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Sample records for 12-week exercise training

  1. Effects of 12-week exercise training on osteocalcin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations, and insulin resistance in elderly females with osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Nayoung; Kim, Kijin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of exercise training on bone metabolism markers, inflammatory markers, and physical fitness in patients with osteoporosis from an osteoporosis-related immunological perspective. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-nine elderly female subjects (age, 74.2 ± 3.2 years) were classified into normal, osteopenia, and osteoporosis groups based on the T-score measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The exercise was performed voluntarily by the patients for 1 hour per day, three times per week, for 12 weeks. [Results] The differences between bone mineral content, bone mineral density, and osteocalcin concentrations increased significantly in the osteoporosis group after 12 weeks of exercise and were significantly higher than those in the normal and osteopenia groups. However, the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance score decreased significantly in the osteoporosis group after 12 weeks of exercise. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations tended to decrease in all groups after 12 weeks of exercise and showed an inverse correlation with osteocalcin concentration; however, no statistical significance was observed. [Conclusion] Our findings suggest that an exercise program in patients with osteopenia and osteoporosis effectively reduces the risk of osteoporotic fracture and related diseases since it improves bone density and physical fitness and reduces inflammatory marker levels.

  2. Effect of a 12-Week Low vs. High Intensity Aerobic Exercise Training on Appetite-Regulating Hormones in Obese Adolescents: A Randomized Exercise Intervention Study.

    PubMed

    Prado, Wagner Luiz; Lofrano-Prado, Mara Cristina; Oyama, Lila Missae; Cardel, Michelle; Gomes, Priscyla Praxedes; Andrade, Maria Laura S S; Freitas, Camila R M; Balagopal, Prabhakaran; Hill, James O

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about how the intensity of aerobic training influences appetite-regulating hormones in obese adolescents. Our goal was to assess the effect of low and high intensity aerobic trainings on food intake and appetite-regulating hormones in obese adolescents. Forty three obese adolescents (age: 13-18y, BMI: 34.48 ± 3.94 kg/m2) were randomized into high intensity training (HIT; n = 20) or low intensity training (LIT; n = 23) groups for 12 weeks. All participants also received the same nutritional, psychological and clinical counseling. Pre- and postintervention energy intake (EI) and circulating levels of insulin, leptin, peptide YY3-36 (PYY3-36) and ghrelin were measured. Adolescents in the HIT showed a reduction in total EI and an increase in PYY3-36 (p < .05). Aerobic exercise training performed at ventilatory threshold 1 intensity, reduced EI and augmented PYY3-36 in obese adolescents, compared with LIT. The data suggest that HIT and LIT have differential effects in the regulation of appetite signals and subsequent EI in obese adolescents. PMID:26680421

  3. The effect of 12-week Pilates exercises on wellness in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Su Yeon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the efficiency of 12-week Pilates exercises on wellness in the elderly. Before Pilates exercises training, the 88 elderly (63 females, 25 males) were given and completed a Wellness Scale. Then, the elderly participated in Pilates exercises and completed the same scale afterwards. Results of paired t-test showed that participants in 12-week Pilates exercises experienced significant improvement in physical (t=2.762, P<0.01), social (t=3.362, P<0.001), spiritual (t=2.307, P<0.05), and emotional wellness (t=2.489, P<0.05). Consequently, Pilates exercises helped improve wellness of the elderly. PMID:27162774

  4. The effect of 12-week Pilates exercises on wellness in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Roh, Su Yeon

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the efficiency of 12-week Pilates exercises on wellness in the elderly. Before Pilates exercises training, the 88 elderly (63 females, 25 males) were given and completed a Wellness Scale. Then, the elderly participated in Pilates exercises and completed the same scale afterwards. Results of paired t-test showed that participants in 12-week Pilates exercises experienced significant improvement in physical (t=2.762, P<0.01), social (t=3.362, P<0.001), spiritual (t=2.307, P<0.05), and emotional wellness (t=2.489, P<0.05). Consequently, Pilates exercises helped improve wellness of the elderly. PMID:27162774

  5. Exercise training versus diet-induced weight-loss on metabolic risk factors and inflammatory markers in obese subjects: a 12-week randomized intervention study.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Tore; Paulsen, Søren K; Bruun, Jens M; Pedersen, Steen B; Richelsen, Bjørn

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise training and diet-induced weight loss alone or in combination on inflammatory markers in circulation, in adipose tissue (AT) and in skeletal muscle (SM) in obese subjects. Seventy-nine obese subjects were randomized into a 12-wk intervention: 1) exercise only (EXO), 2) diet-induced weight loss using a very low energy diet (DIO), and 3) exercise and diet-induced weight-loss combined (DEX). Blood samples (metabolic and inflammatory markers) and AT and SM biopsies (mRNA expression) were collected at baseline and after 12 wk. In the EXO group the weight loss was 3.5 kg and in the DIO and DEX groups it was 12 kg in both. Vo(2max) was increased by 14-18% in the EXO and DEX groups with no changes in the DIO group. In the DIO and DEX groups, circulating levels of MCP-1, MIP-1alpha, IL-15, and IL-18 were decreased, and adiponectin was increased (P < 0.05 for all). In the EXO group, MCP-1 was decreased with 10% (P = 0.06). By combining the weight loss in all three groups, we found a correlation between the degree of weight loss and improvement in several of the inflammatory markers (P < 0.05). In AT biopsies, subjects in the DIO and DEX groups achieved a general beneficial but nonsignificant effect on the gene expression of inflammatory markers. In the EXO group, no changes in AT adipokine mRNA were found except for an increment of adiponectin (P < 0.05). In SM, the only observed change was that the gene expression of IL-6 was increased in all three groups (P < 0.05). In conclusion, rather large weight losses (>5-7%) were found to have beneficial effects on circulating inflammatory markers in these obese subjects. Aerobic exercise for 12 wk, which increased Vo(2max), was found to have no effects on circulating inflammatory markers in these obese patients. It is suggested that more intensive exercise may be necessary to affect systemic inflammation. PMID:20086201

  6. Effects of a 12-week strength training program on experimented fencers' movement time.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Juan C; Alonso, Cruz J; Sedano, Silvia; de Benito, Ana M

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 12-week strength training program on movement time (MT) on fencers of national level. Twelve male fencers were randomly divided into 2 groups: the control group (CG: N = 6; age, 22.3 ± 8.1 years) and the treatment group (TG: N = 6; age, 24.8 ± 7.2 years). The CG fencers followed the standard physical conditioning program, which was partially modified for the TG. The TG participated in a 12-week strength training program divided into 2 parts: maximal strength training, including weightlifting exercises (2 days a week for 6 weeks) and explosive strength training, with combined weights and plyometric exercises (2 days a week for 6 weeks). Body mass, body fat, muscle mass, jumping ability, maximal strength, reaction time, and MT were measured on 4 separate occasions. The TG demonstrated significant increases (p ≤ 0.05) in maximal strength and jumping ability after 6 weeks of training and in MT after 12 weeks. These improvements remained unaltered during the 4-week detraining period. It may be concluded that a 12-week strength training program can improve maximal and explosive strength, and these increases can be transferred to MT performance. However, fencers need time to transfer the gains. PMID:24942170

  7. Effect of a 12-week complex training on the body composition and cardiorespiratory system of female college students

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seungsuk; Han, Gunsoo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a complex exercise program on the body composition and cardiorespiratory system of female college students. [Subjects and Methods] This study included 20 female college students who had not participated in any particular sports in the last 3 months. The complex exercise program consisted of two parts, aerobic exercise and weight training. First, aerobic exercise was implemented (30 min 5 times a week for 12 weeks) according to the participants’ exercise tolerance. Second, weight training was implemented (40 min 5 times a week for 12 weeks) with 60% of 1 repetition maximum (RM). [Results] The t-test results showed significant differences in body composition between the before and after the complex exercise program. The subjects’ body weights and body fat percentages were decreased, and their skeletal muscle masses were increased. Increased levels of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), maximal expiratory volume (VEmax), and maximal heart rate (HRmax) were also observed. [Conclusion] In conclusion, the 12-week complex exercise program, including aerobic and weight training, had positive effects on the body composition and cardiorespiratory system of the female college students.

  8. Sustained improvements in fitness and exercise tolerance in obese adolescents after a 12 week exercise intervention.

    PubMed

    Gow, Megan L; van Doorn, Nancy; Broderick, Carolyn R; Hardy, Louise L; Ho, Mandy; Baur, Louise A; Cowell, Chris T; Garnett, Sarah P

    2016-01-01

    A 12 week exercise program was evaluated for its effect on aerobic fitness, anaerobic threshold, physical activity and sedentary behavior levels in obese insulin resistant adolescents post intervention and at follow up. 111 obese insulin resistant 10-17 year olds were recruited to a 12 month lifestyle intervention, known as RESIST. From months 4 to 6, adolescents participated in supervised exercise sessions twice per week (45-60min/session). Aerobic fitness and anaerobic threshold were measured by gas analysis at baseline, 6 months (post intervention) and 12 months (follow up). Self-reported physical activity and sedentary behavior was measured using the CLASS questionnaire. At 6 months aerobic fitness and time to reach the anaerobic threshold had improved by 5.8% [95% CI: 0.8-11.3] and 19.7% [95% CI: 10.4-29.0], respectively compared with baseline. These improvements were maintained at 12 months. Compared to baseline, 6 month physical activity levels increased by 19min/day [95% CI: 5-33] and screen time decreased by 49min/day [95% CI: 23-74] but returned to baseline levels by 12 months. Improved fitness and anaerobic threshold can be sustained up to 6 months following completion of an exercise program possibly enhancing capacity to perform daily functional tasks. PMID:25959765

  9. Effect of a 12-week aerobic training program on perceptual and affective responses in obese women

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Luís Alberto Garcia; Ferreira, Sandro dos Santos; Freitas, Rosemari Queiroz; Henrique de Souza, Carlos; Garcia, Erick Doner Santos de Abreu; Gregorio da Silva, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to observe the effect of self-selected intensity or imposed intensity during aerobic training on perceptual and affective responses in obese women. [Subjects] The study included 26 obese women aged 30–60 years. [Methods] The subjects were randomly divided into two groups, with 13 subjects in each group: self-selected intensity and imposed intensity (10% above ventilatory threshold) groups. All subjects completed an intervention program that lasted 12 weeks, with three exercise sessions a week. The rating of perceived exertion and affective responses (Feeling Scale and Felt Arousal Scale) were monitored in the first, sixth, and twelfth weeks. [Results] Significant differences were observed between groups in heart rate and rating of perceived exertion. The affective responses during exercise were more negative in the imposed intensity group. [Conclusion] Use of a self-selected exercise intensity can promote smaller negative affective responses during exercise and provide a sufficient stimulus for improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness. PMID:26311958

  10. Lung function profiles and aerobic capacity of adult cigarette and hookah smokers after 12 weeks intermittent training

    PubMed Central

    Koubaa, Abdessalem; Triki, Moez; Trabelsi, Hajer; Masmoudi, Liwa; Zeghal, Khaled N.; Sahnoun, Zouhair; Hakim, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary function is compromised in most smokers. Yet it is unknown whether exercise training improves pulmonary function and aerobic capacity in cigarette and hookah smokers and whether these smokers respond in a similar way as do non-smokers. Aim To evaluate the effects of an interval exercise training program on pulmonary function and aerobic capacity in cigarette and hookah smokers. Methods Twelve cigarette smokers, 10 hookah smokers, and 11 non-smokers participated in our exercise program. All subjects performed 30 min of interval exercise (2 min of work followed by 1 min of rest) three times a week for 12 weeks at an intensity estimated at 70% of the subject's maximum aerobic capacity (V.O2max). Pulmonary function was measured using spirometry, and maximum aerobic capacity was assessed by maximal exercise testing on a treadmill before the beginning and at the end of the exercise training program. Results As expected, prior to the exercise intervention, the cigarette and hookah smokers had significantly lower pulmonary function than the non-smokers. The 12-week exercise training program did not significantly affect lung function as assessed by spirometry in the non-smoker group. However, it significantly increased both forced expiratory volume in 1 second and peak expiratory flow (PEF) in the cigarette smoker group, and PEF in the hookah smoker group. Our training program had its most notable impact on the cardiopulmonary system of smokers. In the non-smoker and cigarette smoker groups, the training program significantly improved V.O2max (4.4 and 4.7%, respectively), v V.O2max (6.7 and 5.6%, respectively), and the recovery index (7.9 and 10.5%, respectively). Conclusions After 12 weeks of interval training program, the increase of V.O2max and the decrease of recovery index and resting heart rate in the smoking subjects indicated better exercise tolerance. Although the intermittent training program altered pulmonary function only partially, both

  11. A Comparison of 12 Weeks of Pilates and Aquatic Training on the Dynamic Balance of Women with Mulitple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Marandi, Sayyed Mohammad; Nejad, Vahid Shayegan; Shanazari, Zohreh; Zolaktaf, Vahid

    2013-01-01

    Background: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a disabling chronic disease of the nervous system in which the myelin system of the central nervous system is deteriorated. The objective of this study is to understand the effect of Pilates exercises and aquatic training for a 12 week period on the dynamic balance of MS patients. Methods: The research method is semi-experimental. As a result, among the female patients visiting the MS clinic of Kashani hospital in Esfahan, 57 patients with disease intensity levels between 0 and 4.5 were taken as samples. The average length of the disease was 8 ± 2 years, 20;40 years old, and they were randomly divided into three groups of Pilates exercise group, aquatic training group, and the control group. The exercise schedule for the experiment groups consisted of 12 weeks, three sessions per week, and 1 hour for each session. The dynamic balance of the patients, before and after the exercises was measured by Six Spot Step Test. Results: The adjusted mean differences of Timed Up and Go Test (TUGT) scores of the experimental groups are significantly different (P<0.05). Therefore, it can be said that Pilates exercise interventions and aquatic training can significantly increase the dynamic balance of the examinees in the post-experiment stage. Conclusions: Performing the Pilate exercises and aquatic training increases dynamic balance of the MS patients. Considering the role of dynamic balance on physical fitness and enabling the person in doing is daily chores and routines, and its direct effect on the quality of life, it leads the specialists in applying these exercises as a supplementary treatment along with the medicinal treatments for MS patients. PMID:23717760

  12. Changes in selected cardiorespiratory responses to exercise and in body composition following a 12-week aerobic dance programme.

    PubMed

    Williams, L D; Morton, A R

    1986-01-01

    Cardiorespiratory and body composition changes were evaluated in 25 sedentary females, aged 18 to 30 years, following 12 weeks of aerobic dance training (3 days a week, 45 min a session). Fifteen subjects, from the same population, comprised a control group: they maintained their normal activity and dietary habits over the course of the study. Analysis of variance of the values for selected cardiorespiratory responses revealed that the aerobic dance programme produced training effects in the experimental group. These training effects were indicated by significant improvements in O2 pulse, VE, heart rate and perceived exertion during submaximal exercise. Significant improvements were also noted in VO2 max, maximal O2 pulse, VE max, maximal heart rate and maximal running time on the treadmill. Additionally, increases in lean body mass and body density, together with decreases in percentage body fat and the sum of four skinfold thicknesses were found to be significant for the experimental group. No significant improvements in any of these variables were found for the control group. It was concluded that this 12-week aerobic dance programme was successful in promoting beneficial changes in cardiorespiratory fitness and body composition. PMID:3586112

  13. Effects of a 12-week resistance exercise program on physical self-perceptions in college students.

    PubMed

    Moore, Justin B; Mitchell, Nathanael G; Bibeau, Wendy S; Bartholomew, John B

    2011-06-01

    There is an increase in literature suggesting exercise can promote positive changes in physical self-perceptions that can manifest as an increase in global self-esteem. In the present study, we assessed self-esteem using the hierarchical framework of the Exercise and Self-Esteem Model (EXSEM) along with cognitive facets at the subdomain level (e.g., competence, certainty, importance, and ideal self-discrepancy). This allowed for an analysis of cognitive facets as possible contributors to changes in physical self-perceptions. We addressed these aims with a sample of 120 college-age adults who completed a 12-week resistance exercise program. Results indicated significant improvements in self-perception constructs at all levels of the EXSEM. The hierarchical structure of the EXSEM was partially supported, as we observed successively smaller improvements at each level of the model (e.g., self-esteem showed lesser improvements than physical self-worth). In addition, a path model developed to explain the impact of strength changes on self-esteem proved a good fit for the data. Results are discussed in terms of contemporary models of self-perception, potential mediators of exercise on self-esteem, and the need to consider cognitive facets of self-perception. PMID:21699109

  14. Effects of 12 weeks combined aerobic and resistance exercise on heart rate variability in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seol-Jung; Ko, Kwang-Jun; Baek, Un-Hyo

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effects of 12 weeks combined aerobic and resistance exercise on heart rate variability in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 16 female patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus selected among the participants of a chronic disease management exercise class at C Region Public Health Center in South Korea. Subjects were randomly assigned to the exercise group (n=8; age, 55.97 ± 7.37) or the control group (n=8; age, 57.53 ± 4.63) The exercise group performed aerobic and resistance exercises for 60 minutes per day, 3 times per week for 12 weeks. Anthropometric measurements, biochemical markers, physical fitness, and heart rate variability were examined. [Results] After 12 weeks of exercise, weight, body fat percentage, waist circumference, blood glucose, insulin resistance, glycated hemoglobin level, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure significantly decreased and cardiorespiratory fitness and muscular strength significantly increased in the exercise group. Although heart rate variability measures showed favorable changes with the exercise program, none were significant. [Conclusion] Although the exercise program did not show notable changes in heart rate variability in patients with Type 2 diabetes within the timeframe of the study, exercise may contribute to the prevention and control of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy. PMID:27512271

  15. Effects of 12 weeks combined aerobic and resistance exercise on heart rate variability in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seol-Jung; Ko, Kwang-Jun; Baek, Un-Hyo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effects of 12 weeks combined aerobic and resistance exercise on heart rate variability in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 16 female patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus selected among the participants of a chronic disease management exercise class at C Region Public Health Center in South Korea. Subjects were randomly assigned to the exercise group (n=8; age, 55.97 ± 7.37) or the control group (n=8; age, 57.53 ± 4.63) The exercise group performed aerobic and resistance exercises for 60 minutes per day, 3 times per week for 12 weeks. Anthropometric measurements, biochemical markers, physical fitness, and heart rate variability were examined. [Results] After 12 weeks of exercise, weight, body fat percentage, waist circumference, blood glucose, insulin resistance, glycated hemoglobin level, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure significantly decreased and cardiorespiratory fitness and muscular strength significantly increased in the exercise group. Although heart rate variability measures showed favorable changes with the exercise program, none were significant. [Conclusion] Although the exercise program did not show notable changes in heart rate variability in patients with Type 2 diabetes within the timeframe of the study, exercise may contribute to the prevention and control of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy. PMID:27512271

  16. The effect of 12 weeks Prop Pilates Exercise Program (PPEP) on body stability and pain for fruit farmers with MSDs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Nam, Sang-Nam; Bae, Ung Ryel; Hwang, Ryong; Lee, Jong-Bok; Kim, Jong-Hyuck

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine possible effects of 12-week Prop Pilates Exercise Program (PPEP) for the fruit farmers (grape, tomato, apple) with musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) on body stability and pain. 131 fruit farmers with MSD were selected and asked to join a 12-week Prop Pilates Exercise Program (PPEP) from 2009 to 2012. The subjects (female=74, male=57) aged 50 to 65 years old voluntarily participated. As a result, it was found that lateral-medial and anterior-posterior of body stability significantly improved in male and female fruit farmers. It was found that pain index (VAS) after 12-week Prop Pilates Exercise Program (PPEP) showed a significant decrease. PMID:24704650

  17. Effect of 12 Weeks of Periodized Resistance Training Upon Total Plasma Adiponectin Concentration in Healthy Young Men.

    PubMed

    Davis, Greggory R; Stephens, Jacqueline M; Nelson, Arnold G

    2015-11-01

    The effects of resistance training on adiponectin have thus far yielded equivocal results. However, the effect of periodized resistance training on plasma adiponectin in offspring of type 2 diabetic and nondiabetic (ND) parents (first-degree family history) has yet to be determined. Untrained healthy young men with and without a first-degree family history of type 2 diabetes were assigned to an exercise intervention group (E) or an active control group (C). The E group performed a 12-week periodized resistance training program, whereas the C group did not participate in any structured exercise program. Fasting plasma samples were obtained pre- and posttraining. Total plasma adiponectin changed significantly in the E group (33.7 ± 14.7%, p = 0.025) but not in the C group (10.8 ± 19.2%). Offspring of type 2 diabetic parents subjects had significantly greater improvements in plasma adiponectin (69.3 ± 34.8%) compared with ND subjects (-3.2 ± 29.9%, p = 0.046). Regular aerobic exercise was significantly correlated with average plasma adiponectin (r = 0.32), whereas first-degree family history of type 2 diabetes (r = -0.58) and decreases in body fat percentage (r = -0.77) were inversely correlated with average plasma adiponectin. Periodized high-intensity resistance training seems to increase plasma adiponectin, particularly in individuals with a first-degree family history of type 2 diabetes or those who experience a significant loss of fat mass. The direct correlation between regular aerobic exercise and adiponectin further suggests that a combination of aerobic and resistance training yields greater improvements in plasma adiponectin compared with resistance training alone. PMID:26274372

  18. Do soccer and Zumba exercise improve fitness and indicators of health among female hospital employees? A 12-week RCT.

    PubMed

    Barene, S; Krustrup, P; Jackman, S R; Brekke, O L; Holtermann, A

    2014-12-01

    This randomized controlled study investigated the effectiveness of soccer and Zumba on fitness and health indicators in female participants recruited from a workplace. One hundred seven hospital employees were cluster-randomized to either a soccer group (SG), Zumba group (ZG), or control group (CG). Intervention effects for the two training groups were compared with CG. The training was conducted outside working hours as 2-3 1-h sessions per week for 12 weeks. Peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak ), fat percentage, fat mass, bone mineral content, and plasma osteocalcin were measured before and after the intervention period. Based on intention-to-treat-analyses, SG significantly improved the VO2peak relative to body mass (5%; P = 0.02) and decreased heart rate during 100-W cycle exercise (-7 bpm; P = 0.01), total body fat percentage (-1.1%; P = 0.002), and total body fat mass (-1.0 kg; P = 0.001) compared with CG. ZG significantly improved the VO2peak relative to body mass (5%; P = 0.03) and decreased total fat mass (-0.6 kg; P < 0.05) compared with CG. Plasma osteocalcin increased in SG (21%; P < 0.001) and ZG (10%; P = 0.01) compared with CG. The present study indicates that workplace initiated short-term soccer training as well as Zumba outside working hours may result in fitness and modest health benefits among female hospital employees. PMID:24151956

  19. A 12-Week Exercise Program for Pregnant Women with Obesity to Improve Physical Activity Levels: An Open Randomised Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Alméras, Natalie; Dufresne, Sébastien S.; Robitaille, Julie; Rhéaume, Caroline; Bujold, Emmanuel; Frenette, Jérôme; Tremblay, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether a 12-week supervised exercise program promotes an active lifestyle throughout pregnancy in pregnant women with obesity. Methods In this preliminary randomised trial, pregnant women (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2) were allocated to either standard care or supervised training, from 15 to 27 weeks of gestation. Physical activity was measured by accelerometry at 14, 28 and 36 weeks, while fitness (oxygen consumption (VO2) at the anaerobic threshold), nutrition (caloric intake and macronutrients percentage) and anthropometry were assessed at 14 and 28 weeks of gestation. Analyses were performed using repeated measures ANOVA. Results A total of fifty (50) women were randomised, 25 in each group. There was no time-group interaction for time spent at moderate and vigorous activity (pinteraction = 0.064), but the exercise group’s levels were higher than controls’ at all times (pgroup effect = 0.014). A significant time-group interaction was found for daily physical activity (p = 0.023); similar at baseline ((22.0 ± 6.7 vs 21.8 ± 7.3) x 104 counts/day) the exercise group had higher levels than the control group following the intervention ((22.8 ± 8.3 vs 19.2 ± 4.5) x 104 counts/day, p = 0.020) and at 36 weeks of gestation ((19.2 ± 1.5 vs 14.9 ± 1.5) x 104 counts/day, p = 0.034). Exercisers also gained less weight than controls during the intervention period despite similar nutritional intakes (difference in weight change = -0.1 kg/week, 95% CI -0.2; -0.02, p = 0.016) and improved cardiorespiratory fitness (difference in fitness change = 8.1%, 95% CI 0.7; 9.5, p = 0.041). Conclusions Compared with standard care, a supervised exercise program allows pregnant women with obesity to maintain fitness, limit weight gain and attenuate the decrease in physical activity levels observed in late pregnancy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01610323 PMID:26375471

  20. Effects of a 12-Week Resistance Exercise Program on Physical Self-Perceptions in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Justin B.; Mitchell, Nathanael G.; Bibeau, Wendy S.; Bartholomew, John B.

    2011-01-01

    There is an increase in literature suggesting exercise can promote positive changes in physical self-perceptions that can manifest as an increase in global self-esteem. In the present study, we assessed self-esteem using the hierarchical framework of the Exercise and Self-Esteem Model (EXSEM) along with cognitive facets at the subdomain level…

  1. Predictors of adherence to a 12-week exercise program among men treated for prostate cancer: ENGAGE study.

    PubMed

    Craike, Melinda; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J; Courneya, Kerry S; Fraser, Steve F; Salmon, Jo; Owen, Patrick J; Broadbent, Suzanne; Livingston, Patricia M

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the factors that influence adherence to exercise programs is necessary to develop effective interventions for people with cancer. We examined the predictors of adherence to a supervised exercise program for participants in the ENGAGE study - a cluster randomized controlled trial that assessed the efficacy of a clinician-referred 12-week exercise program among men treated for prostate cancer. Demographic, clinical, behavioral, and psychosocial data from 52 participants in the intervention group were collected at baseline through self-report and medical records. Adherence to the supervised exercise program was assessed through objective attendance records. Adherence to the supervised exercise program was 80.3%. In the univariate analyses, cancer-specific quality of life subscales (role functioning r = 0.37, P = 0.01; sexual activity r = 0.26, P = 0.06; fatigue r = -0.26, P = 0.06, and hormonal symptoms r = -0.31, P = 0.03) and education (d = -0.60, P = 0.011) were associated with adherence. In the subsequent multivariate analysis, role functioning (B = 0.309, P = 0.019) and hormonal symptoms (B = -0.483, P = 0.054) independently predicted adherence. Men who experienced more severe hormonal symptoms had lower levels of adherence to the exercise program. Those who experienced more positive perceptions of their ability to perform daily tasks and leisure activities had higher levels of adherence to the exercise program. Hormonal symptoms and role functioning need to be considered when conducting exercise programs for men who have been treated for prostate cancer. PMID:26872005

  2. Effects of a 12-week healthy-life exercise program on oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and carotid intima-media thickness in obese elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Hwan; Park, Hyuntae; Lim, Seung-Taek; Park, Jin-Kee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of a 12-week exercise program on plasma level of oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in obese elderly women, who are at increased risk of heart disease morbidity. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty participants were assigned into either a control (n = 10) or a supervised exercise program (n = 10) group. The 12-week exercise intervention was performed 3 days per week and involved combined aerobic exercise, resistance exercise, and traditional Korean dance. [Results] Two-factor analysis of variance revealed significant group × time interactions for body mass, diastolic blood pressure, appendicular muscle mass. For high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and the ratio of oxidized low-/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, two-factor analysis of variance revealed significant interactions (group × time), indicating responses differed significantly between the control and exercise groups after 12 weeks. [Conclusion] A 12-week low- to moderate-intensity exercise program appears to be beneficial for obese elderly women by improving risk factors for cardiovascular disease. PMID:26157235

  3. Effects of a 12-week healthy-life exercise program on oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and carotid intima-media thickness in obese elderly women.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hwan; Park, Hyuntae; Lim, Seung-Taek; Park, Jin-Kee

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of a 12-week exercise program on plasma level of oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in obese elderly women, who are at increased risk of heart disease morbidity. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty participants were assigned into either a control (n = 10) or a supervised exercise program (n = 10) group. The 12-week exercise intervention was performed 3 days per week and involved combined aerobic exercise, resistance exercise, and traditional Korean dance. [Results] Two-factor analysis of variance revealed significant group × time interactions for body mass, diastolic blood pressure, appendicular muscle mass. For high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and the ratio of oxidized low-/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, two-factor analysis of variance revealed significant interactions (group × time), indicating responses differed significantly between the control and exercise groups after 12 weeks. [Conclusion] A 12-week low- to moderate-intensity exercise program appears to be beneficial for obese elderly women by improving risk factors for cardiovascular disease. PMID:26157235

  4. Promoting healthful diets and exercise: efficacy of a 12-week after-school program in urban African Americans.

    PubMed

    Engels, Hermann-J; Gretebeck, Randall J; Gretebeck, Kimberlee A; Jiménez, Linda

    2005-03-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a unique extracurricular after-school initiative designed to promote healthy diets and exercise in urban African Americans. The Students and Parents Actively Involved in Being Fit after-school program was offered for 12 weeks to students and their parents/guardians at an urban middle school. Specific aims of the intervention were to increase participants' vegetable and fruit intake by using established 5 A Day for Better Health educational resource materials/activities and to affect their health-related fitness through dance, games, and fitness activities. Fifty-six children and 25 parents/guardians completed a standard battery of evaluations before and after the program. Pre-post pairwise t test revealed that both children and their parents/guardians showed an increase in fruit consumption and a reduction in diastolic blood pressure (P <.05). Moreover, children showed improvements in systolic blood pressure and fruit juice, salad, and nonfried potato consumption while parents/guardians showed a decrease in body fat, body mass index, and endurance walk/run time (P <.05). Overall, findings indicate that children tended to gain more diet-related benefits while parents/guardians tended to derive more fitness-related benefits. After-school programs like the Students and Parents Actively Involved in Being Fit initiative can potentially contribute to improved health levels in urban African Americans. PMID:15746836

  5. Effect of an herbal/botanical supplement on strength, balance, and muscle function following 12-weeks of resistance training: a placebo controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background StemSport (SS; StemTech International, Inc. San Clemente, CA) contains a proprietary blend of the botanical Aphanizomenon flos-aquae and several herbal antioxidant and anti-inflammatory substances. SS has been purported to accelerate tissue repair and restore muscle function following resistance exercise. Here, we examine the effects of SS supplementation on strength adaptations resulting from a 12-week resistance training program in healthy young adults. Methods Twenty-four young adults (16 males, 8 females, mean age = 20.5 ± 1.9 years, mass = 70.9 ± 11.9 kg, stature = 176.6 ± 9.9 cm) completed the twelve week training program. The study design was a double-blind, placebo controlled parallel group trial. Subjects either received placebo or StemSport supplement (SS; mg/day) during the training. 1-RM bench press, 1-RM leg press, vertical jump height, balance (star excursion and center of mass excursion), isokinetic strength (elbow and knee flexion/extension) and perception of recovery were measured at baseline and following the 12-week training intervention. Results Resistance training increased 1-RM strength (p < 0.008), vertical jump height (p < 0.03), and isokinetic strength (p < 0.05) in both SS and placebo groups. No significant group-by-time interactions were observed (all p-values >0.10). Conclusions These data suggest that compared to placebo, the SS herbal/botanical supplement did not enhance training induced adaptations to strength, balance, and muscle function above strength training alone. PMID:24910543

  6. Effects of 12-week supervised treadmill training on spatio-temporal gait parameters in patients with claudication.

    PubMed

    Konik, Anita; Kuklewicz, Stanisław; Rosłoniec, Ewelina; Zając, Marcin; Spannbauer, Anna; Nowobilski, Roman; Mika, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate selected temporal and spatial gait parameters in patients with intermittent claudication after completion of 12-week supervised treadmill walking training. The study included 36 patients (26 males and 10 females) aged: mean 64 (SD 7.7) with intermittent claudication. All patients were tested on treadmill (Gait Trainer, Biodex). Before the programme and after its completion, the following gait biomechanical parameters were tested: step length (cm), step cycle (cycle/s), leg support time (%), coefficient of step variation (%) as well as pain-free walking time (PFWT) and maximal walking time (MWT) were measured. Training was conducted in accordance with the current TASC II guidelines. After 12 weeks of training, patients showed significant change in gait biomechanics consisting in decreased frequency of step cycle (p < 0.05) and extended step length (p < 0.05). PFWT increased by 96% (p < 0.05). MWT increased by 100% (p < 0.05). After completing the training, patients' gait was more regular, which was expressed via statistically significant decrease of coefficient of variation (p < 0.05) for both legs. No statistically significant relation between the post-training improvement of PFWT and MWT and step length increase and decreased frequency of step cycle was observed (p > 0.05). Implications for Rehabilitation Twelve-week treadmill walking training programme may lead to significant improvement of temporal and spatial gait parameters in patients with intermittent claudication. Twelve-week treadmill walking training programme may lead to significant improvement of pain-free walking time and maximum walking time in patients with intermittent claudication. PMID:26314413

  7. The impact of a 12-week resistance training program on strength, body composition, and self-concept of Hispanic adolescents.

    PubMed

    Velez, Amelia; Golem, Devon L; Arent, Shawn M

    2010-04-01

    Current evidence suggests that a resistance training program may be physically and psychologically beneficial for adolescents. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a structured resistance training program on strength, body composition, and self-concept in normal and overweight Hispanic adolescents. Male and female participants (n = 28; 16.1 +/- 0.2 y; 164.5 +/- 1.4 cm; 63.3 +/- 2.5 kg; 20.0 +/- 1.7% body fat [BF]) were recruited from a predominantly Hispanic high school. Prior to the 12-week program, strength, body composition, and self-concept were assessed. Subjects were randomly assigned to a control group (CON; n = 15) or to a resistance training group (RT; n = 13) that participated in supervised strength training 3 days/week. All measures were repeated at the end of the 12-week program. RT had significantly greater strength increases for bench press (p < 0.001), seated row (p = 0.002), shoulder press (p < 0.001), and squats (p = 0.002). RT had significant reductions in %BF (p = 0.001), whereas CON had slightly increased %BF. RT had an increase in condition/stamina competence (p = 0.008), attractive body adequacy (p = 0.017), and global self-worth (p = 0.013) from pretest to posttest, whereas no change was observed for CON. In conclusion, resistance training resulted in significant physiological and psychological improvements in Hispanic adolescents compared to typical school-based activities. These findings indicate that resistance training can be incorporated into the activities of Hispanic adolescents to promote improved health and fitness. PMID:20375719

  8. Effects of 12 weeks of aerobic training on autonomic modulation, mucociliary clearance, and aerobic parameters in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Marceli Rocha; Ramos, Ercy Mara Cipulo; Kalva-Filho, Carlos Augusto; Freire, Ana Paula Coelho Figueira; de Alencar Silva, Bruna Spolador; Nicolino, Juliana; de Toledo-Arruda, Alessandra Choqueta; Papoti, Marcelo; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques; Ramos, Dionei

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exhibit aerobic function, autonomic nervous system, and mucociliary clearance alterations. These parameters can be attenuated by aerobic training, which can be applied with continuous or interval efforts. However, the possible effects of aerobic training, using progressively both continuous and interval sessions (ie, linear periodization), require further investigation. Aim To analyze the effects of 12-week aerobic training using continuous and interval sessions on autonomic modulation, mucociliary clearance, and aerobic function in patients with COPD. Methods Sixteen patients with COPD were divided into an aerobic (continuous and interval) training group (AT) (n=10) and a control group (CG) (n=6). An incremental test (initial speed of 2.0 km·h−1, constant slope of 3%, and increments of 0.5 km·h−1 every 2 minutes) was performed. The training group underwent training for 4 weeks at 60% of the peak velocity reached in the incremental test (vVO2peak) (50 minutes of continuous effort), followed by 4 weeks of sessions at 75% of vVO2peak (30 minutes of continuous effort), and 4 weeks of interval training (5×3-minute effort at vVO2peak, separated by 1 minute of passive recovery). Intensities were adjusted through an incremental test performed at the end of each period. Results The AT presented an increase in the high frequency index (ms2) (P=0.04), peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) (P=0.01), vVO2peak (P=0.04), and anaerobic threshold (P=0.02). No significant changes were observed in the CG (P>0.21) group. Neither of the groups presented changes in mucociliary clearance after 12 weeks (AT: P=0.94 and CG: P=0.69). Conclusion Twelve weeks of aerobic training (continuous and interval sessions) positively influenced the autonomic modulation and aerobic parameters in patients with COPD. However, mucociliary clearance was not affected by aerobic training. PMID:26648712

  9. Effects of a 12 Week SAQ Training Programme on Agility with and without the Ball among Young Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Milanović, Zoran; Sporiš, Goran; Trajković, Nebojša; James, Nic; Samija, Krešimir

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 12 week conditioning programme involving speed, agility and quickness (SAQ) training and its effect on agility performance in young soccer players. Soccer players were randomly assigned to two groups: experimental group (EG; n = 66, body mass: 71.3 ± 5.9 kg; body height: 1.77 ± 0.07 m) and control group (CG; n = 66, body mass: 70.6 ± 4.9 kg; body height: 1.76 ± 0.06 m). Agility performance was assessed using field tests: Slalom; Slalom with ball; Sprint with 90° turns; Sprint with 90° turns with ball; Sprint with 180° turns; Sprint with backward and forward running; Sprint 4 x 5 m. Statistically significant improvements (p < 0.05) between pre and post training were evident for almost all measures of agility, with and without the ball, with the exception being the Sprint with backward and forward running. This suggests that SAQ training is an effective way of improving agility, with and without the ball, for young soccer players and can be included in physical conditioning programmes. Key pointsSAQ training appears to be an effective way of improving agility with and without the ball in young soccer playersSoccer coaches could use this training during pre-season and in-season trainingCompared with pre-training, there was a statistically significant improvement in all but one measure of agility, both with and without the ball after SAQ training. PMID:24149731

  10. Effects of a 12 Week SAQ Training Programme on Agility with and without the Ball among Young Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Milanović, Zoran; Sporiš, Goran; Trajković, Nebojša; James, Nic; Šamija, Krešimir

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 12 week conditioning programme involving speed, agility and quickness (SAQ) training and its effect on agility performance in young soccer players. Soccer players were randomly assigned to two groups: experimental group (EG; n = 66, body mass: 71.3 ± 5.9 kg; body height: 1.77 ± 0.07 m) and control group (CG; n = 66, body mass: 70.6 ± 4.9 kg; body height: 1.76 ± 0.06 m). Agility performance was assessed using field tests: Slalom; Slalom with ball; Sprint with 90° turns; Sprint with 90° turns with ball; Sprint with 180° turns; Sprint with backward and forward running; Sprint 4 x 5 m. Statistically significant improvements (p < 0.05) between pre and post training were evident for almost all measures of agility, with and without the ball, with the exception being the Sprint with backward and forward running. This suggests that SAQ training is an effective way of improving agility, with and without the ball, for young soccer players and can be included in physical conditioning programmes. Key points SAQ training appears to be an effective way of improving agility with and without the ball in young soccer players Soccer coaches could use this training during pre-season and in-season training Compared with pre-training, there was a statistically significant improvement in all but one measure of agility, both with and without the ball after SAQ training PMID:24149731

  11. The relation between anthropometric and physiological variables and bat velocity of high-school baseball players before and after 12 weeks of training.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, David J; Szymanski, Jessica M; Schade, Ryan L; Bradford, T Jason; McIntyre, Joseph S; DeRenne, Coop; Madsen, Nels H

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this article was to investigate the relation between anthropometric and physiological variables to linear bat swing velocity (BV) of 2 groups of high-school baseball players before and after completing a 12-week periodized resistance exercise program. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 training groups using a stratified sampling technique. Group 1 (n = 24) and group 2 (n = 25) both performed a stepwise periodized resistance exercise program and took 100 swings a day, 3 d·wk-1, for 12 weeks with their normal game bat. Group 2 performed additional rotational and full-body medicine ball exercises 3 d·wk-1 for 12 weeks. Fourteen variables were measured or calculated before and after 12 weeks of training. Anthropometric and physiological variables tested were height, body mass, percent body fat, lean body mass (LBM), dominant torso rotational strength (DTRS) and nondominant torso rotational strength (NDTRS), sequential hip-torso-arm rotational strength measured by a medicine ball hitter's throw (MBHT), estimated 1 repetition maximum parallel squat (PS) and bench press (BP), vertical jump (VJ), estimated peak power, angular hip velocity (AHV), and angular shoulder velocity (ASV). The baseball-specific skill of linear BV was also measured. Statistical analysis indicated a significant moderately high positive relationship (p ≤ 0.05) between prelinear BV and pre-NDTRS for group 1, pre-LBM, DTRS, NDTRS, peak power, and ASV for group 2; moderate positive relationship between prelinear BV and preheight, LBM, DTRS, peak power, BP, PS, and ASV for group 1, preheight, body mass, MBHT, BP, and PS for group 2. Significantly high positive relationships were indicated between postlinear BV and post-NDTRS for group 1, post-DTRS and NDTRS for group 2; moderately high positive relationships between postlinear BV and post-LBM, DTRS, peak power, BP, and PS for group 1, postheight, LBM, VJ, peak power for group 2; moderate positive relationships between

  12. Effects of a 12-week Rehabilitation Program with Music & Exercise Groups on Range of Motion in Young Children with Severe Burns

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Christine Tuden; Serghiou, Michael; Herndon, David N.; Suman, Oscar E.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that rehabilitation programs supplemented with a strength and endurance-based exercise program improve lean body mass, pulmonary function, endurance, strength, and functional outcomes in severely burned children over the age of 7-years when compared to standard of care. To date, supplemental exercise programming for severely burned children under the age of 7-years has not yet been explored. The purpose of this study was to determine if a 12-week rehabilitation program supplemented with music & exercise, was more effective in improving functional outcomes than the standard of care alone. METHODS This is a descriptive study that measured elbow and knee range of motion (ROM) in 24 severely burned children between ages two and six years. Groups were compared for demographics as well as active and passive ROM to bilateral elbows and knees. A total of 15 patients completed the rehabilitation with supplemental music and exercise, and data was compared to 9 patients who received standard of care. RESULTS Patients receiving the 12-week program significantly improved ROM in all joints assessed except for one. Patients receiving standard of care showed a significant improvement in only one of the joints assessed. CONCLUSION Providing a structured supplemental music and exercise program in conjunction with occupational and physical therapy seems to improve both passive and active ROM to a greater extent than the standard of care alone. PMID:18849852

  13. Effects of a 12-week rehabilitation program with music & exercise groups on range of motion in young children with severe burns.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Christine Tuden; Serghiou, Michael; Herndon, David N; Suman, Oscar E

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that rehabilitation programs supplemented with a strength and endurance-based exercise program improve lean body mass, pulmonary function, endurance, strength, and functional outcomes in severely burned children over the age of 7-years when compared with standard of care (SOC). To date, supplemental exercise programming for severely burned children under the age of 7-years has not yet been explored. The purpose of this study was to determine if a 12-week rehabilitation program supplemented with music & exercise, was more effective in improving functional outcomes than the SOC alone. This is a descriptive study that measured elbow and knee range of motion (ROM) in 24 severely burned children between ages 2 and 6 years. Groups were compared for demographics as well as active and passive ROM to bilateral elbows and knees. A total of 15 patients completed the rehabilitation with supplemental music and exercise, and data was compared with 9 patients who received SOC. Patients receiving the 12-week program significantly improved ROM in all joints assessed except for one. Patients receiving SOC showed a significant improvement in only one of the joints assessed. Providing a structured supplemental music and exercise program in conjunction with occupational and physical therapy seems to improve both passive and active ROM to a greater extent than the SOC alone. PMID:18849852

  14. 12 Weeks of Combined Endurance and Resistance Training Reduces Innate Markers of Inflammation in a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wens, Inez; Nuyts, Amber H.; Hens, Niel; De Winter, Benedicte Y.; Koppen, Gudrun; Goossens, Herman; Van Damme, Pierre; Berneman, Zwi N.; Eijnde, Bert O.

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we reported that patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) demonstrate improved muscle strength, exercise tolerance, and lean tissue mass following a combined endurance and resistance exercise program. However, the effect of exercise on the underlying disease pathogenesis remains elusive. Since recent evidence supports a crucial role of dendritic cells (DC) in the pathogenesis of MS, we investigated the effect of a 12-week combined exercise program in MS patients on the number and function of DC. We demonstrate an increased number of plasmacytoid DC (pDC) following the exercise program. These pDC display an activated phenotype, as evidenced by increased numbers of circulating CD62L+ and CD80+ pDC. Interestingly, the number of CD80+ pDC positively correlates with the presence of IL-10-producing regulatory type 1 cells (Tr1), an important cell type for maintaining peripheral tolerance to self-antigens. In addition, decreased production of the inflammatory mediators, TNF-α and MMP-9, upon Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation was found at the end of the exercise program. Overall, our findings suggest that the 12-week exercise program reduces the secretion of inflammatory mediators upon TLR stimulation and promotes the immunoregulatory function of circulating pDC, suggestive for a favorable impact of exercise on the underlying immunopathogenesis of MS. PMID:26903712

  15. Portuguese Special Course: 12 Weeks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This 12-week course in beginning Portuguese comprises four volumes of student text (Lessons 1-55) and a fifth volume of Portuguese-English/English-Portuguese vocabulary. Lesson materials consist of basic dialogs with English translation, recombination dialogs, readings and comprehension questions, oral exercises, and in later units, additional…

  16. Effect of 12-week-long aerobic training programme on body composition, aerobic capacity, complete blood count and blood lipid profile among young women

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Robert; Jastrzębski, Zbigniew; Zarębska, Aleksandra; Bichowska, Marta; Drobnik-Kozakiewicz, Izabela; Radzimiński, Łukasz; Leońska-Duniec, Agata; Ficek, Krzysztof; Cięszczyk, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Background Numerous data suggest that aerobic-type exercise improves lipoprotein-lipid profiles, cardiorespiratory fitness and body composition in young women. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biological response to high-low impact aerobic fitness among young women. Materials and methods Thirty-four young women aged 22 (19-24) years were divided into three groups: underweight (N = 10), normal weight (N = 12) and overweight (N = 12). Aerobic capacity, anthropometry and body composition together with complete blood count and lipid profile were determined before and after completion of a 12-week-long training period. Results The training programme caused a significant decrease in weight (by 4.3 kg, P = 0.003), body mass index (by 1.3 kg/m2, P = 0.003), free fat mass (by 2.1 kg, P = 0.002), total body water (by 0.4 kg, P = 0.036), percentage of fat (by 3 percent points, P = 0.002), all analyzed skinfolds thicknesses, as well as the lipid profile in overweight group, and no changes in normal weight group. Significant changes in weight (by 4.2 kg, P = 0.005), body mass index (by 0.9 kg/m2, P = 0.005), crus skinfold thickness (by 3.3 mm, P = 0.028), and in maximum oxygen uptake (by 2.49 mL/kg/min; P = 0.047) were observed among underweight women. No change in total blood count was observed in all groups. Conclusion Twelve-week-long fitness training programme of two alternating styles (low and high impact) has a beneficial effect on overweight young women. PMID:25672474

  17. A 12 week aerobic exercise program improves fitness, hepatic insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in obese Hispanic adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rise in obesity related morbidity in children and adolescents requires urgent prevention and treatment strategies. Strictly controlled exercise programs might be useful tools to improve insulin sensitivity and glucose kinetics. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that a 12-wk aerobic exerci...

  18. A 12-week aerobic exercise program reduces hepatic fat accumulation and insulin resistance in obese, Hispanic adolescents.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rise in obesity-related morbidity in children and adolescents requires urgent prevention and treatment strategies. Currently, only limited data are available on the effects of exercise programs on insulin resistance, and visceral, hepatic, and intramyocellular fat accumulation. We hypothesized t...

  19. Exercise training in asthma.

    PubMed

    Satta, A

    2000-12-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease that is often limiting the exercise capacity. Rehabilitation programs are recommended and widely applied in asthmatic patients, and exercise prescription is a keystone of these programs. The impairment of exercise performance in asthmatics, the role of exercise training in such patients, the mechanisms of its beneficial effects and the suggested programs are discussed in a review, accordingly to the current evidence and available data in scientific literature. Exercise performance is impaired in most asthmatics. There is no conclusive evidence that asthma may involve a ventilatory limitation to exercise. The lesser fitness in asthmatics seems mainly due to inactivity and sedentary lifestyle. Exercise induced asthma (EIA) is a significant problem, and the best approach to minimise its effects on exercise capacity is prevention. Exercise training has been proved to have health-related benefits and to improve the quality of life. There is substantial evidence that exercise training increases exercise performance and fitness in asthmatics. It is still unclear whether physical training improves pulmonary function and bronchial responsiveness. Since asthma ranges widely, exercise prescription varies for each patient. The proper selection of the patients and the choice of exercise programs are the steps required. Accordingly with the severity of the disease, exercise strategies may range from sports activities to, when the disease is severe, inpatient hospital programs that overlap with COPD rehabilitation. Further research to clarify some aspects (effects on pulmonary function and EIA, outcomes, cost-benefit relationship) is necessary. PMID:11296996

  20. Comparative effect of 12 weeks of slow and fast pranayama training on pulmonary function in young, healthy volunteers: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Dinesh, T; Gaur, GS; Sharma, VK; Madanmohan, T; Harichandra Kumar, KT; Bhavanani, AB

    2015-01-01

    Context: Pranayamas are breathing techniques that exert profound physiological effects on pulmonary, cardiovascular, and mental functions. Previous studies demonstrate that different types of pranayamas produce divergent effects. Aim: The aim was to compare the effect of 12 weeks of slow and fast pranayama training on pulmonary function in young, healthy volunteers. Settings and Design: This study was carried out in Departments of Physiology and ACYTER, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry in 2011. Subjects and Methods: Ninety one healthy volunteers were randomized into slow pranayama group (SPG), n =29, fast pranayama group (FPG), n = 32 and control groups (CG) (n = 30). Supervised pranayama training (SPG: Nadisodhana, Pranav pranayama and Savitri pranayama; FPG: Kapalabhati, Bhastrika and Kukkriya pranayama) was given for 30 min/day, thrice/week for 12 weeks by certified yoga instructors. Pulmonary function parameters (PFT) such as forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in first second (FEV1), ratio between FEV1 and FVC (FEV1 /FVC), peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV), and forced expiratory flow25-75 (FEF25-75), were recorded at baseline and after 12 weeks of pranayama training using the computerized spirometer (Micro laboratory V1.32, England). Results: In SPG, PEFR, and FEF25-75 improved significantly (P < 0.05) while other parameters (FVC, FEV1, FEV1 /FVC, and MVV) showed only marginal improvements. In FPG, FEV1 /FVC, PEFR, and FEF25-75 parameters improved significantly (P < 0.05), while FVC, FEV1, and MVV did not show significant (P > 0.05) change. No significant change was observed in CG. Conclusion: Twelve weeks of pranayama training in young subjects showed improvement in the commonly measured PFT. This indicates that pranayama training improved pulmonary function and that this was more pronounced in the FPG. PMID:25558130

  1. Swahili 12 Weeks Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This 12-weeks course in basic Swahili comprises 55 lesson units in five volumes. The general course format consists of (1) perception drills for comprehension, oral production, and association using "situational picture" illustrations; (2) dialogs in English and Swahili, with cartoon guides; (3) sequenced pattern and recombination drills, and (4)…

  2. Orthostasis: exercise and exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geelen, G.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    There are two major problems here that are not independent. One is the more practically oriented problem of determining the effect of various modes of exercise training on gravitational tolerances, i.e., the point of syncope (unconsciousness) usually estimated from the time of appearance of presyncopal signs and symptoms. The other is more theoretical and concerns the mechanism of blood pressure failure that results in syncope. In many experimental designs these two problems or purposes have been intermingled, with equivocal results.

  3. FAST CP: protocol of a randomised controlled trial of the efficacy of a 12-week combined Functional Anaerobic and Strength Training programme on muscle properties and mechanical gait deficiencies in adolescents and young adults with spastic-type cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Gillett, Jarred G; Lichtwark, Glen A; Boyd, Roslyn N; Barber, Lee A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) have muscles that are smaller, weaker and more resistant to stretch compared to typically developing people. Progressive resistance training leads to increases in muscle size and strength. In CP, the benefits of resistance training alone may not transfer to improve other activities such as walking; however, the transfer of strength improvements to improved mobility may be enhanced by performing training that involves specific functional tasks or motor skills. This study aims to determine the efficacy of combined functional anaerobic and strength training in (1) influencing muscle strength, structure and function and (2) to determine if any changes in muscle strength and structure following training impact on walking ability and gross motor functional capacity and performance in the short (following 3 months of training) and medium terms (a further 3 months post-training). Methods and analysis 40 adolescents and young adults with CP will be recruited to undertake a 12-week training programme. The training programme will consist of 3×75 min sessions per week, made up of 5 lower limb resistance exercises and 2–3 functional anaerobic exercises per session. The calf muscles will be specifically targeted, as they are the most commonly impacted muscles in CP and are a key muscle group involved in walking. If, as we believe, muscle properties change following combined strength and functional training, there may be long-term benefits of this type of training in slowing the deterioration of muscle function in people with spastic-type CP. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from the ethics committees at The University of Queensland (2014000066) and Children's Health Queensland (HREC/15/QRCH/30). The findings will be disseminated by publications in peer-reviewed journals, conferences and local research organisations’ media. Trial registration number Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials

  4. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic floor muscle training exercises are a series of exercises designed to strengthen the muscles of the pelvic floor. ... Pelvic floor muscle training exercises are recommended for: Women ... Men with urinary stress incontinence after prostate surgery ...

  5. Exercise training is beneficial for Alzheimer's patients.

    PubMed

    Santana-Sosa, E; Barriopedro, M I; López-Mojares, L M; Pérez, M; Lucia, A

    2008-10-01

    Decreased ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) associated with deterioration in physical capacity are key determinants of the poor quality of life and loss of independence of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 12-week training program (including resistance, flexibility, joint mobility and balance/coordination exercises) for Spanish patients with AD on their i) overall functional capacity (muscle strength and flexibility, agility and balance while moving, and endurance fitness), and ii) ability to perform ADLs. Using a randomized block design, 16 patients were assigned to a training (mean [SD] age: 76 [4] yrs) or control group (73 [4] yrs) (n = 8 subjects [3 male, 5 female] per group). The results showed significant improvements after training (p < 0.05) in upper and lower body muscle strength and flexibility, agility and dynamic balance, and endurance fitness (using the Senior Fitness test), gait and balance abilities (with subsequent decrease in risk of falls) (Tinetti scale) and in the ability to perform ADLs independently (Katz and Barthel scores). No changes (p > 0.05) were found in the control group over the 12-week period. Exercise training could be included in the overall medical/nursing care protocol for patients with AD. PMID:18401810

  6. Changes in Antioxidant Defense Capability and Lipid Profile after 12-Week Low- Intensity Continuous Training in Both Cigarette and Hookah Smokers: A Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Koubaa, Abdessalem; Triki, Moez; Trabelsi, Hajer; Masmoudi, Liwa; Sahnoun, Zouhair; Hakim, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    To examine the impact of low-intensity continuous training program on antioxidant defense capability and lipid profile in male cigarette or hookah smokers. Forty-three male adults participated in a 12-week continuous training program at an intensity of 40% of VO2max. All subjects were subjected to anthropometric, physical and biochemical tests before and after the training program. The increase of Glutathione reductase (GR) and Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is significant only for cigarette smokers (CS) and hookah smokers (HS) groups. The Malondialdehyde (MDA) decrease and α-tocopherol increase are significant only for HS group. GPx was increased in NS, CS and HS by 2.6% (p< 0.01), 2% (p< 0.05) and 1.7% (p< 0.05) respectively. Likewise, significant improvements of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and TC / HDL-C ratio were observed in three groups. En contrast no significant changes were recorded in triglycerides (TG). Also, significant reduction of total cholesterol (TC) for CS group (p< 0.01) and HS groups (p< 0.05). This continuous training program appears to have an important role in lipid levels improving and oxidative stress attenuation. PMID:26121249

  7. The Effect of a 12-Week Moderate Intensity Interval Training Program on the Antioxidant Defense Capability and Lipid Profile in Men Smoking Cigarettes or Hookah: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Koubaa, Abdessalem; Triki, Moez; Trabelsi, Hajer; Baati, Hamza; Sahnoun, Zouhair; Hakim, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To examine the impact of interval training program on the antioxidant defense capability and lipid profile in men smoking cigarettes or hookah unable or unwilling to quit smoking. Methods. Thirty-five participants performed an interval training (2 : 1 work : rest ratio) 3 times a week for 12 weeks at an intensity of 70% of VO2max. All subjects were subjected to a biochemical test session before and after the training program. Results. The increase of total antioxidant status (TAS), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and α-tocopherol, is significant only for cigarette smokers (CS) and hookah smokers (HS) groups. The decrease of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the increase of glutathione reductase (GR) are more pronounced in smokers groups compared to those of nonsmokers (NS). Superoxide dismutase (SOD) increases in NS, CS, and HS groups by 10.1%, 19.5%, and 13.3%, respectively (P < 0.001). Likewise, a significant improvement of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and TC/HDL-C ratio was observed in CS and HS groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Although the interval training program does not have a significant effect on blood lipid levels, it seems to be very beneficial in the defense and prevention programs of oxidative stress. PMID:25664340

  8. Changes in Antioxidant Defense Capability and Lipid Profile after 12-Week Low- Intensity Continuous Training in Both Cigarette and Hookah Smokers: A Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Koubaa, Abdessalem; Triki, Moez; Trabelsi, Hajer; Masmoudi, Liwa; Sahnoun, Zouhair; Hakim, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    To examine the impact of low-intensity continuous training program on antioxidant defense capability and lipid profile in male cigarette or hookah smokers. Forty-three male adults participated in a 12-week continuous training program at an intensity of 40% of VO2max. All subjects were subjected to anthropometric, physical and biochemical tests before and after the training program. The increase of Glutathione reductase (GR) and Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is significant only for cigarette smokers (CS) and hookah smokers (HS) groups. The Malondialdehyde (MDA) decrease and α-tocopherol increase are significant only for HS group. GPx was increased in NS, CS and HS by 2.6% (p< 0.01), 2% (p< 0.05) and 1.7% (p< 0.05) respectively. Likewise, significant improvements of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and TC/HDL-C ratio were observed in three groups. En contrast no significant changes were recorded in triglycerides (TG). Also, significant reduction of total cholesterol (TC) for CS group (p< 0.01) and HS groups (p< 0.05). This continuous training program appears to have an important role in lipid levels improving and oxidative stress attenuation. PMID:26121249

  9. Resistance exercise training and the orthostatic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, J. P.; Bamman, M. M.; Yelle, J. M.; LeBlanc, A. D.; Rowe, R. M.; Greenisen, M. C.; Lee, S. M.; Spector, E. R.; Fortney, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Resistance exercise has been suggested to increase blood volume, increase the sensitivity of the carotid baroreceptor cardiac reflex response (BARO), and decrease leg compliance, all factors that are expected to improve orthostatic tolerance. To further test these hypotheses, cardiovascular responses to standing and to pre-syncopal limited lower body negative pressure (LBNP) were measured in two groups of sedentary men before and after a 12-week period of either exercise (n = 10) or no exercise (control, n = 9). Resistance exercise training consisted of nine isotonic exercises, four sets of each, 3 days per week, stressing all major muscle groups. After exercise training, leg muscle volumes increased (P < 0.05) by 4-14%, lean body mass increased (P = 0.00) by 2.0 (0.5) kg, leg compliance and BARO were not significantly altered, and the maximal LBNP tolerated without pre-syncope was not significantly different. Supine resting heart rate was reduced (P = 0.03) without attenuating the heart rate or blood pressure responses during the stand test or LBNP. Also, blood volume (125I and 51Cr) and red cell mass were increased (P < 0.02) by 2.8% and 3.9%, respectively. These findings indicate that intense resistance exercise increases blood volume but does not consistently improve orthostatic tolerance.

  10. Effects of 12-Week Endurance Training at Natural Low Altitude on the Blood Redox Homeostasis of Professional Adolescent Athletes: A Quasi-Experimental Field Trial.

    PubMed

    Tong, Tomas K; Kong, Zhaowei; Lin, Hua; He, Yeheng; Lippi, Giuseppe; Shi, Qingde; Zhang, Haifeng; Nie, Jinlei

    2016-01-01

    This field study investigated the influences of exposure to natural low altitude on endurance training-induced alterations of redox homeostasis in professional adolescent runners undergoing 12-week off-season conditioning program at an altitude of 1700 m (Alt), by comparison with that of their counterparts completing the program at sea-level (SL). For age-, gender-, and Tanner-stage-matched comparison, 26 runners (n = 13 in each group) were selected and studied. Following the conditioning program, unaltered serum levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), and superoxide dismutase accompanied with an increase in oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and decreases of xanthine oxidase, reduced glutathione (GSH), and GSH/GSSG ratio were observed in both Alt and SL groups. Serum glutathione peroxidase and catalase did not change in SL, whereas these enzymes, respectively, decreased and increased in Alt. Uric acid (UA) decreased in SL and increased in Alt. Moreover, the decreases in GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio in Alt were relatively lower compared to those in SL. Further, significant interindividual correlations were found between changes in catalase and TBARS, as well as between UA and T-AOC. These findings suggest that long-term training at natural low altitude is unlikely to cause retained oxidative stress in professional adolescent runners. PMID:26783415

  11. Effects of 12-Week Endurance Training at Natural Low Altitude on the Blood Redox Homeostasis of Professional Adolescent Athletes: A Quasi-Experimental Field Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Tomas K.; Kong, Zhaowei; Lin, Hua; He, Yeheng; Lippi, Giuseppe; Shi, Qingde; Zhang, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    This field study investigated the influences of exposure to natural low altitude on endurance training-induced alterations of redox homeostasis in professional adolescent runners undergoing 12-week off-season conditioning program at an altitude of 1700 m (Alt), by comparison with that of their counterparts completing the program at sea-level (SL). For age-, gender-, and Tanner-stage-matched comparison, 26 runners (n = 13 in each group) were selected and studied. Following the conditioning program, unaltered serum levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), and superoxide dismutase accompanied with an increase in oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and decreases of xanthine oxidase, reduced glutathione (GSH), and GSH/GSSG ratio were observed in both Alt and SL groups. Serum glutathione peroxidase and catalase did not change in SL, whereas these enzymes, respectively, decreased and increased in Alt. Uric acid (UA) decreased in SL and increased in Alt. Moreover, the decreases in GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio in Alt were relatively lower compared to those in SL. Further, significant interindividual correlations were found between changes in catalase and TBARS, as well as between UA and T-AOC. These findings suggest that long-term training at natural low altitude is unlikely to cause retained oxidative stress in professional adolescent runners. PMID:26783415

  12. COPD: benefits of exercise training.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    In patients with stable, moderate or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), general exercise training, including limb exercises, provides sustained improvement in various quality of life domains, compared with care without pulmonary rehabilitation. After a COPD exacerbation, exercise training appears to reduce the risk of hospitalisation in the following months by at least half. Few studies have evaluated the adverse effects of exercise training in COPD, but based on the data available in 2015, its harm-benefit balance appears favourable. PMID:27152405

  13. Mitohormesis in exercise training.

    PubMed

    Merry, Troy L; Ristow, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Hormesis is a process whereby exposure to a low dose of a potentially harmful stressor promotes adaptive changes to the cell that enables it to better tolerate subsequent stress. In recent years this concept has been applied specifically to the mitochondria (mitohormesis), suggesting that in response to a perturbation the mitochondria can initiate and transduce a signal to the nucleus that coordinates a transcriptional response resulting in both mitochondrial and non-mitochondrial adaptations that return and maintain cellular homeostasis. In this review we summarize the evidence that mitohormesis is a significant adaptive-response signaling pathway, and suggest that it plays a role in mediating exercise-induced adaptations. We discuss potential mitochondrial emitters of retrograde signals that may activate known exercise-sensitive transcription factors to modulate transcription responses to exercise, and draw on evidence from mitochondrial dysfunction animal models to support a role for mitohormesis in mitochondrial biogenesis. Studies directly linking mitohormesis to the exercise training response are lacking, however mounting evidence suggests numerous signals are emitted from the mitochondria during exercise and have the potential to induce a nuclear transcription response, with reactive oxygen species (ROS) being the primary candidate. PMID:26654757

  14. A 12 WEEKS EXERCISE PROGRAM RESULTED IN REDUCED VISCERAL FAT AND FASTING INSULIN BUT NOT TOTAL AND INTRAMYOCELLULAR FAT IN HISPANIC OBESE ADOLESCENTS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The high prevalence of obesity in children and adolescents is a serious public health concern. Weight loss is known to improve insulin sensitivity but is difficult to achieve. The independent effects of exercise on body fat distribution and insulin sensitivity in the absence of overall w...

  15. A 12-Week Vigorous Exercise Protocol in a Healthy Group of Persons over 65: Study of Physical Function by means of the Senior Fitness Test.

    PubMed

    Todde, Francesco; Melis, Franco; Mura, Roberto; Pau, Massimiliano; Fois, Francesco; Magnani, Sara; Ibba, Gianfranco; Crisafulli, Antonio; Tocco, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 -9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 -15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 -8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults. PMID:27243035

  16. A 12-Week Vigorous Exercise Protocol in a Healthy Group of Persons over 65: Study of Physical Function by means of the Senior Fitness Test

    PubMed Central

    Todde, Francesco; Melis, Franco; Mura, Roberto; Pau, Massimiliano; Fois, Francesco; Magnani, Sara; Ibba, Gianfranco; Crisafulli, Antonio; Tocco, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults. PMID:27243035

  17. Exercise Versus +Gz Acceleration Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Simonson, S. R.; Stocks, J. M.; Evans, J. M.; Knapp, C. F.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Decreased working capacity and "orthostatic" intolerance are two major problems for astronauts during and after landing from spaceflight in a return vehicle. The purpose was to test the hypotheses that (1) supine-passive-acceleration training, supine-interval-exercise plus acceleration training, and supine exercise plus acceleration training will improve orthostatic tolerance (OT) in ambulatory men; and that (2) addition of aerobic exercise conditioning will not influence this enhanced OT from that of passive-acceleration training. Seven untrained men (24-38 yr) underwent 3 training regimens (30 min/d x 5d/wk x 3wk on the human-powered centrifuge - HPC): (a) Passive acceleration (alternating +1.0 Gz to 50% Gzmax); (b) Exercise acceleration (alternating 40% - 90% V02max leg cycle exercise plus 50% of HPCmax acceleration); and (c) Combined intermittent exercise-acceleration at 40% to 90% HPCmax. Maximal supine exercise workloads increased (P < 0.05) by 8.3% with Passive, by 12.6% with Exercise, and by 15.4% with Combined; but maximal V02 and HR were unchanged in all groups. Maximal endurance (time to cessation) was unchanged with Passive, but increased (P < 0.05) with Exercise and Combined. Resting pre-tilt HR was elevated by 12.9% (P < 0.05) only after Passive training, suggesting that exercise training attenuated this HR response. All resting pre-tilt blood pressures (SBP, DBP, MAP) were not different pre- vs. post-training. Post-training tilt-tolerance time and HR were increased (P < 0.05) only with Passive training by 37.8% and by 29.1%, respectively. Thus, addition of exercise training attenuated the increased Passive tilt tolerance. Resting (pre-tilt) and post-tilt cardiac R-R interval, stroke volume, end-diastolic volume, and cardiac output were all uniformly reduced (P < 0.05) while peripheral resistance was uniformly increased (P < 0.05) pre-and post-training for the three regimens indicating no effect of any training regimen on those cardiovascular

  18. Exercise Training During +Gz Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Chou, J. L.; Simonson, S. R.; Jackson, C. G. R.; Barnes, P. R.

    1999-01-01

    The overall purpose is to study the effect of passive (without exercise) and active (with exercise) +Gz (head-to-foot) acceleration training, using a short-arm (1.9m radius) centrifuge, on post- training maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max, work capacity) and 70 deg head-up tilt (orthostatic) tolerance in ambulatory subjects to test the hypothesis that (a) both passive and active acceleration training will improve post-training tilt-tolerance, and (b) there will be no difference in tilt-tolerance between passive and active exercise acceleration training because increased hydrostatic and blood pressures, rather than increased muscular metabolism, will provide the major adaptive stimulus. The purpose of the pilot study was to test the hypothesis that there would be no significant difference in the metabolic responses (oxygen uptake, heart rate, pulmonary ventilation, or respiratory exchange ratio) during supine exercise with moderate +Gz acceleration.

