.89 g · d⁻¹ accounting for 68.06% of the total mercury input during this production process, and the ore powder was considered as the main mercury source. For the solid output material, the output in the sintering process was 14.15 g · d⁻¹ ± 0.38 g · d⁻¹, accounting for 22.61% of the total solid output. The mercury emission amount from this studied iron and steel enterprise was estimated to be 553.83 kg in 2013 with the emission factor of 0.092 g · t⁻¹ steel production. Thus, to control the mercury emissions, iron and steel enterprises should combine with production practice, further reduce energy consumption of coking and sintering, or improve the quality of raw materials and reduce the input of mercury.

  9. Analysis of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels with a Metal Foam Core for Lightweight Fan Blade Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Raj, Sai V.; Holland, Frederic A., Jr.; Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2004-01-01

    The quest for cheap, low density and high performance materials in the design of aircraft and rotorcraft engine fan and propeller blades poses immense challenges to the materials and structural design engineers. The present study investigates the use of a sandwich foam fan blade mae up of solid face sheets and a metal foam core. The face sheets and the metal foam core material were an aerospace grade precipitation hardened 17-4 PH stainless steel with high strength and high toughness. The resulting structures possesses a high stiffness while being lighter than a similar solid construction. The material properties of 17-4 PH metal foam are reviewed briefly to describe the characteristics of sandwich structure for a fan blade application. A vibration analysis for natural frequencies and a detailed stress analysis on the 17-4 PH sandwich foam blade design for different combinations of kin thickness and core volume are presented with a comparison to a solid titanium blade.

  10. Anisotropy in solid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Ricciardone, Angelo; Peloso, Marco E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it E-mail: angelo.ricciardone@pd.infn.it

    2013-08-01

    In the model of solid / elastic inflation, inflation is driven by a source that has the field theoretical description of a solid. To allow for prolonged slow roll inflation, the solid needs to be extremely insensitive to the spatial expansion. We point out that, because of this property, the solid is also rather inefficient in erasing anisotropic deformations of the geometry. This allows for a prolonged inflationary anisotropic solution, providing the first example with standard gravity and scalar fields only which evades the conditions of the so called cosmic no-hair conjecture. We compute the curvature perturbations on the anisotropic solution, and the corresponding phenomenological bound on the anisotropy. Finally, we discuss the analogy between this model and the f(φ)F{sup 2} model, which also allows for anisotropic inflation thanks to a suitable coupling between the inflaton φ and a vector field. We remark that the bispectrum of the curvature perturbations in solid inflation is enhanced in the squeezed limit and presents a nontrivial angular dependence, as had previously been found for the f(φ)F{sup 2} model.

  11. Defects in flexoelectric solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Sheng; Purohit, Prashant K.

    2015-11-01

    A solid is said to be flexoelectric when it polarizes in proportion to strain gradients. Since strain gradients are large near defects, we expect the flexoelectric effect to be prominent there and decay away at distances much larger than a flexoelectric length scale. Here, we quantify this expectation by computing displacement, stress and polarization fields near defects in flexoelectric solids. For point defects we recover some well known results from strain gradient elasticity and non-local piezoelectric theories, but with different length scales in the final expressions. For edge dislocations we show that the electric potential is a maximum in the vicinity of the dislocation core. We also estimate the polarized line charge density of an edge dislocation in an isotropic flexoelectric solid which is in agreement with some measurements in ice. We perform an asymptotic analysis of the crack tip fields in flexoelectric solids and show that our results share some features from solutions in strain gradient elasticity and piezoelectricity. We also compute the energy release rate for cracks using simple crack face boundary conditions and use them in classical criteria for crack growth to make predictions. Our analysis can serve as a starting point for more sophisticated analytic and computational treatments of defects in flexoelectric solids which are gaining increasing prominence in the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  12. 77 FR 67593 - Steel Import Monitoring and Analysis System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... system can be accessed at http://ia.ita.doc.gov/steel/license/SIMA-FR-Notices.html . FOR FURTHER... 7529, which placed temporary tariffs on many steel imports and provided the steel industry time to... ``Steel Import Licensing and Surge Monitoring Program'' (67 FR 79845). In Proclamation 7741 of December...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.757 - Open web steel joists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Open web steel joists. 1926.757 Section 1926.757 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.757 Open web steel joists. (a) General. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, where steel joists are...

  14. 49 CFR 192.315 - Wrinkle bends in steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. 192.315 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.315 Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. (a) A wrinkle bend may not be made on steel... wrinkle bend on steel pipe must comply with the following: (1) The bend must not have any sharp kinks....

  15. 49 CFR 192.315 - Wrinkle bends in steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. 192.315 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.315 Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. (a) A wrinkle bend may not be made on steel... wrinkle bend on steel pipe must comply with the following: (1) The bend must not have any sharp kinks....

  16. 49 CFR 178.504 - Standards for steel drums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standards for steel drums. 178.504 Section 178.504...-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.504 Standards for steel drums. (a) The following are identification codes for steel drums: (1) 1A1 for a non-removable head steel drum; and (2) 1A2 for a removable...

  17. 49 CFR 192.105 - Design formula for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Design formula for steel pipe. 192.105 Section 192... for steel pipe. (a) The design pressure for steel pipe is determined in accordance with the following... § 192.113. T=Temperature derating factor determined in accordance with § 192.115. (b) If steel pipe...

  18. 49 CFR 192.105 - Design formula for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design formula for steel pipe. 192.105 Section 192... for steel pipe. (a) The design pressure for steel pipe is determined in accordance with the following... § 192.113. T=Temperature derating factor determined in accordance with § 192.115. (b) If steel pipe...

  19. 49 CFR 178.504 - Standards for steel drums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standards for steel drums. 178.504 Section 178.504...-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.504 Standards for steel drums. (a) The following are identification codes for steel drums: (1) 1A1 for a non-removable head steel drum; and (2) 1A2 for a removable...

  20. 49 CFR 192.315 - Wrinkle bends in steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. 192.315 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.315 Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. (a) A wrinkle bend may not be made on steel... wrinkle bend on steel pipe must comply with the following: (1) The bend must not have any sharp kinks....

  1. 46 CFR 154.172 - Contiguous steel hull structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Contiguous steel hull structure. 154.172 Section 154.172... Structure § 154.172 Contiguous steel hull structure. (a) Except as allowed in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this... construction of the contiguous steel hull structure must meet the thickness and steel grade in Table 1 for...

  2. 49 CFR 192.105 - Design formula for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design formula for steel pipe. 192.105 Section 192... for steel pipe. (a) The design pressure for steel pipe is determined in accordance with the following... § 192.113. T=Temperature derating factor determined in accordance with § 192.115. (b) If steel pipe...

  3. 49 CFR 192.105 - Design formula for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design formula for steel pipe. 192.105 Section 192... for steel pipe. (a) The design pressure for steel pipe is determined in accordance with the following... § 192.113. T=Temperature derating factor determined in accordance with § 192.115. (b) If steel pipe...

  4. 29 CFR 1926.757 - Open web steel joists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Open web steel joists. 1926.757 Section 1926.757 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.757 Open web steel joists. (a) General. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, where steel joists are...

  5. 49 CFR 178.504 - Standards for steel drums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standards for steel drums. 178.504 Section 178.504...-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.504 Standards for steel drums. (a) The following are identification codes for steel drums: (1) 1A1 for a non-removable head steel drum; and (2) 1A2 for a removable...

  6. 49 CFR 192.105 - Design formula for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design formula for steel pipe. 192.105 Section 192... for steel pipe. (a) The design pressure for steel pipe is determined in accordance with the following... § 192.113. T=Temperature derating factor determined in accordance with § 192.115. (b) If steel pipe...

  7. 46 CFR 154.172 - Contiguous steel hull structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Contiguous steel hull structure. 154.172 Section 154.172... Structure § 154.172 Contiguous steel hull structure. (a) Except as allowed in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this... construction of the contiguous steel hull structure must meet the thickness and steel grade in Table 1 for...

  8. 49 CFR 192.315 - Wrinkle bends in steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. 192.315 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.315 Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. (a) A wrinkle bend may not be made on steel... wrinkle bend on steel pipe must comply with the following: (1) The bend must not have any sharp kinks....

  9. 46 CFR 154.172 - Contiguous steel hull structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Contiguous steel hull structure. 154.172 Section 154.172... Structure § 154.172 Contiguous steel hull structure. (a) Except as allowed in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this... construction of the contiguous steel hull structure must meet the thickness and steel grade in Table 1 for...

  10. 46 CFR 154.172 - Contiguous steel hull structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Contiguous steel hull structure. 154.172 Section 154.172... Structure § 154.172 Contiguous steel hull structure. (a) Except as allowed in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this... construction of the contiguous steel hull structure must meet the thickness and steel grade in Table 1 for...

  11. 29 CFR 1926.757 - Open web steel joists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Open web steel joists. 1926.757 Section 1926.757 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.757 Open web steel joists. (a) General. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, where steel joists are...

  12. 46 CFR 154.172 - Contiguous steel hull structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contiguous steel hull structure. 154.172 Section 154.172... Structure § 154.172 Contiguous steel hull structure. (a) Except as allowed in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this... construction of the contiguous steel hull structure must meet the thickness and steel grade in Table 1 for...

  13. 49 CFR 192.315 - Wrinkle bends in steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. 192.315 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.315 Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. (a) A wrinkle bend may not be made on steel... wrinkle bend on steel pipe must comply with the following: (1) The bend must not have any sharp kinks....

  14. Combined geochemical and electrochemical methodology to quantify corrosion of carbon steel by bacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Marta K; Moreira, Rebeca; Bildstein, Olivier; Lartigue, Jean-Eric; Schlegel, Michel L; Tribollet, Bernard; Vivier, Vincent; Libert, Marie

    2014-06-01

    The availability of respiratory substrates, such as H2 and Fe(II,III) solid corrosion products within nuclear waste repository, will sustain the activities of hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria (HOB) and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB). This may have a direct effect on the rate of carbon steel corrosion. This study investigates the effects of Shewanella oneidensis (an HOB and IRB model organism) on the corrosion rate by looking at carbon steel dissolution in the presence of H2 as the sole electron donor. Bacterial effect is evaluated by means of geochemical and electrochemical techniques. Both showed that the corrosion rate is enhanced by a factor of 2-3 in the presence of bacteria. The geochemical experiments indicated that the composition and crystallinity of the solid corrosion products (magnetite and vivianite) are modified by bacteria. Moreover, the electrochemical experiments evidenced that the bacterial activity can be stimulated when H2 is generated in a small confinement volume. In this case, a higher corrosion rate and mineralization (vivianite) on the carbon steel surface were observed. The results suggest that the mechanism likely to influence the corrosion rate is the bioreduction of Fe(III) from magnetite coupled to the H2 oxidation.

  15. Effect of high dry solids loading on enzymatic hydrolysis of acid bisulfite pretreated Eastern redcedar.

    PubMed

    Ramachandriya, Karthikeyan D; Wilkins, Mark; Atiyeh, Hasan K; Dunford, Nurhan T; Hiziroglu, Salim

    2013-11-01

    This study investigates hydrolysis of cellulose from Eastern redcedar to glucose at high solids loading. Enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated redcedar was performed with 0.5 ml Accelerase® 1500/g glucan (46 FPU/g glucan) using dry solids loading from 2% to 20% (w/w). Rheological challenges observed at high solids loading were overcome by adding stainless steel balls to shake flask reactors. The highest glucose concentration, 126 g/L (84% glucan-to-glucose yield), was obtained using 20% solids loading with stainless steel balls as a mixing aid. This enzymatic hydrolyzate was fermented into ethanol using Saccharomyces cerevisiae D5A to produce 52 g/L of ethanol (corresponding to 166 L/dry Mg of redcedar). Reducing enzyme dosage at 16% solids loading from 46 to 11.5 FPU/g glucan reduced glucan-to-glucose yields. This study has demonstrated the possibility of extracting sugars from the invasive species of Eastern redcedar with high solid loadings and their conversion into ethanol.

  16. Role of microstructure and heat treatments on the desorption kinetics of tritium from austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chêne, J.; Brass, A.-M.; Trabuc, P.; Gastaldi, O.