  19. Exercise Training in Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Chyu, Christopher; Halnon, Nancy

    2016-06-01

    Numerous observational reports suggesting the positive benefits of physical activity in patients diagnosed with cancer have prompted multiple investigative studies involving exercise training for patients throughout the continuum of a cancer diagnosis. Physicians and primary caregivers struggle to find clearly defined guidelines or recommendations for exercise prescriptions that are specific to their widely variable cancer patient populations. Although there continues to be emerging evidence supporting physical activity in cancer survivors, further research is required to investigate new and existing outcomes, methods to sustain positive effects of exercise over time, and to better define guidelines for exercise interventions that include exercise type, frequency, intensity, duration, and timing. Studies of exercise interventions on patients with a range of cancer diagnoses and differing cancer treatments, and involving the pediatric population should be further investigated to document benefit and develop more refined recommendations for physical activity in all cancer survivors. PMID:27155861

  20. Twelve-week exercise training and the quality of life in menopausal women – clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Dąbrowska, Jolanta; Rutkowska, Magdalena; Michalski, Bogdan Adam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The menopause transition is associated with decreased health functioning. About 80-90% of women experience mild to severe physical or physiological menopause-related complaints per year when approaching menopause. Physical activity may reduce some climacteric symptoms and improve the quality of life. Aim of the study Aim of the study was to investigate the influence of a 12-week training programme on the quality of life (QoL) in menopausal-aged women living in a rural area. Material and methods Participants were 80 women aged 40-65 years and divided into two randomly selected groups in training sessions (exercising group, n = 40 and control group, n = 40). SF36 was used to assess the quality of life in both groups before and after 12 weeks. Exercising women participated in training session 3 times a week. Each 60-minute exercise session included warming-up exercises, walking, stretching, strengthening exercises with an elastic band and cooling down exercises. Results A non-significant positive difference in all SF36 domains in the exercising group was observed. The results of the study showed a statistically significant higher QoL in the exercising group compared to the control group after 12-week training in two domains: vitality and mental health. The improvement in the quality of life in the study group was 0.19 points (role limits – physical domain, least change) and 4.96 (vitality domain, most change). Conclusions Controlled and regular exercise for 12 weeks was significantly correlated with a positive change in vitality and mental health. Sedentary women should consider modification of their lifestyle to include physical activity as it leads to improvement of their quality of life. PMID:27095954

  1. Hydration during intense exercise training.

    PubMed

    Maughan, R J; Meyer, N L

    2013-01-01

    Hydration status has profound effects on both physical and mental performance, and sports performance is thus critically affected. Both overhydration and underhydration - if sufficiently severe - will impair performance and pose a risk to health. Athletes may begin exercise in a hypohydrated state as a result of incomplete recovery from water loss induced in order to achieve a specific body mass target or due to incomplete recovery from a previous competition or training session. Dehydration will also develop in endurance exercise where fluid intake does not match water loss. The focus has generally been on training rather than on competition, but sweat loss and fluid replacement in training may have important implications. Hypohydration may impair training quality and may also increase stress levels. It is unclear whether this will have negative effects (reduced training quality, impaired immunity) or whether it will promote a greater adaptive response. Hypohydration and the consequent hyperthermia, however, can enhance the effectiveness of a heat acclimation program, resulting in improved endurance performance in warm and temperate environments. Drinking in training may be important in enhancing tolerance of the gut when athletes plan to drink in competition. The distribution of water between body water compartments may also be important in the initiation and promotion of cellular adaptations to the training stimulus. PMID:23899752

  2. Short term effects of exercise training on exercise capacity and quality of life in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Advances in the understanding and management of pulmonary arterial hypertension have enabled earlier diagnosis and improved prognosis. However, despite best available therapy, symptoms of exertional dyspnoea and fatigue are commonly reported and result in a reduced capacity to perform daily activities and impaired quality of life. Exercise training has demonstrated efficacy in individuals with other respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Historically, however, exercise training has not been utilised as a form of therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension due to the perceived risk of sudden cardiac death and the theoretical possibility that exercise would lead to worsening pulmonary vascular haemodynamics and deterioration in right heart function. Now, with the advances in pharmaceutical management, determining the safety and benefits of exercise training in this population has become more relevant. Only three studies of supervised exercise training in pulmonary arterial hypertension have been published. These studies demonstrated improvements in exercise capacity and quality of life, in the absence of adverse events or clinical deterioration. However, these studies have not utilised an outpatient-based, whole body exercise training program, the most common format for exercise programs within Australia. It is uncertain whether this form of training is beneficial and capable of producing sustained benefits in exercise capacity and quality of life in this population. Design/Methods This randomised controlled trial will determine whether a 12 week, outpatient-based, supervised, whole body exercise training program, followed by a home-based exercise program, is safe and improves exercise capacity and quality of life in individuals with pulmonary arterial hypertension. This study aims to recruit 34 subjects who will be randomly allocated to the exercise group (supervised exercise training 3 times a week for 12 weeks, followed by 3 sessions per week of home

  3. Eccentric exercise testing and training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarkson, Priscilla M.

    1994-01-01

    Some researchers and practitioners have touted the benefits of including eccentric exercise in strength training programs. However, others have challenged its use because they believe that eccentric actions are dangerous and lead to injuries. Much of the controversy may be based on a lack of understanding of the physiology of eccentric actions. This review will present data concerning eccentric exercise in strength training, the physiological characteristics of eccentric exercise, and the possible stimulus for strength development. Also a discussion of strength needs for extended exposure to microgravity will be presented. Not only is the use of eccentric exercise controversial, but the name itself is fraught with problems. The correct pronunciation is with a hard 'c' so that the word sounds like ekscentric. The confusion in pronunciation may have been prevented if the spelling that Asmussen used in 1953, excentric, had been adopted. Another problem concerns the expressions used to describe eccentric exercise. Commonly used expressions are negatives, eccentric contractions, lengthening contractions, resisted muscle lengthenings, muscle lengthening actions, and eccentric actions. Some of these terms are cumbersome (i.e., resisted muscle lengthenings), one is slang (negatives), and another is an oxymoron (lengthening contractions). Only eccentric action is appropriate and adoption of this term has been recommended by Cavanagh. Despite the controversy that surrounds eccentric exercise, it is important to note that these types of actions play an integral role in normal daily activities. Eccentric actions are used during most forms of movement, for example, in walking when the foot touches the ground and the center of mass is decelerated and in lowering objects, such as placing a bag of groceries in the car.

  4. Effects of Low Volume Aerobic Training on Muscle Desaturation During Exercise in Elderly Subjects.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shun; Kime, Ryotaro; Murase, Norio; Niwayama, Masatsugu; Osada, Takuya; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    Aging enhances muscle desaturation responses due to reduced O2 supply. Even though aerobic training enhances muscle desaturation responses in young subjects, it is unclear whether the same is true in elderly subjects. Ten elderly women (age: 62±4 years) participated in 12-weeks of cycling exercise training. Training consisted of 30 min cycling exercise at the lactate threshold. The subjects exercised 15±6 sessions during training. Before and after endurance training, the subjects performed ramp cycling exercise. Muscle O2 saturation (SmO2) was measured at the vastus lateralis by near infrared spectroscopy during the exercise. There were no significant differences in SmO2 between before and after training. Nevertheless, changes in peak pulmonary O2 uptake were significantly negatively related to changes in SmO2 (r=-0.67, p<0.05) after training. Muscle desaturation was not enhanced by low volume aerobic training in this study, possibly because the training volume was too low. However, our findings suggest that aerobic training may potentially enhance muscle desaturation at peak exercise in elderly subjects. PMID:26782196

  5. Benefits of Exercise Training in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Motl, Robert W; Sandroff, Brian M

    2015-09-01

    Exercise training represents a behavioral approach for safely managing many of the functional, symptomatic, and quality of life consequences of multiple sclerosis (MS). This topical review paper summarizes evidence from literature reviews and meta-analyses, supplemented by recent individual studies, indicating that exercise training can yield small but important improvements in walking, balance, cognition, fatigue, depression, and quality of life in MS. The paper highlights limitations of research on exercise training and its consequences and future research directions and provides an overview for promotion of exercise training in MS based on recent prescriptive guidelines. Collectively, the evidence for the benefits of exercise training in MS suggests that the time is ripe for the promotion of exercise by healthcare providers, particularly neurologists as a central part of the clinical care and management of MS patients. PMID:26223831

  6. Moderate exercise training attenuates aging-induced cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis injuries of rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Po-Hsiang; Hsieh, Dennis Jine-Yuan; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Day, Cecilia-Hsuan; Shen, Chia-Yao; Lai, Chao-Hung; Chen, Ray-Jade; Padma, V. Vijaya

    2015-01-01

    Aging is the most important risk factor in cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is the leading causes of death worldwide and the second major cause of death in Taiwan. The major factor in heart failure during aging is heart remodeling, including long-term stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Exercise is good for aging heart health, but the impact of exercise training on aging is not defined. This study used 3-, 12- and 18-month-old rats and randomly divided each age group into no exercise training control groups (C3, A12 and A18) and moderate gentle swimming exercise training groups (E3, AE12 and AE18). The protocol of exercise training was swimming five times weekly with gradual increases from the first week from 20 to 60 min for 12 weeks. Analyses of protein from rat heart tissues and sections revealed cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis pathway increases in aged rat groups (A12 and A18), which were improved in exercise training groups (AE12 and AE18). There were no heart injuries in young rat hearts in exercise group E3. These data suggest that moderate swimming exercise training attenuated aging-induced cardiac inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis injuries of rat hearts. PMID:26496028

  7. Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy after Aerobic Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Adam R.; Harber, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Current dogma suggests aerobic exercise training has minimal effect on skeletal muscle size. We and others have demonstrated that aerobic exercise acutely and chronically alters protein metabolism and induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy. These findings promote an antithesis to the status quo by providing novel perspective on skeletal muscle mass regulation and insight into exercise-countermeasures for populations prone to muscle loss. PMID:24508740

  8. Exercise Training and Bone Mineral Density.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohman, Timothy G.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of exercise on total and regional bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women is reviewed. Studies on non-estrogen-replete postmenopausal women show 1-2% changes in regional BMD with 1 year of weight-bearing exercises. Studies of exercise training in the estrogen-replete postmenopausal population suggest large BMD changes.…

  9. Effect of Exercise Training and +Gz Acceleration Training on Men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Simonson, Shawn R.; Stocks, Jodie M.; Evans, Joyce; Knapp, Charles F.; Cowell, Stephenie A.; Pemberton, Kendra N.; Wilson, Heather W.; Vener, Jamie M.; Evetts, Simon N.

    2001-01-01

    Countermeasures for reduction in work capacity (maximal oxygen uptake and strength) during spaceflight and enhanced orthostatic intolerance during re-entry, landing and egress from the return vehicle are continuing problems. The purpose for this study was to test the hypothesis that passive-acceleration training; supine, interval, exercise plus acceleration training and exercise combined with acceleration training would improve orthostatic tolerance in ambulatory men; and that addition of the aerobic exercise conditioning would not alter this improved tolerance from that of passive-acceleration training. Seven men (24-38 yr) underwent "Passive" training on the Ames human-powered centrifuge (HPC) for 30 min, "Exercise" training on the cycle ergometer with constant +Gz acceleration; and "Combined" exercise training at 40% to 90% of the HPC +Gz(max) exercise level. Maximal supine exercise loads increased significant (P<0.05) by 8.3% (Passive), 12.6% (Exercise), and by 15.4% (Combined) after training, but their post-training maximal oxygen uptakes and maximal heart rates were unchanged. Maximal time to fatigue (endurance) was unchanged with Passive was increased (P<0.05) with Exercise and Combined training. Thus, the exercise in the Exercise and Combined training Phases resulted in greater maximal loads and endurance without effect on maximal oxygen uptake or heart rate. There was a 4% to 6% increase (P<0.05) in all four quadriceps muscle volumes (right and left) after post-Combined training. Resting pre-tilt heart rate was elevated by 12.9% (P<0.05) only after Passive training suggesting that the exercise training attenuated the HR response. Plasma volume (% Delta) was uniformly decreased by 8% to 14% (P<0.05) at tilt-tolerance pre- vs. post-training indicating essentially no effect of training on the level of hypovolemia. Post-training tilt-tolerance time and heart rate were increased (P<0.05) only with Passive training by 37.8% and by 29.1%, respectively. Thus

  10. The effects of high-intensity intermittent exercise training on cardiovascular response to mental and physical challenge.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Mehrdad; Boutcher, Yati N; Boutcher, Stephen H

    2013-02-01

    The purpose was to examine the effect of a 12-week exercise intervention on the cardiovascular and autonomic response of males to mental and physical challenge. Thirty four young overweight males were randomly assigned to either an exercise or control group. The exercise group completed a high-intensity intermittent exercise (HIIE) program three times per week for 12weeks. Cardiovascular response to the Stroop task was determined before and after the intervention by assessing heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), arterial stiffness, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and skeletal muscle blood flow. The exercise group improved their aerobic fitness levels by 17% and reduced their body weight by 1.6kg. Exercisers compared to controls experienced a significant reduction in HR (p<0.001) and a significant increase in SV (p<0.001) at rest and during Stroop and exercise. For exercisers, arterial stiffness significantly decreased at rest and during Stroop (p<0.01), whereas BRS was increased at rest and during Stroop (p<0.01). Forearm blood flow was significantly increased during the first two minutes of Stroop (p<0.05). HIIE induced significant cardiovascular and autonomic changes at rest and during mental and physical challenge after 12weeks of training. PMID:23220158

  11. Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training

    2001-10-08

    ACE-IT is a computer-based training tool developed to simulate an on-site inspection of a facility. Inspectors and hosts practice realistic scenarios to prepare for inspections, to supplement tabletop and mock inspections, and for general training in managed access techniques. A training exercise is conducted between interconnected computer workstations. Participants at each workstation play a role, such as inspector or host, and the exercise permits team-specific actions at each stage of the inspection. Prompts and on-screenmore » menus let the participants know what responses are expected from them to continue the exercise.« less

  12. Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, George; Evanko, Deborah; Horak, Karl

    2001-10-08

    ACE-IT is a computer-based training tool developed to simulate an on-site inspection of a facility. Inspectors and hosts practice realistic scenarios to prepare for inspections, to supplement tabletop and mock inspections, and for general training in managed access techniques. A training exercise is conducted between interconnected computer workstations. Participants at each workstation play a role, such as inspector or host, and the exercise permits team-specific actions at each stage of the inspection. Prompts and on-screen menus let the participants know what responses are expected from them to continue the exercise.

  13. Paediatric exercise training in prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Pieles, Guido E; Horn, Richard; Williams, Craig A; Stuart, A Graham

    2014-04-01

    Exercise training is an underused intervention in paediatric healthcare. This is surprising, since initial evidence demonstrates its effectiveness and safety; furthermore it confers socioeconomic benefits for healthcare systems. Pilot studies have assessed and confirmed the feasibility of exercise training in many paediatric disease settings. However, more research is needed to understand the pathophysiology, quantify treatment effects and monitor outcomes. A concerted effort from researchers, health professionals and police makers will be necessary to make exercise training an evidence-based and cost-effective intervention in paediatric care. PMID:24351606

  14. Protein-Pacing and Multi-Component Exercise Training Improves Physical Performance Outcomes in Exercise-Trained Women: The PRISE 3 Study.

    PubMed

    Arciero, Paul J; Ives, Stephen J; Norton, Chelsea; Escudero, Daniela; Minicucci, Olivia; O'Brien, Gabe; Paul, Maia; Ormsbee, Michael J; Miller, Vincent; Sheridan, Caitlin; He, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial cardiometabolic and body composition effects of combined protein-pacing (P; 5-6 meals/day at 2.0 g/kg BW/day) and multi-mode exercise (resistance, interval, stretching, endurance; RISE) training (PRISE) in obese adults has previously been established. The current study examines PRISE on physical performance (endurance, strength and power) outcomes in healthy, physically active women. Thirty exercise-trained women (>4 days exercise/week) were randomized to either PRISE (n = 15) or a control (CON, 5-6 meals/day at 1.0 g/kg BW/day; n = 15) for 12 weeks. Muscular strength (1-RM bench press, 1-RM BP) endurance (sit-ups, SUs; push-ups, PUs), power (bench throws, BTs), blood pressure (BP), augmentation index, (AIx), and abdominal fat mass were assessed at Weeks 0 (pre) and 13 (post). At baseline, no differences existed between groups. Following the 12-week intervention, PRISE had greater gains (p < 0.05) in SUs, PUs (6 ± 7 vs. 10 ± 7, 40%; 8 ± 13 vs. 14 ± 12, 43% ∆reps, respectively), BTs (11 ± 35 vs. 44 ± 34, 75% ∆watts), AIx (1 ± 9 vs. -5 ± 11, 120%), and DBP (-5 ± 9 vs. -11 ± 11, 55% ∆mmHg). These findings suggest that combined protein-pacing (P; 5-6 meals/day at 2.0 g/kg BW/day) diet and multi-component exercise (RISE) training (PRISE) enhances muscular endurance, strength, power, and cardiovascular health in exercise-trained, active women. PMID:27258301

  15. Protein-Pacing and Multi-Component Exercise Training Improves Physical Performance Outcomes in Exercise-Trained Women: The PRISE 3 Study †

    PubMed Central

    Arciero, Paul J.; Ives, Stephen J.; Norton, Chelsea; Escudero, Daniela; Minicucci, Olivia; O’Brien, Gabe; Paul, Maia; Ormsbee, Michael J.; Miller, Vincent; Sheridan, Caitlin; He, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial cardiometabolic and body composition effects of combined protein-pacing (P; 5–6 meals/day at 2.0 g/kg BW/day) and multi-mode exercise (resistance, interval, stretching, endurance; RISE) training (PRISE) in obese adults has previously been established. The current study examines PRISE on physical performance (endurance, strength and power) outcomes in healthy, physically active women. Thirty exercise-trained women (>4 days exercise/week) were randomized to either PRISE (n = 15) or a control (CON, 5–6 meals/day at 1.0 g/kg BW/day; n = 15) for 12 weeks. Muscular strength (1-RM bench press, 1-RM BP) endurance (sit-ups, SUs; push-ups, PUs), power (bench throws, BTs), blood pressure (BP), augmentation index, (AIx), and abdominal fat mass were assessed at Weeks 0 (pre) and 13 (post). At baseline, no differences existed between groups. Following the 12-week intervention, PRISE had greater gains (p < 0.05) in SUs, PUs (6 ± 7 vs. 10 ± 7, 40%; 8 ± 13 vs. 14 ± 12, 43% ∆reps, respectively), BTs (11 ± 35 vs. 44 ± 34, 75% ∆watts), AIx (1 ± 9 vs. −5 ± 11, 120%), and DBP (−5 ± 9 vs. −11 ± 11, 55% ∆mmHg). These findings suggest that combined protein-pacing (P; 5–6 meals/day at 2.0 g/kg BW/day) diet and multi-component exercise (RISE) training (PRISE) enhances muscular endurance, strength, power, and cardiovascular health in exercise-trained, active women. PMID:27258301

  16. Effect of Aerobic Exercise Training on MDA and TNF-α Levels in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Mihriban; Ipekci, Suleyman Hilmi; Kebapcilar, Levent; Dogan Dede, Nesrin; Kurban, Sevil; Erbay, Ekrem; Gonen, Mustafa Sait

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with low-grade inflammation. The benefits of regular exercise for the DM are well established, whereas less is known about the impact of aerobic exercise on malondialdehyde (MDA) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the DM. Methods. We randomised 64 participants, who do not exercise regularly, without any diabetic chronic complications in parallel to 12 weeks of aerobic exercise (three times per week, n = 31) and no exercise (control; n = 33). Plasma levels of soluble TNF-α and MDA levels were measured before-after physical training programme and control group. Results. Sixty-four patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were analysed. When comparing the two groups of patients with age, gender, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels, lipid profile, waist circumference, body mass index (BMI) and class of treatment for diabetes were not different between groups. While soluble TNF-α remained essentially unaffected by physical training, plasma concentrations of MDA markedly decreased (P < 0.05); physical training also decreased body weight, waist circumference, and blood pressure (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Exercise training favorably affected body weight, waist circumference, and blood pressure. A three-weekly, 12-week, aerobic-training programme, without a concomitant weight loss diet, was associated with significant decrease in MDA levels in type 2 diabetic individuals.

  17. Effect of the low- versus high-intensity exercise training on endoplasmic reticulum stress and GLP-1 in adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Soo; Yoo, Jae Ho; So, Yong Seok

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The primary objective of this study was to investigate the effect of low-intensity exercise training compare with high-intensity exercise training on endoplasmic reticulum stress and glucagon-like peptide-1 in adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus. [Subjects and Methods] The low-intensity exercise training group performed aerobic exercise training at an intensity of ≤ 45% of the heart rate reserve. The high-intensity interval exercise training group performed interval exercise training at an intensity of ≥ 80% of the heart rate reserve. The exercise-related energy consumption was determined for both groups on a per-week basis (1,200 kcal/week). [Results] Both groups showed improvement in the glucose-regulated protein 78 and dipeptidyl peptidase-4, but the size of the between-group effect was not statistically significant. The high-intensity interval exercise training group showed a significant reduction in percentage body fat. The C-peptide level increased after the 12-weeks programs and was significantly different, between the groups. Fasting glucose, insulin resistance in the fasting state according to homeostasis model assessment, and leptin decreased after the 12-weeks exercise program and were significantly different between the groups, and glucagon-like peptide-1 increased after the 12-week exercise programs and was significantly different between the groups. [Conclusion] In conclusion high-intensity interval exercise training, as defined in this study, may lead to improvements in body composition, glycemic control, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and the glucagon-like peptide-1 in adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26644644

  18. Quick Tips for Weight Training Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Saul

    2004-01-01

    Weight training is one of the single most popular types of fitness activities in the United States. One of the reasons for its popularity is that it dramatically contributes to improved strength, muscle tone, body composition, health and appearance. Weight training is a progressive resistance exercise in which resistance is gradually increased as…

  19. Beneficial effects of training at the anaerobic threshold in addition to pharmacotherapy on weight loss, body composition, and exercise performance in women with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Ozcelik, Oguz; Ozkan, Yusuf; Algul, Sermin; Colak, Ramis

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine and compare the effects of weight loss achieved through orlistat therapy alone or a combination of orlistat and an aerobic exercise training program on aerobic fitness and body composition in obese females. Methods Twenty-eight obese patients were randomly assigned to receive 12-week treatment with hypocaloric diet–orlistat or diet–orlistat–exercise. Each participant performed an incremental ramp exercise test every 4 weeks to measure aerobic fitness. Fourteen participants performed continuous exercise (approximately 45 minutes per session) at a work rate corresponding to the anaerobic threshold three times per week. Results A decrease in the fat mass to body weight ratio of 3.8% (P=0.006) was observed at the end of the 12 weeks in the orlistat group, while a decrease of 9.5% (P=0.001) was seen in the orlistat–exercise group. Maximal exercise capacity increased by 46.5% in the orlistat–exercise group and by 19.5% in the orlistat group. Conclusion While orlistat therapy resulted in an improvement in body composition and aerobic fitness at the end of the 12-week period, its combination with exercise training provided improvements in the same parameters within the first 4 weeks of the study. These additional beneficial effects of combining aerobic exercise with orlistat therapy are important with regards to obesity-associated risk factors. PMID:26203232

  20. Early Rehabilitative Exercise Training in the Recovery from Pediatric Burn

    PubMed Central

    Hardee, Justin P.; Porter, Craig; Sidossis, Labros S.; Børsheim, Elisabet; Carson, James A.; Herndon, David N.; Suman, Oscar E.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of early outpatient exercise on muscle mass, function, and fractional synthetic rate in severely burned children. METHODS Forty-seven children with ≥40 % total body surface area burn performed 12-weeks standard of care rehabilitation (SOC: N=23) or rehabilitative exercise training (RET: N=24) immediately following hospital discharge. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to assess lean body mass (LBM) at discharge, post-treatment, and 12 months post-burn. Muscle function was evaluated with a Biodex Isokinetic Dynamometer and peak aerobic fitness (VO2peak) measured using a modified Bruce treadmill protocol post-treatment. Stable isotope infusion studies were performed in a subset of patients (SOC: N=13; RET: N=11) at discharge and post-treatment to determine mixed-muscle fractional synthetic rate. RESULTS Relative peak torque (RET: 138 ± 9 N · m · kg−1 vs SOC: 106 ± 9 N · m · kg−1) and VO2peak (RET: 32 ± 1 ml · kg−1 · min−1 vs SOC: 28 ± 1 ml · kg−1 · min−1) was greater post-treatment with RET compared to SOC. In addition, RET increased whole-body (9 ± 2%) and leg (17 ± 3%) LBM compared to SOC. Furthermore, the percentage change in whole-body (18 ± 3%) and leg (31 ± 4%) LBM from discharge to 12 months post-burn was greater with RET compared to SOC. Muscle fractional synthetic rate decreased from discharge to post-treatment in both groups (6.9 ± 1.1% · d−1 vs 3.4 ± 0.4% · d−1); however no differences were observed between treatment groups at each time-point. CONCLUSIONS Early outpatient exercise training implemented at hospital discharge represents an effective intervention to improve muscle mass and function following severe burn injury. PMID:24824900

  1. Is Moderate Intensity Exercise Training Combined with High Intensity Interval Training More Effective at Improving Cardiorespiratory Fitness than Moderate Intensity Exercise Training Alone?

    PubMed Central

    Roxburgh, Brendon H.; Nolan, Paul B.; Weatherwax, Ryan M.; Dalleck, Lance C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of either continuous moderate intensity exercise training (CMIET) alone vs. CMIET combined with a single weekly bout of high intensity interval training (HIIT) on cardiorespiratory fitness. Twenty nine sedentary participants (36.3 ± 6.9 yrs) at moderate risk of cardiovascular disease were recruited for 12 weeks of exercise training on a treadmill and cycle ergometer. Participants were randomised into three groups: CMIET + HIIT (n = 7; 8-12 x 60 sec at 100% VO2max, 150 sec active recovery), CMIET (n = 6; 30 min at 45-60% oxygen consumption reserve (VO2R)) and a sedentary control group (n = 7). Participants in the CMIET + HIIT group performed a single weekly bout of HIIT and four weekly sessions of CMIET, whilst the CMIET group performed five weekly CMIET sessions. Probabilistic magnitude-based inferences were determined to assess the likelihood that the true value of the effect represents substantial change. Relative VO2max increased by 10.1% (benefit possible relative to control) in in the CMIET + HIIT group (32.7 ± 9.2 to 36.0 ± 11.5 mL·kg-1·min-1) and 3.9% (benefit possible relative to control) in the CMIET group (33.2 ± 4.0 to 34.5 ± 6.1 mL·kg-1·min-1), whilst there was a 5.7% decrease in the control group (30.0 ± 4.6 to 28.3 ± 6.5 mL·kg-1·min-1). It was ‘unclear’ if a clinically significant difference existed between the effect of CMIET + HIIT and CMIET on the change in VO2max. Both exercising groups showed clinically meaningful improvements in VO2max. Nevertheless, it remains ‘unclear’ whether one type of exercise training regimen elicits a superior improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness relative to its counterpart. Key Points Both continuous moderate intensity exercise training (CMIET) alone and CMIET combined with a single weekly bout of high intensity interval training (CMIET + HIIT) elicit ‘possibly beneficial’ clinically meaningful improvements in cardiorespiratory

  2. Effects of intensive exercise training on immunity in athletes.

    PubMed

    Pyne, D B; Gleeson, M

    1998-07-01

    A large number of studies have failed to show whether exercise-induced perturbations in immune function are associated with the incidence of infection. "Sports immunology", examining the interaction of physical, psychological and environmental stress on immunity, is emerging as a sub-discipline of sports medicine. A series of studies by our research team has profiled the immune responses of elite swimmers during training. Serum immunoglobulin and IgG subclass levels were lower in swimmers than controls. Suppression of mucosal immune parameters has been associated with the risk of upper respiratory tract infection. Swimmers with a lower pre-season salivary IgA and/or lower pre-exercise salivary IgA level were more likely to contract an URTI during a 7-month training period. In a shorter 12-week study, infected swimmers had a mean salivary IgM concentration that dropped more sharply after a single training session. Significant declines in natural killer cell count and neutrophil oxidative activity were not associated with URTI. Despite systemic and mucosal immunosuppression a cohort of swimmers were also able to mount an antibody response to pneumococcal vaccine equivalent to that of sedentary individuals. Observations of chronic suppression of aspects of host defence and the significant relationship between changes in mucosal immune parameters and URTI, provide a framework for assessment of the immune status of athletes. The underlying causes of upper respiratory tract distress symptoms may be infective, inflammatory or allergic in origin: a differential diagnosis has implications for treatment and management. PMID:9722284

  3. Exercise, training and neutrophil microbicidal activity.

    PubMed

    Smith, J A; Telford, R D; Mason, I B; Weidemann, M J

    1990-06-01

    The concentration in human plasma of putative neutrophil-"priming" cytokines like endogenous pyrogens is known to increase significantly in response to moderate exercise (11). This is characteristic of an acute-phase response. The ability of blood neutrophils isolated from both trained and untrained human subjects (n = 11, 9) to produce microbicidal reactive oxygen species was determined using luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence both before and after one hour of aerobic exercise at 60% VO2max. Irrespective of training and stimulus concentration, exercise nearly always caused significant "priming" of the capacity of neutrophils to produce H2O2 and HOCl upon stimulation with opsonized zymosan (P less than 0.01); however, compared to their untrained counterparts, the activity of cells isolated from trained individuals was depressed about 50% at unit stimulus concentration, both before and after exercise (P less than 0.075), whilst remaining unaltered at saturating concentrations. Although neutrophil oxygenation activity is only one parameter that contributes to immunological status, regular episodes of moderate exercise may increase resistance to infection by priming the "killing capacity" of neutrophils. In contrast, prolonged periods of intensive training may lead to increased susceptibility to common infections by diminishing this activity. PMID:2115507

  4. Lifestyle modification decreases arterial stiffness in overweight and obese men: dietary modification vs. exercise training.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Seiji; Zempo-Miyaki, Asako; Sasai, Hiroyuki; Tsujimoto, Takehiko; So, Rina; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2015-02-01

    Obesity and increased arterial stiffness are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Arterial stiffness is increased in obese individuals than in age-matched nonobese individuals. We demonstrated that dietary modification and exercise training are effective in reducing arterial stiffness in obese persons. However, the differences in the effect on arterial stiffness between dietary modification and exercise training are unknown. The purpose of the current study was to compare the effect of dietary modification and aerobic exercise training on arterial stiffness and endothelial function in overweight and obese persons. Forty-five overweight and obese men (48 ± 1 year) completed either a dietary modification (well-balanced nutrient, 1680 kcal/day) or an exercise-training program (walking, 40-60 min/day, 3 days/week) for 12 weeks. Before and after the intervention, all participants underwent anthropometric measurements. Arterial stiffness was measured based on carotid arterial compliance, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), and endothelial function was determined by circulating level of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and nitric oxide metabolite (nitrites/nitrate as metabolite: NOx). Body mass and waist circumference significantly decreased after both intervention programs. Weight loss was greater after dietary modification than after exercise training (-10.1 ± 0.6 kg vs. -3.6 ± 0.5 kg, p < .01). Although arterial stiffness and the plasma levels of ET-1 and NOx were improved after dietary modification or exercise training, there were no differences in those improvements between the 2 types of interventions. Exercise training improves arterial function in obese men without as much weight loss as after dietary modification. PMID:25029200

  5. Central nervous system adaptation to exercise training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Lois Anne

    Exercise training causes physiological changes in skeletal muscle that results in enhanced performance in humans and animals. Despite numerous studies on exercise effects on skeletal muscle, relatively little is known about adaptive changes in the central nervous system. This study investigated whether spinal pathways that mediate locomotor activity undergo functional adaptation after 28 days of exercise training. Ventral horn spinal cord expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a trophic factor at the neuromuscular junction, choline acetyltransferase (Chat), the synthetic enzyme for acetylcholine, vesicular acetylcholine transporter (Vacht), a transporter of ACh into synaptic vesicles and calcineurin (CaN), a protein phosphatase that phosphorylates ion channels and exocytosis machinery were measured to determine if changes in expression occurred in response to physical activity. Expression of these proteins was determined by western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Comparisons between sedentary controls and animals that underwent either endurance training or resistance training were made. Control rats received no exercise other than normal cage activity. Endurance-trained rats were exercised 6 days/wk at 31m/min on a treadmill (8% incline) for 100 minutes. Resistance-trained rats supported their weight plus an additional load (70--80% body weight) on a 60° incline (3 x 3 min, 5 days/wk). CGRP expression was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). CGRP expression in the spinal dorsal and ventral horn of exercise-trained animals was not significantly different than controls. Chat expression measured by Western blot and IHC was not significantly different between runners and controls but expression in resistance-trained animals assayed by IHC was significantly less than controls and runners. Vacht and CaN immunoreactivity in motor neurons of endurance-trained rats was significantly elevated relative to control and resistance-trained animals. Ventral

  6. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22258946 . Dumoulin C, Hay-Smith J. Pelvic floor muscle training versus no treatment, ... nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20091581 . Herderschee R, Hay-Smith EJC, Herbison GP, Roovers JP, Heineman MJ. Feedback ...

  7. Effects Ala54Thr polymorphism of FABP2 on obesity index and biochemical variable in response to a aerobic exercise training

    PubMed Central

    Han, Tae Kyung

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether or not the FABP2 gene polymorphism modulated obesity indices, hemodynamic factor, blood lipid factor, and insulin resistance markers through 12-week aerobic exercise training in abdominal obesity group of Korean mid-life women. A total of 243 abdominally obese subjects of Korean mid-life women voluntarily participated in aerobic exercise training program for 12 weeks. Polymerase Chain Reaction with Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay was used to assess the FABP2 genotype of the participants (117 of AA homozygotes, 100 of AT heterozygotes, 26 of TT homozygotes). Prior to the participation of the exercise training program, baseline obesity indices, hemodynamic factor, blood lipid factor, and insulin resistance markers were measured. All the measurements were replicated following the 12-week aerobic exercise training program, and then the following results were found. After 12-week aerobic exercise training program, wild type (Ala54Ala) and mutant type (Ala54Thr+Thr54Thr) significantly decreased weight (P > .001), BMI (P > .001), %bf (P > .001), waist circumference (P > .001), WHR (P > .001), muscle mass (wild type p < .022; mutant type P > .001), RHR (P > .001), viseceral adipose area (wild type p < .005; mutant type P > .001), subcutaneous area (P > .001), insulin (wild type p < .005; mutant type P > .001) and significantly increased VO2max (P > .001). And wild type significantly decresed NEFA (P > .05), glucose (P > .05), OGTT 120min glucose (P > .05) and significantly increased HDLC (p > .005). Mutant type significantly decreased SBP (P > .001), DBP (P > .01), TC (P > .01), LPL (P > .05), LDL (P > .001), HOMA index (P > .01). The result of the present study represents that regular aerobic exercise training may beneficially prevent obesity index, blood pressure, blood lipids and insulin resistance markers independent of FABP Ala54Thr wild type and mutant type. PMID:25566432

  8. Aerobic exercise training without weight loss reduces dyspnea on exertion in obese women.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Vipa; Stickford, Jonathon L; Bhammar, Dharini M; Babb, Tony G

    2016-01-15

    Dyspnea on exertion (DOE) is a common symptom in obesity. We investigated whether aerobic exercise training without weight loss could reduce DOE. Twenty-two otherwise healthy obese women participated in a 12-week supervised aerobic exercise training program, exercising 30 min/day at 70-80% heart rate reserve, 4 days/week. Subjects were grouped based on their Ratings of Perceived Breathlessness (RPB) during constant load 60 W cycling: +DOE (n=12, RPB≥4, 37±7 years, 34±4 kg/m(2)) and -DOE (n=10, RPB≤2, 32±6 years, 33±3 kg/m(2)). No significant differences between the groups in body composition, pulmonary function, or cardiorespiratory fitness were observed pre-training. Post-training,peak was improved significantly in both groups (+DOE: 12±7, -DOE: 14±8%). RPB was significantly decreased in the +DOE (4.7±1.0-2.5±1.0) and remained low in the -DOE group (1.2±0.6-1.3±1.0) (interaction p<0.001). The reduction in RPB was not significantly correlated with the improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness. Aerobic exercise training improved cardiorespiratory fitness and DOE and thus appears to be an effective treatment for DOE in obese women. PMID:26593640

  9. Exercise Training During Bed Rest Attenuates Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A 30-day 6 deg. head-down bed rest study was conducted to evaluate high-intensity, short-duration, alternating isotonic cycle ergometer exercise (ITE) training and high-intensity intermittent isokinetic exercise (IKE) training regiments designed to maintain peak VO2 and muscle mass, strength, and endurance at ambulatory control levels throughout prolonged bed rest. Other elements of the deconditioning (acclimation) syndrome, such as proprioception, psychological performance, hypovolemia, water balance, body composition, and orthostatic tolerance, were also measured. Compared with response during bed rest of the no exercise (NOE) control group: the ITE training regimen (a) maintained work capacity (peak VO2), (b) maintained plasma and red cell volume, (c) induced positive body water balance, (d) decreased quality of sleep and mental concentration, and (e) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance; the IKE training regimen (a) attenuated the decrease in peak VO2 by 50%, (b) attenuated loss of red cell volume by 40%, but had no effect on loss of plasma volume, (c) induced positive body water balance, (d) had no adverse effect on quality of sleep or concentration, and (e) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance. These findings suggest that various elements of the deconditioning syndrome can be manipulated by duration and intensity of ITE or IKE training regiments, and that several different training protocols will be required to maintain or restore physiological and psychological performance of individuals confined to prolonged bed rest.

  10. Intense exercise training and immune function.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Michael; Williams, Clyde

    2013-01-01

    Regular moderate exercise reduces the risk of infection compared with a sedentary lifestyle, but very prolonged bouts of exercise and periods of intensified training are associated with increased infection risk. In athletes, a common observation is that symptoms of respiratory infection cluster around competitions, and even minor illnesses such as colds can impair exercise performance. There are several behavioral, nutritional and training strategies that can be adopted to limit exercise-induced immunodepression and minimize the risk of infection. Athletes and support staff can avoid transmitting infections by avoiding close contact with those showing symptoms of infection, by practicing good hand, oral and food hygiene and by avoiding sharing drinks bottles and cutlery. Medical staff should consider appropriate immunization for their athletes particularly when travelling to international competitions. The impact of intensive training stress on immune function can be minimized by getting adequate sleep, minimizing psychological stress, avoiding periods of dietary energy restriction, consuming a well-balanced diet that meets energy and protein needs, avoiding deficiencies of micronutrients (particularly iron, zinc, and vitamins A, D, E, B6 and B12), ingesting carbohydrate during prolonged training sessions, and consuming - on a daily basis - plant polyphenol containing supplements or foodstuffs and Lactobacillus probiotics. PMID:23899753

  11. Effects of treadmill exercise training on cerebellar estrogen and estrogen receptors, serum estrogen, and motor coordination performance of ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Rauf, Saidah; Soejono, Sri Kadarsih; Partadiredja, Ginus

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The present study aims at examining the motor coordination performance, serum and cerebellar estrogen, as well as ERβ levels, of ovariectomized rats (as menopausal model) following regular exercise. Materials and Methods: Ten female Sprague Dawley rats aged 12 weeks old were randomly divided into two groups; all of which underwent ovariectomy. The first group was treated with regular exercise of moderate intensity, in which the rats were trained to run on a treadmill for 60 min per day for 12 weeks. The second group served as control. Rotarod test was carried out before and after exercise treatment. All rats were euthanized thereafter, and blood and cerebellums of the rats were collected. The serum and cerebellar estrogen as well as cerebellar ERβ levels were measured using ELISA assays. Results: The number of falls in the rotarod task of the exercise group was significantly lower than that of control group. The cerebellar estrogen level of the exercise group was significantly higher than that of control group. Accordingly, there was a significantly negative correlation between the number of falls and cerebellar estrogen level in the exercise group. Conclusion: The present study shows that a lengthy period of regular exercise improves the cerebellar estrogen level and motor coordination performance in ovariectomized rats. PMID:26221482

  12. Aging, Functional Capacity and Eccentric Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Gault, Mandy L.; Willems, Mark E.T.

    2013-01-01

    Aging is a multi-factorial process that ultimately induces a decline in our physiological functioning, causing a decreased health-span, quality of life and independence for older adults. Exercise participation is seen as a way to reduce the impact of aging through maintenance of physiological parameters. Eccentric exercise is a model that can be employed with older adults, due to the muscle’s ability to combine high muscle force production with a low energy cost. There may however be a risk of muscle damage before the muscle is able to adapt. The first part of this review describes the process of aging and how it reduces aerobic capacity, muscle strength and therefore functional mobility. The second part highlights eccentric exercise and the associated muscle damage, in addition to the repeated bout effect. The final section reviews eccentric exercise interventions that have been completed by older adults with a focus on the changes in functional mobility. In conclusion, eccentric endurance exercise is a potential training modality that can be applied to older adults for improving muscle strength, aerobic capacity and functional ability. However, further research is needed to assess the effects on aerobic capacity and the ideal prescription for eccentric endurance exercise. PMID:24307968

  13. Predictors of fat mass changes in response to aerobic exercise training in women.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Brandon J; Bhammar, Dharini M; Angadi, Siddhartha S; Ryan, Dana M; Ryder, Justin R; Sussman, Elizabeth J; Bertmann, Farryl M W; Gaesser, Glenn A

    2015-02-01

    Aerobic exercise training in women typically results in minimal fat loss, with considerable individual variability. We hypothesized that women with higher baseline body fat would lose more body fat in response to exercise training and that early fat loss would predict final fat loss. Eighty-one sedentary premenopausal women (age: 30.7 ± 7.8 years; height: 164.5 ± 7.4 cm; weight: 68.2 ± 16.4 kg; fat percent: 38.1 ± 8.8) underwent dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry before and after 12 weeks of supervised treadmill walking 3 days per week for 30 minutes at 70% of (Equation is included in full-text article.). Overall, women did not lose body weight or fat mass. However, considerable individual variability was observed for changes in body weight (-11.7 to +4.8 kg) and fat mass (-11.8 to +3.7 kg). Fifty-five women were classified as compensators and, as a group, gained fat mass (25.6 ± 11.1 kg to 26.1 ± 11.3 kg; p < 0.001). The strongest correlates of change in body fat at 12 weeks were change in body weight (r = 0.52) and fat mass (r = 0.48) at 4 weeks. Stepwise regression analysis that included change in body weight and body fat at 4 weeks and submaximal exercise energy expenditure yielded a prediction model that explained 37% of the variance in fat mass change (R = 0.37, p < 0.001). Change in body weight and fat mass at 4 weeks were moderate predictors of fat loss and may potentially be useful for identification of individuals who achieve less than expected weight loss or experience unintended fat gain in response to exercise training. PMID:25353081

  14. [New strategies for exercise training in osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, A; Schilling, S; Neuerburg, C; Mutschler, W; Böcker, W; Felsenberg, D; Stumpf, U

    2015-11-01

    In the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, movement with muscle strengthening and proprioceptive training plays a major role. This was taken into consideration in the guidelines by the governing body on osteoporosis (Dachverband Osteoporose, DVO) from 2014 on prophylaxis, diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis and in the DVO guidelines from 2008 on physiotherapy and exercise therapy for osteoporosis. Increases in lumbar bone density of between 0.5 % and 2.5 % can be achieved in women by strengthening exercises with high resistance. With this combination and strengthening of the quadriceps muscle a reduction of falls and hence the fracture risk could also be achieved. In traumatology, training for muscle strengthening is not always possible, especially for elderly patients. Practically relevant alternatives are regular walking and aquatraining, which may also lead to a significant increase in bone mineral density. Furthermore, large effects can be achieved with alternating side whole-body vibration (WBV) training with whole body vibration plates with only 3 days of training per week and with short training periods (15-20 min). Rates of increase in leg strength between 20 % and almost 40 % and in bone density between 0.5 % and 4 % in 6 months have been described. Whether and with what intensity whole body vibration therapy could be used for e.g. more rapid healing of fractures, is currently unclear. Initial positive results have been described in animal models. PMID:26467265

  15. Exercise and training in women, Part I: Influence of gender on exercise and training responses.

    PubMed

    Shephard, R J

    2000-02-01

    Exercise and training responses in women are briefly reviewed. Part I of the paper considers the influence of gender on such responses. The average woman has a smaller inherent aerobic power and less muscular strength than a man, reflecting sociocultural influences, physical size, body composition, and hormonal milieu. Nevertheless, the best-trained women can out-perform sedentary men. The handicap of the average woman is offset by a lighter body mass and a tendency to metabolize fat rather than carbohydrate during exercise. A lack of anabolic hormones may limit training increases of muscle bulk in the female. A low initial fitness may enhance the scope for training tolerance, but it also limits tolerance of conditioning. Nevertheless, women seem less vulnerable than men to exercise-induced sudden death and overtraining. Part II of the review considers the influence of the menstrual cycle and pregnancy upon exercise and training responses. Physical activity programmes for young women should take account of possible pregnancy. Potential dangers to the foetus include an excessive rise of core body temperature, a decrease of maternal blood sugar, and foetal hypoxia. Nevertheless, regular moderate exercise generally has a favourable impact upon pregnancy outcomes. PMID:10683598

  16. Hemodynamic effects of high intensity interval training in COPD patients exhibiting exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation.

    PubMed

    Nasis, I; Kortianou, E; Vasilopoulou, Μ; Spetsioti, S; Louvaris, Z; Kaltsakas, G; Davos, C H; Zakynthinos, S; Koulouris, N G; Vogiatzis, I

    2015-10-01

    Dynamic hyperinflation (DH) has a significant adverse effect on cardiovascular function during exercise in COPD patients. COPD patients with (n = 25) and without (n = 11) exercise-induced DH undertook an incremental (IET) and a constant-load exercise test (CLET) sustained at 75% peak work (WRpeak) prior to and following an interval cycling exercise training regime (set at 100% WRpeak with 30-s work/30-s rest intervals) lasting for 12 weeks. Cardiac output (Q) was assessed by cardio-bio-impedance (PhysioFlow, enduro, PF-O7) to determine Q mean response time (QMRT) at onset (QMRT(ON)) and offset (QMRT(OFF)) of CLET. Post-rehabilitation only those patients exhibiting exercise-induced DH demonstrated significant reductions in QMRT(ON) (from 82.2 ± 4.3 to 61.7 ± 4.2 s) and QMRT(OFF) (from 80.5 ± 3.8 to 57.2 ± 4.9 s ). These post-rehabilitation adaptations were associated with improvements in inspiratory capacity, thereby suggesting that mitigation of the degree of exercise-induced DH improves central hemodynamic responses in COPD patients. PMID:26112284

  17. Treating NAFLD in OLETF Rats with Vigorous-Intensity Interval Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Melissa A.; Fletcher, Justin A.; Morris, E. Matthew; Meers, Grace M.; Laughlin, M. Harold; Booth, Frank W.; Sowers, James R.; Ibdah, Jamal A.; Thyfault, John P.; Rector, R. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Background There is increasing use of high intensity, interval type exercise training in the management of many lifestyle-related diseases. Purpose To test the hypothesis that vigorous-intensity, interval exercise is as effective as traditional, moderate-intensity aerobic exercise training on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) outcomes in obese, Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. Methods OLETF rats (age 20 wks; n= 8–10/group) were assigned to sedentary (O-SED), moderate-intensity exercise training (O-MOD EX; 20 meters/min, 15% incline, 60 min/d, 5 d/wk treadmill running), or vigorous-intensity interval exercise training (O-VIG EX; 40 meters/min, 15% incline, 6×2.5 min bouts/d, 5 d/wk treadmill running) groups for 12 weeks. Results Both MOD EX and VIG EX effectively lowered hepatic triglycerides (TGs), serum ALTs, perivenular fibrosis, and hepatic collagen 1α1 mRNA expression (vs. O-SED, p<0.05). In addition, both interventions increased hepatic mitochondrial markers (citrate synthase activity and fatty acid oxidation) and suppressed markers of de novo lipogenesis (FAS, ACC, Elovl6, and SCD-1); whereas, only MOD EX increased hepatic mitochondrial β-HAD activity and hepatic TG export marker apoB100 and lowered fatty acid transporter CD36 compared with O-SED. Moreover, while total hepatic macrophage population markers (CD68 and F4/80 mRNA) did not differ among groups, MOD EX and VIG EX lowered M1 macrophage polarization markers (CD11c, IL-1β, and TNFα mRNA) and MOD EX increased M2 macrophage marker, CD206 mRNA, compared with O-SED. Conclusions The accumulation of 15 min/day of VIG EX for 12 weeks had similar effectiveness as 60 min/day of MOD EX in the management of NAFLD in OLETF rats. These findings may have important health outcome implications as we work to design better exercise training programs for NAFLD patients. PMID:24983336

  18. The influence of a 12-week program of physical activity on changes in body composition and lipid and carbohydrate status in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Pilch, Wanda Barbara; Mucha, Dariusz Mikołaj; Pałka, Tomasz Adam; Suder, Agnieszka Ewa; Tyka, Anna Katarzyna; Tota, Łukasz Marcin; Ambroży, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction For years there have been studies on what kind of physical activity is optimal for maintaining proper health condition. Besides well known and approved endurance training of moderate intensity, an importance of interval exercise where short term, sudden intensification of work is performed at low endurance load is emphasized. The aim of the work was to assess the effects of a program of physical activity applied to postmenopausal women regarding improvement of their body composition and biochemical indices of lipid and carbohydrate status. Material and methods The program of physical activity contained 12-week trainings of Nordic walking (NW) and gymnastic-dance classes (G-D). The intensity of effort during the NW training was at the level of 60% HRmax, whereas intensity of G-D exercises was selected based on a subjective assessment of effort according to the scale of American College of Sports Medicine. Results The 12-week program of physical activity resulted in statistically significant lowering of total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL) fraction levels. An increase in high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level was observed, whereas the values of triacylglycerols (TG) did not change. The average fasting blood glucose level decreased significantly. Similar changes were noted for the insulin level. The analysed body biometrical-structural indices did not change significantly. Conclusions The applied 12-week program of physical activity without changes of dietary habits contributed to an improvement in plasma lipid profile and an increased insulin sensitivity, but it did not affect significantly body composition. PMID:26848294

  19. Resistance to Aerobic Exercise Training Causes Metabolic Dysfunction and Reveals Novel Exercise-Regulated Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, Sarah J.; Rivas, Donato A.; Alves-Wagner, Ana B.; Hirshman, Michael F.; Gallagher, Iain J.; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Atkins, Ryan; Greenhaff, Paul L.; Qi, Nathan R.; Gustafsson, Thomas; Fielding, Roger A.; Timmons, James A.; Britton, Steven L.; Koch, Lauren G.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2013-01-01

    Low aerobic exercise capacity is a risk factor for diabetes and a strong predictor of mortality, yet some individuals are “exercise-resistant” and unable to improve exercise capacity through exercise training. To test the hypothesis that resistance to aerobic exercise training underlies metabolic disease risk, we used selective breeding for 15 generations to develop rat models of low and high aerobic response to training. Before exercise training, rats selected as low and high responders had similar exercise capacities. However, after 8 weeks of treadmill training, low responders failed to improve their exercise capacity, whereas high responders improved by 54%. Remarkably, low responders to aerobic training exhibited pronounced metabolic dysfunction characterized by insulin resistance and increased adiposity, demonstrating that the exercise-resistant phenotype segregates with disease risk. Low responders had impaired exercise-induced angiogenesis in muscle; however, mitochondrial capacity was intact and increased normally with exercise training, demonstrating that mitochondria are not limiting for aerobic adaptation or responsible for metabolic dysfunction in low responders. Low responders had increased stress/inflammatory signaling and altered transforming growth factor-β signaling, characterized by hyperphosphorylation of a novel exercise-regulated phosphorylation site on SMAD2. Using this powerful biological model system, we have discovered key pathways for low exercise training response that may represent novel targets for the treatment of metabolic disease. PMID:23610057

  20. Weight loss for women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome following a very low-calorie diet in a community-based setting with trained facilitators for 12 weeks

    PubMed Central

    Nikokavoura, Efsevia A; Johnston, Kelly L; Broom, John; Wrieden, Wendy L; Rolland, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects between 2% and 26% of reproductive-age women in the UK, and accounts for up to 75% of anovulatory infertility. The major symptoms include ovarian disruption, hyperandrogenism, insulin resistance, and polycystic ovaries. Interestingly, at least half of the women with PCOS are obese, with the excess weight playing a pathogenic role in the development and progress of the syndrome. The first-line treatment option for overweight/obese women with PCOS is diet and lifestyle interventions; however, optimal dietary guidelines are missing. Although many different dietary approaches have been investigated, data on the effectiveness of very low-calorie diets on PCOS are very limited. Materials and methods The aim of this paper was to investigate how overweight/obese women with PCOS responded to LighterLife Total, a commercial very low-calorie diet, in conjunction with group behavioral change sessions when compared to women without PCOS (non-PCOS). Results PCOS (n=508) and non-PCOS (n=508) participants were matched for age (age ±1 unit) and body mass index (body mass index ±1 unit). A 12-week completers analysis showed that the total weight loss did not differ significantly between PCOS (n=137) and non-PCOS participants (n=137) (−18.5±6.6 kg vs −19.4±5.7 kg, P=0.190). Similarly, the percentage of weight loss achieved by both groups was not significantly different (PCOS 17.1%±5.6% vs non-PCOS 18.2%±4.4%, P=0.08). Conclusion Overall, LighterLife Total could be an effective weight-loss strategy in overweight/obese women with PCOS. However, further investigations are needed to achieve a thorough way of understanding the physiology of weight loss in PCOS. PMID:26508882

  1. Effect of Exercise Training on Enos Expression, NO Production and Oxygen Metabolism in Human Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Bustamante, Juanita; Czerniczyniec, Analia; Aguilar de Plata, Ana C.; Lores-Arnaiz, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of combined aerobic and resistance exercise training during the second half of pregnancy on endothelial NOS expression (eNOS), nitric oxide (NO) production and oxygen metabolism in human placenta. Methods The study included 20 nulliparous in gestational week 16–20, attending prenatal care at three tertiary hospitals in Colombia who were randomly assigned into one of two groups: The exercise group (n = 10) took part in an exercise session three times a week for 12 weeks which consisted of: aerobic exercise at an intensity of 55–75% of their maximum heart rate for 60 min and 25 mins. Resistance exercise included 5 exercise groups circuit training (50 repetitions of each) using barbells (1–3 kg/exercise) and low-to-medium resistance bands. The control group (n = 10) undertook their usual physical activity. Mitochondrial and cytosol fractions were isolated from human placental tissue by differential centrifugation. A spectrophotometric assay was used to measure NO production in cytosolic samples from placental tissue and Western Blot technique to determine eNOS expression. Mitochondrial superoxide levels and hydrogen peroxide were measured to determine oxygen metabolism. Results Combined aerobic and resistance exercise training during pregnancy leads to a 2-fold increase in eNOS expression and 4-fold increase in NO production in placental cytosol (p = 0.05). Mitochondrial superoxide levels and hydrogen peroxide production rate were decreased by 8% and 37% respectively in the placental mitochondria of exercising women (p = 0.05). Conclusion Regular exercise training during the second half of pregnancy increases eNOS expression and NO production and decreases reactive oxygen species generation in human placenta. Collectively, these data demonstrate that chronic exercise increases eNOS/NO production, presumably by increasing endothelial shear stress. This adaptation may contribute to the beneficial effects of

  2. Exercise training improves vascular mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Park, Song-Young; Rossman, Matthew J; Gifford, Jayson R; Bharath, Leena P; Bauersachs, Johann; Richardson, Russell S; Abel, E Dale; Symons, J David; Riehle, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Exercise training is recognized to improve cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity; however, the impact of chronic exercise on vascular mitochondrial respiratory function is unknown. We hypothesized that exercise training concomitantly increases both vascular mitochondrial respiratory capacity and vascular function. Arteries from both sedentary (SED) and swim-trained (EX, 5 wk) mice were compared in terms of mitochondrial respiratory function, mitochondrial content, markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, redox balance, nitric oxide (NO) signaling, and vessel function. Mitochondrial complex I and complex I + II state 3 respiration and the respiratory control ratio (complex I + II state 3 respiration/complex I state 2 respiration) were greater in vessels from EX relative to SED mice, despite similar levels of arterial citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA content. Furthermore, compared with the SED mice, arteries from EX mice displayed elevated transcript levels of peroxisome proliferative activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α and the downstream targets cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV isoform 1,isocitrate dehydrogenase(Idh)2, and Idh3a, increased manganese superoxide dismutase protein expression, increased endothelial NO synthase phosphorylation (Ser(1177)), and suppressed reactive oxygen species generation (all P< 0.05). Although there were no differences in EX and SED mice concerning endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasorelaxation, phenylephrine-induced vasocontraction was blunted in vessels from EX compared with SED mice, and this effect was normalized by NOS inhibition. These training-induced increases in vascular mitochondrial respiratory capacity and evidence of improved redox balance, which may, at least in part, be attributable to elevated NO bioavailability, have the potential to protect against age- and disease-related challenges to arterial function. PMID:26825520

  3. Prognosis: does exercise training reduce adverse events in heart failure?

    PubMed

    Myers, Jonathan; Brawner, Clinton A; Haykowsky, Mark J F; Taylor, Rod S

    2015-01-01

    Patients with heart failure (HF) were once discouraged from participating in exercise programs because of concerns regarding safety and the potential for harm to an already damaged myocardium. However, studies over the last 3 decades have provided extensive insights into both the health outcome benefits of exercise and the mechanisms underlying these benefits. Studies on the outcome benefits of exercise training, including mortality and hospitalization, have been convincing. This article reviews the physiologic benefits of exercise training in HF, studies on exercise training in women, results and implications of the HF-ACTION trial, and recent meta-analyses using the Cochrane data base. PMID:25432474

  4. Motor effort training with low exercise intensity improves muscle strength and descending command in aging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Changhao; Ranganathan, Vinoth K; Zhang, Junmei; Siemionow, Vlodek; Yue, Guang H

    2016-06-01

    This study explored the effect of high mental effort training (MET) and conventional strength training (CST) on increasing voluntary muscle strength and brain signal associated with producing maximal muscle force in healthy aging. Twenty-seven older adults (age: 75 ± 7.9 yr, 8 women) were assigned into 1 of 3 groups: MET group-trained with low-intensity (30% maximal voluntary contraction [MVC]) physical exercise combined with MET, CST group-trained with high-intensity muscle contractions, or control (CTRL) group-no training of any kind. MET and CST lasted for 12 weeks (5 sessions/week). The participants' elbow flexion strength of the right arm, electromyography (EMG), and motor activity-related cortical potential (MRCP) directly related to the strength production were measured before and after training. The CST group had the highest strength gain (17.6%, P <0.001), the MET group also had significant strength gain (13.8%, P <0.001), which was not statistically different from that of the CST group even though the exercise intensity for the MET group was only at 30% MVC level. The CTRL group did not have significant strength changes. Surprisingly, only the MET group demonstrated a significant augmentation in the MRCP (29.3%, P <0.001); the MRCP increase in CST group was at boarder-line significance level (12.11%, P = 0.061) and that for CTRL group was only 4.9% (P = 0.539). These results suggest that high mental effort training combined with low-intensity physical exercise is an effective method for voluntary muscle strengthening and this approach is especially beneficial for those who are physically weak and have difficulty undergoing conventional strength training. PMID:27310942

  5. Motor effort training with low exercise intensity improves muscle strength and descending command in aging

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Changhao; Ranganathan, Vinoth K.; Zhang, Junmei; Siemionow, Vlodek; Yue, Guang H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study explored the effect of high mental effort training (MET) and conventional strength training (CST) on increasing voluntary muscle strength and brain signal associated with producing maximal muscle force in healthy aging. Twenty-seven older adults (age: 75 ± 7.9 yr, 8 women) were assigned into 1 of 3 groups: MET group—trained with low-intensity (30% maximal voluntary contraction [MVC]) physical exercise combined with MET, CST group—trained with high-intensity muscle contractions, or control (CTRL) group—no training of any kind. MET and CST lasted for 12 weeks (5 sessions/week). The participants’ elbow flexion strength of the right arm, electromyography (EMG), and motor activity-related cortical potential (MRCP) directly related to the strength production were measured before and after training. The CST group had the highest strength gain (17.6%, P <0.001), the MET group also had significant strength gain (13.8%, P <0.001), which was not statistically different from that of the CST group even though the exercise intensity for the MET group was only at 30% MVC level. The CTRL group did not have significant strength changes. Surprisingly, only the MET group demonstrated a significant augmentation in the MRCP (29.3%, P <0.001); the MRCP increase in CST group was at boarder-line significance level (12.11%, P = 0.061) and that for CTRL group was only 4.9% (P = 0.539). These results suggest that high mental effort training combined with low-intensity physical exercise is an effective method for voluntary muscle strengthening and this approach is especially beneficial for those who are physically weak and have difficulty undergoing conventional strength training. PMID:27310942

  6. Continuous Exercise but Not High Intensity Interval Training Improves Fat Distribution in Overweight Adults

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Shelley E.; Machan, Elizabeth A.; O'Connor, Helen T.; Gerofi, James A.; Sainsbury, Amanda; Caterson, Ian D.; Johnson, Nathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of high intensity interval training (HIIT) versus continuous aerobic exercise training (CONT) or placebo (PLA) on body composition by randomized controlled design. Methods. Work capacity and body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) were measured before and after 12 weeks of intervention in 38 previously inactive overweight adults. Results. There was a significant group × time interaction for change in work capacity (P < 0.001), which increased significantly in CONT (23.8 ± 3.0%) and HIIT (22.3 ± 3.5%) but not PLA (3.1 ± 5.0%). There was a near-significant main effect for percentage trunk fat, with trunk fat reducing in CONT by 3.1 ± 1.6% and in PLA by 1.1 ± 0.4%, but not in HIIT (increase of 0.7 ± 1.0%) (P = 0.07). There was a significant reduction in android fat percentage in CONT (2.7 ± 1.3%) and PLA (1.4 ± 0.8%) but not HIIT (increase of 0.8 ± 0.7%) (P = 0.04). Conclusion. These data suggest that HIIT may be advocated as a time-efficient strategy for eliciting comparable fitness benefits to traditional continuous exercise in inactive, overweight adults. However, in this population HIIT does not confer the same benefit to body fat levels as continuous exercise training. PMID:24669314

  7. Japanese 12-Week Course. Volume I, Introduction and Lessons 1-15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Educational Systems Development Center.

    This first volume in the Defense Language Institute's 12-week course in Japanese presents an introduction to Japanese phonology for the non-linguist beginning student, and a description of the format used throughout the DLI series (perception drills, dialogues with English equivalents, grammar notes, and exercises and conversations). This volume…

  8. Exercise training in COPD: What is it about intensity?

    PubMed

    Morris, Norman R; Walsh, James; Adams, Lewis; Alision, Jennifer

    2016-10-01

    Most of the current guidelines for pulmonary rehabilitation recommend higher, over lower, intensity exercise training for COPD. Typically, we consider intensity of exercise training to be a key component of any exercise training programme. Whilst studies of young individuals have demonstrated that higher exercise training intensity results in greater improvements in exercise capacity, the evidence for older patients is not so clear cut. In COPD, there is limited evidence regarding the optimal intensity of exercise training. Using both physiological (peak exercise capacity) and patient-centred (e.g. quality of life) outcomes, it remains inconclusive if higher intensity exercise training bestows any greater benefit than low-intensity exercise. If we examine the data from interval training studies, which used both high- and low-intensity interval and continuous exercise, we are able to generate more data for comparison. Unfortunately, these data are challenging to interpret due to heterogeneity in how interval training was prescribed. However, when we normalize the interval training data for training volume and examine the change in peak cycling power, there is a relationship between training intensity and increase in peak power (Wpeak , r = 0.68, P < 0.05). Hence, whilst there is an inconclusive amount of evidence to support this intervention based on studies that only examined high- versus low-intensity continuous exercise, the additional data from interval training studies would suggest that higher intensity may be superior in terms of increases in Wpeak . Future studies should focus on establishing a threshold and an optimal training intensity for COPD. PMID:27623321

  9. Exercise training in aging and diseases.

    PubMed

    Conti, Valeria; Russomanno, Giusy; Corbi, Graziamaria; Filippelli, Amelia

    2012-05-01

    Sedentary lifestyle along with high blood pressure, abnormal values for blood lipids, smoking, and obesity are recognized risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and for many other chronic diseases, such as diabetes, osteoporosis, breast and colon cancer. Several studies conducted on large cohort of individuals have documented the protective effects of physical activity for both vascular and nonvascular syndromes. Exercise training is an integral part of cardiac rehabilitation, a complex therapeutic approach, effective both in young and elderly patients. Despite the number of evidences underling the benefits associated with physical fitness, the cardiac rehabilitation is still an underused medical resource. The molecular mechanism behind physical activity protective effect is presently unresolved, and further studies are also needed to establish the best protocol in terms of specificity, volume and duration of the training. PMID:23905056

  10. Psychophysiological Responses to Group Exercise Training Sessions: Does Exercise Intensity Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Vandoni, Matteo; Codrons, Erwan; Marin, Luca; Correale, Luca; Bigliassi, Marcelo; Buzzachera, Cosme Franklim

    2016-01-01

    Group exercise training programs were introduced as a strategy for improving health and fitness and potentially reducing dropout rates. This study examined the psychophysiological responses to group exercise training sessions. Twenty-seven adults completed two group exercise training sessions of moderate and vigorous exercise intensities in a random and counterbalanced order. The %HRR and the exertional and arousal responses to vigorous session were higher than those during the moderate session (p<0.05). Consequently, the affective responses to vigorous session were less pleasant than those during moderate session (p<0.05). These results suggest that the psychophysiological responses to group exercise training sessions are intensity-dependent. From an adherence perspective, interventionists are encouraged to emphasize group exercise training sessions at a moderate intensity to maximize affective responses and to minimize exertional responses, which in turn may positively affect future exercise behavior. PMID:27490493

  11. Effect of Exercise Training on Skeletal Muscle SIRT1 and PGC-1α Expression Levels in Rats of Different Age

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chi-Chang; Wang, Ting; Tung, Yu-Tang; Lin, Wan-Teng

    2016-01-01

    The protein deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) pathway drives the muscular fiber-type switching, and can directly regulate the biophysiological functions of skeletal muscle. To investigate whether 12-week swimming exercise training modulates the SIRT1/PGC-1α pathway associated proteins expression in rats of different age. Male 3-month-old (3M), 12-month-old (12M) and 18-month-old (18M) Sprague-Dawley rats were used and assigned to sedentary control (C) or 12-week swimming exercise training (E) and divided into six groups: 3MC (n = 8), 12MC (n = 6), 18MC (n = 8), 3ME (n = 8), 12ME (n = 5) and 18ME (n = 6). Body weight, muscle weight, epididymal fat mass and muscle morphology were performed at the end of the experiment. The protein levels of SIRT1, PGC-1α, AMPK and FOXO3a in the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were examined. The SIRT1, PGC-1α and AMPK levels in the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were up-regulated in the three exercise training groups than three control groups. The FOXO3a level in the 12ME group significantly increased in the gastrocnemius muscles than 12MC group, but significantly decreased in the soleus muscles. In 3-, 12- and 18-month-old rats with and without exercise, there was a significant main effect of exercise on PGC-1α, AMPK and FOXO3a in the gastrocnemius muscles, and SIRT1, PGC-1α and AMPK in the soleus muscles. Our result suggests that swimming training can regulate the SIRT1/PGC-1α, AMPK and FOXO3a proteins expression of the soleus muscles in aged rats. PMID:27076782

  12. Effect of Exercise Training on Skeletal Muscle SIRT1 and PGC-1α Expression Levels in Rats of Different Age.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Chang; Wang, Ting; Tung, Yu-Tang; Lin, Wan-Teng

    2016-01-01

    The protein deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) pathway drives the muscular fiber-type switching, and can directly regulate the biophysiological functions of skeletal muscle. To investigate whether 12-week swimming exercise training modulates the SIRT1/PGC-1α pathway associated proteins expression in rats of different age. Male 3-month-old (3M), 12-month-old (12M) and 18-month-old (18M) Sprague-Dawley rats were used and assigned to sedentary control (C) or 12-week swimming exercise training (E) and divided into six groups: 3MC (n = 8), 12MC (n = 6), 18MC (n = 8), 3ME (n = 8), 12ME (n = 5) and 18ME (n = 6). Body weight, muscle weight, epididymal fat mass and muscle morphology were performed at the end of the experiment. The protein levels of SIRT1, PGC-1α, AMPK and FOXO3a in the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were examined. The SIRT1, PGC-1α and AMPK levels in the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were up-regulated in the three exercise training groups than three control groups. The FOXO3a level in the 12ME group significantly increased in the gastrocnemius muscles than 12MC group, but significantly decreased in the soleus muscles. In 3-, 12- and 18-month-old rats with and without exercise, there was a significant main effect of exercise on PGC-1α, AMPK and FOXO3a in the gastrocnemius muscles, and SIRT1, PGC-1α and AMPK in the soleus muscles. Our result suggests that swimming training can regulate the SIRT1/PGC-1α, AMPK and FOXO3a proteins expression of the soleus muscles in aged rats. PMID:27076782

  13. Endocrine Response to Exercise and Training-Closing the Gaps.

    PubMed

    Eliakim, Alon

    2016-05-01

    In recent years there has been a remarkable enhancement in the knowledge and understanding of endocrine responses to exercise and exercise training in children and adolescents who participate in sports. This includes, for example, exercise-associated changes in growth factors that regulate muscle adaptations to exercise training, the use of hormonal changes to assess training intensity, as well as deleterious effects of competitive sports, in particularly if associated with inadequate nutrition, on growth and the reproductive system. However, major scientific gaps still exist in our understanding of the application and translation of this knowledge to the everyday use of young athletes and their coaches. These gaps include the translation of laboratory research to "real-life" training setting to optimize training efficiency, mainly due to the lack of "real-life" exercise studies; and the use of genetic endocrinology for sports selection, the prediction of excellence in sports and to improve training. PMID:27137169

  14. Effect of supervised, periodized exercise training vs. self-directed training on lean body mass and other fitness variables in health club members.

    PubMed

    Storer, Thomas W; Dolezal, Brett A; Berenc, Matthew N; Timmins, John E; Cooper, Christopher B

    2014-07-01

    Conventional wisdom suggests that exercise training with a personal trainer (PTr) is more beneficial for improving health-related fitness than training alone. However, there are no published data that confirm whether fitness club members who exercise with a PTr in the fitness club setting obtain superior results compared with self-directed training. We hypothesized that club members randomized to receive an evidence-based training program would accrue greater improvements in lean body mass (LBM) and other fitness measures than members randomized to self-training. Men, aged 30-44 years, who were members of a single Southern California fitness club were randomized to exercise with a PTr administering a nonlinear periodized training program (TRAINED, N = 17) or to self-directed training (SELF, N = 17); both groups trained 3 days per week for 12 weeks. Lean body mass was determined by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Secondary outcomes included muscle strength 1 repetition maximum (1RM), leg power (vertical jump), and aerobic capacity (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max). TRAINED individuals increased LBM by 1.3 (0.4) kg, mean (SEM) vs. no change in SELF, p = 0.029. Similarly, significantly greater improvements were seen for TRAINED vs. SELF in chest press strength (42 vs. 19%; p = 0.003), peak leg power (6 vs. 0.6%; p < 0.0001), and V[Combining Dot Above]O2max (7 vs. -0.3%; p = 0.01). Leg press strength improved 38 and 25% in TRAINED and SELF, respectively (p = 0.14). We have demonstrated for the first time in a fitness club setting that members whose training is directed by well-qualified PTrs administering evidence-based training regimens achieve significantly greater improvements in LBM and other dimensions of fitness than members who direct their own training. PMID:24276303

  15. The effects of exercise training and acute exercise duration on plasma folate and vitamin B12

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Nam; Hwang, Ji Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Energy production and the rebuilding and repair of muscle tissue by physical activity require folate and vitamin B12 as a cofactor. Thus, this study investigated the effects of regular moderate exercise training and durations of acute aerobic exercise on plasma folate and vitamin B12 concentrations in moderate exercise trained rats. MATERIALS/METHODS Fifty rats underwent non-exercise training (NT, n = 25) and regular exercise training (ET, n = 25) for 5 weeks. The ET group performed moderate exercise on a treadmill for 30 min/day, 5 days/week. At the end of week 5, each group was subdivided into 4 groups: non-exercise and 3 exercise groups. The non-exercise group (E0) was sacrificed without exercising and the 3 exercise groups were sacrificed immediately after exercising on a treadmill for 0.5 h (E0.5), 1 h (E1), and 2 h (E2). Blood samples were collected and plasma folate and vitamin B12 were analyzed. RESULTS After exercise training, plasma folate level was significantly lower and vitamin B12 concentration was significantly higher in the ET group compared with the NT group (P < 0.05). No significant associations were observed between plasma folate and vitamin B12 concentrations. In both the NT and ET groups, plasma folate and vitamin B12 were not significantly changed by increasing duration of aerobic exercise. Plasma folate concentration of E0.5 was significantly lower in the ET group compared with that in the NT group. Significantly higher vitamin B12 concentrations were observed in the E0 and E0.5 groups of the ET group compared to those of the NT group. CONCLUSION Regular moderate exercise training decreased plasma folate and increased plasma vitamin B12 levels. However, no significant changes in plasma folate and vitamin B12 concentrations were observed by increasing duration of acute aerobic exercise. PMID:27087899

  16. Exercise-Trained Men and Women: Role of Exercise and Diet on Appetite and Energy Intake

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Stephanie M.; Hand, Taryn M.; Manore, Melinda M.

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of appetite and energy intake is influenced by numerous hormonal and neural signals, including feedback from changes in diet and exercise. Exercise can suppress subjective appetite ratings, subsequent energy intake, and alter appetite-regulating hormones, including ghrelin, peptide YY, and glucagon-like peptide 1(GLP-1) for a period of time post-exercise. Discrepancies in the degree of appetite suppression with exercise may be dependent on subject characteristics (e.g., body fatness, fitness level, age or sex) and exercise duration, intensity, type and mode. Following an acute bout of exercise, exercise-trained males experience appetite suppression, while data in exercise-trained women are limited and equivocal. Diet can also impact appetite, with low-energy dense diets eliciting a greater sense of fullness at a lower energy intake. To date, little research has examined the combined interaction of exercise and diet on appetite and energy intake. This review focuses on exercise-trained men and women and examines the impact of exercise on hormonal regulation of appetite, post-exercise energy intake, and subjective and objective measurements of appetite. The impact that low-energy dense diets have on appetite and energy intake are also addressed. Finally, the combined effects of high-intensity exercise and low-energy dense diets are examined. This research is in exercise-trained women who are often concerned with weight and body image issues and consume low-energy dense foods to keep energy intakes low. Unfortunately, these low-energy intakes can have negative health consequences when combined with high-levels of exercise. More research is needed examining the combined effect of diet and exercise on appetite regulation in fit, exercise-trained individuals. PMID:25389897

  17. The miRNA Plasma Signature in Response to Acute Aerobic Exercise and Endurance Training

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Søren; Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Rinnov, Anders; Yfanti, Christina; Scheele, Camilla; Pedersen, Bente K.; Laye, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    MiRNAs are potent intracellular posttranscriptional regulators and are also selectively secreted into the circulation in a cell-specific fashion. Global changes in miRNA expression in skeletal muscle in response to endurance exercise training have been reported. Therefore, our aim was to establish the miRNA signature in human plasma in response to acute exercise and chronic endurance training by utilizing a novel methodological approach. RNA was isolated from human plasma collected from young healthy men before and after an acute endurance exercise bout and following 12 weeks of endurance training. Global miRNA (742 miRNAs) measurements were performed as a screening to identify detectable miRNAs in plasma. Using customized qPCR panels we quantified the expression levels of miRNAs detected in the screening procedure (188 miRNAs). We demonstrate a dynamic regulation of circulating miRNA (ci-miRNA) levels following 0 hour (miR-106a, miR-221, miR-30b, miR-151-5p, let-7i, miR-146, miR-652 and miR-151-3p), 1 hour (miR-338-3p, miR-330-3p, miR-223, miR-139-5p and miR-143) and 3 hours (miR-1) after an acute exercise bout (P<0.00032). Where ci-miRNAs were all downregulated immediately after an acute exercise bout (0 hour) the 1 and 3 hour post exercise timepoints were followed by upregulations. In response to chronic training, we identified seven ci-miRNAs with decreased levels in plasma (miR-342-3p, let-7d, miR-766, miR-25, miR-148a, miR-185 and miR-21) and two miRNAs that were present at higher levels after the training period (miR-103 and miR-107) (P<0.00032). In conclusion, acute exercise and chronic endurance training, likely through specific mechanisms unique to each stimulus, robustly modify the miRNA signature of human plasma. PMID:24586268

  18. Exercise Training and Calorie Restriction Influence the Metabolic Parameters in Ovariectomized Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pósa, Anikó; Kupai, Krisztina; Szalai, Zita; Veszelka, Médea; Török, Szilvia; Varga, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    The estrogen deficiency after menopause leads to overweight or obesity, and physical exercise is one of the important modulators of this body weight gain. Female Wistar rats underwent ovariectomy surgery (OVX) or sham operation (SO). OVX and SO groups were randomized into new groups based on the voluntary physical activity (with or without running) and the type of diet for 12 weeks. Rats were fed standard chow (CTRL), high triglyceride diet (HT), or restricted diet (CR). The metabolic syndrome was assessed by measuring the body weight gain, the glucose sensitivity, and the levels of insulin, triglyceride, leptin, and aspartate aminotransferase transaminase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). The exercise training combined with the CR resulted in improvements in the glucose tolerance and the insulin sensitivity. Plasma TG, AST, and ALT levels were significantly higher in OVX rats fed with HT but these high values were suppressed by exercise and CR. Compared to SO animals, estrogen deprivation with HT caused a significant increase in leptin level. Our data provide evidence that CR combined with voluntary physical exercise can be a very effective strategy to prevent the development of a metabolic syndrome induced by high calorie diet. PMID:25874022

  19. The Effects of Acute Exercise and Exercise Training on Plasma Homocysteine: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Deminice, Rafael; Ribeiro, Diogo Farias; Frajacomo, Fernando Tadeu Trevisan

    2016-01-01

    Background Although studies have demonstrated that physical exercise alters homocysteine levels in the blood, meta-analyses of the effects of acute exercise and exercise training on homocysteine blood concentration have not been performed, especially regarding the duration and intensity of exercise, which could affect homocysteine levels differently. Objective The aim of this meta-analysis was to ascertain the effects of acute exercise and exercise training on homocysteine levels in the blood. Method A review was conducted according to the guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses using the online databases PubMed, SPORTDiscus, and SciELO to identify relevant studies published through June 2015. Review Manager was used to calculate the effect size of acute exercise and exercise training using the change in Hcy plasmaserum concentration from baseline to post-acute exercise and trained vs. sedentary control groups, respectively. Weighted mean differences were calculated using random effect models. Results Given the abundance of studies, acute exercise trials were divided into two subgroups according to exercise volume and intensity, whereas the effects of exercise training were analyzed together. Overall, 22 studies with a total of 520 participants indicated increased plasma homocysteine concentration after acute exercise (1.18 μmol/L, 95% CI: 0.71 to 1.65, p < .01). Results of a subgroup analysis indicated that either long-term exercise of low-to-moderate intensity (1.39 μmol/L, 95% CI: 0.9 to 1.89, p < .01) or short-term exercise of high intensity (0.83 μmol/L, 95% CI: 0.19 to 1.40, p < .01) elevated homocysteine levels in the blood. Increased homocysteine induced by exercise was significantly associated with volume of exercise, but not intensity. By contrast, resistance training reduced plasma homocysteine concentration (-1.53 μmol/L, 95% CI: -2.77 to -0.28, p = .02), though aerobic training did not. The cumulative

  20. Towards standardization of the nomenclature of resistance training exercises.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Matthew C; Brown, Lee E; Coburn, Jared W; Judelson, Daniel A; Cullen-Carroll, Nick

    2013-05-01

    There is a disagreement surrounding the names of resistance training exercises. The purpose of this study was to survey different professionals regarding the nomenclature of resistance training exercises. Two hundred five participants volunteered for the study, of which, 64.9 % were male. Participants self-identified as either certified athletic trainer (22.4%), academic (18.5%), strength and conditioning coach (25.9%), personal trainer (15.6%), or clinician (17.6%). Participants were asked to name 10 resistance training exercises as depicted by pictures. A χ2 for exercise name by current profession analysis was used to analyze frequency differences. All exercises in the survey yielded inconsistent terminology primarily related to the responders' profession and 3 items in their naming patterns as follows: specification, equipment, and exercise. These results reveal a need to establish consistent naming pattern guidelines for resistance training exercises. The use of a consistent naming pattern may provide direction and clarity when working with athletes and clients in a strength training environment. We suggest a "specification, equipment, exercise" (e.g., 1 arm dumbbell row) naming pattern be used when naming resistance training exercises. PMID:23439332

  1. Astragalus membranaceus improves exercise performance and ameliorates exercise-induced fatigue in trained mice.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Tzu-Shao; Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Huang, Wen-Ching; Chen, Yi-Ming; Huang, Chi-Chang; Hsu, Mei-Chich

    2014-01-01

    Astragalus membranaceus (AM) is a popular "Qi-tonifying" herb with a long history of use as a Traditional Chinese Medicine with multiple biological functions. However, evidence for the effects of AM on exercise performance and physical fatigue is limited. We evaluated the potential beneficial effects of AM on ergogenic and anti-fatigue functions following physiological challenge. Male ICR strain mice were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 10 per group) for treatment: (1) sedentary control and vehicle treatment (vehicle control); (2) exercise training with vehicle treatment (exercise control); and (3) exercise training with AM treatment at 0.615 g/kg/day (Ex-AM1) or (4) 3.075 g/kg/day (Ex-AM5). Both the vehicle and AM were orally administered for 6 weeks. Exercise performance and anti-fatigue function were evaluated by forelimb grip strength, exhaustive swimming time, and levels of serum lactate, ammonia, glucose, and creatine kinase after 15-min swimming exercise. Exercise training combined with AM supplementation increased endurance exercise capacity and increased hepatic and muscle glycogen content. AM reduced exercise-induced accumulation of the byproducts blood lactate and ammonia with acute exercise challenge. Moreover, we found no deleterious effects from AM treatment. Therefore, AM supplementation improved exercise performance and had anti-fatigue effects in mice. It may be an effective ergogenic aid in exercise training. PMID:24595275

  2. Exposing college students to exercise: the training interventions and genetics of exercise response (TIGER) study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Training Interventions and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) study is an exercise program designed to introduce sedentary college students to regular physical activity and to identify genetic factors that influence response to exercise. A multiracial/ethnic cohort (N = 1,567; 39% male), age ...

  3. Exposing College Students to Exercise: The Training Interventions and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sailors, Mary H.; Jackson, Andrew S.; McFarlin, Brian K.; Turpin, Ian; Ellis, Kenneth J.; Foreyt, John P.; Hoelscher, Deanna M.; Bray, Molly S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The Training Interventions and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) study is an exercise program designed to introduce sedentary college students to regular physical activity and to identify genetic factors that influence response to exercise. Participants: A multiracial/ethnic cohort (N = 1,567; 39% male), age 18 to 35 years,…

  4. Sprint training enhances ionic regulation during intense exercise in men.

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, M J; Heigenhauser, G J; McKelvie, R S; MacDougall, J D; Jones, N L

    1997-01-01

    1. This study investigated the effects of 7 weeks of sprint training on changes in electrolyte concentrations and acid-base status in arterial and femoral venous blood, during and following maximal exercise for 30 s on an isokinetic cycle ergometer. 2. Six healthy males performed maximal exercise, before and after training. Blood samples were drawn simultaneously from brachial arterial and femoral venous catheters, at rest, during the final 10 s of exercise and during 10 min of recovery, and analysed for whole blood and plasma ions and acid-base variables. 3. Maximal exercise performance was enhanced after training, with a 13% increase in total work output and a 14% less decline in power output during maximal cycling. 4. The acute changes in plasma volume, ions and acid-base variables during maximal exercise were similar to previous observations. Sprint training did not influence the decline in plasma volume during or following maximal exercise. After training, maximal exercise was accompanied by lower arterial and femoral venous plasma [K+] and [Na+] across all measurement times (P < 0.05). Arterial plasma lactate concentration ([Lac-]) was greater (P < 0.05), but femoral venous plasma [Lac-] was unchanged by training. 5. Net release into, or uptake of ions from plasma passing through the exercising muscle was assessed by arteriovenous concentration differences, corrected for fluid movements. K+ release into plasma during exercise, and a small net K+ uptake from plasma 1 min post-exercise (P < 0.05), were unchanged by training. A net Na+ loss from plasma during exercise (P < 0.05) tended to be reduced after training (P < 0.06). Release of Lac- into plasma during and after exercise (P < 0.05) was unchanged by training. 6. Arterial and venous plasma strong ion difference ([SID]; [SID] = [Na+] + [K+] - [Lac-] - [Cl-]) were lower after training (mean differences) by 2.7 and 1.8 mmol l-1, respectively (P < 0.05). Arterial and femoral venous CO2 tensions and arterial

  5. Rehabilitation training improves exercise tolerance after percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Fang; Ren, Yusheng; Jin, Heng; Cui, Bo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this present study was to investigate the effects of training on exercise tolerance of patients with coronary heart disease after percutaneous coronary intervention. Fifty-seven cases of coronary heart disease after percutaneous coronary intervention were divided randomly into the rehabilitation training group (26 cases) and control group (31 cases). Patients in the rehabilitation training group received rehabilitation training at different stages and exercise intensities 3 d after percutaneous coronary intervention for 3 months. The heart rate, blood pressure, ECG changes in treadmill exercise test, and the frequency of anginal episodes were observed. The results showed that NST and ΣST of ECG and the frequency of anginal episodes were significantly reduced in the rehabilitation training group. In addition, exercise tolerance was improved and the total exercise time was lengthened in these patients. Moreover, ST segment depression time and emergence time of angina with exercise were also lengthened compared with controls (P < 0.05, or 0.01). However, the heart rate and blood pressure before and after exercise of the two groups were similar. The study indicated that rehabilitation training could significantly relieve angina, amend ischemic features of ECG, and improve exercise tolerance of coronary heart disease patients after percutaneous coronary intervention. PMID:23554756

  6. The Effects of a 12-Week Walking Program on Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Shun-Ping; Tsai, Tzu-I; Lii, Yun-Kung; Yu, Shu; Chou, Chen-Liang; Chen, I-Ju

    2009-01-01

    Walking is a popular and easily accessible form of physical activity. However, walking instruction for older adults is based on the evidence gathered from younger populations. This study evaluated walking conditions, strength, balance, and subjective health status after a 12-week walking-training program in community-dwelling adults greater than…

  7. Amino acid profile during exercise and training in Standardbreds.

    PubMed

    Westermann, C M; Dorland, L; Wijnberg, I D; de Sain-van der Velden, M G M; van Breda, E; Barneveld, A; de Graaf-Roelfsema, E; Keizer, H A; van der Kolk, J H

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the influence of acute exercise, training and intensified training on the plasma amino acid profile. In a 32-week longitudinal study using 10 Standardbred horses, training was divided into four phases, including a phase of intensified training for five horses. At the end of each phase, a standardized exercise test, SET, was performed. Plasma amino acid concentrations before and after each SET were measured. Training significantly reduced mean plasma aspartic acid concentration, whereas exercise significantly increased the plasma concentrations of alanine, taurine, methionine, leucine, tyrosine and phenylalanine and reduced the plasma concentrations of glycine, ornithine, glutamine, citrulline and serine. Normally and intensified trained horses differed not significantly. It is concluded that amino acids should not be regarded as limiting training performance in Standardbreds except for aspartic acid which is the most likely candidate for supplementation. PMID:20863542

  8. STS-58 crewmembers prepare for a training exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Wearing training versions of the partial pressure launch and entry garment, Astronauts Richard A. Searfoss (left), pilot, and John E. Blaha, mission commander, prepare for a training exercise. Most of the training session took place in the crew compartment and full fuselage trainers of the Space Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory.

  9. Cardiac parasympathetic reactivation following exercise: implications for training prescription.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Jamie; Peake, Jonathan M; Buchheit, Martin

    2013-12-01

    The objective of exercise training is to initiate desirable physiological adaptations that ultimately enhance physical work capacity. Optimal training prescription requires an individualized approach, with an appropriate balance of training stimulus and recovery and optimal periodization. Recovery from exercise involves integrated physiological responses. The cardiovascular system plays a fundamental role in facilitating many of these responses, including thermoregulation and delivery/removal of nutrients and waste products. As a marker of cardiovascular recovery, cardiac parasympathetic reactivation following a training session is highly individualized. It appears to parallel the acute/intermediate recovery of the thermoregulatory and vascular systems, as described by the supercompensation theory. The physiological mechanisms underlying cardiac parasympathetic reactivation are not completely understood. However, changes in cardiac autonomic activity may provide a proxy measure of the changes in autonomic input into organs and (by default) the blood flow requirements to restore homeostasis. Metaboreflex stimulation (e.g. muscle and blood acidosis) is likely a key determinant of parasympathetic reactivation in the short term (0-90 min post-exercise), whereas baroreflex stimulation (e.g. exercise-induced changes in plasma volume) probably mediates parasympathetic reactivation in the intermediate term (1-48 h post-exercise). Cardiac parasympathetic reactivation does not appear to coincide with the recovery of all physiological systems (e.g. energy stores or the neuromuscular system). However, this may reflect the limited data currently available on parasympathetic reactivation following strength/resistance-based exercise of variable intensity. In this review, we quantitatively analyse post-exercise cardiac parasympathetic reactivation in athletes and healthy individuals following aerobic exercise, with respect to exercise intensity and duration, and fitness/training

  10. Post-exercise cold water immersion attenuates acute anabolic signalling and long-term adaptations in muscle to strength training.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Llion A; Raastad, Truls; Markworth, James F; Figueiredo, Vandre C; Egner, Ingrid M; Shield, Anthony; Cameron-Smith, David; Coombes, Jeff S; Peake, Jonathan M

    2015-09-15

    We investigated functional, morphological and molecular adaptations to strength training exercise and cold water immersion (CWI) through two separate studies. In one study, 21 physically active men strength trained for 12 weeks (2 days per week), with either 10 min of CWI or active recovery (ACT) after each training session. Strength and muscle mass increased more in the ACT group than in the CWI group (P < 0.05). Isokinetic work (19%), type II muscle fibre cross-sectional area (17%) and the number of myonuclei per fibre (26%) increased in the ACT group (all P < 0.05), but not the CWI group. In another study, nine active men performed a bout of single-leg strength exercises on separate days, followed by CWI or ACT. Muscle biopsies were collected before and 2, 24 and 48 h after exercise. The number of satellite cells expressing neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) (10-30%) and paired box protein (Pax7) (20-50%) increased 24-48 h after exercise with ACT. The number of NCAM(+) satellite cells increased 48 h after exercise with CWI. NCAM(+) - and Pax7(+) -positive satellite cell numbers were greater after ACT than after CWI (P < 0.05). Phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase(Thr421/Ser424) increased after exercise in both conditions but was greater after ACT (P < 0.05). These data suggest that CWI attenuates the acute changes in satellite cell numbers and activity of kinases that regulate muscle hypertrophy, which may translate to smaller long-term training gains in muscle strength and hypertrophy. The use of CWI as a regular post-exercise recovery strategy should be reconsidered. PMID:26174323

  11. Exercise training-induced Regulation of Mitochondrial Quality

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhen; Lira, Vitor A.; Greene, Nicholas P.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles in skeletal muscle critical in physical performance and disease. The mitochondrial life cycle spans biogenesis, maintenance, and clearance. Exercise training may promote each of these processes, conferring positive impacts on skeletal muscle contractile and metabolic functions. This review focuses on the regulation of these processes by endurance exercise and discusses potential benefits in health and disease. PMID:22732425

  12. Exercise Training and Parkinson's Disease: Placebo or Essential Treatment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuter, Iris; Engelhardt, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Exercise training is often recommended for people with Parkinson's disease, though there is debate about the pathophysiologic cause of impaired movement in Parkinsonism which makes it difficult to develop a specific exercise treatment for symptoms that include hypokinesia, tremor, and muscular rigidity. Most published studies show a benefit of…

  13. Impact of exercise training on psychological risk factors.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Carl J; Milani, Richard V; O'Keefe, James H; Lavie, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Although the role of psychological risk factors has been underemphasized, considerable evidence indicates the adverse effects of various psychosocial stressors in the pathogenesis and recovery from cardiovascular diseases. Substantial data, especially from cardiac rehabilitation and exercise training programs, have demonstrated the role of physical activity, exercise training, and cardiorespiratory fitness, to improve psychological risk factors, including depression, anxiety, hostility, and total psychological stress, as well as stress-related mortality. PMID:21545933

  14. Low Intensity Exercise Training Improves Skeletal Muscle Regeneration Potential

    PubMed Central

    Pietrangelo, Tiziana; Di Filippo, Ester S.; Mancinelli, Rosa; Doria, Christian; Rotini, Alessio; Fanò-Illic, Giorgio; Fulle, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether 12 days of low-to-moderate exercise training at low altitude (598 m a.s.l.) improves skeletal muscle regeneration in sedentary adult women. Methods: Satellite cells were obtained from the vastus lateralis skeletal muscle of seven women before and after this exercise training at low altitude. They were investigated for differentiation aspects, superoxide anion production, antioxidant enzymes, mitochondrial potential variation after a depolarizing insult, intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, and micro (mi)RNA expression (miR-1, miR-133, miR-206). Results: In these myogenic populations of adult stem cells, those obtained after exercise training, showed increased Fusion Index and intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. This exercise training also generally reduced superoxide anion production in cells (by 12–67%), although not in two women, where there was an increase of ~15% along with a reduced superoxide dismutase activity. miRNA expression showed an exercise-induced epigenetic transcription profile that was specific according to the reduced or increased superoxide anion production of the cells. Conclusions: The present study shows that low-to-moderate exercise training at low altitude improves the regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle in adult women. The differentiation of cells was favored by increased intracellular calcium concentration and increased the fusion index. This low-to-moderate training at low altitude also depicted the epigenetic signature of cells. PMID:26733888

  15. Unraveling new mechanisms of exercise intolerance in chronic heart failure: role of exercise training.

    PubMed

    Conraads, Viviane M; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M; De Maeyer, Catherine; Van Berendoncks, An M; Beckers, Paul J; Vrints, Christiaan J

    2013-01-01

    Despite remarkable progress in the therapeutic approach of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF), exercise intolerance remains one of the hallmarks of the disease. During the past two decades, evidence has accumulated to underscore the key role of both endothelial dysfunction and skeletal muscle wasting in the process that gradually leads to physical incapacity. Whereas reverse ventricular remodeling has been attributed to aerobic exercise training, the vast majority of studies conducted in this specific patient population emphasize the reversal of peripheral abnormalities. In this review, we provide a general overview on underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. In addition, emphasis is put on recently identified pathways, which contribute to a deeper understanding of the main causes of exercise tolerance and the potential for reversal through exercise training. Recently, deficient bone marrow-related endothelial repair mechanisms have received considerable attention. Both acute exercise bouts, as well as exercise training, affect the mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells and their function. The observed changes following exercise training are believed to significantly contribute to improvement of peripheral endothelial function, as well as exercise capacity. With regard to skeletal muscle dysfunction and energy deprivation, adiponectin has been suggested to play a significant role. The demonstration of local skeletal muscle adiponectin resistance may provide an interesting and new link between the insulin resistant state and skeletal muscle wasting in CHF patients. PMID:22684340

  16. Exercise training - Blood pressure responses in subjects adapted to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    1991-01-01

    Conventional endurance exercise training that involves daily workouts of 1-2 hr duration during exposure to microgravity has not proven completely effective in ameliorating postexposure orthostatic hypotension. Single bouts of intense exercise have been shown to increase plasma volume and baroreflex sensitivity in ambulatory subjects through 24 hr postexercise and to reverse decrements in maximal oxygen uptake and syncopal episodes following exposure to simulated microgravity. These physiological adaptations to acute intense exercise were opposite to those observed following exposure to microgravity. These results suggest that the 'exercise training' stimulus used to prevent orthostatic hypotension induced by microgravity may be specific and should be redefined to include single bouts of maximal exercise which may provide an acute effective countermeasure against postflight hypotension.

  17. Influence of exercise intensity on training-induced tendon mechanical properties changes in older individuals.

    PubMed

    Grosset, Jean-Francois; Breen, Leigh; Stewart, Claire E; Burgess, Katherine E; Onambélé, Gladys L

    2014-06-01

    This study compared the effects of low vs. high intensity training on tendon properties in an elderly population. Participants were pair-matched (gender, habitual physical activity, anthropometrics, and baseline knee extension strength) and then randomly assigned to low (LowR, i.e., ~40 % 1RM) or high (High R, i.e., ~80 % 1RM) intensity resistance training programmes for 12 weeks, 3× per week (LowR, n = 9, age 74 ± 5 years; HighR, n = 8, age 68 ± 6 years). Patellar tendon properties (stiffness [K], Young's modulus [YM], cross-sectional area [T CSA], and tendon length [T L]) were measured pre and post training using a combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), B-mode ultrasonography, dynamometry, electromyography and ramped isometric knee extensions. With training K showed no significant change in the LowR group while it incremented by 57.7 % in the HighR group (p < 0.05). The 51.1 % group difference was significant (p < 0.05). These differences were still apparent when the data was normalized for T CSA and T L, i.e., significant increase in YM post-intervention in HighR (p < 0.05), but no change in LowR. These findings suggest that when prescribing exercise for a mixed genders elderly population, exercise intensities of ≤40 % 1RM may not be sufficient to affect tendon properties. PMID:24760611

  18. Effects of Moderate Aerobic Exercise Training on Hemorheological and Laboratory Parameters in Ischemic Heart Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sandor, Barbara; Nagy, Alexandra; Toth, Andras; Rabai, Miklos; Mezey, Bela; Csatho, Arpad; Czuriga, Istvan; Toth, Kalman; Szabados, Eszter

    2014-01-01

    Background and Design In this study we set out to determine the effects of long-term physical training on hemorheological, laboratory parameters, exercise tolerability, psychological factors in cardiac patients participating in an ambulatory rehabilitation program. Methods Before physical training, patients were examined by echocardiography, tested on treadmill by the Bruce protocol, and blood was drawn for laboratory tests. The enrolled 79 ischemic heart disease patients joined a 24-week cardiac rehabilitation training program. Blood was drawn to measure hematocrit (Hct), plasma and whole blood viscosity (PV, WBV), red blood cell (RBC) aggregation and deformability. Hemorheological, clinical chemistry and psychological measurements were repeated 12 and 24 weeks later, and a treadmill test was performed at the end of the program. Results After 12 weeks Hct, PV, WBV and RBC aggregation were significantly decreased, RBC deformability exhibited a significant increase (p<0.05). Laboratory parameters (triglyceride, uric acid, hsCRP and fibrinogen) were significantly decreased (p<0.05). After 24 weeks the significant results were still observed. By the end of the study, IL-6 and TNF-α levels displayed decreasing trends (p<0.06). There was a significant improvement in MET (p<0.001), and the BMI decrease was also significant (p<0.05). The vital exhaustion parameters measured on the fatigue impact scale indicated a significant improvement in two areas of the daily activities (p<0.05). Conclusions Regular physical training improved the exercise tolerability of patients with ischemic heart disease. Previous publications have demonstrated that decreases in Hct and PV may reduce cardiovascular risk, while a decrease in RBC aggregation and an increase in deformability improve the capillary flow. Positive changes in laboratory parameters and body weight may indicate better oxidative and inflammatory circumstances and an improved metabolic state. The psychological findings point

  19. Effect of concurrent aerobic and resistance circuit exercise training on fitness in older adults.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Nobuo; Rogers, Michael E; Islam, Mohammod M; Yamauchi, Tomoko; Watanabe, Eiji; Okada, Akiyoshi

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the physiological effects of a programmed accommodating circuit exercise (PACE) program consisting of aerobic exercise and hydraulic-resistance exercise (HRE) on fitness in older adults. Thirty-five volunteers were randomly divided into two groups [PACE group (PG) 8 men and 10 women, 68.3 (4.9) years, and non-exercise control group (CG) 7 men and 10 women, 68.0 (3.4) years). The PG participated in a 12-week, 3 days per week supervised program consisting of 10 min warm-up and 30 min of PACE (moderate intensity HRE and aerobic movements at 70% of peak heart rate) followed by 10 min cool-down exercise. PACE increased ( P<0.05) oxygen uptake ( V(.)O(2)) at lactate threshold [PG, pre 0.79 (0.20) l min(-1), post 1.02 (0.22) l min(-1), 29%; CG, pre 0.87 (0.14) l min(-1), post 0.85 (0.15) l min(-1), -2%] and at peak V(.)O(2) [PG, pre 1.36 (0.24) l min(-1), post 1.56 (0.28) l min(-1), 15%; CG, pre 1.32 (0.29) l min(-1), post 1.37 (0.37) l min(-1), 4%] in PG measured using an incremental cycle ergometer. Muscular strength evaluated by a HRE machine increased at low to high resistance dial settings for knee extension (9-52%), knee flexion (14-76%), back extension (18-92%) and flexion (50-70%), chest pull (6-28%) and press (3-17%), shoulder press (18-31%) and pull (26-85%), and leg press (21%). Body fat (sum of three skinfolds) decreased (16%), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC) increased (10.9 mg dl(-1)) for PG. There were no changes in any variables for CG. These results indicate that PACE training incorporating aerobic exercise and HRE elicits significant improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength, body composition, and HDLC for older adults. Therefore, PACE training is an effective well-rounded exercise program that can be utilized as a means to improve health-related components of fitness in older adults. PMID:15293053

  20. Resistance exercise training in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Volaklis, Konstantinos A; Tokmakidis, Savvas P

    2005-01-01

    The utility, safety and physiological adaptations of resistance exercise training in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) are reviewed and recommendations based on current research are presented. Patients with CHF have a poor clinical status and impaired exercise capacity due to both cardiac limitations and peripheral maladaptations of the skeletal musculature. Because muscle atrophy has been demonstrated to be a hallmark of CHF, the main principle of exercise programmes in such patients is to train the peripheral muscles effectively without producing great cardiovascular stress. For this reason, new modes of training as well as new training methods have been applied. Dynamic resistance training, based on the principles of interval training, has recently been established as a safe and effective mode of exercise in patients with CHF. Patients perform dynamic strength exercises slowly, on specific machines at an intensity usually in the range of 50-60% of one repetition maximum; work phases are of short duration (< or =60 seconds) and should be followed by an adequate recovery period (work/recovery ratio >1 : 2). Patients with a low cardiac reserve can use small free weights (0.5, 1 or 3 kg), elastic bands with 8-10 repetitions, or they can perform resistance exercises in a segmental fashion. Based on recent scientific evidence, the application of specific resistance exercise programmes is safe and induces significant histochemical, metabolic and functional adaptations in skeletal muscles, contributing to the treatment of muscle weakness and specific myopathy occurring in the majority of CHF patients. Increased exercise tolerance and peak oxygen consumption (V-dotO(2peak)), changes in muscle composition, increases in muscle mass, alterations in skeletal muscle metabolism, improvement in muscular strength and endurance have also been reported in the literature after resistance exercise alone or in combination with aerobic exercise. According to new scientific

  1. STS-42 crewmembers participate in JSC fire fighting training exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-42 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Payload Specialist Roberta L. Bondar takes a break during fire fighting and fire training exercises held at JSC's Fire Training Pit located across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207. Bondar is representing Canada on the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (IML-1) mission aboard OV-103.

  2. STS-42 crewmembers participate in JSC fire fighting training exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-42 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Payload Specialist Roberta L. Bondar prepares to use fire extinguisher during fire fighting and fire training exercises held at JSC's Fire Training Pit located across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207. Bondar is representing Canada on the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (IML-1) mission aboard OV-103.

  3. STS-42 crewmembers participate in JSC fire fighting training exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-42 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Payload Specialist Ulf D. Merbold sprays a fire extinguisher at the base of a fire during fire fighting and fire training exercises held at JSC's Fire Training Pit located across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207. Merbold is representing the European Space Agency (ESA) on the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (IML-1) mission aboard OV-103.

  4. STS-42 crewmembers participate in JSC fire fighting training exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-42 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, backup Payload Specialist Roger K. Crouch (left) and Payload Specialist Roberta L. Bondar discuss procedures prior to fire fighting and fire training exercises at JSC's Fire Training Pit located across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207. Bondar is representing Canada during the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (IML-1) mission aboard OV-103.

  5. 33 CFR 155.5061 - Alternative Training and Exercise Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... how the Alternative Training and Exercise Program addresses the requirements of 33 CFR 155.1055(b) through (f) and 33 CFR 155.1060; and (3) An explanation of how vessel owners or operators must implement... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alternative Training and...

  6. Physical exercise training and neurovascular unit in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Zhang, M; Feng, R; Li, W B; Ren, S Q; Zhang, J; Zhang, F

    2014-06-20

    Physical exercise could exert a neuroprotective effect in both clinical studies and animal experiments. A series of related studies have indicated that physical exercise could reduce infarct volume, alleviate neurological deficits, decrease blood-brain barrier dysfunction, promote angiogenesis in cerebral vascular system and increase the survival rate after ischemic stroke. In this review, we summarized the protective effects of physical exercise on neurovascular unit (NVU), including neurons, astrocytes, pericytes and the extracellular matrix. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that exercise training could decrease the blood-brain barrier dysfunction and promote angiogenesis in cerebral vascular system. An awareness of the exercise intervention benefits pre- and post stroke may lead more stroke patients and people with high-risk factors to accept exercise therapy for the prevention and treatment of stroke. PMID:24780769

  7. RESISTANCE TRAINING AS A PRECONDITIONING STRATEGY FOR ENHANCING AEROBIC EXERCISE TRAINING OUTCOMES IN COPD

    PubMed Central

    Covey, Margaret K.; Collins, Eileen G.; Reynertson, Sandra I.; Dilling, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Aerobic exercise training is a recognized approach for improving functional capacity in COPD. People with greater disease severity often have difficulty achieving higher aerobic exercise training intensity. The effects of resistance training prior to aerobic training were examined to determine if this sequential approach was associated with greater gains in functional status than aerobic training alone or concurrent aerobic and resistance training. Methods Patients were randomized to: 1) sequential resistance then aerobic training (RT-then-AT) (8 weeks resistance training followed by 8 weeks aerobic exercise training), 2) control group (CE-then-AT+RT) (8 weeks of ‘sham’ training followed by 8 weeks concurrent aerobic and resistance training), 3) control group (CE-then-AT) (8 weeks ‘sham’ training followed by 8 weeks aerobic training). Outcomes were assessed at study entry, after week 8, and after week 16: aerobic exercise performance; muscle strength and endurance. Results 75 patients completed training: FEV1 %pred 40±10, V̇O2peak %predicted, 71±22, fat-free mass index 19.5±3.1. RT-then-AT had greater acquisition of peripheral muscle endurance than CE-then-AT+RT and CE-then-AT, but improvements in aerobic exercise performance were similar. Improvements in muscle strength were similar between RT-then-AT and CE-then-AT+RT. Sarcopenia was associated with poorer attendance, and lower aerobic and resistance training volumes. Conclusion Although the sequential approach to resistance and aerobic training yielded a greater increase in muscle endurance and higher resistance training volume compared to concurrent resistance and aerobic training, other training outcomes were similar between the two groups, thus the sequential approach is not clearly superior to the concurrent approach in severe COPD. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01058213. PMID:24958605

  8. Muscle reflex in heart failure: the role of exercise training

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han-Jun; Zucker, Irving H.; Wang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Exercise evokes sympathetic activation and increases blood pressure and heart rate (HR). Two neural mechanisms that cause the exercise-induced increase in sympathetic discharge are central command and the exercise pressor reflex (EPR). The former suggests that a volitional signal emanating from central motor areas leads to increased sympathetic activation during exercise. The latter is a reflex originating in skeletal muscle which contributes significantly to the regulation of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems during exercise. The afferent arm of this reflex is composed of metabolically sensitive (predominantly group IV, C-fibers) and mechanically sensitive (predominately group III, A-delta fibers) afferent fibers. Activation of these receptors and their associated afferent fibers reflexively adjusts sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activity during exercise. In heart failure, the sympathetic activation during exercise is exaggerated, which potentially increases cardiovascular risk and contributes to exercise intolerance during physical activity in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients. A therapeutic strategy for preventing or slowing the progression of the exaggerated EPR may be of benefit in CHF patients. Long-term exercise training (ExT), as a non-pharmacological treatment for CHF increases exercise capacity, reduces sympatho-excitation and improves cardiovascular function in CHF animals and patients. In this review, we will discuss the effects of ExT and the mechanisms that contribute to the exaggerated EPR in the CHF state. PMID:23060821

  9. Moderate exercise training provides modest protection against adipose tissue inflammatory gene expression in response to high-fat feeding.

    PubMed

    Linden, Melissa A; Pincu, Yair; Martin, Stephen A; Woods, Jeffrey A; Baynard, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    As white adipose tissue (WAT) expands under obesogenic conditions, local WAT hypoxia may contribute to the chronic low-grade inflammation observed in obesity. Aerobic exercise training is beneficial in treating WAT inflammation after obesity is established, but it remains unknown whether exercise training, while on a concomitant high-fat (HF) diet, influences WAT inflammation during the development of obesity. We sought to determine the effects of 4, 8, and 12 weeks of HF feeding and/or moderate intensity treadmill exercise training (EX) on the relationship between inflammatory and hypoxic gene expression within mouse WAT. Male C57Bl6/J mice (n = 113) were randomized into low-fat (LF)/sedentary (SED), LF/EX, HF/SED, or HF/EX groups. The low-fat and high-fat diets contained 10% and 60% energy from fat, respectively. Exercise training consisted of treadmill running 5 days/week at 12 m/min, 8% incline, 40 min/day. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to assess gene expression. HF diet impaired glucose regulation, and upregulated WAT gene expression of inflammation (IL-1β, IL-1ra, TNFα), macrophage recruitment and infiltration (F4/80 and monocyte chemoattractant protein), and M1 (CD11c) and M2 (CD206 and Arginase-1) macrophage polarization markers. Treadmill training resulted in a modest reduction of WAT macrophage and inflammatory gene expression. HF diet had little effect on hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor, suggesting that WAT inflammatory gene expression may not be driven by hypoxia within the adipocytes. Treadmill training may provide protection by preventing WAT expansion and macrophage recruitment. PMID:25347855

  10. Exercise training modalities and strategies to improve exercise performance in patients with respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Almeida, P; Rodrigues, F

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation is an evidence-based, multidisciplinary, comprehensive intervention for patients with chronic respiratory diseases who are symptomatic and whose daily living activities are often restricted. Pulmonary rehabilitation programs are designed to improve the physical and emotional condition of people with chronic respiratory disease and to promote long-term adherence to health-enhancing behavior. Exercise training is at the core of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) programs. The benefits of exercise training include decreased dyspnea, improved health-related quality of life, fewer days of hospitalization, and decreased health-care utilization. To gain PR benefits, patients should be able to complete an exercise training program, preferably with high intensity exercise, and it is likely that these benefits will translate into a change from a pattern of a sedentary lifestyle to a physically active lifestyle. Chronic respiratory patients, namely COPD patients, have a low exercise tolerance due to multiple factors, such as dynamic hyperinflation and peripheral muscle dysfunction. In this article, the authors describe a variety of modalities and strategies to overcome exercise limitations and improve the effects of exercise training. PMID:24290562

  11. Recognizing the intensity of strength training exercises with wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Pernek, Igor; Kurillo, Gregorij; Stiglic, Gregor; Bajcsy, Ruzena

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we propose a system based on a network of wearable accelerometers and an off-the-shelf smartphone to recognize the intensity of stationary activities, such as strength training exercises. The system uses a hierarchical algorithm, consisting of two layers of Support Vector Machines (SVMs), to first recognize the type of exercise being performed, followed by recognition of exercise intensity. The first layer uses a single SVM to recognize the type of the performed exercise. Based on the recognized type a corresponding intensity prediction SVM is selected on the second layer, specializing in intensity prediction for the recognized type of exercise. We evaluate the system for a set of upper-body exercises using different weight loads. Additionally, we compare the most important features for exercise and intensity recognition tasks and investigate how different sliding window combinations, sensor configurations and number of training subjects impact the algorithm performance. We perform all of the experiments for two different types of features to evaluate the feasibility of implementation on resource constrained hardware. The results show the algorithm is able to recognize exercise types with approximately 85% accuracy and 6% intensity prediction error. Furthermore, due to similar performance using different types of features, the algorithm offers potential for implementation on resource constrained hardware. PMID:26453822

  12. Adherence of older women with strength training and aerobic exercise

    PubMed Central

    Picorelli, Alexandra Miranda Assumpção; Pereira, Daniele Sirineu; Felício, Diogo Carvalho; Dos Anjos, Daniela Maria; Pereira, Danielle Aparecida Gomes; Dias, Rosângela Corrêa; Assis, Marcella Guimarães; Pereira, Leani Souza Máximo

    2014-01-01

    Background Participation of older people in a program of regular exercise is an effective strategy to minimize the physical decline associated with age. The purpose of this study was to assess adherence rates in older women enrolled in two different exercise programs (one aerobic exercise and one strength training) and identify any associated clinical or functional factors. Methods This was an exploratory observational study in a sample of 231 elderly women of mean age 70.5 years. We used a structured questionnaire with standardized tests to evaluate the relevant clinical and functional measures. A specific adherence questionnaire was developed by the researchers to determine motivators and barriers to exercise adherence. Results The adherence rate was 49.70% in the aerobic exercise group and 56.20% in the strength training group. Multiple logistic regression models for motivation were significant (P=0.003) for the muscle strengthening group (R2=0.310) and also significant (P=0.008) for the aerobic exercise group (R2=0.154). A third regression model for barriers to exercise was significant (P=0.003) only for the muscle strengthening group (R2=0.236). The present study shows no direct relationship between worsening health status and poor adherence. Conclusion Factors related to adherence with exercise in the elderly are multifactorial. PMID:24600212

  13. Training with the International Space Station interim resistive exercise device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Suzanne M.; Amonette, William E.; Blazine, Kristi; Bentley, Jason; Lee, Stuart M C.; Loehr, James A.; Moore, Alan D Jr; Rapley, Michael; Mulder, Edwin R.; Smith, Scott M.

    2003-01-01

    A unique, interim elastomer-based resistive exercise device (iRED) is being used on the International Space Station. PURPOSE: This study characterized iRED training responses in a 1-g environment by: 1) determining whether 16 wk of high-intensity training with iRED produces increases in muscle strength and volume and bone mineral density (BMD), 2) comparing training responses with iRED to free weights, and 3) comparing iRED training responses at two training volumes. METHODS: Twenty-eight untrained men were assigned to four groups of seven subjects each: a no exercise control group (CON), an iRED group who trained with three sets/exercise (iRED3), a free-weight group (FW) who trained with three sets/exercise, and an iRED group who trained with six sets/exercise (iRED6). Training exercises included squat (SQ), heel raise (HR), and dead lift (DL) exercises, 3 d.wk(-1) for 16 wk. RESULTS: For CON, no changes occurred pre- to posttraining. For iRED3, increases (P< or =0.05) in one-repetition maximum (1-RM) strength (SQ 21 +/- 4%, HR 17 +/- 4%, DL 29 +/- 5%), leg lean mass (3.1 +/- 0.5%) by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and thigh (4.5 +/- 0.9%) and calf (5.9 +/- 0.7%) muscle volume (by magnetic resonance imaging) occurred after training with no changes in BMD (DXA). For FW, increases in 1-RM strength (SQ 22 +/- 5%, HR 24 +/- 3%, DL 41 +/- 7%), whole body (3.0 +/- 1.1%) and leg lean mass (5.4 +/- 1.2%), thigh (9.2 +/- 1.3%) and calf (4.2 +/- 1.0%) muscle volumes, and lumbar BMD (4.2 +/- 0.7%) occurred after training. For iRED6, all responses were similar to iRED3. CONCLUSION: High-intensity training with the iRED produced muscle responses similar to FW but was not effective in stimulating bone. Bed rest and spaceflight studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of the iRED to prevent microgravity deconditioning.

  14. Impact of exercise training on arterial wall thickness in humans

    PubMed Central

    Thijssen, Dick H. J.; Cable, N. Timothy; Green, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Thickening of the carotid artery wall has been adopted as a surrogate marker of pre-clinical atherosclerosis, which is strongly related to increased cardiovascular risk. The cardioprotective effects of exercise training, including direct effects on vascular function and lumen dimension, have been consistently reported in asymptomatic subjects and those with cardiovascular risk factors and diseases. In the present review, we summarize evidence pertaining to the impact of exercise and physical activity on arterial wall remodelling of the carotid artery and peripheral arteries in the upper and lower limbs. We consider the potential role of exercise intensity, duration and modality in the context of putative mechanisms involved in wall remodelling, including haemodynamic forces. Finally, we discuss the impact of exercise training in terms of primary prevention of wall thickening in healthy subjects and remodelling of arteries in subjects with existing cardiovascular disease and risk factors. PMID:22150253

  15. Forearm training attenuates sympathetic responses to prolonged rhythmic forearm exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinoway, L.; Shenberger, J.; Leaman, G.; Zelis, R.; Gray, K.; Baily, R.; Leuenberger, U.

    1996-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that nonfatiguing rhythmic forearm exercise at 25% maximal voluntary contraction (12 2-s contractions/min) evokes sympathoexcitation without significant engagement of metabolite-sensitive muscle afferents (B.A. Batman, J.C. Hardy, U.A. Leuenberger, M.B. Smith, Q.X. Yang and L.I. Sinoway. J. Appl. Physiol. 76: 1077-1081, 1994). This is in contrast to the sympathetic nervous system responses observed during fatiguing static forearm exercise where metabolite-sensitive afferents are the key determinants of sympathetic activation. In this report we examined whether forearm exercise training would attenuate sympathetic nervous system responses to rhythmic forearm exercise. We measured heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (microneurography), plasma norepinephrine (NE), and NE spillover and clearance (tritiated NE kinetics) during nonfatiguing rhythmic forearm exercise before and after a 4-wk unilateral forearm training paradigm. Training had no effect on forearm mass, maximal voluntary contraction, or heart rate but did attenuate the increase in MAP (increase in MAP: from 15.2 +/- 1.8 before training to 11.4 +/- 1.4 mmHg after training; P < 0.017), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (increase in bursts: from 10.8 +/- 1.4 before training to 6.2 +/- 1.1 bursts/min after training; P < 0.030), and the NE spillover (increases in arterial spillover: from 1.3 +/- 0.2 before training to 0.6 +/- 0.2 nmol.min-1.m-2 after training, P < 0.014; increase in venous spillover: from 2.0 +/- 0.6 before training to 1.0 +/- 0.5 nmol.min-1.m-2 after training, P < 0.037) seen in response to exercise performed by the trained forearm. Thus forearm training reduces sympathetic responses during a nonfatiguing rhythmic handgrip paradigm that does not engage muscle metaboreceptors. We speculate that this effect is due to a conditioning-induced reduction in mechanically sensitive muscle afferent discharge.

  16. Blood lactate diagnostics in exercise testing and training.

    PubMed

    Beneke, Ralph; Leithäuser, Renate M; Ochentel, Oliver

    2011-03-01

    A link between lactate and muscular exercise was seen already more than 200 years ago. The blood lactate concentration (BLC) is sensitive to changes in exercise intensity and duration. Multiple BLC threshold concepts define different points on the BLC power curve during various tests with increasing power (INCP). The INCP test results are affected by the increase in power over time. The maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) is measured during a series of prolonged constant power (CP) tests. It detects the highest aerobic power without metabolic energy from continuing net lactate production, which is usually sustainable for 30 to 60 min. BLC threshold and MLSS power are highly correlated with the maximum aerobic power and athletic endurance performance. The idea that training at threshold intensity is particularly effective has no evidence. Three BLC-orientated intensity domains have been established: (1) training up to an intensity at which the BLC clearly exceeds resting BLC, light- and moderate-intensity training focusing on active regeneration or high-volume endurance training (Intensity < Threshold); (2) heavy endurance training at work rates up to MLSS intensity (Threshold ≤ Intensity ≤ MLSS); and (3) severe exercise intensity training between MLSS and maximum oxygen uptake intensity mostly organized as interval and tempo work (Intensity > MLSS). High-performance endurance athletes combining very high training volume with high aerobic power dedicate 70 to 90% of their training to intensity domain 1 (Intensity < Threshold) in order to keep glycogen homeostasis within sustainable limits. PMID:21487146

  17. Heart Rate and Lactate Levels during Weight-Training Exercise in Trained and Untrained Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Michael H.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A study of effects of squatting exercise on heart rate and blood lactate levels in trained and untrained males indicated that trained subjects performed more work and had higher heart rates and lactate levels at exhaustion untrained subjects, though heart rate and lactate levels were lower for trained subjects at a given bar mass or submaximal…

  18. Exercise Training and Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Tara L.; Lloyd, Pamela G.; Yang, Hsiao-Tung; Terjung, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common vascular disease that reduces blood flow capacity to the legs of patients. PAD leads to exercise intolerance that can progress in severity to greatly limit mobility, and in advanced cases leads to frank ischemia with pain at rest. It is estimated that 12–15 million people in the United States are diagnosed with PAD, with a much larger population that is undiagnosed. The presence of PAD predicts a 50–1500% increase in morbidity and mortality, depending on severity. Treatment of patients with PAD is limited to modification of cardiovascular disease risk factors, pharmacological intervention, surgery, and exercise therapy. Extended exercise programs that involve walking ~5 times/wk, at a significant intensity that requires frequent rest periods, are most significant. Pre-clinical studies and virtually all clinical trials demonstrate the benefits of exercise therapy, including: improved walking tolerance, modified inflammatory/hemostatic markers, enhanced vasoresponsiveness, adaptations within the limb (angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, mitochondrial synthesis) that enhance oxygen delivery and metabolic responses, potentially delayed progression of the disease, enhanced quality of life indices, and extended longevity. A synthesis is provided as to how these adaptations can develop in the context of our current state of knowledge and events known to be orchestrated by exercise. The benefits are so compelling that exercise prescription should be an essential option presented to patients with PAD in the absence of contraindications. Obviously, selecting for a life style pattern, that includes enhanced physical activity prior to the advance of PAD limitations, is the most desirable and beneficial. PMID:23720270

  19. Redox modulation of mitochondriogenesis in exercise. Does antioxidant supplementation blunt the benefits of exercise training?

    PubMed

    Gomez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen; Salvador-Pascual, Andrea; Cabo, Helena; Ferrando, Beatriz; Viña, Jose

    2015-09-01

    Physical exercise increases the cellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in muscle, liver, and other organs. This is unlikely due to increased mitochondrial production but rather to extramitochondrial sources such as NADPH oxidase or xanthine oxidase. We have reported a xanthine oxidase-mediated increase in ROS production in many experimental models from isolated cells to humans. Originally, ROS were considered as detrimental and thus as a likely cause of cell damage associated with exhaustion. In the past decade, evidence showing that ROS act as signals has been gathered and thus the idea that antioxidant supplementation in exercise is always recommendable has proved incorrect. In fact, we proposed that exercise itself can be considered as an antioxidant because training increases the expression of classical antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase and, in general, lowering the endogenous antioxidant enzymes by administration of antioxidant supplements may not be a good strategy when training. Antioxidant enzymes are not the only ones to be activated by training. Mitochondriogenesis is an important process activated in exercise. Many redox-sensitive enzymes are involved in this process. Important signaling molecules like MAP kinases, NF-κB, PGC-1α, p53, heat shock factor, and others modulate muscle adaptation to exercise. Interventions aimed at modifying the production of ROS in exercise must be performed with care as they may be detrimental in that they may lower useful adaptations to exercise. PMID:25889822

  20. Non invasive ventilation as an additional tool for exercise training.

    PubMed

    Ambrosino, Nicolino; Cigni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in the use of non invasive ventilation (NIV) to increase exercise capacity. In individuals with COPD, NIV during exercise reduces dyspnoea and increases exercise tolerance. Different modalities of mechanical ventilation have been used non-invasively as a tool to increase exercise tolerance in COPD, heart failure and lung and thoracic restrictive diseases. Inspiratory support provides symptomatic benefit by unloading the ventilatory muscles, whereas Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) counterbalances the intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure in COPD patients. Severe stable COPD patients undergoing home nocturnal NIV and daytime exercise training showed some benefits. Furthermore, it has been reported that in chronic hypercapnic COPD under long-term ventilatory support, NIV can also be administered during walking. Despite these results, the role of NIV as a routine component of pulmonary rehabilitation is still to be defined. PMID:25874110

  1. Urinary 3-methylhistidine excretion increases with repeated weight training exercise.

    PubMed

    Pivarnik, J M; Hickson, J F; Wolinsky, I

    1989-06-01

    This investigation examines the effect of progressive resistance weight training exercise on urinary 3-methylhistidine (3-MH) excretions in untrained subjects. For 19 consecutive days, 11 males were fed a weight maintenance, lactovegetarian diet which contained the Recommended Dietary Allowance (0.8g.kg-1.d-1) for protein. No exercise was performed for the first 7 d of the study. Subjects were strength tested on day 8 and performed upper and lower body weight training exercises from days 9-19. Complete, 24-h urine collections were obtained from each subject on a daily basis. Samples were assayed for creatinine and 3-MH. Stable baseline 3-MH values were present during the pre-exercise control period. Significant increases in 3-MH occurred by study day 11, which was the third day of weight training exercise. This was true regardless of whether the data were expressed by daily excretions (microM.d-1; P less than 0.01), per unit of body weight (microM.kg-1.d-1; P less than 0.005), or per unit of creatinine excretion (microM.g Creat-1.d-1; P less than 0.001). Since urinary 3-MH is an index of actin and myosin catabolism, these data support the hypothesis that the rate of skeletal muscle degradation is increased during strength building exercises. PMID:2733577

  2. Aerobic and anaerobic exercise training in obese adults

    PubMed Central

    Al Saif, Amer; Alsenany, Samira

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Obesity is a global health problem and is associated with a multitude of complications. This study was designed to determine changes in cardiopulmonary functions after aerobic and anaerobic exercise training in obese subjects. [Subjects and Methods] Forty obese subjects, whose ages ranged between 18 and 25 years, were divided into 2 equal groups: group A received aerobic exercise training in addition to dietary measures, and group B received anaerobic exercise training for 3 months in addition to dietary measures. Measurements of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, maximum voluntary ventilation, maximal oxygen consumption, and body mass index were obtained for both groups before and after the exercise program. [Results] The mean body mass index, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, and maximal oxygen consumption decreased significantly, whereas the mean maximum voluntary ventilation increased significantly after treatment in group A. The mean maximum voluntary ventilation also increased significantly after treatment in group B. There were significant differences between the mean levels of the investigated parameters in groups A and B after treatment. [Conclusion] Aerobic exercise reduces weight and improves cardiopulmonary fitness in obese subjects better than anaerobic exercise. PMID:26180300

  3. Exercise-training protocols for astronauts in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Bulbulian, R.; Bernauer, E. M.; Haskell, W. L.; Moore, T.

    1989-01-01

    Based on physical working requirements for astronauts during intra- and extravehicular activity and on the findings from bed-rest studies that utilized exercise training as a countermeasure for the reduction of aerobic power, deterioration of muscular strength and endurance, decrements in mood and cognitive performance, and possibly for bone loss, two exercise protocols are proposed. One assumes that, during microgravity, astronaut exercise physiological functions should be maintained at 100 percent of ground-based levels. The other assumes that maximal aerobic power in flight can be reduced by 10 percent of the ground-based level.

  4. Antiapoptotic effect of exercise training on ovariectomized rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Yang; Lin, Yi-Yuan; Hsu, Chih-Chao; Cheng, Shiu-Min; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Ting, Hua; Yang, Ai-Lun; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Lee, Shin-Da

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of exercise training on cardiac Fas receptor-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathways in ovariectomized rats. Histopathological analysis, TUNEL assay, and Western blotting were performed on the excised hearts from three groups of Sprague-Dawley rats, which were divided into a sham-operated group, a bilaterally ovariectomized group (OVX), and a bilaterally ovariectomized group that underwent treadmill running exercise for 60 min/day, 5 sessions/wk, for 10 wk (OVX-EX). The abnormal myocardial architecture, cardiac trichome-stained fibrosis and cardiac TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells in ovariectomized rats improved after exercise training. The protein levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, tumor necrosis factor receptor 1, Fas ligand, Fas receptors, Fas-associated death domain, activated caspase-8 and activated caspase-3 (Fas receptor-dependent apoptotic pathways), as well as t-Bid, Bad, Bak, Bax, cytosolic cytochrome c, activated caspase-9, and activated caspase-3 (mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathways) were decreased in the OVX-EX group compared with the OVX group. Exercise training suppressed ovariectomy-induced cardiac Fas receptor-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathways in ovariectomized rat models. These findings might indicate a new therapeutic effect for exercise training to prevent cardiac apoptosis in menopausal or bilaterally oophorectomized women. PMID:27339185

  5. Exercise training in hypertension: Role of microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Vander José das; Fernandes, Tiago; Roque, Fernanda Roberta; Soci, Ursula Paula Renó; Melo, Stéphano Freitas Soares; de Oliveira, Edilamar Menezes

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a complex disease that constitutes an important public health problem and demands many studies in order to understand the molecular mechanisms involving his pathophysiology. Therefore, an increasing number of studies have been conducted and new therapies are continually being discovered. In this context, exercise training has emerged as an important non-pharmacological therapy to treat hypertensive patients, minimizing the side effects of pharmacological therapies and frequently contributing to allow pharmacotherapy to be suspended. Several mechanisms have been associated with the pathogenesis of hypertension, such as hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin aldosterone system, impaired endothelial nitric oxide production, increased oxygen-reactive species, vascular thickening and stiffening, cardiac hypertrophy, impaired angiogenesis, and sometimes genetic predisposition. With the advent of microRNAs (miRNAs), new insights have been added to the perspectives for the treatment of this disease, and exercise training has been shown to be able to modulate the miRNAs associated with it. Elucidation of the relationship between exercise training and miRNAs in the pathogenesis of hypertension is fundamental in order to understand how exercise modulates the cardiovascular system at genetic level. This can be promising even for the development of new drugs. This article is a review of how exercise training acts on hypertension by means of specific miRNAs in the heart, vascular system, and skeletal muscle. PMID:25228951

  6. Improvement after training of children with exercise-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Svenonius, E; Kautto, R; Arborelius, M

    1983-01-01

    Fifty children with exercise-induced asthma (EIA) volunteered to take part in a study of the influence of training on EIA. 1) Ten children did not change physical activity. 2) Twelve children trained after premedication with salbutamol inhalations. 3) Thirteen children trained after premedication with disodium chromoglicate (DSCG) and used that drug for treatment. 4) Fifteen children trained in their own regimen, commonly after premedication with salbutamol. Their training programme (groups 2-3) consisted of high load exercise periods of two minutes interrupted by intervals of rest for two minutes during 30 minutes followed by interval swimming for another 30 minutes, twice a week for 3-4 months. Before the training period the degree of EIA was tested with a battery of lung function tests before and after running for 6 minutes on a treadmill at heart rate 170. EIA after training was measured applying the same procedure. Cardiocirculatory performance was evaluated before and after training with work on a cycle ergometer and expressed as W/kg body weight at heart rate 170. The children in groups 2, 3 and 4 improved their physical working capacity by 11% (p less than 0.01), 21% and 11%, respectively, but no improvement was found in group 1. Significant improvements in EIA after the training periods were found in all training groups, but basal asthma improved most in group 3, probably due to the basal treatment with DSCG. PMID:6407276

  7. Training Monitoring for Resistance Exercise: Theory and Applications.

    PubMed

    Scott, Brendan R; Duthie, Grant M; Thornton, Heidi R; Dascombe, Ben J

    2016-05-01

    Resistance exercise is difficult to quantify owing to its inherent complexity with numerous training variables contributing to the training dose (type of exercise, load lifted, training volume, inter-set rest periods, and repetition velocity). In addition, the intensity of resistance training is often inadequately determined as the relative load lifted (% 1-repetition maximum), which does not account for the effects of inter-set recovery periods, repetition velocity, or the number of repetitions performed in each set at a given load. Methods to calculate the volume load associated with resistance training, as well as the perceived intensity of individual sets and entire training sessions have been shown to provide useful information regarding the actual training stimulus. In addition, questionnaires to subjectively assess how athletes are coping with the stressors of training and portable technologies to quantify performance variables such as concentric velocity may also be valuable. However, while several methods have been proposed to quantify resistance training, there is not yet a consensus regarding how these methods can be best implemented and integrated to complement each other. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to provide practical information for strength coaches to highlight effective methods to assess resistance training, and how they can be integrated into a comprehensive monitoring program. PMID:26780346

  8. Instability Resistance Training Across the Exercise Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Behm, David G.; Colado Sanchez, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Context: Instability resistance training (IRT; unstable surfaces and devices to strengthen the core or trunk muscles) is popular in fitness training facilities. Objective: To examine contradictory IRT recommendations for health enthusiasts and rehabilitation. Data Sources: A literature search was performed using MEDLINE, SPORT Discus, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases from 1990 to 2012. Study Selection: Databases were searched using key terms, including “balance,” “stability,” “instability,” “resistance training,” “core,” “trunk,” and “functional performance.” Additionally, relevant articles were extracted from reference lists. Data Extraction: To be included, research questions addressed the effect of balance or IRT on performance, healthy and active participants, and physiologic or performance outcome measures and had to be published in English in a peer-reviewed journal. Results: There is a dichotomy of opinions on the effectiveness and application of instability devices and conditions for health and performance training. Balance training without resistance has been shown to improve not only balance but functional performance as well. IRT studies document similar training adaptations as stable resistance training programs with recreationally active individuals. Similar progressions with lower resistance may improve balance and stability, increase core activation, and improve motor control. Conclusion: IRT is highly recommended for youth, elderly, recreationally active individuals, and highly trained enthusiasts. PMID:24427423

  9. Does 'altitude training' increase exercise performance in elite athletes?

    PubMed

    Lundby, Carsten; Robach, Paul

    2016-07-01

    What is the topic of this review? The aim is to evaluate the effectiveness of various altitude training strategies as investigated within the last few years. What advances does it highlight? Based on the available literature, the foundation to recommend altitude training to athletes is weak. Athletes may use one of the various altitude training strategies to improve exercise performance. The scientific support for such strategies is, however, not as sound as one would perhaps imagine. The question addressed in this review is whether altitude training should be recommended to elite athletes or not. PMID:27173805

  10. Effect of resistance training on muscle use during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz, Lori L.; Tesch, Per A.; Biro, Ronald L.; Dudley, Gary A.

    1994-01-01

    This study examined the effect of resistance training on exercise-induced contrast shift in magnetic resonance (MR) images. It was hypothesized that a given load could be lifted after training with less muscle showing contrast shift, thereby suggesting less muscle was used to perform the exercise. Nine males trained the left quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle 2 days/wk for 9 wk using 3-6 sets of 12 knee extensions each day. The right QF served as a control. Exercise-induced contrast shifts in MR images evoked by each of three bouts of exercise (5 sets of 10 knee extensions with a load equal to 50, 75, and 100% of the maximum pretraining load that could be lifted for 5 sets of 10 repetitions) were quantified pre- and posttraining. MR image contrast shift was quantified by determining QF cross-sectional area (CSA) showing increased spin-spin relaxation time. One repetition maximum increased 14% in the left trained QF and 7% in the right untrained QF. Left QF CSA increased 5%, with no change in right QSF CSA. Left QF CSA showing contrast shift was less after each bout of the exercise test posttraining. This was also true, to a lesser extent, for the right QF at the higher two loads. The results suggest that short-term resistance training reduces MR image contrast shift evoked by a given effort, thereby reflecting the use of less muscle to lift the load. Because this response was evident in both trained and contralateral untrained muscle, neural factors are suggested to be responsible. The consequence of this adaptation could be to increase 'stress' per unit area of active muscle during the course of training and thereby evoke hypertrophy.