    2007-02-01

    The liquid scintillation counting of solid samples (LSC-SS technique) was successfully used to study the role of microstructure and heat treatments on the behavior of residual tritium in several austenitic stainless steels (as-cast remelted tritiated waste, 316LN and 321 steels). The role of desorption annealing in the 100-600 °C range on the residual amount of tritium in tritiated waste was investigated. The residual tritium concentration computed from surface activity measurements is in good agreement with experimental values measured by liquid scintillation counting after full dissolution of the samples. The kinetics of tritium desorption recorded with the LSC-SS technique shows a significant desorption of residual tritium at room temperature, a strong barrier effect of thermal oxide films on the tritium desorption and a dependance of the tritium release on the steels microstructure. Annealing in the 300-600 °C range allows to desorb a large fraction of the residual tritium. However a significant trapping of tritium is evidenced. The influence of trapping phenomena on the concentration of residual tritium and on its dependance with the annealing temperature was investigated with different recrystallized and sensitized microstructures. Trapping is evidenced mainly below 150 °C and concerns a small fraction of the total amount of tritium introduced in austenitic steels. It presumably occurs preferentially on precipitates such as Ti(CN) or on intermetallic phases.

  17. Deterioration in Fracture Toughness of 304LN Austenitic Stainless Steel Due to Sensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Swati; Kain, V.; Ray, A.; Roy, H.; Sivaprasad, S.; Tarafder, S.; Ray, K. K.

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this report is to examine the influence of sensitization on the mechanical properties of AISI grade 304LN stainless steel with special emphasis on its fracture toughness. A series of stainless steel samples has been sensitized by holding at 1023 K for different time periods ranging from 1 to 100 hours followed by water quenching. The degree of sensitization (DOS) for each type of the varyingly heat-treated samples has been measured by an electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation (EPR) test. The microstructures of these samples have been characterized by optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, together with measurements of their hardness and tensile properties. The fracture toughness of the samples has been measured by the ball indentation (BI) technique and the results are validated by conducting conventional J-integral tests. It is revealed for the first time that the fracture toughness and ductility of AISI 304LN stainless steel deteriorate significantly with increased DOS, while the tensile strength (TS) values remain almost unaltered. The results have been critically discussed in terms of the depletion of solid solution strengtheners, the nature of the grain boundary precipitations, and the strain-induced martensite formation with the increasing DOS of the 304LN stainless steel.

  18. The Corrosion Behavior of Carbon Steel in Sulfide Aqueous Media at 30°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Mendili, Yassine; Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Bardeau, Jean-François

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we studied the effect of sulfide ions on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel to simulate the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In geological storage conditions, sulfidogenic environment was sustained by sulfate-reducing bacteria. Corrosion tests were conducted in systems in a controlled atmosphere of 5% H2/N2. Batch experiments were conducted at 30°C for 1 month with steel coupons immersed in Na2S solutions. The structural characterization of the corrosion products was investigated by scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, confocal micro-Raman spectrometry, and x-ray diffraction. In the absence of sulfide ion, a magnetite (Fe3O4) corrosion product layer was formed on steel surface while in the presence of sulfide ions we observed the formation of a poorly crystallized irons sulfide at low-sulfide concentration (1 mg/L) and a solid adherent pyrrhotite layer at higher sulfide concentration (5-15 mg/L). The strong drop in steel corrosion rate with sulfide concentration was revealed and related to the formation of well-crystallized pyrrhotite.

  19. HRTEM Study of the Role of Nanoparticles in ODS Ferritic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Tumey, S; Fluss, M; Serruys, Y; Willaime, F

    2011-08-30

    Structures of nanoparticles and their role in dual-ion irradiated Fe-16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (K3) ODS ferritic steel produced by mechanical alloying (MA) were studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. The observation of Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} complex-oxide nanoparticles in the ODS steel imply that decomposition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} in association with internal oxidation of Al occurred during mechanical alloying. HRTEM observations of crystalline and partially crystalline nanoparticles larger than {approx}2 nm and amorphous cluster-domains smaller than {approx}2 nm provide an insight into the formation mechanism of nanoparticles/clusters in MA/ODS steels, which we believe involves solid-state amorphization and re-crystallization. The role of nanoparticles/clusters in suppressing radiation-induced swelling is revealed through TEM examinations of cavity distributions in (Fe + He) dual-ion irradiated K3-ODS steel. HRTEM observations of helium-filled cavities (helium bubbles) preferably trapped at nanoparticle/clusters in dual-ion irradiated K3-ODS are presented.

  20. Oxidation and electrical behavior of nickel/lanthanum chromite-coated stainless steel interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaigan, Nima; Ivey, Douglas G.; Chen, Weixing

    Solving the contact resistance and cathode-chromium-poisoning problems associated with the application of ferritic stainless steel as solid oxide fuel cell interconnects is the objective of numerous current research efforts. In this work, the application of electrodeposited Ni/LaCrO 3 composites for AISI 430 stainless steel as protective/conductive coatings has been studied, with emphasis on the oxidation behavior, scale structure and electronic conductivity of these coatings. The oxidation tests were performed at 800 °C in air for up to 2040 h. The results showed that the scale is a double layer consisting of a particle filled chromia-rich subscale and an outer Ni/Fe-rich spinel together with NiO. The addition of LaCrO 3 particles greatly enhances the high-temperature oxidation resistance of Ni-coated ferritic stainless steel. Cavities, which form beneath the scale for uncoated steels as a result of cation outward diffusion, reduce the actual contact area between the scale and the alloy resulting in a high area specific resistance (ASR) as well as scale spallation. Excellent, stable ASR (0.005 Ω cm 2 after 400 h) was achieved with the application of Ni/LaCrO 3 coatings.

  1. Joining techniques for a reduced activation 12Cr steel for inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, R. M.; El-Dasher, B.; Choi, B. W.; Torres, S. G.

    2014-10-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are developing a reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel that is based on the ferritic martensitic steel HT-9. As a part of the development of this steel, we tested a series of welding processes for characterization, including conventional welds (electron beam, tungsten inert gas, and laser) as well as solid-state welds (hot isostatic pressing). We also heat treated the joints at various temperatures between 750 °C and 1050 °C to find a suitable normalization scheme. The modified HT-9 reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel appears highly suitable to welding and diffusion bonding. All welds showed good quality fusion zones with insignificant cracking or porosity. Additionally, a heat treatment schedule of 950 °C for one hour caused minimal grain growth while still converging the hardness of the base metal with that of the fusion and heat-affected zones. Also, modified HT-9 diffusion bonds that were created at temperatures of at least 950 °C for two hours at 103 MPa had interface tensile strengths of greater than 600 MPa. The diffusion bonds showed no evidence of increased hardness nor void formation at the diffusion bonded interface.

  2. Spreading of lithium on a stainless steel surface at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Roszell, J. P.; Koel, B. E.

    2015-11-10

    Lithium conditioned plasma facing surfaces have lowered recycling and enhanced plasma performance on many fusion devices and liquid lithium plasma facing components are under consideration for future machines. A key factor in the performance of liquid lithium components is the wetting by lithium of its container. We have observed the surface spreading of lithium from a mm-scale particle to adjacent stainless steel surfaces using a scanning Auger microprobe that has elemental discrimination. Here, the spreading of lithium occurred at room temperature (when lithium is a solid) from one location at a speed of 0.62 μm/day under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Separatemore » experiments using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) investigated bonding energetics between monolayer-scale films of lithium and stainless steel. While multilayer lithium desorption from stainless steel begins to occur just above 500 K (Edes = 1.54 eV), sub-monolayer Li desorption occurred in a TPD peak at 942 K (Edes = 2.52 eV) indicating more energetically favorable lithium-stainless steel bonding (in the absence of an oxidation layer) than lithium lithium bonding.« less

  3. Spreading of lithium on a stainless steel surface at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Roszell, J. P.; Koel, B. E.

    2015-11-10

    Lithium conditioned plasma facing surfaces have lowered recycling and enhanced plasma performance on many fusion devices and liquid lithium plasma facing components are under consideration for future machines. A key factor in the performance of liquid lithium components is the wetting by lithium of its container. We have observed the surface spreading of lithium from a mm-scale particle to adjacent stainless steel surfaces using a scanning Auger microprobe that has elemental discrimination. Here, the spreading of lithium occurred at room temperature (when lithium is a solid) from one location at a speed of 0.62 μm/day under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Separate experiments using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) investigated bonding energetics between monolayer-scale films of lithium and stainless steel. While multilayer lithium desorption from stainless steel begins to occur just above 500 K (Edes = 1.54 eV), sub-monolayer Li desorption occurred in a TPD peak at 942 K (Edes = 2.52 eV) indicating more energetically favorable lithium-stainless steel bonding (in the absence of an oxidation layer) than lithium lithium bonding.

  4. Modelling of macrosegregation in steel ingots: benchmark validation and industrial application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wensheng; Shen, Bingzhen; Shen, Houfa; Liu, Baicheng

    2012-07-01

    The paper presents the recent progress made by the authors on modelling of macrosegregation in steel ingots. A two-phase macrosegregation model was developed that incorporates descriptions of heat transfer, melt convection, solute transport, and solid movement on the process scale with microscopic relations for grain nucleation and growth. The formation of pipe shrinkage at the ingot top is also taken into account in the model. Firstly, a recently proposed numerical benchmark test of macrosegregation was used to verify the model. Then, the model was applied to predict the macrosegregation in a benchmark industrial-scale steel ingot. The predictions were validated against experimental data from the literature. Furthermore, macrosegregation experiment of an industrial 53-t steel ingot was performed. The simulation results were compared with the measurements. It is indicated that the typical macrosegregation patterns encountered in steel ingots, including a positively segregated zone in the hot top and a negative segregation in the bottom part of the ingot, are well reproduced with the model.

  5. Accumulation and annealing of radiation defects under low-temperature electron and neutron irradiation of ODS steel and Fe-Cr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzov, V. L.; Goshchitskii, B. N.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Danilov, S. E.; Kar'kin, A. E.

    2010-10-01

    The processes of accumulation and annealing of radiation defects at low-temperature (77 K) electron and neutron irradiation and their effect on the physicomechanical properties of Fe-Cr alloys and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel have been studied. It has been shown that the behavior of radiation defects in ODS steel and Fe-Cr alloys is qualitatively similar. Above 250 K, radiation-induced processes of the solid solution decomposition become conspicuous. These processes are much less pronounced in ODS steel because of specific features of its microstructure. Processes related to the overlapping of displacement cascades under neutron irradiation have been considered. It has been shown that, in this case, it is the increase in the size of vacancy clusters, rather than the growth of their concentration, that is prevailing. Possible mechanisms of the radiation hardening of the ODS steel and the Fe-13Cr alloy upon irradiation and subsequent annealing have been discussed.

  6. Solid state cell with anolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Barnette, L. H.; Liang, C. C.

    1985-06-25

    A solid state cell having a solid cathode, a solid electrolyte, and a solid anolyte comprised of at least 50% by volume of ionically conductive materials such as the electrolye and 50% or less by volume of an active metal. The anolyte is either the cell anode or alternatively the anolyte is an additional structural member within said cell positioned between an anode, comprised of the same active metal, and the solid electrolyte.

  7. Recycling galvanized steel: Operating experience and benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Morgan, W.A.

    1993-08-01

    In response to the increase in consumption of galvanized steel for automobiles in the last decade and the problems associated with remelting larger quantities of galvanized steel scrap, a process is being developed to separate and recover the steel and zinc from galvanized ferrous scrap. The zinc is dissolved from the scrap in hot caustic using anodic assistance and is recovered electrolytically as dendritic powder. The dezinced ferrous scrap is rinsed and used directly. The process is effective for zinc, lead, and aluminum removal on loose and baled scrap and on all types of galvanized steel. The process has been pilot tested for batch treatment of 900 tonnes of mostly baled scrap. A pilot plant to continuously treat loose scrap, with a design capacity of 48,000 tonnes annually, has been in operation in East Chicago, Indiana since early in 1993. The first 450 t of scrap degalvanized in the pilot plant have residual zinc below 0.01% and sodium dragout below 0.01%. Use of degalvanized steel scrap decreases raw materials, environmental compliance, and opportunity costs to steel- and iron-makers. Availability of clean degalvanized scrap may enable integrated steel producers to recycle furnace dusts to the sinter plant and EAF shops to produce flat products without use of high quality scrap alternatives such as DRI, pig iron, or iron carbide. Recycling the components of galvanized steel scrap saves primary energy, decreases zinc imports, and adds value to the scrap. The quantities of zinc available by the year 2000 from prompt and obsolete automotive scrap win approach 25% of zinc consumed in the major automotive production centers of the world. Zinc recycling from galvanized steel scrap, either before or after scrap melting, will have to be implemented.