  11. Exercise training increases size of hippocampus and improves memory.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Kirk I; Voss, Michelle W; Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya; Basak, Chandramallika; Szabo, Amanda; Chaddock, Laura; Kim, Jennifer S; Heo, Susie; Alves, Heloisa; White, Siobhan M; Wojcicki, Thomas R; Mailey, Emily; Vieira, Victoria J; Martin, Stephen A; Pence, Brandt D; Woods, Jeffrey A; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F

    2011-02-15

    The hippocampus shrinks in late adulthood, leading to impaired memory and increased risk for dementia. Hippocampal and medial temporal lobe volumes are larger in higher-fit adults, and physical activity training increases hippocampal perfusion, but the extent to which aerobic exercise training can modify hippocampal volume in late adulthood remains unknown. Here we show, in a randomized controlled trial with 120 older adults, that aerobic exercise training increases the size of the anterior hippocampus, leading to improvements in spatial memory. Exercise training increased hippocampal volume by 2%, effectively reversing age-related loss in volume by 1 to 2 y. We also demonstrate that increased hippocampal volume is associated with greater serum levels of BDNF, a mediator of neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. Hippocampal volume declined in the control group, but higher preintervention fitness partially attenuated the decline, suggesting that fitness protects against volume loss. Caudate nucleus and thalamus volumes were unaffected by the intervention. These theoretically important findings indicate that aerobic exercise training is effective at reversing hippocampal volume loss in late adulthood, which is accompanied by improved memory function. PMID:21282661

  12. Exercise Training Restores Cardiac Protein Quality Control in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Juliane C.; Queliconi, Bruno B.; Dourado, Paulo M. M.; Cunha, Telma F.; Zambelli, Vanessa O.; Bechara, Luiz R. G.; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.; Brum, Patricia C.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Ferreira, Julio C. B.

    2012-01-01

    Exercise training is a well-known coadjuvant in heart failure treatment; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects remain elusive. Despite the primary cause, heart failure is often preceded by two distinct phenomena: mitochondria dysfunction and cytosolic protein quality control disruption. The objective of the study was to determine the contribution of exercise training in regulating cardiac mitochondria metabolism and cytosolic protein quality control in a post-myocardial infarction-induced heart failure (MI-HF) animal model. Our data demonstrated that isolated cardiac mitochondria from MI-HF rats displayed decreased oxygen consumption, reduced maximum calcium uptake and elevated H2O2 release. These changes were accompanied by exacerbated cardiac oxidative stress and proteasomal insufficiency. Declined proteasomal activity contributes to cardiac protein quality control disruption in our MI-HF model. Using cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes, we showed that either antimycin A or H2O2 resulted in inactivation of proteasomal peptidase activity, accumulation of oxidized proteins and cell death, recapitulating our in vivo model. Of interest, eight weeks of exercise training improved cardiac function, peak oxygen uptake and exercise tolerance in MI-HF rats. Moreover, exercise training restored mitochondrial oxygen consumption, increased Ca2+-induced permeability transition and reduced H2O2 release in MI-HF rats. These changes were followed by reduced oxidative stress and better cardiac protein quality control. Taken together, our findings uncover the potential contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction and cytosolic protein quality control disruption to heart failure and highlight the positive effects of exercise training in re-establishing cardiac mitochondrial physiology and protein quality control, reinforcing the importance of this intervention as a non-pharmacological tool for heart failure therapy. PMID:23300764

  13. Effects of Exercise Training and Inspiratory Muscle Training in Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sheel, A. William; Reid, Wendy Darlene; Townson, Andrea F; Ayas, Najib T; Konnyu, Kristin J

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To provide a systematic review of the studies assessing exercise training and inspiratory muscle training (IMT) in individuals for the improved respiratory function of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: Thirteen studies (5 exercise training, 8 IMT) were identified. Articles were scored for their methodological quality using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scores and Downs and Black tools for randomized and nonrandomized studies, respectively. Conclusions were based on the most rigorously executed studies using Sackett's levels of evidence. Results: Study comparison was compromised by diverse research designs; small sample sizes; and heterogeneity of studied populations, protocols, and outcome measures. Based on current literature, there is level 2 evidence supporting exercise training as an intervention to improve respiratory strength and endurance and level 4 evidence to support exercise training as an intervention that might improve resting and exercising respiratory function in people with SCI. There is level 4 evidence to support IMT as an intervention that might decrease dyspnea and improve respiratory function in people with SCI. Conclusions: There are insufficient data to strongly support the use of exercise training or IMT for improved respiratory function in people with SCI. There is some evidence of efficacy of both regimens; however, the evidence is not of the best possible quality. PMID:19086707

  14. Exercise training attenuates age-dependent elevation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and Nox2 signaling in the rat heart.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang; Kwak, Hyo-Bum; Hord, Jeff; Kim, Jong-Hee; Lawler, John M

    2015-10-01

    Fibrosis of the aging heart impedes cardiac function and increases the risk of arrhythmias and heart disease. Previously, we demonstrated that exercise-induced reduction of collagen I in the aging heart was linked to a suppression of oxidative stress and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-ß). The renin-angiotensin II system (RAS) increases oxidative stress via NADPH oxidase-2 (Nox2) and thus elevates TGF-ß and collagen accumulation. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that exercise training would alleviate age-related upregulation of the angiotensin II receptor I (AT1R) and NADPH oxidase-2 (Nox2), concomitant with suppression of TGF-β and fibrosis. Young (3 months, n=20) and old (31 months, n=20) Fischer 344 ×B rown Norway F1 (FBNF1) hybrid rats were assigned into sedentary and exercise groups, with exercise training rats training on a treadmill 45 min/day, 5 days/week for the next 12 weeks. Exercise training mitigated age-related upregulation of AT1R, Nox2 activity, and Nox2 subunits gp91phox and p47phox. Exercise training also attenuated TGF-ß positive staining and downstream effectors of fibrosis in the aging heart: connective tissue growth factor, phosphorylation of Smad2 at Ser423, myofibroblast proliferation, and collagen I-positive staining. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that exercise training protects against age-dependent cardiac fibrosis by suppressing AT1R and Nox2 as part of a RAS-Nox2-TGF-β pathway. PMID:26239262

  15. Astronaut John Glenn during training exercise in Mercury Procedures Trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Mercury Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. runs through a training exercise in the Mercury Procedures Trainer in use at Space Task Group, Langley Field, Virginia. This Link-type spacecraft simulator permits the practice of both normal and emergency modes of systems operations.

  16. Exercise manual for the Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT) software

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranich, P.R.; Widney, T.W.; Goolsby, P.T.; Nelson, J.D.; Evanko, D.A.

    1997-09-01

    The on-site inspection provisions in many current and proposed arms control agreements require extensive preparation and training on the part of both the Inspected Party and the Inspection Team. Current training techniques include table-top inspections and practice inspections. The Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT), an interactive computer training tool, increases the utility of table-top inspections. ACE-IT has been designed to provide training for a hypothetical challenge inspection under the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC); however, this training tool can be modified for other inspection regimes. Although ACE-IT provides training from notification of an inspection through post-inspection activities, the primary emphasis of ACE-IT is in the inspection itself--particularly with the concept of managed access. ACE-IT also demonstrates how inspection provisions impact compliance determination and the protection of sensitive information. The Exercise Manual supplements the ACE-IT software by providing general information on on-site inspections and detailed information for the CWC challenge inspection exercise. The detailed information includes the pre-inspection briefing, maps, list of sensitive items, medical records, and shipping records.

  17. Intensive exercise training suppresses testosterone during bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, C. E.; Stanford, K. I.; Stein, T. P.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    2005-01-01

    Spaceflight and prolonged bed rest (BR) alter plasma hormone levels inconsistently. This may be due, in part, to prescription of heavy exercise as a countermeasure for ameliorating the adverse effects of disuse. The initial project was to assess exercise programs to maintain aerobic performance and leg strength during BR. The present study evaluates the effect of BR and the performance of the prescribed exercise countermeasures on plasma steroid levels. In a 30-day BR study of male subjects, the efficacy of isotonic (ITE, n = 7) or isokinetic exercise (IKE, n = 7) training was evaluated in contrast to no exercise (n = 5). These exercise countermeasures protected aerobic performance and leg strength successfully. BR alone (no-exercise group) did not change steroidogenesis, as assessed by the plasma concentrations of cortisol, progesterone, aldosterone, and free (FT) and total testosterone (TT). In the exercise groups, both FT and TT were decreased (P < 0.05): FT during IKE from 24 +/- 1.7 to 18 +/- 2.0 pg/ml and during ITE from 21 +/- 1.5 to 18 +/- 1 pg/ml, and TT during IKE from 748 +/- 68 to 534 +/- 46 ng/dl and during ITE from 565 +/- 36 to 496 +/- 38 ng/dl. The effect of intensive exercise countermeasures on plasma testosterone was not associated with indexes of overtraining. The reduction in plasma testosterone associated with both the IKE and ITE countermeasures during BR supports our hypothesis that intensive exercise countermeasures may, in part, contribute to changes in plasma steroid concentrations during spaceflight.

  18. The Anti-Inflammatory Actions of Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Michael G.; McFarlin, Brian K.; Markofski, Melissa M.

    2014-01-01

    The list of diseases with a known inflammatory etiology is growing. Cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, diabetes, geriatric cachexia, and Alzheimer’s disease have all been shown to be linked to or exacerbated by aberrantly regulated inflammatory processes. Nevertheless, there is mounting evidence that those who are physically active, or who become physically active, have a reduction in biomarkers associated with chronic inflammation. There was strong early consensus that exercise-induced reductions in inflammation were explained by body mass index or body fatness, but recent studies provide support for the contention that exercise has body fat–independent anti-inflammatory effects. With few exceptions, the anti-inflammatory effects of exercise appear to occur regardless of age or the presence of chronic diseases. What remains unclear are the mechanisms by which exercise training induces these anti-inflammatory effects, but there are several intriguing possibilities, including release of endogenous products, such as heat shock proteins; selective reduction of visceral adipose tissue mass or reducing infiltration of adipocytes by macrophages; shift in immune cell phenotype; cross-tolerizing effects; or exercise-induced shifts in accessory proteins of toll-like receptor signaling. However, future research endeavors are likely to uncover additional potential mechanisms, and it could be some time before functional mechanisms are made clear. In summary, the potential anti-inflammatory influences of exercise training may provide a low-cost, readily available, and effective treatment for low-grade systemic inflammation and could contribute significantly to the positive effects of exercise training on chronic disease. PMID:25431545

  19. Plyometric exercise combined with high-intensity interval training improves metabolic abnormalities in young obese females more so than interval training alone.

    PubMed

    Racil, Ghazi; Zouhal, Hassane; Elmontassar, Wassim; Ben Abderrahmane, Abderraouf; De Sousa, Maysa Vieira; Chamari, Karim; Amri, Mohamed; Coquart, Jeremy B

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of 12 weeks of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) with the effects of 12 weeks of plyometric exercise combined with HIIT (P+HIIT) on anthropometric, biochemical, and physical fitness data in young obese females. Sixty-eight participants (age, 16.6 ± 1.3 y; body mass, 82.8 ± 5.0 kg; body fat, 39.4% ± 3.3%; body mass index z score, 2.9 ± 0.4) were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: HIIT (2 blocks per session of 6-8 bouts of 30-s runs at 100% velocity at peak oxygen uptake, with 30-s active recovery between bouts at 50%velocity at peak oxygen uptake (n = 23)); P+HIIT (2 blocks per session of 3 different 15-s plyometric exercises with 15-s passive recoveries, totaling 2 min for each plyometric exercise + the same HIIT program (n = 26)); or control (no exercise (n = 19)). Anthropometric (body mass, body mass index z score, body fat, lean body mass, and waist circumference), biochemical (plasma glucose, insulin, leptin and adiponectin concentrations, leptin/adiponectin ratio, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)), physical fitness (peak oxygen uptake, velocity at peak oxygen uptake, squat jump, and countermovement jump performances), and energy intake data were collected. Both training programs improved the anthropometric, biochemical, and physical fitness variables. However, the P+HIIT program induced greater improvements than did the HIIT program in lean body mass (+3.0% ± 1.7%), plasma glucose and leptin concentrations (-11.0% ± 4.7% and -23.8% ± 5.8%, respectively), plasma leptin/adiponectin ratio (-40.9% ± 10.9%), HOMA-IR (-37.3% ± 6.2%), and squat jump performance (22.2% ± 7.5%). Taken together, these findings suggest that adding plyometric exercises to a HIIT program may be more beneficial than HIIT alone in obese female adolescents. PMID:26701117

  20. Intensive Exercise Training During Bed Rest Attenuates Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1997-01-01

    Intensive exercise training during bed rest attenuates deconditioning. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 29, No. 2, pp. 207-215, 1997. A 30-d 6 deg head-down bed rest project was conducted to evaluate variable high-intensity, short-duration, isotonic cycle ergometer exercise (ITE) training and high-intensity intermittent resistive isokinetic exercise (IKE) training regimens designed to maintain peak VO2 and muscle mass, strength, and endurance at ambulatory control levels throughout prolonged bed rest. Other elements of the deconditioning (adaptive) syndrome, such as proprioception, psychological performance, hypovolemia, water balance, body composition, and orthostatic tolerance, were also measured. Major findings are summarized in this paper. Compared with response during bed rest of the no exercise (NOE) control group: the ITE training regimen (a) maintained work capacity (peak VO2), (b) maintained plasma and red cell volumes, (c) induced positive body water balance, (d) decreased quality of sleep and mental concentration, and (e) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance; the IKE training regimen (f) attenuated the decrease in peak VO2 by 50%, (g) attenuated loss of red cell volume by 40% but had no effect on loss of plasma volume, (b) induced positive body water balance, (i) had no adverse effect on quality of sleep or concentration, and 0) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance. These findings suggest that various elements of the deconditioning syndrome can be manipulated by duration and intensity of ITE or IKE training regimens and that several different training protocols will be required to maintain or restore physiological and psychological performance of individuals confined to prolonged bed rest.

  1. ASCAN Helms simulates parachute jump during VAFB training exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    1990 Group 13 Astronaut Candidate (ASCAN) Susan J. Helms simulates a parachute jump during ground egress and parasail training exercises at Vance Air Force Base (VAFB), Enid, Oklahoma. With her arms folded against her chest, Helms jumps from a brick platform onto the ground. In line behind her are Charles J. Precourt followed by Leroy Chiao. The training is designed to prepare the ASCANs for proper survival measures to take in the event of an emergency aboard the T-38 jet trainer aircraft they will frequently use once they become full-fledged astronauts. ASCANs completed the VAFB training courses from 07-29-90 through 07-31-90.

  2. STS-42 crewmembers participate in JSC fire fighting training exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-42 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Payload Specialist Ulf D. Merbold (far left), fire fighting trainer (center), Payload Specialist Roberta L. Bondar (holding hose nozzle), and backup Payload Specialist Roger K. Crouch position water hoses in the direction of a blazing fire in JSC's Fire Training Pit. The crewmembers and backup are learning fire extinguishing techniques during fire fighting and fire training exercises held at JSC's Fire Training Pit located across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207. Merbold is representing the European Space Agency (ESA) and Bondar is representing Canada during the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (IML-1) mission aboard OV-103.

  3. Exercise training improves endothelial function in young prehypertensives

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Darren T; Casey, Darren P; Martin, Jeffrey S; Emerson, Blaze D; Braith, Randy W

    2015-01-01

    Prehypertensives exhibit marked endothelial dysfunction, a risk factor for future cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the ability of exercise to ameliorate endothelial dysfunction in prehypertensives is grossly underinvestigated. This prospective randomized and controlled study examined the separate effects of resistance and endurance training on conduit artery endothelial function in young prehypertensives. Forty-three unmedicated prehypertensive (systolic blood pressure [SBP]=120–139 mmHg; diastolic blood pressure [DBP]=80–89 mmHg) but otherwise healthy men and women and 15 normotensive matched time-controls (NMTC); n = 15) between 18 and 35 y of age met screening requirements and participated in the study. Prehypertensive subjects were randomly assigned to either a resistance exercise training (PHRT; n = 15), endurance exercise training (PHET; n = 13) or time-control group (PHTC; n = 15). The treatment groups performed exercise training three days per week for eight weeks. The control groups did not initiate exercise programs throughout the study. Flow mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery, biomarkers of enodothelial function and peripheral blood pressure were evaluated before and after exercise intervention or time-matched control. PHRT and PHET reduced resting SBP (9.6 ± 3.6 and 11.9 ± 3.4 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05) and DBP (8.0 ± 5.1 and 7.2 ± 3.4 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05). Exercise training improved brachial artery FMD absolute diameter, percent dilation and normalized percent dilation by 30%, 34% and 19% for PHRT, P < 0.05; and by 54%, 63% and 75% for PHET, P < 0.05; respectively. PHRT and PHET increased plasma concentrations of 6-keto prostaglandin F1α (19% and 22%, respectively; P < 0.05), NOx (19% and 23%, respectively; P < 0.05), and reduced endothelin-1 by (16% and 24%, respectively; P < 0.01). This study provides novel evidence that resistance and endurance exercise separately have beneficial effects on resting

  4. Exercise training improves endothelial function in young prehypertensives.

    PubMed

    Beck, Darren T; Casey, Darren P; Martin, Jeffrey S; Emerson, Blaze D; Braith, Randy W

    2013-04-01

    Prehypertensives exhibit marked endothelial dysfunction, a risk factor for future cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the ability of exercise to ameliorate endothelial dysfunction in prehypertensives is grossly underinvestigated. This prospective randomized and controlled study examined the separate effects of resistance and endurance training on conduit artery endothelial function in young prehypertensives. Forty-three unmedicated prehypertensive (systolic blood pressure [SBP]=120-139 mmHg; diastolic blood pressure [DBP]=80-89 mmHg) but otherwise healthy men and women and 15 normotensive matched time-controls (NMTC); n = 15) between 18 and 35 y of age met screening requirements and participated in the study. Prehypertensive subjects were randomly assigned to either a resistance exercise training (PHRT; n = 15), endurance exercise training (PHET; n = 13) or time-control group (PHTC; n = 15). The treatment groups performed exercise training three days per week for eight weeks. The control groups did not initiate exercise programs throughout the study. Flow mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery, biomarkers of enodothelial function and peripheral blood pressure were evaluated before and after exercise intervention or time-matched control. PHRT and PHET reduced resting SBP (9.6 ± 3.6 and 11.9 ± 3.4 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05) and DBP (8.0 ± 5.1 and 7.2 ± 3.4 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05). Exercise training improved brachial artery FMD absolute diameter, percent dilation and normalized percent dilation by 30%, 34% and 19% for PHRT, P < 0.05; and by 54%, 63% and 75% for PHET, P < 0.05; respectively. PHRT and PHET increased plasma concentrations of 6-keto prostaglandin F1α (19% and 22%, respectively; P < 0.05), NO x (19% and 23%, respectively; P < 0.05), and reduced endothelin-1 by (16% and 24%, respectively; P < 0.01). This study provides novel evidence that resistance and endurance exercise separately have beneficial effects on resting

  5. The development of radioactive sample surrogates for training and exercises

    SciTech Connect

    Martha Finck; Bevin Brush; Dick Jansen; David Chamberlain; Don Dry; George Brooks; Margaret Goldberg

    2012-03-01

    The development of radioactive sample surrogates for training and exercises Source term information is required for to reconstruct a device used in a dispersed radiological dispersal device. Simulating a radioactive environment to train and exercise sampling and sample characterization methods with suitable sample materials is a continued challenge. The Idaho National Laboratory has developed and permitted a Radioactive Response Training Range (RRTR), an 800 acre test range that is approved for open air dispersal of activated KBr, for training first responders in the entry and exit from radioactively contaminated areas, and testing protocols for environmental sampling and field characterization. Members from the Department of Defense, Law Enforcement, and the Department of Energy participated in the first contamination exercise that was conducted at the RRTR in the July 2011. The range was contaminated using a short lived radioactive Br-82 isotope (activated KBr). Soil samples contaminated with KBr (dispersed as a solution) and glass particles containing activated potassium bromide that emulated dispersed radioactive materials (such as ceramic-based sealed source materials) were collected to assess environmental sampling and characterization techniques. This presentation summarizes the performance of a radioactive materials surrogate for use as a training aide for nuclear forensics.

  6. Effects of exercise training on coronary transport capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, M.H.

    1985-02-01

    Coronary transport capacity was estimated in eight sedentary control and eight exercise-trained anesthetized dogs by determining the differences between base line and the highest coronary blood flow and permeability-surface area product (PS) obtained during maximal adenosine vasodilation with coronary perfusion pressure constant. The anterior descending branch of the left coronary artery was cannulated and pump- perfused under constant-pressure conditions (approximately equal to 100 Torr) while aortic, central venous, and coronary perfusion pressures, heart rate, electrocardiogram, and coronary flow were monitored. Myocardial extraction and PS of /sup 51/Cr-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid were determined with the single-injection indicator-diffusion method. The efficacy of the 16 +/- 1 wk exercise training program was shown by significant increases in the succinate dehydrogenase activities of the gastrocnemius, gluteus medialis, and long head of triceps brachii muscles. There were no differences between control and trained dogs for either resting coronary blood flow or PS. During maximal vasodilation with adenosine, the trained dogs had significantly lower perfusion pressures with constant flow and, with constant-pressure vasodilation, greater coronary blood flow and PS. It is concluded that exercise training in dogs induces an increased coronary transport capacity that includes increases in coronary blood flow capacity (26% of control) and capillary diffusion capacity (82% of control).

  7. Differential Effects of Acute (Extenuating) and Chronic (Training) Exercise on Inflammation and Oxidative Stress Status in an Animal Model of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira de Lemos, Edite; Pinto, Rui; Oliveira, Jorge; Garrido, Patrícia; Sereno, José; Mascarenhas-Melo, Filipa; Páscoa-Pinheiro, João; Teixeira, Frederico; Reis, Flávio

    2011-01-01

    This study compares the effects of a single bout of exercise (acute extenuating) with those promoted by an exercise training program (chronic), focusing on low-grade chronic inflammation profile and on oxidative stress status, using the obese ZDF rats as a model of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Animals were sacrificed after 12 weeks of a swimming training program and after a single bout of acute extenuating exercise. Glycaemic, insulinemic, and lipidic profile (triglycerides, total-cholesterol) were evaluated, as well as inflammatory (serum CRPhs, TNF-α, adiponectin) and oxidative (lipidic peroxidation and uric acid) status. When compared to obese diabetic sedentary rats, the animals submitted to acute exercise presented significantly lower values of glycaemia and insulinaemia, with inflammatory profile and oxidative stress significantly aggravated. The trained animals showed amelioration of glycaemic and lipidic dysmetabolism, accompanied by remarkable reduction of inflammatory and oxidative markers. In conclusion, the results presented herein suggessted that exercise pathogenesis-oriented interventions should not exacerbate underlying inflammatory stress associated with T2DM. PMID:22174491

  8. Cardio-respiratory, haematological and biochemical parameter adjustments to exercise: effect of a probiotic in horses during training.

    PubMed

    Art, T; Votion, D; McEntee, K; Amory, H; Linden, A; Close, R; Lekeux, P

    1994-01-01

    Two randomly distributed groups of thoroughbred horses were compared during a 12-week period for their cardio-respiratory and metabolic adjustment to strenuous exercise, training and detraining. The horses were trained following the same standardized schedule and were regularly investigated using standardized treadmill exercise tests (SET) of increasing speed. After the first SET and during the whole experimental period, a group of 6 horses received a probiotic (Bioracing) once a day while a group of 5 horses received a placebo. All other conditions were similar for both groups. During each SET, the oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide output, tidal volume (inspired volume), respiratory rate and expired minute volume were obtained using 2 ultrasonic pneumotachographs and a mass spectrometer. All the parameters were the mean of the values calculated during the last 20 s of the SET. Heart rate was continuously measured with a polar horse tester. Venous blood was sampled before and after the test and analyzed for various biochemical parameters. In both groups, training induced significant modification in most of the cardio-respiratory parameters, ie peak oxygen uptake, peak carbon dioxide output, respiratory exchange ratio, ventilation/min to oxygen-uptake ratio and oxygen-uptake to heart-rate ratio. After the 3-week detraining period, most of the values were again similar to the pre-training values in both groups. However, the training-induced modifications of most of the cardio-respiratory parameters occurred earlier and were proportionally greater in the probiotic-treated group than in the control. The respiratory coefficient decreased in the control but not in the treated group. All other parameters changed similarly in both groups. This suggests that Bioracing could modify the physiological effects of training by improving some aerobic metabolic capacities for carbohydrate utilization, but that this effect occurs only during training and not during periods of physical

  9. Maximal oxygen uptake during exercise using trained or untrained muscles.

    PubMed

    Moreira-da-Costa, M; Russo, A K; Piçarro, I C; Silva, A C; Leite-de-Barros-Neto, T; Tarasantchi, J; Barbosa, A S

    1984-01-01

    Maximal oxygen uptake, VO2 max, was determined for cyclists, long-distance runners and non-athletes during uphill running (treadmill) and cycling (cycloergometer) to compare trained and untrained muscles. Blood lactate, maximal heart rate and maximal ventilation during work were also measured. VO2 max was higher for runners and non-athletes during exercise on the treadmill and higher for cyclists during exercise on the cycloergometer. For runners and non-athletes, maximal heart rate accompanied the increase in VO2 max, whereas similar values were obtained for cyclists on both ergometers. Maximal ventilation during work accompanied the difference in VO2 max in both groups of athletes but among non-athletes it was similar during exercise on both the cycloergometer and the treadmill. Blood lactate was similar during exercise on both ergometers for all groups. These results suggest that the quantitative effects of training on cardiovascular and respiratory functions may only be properly evaluated by using an ergometer which requires an activity similar to that usually performed by the subjects. Cycle riding may possibly induce significant and specific alterations in the muscles involved in the exercise, thus increasing peripheral O2 uptake even after stabilization of maximal cardiac output, whereas running may well induce an improvement of all factors which are responsible for aerobic work power. PMID:6518340

  10. Sake Protein Supplementation Affects Exercise Performance and Biochemical Profiles in Power-Exercise-Trained Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ming; Lin, Che-Li; Wei, Li; Hsu, Yi-Ju; Chen, Kuan-Neng; Huang, Chi-Chang; Kao, Chin-Hsung

    2016-01-01

    Exercise and fitness training programs have attracted the public’s attention in recent years. Sports nutrition supplementation is an important issue in the global sports market. Purpose: In this study, we designed a power exercise training (PET) program with a mouse model based on a strength and conditional training protocol for humans. We tested the effect of supplementation with functional branched-chain amino acid (BCAA)-rich sake protein (SP) to determine whether the supplement had a synergistic effect during PET and enhanced athletic performance and resistance to fatigue. Methods: Male ICR mice were divided into three groups (n = 8 per group) for four-week treatment: sedentary controls with vehicle (SC), and PET and PET groups with SP supplementation (3.8 g/kg, PET + SP). Exercise performance was evaluated by forelimb grip strength and exhaustive swimming time as well as changes in body composition and anti-fatigue activity levels of serum lactate, ammonia, glucose, and creatine kinase (CK) after a 15-min swimming exercise. The biochemical parameters were measured at the end of the experiment. Results: four-week PET significantly increased grip strength and exhaustive swimming time and decreased epididymal fat pad (EFP) weight and area. Levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), creatinine, and uric acid (UA) were significantly increased. PET + SP supplementation significantly decreased serum lactate, ammonia and CK levels after the 15-min swimming exercise. The resting serum levels of AST, ALT, CREA and UA were all significantly decreased with PET + SP. Conclusion: The PET program could increase the exercise performance and modulate the body composition of mice. PET with SP conferred better anti-fatigue activity, improved biochemical profiles, and may be an effective ergogenic aid in strength training. PMID:26907336

  11. Moving Beyond Cardio: The Value of Resistance Training, Balance Training, and Other Forms of Exercise in the Management of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Colberg, Sheri R.; Sigal, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    IN BRIEF Traditionally, aerobic training has been a central focus of exercise promotion for diabetes management. However, people with diabetes have much to gain from other forms of exercise. This article reviews the evidence and recommendations on resistance, balance, and flexibility training, as well as other, less traditional, forms of exercise such as yoga and Tai Chi. PMID:25717274

  12. Resistance exercise countermeasures for space flight: implications of training specificity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamman, M. M.; Caruso, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    While resistance exercise should be a logical choice for prevention of strength loss during unloading, the principle of training specificity cannot be overlooked. Our purpose was to explore training specificity in describing the effect of our constant load exercise countermeasure on isokinetic strength performance. Twelve healthy men (mean +/- SD: 28.0 +/- 5.2 years, 179.4 +/- 3.9 cm, 77.5 +/- 13.6 kg) were randomly assigned to no exercise or resistance exercise (REX) during 14 days of bed rest. REX performed five sets of leg press exercise to volitional fatigue (6-10 repetitions) every other day. Unilateral isokinetic concentric-eccentric knee extension testing performed before and on day 15 prior to reambulation included torque-velocity and power-velocity relationships at four velocities (0.52, 1.75, 2.97, and 4.19 rad s-1), torque-position relationship, and contractile work capacity (10 repetitions at 1.05 rad s-1). Two (group) x 2 (time) ANOVA revealed no group x time interactions; thus, groups were combined. Across velocities, angle-specific torque fell 18% and average power fell 20% (p < 0.05). No velocity x time or mode (concentric/eccentric) x time interactions were noted. Torque x position decreased on average 24% (p < 0.05). Total contractile work dropped 27% (p < 0.05). Results indicate bed rest induces rapid and marked reductions in strength and our constant load resistance training protocol did not prevent isokinetic strength losses. Differences between closed-chain training and open-chain testing may explain the lack of protection.

  13. Resistance exercise countermeasures for space flight: implications of training specificity.

    PubMed

    Bamman, M M; Caruso, J F

    2000-02-01

    While resistance exercise should be a logical choice for prevention of strength loss during unloading, the principle of training specificity cannot be overlooked. Our purpose was to explore training specificity in describing the effect of our constant load exercise countermeasure on isokinetic strength performance. Twelve healthy men (mean +/- SD: 28.0 +/- 5.2 years, 179.4 +/- 3.9 cm, 77.5 +/- 13.6 kg) were randomly assigned to no exercise or resistance exercise (REX) during 14 days of bed rest. REX performed five sets of leg press exercise to volitional fatigue (6-10 repetitions) every other day. Unilateral isokinetic concentric-eccentric knee extension testing performed before and on day 15 prior to reambulation included torque-velocity and power-velocity relationships at four velocities (0.52, 1.75, 2.97, and 4.19 rad s-1), torque-position relationship, and contractile work capacity (10 repetitions at 1.05 rad s-1). Two (group) x 2 (time) ANOVA revealed no group x time interactions; thus, groups were combined. Across velocities, angle-specific torque fell 18% and average power fell 20% (p < 0.05). No velocity x time or mode (concentric/eccentric) x time interactions were noted. Torque x position decreased on average 24% (p < 0.05). Total contractile work dropped 27% (p < 0.05). Results indicate bed rest induces rapid and marked reductions in strength and our constant load resistance training protocol did not prevent isokinetic strength losses. Differences between closed-chain training and open-chain testing may explain the lack of protection. PMID:11543414

  14. Exercise training reduces insulin resistance and upregulates the mTOR/p70S6k pathway in cardiac muscle of diet-induced obesity rats.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Cleber; Frederico, Marisa J; da Luz, Gabrielle; Pauli, José R; Silva, Adelino S R; Pinho, Ricardo A; Velloso, Lício A; Ropelle, Eduardo R; De Souza, Cláudio T

    2011-03-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are rapidly expanding public health problems. These disturbances are related to many diseases, including heart pathology. Acting through the Akt/mTOR pathway, insulin has numerous and important physiological functions, such as the induction of growth and survival of many cell types and cardiac hypertrophy. However, obesity and insulin resistance can alter mTOR/p70S6k. Exercise training is known to induce this pathway, but never in the heart of diet-induced obesity subjects. To evaluate the effect of exercise training on mTOR/p70S6k in the heart of obese Wistar rats, we analyzed the effects of 12 weeks of swimming on obese rats, induced by a high-fat diet. Exercise training reduced epididymal fat, fasting serum insulin and plasma glucose disappearance. Western blot analyses showed that exercise training increased the ability of insulin to phosphorylate intracellular molecules such as Akt (2.3-fold) and Foxo1 (1.7-fold). Moreover, reduced activities and expressions of proteins, induced by the high-fat diet in rats, such as phospho-JNK (1.9-fold), NF-kB (1.6-fold) and PTP-1B (1.5-fold), were observed. Finally, exercise training increased the activities of the transduction pathways of insulin-dependent protein synthesis, as shown by increases in Raptor phosphorylation (1.7-fold), p70S6k phosphorylation (1.9-fold), and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation (1.4-fold) and a reduction in atrogin-1 expression (2.1-fold). Results demonstrate a pivotal regulatory role of exercise training on the Akt/mTOR pathway, in turn, promoting protein synthesis and antagonizing protein degradation. PMID:20717955

  15. Twelve Weeks of Sprint Interval Training Improves Indices of Cardiometabolic Health Similar to Traditional Endurance Training despite a Five-Fold Lower Exercise Volume and Time Commitment

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Brian J.; MacInnis, Martin J.; Skelly, Lauren E.; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.; Gibala, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims We investigated whether sprint interval training (SIT) was a time-efficient exercise strategy to improve insulin sensitivity and other indices of cardiometabolic health to the same extent as traditional moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT). SIT involved 1 minute of intense exercise within a 10-minute time commitment, whereas MICT involved 50 minutes of continuous exercise per session. Methods Sedentary men (27±8y; BMI = 26±6kg/m2) performed three weekly sessions of SIT (n = 9) or MICT (n = 10) for 12 weeks or served as non-training controls (n = 6). SIT involved 3x20-second ‘all-out’ cycle sprints (~500W) interspersed with 2 minutes of cycling at 50W, whereas MICT involved 45 minutes of continuous cycling at ~70% maximal heart rate (~110W). Both protocols involved a 2-minute warm-up and 3-minute cool-down at 50W. Results Peak oxygen uptake increased after training by 19% in both groups (SIT: 32±7 to 38±8; MICT: 34±6 to 40±8ml/kg/min; p<0.001 for both). Insulin sensitivity index (CSI), determined by intravenous glucose tolerance tests performed before and 72 hours after training, increased similarly after SIT (4.9±2.5 to 7.5±4.7, p = 0.002) and MICT (5.0±3.3 to 6.7±5.0 x 10−4 min-1 [μU/mL]-1, p = 0.013) (p<0.05). Skeletal muscle mitochondrial content also increased similarly after SIT and MICT, as primarily reflected by the maximal activity of citrate synthase (CS; P<0.001). The corresponding changes in the control group were small for VO2peak (p = 0.99), CSI (p = 0.63) and CS (p = 0.97). Conclusions Twelve weeks of brief intense interval exercise improved indices of cardiometabolic health to the same extent as traditional endurance training in sedentary men, despite a five-fold lower exercise volume and time commitment. PMID:27115137

  16. Resistive exercise training in cardiac rehabilitation. An update.

    PubMed

    Verrill, D E; Ribisl, P M

    1996-05-01

    Resistive exercise training has become very popular for patients of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programmes (CRPs). For decades, CRPs focused almost exclusively on improving cardiorespiratory endurance and most programmes ignored muscular fitness development. Moreover, resistance training was thought to be potentially hazardous for the cardiac patient due to the risk of cardiovascular complications from adverse haemodynamic responses. We now know that resistive exercise testing and training is very safe for properly screened patients, even at relatively high workloads. Improvement in muscular strength facilitates return to daily vocational and avocational activities and is important for the CRP participant to regain lost strength and resume work soon after a cardiac event. Circuit weight training (CWT) is helpful in this respect and has been shown to increase muscular strength, cardiovascular endurance, body composition, bone density and mineral content, self-confidence, and self-efficacy in various populations. This article presents an update on current research in cardiac patients and also presents guidelines for implementing a properly supervised cardiac resistive exercise programme. PMID:8724203

  17. Autogenic-Feedback Training Exercise (AFTE) Method and System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The Autogenic-Feedback Training Exercise (AFTE) method of the present invention is a combined application of physiologic and perceptual training techniques. such as autogenic therapy and biofeedback. This combined therapy approach produces a methodology that is appreciably more effective than either of the individual techniques used separately. The AFTE method enables sufficient magnitude of control necessary to significantly reduce the behavioral and physiologic reactions to severe environmental stressors. It produces learned effects that are persistent over time and are resistant to extinction and it can be administered in a short period of time. The AFTE method may be used efficiently in several applications, among which are the following: to improve pilot and crew performance during emergency flying conditions; to train people to prevent the occurrence of nausea and vomiting associated with motion and sea sickness, or morning sickness in early pregnancy; as a training method for preventing or counteracting air-sickness symptoms in high-performance military aircraft; for use as a method for cardiovascular training, as well as for multiple other autonomic responses, which may contribute to the alleviation of Space Motion Sickness (SMS) in astronauts and cosmonauts; training people suffering from migraine or tension headaches to control peripheral blood flow and reduce forehead and/or trapezius muscle tension; training elderly people suffering from fecal incontinence to control their sphincter muscles; training cancer patients to reduce the nauseagenic effects of chemotherapy; and training patients with Chronic Intestinal Pseudo-obstruction (CIP).

  18. Limb-specific and cross-transfer effects of arm-crank exercise training in patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Tew, Garry; Nawaz, Shah; Zwierska, Irena; Saxton, John M

    2009-12-01

    Arm cranking is a useful alternative exercise modality for improving walking performance in patients with intermittent claudication; however, the mechanisms of such an improvement are poorly understood. The main aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of arm-crank exercise training on lower-limb O2 delivery in patients with intermittent claudication. A total of 57 patients with intermittent claudication (age, 70+/-8 years; mean+/-S.D.) were randomized to an arm-crank exercise group or a non-exercise control group. The exercise group trained twice weekly for 12 weeks. At baseline and 12 weeks, patients completed incremental tests to maximum exercise tolerance on both an arm-crank ergometer and a treadmill. Respiratory variables were measured breath-by-breath to determine peak VO2 (O2 uptake) and ventilatory threshold. Near-IR spectroscopy was used in the treadmill test to determine changes in calf muscle StO2 (tissue O2 saturation). Patients also completed a square-wave treadmill-walking protocol to determine VO2 kinetics. A total of 51 patients completed the study. In the exercise group, higher maximum walking distances (from 496+/-250 to 661+/-324 m) and peak VO2 values (from 17.2+/-2.7 to 18.2+/-3.4 ml.kg-1 of body mass.min-1) were recorded in the incremental treadmill test (P<0.05). After training, there was also an increase in time to minimum StO2 (from 268+/-305 s to 410+/-366 s), a speeding of VO2 kinetics (from 44.7+/-10.4 to 41.3+/-14.4 s) and an increase in submaximal StO2 during treadmill walking (P<0.05). There were no significant changes in the control group. The results suggest that the improvement in walking performance after arm-crank exercise training in patients with intermittent claudication is attributable, at least in part, to improved lower-limb O2 delivery. PMID:19388883

  19. ARGX-87: Accident Response Group Exercise, 1987: A Broken Arrow mini exercise. [Training

    SciTech Connect

    Schuld, E.P.; Cruff, D.F.

    1987-07-01

    A Broken Arrow mini exercise dubbed ''Accident Response Group Exercise - 1987'' (ARGX-87) was conducted on June 1, 1987 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNLL). The exercise started at 0445 PDT with a call from the Department of Energy (DOE) - EOC in Washington, DC, to the Albuquerque Operations (AL - ) - EOC. AL, in turn, called the Laboratory off-hour emergency number (Fire Dispatcher), who called the Laboratory Emergency Duty Officer (LEDO). The LEDO then contacted the Accident Response Group (ARG) Senior Scientific Advisor. Calls were placed to assemble appropriate members of the ARG in the ALERT Center. No phone number for SNLL was available at the Albuquerque Operations EOC, so a controller injected a message to SNLL to get them involved in the exercise. The messages received at the Laboratory identified the Air Force line item weapon system involved in the accident and the accident location. As people arrived at the ALERT Center they began discussing the details of the accident. They also started working the deployment logistics and other issues. Travel arrangements for the HOT SPOT equipment and ARG personnel were made for immediate deployment to the accident site in North Dakota. The exercise was terminated at 0840 as planned. While certain procedural deficiencies were noted, the exercise was considered a valuable learning experience. The results and observations from this experience will be used to refine the operating procedures and the training program.

  20. Astronaut John Glenn during training exercise in Mercury Procedures Trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Close-up view of Mercury Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. as he runs through a training exercise in the Mercury Procedures Trainer in use at Space Task Group, Langley Field, Virginia. This Link-type spacecraft simulator permits the practice of both normal and emergency modes of systems operations. Glenn is in the Mercury pressure suit and is wearing his helmet, just as he would if the flight were real.

  1. Effect of swim exercise training on human muscle fiber function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, R. H.; Costill, D. L.; Gardetto, P. R.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of swim exercise training on the human muscle fiber function was investigated in swimmers trained in a typical collegiate swim-training program followed by an intensified 10-day training period. The measured parameters included the peak tension (P0), negative log molar Ca(2+) concentration (pCa)-force, and maximal shortening speed (Vmax) of the slow-twitch type I and fast-twitch type II fibers obtained by biopsy from the deltoid muscle. The P0 values were found to be not altered after either the training or the 10-day intensive program. The type I fibers from the trained swimmers showed pCa-force curves shifted to the right, such that higher free Ca(2+) levels were required to elicit a given percent of P0. The training program significantly increased the Vmax in the type I fibers and decreased that of the type II fibers, and the 10-day intensive training produced a further significant decrease of the type II fibers.

  2. Exercise-training protocols for astronauts in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Greenleaf, J E; Bulbulian, R; Bernauer, E M; Haskell, W L; Moore, T

    1989-12-01

    The question of the composition of exercise protocols for use by astronauts in microgravity is unresolved. Based on our knowledge of physical working requirements for astronauts during intra- and extravehicular activity and on the findings from bed-rest studies that utilized exercise training as a countermeasure for the reduction of aerobic power, deterioration of muscular strength and endurance, decrements in mood and cognitive performance, and possibly for bone loss, two exercise protocols are proposed. One assumes that, during microgravity, astronaut exercise physiological functions should be maintained at 100% of ground-based levels; the other assumes that maximal aerobic power in flight can be reduced by 10% of the ground-based level. A recommended prescription for in-flight prevention or partial suppression of calcium (bone) loss cannot be written until further research findings are obtained that elucidate the site, the magnitude, and the mechanism of the changes. Hopefully these proposed exercise prescriptions will stimulate further research and discussion resulting in even more efficient protocols that will help ensure the optimal health and well-being of our astronauts. PMID:2691487

  3. AUTONOMIC CONTROL OF HEART RATE AFTER EXERCISE IN TRAINED WRESTLERS

    PubMed Central

    Báez, San Martín E.; Von Oetinger, A.; Cañas, Jamett R.; Ramírez, Campillo R.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish differences in vagal reactivation, through heart rate recovery and heart rate variability post exercise, in Brazilian jiu-jitsu wrestlers (BJJW). A total of 18 male athletes were evaluated, ten highly trained (HT) and eight moderately trained (MT), who performed a maximum incremental test. At the end of the exercise, the R-R intervals were recorded during the first minute of recovery. We calculated heart rate recovery (HRR60s), and performed linear and non-linear (standard deviation of instantaneous beat-to-beat R-R interval variability – SD1) analysis of heart rate variability (HRV), using the tachogram of the first minute of recovery divided into four segments of 15 s each (0-15 s, 15-30 s, 30-45 s, 45-60 s). Between HT and MT individuals, there were statistically significant differences in HRR60s (p <0.05) and in the non linear analysis of HRV from SD130-45s (p <0.05) and SD145-60s (p <0.05). The results of this research suggest that heart rate kinetics during the first minute after exercise are related to training level and can be used as an index for autonomic cardiovascular control in BJJW. PMID:24744476

  4. Autonomic control of heart rate after exercise in trained wrestlers.

    PubMed

    Henríquez, Olguín C; Báez, San Martín E; Von Oetinger, A; Cañas, Jamett R; Ramírez, Campillo R

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to establish differences in vagal reactivation, through heart rate recovery and heart rate variability post exercise, in Brazilian jiu-jitsu wrestlers (BJJW). A total of 18 male athletes were evaluated, ten highly trained (HT) and eight moderately trained (MT), who performed a maximum incremental test. At the end of the exercise, the R-R intervals were recorded during the first minute of recovery. We calculated heart rate recovery (HRR60s), and performed linear and non-linear (standard deviation of instantaneous beat-to-beat R-R interval variability - SD1) analysis of heart rate variability (HRV), using the tachogram of the first minute of recovery divided into four segments of 15 s each (0-15 s, 15-30 s, 30-45 s, 45-60 s). Between HT and MT individuals, there were statistically significant differences in HRR60s (p <0.05) and in the non linear analysis of HRV from SD130-45s (p <0.05) and SD145-60s (p <0.05). The results of this research suggest that heart rate kinetics during the first minute after exercise are related to training level and can be used as an index for autonomic cardiovascular control in BJJW. PMID:24744476

  5. Interaction of physical trainings and coffee intakes in fuel utilization during exercise in rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Young; Cho, Yun-Ok

    2013-06-01

    This study investigates the impact of exercises, coffee intakes, and physical trainings on fuel utilization in rats. Ninety-six rats were fed a control diet with either water (C) or coffee (CF; 0.12 g freeze-dried instant coffee/100 g body weight/d). Additionally, the animals go through physical training (TC and TCF) or no training (NTC and NTCF) for 4 weeks. For physical training, animals have to exercise on treadmills for 30 minutes (5 d per week, 15° incline, 0.5-0.8 km/h). At the end of week 4, the animals in each group were subdivided into three exercise groups: before exercise (BE), during exercise (DE), and after exercise (AE). The DE rats exercised on treadmills for 1 hour immediately before being sacrificed. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, glucose, glycogen, protein, triglyceride (TG), and free fatty acid (FFA) levels in the plasma, liver, and skeletal muscle of the rats were compared accordingly. Organ weights were also measured. Coffee-training interaction had a significant impact on heart weight, visceral fat, hemoglobin, hematocrit, liver glycogen in DE and AE, and liver triglyceride in DE and AE. Exercise (meaning exercised on a treadmill for 1 hour immediately before being sacrificed) training interaction was significant in liver glycogen, muscle glycogen in control diet and control diet with coffee, FFA and muscle TG levels at control diet with coffee group. Exercise-coffee interactions significantly influenced the FFA with no training groups. Exercise-coffee-training interaction significantly effects on FFA, Liver TG and Muscle TG. Coffee intakes can increase lipolysis during exercising but coffee consumptions delay the recovery of liver glycogen levels in trained rats after exercising. Coffee intakes can increase lipolysis during exercising but coffee consumptions delay the recovery of liver glycogen levels in trained rats after exercising. Coffee can be an effective ergogenic aid during exercise for physically trained rats. PMID:23766878

  6. Interaction of physical trainings and coffee intakes in fuel utilization during exercise in rats

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun-Young

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of exercises, coffee intakes, and physical trainings on fuel utilization in rats. Ninety-six rats were fed a control diet with either water (C) or coffee (CF; 0.12 g freeze-dried instant coffee/100 g body weight/d). Additionally, the animals go through physical training (TC and TCF) or no training (NTC and NTCF) for 4 weeks. For physical training, animals have to exercise on treadmills for 30 minutes (5 d per week, 15° incline, 0.5-0.8 km/h). At the end of week 4, the animals in each group were subdivided into three exercise groups: before exercise (BE), during exercise (DE), and after exercise (AE). The DE rats exercised on treadmills for 1 hour immediately before being sacrificed. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, glucose, glycogen, protein, triglyceride (TG), and free fatty acid (FFA) levels in the plasma, liver, and skeletal muscle of the rats were compared accordingly. Organ weights were also measured. Coffee-training interaction had a significant impact on heart weight, visceral fat, hemoglobin, hematocrit, liver glycogen in DE and AE, and liver triglyceride in DE and AE. Exercise (meaning exercised on a treadmill for 1 hour immediately before being sacrificed) training interaction was significant in liver glycogen, muscle glycogen in control diet and control diet with coffee, FFA and muscle TG levels at control diet with coffee group. Exercise-coffee interactions significantly influenced the FFA with no training groups. Exercise-coffee-training interaction significantly effects on FFA, Liver TG and Muscle TG. Coffee intakes can increase lipolysis during exercising but coffee consumptions delay the recovery of liver glycogen levels in trained rats after exercising. Coffee intakes can increase lipolysis during exercising but coffee consumptions delay the recovery of liver glycogen levels in trained rats after exercising. Coffee can be an effective ergogenic aid during exercise for physically trained rats. PMID:23766878

  7. Participation in a Twelve-Week Moderate Exercise Program--Selected Physiological Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyness, G. B. Jerry

    1990-01-01

    Adults (N=142) who engaged in a 12-week moderate exercise program requiring the maintenance of training state exercise heart rates for a minimum of 20 minutes, 3 times a week, experienced an improvement in cardiovascular functioning regardless of age and/or sex. (Author/IAH)

  8. Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy with Concurrent Exercise Training: Contrary Evidence for an Interference Effect.

    PubMed

    Murach, Kevin A; Bagley, James R

    2016-08-01

    Over the last 30+ years, it has become axiomatic that performing aerobic exercise within the same training program as resistance exercise (termed concurrent exercise training) interferes with the hypertrophic adaptations associated with resistance exercise training. However, a close examination of the literature reveals that the interference effect of concurrent exercise training on muscle growth in humans is not as compelling as previously thought. Moreover, recent studies show that, under certain conditions, concurrent exercise may augment resistance exercise-induced hypertrophy in healthy human skeletal muscle. The purpose of this article is to outline the contrary evidence for an acute and chronic interference effect of concurrent exercise on skeletal muscle growth in humans and provide practical literature-based recommendations for maximizing hypertrophy when training concurrently. PMID:26932769

  9. Changes in skeletal muscle with aging: effects of exercise training.

    PubMed

    Rogers, M A; Evans, W J

    1993-01-01

    There is an approximate 30% decline in muscle strength and a 40% reduction in muscle area between the second and seventh decades of life. Thus, the loss of muscle mass with aging appears to be the major factor in the age-related loss of muscle strength. The loss of muscle mass is partially due to a significant decline in the numbers of both Type I and Type II muscle fibers plus a decrease in the size of the muscle cells, with the Type II fibers showing a preferential atrophy. There appears to be no loss of glycolytic capacity in senescent skeletal muscle whereas muscle oxidative enzyme activity and muscle capillarization decrease by about 25%. Vigorous endurance exercise training in older people, where the stimulus is progressively increased, elicits a proliferation of muscle capillaries, an increase in oxidative enzyme activity, and a significant improvement in VO2max. Likewise, progressive resistive training in older individuals results in muscle hypertrophy and increased strength, if the training stimulus is of a sufficient intensity and duration. Since older individuals adapt to resistive and endurance exercise training in a similar fashion to young people, the decline in the muscle's metabolic and force-producing capacity can no longer be considered as an inevitable consequence of the aging process. Rather, the adaptations in aging skeletal muscle to exercise training may prevent sarcopenia, enhance the ease of carrying out the activities of daily living, and exert a beneficial effect on such age-associated diseases as Type II diabetes, coronary artery disease, hypertension, osteoporosis, and obesity. PMID:8504850

  10. Early Postmenopausal Phase Is Associated With Reduced Prostacyclin-Induced Vasodilation That Is Reversed by Exercise Training: The Copenhagen Women Study.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Michael; Egelund, Jon; Mandrup, Camilla M; Nielsen, Mads B; Mogensen, Alexander S; Stallknecht, Bente; Bangsbo, Jens; Hellsten, Ylva

    2016-10-01

    The postmenopausal phase is associated with an accelerated rate of rise in the prevalence of vascular dysfunction and hypertension; however, the mechanisms underlying these adverse vascular changes and whether exercise training can reverse the decline in vascular function remains unclear. We examined the function of the vascular prostanoid system in matched pre- and postmenopausal women before and after 12 weeks of exercise training. Twenty premenopausal and 16 early postmenopausal (3.1±0.5 [mean±SE] years after final menstrual period) women only separated by 4 (50±0 versus 54±1) years of age were included. Before the training period, the vasodilator response to intra-arterial infusion of either the prostacyclin analog epoprostenol or acetylcholine was lower (≈13%-41%; P<0.05) in the postmenopausal compared with the premenopausal women. Acetylcholine infusion induced a similar release of prostacyclin (6-keto prostaglandin F1a). To elucidate the role of vasoconstrictor prostanoids, acetylcholine infusion was combined with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor ketorolac and here the vascular response to acetylcholine was reduced to a similar extent in pre- and postmenopausal women. Exercise training increased (P<0.05) the vasodilator response to epoprostenol (≈100%-150%) and acetylcholine (≈100%-120%) infusion in the postmenopausal group. These findings demonstrate that the early postmenopausal phase is associated with a marked reduction in vascular function. Despite of a reduced sensitivity to prostacyclin, the overall balance between vasodilator and vasoconstrictor prostanoids does not seem to be altered. Exercise training can reverse the decline in vascular sensitivity to epoprostenol and acetylcholine, suggesting that beneficial vascular adaptations with exercise training are preserved in recent postmenopausal women. PMID:27550922

  11. Exercise training in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: is it of benefit?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Key points Exercise training has been proven to be a safe and effective behavioural intervention for prevention and rehabilitation of chronic conditions. Despite the complexity of the signs and symptoms presented in IPF, supervised exercise training is a feasible and effective treatment for clinical improvement. Emerging data show significant enhancements in exercise capacity, dyspnoea and quality of life among IPF patients after exercise training interventions. Understanding of the principles of exercise training and the pathophysiology of IPF are essential for effective exercise programme delivery. Educational aims To describe the current evidence supporting exercise training for IPF. To highlight the importance of exercise physiology principles in rehabilitation treatment of patients with IPF. To introduce an effective practical exercise programme for IPF. To discuss the possible underlying physiological mechanisms of training effects in IPF. Exercise is a well-documented safe and effective intervention for prevention and rehabilitation of chronic diseases. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic deadly lung disease associated with severe signs and symptoms, exercise intolerance, diminished quality of life and poor prognosis. In the short term, supervised exercise training programmes have demonstrated clinical benefits in improving exercise capacity, dyspnoea and quality of life in patients with IPF. The underlying mechanisms of chronic adaption to a regular exercise regimen in IPF have yet to be well described and require further investigation. The available data underscore the importance of implementing training principles to target the pathophysiological impairments of IPF in order to optimise training adaption and enhance the outcomes. The current exercise training data in IPF provide sufficient evidence of clinical benefit for consideration to be given to recommending exercise-based pulmonary rehabilitation as standard of care for IPF. PMID

  12. Stress Management for School Personnel: Stress-Inoculation Training and Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Bonita C.

    1988-01-01

    Evaluated effectiveness of Stress-Inoculation Training (SIT) with and without exercise component and Minimal exercise treatment (MIN) on trait anxiety, teacher stress, and coping strategies among 66 teachers. Found eight-week SIT with exercise to be more effective than MIN in reducing anxiety and teacher stress. SIT without exercise did not…

  13. STS-42 crewmembers participate in JSC fire fighting training exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-42 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) Norman E. Thagard, holding hose nozzle, is followed by Payload Specialist Ulf D. Merbold and backup Payload Specialist Kenneth Money as the team positions the water hose in the direction of a blazing fire at JSC's Fire Training Pit. A second team of crewmembers, manning another hose, forms a line parallel to the first. The crewmembers and backups are learning fire extinguishing techniques during fire fighting and fire training exercises held at JSC's Fire Training Pit located across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207. Merbold is representing the European Space Agency (ESA) during the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (IML-1) mission aboard OV-103.

  14. Effects of physical training on pulmonary arterial pressure during exercise under hypobaric hypoxia in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashimura, Osamu; Sakai, Akio

    1991-12-01

    In this investigation, we assessed the effects of physical training on exercise-induced systemic and pulmonary hemodynamic changes under hypobaric hypoxia in catheter-implanted rats. We made continuous measurements of pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures during progressive treadmill exercises under hypobaric hypoxia (equivalent to altitudes of 2500 and 5500 m) in 46 control and 41 trained rats. Trained rats were exercised on two running schedules: 4 weeks (4-trained) and 6 weeks (6-trained). Both these groups of trained rats were exercised for the same length of running time each day. The increase in resting mean pulmonary arterial pressure(overline {P_{pa} } ) with increasing equivalent altitude was lower in the two trained groups than in the control group. The increase in(overline {P_{pa} } ) with progressive intensity of exercise was lower in the 6-trained than in the 4-trained and control groups at 610 and 2500 m. The 6-trained rats showed higher pH, P a CO 2 and O2 saturation in their blood than did the control group, whereas the P a O 2 was less. Lung tissue cyclic AMP concentration at rest was higher in the 6-trained than in the control group. Finally, it may be noted that exercise-induced lung tissue vasodilator responses seem to be enhanced in well-trained rats under both normobaric normoxia and hypobaric hypoxia. This study indicates that exercise training may be useful in preventing pulmonary hypertension resulting from both hypoxia and exercise.

  15. Exercise-training intervention studies in competitive swimming.

    PubMed

    Aspenes, Stian Thoresen; Karlsen, Trine

    2012-06-01

    Competitive swimming has a long history and is currently one of the largest Olympic sports, with 16 pool events. Several aspects separate swimming from most other sports such as (i) the prone position; (ii) simultaneous use of arms and legs for propulsion; (iii) water immersion (i.e. hydrostatic pressure on thorax and controlled respiration); (iv) propulsive forces that are applied against a fluctuant element; and (v) minimal influence of equipment on performance. Competitive swimmers are suggested to have specific anthropometrical features compared with other athletes, but are nevertheless dependent on physiological adaptations to enhance their performance. Swimmers thus engage in large volumes of training in the pool and on dry land. Strength training of various forms is widely used, and the energetic systems are addressed by aerobic and anaerobic swimming training. The aim of the current review was to report results from controlled exercise training trials within competitive swimming. From a structured literature search we found 17 controlled intervention studies that covered strength or resistance training, assisted sprint swimming, arms-only training, leg-kick training, respiratory muscle training, training the energy delivery systems and combined interventions across the aforementioned categories. Nine of the included studies were randomized controlled trials. Among the included studies we found indications that heavy strength training on dry land (one to five repetitions maximum with pull-downs for three sets with maximal effort in the concentric phase) or sprint swimming with resistance towards propulsion (maximal pushing with the arms against fixed points or pulling a perforated bowl) may be efficient for enhanced performance, and may also possibly have positive effects on stroke mechanics. The largest effect size (ES) on swimming performance was found in 50 m freestyle after a dry-land strength training regimen of maximum six repetitions across three

  16. Exercise training hypotension - Implications for plasma volume, renin, and vasopressin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Sciaraffa, D.; Shvartz, E.; Keil, L. C.; Brock, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    The relation of changes in plasma volume, plasma renin activity and arginine vasopressin to changes in resting blood pressure during exercise training is investigated. Resting supine, sitting, and standing systolic and fifth-phase diastolic blood pressures were measured in ten men before and after an eight-day training period on a cycle ergometer in either a hot (39.8 C) or cool (23.8 C) environment, and compared with plasma volume, renin and vasopressin levels, heart rates, maximal oxygen uptakes, rectal temperatures and sweat rates. Following acclimatization, resting supine and sitting diastolic pressures are observed to decrease by 6 and 9 mm Hg, respectively, while no significant changes are found in the diastolic pressures of the control group or the systolic pressures of either group. Resting plasma volume is found to increase by 12.2% in the controls and by 17.6% after acclimatization following the exercise training. Results suggest that the resting hypotension produced is not attributable to changes in resting plasma volume, renin or vasopressin, although heat acclimatization, which leads to large decreases in plasma volume and increases in vasopressin and renin activity, may be useful in the treatment of hypertension.

  17. Differences in Acceleration Training and Exercise Training on Resting Cardiovascular Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. M.; Simonson, S. R.; Knapp, C. F.; Stocks, J. M.; Biagini, H. W.; Cowell, S. A.; Bailey, Kn. N.; Vener, J. M.; Evetts, S. N.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The relative effects of alternating exercise vs. acclamation training an mean blood pressure (BP, Finapres), cardiac output (CO, BoMed) and peripheral resistance (PR, calculated) were evaluated. Six healthy men (33$\\pm$(SD)6 yr. 178$\\pm$4 cm, 86$\\pm$6 kg) underwent exercise training (ET, n=3): supine on a cycle ergometer (40 to 90\\% Vo$_{2}$ max) during exposure to constant+1G$_{z}$ for $\\sim$30 min/day for 14 days on NASA's 1.9m Human Powered Centrifuge (HPC). They also underwent oscillatory (between +1 G$ {z}$and$\\sim$2.5G$_{z}$) acceleration training (AT, n=3) for $\\sim$30 min/day for 14 days on the HPC. After four weeks of ambulatory deconditioning, training protocols were switched. AT increased resting CO by 9.MpmS(SE)3.2\\% (p$less than$0.05) with no effect on BF, and ET decreased BP by 9.2$\\pm$4.6\\% (p$less than$0.08) as well as spectral power of PR by 41$\\pm$9\\% (p$less than$0.05). The major effect of acceleration training was to increase resting cardiac output while that of exercise mining was to decrease resting blood pressure.

  18. Exercise training improves hemodynamic recovery to isometric exercise in obese men with type 2 diabetes but not in obese women

    PubMed Central

    Kanaley, Jill A.; Goulopoulou, Styliani; Franklin, Ruth; Baynard, Tracy; Carhart, Robert L; Weinstock, Ruth S; Fernhall, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Women with type 2 diabetes (T2D) show greater rates of mortality due to ischemic heart disease than men with T2D. We aimed to examine cardiovascular and autonomic function responses to isometric handgrip (IHG) exercise between men and women with T2D, before and after an exercise training program. Materials/Methods Hemodynamic responses were measured in 22 men and women with T2D during and following a 3-minute IHG test, and before and after 16 wks of aerobic exercise training. Results Women had a smaller decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and systolic blood pressure (BP) during recovery from IHG (ΔMAPREC) than men pre- and post-training (P<0.05). Men showed a greater reduction in diastolic BP during recovery from IHG (P<0.05), and exercise training improved this response in men but not in women (men, pre-training: −13.9±1.8, post-training: −20.5±5.3 mmHg vs. women, pre-training: −10.7±1.7, post-training: −4.1±4.9 mmHg; P<0.05). Men had a greater reduction in sympathetic modulation of vasomotor tone (P<0.05), as estimated by blood pressure variability, following IHG. This response was accentuated after training, while this training effect was not seen in women. Post-training ΔMAPREC was correlated with recovery of low frequency component of the BP spectrum (ΔLFSBPrec, r=0.52, P<0.05). Conclusions Differences in BP recovery immediately following IHG may be attributed to gender differences in cardiovascular autonomic modulation. An improvement in these responses occurs following aerobic exercise training in obese men, but not in obese women with T2D which reflects a better adaptive autonomic response to exercise training. PMID:22902004

  19. Aerobic exercise training reduces arterial stiffness in metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Donley, David A.; Fournier, Sara B.; Reger, Brian L.; DeVallance, Evan; Bonner, Daniel E.; Olfert, I. Mark; Frisbee, Jefferson C.

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a threefold increase risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality partly due to increased arterial stiffening. We compared the effects of aerobic exercise training on arterial stiffening/mechanics in MetS subjects without overt CVD or type 2 diabetes. MetS and healthy control (Con) subjects underwent 8 wk of exercise training (ExT; 11 MetS and 11 Con) or remained inactive (11 MetS and 10 Con). The following measures were performed pre- and postintervention: radial pulse wave analysis (applanation tonometry) was used to measure augmentation pressure and index, central pressures, and an estimate of myocardial efficiency; arterial stiffness was assessed from carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity (cfPWV, applanation tonometry); carotid thickness was assessed from B-mode ultrasound; and peak aerobic capacity (gas exchange) was performed in the seated position. Plasma matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and CVD risk (Framingham risk score) were also assessed. cfPWV was reduced (P < 0.05) in MetS-ExT subjects (7.9 ± 0.6 to 7.2 ± 0.4 m/s) and Con-ExT (6.6 ± 1.8 to 5.6 ± 1.6 m/s). Exercise training reduced (P < 0.05) central systolic pressure (116 ± 5 to 110 ± 4 mmHg), augmentation pressure (9 ± 1 to 7 ± 1 mmHg), augmentation index (19 ± 3 to 15 ± 4%), and improved myocardial efficiency (155 ± 8 to 168 ± 9), but only in the MetS group. Aerobic capacity increased (P < 0.05) in MetS-ExT (16.6 ± 1.0 to 19.9 ± 1.0) and Con-ExT subjects (23.8 ± 1.6 to 26.3 ± 1.6). MMP-1 and -7 were correlated with cfPWV, and both MMP-1 and -7 were reduced post-ExT in MetS subjects. These findings suggest that some of the pathophysiological changes associated with MetS can be improved after aerobic exercise training, thereby lowering their cardiovascular risk. PMID:24744384

  20. Effects of Strength Training Combined with Specific Plyometric exercises on body composition, vertical jump height and lower limb strength development in elite male handball players: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Alberto; Mourão, Paulo; Abade, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify the effects of a strength training program combined with specific plyometric exercises on body composition, vertical jump (VJ) height and strength development of lower limbs in elite male handball players. A 12-week program with combined strength and specific plyometric exercises was carried out for 7 weeks. Twelve elite male handball players (age: 21.6 ± 1.73) competing in the Portuguese Major League participated in the study. Besides the anthropometric measurements, several standardized jump tests were applied to assess VJ performance together with the strength development of the lower limbs in an isokinetic setting. No significant changes were found in body circumferences and diameters. Body fat content and fat mass decreased by 16.4 and 15.7% respectively, while lean body mass increased by 2.1%. Despite small significance, there was in fact an increase in squat jump (SJ), counter movement jump (CMJ) and 40 consecutive jumps after the training period (6.1, 3.8 and 6.8%, respectively). After the applied protocol, peak torque increased in lower limb extension and flexion in the majority of the movements assessed at 90ºs-1. Consequently, it is possible to conclude that combining general strength-training with plyometric exercises can not only increase lower limb strength and improve VJ performance but also reduce body fat content. PMID:25114739

  1. Plasma glutamine responses to high-intensity exercise before and after endurance training.

    PubMed

    Kargotich, Stephen; Goodman, Carmél; Dawson, Brian; Morton, Alan R; Keast, David; Joske, David J L

    2005-01-01

    Glutamine responses to strenuous interval exercise were examined before and after 6 weeks of endurance training. Glutamine measures were obtained before and after the interval exercise sessions and training in untrained males assigned to training (T; n = 10) or control (C; n = 10) groups. Before training, C and T group glutamine progressively decreased (p < 0.05) by 18% and 16%, respectively, by 150-min postinterval exercise. Over the training period C group glutamine did not change, while T group values increased (p < 0.05) by 14%. After training, glutamine again decreased (p < 0.05) by similar percentages (C = 16% and T = 15%) by 150-min postinterval exercise, but the T group recorded higher (p < 0.05) resting and postexercise glutamine concentrations than the C group. Training induced increases in glutamine may prevent the decline in glutamine levels following strenuous exercise falling below a threshold where immune function might be acutely compromised. PMID:16440504

  2. Effect of exhaustive ultra-endurance exercise in muscular glycogen and both Alpha1 and Alpha2 Ampk protein expression in trained rats.

    PubMed

    Tarini, V A F; Carnevali, L C; Arida, R M; Cunha, C A; Alves, E S; Seeleander, M C L; Schmidt, B; Faloppa, F

    2013-09-01

    Glycogen is the main store of readily energy in skeletal muscle and plays a key role in muscle function, demonstrated by the inability to sustain prolonged high-intensity exercise upon depletion of these glycogen stores. With prolonged exercise, glycogen depletion occurs and 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a potent regulator of muscle metabolism and gene expression, is activated promoting molecular signalling that increases glucose uptake by muscular skeletal cells. The aim of this study was primarily to determine the effect of ultra-endurance exercise on muscle glycogen reserves and secondly to verify the influence of this type of exercise on AMPK protein expression. Twenty-four male Wistar rats, 60 days old, were divided into four experimental groups: sedentary, sedentary exhausted (SE), endurance trained (T) and endurance trained exhausted (TE). The animals ran for 10 to 90 min/day, 5 days/week, for 12 weeks to attain trained status. Rats were killed immediately after the exhaustion protocol, which consisted of running on a treadmill (at approximately 60% Vmax until exhaustion). Optical density of periodic acid-Schiff was detected and glycogen depletion observed predominantly in type I muscle fibres of the TE group and in both type I and II muscle fibres in the SE group. Plasma glucose decreased only in the TE group. Hepatic glycogen was increased in T group and significantly depleted in TE group. AMPK protein expression was significantly elevated in TE and T groups. In conclusion, acute exhaustive ultra-endurance exercise promoted muscle glycogen depletion. It seems that total AMPK protein and gene expression is more influenced by status training. PMID:23184732

  3. Influence of preliminary exercise training on muscle damage indices in rats after one bout of prolonged treadmill exercise.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Ju; Kim, Young Mi; Hwangbo, Kak; Kim, Young Mi

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise on muscle damage indices in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Two groups of rats were trained in either moderate- or high-intensity treadmill running for 4 weeks. Subsequently, the concentrations of creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were examined following a single bout of prolonged (3-h) intensive exercise. [Subjects and Methods] The study included forty 6-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 150-180 g each. The aerobic exercise group was divided into high-intensity (28 m/min) and moderate-intensity (15 m/min) subgroups. Both subgroups were trained for 35 min daily for 6 days per week (excluding Sunday) over a 4-week period. Following training, the high- and moderate-intensity exercise groups and a non-exercise group performed one bout of prolonged (3-h) treadmill exercise for 3 hours at a speed of 15 m/min. [Results] Creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase levels differed significantly among the groups. [Conclusion] The preliminary exercise groups showed lower muscle damage and inflammatory response levels than the non-exercise group after the bout of prolonged intensive exercise. PMID:27390433

  4. Influence of preliminary exercise training on muscle damage indices in rats after one bout of prolonged treadmill exercise

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Ju; Kim, Young Mi; Hwangbo, Kak; Kim, Young Mi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise on muscle damage indices in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Two groups of rats were trained in either moderate- or high-intensity treadmill running for 4 weeks. Subsequently, the concentrations of creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were examined following a single bout of prolonged (3-h) intensive exercise. [Subjects and Methods] The study included forty 6-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 150–180 g each. The aerobic exercise group was divided into high-intensity (28 m/min) and moderate-intensity (15 m/min) subgroups. Both subgroups were trained for 35 min daily for 6 days per week (excluding Sunday) over a 4-week period. Following training, the high- and moderate-intensity exercise groups and a non-exercise group performed one bout of prolonged (3-h) treadmill exercise for 3 hours at a speed of 15 m/min. [Results] Creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase levels differed significantly among the groups. [Conclusion] The preliminary exercise groups showed lower muscle damage and inflammatory response levels than the non-exercise group after the bout of prolonged intensive exercise. PMID:27390433

  5. Plasma lactic dehydrogenase activities in men during bed rest with exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Juhos, L. T.; Young, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    Peak oxygen uptake and the activity of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH-T) and its five isoenzymes were measured by spectrophotometer in seven men before, during, and after bed rest and exercise training. Exercise training consisted of isometric leg exercises of 250 kcal/hr for a period of one hour per day. It is found that LDH-T was reduced by 0.05 percent in all three regimens by day 10 of bed rest, and that the decrease occurred at different rates. The earliest reduction in LDH-T activity in the no-exercise regimen was associated with a decrease in peak oxygen uptake of 12.3 percent. It is concluded that isometric (aerobic) muscular strength training appear to maintain skeletal muscle integrity better during bed rest than isotonic exercise training. Reduced hydrostatic pressure during bed rest, however, ultimately counteracts the effects of both moderate isometric and isotonic exercise training, and may result in decreased LDH-T activity.

  6. Benefits of exercise training in Spanish prison inmates.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Moreno, F; Cámara-Sánchez, M; Tremblay, J F; Riera-Rubio, V J; Gil-Paisán, L; Lucia, A

    2007-12-01

    Prison populations are growing in Western countries. Imprisoned people usually have a poor health status and an increased risk to suffer chronic debilitating conditions as coinfection with the HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) and/or opioid dependency. We studied the effects of a 4-month concurrent cardiorespiratory and resistance training program on the cardiorespiratory fitness, lower and upper body dynamic strength endurance (6-RM test for bench press and knee-extensor exercise, respectively), muscle mass and quality of life (QOL) of adult prison inmates who are HIV/HVC co-infected and enrolled in a methadone maintenance program (n = 9; mean [SD] age: 37 [3] yrs). We also evaluated a control group (n = 10; 37 [2] yrs). A significant combined effect of group and time was found for peak completed workload (W) (p < 0.01), peak heart rate (HR (peak)) (p < 0.05) and rate of HR decrease at 1-min postexercise compared to HR (peak) (p < 0.05), respectively, in a gradual cycle ergometer test. A significant combined effect of group and time was also found for both bench press and knee-extensor 6-RM tests, respectively (p < 0.05). Supervised exercise training can improve the overall physical fitness of incarcerated people. Our results suggest that this type of intervention could be applied in prisons of Western societies. PMID:17549659

  7. Exercise Training suppresses vascular fibrosis in aging obesity induced rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin Young; Lee, Jin

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise training (ET) on vascular fibrosis in aging model rats with diet-induced obesity. [Methods] Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: Aging control (A-C), A-C with high fat diet (AHF), AHF with ET (AHF + ET). Aging was induced by D-galactose (D-gal) and obesity was induced by HFD (60% fat) for 9 weeks. The experimental rats performed swimming (60 min/day, 5 days/week) for 8 weeks. All rat aorta samples were harvested for RT-PCR and morphologic analyses. [Results] The exercise training significantly decreased levels of AT-1, TGF-ß and Coll-1 gene expression compared to AHF group. The AHF + ET group showed a reduced collagen accumulation in the aorta media compared to AHF group. [Conclusion] These results suggest that ET could protect the aging obesity aorta against down-regulation of fibrotic factors (AT-1, TGF-ß and Coll-1 gene) and fibrosis by inhibition of collagen accumulation in the aorta media. PMID:25566453

  8. Effects of Resveratrol Supplementation and Exercise Training on Exercise Performance in Middle-Aged Mice.

    PubMed

    Kan, Nai-Wen; Ho, Chin-Shan; Chiu, Yen-Shuo; Huang, Wen-Ching; Chen, Pei-Yu; Tung, Yu-Tang; Huang, Chi-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol (RES) has antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antidiabetic, antiasthmatic, antalgic, and anti-fatigue activities. Exercise training (ET) improves frailty resulting from aging. This study evaluated the effects of a combination of RES supplementation and ET on the exercise performance of aged mice. C57BL/6J mice (16 months old) were randomly divided into four groups: an older control group (OC group), supplementation with RES group (RES group), ET group (ET group), and a combination of ET and RES supplementation group (ET+RES group). Other 10-week-old mice were used as a young control group (Y-Ctrl group). In this study, exercise performance was evaluated using forelimb grip strength and exhaustive swimming time, as well as levels of plasma lactate, ammonia, glucose, and creatine kinase after an acute swimming exercise. Our results showed that the forelimb grip strength of mice in the ET+RES group was significantly higher than those in the OC, RES, and ET groups (by 1.3-, 1.2-, and 1.1-fold, respectively, p < 0.05), and exhibited no difference with the Y-Ctrl group. The endurance swimming test showed that swimming times of the ET and ET+RES groups were significantly longer than those of the OC and RES groups. Moreover, plasma lactate and ammonia levels of the ET + RES group after acute swimming exercise were significantly lower compared to the OC group (p < 0.05). Thus, it was suggested that by combining RES supplementation with ET for 4 weeks, the muscle strength and endurance performance of aged mice were significantly improved compared to the single intervention with either RES or ET alone. This combination might help shorten the extent of deterioration accompanying the aging process. PMID:27213310

  9. Irisin and exercise training in humans – Results from a randomized controlled training trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The recent discovery of a new myokine (irisin) potentially involved in health-related training effects has gained great attention, but evidence for a training-induced increase in irisin remains preliminary. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine whether irisin concentration is increased after regular exercise training in humans. Methods In a randomized controlled design, two guideline conforming training interventions were studied. Inclusion criteria were age 30 to 60 years, <1 hour/week regular activity, non-smoker, and absence of major diseases. 102 participants could be included in the analysis. Subjects in the training groups exercised 3 times per week for 26 weeks. The minimum compliance was defined at 70%. Aerobic endurance training (AET) consisted of 45 minutes of walking/running at 60% heart rate reserve. Strength endurance training (SET) consisted of 8 machine-based exercises (2 sets of 15 repetitions with 100% of the 20 repetition maximum). Serum irisin concentrations in frozen serum samples were determined in a single blinded measurement immediately after the end of the training study. Physical performance provided positive control for the overall efficacy of training. Differences between groups were tested for significance using analysis of variance. For post hoc comparisons with the control group, Dunnett’s test was used. Results Maximum performance increased significantly in the training groups compared with controls (controls: ±0.0 ± 0.7 km/h; AET: 1.1 ± 0.6 km/h, P < 0.01; SET: +0.5 ± 0.7 km/h, P = 0.01). Changes in irisin did not differ between groups (controls: 101 ± 81 ng/ml; AET: 44 ± 93 ng/ml; SET: 60 ± 92 ng/ml; in both cases: P = 0.99 (one-tailed testing), 1−β error probability = 0.7). The general upward trend was mainly accounted for by a negative association of irisin concentration with the storage duration of frozen serum samples (P < 0.01, β = −0.33). After

  10. The value of electrical stimulation as an exercise training modality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currier, Dean P.; Ray, J. Michael; Nyland, John; Noteboom, Tim

    1994-01-01

    capability of muscle. NMES in exercise training is our major concern.

  11. Analyzing Exercise Training Effect and Its Impact on Cardiorespiratory and Cardiovascular Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laumakis, Paul J.; McCormack, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a statistical investigation of the impact of heart rate levels on training effect for a specific exercise regimen, including an analysis of post-exercise heart rate recovery. Results indicate optimum target values for both average and maximum heart rate during exercise in order to improve both cardiorespiratory and…

  12. Cardiac Arrest During Medically-Supervised Exercise Training: A Report of Fifteen Successful Defibrillations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyfer, Howard R.; And Others

    The Cardio-Pulmonary Research Institute conducted an exercise program for men with a history of coronary heart disease. Over 7 years, there were 15 cases of cardiac arrest during exercise (one for every 6,000 man-hours of exercise). Trained medical personnel were present in all cases, and all were resuscitated by electrical defibrillation with no…

  13. ACE I/D and ACTN3 R/X polymorphisms as potential factors in modulating exercise-related phenotypes in older women in response to a muscle power training stimuli.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ana; Costa, Aldo M; Izquierdo, Mikel; Silva, António J; Bastos, Estela; Marques, Mário C

    2013-10-01

    Genetic variation of the human ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms subsequent to 12 weeks of high-speed power training on maximal strength (1RM) of the arm and leg muscles, muscle power performance (counter-movement jump), and functional capacity (sit-to-stand test) was examined in older Caucasian women [n = 139; mean age 65.5 (8.2) years; 67.0 (10.0) kg and 1.57 (0.06) m]. Chelex 100 was used for DNA extraction, and genotype was determined by PCR-RFLP methods. Muscular strength, power, and functional testing were conducted at baseline (T1) and after 12 weeks (T2) of high-speed power training. At baseline, the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R/X polymorphisms were not associated with muscle function or muscularity phenotypes in older Caucasian women. After the 12-week high-speed training program, subjects significantly increased their muscular and functional capacity performance (p < 0.05). For both polymorphisms, significant genotype-training interaction (p < 0.05) was found in all muscular performance indices, except for 1RM leg extension in the ACE I/D (p = 0.187). Analyses of the combined effects between genotypes showed significant differences in all parameters (p < 0.05) in response to high-speed power training between the power (ACTN3 RR + RX & ACE DD) versus "non-power" muscularity-oriented genotypes (ACTN3 XX & ACE II + ID)]. Our data suggest that the ACE and ACTN3 genotypes (single or combined) exert a significant influence in the muscle phenotypes of older Caucasian women in response to high-speed power training. Thus, the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R/X polymorphisms are likely factors in modulating exercise-related phenotypes in older women, particularly in response to a resistance training stimuli. PMID:22855367

  14. Short-term exercise training improves the cardiovascular response to exercise in the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Shigeki; Fu, Qi; Bivens, Tiffany B; Hastings, Jeffrey L; Wang, Wade; Levine, Benjamin D

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested the presence of cardiac atrophy as a key component of the pathogenesis of the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), similar to physical deconditioning. It has also been shown that exercise intolerance is associated with a reduced stroke volume (SV) in POTS, and that the high heart rate (HR) observed at rest and during exercise in these patients is due to this low SV. We tested the hypotheses that (a) circulatory control during exercise is normal in POTS; and (b) that physical ‘reconditioning’ with exercise training improves exercise performance in patients with POTS. Nineteen (18 women) POTS patients completed a 3 month training programme. Cardiovascular responses during maximal exercise testing were assessed in the upright position before and after training. Resting left ventricular diastolic function was evaluated by Doppler echocardiography. Results were compared with those of 10 well-matched healthy sedentary controls. A lower SV resulted in a higher HR in POTS at any given oxygen uptake () during exercise while the cardiac output ()– relationship was normal. was lower in POTS than controls (26.1 ± 1.0 (SEM) vs. 36.3 ± 0.9 ml kg−1 min−1; P < 0.001) due to a lower peak SV (65 ± 3 vs. 80 ± 5 ml; P = 0.009). After training in POTS, HR became lower at any given due to increased SV without changes in the – relationship. increased by 11% (P < 0.001) due to increased peak SV (P = 0.021) and was proportional to total blood volume. Peak HR was similar, but HR recovery from exercise was faster after training than before training (P = 0.036 for training and 0.009 for interaction). Resting diastolic function was mostly normal in POTS before training, though diastolic suction was impaired (P = 0.023). There were no changes in any Doppler index after training. These results suggest that short-term exercise training improves physical fitness and cardiovascular responses during exercise in patients with POTS. PMID

  15. Exercise testing and training in chronic lung disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Arena, Ross

    2011-01-01

    Research examining the clinical value of exercise testing and training in patients with chronic lung disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is less robust compared with cardiac populations but nevertheless highly supportive. Functional limitations are common in these patients, and exercise testing provides important information pertaining to the degree of this limitation, disease severity, and prognosis. Moreover, exercise testing, particularly in conjunction with ventilatory expired gas analysis, serves as a valuable diagnostic tool when the mechanism of the functional limitation and abnormal exertional symptoms is uncertain. Most work with respect to the benefits of exercise training has been performed in chronic obstructive lung disease cohorts and is used to support pulmonary rehabilitation. Emerging data indicate that exercise training is likewise beneficial in patients with interstitial lung disease and PAH. This review summarizes the evidence supporting the value of exercise testing and training and provides recommendations for clinical practice. PMID:21545932

  16. The Difference Between Exercise-Induced Autonomic and Fitness Changes Measured After 12 and 20 Weeks of Medium-to-High Intensity Military Training.

    PubMed

    Grant, Catharina C; Mongwe, Lot; Janse van Rensburg, Dina C; Fletcher, Lizelle; Wood, Paola S; Terblanche, Etrisia; du Toit, Peet J

    2016-09-01

    Grant, CC, Mongwe, L, Janse van Rensburg, DC, Fletcher, L, Wood, PS, Terblanche, E, and du Toit, PJ. The difference between exercise-induced autonomic and fitness changes measured after 12 and 20 weeks of medium-to-high intensity military training. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2453-2459, 2016-The aim of this study was to compare the physical fitness, based on VO2max and exercise-induced cardiac autonomic changes, measured by heart rate variability (HRV) of 12 weeks with 20 weeks of training in the South African National Defence Force. Recruits (n = 154) participated in a medium-to-high intensity exercise intervention (daily energy expenditure: 8,485 kJ·d). The significant effect on VO2max between weeks 1 and 12 (48.57, SD = 9.25 vs. 53.36, SD = 7.21] did not continue during weeks 12-20 (53.36, SD = 7.21 vs. 53.87, SD = 7.87). No changes in the supine low frequency (LF)/high frequency (HF) (0.48, SD = 0.51 vs. 0.41, SD = 0.64) or the standing LF/HF (4.02, SD = 5.14 vs. 3.91, SD = 5.28), an indicator of autonomic balance and a possible indicator of overtraining syndrome, suggests that overtraining did not take place during weeks 12-20. This was confirmed with further decreases in supine and standing heart rate. However, the power of the vagal-induced variability continued to increase after 12 weeks. Increased vagal influence without concurrent change in autonomic balance may be interpreted as decreased sympathetic cardiac control. It is important to note that although no fitness changes were detected, positive cardiac autonomic conditioning did continue between weeks 12 and 20, as measured by increased vagal-induced HRV and decreased sympathetic influence on cardiac control. Results may be extrapolated to training in the normal population/athletes after a medium-to-high intensity exercise program, as this intervention was a closely monitored and standardized exercise program. PMID:23838980

  17. 76 FR 25548 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ...; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay, CA in the Federal Register (74 FR 214). We... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard...

  18. Heritability of HR and BP Response To Exercise Training in the HERITAGE Family Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Treva; Gagnon, Jacques; Leon, Arthur S.; Skinner, James S.; Wilmore, Jack H.; Bouchard, Claude; Rao, D. C.

    2002-01-01

    Assessed the heritability of response to exercise training in resting blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) among sedentary Caucasians comprising 98 families who completed an exercise training program. Results indicated that the trainability of systolic BP and HR in families with elevated BP was partially determined by genetic factors. Diastolic…

  19. Strongwomen® Program Evaluation: Effect of Strength Training Exercises on Physical Fitness of Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaudhary, Anil Kumar; Van Horn, Beth; Corbin, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    The Strongwomen® Program (SWP) is a nationally disseminated group strength-training exercise and nutrition education program delivered by Extension. The study reported here examined the effect of strength training exercises in SWP on improvement in physical fitness of program participants. Senior Fitness Test was used to collect data. Upon…

  20. Exercise testing and training in patients with peripheral vascular disease and lower extremity amputation.

    PubMed

    Priebe, M; Davidoff, G; Lampman, R M

    1991-05-01

    Patients with peripheral vascular disease have a high risk of coronary artery disease. The risk is even greater when the peripheral vascular disease leads to lower extremity amputation. Exercise testing using lower extremity exercise has been the "gold standard" for screening for coronary artery disease, but many patients with peripheral vascular disease and those with amputations have difficulty doing this type of exercise. Arm exercise ergometry has been shown to be a safe and effective alternative for the detection of coronary artery disease in patients who cannot do leg exercise. This test has also been used to determine safe exercise levels and may be able to predict the ultimate level of prosthetic use in amputees. Exercise training with arm ergometry also improves cardiovascular efficiency and upper body strength in poorly conditioned patients. Studies are needed to appreciate fully the role of exercise testing and training in the recovery of these patients after amputation. PMID:1866958

  1. Exercise training can attenuate the inflammatory milieu in women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Perandini, Luiz A; Sales-de-Oliveira, Diego; Mello, Suzana B V; Camara, Niels O; Benatti, Fabiana B; Lima, Fernanda R; Borba, Eduardo; Bonfa, Eloisa; Sá-Pinto, Ana L; Roschel, Hamilton; Gualano, Bruno

    2014-09-15

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation. This study sought to assess the effects of an exercise training program on cytokines and soluble TNF receptors (sTNFRs) in response to acute exercise in SLE women. Eight SLE women and 10 sex-, age-, and body mass index-comparable healthy controls (HC) participated in this study. Before and after a 12-wk aerobic exercise training program, cytokines and sTNFRs were assessed at rest and in response to single bouts of acute moderate/intense exercise. HC performed the acute exercise bouts only at baseline. After the exercise training program, there was a decrease in resting TNFR2 levels (P = 0.025) and a tend to reduction interleukin (IL)-10 levels (P = 0.093) in SLE. The resting levels of IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α after the exercise training in SLE reached HC levels (P > 0.05). In response to a single bout of acute moderate exercise, the area under the curve (AUC) of IL-10 was significantly reduced after the exercise training program in SLE (P = 0.043), and the AUC of IL-10, IL-6, TNF-α, and sTNFR1 of SLE approached control values (P > 0.05). In response to a single bout of acute intense exercise, the AUC of IL-10 was significantly reduced in SLE (P = 0.015). Furthermore, the AUC of sTNFR2 tended to decrease after exercise training program in SLE (P = 0.084), but it did not reach control values (P = 0.001). An aerobic exercise training program attenuated the inflammatory milieu in SLE women, revealing a novel homeostatic immunomodulatory role of exercise in an autoimmunity condition. PMID:25038103

  2. Vascular Effects of Exercise Training in CKD: Current Evidence and Pathophysiological Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M.; Kouidi, Evangelia; Vrints, Christiaan J.; Couttenye, Marie M.; Conraads, Viviane M.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD, an observation that cannot be explained by the coexistence of traditional risk factors alone. Recently, other mechanisms, such as alterations in nitric oxide bioavailability, impaired endothelial repair mechanisms, inflammation, and oxidative stress (all characteristic in CKD), have gained much attention as mediators for the increased cardiovascular risk. Regular physical training is a valuable nonpharmacological intervention for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Likewise, the benefits of exercise training on exercise capacity and quality of life are increasingly recognized in patients with CKD. Furthermore, exercise training could also influence potential reversible mechanisms involved in atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis. After discussing briefly the general concepts of vascular disease in CKD, this review provides an overview of the current evidence for the effects of exercise training at both clinical and preclinical levels. It concludes with some practical considerations on exercise training in this specific patient group. PMID:24832091

  3. Vascular effects of exercise training in CKD: current evidence and pathophysiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Van Craenenbroeck, Amaryllis H; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M; Kouidi, Evangelia; Vrints, Christiaan J; Couttenye, Marie M; Conraads, Viviane M

    2014-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD, an observation that cannot be explained by the coexistence of traditional risk factors alone. Recently, other mechanisms, such as alterations in nitric oxide bioavailability, impaired endothelial repair mechanisms, inflammation, and oxidative stress (all characteristic in CKD), have gained much attention as mediators for the increased cardiovascular risk. Regular physical training is a valuable nonpharmacological intervention for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Likewise, the benefits of exercise training on exercise capacity and quality of life are increasingly recognized in patients with CKD. Furthermore, exercise training could also influence potential reversible mechanisms involved in atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis. After discussing briefly the general concepts of vascular disease in CKD, this review provides an overview of the current evidence for the effects of exercise training at both clinical and preclinical levels. It concludes with some practical considerations on exercise training in this specific patient group. PMID:24832091

  4. Risks and Benefits of Exercise Training in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Chaix, Marie-A; Marcotte, François; Dore, Annie; Mongeon, François-Pierre; Mondésert, Blandine; Mercier, Lise-Andrée; Khairy, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Exercise capacity in adults with various forms of congenital heart disease is substantially lower than that of the general population. Although the underlying congenital heart defect, and its sequelae, certainly contribute to observed exercise limitations, there is evidence suggesting that deconditioning and a sedentary lifestyle are important implicated factors. The prevalence of acquired cardiovascular comorbidities is on the increase in the aging population with congenital heart disease, such that obesity and a sedentary lifestyle confer increased risk. Health fears and misconceptions are common barriers to regular physical activity in adults with congenital heart disease, despite evidence linking lower functional capacity to poor outcomes, and data supporting the safety and efficacy of exercise in bestowing numerous physical and psychosocial rewards. With few exceptions, adults with congenital heart disease should be counselled to exercise regularly. In this contemporary review, we provide a practical approach to assessing adults with congenital heart disease before exercise training. We examine available evidence supporting the safety and benefits of exercise training. Risks associated with exercise training in adults with congenital heart disease are discussed, particularly with regard to sudden cardiac death. Finally, recommendations for exercise training are provided, with consideration for the type of congenital heart disease, the nature (ie, static vs dynamic) and intensity (ie, low, medium, high) of the physical activity, and associated factors such as systemic ventricular dysfunction and residual defects. Further research is required to determine optimal exercise regimens and to identify effective strategies to implement exercise training as a key determinant of healthy living. PMID:26868839

  5. Order effects of concurrent endurance and resistance training on post-exercise response of non-trained women.

    PubMed

    Di Blasio, Andrea; Gemello, Eugenio; Di Iorio, Angelo; Di Giacinto, Gabriella; Celso, Tiziana; Di Renzo, Donatella; Sablone, Andrea; Ripari, Patrizio

    2012-01-01

    Physical exercise is used for the promotion and maintenance of good health and for the improvement of physical fitness. Both endurance and resistance exercises are needed to carry out a complete training program. Because time may be a barrier to physical exercise practice, the aim of this study was to verify whether the order of execution of endurance and resistance exercises, in concurrent training, has different effects on the metabolic responses during recovery. Thirteen healthy women [24.40 (1.67) years, Mean (SD)] were investigated for energy expenditure (EE), oxygen consumption (VO2), ventilation (Ve), respiratory frequency (RF), proportion of oxygen in expired air (FeO2) and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) both before and after three concurrent endurance and resistance trainings, carried out in different orders: endurance-resistance training (ERT), resistance-endurance training (RET) and alternating endurance-resistance training (AERT). AERT elicited a significantly greater increase of EE, VO2, and Ve and a greater decrease of FeO2. ERT elicited a lower increase of RPE. Acute post-exercise physiological responses to concurrent endurance and resistance physical exercise seem to depend on the order of execution of the two parts: among the selected protocols, AERT seems to elicit the best responses. Key pointsThe concurrent execution of both endurance and resistance exercise, in the same training session, could be a practical solution to conform to guidelines for health in the presence of lack of time.The order of concurrent execution of both endurance and resistance exercise, in the same training session, influences the amplitude of some post-exercise physiological responses. PMID:24149345

  6. Benefits of exercise training for men with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    McCargar, L J; Taunton, J; Paré, S

    1991-01-01

    Twelve healthy men with IDDM participated in a 12-week walking/jogging exercise program. Pre- and postexercise assessment of dietary intakes, body composition, biochemical measures, and exercise performance indicators were completed. Subjects exercised either 3 or 5 days per week for 1 hour at 60% to 80% of estimated maximal heart rate. Dietary intakes showed a voluntary reduction in fat intake as a percent of total energy from 40% +/- 7% (mean +/- SD) to 37% +/- 8% (P = .053). No change occurred over time in body composition measures except for a significant reduction in the waist-to-hip ratio from 0.87 +/- 0.04 to 0.86 +/- 0.04 (P = .007). Fasting serum glucose and lipid levels did not change over time. Exercise capacity improved, as shown by an increased time to exhaustion on a treadmill run from 7.9 +/- 3.7 minutes to 9.7 +/- 3.8 minutes (P less than .001); and a lower heart rate at a constant work load--from 183 +/- 18 beats per minute preexercise to 175 +/- 20 beats per minute postexercise (P = .022). The study showed that healthy male subjects with IDDM can benefit from regular exercise with a redistribution of body fat and improved exercise capacity. PMID:2019225

  7. Exercise training-induced hypervolemia - Role of plasma albumin, renin, and vasopressin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Brock, P. J.; Keil, L. C.; Bernauer, E. M.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was twofold: (1) to determine the rate of induction and decay of exercise-training hypervolemia with a short-duration high-intensity training regimen; and (2) to assess the protein, osmotic, and endocrine responses that contribute to that mechanism. The test subjects were eight volunteer, healthy, trained college men (20-22 yr) engaged in isotonic exercise on a bicycle ergometer. Factors associated with plasma hypervolemia during training are identified. The results suggest that an efficient procedure for increasing plasma volume is the daily performance of high-intensity isotonic leg exercise for 2 h/day.

  8. Effect of exercise training on biologic vascular age in healthy seniors

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Shigeki

    2012-01-01

    Arteriosclerosis with aging leads to central arterial stiffening in humans, which could be a prime cause for increased cardiac afterload in the elderly. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of 1 yr of progressive exercise training on central aortic compliance and left ventricular afterload in sedentary healthy elderly volunteers. Ten healthy sedentary seniors and 11 Masters athletes (>65 yr) were recruited. The sedentary seniors underwent 1 yr of progressive exercise training so that at the end of the year, they were exercising ∼200 min/wk. Central aortic compliance was assessed by the Modelflow aortic age, which reflects the intrinsic structural components of aortic compliance. Cardiac afterload was assessed by effective arterial elastance (Ea) with its contributors of peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) and systemic arterial compliance (SAC). After exercise training, Ea, PVR, and SAC were improved in sedentary seniors and became comparable with those of Masters athletes although the Modelflow aortic age was not changed. Moreover, after exercise training, when stroke volume was restored with lower body negative pressure back to pretraining levels, the exercise training-induced improvements in Ea, PVR, and SAC were eliminated. Aortic stiffening with aging was not improved even after 1 yr of progressive endurance exercise training in the previously sedentary elderly, while left ventricular afterload was reduced. This reduced afterload after exercise training appeared to be attributable to cardiovascular functional modulation to an increase in stroke volume rather than to intrinsic structural changes in the arterial wall. PMID:22268113

  9. Effects of Exercise Training on Autonomic Function in Chronic Heart Failure: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chung-Yin; Hsieh, Ping-Lun; Hsiao, Shu-Fang; Chien, Meng-Yueh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Cardiac autonomic imbalance accompanies the progression of chronic heart failure (CHF). It is unclear whether exercise training could modulate autonomic control in CHF. This study aimed to review systematically the effects of exercise training on heart rate recovery (HRR) and heart rate variability (HRV) in patients with CHF. Methods. Literatures were systematically searched in electronic databases and relevant references. Only published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focusing on exercise training for CHF were eligible for inclusion. Outcome measurements included HRR and HRV parameters. Results. Eight RCTs were eligible for inclusion and provided data on 280 participants (186 men). The participants were 52–70 years of age with New York Heart Association functional class II-III of CHF. Each study examined either aerobic or resistance exercise. Two trials addressed outcome of HRR and six HRV among these studies. Two RCTs showed that moderate aerobic exercise could improve HRR at 2 minutes after exercise training in CHF. Five of six RCTs demonstrated positive effects of exercise training on HRV which revealed the increments in high frequency (HF) and decrements in LF (low frequency)/HF ratio after training. Conclusion. Participation in an exercise training program has positive effects on cardiac autonomic balance in patients with CHF. PMID:26543861

  10. Successful dissemination of a community-based strength training program for older adults by peer and professional leaders: the people exercising program.

    PubMed

    Layne, Jennifer E; Sampson, Susan E; Mallio, Charlotte J; Hibberd, Patricia L; Griffith, John L; Das, Sai Krupa; Flanagan, William J; Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this longitudinal study was to determine the feasibility of a model for disseminating community-based strength training programs for older adults through leadership training of laypersons or "peers" and health and fitness professionals. The intervention consisted of a progressive strength training, balance, and flexibility exercise program and a leader training and certification workshop. Feasibility was defined as 75% or more of individuals who completed leader training establishing or teaching at least two 12-week strength training classes within 1 year. Program dissemination was quantified as the number of classes established between January 2005 and December 2006. Demographic characteristics and health status of leaders and program participants were evaluated. Two hundred forty-four leaders (peers, n=149; professionals, n=95) were trained and certified. Seventy-nine percent of all leaders (n=193) met the feasibility criteria of establishing or teaching strength training classes. There was no difference in the percentage of peer leaders (80%, n=119) and professional leaders (78%, n=74) who established or taught classes (P5.71) despite significant differences in their demographic and health profiles. Ninety-seven self-sustaining strength training classes were established in senior and community centers, and 2,217 older adults (women, n=1,942; men, n=275) aged 50 to 97 with multiple chronic medical conditions enrolled. In conclusion, training peer and professional leaders is a feasible and successful model for disseminating a community strength training program for older adults. Widespread dissemination of this program has significant public health implications for increasing physical activity participation by older adults. PMID:19112654

  11. [Relevance of Outpatient, Equipment-based Exercise Training in Patients with Chronic Respiratory Diseases].

    PubMed

    Glöckl, R; Göhl, O; Spielmanns, M; Taube, K; Bock, R; Schultz, K; Worth, H

    2016-07-01

    Exercise training is one of the most important components in disease management for patients with chronic respiratory diseases. The clinically relevant benefits of endurance and strength training on dyspnea, exercise capacity and quality of life have been evaluated very well. However, there are some legal limitations by the German Working Group for Rehabilitation (BAR) concerning outpatient exercise training programs (beyond pulmonary rehabilitation): only group-based callisthenic training programs receive funding from health care insurances while professional equipment-based training programs are excluded despite their outstanding effectiveness.This review provides an overview on the methodology and the benefits of outpatient exercise training programs for patients with chronic respiratory diseases, and it critically discusses the organizational structures of these programs in Germany. PMID:27218214

  12. Standardization of resistance exercise training: effects in diabetic ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Sanches, I C; Conti, F F; Sartori, M; Irigoyen, M C; De Angelis, K

    2014-04-01

    This study was carried out with a 3-fold aim: 1) to standardize a maximal load test (MLT) on ladders for prescription of resistance exercise training (RET) in rats, 2) to prescribe moderate-intensity RET based on this MLT and 3) to test the effect of this RET in diabetic ovariectomized rats. Female Wistar rats were divided into control (C), diabetic ovariectomized sedentary (DOS) and trained (DOT) groups. The MLT was standardized with increased load applied to the rat tail for each climb, and blood lactate was measured to identify lactate threshold in C rats. MLT was applied in the 1st, 4th and 8th week of the protocol. After 8 weeks of RET, the arterial pressure was directly recorded. DOS group reduced performance in MLT, body weight, left ventricular, plantar and soleus muscles mass (vs. C). DOT rats showed an improvement in MLT associated with plantar muscle mass increased (vs. C and DOS), with attenuation of hypotension and bradycardia (vs. DOS). In conclusion, the results provide a useful method for determining the maximal load and applying RET in rats. Moreover, this study showed that moderate intensity RET improves hemodynamic status in diabetic ovariectomized rats, thereby reinforcing the role of RET in diabetes management. PMID:24022577

  13. Exercise training using arms and legs versus legs along.

    PubMed

    Mostardi, R A; Gandee, R N; Norris, W A

    1981-07-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether levels of conditioning associated with conventional leg work are comparable to those associated with both arm and leg work. Six healthy men conditioned for 6 weeks using both arms and legs while a similar group of 5 men conditioned using legs alone. The subjects trained 3 times per week on a bicycle ergometer, and covered a distance of 3 miles (4.83 km) per session using interval training techniques. Oxygen consumption (VO2) and heart rate (HR) were the primary comparative measures. There were no differences in improvement of maximal aerobic power between the 2 groups. However, the arm and leg subjects were able to do more work at a lower HR during the conditioning program. This implies considerably less physical stress on the heart and skeletal muscle, and indicates that the feeling of stress is related to metabolic rate per square area of working muscle rather than to total metabolism. Since this type of conditioning provides high levels of improvement in aerobic power wit less demands on the myocardium, it is suggested that arm and leg exercise be incorporated in the rehabilitation of cardiac patients. PMID:7247660

  14. Cardiac adaptation to endurance exercise in rats.

    PubMed

    Fenning, Andrew; Harrison, Glenn; Dwyer, Dan; Rose'Meyer, Roselyn; Brown, Lindsay

    2003-09-01

    Endurance exercise is widely assumed to improve cardiac function in humans. This project has determined cardiac function following endurance exercise for 6 (n = 30) or 12 (n = 25) weeks in male Wistar rats (8 weeks old). The exercise protocol was 30 min/day at 0.8 km/h for 5 days/week with an endurance test on the 6th day by running at 1.2 km/h until exhaustion. Exercise endurance increased by 318% after 6 weeks and 609% after 12 weeks. Heart weight/kg body weight increased by 10.2% after 6 weeks and 24.1% after 12 weeks. Echocardiography after 12 weeks showed increases in left ventricular internal diameter in diastole (6.39 +/- 0.32 to 7.90 +/- 0.17 mm), systolic volume (49 +/- 7 to 83 +/- 11 miccrol) and cardiac output (75 +/- 3 to 107 +/- 8 ml/min) but not left wall thickness in diastole (1.74 +/- 0.07 to 1.80 +/- 0.06 mm). Isolated Langendorff hearts from trained rats displayed decreased left ventricular myocardial stiffness (22 +/- 1.1 to 19.1 +/- 0.3) and reduced purine efflux during pacing-induced workload increases. 31P-NMR spectroscopy in isolated hearts from trained rats showed decreased PCr and PCr/ATP ratios with increased creatine, AMP and ADP concentrations. Thus, this endurance exercise protocol resulted in physiological hypertrophy while maintaining or improving cardiac function. PMID:14575304

  15. Exercise Training Improves the Altered Renin-Angiotensin System in the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla of Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Chang-zhen; Yang, Ya-Hong; Sun, Jia-cen; Wu, Zhao-Tang; Zhang, Ru-Wen; Shen, Du; Wang, Yang-Kai

    2016-01-01

    The imbalance between angiotensin II (Ang II) and angiotensin 1–7 (Ang 1–7) in the brain has been reported to contribute to cardiovascular dysfunction in hypertension. Exercise training (ExT) is beneficial to hypertension and the mechanism is unclear. This study was aimed to determine if ExT improves hypertension via adjusting renin angiotensin system in cardiovascular centers including the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, 8 weeks old) were subjected to low-intensity ExT or kept sedentary (Sed) for 12 weeks. Blood pressure elevation coupled with increase in age was significantly decreased in SHR received ExT compared with Sed. The results in vivo showed that ExT significantly reduced or increased the cardiovascular responses to central application of sarthran (antagonist of Ang II) or A779 (antagonist of Ang 1–7), respectively. The protein expression of the Ang II acting receptor AT1R and the Ang 1–7 acting receptor Mas in the RVLM was significantly reduced and elevated in SHR following ExT, respectively. Moreover, production of reactive oxygen species in the RVLM was significantly decreased in SHR following ExT. The current data suggest that ExT improves hypertension via improving the balance of Ang II and Ang 1–7 and antioxidative stress at the level of RVLM. PMID:26881037

  16. The Effects of Physical Training on Blood Lipid Profiles in Adolescents with Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campaigne, B. N.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Fourteen adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) participated in a 12-week exercise program to determine whether such training would bring about changes in blood lipid and lipoprotein profiles. The findings support the beneficial effects of regular exercise for individuals with IDDM. (MT)

  17. Exercise training reverses aging-induced impairment of myogenic constriction in skeletal muscle arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Payal; Mora Solis, Fredy R.; Dominguez, James M.; Spier, Scott A.; Donato, Anthony J.; Delp, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether exercise training can reverse age-related impairment of myogenic vasoconstriction in skeletal muscle arterioles, young (4 mo) and old (22 mo) male Fischer 344 rats were randomly assigned to either sedentary or exercise-trained groups. The roles of the endothelium and Kv1 channels in age- and exercise training-induced adaptations of myogenic responses were assessed through evaluation of pressure-induced constriction in endothelium-intact and denuded soleus muscle arterioles in the presence and absence of the Kv1 channel blocker, correolide. Exercise training enhanced myogenic constriction in arterioles from both old and young rats. In arterioles from old rats, exercise training restored myogenic constriction to a level similar to that of arterioles from young sedentary rats. Removal of the endothelium did not alter myogenic constriction of arterioles from young sedentary rats, but reduced myogenic constriction in arterioles from young exercise-trained rats. In contrast, endothelial removal had no effect on myogenic constriction of arterioles from old exercise-trained rats, but increased myogenic vasoconstriction in old sedentary rats. The effect of Kv1 channel blockade was also dependent on age and training status. In arterioles from young sedentary rats, Kv1 blockade had little effect on myogenic constriction, whereas in old sedentary rats Kv1 blockade increased myogenic constriction. After exercise training, Kv1 channel blockade increased myogenic constriction in arterioles from both young and old rats. Thus exercise training restores myogenic constriction of arterioles from old rats and enhances myogenic constriction from young rats through adaptations of the endothelium and smooth muscle Kv1 channels. PMID:25634999

  18. Elevated central venous pressure: A consequence of exercise training-induced hypervolemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.; Mack, Gary W.; Nadel, Ethan R.

    1990-01-01

    Resting plasma volumes, and arterial and central venous pressures (CVP) were measured in 16 men before and after exercise training to determine if training-induced hypervolemia could be explained by a change in total vascular capacitance. In addition, resting levels of plasma vasopressin (AVP), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), aldosterone (ALD), and norepinephrine (NE) were measured before and after training. The same measurements of vacular volume, pressures, and plasma hormones were measured in 8 subjects who did not undergo exercise and acted as controls. The exercise training program consisted of 10 weeks of controlled cycle exercise for 30 min/d, 4 d/wk at 75 to 80 percent of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). A training effect was verified by a 20 percent increase in VO2max, a resting bradycardia, and a 370 ml (9 percent) increase in blood volume. Mean arterial blood pressure was unaltered by exercise training, but resting CVP increased. The percent change in blood volume from before to after training was linearly related to the percent change in CVP. As a consequence of elevations in both blood volume and CVP, the volume-to-pressure ratio was essentially unchanged following exercise training. Plasma AVP, ANP, ALD, and NE were unaltered. Results indicate that elevated CVP is a consequence of training-induced hypervolemia without alteration in total effective venous capacitance. This may represent a resetting of the pressure-volume stimulus-response relation for regulation of blood volume.

  19. Improved Insulin Sensitivity After Exercise Training is Linked to Reduced Plasma C14:0 Ceramide in Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kasumov, Takhar; Solomon, Thomas P.J.; Hwang, Calvin; Huang, Hazel; Haus, Jacob M.; Zhang, Renliang; Kirwan, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of exercise training on insulin sensitivity and plasma ceramides in obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods Twenty-four adults with obesity and normal glucose tolerance (NGT, n=14), or diabetes (n=10) were studied before and after a 12-week supervised exercise-training program (5 d/wk, 1 hr/d, 80–85% of maximum heart rate). Changes in body composition were assessed using hydrostatic weighing and computed tomography. Peripheral tissue insulin sensitivity was assessed by a 40 mU/m2/min hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. Plasma ceramides (C14:0, C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, C20:0, C24:0 and C24:1) were quantified using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry after separation with HPLC. Results Plasma ceramides were similar for the obese NGT and subjects with diabetes, despite differences in glucose tolerance. Exercise significantly reduced body weight and adiposity, and increased peripheral insulin sensitivity in both groups (P<0.05). In addition, plasma C14:0, C16:0, C18:1, and C24:0 ceramide levels were reduced in all subjects following the intervention (P<0.05). Decreases in total (r=-0.51, P=0.02) and C14:0 (r=-0.56, P=0.009) ceramide were negatively correlated with the increase in insulin sensitivity. Conclusion Ceramides are linked to exercise training-induced improvements in insulin sensitivity, and plasma C14:0 ceramide may provide a specific target for investigating lipid-related insulin resistance in obesity and T2D. PMID:25966363

  20. Long-term exercise training selectively alters serum cytokines involved in fever.

    PubMed

    Rowsey, Pamela Johnson; Metzger, Bonnie L; Carlson, John; Gordon, Christopher J

    2009-04-01

    Long-term exercise training selectively alters serum cytokines involved in fever. Chronic exercise training has a number of effects on the immune system that may mimic the physiological response to fever. Female rats that voluntarily exercise on running wheels develop an elevated daytime core temperature after several weeks of training. It remains to be seen whether the elevation in daytime temperature involves inflammatory patterns characteristic of an infectious fever. We assessed whether chronic exercise training in the rat would alter levels of cytokines involved in fever. Female Sprague Dawley rats at 45 days of age weighing 90-110 g were divided into two groups (exercise and sedentary) and housed at an ambient temperature of 22( degrees )C. Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), iron, and zinc levels were analyzed. Rats underwent 8 weeks of exercise on running wheels. Exercise led to altered levels of some key cytokines that are involved in fever. Exercise animals had significantly higher IL-1beta levels and lower IL-10 levels compared to sedentary animals. Although IL-6 levels were slightly lower in the exercise animals, these levels were not significantly affected by training. TNF-alpha activity was similar in the two groups. Training also led to a slight increase in serum zinc and decrease in serum unsaturated iron binding capacity (UIBC). The data suggest that chronic exercise training evokes immune responses that mimic some, but not all, aspects of fever. This may explain why exercise leads to elevated daytime core temperature. PMID:19190031

  1. Training at the Gym, Training for Life: Creating Better Versions of the Self Through Exercise.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Ceren

    2015-08-01

    The present study draws on Scott's (2011) notion of the Re-Inventive Institution and explores how gym members make sense and give meaning to their exercise regime. Overall, it is argued that for many participants gym exercise is more than physical training; it is also training for life. Based on a thematic analysis of 32 semi-structured interviews it is argued that gym workout is a means to create better versions of the self on mainly three levels. First, gym participants perceive themselves to be efficient and productive in general. Second, gym training is believed to increase the control they have over their lives. Third, gym members associate their gym workout with amplified emotional resilience, believing that fitness workout makes them not only fitter in a physical sense but also fitter and better equipped in a psychological sense. Surprisingly, a small group of regular gym users displayed more critical sentiments and distanced themselves from the images and values the gym stands for. The results of this study can be linked to broader political discourses on health and fitness that make use of corporate managerial vocabularies and are based on ideals of rationalization and efficiency. PMID:27247669

  2. Training at the Gym, Training for Life: Creating Better Versions of the Self Through Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, Ceren

    2015-01-01

    The present study draws on Scott’s (2011) notion of the Re-Inventive Institution and explores how gym members make sense and give meaning to their exercise regime. Overall, it is argued that for many participants gym exercise is more than physical training; it is also training for life. Based on a thematic analysis of 32 semi-structured interviews it is argued that gym workout is a means to create better versions of the self on mainly three levels. First, gym participants perceive themselves to be efficient and productive in general. Second, gym training is believed to increase the control they have over their lives. Third, gym members associate their gym workout with amplified emotional resilience, believing that fitness workout makes them not only fitter in a physical sense but also fitter and better equipped in a psychological sense. Surprisingly, a small group of regular gym users displayed more critical sentiments and distanced themselves from the images and values the gym stands for. The results of this study can be linked to broader political discourses on health and fitness that make use of corporate managerial vocabularies and are based on ideals of rationalization and efficiency. PMID:27247669

  3. The post-exercise glycogen recovery in tissues of trained rats.

    PubMed

    Górski, J; Palka, P; Puch, U; Kiczka, K

    1976-01-01

    The post-exercise glycogen recovery in myocardium, liver, diaphragm muscle and musculus biceps femoris was compared in untrained and trained rats. The glycogen level in myocardium of the trained rats was significantly higher than that in the untrained ones only immediately after the exercise-test and on the second day after the exercise. The liver glycogen levels on each of the examined post-exercise days were similar in both groups and did not differ from the control values. The post-exercise glycogen recovery in the diapraghm muscle of the untrained rats was also similar to that in the trained animals. In musculus bicpes femoris similar post-exercise supercompensation was found in both groups except on the second day when the glycogen level in the trained animals was significantly higher than that in the untrained ones. The results suggest that it is necessary to separate the effects of training from those of the last bout of exercise in the training program when the effect of training is examined. PMID:1274602

  4. Enhanced pulmonary and active skeletal muscle gas exchange during intense exercise after sprint training in men.

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, M J; Heigenhauser, G J; McKelvie, R S; Obminski, G; MacDougall, J D; Jones, N L

    1997-01-01

    1. This study investigated the effects of 7 weeks of sprint training on gas exchange across the lungs and active skeletal muscle during and following maximal cycling exercise in eight healthy males. 2. Pulmonary oxygen uptake (VO2) and carbon dioxide output (VCO2) were measured before and after training during incremental exercise (n = 8) and during and in recovery from a maximal 30 s sprint exercise bout by breath-by-breath analysis (n = 6). To determine gas exchange by the exercising leg muscles, brachial arterial and femoral venous blood O2 and CO2 contents and lactate concentration were measured at rest, during the final 10 s of exercise and during 10 min of recovery. 3. Training increased (P < 0.05) the maximal incremental exercise values of ventilation (VE, by 15.7 +/- 7.1%), VCO2 (by 9.3 +/- 2.1%) and VO2 (by 15.0 +/- 4.2%). Sprint exercise peak power (3.9 +/- 1.0% increase) and cumulative 30 s work (11.7 +/- 2.8% increase) were increased and fatigue index was reduced (by -9.2 +/- 1.5%) after training (P < 0.05). The highest VE, VCO2 and VO2 values attained during sprint exercise were not significantly changed after training, but a significant (P < 0.05) training effect indicated increased VE (by 19.2 +/- 7.9%), VCO2 (by 9.3 +/- 2.1%) and VO2 (by 12.7 +/- 6.5%), primarily reflecting elevated post-exercise values after training. 4. Arterial O2 and CO2 contents were lower after training, by respective mean differences of 3.4 and 21.9 ml l-1 (P < 0.05), whereas the arteriovenous O2 and CO2 content differences and the respiratory exchange ratio across the leg were unchanged by training. 5. Arterial whole blood lactate concentration and the net lactate release by exercising muscle were unchanged by training. 6. The greater peak pulmonary VO2 and VCO2 with sprint exercise, the increased maximal incremental values, unchanged arterial blood lactate concentration and greater sprint performance all point strongly towards enhanced gas exchange across the lungs and in

  5. Exercise training does not increase muscle FNDC5 protein or mRNA expression in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Fain, John N.; Company, Joseph M.; Booth, Frank W.; Laughlin, M. Harold; Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Bahouth, Suleiman W.; Sacks, Harold S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Exercise training elevates circulating irisin and induces the expression of the FNDC5 gene in skeletal muscles of mice. Our objective was to determine whether exercise training also increases FNDC5 protein or mRNA expression in the skeletal muscles of pigs as well as plasma irisin. Methods Castrated male pigs of the Rapacz familial hypercholesterolemic (FHM) strain and normal (Yucatan miniature) pigs were sacrificed after 16–20 weeks of exercise training. Samples of cardiac muscle, deltoid and triceps brachii muscle, subcutaneous and epicardial fat were obtained and FNDC5 mRNA, along with that of 6 other genes, was measured in all tissues of FHM pigs by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. FNDC protein in deltoid and triceps brachii was determined by Western blotting in both FHM and normal pigs. Citrate synthase activity was measured in the muscle samples of all pigs as an index of exercise training. Irisin was measured by an ELISA assay. Results There was no statistically significant effect of exercise training on FNDC5 gene expression in epicardial or subcutaneous fat, deltoid muscle, triceps brachii muscle or heart muscle. Exercise-training elevated circulating levels of irisin in the FHM pigs and citrate synthase activity in deltoid and triceps brachii muscle. A similar increase in citrate synthase activity was seen in muscle extracts of exercise-trained normal pigs but there was no alteration in circulating irisin. Conclusion Exercise training in pigs does not increase FNDC5 mRNA or protein in the deltoid or triceps brachii of FHM or normal pigs while increasing circulating irisin only in the FHM pigs. These data indicate that the response to exercise training in normal pigs is not comparable to that seen in mice. PMID:23831442

  6. Assessment of protein synthesis in highly aerobic canine species at the onset and during exercise training

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlicher, Sarah E.; Drake, Joshua C.; Peelor, Frederick F.; Biela, Laurie M.; Pratt-Phillips, Shannon; Davis, Michael; Hamilton, Karyn L.

    2015-01-01

    Canis lupus familiaris, the domesticated dog, is capable of extreme endurance performance. The ability to perform sustained aerobic exercise is dependent on a well-developed mitochondrial reticulum. In this study we examined the cumulative muscle protein and DNA synthesis in groups of athletic dogs at the onset of an exercise training program and following a strenuous exercise training program. We hypothesized that both at the onset and during an exercise training program there would be greater mitochondrial protein synthesis rates compared with sedentary control with no difference in mixed or cytoplasmic protein synthesis rates. Protein synthetic rates of three protein fractions and DNA synthesis were determined over 1 wk using 2H2O in competitive Alaskan Huskies and Labrador Retrievers trained for explosive device detection. Both groups of dogs had very high rates of skeletal muscle protein synthesis in the sedentary state [Alaskan Huskies: Mixed = 2.28 ± 0.12, cytoplasmic (Cyto) = 2.91 ± 0.10, and mitochondrial (Mito) = 2.62 ± 0.07; Labrador Retrievers: Mixed = 3.88 ± 0.37, Cyto = 3.85 ± 0.06, and Mito = 2.92 ± 0.20%/day]. Mitochondrial (Mito) protein synthesis rates did not increase at the onset of an exercise training program. Exercise-trained dogs maintained Mito protein synthesis during exercise training when mixed (Mixed) and cytosolic (Cyto) fractions decreased, and this coincided with a decrease in p-RpS6 but also a decrease in p-ACC signaling. Contrary to our hypothesis, canines did not have large increases in mitochondrial protein synthesis at the onset or during an exercise training program. However, dogs have a high rate of protein synthesis compared with humans that perhaps does not necessitate an extra increase in protein synthesis at the onset of aerobic exercise training. PMID:25614602

  7. Autophagy plays a role in skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis in an endurance exercise-trained condition.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jeong-Sun; Jeon, Sei-Il; Park, Je-Young; Lee, Jong-Young; Lee, Seong-Cheol; Cho, Ki-Jung; Jeong, Jong-Moon

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial homeostasis is tightly regulated by two major processes: mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial degradation by autophagy (mitophagy). Research in mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle in response to endurance exercise training has been well established, while the mechanisms regulating mitophagy and the interplay between mitochondrial biogenesis and degradation following endurance exercise training are not yet well defined. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a short-term inhibition of autophagy in response to acute endurance exercise on skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics in an exercise-trained condition. Male wild-type C57BL/6 mice performed five daily bouts of 1-h swimming per week for 8 weeks. In order to measure autophagy flux in mouse skeletal muscle, mice were treated with or without 2 days of 0.4 mg/kg/day intraperitoneal colchicine (blocking the degradation of autophagosomes) following swimming exercise training. The autophagic flux assay demonstrated that swimming training resulted in an increase in the autophagic flux (~100 % increase in LC3-II) in mouse skeletal muscle. Mitochondrial fusion proteins, Opa1 and MFN2, were significantly elevated, and mitochondrial fission protein, Drp1, was also increased in trained mouse skeletal muscle, suggesting that endurance exercise training promotes both mitochondrial fusion and fission processes. A mitochondrial receptor, Bnip3, was further increased in exercised muscle when treated with colchicine while Pink/Parkin protein levels were unchanged. The endurance exercise training induced increases in mitochondrial biogenesis marker proteins, SDH, COX IV, and a mitochondrial biogenesis promoting factor, PGC-1α but this effect was abolished in colchicine-treated mouse skeletal muscle. This suggests that autophagy plays an important role in mitochondrial biogenesis and this coordination between these opposing processes is involved in the cellular

  8. Elevated central venous pressure: a consequence of exercise training-induced hypervolemia?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Mack, G. W.; Nadel, E. R.

    1991-01-01

    Resting blood volumes and arterial and central venous pressures (CVP) were measured in 14 men before and after exercise training to determine whether training-induced hypervolemia is accompanied by a change in total vascular capacitance. In addition, resting levels of plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), aldosterone (Ald), and norepinephrine (NE) were measured. The same measurements were conducted in seven subjects who did not undergo exercise and acted as controls. Exercise training consisted of 10 wk of controlled cycle exercise for 30 min/day, 4 days/wk at 75-80% of maximal O2 uptake (VO2max). A training effect was verified by a 20% increase in VO2max, a resting bradycardia, and a 9% increase in blood volume. Mean arterial blood pressure was unaltered by exercise training, but resting CVP increased by 16% (P less than 0.05). The percent change in blood volume from before to after training was linearly related to the percent change in CVP (r = 0.903, P less than 0.05). As a consequence of elevations in both blood volume and CVP, the volume-to-pressure ratio was unchanged after exercise training. Plasma AVP, ANP, Ald, and NE were unaltered. Our results indicate that elevated CVP is a consequence of training-induced hypervolemia without alteration in total effective venous capacitance.

  9. Exercise-Based Performance Enhancement and Injury Prevention for Firefighters: Contrasting the Fitness- and Movement-Related Adaptations to Two Training Methodologies.

    PubMed

    Frost, David M; Beach, Tyson A C; Callaghan, Jack P; McGill, Stuart M

    2015-09-01

    Using exercise to enhance physical fitness may have little impact on performers' movement patterns beyond the gym environment. This study examined the fitness and movement adaptations exhibited by firefighters in response to 2 training methodologies. Fifty-two firefighters were assigned to a movement-guided fitness (MOV), conventional fitness (FIT), or control (CON) group. Before and after 12 weeks of training, participants performed a fitness evaluation and laboratory-based test. Three-dimensional lumbar spine and frontal plane knee kinematics were quantified. Five whole-body tasks not included in the interventions were used to evaluate the transfer of training. FIT and MOV groups exhibited significant improvements in all aspects of fitness; however, only MOV exhibited improvements in spine and frontal plane knee motion control when performing each transfer task (effect sizes [ESs] of 0.2-1.5). FIT exhibited less controlled spine and frontal plane knee motions while squatting, lunging, pushing, and pulling (ES: 0.2-0.7). More MOV participants (43%) exhibited only positive posttraining changes (i.e., improved control), in comparison with FIT (30%) and CON (23%). Fewer negative posttraining changes were also noted (19, 25, and 36% for MOV, FIT, and CON). These findings suggest that placing an emphasis on how participants move while exercising may be an effective training strategy to elicit behavioral changes beyond the gym environment. For occupational athletes such as firefighters, soldiers, and police officers, this implies that exercise programs designed with a movement-oriented approach to periodization could have a direct impact on their safety and effectiveness by engraining desirable movement patterns that transfer to occupational tasks. PMID:25763518

  10. Alteration in angiogenic and anti-angiogenic forms of vascular endothelial growth factor-A in skeletal muscle of patients with intermittent claudication following exercise training

    PubMed Central

    Jones, W Schuyler; Duscha, Brian D; Robbins, Jennifer L; Duggan, Natasha N; Regensteiner, Judith G; Kraus, William E; Hiatt, William R; Dokun, Ayotunde O; Annex, Brian H

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were twofold: (1) to identify whether peripheral artery disease (PAD) patients had increased muscle concentration of angiogenic VEGF-A, anti-angiogenic VEGF165b or VEGF receptor 1 (VEGF-R1) when compared with control subjects, and (2) to evaluate whether exercise training in PAD patients was associated with changes in muscle concentration of VEGF-A, VEGF165b or VEGF-R1. At baseline, 22 PAD and 30 control subjects underwent gastrocnemius muscle biopsy. Twelve PAD patients were treated with supervised exercise training (SET) and underwent muscle biopsy after 3 weeks and 12 weeks of training and had sufficient tissue to measure VEGF-A, VEGF165b and VEGF-R1 concentrations in skeletal muscle lysates by ELISA. Muscle concentrations of VEGF-A and VEGF165b were similar in PAD patients versus controls at baseline. At both time points after the start of SET, VEGF-A levels decreased and there was a trend towards increased VEGF165b concentrations. At baseline, VEGF-R1 concentrations were lower in PAD patients when compared with controls but did not change after SET. Skeletal muscle concentrations of VEGF-A are not different in PAD patients when compared with controls at baseline. SET is associated with a significant reduction in VEGF-A levels and a trend towards increased VEGF165b levels. These somewhat unexpected findings suggest that further investigation into the mechanism of vascular responses to exercise training in PAD patients is warranted. PMID:22402934

  11. The impact of long-term exercise training on psychological function in older adults.

    PubMed

    Hill, R D; Storandt, M; Malley, M

    1993-01-01

    The effect of long-term aerobic training on psychological function was examined in 87 sedentary older adults who engaged in a year-long endurance exercise training program compared with a nonexercising control group. In addition to improved cardiovascular fitness, a positive change in self-reported morale was found for the exercise condition. Of the cognitive functions measured, a significant effect was noted for the Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS) Logical Memory subtest; however, this effect was caused by a decline in performance from pre- to posttesting in the control group. Long-term exercise training had little, if any, effect on improving cognitive function in this older adult sample. PMID:8418145

  12. Strategies to enhance the benefits of exercise training in the respiratory patient.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kylie; Holland, Anne E

    2014-06-01

    Despite the well-established benefits of exercise training in people with chronic respiratory disease, there are a group of people in whom it confers minimal gains. Furthermore, there is increasing recognition of the prevalence of comorbid conditions among people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and other respiratory diseases, such as musculoskeletal disorders, which make participation in traditional exercise training programs challenging. This article focuses on several adjuncts or strategies that may be implemented by clinicians during exercise training, with the goal of optimizing the proportion of pulmonary rehabilitation participants who achieve significant and meaningful gains on program completion. PMID:24874128

  13. Resistance exercise, but not endurance exercise, induces IKKβ phosphorylation in human skeletal muscle of training-accustomed individuals.

    PubMed

    Møller, Andreas Buch; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Clasen, Berthil Forrest; Schjerling, Peter; Vissing, Kristian; Jessen, Niels

    2013-12-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is considered an important role in the muscular adaptations to exercise. It has been proposed that exercise-induced signaling to mTORC1 do not require classic growth factor PI3K/Akt signaling. Activation of IKKβ and the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) Erk1/2 and p38 has been suggested to link inflammation and cellular stress to activation of mTORC1 through the tuberous sclerosis 1 (TSC1)/tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) complex. Consequently, activation of these proteins constitutes potential alternative mechanisms of mTORC1 activation following exercise. Previously, we demonstrated that mTOR is preferentially activated in response to resistance exercise compared to endurance exercise in trained individuals without concomitant activation of Akt. In the present study, we extended this investigation by examining IκB kinase complex (IKK), TSC1, MAPK, and upstream Akt activators, along with gene expression of selected cytokines, in skeletal muscles from these subjects. Biopsies were sampled prior to, immediately after, and in the recovery period following resistance exercise, endurance exercise, and control interventions. The major finding was that IKKβ phosphorylation increased exclusively after resistance exercise. No changes in TSC1, Erk1/2, insulin receptor, or insulin receptor substrate 1 phosphorylation were observed in any of the groups, while p38 phosphorylation was higher in the resistance exercise group compared to both other groups immediately after the intervention. Resistance and endurance exercise increased IL6, IL8, and TNFα gene expression immediately after exercise. The non-exercise control group demonstrated that cytokine gene expression is also sensitive to repeated biopsy sampling, whereas no effect of repeated biopsy sampling on protein expression and phosphorylation was observed. In conclusion, resistance exercise, but not endurance exercise, increases IKKβ phosphorylation in trained

  14. Responses of sweating and body temperature to sinusoidal exercise in physically trained men.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, F; Fujii, N; Sone, R; Ikegami, H

    1996-02-01

    The effect of physical training on the dynamic responses of sweating to transient exercise is still controversial. We determined the phase response and amplitude response (delta) of sweating rate and body temperature to sinusoidal exercise in physically trained and untrained subjects. Eight trained and seven untrained male subjects exercised on a cycle ergometer with a constant load for 30 min; for the next 28 min, they exercised with a sinusoidal load. The sinusoidal load variation ranged from approximately 10 to 60% of peak O2 uptake with a 4-min period. The ambient temperature and the relative humidity during exercise were 25 degrees C and 35%, respectively. There was no difference between the groups in the phase lags of esophageal temperature (Tes) and mean skin temperature (Tsk), whereas the phase lags of sweating rates for the chest and forearm were significantly shorter in the trained group (P < 0.05). The delta of Tes and Tsk per 1 W of exercise load in the trained group was significantly smaller than that in the untrained group (both, P < 0.05), whereas there was no difference between the groups in the delta of sweating rate for the chest and forearm. We conclude that subjects who have undergone long-term physical training show prompter dynamic characteristics of sweating response compared with untrained subjects and have a higher capacity to maintain constant body temperature during exercise at transient load. PMID:8929589

  15. Preferred Exertion across Three Common Modes of Exercise Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Stephen C.; Chvala, Angela M.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the influence of exercise mode on self-selected exercise intensities. Participants performed three types of intensity tests. Researchers collected data on VO2 values continuously and recorded 1-minute averages several times for each submaximal test. Participants allowed to self-select exercise intensity chose work rates within the…

  16. Time to adapt exercise training regimens in pulmonary rehabilitation – a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Annemarie L; Holland, Anne E

    2014-01-01

    Exercise intolerance, exertional dyspnea, reduced health-related quality of life, and acute exacerbations are features characteristic of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Patients with a primary diagnosis of COPD often report comorbidities and other secondary manifestations, which diversifies the clinical presentation. Pulmonary rehabilitation that includes whole body exercise training is a critical part of management, and core programs involve endurance and resistance training for the upper and lower limbs. Improvement in maximal and submaximal exercise capacity, dyspnea, fatigue, health-related quality of life, and psychological symptoms are outcomes associated with exercise training in pulmonary rehabilitation, irrespective of the clinical state in which it is commenced. There may be benefits for the health care system as well as the individual patient, with fewer exacerbations and subsequent hospitalization reported with exercise training. The varying clinical profile of COPD may direct the need for modification to traditional training strategies for some patients. Interval training, one-legged cycling (partitioning) and non-linear periodized training appear to be equally or more effective than continuous training. Inspiratory muscle training may have a role as an adjunct to whole body training in selected patients. The benefits of balance training are also emerging. Strategies to ensure that health enhancing behaviors are adopted and maintained are essential. These may include training for an extended duration, alternative environments to undertake the initial program, maintenance programs following initial exercise training, program repetition, and incorporation of approaches to address behavioral change. This may be complemented by methods designed to maximize uptake and completion of a pulmonary rehabilitation program. PMID:25419125

  17. Time to adapt exercise training regimens in pulmonary rehabilitation--a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Annemarie L; Holland, Anne E

    2014-01-01

    Exercise intolerance, exertional dyspnea, reduced health-related quality of life, and acute exacerbations are features characteristic of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Patients with a primary diagnosis of COPD often report comorbidities and other secondary manifestations, which diversifies the clinical presentation. Pulmonary rehabilitation that includes whole body exercise training is a critical part of management, and core programs involve endurance and resistance training for the upper and lower limbs. Improvement in maximal and submaximal exercise capacity, dyspnea, fatigue, health-related quality of life, and psychological symptoms are outcomes associated with exercise training in pulmonary rehabilitation, irrespective of the clinical state in which it is commenced. There may be benefits for the health care system as well as the individual patient, with fewer exacerbations and subsequent hospitalization reported with exercise training. The varying clinical profile of COPD may direct the need for modification to traditional training strategies for some patients. Interval training, one-legged cycling (partitioning) and non-linear periodized training appear to be equally or more effective than continuous training. Inspiratory muscle training may have a role as an adjunct to whole body training in selected patients. The benefits of balance training are also emerging. Strategies to ensure that health enhancing behaviors are adopted and maintained are essential. These may include training for an extended duration, alternative environments to undertake the initial program, maintenance programs following initial exercise training, program repetition, and incorporation of approaches to address behavioral change. This may be complemented by methods designed to maximize uptake and completion of a pulmonary rehabilitation program. PMID:25419125

  18. Endurance training improves the resistance of rat diaphragm to exercise-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Oh-ishi, S; Kizaki, T; Ookawara, T; Sakurai, T; Izawa, T; Nagata, N; Ohno, H

    1997-11-01

    The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that endurance training improves the ability of the diaphragm muscle to resist exercise-induced oxidative stress. Twenty-eight male Wistar rats were assigned to either untrained or trained groups. Trained rats were treadmill-trained for 9 wk. Each group was subdivided into acutely exercised or nonexercised groups. Diaphragm muscle from each rat was analyzed to determine the levels of certain antioxidant enzymes: Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD), glutathione peroxidase, and catalase. In addition, interleukin-1 and myeloperoxidase levels were determined. Endurance training upregulated all of the antioxidant enzymes. Conversely, acute exercise increased glutathione peroxidase and catalase in untrained rats, while it had no overt effect on any antioxidant enzymes in trained rats. Both Mn-SOD and Cu,Zn-SOD contents and activities were increased with endurance training. However, the mRNA expressions of both forms of SOD did not show any significant change with endurance training. Acute exercise also increased the levels of interleukin-1 and myeloperoxidase in untrained rats but not in trained rats. Moreover, acute exercise significantly increased the ability of neutrophils to produce superoxide, especially in untrained rats. The results from this study demonstrate that endurance training can upregulate certain antioxidant enzyme activities in rat diaphragm muscle, indicating the potential for improvement of the resistance to intracellular reactive oxygen species. The results of this study also suggest that acute exercise may cause oxidative damage in rat diaphragm through the activation of the inflammatory pathway and that endurance training may minimize such an extracellular oxidative stress by acute exercise. PMID:9372679

  19. Concentrically trained cyclists are not more susceptible to eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage than are stretch-shortening exercise-trained runners.

    PubMed

    Snieckus, Audrius; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Venckūnas, Tomas; Brazaitis, Marius; Volungevičius, Gintautas; Skurvydas, Albertas

    2013-03-01

    Here, we test the hypothesis that continuous concentric exercise training renders skeletal muscles more susceptible to damage in response to eccentric exercise. Elite road cyclists (CYC; n = 10, training experience 8.1 ± 2.0 years, age 22.9 ± 3.7 years), long-distance runners (LDR; n = 10, 9.9 ± 2.3 years, 24.4 ± 2.5 years), and healthy untrained (UT) men (n = 10; 22.4 ± 1.7 years) performed 100 submaximal eccentric contractions at constant angular velocity of 60° s(-1). Concentric isokinetic peak torque, isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and electrically induced knee extension torque were measured at baseline and immediately and 48 h after an eccentric exercise bout. Muscle soreness was assessed and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity was measured at baseline and 48 h after exercise. Voluntary and electrically stimulated knee extension torque reduction were significantly greater (p < 0.05) in UT than in LDR and CYC. Immediately and 48 h after exercise, MVC decreased by 32 % and 20 % in UT, 20 % and 5 % in LDR, and 25 % and 6 % in CYC. Electrically induced 20 Hz torque decreased at the same times by 61 and 29 % in UT, 40 and 17 % in LDR, and 26 and 14 % in CYC. Muscle soreness and plasma CK activity 48 h after exercise did not differ significantly between athletes and UT subjects. In conclusion, even though elite endurance athletes are more resistant to eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage than are UT people, stretch-shortening exercise-trained LDR have no advantage over concentrically trained CYC. PMID:22886189

  20. Comparison of Different Forms of Exercise Training in Patients With Cardiac Disease: Where Does High-Intensity Interval Training Fit?