  8. Steel Creek wildlife: L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Giffin, M.A.; Patterson, K.K.

    1988-03-01

    Reptile and amphibian populations in Steel Creek below L-Lake were assessed in monthly or quarterly sampling programs. Thirty-eight species of reptiles or amphibians were collected during 1987 in the Steel Creek corridor below the L-Lake impoundment, and in the delta and channel. Juvenile turtles and alligators, and larval amphibians were observed or collected during the study, indicating continued reproduction in Steel Creek. The reptile and amphibian populations in Steel Creek show no indication of any effect due to the impoundment of the lake or the operation of L-Reactor. Waterfowl and associated birds in Steel Creek below L-Lake were observed, in conjunction with other sampling programs, during winter--spring and fall--winter migrations. Nine species of waterfowl and five species of associated birds were observed in 1987 in the Steel Creek corridor below the L-Lake impoundment and in the delta and channel.

  9. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Hugo S. Caram; Natalie Foster

    1999-07-01

    The strain-stress behavior of a wet granular media was measured using a split Parfitt tensile tester. In all cases the stress increases linearly with distance until the maximum uniaxial tensile stress is reached. The stress then decreases exponentially with distance after this maximum is reached. The linear region indicates that wet solids behave elastically for stresses below the tensile stresses and can store significant elastic energy. The elastic deformation cannot be explained by analyzing the behavior of individual capillary bridges and requires accounting for the deformation of the solids particles. The elastic modulus of the wet granular material remains unexplained.

  10. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Hugo S. Caram; Natalie Foster

    1998-03-30

    The strain-stress behavior of a wet granular media was measured using a split Parfitt tensile tester. In all cases the stress increases linearly with distance until the maximum uniaxial tensile stress is reached. The stress then decreases exponentially with distance after this maximum is reached. The linear region indicates that wet solids behave elastically for stresses below the tensile stresses and can store significant elastic energy. The elastic deformation cannot be explained by analyzing the behavior of individual capillary bridges and may require accounting for the deformation of the solids particles. The elastic modulus of the wet granular material remains unexplained.

  11. Local Solid Shape

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Local solid shape applies to the surface curvature of small surface patches—essentially regions of approximately constant curvatures—of volumetric objects that are smooth volumetric regions in Euclidean 3-space. This should be distinguished from local shape in pictorial space. The difference is categorical. Although local solid shape has naturally been explored in haptics, results in vision are not forthcoming. We describe a simple experiment in which observers judge shape quality and magnitude of cinematographic presentations. Without prior training, observers readily use continuous shape index and Casorati curvature scales with reasonable resolution. PMID:27648217

  12. Solid handling valve

    DOEpatents

    Williams, William R.

    1979-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a solids handling valve for use in combination with lock hoppers utilized for conveying pulverized coal to a coal gasifier. The valve comprises a fluid-actuated flow control piston disposed within a housing and provided with a tapered primary seal having a recessed seat on the housing and a radially expandable fluid-actuated secondary seal. The valve seals are highly resistive to corrosion, erosion and abrasion by the solids, liquids, and gases associated with the gasification process so as to minimize valve failure.

  13. Local Solid Shape

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Local solid shape applies to the surface curvature of small surface patches—essentially regions of approximately constant curvatures—of volumetric objects that are smooth volumetric regions in Euclidean 3-space. This should be distinguished from local shape in pictorial space. The difference is categorical. Although local solid shape has naturally been explored in haptics, results in vision are not forthcoming. We describe a simple experiment in which observers judge shape quality and magnitude of cinematographic presentations. Without prior training, observers readily use continuous shape index and Casorati curvature scales with reasonable resolution.

  14. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, B.T.; Dreifuerst, G.R.

    1994-07-19

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1,500 A peak, 1.0 [mu]s pulsewidth, and 4,500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry. 6 figs.

  15. Local Solid Shape.

    PubMed

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea; Wagemans, Johan

    2015-10-01

    Local solid shape applies to the surface curvature of small surface patches-essentially regions of approximately constant curvatures-of volumetric objects that are smooth volumetric regions in Euclidean 3-space. This should be distinguished from local shape in pictorial space. The difference is categorical. Although local solid shape has naturally been explored in haptics, results in vision are not forthcoming. We describe a simple experiment in which observers judge shape quality and magnitude of cinematographic presentations. Without prior training, observers readily use continuous shape index and Casorati curvature scales with reasonable resolution. PMID:27648217

  16. Direct Alloying of Steel with Nickel Concentrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokhrina, O. I.; Rozhikhina, I. D.; Proshunin, I. E.

    2016-08-01

    A technology of alloying steel with nickel reduced from nickel concentrate is analysed and developed. Limits of reduction concentration areas are defined. An optimal composition of nickel concentrate pellets and a method of feeding them into the furnace are deduced from experiments. It is proved that when pellets made of nickel concentrate and coke are added into the charge during steel smelting by the technology of alloyed scrap remelting, nickel recovery achieves 92-95%. The technology was tested by smelting DSP-40 steel.

  17. Tritiated Water Interaction with Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-05-01

    Experiments conducted to study tritium permeation of stainless steel at ambient and elevated temperatures revealed that HT converts relatively quickly to HTO. Further, the HTO partial pressure contributes essentially equally with elemental tritium gas in driving permeation through the stainless steel. Such permeation appears to be due to dissociation of the water molecule on the hot stainless steel surface. There is an equilibrium concentration of HTO vapor above adsorbed gas on the walls of the experimental apparatus evident from freezing transients. The uptake process of tritium from the carrier gas involves both surface adsorption and isotopic exchange with surface bound water.

  18. Steel Foil Improves Performance Of Blasting Caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Perry, Ronnie; Schimmel, Morry L.

    1990-01-01

    Blasting caps, which commonly include deep-drawn aluminum cups, give significantly higher initiation performance by application of steel foils on output faces. Steel closures 0.005 in. (0.13 mm) thick more effective than aluminum. Caps with directly bonded steel foil produce fragment velocities of 9,300 ft/s (2.8 km/s) with large craters and unpredictable patterns to such degree that no attempts made to initiate explosions. Useful in military and aerospace applications and in specialized industries as mining and exploration for oil.

  19. Ultrasonic attenuation in pearlitic steel.

    PubMed

    Du, Hualong; Turner, Joseph A

    2014-03-01

    Expressions for the attenuation coefficients of longitudinal and transverse ultrasonic waves are developed for steel with pearlitic microstructure. This type of lamellar duplex microstructure influences attenuation because of the lamellar spacing. In addition, longitudinal attenuation measurements were conducted using an unfocused transducer with 10 MHz central frequency on the cross section of a quenched railroad wheel sample. The dependence of longitudinal attenuation on the pearlite microstructure is observed from the changes of longitudinal attenuation from the quenched tread surface to deeper locations. The results show that the attenuation value is lowest and relatively constant within the quench depth, then increases linearly. The experimental results demonstrate a reasonable agreement with results from the theoretical model. Ultrasonic attenuation provides an important non-destructive method to evaluate duplex microstructure within grains which can be implemented for quality control in conjunction with other manufacturing processes.

  20. Steel pressure vessels for hydrostatic pressures to 50 kilobars.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, A; Whalley, E

    1978-07-01

    Cylindrical steel pressure vessels are described that can be used for hydrostatic pressures up to 50 kilobars. Monoblock vessels of 350 maraging steel can be used to 40 kilobars and compound vessels with an inner vessel of 350 maraging steel and an outer vessel of 300 maraging steel to 50 kilobars. Neither requires the cylinder to be end loaded, and so they are much easier to use than the more usual compound vessels with a tungsten carbide inner and steel outer vessel.

  1. Project B: Improved Liquid Steel Feed For Slab Casters

    SciTech Connect

    Brent S. Isaacson; Mike Slepian; Thomas Richter

    1998-10-01

    This report describes the completion of the development of an electromagnetic valve to control liquid steel flow for improved liquid steel feeding for slab casters. Achievements result from a joint research effort between Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, North American Refractories and U.S. Steel. This effort is part of the American Iron and Steel Institute's (AISI) Advanced Process Control Program, a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and fifteen North American steel makers.

  2. Spheroidizing of medium carbon steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, James Michael

    2000-11-01

    An investigation has been made of spheroidization of medium carbon steels used in the bolt industry. Two process cycles were considered. One was the intercritical cycle, widely used in industry, in which the steel was heated above the A1 temperature for approximately 2 hours and then cooled to 688°C (1270°F) and held for various periods. The other was a subcritical cycle that involved heating to 704°C (1300°F) for various times. Wire samples were 0.4-in. diameter AISI 1541, considered high in manganese and difficult to spheroidize. Although AISI 4037 is considered easier to spheroidize, this alloy was also tested due to its extensive industrial use. It was found that the intercritical cycle produced a somewhat faster drop in hardness. However, one hour of the subcritical cycle yielded greater ductility than 32 hours of the intercritical process, as measured by tensile tests. Similar ductility results were achieved using a new flare test. The level of spheroidization was defined in this study to be the percentage of carbide particles with aspect ratios less than 3. The subcritical cycle produced the same level of spheroidization in 1/2 hour as that reached by the intercritical cycle in 32 hours. Faster spheroidization of cementite plates in the subcritical process appears to be due to the fine pearlite generated by the current practice of rapid cooling off the hot mill. This advantage is lost in the intercritical process because the original pearlite is dissolved above the A1 temperature.

  3. Production of gaseous fuel by pyrolysis of municipal solid waste

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, T. H.; Ringer, H. N.; Bridges, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Pilot plant tests were conducted on a simulated solid waste which was a mixture of shredded newspaper, wood waste, polyethylene plastics, crushed glass, steel turnings, and water. Tests were conducted at 1400 F in a lead-bath pyrolyser. Cold feed was deaerated by compression and was dropped onto a moving hearth of molten lead before being transported to a sealed storage container. About 80 percent of the feed's organic content was converted to gaseous products which contain over 90 percent of the potential waste energy; 12 percent was converted to water; and 8 percent remained as partially pyrolyzed char and tars. Nearly half of the carbon in the feed is converted to benzene, toluene and medium-quality fuel gas, a potential credit of over $25 per ton of solid waste. The system was shown to require minimal preprocessing and less sorting then other methods.

  4. Microstructural characterization in dissimilar friction stir welding between 304 stainless steel and st37 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Jafarzadegan, M.; Feng, A.H.; Abdollah-zadeh, A.; Saeid, T.; Shen, J.; Assadi, H.

    2012-12-15

    In the present study, 3 mm-thick plates of 304 stainless steel and st37 steel were welded together by friction stir welding at a welding speed of 50 mm/min and tool rotational speed of 400 and 800 rpm. X-ray diffraction test was carried out to study the phases which might be formed in the welds. Metallographic examinations, and tensile and microhardness tests were used to analyze the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joint. Four different zones were found in the weld area except the base metals. In the stir zone of the 304 stainless steel, a refined grain structure with some features of dynamic recrystallization was evidenced. A thermomechanically-affected zone was characterized on the 304 steel side with features of dynamic recovery. In the other side of the stir zone, the hot deformation of the st37 steel in the austenite region produced small austenite grains and these grains transformed to fine ferrite and pearlite and some products of displacive transformations such as Widmanstatten ferrite and martensite by cooling the material after friction stir welding. The heat-affected zone in the st37 steel side showed partially and fully refined microstructures like fusion welding processes. The recrystallization in the 304 steel and the transformations in the st37 steel enhanced the hardness of the weld area and therefore, improved the tensile properties of the joint. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FSW produced sound welds between st37 low carbon steel and 304 stainless steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SZ of the st37 steel contained some products of allotropic transformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The material in the SZ of the 304 steel showed features of dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The finer microstructure in the SZ increased the hardness and tensile strength.