    PubMed

    Gayda, Mathieu; Ribeiro, Paula A B; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil

    2016-04-01

    In this review, we discuss the most recent forms of exercise training available to patients with cardiac disease and their comparison or their combination (or both) during short- and long-term (phase II and III) cardiac rehabilitation programs. Exercise training modalities to be discussed include inspiratory muscle training (IMT), resistance training (RT), continuous aerobic exercise training (CAET), and high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Particular emphasis is placed on HIIT compared or combined (or both) with other forms such as CAET or RT. For example, IMT combined with CAET was shown to be superior to CAET alone for improving functional capacity, ventilatory function, and quality of life in patients with chronic heart failure. Similarly, RT combined with CAET was shown to optimize benefits with respect to functional capacity, muscle function, and quality of life. Furthermore, in recent years, HIIT has emerged as an alternative or complementary (or both) exercise modality to CAET, providing equivalent if not superior benefits to conventional continuous aerobic training with respect to aerobic fitness, cardiovascular function, quality of life, efficiency, safety, tolerance, and exercise adherence in both short- and long-term training studies. Finally, short-interval HIIT was shown to be useful in the initiation and improvement phases of cardiac rehabilitation, whereas moderate- or longer-interval (or both) HIIT protocols appear to be more appropriate for the improvement and maintenance phases because of their high physiological stimulus. We now propose progressive models of exercise training (phases II-III) for patients with cardiac disease, including a more appropriate application of HIIT based on the scientific literature in the context of a multimodal cardiac rehabilitation program. PMID:26927863

  1. Effects of Electrical Stimulation, Exercise Training and Motor Skills Training on Strength of Children with Meningomyelocele: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagenais, Liese M.; Lahay, Erin R.; Stueck, Kailey A.; White, Erin; Williams, Lindsay; Harris, Susan R.

    2009-01-01

    This systematic review provides a critical synthesis of research regarding the effects of electrical stimulation, exercise training, and motor skills training on muscle strength in children with meningomyelocele. Nine databases were searched using terms related to meningomyelocele and physical therapy interventions. Of 298 potentially relevant…

  2. Changes in the exercise activation of diencephalic and brainstem cardiorespiratory areas after training.

    PubMed

    Ichiyama, Ronaldo M; Gilbert, Andrea B; Waldrop, Tony G; Iwamoto, Gary A

    2002-08-30

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether exercise training changes the extent or pattern of activation of areas in the central nervous system (CNS) involved in cardiorespiratory control. Rats that spontaneously trained on running wheels for 80-100 days were compared to rats that were not provided an opportunity to exercise. Selected brain regions including the hypothalamic and mesencephalic locomotor regions, and ventrolateral medulla were studied using c-Fos-like immunocytochemistry. A single test bout of exercise evoked significantly less activation as indicated by Fos labeling in the posterior (caudal) hypothalamic area, periaqueductal gray, nucleus of the tractus solitarius and the rostral ventrolateral medulla of the trained rats when compared to sedentary rats. These results are consistent with the concept that the nervous system changes its responses to a given level of exercise after training. These changes may also be related to perceived exertion. PMID:12176165

  3. Kinetics of plasma potassium concentrations during exhausting exercise in trained and untrained men.

    PubMed

    Marcos, E; Ribas, J

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the time course of changes in plasma potassium concentration during high intensity exercise and recovery in trained and untrained men. The subjects performed two exercise protocols, an incremental test and a sprint, on a cycle ergometer. A polyethylene catheter was inserted into the antecubital vein to obtain blood samples for the analysis of plasma electrolyte concentrations and acid-base parameters, during and after exercise. During both tests, venous plasma sodium, potassium and chloride concentrations increased in all the subjects, although the largest relative increase was detected in potassium concentration--35% and 31% over rest in the progressive test and 61% and 37.7% in the sprint test, for cyclists and controls, respectively. After exercise plasma potassium concentration decreased exponentially to below resting values. There was a linear correlation between the amount of potassium accumulated in plasma during exercise and the amount eliminated from plasma when the exercise ceased. We found that, although plasma potassium accumulation occurred in both forms of exercise in the trained and nontrained subjects, the time constant of potassium decrease following exercise was shorter in the trained subjects. Thus, the trained subjects exhibited a better capacity to recover to resting concentrations of plasma potassium. We propose that the extracellular potassium accumulation acts as a negative feedback signal for sarcolemma excitability depending on the muscle metabolic rate. PMID:7588690

  4. Anaerobic threshold employed on exercise training prescription and performance assessment for laboratory rodents: A short review.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Phablo; Mendes, Sávio Victor Diogenes; Leal-Cardoso, José Henrique; Ceccatto, Vânia Marilande

    2016-04-15

    Several studies have generated numerous terms in the field of exercise training prescription and performance assessment that often do not match the information previously demonstrated by many other works, generating much debate and resulting in an immense pool of scientific results. Several protocols in exercise training prescription and performance assessment have been proposed for these purposes by many reasons. In the field of exercise science, the protocol must be thoroughly investigated and provide real tools to be reproducible. Many laboratories have been adapting and developing evaluation protocols and testing on physical training of rodents in different experimental conditions. In this context, mice, rats and rabbits are preferentially chosen due to easy manipulation and good response to exercise, and comparable at results obtained with humans in compatible effort intensities. But, the exercise training programs and aerobic-anaerobic transition assessment proposed for animal models vary extensively, depending on the species, gender, age, type of stimulus, type of exercise, type of method and also on the specific objectives of the program. This short review demonstrates the need in offering tools performed by invasive measurement to assess the anaerobic threshold by blood lactate employed on evolution of aerobic-anaerobic parameters of rodents. The objective of this short review was to present and to discuss physical evaluation protocols applications to rodents. The table submitted may give a basis for anaerobic threshold employed on exercise training prescription and performance assessment for laboratory rodents in future research. PMID:26860893

  5. Impact of aerobic and anaerobic exercise training on oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Song-Young; Kwak, Yi-Sub

    2016-01-01

    Exercise mediates an excessive free radical production leading to oxidative stress (OS). The body has natural antioxidant systems that help decrease OS, and these systems may be enhanced with exercise training. However, only a few studies have investigated the differences in resting OS and antioxidant capacity (AOC) between aerobically trained athletes (ET), anaerobically trained athletes (RT), and untrained individuals (UT). Therefore, this study sought to investigate the resting and postexercise OS and AOC in ET, RT, and UT. Sixty healthy young males (26.6±0.8 yr) participated in this study. Subjects were divided into three groups, ET, RT, and UT by distinct training background. Resting plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyls (PC) were not significantly different in ET, RT, and UT. However, MDA and PC were significantly increased following a graded exercise test (GXT) in UT but not in ET and RT. Resting total antioxidant capacity (TAC) levels and TAC were not different in ET, RT, and UT. Interestingly, TAC levels significantly decreased after the GXT in all groups. Additionally, UT showed lower post-exercise TAC levels compared to ET and RT. These results showed that ET, RT, and UT have similar OS and AOC at rest. However, both ET and RT have greater AOC against exercise mediated OS compared to UT. These findings may explain, at least in part, why both aerobic and anaerobic types of exercise training improve redox balance. However, it appears there is no specific exercise type effect in terms of redox balance. PMID:27162773

  6. Impact of aerobic and anaerobic exercise training on oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in athletes.

    PubMed

    Park, Song-Young; Kwak, Yi-Sub

    2016-04-01

    Exercise mediates an excessive free radical production leading to oxidative stress (OS). The body has natural antioxidant systems that help decrease OS, and these systems may be enhanced with exercise training. However, only a few studies have investigated the differences in resting OS and antioxidant capacity (AOC) between aerobically trained athletes (ET), anaerobically trained athletes (RT), and untrained individuals (UT). Therefore, this study sought to investigate the resting and postexercise OS and AOC in ET, RT, and UT. Sixty healthy young males (26.6±0.8 yr) participated in this study. Subjects were divided into three groups, ET, RT, and UT by distinct training background. Resting plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyls (PC) were not significantly different in ET, RT, and UT. However, MDA and PC were significantly increased following a graded exercise test (GXT) in UT but not in ET and RT. Resting total antioxidant capacity (TAC) levels and TAC were not different in ET, RT, and UT. Interestingly, TAC levels significantly decreased after the GXT in all groups. Additionally, UT showed lower post-exercise TAC levels compared to ET and RT. These results showed that ET, RT, and UT have similar OS and AOC at rest. However, both ET and RT have greater AOC against exercise mediated OS compared to UT. These findings may explain, at least in part, why both aerobic and anaerobic types of exercise training improve redox balance. However, it appears there is no specific exercise type effect in terms of redox balance. PMID:27162773

  7. Changes in ambient temperature at the onset of thermoregulatory responses in exercise-trained rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, N.; Sakurada, S.; Shido, O.

    Spontaneous running in a wheel has emerged as a useful method of exercise in rodents. We investigated how exercise training with a running wheel affects ambient temperatures (Ta) at the onset of thermoregulatory responses in rats. Female rats were allowed to run freely in the wheel for 6 months. Sedentary control rats did not exercise during the same period. After the exercise training period, they were loosely restrained and Ta values at the onset of tail skin vasodilation and cold- induced thermogenesis were determined by raising or lowering Ta. Resting levels of core temperature and heat production of the exercise-trained rats were significantly higher than those of the controls. Ta values at the onset of tail skin vasodilation and cold-induced thermogenesis of the exercise-trained rats were higher than those of the controls. The results suggest that, in rats, exercise training with a running wheel elevates ambient temperatures for heat loss and heat production, which may then contribute to maintaining the core temperature at a high level.

  8. Strength training prior to endurance exercise: impact on the neuromuscular system, endurance performance and cardiorespiratory responses.

    PubMed

    Conceição, Matheus; Cadore, Eduardo Lusa; González-Izal, Miriam; Izquierdo, Mikel; Liedtke, Giane Veiga; Wilhelm, Eurico Nestor; Pinto, Ronei Silveira; Goltz, Fernanda Reistenbach; Schneider, Cláudia Dornelles; Ferrari, Rodrigo; Bottaro, Martim; Kruel, Luiz Fernando Martins

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the acute effects of two strength-training protocols on the neuromuscular and cardiorespiratory responses during endurance exercise. Thirteen young males (23.2 ± 1.6 years old) participated in this study. The hypertrophic strength-training protocol was composed of 6 sets of 8 squats at 75% of maximal dynamic strength. The plyometric strength-training protocol was composed of 6 sets of 8 jumps performed with the body weight as the workload. Endurance exercise was performed on a cycle ergometer at a power corresponding to the second ventilatory threshold until exhaustion. Before and after each protocol, a maximal voluntary contraction was performed, and the rate of force development and electromyographic parameters were assessed. After the hypertrophic strength-training and plyometric strength-training protocol, significant decreases were observed in the maximal voluntary contraction and rate of force development, whereas no changes were observed in the electromyographic parameters. Oxygen uptake and a heart rate during endurance exercise were not significantly different among the protocols. However, the time-to-exhaustion was significantly higher during endurance exercise alone than when performed after hypertrophic strength-training or plyometric strength-training (p <0.05). These results suggest that endurance performance may be impaired when preceded by strength-training, with no oxygen uptake or heart rate changes during the exercise. PMID:25713678

  9. Exhaustive exercise training enhances aerobic capacity in American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Eme, John; Owerkowicz, Tomasz; Gwalthney, June; Blank, Jason M; Rourke, Bryan C; Hicks, James W

    2009-11-01

    The oxygen transport system in mammals is extensively remodelled in response to repeated bouts of activity, but many reptiles appear to be 'metabolically inflexible' in response to exercise training. A recent report showed that estuarine crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus) increase their maximum metabolic rate in response to exhaustive treadmill training, and in the present study, we confirm this response in another crocodilian, American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis). We further specify the nature of the crocodilian training response by analysing effects of training on aerobic [citrate synthase (CS)] and anaerobic [lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)] enzyme activities in selected skeletal muscles, ventricular and skeletal muscle masses and haematocrit. Compared to sedentary control animals, alligators regularly trained for 15 months on a treadmill (run group) or in a flume (swim group) exhibited peak oxygen consumption rates higher by 27 and 16%, respectively. Run and swim exercise training significantly increased ventricular mass (~11%) and haematocrit (~11%), but not the mass of skeletal muscles. However, exercise training did not alter CS or LDH activities of skeletal muscles. Similar to mammals, alligators respond to exercise training by increasing convective oxygen transport mechanisms, specifically heart size (potentially greater stroke volume) and haematocrit (increased oxygen carrying-capacity of the blood). Unlike mammals, but similar to squamate reptiles, alligators do not also increase citrate synthase activity of the skeletal muscles in response to exercise. PMID:19533151

  10. Low Volume Aerobic Training Heightens Muscle Deoxygenation in Early Post-Angina Pectoris Patients.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shun; Murase, Norio; Kime, Ryotaro; Niwayama, Masatsugu; Osada, Takuya; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of low volume aerobic exercise training on muscle O2 dynamics during exercise in early post-angina pectoris (AP) patients, as a pilot study. Seven AP patients (age: 72 ± 6 years) participated in aerobic exercise training for 12 weeks. Training consisted of continuous cycling exercise for 30 min at the individual's estimated lactate threshold, and the subjects trained for 15 ± 5 exercise sessions over 12 weeks. Before and after training, the subjects performed ramp cycling exercise until exhaustion. Muscle O2 saturation (SmO2) and relative changes from rest in deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration (∆Deoxy-Hb) and total hemoglobin concentration (∆Total-Hb) were monitored at the vastus lateralis by near infrared spatial resolved spectroscopy during exercise. The SmO2 was significantly lower and ∆Deoxy-Hb was significantly higher after training than before training, while there were no significant changes in ∆Total-Hb. These results indicated that muscle deoxygenation and muscle O2 extraction were potentially heightened by aerobic exercise training in AP patients, even though the exercise training volume was low. PMID:27526151

  11. Structural remodeling of coronary resistance arteries: effects of age and exercise training

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Mina A.; Taylor, Curtis R.; Chen, Bei; La, Hae-Sun; Maraj, Joshua J.; Kilar, Cody R.; Behnke, Bradley J.; Delp, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Age is known to induce remodeling and stiffening of large-conduit arteries; however, little is known of the effects of age on remodeling and mechanical properties of coronary resistance arteries. We employed a rat model of aging to investigate whether 1) age increases wall thickness and stiffness of coronary resistance arteries, and 2) exercise training reverses putative age-induced increases in wall thickness and stiffness of coronary resistance arteries. Young (4 mo) and old (21 mo) Fischer 344 rats remained sedentary or underwent 10 wk of treadmill exercise training. Coronary resistance arteries were isolated for determination of wall-to-lumen ratio, effective elastic modulus, and active and passive responses to changes in intraluminal pressure. Elastin and collagen content of the vascular wall were assessed histologically. Wall-to-lumen ratio increased with age, but this increase was reversed by exercise training. In contrast, age reduced stiffness, and exercise training increased stiffness in coronary resistance arteries from old rats. Myogenic responsiveness was reduced with age and restored by exercise training. Collagen-to-elastin ratio (C/E) of the wall did not change with age and was reduced with exercise training in arteries from old rats. Thus age induces hypertrophic remodeling of the vessel wall and reduces the stiffness and myogenic function of coronary resistance arteries. Exercise training reduces wall-to-lumen ratio, increases wall stiffness, and restores myogenic function in aged coronary resistance arteries. The restorative effect of exercise training on myogenic function of coronary resistance arteries may be due to both changes in vascular smooth muscle phenotype and expression of extracellular matrix proteins. PMID:25059239

  12. Aerobic exercise training reduces cardiac function in adult male offspring exposed to prenatal hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Laura M; Kirschenman, Raven; Quon, Anita; Morton, Jude S; Shah, Amin; Davidge, Sandra T

    2015-09-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) has been associated with increased susceptibility to myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Exercise is an effective preventive intervention for cardiovascular diseases; however, it may be detrimental in conditions of compromised health. The aim of this study was to determine whether exercise training can improve cardiac performance after I/R injury in IUGR offspring. We used a hypoxia-induced IUGR model by exposing pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats to 21% oxygen (control) or hypoxic (11% oxygen; IUGR) conditions from gestational day 15 to 21. At 10 wk of age, offspring were randomized to a sedentary group or to a 6-wk exercise protocol. Transthoracic echocardiography assessments were performed after 6 wk. Twenty-four hours after the last bout of exercise, ex vivo cardiac function was determined using a working heart preparation. With exercise training, there was improved baseline cardiac performance in male control offspring but a reduced baseline cardiac performance in male IUGR exercised offspring (P < 0.05). In male offspring, exercise decreased superoxide generation in control offspring, while in IUGR offspring, it had the polar opposite effect (interaction P ≤ 0.05). There was no effect of IUGR or exercise on cardiac function in female offspring. In conclusion, in male IUGR offspring, exercise may be a secondary stressor on cardiac function. A reduction in cardiac performance along with an increase in superoxide production in response to exercise was observed in this susceptible group. PMID:26157059

  13. Effects of exercise training on red blood cell production: implications for anemia.

    PubMed

    Hu, Min; Lin, Wentao

    2012-01-01

    Exercise training can increase total Hb and red cell mass, which enhances oxygen-carrying capacity. The possible underlying mechanisms are proposed to come mainly from bone marrow, including stimulated erythropoiesis with hyperplasia of the hematopoietic bone marrow, improvement of the hematopoietic microenvironment induced by exercise training, and hormone- and cytokine-accelerated erythropoiesis. Anemia is one of the most common medical conditions in chronic disease. The effects of exercise training on counteracting anemia have been explored and evaluated. The results of the research available to date are controversial, and it seems that significant methodological limitations exist. However, exercise training might be a promising, additional, safe and economical method to help improve anemia. There is a need for further investigation into the effects of and guidelines for exercise interventions (especially strength training) in this population of patients, particularly among cancer patients who are undergoing or have undergone chemotherapy or radiation treatments. As the available data are limited, additional research to uncover the underlying mechanisms associated with the effects of exercise training on anemia is clearly warranted. PMID:22301865

  14. Muscle Volume Increases Following 16 Weeks of Resistive Exercise Training with the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) and Free Weights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, R. E.; Loehr, J. A.; Lee, S. M. C.; English, K. L.; Evans, H.; Smith, S. A.; Hagan, R. D.

    2009-01-01

    Space flight-induced muscle atrophy, particularly in the postural and locomotorymuscles, may impair task performance during long-duration space missions and planetary exploration. High intensity free weight (FW) resistive exercise training has been shown to prevent atrophy during bed rest, a space flight analog. NASA developed the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) to simulate the characteristics of FW exercise (i.e. constant mass, inertial force) and to be used as a countermeasure during International Space Station (ISS) missions. PURPOSE: To compare the efficacy of ARED and FW training to induce hypertrophy in specific muscle groups in ambulatory subjects prior to deploying ARED on the ISS. METHODS: Twenty untrained subjects were assigned to either the ARED (8 males, 3 females) or FW (6 males, 3 females) group and participated in a periodizedtraining protocol consisting of squat (SQ), heel raise (HR), and deadlift(DL) exercises 3 d wk-1 for 16 wks. SQ, HR, and DL muscle strength (1RM) was measured before, after 8 wks, and after 16 wks of training to prescribe exercise and measure strength changes. Muscle volume of the vastigroup (V), hamstring group (H), hip adductor group (ADD), medial gastrocnemius(MG), lateral gastrocnemius(LG), and deep posterior muscles including soleus(DP) was measured using MRI pre-and post-training. Consecutive cross-sectional images (8 mm slices with a 2 mm gap) were analyzed and summed. Anatomical references insured that the same muscle sections were analyzed pre-and post-training. Two-way repeated measures ANOVAs (p<0.05) were used to test for differences in muscle strength and volume between training devices. RESULTS: SQ, HR, and DL 1RM increased in both FW (SQ: 49+/-6%, HR: 12+/-2%, DL: 23+/-4%) and ARED (SQ: 31+/-4%, HR: 18+/-2%, DL: 23+/-3%) groups. Both groups increased muscle volume in the V (FW: 13+/-2%, ARED: 10+/-2%), H (FW: 3+/-1%, ARED: 3+/-1 %), ADD (FW: 15=/-2%, ARED: 10+/-1%), LG (FW: 7+/-2%, ARED: 4+/-1%), MG (FW

  15. 33 CFR 165.1184 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay, CA. 165.1184 Section 165.1184 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Coast Guard District § 165.1184 Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay.... If the exercises conclude prior to the scheduled termination time, the Coast Guard will...

  16. Cardiovascular Effects of 1 Year of Alagebrium and Endurance Exercise Training in Healthy Older Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Naoki; Hastings, Jeffrey L.; Carrick-Ranson, Graeme; Shafer, Keri M.; Shibata, Shigeki; Bhella, Paul S.; Abdullah, Shuaib M.; Barkley, Kyler W.; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Boyd, Kara N.; Livingston, Sheryl A.; Palmer, Dean; Levine, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Lifelong exercise training maintains a youthful compliance of the left ventricle (LV), whereas a year of exercise training started later in life fails to reverse LV stiffening, possibly because of accumulation of irreversible advanced glycation end products. Alagebrium breaks advanced glycation end product crosslinks and improves LV stiffness in aged animals. However, it is unclear whether a strategy of exercise combined with alagebrium would improve LV stiffness in sedentary older humans. Methods and Results Sixty-two healthy subjects were randomized into 4 groups: sedentary+placebo; sedentary+alagebrium (200 mg/d); exercise+placebo; and exercise+alagebrium. Subjects underwent right heart catheterization to define LV pressure–volume curves; secondary functional outcomes included cardiopulmonary exercise testing and arterial compliance. A total of 57 of 62 subjects (67±6 years; 37 f/20 m) completed 1 year of intervention followed by repeat measurements. Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and LV end-diastolic volume were measured at baseline, during decreased and increased cardiac filling. LV stiffness was assessed by the slope of LV pressure–volume curve. After intervention, LV mass and end-diastolic volume increased and exercise capacity improved (by ≈8%) only in the exercise groups. Neither LV mass nor exercise capacity was affected by alagebrium. Exercise training had little impact on LV stiffness (training×time effect, P=0.46), whereas alagebrium showed a modest improvement in LV stiffness compared with placebo (medication×time effect, P=0.04). Conclusions Alagebrium had no effect on hemodynamics, LV geometry, or exercise capacity in healthy, previously sedentary seniors. However, it did show a modestly favorable effect on age-associated LV stiffening. PMID:24130005

  17. No Effect of Exercise Intensity on Appetite in Highly-Trained Endurance Women.

    PubMed

    Howe, Stephanie M; Hand, Taryn M; Larson-Meyer, D Enette; Austin, Kathleen J; Alexander, Brenda M; Manore, Melinda M

    2016-01-01

    In endurance-trained men, an acute bout of exercise is shown to suppress post-exercise appetite, yet limited research has examined this response in women. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise intensity on appetite and gut hormone responses in endurance-trained women. Highly-trained women (n = 15, 18-40 years, 58.4 ± 6.4 kg, VO2MAX = 55.2 ± 4.3 mL/kg/min) completed isocaloric bouts (500 kcals or 2093 kJ) of moderate-intensity (MIE, 60% VO2MAX) and high-intensity (HIE, 85% VO2MAX) treadmill running at the same time of day, following a similar 48-h diet/exercise period, and at least 1-week apart. Blood was drawn pre-exercise (baseline), immediately post-exercise and every 20-min for the next 60-min. Plasma concentrations of acylated ghrelin, PYY3-36, GLP-1 and subjective appetite ratings via visual analog scale (VAS) were assessed at each time point. Acylated ghrelin decreased (p = 0.014) and PYY3-36 and GLP-1 increased (p = 0.036, p < 0.0001) immediately post-exercise, indicating appetite suppression. VAS ratings of hunger and desire to eat decreased immediately post-exercise (p = 0.0012, p = 0.0031, respectively), also indicating appetite suppression. There were no differences between exercise intensities for appetite hormones or VAS. Similar to males, post-exercise appetite regulatory hormones were altered toward suppression in highly-trained women and independent of energy cost of exercise. Results are important for female athletes striving to optimize nutrition for endurance performance. PMID:27096869

  18. No Effect of Exercise Intensity on Appetite in Highly-Trained Endurance Women

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Stephanie M.; Hand, Taryn M.; Larson-Meyer, D. Enette; Austin, Kathleen J.; Alexander, Brenda M.; Manore, Melinda M.

    2016-01-01

    In endurance-trained men, an acute bout of exercise is shown to suppress post-exercise appetite, yet limited research has examined this response in women. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise intensity on appetite and gut hormone responses in endurance-trained women. Highly-trained women (n = 15, 18–40 years, 58.4 ± 6.4 kg, VO2MAX = 55.2 ± 4.3 mL/kg/min) completed isocaloric bouts (500 kcals or 2093 kJ) of moderate-intensity (MIE, 60% VO2MAX) and high-intensity (HIE, 85% VO2MAX) treadmill running at the same time of day, following a similar 48-h diet/exercise period, and at least 1-week apart. Blood was drawn pre-exercise (baseline), immediately post-exercise and every 20-min for the next 60-min. Plasma concentrations of acylated ghrelin, PYY3–36, GLP-1 and subjective appetite ratings via visual analog scale (VAS) were assessed at each time point. Acylated ghrelin decreased (p = 0.014) and PYY3–36 and GLP-1 increased (p = 0.036, p < 0.0001) immediately post-exercise, indicating appetite suppression. VAS ratings of hunger and desire to eat decreased immediately post-exercise (p = 0.0012, p = 0.0031, respectively), also indicating appetite suppression. There were no differences between exercise intensities for appetite hormones or VAS. Similar to males, post-exercise appetite regulatory hormones were altered toward suppression in highly-trained women and independent of energy cost of exercise. Results are important for female athletes striving to optimize nutrition for endurance performance. PMID:27096869

  19. Exercise training as a drug to treat age associated frailty.

    PubMed

    Viña, Jose; Salvador-Pascual, Andrea; Tarazona-Santabalbina, Francisco Jose; Rodriguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Gomez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen

    2016-09-01

    Exercise causes an increase in the production of free radicals [1]. As a result of a hormetic mechanism antioxidant enzymes are synthesised and the cells are protected against further oxidative stress. Thus, exercise can be considered as an antioxidant [2]. Age-associated frailty is a major medical and social concern as it can easily lead to dependency. In this review we describe that oxidative stress is associated with frailty and the mechanism by which exercise prevents age-associated frailty. We propose that individually tailored multicomponent exercise programmes are one of the best ways to prevent and to treat age-associated frailty. PMID:27021963

  20. Effect of body weight gain on insulin sensitivity after retirement from exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolkas, Constantine B.; Rodnick, Kenneth J.; Mondon, Carl E.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of the body-weight gain after retirement from an exercise-training program on the retained increase in insulin sensitivity elicited by the training was investigated in exercise-trained (ET) rats. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by oral glucose tolerance and insulin suppression tests immediately after training and during retirement. Results show that, compared with sedentary controls, exercise training enhanced insulin-induced glucose uptake, but the enhanced sensitivity was gradually lost with the end of running activity until after seven days of retirement, when it became equal to that of controls. This loss of enhanced sensitivity to insulin was associated with an accelerated gain in body weight beginning one day after the start of retirement. However, those animals that gained weight only at rates similar to those of control rats, retained their enhanced sensitivity to insulin.

  1. Exercise training characteristics in cardiac rehabilitation programmes: a cross-sectional survey of Australian practice

    PubMed Central

    Abell, Bridget; Glasziou, Paul; Briffa, Tom; Hoffmann, Tammy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Exercise training is a core component of cardiac rehabilitation (CR), however, little information exists regarding the specific exercise interventions currently provided for coronary heart disease in Australian practice. We aimed to analyse the current status of exercise-based CR services across Australia. Design Cross-sectional survey. Methods Australian sites offering exercise-based CR were identified from publically available directories. All sites were invited by email to participate in an online Survey Monkey questionnaire between October 2014 and March 2015, with reminders via email and phone follow-up. Questions investigated the demographics and format of individual programmes, as well as specific exercise training characteristics. Results 297 eligible programmes were identified, with an 82% response rate. Most sites (82%) were based at hospital or outpatient centres, with home (15%), community (18%) or gym-based options (5%) less common. While CR was most often offered in a comprehensive format (72% of sites), the level of exercise intervention varied greatly among programmes. Most frequently, exercise was prescribed 1–2 times per week for 60 min over 7 weeks. Almost one-quarter (24%) had a sole practitioner supervising exercise, although the majority used a nurse/physiotherapist combination. Low to moderate exercise intensities were used in 60% of programmes, however, higher intensity prescriptions were not uncommon. Few sites (<6%) made use of technology, such as mobile phones or the internet, to deliver or support exercise training. Conclusions While advances have been made towards providing flexible and accessible exercise-based CR, much of Australia's service remains within traditional models of care. A continuing focus on service improvement and evidence-based care should, therefore, be considered a core aim of those providing exercise for CR in order to improve health service delivery and optimise outcomes for patients. PMID

  2. Exercise Training Prevents TNF-α Induced Loss of Force in the Diaphragm of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mangner, Norman; Linke, Axel; Oberbach, Andreas; Kullnick, Yvonne; Gielen, Stephan; Sandri, Marcus; Hoellriegel, Robert; Matsumoto, Yasuharu; Schuler, Gerhard; Adams, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Inflammatory cytokines like tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) are elevated in congestive heart failure and are known to induce the production of reactive oxygen species as well as to deteriorate respiratory muscle function. Objectives Given the antioxidative effects of exercise training, the aim of the present study was to investigate if exercise training is capable of preventing a TNF-α induced loss of diaphragmatic force in mice and, if so, to elucidate the potential underlying mechanisms. Methods Prior to intraperitoneal injection of TNF-α or saline, C57Bl6 mice were assigned to four weeks of exercise training or sedentary behavior. Diaphragmatic force and power generation were determined in vitro. Expression/activity of radical scavenger enzymes, enzymes producing reactive oxygen species and marker of oxidative stress were measured in the diaphragm. Main Results In sedentary animals, TNF-α reduced specific force development by 42% concomitant with a 2.6-fold increase in the amount of carbonylated α-actin and creatine kinase. Furthermore, TNF-α led to an increased NAD(P)H oxidase activity in both sedentary and exercised mice whereas xanthine oxidase activity and intramitochondrial ROS production was only enhanced in sedentary animals by TNF-α. Exercise training prevented the TNF-α induced force reduction and led to an enhanced mRNA expression and activity of glutathione peroxidase. Carbonylation of proteins, in particular of α-actin and creatine kinase, was diminished by exercise training. Conclusion TNF-α reduces the force development in the diaphragm of mice. This effect is almost abolished by exercise training. This may be a result of reduced carbonylation of proteins due to the antioxidative properties of exercise training. PMID:23300968

  3. Respiratory and limb muscle dysfunction in pulmonary arterial hypertension: a role for exercise training?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Respiratory and limb muscle dysfunction is emerging as an important pathophysiological abnormality in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Muscle abnormalities appear to occur frequently and promote dyspnea, fatigue, and exercise limitation in patients with PAH. Preliminary data suggest that targeted muscle training may be of benefit, although further evidence is required to consolidate these findings into specific recommendations for exercise training in patients with PAH. This article reviews the current evidence on prevalence, risk factors, and implications of respiratory and limb muscle dysfunction in patients with PAH. It also reviews the impact of exercise rehabilitation on morphologic, metabolic, and functional muscle profile and outcomes in PAH. Future research priorities are highlighted. PMID:26401245

  4. Structural and functional prevention of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension by individualized exercise training in mice.

    PubMed

    Weissmann, Norbert; Peters, Dorothea M; Klöpping, Christina; Krüger, Karsten; Pilat, Christian; Katta, Susmitha; Seimetz, Michael; Ghofrani, Hossein A; Schermuly, Ralph T; Witzenrath, Martin; Seeger, Werner; Grimminger, Friedrich; Mooren, Frank C

    2014-06-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a disease with a poor prognosis characterized by a vascular remodeling process and an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. While a variety of reports demonstrated that exercise training exerts beneficial effects on exercise performance and quality of life in PH patients, it is not known how physical exercise affects vascular remodeling processes occurring in hypoxia-induced PH. Therefore, we investigated the effect of individualized exercise training on the development of hypoxia-induced PH in mice. Training effects were compared with pharmacological treatment with the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor Sildenafil or a combination of training plus Sildenafil. Trained mice who received Sildenafil showed a significantly improved walking distance (from 88.9 ± 8.1 to 146.4 ± 13.1 m) and maximum oxygen consumption (from 93.3 ± 2.9 to 105.5 ± 2.2% in combination with Sildenafil, to 102.2 ± 3.0% with placebo) compared with sedentary controls. Right ventricular systolic pressure, measured by telemetry, was at the level of healthy normoxic animals, whereas right heart hypertrophy did not benefit from training. Most interestingly, the increase in small pulmonary vessel muscularization was prevented by training. Respective counterregulatory processes were detected for the nitric oxide-soluble guanylate cyclase-phosphodiesterase system. We conclude that individualized daily exercise can prevent vascular remodeling in hypoxia-induced PH. PMID:24705723

  5. Moderate exercise training promotes adaptations in coronary blood flow and adenosine production in normotensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Roque, Fernanda R.; Soci, Ursula Paula Renó; De Angelis, Katia; Coelho, Marcele A.; Furstenau, Cristina R.; Vassallo, Dalton V.; Irigoyen, Maria Claudia; Oliveira, Edilamar M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Aerobic exercise training prevents cardiovascular risks. Regular exercise promotes functional and structural adaptations that are associated with several cardiovascular benefits. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of swimming training on coronary blood flow, adenosine production and cardiac capillaries in normotensive rats. METHODS: Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: control (C) and trained (T). An exercise protocol was performed for 10 weeks and 60 min/day with a tail overload of 5% bodyweight. Coronary blood flow was quantified with a color microsphere technique, and cardiac capillaries were quantified using light microscopy. Adenine nucleotide hydrolysis was evaluated by enzymatic activity, and protein expression was evaluated by western blot. The results are presented as the means ± SEMs (p<0.05). RESULTS: Exercise training increased the coronary blood flow and the myocardial capillary-to-fiber ratio. Moreover, the circulating and cardiac extracellular adenine nucleotide hydrolysis was higher in the trained rats than in the sedentary rats due to the increased activity and protein expression of enzymes, such as E-NTPDase and 5′-nucleotidase. CONCLUSIONS: Swimming training increases coronary blood flow, number of cardiac capillaries, and adenine nucleotide hydrolysis. Increased adenosine production may be an important contributor to the enhanced coronary blood flow and angiogenesis that were observed in the exercise-trained rats; collectively, these results suggest improved myocardial perfusion. PMID:22189737

  6. A Randomized Controlled Exercise Training Trial on Insulin Sensitivity in African American Men: The ARTIIS study

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Robert L.; Johnson, William D.; Hendrick, Chelsea; Harris, Melissa; Andrews, Emanuel; Johannsen, Neil; Rodarte, Ruben Q.; Hsia, Daniel S.; Church, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lack of regular physical activity at prescribed intensity levels is a modifiable risk factor for insulin resistance and the development of diabetes. African American men are at increased risk for developing diabetes and most African American men are not meeting the current recommended levels of physical activity. The primary objective of the Aerobic Plus Resistance Training and Insulin Resistance in African American Men (ARTIIS) study is to determine the effectiveness of an exercise training intervention aimed at reducing diabetes risk factors in African American men at risk for developing diabetes. Methods Insufficiently active 35–70 year old African American men with a family history of diabetes were eligible for the study. The 5-month randomized controlled trial assigns 116 men to an exercise training or healthy living control arm. The exercise training arm combines aerobic and resistance training according to the current national physical activity recommendations and is conducted in community (YMCA) facilities. The healthy living arm receives information promoting healthy lifestyle changes. Outcomes Insulin response to an oral glucose load is the primary outcome measure, and changes in physiological parameters, cardiorespiratory fitness, strength, body composition, and psychological well-being comprise the secondary outcomes. Conclusions The ARTIIS study is one of the first adequately powered, rigorously designed studies to investigate the effects of an aerobic plus resistance exercise training program and to assess adherence to exercise training in community facilities, in African American men. PMID:25979318

  7. Tablet-Based Strength-Balance Training to Motivate and Improve Adherence to Exercise in Independently Living Older People: Part 2 of a Phase II Preclinical Exploratory Trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Home-based exercise programs can improve physical functioning and health status of elderly people. Successful implementation of exercise interventions for older people presents major challenges and supporting elderly people properly while doing their home-based exercises is essential for training success. We developed a tablet-based system—ActiveLifestyle—that offers older adults a home-based strength-balance training program with incorporated motivation strategies and support features. Objective The goal was to compare 3 different home-based training programs with respect to their effect on measures of gait quality and physical performance through planned comparisons between (1) tablet-based and brochure-based interventions, (2) individual and social motivation strategies, and (3) active and inactive participants. Methods A total of 44 autonomous-living elderly people (mean 75, SD 6 years) were assigned to 3 training groups: social (tablet guided, n=14), individual (tablet guided, n=13), and brochure (brochure guided, n=17). All groups joined a 12-week progressive home-based strength-balance training program. Outcome measures were gait performance under single and dual task conditions, dual task costs of walking, falls efficacy, and physical performance as measured by the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). Furthermore, active (≥75% program compliance) and inactive (<75% program compliance) individuals were compared based on their characteristics and outcome measures. Results The tablet groups showed significant improvements in single and dual task walking, whereas there were no significant changes observable in the brochure group. Between-groups comparisons revealed significant differences for gait velocity (U=138.5; P=.03, r=.33) and cadence (U=138.5, P=.03 r=.34) during dual task walking at preferred speed in favor of the tablet groups. The brochure group had more inactive participants, but this did not reach statistical significance (U

  8. Effects of Moderate Exercise on Relieving Mental Load of Elementary School Teachers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shing-Hong; Cheng, Da-Chuan; Wang, Jia-Jung; Lin, Tzu-Hsin; Chang, Kang-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Long-term endurance exercise could increase activity of parasympathetic nervous and decrease activity of sympathetic nervous at rest. However, previous studies all focused on the effect of endurance training on heart rate variability (HRV) for athletes or sedentary subjects. In Taiwan, elementary school teachers teaching and processing the children's and administrative problems always stand and walk. They will sit down only when they review and correct the students' home work. Thus, the goal of this study was to elucidate the beneficial effect of moderate intensity exercise on relieving mental load of elementary school teachers. There were 20 participants in the exercise group and another 20 participants in the nonexercise group. The exercising teachers performed 12 weeks of moderate intensity exercise training for an average of 30 minutes per day, 3 times per week. HRV was measured before and after the 4th, 6th, and 12th weeks. The time and frequency domain parameters of HRV all had significant increases between the beginning and after 12 weeks of training. However, the time and frequency domain parameters of HRV in the nonexercise group had significant decreases between the beginning and after 12 weeks of training. The long-term moderate exercises can relieve mental load of elementary school teachers. Moreover, age was the considerable factor affecting HRV in this study. PMID:25861352

  9. Effects of moderate exercise on relieving mental load of elementary school teachers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shing-Hong; Cheng, Da-Chuan; Wang, Jia-Jung; Lin, Tzu-Hsin; Chang, Kang-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Long-term endurance exercise could increase activity of parasympathetic nervous and decrease activity of sympathetic nervous at rest. However, previous studies all focused on the effect of endurance training on heart rate variability (HRV) for athletes or sedentary subjects. In Taiwan, elementary school teachers teaching and processing the children's and administrative problems always stand and walk. They will sit down only when they review and correct the students' home work. Thus, the goal of this study was to elucidate the beneficial effect of moderate intensity exercise on relieving mental load of elementary school teachers. There were 20 participants in the exercise group and another 20 participants in the nonexercise group. The exercising teachers performed 12 weeks of moderate intensity exercise training for an average of 30 minutes per day, 3 times per week. HRV was measured before and after the 4th, 6th, and 12th weeks. The time and frequency domain parameters of HRV all had significant increases between the beginning and after 12 weeks of training. However, the time and frequency domain parameters of HRV in the nonexercise group had significant decreases between the beginning and after 12 weeks of training. The long-term moderate exercises can relieve mental load of elementary school teachers. Moreover, age was the considerable factor affecting HRV in this study. PMID:25861352

  10. Swahili 12 Weeks Course. Volume VI, Vocabulary List: Swahili-English, English-Swahili.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This Swahili-English/English-Swahili vocabulary list accompanies the Defense Language Institute's 12-weeks course in Swahili. For a description of the first five volumes (55 lesson units), see ED 026 651. (AMM)

  11. Effects of eight weeks of exercise training and orlistat therapy on body composition and maximal exercise capacity in obese females.

    PubMed

    Ozcelik, O; Dogan, H; Kelestimur, H

    2006-01-01

    A comparative assessment was made of the short-term effects of orlistat therapy and exercise training on body composition and aerobic fitness in obese females. A total of 24 obese patients were enrolled in to the study; 12 received orlistat therapy (DO) and 12 participated in a regular aerobic exercise-training programme (DE). All patients were on hypocaloric diets. Each patient performed three incremental ramp exercise tests (one at Week 0, one at the end of Week 4 and one at the end of Week 8) to exhaustion using an electromagnetically braked cycle ergometer to determine their anaerobic threshold and maximal exercise (Wmax) capacity. Patients in the DE group performed continuous exercise at a work rate that corresponded to the anaerobic threshold. Weight loss and loss of fat mass after 8 weeks were -6.4% (P=0.002) and -13.4% (DE) vs -5.8% (P=0.002) and -6.4% (P=0.008) (DO), respectively. Wmax capacity was 90.8+/-5 W (basal) vs 92.9+/-5 W (Week 4, P=0.1) and 100.4+/-6 W (Week 8, 10.5%, P=0.04) in the DO group, and 96.2+/-6 W (basal) vs 129.1+/-4 W (Week 4, 34.1%, P=0.002) and 137.5+/-5 W(Week 8, 42.9%, P=0.002) in the DE group. Despite similar decreases in body weight in both groups, patients in the DE group achieved a markedly higher level of Wmax, reflecting a better improvement in cardiopulmonary fitness, compared with patients in the DO group. Considering the improvement of aerobic fitness in the short term, an aerobic exercise-training programme should be considered for sedentary obese patients to improve their aerobic fitness and thereby reduce the negative outcomes of obesity. PMID:16198382

  12. Acute and training effects of resistance exercise on heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, J Derek; Figueroa, Arturo

    2016-05-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has been used as a non-invasive method to evaluate heart rate (HR) regulation by the parasympathetic and sympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system. In this review, we discuss the effect of resistance exercise both acutely and after training on HRV in healthy individuals and in those with diseases characterized by autonomic dysfunction, such as hypertension and fibromyalgia. HR recovery after exercise is influenced by parasympathetic reactivation and sympathetic recovery to resting levels. Therefore, examination of HRV in response to acute exercise yields valuable insight into autonomic cardiovascular modulation and possible underlying risk for disease. Acute resistance exercise has shown to decrease cardiac parasympathetic modulation more than aerobic exercise in young healthy adults suggesting an increased risk for cardiovascular dysfunction after resistance exercise. Resistance exercise training appears to have no effect on resting HRV in healthy young adults, while it may improve parasympathetic modulation in middle-aged adults with autonomic dysfunction. Acute resistance exercise appears to decrease parasympathetic activity regardless of age. This review examines the acute and chronic effects of resistance exercise on HRV in young and older adults. PMID:25524332

  13. Aerobic Exercise Training in Post-Polio Syndrome: Process Evaluation of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Voorn, Eric L.; Koopman, Fieke S.; Brehm, Merel A.; Beelen, Anita; de Haan, Arnold; Gerrits, Karin H. L.; Nollet, Frans

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore reasons for the lack of efficacy of a high intensity aerobic exercise program in post-polio syndrome (PPS) on cardiorespiratory fitness by evaluating adherence to the training program and effects on muscle function. Design A process evaluation using data from an RCT. Patients Forty-four severely fatigued individuals with PPS were randomized to exercise therapy (n = 22) or usual care (n = 22). Methods Participants in the exercise group were instructed to exercise 3 times weekly for 4 months on a bicycle ergometer (60–70% heart rate reserve). Results The attendance rate was high (median 89%). None of the participants trained within the target heart rate range during >75% of the designated time. Instead, participants exercised at lower intensities, though still around the anaerobic threshold (AT) most of the time. Muscle function did not improve in the exercise group. Conclusion Our results suggest that severely fatigued individuals with PPS cannot adhere to a high intensity aerobic exercise program on a cycle ergometer. Despite exercise intensities around the AT, lower extremity muscle function nor cardiorespiratory fitness improved. Improving the aerobic capacity in PPS is difficult through exercise primarily focusing on the lower extremities, and may require a more individualized approach, including the use of other large muscle groups instead. Trial Registration Netherlands National Trial Register NTR1371 PMID:27419388

  14. Early myogenic responses to acute exercise before and after resistance training in young men

    PubMed Central

    Caldow, Marissa K; Thomas, Emily E; Dale, Michael J; Tomkinson, Grant R; Buckley, Jonathan D; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    To enable dynamic regulation of muscle mass and myofiber repair following injury, a satellite cell precursor population exists to supply additional nuclei. Activated satellite cells express many genes and associated proteins necessary for maturation and incorporation into the damaged fiber. There is little knowledge about the response of these markers following whole-body resistance exercise training. We investigated the impact of 12 weeks of progressive whole-body resistance training on the expression of MRFs, PAX7, NCAM, and FA1, incorporating both acute and chronic resistance exercise components. Ten young recreationally active males (21.2 ± 3.5 years) performed 12 weeks of whole-body resistance training at 70–85% of their predetermined one-repetition maximum (1RM). At the initiation and completion of the training period, muscular strength was assessed by RM and dynamometer testing, and vastus lateralis samples were obtained prior to and 3 h following an acute resistance exercise test (both whole-body and isometric exercises). Increased mRNA expression of PAX7 (threefold), NCAM (threefold), MYF5 (threefold), MYOD (threefold) and MYOGENIN (twofold) was observed 3 h after the acute resistance exercise test, both pre and posttraining. Similarly, PAX7 (11-fold) and FA1 (twofold) protein abundance increased after acute exercise, while resting NCAM (eightfold) and FA1 (threefold) protein abundance increased following 12 weeks of resistance training. It is possible that these molecular changes are primarily due to the preceding exercise bout, and are not modified by long-term or whole-body exercise training. PMID:26359239

  15. Blood flow restriction training and the exercise pressor reflex: a call for concern.

    PubMed

    Spranger, Marty D; Krishnan, Abhinav C; Levy, Phillip D; O'Leary, Donal S; Smith, Scott A

    2015-11-01

    Blood flow restriction (BFR) training (also known as Kaatsu training) is an increasingly common practice employed during resistance exercise by athletes attempting to enhance skeletal muscle mass and strength. During BFR training, blood flow to the exercising muscle is mechanically restricted by placing flexible pressurizing cuffs around the active limb proximal to the working muscle. This maneuver results in the accumulation of metabolites (e.g., protons and lactic acid) in the muscle interstitium that increase muscle force and promote muscle growth. Therefore, the premise of BFR training is to simulate and receive the benefits of high-intensity resistance exercise while merely performing low-intensity resistance exercise. This technique has also been purported to provide health benefits to the elderly, individuals recovering from joint injuries, and patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation. Since the seminal work of Alam and Smirk in the 1930s, it has been well established that reductions in blood flow to exercising muscle engage the exercise pressor reflex (EPR), a reflex that significantly contributes to the autonomic cardiovascular response to exercise. However, the EPR and its likely contribution to the BFR-mediated cardiovascular response to exercise is glaringly missing from the scientific literature. Inasmuch as the EPR has been shown to generate exaggerated increases in sympathetic nerve activity in disease states such as hypertension (HTN), heart failure (HF), and peripheral artery disease (PAD), concerns are raised that BFR training can be used safely for the rehabilitation of patients with cardiovascular disease, as has been suggested. Abnormal BFR-induced and EPR-mediated cardiovascular complications generated during exercise could precipitate adverse cardiovascular or cerebrovascular events (e.g., cardiac arrhythmia, myocardial infarction, stroke and sudden cardiac death). Moreover, although altered EPR function in HTN, HF, and PAD underlies our

  16. VO2 Max in Variable Type Exercise Among Well-Trained Upper Body Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seals, Douglas R.; Mullin, John P.

    1982-01-01

    The maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) of well-trained upper body athletes was compared to that of untrained individuals in four types of exercise: arm cranking, legs only cycling, graded treadmill running, and combined arm cranking and leg cycling. Results of the study showed that well-trained upper body athletes attained a significantly higher…

  17. Effects of Two Modes of Exercise Training on Physical Fitness of 10 Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribeiro, Ligia G. dos Santos Chaves; Portal, Maria de Nazare Dias; da Silva, Joao Bittencourt; Saraiva, Alan; da Cruz Monte, Gerson, Jr.; Dantas, Estelio H. M.

    2010-01-01

    Study aim: To compare two exercise training modes on the physical fitness of 10 year-old children. Material and methods: A sample of 60 schoolboys aged 10 years were randomly divided into 3 groups: Traditional (TG), trained according to the Brazilian national curricular parameters, Maturational (MG), in which the degree of difficulty of the…

  18. Effects of Video-Based Staff Training with Manager-Led Exercises in Residential Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Daniel J.

    1998-01-01

    The effectiveness of video-based staff training with manager-led exercises in improving the performance of six staffers in residential support for persons with disabilities was examined. The training procedures improved performance in hand-washing, glove usage, and frequency of positive interaction, but not in the frequency of valued activities.…

  19. Effects of Sit Up Exercise Training on Adipose Cell Size and Adiposity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katch, Frank I.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This article reports on an experiment that evaluated the effects of a 27-day sit up exercise training program on adipose cell size and adiposity. Fat biopsies were taken by needle aspiration from male subjects before and after a progressive training regimen. Results are discussed. (Author/DF)

  20. Aerobic exercise training improves insulin sensitivity without changes in body weight, body fat, adiponectin, and inflammatory markers in overweight and obese girls.

    PubMed

    Nassis, George P; Papantakou, Katerina; Skenderi, Katerina; Triandafillopoulou, Maria; Kavouras, Stavros A; Yannakoulia, Mary; Chrousos, George P; Sidossis, Labros S

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of aerobic exercise training on insulin sensitivity in overweight and obese girls. Nineteen overweight and obese girls (mean +/- SD: age, 13.1+/-1.8 years; body mass index, 26.8+/-3.9 kg/m(2)) volunteered for this study. Body composition (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry), insulin sensitivity (oral glucose tolerance test and homeostasis model assessment estimate of insulin resistance; n=15), adiponectin, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL) 6, insulin-like growth factor-1, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 serum levels, and blood lipids and lipoproteins were assessed before and after 12 weeks of aerobic training. Cardiorespiratory fitness increased by 18.8% (P<.05) as a result of training. The area under the insulin concentration curve (insulin area under the curve) decreased by 23.3% (12781.7+/-7454.2 vs 9799.0+/-4918.6 microU.min/mL before and after intervention, respectively; P=.03). Insulin sensitivity was improved without changes in body weight (pre-intervention, 67.9+/-14.5 kg; post-intervention, 68.3+/-14.0 kg) or percent body fat (pre-intervention, 41.4% +/- 4.8%; post-intervention, 40.7%+/-5.2%). The lower limb fat-free mass increased by 6.2% (P<.01) as a result of training, and changes in lower limb fat-free mass were correlated with changes in the insulin area under the curve (r= -.68; P< .01). Serum adiponectin, IL-6, and CRP concentrations did not change (pre-intervention vs post-intervention: adiponectin, 9.57+/-3.01 vs 9.08+/-2.32 microg/mL; IL-6, 1.67+/-1.29 vs 1.65+/-1.25 pg/mL, CRP, 3.21+/-2.48 vs 2.73+/-1.88 mg/L) whereas insulin-like growth factor-1 was lower after training (pre-intervention, 453.8 +/- 159.3 ng/mL; post-intervention, 403.2+/- 155.1 ng/mL; P<.05). In conclusion, 12 weeks of aerobic training improved insulin sensitivity in overweight and obese girls without change in body weight, percent body fat, and circulating

  1. The influence of training characteristics on the effect of aerobic exercise training in patients with chronic heart failure: A meta-regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Vromen, T; Kraal, J J; Kuiper, J; Spee, R F; Peek, N; Kemps, H M

    2016-04-01

    Although aerobic exercise training has shown to be an effective treatment for chronic heart failure patients, there has been a debate about the design of training programs and which training characteristics are the strongest determinants of improvement in exercise capacity. Therefore, we performed a meta-regression analysis to determine a ranking of the individual effect of the training characteristics on the improvement in exercise capacity of an aerobic exercise training program in chronic heart failure patients. We focused on four training characteristics; session frequency, session duration, training intensity and program length, and their product; total energy expenditure. A systematic literature search was performed for randomized controlled trials comparing continuous aerobic exercise training with usual care. Seventeen unique articles were included in our analysis. Total energy expenditure appeared the only training characteristic with a significant effect on improvement in exercise capacity. However, the results were strongly dominated by one trial (HF-action trial), accounting for 90% of the total patient population and showing controversial results compared to other studies. A repeated analysis excluding the HF-action trial confirmed that the increase in exercise capacity is primarily determined by total energy expenditure, followed by session frequency, session duration and session intensity. These results suggest that the design of a training program requires high total energy expenditure as a main goal. Increases in training frequency and session duration appear to yield the largest improvement in exercise capacity. PMID:26849686

  2. Long-term mild exercise training enhances hippocampus-dependent memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Hanaoka, Y; Nishijima, T; Okamoto, M; Chang, H; Saito, T; Soya, H

    2015-04-01

    Although exercise training improves hippocampus-related cognition, the optimum exercise intensity is still disputed. Based on the lactate threshold (LT, approximately 20 m/min on treadmill) of rats, we have shown that 2 weeks of training with stress-free mild exercise (ME, exercise (IE, >LT), comprising exercise stress, promotes adult hippocampal neurogenesis (Okamoto et al., PNAS, 2012), a potential substrate for memory improvement. These results led us to postulate that long-term ME, but not IE, training leads to improved hippocampal function as assessed with a Morris water maze (MWM) task. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the changes in physiological stress levels and MWM task performance in rats assigned to 6 weeks of sedentary control (CONT), ME-training or IE-training conditions. Results showed that, compared to the other conditions, only IE causes general adaptive syndrome (GAS), including adrenal hypertrophy, thymic atrophy and hypercorticosteronemia. In the MWM, ME led to enhanced memory, but not learning, compared with CONT, while IE produced no change in either capacity, probably due to GAS. These findings support the hypothesis that 6 weeks of continuous ME training leads to enhanced hippocampus-related memory, which may have implications for both healthy adults and subjects with low physical capacity. PMID:25429548

  3. Chronic endurance exercise training offsets the age-related attenuation in contraction-induced rapid vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Hughes, William E; Ueda, Kenichi; Casey, Darren P

    2016-06-01

    Aging is associated with attenuated contraction-induced rapid onset vasodilation (ROV). We sought to examine whether chronic exercise training would improve ROV in older adults. Additionally, we examined whether a relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness and ROV exists in young and older adults. Chronically exercise-trained older adults (n = 16; 66 ± 2 yr, mean ± SE) performed single muscle contractions in the forearm and leg at various intensities. Brachial and femoral artery diameter and blood velocity were measured using Doppler ultrasound. Vascular conductance (VC) was calculated as the quotient of blood flow (ml/min) and mean arterial pressure (mmHg). These data were compared with our previously published work from an identical protocol in 16 older untrained (66 ± 1 yr, mean ± SE) and 14 young (23 ± 1 yr) adults. Peak (ΔVCpeak) and total vasodilator (VCtotal) responses were greater in trained compared with untrained older adults across leg exercise intensities (P < 0.05). There were no differences in responses between trained older and young adults in the arm or leg at any exercise intensity (P > 0.05). Comparison of ΔVCpeak in a subset of subjects at an absolute workload in the leg revealed that trained older adults exhibited augmented responses relative to untrained older adults. Exercise capacity (V̇o2 peak) was associated with ΔVCpeak and VCtotal across arm (r = 0.59-0.64) and leg exercise intensities (r = 0.55-0.68, P < 0.05) in older adults. Our data demonstrate that 1) chronic exercise training improves ROV in the arm and leg of trained older adults, such that age-related differences in ROV are abolished, and 2) VO2peak is associated with ΔVCpeak responses in both limbs of older adults. PMID:27032899

  4. Noninvasive assessment of changes in myocardial perfusion and ventricular performance following exercise training

    SciTech Connect

    Tubau, J.; Witztum, K.; Froelicher, V.; Jensen, D.; Atwood, E.; McKirnan, M.D.; Reynolds, J.; Ashburn, W.

    1982-08-01

    Seventeen coronary patients (CAD) underwent /sup 201/Tl treadmill and radionuclide (RNV) ejection fraction supine bicycle testing before and after 5.6 +/- 1.6 (mean +/- SD) months of an exercise program. Thallium data were assessed both using analog images and a computerized circumferential profile technique. Patients exercised on the treadmill to a higher workload after the exercise program, but achieved a similar pressure-rate product. When interpreting the analog thallium images, only 50% agreement was obtained for the assessment of changes in myocardial perfusion (pre/post-training). The computer technique, however, had low inter-intraobserver variability (6%) and better agreement (90.5%). Using the circumferential profile method, five patients improved (a total of 11 regions) and one patient worsened (with two regions). Before the exercise program, the ejection fraction (EF) response to supine bike exercise was normal (an increase greater than 11%) in four, flat in seven, and severely abnormal (a decrease of more than 4%) in six patients. After the exercise program, even though achieving similar or higher pressure-rate products, six patients improved their EF response, nine did not change, and two worsened. Of the five patients who improved their thallium images, one improved his EF response, two remained normal, and two did not change. One patient worsened both his thallium study and the EF response after the exercise program. Changes in thallium exercise images and the EF response to supine exercise occurred in our patients after an exercise program, but were not always concordant. Indeed, of five patients with exercise-induced ischemic ST changes before and after training, the EF response improved in three whereas myocardial perfusion was unchanged. Reasons for this lack of agreement are discussed, and have been considered in the planning of a randomized trial of the effects of an exercise program on myocardial perfusion and function.

  5. Effects of continuous vs interval exercise training on oxygen uptake efficiency slope in patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Prado, D.M.L.; Rocco, E.A.; Silva, A.G.; Rocco, D.F.; Pacheco, M.T.; Silva, P.F.; Furlan, V.

    2016-01-01

    The oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES) is a submaximal index incorporating cardiovascular, peripheral, and pulmonary factors that determine the ventilatory response to exercise. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of continuous exercise training and interval exercise training on the OUES in patients with coronary artery disease. Thirty-five patients (59.3±1.8 years old; 28 men, 7 women) with coronary artery disease were randomly divided into two groups: continuous exercise training (n=18) and interval exercise training (n=17). All patients performed graded exercise tests with respiratory gas analysis before and 3 months after the exercise-training program to determine ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT), respiratory compensation point, and peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2). The OUES was assessed based on data from the second minute of exercise until exhaustion by calculating the slope of the linear relation between oxygen uptake and the logarithm of total ventilation. After the interventions, both groups showed increased aerobic fitness (P<0.05). In addition, both the continuous exercise and interval exercise training groups demonstrated an increase in OUES (P<0.05). Significant associations were observed in both groups: 1) continuous exercise training (OUES and peak VO2 r=0.57; OUES and VO2 VAT r=0.57); 2) interval exercise training (OUES and peak VO2 r=0.80; OUES and VO2 VAT r=0.67). Continuous and interval exercise training resulted in a similar increase in OUES among patients with coronary artery disease. These findings suggest that improvements in OUES among CAD patients after aerobic exercise training may be dependent on peripheral and central mechanisms. PMID:26871969

  6. Acute EPOC response in women to circuit training and treadmill exercise of matched oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Braun, W A; Hawthorne, W E; Markofski, M M

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of circuit training (CT) and treadmill exercise performed at matched rates of oxygen consumption and exercise duration on elevated post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) in untrained women, while controlling for the menstrual cycle. Eight, untrained females (31.3 +/- 9.1 years; 2.04 +/- 0.26 l min(-1) estimated VO2max; BMI=24.6+/-3.9 kg/m2) volunteered to participate in the study. Testing was performed during the early follicular phase for each subject to minimize hormonal variability between tests. Subjects performed two exercise sessions approximately 28 days apart. Resting, supine energy expenditure was measured for 30 min preceding exercise and for 1 h after completion of exercise. Respiratory gas exchange data were collected continuously during rest and exercise periods via indirect calorimetry. CT consisted of three sets of eight common resistance exercises. Pre-exercise and exercise oxygen consumption was not different between testing days (P>0.05). Thus, exercise conditions were appropriately matched. Analysis of EPOC data revealed that CT resulted in a significantly higher (p<0.05) oxygen uptake during the first 30 min of recovery (0.27 +/- 0.01 l min(-1) vs 0.23+/-0.01 l min(-1)); though, at 60 min, treatment differences were not present. Mean VO2 remained significantly higher (0.231 +/- 0.01 l min(-1)) than pre-exercise measures (0.193 +/- 0.01 l min(-1)) throughout the 60-min EPOC period (p<0.05). Heart rate, RPE, V(E) and RER were all significantly greater during CT (p<0.05). When exercise VO2 and exercise duration were matched, CT was associated with a greater metabolic disturbance and cost during the early phases of EPOC. PMID:15942765

  7. Safety and Efficacy of Supervised Strength Training Adopted in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Patrick J.; Poudevigne, Melanie S.; Cress, M. Elaine; Motl, Robert W.; Clapp, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Describe safety and efficacy of a supervised, low-to-moderate intensity strength training program adopted during pregnancy among women at increased risk for back pain. Methods 32 women adopted strength training twice per week for 12 weeks. Data on musculoskeletal injuries, symptoms, blood pressure, and the absolute external load used for 5 of 6 exercises were obtained during each session. A submaximal lumbar extension endurance exercise test was performed at weeks 5, 10, and 13. Results The mean (± SD) exercise session attendance rate was 80.5% (± 11.3%). No musculoskeletal injuries occurred. Potentially adverse symptoms (eg, dizziness) were infrequent (2.1% of sessions). Repeated-measures ANOVA showed large increases in the external load across 12 weeks (all P values < .001) and the percentage increases in external load from weeks 1 to 12 were 36% for leg press, 39% for leg curl, 39% for lat pull down, 41% for lumbar extension and 56% for leg extension. Training was associated with a 14% increase in lumbar endurance. Blood pressure was unchanged following acute exercise sessions and after 12 weeks of exercise training. Conclusion The adoption of a supervised, low-to-moderate intensity strength training program during pregnancy can be safe and efficacious for pregnant women. PMID:21487130

  8. Comparing exercise training modalities in heart failure: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Justien; Beckers, Paul; Taeymans, Jan; Vrints, Christiaan; Vissers, Dirk

    2016-10-15

    Exercise training (ET) is suggested to improve exercise capacity, prognosis, quality of life (QOL) and functional modifications of the heart in patients with heart failure (HF). However, it is not clear which modality is best. In order to assess the effectiveness of different ET modalities on prognostic cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) parameters, QOL and left ventricular remodeling, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were selected in three databases. The primary outcome data were peak oxygen uptake, ventilation over carbon dioxide slope, oxygen uptake efficiency slope, exercise oscillatory ventilation, rest and peak pulmonary end-tidal CO2. Secondary variables were QOL, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD). Twenty RCTs (n=811) met the a priori stated inclusion criteria. Studies were categorized into four different groups: "interval training (IT1) versus combined interval and strength training (IT1S)" (n=156), "continuous training (CT1) versus combined continuous and strength training (CT1S)" (n=130), "interval training (IT2) versus continuous training (CT2)" (n=501) and "continuous training (CT3) versus strength training (S3)" (n=24). No significant random effects of exercise modality were revealed assessing the CPET parameters. There was a significant improvement in QOL applying CT1S (P<0.001). Comparing IT2 with CT2, LVEDD and LVEF were significantly improved favoring IT2 (P<0.001). There is some evidence to support that interval training is more effective to improve LVEF and LVEDD. The fact that patients with HF are actively involved in any kind of ET program seems sufficient to improve the prognosis, QOL and anatomic function. PMID:27434363

  9. Kegel Exercises for Your Pelvic Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... control until after 6 to 12 weeks of daily exercises. Still, most women notice an improvement after just ... Weak pelvic muscles often lead to urine leakage. Daily exercises can strengthen pelvic muscles. These exercises often improve ...

  10. Effects of Exercise Rehab on Male Asthmatic Patients: Aerobic Verses Rebound Training

    PubMed Central

    Zolaktaf, Vahid; Ghasemi, Gholam A; Sadeghi, Morteza

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are some auspicious records on applying aerobic exercise for asthmatic patients. Recently, it is suggested that rebound exercise might even increase the gains. This study was designed to compare the effects of rebound therapy to aerobic training in male asthmatic patients. Methods: Sample included 37 male asthmatic patients (20-40 years) from the same respiratory clinic. After signing the informed consent, subjects volunteered to take part in control, rebound, or aerobic groups. There was no change in the routine medical treatment of patients. Supervised exercise programs continued for 8 weeks, consisting of two sessions of 45 to 60 minutes per week. Criteria measures were assessed pre- and post exercise program. Peak exercise capacity (VO2peak) was estimated by modified Bruce protocol, Forced vital capacity (FVC), Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and FEV1% were measured by spirometer. Data were analyzed by repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: Significant interactions were observed for all 4 criteria measures (P < 0.01), meaning that both the exercise programs were effective in improving FVC, FEV1, FEV1%, and VO2peak. Rebound exercise produced more improvement in FEV1, FEV1%, and VO2peak. Conclusions: Regular exercise strengthens the respiratory muscles and improves the cellular respiration. At the same time, it improves the muscular, respiratory, and cardio-vascular systems. Effects of rebound exercise seem to be promising. Findings suggest that rebound exercise is a useful complementary means for asthmatic male patients. PMID:23717762

  11. Effect of exercise training on ventilatory efficiency in patients with heart disease: a review

    PubMed Central

    Prado, D.M.L.; Rocco, E.A.; Silva, A.G.; Rocco, D.F.; Pacheco, M.T.; Furlan, V.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of ventilatory efficiency in cardiopulmonary exercise testing has proven useful for assessing the presence and severity of cardiorespiratory diseases. During exercise, efficient pulmonary gas exchange is characterized by uniform matching of lung ventilation with perfusion. By contrast, mismatching is marked by inefficient pulmonary gas exchange, requiring increased ventilation for a given CO2 production. The etiology of increased and inefficient ventilatory response to exercise in heart disease is multifactorial, involving both peripheral and central mechanisms. Exercise training has been recommended as non-pharmacological treatment for patients with different chronic cardiopulmonary diseases. In this respect, previous studies have reported improvements in ventilatory efficiency after aerobic exercise training in patients with heart disease. Against this background, the primary objective of the present review was to discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in abnormal ventilatory response to exercise, with an emphasis on both patients with heart failure syndrome and coronary artery disease. Secondly, special focus was dedicated to the role of aerobic exercise training in improving indices of ventilatory efficiency among these patients, as well as to the underlying mechanisms involved. PMID:27332771

  12. Voluntary Exercise Training: Analysis of Mice in Uninjured, Inflammatory, and Nerve-Injured Pain States

    PubMed Central

    Sheahan, Tayler D.; Copits, Bryan A.; Golden, Judith P.; Gereau, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Both clinical and animal studies suggest that exercise may be an effective way to manage inflammatory and neuropathic pain conditions. However, existing animal studies commonly use forced exercise paradigms that incorporate varying degrees of stress, which itself can elicit analgesia, and thus may complicate the interpretation of the effects of exercise on pain. We investigated the analgesic potential of voluntary wheel running in the formalin model of acute inflammatory pain and the spared nerve injury model of neuropathic pain in mice. In uninjured, adult C57BL/6J mice, 1 to 4 weeks of exercise training did not alter nociceptive thresholds, lumbar dorsal root ganglia neuronal excitability, or hindpaw intraepidermal innervation. Further, exercise training failed to attenuate formalin-induced spontaneous pain. Lastly, 2 weeks of exercise training was ineffective in reversing spared nerve injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity or in improving muscle wasting or hindpaw denervation. These findings indicate that in contrast to rodent forced exercise paradigms, short durations of voluntary wheel running do not improve pain-like symptoms in mouse models of acute inflammation and peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26196858

  13. Effect of exercise training on ventilatory efficiency in patients with heart disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Prado, D M L; Rocco, E A; Silva, A G; Rocco, D F; Pacheco, M T; Furlan, V

    2016-06-20

    The analysis of ventilatory efficiency in cardiopulmonary exercise testing has proven useful for assessing the presence and severity of cardiorespiratory diseases. During exercise, efficient pulmonary gas exchange is characterized by uniform matching of lung ventilation with perfusion. By contrast, mismatching is marked by inefficient pulmonary gas exchange, requiring increased ventilation for a given CO2 production. The etiology of increased and inefficient ventilatory response to exercise in heart disease is multifactorial, involving both peripheral and central mechanisms. Exercise training has been recommended as non-pharmacological treatment for patients with different chronic cardiopulmonary diseases. In this respect, previous studies have reported improvements in ventilatory efficiency after aerobic exercise training in patients with heart disease. Against this background, the primary objective of the present review was to discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in abnormal ventilatory response to exercise, with an emphasis on both patients with heart failure syndrome and coronary artery disease. Secondly, special focus was dedicated to the role of aerobic exercise training in improving indices of ventilatory efficiency among these patients, as well as to the underlying mechanisms involved. PMID:27332771

  14. Operational Applications of Autogenic Feedback Training Exercise as a Treatment for Airsickness in the Military

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gebreyesus, Fiyore; Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Airsickness is experienced by about 50% of military aviators some time in their career. Aviators who suffer from recurrent episodes of airsickness are typically referred to the Naval Aerospace Medical Institute (NAMI) at Pensacola where they undergo extensive evaluation and 8 weeks of training in the Self-Paced Airsickness Desensitization (SPAD) program. Researchers at NASA Ames have developed an alternative mitigation training program, Autogenic Feedback Training Exercise (AFTE) that has demonstrated an 80% success rate for improving motion sickness tolerance.