  5. Indium oxide thin film as potential photoanodes for corrosion protection of stainless steel under visible light

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yan; Yu, Jianqiang; Sun, Kai; Zhu, Yukun; Bu, Yuyu; Chen, Zhuoyuan

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: If the conduction band potential of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} is more negative than the corrosion potential of stainless steel, photo-induced electrons will be transferred from In{sub 2}O{sub 3} to the steel, thus shifting the potential of the steel into a corrosion immunity region and preventing the steel from the corrosion. - Highlights: • Indium oxide performed novel application under visible light. • Indium oxide by sol–gel method behaved better photoelectrochemical properties. • Electrons were transferred to stainless steel from indium oxide once light on. - Abstract: This paper reports the photoelectrochemical cathodic protection of 304 stainless steel by In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin-film under visible-light. The films were fabricated with In{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders, synthesized by both sol–gel (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg) and solid-state (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ss) processes. The photo-induced open circuit potential and the photo-to-current efficiency measurements suggested that In{sub 2}O{sub 3} could be a promising candidate material for photoelectrochemical cathodic protection of metallic alloys under visible light. Moreover, the polarization curve experimental results indicated that In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg thin-film can mitigate the corrosion potential of 304 stainless steel to much more negative values with a higher photocurrent density than the In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ss film under visible-light illumination. All the results demonstrated that the In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg thin-film provides a better photoelectrochemical cathodic protection for 304 stainless steel than In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ss thin-film under visible-light illumination. The higher photoelectrochemical efficiency is possibly due to the uniform thin films produced with the smaller particle size of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg, which facilitates the transfer of the photo-induced electrons from bulk to the surface and suppresses the charge recombination of the electrons and holes.

  6. LCA comparison of container systems in municipal solid waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Rives, Jesus; Rieradevall, Joan; Gabarrell, Xavier

    2010-06-15

    The planning and design of integrated municipal solid waste management (MSWM) systems requires accurate environmental impact evaluation of the systems and their components. This research assessed, quantified and compared the environmental impact of the first stage of the most used MSW container systems. The comparison was based on factors such as the volume of the containers, from small bins of 60-80 l to containers of 2400 l, and on the manufactured materials, steel and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Also, some parameters such as frequency of collections, waste generation, filling percentage and waste container contents, were established to obtain comparable systems. The methodological framework of the analysis was the life cycle assessment (LCA), and the impact assessment method was based on CML 2 baseline 2000. Results indicated that, for the same volume, the collection systems that use HDPE waste containers had more of an impact than those using steel waste containers, in terms of abiotic depletion, global warming, ozone layer depletion, acidification, eutrophication, photochemical oxidation, human toxicity and terrestrial ecotoxicity. Besides, the collection systems using small HDPE bins (60 l or 80 l) had most impact while systems using big steel containers (2400 l) had less impact. Subsequent sensitivity analysis about the parameters established demonstrated that they could change the ultimate environmental impact of each waste container collection system, but that the comparative relationship between systems was similar.

  7. LCA comparison of container systems in municipal solid waste management.

    PubMed

    Rives, Jesús; Rieradevall, Joan; Gabarrell, Xavier

    2010-06-01

    The planning and design of integrated municipal solid waste management (MSWM) systems requires accurate environmental impact evaluation of the systems and their components. This research assessed, quantified and compared the environmental impact of the first stage of the most used MSW container systems. The comparison was based on factors such as the volume of the containers, from small bins of 60-80l to containers of 2400l, and on the manufactured materials, steel and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Also, some parameters such as frequency of collections, waste generation, filling percentage and waste container contents, were established to obtain comparable systems. The methodological framework of the analysis was the life cycle assessment (LCA), and the impact assessment method was based on CML 2 baseline 2000. Results indicated that, for the same volume, the collection systems that use HDPE waste containers had more of an impact than those using steel waste containers, in terms of abiotic depletion, global warming, ozone layer depletion, acidification, eutrophication, photochemical oxidation, human toxicity and terrestrial ecotoxicity. Besides, the collection systems using small HDPE bins (60l or 80l) had most impact while systems using big steel containers (2400l) had less impact. Subsequent sensitivity analysis about the parameters established demonstrated that they could change the ultimate environmental impact of each waste container collection system, but that the comparative relationship between systems was similar.

  8. Solid Collection Efforts: Ta Collimator Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gostic, J M

    2011-11-21

    Ta collimator sets that were part of the gated x-ray detector diagnostic (GXD) at NIF were analyzed for debris distribution and damage in 2011. These disks (ranging in thickness from 250 to 750 {mu}m) were fielded approximately 10 cm from target chamber center (TCC) on various symcap, THD and re-emit shots. The nose cone holder and forward Ta collimator (facing target chamber center, TCC) from all shots show evidence of surface melt. Non-destructive analysis techniques such as optical microscopy, surface profilometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) were used to determine debris composition and degree of deformation associated with each Ta disk. Molten debris from the stainless steel nose cone contaminated the surface of the collimators along with other debris associated with the target assembly (Al, Si, Cu, Au and In). Surface elemental analysis of the forward collimator Ta disks indicates that Au hohlraum debris is less concentrated on these samples versus those fielded 50 cm from TCC in the wedge range filter (WRF) assembly. It is possible that the Au is distributed below or within the stainless steel melt layer covering the disk, as most of the foreign debris is captured in the melted coating. The other disks (fielded directly behind the forward collimator in a sandwiched configuration) have visible forms of deformation and warping. The degree of warping increases as the shock wave penetrates the assembly with the most damage sustained on the back collimator. In terms of developing a solid collection capability, the collimator analyses suggests that close proximity may cause more interference with capsule debris collection and more damage to the surface of the collector diagnostic. The analyses of the Ta collimators were presented to the Target and Laser Interaction Sphere (TaLIS) group; a representative presentation is attached to this document.

  9. Solid-State Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutliff, Ronald D.; And Others

    This self-study course is designed to familiarize Marine Corps enlisted personnel with the principles of solid-state devices and their functions. The course contains four study units. Each study unit begins with a general objective, which is a statement of what the student should learn from the unit. The study units are divided into numbered work…

  10. Solid polymer electrolyte compositions

    DOEpatents

    Garbe, James E.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Hamrock, Steven J.; Le, Dinh Ba

    2001-01-01

    An electrolyte composition is featured that includes a solid, ionically conductive polymer, organically modified oxide particles that include organic groups covalently bonded to the oxide particles, and an alkali metal salt. The electrolyte composition is free of lithiated zeolite. The invention also features cells that incorporate the electrolyte composition.

  11. Solid-Waste Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Consists of excerpts from a forthcoming publication of the United States Environmental Protection Agency, Student's Guide to Solid-Waste Management.'' Discusses the sources of wastes from farms, mines, factories, and communities, the job of governments, ways to collect trash, methods of disposal, processing, and suggests possible student action.…

  12. Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Dieckmann, John; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-03-30

    The article discusses solid state lighting technologies. This topic was covered in two previous ASHRAE Journal columns (2010). This article covers advancements in technologies and the associated efficacies. The life-cycle, energy savings and market potential of these technologies are addressed as well.

  13. A new solid lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.; Sliney, H. E.

    1969-01-01

    Friction and wear life studies on burnished films of the compound graphite fluoride have demonstrated its potential as a solid lubricant material. It is effective in moist air, dry air, or in dry argon at temperatures up to approximately 400 degrees C.

  14. Solid fuel oil mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Rutter, P.R.; Veal, C.J.

    1984-11-27

    Fuel composition comprises 15 to 60% be weight, preferably 40 to 55%, of a friable solid fuel, e.g. coal, a stabilizing additive composition and a fuel oil. The additive comprises the combination of a polymer containing functional groups, e.g., maleinized polybutadiene, and a surfactant. The composition is suitable for use as a liquid fuel for industrial burners.

  15. Solid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Ronn L.

    1993-01-01

    Structural requirements, materials and, especially, processing are critical issues that will pace the introduction of new types of solid rocket motors. Designers must recognize and understand the drivers associated with each of the following considerations: (1) cost; (2) energy density; (3) long term storage with use on demand; (4) reliability; (5) safety of processing and handling; (6) operability; and (7) environmental acceptance.

  16. Thiokol Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on thiokol solid rocket motors. The topics include: 1) Communications; 2) Military and government intelligence; 3) Positioning satellites; 4) Remote sensing; 5) Space burial; 6) Science; 7) Space manufacturing; 8) Advertising; 9) Space rescue space debris management; 10) Space tourism; 11) Space settlements; 12) Hazardous waste disposal; 13) Extraterrestrial resources; 14) Fast package delivery; and 15) Space utilities.

  17. Solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Ronn L.

    1993-02-01

    Structural requirements, materials and, especially, processing are critical issues that will pace the introduction of new types of solid rocket motors. Designers must recognize and understand the drivers associated with each of the following considerations: (1) cost; (2) energy density; (3) long term storage with use on demand; (4) reliability; (5) safety of processing and handling; (6) operability; and (7) environmental acceptance.

  18. Solid electrolyte structure

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, Anthony V.

    1984-01-01

    A solid electrolyte structure for fuel cells and other electrochemical devices providing oxygen ion transfer by a multiplicity of exposed internal surfaces made of a composition containing an oxide of a multivalent transition metal and forming small pore-like passages sized to permit oxygen ion transfer while limiting the transfer of oxygen gas.

  19. Silicone containing solid propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K. N. R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The addition of a small amount, for example 1% by weight, of a liquid silicone oil to a metal containing solid rocket propellant provides a significant reduction in heat transfer to the inert nozzle walls. Metal oxide slag collection and blockage of the nozzle are eliminated and the burning rate is increased by about 5% to 10% thus improving ballistic performance.

  20. Aqueous two-phase extraction of nickel dimethylglyoximato complex and its application to spectrophotometric determination of nickel in stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Yoshikuni, Nobutaka; Baba, Takayuki; Tsunoda, Natsuki; Oguma, Koichi

    2005-03-31

    A polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based aqueous two-phase system has been established for the extraction of Ni-dimethylglyoximato complex. Appropriate amounts of PEG solution and solid (NH(4))(2)SO(4) were added to the Ni-dimethylglyoximato complex which had been formed in the presence of sodium tartrate and K(2)S(2)O(8) at pH 12 in a separatory funnel and shaken vigorously for about 1min. The mixture was allowed to stand for 10min and then the absorbance of the extracted complex in the upper PEG-rich phase was measured at 470nm. Beer's law was obeyed over the range of 0.26-2.1ppm Ni. The proposed extraction method has been applied to the determination of Ni in steel. A steel sample was decomposed with an appropriate acid mixture. An aliquot of the sample solution was taken, treated with H(3)PO(4) and most of the iron and copper were removed by hydroxide precipitation using solid BaCO(3) to control the pH of the sample solution in advance of the extraction of Ni. The analytical results obtained for Ni in steel certified reference material JSS 650-10 (The Japan Iron and Steel Federation), BCS 323 (Bureau of Analysed Samples Ltd.) and NIST SRM 361 and 362 (National Institute of Standards and Technology) were in good agreement with certified values.

  1. Internal friction study of decomposition kinetics of SAF 2507 type duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Smuk, O.; Smuk, S.; Hanninen, H.; Jagodzinski, Yu.; Tarasenko, O.

    1999-01-08

    During the last decade, super duplex stainless steels (DSSs) with increased nitrogen content have been an object of intensive studies. Present work is devoted to the study of the peculiarities of {delta}-ferrite decomposition in SAF 2507 type duplex steel, and redistribution of nitrogen between ferrite and austenite phases in a wide temperature range by means of internal fraction (IF). Unlike local methods of electron microscopy or engineering methods of hardness or impact toughness testing, which give basically information on the formation of brittle intermetallic phases, the internal friction technique allows to study the state of solid solution and kinetics of changes in the relative amounts of ferrite and austenite phases during thermal treatment.