  15. Exercise training combined with psychological interventions for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Louise; Cafarella, Paul; Williams, Marie T

    2015-01-01

    Previous systematic reviews have confirmed the benefits of both exercise training and psychological interventions in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The objective of this systematic review was to examine the effect of interventions which combine exercise training and psychological interventions for a range of health outcomes in people with COPD. Database searches identified randomized controlled trials of people with COPD participating in interventions that combined exercise training with a psychological strategy compared with control (usual care, waiting list) or active comparators (education, exercise, psychological interventions alone). Health outcomes included dyspnoea, anxiety, depression, quality of life or functional exercise capacity. Standardized mean differences (SMD) were calculated for each intervention arm/control comparison. Across the 12 included studies (738 participants), compared with control conditions, SMD consistently favoured interventions which included both exercise + psychological components (SMD range dyspnoea -1.63 to -0.25; anxiety -0.50 to -0.20; depression -0.46 to -0.18; quality of life 0.09 to 1.16; functional exercise capacity 0.22 to 1.23). When compared with active comparators, SMD consistently favoured interventions that included exercise training + psychological component for dyspnoea (SMD range -0.35 to -0.97), anxiety (SMD range -0.13 to -1.00) and exercise capacity (SMD range 0.64 to 0.71) but were inconsistent for depression (-0.11 to 1.27) and quality of life (0.02 to -2.00). The magnitude of effect for most interventions was greater than the minimum required for clinical significance (i.e. > 0.32) in behavioural medicine. While interventions, outcomes and effect sizes differed substantially between studies, combining exercise training with a psychological intervention may provide a means of optimizing rehabilitation in people with COPD. PMID:25339508

  16. Effects of exercise training on chronic inflammation in obesity : current evidence and potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    You, Tongjian; Arsenis, Nicole C; Disanzo, Beth L; Lamonte, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    Chronic, systemic inflammation is an independent risk factor for several major clinical diseases. In obesity, circulating levels of inflammatory markers are elevated, possibly due to increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines from several tissues/cells, including macrophages within adipose tissue, vascular endothelial cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Recent evidence supports that adipose tissue hypoxia may be an important mechanism through which enlarged adipose tissue elicits local tissue inflammation and further contributes to systemic inflammation. Current evidence supports that exercise training, such as aerobic and resistance exercise, reduces chronic inflammation, especially in obese individuals with high levels of inflammatory biomarkers undergoing a longer-term intervention. Several studies have reported that this effect is independent of the exercise-induced weight loss. There are several mechanisms through which exercise training reduces chronic inflammation, including its effect on muscle tissue to generate muscle-derived, anti-inflammatory 'myokine', its effect on adipose tissue to improve hypoxia and reduce local adipose tissue inflammation, its effect on endothelial cells to reduce leukocyte adhesion and cytokine production systemically, and its effect on the immune system to lower the number of pro-inflammatory cells and reduce pro-inflammatory cytokine production per cell. Of these potential mechanisms, the effect of exercise training on adipose tissue oxygenation is worth further investigation, as it is very likely that exercise training stimulates adipose tissue angiogenesis and increases blood flow, thereby reducing hypoxia and the associated chronic inflammation in adipose tissue of obese individuals. PMID:23494259

  17. Controlled exercise effects on chromium excretion of trained and untrained runners consuming a constant diet

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.A.; Bryden, N.A.; Polansky, M.M.; Deuster, P.A.

    1986-03-05

    To determine if degree of training effects urinary Cr losses, Cr excretion of 8 adult trained and 5 untrained runners was determined on rest days and following exercise at 90% of maximal oxygen uptake on a treadmill to exhaustion with 30 second exercise and 30 second rest periods. Subjects were fed a constant daily diet containing 9 ..mu..g of Cr per 1000 calories to minimize changes due to diet. Maximal oxygen consumption of the trained runners was in the good or above range based upon their age and that of the untrained runners was average or below. While consuming the control diet, basal urinary Cr excretion of subjects who exercise regularly was significantly lower than that of the sedentary control subjects, 0.09 +/- 0.01 and 0.21 +/- 0.03 ..mu..g/day (mean +/- SEM), respectively. Daily urinary Cr excretion of trained subjects was significantly higher on the day of a single exercise bout at 90% of maximal oxygen consumption compared to nonexercise days, 0.12 +/- 0.02 and 0.09 +/- 0.01 ..mu..g/day, respectively. Urinary Cr excretion of 5 untrained subjects was not altered following controlled exercise. These data demonstrate that basal urinary Cr excretion and excretion in response to exercise are related to maximal oxygen consumption and therefore degree of fitness.

  18. Active Video Game Exercise Training Improves the Clinical Control of Asthma in Children: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Evelim L. F. D.; Carvalho, Celso R. F.; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Teixeira-Carvalho, Etiene Farah; Mendonça, Juliana Fernandes Barreto; Stirbulov, Roberto; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to determine whether aerobic exercise involving an active video game system improved asthma control, airway inflammation and exercise capacity in children with moderate to severe asthma. Design A randomized, controlled, single-blinded clinical trial was carried out. Thirty-six children with moderate to severe asthma were randomly allocated to either a video game group (VGG; N = 20) or a treadmill group (TG; n = 16). Both groups completed an eight-week supervised program with two weekly 40-minute sessions. Pre-training and post-training evaluations involved the Asthma Control Questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide levels (FeNO), maximum exercise testing (Bruce protocol) and lung function. Results No differences between the VGG and TG were found at the baseline. Improvements occurred in both groups with regard to asthma control and exercise capacity. Moreover, a significant reduction in FeNO was found in the VGG (p < 0.05). Although the mean energy expenditure at rest and during exercise training was similar for both groups, the maximum energy expenditure was higher in the VGG. Conclusion The present findings strongly suggest that aerobic training promoted by an active video game had a positive impact on children with asthma in terms of clinical control, improvementin their exercise capacity and a reductionin pulmonary inflammation. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01438294 PMID:26301706

  19. Acute and chronic cytokine responses to resistance exercise and training in people with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kjølhede, T; Dalgas, U; Gade, A B; Bjerre, M; Stenager, E; Petersen, T; Vissing, K

    2016-07-01

    Exercise is a well-established part of rehabilitation for people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), and it has been hypothesized to stimulate an anti-inflammatory environment that might be disease modifying. Yet, investigations on exercise-induced immune responses are scarce and generally not paying attention to the medical treatments of the patient. At present, PwMS are routinely enrolled in immunosuppressive medication, but exercise-induced immunomodulatory effects have not been investigated under these circumstances. The objective of this study was to investigate the acute and chronic cytokines responses to resistance exercise training in medicated PwMS. Thirty-five people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with interferon (IFN)-β, were randomized to a 24-week progressive resistance training (PRT) or control group. Plasma interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-4, IL-10, IL-17F, IL-23, tumor necrosis factor-α and IFN-γ were measured before and after 24 weeks of PRT. The acute effect was evaluated following standardized single-bout resistance exercise in the untrained and the trained state. No changes were observed in resting cytokine levels after PRT. However, an indication of reduced IL-17F secretion following resistance exercise was observed in the trained compared with the untrained state. This study suggests little acute and chronic effect of PRT on cytokine levels in IFN-treated PwMS. PMID:26105554

  20. Effects of exercise training on neurovascular control and skeletal myopathy in systolic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Middlekauff, Holly R.; Gomes-Santos, Igor L.; Antunes-Correa, Ligia M.

    2015-01-01

    Neurohormonal excitation and dyspnea are the hallmarks of heart failure (HF) and have long been associated with poor prognosis in HF patients. Sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and ventilatory equivalent of carbon dioxide (VE/VO2) are elevated in moderate HF patients and increased even further in severe HF patients. The increase in SNA in HF patients is present regardless of age, sex, and etiology of systolic dysfunction. Neurohormonal activation is the major mediator of the peripheral vasoconstriction characteristic of HF patients. In addition, reduction in peripheral blood flow increases muscle inflammation, oxidative stress, and protein degradation, which is the essence of the skeletal myopathy and exercise intolerance in HF. Here we discuss the beneficial effects of exercise training on resting SNA in patients with systolic HF and its central and peripheral mechanisms of control. Furthermore, we discuss the exercise-mediated improvement in peripheral vasoconstriction in patients with HF. We will also focus on the effects of exercise training on ventilatory responses. Finally, we review the effects of exercise training on features of the skeletal myopathy in HF. In summary, exercise training plays an important role in HF, working synergistically with pharmacological therapies to ameliorate these abnormalities in clinical practice. PMID:25681428

  1. Influence of exercise training with resveratrol supplementation on skeletal muscle mitochondrial capacity.

    PubMed

    Polley, Kristine R; Jenkins, Nathan; O'Connor, Patrick; McCully, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Physical inactivity reduces, and exercise training increases, mitochondrial capacity. In rodents, exercise training effects can be augmented by large doses of resveratrol supplementation but whether this can occur in humans with a smaller dose is unclear. This study sought to determine the effects of resveratrol supplementation in combination with exercise training on skeletal muscle mitochondrial capacity. Sixteen healthy young adults were randomly assigned in a double-blind fashion to consume either placebo or 500 mg of resveratrol plus 10 mg of piperine, a bioenhancer to increase bioavailibilty and bioefficacy of resveratrol. Participants ingested the pills daily for 4 weeks and completed 3 sessions per week of submaximal endurance training of the wrist flexor muscles of the nondominant arm. The contralateral arm served as an untrained control. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial capacity was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy. Changes in mitochondrial capacity from baseline to post-testing indicated significant differences between the resveratrol+piperine-trained arm and the placebo-trained arm (p = 0.02), with the resveratrol+piperine group increasing about 40% from baseline (Δk = 0.58), while the placebo group increased about 10% from baseline (Δk = 0.13). Neither the placebo group nor the resveratrol+piperine group exhibited changes in mitochondrial capacity in the untrained arm. In conclusion, low-intensity exercise training can increase forearm skeletal muscle mitochondrial capacity when combined with resveratrol and piperine supplementation. PMID:26638911

  2. Effect of endurance exercise training on muscle glycogen supercompensation in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, A; Han, D H; Hansen, P A; Nolte, L A; Host, H H; Hickner, R C; Holloszy, J O

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the rate and extent of glycogen supercompensation in skeletal muscle are increased by endurance exercise training. Rats were trained by using a 5-wk-long swimming program in which the duration of swimming was gradually increased to 6 h/day over 3 wk and then maintained at 6 h/day for an additional 2 wk. Glycogen repletion was measured in trained and untrained rats after a glycogen-depleting bout of exercise. The rats were given a rodent chow diet plus 5% sucrose in their drinking water and libitum during the recovery period. There were remarkable differences in both the rates of glycogen accumulation and the glycogen concentrations attained in the two groups. The concentration of glycogen in epitrochlearis muscle averaged 13.1 +/- 0.9 mg/g wet wt in the untrained group and 31.7 +/- 2.7 mg/g in the trained group (P < 0.001) 24 h after the exercise. This difference could not be explained by a training effect on glycogen synthase. The training induced approximately 50% increases in muscle GLUT-4 glucose transporter protein and in hexokinase activity in epitrochlearis muscles. We conclude that endurance exercise training results in increases in both the rate and magnitude of muscle glycogen supercompensation in rats. PMID:9049757

  3. Blood volume, heart rate, and left ventricular ejection fraction changes in dogs before and after exercise during endurance training

    SciTech Connect

    Mackintosh, I.C.; Dormehl, I.C.; van Gelder, A.L.; du Plessis, M.

    1983-10-01

    In Beagles after 7 weeks' endurance training, resting blood volume increased by an average of 13.1%. Resting heart rates were not significantly affected, but heart rates measured 2 minutes after exercise were significantly lower after the endurance training than before. Left ventricular ejection fractions determined by radionuclide angiography from 2 minutes after exercise showed no significant changes in response to a single exercise period or over the 50 days' training.

  4. Effects of Exhaustive Aerobic Exercise on Tryptophan-Kynurenine Metabolism in Trained Athletes.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Barbara; Geiger, Daniela; Schauer, Markus; Gatterer, Hannes; Burtscher, Martin; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Exhaustive exercise can cause a transient depression of immune function. Data indicate significant effects of immune activation cascades on the biochemistry of monoamines and amino acids such as tryptophan. Tryptophan can be metabolized through different pathways, a major route being the kynurenine pathway, which is often systemically up-regulated when the immune response is activated. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of exhaustive aerobic exercise on biomarkers of immune activation and tryptophan metabolism in trained athletes. After a standardized breakfast 2 h prior to exercise, 33 trained athletes (17 women, 16 men) performed an incremental cycle ergometer exercise test at 60 rpm until exhaustion. After a 20 min rest phase, the participants performed a 20 min maximal time-trial on a cycle ergometer (RBM Cyclus 2, Germany). During the test, cyclists were strongly encouraged to choose a maximal pedalling rate that could be maintained for the respective test duration. Serum concentrations of amino acids tryptophan, kynurenine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine were determined by HPLC and immune system biomarker neopterin by ELISA at rest and immediately post exercise. Intense exercise was associated with a strong increase in neopterin concentrations (p<0.001), indicating increased immune activation following intense exercise. Exhaustive exercise significantly reduced tryptophan concentrations by 12% (p<0.001) and increased kynurenine levels by 6% (p = 0.022). Also phenylalanine to tyrosine ratios were lower after exercise as compared with baseline (p<0.001). The kynurenine to tryptophan ratio correlated with neopterin (r = 0.560, p<0.01). Thus, increased tryptophan catabolism by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase appears likely. Peak oxygen uptake correlated with baseline tryptophan and kynurenine concentrations (r = 0.562 and r = 0.511, respectively, both p<0.01). Findings demonstrate that exhaustive aerobic exercise is associated with increased immune

  5. Effects of Exhaustive Aerobic Exercise on Tryptophan-Kynurenine Metabolism in Trained Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Barbara; Geiger, Daniela; Schauer, Markus; Gatterer, Hannes; Burtscher, Martin; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Exhaustive exercise can cause a transient depression of immune function. Data indicate significant effects of immune activation cascades on the biochemistry of monoamines and amino acids such as tryptophan. Tryptophan can be metabolized through different pathways, a major route being the kynurenine pathway, which is often systemically up-regulated when the immune response is activated. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of exhaustive aerobic exercise on biomarkers of immune activation and tryptophan metabolism in trained athletes. After a standardized breakfast 2 h prior to exercise, 33 trained athletes (17 women, 16 men) performed an incremental cycle ergometer exercise test at 60 rpm until exhaustion. After a 20 min rest phase, the participants performed a 20 min maximal time-trial on a cycle ergometer (RBM Cyclus 2, Germany). During the test, cyclists were strongly encouraged to choose a maximal pedalling rate that could be maintained for the respective test duration. Serum concentrations of amino acids tryptophan, kynurenine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine were determined by HPLC and immune system biomarker neopterin by ELISA at rest and immediately post exercise. Intense exercise was associated with a strong increase in neopterin concentrations (p<0.001), indicating increased immune activation following intense exercise. Exhaustive exercise significantly reduced tryptophan concentrations by 12% (p<0.001) and increased kynurenine levels by 6% (p = 0.022). Also phenylalanine to tyrosine ratios were lower after exercise as compared with baseline (p<0.001). The kynurenine to tryptophan ratio correlated with neopterin (r = 0.560, p<0.01). Thus, increased tryptophan catabolism by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase appears likely. Peak oxygen uptake correlated with baseline tryptophan and kynurenine concentrations (r = 0.562 and r = 0.511, respectively, both p<0.01). Findings demonstrate that exhaustive aerobic exercise is associated with increased immune

  6. Computer-assisted upper extremity training using interactive biking exercise (iBikE) platform.

    PubMed

    Jeong, In Cheol; Finkelstein, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Upper extremity exercise training has been shown to improve clinical outcomes in different chronic health conditions. Arm-operated bicycles are frequently used to facilitate upper extremity training however effective use of these devices at patient homes is hampered by lack of remote connectivity with clinical rehabilitation team, inability to monitor exercise progress in real time using simple graphical representation, and absence of an alert system which would prevent exertion levels exceeding those approved by the clinical rehabilitation team. We developed an interactive biking exercise (iBikE) platform aimed at addressing these limitations. The platform uses a miniature wireless 3-axis accelerometer mounted on a patient wrist that transmits the cycling acceleration data to a laptop. The laptop screen presents an exercise dashboard to the patient in real time allowing easy graphical visualization of exercise progress and presentation of exercise parameters in relation to prescribed targets. The iBikE platform is programmed to alert the patient when exercise intensity exceeds the levels recommended by the patient care provider. The iBikE platform has been tested in 7 healthy volunteers (age range: 26-50 years) and shown to reliably reflect exercise progress and to generate alerts at pre-setup levels. Implementation of remote connectivity with patient rehabilitation team is warranted for future extension and evaluation efforts. PMID:23367319

  7. Echinochrome A Improves Exercise Capacity during Short-Term Endurance Training in Rats.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dae Yun; McGregor, Robin A; Noh, Su Jin; Choi, Seung Jun; Mishchenko, Natalia P; Fedoreyev, Sergey A; Stonik, Valentin A; Han, Jin

    2015-09-01

    Echinochrome A (Echi A) improves mitochondrial function in the heart; however, its effects on skeletal muscle are still unclear. We hypothesized that Echi A administration during short-term exercise may improve exercise capacity. Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the following groups: control group (CG), Echi A-treated group (EG), aerobic exercise group (AG), and aerobic exercise treated with Echi A group (AEG) (n = 6 per group). Echi A was administered intra-peritoneally (0.1 mg/kg of Echi A in 300 µL phosphate-buffered saline) daily 30 min before each exercise training. The AG and AEG groups performed treadmill running (20 m/min, 60 min/day) five days/week for two weeks. The exercise capacity was significantly higher in the AG and AEG groups compared to other groups. Interestingly, the exercise capacity increased more effectively in the AEG group. The body weight in the EG tended to be slightly lower than that in the other groups. There were no significant changes in the plasma lipids among the groups. However, the gastrocnemius muscle mitochondria content was greater in the EG and AEG groups. These findings show that Echi A administration after short-term endurance training enhances exercise capacity, which was associated with an increase in skeletal muscle mitochondrial content. PMID:26371013

  8. [Exercise training in hypoxia prevents hypoxia induced mitochondrial DNA oxidative damage in skeletal muscle].

    PubMed

    Bo, Hai; Li, Ling; Duan, Fu-Qiang; Zhu, Jiang

    2014-10-25

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of exercise training on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) oxidative damage and 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1) expression in skeletal muscle of rats under continuous exposure to hypoxia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 8): normoxia control group (NC), normoxia training group (NT), hypoxia control group (HC), and hypoxia training group (HT). The hypoxia-treated animals were housed in normobaric hypoxic tent containing 11.3% oxygen for consecutive 4 weeks. The exercise-trained animals were exercised on a motor-driven rodent treadmill at a speed of 15 m/min, 5% grade for 60 min/day, 5 days per week for 4 weeks. The results showed that, compared with NC group, hypoxia attenuated complex I, II, IV and ATP synthase activities of the electron transport chain, and the level of mitochondrial membrane potential in HC group (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). Moreover, hypoxia decreased mitochondrial OGG1, MnSOD, and GPx activities (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01), whereas elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and the level of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in mtDNA (P < 0.01). Furthermore, hypoxia attenuated muscle and mitochondrial [NAD⁺]/ [NADH] ratio, and SIRT3 protein expression (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). Compared with HC group, exercise training in hypoxia elevated complex I, II, IV and ATP synthase activities, and the level of mitochondrial membrane potential in HT group (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). Moreover, exercise training in hypoxia increased MnSOD and GPx activities and mitochondrial OGG1 level (P < 0.01), whereas decreased ROS generation and the level of 8-oxodG in mtDNA (P < 0.01). Furthermore, exercise training in hypoxia increased muscle and mitochondrial [NAD⁺]/[NADH] ratio, as well as SIRT3 protein expression (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). These findings suggest that exercise training in hypoxia can decrease hypoxia-induced mtDNA oxidative damage in the skeletal muscle through up

  9. Artificial Gravity with Ergometric Exercise Training Improves Cardiovascular Function in Ambulatory Men

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xi-Qing; Zhu, Chao; Shang, Shu; Yao, Yong-Jie

    2008-06-01

    The necessity of preventing physiological deconditioning in astronauts exposed to long-term space flights is well known. Artificial gravity training via short-arm centrifugation as a countermeasure to microgravity has been considered for many years. However, an optimal duration, level and rate of exposure to artificial gravity have not yet been determined. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the cardiovascular effects of three weeks of intermittent artificial gravity with ergometric exercise training on normal ambulatory men. During 3 weeks experiment, eight healthy male subjects received alternate +1 to +2 Gz (at the foot) short-arm centrifuge training with 30 W ergometric exercise for 30 min per day. Cardiac function, heart rate variability, heart rate and blood pressure were measured before and after training. Stroke volume and total peripheral resistance increased significantly after 3 weeks training, compared with the pre-training baseline. Left ventricular ejection time (LVET) and ejection fraction increased significantly after 3 weeks training, while heart rate, the ratio of pre-ejection period to LVET, and the ratio of low frequency to high frequency power decreased significantly after 3 weeks training. These results suggest that three weeks short-arm centrifuge training with ergometric exercise could improve human cardiac systolic and pumping functions, and increase cardiac vagal modulation.

  10. Prior exercise training blunts short-term high-fat diet-induced weight gain.

    PubMed

    Snook, Laelie A; MacPherson, Rebecca E K; Monaco, Cynthia M F; Frendo-Cumbo, Scott; Castellani, Laura; Peppler, Willem T; Anderson, Zachary G; Buzelle, Samyra L; LeBlanc, Paul J; Holloway, Graham P; Wright, David C

    2016-08-01

    High-fat diets rapidly cause weight gain and glucose intolerance. We sought to determine whether these changes could be mitigated with prior exercise training. Male C57BL/6J mice were exercise-trained by treadmill running (1 h/day, 5 days/wk) for 4 wk. Twenty-four hours after the final bout of exercise, mice were provided with a high-fat diet (HFD; 60% kcal from lard) for 4 days, with no further exercise. In mice fed the HFD prior to exercise training, the results were blunted weight gain, reduced fat mass, and a slight attenuation in glucose intolerance that was mirrored by greater insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation in skeletal muscle compared with sedentary mice fed the HFD. When ad libitum-fed sedentary mice were compared with sedentary high-fat fed mice that were calorie restricted (-30%) to match the weight gain of the previously trained high-fat fed mice, the same attenuated impairments in glucose tolerance were found. Blunted weight gain was associated with a greater capacity to increase energy expenditure in trained compared with sedentary mice when challenged with a HFD. Although mitochondrial enzymes in white adipose tissue and UCP-1 protein content in brown adipose tissue were increased in previously exercised compared with sedentary mice fed a HFD, ex vivo mitochondrial respiration was not increased in either tissue. Our data suggest that prior exercise training attenuates high-fat diet-induced weight gain and glucose intolerance and is associated with a greater ability to increase energy expenditure in response to a high-fat diet. PMID:27101294

  11. Use of Martial Art Exercises in Performance Enhancement Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClellan, Tim; Anderson, Warren

    2002-01-01

    Details some of the many martial arts training techniques and their potential applications for inclusion in performance enhancement programs, focusing on the benefits of martial training, the arts continuum, and martial arts training modes. The article concludes that the various martial arts techniques provide a stimulating and intuitively…

  12. Evaluation of Exercise Tolerance in Dialysis Patients Performing Tai Chi Training: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Bulińska, Katarzyna; Kusztal, Mariusz; Kowalska, Joanna; Rogowski, Łukasz; Zembroń-Łacny, Agnieszka; Gołębiowski, Tomasz; Ochmann, Bartosz; Pawlaczyk, Weronika; Woźniewski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have poor physical performance and exercise capacity due to frequent dialysis treatments. Tai Chi exercises can be very useful in the area of rehabilitation of people with ESRD. Objectives. The aim of the study was to assess exercise capacity in ESRD patients participating in 6-month Tai Chi training. Patients and Methods. Twenty dialysis patients from Wroclaw took part in the training; at the end of the project, 14 patients remained (age 69.2 ± 8.6 years). A 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and spiroergometry were performed at the beginning and after 6 months of training. Results. After 6 months of Tai Chi, significant improvements were recorded in mean distance in the 6MWT (387.89 versus 436.36 m), rate of perceived exertion (7.4 versus 4.7), and spiroergometry (8.71 versus 10.08 min). Conclusions. In the ESRD patients taking part in Tai Chi training, a definite improvement in exercise tolerance was recorded after the 6-month training. Tai Chi exercises conducted on days without dialysis can be an effective and interesting form of rehabilitation for patients, offering them a chance for a better quality of life and fewer falls and hospitalisations that are the result of it. PMID:27547228

  13. Physical Training Status Determines Oxidative Stress and Redox Changes in Response to an Acute Aerobic Exercise.

    PubMed

    Seifi-Skishahr, Farnaz; Damirchi, Arsalan; Farjaminezhad, Manoochehr; Babaei, Parvin

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess the influence of different physical training status on exercise-induced oxidative stress and changes in cellular redox state. Methods. Thirty male subjects participated in this study and were assigned as well-trained (WT), moderately trained (MT), and untrained (UT) groups. The levels of cortisol, creatine kinase, plasma reduced glutathione to oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG), cysteine/cystine (Cys/CySS), and GSH/GSSG ratio in red blood cells (RBCs) were measured immediately and 10 and 30 min after exercise. Results. Following the exercise, plasma GSH/GSSG (p = 0.001) and Cys/CySS (p = 0.005) were significantly reduced in all groups. Reduction in plasma GSH/GSSG ratio in all groups induced a transient shift in redox balance towards a more oxidizing environment without difference between groups (p = 0.860), while RBCs GSH/GSSG showed significant reduction (p = 0.003) and elevation (p = 0.007) in UT and MT groups, respectively. The highest level of RBCs GSH/GSSG ratio was recorded in MT group, and the lowest one was recorded in the WT group. Conclusion. Long term regular exercise training with moderate intensity shifts redox balance towards more reducing environment, versus intensive exercise training leads to more oxidizing environment and consequently development of related diseases. PMID:27064342

  14. Physical Training Status Determines Oxidative Stress and Redox Changes in Response to an Acute Aerobic Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Damirchi, Arsalan; Farjaminezhad, Manoochehr

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess the influence of different physical training status on exercise-induced oxidative stress and changes in cellular redox state. Methods. Thirty male subjects participated in this study and were assigned as well-trained (WT), moderately trained (MT), and untrained (UT) groups. The levels of cortisol, creatine kinase, plasma reduced glutathione to oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG), cysteine/cystine (Cys/CySS), and GSH/GSSG ratio in red blood cells (RBCs) were measured immediately and 10 and 30 min after exercise. Results. Following the exercise, plasma GSH/GSSG (p = 0.001) and Cys/CySS (p = 0.005) were significantly reduced in all groups. Reduction in plasma GSH/GSSG ratio in all groups induced a transient shift in redox balance towards a more oxidizing environment without difference between groups (p = 0.860), while RBCs GSH/GSSG showed significant reduction (p = 0.003) and elevation (p = 0.007) in UT and MT groups, respectively. The highest level of RBCs GSH/GSSG ratio was recorded in MT group, and the lowest one was recorded in the WT group. Conclusion. Long term regular exercise training with moderate intensity shifts redox balance towards more reducing environment, versus intensive exercise training leads to more oxidizing environment and consequently development of related diseases. PMID:27064342

  15. Chronic exercise training versus acute endurance exercise in reducing neurotoxicity in rats exposed to lead acetate.

    PubMed

    Shahandeh, Mohammad; Roshan, Valiollah Dabidi; Hosseinzadeh, Somayeh; Mahjoub, Soleiman; Sarkisian, Vaginak

    2013-03-15

    After intraperitoneal injection of 20 mg/kg lead acetate, rats received 8 weeks of treadmill exercise (15-22 m/min, 25-64 minutes) and/or treadmill exercise at 1.6 km/h until exhaustion. The markers related to neurotoxicity were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. 8 weeks of treadmill exercise significantly increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor level in the hippocampus (P = 0.04) and plasma level of total antioxidant capacity of rats exposed to lead acetate (P < 0.001), and significantly decreased plasma level of malondialdehyde (P < 0.001). Acute exercise only decreased the hippocampal malondialdehyde level (P = 0.09) and increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor level in the hippocampus (P = 0.66). Acute exercise also enhanced the total antioxidant capacity in rats exposed to lead acetate, insignificantly (P = 0.99). These findings suggest that chronic treadmill exercise can significantly decrease neurotoxicity and alleviate oxidative stress in rats exposed to lead acetate. However, acute endurance exercise was not associated with these beneficial effects. PMID:25206718

  16. Chronic exercise training versus acute endurance exercise in reducing neurotoxicity in rats exposed to lead acetate☆

    PubMed Central

    Shahandeh, Mohammad; Roshan, Valiollah Dabidi; Hosseinzadeh, Somayeh; Mahjoub, Soleiman; Sarkisian, Vaginak

    2013-01-01

    After intraperitoneal injection of 20 mg/kg lead acetate, rats received 8 weeks of treadmill exercise (15–22 m/min, 25–64 minutes) and/or treadmill exercise at 1.6 km/h until exhaustion. The markers related to neurotoxicity were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. 8 weeks of treadmill exercise significantly increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor level in the hippocampus (P = 0.04) and plasma level of total antioxidant capacity of rats exposed to lead acetate (P < 0.001), and significantly decreased plasma level of malondialdehyde (P < 0.001). Acute exercise only decreased the hippocampal malondialdehyde level (P = 0.09) and increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor level in the hippocampus (P = 0.66). Acute exercise also enhanced the total antioxidant capacity in rats exposed to lead acetate, insignificantly (P = 0.99). These findings suggest that chronic treadmill exercise can significantly decrease neurotoxicity and alleviate oxidative stress in rats exposed to lead acetate. However, acute endurance exercise was not associated with these beneficial effects. PMID:25206718

  17. Training Effects on Immune Function in Judoists

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Namju; Kim, Jongkyu; Hyung, Gu Am; Park, Jeong Hun; Kim, Sung Jin; Kim, Han Byeol; Jung, Han Sang

    2015-01-01

    Background: It has been reported that high intensity long term training in elite athletes may increase risk of immune function. Objectives: This study is to examine training effects on immunoglobulin and changes of physiological stress and physical fitness level induced by increased cold stress during 12-week winter off-season training in elite Judoists. Patients and Methods: Twenty-nine male participants (20 ± 1 years) were assigned to only Judo training (CG, n = 9), resistance training combined with Judo training (RJ, n = 10), and interval training combined with Judo training (IJ, n = 10). Blood samples collected at rest, immediately after all-out exercise, and 30-minute recovery period were analyzed for testing IgA, IgG, and IgM, albumin and catecholamine levels. Results: VO2max and anaerobic mean power in IJ (P < 0.05) and anaerobic power in RJ (P < 0.05) were significantly increased after 12-week training compared to CG. There was no significant interaction effect (group × period) in albumin after 12-week training; however, there was a significant interaction effect (group × period) in epinephrine after 12-week training (F (4, 52) = 3.216, P = 0.002) and immediately after all-out exercise and at 30-minute recovery (F (2, 26) = 14.564, P = 0.008). There was significantly higher changes in epinephrine of RJ compared to IJ at 30-minute recovery (P = 0.045). There was a significant interaction effect (group × period) in norepinephrine after 12-week training (F (4, 52) = 8.141, P < 0.0001), at rest and immediately after all-out exercise (F (2, 26) = 9.570, P = 0.001), and immediately after all-out exercise and at 30-minute recovery (F (2, 26) = 8.862, P = 0.001). Conclusions: Winter off-season training of IJ increased physical fitness level as well as physical stress induced by overtraining. Along with increased physical stress, all groups showed reduced trend of IgA; however, there was no group difference based on different training methods. PMID:26448852

  18. Effect of Training Status on Oxygen Consumption in Women After Resistance Exercise.

    PubMed

    Benton, Melissa J; Waggener, Green T; Swan, Pamela D

    2016-03-01

    This study compared acute postexercise oxygen consumption in 11 trained women (age, 46.5 ± 1.6 years; body mass index [BMI], 28.4 ± 1.7 kg·m(-2) and 11 untrained women (age, 46.5 ± 1.5 years; BMI, 27.5 ± 1.5 kg·m(-2)) after resistance exercise (RE). Resistance exercise consisted of 3 sets of 8 exercises (8-12 repetitions at 50-80% 1 repetition maximum). Oxygen consumption (VO2 ml·min(-1)) was measured before and after (0, 20, 40, 60, 90, and 120 minutes) RE. Immediately after cessation of RE (time 0), oxygen consumption increased in both trained and untrained women and remained significantly above baseline through 60 minutes after exercise (p < 0.01). Total oxygen consumption during recovery was 31.3 L in trained women and 27.4 L in untrained women (p = 0.07). In trained women, total oxygen consumption was strongly related to absolute (kg) lean mass (r = 0.88; p < 0.001), relative (kilogram per square meter) lean mass (r = 0.91; p < 0.001), and duration of exercise (r = 0.68; p ≤ 0.05), but in untrained women, only training volume-load was related to total oxygen consumption (r = 0.67; p ≤ 0.05). In trained women, 86% of the variance in oxygen consumption was explained by lean mass and exercise duration, whereas volume-load explained 45% in untrained women. Our findings suggest that, in women, resistance training increases metabolic activity of lean tissue. Postexercise energy costs of RE are determined by the duration of stimulation provided by RE rather than absolute work (volume-load) performed. This phenomenon may be related to type II muscle fibers and increased protein synthesis. PMID:26907844

  19. Exercise physiology, testing, and training in patients supported by a left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Loyaga-Rendon, Renzo Y; Plaisance, Eric P; Arena, Ross; Shah, Keyur

    2015-08-01

    The left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is an accepted treatment alternative for the management of end-stage heart failure. As we move toward implantation of LVADs in less severe cases of HF, scrutiny of functional capacity and quality of life becomes more important. Patients demonstrate improvements in exercise capacity after LVAD implantation, but the effect is less than predicted. Exercise training produces multiple beneficial effects in heart failure patients, which would be expected to improve quality of life. In this review, we describe factors that are thought to participate in the persistent exercise impairment in LVAD-supported patients, summarize current knowledge about the effect of exercise training in LVAD-supported patients, and suggest areas for future research. PMID:25682553

  20. Endurance exercise training induces fat depot-specific differences in basal autophagic activity.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Goki; Kato, Hisashi; Izawa, Tetsuya

    2015-10-23

    The purpose of this study was to uncover the effect of exercise training on the expression of autophagy marker proteins in epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT), inguinal WAT (iWAT), and the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) collected from eWAT. Male Wistar rats aged 4-5 weeks were randomly divided into two groups, sedentary control (n = 7) and exercise-trained (n = 7). Rats in the exercise-trained group were exercised on a treadmill set at a 5° incline 5 days/week for 9 weeks. We determined that the expression levels of an autophagosome-associating form of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-II and of p62 were significantly higher in eWAT from exercise-trained than from control rats, while those of adipose-specific deletion of autophagy-related protein (ATG7) and lysosomal-associated membrane protein type 2A (LAMP2a) showed no difference between groups. However, in iWAT, the expression levels of LC3-II and ATG7 were significantly higher in exercise-trained than in control rats. The expression of p62 was highly correlated with that of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a master regulator of adipogenesis and lipid metabolism, in both WAT types (eWAT, r = 0.856, P < 0.05; iWAT, r = 0.762, P < 0.05), whereas LC3-II and PPARγ levels were highly correlated in eWAT (r = 0.765, P < 0.05) but not in iWAT (r = -0.306, ns). In SVF, the expression levels of LC3II, ATG7, and LAMP2a were significantly higher in exercise-trained than in control rats. These results suggest that exercise training suppresses basal autophagy activity in eWAT, but that this activity is enhanced in iWAT and SVF collected from eWAT. Thus, the adaptation of basal autophagic activity following exercise training exhibits fat depot-specific differences. PMID:26381175

  1. Cognitive plasticity in older adults: effects of cognitive training and physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Bherer, Louis

    2015-03-01

    Cognitive training, physical activity, and exercise have often been reported to improve cognitive performance in older adults. This paper reviews some seminal and recent studies using these approaches to improve cognition and physical functioning in healthy older adults and in patients suffering from non-neurological chronic medical conditions. Results from cognitive training studies suggest that despite performance improvement in trained tasks, transfer effects appeared very limited. Surprisingly though, computerized dual-task training has been shown to improve balance and postural control in tests of physical functioning, suggesting that broad transfer can sometimes be observed. Physical exercise intervention studies generally found significant and large improvements in physical capacity, in some cognitive domains, and in quality of life. The benefits seem to be equivalent between frail and nonfrail participants. Overall, results reviewed here support the notion that cognitive plasticity for attentional control, as induced by cognitive training or physical activity and exercise, is preserved in late adulthood. Moreover, results of studies with patients at risk of cognitive decline also suggest that cognitive training and exercise interventions are promising nonpharmaceutical tools to help improve cognition in older at-risk individuals. PMID:25773610

  2. Effect of dehydroepiandrosterone administration on recovery from mix-type exercise training-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yi-Hung; Liao, Kun-Fu; Kao, Chung-Lan; Chen, Chung-Yu; Huang, Chih-Yang; Chang, Wei-Hsiang; Ivy, John L; Bernard, Jeffrey R; Lee, Shin-Da; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the role of DHEA-S in coping against the exercise training mixing aerobic and resistance components. During 5-day successive exercise training, 16 young male participants (19.2 ± 1.2 years) received either a placebo (flour capsule) or DHEA (100 mg/day) in a double-blinded and placebo-controlled design. Oral DHEA supplementation significantly increased circulating DHEA-S by 2.5-fold, but a protracted drop (~35 %) was observed from Day 3 during training. In the Placebo group, only a minimal DHEA-S reduction (~17 %) was observed. Changes in testosterone followed a similar pattern as DHEA-S. Muscle soreness was elevated significantly on Day 2 for both groups to a similar extent. Lower muscle soreness was observed in the DHEA-supplemented group on Day 3 and Day 6. In the Placebo group, training increased circulating creatine kinase (CK) levels by approximately ninefold, while only a threefold increase was observed in the DHEA-supplemented group. This mix-type exercise training improved glucose tolerance in both groups, while lowering the insulin response to the glucose challenge, but no difference between treatments was observed. Our results suggest that DHEA-S may play a role in protecting skeletal muscle from exercise training-induced muscle damage. PMID:22588361

  3. Abdominal fat reducing outcome of exercise training: fat burning or hydrocarbon source redistribution?

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chia-Hua; Harris, M Brennan

    2016-07-01

    Fat burning, defined by fatty acid oxidation into carbon dioxide, is the most described hypothesis to explain the actual abdominal fat reducing outcome of exercise training. This hypothesis is strengthened by evidence of increased whole-body lipolysis during exercise. As a result, aerobic training is widely recommended for obesity management. This intuition raises several paradoxes: first, both aerobic and resistance exercise training do not actually elevate 24 h fat oxidation, according to data from chamber-based indirect calorimetry. Second, anaerobic high-intensity intermittent training produces greater abdominal fat reduction than continuous aerobic training at similar amounts of energy expenditure. Third, significant body fat reduction in athletes occurs when oxygen supply decreases to inhibit fat burning during altitude-induced hypoxia exposure at the same training volume. Lack of oxygen increases post-meal blood distribution to human skeletal muscle, suggesting that shifting the postprandial hydrocarbons towards skeletal muscle away from adipose tissue might be more important than fat burning in decreasing abdominal fat. Creating a negative energy balance in fat cells due to competition of skeletal muscle for circulating hydrocarbon sources may be a better model to explain the abdominal fat reducing outcome of exercise than the fat-burning model. PMID:27152424

  4. Resistance training exercise program for intervention to enhance gait function in elderly chronically ill patients: multivariate multiscale entropy for center of pressure signal analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Shu; Jiang, Bernard C

    2014-01-01

    Falls are unpredictable accidents, and the resulting injuries can be serious in the elderly, particularly those with chronic diseases. Regular exercise is recommended to prevent and treat hypertension and other chronic diseases by reducing clinical blood pressure. The "complexity index" (CI), based on multiscale entropy (MSE) algorithm, has been applied in recent studies to show a person's adaptability to intrinsic and external perturbations and widely used measure of postural sway or stability. The multivariate multiscale entropy (MMSE) was advanced algorithm used to calculate the complexity index (CI) values of the center of pressure (COP) data. In this study, we applied the MSE & MMSE to analyze gait function of 24 elderly, chronically ill patients (44% female; 56% male; mean age, 67.56 ± 10.70 years) with either cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, or osteoporosis. After a 12-week training program, postural stability measurements showed significant improvements. Our results showed beneficial effects of resistance training, which can be used to improve postural stability in the elderly and indicated that MMSE algorithms to calculate CI of the COP data were superior to the multiscale entropy (MSE) algorithm to identify the sense of balance in the elderly. PMID:25295070

  5. Resistance Training Exercise Program for Intervention to Enhance Gait Function in Elderly Chronically Ill Patients: Multivariate Multiscale Entropy for Center of Pressure Signal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bernard C.

    2014-01-01

    Falls are unpredictable accidents, and the resulting injuries can be serious in the elderly, particularly those with chronic diseases. Regular exercise is recommended to prevent and treat hypertension and other chronic diseases by reducing clinical blood pressure. The “complexity index” (CI), based on multiscale entropy (MSE) algorithm, has been applied in recent studies to show a person's adaptability to intrinsic and external perturbations and widely used measure of postural sway or stability. The multivariate multiscale entropy (MMSE) was advanced algorithm used to calculate the complexity index (CI) values of the center of pressure (COP) data. In this study, we applied the MSE & MMSE to analyze gait function of 24 elderly, chronically ill patients (44% female; 56% male; mean age, 67.56 ± 10.70 years) with either cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, or osteoporosis. After a 12-week training program, postural stability measurements showed significant improvements. Our results showed beneficial effects of resistance training, which can be used to improve postural stability in the elderly and indicated that MMSE algorithms to calculate CI of the COP data were superior to the multiscale entropy (MSE) algorithm to identify the sense of balance in the elderly. PMID:25295070

  6. Exercise Training and Insulin Resistance: A Current Review

    PubMed Central

    Keshel, Tyler E; Coker, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    There is a general perception that increased physical activity will improve glucose homeostasis in all individuals. While this is an attractive concept, this conclusion may be overly simplistic and even misleading. The topic was reviewed extensively over 30 years ago and it was concluded that acute exercise enhances glucose uptake. However, in some cases the chronic influence of interventions utilizing exercise may have little effect on glucose metabolism. Moreover, insulin resistance often returns to near baseline levels within a couple of days following cessation of the exercise bout; leaving the overall effectiveness of the intervention in question. Since improving glucose homeostasis should be the focal endpoint of any intervention designed to mitigate the overwhelming degree of insulin resistance in individuals at risk for metabolic disease, it is essential to evaluate the key components of a successful approach. PMID:26523243

  7. Irisin in Blood Increases Transiently after Single Sessions of Intense Endurance Exercise and Heavy Strength Training

    PubMed Central

    Nygaard, Håvard; Slettaløkken, Gunnar; Vegge, Geir; Hollan, Ivana; Whist, Jon Elling; Strand, Tor; Rønnestad, Bent R.; Ellefsen, Stian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Irisin is a recently identified exercise-induced hormone that increases energy expenditure, at least in rodents. The main purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Irisin increases acutely in blood after singular sessions of intense endurance exercise (END) and heavy strength training (STR). Secondary, we wanted to explore the relationship between body composition and exercise-induced effects on irisin, and the effect of END and STR on muscular expression of the irisin gene FNDC5. Methods Nine moderately trained healthy subjects performed three test days using a randomized and standardized crossover design: one day with 60 minutes of END, one day with 60 minutes of STR, and one day without exercise (CON). Venous blood was sampled over a period of 24h on the exercise days. Results Both END and STR led to transient increases in irisin concentrations in blood, peaking immediately after END and one hour after STR, before gradually returning to baseline. Irisin responses to STR, but not END, showed a consistently strong negative correlation with proportions of lean body mass. Neither END nor STR affected expression of FNDC5, measured 4h after training sessions, though both protocols led to pronounced increases in PGC-1α expression, which is involved in transcriptional control of FNDC5. Conclusion The results strongly suggest that single sessions of intense endurance exercise and heavy strength training lead to transient increases in irisin concentrations in blood. This was not accompanied by increased FNDC5 expression, measured 4h post-exercise. The results suggest that irisin responses to resistance exercise are higher in individuals with lower proportions of lean body mass. PMID:25781950

  8. Rehabilitation (exercise and strength training) and osteoarthritis: A critical narrative review.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Christelle; Lefèvre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Poiraudeau, Serge; Rannou, François

    2016-06-01

    Rehabilitation is widely recommended in national and international guidelines for managing osteoarthritis (OA) in primary care settings. According to the 2014 OA Research Society International (OARSI) recommendations, rehabilitation is even considered the core treatment of OA and is recommended for all patients. Rehabilitation for OA widely includes land- and water-based exercise, strength training, weight management, self-management and education, biomechanical interventions, and physically active lifestyle. We performed a critical narrative review of the efficacy and safety of rehabilitation for managing OA and discuss evidence-based international recommendations. The process of article selection was unsystematic. Articles were selected based on authors' expertise, self-knowledge, and reflective practice. For the purpose of the review, we focused on land- and water-based exercise and strength training for knee, hip and hand OA. Other aspects of rehabilitation in OA are treated elsewhere in this special issue. Exercise therapy is widely recommended for managing knee, hip and hand OA. However, the level of evidence varies according to OA location. Overall, consistent evidence suggests that exercise therapy and specific strengthening exercise or strength training for the lower limb reduce pain and improve physical function in knee OA. Evidence for other OA sites are less consistent. Therefore, because of the lack of specific studies, recommendations for hip and hand OA are mainly derived from studies of knee OA. In addition, no recommendations have been established regarding the exercise regimen. The efficacy and safety of exercise therapy and strength training need to be further evaluated in randomized controlled trials of patients with hip and hand OA. The optimal delivery of exercise programs also has to be more clearly defined. PMID:27155923

  9. Beneficial effects of previous exercise training on renal changes in streptozotocin-induced diabetic female rats.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Liliany S de Brito; Silva, Fernanda A; Correia, Vicente B; Andrade, Clara Ef; Dutra, Bárbara A; Oliveira, Márcio V; Magalhães, Amélia Cm de; Volpini, Rildo A; Seguro, Antonio C; Coimbra, Terezila M; Soares, Telma de J

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the effects of aerobic exercise performed both previously and after the induction of diabetes mellitus on changes of renal function and structure in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Female wistar rats were divided into five groups: sedentary control (C + Se); trained control (C + Ex); sedentary diabetic (D + Se); trained diabetic (D + Ex) and previously trained diabetic (D + PEx). The previous exercise consisted of treadmill running for four weeks before the induction of diabetes mellitus. After induction of diabetes mellitus with streptozotocin, the D + PEx, D + Ex and C + Ex groups were submitted to eight weeks of aerobic exercise. At the end of the training protocol, we evaluate the serum glucose, insulin and 17β-estradiol levels, renal function and structure, proteinuria, and fibronectin, collagen IV and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) renal expressions. Induction of diabetes mellitus reduced the insulin and did not alter 17β-estradiol levels, and exercise did not affect any of these parameters. Previous exercise training attenuated the loss of body weight, the blood glucose, the increase of glomerular filtration rate and prevented the proteinuria in the D + PEx group compared to D + Se group. Previous exercise also reduced glomerular hypertrophy, tubular and glomerular injury, as well as the expressions of fibronectin and collagen IV. These expressions were associated with reduced expression of TGF-β1. In conclusion, our study shows that regular aerobic exercise especially performed previously to induction of diabetes mellitus improved metabolic control and has renoprotective action on the diabetic kidney. PMID:26490345

  10. Exercise training improves vascular function in adolescents with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Louise H; Davis, Elizabeth A; Kalic, Rachelle J; Paramalingam, Niru; Abraham, Mary B; Jones, Timothy W; Green, Daniel J

    2016-02-01

    The impact of exercise training on vascular health in adolescents with type 2 diabetes has not been previously studied. We hypothesized that exercise training would improve micro- and macrovascular health in adolescents with type 2 diabetes. Thirteen adolescents (13-21 years, 10F) with type 2 diabetes were recruited from Princess Margaret Hospital. Participants were randomized to receive either an exercise program along with standard clinical care (n = 8) or standard care alone (n = 5). Those in the intervention group received 12 weeks of gym-based, personalized, and supervised exercise training. Those in the control group were instructed to maintain usual activity levels. Assessments were conducted at baseline and following week 12. The exercise group was also studied 12 weeks following the conclusion of their program. Assessments consisted of conduit artery endothelial function (flow-mediated dilation, FMD) and microvascular function (cutaneous laser Doppler). Secondary outcomes included body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, DXA), glycemic control (whole body insulin sensitivity, M) assessed using the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp protocol, cardiorespiratory fitness (V˙O2peak), and muscular strength (1RM). Exercise training increased FMD (P < 0.05), microvascular function (P < 0.05), total lean mass (P < 0.05), and muscle strength (P < 0.001). There were no changes in cardiorespiratory fitness, body weight, BMI, or M. In the control group, body weight (P < 0.01), BMI (P < 0.01), and total fat mass (P < 0.05) increased. At week 24, improvements in vascular function were reversed. This study indicates that exercise training can improve both conduit and microvascular endothelial function and health, independent of changes in insulin sensitivity in adolescents with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26887327

  11. Randomized trial of the effects of exercise training after coronary artery bypass surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Froelicher, V.; Jensen, D.; Sullivan, M.

    1985-04-01

    Fifty-three male volunteers who had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery were randomized to a medically supervised exercise program (N = 28) or to usual community care (N = 25). They were tested initially and at one year with exercise tests for thallium scintigraphy, maximal oxygen uptake, and electrocardiography. Approximately one third of the patients had signs and/or symptoms of ischemia consistent with incomplete or unsuccessful revascularization. Over the year there were five dropouts, but no major complications occurred. The exercisers attended an average of 82% of the sessions (three times a week) and trained at 80% of their maximal heart rate. Both the exercisers with and those without angina had significant increases in estimated and measured oxygen uptake and significant declines in submaximal and resting heart rate. There was a trend toward improved thallium scans in the exercised patients with angina.

  12. Eccentric exercise training as a countermeasure to non-weight-bearing soleus muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Ryan, Mirelle J.; Booth, Frank W.

    1992-01-01

    This investigation tested whether eccentric resistance training could prevent soleus muscle atrophy during non-weight bearing. Adult female rats were randomly assigned to either weight bearing +/- intramuscular electrodes or non-weight bearing +/- intramuscular electrodes groups. Electrically stimulated maximal eccentric contractions were performed on anesthetized animals at 48-h intervals during the 10-day experiment. Non-weight bearing significantly reduced soleus muscle wet weight (28-31 percent) and noncollagenous protein content (30-31 percent) compared with controls. Eccentric exercise training during non-weight bearing attenuated but did not prevent the loss of soleus muscle wet weight and noncollagenous protein by 77 and 44 percent, respectively. The potential of eccentric exercise training as an effective and highly efficient counter-measure to non-weight-bearing atrophy is demonstrated in the 44 percent attenuation of soleus muscle noncollagenous protein loss by eccentric exercise during only 0.035 percent of the total non-weight-bearing time period.

  13. Effects of aging and exercise training on skeletal muscle blood flow and resistance artery morphology

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Michael W.; Stabley, John N.; Dominguez, James M.; Davis, Robert T.; McCullough, Danielle J.; Muller-Delp, Judy M.; Delp, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    With old age, blood flow to the high-oxidative red skeletal muscle is reduced and blood flow to the low-oxidative white muscle is elevated during exercise. Changes in the number of feed arteries perforating the muscle are thought to contribute to this altered hyperemic response during exercise. We tested the hypothesis that exercise training would ameliorate age-related differences in blood flow during exercise and feed artery structure in skeletal muscle. Young (6–7 mo old, n = 36) and old (24 mo old, n = 25) male Fischer 344 rats were divided into young sedentary (Sed), old Sed, young exercise-trained (ET), and old ET groups, where training consisted of 10–12 wk of treadmill exercise. In Sed and ET rats, blood flow to the red and white portions of the gastrocnemius muscle (GastRed and GastWhite) and the number and luminal cross-sectional area (CSA) of all feed arteries perforating the muscle were measured at rest and during exercise. In the old ET group, blood flow was greater to GastRed (264 ± 13 and 195 ± 9 ml·min−1·100 g−1 in old ET and old Sed, respectively) and lower to GastWhite (78 ± 5 and 120 ± 6 ml·min−1·100 g−1 in old ET and old Sed, respectively) than in the old Sed group. There was no difference in the number of feed arteries between the old ET and old Sed group, although the CSA of feed arteries from old ET rats was larger. In young ET rats, there was an increase in the number of feed arteries perforating the muscle. Exercise training mitigated old age-associated differences in blood flow during exercise within gastrocnemius muscle. However, training-induced adaptations in resistance artery morphology differed between young (increase in feed artery number) and old (increase in artery CSA) animals. The altered blood flow pattern induced by exercise training with old age would improve the local matching of O2 delivery to consumption within the skeletal muscle. PMID:23042906

  14. The effect of various breathing exercises (pranayama) in patients with bronchial asthma of mild to moderate severity

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Tarun; Saxena, Manjari

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aim: The incidence of bronchial asthma is on increase. Chemotherapy is helpful during early course of the disease, but later on morbidity and mortality increases. The efficacy of yoga therapy though appreciated is yet to be defined and modified. Aim: To study the effect of breathing exercises (pranayama) in patients with bronchial asthma of mild to moderate severity. Materials and Methods: Fifty cases of bronchial asthma (Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1) > 70%) were studied for 12 weeks. Patients were allocated to two groups: group A and group B (control group). Patients in group A were treated with breathing exercises (deep breathing,Brahmari, and Omkara, etc.) for 20 minutes twice daily for a period of 12 weeks. Patients were trained to perform Omkara at high pitch (forceful) with prolonged exhalation as compared to normal Omkara. Group B was treated with meditation for 20 minutes twice daily for a period of 12 weeks. Subjective assessment, FEV1%, and Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) were done in each case initially and after 12 weeks. Results: After 12 weeks, group A subjects had significant improvement in symptoms, FEV1, and PEFR as compared to group B subjects. Conclusion: Breathing exercises (pranayama), mainly expiratory exercises, improved lung function subjectively and objectively and should be regular part of therapy. PMID:21234211

  15. A comparison of training intensity between whole-body vibration and conventional squat exercise.

    PubMed

    Marín, Pedro J; Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; Santin-Medeiros, Fernanda; Delecluse, Christophe; Garatachea, Nuria

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate surface electromyographic activity (sEMG) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) during semi-squat exercise on vibration platform compared with semi-squat exercise performed on a Smith machine. Twenty-three recreationally active students (15 males and 8 females) were exposed to six different loads in one of both exercise modes: vibration or Smith machine. The subject performed a squat in six experimental conditions; the load differed per experimental condition. For each subject the exercise mode (n=2) and the different loads per mode (n=6) were assigned in a random order to check the influence of vibration magnitude (acceleration: ms(-2)) as well as weight (kg) on sEMG and RPE. Two-way ANOVA for RPE, lumbar and lower-body sEMG revealed a significant weight main effect (P<0.01) and a significant acceleration main effect (P<0.01). The results from this study demonstrate that the training stimulus resulting from an isometric semi-squat exercise on a vibration platform (acceleration: from 12 to 89 ms(-2)) is similar to the training stimulus of an isometric semi-squat exercise on Smith machine (weight: from 20 to 70 kg) according to lower-body sEMG and RPE. However, the impact of semi-squat on vibration platform exercise for lumbar muscle is relatively small compared with semi-squat on Smith machine. PMID:21306916

  16. Combination of exercise training and erythropoietin prevents cancer-induced muscle alterations

    PubMed Central

    Pin, Fabrizio; Busquets, Silvia; Toledo, Miriam; Camperi, Andrea; Lopez-Soriano, Francisco J.; Costelli, Paola; Argilés, Josep M.; Penna, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is a syndrome characterized by loss of skeletal muscle mass, inflammation, anorexia and anemia, contributing to patient fatigue and reduced quality of life. In addition to nutritional approaches, exercise training (EX) has been proposed as a suitable tool to manage cachexia. In the present work the effect of mild exercise training, coupled to erythropoietin (EPO) administration to prevent anemia, has been tested in tumor-bearing mice. In the C26 hosts, acute exercise does not prevent and even worsens muscle wasting. Such pattern is prevented by EPO co-administration or by the adoption of a chronic exercise protocol. EX and EPO co-treatment spares oxidative myofibers from atrophy and counteracts the oxidative to glycolytic shift, inducing PGC-1α. LLC hosts are responsive to exercise and their treatment with the EX-EPO combination prevents the loss of muscle strength and the onset of mitochondrial ultrastructural alterations, while increases muscle oxidative capacity and intracellular ATP content, likely depending on PGC-1α induction and mitophagy promotion. Consistently, muscle-specific PGC-1α overexpression prevents LLC-induced muscle atrophy and Atrogin-1 hyperexpression. Overall, the present data suggest that low intensisty exercise can be an effective tool to be included in combined therapeutic approaches against cancer cachexia, provided that anemia is coincidently treated in order to enhance the beneficial action of exercise. PMID:26636649

  17. Exercise training and rehabilitation in pulmonary arterial hypertension: rationale and current data evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zafrir, Barak

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by reduced functional capacity and health-related quality of life. Despite the progress made in recent years in disease-targeted therapies with improvement in prognosis, PAH patients often experience progressive exercise intolerance. Exercise rehabilitation is beneficial and has become a standard of care in patients with systolic heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, although PAH patients present with similar exertional limitation and often share common hemodynamic, ventilatory, and skeletal muscle derangements, exercise rehabilitation was discouraged in PAH patients because of concerns of clinical deterioration and adverse outcomes. In recent years, several small-scale studies have demonstrated that closely supervised and monitored exercise training programs may have potential benefits in the management of stable PAH patients, improving exercise capacity and quality of life, with an acceptable low risk of adverse events in the studied populations. This review describes the emerging clinical data supporting the efficacy and safety of exercise training in PAH patients. The review provides a perspective on the pathophysiological impairments contributing to exercise intolerance in these patients and critically project from the proven evidence-based benefits of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation in chronic heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on the PAH population. PMID:23962982

  18. Blood Volume: Importance and Adaptations to Exercise Training, Environmental Stresses and Trauma/Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawka, Michael N.; Convertino, Victor A.; Eichner, E. Randy; Schnieder, Suzanne M.; Young, Andrew J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the influence of several perturbations (physical exercise, heat stress, terrestrial altitude, microgravity, and trauma/sickness) on adaptations of blood volume (BV), erythrocyte volume (EV), and plasma volume (PV). Exercise training can induced BV expansion; PV expansion usually occurs immediately, but EV expansion takes weeks. EV and PV expansion contribute to aerobic power improvements associated with exercise training. Repeated heat exposure induces PV expansion but does not alter EV. PV expansion does not improve thermoregulation, but EV expansion improves thermoregulation during exercise in the heat. Dehydration decreases PV (and increases plasma tonicity) which elevates heat strain and reduces exercise performance. High altitude exposure causes rapid (hours) plasma loss. During initial weeks at altitude, EV is unaffected, but a gradual expansion occurs with extended acclimatization. BV adjustments contribute, but are not key, to altitude acclimatization. Microgravity decreases PV and EV which contribute to orthostatic intolerance and decreased exercise capacity in astronauts. PV decreases may result from lower set points for total body water and central venous pressure, which EV decrease bay result form increased erythrocyte destruction. Trauma, renal disease, and chronic diseases cause anemia from hemorrhage and immune activation, which suppressions erythropoiesis. The re-establishment of EV is associated with healing, improved life quality, and exercise capabilities for these injured/sick persons.

  19. Mitochondrial and performance adaptations to exercise training in mice lacking skeletal muscle LKB1

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Colby B.; Madsen, Steven R.; Hallowell, David M.; Goring, Darren M. J.; Moore, Timothy M.; Hardman, Shalene E.; Heninger, Megan R.; Atwood, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    LKB1 and its downstream targets of the AMP-activated protein kinase family are important regulators of many aspects of skeletal muscle cell function, including control of mitochondrial content and capillarity. LKB1 deficiency in skeletal and cardiac muscle (mLKB1-KO) greatly impairs exercise capacity. However, cardiac dysfunction in that genetic model prevents a clear assessment of the role of skeletal muscle LKB1 in the observed effects. Our purposes here were to determine whether skeletal muscle-specific knockout of LKB1 (skmLKB1-KO) decreases exercise capacity and mitochondrial protein content, impairs accretion of mitochondrial proteins after exercise training, and attenuates improvement in running performance after exercise training. We found that treadmill and voluntary wheel running capacity was reduced in skmLKB1-KO vs. control (CON) mice. Citrate synthase activity, succinate dehydrogenase activity, and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase content were lower in KO vs. CON muscles. Three weeks of treadmill training resulted in significantly increased treadmill running performance in both CON and skmLKB1-KO mice. Citrate synthase activity increased significantly with training in both genotypes, but protein content and activity for components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain increased only in CON mice. Capillarity and VEGF protein was lower in skmLKB1-KO vs. CON muscles, but VEGF increased with training only in skmLKB1-KO. Three hours after an acute bout of muscle contractions, PGC-1α, cytochrome c, and VEGF gene expression all increased in CON but not skmLKB1-KO muscles. Our findings indicate that skeletal muscle LKB1 is required for accretion of some mitochondrial proteins but not for early exercise capacity improvements with exercise training. PMID:23982155

  20. Walking impairment in patients with multiple sclerosis: exercise training as a treatment option

    PubMed Central

    Motl, Robert W; Goldman, Myla D; Benedict, Ralph HB

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the central nervous system that culminates in the progression of physical and cognitive disability over time. Walking impairment is a ubiquitous feature of MS and a sentinel characteristic of the later or advanced stages of the disease. This paper presents a conceptual rationale along with empirical evidence for exercise training as a rehabilitation approach for managing walking impairment and improving walking function in persons with MS. Conceptually, MS is associated with a decrease in physical activity, which, in turn, can result in deconditioning across multiple domains of physiological functioning. The resulting deconditioning feeds back and further drives physical inactivity until a threshold is reached that likely initiates the progression of walking impairment in MS. Empirically, physical activity and exercise training have been associated with beneficial effects on walking function in persons with MS. This is based on cross-sectional, longitudinal, and experimental research that included diversity in the breadth of measures of walking, persons with MS, and exercise/physical activity characteristics. Of particular importance, future researchers might consider examining the combinatory effects of exercise training plus pharmacological agents on walking mobility in MS. Collectively, exercise training and physical activity might hold significant potential for the management of progressive mobility disability in MS. PMID:21173883

  1. Self-Determination and Physical Exercise Adherence in the Contexts of Fitness Academies and Personal Training

    PubMed Central

    Klain, Ingi Petitemberte; de Matos, Dihogo Gama; Leitão, José Carlos; Cid, Luís; Moutão, João

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to analyze the validity of the relations hypothesized by the theory of self-determination in predicting adherence to physical exercise in fitness academy users and subjects following personal training. A total of 588 persons from Pelotas / RS / Brazil (405 gym users and 183 subjects following personal training) completed the Portuguese version of the three questionnaires, i.e. the Perceived Autonomy Support Climate Exercise Questionnaire, Basic Psychological Needs in the Exercise Scale and Behavioral Regulation in the Exercise Questionnaire −2. The results support the factorial structure of the questionnaires used in this sample. There was a significant multivariate effect of context on self-determination for physical exercise training [Wilks’ λ = 0.934, F (10, 576.000) = 4.03, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.01]. The hypothesized structural equation model, which considered the self-determination theory, showed a good fit to the data (S-B χ2 = 234.703; p= .001; df = 52; χ2/df = 4.514; SRMS = .049; NNFI = .906; CFI = .926; RMSEA = .077; RMSEA 90% CI = .067 − .088). However, in the comparative analysis, the perception of autonomy support, relatedness and competence were significantly higher in the context of personal training, while the amotivation and external regulation were significantly higher in the context of fitness academies. PMID:26240667

  2. A DIGE proteomic analysis for high-intensity exercise-trained rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Wataru; Fujimoto, Eri; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Tabata, Izumi

    2010-09-01

    Exercise training induces various adaptations in skeletal muscles. However, the mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we conducted 2D-DIGE proteomic analysis, which has not yet been used for elucidating adaptations of skeletal muscle after high-intensity exercise training (HIT). For 5 days, rats performed HIT, which consisted of 14 20-s swimming exercise bouts carrying a weight (14% of the body weight), and 10-s pause between bouts. The 2D-DIGE analysis was conducted on epitrochlearis muscles excised 18 h after the final training exercise. Proteomic profiling revealed that out of 800 detected and matched spots, 13 proteins exhibited changed expression by HIT compared with sedentary rats. All proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF/MS. Furthermore, using western immunoblot analyses, significantly changed expressions of NDUFS1 and parvalbumin (PV) were validated in relation to HIT. In conclusion, the proteomic 2D-DIGE analysis following HIT-identified expressions of NDUFS1 and PV, previously unknown to have functions related to exercise-training adaptations. PMID:20634418

  3. Children and Adolescents: Physiological Considerations during Exercise Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawbridge, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    Because children and adolescents are not just miniature adults, it is important to know that children might be vulnerable to injury and may not respond positively to certain types or intensities of training. It is also important to recognize how training can positively affect growth and development, so it can be judiciously applied at critical…

  4. Exercise Training-Induced Adaptations Associated with Increases in Skeletal Muscle Glycogen Content

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Yasuko; Gollisch, Katja S.C.; Holton, Laura; Kim, Young–Bum; Brandauer, Josef; Fujii, Nobuharu L.; Hirshman, Michael F.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic exercise training results in numerous skeletal muscle adaptations, including increases in insulin sensitivity and glycogen content. To understand the mechanism for increased muscle glycogen, we studied the effects of exercise training on glycogen regulatory proteins in rat skeletal muscle. Female Sprague Dawley rats performed voluntary wheel running for 1, 4, or 7 weeks. After 7 weeks of training, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was increased in epitrochlearis muscle. Compared to sedentary control rats, muscle glycogen did not change after 1 week of training, but increased significantly after 4 and 7 weeks. The increases in muscle glycogen were accompanied by elevated glycogen synthase activity and protein expression. To assess the regulation of glycogen synthase, we examined its major activator, protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), and its major deactivator, glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). Consistent with glycogen synthase activity, PP1 activity was unchanged after 1 week of training but significantly increased after 4 and 7 weeks of training. Protein expression of RGL(GM), another regulatory PP1 subunit, significantly decreased after 4 and 7 weeks of training. Unlike PP1, GSK3 phosphorylation did not follow the pattern of glycogen synthase activity. The ~40% decrease in GSK-3α phosphorylation after 1 week of exercise training persisted until 7 weeks and may function as a negative feedback to elevated glycogen. Our findings suggest that exercise training-induced increases in muscle glycogen content could be regulated by multiple mechanisms including enhanced insulin sensitivity, glycogen synthase expression, allosteric activation of glycogen synthase and PP1activity. PMID:23206309

  5. Exercise training and muscle microvascular oxygenation: functional role of nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Daniel M.; Copp, Steven W.; Ferguson, Scott K.; Holdsworth, Clark T.; McCullough, Danielle J.; Behnke, Bradley J.; Musch, Timothy I.