  2. Material Corrosion and Plate-Out Test of Types 304L and 316L Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.E.

    2001-02-06

    Corrosion and plate-out tests were performed on 304L and 316L stainless steel in pretreated Envelope B and Envelope C solutions. Flat coupons of the two stainless steels were exposed to 100 degrees C liquid and to 74 degrees C and 88 degrees C vapor above the solutions for 61 days. No significant corrosion was observed either by weight-loss measurements or by microscopic examination. Most coupons had small weight gains due to plate-out of solids, which remained to some extent even after 24-hour immersion in 1 N nitric acid at room temperature. Plate-out was more significant in the Envelope B coupons, with film thickness from less than 0.001 in. to 0.003-inches.

  3. Chromia scale adhesion on 430 stainless steel: Effect of different surface treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belogolovsky, I.; Hou, P. Y.; Jacobson, C. P.; Visco, S. J.

    In the context of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications, the adhesion strength and failure location of chromia scale that developed on 430 stainless steel after various surface modifications prior to oxidations between 600 and 800 °C were evaluated. Results demonstrated that the tensile strength and nature of adhesion of the oxide/alloy interface on 430 stainless steel can be compromised by polishing, but can be improved by reducing surface impurities, increasing surface roughness and applying a coating that contains a reactive element, such as Y-nitrate. Optimally, a combination of firing in a reducing atmosphere and applying a thin yttrium nitrate coating was found to be especially effective. These findings identify surface modification techniques that improve scale adhesion for Cr 2O 3-forming metallic interconnects whether independently or beneath a protective coating.

  4. Mechanical Properties and Fracture Surfaces of Thixoformed HP9/4/30 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, M. Z.; Jaharah, A. G.; Atkinson, H. V.; Kapranos, P.

    2007-04-07

    Most work in semi-solid metal processing has been focused on relatively low-melting temperature materials such as aluminium, magnesium, tin, lead and their composites. Because of the high melting temperatures and related measurement difficulties, there is relatively small amount of experimental data available on the thixoforming of high temperature materials such as steels. This paper discusses the relationships between tensile tests data and the fracture surfaces of HP9/4/30 steel samples, in as-received and as-thixoformed conditions. Some of the as-thixoformed samples were subjected to commercial heat treatments before the tests were carried out. The as-received samples showed a typical ductile fracture of 'cup' and 'cone' surface appearance. The thixoformed samples, although showing some significant increase in tensile strength values, failed in a brittle manner, with the fracture surfaces showing a 'cobbled' surface appearance. The application of the commercial heat treatment to the thixoformed samples has significantly improved their ductility.

  5. Effect of MX type particles on creep strength of ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, M.; Sakasegawa, H.; Kohyama, A.; Esaka, H.; Shinozuka, K.

    2003-09-01

    Creep rupture strength at 650 °C and microstructures of the plain ferritic steels with fine particles of the NaCl type (MX) were studied. Precipitation hardening by the fine MX type particles is more effective than solid solution hardening by tungsten. Excess precipitation of MX type particles relatively weakens the grain boundaries as compared with the matrix and, as a consequence, lowers the rupture strength. The equivalent obstacle spacing for mobile dislocations is calculated from the rupture data and is comparable to the interparticle distance observed by transmission electron microscopy. By controlling the interparticle distance of MX type particles with some adjustments of the chemical composition to meet the engineering requirements, it is feasible to develop a new alloy with high rupture strength at 650 °C which is superior to the conventional ferritic steels.

  6. Origin of predominance of cementite among iron carbides in steel at elevated temperature.

    PubMed

    Fang, C M; Sluiter, M H F; van Huis, M A; Ande, C K; Zandbergen, H W

    2010-07-30

    A long-standing challenge in physics is to understand why cementite is the predominant carbide in steel. Here we show that the prevalent formation of cementite can be explained only by considering its stability at elevated temperature. A systematic highly accurate quantum mechanical study was conducted on the stability of binary iron carbides. The calculations show that all the iron carbides are unstable relative to the elemental solids, α-Fe and graphite. Apart from a cubic Fe23C6 phase, the energetically most favorable carbides exhibit hexagonal close-packed Fe sublattices. Finite-temperature analysis showed that contributions from lattice vibration and anomalous Curie-Weis magnetic ordering, rather than from the conventional lattice mismatch with the matrix, are the origin of the predominance of cementite during steel fabrication processes.

  7. Finite element based simulation on friction stud welding of metal matrix composites to steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Tharmaraj, R.; Velu, P. Shenbaga; Kumar, R.

    2016-05-01

    Friction welding is a solid state joining technique used for joining similar and dissimilar materials with high integrity. This new technique is being successfully applied to the aerospace, automobile, and ship building industries, and is attracting more and more research interest. The quality of Friction Stud Welded joints depends on the frictional heat generated at the interface. Hence, thermal analysis on friction stud welding of stainless steel (AISI 304) and aluminium silicon carbide (AlSiC) combination is carried out in the present work. In this study, numerical simulation is carried out using ANSYS software and the temperature profiles are predicted at various increments of time. The developed numerical model is found to be adequate to predict temperature distribution of friction stud weld aluminium silicon carbide/stainless steel joints.

  8. Temperature Histories of Structural Steel Welds Calculated Using Solidification-Boundary Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrakos, S. G.

    2016-09-01

    Temperature histories of structural steel deep-penetration welds are presented, which are calculated using numerical-analytical basis functions and solidification-boundary constraints. These weld temperature histories can be adopted as input data to various types of computational procedures, which include numerical models for prediction of solid-state phase transformations and mechanical response. In addition, these temperature histories can be used parametrically for inverse thermal analysis of welds corresponding to other welding processes whose process conditions are within similar regimes. The present study applies an inverse thermal analysis procedure that uses three-dimensional constraint conditions whose two-dimensional projections are mapped within transverse cross sections of experimentally measured solidification boundaries. In addition, the present study uses experimentally measured estimates of the heat effect zone edge to examine the consistency of calculated temperature histories for steel welds.

  9. Fabrication of biomimetic superhydrophobic steel surface under an oxygen rich environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Liang; Zhang, Haifeng; Li, Yuyang; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Ruimin; Chen, Weiping; Liu, Xiaowei

    2016-09-01

    A novel and facile approach was proposed to fabricate superhydrophobic surface with similar micro- and nanostructures of lotus leaf on the steel foil. The acidic solution was used to grow Fe3O4 nanosheet films consisted of hydrochloric acid and potassium chloride under an O2 rich environment. The as-prepared superhydrophobic steel surfaces had water CA (contact angle) of 166 ± 2°. The water SA (sliding angle) was less than 2°. In order to estimate the drag reduction property of the as-prepared surface, the experimental setup of the liquid-solid friction drag was proposed. The drag reduction ratio for superhydrophobic surface was 61.3% compare with untreated surface at a flow velocity of 1.66 m s-1.

  10. Temperature Histories of Structural Steel Welds Calculated Using Solidification-Boundary Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrakos, S. G.

    2016-07-01

    Temperature histories of structural steel deep-penetration welds are presented, which are calculated using numerical-analytical basis functions and solidification-boundary constraints. These weld temperature histories can be adopted as input data to various types of computational procedures, which include numerical models for prediction of solid-state phase transformations and mechanical response. In addition, these temperature histories can be used parametrically for inverse thermal analysis of welds corresponding to other welding processes whose process conditions are within similar regimes. The present study applies an inverse thermal analysis procedure that uses three-dimensional constraint conditions whose two-dimensional projections are mapped within transverse cross sections of experimentally measured solidification boundaries. In addition, the present study uses experimentally measured estimates of the heat effect zone edge to examine the consistency of calculated temperature histories for steel welds.

  11. Stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaluzny, J. A.; Grimm, C.; Passarelli, D.

    2015-12-01

    In order to use stainless steel piping in an LCLS-II (Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade) cryomodule, stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions are needed to connect the stainless steel piping to the titanium cavity helium vessel. Explosion bonded stainless steel to titanium transition pieces and bimetallic transition material samples have been tested. A sample transition tube was subjected to tests and x-ray examinations between tests. Samples of the bonded joint material were impact and tensile tested at room temperature as well as liquid helium temperature. The joint has been used successfully in horizontal tests of LCLS-II cavity helium vessels and is planned to be used in LCLS-II cryomodules. Results of material sample and transition tube tests will be presented. Operated by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC under Contract No. De-AC02-07CH11359 with the United States Department of Energy.

  12. Clean Cast Steel Technology, Phase IV

    SciTech Connect

    Charles E. Bates

    2003-02-24

    The objective of the Clean Cast Steel Technology Program was to improve casting product quality by removing or minimizing oxide defects and to allow the production of higher integrity castings for high speed machining lines. Previous research has concentrated on macro-inclusions that break, chip, or crack machine tool cutters and drills and cause immediate shutdown of the machining lines. The overall goal of the project is to reduce the amount of surface macro-inclusions and improve the machinability of steel castings. Macro-inclusions and improve the machinability of steel castings. Macro-inclusions have been identified by industrial sponsors as a major barrier to improving the quality and marketability of steel castings.

  13. Development of a carburizing stainless steel alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, D.E. )

    1994-06-01

    A new carburizing stainless steel alloy that resists corrosion, heat, and fatigue has been developed for bearing and gear applications. Pyrowear 675 Stainless alloy is vacuum induction melted and vacuum arc remelted (VIM/VAR) for aircraft-quality cleanliness. Test results show that it has corrosion resistance similar to that of AISI Type 440-C stainless, and its rolling fatigue resistance is superior to that of AISI M50 (UNS K88165). In contrast to alloy gear steels and Type 440C, Pyrowear 675 maintains case hardness of HRC 60 at operating temperatures up to 200 C (400 F). Impact and fracture toughness are superior to that of other stainless bearing steels, which typically are relatively brittle and can break under severe service. Toughness is also comparable or superior to conventional noncorrosion-resistant carburizing bearing steels, such as SAE Types 8620 and 9310.

  14. Hydrogen compatibility handbook for stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1983-06-01

    This handbook compiles data on the effects of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of stainless steels and discusses this data within the context of current understanding of hydrogen compatibility of metals. All of the tabulated data derives from continuing studies of hydrogen effects on materials that have been conducted at the Savannah River Laboratory over the past fifteen years. Supplementary data from other sources are included in the discussion. Austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, and precipitation hardenable stainless steels have been studied. Damage caused by helium generated from decay of tritium is a distinctive effect that occurs in addition to the hydrogen isotopes protium and deuterium. The handbook defines the scope of our current knowledge of hydrogen effects in stainless steels and serves as a guide to selection of stainless steels for service in hydrogen.

  15. Lightweight Steel Solutions for Automotive Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hong Woo; Kim, Gyosung; Park, Sung Ho

    2010-06-15

    Recently, improvement in fuel efficiency and safety has become the biggest issue in worldwide automotive industry. Although the regulation of environment and safety has been tightened up more and more, the majority of vehicle bodies are still manufactured from stamped steel components. This means that the optimized steel solutions enable to demonstrate its ability to reduce body weight with high crashworthiness performance instead of expensive light weight materials such as Al, Mg and composites. To provide the innovative steel solutions for automotive industry, POSCO has developed AHSS and its application technologies, which is directly connected to EVI activities. EVI is a technical cooperation program with customer covering all stages of new car project from design to mass production. Integrated light weight solutions through new forming technologies such as TWB, hydroforming and HPF are continuously developed and provided for EVI activities. This paper will discuss the detailed status of these technologies especially light weight steel solutions based on innovative technologies.

  16. Adhesive bonding between polyamide and steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettegren', V. I.; Bashkarev, A. Ya.; Savitskii, A. V.; Shcherbakov, I. P.; Sytov, V. V.; Mamalimov, R. I.