    2012-01-01

    Exercise training induces multiple adaptations within skeletal muscle that may improve local O2 delivery-utilization matching (i.e., Po2mv). We tested the hypothesis that increased nitric oxide (NO) function is intrinsic to improved muscle Po2mv kinetics from rest to contractions after exercise training. Healthy young Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to sedentary (n = 18) or progressive treadmill exercise training (n = 10; 5 days/wk, 6–8 wk, final workload of 60 min/day at 35 m/min, −14% grade) groups. Po2mv was measured via phosphorescence quenching in the spinotrapezius muscle at rest and during 1-Hz twitch contractions under control (Krebs-Henseleit solution), sodium nitroprusside (SNP, NO donor; 300 μM), and NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, nonspecific NO synthase blockade; 1.5 mM) superfusion conditions. Exercise-trained rats had greater peak oxygen uptake (V̇o2peak) than their sedentary counterparts (81 ± 1 vs. 72 ± 2 ml·kg−1·min−1, respectively; P < 0.05). Exercise-trained rats had significantly slower Po2mv fall throughout contractions (τ1; time constant for the first component) during control (sedentary: 8.1 ± 0.6; trained: 15.2 ± 2.8 s). Compared with control, SNP slowed τ1 to a greater extent in sedentary rats (sedentary: 38.7 ± 5.6; trained: 26.8 ± 4.1 s; P > 0.05) whereas l-NAME abolished the differences in τ1 between sedentary and trained rats (sedentary: 12.0 ± 1.7; trained: 11.2 ± 1.4 s; P < 0.05). Our results indicate that endurance exercise training leads to greater muscle microvascular oxygenation across the metabolic transient following the onset of contractions (i.e., slower Po2mv kinetics) partly via increased NO-mediated function, which likely constitutes an important mechanism for training-induced metabolic adaptations. PMID:22678970

  6. Improved Arterial–Ventricular Coupling in Metabolic Syndrome after Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Sara B.; Donley, David A.; Bonner, Daniel E.; DeVallance, Evan; Olfert, I. Mark; Chantler, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a three-fold increase risk of cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality, which is in part, due to a blunted CV reserve capacity, reflected by a reduced peak exercise left ventricular contractility and aerobic capacity, and a blunted peak arterial-ventricular coupling. To date, no study has examined whether aerobic exercise training in MetS can reverse the peak exercise CV dysfunction. Further, examining how exercise training alters CV function in a group of individuals with MetS prior to the development of diabetes and/or overt CVD, can provide insights into whether some of the pathophysiological changes to the CV can be delayed/reversed, lowering their CV risk. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of 8 weeks of aerobic exercise training in individuals with MetS on resting and peak exercise CV function. Methods Twenty MetS underwent either 8 weeks of aerobic exercise training (MetS-ExT; n=10) or remained sedentary (MetS-NonT; n=10) during this time period. Resting and peak exercise CV function was characterized using Doppler echocardiography and gas exchange. Results Exercise training did not alter resting left ventricular diastolic or systolic function and arterial-ventricular coupling in MetS. In contrast, at peak exercise an increase in LV contractility (40%, p<0.01), cardiac output (28%, p<0.05) and aerobic capacity (20%, p<0.01), while a reduction in vascular resistance (30%, p<0.05) and arterial-ventricular coupling (27%, p<0.01), were noted in the MetS-ExT but not the MetS-NonT group. Further, an improvement in Lifetime Risk Score was also noted in the MetS-ExT group. Conclusions These findings have clinical importance as they provide insight that some of the pathophysiological changes associated with MetS can be improved and lower the risk of CVD. PMID:24870568

  7. Effect of exercise training on cardiac oxytocin and natriuretic peptide systems in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Gutkowska, Jolanta; Paquette, Amélie; Wang, Donghao; Lavoie, Jean-Marc; Jankowski, Marek

    2007-07-01

    Exercise training results in cardiovascular and metabolic adaptations that may be beneficial in menopausal women by reducing blood pressure, insulin resistance, and cholesterol level. The adaptation of the cardiac hormonal systems oxytocin (OT), natriuretic peptides (NPs), and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in response to exercise training was investigated in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Ovariectomy significantly augmented body weight (BW), left ventricle (LV) mass, and intra-abdominal fat pad weight and decreased the expression of oxytocin receptor (OTR), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A), in the right atrium (RA) and LV, indicating estrogenic control of these genes. These effects of ovariectomy were counteracted by 8-wk-long exercise training which decreased fat pad weight (33.4 +/- 2.3 to 23.4 +/- 3.1 g, n = 8, P < 0.05), plasma free fatty acids (0.124 +/- 0.033 to 0.057 +/- 0.010 mM, n = 8, P < 0.01), and plasma triacylglycerol (0.978 +/- 0.174 to 0.588 +/- 0.115 mM, n = 8, P < 0.05). Chronic exercise tended to decrease BW and stimulated ANP (4- to 5-fold) and OTR gene expression in the LV and RA and BNP and inducible NOS (iNOS) mRNA in the LV. In sham-operated rats, exercise augmented ANP expression in the RA, downregulated GC-A mRNA in the LV and RA, but increased its expression threefold in the RA of OVX animals. Endothelial NOS and iNOS expression was enhanced in the left atrium of sham-operated rats. Altogether, these data indicate that in OVX animals, chronic exercise significantly enhances cardiac OT, NPs, and NOS, thus implicating all three hormonal systems in the beneficial effects of exercise training. PMID:17475680

  8. Plasma metabolic signatures reveal the regulatory effect of exercise training in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Xiang, L; Cheang, W S; Lin, S H; Wang, L; Li, Y L; Huang, Y; Cai, Z W

    2015-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is caused by a complex set of interactions between genetic modifications and life styles. This complexity creates challenges for a full understanding of the altered metabolic pathways that contribute to the development of T2DM, which needs a comprehensive metabolic analysis. Exercise training is a common therapeutic approach known to antagonize the metabolic consequences of T2DM. However, the metabolic phenotypes of exercise effected in T2DM have not been clearly characterized. Here, we present the effect of physical activity on biochemical changes in diabetic db/db mice. An untargeted metabolomics study based on liquid chromatography coupled with high resolution mass spectrometry was carried out to delineate the plasma metabolic signatures in conjunction with a multivariate statistical analysis. As a result, a total of 24 differential metabolites were identified, covering amino acids, organic acids and lipids. Three biomarkers, including lysine, creatine and uridine, were significantly reversed by exercise training in db/db diabetic mice groups compared to lean db/m+ groups. Of note, pantothenic acid and palmitoylcarnitine, which are involved in fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO), were promoted by exercise training in diabetic mice rather than in lean mice. These findings indicated that diabetic mice might be more susceptible to exercise for energy expenditure. Together, the results might demonstrate that exercise could mitigate insulin resistance in T2DM through improving FAO and that uridine in blood might be an important indicator to reflect insulin sensitivity promoted by exercise training in T2DM mice. PMID:26227879

  9. Salivary testosterone and cortisol responses to four different rugby training exercise protocols.

    PubMed

    Gaviglio, Christopher M; Osborne, Mark; Kelly, Vincent G; Kilduff, Liam P; Cook, Christian J

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the acute response of salivary testosterone and cortisol concentrations to four exercise protocols in 27 elite male rugby players. Each athlete completed four protocols in random order on separate in-season weeks. Two protocols were resistance training based consisting of four exercises (high pull, bench press, squat and chin-ups/prone row): Protocol 1 consisted of 5 sets of 15 repetitions at 55% of 1 repetition maximum (1 RM) with 1-minute rest (5 × 15-55%). Protocol 2 consisted of three sets of five repetitions at 85% 1 RM with 2-minute rest (3 × 5-85%). Protocol 3 was a strongman (STRNG) session consisting of three stations within a circuit of exercises that included exercises such as battling ropes, prowler push, farmer's walk and tyre flips. Protocol 4 was based on boxing and wrestling inspired exercises (combative--COMB). Salivary testosterone and cortisol concentrations were measured before (PRE) and immediately after exercise (POST). Testosterone did not significantly change as a result of any intervention, whereas cortisol declined and the testosterone to cortisol (T/C) ratio increased significantly in both the 5 × 15-55% and 3 × 5-85% protocol. When results were retrospectively grouped and analysed according to the protocol that demonstrated the greatest absolute testosterone response, significant (P < 0.01) increases for the 5 × 15-55%, STRNG and COMB protocols were observed. The individualised hormone response to exercise observed in this study highlights the importance of recognising a protocol-dependent approach to training athletes. Furthermore this study also highlights a potential usefulness of employing STRNG and COMB training protocols as an alternative stimulus to resistance training. PMID:25743223

  10. Long-term efficacy of intensive cycle ergometer exercise training program for advanced COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Pothirat, Chaicharn; Chaiwong, Warawut; Phetsuk, Nittaya; Liwsrisakun, Chalerm; Bumroongkit, Chaiwat; Deesomchok, Athavudh; Theerakittikul, Theerakorn; Limsukon, Atikun

    2015-01-01

    Background Exercise training has been incorporated into the international guidelines for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the long-term efficacy of the training program for patients with advanced COPD has never been evaluated in Thailand. Purpose To determine the long-term efficacy of intensive cycle ergometer exercise program on various clinical parameters of patients with advanced COPD. Materials and methods The patients with advanced COPD were separated into two groups: the intensive ergometer exercise program group and the control group. The clinical parameters of all the patients were assessed at baseline, every month for the first 3 months, and then every 3 months until they had completed the 24-month follow-up. Mann–Whitney U test was used to compare baseline mean differences between the groups. Repeated measure analysis was applied to determine the progress in all parameters during the entire follow-up period. Mean incase imputation method was applied to estimate the parameters of dropout cases. Results A total of 41 patients were enrolled: 27 in the intensive ergometer exercise program group and 14 in the control group. The intensive cycle ergometer exercise program group showed statistically significant improvements in muscle strength (from month 1 till the end of the study, month 24), endurance time (from month 1 till the end of measurement, month 12) and clinically significant improvements in 6-minute walk distance (from month 2 until month 9), dyspnea severity by transitional dyspnea index (from month 1 till the end of the study, month 24), and quality of life (from month 1 till the end of the study, month 24). There was no significant difference in survival rates between the groups. Conclusion The intensive ergometer exercise training program revealed meaningful long-term improvements in various clinical parameters for up to 2 years. These promising results should encourage health care professionals to promote

  11. Ginsenoside Rg3 improves cardiac mitochondrial population quality: Mimetic exercise training

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Mengwei; Huang, Chenglin; Wang, Cheng; Zheng, Jianheng; Zhang, Peng; Xu, Yangshu; Chen, Hong; Shen, Weili

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Rg3 is an ergogenic aid. •Rg3 improves mitochondrial antioxidant capacity. •Rg3 regulates mitochondria dynamic remodeling. •Rg3 alone matches some the benefits of aerobic exercise. -- Abstract: Emerging evidence indicates exercise training could mediate mitochondrial quality control through the improvement of mitochondrial dynamics. Ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3), one of the active ingredients in Panax ginseng, is well known in herbal medicine as a tonic and restorative agent. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the beneficial effects of Rg3 has been elusive. In the present study, we compared the effects of Rg3 administration with aerobic exercise on mitochondrial adaptation in cardiac muscle tissue of Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats. Three groups of SD rats were studied: (1) sedentary control, (2) Rg3-treated and (3) aerobic exercise trained. Both aerobic exercise training and Rg3 supplementation enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) and nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein levels in cardiac muscle. The activation of PGC-1α led to increased mRNA levels of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) and nuclear related factor 1(Nrf1), these changes were accompanied by increases in mitochondrial DNA copy number and complex protein levels, while activation of Nrf2 increased levels of phase II detoxifying enzymes, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate:quinone oxidoreductase 1(NQO1), superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase. Aerobic exercise also enhanced mitochondrial autophagy pathway activity, including increased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and greater expression of beclin1 and autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7), these effects of aerobic exercise are comparable to that of Rg3. These results demonstrate that Rg3 mimics improved cardiac adaptations to exercise by regulating mitochondria dynamic remodeling and enhancing the quantity and quality of mitochondria.

  12. A system to assess fitness of dairy cows responding to exercise training.

    PubMed

    Davidson, J A; Beede, D K

    2003-09-01

    Objectives were to develop a system to administer exercise training to dairy cows, to measure potential physiological indicators of fitness, and to assess physical fitness. Nonlactating, nonpregnant multiparous Holstein cows (n = 19) were in one of three exercise training treatments: no exercise; 1-h exercise; or 2-h exercise by walking 3 km/h every other day for 60 d in a mechanical walker. Treadmill tests on d 15, 30, 45, and 60 consisted of walking (5 km/h) with 1.6% increases in slope at 3-min intervals until heart rates reached 180 beats per minute (experimentally specified maximum) or until cows refused to walk. Fitness indices analyzed in tests as single datum points at maximal heart rates were length of time of test, heart rate, and plasma L-lactate concentration at end of the test, and change in heart rate and lactate concentration during the test. Exercised (1 or 2 h) cows had longer times to end of tests than nonexercised cows. Maximal and change in heart rates or plasma lactate during tests did not indicate improved physical fitness. However, when all data were evaluated as repeated measures of day and minute of tests, reductions of heart rates and plasma lactate concentrations were greatest on d 60 between exercised and nonexercised cows indicating improved fitness. Acid-base measurements were not found useful in this study. Changes of heart rates and plasma lactate concentrations over time (repeated measures) of treadmill tests quantified the physical fitness of dairy cows and can be used to compare potential responses to different exercise training treatments in this system. PMID:14507020

  13. Heredity and pituitary response to exercise-related stress in trained men.

    PubMed

    Di Luigi, L; Guidetti, L; Baldari, C; Romanelli, F

    2003-11-01

    To evaluate the role of heredity in the pituitary responses to exercise-related stress, serum ACTH, beta-endorphin, cortisol, GH, and PRL responses to a thirty-minute treadmill exercise at individual anaerobic threshold were evaluated in nine pairs of male monozygotic twin athletes. Hormone evaluations were performed before (-30, -15, 0 pre) and after exercise (0 post, + 15, + 30, + 45, + 60, and + 90 min). The intraclass correlation coefficient (expression of within-pair resemblance) was computed for each hormone before and after exercise as area under curves (AUC), absolute values, and percentage of variation, respectively. The exercise-related stress condition induced a significant increase for all evaluated hormones before (anticipatory response) and/or after exercise. As new data, we observed: 1) A significant within-pair resemblance for exercise-related GH and PRL increase (AUCs and/or absolute values), and for the percentage of variation of cortisol, and 2) the lack of significant resemblance for the observed increase of ACTH, cortisol and absolute beta-endorphin serum concentration. This first co-twin control study supports the hypothesis that, in trained men, there are probably different relative roles for the influence of genetic factors on the pituitary hormones involved in physiological adaptation to exercise-related stress. Furthermore, our findings justify further investigations into this topic. PMID:14598189

  14. Performance and mood-state parameters during 30-day 6 deg head-down bed rest with exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deroshia, Charles W.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    A study aimed at determining if the performance and mood impairments occur in bed-rested subjects, and if different exercise-training regimens modify or prevent them is presented. Eighteen healthy men were divided into three groups performing no exercise, isotonic exercise, and isokinetic exercise. Few deleterious changes occurred in performance and mood of the three groups which did not exceed baseline ambulatory levels. It is concluded that mood and performance did not deteriorate in response to prolonged bedrest and were not altered by exercise training.

  15. Exercise training, but not resveratrol, improves metabolic and inflammatory status in skeletal muscle of aged men

    PubMed Central

    Olesen, Jesper; Gliemann, Lasse; Biensø, Rasmus; Schmidt, Jakob; Hellsten, Ylva; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the metabolic and anti-inflammatory effects of resveratrol alone and when combined with exercise training in skeletal muscle of aged human subjects. Healthy, physically inactive men (60–72 years old) were randomized to either 8 weeks of daily intake of 250 mg resveratrol or placebo or to 8 weeks of high-intensity exercise training with 250 mg resveratrol or placebo. Before and after the interventions, resting blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained and a one-legged knee-extensor endurance exercise test was performed. Exercise training increased skeletal muscle peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator-1α mRNA ∼1.5-fold, cytochrome c protein ∼1.3-fold, cytochrome c oxidase I protein ∼1.5-fold, citrate synthase activity ∼1.3-fold, 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity ∼1.3-fold, inhibitor of κB-α and inhibitor of κB-β protein content ∼1.3-fold and time to exhaustion in the one-legged knee-extensor endurance exercise test by ∼1.2-fold, with no significant additive or adverse effects of resveratrol on these parameters. Despite an overall ∼25% reduction in total acetylation level in skeletal muscle with resveratrol, no exclusive resveratrol-mediated metabolic effects were observed on the investigated parameters. Notably, however, resveratrol blunted an exercise training-induced decrease (∼20%) in protein carbonylation and decrease (∼40%) in tumour necrosis factor α mRNA content in skeletal muscle. In conclusion, resveratrol did not elicit metabolic improvements in healthy aged subjects; in fact, resveratrol even impaired the observed exercise training-induced improvements in markers of oxidative stress and inflammation in skeletal muscle. Collectively, this highlights the metabolic efficacy of exercise training in aged subjects and does not support the contention that resveratrol is a potential exercise mimetic in healthy aged subjects. PMID:24514907

  16. Resistance exercise training modulates acute gene expression during human skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Nader, G A; von Walden, F; Liu, C; Lindvall, J; Gutmann, L; Pistilli, E E; Gordon, P M

    2014-03-15

    We sought to determine whether acute resistance exercise (RE)-induced gene expression is modified by RE training. We studied the expression patterns of a select group of genes following an acute bout of RE in naïve and hypertrophying muscle. Thirteen untrained subjects underwent supervised RE training for 12 wk of the nondominant arm and performed an acute bout of RE 1 wk after the last bout of the training program (training+acute). The dominant arm was either unexercised (control) or subjected to the same acute exercise bout as the trained arm (acute RE). Following training, men (14.8 ± 2.8%; P < 0.05) and women (12.6 ± 2.4%; P < 0.05) underwent muscle hypertrophy with increases in dynamic strength in the trained arm (48.2 ± 5.4% and 72.1 ± 9.1%, respectively; P < 0.01). RE training resulted in attenuated anabolic signaling as reflected by a reduction in rpS6 phosphorylation following acute RE. Changes in mRNA levels of genes involved in hypertrophic growth, protein degradation, angiogenesis, and metabolism commonly expressed in both men and women was determined 4 h following acute RE. We show that RE training can modify acute RE-induced gene expression in a divergent and gene-specific manner even in genes belonging to the same ontology. Changes in gene expression following acute RE are multidimensional, and may not necessarily reflect the actual adaptive response taking place during the training process. Thus RE training can selectively modify the acute response to RE, thereby challenging the use of gene expression as a marker of exercise-induced adaptations. PMID:24458751

  17. Effect of Exercise Training on Peak Oxygen Consumption in Patients with Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yuanyuan; Pituskin, Edith N.; Battaglini, Claudio L.; Scott, Jessica M.; Hornsby, Whitney E.; Haykowsky, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Background. We conducted a meta-analysis to determine the effects of supervised exercise training on peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) in adults with cancer. Methods. A literature review using Ovid MEDLINE (1950–2010), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (1991–2010), AMED (1985–2010), Embase (1988–2010), PubMed (1966–2010), Scopus (1950–2010), and Web of Science (1950–2010) was performed to identify randomized controlled trials examining the effects of supervised exercise training on measurement of VO2peak (via gas exchange analysis) in adults with cancer. Studies were selected using predetermined criteria, and two independent reviewers extracted data. Weighted mean differences (WMDs) were calculated using random effect models. Results. Six studies evaluated VO2peak involving a total of 571 adult cancer patients (exercise, n = 344; usual care control, n = 227). Pooled data indicated that exercise training was associated with a statistically significant increase in VO2peak (WMD, 2.90 ml·kg−1·min−1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16–4.64); however, significant heterogeneity was evident in this estimate (I2, 87%). Usual care (control) was associated with a significant decline in VO2peak from baseline to postintervention (WMD, −1.02 ml·kg−1·min−1; 95% CI, −1.46 to −0.58; I2, 22%). Sensitivity analyses indicated superior improvements in VO2peak for studies conducted for a shorter duration (<4 months) and following the completion of adjuvant therapy (p-values < .001). Exercise training was not associated with a higher incidence of adverse events, although safety was not rigorously monitored or reported. Conclusions. Supervised exercise training is associated with significant improvements in VO2peak following a diagnosis of early-stage cancer, with minimal adverse events. PMID:21212429

  18. Enhancing Cognitive Training Through Aerobic Exercise After a First Schizophrenia Episode: Theoretical Conception and Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Nuechterlein, Keith H; Ventura, Joseph; McEwen, Sarah C; Gretchen-Doorly, Denise; Vinogradov, Sophia; Subotnik, Kenneth L

    2016-07-01

    Cognitive training (CT) and aerobic exercise have separately shown promise for improving cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Aerobic exercise releases brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which promotes synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis. Thus, aerobic exercise provides a neurotrophic platform for neuroplasticity-based CT. The combination of aerobic exercise and CT may yield more robust effects than CT alone, particularly in the initial course of schizophrenia. In a pilot study, 7 patients with a recent onset of schizophrenia were assigned to Cognitive Training & Exercise (CT&E) and 9 to CT alone for a 10-week period. Posit Science programs were used for CT. Neurocognitive training focused on tuning neural circuits related to perceptual processing and verbal learning and memory. Social cognitive training used the same learning principles with social and affective stimuli. Both groups participated in these training sessions 2d/wk, 2h/d. The CT&E group also participated in an aerobic conditioning program for 30 minutes at our clinic 2d/wk and at home 2d/wk. The effect size for improvement in the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery Overall Composite score for CT&E patients relative to CT patients was large. Functional outcome, particularly independent living skills, also tended to improve more in the CT&E than in the CT group. Muscular endurance, cardiovascular fitness, and diastolic blood pressure also showed relative improvement in the CT&E compared to the CT group. These encouraging pilot study findings support the promise of combining CT and aerobic exercise to improve the early course of schizophrenia. PMID:27460618

  19. Intermittent bout exercise training down-regulates age-associated inflammation in skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Seok; Yi, Ho-Keun

    2015-12-01

    Aging is characterized by the progressive decline in mass and function of the skeletal muscle along with increased susceptibility to inflammation, oxidative stress, and atrophy. In this study, we investigate the effect of intermittent bout and single bout exercise training on inflammatory molecules in young (3 months) and old (22 months) male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were divided into 6 groups. Young and old rats were randomly assigned for control and two exercise training groups, single bout (S type): 30 min/day, 5 days/week for 6 weeks and intermittent bout (I type): three times for 10 min/day, 5 days/week for 6 weeks respectively. The exercise training was carried out by a treadmill at a speed of 15m/min (young) or 10 m/min (old) with a slope of 5°. After 48 h of the final exercise bout, muscle samples were collected for biochemical assay. I type exercise training reduced the serum levels of inflammatory molecules such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in old rats. By contrast, interleukin-4 (IL-4) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were elevated. Consequently in skeletal muscles, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were decreased significantly in the old group of I type. However, the matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) level had no positive effects. Also, phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (p-mTOR) and myogenic differentiation (MyoD) were increased markedly in S and I types of old rats. These results suggest that I type exercise training appears more effective to reduce age-associated inflammatory molecules, and may recommend in regulating against chronic complicated disease induced by aging. PMID:26545590

  20. Making Olympic lizards: the effects of specialised exercise training on performance.

    PubMed

    Husak, Jerry F; Keith, Allison R; Wittry, Beth N

    2015-03-01

    Exercise training is well known to affect a suite of physiological and performance traits in mammals, but effects of training in other vertebrate tetrapod groups have been inconsistent. We examined performance and physiological differences among green anole lizards (Anolis carolinensis) that were trained for sprinting or endurance, using an increasingly rigorous training regimen over 8 weeks. Lizards trained for endurance had significantly higher post-training endurance capacity compared with the other treatment groups, but groups did not show post-training differences in sprint speed. Although acclimation to the laboratory environment and training explain some of our results, mechanistic explanations for these results correspond with the observed performance differences. After training, endurance-trained lizards had higher haematocrit and larger fast glycolytic muscle fibres. Despite no detectable change in maximal performance of sprint-trained lizards, we detected that they had significantly larger slow oxidative muscle fibre areas compared with the other treatments. Treatment groups did not differ in the proportion of number of fibre types, nor in the mass of most limb muscles or the heart. Our results offer some caveats for investigators conducting training research on non-model organisms and they reveal that muscle plasticity in response to training may be widespread phylogenetically. PMID:25617462

  1. Effects of regular exercise training on skeletal muscle contractile function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, Robert H.

    2003-01-01

    Skeletal muscle function is critical to movement and one's ability to perform daily tasks, such as eating and walking. One objective of this article is to review the contractile properties of fast and slow skeletal muscle and single fibers, with particular emphasis on the cellular events that control or rate limit the important mechanical properties. Another important goal of this article is to present the current understanding of how the contractile properties of limb skeletal muscle adapt to programs of regular exercise.

  2. The effect of 1 year of Alagebrium and moderate-intensity exercise training on left ventricular function during exercise in seniors: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Carrick-Ranson, Graeme; Fujimoto, Naoki; Shafer, Keri M; Hastings, Jeffrey L; Shibata, Shigeki; Palmer, M Dean; Boyd, Kara; Levine, Benjamin D

    2016-08-01

    Sedentary aging leads to left ventricular (LV) and vascular stiffening due in part to advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) cross-linking of extracellular matrix proteins. Vigorous lifelong exercise ameliorates age-related cardiovascular (CV) stiffening and enhances exercise LV function, although this effect is limited when exercise is initiated later in life. We hypothesized that exercise training might be more effective at improving the impact of age-related CV stiffening during exercise when combined with an AGE cross-link breaker (Alagebrium). Sixty-two seniors (≥60 yr) were randomized into four groups: sedentary + placebo, sedentary + Alagebrium, exercise + placebo, and exercise + Alagebrium for 1 yr. Moderate-intensity aerobic exercise was performed 3-4 sessions/wk; controls underwent similar frequency of yoga/balance training. Twenty-four similarly-aged, lifelong exercisers (4-5 sessions/wk) served as a comparator for the effect of lifelong exercise on exercising LV function. Oxygen uptake (Douglas bags), stroke index (SI; acetylene rebreathing), and effective arterial elastance (Ea) were collected at rest and submaximal and maximal exercise. Maximum O2 uptake (23 ± 5 to 25 ± 6 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) increased, while SI (35 ± 11 to 39 ± 12 ml/m(2)) and Ea (4.0 ± 1.1 to 3.7 ± 1.2 mmHg·ml(-1)·m(-2)) were improved across all conditions with exercise, but remained unchanged in controls (exercise × time, P ≤ 0.018). SI or Ea were not affected by Alagebrium (medication × time, P ≥ 0.468) or its combination with exercise (interaction P ≥ 0.252). After 1 yr of exercise plus Alagebrium, exercise SI and Ea remained substantially below that of lifelong exercisers (15-24 and 9-22%, respectively, P ≤ 0.415). In conclusion, Alagebrium plus exercise had no synergistic effect on exercise LV function and failed to achieve levels associated with lifelong exercise, despite a similar exercise frequency. PMID:27402556

  3. Knee-joint proprioception during 30-day 6 degrees head-down bed rest with isotonic and isokinetic exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernauer, E. M.; Walby, W. F.; Ertl, A. C.; Dempster, P. T.; Bond, M.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    To determine if daily isotonic exercise or isokinetic exercise training coupled with daily leg proprioceptive training, would influence leg proprioceptive tracking responses during bed rest (BR), 19 men (36 +/- SD 4 years, 178 +/- 7 cm, 76.8 +/- 7.8 kg) were allocated into a no-exercise (NOE) training control group (n = 5), and isotonic exercise (ITE, n = 7) and isokinetic exercise (IKE, n = 7) training groups. Exercise training was conducted during BR for two 30-min periods.d-1, 5 d.week-1. Only the IKE group performed proprioceptive training using a new isokinetic procedure with each lower extremity for 2.5 min before and after the daily exercise training sessions; proprioceptive testing occurred weekly for all groups. There were no significant differences in proprioceptive tracking scores, expressed as a percentage of the perfect score of 100, in the pre-BR ambulatory control period between the three groups. Knee extension and flexion tracking responses were unchanged with NOE during BR, but were significantly greater (*p < 0.05) at the end of BR in both exercise groups when compared with NOE responses (extension: NOE 80.7 +/- 0.7%, ITE 82.9* +/- 0.6%, IKE 86.5* +/- 0.7%; flexion: NOE 77.6 +/- 1.5%, ITE 80.0 +/- 0.8% (NS), IKE 83.6* +/- 0.8%). Although proprioceptive tracking was unchanged during BR with NOE, both isotonic exercise training (without additional proprioceptive training) and especially isokinetic exercise training when combined with daily proprioceptive training, significantly improved knee proprioceptive tracking responses after 30 d of BR.

  4. Knee-Joint Proprioception During 30-Day 6 deg Head-Down Bed Rest with Isotonic and Isokinetic Exercise Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernauer, E. M.; Walby, W. F.; Ertl, A. C.; Dempster, P. T.; Bond, M.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    To determine if daily isotonic exercise or isokinetic exercise training coupled with daily log proprioceptive training, would influence log proprioceptive tracking responses during Bed Rest (BR), 19 men (36 +/- SD 4 years, 178 +/- 7 cm, 76.8 +/- 7.8 kg) were allocated into a NO-Exercise (NOE) training control group (n = 5), and IsoTanic Exercise (ITE, n = 7) and IsoKinetic Exercise (IKE, n = 7) training groups. Exercise training was conducted during BR for two 30-min period / d, 5 d /week. Only the IKE group performed proprioceptive training using a now isokinetic procedure with each lower extremity for 2.5 min before and after the daily exercise training sessions; proprioceptive testing occurred weekly for all groups. There were no significant differences in proprioceptive tracking scores, expressed as a percentage of the perfect score of 100, in the pro-BR ambulatory control period between the three groups. Knee extension and flexion tracking responses were unchanged with NOE during BR, but were significantly greater (*p less than 0.05) at the end of BR in both exercise groups when compared with NOE responses (extension: NOE 80.7 +/- 0.7%, ITE 82.9 +/- 0.6%, IKE 86.5* +/- 0.7%; flexion: NOE 77.6 +/- 1.50, ITE 80.0 +/- 0.8% (NS), IKE 83.6* +/- 0.8%). Although proprioceptive tracking was unchanged during BR with NOE, both lsotonic exercise training (without additional propriaceptive training) and especially isokinetic exercise training when combined with daily proprioceptive training, significantly improved knee proprioceptive tracking responses after 30 d of BR.

  5. Achondrogenesis type 2 diagnosed by transvaginal ultrasound at 12 weeks' gestation.

    PubMed

    Soothill, P W; Vuthiwong, C; Rees, H

    1993-06-01

    Ultrasound examination at 12 weeks' gestation revealed severe generalised subcutaneous oedema in a pregnancy at risk for achondrogenesis type II. Transvaginal scanning confirmed the oedema and suggested abnormal limb development. The prenatal diagnosis was confirmed by X-ray examination after transvaginal termination. PMID:8372079

  6. The Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS): Methods and Message at 12 Weeks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    March, John; Silva, Susan; Vitiello, Benedetto

    2006-01-01

    Funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, the Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS) is intended to evaluate the short-term (12 weeks) and longer-term (36 weeks) effectiveness of four treatments for adolescents with DSM-IV major depressive disorder: clinical management with fluoxetine (FLX), cognitive-behavioral therapy…

  7. Japanese 12-Week Course. Volume IV, Lessons 42-55. Volume V, Glossary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Educational Systems Development Center.

    These two volumes comprise Lesson Units 42-55 (Volume IV), and a comprehensive Glossary (Volume V) which accompanies this 12-week Defense Language Institute course in beginning Japanese. (See AL 002 223 for Volume I--Introduction and Lesson Units 1-15, and AL 002 224 for Volumes II and III--Lesson Units 16-27 and 28-41.) (AMM)

  8. Japanese 12-Week Course. Volume II, Lessons 16-27. Volume III, Lessons 28-41.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Educational Systems Development Center.

    These two volumes contain Lesson Units 16-41 in the Defense Language Institute's 12-week course in Japanese. (See AL 002 223 for Volume I, Lessons Units 1-15 and AL 002 225 for Volume IV, Lesson Units 42-55 and Volume V, Glossary.) (AMM)

  9. Influence of power and aerobic exercise training on haemostatic factors after coronary artery surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wosornu, D; Allardyce, W; Ballantyne, D; Tansey, P

    1992-01-01

    Objectives—To determine the effects of aerobic and power exercise training on haemostatic factors after coronary artery surgery and to compare the effect of the two exercise programmes. Design—A prospective randomised controlled study of six months aerobic and power exercise training in men after coronary artery surgery. Setting—Exercise rehabilitation classes in a teaching hospital in Glasgow. Patients—55 men within 12 months of coronary artery surgery recruited from surgical centres and medical clinics and asked to participate in the study. Interventions—Assessments, including a treadmill test, measurements of haemoglobin, platelet, fibrinogen, factor VIIc, and fibrinopeptide A concentrations, and packed cell volume, done at baseline, three months, and six months. Patients in the two exercise groups attended training sessions three times weekly for six months. Control patients had no formal exercise training but continued with their leisure time activities. Main outcome measures—Exercise performance on a treadmill, haematology, and haemostatic factor assays at baseline, three months, and six months. Results—In the aerobic trained group exercise performance increased significantly over baseline at three months (interval change 146·7, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 52·5 to 240·9 s, p = 0·003) and was maintained at six months (interval change 172·1, 95% CI 63·3 to 280·9 s, p = 0·002). In the power trained groups significant improvement in exercise performance was delayed until six months (interval change 99·9 s, 95% CI 20·3 to 170·5 s, p = 0·01). Exercise performance in the control did not change significantly. Haemoglobin, concentration, packed cell volume, and platelet counts did not change significantly at any time. Fibrinogen concentration was significantly lower in the aerobic group than the other two groups at three months (2·96 g/dl compared with 3·3 g/dl and 3·87 g/dl in the power and control groups, p = 0·01). The power group

  10. Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) COPD: Lifestyle Management Exercises Exercises Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... riding a stationary bike. Medication to Help You Exercise People with COPD often use a metered-dose ...

  11. Effects of systemic hypoxia on human muscular adaptations to resistance exercise training.

    PubMed

    Kon, Michihiro; Ohiwa, Nao; Honda, Akiko; Matsubayashi, Takeo; Ikeda, Tatsuaki; Akimoto, Takayuki; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Hirano, Yuichi; Russell, Aaron P

    2014-06-01

    Hypoxia is an important modulator of endurance exercise-induced oxidative adaptations in skeletal muscle. However, whether hypoxia affects resistance exercise-induced muscle adaptations remains unknown. Here, we determined the effect of resistance exercise training under systemic hypoxia on muscular adaptations known to occur following both resistance and endurance exercise training, including muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), one-repetition maximum (1RM), muscular endurance, and makers of mitochondrial biogenesis and angiogenesis, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), citrate synthase (CS) activity, nitric oxide synthase (NOS), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), and capillary-to-fiber ratio. Sixteen healthy male subjects were randomly assigned to either a normoxic resistance training group (NRT, n = 7) or a hypoxic (14.4% oxygen) resistance training group (HRT, n = 9) and performed 8 weeks of resistance training. Blood and muscle biopsy samples were obtained before and after training. After training muscle CSA of the femoral region, 1RM for bench-press and leg-press, muscular endurance, and skeletal muscle VEGF protein levels significantly increased in both groups. The increase in muscular endurance was significantly higher in the HRT group. Plasma VEGF concentration and skeletal muscle capillary-to-fiber ratio were significantly higher in the HRT group than the NRT group following training. Our results suggest that, in addition to increases in muscle size and strength, HRT may also lead to increased muscular endurance and the promotion of angiogenesis in skeletal muscle. PMID:24907297

  12. Moderate exercise training and chronic caloric restriction modulate redox status in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Santin, Katiane; da Rocha, Ricardo Fagundes; Cechetti, Fernanda; Quincozes-Santos, André; de Souza, Daniela Fraga; Nardin, Patrícia; Rodrigues, Letícia; Leite, Marina Concli; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca; Salbego, Christianne Gazzana; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto

    2011-11-01

    Physical activity has been related to antioxidant adaptations, which is associated with health benefits, including those to the nervous system. Additionally, available data suggest exercise and a caloric restriction regimen may reduce both the incidence and severity of neurological disorders. Therefore, our aim was to compare hippocampal redox status and glial parameters among sedentary, trained, caloric-restricted sedentary and caloric-restricted trained rats. Forty male adult rats were divided into 4 groups: ad libitum-fed sedentary (AS), ad libitum-fed exercise training (AE), calorie-restricted sedentary (RS) and calorie-restricted exercise training (RE). The caloric restriction (decrease of 30% in food intake) and exercise training (moderate in a treadmill) were carried out for 3 months. Thereafter hippocampus was surgically removed, and then redox and glial parameters were assessed. Increases in reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and total antioxidant reactivity (TAR) were observed in AE, RS and RE. The nitrite/nitrate levels decreased only in RE. We found a decrease in carbonyl content in AE, RS and RE, while no modifications were detected in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Total reactive antioxidant potential (TRAP), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, S100B and glial fibrilary acid protein (GFAP) content did not change, but caloric restriction was able to increase glutamine synthetase (GS) activity in RS and glutamate uptake in RS and RE. Exercise training, caloric restriction and both combined can decrease oxidative damage in the hippocampus, possibly involving modulation of astroglial function, and could be used as a strategy for the prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21974860

  13. Effect of post-myocardial infarction exercise training on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wenhan; Powers, Anthony S; Li, Ji; Ji, Lisa; Erikson, John M; Zhang, John Q

    2007-10-01

    After a myocardial infarction (MI), the injured heart undergoes intensive remodeling characterized by activation of the circulating renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), left ventricular (LV) dilation, and contractile dysfunction. Exercise training may attenuate activation of the RAAS and improve myocardial remodeling. In this study, we investigated whether starting exercise training early or late after MI would have different effect on circulating RAAS and LV dilation and function. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (7 weeks old) underwent surgically induced MI. After surgery, rats were matched for similar infarct sizes and assigned into two major groups, based on the designated starting time of exercise training. Exercise groups started exercise at either 1 or 6 weeks after MI and exercised on a treadmill for 8 weeks. Groups starting exercise 1 week after MI included sham-operated control (1Wk-Sham), MI-ksedentary (1Wk-MI-Sed), and MI-exercise (1Wk-MI-Ex). Groups starting exercise 6 weeks after MI included sham-operated control (6Wk-Sham), MI-sedentary (6Wk-MI-Sed), and MI-exercise (6Wk-MI-Ex). An echocardiogram was performed before and after exercise training. Blood samples were obtained at the end of experiments. The results showed that compared with sedentary rats with MI, exercise training significantly attenuated circulating renin, angiotensin converting enzyme, angiotensin II, and aldosterone. Rats in exercise groups had similar LV end-diastolic diameters compared with their sedentary counterparts and tended to have smaller LV end-systolic diameters, and percent fractional shortening in exercise rats was significantly higher than in sedentary rats. These findings suggest that exercise training does not cause LV dilation and preserves LV function. Post-MI exercise training also normalizes the circulating RAAS, and this effect is independent of timing of post-MI exercise. Exercise starting early or late after MI affects myocardial remodeling and function

  14. Cardiovascular and behavioral effects of aerobic exercise training in healthy older men and women.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, J A; Emery, C F; Madden, D J; George, L K; Coleman, R E; Riddle, M W; McKee, D C; Reasoner, J; Williams, R S

    1989-09-01

    The cardiovascular and behavioral adaptations associated with a 4-month program of aerobic exercise training were examined in 101 older men and women (mean age = 67 years). Subjects were randomly assigned to an Aerobic Exercise group, a Yoga and Flexibility control group, or a Waiting List control group. Prior to and following the 4-month program, subjects underwent comprehensive physiological and psychological evaluations. Physiological measures included measurement of blood pressure, lipids, bone density, and cardiorespiratory fitness including direct measurements of peak oxygen consumption (VO2) and anaerobic threshold. Psychological measures included measures of mood, psychiatric symptoms, and neuropsychological functioning. This study demonstrated that 4 months of aerobic exercise training produced an overall 11.6% improvement in peak VO2 and a 13% increase in anaerobic threshold. In contrast, the Yoga and Waiting List control groups experienced no change in cardiorespiratory fitness. Other favorable physiological changes observed among aerobic exercise participants included lower cholesterol levels, diastolic blood pressure levels, and for subjects at risk for bone fracture, a trend toward an increase in bone mineral content. Although few significant psychological changes could be attributed to aerobic exercise training, participants in the two active treatment groups perceived themselves as improving on a number of psychological and behavioral dimensions. PMID:2768768

  15. Cognitive Fatigue Influences Time-On-Task during Bodyweight Resistance Training Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Head, James R.; Tenan, Matthew S.; Tweedell, Andrew J.; Price, Thomas F.; LaFiandra, Michael E.; Helton, William S.

    2016-01-01

    Prior investigations have shown measurable performance impairments on continuous physical performance tasks when preceded by a cognitively fatiguing task. However, the effect of cognitive fatigue on bodyweight resistance training exercise task performance is unknown. In the current investigation 18 amateur athletes completed a full body exercise task preceded by either a cognitive fatiguing or control intervention. In a randomized repeated measure design, each participant completed the same exercise task preceded by a 52 min cognitively fatiguing intervention (vigilance) or control intervention (video). Data collection sessions were separated by 1 week. Participants rated the fatigue intervention with a significantly higher workload compared to the control intervention (p < 0.001). Additionally, participants self-reported significantly greater energetic arousal for cognitively fatiguing task (p = 0.02). Cognitive fatigue did not significantly impact number of repetitions completed during the exercise task (p = 0.77); however, when cognitively fatigued, participants had decreased percent time-on-task (57%) relative to the no fatigue condition (60%; p = 0.04). RPE significantly changed over time (p < 0.001), but failed to show significant differences between the cognitive fatigue intervention and control intervention (p > 0.05). There was no statistical difference for heart rate or metabolic expenditure as a function of fatigue intervention during exercise. Cognitively fatigued athletes have decreased time-on-task in bodyweight resistance training exercise tasks.

  16. Exercise therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Palmer, S S; Mortimer, J A; Webster, D D; Bistevins, R; Dickinson, G L

    1986-10-01

    The outcomes of two different 12-week exercise programs were assessed by machine measurements of motor signs, tests of grip strength, motor coordination and speed, and neurophysiologic determinations of long-latency stretch responses in two groups of Parkinson patients matched for age, sex and stage of disease. The programs tested included an exercise program developed by the United Parkinson Foundation and a program of upper body karate training. Outcomes of these programs were similar. The majority of patients in both groups showed improvements in gait, tremor, grip strength and motor coordination on tasks requiring fine control. In one task involving whole body coordination there was a decline in function, while muscle rigidity was unchanged. The findings suggest that exercise is a useful adjunct to pharmacologic therapy. PMID:3767624

  17. Efficacy of Home-Based Kinesthesia, Balance & Agility Exercise Training Among Persons with Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Matthew W.; Tamulevicius, Nauris; Semple, Stuart J.; Krkeljas, Zarko

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of a home-based kinesthesia, balance and agility (KBA) exercise program to improve symptoms among persons age ≥ 50 years with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Forty-four persons were randomly assigned to 8-weeks, 3 times per week KBA, resistance training (RT), KBA + RT, or Control. KBA utilized walking agility exercises and single-leg static and dynamic balancing. RT used elastic resistance bands for open chain lower extremity exercises. KBA + RT performed selected exercises from each technique. Control applied inert lotion daily. Outcomes included the OA specific WOMAC Index of Pain, Stiffness, and Physical Function (PF), community activity level, exercise self-efficacy, self-report knee stability, and 15m get up & go walk (GUG). Thirty-three participants [70.7 (SD 8.5) years] completed the trial. Analysis of variance comparing baseline, mid-point, and follow-up measures revealed significant (p < 0.05) improvements in WOMAC scores among KBA, RT, KBA + RT, and Control, with no differences between groups. However, Control WOMAC improvements peaked at mid-point, whereas improvement in the exercise conditions continued at 8-weeks. There were no significant changes in community activity level. Only Control improved exercise self-efficacy. Knee stability was improved in RT and Control. GUG improved in RT and KBA+RT. These results indicate that KBA, RT, or a combination of the two administered as home exercise programs are effective in improving symptoms and quality of life among persons with knee OA. Control results indicate a strong placebo effect in the short term. A combination of KBA and RT should be considered as part of the rehabilitation program, but KBA or RT alone may be appropriate for some patients. Studies with more statistical power are needed to confirm or refute these results. Patient presentation, preferences, costs, and convenience should be considered when choosing an exercise rehabilitation approach

  18. High-intensity interval training (HIT) for effective and time-efficient pre-surgical exercise interventions.

    PubMed

    Weston, Matthew; Weston, Kathryn L; Prentis, James M; Snowden, Chris P

    2016-01-01

    The advancement of perioperative medicine is leading to greater diversity in development of pre-surgical interventions, implemented to reduce patient surgical risk and enhance post-surgical recovery. Of these interventions, the prescription of pre-operative exercise training is gathering momentum as a realistic means for enhancing patient surgical outcome. Indeed, the general benefits of exercise training have the potential to pre-operatively optimise several pre-surgical risks factors, including cardiorespiratory function, frailty and cognitive function. Any exercise programme incorporated into the pre-operative pathway of care needs to be effective and time efficient in that any fitness gains are achievable in the limited period between the decision for surgery and operation (e.g. 4 weeks). Fortunately, there is a large volume of research describing effective and time-efficient exercise training programmes within the discipline of sports science. Accordingly, the objective of our commentary is to synthesise contemporary exercise training research, both from non-clinical and clinical populations, with the overarching aim of informing the development of effective and time-efficient pre-surgical exercise training programmes. The development of such exercise training programmes requires the careful consideration of several key principles, namely frequency, intensity, time, type and progression of exercise. Therefore, in light of more recent evidence demonstrating the effectiveness and time efficiency of high-intensity interval training-which involves brief bouts of intense exercise interspersed with longer recovery periods-the principles of exercise training programme design will be discussed mainly in the context of such high-intensity interval training programmes. Other issues pertinent to the development, implementation and evaluation of pre-operative exercise training programmes, such as individual exercise prescription, training session monitoring and potential

  19. Physiological Adaptations to Chronic Endurance Exercise Training in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physician and Sportsmedicine, 1987

    1987-01-01

    In a roundtable format, five doctors explore the reasons why regular physical activity should continue to play a significant role in the rehabilitation of patients with coronary artery disease. Endurance exercise training improves aerobic capacity, reduces blood pressure, and decreases risk. (Author/MT)

  20. Learning Style Preferences of Undergraduate Dietetics, Athletic Training, and Exercise Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Meredith G.; Hansen, Pamela; Rhee, Yeong; Brundt, Ardith; Terbizan, Donna; Christensen, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The study assessed the preferred learning style (LS) of college students and compared LS preferences among students majoring in Dietetics, Exercise Science, and Athletic Training. LS questionnaires were distributed to students (N = 693, mean age 20.5 ± 1.7) enrolled in health science courses at three Midwestern universities. Most students…

  1. STS-47 crew participates in fire fighting exercises at JSC Fire Training Pit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Mission Specialist (MS) N. Jan Davis (foreground) and MS and Payload Commander (PLC) Mark C. Lee, squinting and holding water hose, listen to instructions prior to participating in fire fighting exercises held at JSC's Fire Training Pit across from Gilruth Center Bldg 207.

  2. The effect of almond consumption on elements of endurance exercise performance in trained athletes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Almonds are a healthy tree nut food with high nutrient density. Their consumption has been shown to ameliorate oxidative stress, inflammation, etc. The objective of the study was to examine the effect of almonds on elements of endurance exercise performance in trained athletes. A 10-week crossover, ...

  3. Sex differences in the response to resistance exercise training in older people.

    PubMed

    Da Boit, Mariasole; Sibson, Rachael; Meakin, Judith R; Aspden, Richard M; Thies, Frank; Mangoni, Arduino A; Gray, Stuart Robert

    2016-06-01

    Resistance exercise training is known to be effective in increasing muscle mass in older people. Acute measurement of protein metabolism data has indicated that the magnitude of response may differ between sexes. We compared adaptive responses in muscle mass and function to 18 weeks resistance exercise training in a cohort of older (>65 years) men and women. Resistance exercise training improved knee extensor maximal torque, 4 m walk time, time to complete five chair rises, muscle anatomical cross-sectional area (ACSA) and muscle quality with no effect on muscle fat/water ratio or plasma glucose, insulin, triacylglycerol, IL-6, and TNF-α Differences between sexes were observed for knee extensor maximal torque and muscle quality with greater increases observed in men versus women (P < 0.05). Maximal torque increased by 15.8 ± 10.6% in women and 41.7 ± 25.5% in men, whereas muscle quality increased by 8.8 ± 17.5% in women and by 33.7 ± 25.6% in men. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated a difference in the magnitude of adaptation, of some of the outcome measures employed, in response to 18 weeks of resistance exercise training between men and women. The mechanisms underlying this observation remain to be established. PMID:27354538

  4. Structured-Exercise-Program (SEP): An Effective Training Approach to Key Healthcare Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miazi, Mosharaf H.; Hossain, Taleb; Tiroyakgosi, C.

    2014-01-01

    Structured exercise program is an effective approach to technology dependent resource limited healthcare area for professional training. The result of a recently conducted data analysis revealed this. The aim of the study is to know the effectiveness of the applied approach that was designed to observe the level of adherence to newly adopted…

  5. The Ability of Instructors to Organize Aerobic Dance Exercise Into Effective Cardiovascular Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claremont, Alan D.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The ability of five aerobics instructors to combine music and exercise movements into effective low, medium, and high levels of cardiovascular intensity was evaluated by measuring respiratory gas exchange and heart rate for twelve subjects. Results underscore the need for instructor training guidelines. (Author/MT)

  6. STS-6 crewmembers go through a training exercise in the shuttle mock-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    STS-6 crew members go through a training exercise in the full-scale engineering Shuttle mockup. Their seating configuration reflects that of launch and landing phases aboard the shuttle Challenger. The front stations are occupied by Astronauts Paul J. Weitz (left), commander, and Karol J. Bobko, pilot. In the rear seats are Astronauts Story Musgrave and Donald H. Peterson, both mission specialists.

  7. Enhancement of aphrodisiac activity in male rats by ethanol extract of Kaempferia parviflora and exercise training.

    PubMed

    Chaturapanich, G; Chaiyakul, S; Verawatnapakul, V; Yimlamai, T; Pholpramool, C

    2012-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of Kaempferia parviflora extract (KD) and exercise training on reproductive function in male rats. Sexually mature males were assigned to four groups: control, KD70 (received 70 mg kg(-1) day(-1) for 4 weeks), Ex (exercise training for 4 weeks), Ex + KD70 (exercise training with KD 70 mg kg(-1) day(-1)). At the end of treatment regimes, sexual behaviours including mount latency (ML), mount frequency (MF), ejaculation latency (EL), post-ejaculation latency (PEL), number of mount within 30 min (MF(30)) and number of ejaculation (NEL) were assessed by a video camera, and fertility was tested by natural mating. Results showed that KD had no effect on the weights of reproductive organs, liver, kidneys and levator ani muscle. On the other hand, the weights of epididymis, seminal vesicles, prostate gland and levator ani muscle were significantly increased in the Ex and Ex+KD70 groups. ML and EL were shortened in all treatment groups, but PEL was decreased only in KP70 group. Only Ex and Ex + KD70 groups exhibited lower MF and higher NEL whilst MF(30) were not changed in all groups. None of the treatments altered male fertility. It is concluded that KD enhanced sexual motivation whereas exercise training promoted both sexual motivation and performance. PMID:21729142

  8. 77 FR 46733 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals: Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Navy Training Exercises...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-06

    ...In accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), as amended, and implementing regulations, notification is hereby given that NMFS has issued a Letter of Authorization (LOA) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to the U.S. Navy's training exercises within the Navy's Mariana Islands Range Complex (MIRC) in the Pacific...

  9. Comparison of high and low intensity training in well controlled rheumatoid arthritis. Results of a randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed Central

    van den Ende, C H; Hazes, J M; le Cessie, S; Mulder, W J; Belfor, D G; Breedveld, F C; Dijkmans, B A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the benefit of intensive dynamic exercises in comparison to range of motion (ROM) and isometric exercises in rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: 100 consecutive rheumatoid arthritis patients on stable medication were randomly assigned to (1) intensive dynamic group exercises which included full weight bearing exercises and conditioning exercises on a stationary bicycle while the heart rate was maintained at 70-85% of the age predicted maximum heart rate, (2) range of motion (ROM) exercises and isometric exercises in a group, (3) individual isometric and ROM exercises, and (4) home instructions for isometric and ROM exercises. Variables of physical condition, muscle strength, joint mobility, daily functioning (HAQ), and disease activity were assessed before and after the 12 week exercise course, and 12 weeks thereafter. An intention to treat analysis was performed. RESULTS: Increases in aerobic capacity (n = 77), muscle strength, and joint mobility in the high intensity exercise programme were respectively 17%, 17% and 16% and differed significantly from the changes in aerobic capacity, muscle strength, and joint mobility in the other exercise groups. No deterioration of disease activity was observed. Twelve weeks after discontinuation of the exercise course the gain in physical capacity had disappeared. CONCLUSIONS: Intensive dynamic training is more effective in increasing aerobic capacity, joint mobility, and muscle strength than ROM exercises and isometric training in rheumatoid arthritis patients with well controlled disease. PMID:8976635

  10. Lower limb control and mobility following exercise training

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of 8-week balance or weight training on ankle joint stiffness and limb stability for older adults, furthermore, on outcomes of slips while walking. Eighteen older adults volunteered for the study and randomly were assigned to the three groups, such as, weight, balance, or control group. While walking on a walking track, three-dimensional posture data were sampled and ankle joint stiffness and limb stability were computed to evaluate the effects of training. 2 (pre and post) × 3 (weight, balance, and control) × 2 (dominant and non-dominant legs) mixed factor repeated ANOVA was performed. The results indicated that only balance training group showed an improvement in joint stiffness and both the training groups showed improvements in limb stability. Also, fall frequency results suggested that joint stiffness and limb stability had an effect on the likelihood of slip-induced falls. In conclusion, training can facilitate improvements in joint and limb control mechanism for older adults contributing to an improvement in the likelihood of slip-induced falls. PMID:22335998

  11. Exercise training program for older adults. Incentives and disincentives for participation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Joanne Kraenzle; Eveker, Ann; Bronder, Deborah Rilling; Meiner, Sue E; Binder, Ellen F

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the incentives and disincentives for participating in an exercise training program for community-dwelling individuals 78 and older. One hundred forty-seven women and 62 men participated in this descriptive study, and ages ranged from 78 to 95 years (mean 82.7 +/- 4.1). Individuals were interviewed by phone about their decision to participate in an exercise program. Qualitative responses were analyzed using content analysis. Three main incentive themes emerged: Health Benefits, Psychological Benefits, and Positive Program Features. Disincentive themes included Competing Commitments, Doubts about Exercise, and Negative Program Features. To better tailor an exercise program to the needs of this older age group, nurses working with older adults should keep in mind the lifestyle, age-specific obligations, and set of values affecting this cohort's participation. PMID:14528746

  12. [Physical activity and exercise training in the prevention and therapy of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Francesconi, Claudia; Lackinger, Christian; Weitgasser, Raimund; Haber, Paul; Niebauer, Josef

    2016-04-01

    Lifestyle in general (nutrition, exercise, smoking habits), besides the genetic predisposition, is known to be a strong predictor for the development of diabetes. Exercise in particular is not only useful in improving glycaemia by lowering insulin resistance and positively affect insulin secretion, but to reduce cardiovascular risk.To gain substantial health benefits a minimum of 150 min of moderate or vigorous intense aerobic physical activity and muscle strengthening activities per week are needed. The positive effect of training correlates directly with the amount of fitness gained and lasts only as long as the fitness level is sustained. The effect of exercise is independent of age and gender. It is reversible and reproducible.Based on the large evidence of exercise referral and prescription the Austrian Diabetes Associations aims to implement the position of a "physical activity adviser" in multi-professional diabetes care. PMID:27052239

  13. Differentiated mTOR but not AMPK signaling after strength vs endurance exercise in training-accustomed individuals.

    PubMed

    Vissing, K; McGee, S L; Farup, J; Kjølhede, T; Vendelbo, M H; Jessen, N

    2013-06-01

    The influence of adenosine mono phosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) vs Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin C1 (mTORC1) protein signaling mechanisms on converting differentiated exercise into training specific adaptations is not well-established. To investigate this, human subjects were divided into endurance, strength, and non-exercise control groups. Data were obtained before and during post-exercise recovery from single-bout exercise, conducted with an exercise mode to which the exercise subjects were accustomed through 10 weeks of prior training. Blood and muscle samples were analyzed for plasma substrates and hormones and for muscle markers of AMPK and Akt-mTORC1 protein signaling. Increases in plasma glucose, insulin, growth hormone (GH), and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, and in phosphorylated muscle phospho-Akt substrate (PAS) of 160 kDa, mTOR, 70 kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E, and glycogen synthase kinase 3a were observed after strength exercise. Increased phosphorylation of AMPK, histone deacetylase5 (HDAC5), cAMP response element-binding protein, and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) was observed after endurance exercise, but not differently from after strength exercise. No changes in protein phosphorylation were observed in non-exercise controls. Endurance training produced an increase in maximal oxygen uptake and a decrease in submaximal exercise heart rate, while strength training produced increases in muscle cross-sectional area and strength. No changes in basal levels of signaling proteins were observed in response to training. The results support that in training-accustomed individuals, mTORC1 signaling is preferentially activated after hypertrophy-inducing exercise, while AMPK signaling is less specific for differentiated exercise. PMID:23802289

  14. Exercise training does not affect anthracycline antitumor efficacy while attenuating cardiac dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Parry, Traci L; Hayward, Reid

    2015-09-15

    Highly effective anthracyclines, like doxorubicin (DOX), have limited clinical use due to protracted cardiotoxic effects. While exercise is known to be cardioprotective, it is unclear whether exercise compromises chemotherapy treatment efficacy. To determine the effect of exercise training on DOX antitumor efficacy as well as DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, female Fisher 344 rats were randomly assigned to sedentary + saline (SED+SAL), SED+DOX, wheel run exercise training + SAL (WR+SAL), or WR+DOX. On week 11, animals were inoculated with 1×10(6) MatBIII tumor cells. Once tumors reached ∼1 cm in diameter, animals were treated with 12 mg/kg of DOX or SAL. Animals were killed 1, 3, or 5 days following treatment. Tumor growth and cardiac function were measured at each interval. DOX accumulation and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) expression were quantified in tumor and heart tissue. No significant difference (P > 0.05) existed between DOX-treated SED and WR groups for tumor measurements. Exercise preserved cardiac function up to 5 days following DOX treatment. Exercise reduced ventricular DOX accumulation and upregulated ventricular MPR1 and MPR2. In contrast, no differences were observed in DOX accumulation or MRP expression in tumors of SED and WR animals. Endurance exercise had no effect on DOX antitumor efficacy as evidenced by a definitive DOX-induced reduction in tumor growth in both the SED and WR groups. Although exercise did not affect the antitumor efficacy of DOX, it still provided protection against cardiac dysfunction. These effects may be mediated by the degree of DOX tissue accumulation secondary to the regulation of MRP expression. PMID:26246505

  15. Treadmill exercise training prevents myocardial mechanical dysfunction induced by androgenic-anabolic steroid treatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Bocalini, Danilo S; Beutel, Abram; Bergamaschi, Cássia T; Tucci, Paulo J; Campos, Ruy R

    2014-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of testosterone and its synthetic analogs may induce changes in cardiovascular function. However, the effects of the combination of anabolic/androgenic steroid (AAS) treatment and exercise training on systolic and diastolic cardiac function are poorly understood. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of low-dose steroid treatment (stanozolol) on cardiac contractile parameters when this steroid treatment was combined with exercise training in rats and the effects of chronic steroid treatment on the Frank-Starling (length-tension curves) relationship. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to one of four groups: U (untrained), US (untrained and treated with stanozolol 5 mg/kg/week), T (trained, 16 m/min/1 h) and TS (trained and treated with stanozolol 5 mg/kg/week). Continuous exercise training was conducted 5 days/week for 8 consecutive weeks. The speed of the treadmill was gradually increased to a final setting of 16 m/min/1 h. Experiments were divided into two independent series: 1) central hemodynamic analysis for mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and cardiac output (CO) measurements and 2) isolated papillary muscle preparation in Krebs solution. Stanozolol treatment significantly increased the MAP and the heart size in untrained and trained rats (U 113±2; T 106±2; US 138±8 and TS 130±7 mmHg). Furthermore, stanozolol significantly decreased developed tension and dT/dt (maximal and minimal) in U rats. However, the developed tension was completely restored by training. The Frank/Starling relationship was impaired in rats treated with stanozolol; however, again, training completely restored diastolic function. Taken together, the present data suggest that AAS treatment is able to decrease cardiac performance (systolic and diastolic functions). The combination of stanozolol and physical training improved cardiac performance, including diastolic and systolic functions, independent of changes in central hemodynamic

  16. The effects of exercise training of different intensities on neuromuscular junction morphology.

    PubMed

    Deschenes, M R; Maresh, C M; Crivello, J F; Armstrong, L E; Kraemer, W J; Covault, J

    1993-08-01

    Little is known about the effects of exercise training on neuromuscular junction morphology in skeletal muscle. The objectives of this investigation were: 1) to determine if exercise training would elicit changes in neuromuscular junction morphology, 2) to determine if exercise training of different intensities would evoke specific changes in neuromuscular junction morphology, and 3) to determine whether changes in neuromuscular junction structure occur independently of changes in muscle fibre type and size. Twenty-four age and size matched male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three groups: high-intensity trained (HIT), low-intensity trained (LIT), or untrained. Neuromuscular junction morphology of the soleus muscle was determined via immunofluorescent staining. Presynaptic acetylcholine vesicles were visualized with SV-2 antibody in conjunction with fluorescein isothiocyanate labelled secondary secondary antibody. Postsynaptic acetylcholine receptors were identified with rhodamine labelled alpha-bungarotoxin. Laser scanning microscopy was used to produce images of synapses, which were used to quantitate the following: total area of SV-2 and alpha-bungarotoxin staining, density of acetylcholine vesicles and receptors, structural complexity, and synaptic coupling. To visualize nerve terminal branching, a smaller number of neuromuscular junctions were stained with C-2 antibody, which reacts with a neurofilament epitope, in conjunction with fluorescein isothiocyanate labelled secondary antibody. Total length of branching, number of branches, average length of branches, and ratio of secondary to primary branches per neuromuscular junction were determined. Citrate synthase activity, fibre type composition and fibre cross-sectional areas of the soleus muscle were assessed to determine the presence of a training effect in that muscle. Results indicate that training did induce hypertrophy of the neuromuscular junction that was independent of muscle

  17. Developing cognitive-emotional training exercises as interventions for mood and anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Iacoviello, B M; Charney, D S

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need for more effective treatments for mood and anxiety disorders. As our understanding of the cognitive and affective neuroscience underlying psychiatric disorders expands, so do opportunities to develop novel interventions that capitalize on the capacity for brain plasticity. Cognitive training is one such strategy. This paper provides the background and rationale for developing cognitive-emotional training exercises as an intervention strategy, and proposes guidelines for the development and evaluation of cognitive training interventions with a specific focus on major depressive disorder as an example. PMID:25451246

  18. Astronaut William McArthur prepares for a training exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Wearing training versions of the partial pressure launch and entry garment, Astronaut William S. McArthur prepares to rehearse emergency egress procedures for the STS-58 mission. He is standing outside of the side hatch to the full fuselage trainer.

  19. STS-58 crewmembers prepares for a training exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Wearing training versions of the partial pressure launch and entry garment, three members of the STS-58 crew rehearse launch and entry procedures. Pictured on the middeck of the Shuttle trainer are (left to right) payload specialist Martin J. Fettman, and Shannon W. Lucid and David A. Wolf, mission specialists.

  20. MAP training: combining meditation and aerobic exercise reduces depression and rumination while enhancing synchronized brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Alderman, B L; Olson, R L; Brush, C J; Shors, T J

    2016-01-01

    Mental and physical (MAP) training is a novel clinical intervention that combines mental training through meditation and physical training through aerobic exercise. The intervention was translated from neuroscientific studies indicating that MAP training increases neurogenesis in the adult brain. Each session consisted of 30 min of focused-attention (FA) meditation and 30 min of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise. Fifty-two participants completed the 8-week intervention, which consisted of two sessions per week. Following the intervention, individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD; n=22) reported significantly less depressive symptoms and ruminative thoughts. Typical healthy individuals (n=30) also reported less depressive symptoms at follow-up. Behavioral and event-related potential indices of cognitive control were collected at baseline and follow-up during a modified flanker task. Following MAP training, N2 and P3 component amplitudes increased relative to baseline, especially among individuals with MDD. These data indicate enhanced neural responses during the detection and resolution of conflicting stimuli. Although previous research has supported the individual beneficial effects of aerobic exercise and meditation for depression, these findings indicate that a combination of the two may be particularly effective in increasing cognitive control processes and decreasing ruminative thought patterns. PMID:26836414

  1. MAP training: combining meditation and aerobic exercise reduces depression and rumination while enhancing synchronized brain activity.

    PubMed

    Alderman, B L; Olson, R L; Brush, C J; Shors, T J

    2016-01-01

    Mental and physical (MAP) training is a novel clinical intervention that combines mental training through meditation and physical training through aerobic exercise. The intervention was translated from neuroscientific studies indicating that MAP training increases neurogenesis in the adult brain. Each session consisted of 30 min of focused-attention (FA) meditation and 30 min of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise. Fifty-two participants completed the 8-week intervention, which consisted of two sessions per week. Following the intervention, individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD; n=22) reported significantly less depressive symptoms and ruminative thoughts. Typical healthy individuals (n=30) also reported less depressive symptoms at follow-up. Behavioral and event-related potential indices of cognitive control were collected at baseline and follow-up during a modified flanker task. Following MAP training, N2 and P3 component amplitudes increased relative to baseline, especially among individuals with MDD. These data indicate enhanced neural responses during the detection and resolution of conflicting stimuli. Although previous research has supported the individual beneficial effects of aerobic exercise and meditation for depression, these findings indicate that a combination of the two may be particularly effective in increasing cognitive control processes and decreasing ruminative thought patterns. PMID:26836414

  2. Ground-based walking training improves quality of life and exercise capacity in COPD.

    PubMed

    Wootton, Sally L; Ng, L W Cindy; McKeough, Zoe J; Jenkins, Sue; Hill, Kylie; Eastwood, Peter R; Hillman, David R; Cecins, Nola; Spencer, Lissa M; Jenkins, Christine; Alison, Jennifer A

    2014-10-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of ground-based walking training on health-related quality of life and exercise capacity in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). People with COPD were randomised to either a walking group that received supervised, ground-based walking training two to three times a week for 8-10 weeks, or a control group that received usual medical care and did not participate in exercise training. 130 out of 143 participants (mean±sd age 69±8 years, forced expiratory volume in 1 s 43±15% predicted) completed the study. Compared to the control group, the walking group demonstrated greater improvements in the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire total score (mean difference -6 points (95% CI -10- -2), p<0.003), Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire total score (mean difference 7 points (95% CI 2-11), p<0.01) and endurance shuttle walk test time (mean difference 208 s (95% CI 104-313), p<0.001). This