    2015-08-01

    Fluorescence and IR absorption spectra are taken of coatings obtained by applying polyamide 6 powder on a steel substrate heated above the polymer melting point and subsequently cooling to room temperature. It follows from the coating spectra that the energy of a π* → n transition in the C—O bonds of polyamide decreases. Simultaneously, the maximum of a band assigned to the deformation vibrations of N—H bonds shifts toward longer wavelengths. These effects are explained by the formation of coordination bonds between Fe2+ ions having diffused from the steel into the polymer and nitrogen atoms entering into polyamide 6 molecules. As a result, a coordination-compound-saturated diffusion layer up to 100 µm thick arises near the steel surface. Coordination compounds squeeze the framework of the polyamide 6 molecule roughly by 0.06%. Eventually, a polyamide layer that is stronger than the surroundings appears at the polyamide 6—steel interface.

  17. Precise carbon control of fabricated stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, R.J.

    1975-12-01

    A process is described for controlling the carbon content of fabricated stainless steel components including the steps of heat treating the component in hydrogen atmospheres of varying dewpoints and carbon potentials.

  18. Lightweight Steel Solutions for Automotive Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hong Woo; Kim, Gyosung; Park, Sung Ho

    2010-06-01

    Recently, improvement in fuel efficiency and safety has become the biggest issue in worldwide automotive industry. Although the regulation of environment and safety has been tightened up more and more, the majority of vehicle bodies are still manufactured from stamped steel components. This means that the optimized steel solutions enable to demonstrate its ability to reduce body weight with high crashworthiness performance instead of expensive light weight materials such as Al, Mg and composites. To provide the innovative steel solutions for automotive industry, POSCO has developed AHSS and its application technologies, which is directly connected to EVI activities. EVI is a technical cooperation program with customer covering all stages of new car project from design to mass production. Integrated light weight solutions through new forming technologies such as TWB, hydroforming and HPF are continuously developed and provided for EVI activities. This paper will discuss the detailed status of these technologies especially light weight steel solutions based on innovative technologies.

  19. Factors Affecting Scale Adhesion on Steel Forgings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitterman, J. A.; Bacco, R. P.; Boggs, W. E.

    1982-04-01

    Occasionally, undesirable "sticky" adherent scale forms on low-carbon steel during reheating for hot forging. The mechanical abrading or chemical pickling required to remove this scale adds appreciably to the fabrication cost. Characterization of the steel-scale system by metallographic examination, x-ray diffraction, and electron-probe microanalysis revealed that nickel, silicon, and/or sulfur might be involved in the mechanism of sticky-scale formation. Laboratory reheating tests were conducted on steels with varied concentrations of nickel and silicon in atmospheres simulating those resulting from burning natural gas or sulfur-bearing fuels. Subsequent characterization of the scale formed during the tests tends to confirm that the composition of the steel, especially increased nickel and silicon contents, and the presence of the sulfur in the furnace atmosphere cause the formation of this undesirable scale.

  20. Stainless Steel to Titanium Bimetallic Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaluzny, J. A.; Grimm, C.; Passarelli, D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to use stainless steel piping in an LCLS-II (Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade) cryomodule, stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions are needed to connect the stainless steel piping to the titanium cavity helium vessel. Explosion bonded stainless steel to titanium transition pieces and bimetallic transition material samples have been tested. A sample transition tube was subjected to tests and x-ray examinations between tests. Samples of the bonded joint material were impact and tensile tested at room temperature as well as liquid helium temperature. The joint has been used successfully in horizontal tests of LCLS-II cavity helium vessels and is planned to be used in LCLS-II cryomodules. Results of material sample and transition tube tests will be presented.

  1. Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding Tanks Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turichin, G.; Tsibulskiy, I.; Kuznetsov, M.; Akhmetov, A.; Klimova-Korsmik, O.

    2016-04-01

    The results investigate hybrid laser-arc welding of high strength steels using design responsible metallic construction and the highest strength body of vehicles. Welds from modern high strength steels grade Hardox 400, Hardox 450, Armox 600T and AB were created. High power fiber laser LS-15 with output 15 kW and arc rectifier VDU - 1500 DC were used in the experiment. Results of the metallographic research and mechanical tests are presented.

  2. Regularities of bainitic steel deformation transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, V. E.; Nikitina, E. N.; Ivanov, Yu F.; Aksenova, K. V.

    2016-09-01

    Quantitative analysis of defect and carbide subsystems evolution in medium-carbon bainitic steel subjected to compressive strain up to 36% was performed by means of transmission electron diffraction microscopy. Dislocation substructure and carbide phase parameters dependence on degree of deformation are identified, possible reasons of staging in their changes are discussed. It is suggested that the reason for bainitic steel softening at high (over 15%) degrees of deformation is activation of deformation microtwinning process.

  3. High strength, high ductility low carbon steel

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jayoung; Thomas, Gareth

    1978-01-01

    A high strength, high ductility low carbon steel consisting essentially of iron, 0.05-0.15 wt% carbon, and 1-3 wt% silicon. Minor amounts of other constituents may be present. The steel is characterized by a duplex ferrite-martensite microstructure in a fibrous morphology. The microstructure is developed by heat treatment consisting of initial austenitizing treatment followed by annealing in the (.alpha. + .gamma.) range with intermediate quenching.

  4. Analysis of plasma-nitrided steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.; Ferrante, J.; Honecy, F.; Hoffman, R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of plasma nitrided steels can be divided to two main categories - structural and chemical. Structural analysis can provide information not only on the hardening mechanisms but also on the fundamental processes involved. Chemical analysis can be used to study the kinetics for the nitriding process and its mechanisms. In this paper preliminary results obtained by several techniques of both categories are presented and the applicability of those techniques to the analysis of plasma-nitrided steels is discussed.

  5. Ion-beam nitriding of steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.

    1984-01-01

    The application of the ion beam technique to the nitriding of steels is described. It is indicated that the technique can be successfully applied to nitriding. Some of the structural changes obtained by this technique are similar to those obtained by ion nitriding. The main difference is the absence of the iron nitride diffraction lines. It is found that the dependence of the resultant microhardness on beam voltage for super nitralloy is different from that of 304 stainless steel.

  6. Bearing steels: Into the 21. century

    SciTech Connect

    Hoo, J.J.C.; Green, W.B. Jr.

    1998-12-31

    The symposium was organized in 9 separate categories, some sessions updating information previously presented, and some presenting brand new materials and processing to advance bearing technology. Subjects covered include steel cleanliness and measuring methods, bearing fatigue life, and advanced steel processing. Also covered are advances in both thru-hardening and carburizing heat treatments, progress in aerospace and corrosion resistant materials, and surface modifying processes, such as induction hardening and coating methods. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  7. High strength and high toughness steel

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Earl R.; Zackay, Victor F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural steel which possess both high strength and high toughness and has particular application of cryogenic uses. The steel is produced by the utilization of thermally induced phase transformation following heating in a three-phase field in iron-rich alloys of the Fe-Ni-Ti system, with a preferred composition of 12% nickel, 0.5% titanium, the remainder being iron.

  8. Corrosion inhibition of steel by bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, G.; Kucera, V.; Thierry, D.; Pedersen, A. ); Hermansson, M. . Dept. of General and Marine Microbiology)

    1994-08-01

    Mild steel was exposed to Pseudomonas sp. S9 or Serratia marcescens in synthetic seawater. An increase in corrosion resistance over that i natural seawater was monitored by electrochemical techniques. Biological analyses were performed to characterize the system. The inhibition effect also was observed when mild steel was coated with bacteria and then immersed in synthetic seawater. When specimens coated with bacteria were transferred to a natural seawater flow system, the inhibition effect disappeared during the first 2 weeks.

  9. Occupational rhinitis due to steel welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Castano, Roberto; Suarthana, Eva

    2014-12-01

    Exposure to welding fumes is a recognized respiratory hazard. Occupational asthma but not occupational rhinitis has been documented in workers exposed to steel welding fumes. We report a 26-year-old male with work-related rhinitis symptoms as well as lower airways symptoms suggestive of occupational asthma and metal fume fever associated with exposure to steel welding fumes. The diagnosis of occupational rhinitis was confirmed by specific inhalation challenge.

  10. Thermal treatment of dissimilar steels' welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulina, A. A.; Denisova, A. S.; Gradusov, I. N.; Ryabinkina, P. A.; Rushkovets, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper combinations of chrome-nickel steel and high-carbon steel, produced by flash butt welding after heat treatment, are investigated. Light and electron microscopic studies show that the welded joints after heat treatment have a complex structure consisting of several phases as initial welded joints. A martensite structure in welded joints after thermal treatment at 300... 800 °C has been found.

  11. Review of comparative energy use in materials potentially recoverable from municipal solid waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, M. L.

    1982-03-01

    Published literature on the energy savings that might be realized from manufacturing four materials present in municipal solid waste (MSW), using recycled rather than virgin materials is reviewed. The four materials examined are glass, paper, steel, and aluminum. An attempt is made to assess this energy savings, reported by diverse sources, on a consistent basis or at least by pointing out the conceptual bases on which the results were obtained. Significant savings in manufacturing energy are achievable for aluminum, steel, glass, and certain grades of paper. These materials are all potentially recoverable from the municipal solid waste stream, but must be of a purity and in a form acceptable to the respective industries for reuse in manufacturing.

  12. Antifriction Property of Microarc Oxidation Coating on Titanium Alloy Under Solid Lubricating Sliding Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. M.; Jiang, B. L.; Guo, L. X.; Lei, T. Q.

    Ceramic coatings were fabricated on Ti6Al4V alloy surface by microarc oxidation (MAO) in Na2SiO3-(NaPO3)6-NaAlO2 solution using an AC power supply. Microstructure and phase composition of coating were characterized by SEM and XRD, respectively. The antifriction property of the coating with and without solid lubricant sliding against SAE 52100 steel ball was investigated on a pin-on-disk friction and wear tester. The results show that the microarc oxidation coating is relatively dense and uniform, mainly composed of rutile and anatase. The coating sliding against the steel has friction coefficient as low as 0.2-0.3 at an applied load of 0.5 N and sliding cycle below 2500, which is much smaller than that of uncoated Ti6Al4V against the same counterpart. The transferring of materials from the softer steel ball onto the coating surface is the main wear event, while the microarc oxidation coating is characterized by slight abrasive wear and adhesive wear. Introducing solid graphite lubricant into the porous surface of microarc oxidation coating significantly improves the long-term antifriction property (registering friction efficient of 0.15 in the long-term sliding) under a similar sliding condition. This improvement is attributed to the reduction of materials that are transferred from the softer steel ball onto the coating surface.

  13. Irradiation Assisted Grain Boundary Segregation in Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zheng; Faulkner, Roy G.

    2008-07-01

    The understanding of radiation-induced grain boundary segregation (RIS) has considerably improved over the past decade. New models have been introduced and much effort has been devoted to obtaining comprehensive information on segregation from the literature. Analytical techniques have also improved so that chemical analysis of layers 1 nm thick is almost routine. This invited paper will review the major methods used currently for RIS prediction: namely, Rate Theory, Inverse Kirkendall, and Solute Drag approaches. A summary is made of the available data on phosphorus RIS in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. This will be discussed in the light of the predictions of the various models in an effort to show which models are the most reliable and easy to use for forecasting P segregation behaviour in steels. A consequence of RIS in RPV steels is a radiation induced shift in the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). It will be shown how it is possible to relate radiation-induced P segregation levels to DBTT shift. Examples of this exercise will be given for RPV steels and for ferritic steels being considered for first wall fusion applications. Cr RIS in high alloy stainless steels and associated irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) will be briefly discussed. (authors)

  14. Ultrahigh Ductility, High-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-10-01

    Based on the proposed design idea of the anti-transformation-induced plasticity effect, both the additions of the Nb element and pretreatment of the normalization process as a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) were designed for Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb hot-rolled steel. This high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel exhibits a tensile strength of 1890 MPa and elongation of 29 pct accompanied by the excellent product of tensile and elongation of 55 GPa pct. The origin of ultrahigh ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel is revealed from two aspects: one is the softening of martensitic matrix due to both the depletion of carbon in the matensitic matrix during the Q-P-T process by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to retained austenite and the reduction of the dislocation density in a martensitic matrix by dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect during deformation, which significantly enhances the deformation ability of martensitic matrix; another is the high mechanical stability of considerable carbon-enriched retained austenite, which effectively reduces the formation of brittle twin-type martensite. This work verifies the correctness of the design idea of the anti-TRIP effect and makes the third-generation advanced high-strength steels extend to the field of high-carbon steels from low- and medium-carbon steels.

  15. Ultrahigh Ductility, High-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-07-01

    Based on the proposed design idea of the anti-transformation-induced plasticity effect, both the additions of the Nb element and pretreatment of the normalization process as a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) were designed for Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb hot-rolled steel. This high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel exhibits a tensile strength of 1890 MPa and elongation of 29 pct accompanied by the excellent product of tensile and elongation of 55 GPa pct. The origin of ultrahigh ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel is revealed from two aspects: one is the softening of martensitic matrix due to both the depletion of carbon in the matensitic matrix during the Q-P-T process by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to retained austenite and the reduction of the dislocation density in a martensitic matrix by dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect during deformation, which significantly enhances the deformation ability of martensitic matrix; another is the high mechanical stability of considerable carbon-enriched retained austenite, which effectively reduces the formation of brittle twin-type martensite. This work verifies the correctness of the design idea of the anti-TRIP effect and makes the third-generation advanced high-strength steels extend to the field of high-carbon steels from low- and medium-carbon steels.

  16. Microstructural studies of advanced austenitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, J. A.; Ren, Jyh-Ching

    1989-11-15

    This report presents the first complete microstructural and analytical electron microscopy study of Alloy AX5, one of a series of advanced austenitic steels developed by Maziasz and co-workers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for their potential application as reheater and superheater materials in power plants that will reach the end of their design lives in the 1990's. The advanced steels are modified with carbide forming elements such as titanium, niobium and vanadium. When combined with optimized thermo-mechanical treatments, the advanced steels exhibit significantly improved creep rupture properties compared to commercially available 316 stainless steels, 17--14 Cu--Mo and 800 H steels. The importance of microstructure in controlling these improvements has been demonstrated for selected alloys, using stress relaxation testing as an accelerated test method. The microstructural features responsible for the improved creep strengths have been identified by studying the thermal aging kinetics of one of the 16Ni--14Cr advanced steels, Alloy AX5, in both the solution annealed and the solution annealed plus cold worked conditions. Time-temperature-precipitation diagrams have been developed for the temperature range 600 C to 900 C and for times from 1 h to 3000 h. 226 refs., 88 figs., 10 tabs.

  17. Ion-nitriding of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, O.; Hertz, D.; Lebrun, J.P.; Michel, H.

    1995-12-31

    Although ion-nitriding is an extensively industrialized process enabling steel surfaces to be hardened by nitrogen diffusion, with a resulting increase in wear, seizure and fatigue resistance, its direct application to stainless steels, while enhancing their mechanical properties, also causes a marked degradation in their oxidation resistance. However, by adaption of the nitriding process, it is possible to maintain the improved wear resistant properties while retaining the oxidation resistance of the stainless steel. The controlled diffusion permits the growth of a nitrogen supersaturated austenite layer on parts made of stainless steel (AISI 304L and 316L) without chromium nitride precipitation. The diffusion layer remains stable during post heat treatments up to 650 F for 5,000 hrs and maintains a hardness of 900 HV. A very low and stable friction coefficient is achieved which provides good wear resistance against stainless steels under diverse conditions. Electrochemical and chemical tests in various media confirm the preservation of the stainless steel characteristics. An example of the application of this process is the treatment of Reactor Control Rod Cluster Assemblies (RCCAs) for Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactors.

  18. Utilization of structural steel in buildings

    PubMed Central

    Moynihan, Muiris C.; Allwood, Julian M.

    2014-01-01

    Over one-quarter of steel produced annually is used in the construction of buildings. Making this steel causes carbon dioxide emissions, which climate change experts recommend be reduced by half in the next 37 years. One option to achieve this is to design and build more efficiently, still delivering the same service from buildings but using less steel to do so. To estimate how much steel could be saved from this option, 23 steel-framed building designs are studied, sourced from leading UK engineering firms. The utilization of each beam is found and buildings are analysed to find patterns. The results for over 10 000 beams show that average utilization is below 50% of their capacity. The primary reason for this low value is ‘rationalization’—providing extra material to reduce labour costs. By designing for minimum material rather than minimum cost, steel use in buildings could be drastically reduced, leading to an equivalent reduction in ‘embodied’ carbon emissions. PMID:25104911

  19. Development of Steel Foam Materials and Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Kremer; Anthony Liszkiewicz; James Adkins

    2004-10-20

    In the past few years there has been a growing interest in lightweight metal foams. Demands for weight reduction, improved fuel efficiency, and increased passenger safety in automobiles now has manufacturers seriously considering the use of metal foams, in contrast to a few years ago, when the same materials would have been ruled out for technical or economical reasons. The objective of this program was to advance the development and use of steel foam materials, by demonstrating the advantages of these novel lightweight materials in selected generic applications. Progress was made in defining materials and process parameters; characterization of physical and mechanical properties; and fabrication and testing of generic steel foam-filled shapes with compositions from 2.5 wt.% to 0.7 wt.% carbon. A means of producing steel foam shapes with uniform long range porosity levels of 50 to 60 percent was demonstrated and verified with NDE methods. Steel foam integrated beams, cylinders and plates were mechanically tested and demonstrated advantages in bend stiffness, bend resistance, and crush energy absorption. Methods of joining by welding, adhesive bonding, and mechanical fastening were investigated. It is important to keep in mind that steel foam is a conventional material in an unconventional form. A substantial amount of physical and mechanical properties are presented throughout the report and in a properties database at the end of the report to support designer's in applying steel foam in unconventional ways.

  20. Microstructure and mechanical properties of diffusion bonded W/steel joint using V/Ni composite interlayer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.S.; Cai, Q.S. Ma, Y.Z.; Wang, Y.Y.; Liu, H.Y.; Li, D.X.

    2013-12-15

    Diffusion bonding between W and steel using V/Ni composite interlayer was carried out in vacuum at 1050 °C and 10 MPa for 1 h. The microstructural examination and mechanical property evaluation of the joints show that the bonding of W to steel was successful. No intermetallic compound was observed at the steel/Ni and V/W interfaces for the joints bonded. The electron probe microanalysis and X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that Ni{sub 3}V, Ni{sub 2}V, Ni{sub 2}V{sub 3} and NiV{sub 3} were formed at the Ni/V interface. The tensile strength of about 362 MPa was obtained for as-bonded W/steel joint and the failure occurred at W near the V/W interface. The nano-indentation test across the joining interfaces demonstrated the effect of solid solution strengthening and intermetallic compound formation in the diffusion zone. - Highlights: • Diffusion bonding of W to steel was realized using V/Ni composite interlayer. • The interfacial microstructure of the joint was clarified. • Several V–Ni intermetallic compounds were formed in the interface region. • The application of V/Ni composite interlayer improved the joining quality.

  1. Mathematical Modelling of Solidification in a Curved Strand During Continuous Casting of Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, Ambrish; Jha, Pradeep Kumar

    2016-06-01

    A two dimensional fluid flow, heat transfer and solidification model has been developed for a curved shape continuous steel slab caster. The strand has been divided in various sections depending upon cooling conditions in the mold and Secondary Cooling Zone (SCZ). The model was validated against the experimental results reported in the literature for solid shell thickness in the mold. CFD software ANSYS Fluent has been used for solving the differential equations of heat transfer and fluid flow. Surface temperature distribution has been predicted while; the thickness of solid shell formed in the mold and SCZ has been calculated by finding the liquid fraction of steel within the domain. Process parameters such as, casting speed and cooling rate has been varied to analyse their effects on metallurgical length and solid shell thickness at the mold exit. The analysis was based on keeping the shell thickness between 10 and 14 mm at mold exit and metallurgical length less than the cut-off length but having complete solidification after the straightening zone.

  2. General view of the Solid Rocket Booster's (SRB) Solid Rocket ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of the Solid Rocket Booster's (SRB) Solid Rocket Motor Segments in the Surge Building of the Rotation Processing and Surge Facility at Kennedy Space Center awaiting transfer to the Vehicle Assembly Building and subsequent mounting and assembly on the Mobile Launch Platform. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  3. Solid Phase Characterization of Solids Recovered from Failed Sluicer Arm

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Gary A.

    2015-03-09

    The Enclosure to this memo discusses the solid phase characterization of a solid sample that was retrieved from the single-shell Tank 241-C-111 extended reach sluicer #2. This sluicer, removed from riser #3 on September 25, 2014, was found to have approximately 0.4 gallons of solid tank waste adhering to the nozzle area.

  4. Tensile-property characterization of thermally aged cast stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, W.F.; Toben, P.T.; Soppet, W.K.; Chopra, O.K.

    1994-02-01

    The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of cast stainless steels during service in light water reactors has been evaluated. Tensile data for several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steels are presented. Thermal aging increases the tensile strength of these steels. The high-C Mo-bearing CF-8M steels are more susceptible to thermal aging than the Mo-free CF-3 or CF-8 steels. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in tensile flow and yield stresses and engineering stress-vs.-strain curve of cast stainless steel as a function of time and temperature of service. The tensile properties of aged cast stainless steel are estimated from known material information, i.e., chemical composition and the initial tensile strength of the steel. The correlations described in this report may be used for assessing thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel components.

  5. Modification of Alumina and Spinel Inclusions by Calcium in Liquid Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Neerav

    2011-12-01

    Steel Cleanliness plays a crucial role in determining steel properties such as toughness, ductility, formability, corrosion resistance and surface quality. The production of clean steel often involves the elimination or chemical and morphological modification of oxide and sulfide inclusions. Along with deteriorating the steel properties, solid inclusions can affect steel castability through nozzle clogging. Nozzle clogging occurs when solid inclusions accumulate in the caster pouring system such as the ladle shroud or submerged entry nozzle (SEN). Thus, it is important to understand how to achieve desired inclusion characteristics (shape, size and chemistry) through the steelmaking process. Among the various practices adopted in industries to counteract the effect of solid inclusions, modification of solid inclusions to liquid or partially liquid state through calcium treatment is one of the methods. Calcium can be used because it has a strong ability to form oxides and sulfides. In Al-killed steels, the most common inclusions are alumina (Al2O3) inclusions, which are solid at steelmaking temperatures. On calcium treatment, solid alumina inclusions are converted to calcium aluminates, which have liquidus temperatures lower than steelmaking temperature (1600°C) [14]. It has been found that alumina inclusions may contain some MgO and such inclusions are termed alumina magnesia spinels (Al2O3.xMgO) [18]. These spinels are more stable than alumina and it has been suggested that they might be more difficult to modify [18]. But, some authors have proposed that MgO can actually help in the liquefaction of inclusions, and have demonstrated successful modification of spinels by Ca treatment [20, 21]. In the present research, the mechanism of transformation of alumina and spinel inclusions upon calcium treatment was studied by characterizing transient evolution of inclusions. A vacuum induction was used for melting, making additions (Al, Al-Mg and CaSi2) and sampling. The

  6. Influence of the PM-Processing Route and Nitrogen Content on the Properties of Ni-Free Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefor, Kathrin; Walter, M.; Weddeling, A.; Hryha, E.; Huth, S.; Weber, S.; Nyborg, L.; Theisen, W.

    2015-03-01

    Ni-free austenitic steels alloyed with Cr and Mn are an alternative to conventional Ni-containing steels. Nitrogen alloying of these steel grades is beneficial for several reasons such as increased strength and corrosion resistance. Low solubility in liquid and δ-ferrite restricts the maximal N-content that can be achieved via conventional metallurgy. Higher contents can be alloyed by powder-metallurgical (PM) production via gas-solid interaction. The performance of sintered parts is determined by appropriate sintering parameters. Three major PM-processing routes, hot isostatic pressing, supersolidus liquid phase sintering (SLPS), and solid-state sintering, were performed to study the influence of PM-processing route and N-content on densification, fracture, and mechanical properties. Sintering routes are designed with the assistance of thermodynamic calculations, differential thermal analysis, and residual gas analysis. Fracture surfaces were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Tensile tests and X-ray diffraction were performed to study mechanical properties and austenite stability. This study demonstrates that SLPS process reaches high densification of the high-Mn-containing powder material while the desired N-contents were successfully alloyed via gas-solid interaction. Produced specimens show tensile strengths >1000 MPa combined with strain to fracture of 60 pct and thus overcome the other tested production routes as well as conventional stainless austenitic or martensitic grades.

  7. Dynamics of solid dispersions in oil during the lubrication of point of contacts. Part 2: Molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cusano, C.; Sliney, H. E.

    1981-01-01

    A Hertzian contact consisting of a steel ball in contact with a glass disk is lubricated with MoS2 dispersions and observed by optical microscopy at various slide/roll conditions. In general the behavior of MoS2 and graphite are similar. That is, the solids tend to enter the contact and form a film on the contacting surfaces whenever a rolling component of motion is used, but solid particles seldom enter the contact during pure sliding. The MoS2 has more pronounced plastic flow behavior than graphite. However, the polished steel ball is more readily scratched by MoS2 than by graphite. Under the conditions of these studies, lower friction and wear are observed with pure oil rather than with the dispersions. However under other conditions (such as different contact geometry or rougher surfaces) the solid lubricant dispersions might be beneficial.

  8. Steelmaking using a solid metallic charge. Electric or fuel melting units?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudim, Yu. A.; Zinurov, I. Yu.

    2011-12-01

    A continuously operating MAGMA plant is proposed as an alternative to a superpower arc steel-melting furnace in order to increase the utilization of the heat of primary energy carriers and the liquid semiproduct yield in melting of a solid metal charge. The principle of operation of this plant is described, and its operation characteristics are presented in comparison with those of modern electric-steelmaking furnaces.

  9. Corrosion behavior of iron and nickel base alloys under solid oxide fuel cell exposure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.

    2006-03-01

    Topography and phase composition of the scales formed on commercial ferritic stainless steels and experimental low CTE nickel-based alloys were studied in atmospheres simulating solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) environments. The materials were studied under dual environment conditions with air on one side of the sample and carbon monoxide on the other side at 750°C. Surface characterization techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis were used in this study.

  10. Dissolution Behaviour of Hazardous Materials from Steel Slag with Wet Grinding Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisyamudin Muhd Nor, Nik; Norhana Selamat, Siti; Hanif Abd Rashid, Muhammad; Fauzi Ahmad, Mohd; Jamian, Saifulnizan; Chee Kiong, Sia; Fahrul Hassan, Mohd; Mohamad, Fariza; Yokoyama, Seiji

    2016-06-01

    Steel slag is a by-product from steel industry and it contains variety of hazardous materials. In this study, the dissolution behaviour and removal potential of hazardous materials from steel slag with the wet grinding method was investigated. The slag was wet ground in the CO2 atmosphere and the slurry produced was filtered using centrifugal separator to separate the liquid and solid sediments. Then, the concentrations of dissolved metal elements in the liquid sediment were analyzed by ICP-MS. The changes of pH during the grinding were also investigated. It was found that the pHs were decreased immediately after the CO2 gas introduced into the vessel. The pHs were ranging from 6.8 to 7.6 at the end of grinding. The dissolved concentration of Zn and Cr were ranging from 5~45 [mg/dm3] and 0.2~2.5 [mg/dm3] respectively. The ratios of Zn removal for stainless steel oxidizing and reducing slag were very high, but those from normal steel oxidizing and reducing slag were very low. It is assumed that the Zn dissolved as ZnOH+ from Zn(OH)2 that formed due to the reaction between ZnO and water. Dissolution of Cr also occurred but in very low quantity compared to the dissolution of Zn. The dissolution of Cr occurred due to the grinding process and small amount of Cr(OH)3 was formed during the grinding. This small formation of Cr(OH)3 resulted to the low dissolved concentration of Cr in the form of Cr(OH)2+. According to the XRD analysis, the Cr mostly existed in the slags as Cr(IIl) in the form of MgCr2O4 and FeCr2O4.

  11. The competing effects of slip and twinning on the deformation of Hadfield manganese steel single and polycrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaman, Ibrahim

    2000-10-01

    Hadfield steel is well known for its high strain hardening. However, the mechanism of high strain hardening is still not completely understood. There is a striking paucity of single crystal studies that would allow a superior understanding of the fundamental deformation mechanisms by circumventing the complications associated with grain boundaries. With this need, the present study is aimed at studying Hadfield steel in single and polycrystalline forms. For this purpose, the stress-strain behavior of Hadfield steel (Fe, 12.3% Mn, 1.0 C, in wt.%) single crystals studied for selected orientations ([001], [1¯11], [1¯23], [1¯44] and [1¯5 10]), and for different interstitial contents under tension and compression in the temperature range of 113 K to 293 K. The effect of twinning, slip and stacking faults was revealed in terms of the critical stress levels, and the strain-hardening coefficients. Based on the experimental observations, a model is presented that predicts the orientation, stress direction and solid solution content effects on the critical stress for initiating twinning. Nitrogen was also added to Hadfield steel. Nitrogen was not only proven to be a more effective strengthening agent than carbon in Hadfield steel but also it served as a better trigger for twinning. Stress-strain responses of Hadfield steel were modeled using a viscoplastic self consistent approach. A unique hardening formulation was proposed in the constitutive model incorporating length scales associated with spacing between twin lamellae and grain boundaries. The responses of single crystals and polycrystals with different grain sizes were captured closely with the model. Based on simulations, it was possible to explain unequivocally the upward curvature in stress-strain curves of Hadfield steel. A similar study on the 316L stainless steel single crystals indicated that the addition of nitrogen lead austenitic stainless steel to exhibit deformation mechanisms, orientation and

  12. Charge partitioning at gas-solid interfaces: humidity causes electricity buildup on metals.

    PubMed

    Ducati, Telma R D; Simões, Luís H; Galembeck, Fernando

    2010-09-01

    Isolated metals within Faraday cages spontaneously acquire charge at relative humidity above 50%: aluminum and chrome-plated brass become negative, stainless steel is rendered positive, and copper remains almost neutral. Isolated metal charging within shielded and grounded containers confirms that the atmosphere is an electric charge reservoir where OH(-) and H(+) ions transfer to gas-solid interfaces, producing net current. The electricity buildup dependence on humidity, or hygroelectricity, acts simultaneously but in opposition to the well-known charge dissipation due to the increase in surface conductance of solids under high humidity. Acknowledging this dual role of humidity improves the reproducibility of electrostatic experiments.

  13. How to Reduce Solid Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, George; Clapp, Leallyn B.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the problem of solid waste disposal in the United States, suggests ways in which solid wastes might be reduced, and proposes a number of related topics for student debate in classes or in science clubs. (JR)

  14. Effect of the Solution Annealing and Chemical Passivation Followed by Aging on the Corrosion of Shell Mold Cast CF8 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kuk-Jin; Ju, Heongkyu; Moon, Young-Dae; Hong, Jun Ho; Pak, Sung Joon

    2016-10-01

    The effects of solution annealing and passivation of shell mold cast CF8 stainless steels on Elbow pipe fittings with 2-month room temperature aging have been studied using a corrosion technique. The resistance of corrosion increased with 2-month room temperature aging combined with solid solution annealing and chemical passivation. The mode of corrosion was deeply related to the δ-ferrite content, permeability, and passivation. The corrosion probability decreased as both the δ-ferrite content and the permeability decreased. Therefore, it is considered that δ-ferrite content and passive film of Cr2O3 play an important role in corrosion resistance of CF8 Elbow pipe fittings due to the long-term aging with solid solution annealing and chemical passivation. This result shows that the corrosion resistance of CF8 fittings can be enhanced by the solid solution annealing and chemical passivation. Decreased ferrite phases and permeability improve IGC resistance in CF8 steel.

  15. Effect of the Solution Annealing and Chemical Passivation Followed by Aging on the Corrosion of Shell Mold Cast CF8 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kuk-Jin; Ju, Heongkyu; Moon, Young-Dae; Hong, Jun Ho; Pak, Sung Joon

    2016-07-01

    The effects of solution annealing and passivation of shell mold cast CF8 stainless steels on Elbow pipe fittings with 2-month room temperature aging have been studied using a corrosion technique. The resistance of corrosion increased with 2-month room temperature aging combined with solid solution annealing and chemical passivation. The mode of corrosion was deeply related to the δ-ferrite content, permeability, and passivation. The corrosion probability decreased as both the δ-ferrite content and the permeability decreased. Therefore, it is considered that δ-ferrite content and passive film of Cr2O3 play an important role in corrosion resistance of CF8 Elbow pipe fittings due to the long-term aging with solid solution annealing and chemical passivation. This result shows that the corrosion resistance of CF8 fittings can be enhanced by the solid solution annealing and chemical passivation. Decreased ferrite phases and permeability improve IGC resistance in CF8 steel.

  16. Ion-Solid Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastasi, Michael; Mayer, James; Hirvonen, James K.

    2004-12-01

    Modern technology depends on materials with precisely controlled properties. Ion beams are an excellent way to achieve controlled modification of surface and near-surface regions. In every integrated circuit production line, for example, there are ion implantation systems. In addition to integrated circuit technology, ion beams can modify the mechanical, tribological, and chemical properties of metal, intermetallic, and ceramic materials without altering their bulk properties. Ion-solid interactions are the foundation that underlies the broad application of ion beams to the modification of materials. This text covers the fundamentals and applications of ion-solid interactions, and is aimed at graduate students and researchers interested in electronic devices, surface engineering, reactor and nuclear engineering, and materials science issues associated with metastable phase synthesis.

  17. Edge remap for solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, James R.; Love, Edward; Robinson, Allen C.; Young, Joseph G.; Ridzal, Denis

    2013-12-01

    We review the edge element formulation for describing the kinematics of hyperelastic solids. This approach is used to frame the problem of remapping the inverse deformation gradient for Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) simulations of solid dynamics. For hyperelastic materials, the stress state is completely determined by the deformation gradient, so remapping this quantity effectively updates the stress state of the material. A method, inspired by the constrained transport remap in electromagnetics, is reviewed, according to which the zero-curl constraint on the inverse deformation gradient is implicitly satisfied. Open issues related to the accuracy of this approach are identified. An optimization-based approach is implemented to enforce positivity of the determinant of the deformation gradient. The efficacy of this approach is illustrated with numerical examples.

  18. Solid polymer membrane program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The results are presented for a solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell development program. Failure mechanism was identified and resolution of the mechanism experienced in small stack testing was demonstrated. The effect included laboratory analysis and evaluation of a matrix of configurations and operational variables for effects on the degree of hydrogen fluoride released from the cell and on the degree of blistering/delamination occurring in the reactant inlet areas of the cell and to correlate these conditions with cell life capabilities. The laboratory evaluation tests were run at conditions intended to accelerate the degradation of the solid polymer electrolyte in order to obtain relative evaluations as quick as possible. Evaluation of the resolutions for the identified failure mechanism in space shuttle configuration cell assemblies was achieved with the fabrication and life testing of two small stack buildups of four cell assemblies and eight cells each.

  19. Solid State Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Titan-CW Ti:sapphire (titanium-doped sapphire) tunable laser is an innovation in solid-state laser technology jointly developed by the Research and Solid State Laser Divisions of Schwartz Electro-optics, Inc. (SEO). SEO is producing the laser for the commercial market, an outgrowth of a program sponsored by Langley Research Center to develop Ti:sapphire technology for space use. SEO's Titan-CW series of Ti:sapphire tunable lasers have applicability in analytical equipment designed for qualitative analysis of carbohydrates and proteins, structural analysis of water, starch/sugar analyses, and measurements of salt in meat. Further applications are expected in semiconductor manufacture, in medicine for diagnosis and therapy, and in biochemistry.

  20. Solid state electrochemical current source

    DOEpatents

    Potanin, Alexander Arkadyevich; Vedeneev, Nikolai Ivanovich

    2002-04-30

    A cathode and a solid state electrochemical cell comprising said cathode, a solid anode and solid fluoride ion conducting electrolyte. The cathode comprises a metal oxide and a compound fluoride containing at least two metals with different valences. Representative compound fluorides include solid solutions of bismuth fluoride and potassium fluoride; and lead fluoride and potassium fluoride. Representative metal oxides include copper oxide, lead oxide, manganese oxide, vanadium oxide and silver oxide.